Science.gov

Sample records for acid breakdown products

  1. Effects of microbial utilization of phenolic acids and their phenolic acid breakdown products on allelopathic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, U.

    1998-04-01

    Reversible sorption of phenolic acids by soils may provide some protection to phenolic acids from microbial degradation. In the absence of microbes, reversible sorption 35 days after addition of 0.5--3 {micro}mol/g of ferulic acid or p-coumaric acid was 8--14% in Cecil A{sub p} horizon and 31--38% in Cecil B{sub t} horizon soil materials. The reversibly sorbed/solution ratios (r/s) for ferulic acid or p-coumaric acid ranged from 0.12 to 0.25 in A{sub p} and 0.65 to 0.85 in B{sub t} horizon soil materials. When microbes were introduced, the r/s ratio for both the A{sub p} and B{sub t} horizon soil materials increased over time up to 5 and 2, respectively, thereby indicating a more rapid utilization of solution phenolic acids over reversibly sorbed phenolic acids. The increase in r/s ratio and the overall microbial utilization of ferulic acid and/or p-coumaric acid were much more rapid in A{sub p} than in B{sub t} horizon soil materials. Reversible sorption, however, provided protection of phenolic acids from microbial utilization for only very short periods of time. Differential soil fixation, microbial production of benzoic acids (e.g., vanillic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid) from cinnamic acids (e.g., ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid, respectively), and the subsequent differential utilization of cinnamic and benzoic acids by soil microbes indicated that these processes can substantially influence the magnitude and duration of the phytotoxicity of individual phenolic acids.

  2. Human traumatic brain injury induces autoantibody response against glial fibrillary acidic protein and its breakdown products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqun; Zoltewicz, J Susie; Mondello, Stefania; Newsom, Kimberly J; Yang, Zhihui; Yang, Boxuan; Kobeissy, Firas; Guingab, Joy; Glushakova, Olena; Robicsek, Steven; Heaton, Shelley; Buki, Andras; Hannay, Julia; Gold, Mark S; Rubenstein, Richard; Lu, Xi-Chun May; Dave, Jitendra R; Schmid, Kara; Tortella, Frank; Robertson, Claudia S; Wang, Kevin K W

    2014-01-01

    The role of systemic autoimmunity in human traumatic brain injury (TBI) and other forms of brain injuries is recognized but not well understood. In this study, a systematic investigation was performed to identify serum autoantibody responses to brain-specific proteins after TBI in humans. TBI autoantibodies showed predominant immunoreactivity against a cluster of bands from 38-50 kDa on human brain immunoblots, which were identified as GFAP and GFAP breakdown products. GFAP autoantibody levels increased by 7 days after injury, and were of the IgG subtype predominantly. Results from in vitro tests and rat TBI experiments also indicated that calpain was responsible for removing the amino and carboxyl termini of GFAP to yield a 38 kDa fragment. Additionally, TBI autoantibody staining co-localized with GFAP in injured rat brain and in primary rat astrocytes. These results suggest that GFAP breakdown products persist within degenerating astrocytes in the brain. Anti-GFAP autoantibody also can enter living astroglia cells in culture and its presence appears to compromise glial cell health. TBI patients showed an average 3.77 fold increase in anti-GFAP autoantibody levels from early (0-1 days) to late (7-10 days) times post injury. Changes in autoantibody levels were negatively correlated with outcome as measured by GOS-E score at 6 months, suggesting that TBI patients with greater anti-GFAP immune-responses had worse outcomes. Due to the long lasting nature of IgG, a test to detect anti-GFAP autoantibodies is likely to prolong the temporal window for assessment of brain damage in human patients. PMID:24667434

  3. Serum Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Predicts Tissue Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Break-Down Products and Therapeutic Efficacy after Penetrating Ballistic-Like Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Angela M; Deng-Bryant, Ying; Johnson, David; Tortella, Frank C; Dave, Jitendra R; Shear, Deborah A; Schmid, Kara E

    2016-01-01

    Acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with neurological dysfunction, changes in brain proteins, and increased serum biomarkers. However, the relationship between these brain proteins and serum biomarkers, and the ability of these serum biomarkers to indicate a neuroprotective/therapeutic response, remains elusive. Penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) was used to systematically analyze several key TBI biomarkers, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and its break-down products (BDPs)-ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1), α-II spectrin, and α-II spectrin BDPs (SBDPs)-in brain tissues and serum during an extended acute-subacute time-frame. In addition, neurological improvement and serum GFAP theranostic value was evaluated after neuroprotective treatment. In brain tissues, total GFAP increased more than three-fold 2 to 7 d after PBBI. However, this change was primarily due to GFAP-BDPs which increased to 2.7-4.8 arbitrary units (AU). Alpha-II spectrin was nearly ablated 3 d after PBBI, but somewhat recovered after 7 d. In conjunction with α-II spectrin loss, SBDP-145/150 increased approximately three-fold 2 to 7 d after PBBI (vs. sham, p<0.05). UCH-L1 protein levels were slightly decreased 7 d after PBBI but otherwise were unaffected. Serum GFAP was elevated by 3.2- to 8.8-fold at 2 to 4 h (vs. sham; p<0.05) and the 4 h increase was strongly correlated to 3 d GFAP-BDP abundance (r=0.66; p<0.05). Serum GFAP showed such a strong injury effect that it also was evaluated after therapeutic intervention with cyclosporin A (CsA). Administration of 2.5 mg/kg CsA significantly reduced serum GFAP elevation by 22.4-fold 2 h after PBBI (vs. PBBI+vehicle; p<0.05) and improved neurological function 1 d post-injury. Serum biomarkers, particularly GFAP, may be correlative tools of brain protein changes and feasible theranostic markers of TBI progression and recovery. PMID:25789543

  4. Combined free nitrous acid and hydrogen peroxide pre-treatment of waste activated sludge enhances methane production via organic molecule breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Qilin; Ye, Liu; Batstone, Damien; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a novel pre-treatment strategy using combined free nitrous acid (FNA i.e. HNO2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to enhance methane production from WAS, with the mechanisms investigated bio-molecularly. WAS from a full-scale plant was treated with FNA alone (1.54 mg N/L), H2O2 alone (10–80 mg/g TS), and their combinations followed by biochemical methane potential tests. Combined FNA and H2O2 pre-treatment substantially enhanced methane potential of WAS by 59–83%, compared to 13–23% and 56% with H2O2 pre-treatment alone and FNA pre-treatment alone respectively. Model-based analysis indicated the increased methane potential was mainly associated with up to 163% increase in rapidly biodegradable fraction with combined pre-treatment. The molecular weight distribution and chemical structure analyses revealed the breakdown of soluble macromolecules with the combined pre-treatment caused by the deamination and oxidation of the typical functional groups in proteins, polysaccharides and phosphodiesters. These changes likely improved the biodegradability of WAS. PMID:26565653

  5. Combined free nitrous acid and hydrogen peroxide pre-treatment of waste activated sludge enhances methane production via organic molecule breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Qilin; Ye, Liu; Batstone, Damien; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-11-01

    This study presents a novel pre-treatment strategy using combined free nitrous acid (FNA i.e. HNO2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to enhance methane production from WAS, with the mechanisms investigated bio-molecularly. WAS from a full-scale plant was treated with FNA alone (1.54 mg N/L), H2O2 alone (10-80 mg/g TS), and their combinations followed by biochemical methane potential tests. Combined FNA and H2O2 pre-treatment substantially enhanced methane potential of WAS by 59-83%, compared to 13-23% and 56% with H2O2 pre-treatment alone and FNA pre-treatment alone respectively. Model-based analysis indicated the increased methane potential was mainly associated with up to 163% increase in rapidly biodegradable fraction with combined pre-treatment. The molecular weight distribution and chemical structure analyses revealed the breakdown of soluble macromolecules with the combined pre-treatment caused by the deamination and oxidation of the typical functional groups in proteins, polysaccharides and phosphodiesters. These changes likely improved the biodegradability of WAS.

  6. Functions of Carotenoid Metabolites and Breakdown Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George

    It is not only intact carotenoids but also fragments of carotenoid molecules that have important natural functions and actions. The electron-rich polyene chain of the carotenoids is very susceptible to oxidative breakdown, which may be enzymic or non-enzymic. Central cleavage gives C20 compounds, retinoids, as described in Chapter 16. Cleavage at other positions gives smaller fragments, notably C10, C13 and C15 compounds that retain the carotenoid end group. The formation of these is described in Chapter 17 and in Volume 3, Chapter 4. Oxidative breakdown can also take place during storage, processing and curing of plant material, and the products contribute to the desired aroma/flavour properties of, for example, tea, wine and tobacco. The importance of vitamin A (C20) in animals is well known. Vitamin A deficiency is still a major concern in many parts of the world. It can lead to blindness and serious ill-health or death, especially in young children. Volatile smaller carotenoid fragments (`norisoprenoids') are widespread scent/flavour compounds in plants.

  7. Development of Hybrid Product Breakdown Structure for NASA Ground Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, Mark W.; Henry, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The Product Breakdown Structure is traditionally a method of identification of the products of a project in a tree structure. It is a tool used to assess, plan, document, and display the equipment requirements for a project. It is part of a product based planning technique, and attempts to break down all components of a project in as much detail as possible, so that nothing is overlooked. The PBS for ground systems at the Kennedy Space Center is being developed to encompass the traditional requirements including the alignment of facility, systems, and components to the organizational hierarchy. The Ground Operations Product Breakdown Structure is a hybrid in nature in that some aspects of a work breakdown structure will be incorporated and merged with the Architecture Concept of Operations, Master Subsystem List, customer interface, and assigned management responsibility. The Ground Operations Product Breakdown Structure needs to be able to identify the flexibility of support differing customers (internal and external) usage of ground support equipment within the Kennedy Space Center launch and processing complex. The development of the Product Breakdown Structure is an iterative activity Initially documenting the organization hierarchy structure and relationships. The Product Breakdown Structure identifies the linkage between the customer program requirements, allocation of system resources, development of design goals, and identification logistics products. As the Product Breakdown Structure progresses the incorporation of the results of requirement planning for the customer occurs identifying facility needs and systems. The mature Product Breakdown Structure is baselined with a hierarchical drawing, the Product Breakdown Structure database, and an associated document identifying the verification of the data through the life cycle of the program/product line. This paper will document, demonstrate, and identify key aspects of the life cycle of a Hybrid Product

  8. Breakdown of Cell Wall Nanostructure in Dilute Acid Pretreated Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker S; Heller, William T; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Foston, Marcus B; Myles, Dean A A; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Evans, Barbara R

    2010-01-01

    The generation of bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass holds great promise for renewable and clean energy production. A better understanding of the complex mechanisms of lignocellulose breakdown during various pretreatment methods is needed to realize this potential in a cost and energy efficient way. Here, we use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to characterize morphological changes in switchgrass lignocellulose across molecular to sub-micron length scales resulting from the industrially-relevant dilute acid pretreatment method. Our results demonstrate that dilute acid pretreatment increases the cross-sectional radius of the crystalline cellulose fibril. This change is accompanied by removal of hemicellulose and the formation of Rg ~ 135 lignin aggregates. The structural signature of smooth cell wall surfaces is observed at length scales larger than 1000 , and it remains remarkably invariable during pretreatment. This study elucidates the interplay of the different biomolecular components in the break down process of switchgrass by dilute acid pretreatment. The results are important for the development of efficient strategies of biomass to biofuel conversion.

  9. Role of the fatty acid breakdown pathway in the leaf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Components of the lipid breakdown pathway including beta-oxidation enzymes and fatty acid transport mechanisms are essential for mobilizing storage lipid in germinating seeds of many plants. Comparatively little is known about their role during the rest of the plant’s life-time, however. We are cur...

  10. Elevaed Levels of Serum Glial FibrillaryAcidic Protein Breakdown Products in Mild and Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury are Associated With Intracranial Lesions and Neurosurgical Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Linda; Lewis, Lawrence M.; Falk, Jay L.; Zhang, Zhiqun; Silvestri, Salvatore; Giordano, Philip; Brophy, Gretchen M.; Demery, Jason; Dixit, Neha K.; Ferguson, Ian; Liu, Ming Cheng; Mo, Jixiang; Akinyi, Linnet; Schmid, Kara; Mondello, Stefania; Robertson, Claudia S.; Tortella, Frank C.; Hayes, Ronald L.; Wang, Kevin K. W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined whether serum levels of GFAP breakdown products (GFAP-BDP) were elevated in mild and moderate TBI compared to controls and if they were associated with traumatic intracranial lesions on CT scan (+CT) and having a neurosurgical intervention (NSI). Methods This prospective cohort study enrolled adult patients presenting to three Level 1 Trauma Centers following blunt head trauma with loss of consciousness, amnesia, or disorientation and a GCS 9–15. Control groups included normal uninjured controls and trauma controls presenting to the ED with orthopedic injuries or an MVC without TBI. Blood samples were obtained in all patients within 4 hours of injury and measured by ELISA for GFAP-BDP (ng/ml). Results Of the 307 patients enrolled, 108 were TBI patients (97 with GCS 13–15, and 11 with GCS 9–12) and 199 were controls (176 normal controls and 16 MVC controls and 7 orthopedic controls). ROC curves demonstrated that early GFAP-BDP levels were able to distinguish TBI from uninjured controls with an AUC of 0.90 (95%CI 0.86–0.94) and differentiated TBI with a GCS 15 with an AUC 0.88 (95%CI 0.82–0.93). Thirty two TBI patients (30%) had lesions on CT. The AUC for discriminating those patients with CT lesions versus those without CT lesions was 0.79 (95%CI 0.69–0.89). Moreover, the ROC curve for distinguishing NSI from no NSI yielded an AUC of 0.87 (95%CI 0.77–0.96). Conclusions GFAP-BDP is detectable in serum within an hour of injury and is associated with measures of injury severity including the GCS score, CT lesions and neurosurgical intervention. Further study is required to validate these findings before clinical application. PMID:22071014

  11. AVLIS Production Plant work breakdown structure and Dictionary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    The work breakdown structure has been prepared for the AVLIS Production Plant to define, organize, and identify the work efforts and is summarized in Fig. 1-1 for the top three project levels. The work breakdown structure itself is intended to be the primary organizational tool of the AVLIS Production Plant and is consistent with the overall AVLIS Program Work Breakdown Structure. It is designed to provide a framework for definition and accounting of all of the elements that are required for the eventual design, procurement, and construction of the AVLIS Production Plant. During the present phase of the AVLIS Project, the conceptual engineering phase, the work breakdown structure is intended to be the master structure and project organizer of documents, designs, and cost estimates. As the master project organizer, the key role of the work breakdown structure is to provide the mechanism for developing completeness in AVLIS cost estimates and design development of all hardware and systems. The work breakdown structure provides the framework for tracking, on a one-to-one basis, the component design criteria, systems requirements, design concepts, design drawings, performance projections, and conceptual cost estimates. It also serves as a vehicle for contract reporting. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Method to simultaneously determine the sphingosine 1-phosphate breakdown product (2E)-hexadecenal and its fatty acid derivatives using isotope-dilution HPLC-electrospray ionization-quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Neuber, Corinna; Schumacher, Fabian; Gulbins, Erich; Kleuser, Burkhard

    2014-09-16

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid involved in various physiological processes, can be irreversibly degraded by the membrane-bound S1P lyase (S1PL) yielding (2E)-hexadecenal and phosphoethanolamine. It is discussed that (2E)-hexadecenal is further oxidized to (2E)-hexadecenoic acid by the long-chain fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH3A2 (also known as FALDH) prior to activation via coupling to coenzyme A (CoA). Inhibition or defects in these enzymes, S1PL or FALDH, result in severe immunological disorders or the Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, respectively. Hence, it is of enormous importance to simultaneously determine the S1P breakdown product (2E)-hexadecenal and its fatty acid metabolites in biological samples. However, no method is available so far. Here, we present a sensitive and selective isotope-dilution high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry method for simultaneous quantification of (2E)-hexadecenal and its fatty acid metabolites following derivatization with 2-diphenylacetyl-1,3-indandione-1-hydrazone and 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide. Optimized conditions for sample derivatization, chromatographic separation, and MS/MS detection are presented as well as an extensive method validation. Finally, our method was successfully applied to biological samples. We found that (2E)-hexadecenal is almost quantitatively oxidized to (2E)-hexadecenoic acid, that is further activated as verified by cotreatment of HepG2 cell lysates with (2E)-hexadecenal and the acyl-CoA synthetase inhibitor triacsin C. Moreover, incubations of cell lysates with deuterated (2E)-hexadecenal revealed that no hexadecanoic acid is formed from the aldehyde. Thus, our method provides new insights into the sphingolipid metabolism and will be useful to investigate diseases known for abnormalities in long-chain fatty acid metabolism, e.g., the Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, in more detail. PMID:25137547

  13. Spectrin Breakdown Products (SBDPs) as Potential Biomarkers for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiao-Xin; Jeromin, Andreas; Jeromin, A.

    2013-01-01

    The world’s human population ages rapidly thanks to the great advance in modern medicine. While more and more body system diseases become treatable and curable, age-related neurodegenerative diseases remain poorly understood mechanistically, and are desperately in need of preventive and therapeutic interventions. Biomarker development consists of a key part of concerted effort in combating neurodegenerative diseases. In many chronic neurodegenerative conditions, neuronal damage/death occurs long before the onset of disease symptoms, and abnormal proteolysis may either play an active role or be a companying event of neuronal injury. Increased spectrin cleavage yielding elevated spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs) by calcium-sensitive proteases such as calpain and caspases has been established in conditions associated with acute neuronal damage such as traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here we review literature regarding spectrin expression and metabolism in the brain, and propose a potential use of SBDPs as biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s diseases. PMID:23710421

  14. Bioavailability of Glucosinolates and Their Breakdown Products: Impact of Processing.

    PubMed

    Barba, Francisco J; Nikmaram, Nooshin; Roohinejad, Shahin; Khelfa, Anissa; Zhu, Zhenzhou; Koubaa, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a large group of plant secondary metabolites with nutritional effects, and are mainly found in cruciferous plants. After ingestion, glucosinolates could be partially absorbed in their intact form through the gastrointestinal mucosa. However, the largest fraction is metabolized in the gut lumen. When cruciferous are consumed without processing, myrosinase enzyme present in these plants hydrolyzes the glucosinolates in the proximal part of the gastrointestinal tract to various metabolites, such as isothiocyanates, nitriles, oxazolidine-2-thiones, and indole-3-carbinols. When cruciferous are cooked before consumption, myrosinase is inactivated and glucosinolates transit to the colon where they are hydrolyzed by the intestinal microbiota. Numerous factors, such as storage time, temperature, and atmosphere packaging, along with inactivation processes of myrosinase are influencing the bioavailability of glucosinolates and their breakdown products. This review paper summarizes the assimilation, absorption, and elimination of these molecules, as well as the impact of processing on their bioavailability. PMID:27579302

  15. Bioavailability of Glucosinolates and Their Breakdown Products: Impact of Processing

    PubMed Central

    Barba, Francisco J.; Nikmaram, Nooshin; Roohinejad, Shahin; Khelfa, Anissa; Zhu, Zhenzhou; Koubaa, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a large group of plant secondary metabolites with nutritional effects, and are mainly found in cruciferous plants. After ingestion, glucosinolates could be partially absorbed in their intact form through the gastrointestinal mucosa. However, the largest fraction is metabolized in the gut lumen. When cruciferous are consumed without processing, myrosinase enzyme present in these plants hydrolyzes the glucosinolates in the proximal part of the gastrointestinal tract to various metabolites, such as isothiocyanates, nitriles, oxazolidine-2-thiones, and indole-3-carbinols. When cruciferous are cooked before consumption, myrosinase is inactivated and glucosinolates transit to the colon where they are hydrolyzed by the intestinal microbiota. Numerous factors, such as storage time, temperature, and atmosphere packaging, along with inactivation processes of myrosinase are influencing the bioavailability of glucosinolates and their breakdown products. This review paper summarizes the assimilation, absorption, and elimination of these molecules, as well as the impact of processing on their bioavailability. PMID:27579302

  16. Metolachlor and alachlor breakdown product formation patterns in aquatic field mesocosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, W.H.; Graham, D.W.; DeNoyelles, F., Jr.; Smith, V.H.; Larive, C.K.; Thurman, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    The transformation of metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)- N-(2-methoxy-1-methyl)ethyl)acetamide] and alachlor [2-chloro-N-(2,6- diethylphenyl)-N-methoxymethyl)acetamide] in aquatic systems was investigated using outdoor tank mesocosms. Metolachlor and alachlor levels and their ethane sulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanillic acid breakdown products were monitored over time under five experimental treatments (each in quadruplicate). Background water conditions were identical in all treatments with each treatment differing based on the level and type(s) of herbicide present. Treatments included a noherbicide control, 10 ??g/L metolachlor, 25 ??g/L metolachlor, 25 ??g/L alachlor, and 25 ??g/L alachlor plus 25 ??g/L metolachlor in combination. The experiment was initiated by adding herbicide(s) to the units to the target concentrations; herbicide and breakdown product levels and other chemical parameters were then monitored for 85 days. In general, metolachlor half-lives were longer than alachlor half-lives under all treatments, although the differences were not statistically significant. Metolachlor half-lives (??95% confidence limits) ranged from 33.0 d (??14.1 d) to 46.2 d (??40.0 d), whereas alachlor half- lives ranged from 18.7 d (??3.5 d) to 21.0 d (??6.5 d) for different treatments. Formation patterns of ESA were similar in all treatments, whereas oxanillic acid formation differed for the two herbicides. Alachlor oxanillic acid was produced in larger quantities than metolachlor oxanillic acid and either ESA under equivalent conditions. Our results suggest that the transformation pathways for alachlor and metolachlor in aquatic systems are similar and resemble the acetochlor pathway in soils proposed by Feng (Pestic. Biochem. Physiol. 1991, 34, 136); however, the oxanillic acid branch of the pathway is favored for alachlor as compared with metolachlor.The transformation of metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N- (2-methoxy-1-methylethy

  17. Vacuolar Acid Hydrolysis as a Physiological Mechanism for Sucrose Breakdown 1

    PubMed Central

    Echeverria, Ed; Burns, Jacqueline K.

    1989-01-01

    Sucrose breakdown in mature acidic `Persian' limes (Citrus aurantifolia [Christm.] Swing.) occurred at a rate of 30.6 picomoles per milliliter per day during 9 weeks storage at 15°C. Neither enzyme of sucrose catabolism (sucrose synthase or acid/alkaline invertase) was present in extracts of mature storage tissue. The average vacuolar pH, estimated by direct measurement of sap from isolated vacuoles and by the methylamine method, was about 2.0 to 2.2. In vitro acid hydrolysis of sucrose at physiological concentrations in a buffered solution (pH 2.2) occurred at identical rates as in matured limes. The results indicate that sucrose breakdown in stored mature acidic limes occurs by acid hydrolysis. PMID:16666803

  18. HYDROLYTIC BREAKDOWN OF LACTOFERRICIN BY LACTIC ACID BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactoferricin is a 25 amino acid antimicrobial peptide domain that is liberated by pepsin digestion of lactoferrin in bovine milk. Along with its antibacterial properties, lactoferricin has also been reported to have immunostimulatory, antiviral, and anticarcinogenic effects. There is substantial ...

  19. Breakdown of hierarchical architecture in cellulose during dilute acid pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Inouye, Hideyo; Yang, Lin; Himmel, Michael E.; Tucker, Melvin; Makowski, Lee

    2015-02-28

    Cellulose is an attractive candidate as a feedstock for sustainable bioenergy because of its global abundance. Pretreatment of biomass has significant influence on the chemical availability of cellulose locked in recalcitrant microfibrils. Optimizing pretreatment depends on an understanding of its impact on the microscale and nanoscale molecular architecture. X-ray scattering experiments have been performed on native and pre-treated maize stover and models of cellulose architecture have been derived from these data. Ultra small-angle, very small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS, VSAXS and SAXS) probe three different levels of architectural scale. USAXS and SAXS have been used to study cellulose at two distinct length scales, modeling the fibrils as ~30 Å diameter rods packed into ~0.14 μm diameter bundles. VSAXS is sensitive to structural features at length scales between these two extremes. Detailed analysis of diffraction patterns from untreated and pretreated maize using cylindrical Guinier plots and the derivatives of these plots reveals the presence of substructures within the ~0.14 μm diameter bundles that correspond to grouping of cellulose approximately 30 nm in diameter. These sub-structures are resilient to dilute acid pretreatments but are sensitive to pretreatment when iron sulfate is added. Lastly, these results provide evidence of the hierarchical arrangement of cellulose at three length scales and the evolution of these arrangements during pre-treatments.

  20. Breakdown of hierarchical architecture in cellulose during dilute acid pretreatments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yan; Inouye, Hideyo; Yang, Lin; Himmel, Michael E.; Tucker, Melvin; Makowski, Lee

    2015-02-28

    Cellulose is an attractive candidate as a feedstock for sustainable bioenergy because of its global abundance. Pretreatment of biomass has significant influence on the chemical availability of cellulose locked in recalcitrant microfibrils. Optimizing pretreatment depends on an understanding of its impact on the microscale and nanoscale molecular architecture. X-ray scattering experiments have been performed on native and pre-treated maize stover and models of cellulose architecture have been derived from these data. Ultra small-angle, very small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS, VSAXS and SAXS) probe three different levels of architectural scale. USAXS and SAXS have been used to study cellulose atmore » two distinct length scales, modeling the fibrils as ~30 Å diameter rods packed into ~0.14 μm diameter bundles. VSAXS is sensitive to structural features at length scales between these two extremes. Detailed analysis of diffraction patterns from untreated and pretreated maize using cylindrical Guinier plots and the derivatives of these plots reveals the presence of substructures within the ~0.14 μm diameter bundles that correspond to grouping of cellulose approximately 30 nm in diameter. These sub-structures are resilient to dilute acid pretreatments but are sensitive to pretreatment when iron sulfate is added. Lastly, these results provide evidence of the hierarchical arrangement of cellulose at three length scales and the evolution of these arrangements during pre-treatments.« less

  1. Breakdown of hierarchical architecture in cellulose during dilute acid pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Inouye, Hideyo; Yang, Lin; Himmel, Michael E.; Tucker, Melvin; Makowski, Lee

    2015-02-28

    Cellulose can work as a feedstock for sustainable bioenergy because of its global abundance. Pretreatment of biomass has significant influence on the chemical availability of cellulose locked in recalcitrant microfibrils. Optimizing pretreatment depends on an understanding of its impact on the microscale and nanoscale molecular architecture. X-ray scattering experiments have been performed on native and pre-treated maize stover and models of cellulose architecture have been derived from these data. Ultra small-angle, very small-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS, VSAXS and SAXS) probe three different levels of architectural scale. USAXS and SAXS have been used to study cellulose at two distinct length scales, modeling the fibrils as ~30 Å diameter rods packed into ~0.14 μm diameter bundles. VSAXS is sensitive to structural features at length scales between these two extremes. Detailed analysis of diffraction patterns from untreated and pretreated maize using cylindrical Guinier plots and the derivatives of these plots reveals the presence of substructures within the ~0.14 μm diameter bundles that correspond to grouping of cellulose approximately 30 nm in diameter. These sub-structures are resilient to dilute acid pretreatments but are sensitive to pretreatment when iron sulfate is added. Our results provide evidence of the hierarchical arrangement of cellulose at three length scales and the evolution of these arrangements during pre-treatments.

  2. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID

    DOEpatents

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-07-19

    A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

  3. Investigation of the breakdown products produced from electrical discharge in selected CFC replacement fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley-Fedder, R.; Goerz, D.; Koester, C.; Wilson, M.

    1996-04-01

    LLNL personnel have designed and constructed a special purpose electrical test stand to evaluate CFCs and CFC replacement fluids under simulated AC, DC, and pulsed breakdown conditions. The test stand includes an electrical diagnostic system which allows the measurement of breakdown voltage, discharge current, arc power, and energy associated with each pulse. The appropriate data that is collected in order to correlate the quantity of by-products produced with the pertinent control variables, such as voltage, current, pulse width, pulse repetition frequency, and energy. Along with the electrical test stand, LLNL has extensive chemical analysis facilities that enable us to perform gas chromatographic and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of various fluids to identify and quantify the breakdown products formed under various scenarios of electrical energy deposition.

  4. Diacylglycerol production induced by growth hormone in Ob1771 preadipocytes arises from phosphatidylcholine breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Catalioto, R.M.; Ailhaud, G.; Negrel, R. )

    1990-12-31

    Growth Hormone has recently been shown to stimulate the formation of diacylglycerol in Ob1771 mouse preadipocyte cells without increasing inositol lipid turnover. Addition of growth hormone to Ob1771 cells prelabelled with ({sup 3}H)glycerol or ({sup 3}H)choline led to a rapid, transient and stoechiometric formation of labelled diacylglycerol and phosphocholine, respectively. In contrast, no change was observed in the level of choline and phosphatidic acid whereas the release of water-soluble metabolites in ({sup 3}H)ethanolamine prelabelled cells exposed to growth hormone was hardly detectable. Stimulation by growth hormone of cells prelabelled with (2-palmitoyl 9, 10 ({sup 3}H))phosphatidylcholine also induced the production of labelled diacyglycerol. Pertussis toxin abolished both diacylglycerol and phosphocholine formation induced by growth hormone. It is concluded that growth hormone mediates diacylglycerol production in Ob1771 cells by means of phosphatidylcholine breakdown involving a phospholipase C which is likely coupled to the growth hormone receptor via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein.

  5. Use of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the analysis of poultry products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy is evaluated as a potential method to characterize a wide range of poultry product quality and safety characteristics. In one part of this study, breast meat quality indices, including pH and water holding capacity, were treated as dependent variables for correla...

  6. Systems engineering product breakdown structure for the Hanford Cleanup Mission: First issue

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.J.; Bailey, K.B.; Collings, J.L.; Hubbard, A.B.; Niepke, T.M.

    1994-08-01

    This document provides the product breakdown structure (PBS) for the upper level physical products that, when delivered, complete the Hanford Site Cleanup Mission. Development of the PBS is a continuation of the sitewide systems engineering work described in the sitewide functional analysis, the architecture synthesis, and the product description report and is generally consistent with guidance contained in the Hanford Mission Plan. The PBS presents the interrelationship of products produced by the functions that are necessary to perform the clean up mission from their initial source through interim products to final product disposition.

  7. Analysis of RDX and RDX Breakdown Products in Environmental Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Felt, Deborah R.; Larson, Steven L.; Wani, Altaf; Davis, Jeffrey L.

    2003-03-26

    The identification and quantification of explosives and their degradation products in soil and natural waters is helpful in the design of remediation technologies, mobility investigations and performing risk assessments. The objective of this study was to develop a method for the determination of the degradation of nitramine compounds, specifically hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). The analytical methods developed in this study were based on reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using both C-18 and CN bonded silica columns to eliminate common interferences. Contaminant identification was further confirmed by performing spectral analysis of the compounds upon elution. The proposed method yields good separation of RDX from its degradation products and from other common energetic compounds. Method detection limits for the proposed method ranged from 0.01 to 0.03 mg/L. This method satisfies the need for analytical techniques to monitor the formation and subsequent degradation products of toxic and carcinogenic nitrosyl substituted nitramines.

  8. In vivo breakdown products of the 32 kDa thylakoid herbicide binding protein. [Spirodela oligorrhiza

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, B.M.; Mattoo, A.K.; Gaba, V.; Edelman, M.

    1986-04-01

    The 32 kDa herbicide binding protein of PSII is degraded rapidly in the light. This phenomenon was investigated in Spirodela oligorrhiza. When fronds were radiolabeled in the presence of cycloheximide only the chloroplast-encoded proteins were labeled. Under these conditions, a breakdown product of 23.5 kDa was observed. This polypeptide was further degraded with kinetics similar to that of the 32 kDa protein. The 23.5 kDa polypeptide cross-reacted with an antibody specific to the 32 kDa protein. By protease digestion it was determined that the 23.5 kDa polypeptide is the intact N-terminal piece of the 32 kDa protein. Thus, this product corresponds to the membrane anchor of the 32 kDa protein. Using the same antibody, breakdown products of 16 kDa, 14 kDa and 12 kDa were observed. These products have also been observed in Zea mays and Solanum nigrum. Using DCMU during pulse-chase experiments at different light intensities, evidence was obtained that the 23.5 kDa breakdown product is generated in vivo.

  9. The glucosinolate breakdown product indole-3-carbinol acts as an auxin antagonist in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Katz, Ella; Nisani, Sophia; Yadav, Brijesh S; Woldemariam, Melkamu G; Shai, Ben; Obolski, Uri; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Shani, Eilon; Jander, Georg; Chamovitz, Daniel A

    2015-05-01

    The glucosinolate breakdown product indole-3-carbinol functions in cruciferous vegetables as a protective agent against foraging insects. While the toxic and deterrent effects of glucosinolate breakdown on herbivores and pathogens have been studied extensively, the secondary responses that are induced in the plant by indole-3-carbinol remain relatively uninvestigated. Here we examined the hypothesis that indole-3-carbinol plays a role in influencing plant growth and development by manipulating auxin signaling. We show that indole-3-carbinol rapidly and reversibly inhibits root elongation in a dose-dependent manner, and that this inhibition is accompanied by a loss of auxin activity in the root meristem. A direct interaction between indole-3-carbinol and the auxin perception machinery was suggested, as application of indole-3-carbinol rescues auxin-induced root phenotypes. In vitro and yeast-based protein interaction studies showed that indole-3-carbinol perturbs the auxin-dependent interaction of Transport Inhibitor Response (TIR1) with auxin/3-indoleacetic acid (Aux/IAAs) proteins, further supporting the possibility that indole-3-carbinol acts as an auxin antagonist. The results indicate that chemicals whose production is induced by herbivory, such as indole-3-carbinol, function not only to repel herbivores, but also as signaling molecules that directly compete with auxin to fine tune plant growth and development. PMID:25758811

  10. Leaf litter breakdown, microbial respiration and shredder production in metal-polluted streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlisle, D.M.; Clements, W.H.

    2005-01-01

    1. If species disproportionately influence ecosystem functioning and also differ in their sensitivities to environmental conditions, the selective removal of species by anthropogenic stressors may lead to strong effects on ecosystem processes. We evaluated whether these circumstances held for several Colorado, U.S.A. streams stressed by Zn. 2. Benthic invertebrates and chemistry were sampled in five second-third order streams for 1 year. Study streams differed in dissolved metal concentrations, but were otherwise similar in chemical and physical characteristics. Secondary production of leaf-shredding insects was estimated using the increment summation and size-frequency methods. Leaf litter breakdown rates were estimated by retrieving litter-bags over a 171 day period. Microbial activity on leaf litter was measured in the laboratory using changes in oxygen concentration over a 48 h incubation period. 3. Dissolved Zn concentrations varied eightfold among two reference and three polluted streams. Total secondary production of shredders was negatively associated with metal contamination. Secondary production in reference streams was dominated by Taenionema pallidum. Results of previous studies and the current investigation demonstrate that this shredder is highly sensitive to metals in Colorado headwater streams. Leaf litter breakdown rates were similar between reference streams and declined significantly in the polluted streams. Microbial respiration at the most contaminated site was significantly lower than at reference sites. 4. Our results supported the hypothesis that some shredder species contribute disproportionately to leaf litter breakdown. Furthermore, the functionally dominant taxon was also the most sensitive to metal contamination. We conclude that leaf litter breakdown in our study streams lacked functional redundancy and was therefore highly sensitive to contaminant-induced alterations in community structure. We argue for the necessity of simultaneously

  11. The Effects of Glucosinolates and Their Breakdown Products on Necrotrophic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Barda, Omer; Levy, Maggie

    2013-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a diverse class of S- and N-containing secondary metabolites that play a variety of roles in plant defense. In this study, we used Arabidopsis thaliana mutants that contain different amounts of glucosinolates and glucosinolate-breakdown products to study the effects of these phytochemicals on phytopathogenic fungi. We compared the fungus Botrytis cinerea, which infects a variety of hosts, with the Brassicaceae-specific fungus Alternaria brassicicola. B. cinerea isolates showed variable composition-dependent sensitivity to glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products, while A. brassicicola was more strongly affected by aliphatic glucosinolates and isothiocyanates as decomposition products. We also found that B. cinerea stimulates the accumulation of glucosinolates to a greater extent than A. brassicicola. In our work with A. brassicicola, we found that the type of glucosinolate-breakdown product is more important than the type of glucosinolate from which that product was derived, as demonstrated by the sensitivity of the Ler background and the sensitivity gained in Col-0 plants expressing epithiospecifier protein both of which accumulate simple nitrile and epithionitriles, but not isothiocyanates. Furthermore, in vivo, hydrolysis products of indole glucosinolates were found to be involved in defense against B. cinerea, but not in the host response to A. brassicicola. We suggest that the Brassicaceae-specialist A. brassicicola has adapted to the presence of indolic glucosinolates and can cope with their hydrolysis products. In contrast, some isolates of the generalist B. cinerea are more sensitive to these phytochemicals. PMID:23940639

  12. Formation of chlorinated breakdown products during degradation of sunscreen agent, 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate in the presence of sodium hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Gackowska, Alicja; Przybyłek, Maciej; Studziński, Waldemar; Gaca, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a new degradation path of sunscreen active ingredient, 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC) and 4-methoxycinnamic acid (MCA) in the presence of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), was discussed. The reaction products were detected using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Since HOCl treatment leads to more polar products than EHMC, application of polar extracting agents, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate/n-hexane mixture, gave better results in terms of chlorinated breakdown products identification than n-hexane. Reaction of EHMC with HOCl lead to the formation of C=C bridge cleavage products such as 2-ethylhexyl chloroacetate, 1-chloro-4-methoxybenzene, 1,3-dichloro-2-methoxybenzene, and 3-chloro-4-methoxybenzaldehyde. High reactivity of C=C bond attached to benzene ring is also characteristic for MCA, since it can be converted in the presence of HOCl to 2,4-dichlorophenole, 2,6-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone, 1,3-dichloro-2-methoxybenzene, 1,2,4-trichloro-3-methoxybenzene, 2,4,6-trichlorophenole, and 3,5-dichloro-2-hydroxyacetophenone. Surprisingly, in case of EHMC/HOCl/UV, much less breakdown products were formed compared to non-UV radiation treatment. In order to describe the nature of EHMC and MCA degradation, local reactivity analysis based on the density functional theory (DFT) was performed. Fukui function values showed that electrophilic attack of HOCl to the C=C bridge in EHMC and MCA is highly favorable (even more preferable than phenyl ring chlorination). This suggests that HOCl electrophilic addition is probably the initial step of EHMC degradation. PMID:26408113

  13. The effect of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid on protein synthesis and breakdown in murine C2C12 myotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kamolrat, Torkamol; Gray, Stuart R.

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► EPA can enhance protein synthesis and retard protein breakdown in muscle cells. ► These effects were concurrent with increases in p70s6k and FOXO3a phosphorylation. ► EPA may be a useful tool in the treatment of muscle wasting conditions. -- Abstract: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been found to stimulate protein synthesis with little information regarding their effects on protein breakdown. Furthermore whether there are distinct effects of EPA and DHA remains to be established. The aim of the current study was to determine the distinct effects of EPA and DHA on protein synthesis, protein breakdown and signalling pathways in C2C12 myotubes. Fully differentiated C2C12 cells were incubated for 24 h with 0.1% ethanol (control), 50 μM EPA or 50 μM DHA prior to experimentation. After serum (4 h) and amino acid (1 h) starvation cells were stimulated with 2 mM L-leucine and protein synthesis measured using {sup 3}H-labelled phenylalanine. Protein breakdown was measured using {sup 3}H-labelled phenylalanine and signalling pathways (Akt, mTOR, p70S6k, 4EBP1, rps6 and FOXO3a) via Western blots. Data revealed that after incubation with EPA protein synthesis was 25% greater (P < 0.05) compared to control cells, with no effect of DHA. Protein breakdown was 22% (P < 0.05) lower, compared to control cells, after incubation with EPA, with no effect of DHA. Analysis of signalling pathways revealed that both EPA and DHA incubation increased (P < 0.05) p70s6k phosphorylation, EPA increased (P < 0.05) FOXO3a phosphorylation, with no alteration in other signalling proteins. The current study has demonstrated distinct effects of EPA and DHA on protein metabolism with EPA showing a greater ability to result in skeletal muscle protein accretion.

  14. Detection of Alpha II-Spectrin Breakdown Products in the Serum of Neonates With Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Parag; Spaeder, Michael C.; Donofrio, Mary T.; Sinha, Pranava; Jonas, Richard A.; Levy, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine if alpha II-spectrin breakdown products can be detected in the serum of neonates with congenital heart disease in the perioperative period. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting Pediatric cardiac ICU in an urban tertiary care academic center. Patients Neonates with congenital heart disease undergoing surgical repair or palliation. Interventions Serial blood sampling for measurement of 120 and 150 kDa spectrin breakdown products. Measurements and Main Results Fourteen neonates with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac surgery were evaluated. Nine infants underwent open-heart surgery and five underwent closed-heart surgery. Serum spectrin breakdown products were measured with sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay preoperatively and then 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours following surgery. Brain imaging was obtained as part of routine clinical care in 12 patients pre-operatively and six patients postoperatively. Six patients had normal preoperative imaging (three closed-heart surgery and three open-heart surgery), whereas six had evidence of neurologic injury prior to surgery (one closed-heart surgery and five open-heart surgery). Only one patient had a postoperative imaging study that lacked injury. All others demonstrated infarction or hemorrhage. Spectrin breakdown product 120 kDa significantly increased 24 hours after open-heart surgery compared to preoperative values and time-matched closed-heart surgery levels. Spectrin breakdown product 150 kDa significantly increased 6 hours after open-heart surgery compared to preoperative values. There was no significant change in spectrin breakdown products following closed-heart surgery. Peak spectrin breakdown products significantly increased following open-heart surgery compared to closed-heart surgery. Conclusions Spectrin breakdown products can be detected in the serum of neonates with congenital heart disease in the perioperative period and levels increased to a greater

  15. Fumaric acid production by fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Roa Engel, Carol A.; Zijlmans, Tiemen W.; van Gulik, Walter M.; van der Wielen, Luuk A. M.

    2008-01-01

    The potential of fumaric acid as a raw material in the polymer industry and the increment of cost of petroleum-based fumaric acid raises interest in fermentation processes for production of this compound from renewable resources. Although the chemical process yields 112% w/w fumaric acid from maleic anhydride and the fermentation process yields only 85% w/w from glucose, the latter raw material is three times cheaper. Besides, the fermentation fixes CO2. Production of fumaric acid by Rhizopus species and the involved metabolic pathways are reviewed. Submerged fermentation systems coupled with product recovery techniques seem to have achieved economically attractive yields and productivities. Future prospects for improvement of fumaric acid production include metabolic engineering approaches to achieve low pH fermentations. PMID:18214471

  16. Microbial production of lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Eiteman, Mark A; Ramalingam, Subramanian

    2015-05-01

    Lactic acid is an important commodity chemical having a wide range of applications. Microbial production effectively competes with chemical synthesis methods because biochemical synthesis permits the generation of either one of the two enantiomers with high optical purity at high yield and titer, a result which is particularly beneficial for the production of poly(lactic acid) polymers having specific properties. The commercial viability of microbial lactic acid production relies on utilization of inexpensive carbon substrates derived from agricultural or waste resources. Therefore, optimal lactic acid formation requires an understanding and engineering of both the competing pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism, as well as pathways leading to potential by-products which both affect product yield. Recent research leverages those biochemical pathways, while researchers also continue to seek strains with improved tolerance and ability to perform under desirable industrial conditions, for example, of pH and temperature. PMID:25604523

  17. Location and characteristics of enzymes involved in the breakdown of polygalacturonic acid by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, R E; Kotarski, S F; Salyers, A A

    1985-01-01

    When Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is grown in medium which contains polygalacturonic acid (PGA) as the sole carbon source, two different polygalacturonases are produced: a PGA lyase (EC 4.2.2.2) and a PGA hydrolase (EC 3.2.1.15). Both enzymes are cell associated. The PGA hydrolase appears to be an inner membrane protein. The PGA lyase is a soluble protein that associates with membranes under certain conditions. The PGA lyase was purified to apparent homogeneity. It has a molecular weight (from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) of 74,000, a pH optimum of 8.7, a pI of 7.5, and a Km for PGA of 40 to 70 micrograms/ml. It requires calcium for maximal activity. The main product of this enzyme appears to be a disaccharide that contains a delta 4,5-unsaturated galacturonic acid residue. The PGA hydrolase can be solubilized from membranes with 2% Triton X-100 and has been partially purified. It has a pH optimum of 5.4 to 5.5, a pI of 4.7 to 4.9, and a Km for PGA of 350 to 400 micrograms/ml. The main product of this enzyme appears to be galacturonic acid. The specific activities of both PGA hydrolase and PGA lyase increase at the same rate when bacteria are exposed to PGA. The two enzymes therefore appear to be similarly regulated. Images PMID:3968032

  18. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of beta-carotene breakdown products on primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Alija, A J; Bresgen, N; Sommerburg, O; Siems, W; Eckl, P M

    2004-05-01

    According to Siems and colleagues, free radical attack on beta-carotene results in the formation of high amounts of cleavage products with prooxidant activities towards subcellular organelles such as mitochondria. This finding may be an explanation for the contradictory results obtained with beta-carotene in clinical efficacy and cancer prevention trials. Since primary hepatocytes proved to be very sensitive indicators of the genotoxic action of suspect mutagens/carcinogens we therefore investigated a beta-carotene cleavage products mixture (CP), apo8'- carotenal (apo8') and beta-carotene utilizing primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. The end-points tested were: the mitotic index, the percentage of necrotic and apoptotic cells, micronucleated cells, chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). Our results indicate a genotoxic potential of both CP and apo8' already at the concentrations 100 nM and 1 microM, i.e. at pathophysiologically relevant levels of beta-carotene and beta-carotene breakdown products. A 3 h treatment with CP induced statistically significant levels of micronuclei at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10 microM and chromosomal aberrations at concentrations of 1, 5 and 10 microM. Apo8' induced statistically significant levels of micronuclei at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 5 microM and chromosomal aberrations at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10 microM. Statistically significant increases in SCE induction were only observed at a concentration of 10 microM CP and apo8'. In contrast, no significant cytotoxic effects of these substances were observed. Since beta-carotene induced neither significant cytotoxic nor genotoxic effects at concentrations ranging from 0.01 up to 10 microM, these observations indicate that most likely beta-carotene breakdown products are responsible for the occurrence of carcinogenic effects found in the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study and the Beta-CArotene and RETinol Efficacy Trial

  19. A doping concentration-dependent upper limit of the breakdown voltage cutoff frequency product in Si bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieh, Jae-Sung; Jagannathan, Basanth; Greenberg, David; Freeman, Greg; Subbanna, Seshadri

    2004-02-01

    Recent high-speed Si-based bipolar transistors apparently exceed the Johnson Limit in terms of breakdown voltage-cutoff frequency product, and this paper addresses the relevant issues. First, BV CES rather than BV CEO is shown to be the representative breakdown voltage in describing the breakdown-speed trade-off in collector design, since BV CEO is modulated by the current gain which is irrelevant of the collector design and also practical bipolar circuits are rarely operated with open-base condition for which BV CEO is defined. In the same context, it is suggested BV CES be employed in representing the upper limit of breakdown voltage-cutoff frequency product. Second, a collector doping concentration-dependent upper limit of BV CES· fT product is proposed incorporating the doping concentration-dependent critical electric field and accurate values for related device parameters. With this new approach, it is shown that the limit is far larger than the Johnson Limit and the limit is still yet to be reached.

  20. Biotechnological production of citric acid

    PubMed Central

    Max, Belén; Salgado, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Noelia; Cortés, Sandra; Converti, Attilio; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This work provides a review about the biotechnological production of citric acid starting from the physicochemical properties and industrial applications, mainly in the food and pharmaceutical sectors. Several factors affecting citric acid fermentation are discussed, including carbon source, nitrogen and phosphate limitations, pH of culture medium, aeration, trace elements and morphology of the fungus. Special attention is paid to the fundamentals of biochemistry and accumulation of citric acid. Technologies employed at industrial scale such as surface or submerged cultures, mainly employing Aspergillus niger, and processes carried out with Yarrowia lipolytica, as well as the technology for recovering the product are also described. Finally, this review summarizes the use of orange peels and other by-products as feedstocks for the bioproduction of citric acid. PMID:24031566

  1. Coadministration of branched-chain amino acids and lipopolysaccharide causes matrix metalloproteinase activation and blood-brain barrier breakdown.

    PubMed

    Scaini, Giselli; Morais, Meline O S; Galant, Leticia S; Vuolo, Francieli; Dall'Igna, Dhébora M; Pasquali, Matheus A B; Ramos, Vitor M; Gelain, Daniel P; Moreira, Jose Claudio F; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Soriano, Francisco G; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-10-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by a severe deficiency in the activity of the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, leading to accumulation of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) leucine, isoleucine, and valine. Infections have a significant role in precipitating acute metabolic decompensation in patients with MSUD; however, the mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity in this disorder are poorly understood. In this study, we subjected rats to the coadministration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which is a major component of gram-negative bacteria cell walls, and high concentrations of BCAA (H-BCAA) to determine their effects on the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and on the levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9). Our results demonstrated that the coadministration of H-BCAA and LPS causes breakdown of the BBB and increases the levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the hippocampus of these rats. On the other hand, examination of the cerebral cortex of the 10- and 30-day-old rats revealed a significant difference in Evan's Blue content after coadministration of H-BCAA and LPS, as MMP-9 levels only increased in the cerebral cortex of the 10-day-old rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that the inflammatory process associated with high levels of BCAA causes BBB breakdown. Thus, we suggest that BBB breakdown is relevant to the perpetuation of brain inflammation and may be related to the brain dysfunction observed in MSUD patients. PMID:24390570

  2. Transport of large breakdown products of dietary protein through the gut wall.

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings, W A; Williams, E W

    1978-01-01

    Ferritin or tritium labelled immunoglobulin G may, by electron microscopy, be demonstrated entering, within, and leaving the epithelial cells. Quantitative studies using various proteins labelled with radioiodine show that large amounts of protein bound radioactivity may be demonstrated in the tissues after feeding the labelled protein to adult rats by stomach tube. The molecular size of this material as determined by sugar gradient ultracentrifugation of tissue extracts ranges when IgG is fed from 50,000-20,000 Daltons. The material retains its ability to react as antigen with antisera specific to the original molecule: precipitation reactions may be obtained in gels and quantitative studies show that cnosiderable amounts of the protein-bound radioactivity are still specifically precipitable. Such studies have been carried out with alpha-gliadin as well as bovine IgG. At 100 days old rats may absorb as much as 40% of a dose of bovine IgG in the form of these large molecular breakdown products. PMID:680603

  3. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-08-30

    A process is described for the preparation of trifluoroacetic acid. Acetone vapor diluted wlth nitrogen and fluorine also diluted with nltrogen are fed separately at a temperature of about 210 deg C into a reaction vessel containing a catalyst mass selected from-the group consisting of silver and gold. The temperature in the reaction vessel is maintained in the range of 200 deg to 250 deg C. The reaction product, trifluoroacetyl fluoride, is absorbed in aqueous alkali solution. Trifluoroacetic acid is recovered from the solution by acidification wlth an acid such as sulfuric followed by steam distillation.

  4. Amino acids in sheep production.

    PubMed

    McCoard, Susan A; Sales, Francisco A; Sciascia, Quentin L

    2016-01-01

    Increasing production efficiency with a high standard of animal welfare and respect for the environment is a goal of sheep farming systems. Substantial gains in productivity have been achieved through improved genetics, nutrition and management changes; however the survival and growth performance of multiple-born lambs still remains a problem. This is a significant production efficiency and animal well-being issue. There is a growing body of evidence that some amino acids have a role in regulating growth, reproduction and immunity through modulation of metabolic and cell signaling pathways. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of what is currently known about the role of amino acids in sheep production and the potential for supplementation strategies to influence on-farm survival and growth of lambs. PMID:26709661

  5. Prediction of acute mammalian toxicity using QSAR methods: a case study of sulfur mustard and its breakdown products.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Patricia; Begluitti, Gino; Tincher, Terry; Wheeler, John; Mumtaz, Moiz

    2012-01-01

    Predicting toxicity quantitatively, using Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSAR), has matured over recent years to the point that the predictions can be used to help identify missing comparison values in a substance's database. In this manuscript we investigate using the lethal dose that kills fifty percent of a test population (LD₅₀) for determining relative toxicity of a number of substances. In general, the smaller the LD₅₀ value, the more toxic the chemical, and the larger the LD₅₀ value, the lower the toxicity. When systemic toxicity and other specific toxicity data are unavailable for the chemical(s) of interest, during emergency responses, LD₅₀ values may be employed to determine the relative toxicity of a series of chemicals. In the present study, a group of chemical warfare agents and their breakdown products have been evaluated using four available rat oral QSAR LD₅₀ models. The QSAR analysis shows that the breakdown products of Sulfur Mustard (HD) are predicted to be less toxic than the parent compound as well as other known breakdown products that have known toxicities. The QSAR estimated break down products LD₅₀ values ranged from 299 mg/kg to 5,764 mg/kg. This evaluation allows for the ranking and toxicity estimation of compounds for which little toxicity information existed; thus leading to better risk decision making in the field. PMID:22842643

  6. Allelopathic effects of glucosinolate breakdown products in Hanza [Boscia senegalensis (Pers.) Lam.] processing waste water.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Vega, Loren J; Krosse, Sebastian; de Graaf, Rob M; Garvi, Josef; Garvi-Bode, Renate D; van Dam, Nicole M

    2015-01-01

    Boscia senegalensis is a drought resistant shrub whose seeds are used in West Africa as food. However, the seeds, or hanza, taste bitter which can be cured by soaking them in water for 4-7 days. The waste water resulting from the processing takes up the bitter taste, which makes it unsuitable for consumption. When used for irrigation, allelopathic effects were observed. Glucosinolates and their breakdown products are the potential causes for both the bitter taste and the allelopathic effects. The objectives of this study are to identify and quantify the glucosinolates present in processed and unprocessed hanza as well as different organs of B. senegalensis, to analyze the chemical composition of the processing water, and to pinpoint the causal agent for the allelopathic properties of the waste water. Hanza (seeds without testa), leaves, branches, unripe, and ripe fruits were collected in three populations and subjected to glucosinolate analyses. Methylglucosinolates (MeGSL) were identified in all plant parts and populations, with the highest concentrations being found in the hanza. The levels of MeGSLs in the hanza reduced significantly during the soaking process. Waste water was collected for 6 days and contained large amounts of macro- and micronutrients, MeGSL as well as methylisothiocyanate (MeITC), resulting from the conversion of glucosinolates. Waste water from days 1-3 (High) and 4-6 (Low) was pooled and used to water seeds from 11 different crops to weeds. The High treatment significantly delayed or reduced germination of all the plant species tested. Using similar levels of MeITC as detected in the waste water, we found that germination of a subset of the plant species was inhibited equally to the waste water treatments. This confirmed that the levels of methylisiothiocyanate in the waste water were sufficient to cause the allelopathic effect. This leads to the possibility of using hanza waste water in weed control programs. PMID:26236325

  7. Allelopathic effects of glucosinolate breakdown products in Hanza [Boscia senegalensis (Pers.) Lam.] processing waste water

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Vega, Loren J.; Krosse, Sebastian; de Graaf, Rob M.; Garvi, Josef; Garvi-Bode, Renate D.; van Dam, Nicole M.

    2015-01-01

    Boscia senegalensis is a drought resistant shrub whose seeds are used in West Africa as food. However, the seeds, or hanza, taste bitter which can be cured by soaking them in water for 4–7 days. The waste water resulting from the processing takes up the bitter taste, which makes it unsuitable for consumption. When used for irrigation, allelopathic effects were observed. Glucosinolates and their breakdown products are the potential causes for both the bitter taste and the allelopathic effects. The objectives of this study are to identify and quantify the glucosinolates present in processed and unprocessed hanza as well as different organs of B. senegalensis, to analyze the chemical composition of the processing water, and to pinpoint the causal agent for the allelopathic properties of the waste water. Hanza (seeds without testa), leaves, branches, unripe, and ripe fruits were collected in three populations and subjected to glucosinolate analyses. Methylglucosinolates (MeGSL) were identified in all plant parts and populations, with the highest concentrations being found in the hanza. The levels of MeGSLs in the hanza reduced significantly during the soaking process. Waste water was collected for 6 days and contained large amounts of macro- and micronutrients, MeGSL as well as methylisothiocyanate (MeITC), resulting from the conversion of glucosinolates. Waste water from days 1–3 (High) and 4–6 (Low) was pooled and used to water seeds from 11 different crops to weeds. The High treatment significantly delayed or reduced germination of all the plant species tested. Using similar levels of MeITC as detected in the waste water, we found that germination of a subset of the plant species was inhibited equally to the waste water treatments. This confirmed that the levels of methylisiothiocyanate in the waste water were sufficient to cause the allelopathic effect. This leads to the possibility of using hanza waste water in weed control programs. PMID:26236325

  8. Filaggrin breakdown products determine corneocyte conformation in patients with atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Riethmuller, Christoph; McAleer, Maeve A.; Koppes, Sjors A.; Abdayem, Rawad; Franz, Jonas; Haftek, Marek; Campbell, Linda E.; MacCallum, Stephanie F.; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Irvine, Alan D.; Kezic, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Background Loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are a well-replicated risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD) and are known to cause an epidermal barrier defect. The nature of this barrier defect is not fully understood. Patients with AD with FLG LOF mutations are known to have more persistent disease, more severe disease, and greater risk of food allergies and eczema herpeticum. Abnormalities in corneocyte morphology have been observed in patients with AD, including prominent villus-like projections (VP); however, these ultrastructural features have not been systematically studied in patients with AD in relation to FLG genotype and acute and convalescent status. Objective We sought to quantitatively explore the relationship between FLG genotype, filaggrin breakdown products (natural moisturizing factor [NMF]), and corneocyte morphology in patients with AD. Methods We studied 15 children at first presentation of AD and after 6 weeks of standard therapy. We applied atomic force microscopy to study corneocyte conformation in patients with AD stratified by FLG status and NMF level. By using a new quantitative methodology, the number of VPs per investigated corneocyte area was assessed and expressed as the Dermal Texture Index score. Corneocytes were also labeled with an anti-corneodesmosin antibody and visualized with scanning electron microscopy. Results We found a strong correlation between NMF levels and Dermal Texture Index scores in both acute and convalescent states (respective r = −0.80 and −0.75, P < .001 and P = .002). Most, but not all, VPs showed the presence of corneodesmosin abundantly all over the cell surface in homozygous/compound heterozygous FLG patients and, to a lesser extent, in heterozygous and wild-type patients. Conclusions NMF levels are highly correlated with corneocyte morphology in patients with AD. These corneocyte conformational changes shed further insight into the filaggrin-deficient phenotype and help

  9. A fluorescent imaging method for analyzing the biodistribution of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that can distinguish intact antibodies from their breakdown products

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takuo; Miyazaki, Chihiro; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Tada, Minoru; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawanishi, Toru; Kawasaki, Nana

    2015-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies have been developed for therapy over the last 2 decades. In the development of therapeutic antibodies, the preclinical assessment of an antibody's biodistribution is important for the prediction of the antibody's efficacy and safety. For imaging analyses of such biodistributions, radioisotope (RI) labeling and fluorescence labeling methods are typically used, but the resulting data are limited because these methods cannot distinguish breakdown products from intact antibodies. To resolve this problem, we developed a novel method using fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET)-type labeling and a spectral unmixing tool. With FRET-type labeling (labeling with 2 species of fluorophore), different fluorescence properties of labeled intact antibodies and their breakdown products (the hydrolyzed/digested type of breakdown products) are made visible. With the spectral unmixing tool, the fluorescence of a solution containing the intact antibody and its breakdown products could be unmixed in proportion to their contents. Moreover, when labeled antibodies that targeted either human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 or epidermal growth factor receptor were injected into nude mice implanted subcutaneously with tumor cells, the accumulation of the injected labeled antibodies and their breakdown products in the tumor could be separately analyzed by both whole-mouse imaging and a tumor homogenate analysis. These results suggest that our method using FRET-type labeling and a spectral unmixing tool could be useful in distinguishing breakdown products from intact antibodies. PMID:25891896

  10. Studies on the photolytic breakdown of hydroperoxides and peroxidized fatty acids by using electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Spin trapping of alkoxyl and peroxyl radicals in organic solvents.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M J; Slater, T F

    1986-01-01

    Spin trapping using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) has been used to detect and distinguish between the carbon-centred, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals produced during the photolytic decomposition of hydroperoxides. Photolysis of tert-butyl and cumene hydroperoxides, and peroxidized fatty acids, in toluene, with low levels of u.v. light, is shown to lead to the initial production of alkoxyl radicals by homolysis of the oxygen-oxygen bond. Subsequent reaction of these radicals with excess hydroperoxide leads, by hydrogen abstraction, to the production of peroxyl radicals that can be detected as their corresponding adducts with the spin trap. Subsequent breakdown of these adducts produces alkoxyl radicals and a further species that is believed to be the oxidized spin-trap radical 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrrolidone-2-oxyl. No evidence was obtained at low hydroperoxide concentrations, with either the cumene or lipid alkoxyl radicals, for the occurrence of beta-scission reactions; the production of low levels of carbon-centred radicals is believed to be due to the alternative reactions of hydrogen abstraction, ring closure, and/or 1,2 hydrogen shifts. Analogous experiments with 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (TMPO) led only to the trapping of alkoxyl radicals with no evidence for peroxyl radical adducts, this is presumably due to a decreased rate of radical addition because of increased steric hindrance. PMID:3030287

  11. Collector optimization for improving the product of the breakdown voltage-cutoff frequency in SiGe HBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Fu; Wanrong, Zhang; Dongyue, Jin; Yanxiao, Zhao; Lianghao, Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Compared with BVCEO, BVCES is more related to collector optimization and more practical significance, so that BVCES × fT rather than BVCEO × fT is employed in representing the limit of the product of the breakdown voltage-cutoff frequency in SiGe HBT for collector engineering design. Instead of a single decrease in collector doping to improve BVCES × fT and BVCEO × fT, a novel thin composite of N- and P+ doping layers inside the CB SCR is presented to improve the well-known tradeoff between the breakdown voltage and cut-off frequency in SiGe HBT, and BVCES and BVCEO are improved respectively with slight degradation in fT. As a result, the BVCES × fT product is improved from 537.57 to 556.4 GHz·V, and the BVCEO × fT product is improved from 309.51 to 326.35 GHz·V. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 60776051, 61006059, 61006044), the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Nos. 4082007, 4143059, 4142007, 4122014), and the Beijing Municipal Education Committee (Nos. KM200710005015, KM200910005001).

  12. Yoghurt impacts on the excretion of phenolic acids derived from colonic breakdown of orange juice flavanones in humans.

    PubMed

    Roowi, Suri; Mullen, William; Edwards, Christine A; Crozier, Alan

    2009-05-01

    Human urine was collected over a 24 h period after the consumption of 250 mL of (i) water, (ii) orange juice, and (iii) orange juice plus 150 mL of full fat natural yoghurt. The orange juice contained 168 micromol of hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside and 18 micromol of naringenin-7-O-rutinoside. GC-MS analysis of the urine identified nine phenolic acids, five of which, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylhydracrylic acid, dihydroferulic acid, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylhydracrylic acid and 3-hydroxyhippuric acid, were associated with orange juice consumption indicating that they were derived from colonic catabolism of hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside. The overall 0-24 h excretion of the five phenolic acids was 6.7 +/- 1.8 micromol after drinking water and this increased significantly (p < 0.05) to 62 +/- 18 micromol, equivalent to 37% of the ingested flavanones, following orange juice consumption. When the orange juice was ingested with yoghurt excretion fell back markedly to 9.3 +/- 4.4 micromol. This was not due to a difference in mouth to caecum transit time, as measured with breath hydrogen production, though possibly there may have been a slowing of the bulk of the meal reaching the large intestine which may then have altered the catabolism of the flavanones to phenolic acids by the colonic microbiota. PMID:19415668

  13. Identification and phytotoxicity of a new glucosinolate breakdown product from Meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba) seed meal.

    PubMed

    Intanon, Suphannika; Reed, Ralph L; Stevens, Jan F; Hulting, Andrew G; Mallory-Smith, Carol A

    2014-07-30

    Meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba Hartw. ex Benth.) is an oilseed crop grown in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Meadowfoam seed meal (MSM), a byproduct after oil extraction, contains 2-4% glucosinolate (glucolimnanthin). Activated MSM, produced by adding freshly ground myrosinase-active meadowfoam seeds to MSM, facilitates myrosinase-mediated formation of glucosinolate-derived degradation products with herbicidal activity. In the activated MSM, glucolimnanthin was converted into 3-methoxybenzyl isothiocyanate ("isothiocyanate") within 24 h and was degraded by day three. 3-Methoxyphenylacetonitrile ("nitrile") persisted for at least 6 days. Methoxyphenylacetic acid (MPAA), a previously unknown metabolite of glucolimnanthin, appeared at day three. Its identity was confirmed by LC-UV and high resolution LC-MS/MS comparisons with a standard of MPAA. Isothiocyanate inhibited lettuce germination 8.5- and 14.4-fold more effectively than MPAA and nitrile, respectively. Activated MSM inhibited lettuce germination by 58% and growth by 72% compared with the control. Results of the study suggest that MSM has potential uses as a pre-emergence bioherbicide. PMID:24998843

  14. Heme content and breakdown in developing chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Heme regulates tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in plants by inhibition of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthesis, product inhibition of heme synthesis, and possibly other mechanisms. Plastid heme levels may be modulated by heme synthesis, breakdown and/or efflux. Heme breakdown may be catalyzed by a chloroplast localized heme oxygenase. Chloroplasts isolated from greening cucumber cotyledons were incubated in the presence or absence of various components thought to modulate heme breakdown. Following the incubations, the chloroplasts were broken (freeze-thaw) and then supplemented with horseradish peroxidase apoenzyme. The reconstituted peroxidase activity was used to determine the amount of free heme remaining (Thomas Weinstein (1989) Plant Physiol. 89S: 74). Chloroplasts, freshly isolated from seedlings greened for 16 hours, contained approximately 37 pmol heme/mg protein. When chloroplasts were incubated with 5 mM NADPH for 30 min, the endogenous heme dropped to unmeasurable levels. Exogenous heme was also broken down when NADPH was included in the incubation. Heme levels could be increased by the inclusion of 50 {mu}M ALA and/or p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. The increase due to exogenous ALA was blocked by levulinic acid, an inhibitor of ALA utilization. NADPH-dependent heme breakdown acid was inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate.

  15. Production of carboxylic acid and salt co-products

    DOEpatents

    Hanchar, Robert J.; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V.

    2014-09-09

    This invention provide processes for producing carboxylic acid product, along with useful salts. The carboxylic acid product that is produced according to this invention is preferably a C.sub.2-C.sub.12 carboxylic acid. Among the salts produced in the process of the invention are ammonium salts.

  16. A Framework of Combining Case-Based Reasoning with a Work Breakdown Structure for Estimating the Cost of Online Course Production Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Currently, a work breakdown structure (WBS) approach is used as the most common cost estimation approach for online course production projects. To improve the practice of cost estimation, this paper proposes a novel framework to estimate the cost for online course production projects using a case-based reasoning (CBR) technique and a WBS. A…

  17. Optical spectroscopy of radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy responses in normal rat skin shows vascular breakdown products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teles de Andrade, Cintia; Nogueira, Marcelo S.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason; Andreozzi, Jacqueline; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Kurachi, Cristina; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radiotherapy are non-systemic cancer treatment options with different mechanisms of damage. So combining these techniques has been shown to have some synergy, and can mitigate their limitations such as low PDT light penetration or radiotherapy side effects. The present study monitored the induced tissue changes after PDT, radiotherapy, and a combination protocol in normal rat skin, using an optical spectroscopy system to track the observed biophysical changes. The Wistar rats were treated with one of the protocols: PDT followed by radiotherapy, PDT, radiotherapy and radiotherapy followed by PDT. Reflectance spectra were collected in order to observe the effects of these combined therapies, especially targeting vascular response. From the reflectance, information about oxygen saturation, met-hemoglobin and bilirubin concentration, blood volume fraction (BVF) and vessel radius were extracted from model fitting of the spectra. The rats were monitored for 24 hours after treatment. Results showed that there was no significant variation in the vessel size or BVF after the treatments. However, the PDT caused a significant increase in the met-hemoglobin and bilirubin concentrations, indicating an important blood breakdown. These results may provide an important clue on how the damage establishment takes place, helping to understand the effect of the combination of those techniques in order to verify the existence of a known synergistic effect.

  18. Stabilization and breakdown of Archean Cratons: Formation of sedimentary basins, mafic magmatism, and metallogenic productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, O. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Kenorland supercontinent was created as a result of the ascent of the most powerful mantle plumes in the Earth’s geological history and accompanied by the formation of the continental crust and its subsequent accretion into a supercontinent 2.7 Ga ago. The geological phenomena that occurred at that time in Australia, Canada, and South Africa reflecting its features are considered in this paper. The first sedimentary basins resting upon the sialic basement give evidence for long-existing peneplanes formed in the Early Precambrian, i.e., for stabilization of the underlying cratons; this is also supported by the appearance of rapakivi granite 2.8 Ga ago. The platform regime existed as early as the Mesoarchean 3.5 Ga ago. The platform sedimentary basins developed almost continuously over a billion years. Layered mafic intrusions were frequently emplaced into sedimentary sequences. Unique gold, uranium, PGE, chrome, and other deposits are hosted in sedimentary basins and layered intrusions. The extremely high intensity of plume activity determined the origin and breakdown of the Kenorland supercontinent and the cause of transport of ore elements concentrated in unique deposits. In terms of the intensity of plume-related magmatism and ore formation, the considered period of geological history has no more recent analogues and was critical for the Earth’s evolution.

  19. Glucosidic pathways of glycogen breakdown and glucose production by muscle from postexercised frogs.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P A; Guderley, H

    1993-11-01

    Muscle and body glucose in frogs increases markedly during the initial hour of recovery after strenuous exercise. The liver is not the major source responsible for this accumulation. This is indicated by the stability of liver glycogen levels after exercise and by the observation that hepatectomized and normal frogs accumulate similar amounts of glucose in their muscles and body during recovery. The renal contribution cannot account for this increase in body glucose. Most of the glucose that accumulates in the body after exercise has a muscular origin, as indicated by the facts that two-thirds of the body glucose is found in muscle and that the intracellular levels of muscle glucose are much higher than those of the plasma. The glucose that accumulates outside muscle may also have a muscular origin. The glucosidic pathways of glycogen breakdown are the only metabolic avenue with sufficient capacity to account for the amount of glucose accumulated in muscle during the first hour of recovery. These results indicate that the ability of an isolated preparation of frog muscle to liberate glucose during recovery from exercise (Fournier et al. J. Biol. Chem. 267: 8234-8238, 1992) is not an artifactual metabolic curiosity but rather a metabolic reality that takes place in vivo. Glucose accumulation during recovery is thought to facilitate the metabolic transition of frog carbohydrate metabolism from a catabolic state, characteristic of exercise, to an anabolic one. PMID:8238616

  20. Detection and quantification of sulfur in oil products by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for on-line analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichard, F.; Forquet, V.; Gilon, N.; Lienemann, C.-P.; Baco-Antoniali, F.

    2016-04-01

    Determination of sulfur in petroleum products is described using Laser Induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). A study of buffer gases employed to improve sulfur IR line detection is presented. Optimisation of the flow rate led to a 1.4 L/min optimal helium flow rate. An adaptation between a typical laboratory setup to a compact system allowed to obtain detection limits in the 0.2% w/w range. Calibration is made under the process conditions (70 °C) and at room temperature. Normalization with a helium emission line compensates for liquid level variations and for the temperature variations. The analysis of a sample over the course of 2 days under the conditions of the industrial process was tested and gave a good repeatability.

  1. Biochemistry of microbial itaconic acid production

    PubMed Central

    Steiger, Matthias G.; Blumhoff, Marzena L.; Mattanovich, Diethard; Sauer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Itaconic acid is an unsaturated dicarbonic acid which has a high potential as a biochemical building block, because it can be used as a monomer for the production of a plethora of products including resins, plastics, paints, and synthetic fibers. Some Aspergillus species, like A. itaconicus and A. terreus, show the ability to synthesize this organic acid and A. terreus can secrete significant amounts to the media (>80 g/L). However, compared with the citric acid production process (titers >200 g/L) the achieved titers are still low and the overall process is expensive because purified substrates are required for optimal productivity. Itaconate is formed by the enzymatic activity of a cis-aconitate decarboxylase (CadA) encoded by the cadA gene in A. terreus. Cloning of the cadA gene into the citric acid producing fungus A. niger showed that it is possible to produce itaconic acid also in a different host organism. This review will describe the current status and recent advances in the understanding of the molecular processes leading to the biotechnological production of itaconic acid. PMID:23420787

  2. Organic Acid Production by Filamentous Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, Jon K.; Lasure, Linda L.

    2004-05-03

    Many of the commercial production processes for organic acids are excellent examples of fungal biotechnology. However, unlike penicillin, the organic acids have had a less visible impact on human well-being. Indeed, organic acid fermentations are often not even identified as fungal bioprocesses, having been overshadowed by the successful deployment of the β-lactam processes. Yet, in terms of productivity, fungal organic acid processes may be the best examples of all. For example, commercial processes using Aspergillus niger in aerated stirred-tank-reactors can convert glucose to citric acid with greater than 80% efficiency and at final concentrations in hundreds of grams per liter. Surprisingly, this phenomenal productivity has been the object of relatively few research programs. Perhaps a greater understanding of this extraordinary capacity of filamentous fungi to produce organic acids in high concentrations will allow greater exploitation of these organisms via application of new knowledge in this era of genomics-based biotechnology. In this chapter, we will explore the biochemistry and modern genetic aspects of the current and potential commercial processes for making organic acids. The organisms involved, with a few exceptions, are filamentous fungi, and this review is limited to that group. Although yeasts including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, species of Rhodotorula, Pichia, and Hansenula are important organisms in fungal biotechnology, they have not been significant for commercial organic acid production, with one exception. The yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, and related yeast species, may be in use commercially to produce citric acid (Lopez-Garcia, 2002). Furthermore, in the near future engineered yeasts may provide new commercial processes to make lactic acid (Porro, Bianchi, Ranzi, Frontali, Vai, Winkler, & Alberghina, 2002). This chapter is divided into two parts. The first contains a review of the commercial aspects of current and potential large

  3. Photostability and breakdown products of pigments currently used in tattoo inks.

    PubMed

    Hauri, Urs; Hohl, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Tattoos fade with time. Part of this fading can be attributed to the photodegradation of pigments. When people get tired of their tattoos, removal by laser irradiation is the method of choice. In vivo laser irradiation of tattoos on mice has shown that the degradation of pigments can result in toxic compounds. Various in vitro studies on photodegradation by sunlight or laser have shown similar degradation products for both irradiations. Even visible light was shown to be able to decompose some pigments to toxic degradation products in vitro. Whereas the investigated phthalocyanins (C.I. 74160, 74260), quinacridones (C.I. 73915) or dioxazines (C.I. 51319) were fairly photostable in vitro, all azo pigments exposed to sunlight or laser were degraded into a variety of products, some of which were toxic or even carcinogenic, such as 2-amino-4-nitrotoluene, 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine and o-toluidine. Up to now, the absence of specific toxicological data is the reason why legal restrictions for tattoo inks are derived from those for cosmetics, toys and textiles. Photodegradation has not been considered. In light of the present analytical findings, even with their possible shortcomings, the evidence weighs heavily enough to consider banning azo pigments containing carcinogenic aromatic amines or allergens in their structure from use in tattoo inks. PMID:25833639

  4. Pesticides and their breakdown products in Lake Waxahachie, Texas, and in finished drinking water from the lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ging, Patricia B.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1991, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program has collected pesticide data from streams and aquifers throughout the Nation (Gilliom and others, 1995). However, little published information on pesticides in public drinking water is available. The NAWQA Program usually collects data on the sources of drinking water but not on the finished drinking water. Therefore, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), in conjunction with the NAWQA Program, has initiated a nationwide pilot project to collect information on concentrations of pesticides and their breakdown products in finished drinking water, in source waters such as reservoirs, and in the basins that contribute water to the reservoirs. The pilot project was designed to collect water samples from finished drinking-water supplies and the associated source water from selected reservoirs that receive runoff from a variety of land uses. Lake Waxahachie, in Ellis County in north-central Texas, was chosen to represent a reservoir receiving water that includes runoff from cotton cropland. This fact sheet presents the results of pesticide sampling of source water from Lake Waxahachie and in finished drinking water from the lake. Analyses are compared to indicate differences in pesticide detections and concentrations between lake water and finished drinking water.

  5. Assessment of the breakdown products of solar/UV induced photolytic degradation of food dye tartrazine.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Tuane Cristina; Zocolo, Guilherme Julião; Morales, Daniel Alexandre; Umbuzeiro, Gisela de Aragão; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin

    2014-06-01

    The food dye tartrazine (CI 19140) was exposed to UV irradiation from an artificial source, a mercury vapor lamp, and a natural one, sunlight. It was observed that conditions such as energy dose, irradiation time, pH and initial dye concentration affected its discoloration. There was 100% of color removal, after 30min of irradiation, when a dye solution 1×10(-5)molL(-1) was submitted to an energy dose of 37.8Jcm(-2). Liquid Chromatography coupled to Diode Array Detection and Mass Spectrometry confirmed the cleavage of the chromophore group and the formation of five by-products at low concentration. Although by-products were formed, the Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay performed for both, the dye solution at a dose of 5.34mg/plate and the solutions obtained after exposure to UV irradiation, did not present mutagenic activity for TA98 and TA100 with and without S9. PMID:24704040

  6. Breakdown Products of Gaseous Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Investigated with Infrared Ion Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrignani, A.; Vala, M.; Eyler, J. R.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Berden, G.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Redlich, B.; Oomens, J.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a common fragment ion formed during the electron-ionization-induced fragmentation of three different three-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), fluorene (C13H10), 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (C14H12), and 9,10-dihydroanthracene (C14H12). The infrared spectra of the mass-isolated product ions with m/z = 165 were obtained in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer whose cell was placed inside the optical cavity of an infrared free-electron laser, thus providing the high photon fluence required for efficient infrared multiple-photon dissociation. The infrared spectra of the m/z = 165 species generated from the three different precursors were found to be similar, suggesting the formation of a single {{{C}}}13{{{{H}}}9}+ isomer. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT) revealed the fragment's identity as the closed-shell fluorenyl cation. Decomposition pathways from each parent precursor to the fluorenyl ion are proposed on the basis of DFT calculations. The identification of a single fragmentation product from three different PAHs supports the notion of the existence of common decomposition pathways of PAHs in general and can aid in understanding the fragmentation chemistry of astronomical PAH species.

  7. Electrolysis within anaerobic bioreactors stimulates breakdown of toxic products from azo dye treatment.

    PubMed

    Gavazza, Sávia; Guzman, Juan J L; Angenent, Largus T

    2015-04-01

    Azo dyes are the most widely used coloring agents in the textile industry, but are difficult to treat. When textile effluents are discharged into waterways, azo dyes and their degradation products are known to be environmentally toxic. An electrochemical system consisting of a graphite-plate anode and a stainless-steel mesh cathode was placed into a lab-scale anaerobic bioreactor to evaluate the removal of an azo dye (Direct Black 22) from synthetic textile wastewater. At applied potentials of 2.5 and 3.0 V when water electrolysis occurs, no improvement in azo dye removal efficiency was observed compared to the control reactor (an integrated system with electrodes but without an applied potential). However, applying such electric potentials produces oxygen via electrolysis and promoted the aerobic degradation of aromatic amines, which are toxic, intermediate products of anaerobic azo dye degradation. The removal of these amines indicates a decrease in overall toxicity of the effluent from a single-stage anaerobic bioreactor, which warrants further optimization in anaerobic digestion. PMID:25750156

  8. Efficient breakdown of lignocellulose using mixed-microbe populations for bioethanol production.

    SciTech Connect

    Murton, Jaclyn K.; Ricken, James Bryce; Powell, Amy Jo

    2009-11-01

    This report documents progress in discovering new catalytic technologies that will support the development of advanced biofuels. The global shift from petroleum-based fuels to advanced biofuels will require transformational breakthroughs in biomass deconstruction technologies, because current methods are neither cost effective nor sufficiently efficient or robust for scaleable production. Discovery and characterization of lignocellulolytic enzyme systems adapted to extreme environments will accelerate progress. Obvious extreme environments to mine for novel lignocellulolytic deconstruction technologies include aridland ecosystems (ALEs), such as those of the Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site in central New Mexico (NM). ALEs represent at least 40% of the terrestrial biosphere and are classic extreme environments, with low nutrient availability, high ultraviolet radiation flux, limited and erratic precipitation, and extreme variation in temperatures. ALEs are functionally distinct from temperate environments in many respects; one salient distinction is that ALEs do not accumulate soil organic carbon (SOC), in marked contrast to temperate settings, which typically have large pools of SOC. Low productivity ALEs do not accumulate carbon (C) primarily because of extraordinarily efficient extracellular enzyme activities (EEAs) that are derived from underlying communities of diverse, largely uncharacterized microbes. Such efficient enzyme activities presumably reflect adaptation to this low productivity ecosystem, with the result that all available organic nutrients are assimilated rapidly. These communities are dominated by ascomycetous fungi, both in terms of abundance and contribution to ecosystem-scale metabolic processes, such as nitrogen and C cycling. To deliver novel, robust, efficient lignocellulolytic enzyme systems that will drive transformational advances in biomass deconstruction, we have: (1) secured an award through the Department of Energy

  9. Production of Succinic Acid for Lignocellulosic Hydrolysates

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, B.H.; Nghiem, J.

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) is to add and test new metabolic activities to existing microbial catalysts for the production of succinic acid from renewables. In particular, they seek to add to the existing organism the ability to utilize xylose efficiently and simultaneously with glucose in mixtures of sugars or to add succinic acid production to another strain and to test the value of this new capability for production of succinic acid from industrial lignocellulosic hydrolyasates. The Contractors and Participant are hereinafter jointly referred to as the 'Parties'. Research to date in succinic acid fermentation, separation and genetic engineering has resulted in a potentially economical process based on the use of an Escherichia coli strain AFP111 with suitable characteristics for the production of succinic acid from glucose. Economic analysis has shown that higher value commodity chemicals can be economically produced from succinic acid based on repliminary laboratory findings and predicted catalytic parameters. The initial target markets include succinic acid itself, succinate salts, esters and other derivatives for use as deicers, solvents and acidulants. The other commodity products from the succinic acid platform include 1,4-butanediol, {gamma}-butyrolactone, 2-pyrrolidinone and N-methyl pyrrolidinone. Current economic analyses indicate that this platform is competitive with existing petrochemical routes, especially for the succinic acid and derivatives. The report presents the planned CRADA objectives followed by the results. The results section has a combined biocatalysis and fermentation section and a commercialization section. This is a nonproprietary report; additional proprietary information may be made available subject to acceptance of the appropriate proprietary information agreements.

  10. Beta-carotene breakdown products enhance genotoxic effects of oxidative stress in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Alija, A J; Bresgen, N; Sommerburg, O; Langhans, C D; Siems, W; Eckl, P M

    2006-06-01

    Since it has to be expected that individuals exposed to oxidative stress who take supplements of beta-carotene are simultaneously exposed to both beta-carotene cleavage products (CPs) and oxidative stress, and both exposures have been demonstrated to cause genotoxic effects in primary rat hepatocytes, cyto- and genotoxic effects on primary rat hepatocytes after supplementation of the medium with increasing concentrations of a CP mixture during exposure to oxidative stress by treatment with either DMNQ (2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) or hypoxia/reoxygenation (Hy/Reox) was investigated. The cytological endpoints analysed were the mitotic indices, the percentages of apoptotic and necrotic cells, the percentages of micronucleated (MN) cells and the number of chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). The results obtained clearly demonstrate that the CP mixture enhances the genotoxic effects of oxidative stress exposure, whereas it had no effect at all on the endpoints of cytotoxicity studied. These results further support the hypothesis that CP might be responsible for the reported carcinogenic response in the beta-CArotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET) and Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-carotene Cancer prevention (ATBC) chemoprevention trials. PMID:16418177

  11. Laser-induced breakdown spectrometry — applications for production control and quality assurance in the steel industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Reinhard; Bette, Holger; Brysch, Adriane; Kraushaar, Marc; Mönch, Ingo; Peter, Laszlo; Sturm, Volker

    2001-06-01

    Recent progress in sensitivity and signal processing opened a broad field of application for laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) in the steel making and processing industry. Analyzed substances range from top gas of the blast furnace, via liquid steel up to finished products. This paper gives an overview of R&D activities and first routine industrial applications of LIBS. The continuous knowledge of the topgas composition yields information about the blast furnace process. An online monitoring method using LIBS is currently under investigation to measure alkali metals, which influence energy and mass flow in the furnace. Direct analysis of liquid steel reduces processing times in secondary metallurgy. By using sensitivity-enhanced LIBS, limits of detection of approximately 10 μg/g and below were achieved for light and heavy elements in liquid steel. The process control in steel production relies on the results from the chemical analysis of the slag. A prototype of an analytical system was developed using LIBS to analyze slag samples two times faster than with conventional methods. The cleanness of steel is a key issue in the manufacturing of spring steel, thin foils and wires. Microscopic inclusions have to be determined quickly. A scanning microanalysis system based on LIBS was developed with measuring frequencies up to 1 kHz and a spatial resolution of <15 μm. For the final inspection of the steel grade of pipe fittings, an inspection machine using LIBS was developed and introduced into routine industrial use to detect material mix-ups. More than 500 000 pipe fittings were inspected during the last 20 months.

  12. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and multivariate statistics for the rapid identification of oxide inclusions in steel products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boué-Bigne, Fabienne

    2016-05-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) scanning measurements can generally be used to detect the presence of non-metallic inclusions in steel samples. However, the inexistence of appropriate standards to calibrate the LIBS instrument signal means that its application is limited to identifying simple diatomic inclusions and inclusions that are chemically fully distinct from one another. Oxide inclusions in steel products have varied and complex chemical content, with an approximate size of interest of 1 μm. Several oxide inclusions types have chemical elements in common, but it is the concentration of these elements that makes an inclusion type have little or, on the contrary, deleterious impact on the final steel product quality. During the LIBS measurement of such inclusions, the spectroscopic signal is influenced not only by the inclusions' chemical concentrations but also by their varying size and associated laser ablation matrix effects. To address the complexity of calibrating the LIBS instrument signal for identifying such inclusion species, a new approach was developed where a calibration dataset was created, combining the elemental concentrations of typical oxide inclusions with the associated LIBS signal, in order to define a multivariate discriminant function capable of identifying oxide inclusions from LIBS data obtained from the measurement of unknown samples. The new method was applied to a variety of steel product samples. Inclusions populations consisting of mixtures of several complex oxides, with overlapping chemical content and size ranging typically from 1 to 5 μm, were identified and correlated well with validation data. The ability to identify complex inclusion types from LIBS data could open the way to new applications as, for a given sample area, the LIBS measurement is performed in a fraction of the time required by scanning electron microscopy, which is the conventional technique used for inclusion characterisation in steel

  13. Economic aspects of amino acids production.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Udo; Huebner, Susanna

    2003-01-01

    Amino acids represent basic elements of proteins, which as a main source of nutrition themselves serve as a major reserve for maintaining essential functions of humans as well as animals. Taking the recent state of scientific knowledge into account, the industrial sector of amino acids is a priori "suitable" to a specific kind of an ecologically sound way of production, which is based on biotechnology. The following article may point out characteristics of this particular industrial sector and illustrates the applicability of the latest economic methods, founded on development of the discipline of bionics in order to describe economic aspects of amino acids markets. The several biochemical and technological fields of application of amino acids lead to specific market structures in high developed and permanently evolving systems. The Harvard tradition of industrial economics explains how market structures mould the behaviour of the participants and influences market results beyond that. A global increase in intensity of competition confirms the notion that the supply-side is characterised by asymmetric information in contrast to Kantzenbachs concept of "narrow oligopoly" with symmetrical shared knowledge about market information. Departing from this point, certain strategies of companies in this market form shall be derived. The importance of Research and Development increases rapidly and leads to innovative manufacturing methods which replace more polluting manufacturing processes like acid hydrolysis. In addition to these modifications within the production processes the article deals furthermore with the pricing based on product life cycle concept and introduces specific applications of tools like activity based costing and target costing to the field of amino acid production. The authors come to the conclusion that based on a good transferability of latest findings in bionics and ecological compatibility competitors in amino acids manufacturing are well advised

  14. Fatty acid production in genetically modified cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyao; Sheng, Jie; Curtiss III, Roy

    2011-01-01

    To avoid costly biomass recovery in photosynthetic microbial biofuel production, we genetically modified cyanobacteria to produce and secrete fatty acids. Starting with introducing an acyl–acyl carrier protein thioesterase gene, we made six successive generations of genetic modifications of cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 wild type (SD100). The fatty acid secretion yield was increased to 197 ± 14 mg/L of culture in one improved strain at a cell density of 1.0 × 109 cells/mL by adding codon-optimized thioesterase genes and weakening polar cell wall layers. Although these strains exhibited damaged cell membranes at low cell densities, they grew more rapidly at high cell densities in late exponential and stationary phase and exhibited less cell damage than cells in wild-type cultures. Our results suggest that fatty acid secreting cyanobacteria are a promising technology for renewable biofuel production. PMID:21482809

  15. Biotechnological production and application of ganoderic acids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun-Wei; Zhao, Wei; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2010-06-01

    Ganoderic acids (GAs), a kind of highly oxygenated lanostane-type triterpenoids, are important bioactive constituents of the famous medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum. They have received wide attention in recent years due to extraordinarily pharmacological functions. Submerged fermentation of G. lucidum is viewed as a promising technology for production of GAs, and substantial efforts have been devoted to process development for enhancing GA production in the last decade. This article reviews recent publication about fermentative production of GAs and their potential applications, especially the progresses toward manipulation of fermentation conditions and bioprocessing strategies are summarized. The biosynthetic pathway of GAs is also outlined. PMID:20437236

  16. Work breakdown structure guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-06

    Utilization of the work breakdown structure (WBS) technique is an effective aid in managing Department of Energy (DOE) programs and projects. The technique provides a framework for project management by focusing on the products that are being developed or constructed to solve technical problems. It assists both DOE and contractors in fulfilling their management responsibilities. This document provides guidance for use of the WBS technique for product oriented work identification and definition. It is one in a series of policy and guidance documents supporting DOE's project manaagement system.

  17. Production of fusaric acid by Fusarium species.

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, C W; Porter, J K; Norred, W P; Leslie, J F

    1996-01-01

    Fusaric acid is a mycotoxin with low to moderate toxicity, which is of concern since it might be synergistic with other cooccurring mycotoxins. Fusaric acid is widespread on corn and corn-based food and feeds and is frequently found in grain, where Fusarium spp. are also isolated. We surveyed 78 strains of Fusarium moniliforme, F. crookwellense, F. subglutinans, F. sambucinum, F. napiforme, F. heterosporum, F. oxysporum, F. solani, and F. proliferatum for their ability to produce fusaric acid. Strains in Fusarium section Liseola also were assigned to mating population of the Gibberella fujikuroi species complex. The fungi could be divided into three classes, low (< 100 micrograms/g), moderate (100 to 500 micrograms/g), and high (> 500 micrograms/g), based on the amounts of this mycotoxin produced in culture on autoclaved corn. Strains of mating populations C from rice consistently produced moderate to high concentrations of fusaric acid. Two isolates, one each from mating populations C and D, produced fusaric acid in excess of 1,000 micrograms/g of corn. No isolates of any of the Fusarium species examined were negative for the production of fusaric acid on autoclaved corn. PMID:8899996

  18. Deglacial diatom production in the tropical North Atlantic driven by enhanced silicic acid supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, Katharine R.; Gong, Xun; Knorr, Gregor; Pike, Jennifer; Hall, Ian R.

    2016-03-01

    Major shifts in ocean circulation are thought to be responsible for abrupt changes in temperature and atmospheric CO2 during the last deglaciation, linked to variability in meridional heat transport and deep ocean carbon storage. There is also widespread evidence for shifts in biological production during these times of deglacial CO2 rise, including enhanced diatom production in regions such as the tropical Atlantic. However, it remains unclear as to whether this diatom production was driven by enhanced wind-driven upwelling or density-driven vertical mixing, or by elevated thermocline concentrations of silicic acid supplied to the surface at a constant rate. Here, we demonstrate that silicic acid supply at depth in the NE Atlantic was enhanced during the abrupt climate events of the deglaciation. We use marine sediment archives to show that an increase in diatom production during abrupt climate shifts could only occur in regions of the NE Atlantic where the deep supply of silicic acid could reach the surface. The associated changes are indicative of enhanced regional wind-driven upwelling and/or weakened stratification due to circulation changes during phases of weakened Atlantic meridional overturning. Globally near-synchronous pulses of diatom production and enhanced thermocline concentrations of silicic acid suggest that widespread deglacial surface-driven breakdown of stratification, linked to changes in atmospheric circulation, had major consequences for biological productivity and carbon cycling.

  19. Extraction chemistry of fermentation product carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kertes, A.S.; King, C.J.

    1986-02-01

    Within the framework of a program aiming to improve the existing extractive recovery technology of fermentation products, the state of the art is critically reviewed. The acids under consideration are propionic, lactic, pyruvic, succinic, fumaric, maleic, malic, itaconic, tartaric, citric, and isocitric, all obtained by the aerobic fermentation of glucose via the glycolytic pathways and glyoxylate bypass. With no exception, it is the undissociated monomeric acid that is extracted into carbon-bonded and phosphorus-bonded oxygen donor extractants. In the organic phase, the acids are usually dimerized. The extractive transfer process obeys the Nernst law, and the measured partition coefficients range from about 0.003 for aliphatic hydrocarbons to about 2 to 3 for aliphatic alcohols and ketones to about 10 or more for organophosphates. Equally high distribution ratios are measured when long-chain tertiary amines are employed as extractants, forming bulky salts preferentially soluble in the organic phase.

  20. Extraction chemistry of fermentation product carboxylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kertes, A.S.; King, C.J.

    1986-02-01

    Within the framework of a program aiming to improve the existing extractive recovery technology of fermentation products, the state of the art is critically reviewed. The acids under consideration are propionic, lactic, pyruvic, succinic, fumaric, maleic, malic, itaconic, tartaric, citric, and isocitric, all obtained by the aerobic fermentation of glucose via the glycolytic pathway and glyoxylate bypass. With no exception, it is the undissociated monomeric acid that is extracted into carbon-bonded and phosphorus-bonded oxygen donor extractants. In the organic phase, the acids are usually dimerized. The extractive transfer process obeys the Nernst law, and the measured partition coefficients range from about 0.003 for aliphatic hydrocarbons to about 2 to 3 for aliphatic alcohols and ketones to about 10 or more for organophosphates. Equally high distribution ratios are measured when long-chain tertiary amines are employed as extractants, forming bulky salts preferentially soluble in the organic phase. 123 references.

  1. Production of Succinic Acid from Citric Acid and Related Acids by Lactobacillus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kaneuchi, Choji; Seki, Masako; Komagata, Kazuo

    1988-01-01

    A number of Lactobacillus strains produced succinic acid in de Man-Rogosa-Sharpe broth to various extents. Among 86 fresh isolates from fermented cane molasses in Thailand, 30 strains (35%) produced succinic acid; namely, 23 of 39 Lactobacillus reuteri strains, 6 of 18 L. cellobiosus strains, and 1 of 6 unidentified strains. All of 10 L. casei subsp. casei strains, 5 L. casei subsp. rhamnosus strains, 6 L. mali strains, and 2 L. buchneri strains did not produce succinic acid. Among 58 known strains including 48 type strains of different Lactobacillus species, the strains of L. acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. parvus produced succinic acid to the same extent as the most active fresh isolates, and those of L. alimentarius, L. collinoides, L. farciminis, L. fructivorans (1 of 2 strains tested), L. malefermentans, and L. reuteri were also positive, to lesser extents. Diammonium citrate in de Man-Rogosa-Sharpe broth was determined as a precursor of the succinic acid produced. Production rates were about 70% on a molar basis with two fresh strains tested. Succinic acid was also produced from fumaric and malic acids but not from dl-isocitric, α-ketoglutaric, and pyruvic acids. The present study is considered to provide the first evidence on the production of succinic acid, an important flavoring substance in dairy products and fermented beverages, from citrate by lactobacilli. PMID:16347795

  2. Method for the production of dicarboxylic acids

    DOEpatents

    Nghiem, Nhuan Phu; Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an economical fermentation method for the production of carboxylic acids comprising the steps of a) inoculating a medium having a carbon source with a carboxylic acid-producing organism; b) incubating the carboxylic acid-producing organism in an aerobic atmosphere to promote rapid growth of the organism thereby increasing the biomass of the organism; c) controllably releasing oxygen to maintain the aerobic atmosphere; d) controllably feeding the organism having increased biomass with a solution containing the carbon source to maintain the concentration of the carbon source within the medium of about 0.5 g/L up to about 1 g/L; e) depriving the aerobic atmosphere of oxygen to produce an anaerobic atmosphere to cause the organism to undergo anaerobic metabolism; f) controllably feeding the organism having increased biomass a solution containing the carbon source to maintain the concentration of the carbon source within the medium of .gtoreq.1 g/L; and g) converting the carbon source to carboxylic acids using the anaerobic metabolism of the organism.

  3. Method for the production of dicarboxylic acids

    DOEpatents

    Nghiem, N.P.; Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

    1999-02-09

    The present invention is an economical fermentation method for the production of carboxylic acids comprising the steps of (a) inoculating a medium having a carbon source with a carboxylic acid-producing organism; (b) incubating the carboxylic acid-producing organism in an aerobic atmosphere to promote rapid growth of the organism thereby increasing the biomass of the organism; (c) controllably releasing oxygen to maintain the aerobic atmosphere; (d) controllably feeding the organism having increased biomass with a solution containing the carbon source to maintain the concentration of the carbon source within the medium of about 0.5 g/l up to about 1 g/l; (e) depriving the aerobic atmosphere of oxygen to produce an anaerobic atmosphere to cause the organism to undergo anaerobic metabolism; (f) controllably feeding the organism having increased biomass a solution containing the carbon source to maintain the concentration of the carbon source within the medium of {>=}1 g/l; and (g) converting the carbon source to carboxylic acids using the anaerobic metabolism of the organism. 7 figs.

  4. DC Breakdown Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Calatroni, S.; Descoeudres, A.; Levinsen, Y.; Taborelli, M.; Wuensch, W.

    2009-01-22

    In the context of the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project investigations of DC breakdown in ultra high vacuum are carried out in parallel with high power RF tests. From the point of view of saturation breakdown field the best material tested so far is stainless steel, followed by titanium. Copper shows a four times weaker breakdown field than stainless steel. The results indicate clearly that the breakdown events are initiated by field emission current and that the breakdown field is limited by the cathode. In analogy to RF, the breakdown probability has been measured in DC and the data show similar behaviour as a function of electric field.

  5. Cellulose Breakdown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenler, John; Nye, Leith; Tangen, Travis

    2014-01-01

    Production of liquid fuels such as ethanol from fibrous plant biomass could potentially be a significant sustainable component of the U.S. energy portfolio. Engineers and scientists are actively researching this area, and high school students can engage in this contemporary inquiry process by experimenting with different types of biomass, varying…

  6. Classification of vegetable oils based on their concentration of saturated fatty acids using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Mbesse Kongbonga, Yvon G; Ghalila, Hassen; Onana, Marthe Boyomo; Ben Lakhdar, Zohra

    2014-03-15

    Spectrochemical analyses of organic liquid media such as vegetable oils and sweetened water were performed with the use of LIBS. The aim of this work is to study, on the basis of spectral analyses by LIBS technique of "Swan band" of C2 emitted by different vegetable oils in liquid phase, the characteristics of each organic media. Furthermore this paper proposes, as a classification, a single parameter that could be used to determine the concentration of saturated fatty acids of vegetable oils. A Nd:YAG operating at λ=532 nm and an energies per pulse of 30 mJ was focused onto the surface of the liquid in ambient air. Following ablation of vegetable oils and sweetened water, we find that vibrational bonds of C2 were released from the molecule containing carbon-carbon bonds linear. In the case of vegetable oils, we find a clear relationship between C2 emission from the plasma and the concentration of saturated fatty acids in the oil. PMID:24206726

  7. Biobased organic acids production by metabolically engineered microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-02-01

    Bio-based production of organic acids via microbial fermentation has been traditionally used in food industry. With the recent desire to develop more sustainable bioprocesses for production of fuels, chemicals and materials, the market for microbial production of organic acids has been further expanded as organic acids constitute a key group among top building block chemicals that can be produced from renewable resources. Here we review the current status for production of citric acid and lactic acid, and we highlight the use of modern metabolic engineering technologies to develop high performance microbes for production of succinic acid and 3-hydroxypropionic acid. Also, the key limitations and challenges in microbial organic acids production are discussed. PMID:26748037

  8. Method for production of petroselinic acid and OMEGA12 hexadecanoic acid in transgenic plants

    DOEpatents

    Ohlrogge, J.B.; Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C.R.

    1995-07-04

    The present invention relates to a process for producing lipids containing the fatty acid, petroselinic acid, in plants. The production of petroselinic acid is accomplished by genetically transforming plants which do not normally accumulate petroselinic acid with a gene for a {omega}12 desaturase from another species which does normally accumulate petroselinic acid. 19 figs.

  9. Method for production of petroselinic acid and OMEGA12 hexadecanoic acid in transgenic plants

    DOEpatents

    Ohlrogge, John B.; Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Somerville, Christopher R.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for producing lipids containing the fatty acid petroselinic acid in plants. The production of petroselinic acid is accomplished by genetically transforming plants which do not normally accumulate petroselinic acid with a gene for a .omega.12 desaturase from another species which does normally accumulate petroselinic acid.

  10. Recent advances in lactic acid production by microbial fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ali; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2013-11-01

    Fermentative production of optically pure lactic acid has roused interest among researchers in recent years due to its high potential for applications in a wide range of fields. More specifically, the sharp increase in manufacturing of biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA) materials, green alternatives to petroleum-derived plastics, has significantly increased the global interest in lactic acid production. However, higher production costs have hindered the large-scale application of PLA because of the high price of lactic acid. Therefore, reduction of lactic acid production cost through utilization of inexpensive substrates and improvement of lactic acid production and productivity has become an important goal. Various methods have been employed for enhanced lactic acid production, including several bioprocess techniques facilitated by wild-type and/or engineered microbes. In this review, we will discuss lactic acid producers with relation to their fermentation characteristics and metabolism. Inexpensive fermentative substrates, such as dairy products, food and agro-industrial wastes, glycerol, and algal biomass alternatives to costly pure sugars and food crops are introduced. The operational modes and fermentation methods that have been recently reported to improve lactic acid production in terms of concentrations, yields, and productivities are summarized and compared. High cell density fermentation through immobilization and cell-recycling techniques are also addressed. Finally, advances in recovery processes and concluding remarks on the future outlook of lactic acid production are presented. PMID:23624242

  11. Conjugated linoleic acid-enriched beef production.

    PubMed

    Mir, Priya S; McAllister, Timothy A; Scott, Shannon; Aalhus, Jennifer; Baron, Vern; McCartney, Duane; Charmley, Edward; Goonewardene, Laki; Basarab, John; Okine, Erasmus; Weselake, Randall J; Mir, Zahir

    2004-06-01

    Canadian beef consumption is approximately 31 kg per annum, or a third of all meats consumed. Beef is a nutrient-rich food, providing good quality protein, vitamins B-6 and B-12, niacin, iron, and zinc. However, animal fats have gained the reputation of being less healthy. The identification of the anticarcinogenic effects of beef extracts due to the presence of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has heightened interest in increasing the amount of CLA deposited in beef. Beef cattle produce CLA and deposit these compounds in the meat; thus, beef consumers can receive bioformed CLA. Beef contains both of the bioactive CLA isomers, namely, cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12. The relative content of these CLA isomers in beef depends on the feeds consumed by the animals during production. Feeding cattle linoleic acid-rich oils for extended periods of time increases the CLA content of beef. Depending on the type and relative maturity of the pasture, beef from pasture-fed cattle may have a higher CLA content than beef from grain- or silage-fed cattle. In feedlot animals fed high-grain diets, inclusion of dietary oil along with hay during both the growth and finishing phases led to an increase in CLA content from 2.8 to 14 mg/g beef fat, which would provide 77 mg CLA in an 85-g serving of beef. The CLAs appear to be concentrated in intramuscular and subcutaneous fat of beef cattle, with the CLA trans-10, cis-12 isomer being greater in the subcutaneous fat. PMID:15159258

  12. Lactobionic and cellobionic acid production profiles of the resting cells of acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kiryu, Takaaki; Kiso, Taro; Nakano, Hirofumi; Murakami, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Lactobionic acid was produced by acetic acid bacteria to oxidize lactose. Gluconobacter spp. and Gluconacetobacter spp. showed higher lactose-oxidizing activities than Acetobacter spp. Gluconobacter frateurii NBRC3285 produced the highest amount of lactobionic acid per cell, among the strains tested. This bacterium assimilated neither lactose nor lactobionic acid. At high lactose concentration (30%), resting cells of the bacterium showed sufficient oxidizing activity for efficient production of lactobionic acid. These properties may contribute to industrial production of lactobionic acid by the bacterium. The bacterium showed higher oxidizing activity on cellobiose than that on lactose and produced cellobionic acid. PMID:25965080

  13. Analysis of cyclic pyrolysis products formed from amino acid monomer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Seen; Ko, Ji-Eun

    2011-11-18

    Amino acid was mixed with silica and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to favor pyrolysis of amino acid monomer. The pyrolysis products formed from amino acid monomer were using GC/MS and GC. 20 amino acids of alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, cysteine, glutamic acid, glutamine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and valine were analyzed. The pyrolysis products were divided into cyclic and non-cyclic products. Among the 20 amino acids, arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glutamine, histidine, lysine, and phenylalanine generated cyclic pyrolysis products of the monomer. New cyclic pyrolysis products were formed by isolation of amino acid monomers. They commonly had polar side functional groups to 5-, 6-, or 7-membered ring structure. Arginine, asparagine, glutamic acid, glutamine, histidine, and phenylalanine generated only 5- or 6-membered ring products. However, lysine generated both 6- and 7-membered ring compounds. Variations of the relative intensities of the cyclic pyrolysis products with the pyrolysis temperature and amino acid concentration were also investigated. PMID:21993510

  14. 40 CFR 721.10679 - Carboxylic acid, substituted alkylstannylene ester, reaction products with inorganic acid tetra...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... alkylstannylene ester, reaction products with inorganic acid tetra alkyl ester (generic). 721.10679 Section 721... SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10679 Carboxylic acid, substituted alkylstannylene ester, reaction products with inorganic acid tetra alkyl...

  15. Production of high molecular weight polylactic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignore, Patrick V.

    1995-01-01

    A degradable high molecular weight poly(lactic acid). A poly(lactic acid) has a terminal end group of one of carboxyl or hydroxyl groups with low molecular weight poly(lactic acid) units coupled with linking agents of di-isocyanates, bis-epoxides, bis-oxazolines and bis-ortho esters. The resulting high molecular weight poly(lactic acid) can be used for applications taking advantage of the improved physical properties.

  16. Production of high molecular weight polylactic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignore, P.V.

    1995-11-28

    A degradable high molecular weight poly(lactic acid) is described. The poly(lactic acid) has a terminal end group of one of carboxyl or hydroxyl groups with low molecular weight poly(lactic acid) units coupled with linking agents of di-isocyanates, bis-epoxides, bis-oxazolines and bis-ortho esters. The resulting high molecular weight poly(lactic acid) can be used for applications taking advantage of the improved physical properties.

  17. Microbial granulation for lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Mo-Kwon; Hwang, Yuhoon; Im, Wan-Taek; Yun, Yeo-Myeong; Park, Chul; Kim, Mi-Sun

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the formation of microbial granules to boost the productivity of lactic acid (LA). The flocculated form of LA-producing microbial consortium, dominated by Lactobacillus sp. (91.5% of total sequence), was initially obtained in a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR), which was fed with 2% glucose and operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 12 h and pH 5.0 ± 0.1 under a thermophilic condition (50°C). The mixed liquor in the CSTR was then transferred to an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB). The fermentation performance and granulation process were monitored with a gradual decrease of HRT from 8.0 to 0.17 h, corresponding to an increase in the substrate loading from 60 to 2,880 g glucose L(-1) d(-1) . As the operation continued, the accumulation of biomass in the UASB was clearly observed, which changed from flocculent to granular form with decrease in HRT. Up to the HRT decrease to 0.5 h, the LA concentration was maintained at 19-20 g L(-1) with over 90% of substrate removal efficiency. However, further decrease of HRT resulted in a decrease of LA concentration with increase in residual glucose. Nevertheless, the volumetric LA productivity continuously increased, reaching 67 g L-fermenter (-1) h(-1) at HRT 0.17 h. The size of LA-producing granules and hydrophobicity gradually increased with decrease in HRT, reaching 6.0 mm and 60%, respectively. These biogranules were also found to have high settling velocities and low porosities, ranging 2.69-4.73 cm s(-1) and 0.39-0.92, respectively. PMID:25925200

  18. Chicoric acid: chemistry, distribution, and production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungmin; Scagel, Carolyn

    2013-12-01

    Though chicoric acid was first identified in 1958, it was largely ignored until recent popular media coverage cited potential health beneficial properties from consuming food and dietary supplements containing this compound. To date, plants from at least 63 genera and species have been found to contain chicoric acid, and while the compound is used as a processing quality indicator, it may also have useful health benefits. This review of chicoric acid summarizes research findings and highlights gaps in research knowledge for investigators, industry stakeholders, and consumers alike. Additionally, chicoric acid identification and quantification methods, biosynthesis, processing improvements to increase chicoric acid retention, and potential areas for future research are discussed.

  19. Chicoric acid: chemistry, distribution, and production

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungmin; Scagel, Carolyn F.

    2013-01-01

    Though chicoric acid was first identified in 1958, it was largely ignored until recent popular media coverage cited potential health beneficial properties from consuming food and dietary supplements containing this compound. To date, plants from at least 63 genera and species have been found to contain chicoric acid, and while the compound is used as a processing quality indicator, it may also have useful health benefits. This review of chicoric acid summarizes research findings and highlights gaps in research knowledge for investigators, industry stakeholders, and consumers alike. Additionally, chicoric acid identification, and quantification methods, biosynthesis, processing improvements to increase chicoric acid retention, and potential areas for future research are discussed. PMID:24790967

  20. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction..., reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction..., reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction..., reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction..., reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction..., reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific...

  5. EFFECTS OF METHOPRENE, ITS METABOLITES, AND BREAKDOWN PRODUCTS ON RETINOID-ACTIVATED PATHWAYS IN TRANSFECTED CELL LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methoprene is a terpene-based insecticide designed to act as an agonist of insect juvenile hormone, which is essential for the transition from larval to adult forms in some metamorphic insects. Recent evidence suggests that a methoprene metabolite, methoprene acid, activates a ve...

  6. Methods for producing 3-hydroxypropionic acid and other products

    DOEpatents

    Lynch, Michael D.; Gill, Ryan T.; Lipscomb, Tanya E. W.

    2016-07-12

    This invention relates to metabolically engineered microorganism strains, such as bacterial strains, in which there is an increased utilization of malonyl-CoA for production of a chemical product, which includes 3-hydroxypropionic acid.

  7. Protein breakdown in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly adaptive tissue, capable of altering muscle fiber size, functional capacity and metabolism in response to physiological stimuli. However, pathological conditions such as cancer growth compromise the mechanisms that regulate muscle homeostasis, resulting in loss of muscle mass, functional impairment and compromised metabolism. This tumor-induced condition is characterized by enhanced muscle protein breakdown and amino acids release that sustain liver gluconeogenesis and tissue protein synthesis. Proteolysis is controlled by the two most important cellular degradation systems, the ubiquitin proteasome and autophagy lysosome. These systems are carefully regulated by different signalling pathways that determine protein and organelle turnover. In this review we will describe the involvement of the ubiquitin proteasome and autophagy lysosome systems in cancer cachexia and the principal signalling pathways that regulate tumor-induced protein breakdown in muscle. PMID:26564688

  8. Modeling the continuous lactic acid production process from wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Karen; Tebbani, Sihem; Lopes, Filipa; Thorigné, Aurore; Givry, Sébastien; Dumur, Didier; Pareau, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    A kinetic model of the simultaneous saccharification, protein hydrolysis, and fermentation (SSPHF) process for lactic acid production from wheat flour has been developed. The model describes the bacterial growth, substrate consumption, lactic acid production, and maltose hydrolysis. The model was fitted and validated with data from SSPHF experiments obtained under different dilution rates. The results of the model are in good agreement with the experimental data. Steady state concentrations of biomass, lactic acid, glucose, and maltose as function of the dilution rate were predicted by the model. This steady state analysis is further useful to determine the operating conditions that maximize lactic acid productivity. PMID:26399412

  9. Toward biotechnological production of adipic acid and precursors from biorenewables.

    PubMed

    Polen, Tino; Spelberg, Markus; Bott, Michael

    2013-08-20

    Adipic acid is the most important commercial aliphatic dicarboxylic acid in the chemical industry and is primarily used for the production of nylon-6,6 polyamide. The current adipic acid market volume is about 2.6 million tons/y and the average annual demand growth rate forecast to stay at 3-3.5% worldwide. Hitherto, the industrial production of adipic acid is carried out by petroleum-based chemo-catalytic processes from non-renewable fossil fuels. However, in the past years, efforts were made to find alternative routes for adipic acid production from renewable carbon sources by biotechnological processes. Here we review the approaches and the progress made toward bio-based production of adipic acid. PMID:22824738

  10. Biotechnological routes based on lactic acid production from biomass.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid, the most important hydroxycarboxylic acid, is now commercially produced by the fermentation of sugars present in biomass. In addition to its use in the synthesis of biodegradable polymers, lactic acid can be regarded as a feedstock for the green chemistry of the future. Different potentially useful chemicals such as pyruvic acid, acrylic acid, 1,2-propanediol, and lactate ester can be produced from lactic acid via chemical and biotechnological routes. Here, we reviewed the current status of the production of potentially valuable chemicals from lactic acid via biotechnological routes. Although some of the reactions described in this review article are still not applicable at current stage, due to their "greener" properties, biotechnological processes for the production of lactic acid derivatives might replace the chemical routes in the future. PMID:21846500

  11. New uses of bioglycerin: production of arachidonic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Filamentous fungi of the genus Mortierella are known to produce arachidonic acid from glucose and M. alpina is currently used in industrial scale production of arachidonic acid in Japan. In anticipation of a large excess of co-product bioglycerin from the national biodiesel program, we would like ...

  12. Current topics in the biotechnological production of essential amino acids, functional amino acids, and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Satoshi

    2014-04-01

    Amino acids play important roles in both human and animal nutrition and in the maintenance of health. Here, amino acids are classified into three groups: first, essential amino acids, which are essential to nutrition; second, functional amino acids, recently found to be important in the promotion of physiological functions; and third, dipeptides, which are used to resolve problematic features of specific free amino acids, such as their instability or insolubility. This review focusses on recent researches concerning the microbial production of essential amino acids (lysine and methionine), functional amino acids (histidine and ornithine), and a dipeptide (L-alanyl-L-glutamine). PMID:24679256

  13. Effects of acid deposition on agricultural production

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Oden, N.L.; Thode, H.C. Jr.; Coveney, E.A.; Jacobson, J.S.; Rosenthal, R.E.; Evans, L.S.; Lewin, K.F.; Allen, F.L.

    1985-09-01

    A preliminary assessment, both qualitative and quantitative, was carried out on the effects of acid deposition on agriculture. An inventory was made of US crops exposed to different acid deposition levels in 1982. Most crops (valued at more than $50 billion) were exposed to annual average acid deposition levels greater than pH 4.6, but crops worth more than $220 billion were exposed to even lower pH levels. Published results of experiments on crop response to acid deposition have not identified any single crop as being consistently sensitive, and suggest that present levels of acidic precipitation in the US are not significantly affecting growth and yield of crops. Because relatively few experiments appropriate to a quantitative acid deposition assessment have been conducted, the quantitative section is necessarily based on a restricted data set. Corn, potatoes, and soybeans have been studied in experimental environments which simulate agronomic conditions and which have adequate statistical power for yield estimates; only some varieties of soybeans have demonstrated statistically significant sensitivity to acid deposition.

  14. Production of extracellular fatty acid using engineered Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As an alternative for economic biodiesel production, the microbial production of extracellular fatty acid from renewable resources is receiving more concerns recently, since the separation of fatty acid from microorganism cells is normally involved in a series of energy-intensive steps. Many attempts have been made to construct fatty acid producing strains by targeting genes in the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway, while few studies focused on the cultivation process and the mass transfer kinetics. Results In this study, both strain improvements and cultivation process strategies were applied to increase extracellular fatty acid production by engineered Escherichia coli. Our results showed overexpressing ‘TesA and the deletion of fadL in E. coli BL21 (DE3) improved extracellular fatty acid production, while deletion of fadD didn’t strengthen the extracellular fatty acid production for an undetermined mechanism. Moreover, the cultivation process controls contributed greatly to extracellular fatty acid production with respect to titer, cell growth and productivity by adjusting the temperature, adding ampicillin and employing on-line extraction. Under optimal conditions, the E. coli strain (pACY-‘tesA-ΔfadL) produced 4.8 g L−1 extracellular fatty acid, with the specific productivity of 0.02 g h−1 g−1dry cell mass, and the yield of 4.4% on glucose, while the ratios of cell-associated fatty acid versus extracellular fatty acid were kept below 0.5 after 15 h of cultivation. The fatty acids included C12:1, C12:0, C14:1, C14:0, C16:1, C16:0, C18:1, C18:0. The composition was dominated by C14 and C16 saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Using the strain pACY-‘tesA, similar results appeared under the same culture conditions and the titer was also much higher than that ever reported previously, which suggested that the supposedly superior strain did not necessarily perform best for the efficient production of desired product. The strain p

  15. Metabolic engineering of Yarrowia lipolytica for itaconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Blazeck, John; Hill, Andrew; Jamoussi, Mariam; Pan, Anny; Miller, Jarrett; Alper, Hal S

    2015-11-01

    Itaconic acid is a naturally produced organic acid with diverse applications as a replacement for petroleum derived products. However, its industrial viability as a bio-replacement has been restricted due to limitations with native producers. In this light, Yarrowia lipolytica is an excellent potential candidate for itaconic acid production due to its innate capacity to accumulate citric acid cycle intermediates and tolerance to lower pH. Here, we demonstrate the capacity to produce itaconic acid in Y. lipolytica through heterologous expression of the itaconic acid synthesis enzyme, resulting in an initial titer of 33 mg/L. Further optimizations of this strain via metabolic pathway engineering, enzyme localization, and media optimization strategies enabled 4.6g/L of itaconic acid to be produced in bioreactors, representing a 140-fold improvement over initial titer. Moreover, these fermentation conditions did not require additional nutrient supplementation and utilized a low pH condition that enabled the acid form of itaconic acid to be produced. Overall yields (0.058 g/g yield from glucose) and maximum productivity of 0.045 g/L/h still provide areas for future strain improvement. Nevertheless, this work demonstrates that Y. lipolytica has the potential to serve as an industrially relevant platform for itaconic acid production. PMID:26384571

  16. Heterologous production of caffeic acid from tyrosine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, J L; Araújo, R G; Prather, K L J; Kluskens, L D; Rodrigues, L R

    2015-04-01

    Caffeic acid is a plant secondary metabolite and its biological synthesis has attracted increased attention due to its beneficial effects on human health. In this study, Escherichia coli was engineered for the production of caffeic acid using tyrosine as the initial precursor of the pathway. The pathway design included tyrosine ammonia lyase (TAL) from Rhodotorula glutinis to convert tyrosine to p-coumaric acid and 4-coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) from Saccharothrix espanaensis or cytochrome P450 CYP199A2 from Rhodopseudomonas palustris to convert p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid. The genes were codon-optimized and different combinations of plasmids were used to improve the titer of caffeic acid. TAL was able to efficiently convert 3mM of tyrosine to p-coumaric acid with the highest production obtained being 2.62mM (472mg/L). CYP199A2 exhibited higher catalytic activity towards p-coumaric acid than C3H. The highest caffeic acid production obtained using TAL and CYP199A2 and TAL and C3H was 1.56mM (280mg/L) and 1mM (180mg/L), respectively. This is the first study that shows caffeic acid production using CYP199A2 and tyrosine as the initial precursor. This study suggests the possibility of further producing more complex plant secondary metabolites like flavonoids and curcuminoids. PMID:25765308

  17. By-products of electrochemical synthesis of suberic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shirobokova, O.I.; Adamov, A.A.; Freidlin, G.N.; Antonenko, N.S.; Grudtsyn, Yu.D.

    1988-05-10

    By-products of the electrochemical synthesis of dimethyl suberate from glutaric anhydride were studied. This is isolated by thermal dehydration of a mixture of lower dicarboxylic acids that are wastes from the production of adipic acid. To isolate the by-products, they used the methods of vacuum rectification and preparative gas-liquid chromatography, and for their identification, PMR, IR spectroscopy, gas-liquid chromatography, and other known physicochemical methods of investigation.

  18. Cultivation characteristics of immobilized Aspergillus oryzae for kojic acid production.

    PubMed

    Kwak, M Y; Rhee, J S

    1992-04-15

    Aspergillus oryzae in situ grown from spores entrapped in calcium alginate gel beads was used for the production of kojic acid. The immobilized cells in flask cultures produced kojic acid in a linear proportion while maintaining the stable metabolic activity for a prolonged production period. Kojic acid was accumulated up to a high concentration of 83 g/L, at which the kojic acid began to crystallize, and, thus, the culture had to be replaced with fresh media for the next batch culture. The overall productivities of two consecutive cultivations were higher than that of free mycelial fermentation. However, the production rate of kojic acid by the immobilized cells was suddenly decreased with the appearance of central cavernae inside the immobilized gel beads after 12 days of the third batch cultivation. PMID:18601027

  19. Vortex breakdown simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    A vortex breakdown was simulated by the vortex filament method, and detailed figures are presented based on the results. Deformations of the vortex filaments showed clear and large swelling at a particular axial station which implied the presence of a recirculation bubble at that station. The tendency for two breakdowns to occur experimentally was confirmed by the simulation, and the jet flow inside the bubble was well simulated. The particle paths spiralled with expansion, and the streamlines took spiral forms at the breakdown with expansion.

  20. Spillway-induced salmon head injury triggers the generation of brain alphaII-spectrin breakdown product biomarkers similar to mammalian traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Miracle, Ann; Denslow, Nancy D; Kroll, Kevin J; Liu, Ming Cheng; Wang, Kevin K W

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are alphaII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs), which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario. PMID:19214235

  1. Spillway-Induced Salmon Head Injury Triggers the Generation of Brain αII-Spectrin Breakdown Product Biomarkers Similar to Mammalian Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miracle, Ann; Denslow, Nancy D.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Liu, Ming Cheng; Wang, Kevin K. W.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are αII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs), which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario. PMID:19214235

  2. Thermodynamic prediction of hydrogen production from mixed-acid fermentations.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Andrea K; Wales, Melinda E; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-10-01

    The MixAlco™ process biologically converts biomass to carboxylate salts that may be chemically converted to a wide variety of chemicals and fuels. The process utilizes lignocellulosic biomass as feedstock (e.g., municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, and agricultural residues), creating an economic basis for sustainable biofuels. This study provides a thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen yield from mixed-acid fermentations from two feedstocks: paper and bagasse. During batch fermentations, hydrogen production, acid production, and sugar digestion were analyzed to determine the energy selectivity of each system. To predict hydrogen production during continuous operation, this energy selectivity was then applied to countercurrent fermentations of the same systems. The analysis successfully predicted hydrogen production from the paper fermentation to within 11% and the bagasse fermentation to within 21% of the actual production. The analysis was able to faithfully represent hydrogen production and represents a step forward in understanding and predicting hydrogen production from mixed-acid fermentations. PMID:21875794

  3. Gluconic acid production by gad mutant of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dexin; Wang, Chenhong; Wei, Dong; Shi, Jiping; Kim, Chul Ho; Jiang, Biao; Han, Zengsheng; Hao, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae produces many economically important chemicals. Using glucose as a carbon source, the main metabolic product in K. pneumoniae is 2,3-butanediol. Gluconic acid is an intermediate of the glucose oxidation pathway. In the current study, a metabolic engineering strategy was used to develop a gluconic acid-producing K. pneumoniae strain. Deletion of gad, resulting in loss of gluconate dehydrogenase activity, led to the accumulation of gluconic acid in the culture broth. Gluconic acid accumulation by K. pneumoniae Δgad was an acid-dependent aerobic process, with accumulation observed at pH 5.5 or lower, and at higher levels of oxygen supplementation. Under all other conditions tested, 2,3-butanediol was the main metabolic product of the process. In fed batch fermentation, a final concentration of 422 g/L gluconic acid was produced by K. pneumoniae Δgad, and the conversion ratio of glucose to gluconic acid reached 1 g/g. The K. pneumoniae Δgad described in this study is the first genetically modified strain used for gluconic acid production, and this optimized method for gluconic acid production may have important industrial applications. Gluconic acid is an intermediate of this glucose oxidation pathway. Deletion of gad, resulting in loss of gluconate dehydrogenase activity, led to the accumulation of gluconic acid in the culture broth. In fed batch fermentation, a final concentration of 422 g/L gluconic acid was produced by the K. pneumoniae Δgad strain, and the conversion ratio of glucose to gluconic acid reached 1 g/g. PMID:27339313

  4. Recent advances in biological production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Ashok, Somasundar; Park, Sunghoon

    2013-11-01

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) is a valuable platform chemical that can be produced biologically from glucose or glycerol. This review article provides an overview and the current status of microbial 3-HP production. The constraints of microbial 3-HP production and possible solutions are also described. Finally, future prospects of biological 3-HP production are discussed. PMID:23473969

  5. Chicoric acid: chemistry, distribution, and production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though chicoric acid was first identified in 1958, it was largely ignored until recent popular media coverage cited potential health beneficial properties from consuming food and dietary supplements containing this compound. To date, plants from at least 60 genera have been found to contain chicoric...

  6. Kojic Acid Production from Agro-Industrial By-Products Using Fungi

    PubMed Central

    El-Kady, Ismael A.; Zohri, Abdel Naser A.; Hamed, Shimaa R.

    2014-01-01

    A total of 278 different isolates of filamentous fungi were screened using synthetic medium for respective ability to produce kojic acid. Nineteen, six, and five isolates proved to be low, moderate, and high kojic acid producers, respectively. Levels of kojic acid produced were generally increased when shaking cultivation was used rather than those obtained using static cultivation. A trial for the utilization of 15 agro-industrial wastes or by-products for kojic acid production by the five selected higher kojic acid producer isolates was made. The best by-product medium recorded was molasses for kojic acid. A. flavus numbers 7 and 24 were able to grow and produce kojic acid on only 12 out of 15 wastes or by-products media. The best medium used for kojic acid production by A. flavus number 7 was rice fragments followed by molasses, while the best medium used for kojic acid production by A. flavus number 24 was the molasses followed by orange, pea, and rice fragments. An attempt for production of kojic acid using a 1.5 L laboratory fermentor has been made. Aspergillus flavus number 7 was used and grown on molasses medium; maximum level (53.5 g/L) of kojic acid was obtained after eight days of incubation. PMID:24778881

  7. Biohydrogen and carboxylic acids production from wheat straw hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Chandolias, Konstantinos; Pardaev, Sindor; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2016-09-01

    Hydrolyzed wheat straw was converted into carboxylic acids and biohydrogen using digesting bacteria. The fermentations were carried out using both free and membrane-encased thermophilic bacteria (55°C) at various OLRs (4.42-17.95g COD/L.d), in semi-continuous conditions using one or two bioreactors in a series. The highest production of biohydrogen and acetic acid was achieved at an OLR of 4.42g COD/L.d, whilst the highest lactic acid production occurred at an OLR of 9.33g COD/L.d. Furthermore, the bioreactor with both free and membrane-encased cells produced 60% more lactic acid compared to the conventional, free-cell bioreactor. In addition, an increase of 121% and 100% in the production of acetic and isobutyric acid, respectively, was achieved in the 2nd-stage bioreactor compared to the 1st-stage bioreactor. PMID:27268482

  8. Very high gravity ethanol and fatty acid production of Zymomonas mobilis without amino acid and vitamin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoyong; Cao, Shangzhi; Wang, William Tianshuo; Wang, Kaven Tianyv; Jia, Xianhui

    2016-06-01

    Very high gravity (VHG) fermentation is the mainstream technology in ethanol industry, which requires the strains be resistant to multiple stresses such as high glucose concentration, high ethanol concentration, high temperature and harsh acidic conditions. To our knowledge, it was not reported previously that any ethanol-producing microbe showed a high performance in VHG fermentations without amino acid and vitamin. Here we demonstrate the engineering of a xylose utilizing recombinant Zymomonas mobilis for VHG ethanol fermentations. The recombinant strain can produce ethanol up to 136 g/L without amino acid and vitamin with a theoretical yield of 90 %, which is significantly superior to that produced by all the reported ethanol-producing strains. The intracellular fatty acids of the bacterial were about 16 % of the bacterial dry biomass, with the ratio of ethanol:fatty acids was about 273:1 (g/g). The recombinant strain was achieved by a multivariate-modular strategy tackles with the multiple stresses which are closely linked to the ethanol productivity of Z. mobilis. The over-expression of metB/yfdZ operon enabled the growth of the recombinant Z. mobilis in a chemically defined medium without amino acid and vitamin; and the fatty acids overproduction significantly increased ethanol tolerance and ethanol production. The coupled production of ethanol with fatty acids of the Z. mobilis without amino acid and vitamin under VHG fermentation conditions may permit a significant reduction of the production cost of ethanol and microbial fatty acids. PMID:27033536

  9. Acid-catalyzed reactions of hexanal on sulfuric acid particles: Identification of reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Rebecca M.; Elrod, Matthew J.; Kincaid, Kristi; Beaver, Melinda R.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    While it is well established that organics compose a large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol mass, the mechanisms through which organics are incorporated into atmospheric aerosols are not well understood. Acid-catalyzed reactions of compounds with carbonyl groups have recently been suggested as important pathways for transfer of volatile organics into acidic aerosols. In the present study, we use the aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to probe the uptake of gas-phase hexanal into ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols. While both deliquesced and dry non-acidic ammonium sulfate aerosols showed no organic uptake, the acidic aerosols took up substantial amounts of organic material when exposed to hexanal vapor. Further, we used 1H-NMR, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and GC-MS to identify the products of the acid-catalyzed reaction of hexanal in acidic aerosols. Both aldol condensation and hemiacetal products were identified, with the dominant reaction products dependent upon the initial acid concentration of the aerosol. The aldol condensation product was formed only at initial concentrations of 75-96 wt% sulfuric acid in water. The hemiacetal was produced at all sulfuric acid concentrations studied, 30-96 wt% sulfuric acid in water. Aerosols up to 88.4 wt% organic/11.1 wt% H 2SO 4/0.5 wt% water were produced via these two dimerization reaction pathways. The UV-VIS spectrum of the isolated aldol condensation product, 2-butyl 2-octenal, extends into the visible region, suggesting these reactions may impact aerosol optical properties as well as aerosol composition. In contrast to previous suggestions, no polymerization of hexanal or its products was observed at any sulfuric acid concentration studied, from 30 to 96 wt% in water.

  10. Biotechnological production of muconic acid: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Xie, Neng-Zhong; Liang, Hong; Huang, Ri-Bo; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Muconic acid (MA), a high value-added bio-product with reactive dicarboxylic groups and conjugated double bonds, has garnered increasing interest owing to its potential applications in the manufacture of new functional resins, bio-plastics, food additives, agrochemicals, and pharmaceuticals. At the very least, MA can be used to produce commercially important bulk chemicals such as adipic acid, terephthalic acid and trimellitic acid. Recently, great progress has been made in the development of biotechnological routes for MA production. This present review provides a comprehensive and systematic overview of recent advances and challenges in biotechnological production of MA. Various biological methods are summarized and compared, and their constraints and possible solutions are also described. Finally, the future prospects are discussed with respect to the current state, challenges, and trends in this field, and the guidelines to develop high-performance microbial cell factories are also proposed for the MA production by systems metabolic engineering. PMID:24751381

  11. Genetic Engineering of Rhizopus for Enhancing Lactic Acid Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Rhizopus is frequently used to convert, or ferment sugars obtained from agricultural crops to lactic acid. This natural product has long been utilized by the food industry as an additive for preservation, flavor, and acidity. Additionally, it is used for the manufacture of environmental...

  12. Enhanced Production of Carboxylic Acids by Engineering of Rhizopus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Rhizopus is frequently used to convert, or ferment sugars obtained from agricultural crops to lactic acid. This natural product has long been utilized by the food industry as an additive for preservation, flavor, and acidity. Additionally, it is used for the manufacture of environmental...

  13. Increase of betulinic acid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by balancing fatty acids and betulinic acid forming pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Yansheng

    2014-04-01

    Betulinic acid is a plant-based triterpenoid that has been recognized for its antitumor and anti-HIV activities. The level of betulinic acid in its natural hosts is extremely low. In the present study, we constructed betulinic acid biosynthetic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by metabolic engineering. Given the betulinic acid forming pathways sharing the common substrate acetyl-CoA with fatty acid synthesis, the metabolic fluxes between the two pathways were varied by changing gene expressions, and their effects on betulinic acid production were investigated. We constructed nine S. cerevisiae strains representing nine combinations of the flux distributions between betulinic acid and fatty acid pathways. Our results demonstrated that it was possible to improve the betulinic acid production in S. cerevisiae while keeping a desirable growth phenotype by optimally balancing the carbon fluxes of the two pathways. Through modulating the expressions of the key genes on betulinic acid and fatty acid pathways, the difference in betulinic acid yield varied largely in the range of 0.01-1.92 mg L(-1) OD(-1). The metabolic engineering approach used in this study could be extended for synthesizing other triterpenoids in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24389702

  14. Production of Value-added Products by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a group of facultative anaerobic, catalase negative, nonmotile and nonsporeforming–Gram positive bacteria. Most LAB utilize high energy C sources including monomer sugars to produce energy to maintain cellular structure and function. This anaerobic fermentation proce...

  15. Metabolic engineering of biocatalysts for carboxylic acids production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Jarboe, Laura R.

    2012-01-01

    Fermentation of renewable feedstocks by microbes to produce sustainable fuels and chemicals has the potential to replace petrochemical-based production. For example, carboxylic acids produced by microbial fermentation can be used to generate primary building blocks of industrial chemicals by either enzymatic or chemical catalysis. In order to achieve the titer, yield and productivity values required for economically viable processes, the carboxylic acid-producing microbes need to be robust and well-performing. Traditional strain development methods based on mutagenesis have proven useful in the selection of desirable microbial behavior, such as robustness and carboxylic acid production. On the other hand, rationally-based metabolic engineering, like genetic manipulation for pathway design, has becoming increasingly important to this field and has been used for the production of several organic acids, such as succinic acid, malic acid and lactic acid. This review investigates recent works on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli, as well as the strategies to improve tolerance towards these chemicals. PMID:24688671

  16. A Comparative Overview of Prescription Omega-3 Fatty Acid Products

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 25% of adults in the United States have elevated triglyceride (TG) levels. This is of particular concern given the evidence for a causal role of TG in the pathway of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Approved prescription omega-3 fatty acid products (RxOM3FAs) contain the long-chain fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and/or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and are effective options for the treatment of high TG levels. RxOM3FAs that contain both EPA and DHA include omega-3-acid ethyl esters (ethyl esters of EPA and DHA; brand and generic products) and omega-3-carboxylic acids (free fatty acids primarily composed of EPA and DHA), while the RxOM3FA icosapent ethyl (the ethyl ester of EPA) contains EPA only. All RxOM3FA products produce substantial TG reduction and other beneficial effects on atherogenic lipid and inflammation-related parameters, blood pressure, and heart rate variability, but products that contain DHA may raise low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C). This commentary provides an overview of hypertriglyceridemia while summarizing the pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of prescription RxOM3FAs. PMID:26681905

  17. Lactic acid production by Enteroccocus faecium in liquefied sago starch

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium No. 78 (PNCM-BIOTECH 10375) isolated from puto, a type of fermented rice in the Philippines was used to produce lactic acid in repeated batch fermentation mode. Enzymatically liquefied sago starch was used as the sole carbon source, since sago (Metroxylon spp) is a sustainable crop for industrial exploitation. Liquefied sago starch was inoculated with E. faecium to perform the saccharification and fermentation processes simultaneously. Results demonstrated that E. faecium was reused for 11 fermentation cycles with an average lactic acid yield of 36.3 ± 4.71 g/l. The lactic acid production was superior to that of simple batch mode and continuous fermentation in terms of lactic acid concentration. An un-dissociated lactic acid concentration of 1.15 mM affected the productivity of the cells. Work is in progress to maintain and increase the usability of the cells over higher fermentation cycles. PMID:23021076

  18. Production of Gluconic Acid by Some Local Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Shindia, A. A.; El-Esawy, A. E.; Sheriff, Y. M. M. M.

    2006-01-01

    Forty-one fungal species belonging to 15 fungal genera isolated from Egyptian soil and sugar cane waste samples were tested for their capacity of producing acidity and gluconic acid. For the tests, the fungi were grown on glucose substrate and culture filtrates were examined using paper chromatography analysis. Most of the tested fungi have a relative wide potentiality for total acid production in their filtrates. Nearly 51% of them showed their ability of producing gluconic acid. Aspergillus niger was distinguishable from other species by its capacity to produce substantial amounts of gluconic acid when it was cultivated on a selective medium. The optimized cultural conditions for gluconic acid yields were using submerged culture at 30℃ at initial pH 6.0 for 7 days of incubation. Among the various concentrations of substrate used, glucose (14%, w/v) was found to be the most suitable carbon source for maximal gluconic acid during fermentation. Maximum values of fungal biomass (10.02 g/l) and gluconic acid (58.46 g/l) were obtained when the fungus was grown with 1% peptone as sole nitrogen source. Influence of the concentration of some inorganic salts as well as the rate of aeration on the gluconic acid and biomass production is also described. PMID:24039465

  19. Aluminum: A neurotoxic product of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.B.

    1994-07-01

    Two separate but converging concerns have resulted in an upsurge in research on aluminum ion in the past 15 years. Acid rain releases Al(III) from soils into fresh waters, where it is for the first time accessible to living organisms. Though long considered benign, Al(III) has recently been found to cause bone and neurological disorders, while its role in Alzheimer`s disease remains uncertain. The greater availability of Al(III), coupled with its demonstrated harmful effects, challenges chemists to describe its chemistry and biochemistry. Many interactions of Al(III) have been described, but several questions remain unsolved. A great deal of work not within the scope of this Account is described in several edited volumes. (This Account uses Al(III) as a generic term for the 3+ ion when a specific form is not indicated). 96 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Biotechnology For hydroxy Fatty Acid Production in Oilseed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional source of hydroxyl fatty acid is from castor oil which contains 90% ricinoleate. Ricinoleate and its derivatives are used as raw materials for numerous industrial products, such as lubricants, plasticizers and bio-diesel. However, the production of castor oil is hampered by the presen...

  1. Membrane recovery of phenolic acid co-products from biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The technology to convert lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels is progressing with parallel efforts to develop processes to recover valuable natural products and generate additional revenue from these associated co-products. The lignified components of plant tissues contain phenolic acid structures s...

  2. Production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid from acrylic acid by newly isolated rhodococcus erythropolis LG12.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Park, Si Jae; Park, Oh-Jin; Cho, Junhyeong; Rhee, Joo Won

    2009-05-01

    A novel microorganism, designated as LG12, was isolated from soil based on its ability to use acrylic acid as the sole carbon source. An electron microscopic analysis of its morphological characteristics and phylogenetic classification by 16S rRNA homology showed that the LG12 strain belongs to Rhodococcus erythropolis. R. erythropolis LG12 was able to metabolize a high concentration of acrylic acid (up to 40 g/l). In addition, R. erythropolis LG12 exhibited the highest acrylic acid-degrading activity among the tested microorganisms, including R. rhodochrous, R. equi, R. rubber, Candida rugosa, and Bacillus cereus. The effect of the culture conditions of R. erythropolis LG12 on the production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) from acrylic acid was also examined. To enhance the production of 3HP, acrylic acid-assimilating activity was induced by adding 1 mM acrylic acid to the culture medium when the cell density reached an OD600 of 5. Further cultivation of R. erythropolis LG12 with 40 g/l of acrylic acid resulted in the production of 17.5 g/l of 3HP with a molar conversion yield of 44% and productivity of 0.22 g/I/h at 30 degrees after 72 h. PMID:19494695

  3. ACID RECYCLING TO OPTIMIZE CITRIC ACID-MODIFIED SOYBEAN HULL PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were 1) to develop a wash procedure to remove non-reacted or residual citric acid after soybean hull modification in order to maximize the amount of non- reacted acid removed but minimize the subsequent effect on the product's ability to adsorb copper ion (Cu2+) and 2) t...

  4. Comparison of D-gluconic acid production in selected strains of acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sainz, F; Navarro, D; Mateo, E; Torija, M J; Mas, A

    2016-04-01

    The oxidative metabolism of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) can be exploited for the production of several compounds, including D-gluconic acid. The production of D-gluconic acid in fermented beverages could be useful for the development of new products without glucose. In the present study, we analyzed nineteen strains belonging to eight different species of AAB to select those that could produce D-gluconic acid from D-glucose without consuming D-fructose. We tested their performance in three different media and analyzed the changes in the levels of D-glucose, D-fructose, D-gluconic acid and the derived gluconates. D-Glucose and D-fructose consumption and D-gluconic acid production were heavily dependent on the strain and the media. The most suitable strains for our purpose were Gluconobacter japonicus CECT 8443 and Gluconobacter oxydans Po5. The strawberry isolate Acetobacter malorum (CECT 7749) also produced D-gluconic acid; however, it further oxidized D-gluconic acid to keto-D-gluconates. PMID:26848948

  5. Modulation of interleukin production by ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Schwager, J; Schulze, J

    1998-06-30

    We studied the influence of ascorbate (vitamin C) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of pigs with hereditary deficiency in ascorbate synthesis. Groups of animals were depleted of, or supplemented with dietary ascorbate for up to 5 weeks. B lymphocytes and T lymphocyte subsets differed in the two experimental groups only marginally and transiently as determined by analysis of cell surface markers. The proliferative response of PBMC to B and T lymphocyte mitogens was lower in depleted as compared to supplemented animals. Interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-6 were determined by bioassays and were secreted within few hours after mitogenic activation of PBMC which contained normal physiological concentrations of ascorbate. IL-2 production peaked at about 24 h of in vitro culture after Con A activation, but it lasted for 2-3 days after PWM activation. The production of IL-2 and IL-6 were compared during systemic depletion and supplementation with ascorbate. Depleted PBMC produced IL-2 which accumulated in cultures instead of being rapidly consumed by IL-2 dependent cell growth. This suggests that cellular ascorbate influences the production of IL-2. Secretion of IL-6 by mitogen activated PBMC was also affected by prolonged dietary ascorbate depletion. The results suggest that ascorbate levels exert an early effect on immune homeostasis via reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI)-dependent expression of interleukin genes, since the transcription factor NF-kappa B is sensitive to ROI and regulates the expression of interleukin genes. PMID:9656430

  6. Biogas Production on Demand Regulated by Butyric Acid Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, K.; Schiffels, J.; Krafft, S.; Kuperjans, I.; Elbers, G.; Selmer, T.

    2016-03-01

    Investigating effects of volatile fatty acids on the biogas process it was observed that butyric acid can be used for transient stimulation of the methane production in biogas plants operating with low energy substrates like cattle manure. Upon addition of butyrate the methane output of the reactors doubled within 24 h and reached almost 3-times higher methane yields within 3-4 days. Butyrate was quantitatively eliminated and the reactors returned to the original productivity state within 3 days when application of butyrate was stopped. The opportunity to use butyrate feeding for increased biogas production on demand is discussed.

  7. Production and applications of rosmarinic acid and structurally related compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Dong; Park, Yong Seek; Jin, Young-Ho; Park, Cheung-Seog

    2015-03-01

    Rosmarinic acid (α-o-caffeoyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyllactic acid; RA) is a naturally occurring hydroxylated compound commonly found in species of the subfamily Nepetoideae of the Lamiaceae and Boraginaceae, such as Rosmarinus officinalis, Salvia officinalis, and Perilla frutescens. RA is biosynthesized from the amino acids L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine by eight enzymes that include phenylalanine ammonia lyase and cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase. RA can also be chemically produced by the esterification of caffeic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenyllactic acid. RA and its numerous derivatives containing one or two RA with other aromatic moieties are well known and include lithospermic acid, yunnaneic acid, salvianolic acid, and melitric acid. Recently, RA and its derivatives have attracted interest for their biological activities, which include anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-angiogenic, anti-tumor, and anti-microbial functions. Clinically, RA attenuates T cell receptor-mediated signaling, attenuates allergic diseases like allergic rhinitis and asthma, and 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like symptoms, protects from neurotoxicity, and slows the development of Alzheimer's disease. These attributes have increased the demand for the biotechnological production and application of RA and its derivatives. The present review discusses the function and application of RA and its derivatives including the molecular mechanisms underlying clinical efficacy. PMID:25620368

  8. Orthogonal Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Pathway Improves Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Dawn T; HamediRad, Mohammad; Yuan, Yongbo; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-07-17

    Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) are a form of biodiesel that can be microbially produced via a transesterification reaction of fatty acids with ethanol. The titer of microbially produced FAEEs can be greatly reduced by unbalanced metabolism and an insufficient supply of fatty acids, resulting in a commercially inviable process. Here, we report on a pathway engineering strategy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhancing the titer of microbially produced FAEEs by providing the cells with an orthogonal route for fatty acid synthesis. The fatty acids generated from this heterologous pathway would supply the FAEE production, safeguarding endogenous fatty acids for cellular metabolism and growth. We investigated the heterologous expression of a Type-I fatty acid synthase (FAS) from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes coupled with WS/DGAT, the wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme that catalyzes the transesterification reaction with ethanol. Strains harboring the orthologous fatty acid synthesis yielded a 6.3-fold increase in FAEE titer compared to strains without the heterologous FAS. Variations in fatty acid chain length and degree of saturation can affect the quality of the biodiesel; therefore, we also investigated the diversity of the fatty acid production profile of FAS enzymes from other Actinomyces organisms. PMID:25594225

  9. Economical succinic acid production from cane molasses by Actinobacillus succinogenes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Peng; Zheng, Pu; Sun, Zhi-Hao; Ni, Ye; Dong, Jin-Jun; Zhu, Lei-Lei

    2008-04-01

    In this work, production of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes CGMCC1593 using cane molasses as a low cost carbon source was developed. In anaerobic bottles fermentation, succinic acid concentration of 50.6+/-0.9 g l(-1) was attained at 60 h using an optimum medium containing molasses pretreated with sulfuric acid, resulting in a succinic acid yield of 79.5+/-1.1% and sugar utilization of 97.1+/-0.6%. When batch fermentation was carried out in a 5-l stirred bioreactor with pretreated molasses, 46.4 g l(-1) of succinic acid was attained at 48 h and faster cells growth was also observed. Fed batch fermentation was performed to minimize the substrate (sugar) inhibition effect, giving 55.2 g l(-1) of succinic acid and 1.15 g l(-1)h(-1) of productivity at 48 h. The present study suggests that the inexpensive cane molasses could be utilized for the economical and efficient production of succinic acid by A. succinogenes. PMID:17532626

  10. Updates on industrial production of amino acids using Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Wendisch, Volker F; Jorge, João M P; Pérez-García, Fernando; Sgobba, Elvira

    2016-06-01

    L-Amino acids find various applications in biotechnology. L-Glutamic acid and its salts are used as flavor enhancers. Other L-amino acids are used as food or feed additives, in parenteral nutrition or as building blocks for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. L-amino acids are synthesized from precursors of central carbon metabolism. Based on the knowledge of the biochemical pathways microbial fermentation processes of food, feed and pharma amino acids have been developed. Production strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum, which has been used safely for more than 50 years in food biotechnology, and Escherichia coli are constantly improved using metabolic engineering approaches. Research towards new processes is ongoing. Fermentative production of L-amino acids in the million-ton-scale has shaped modern biotechnology and its markets continue to grow steadily. This review focusses on recent achievements in strain development for amino acid production including the use of CRISPRi/dCas9, genome-reduced strains, biosensors and synthetic pathways to enable utilization of alternative carbon sources. PMID:27116971

  11. Analysis of Laser Breakdown Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Roger

    2009-03-01

    Experiments on laser breakdown for ns pulses of 532 nm or 1064 nm light in water and dozens of simple hydrocarbon liquids are analyzed and compared to widely-used models and other laser breakdown experiments reported in the literature. Particular attention is given to the curve for the probability of breakdown as a function of the laser fluence at the beam focus. Criticism is made of the na"ive forms of both ``avalanche'' breakdown and multi-photon breakdown. It appears that the process is complex and is intimately tied to the chemical group of the material. Difficulties with developing an accurate model of laser breakdown in liquids are outlined.

  12. Utilization of by-products derived from bioethanol production process for cost-effective production of lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Moon, Se-Kwon; Wee, Young-Jung; Choi, Gi-Wook

    2014-10-01

    The by-products of bioethanol production such as thin stillage (TS) and condensed distillers solubles (CDS) were used as a potential nitrogen source for economical production of lactic acid. The effect of those by-products and their concentrations on lactic acid fermentation were investigated using Lactobacillus paracasei CHB2121. Approximately, 6.7 g/L of yeast extract at a carbon source to nitrogen source ratio of 15 was required to produce 90 g/L of lactic acid in the medium containing 100 g/L of glucose. Batch fermentation of TS medium resulted in 90 g/L of lactic acid after 48 h, and the medium containing 10 % CDS resulted in 95 g/L of lactic acid after 44 h. Therefore, TS and CDS could be considered as potential alternative fermentation medium for the economical production of lactic acid. Furthermore, lactic acid fermentation was performed using only cassava and CDS for commercial production of lactic acid. The volumetric productivity of lactic acid [2.94 g/(L·h)] was 37 % higher than the productivity obtained from the medium with glucose and CDS. PMID:25163666

  13. Fatty acid composition of Swedish bakery products, with emphasis on trans-fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Trattner, Sofia; Becker, Wulf; Wretling, Sören; Öhrvik, Veronica; Mattisson, Irene

    2015-05-15

    Trans-fatty acids (TFA) have been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease, by affecting blood lipids and inflammation factors. Current nutrition recommendations emphasise a limitation of dietary TFA intake. The aim of this study was to investigate fatty acid composition in sweet bakery products, with emphasis on TFA, on the Swedish market and compare fatty acid composition over time. Products were sampled in 2001, 2006 and 2007 and analysed for fatty acid composition by using GC. Mean TFA levels were 0.7% in 2007 and 5.9% in 2001 of total fatty acids. In 1995-97, mean TFA level was 14.3%. In 2007, 3 of 41 products had TFA levels above 2% of total fatty acids. TFA content had decreased in this product category, while the proportion of saturated (SFA) and polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids had increased, mostly through increased levels of 16:0 and 18:2 n-6, respectively. The total fat content remained largely unchanged. PMID:25577101

  14. Phenoloxidase production and vanillic acid metabolism by Zygomycetes.

    PubMed

    Seigle-Murandi, F; Guiraud, P; Steiman, R; Benoit-Guyod, J L

    1992-04-01

    The ability of 23 strains of Zygomycetes to produce extracellular phenoloxidases was examined on solid media by using 10 different reagents. The results varied depending on the reagent and indicated that most of the strains were devoid of phenoloxidase activity. The production of inducible phenoloxidases was demonstrated by the Bavendamm reaction. The study of the biotransformation of vanillic acid in synthetic medium indicated that the reaction most often obtained was the reduction of vanillic acid to vanillyl alcohol. Helicostylum piriforme and Rhizopus microsporus var. chinensis completely metabolized vanillic acid while good transformation was obtained with Absidia spinosa, Cunninghamella bainieri, Mucor bacilliformis, Mucor plumbeus, Rhizopus arrhizus, Rhizopus stolonifer, Syncephalastrum racemosum and Zygorhynchus moelleri. Other strains did not degrade or poorly degraded vanillic acid. Decarboxylation and demethoxylation of this compound was independent of the production of phenoloxidases as in the case of white-rot fungi. Other enzymatic systems might be implicated in this phenomenon. PMID:1602986

  15. Materials and methods for efficient lactic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Shengde; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.; Yomano, Lorraine; Grabar, Tammy B.; Moore, Jonathan C.

    2009-12-08

    The present invention provides derivatives of ethanologenic Escherichia coli K011 constructed for the production of lactic acid. The transformed E. coli of the invention are prepared by deleting the genes that encode competing pathways followed by a growth-based selection for mutants with improved performance. These transformed E. coli are useful for providing an increased supply of lactic acid for use in food and industrial applications.

  16. Materials and methods for efficient lactic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shengde; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Yomano, Lorraine; Grabar, Tammy B; Moore, Jonathan C

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides derivatives of Escherichia coli constructed for the production of lactic acid. The transformed E. coli of the invention are prepared by deleting the genes that encode competing pathways followed by a growth-based selection for mutants with improved performance. These transformed E. coli are useful for providing an increased supply of lactic acid for use in food and industrial applications.

  17. Engineered Production of Short Chain Fatty Acid in Escherichia coli Using Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Kamran; Mattam, Anu Jose; Fatma, Zia; Wajid, Saima; Abdin, Malik Z.; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyric acid, have a broad range of applications in chemical and fuel industries. Worldwide demand of sustainable fuels and chemicals has encouraged researchers for microbial synthesis of SCFAs. In this study we compared three thioesterases, i.e., TesAT from Anaerococcus tetradius, TesBF from Bryantella formatexigens and TesBT from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, for production of SCFAs in Escherichia coli utilizing native fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway and modulated the genetic and bioprocess parameters to improve its yield and productivity. E. coli strain expressing tesBT gene yielded maximum butyric acid titer at 1.46 g L-1, followed by tesBF at 0.85 g L-1 and tesAT at 0.12 g L-1. The titer of butyric acid varied significantly depending upon the plasmid copy number and strain genotype. The modulation of genetic factors that are known to influence long chain fatty acid production, such as deletion of the fadD and fadE that initiates the fatty acid degradation cycle and overexpression of fadR that is a global transcriptional activator of fatty acid biosynthesis and repressor of degradation cycle, did not improve the butyric acid titer significantly. Use of chemical inhibitor cerulenin, which restricts the fatty acid elongation cycle, increased the butyric acid titer by 1.7-fold in case of TesBF, while it had adverse impact in case of TesBT. In vitro enzyme assay indicated that cerulenin also inhibited short chain specific thioesterase, though inhibitory concentration varied according to the type of thioesterase used. Further process optimization followed by fed-batch cultivation under phosphorous limited condition led to production of 14.3 g L-1 butyric acid and 17.5 g L-1 total free fatty acid at 28% of theoretical yield. This study expands our understanding of SCFAs production in E. coli through FASII pathway and highlights role of genetic and process optimization to enhance the desired product. PMID:27466817

  18. Engineered Production of Short Chain Fatty Acid in Escherichia coli Using Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Kamran; Mattam, Anu Jose; Fatma, Zia; Wajid, Saima; Abdin, Malik Z; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyric acid, have a broad range of applications in chemical and fuel industries. Worldwide demand of sustainable fuels and chemicals has encouraged researchers for microbial synthesis of SCFAs. In this study we compared three thioesterases, i.e., TesAT from Anaerococcus tetradius, TesBF from Bryantella formatexigens and TesBT from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, for production of SCFAs in Escherichia coli utilizing native fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway and modulated the genetic and bioprocess parameters to improve its yield and productivity. E. coli strain expressing tesBT gene yielded maximum butyric acid titer at 1.46 g L-1, followed by tesBF at 0.85 g L-1 and tesAT at 0.12 g L-1. The titer of butyric acid varied significantly depending upon the plasmid copy number and strain genotype. The modulation of genetic factors that are known to influence long chain fatty acid production, such as deletion of the fadD and fadE that initiates the fatty acid degradation cycle and overexpression of fadR that is a global transcriptional activator of fatty acid biosynthesis and repressor of degradation cycle, did not improve the butyric acid titer significantly. Use of chemical inhibitor cerulenin, which restricts the fatty acid elongation cycle, increased the butyric acid titer by 1.7-fold in case of TesBF, while it had adverse impact in case of TesBT. In vitro enzyme assay indicated that cerulenin also inhibited short chain specific thioesterase, though inhibitory concentration varied according to the type of thioesterase used. Further process optimization followed by fed-batch cultivation under phosphorous limited condition led to production of 14.3 g L-1 butyric acid and 17.5 g L-1 total free fatty acid at 28% of theoretical yield. This study expands our understanding of SCFAs production in E. coli through FASII pathway and highlights role of genetic and process optimization to enhance the desired product. PMID:27466817

  19. New yeast-based approaches in production of palmitoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Kolouchová, Irena; Sigler, Karel; Schreiberová, Olga; Masák, Jan; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2015-09-01

    Palmitoleic acid is found in certain dairy products and has broad applications in medicine and cosmetics. We tried to find a suitable producer of this acid among traditional biotechnological yeast species (Kluyveromyces polysporus, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Saccharomyces cerevisiae) characterized by high biomass yield and Candida krusei, Yarrowia lipolytica and Trichosporon cutaneum accumulating large amounts of lipids. The main factor affecting the content of palmitoleic acid was found to be the C/N ratio in the culture medium, with ammonium sulfate as an optimum nitrogen source leading to highest biomass yield with concomitantly increased lipid accumulation, and an increased content of ω6-linoleic acid, the precursor of prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and thromboxanes. We found that C. krusei can be conveniently used for the purpose, albeit only under certain cultivation conditions, whereas S. cerevisiae can produce high and stable amounts of palmitoleic acid in a broad range of cultivation conditions ranging from conventional to nutrient limitations. PMID:26101962

  20. Beauty in the Breakdown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisco, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Most human beings look at erosion as the destruction of a surface, but artists can see that erosion often creates indefinable beauty. Where do you see beauty in the breakdown? In this article, the author presents an innovative lesson that would allow students to observe both human and physical nature. In this activity students will create a work…

  1. Measuring Breakdown Voltage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auer, Herbert J.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses an aspect of conductivity, one of the electrical properties subdivisions, and describes a tester that can be shop-built. Breakdown voltage of an insulation material is specifically examined. Test procedures, parts lists, diagrams, and test data form are included. (MF)

  2. Recent advances in production of succinic acid from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Junaid; Idris, Ani; Abd Aziz, Ramlan

    2014-02-01

    Production of succinic acid via separate enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) are alternatives and are environmentally friendly processes. These processes have attained considerable positions in the industry with their own share of challenges and problems. The high-value succinic acid is extensively used in chemical, food, pharmaceutical, leather and textile industries and can be efficiently produced via several methods. Previously, succinic acid production via chemical synthesis from petrochemical or refined sugar has been the focus of interest of most reviewers. However, these expensive substrates have been recently replaced by alternative sustainable raw materials such as lignocellulosic biomass, which is cheap and abundantly available. Thus, this review focuses on succinic acid production utilizing lignocellulosic material as a potential substrate for SSF and SHF. SSF is an economical single-step process which can be a substitute for SHF - a two-step process where biomass is hydrolyzed in the first step and fermented in the second step. SSF of lignocellulosic biomass under optimum temperature and pH conditions results in the controlled release of sugar and simultaneous conversion into succinic acid by specific microorganisms, reducing reaction time and costs and increasing productivity. In addition, main process parameters which influence SHF and SSF processes such as batch and fed-batch fermentation conditions using different microbial strains are discussed in detail. PMID:24292125

  3. 2012: no trans fatty acids in Spanish bakery products.

    PubMed

    Ansorena, Diana; Echarte, Andrea; Ollé, Rebeca; Astiasarán, Iciar

    2013-05-01

    Trans fatty acids (TFA) are strongly correlated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and other chronic diseases. Current dietary recommendations exclude bakery products from frequent consumption basically due to their traditionally high content of TFA. The aim of this work was to analyse the lipid profile of different bakery products currently commercialised in Spain and with a conventionally high fat and TFA content. Premium and store brands for each product were included in the study. No significant amounts of TFA were found in any of the analysed products, regardless the brand. TFA content ranged between 0.17 g and 0.22 g/100 g product (mean=0.19 g/100 g product). Expressed on percentage of fatty acids, the maximum value was 0.87 g/100 g fatty acids and the mean value was 0.68%. These data are significantly lower than those observed in previously published papers for these types of products, and highlighted the importance of updating food composition databases in order to accurately estimate the real and current intake of TFA. PMID:23265507

  4. Bio-based production of organic acids with Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Wieschalka, Stefan; Blombach, Bastian; Bott, Michael; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2013-03-01

    The shortage of oil resources, the steadily rising oil prices and the impact of its use on the environment evokes an increasing political, industrial and technical interest for development of safe and efficient processes for the production of chemicals from renewable biomass. Thus, microbial fermentation of renewable feedstocks found its way in white biotechnology, complementing more and more traditional crude oil-based chemical processes. Rational strain design of appropriate microorganisms has become possible due to steadily increasing knowledge on metabolism and pathway regulation of industrially relevant organisms and, aside from process engineering and optimization, has an outstanding impact on improving the performance of such hosts. Corynebacterium glutamicum is well known as workhorse for the industrial production of numerous amino acids. However, recent studies also explored the usefulness of this organism for the production of several organic acids and great efforts have been made for improvement of the performance. This review summarizes the current knowledge and recent achievements on metabolic engineering approaches to tailor C. glutamicum for the bio-based production of organic acids. We focus here on the fermentative production of pyruvate, L- and D-lactate, 2-ketoisovalerate, 2-ketoglutarate, and succinate. These organic acids represent a class of compounds with manifold application ranges, e.g. in pharmaceutical and cosmetics industry, as food additives, and economically very interesting, as precursors for a variety of bulk chemicals and commercially important polymers. PMID:23199277

  5. Evolution for exogenous octanoic acid tolerance improves carboxylic acid production and membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Royce, Liam A; Yoon, Jong Moon; Chen, Yingxi; Rickenbach, Emily; Shanks, Jacqueline V; Jarboe, Laura R

    2015-05-01

    Carboxylic acids are an attractive biorenewable chemical, but as with many biorenewables, their toxicity to microbial biocatalysts limits their fermentative production. While it is generally accepted that membrane damage is the main mechanism of fatty acid toxicity, previous metabolic engineering efforts that increased membrane integrity did not enable increased carboxylic acid production. Here we used an evolutionary approach to improve tolerance to exogenous octanoic acid, with the goal of learning design strategies from this evolved strain. This evolution of an Escherichia coli MG1655 derivative at neutral pH in minimal media produced a strain with increased tolerance not only to octanoic acid, but also to hexanoic acid, decanoic acid, n-butanol and isobutanol. This evolved strain also produced carboxylic acids at a 5-fold higher titer than its parent strain when expressing the Anaerococcus tetradius thioesterase. While it has been previously suggested that intracellular acidification may contribute to carboxylic acid toxicity, we saw no evidence that the evolved strain has increased resistance to this acidification. Characterization of the evolved strain membrane showed that it had significantly altered membrane polarization (fluidity), integrity (leakage) and composition relative to its parent. The changes in membrane composition included a significant increase in average lipid length in a variety of growth conditions, including 30°C, 42°C, carboxylic acid challenge and ethanol challenge. The evolved strain has a more dynamic membrane composition, showing both a larger number of significant changes and larger fold changes in the relative abundance of membrane lipids. These results highlight the importance of the cell membrane in increasing microbial tolerance and production of biorenewable fuels and chemicals. PMID:25839166

  6. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  7. Catabolism of circulating enzymes: plasma clearance, endocytosis, and breakdown of lactate dehydrogenase-1 in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Smit, M J; Beekhuis, H; Duursma, A M; Bouma, J M; Gruber, M

    1988-12-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase-1 (EC 1.1.1.27), intravenously injected into rabbits, was cleared with first-order kinetics (half-life 27 min), until at least 80% of the injected activity had disappeared from plasma. Radioactivity from injected 125I-labeled enzyme disappeared at this same rate. Trichloroacetic-acid-soluble breakdown products started to appear in the circulation shortly after injection of the labeled enzyme. Body scans of the rabbits for 80 min after injection of 131I-labeled enzyme revealed rapid accumulation of label in the liver, peaking 10-20 min after injection. Subsequently, activity in the liver declined and radioactivity (probably labeled breakdown products of low molecular mass) steadily accumulated in the bladder. Tissue fractionation of liver, 19 min after injection of labeled enzyme, indicated that the radioactivity was present both in endosomes and in lysosomes, suggesting uptake by endocytosis, followed by breakdown in the lysosomes. Measurements of radioactivity in liver and plasma suggest that the liver is responsible for the breakdown of at least 75% of the injected enzyme. Radioautography of tissue sections of liver and spleen showed accumulated radioactivity in sinusoidal liver cells and red pulpa, respectively. These results are very similar to those for lactate dehydrogenase-5, creatine kinase MM, and several other enzymes that we have previously studied in rats. PMID:3197286

  8. Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.; Chendrayan, K.; Quinby, H.L.

    1987-04-16

    The present invention related to an anaerobic bacterial culture of Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 which solubilizes lead oxide under anaerobic conditions in coal and industrial wastes and therefore presents a method of removing lead from such wastes before they are dumped into the environment. The rat of lead dissolution during logarithmic growth of the bacteria in 40 ml medium containing 3.32 ..mu..moles of lead as lead oxide was 0.042 ..mu..moles m1/sup /-/1/ hr/sup /-/1/. Dissolution of lead oxide by the bacterial isolate is due to the production of metabolites and acidity in the culture medium. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 can be used in the recovery of the strategic metals from ores and wastes and also for the production of lactic acid for commercial purposes. The process yields large quantities of lactic acid as well as lead complexed in a stable form with said acids. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for itaconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Blazeck, John; Miller, Jarrett; Pan, Anny; Gengler, Jon; Holden, Clinton; Jamoussi, Mariam; Alper, Hal S

    2014-10-01

    Renewable alternatives for petroleum-derived chemicals are achievable through biosynthetic production. Here, we utilize Saccharomyces cerevisiae to enable the synthesis of itaconic acid, a molecule with diverse applications as a petrochemical replacement. We first optimize pathway expression within S. cerevisiae through the use of a hybrid promoter. Next, we utilize sequential, in silico computational genome-scanning to identify beneficial genetic perturbations that are metabolically distant from the itaconic acid synthesis pathway. In this manner, we successfully identify three non-obvious genetic targets (∆ade3 ∆bna2 ∆tes1) that successively improve itaconic acid titer. We establish that focused manipulations of upstream pathway enzymes (localized refactoring) and enzyme re-localization to both mitochondria and cytosol fail to improve itaconic acid titers. Finally, we establish a higher cell density fermentation that ultimately achieves itaconic acid titer of 168 mg/L, a sevenfold improvement over initial conditions. This work represents an attempt to increase itaconic acid production in yeast and demonstrates the successful utilization of computationally guided genetic manipulation to increase metabolic capacity. PMID:24997118

  10. Production of ω-hydroxy octanoic acid with Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kirtz, Marko; Klebensberger, Janosch; Otte, Konrad B; Richter, Sven M; Hauer, Bernhard

    2016-07-20

    The present proof-of-concept study reports the construction of a whole-cell biocatalyst for the de novo production of ω-hydroxy octanoic acid. This was achieved by hijacking the natural fatty acid cycle and subsequent hydroxylation using a specific monooxygenase without the need for the additional feed of alkene-like precursors. For this, we used the model organism Escherichia coli and increased primarily the release of the octanoic acid precursors by overexpressing the plant thioesterase FatB2 from Cuphea hookeriana in a β-oxidation deficient strain, which lead to the production of 2.32mM (8.38mggcww(-1)) octanoic acid in 24h. In order to produce the corresponding ω-hydroxy derivative, we additionally expressed the engineered self-sufficient monooxygenase fusion protein CYP153AMaq(G307A)-CPRBM3 within the octanoic acid producing strain. With this, we finally produced 234μM (0.95mggcww(-1)) ω-hydroxy octanoic acid in a 20h fed-batch set-up. PMID:27184430

  11. Amino Acid Degradations Produced by Lipid Oxidation Products.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-06-10

    Differently to amino acid degradations produced by carbohydrate-derived reactive carbonyls, amino acid degradations produced by lipid oxidation products are lesser known in spite of being lipid oxidation a major source of reactive carbonyls in food. This article analyzes the conversion of amino acids into Strecker aldehydes, α-keto acids, and amines produced by lipid-derived free radicals and carbonyl compounds, as well as the role of lipid oxidation products on the reactions suffered by these compounds: the formation of Strecker aldehydes and other aldehydes from α-keto acids; the formation of Strecker aldehydes and olefins from amines; the formation of shorter aldehydes from Strecker aldehydes; and the addition reactions suffered by the olefins produced from the amines. The relationships among all these reactions and the effect of reaction conditions on them are discussed. This knowledge should contribute to better control food processing in order to favor the formation of desirable beneficial compounds and to inhibit the production of compounds with deleterious properties. PMID:25748518

  12. Production of gaba (γ - Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods. PMID:24031948

  13. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Production by Bifidobacteria: Screening, Kinetic, and Composition

    PubMed Central

    Amaretti, Alberto; Leonardi, Alan; Quartieri, Andrea; Gozzoli, Caterina; Rossi, Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid involved in a number of health aspects. In humans, CLA production is performed by gut microbiota, including some species of potential probiotic bifidobacteria. 128 strains of 31 Bifidobacterium species were screened with a spectrophotometric assay to identify novel CLA producers. Most species were nonproducers, while producers belonged to B. breve and B. pseudocatenulatum. GC-MS revealed that CLA producer strains yielded 9cis,11trans-CLA and 9trans,11trans-CLA, without any production of other isomers. Hydroxylated forms of LA were absent in producer strains, suggesting that the myosin-cross-reactive antigen (MCRA) protein that exerts hydratase activity is not involved in LA isomerization. Moreover, both CLA producer and nonproducer species bear a MCRA homologue. The strain B. breve WC 0421 was the best CLA producer, converting LA into 68.8% 9cis,11trans-CLA and 25.1% 9trans,11trans-CLA. Production occurred mostly during the lag and the exponential phase. For the first time, production and incorporation of CLA in biomass were assessed. B. breve WC 0421 stored CLA in the form of free fatty acids, without changing the composition of the esterified fatty acids, which mainly occurred in the plasmatic membrane. PMID:27429985

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of acetic acid steam reforming for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicoechea, Saioa; Ehrich, Heike; Arias, Pedro L.; Kockmann, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen generation by acetic acid steam reforming has been carried out with respect to applications in solid oxide fuel cells. The effect of operating parameters on equilibrium composition has been examined focusing especially on hydrogen and carbon monoxide production, which are the fuels in this type of fuel cell. The temperature, steam to acetic acid ratio, and to a lesser extent pressure affect significantly the equilibrium product distribution due to their influence on steam reforming, thermal decomposition and water-gas shift reaction. The study shows that steam reforming of acetic acid with a steam to acetic acid ratio of 2 to 1 is thermodynamically feasible with hydrogen, carbon monoxide and water as the main products at the equilibrium at temperatures higher than 700 °C, and achieving CO/CO2 ratios higher than 1. Thus, it can be concluded that within the operation temperature range of solid oxide fuel cells - between 700 °C and 1000 °C - the production of a gas rich in hydrogen and carbon monoxide is promoted.

  15. Detoxification of acidic biorefinery waste liquor for production of high value amino acid.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Meera; Anusree, Murali; Mathew, Anil K; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan; Sukumaran, Rajeev Kumar; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-08-01

    The current study evaluates the detoxification of acid pretreatment liquor (APL) using adsorbent (ADS 400 & ADS 800) or ion-exchange (A-27MP & A-72MP) resins and its potential for amino acid production. The APL is generated as a by-product from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass and is rich monomeric sugars as well as sugar degradation products (fermentation inhibitors) such as furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF). Of the four resins compared, ADS 800 removed approximately 85% and 60% of furfural and HMF, respectively. ADS 800 could be reused for up to six cycles after regeneration without losing its adsorption properties. The study was further extended by assessing the fermentability of detoxified APL for l-lysine production using wild and mutant strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The detoxified APL was superior to APL for l-lysine production. PMID:26996259

  16. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(II) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls. These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (α,β-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(II) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed. In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts.

  17. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    PubMed Central

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(II) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls. These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (α,β-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(II) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed. In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts. PMID:10639127

  18. Lactic Acid and Biosurfactants Production from Residual Cellulose Films.

    PubMed

    Portilla Rivera, Oscar Manuel; Arzate Martínez, Guillermo; Jarquín Enríquez, Lorenzo; Vázquez Landaverde, Pedro Alberto; Domínguez González, José Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The increasing amounts of residual cellulose films generated as wastes all over the world represent a big scale problem for the meat industry regarding to environmental and economic issues. The use of residual cellulose films as a feedstock of glucose-containing solutions by acid hydrolysis and further fermentation into lactic acid and biosurfactants was evaluated as a method to diminish and revalorize these wastes. Under a treatment consisting in sulfuric acid 6% (v/v); reaction time 2 h; solid liquid ratio 9 g of film/100 mL of acid solution, and temperature 130 °C, 35 g/L of glucose and 49% of solubilized film was obtained. From five lactic acid strains, Lactobacillus plantarum was the most suitable for metabolizing the glucose generated. The process was scaled up under optimized conditions in a 2-L bioreactor, producing 3.4 g/L of biomass, 18 g/L of lactic acid, and 15 units of surface tension reduction of a buffer phosphate solution. Around 50% of the cellulose was degraded by the treatment applied, and the liqueurs generated were useful for an efficient production of lactic acid and biosurfactants using L. plantarum. Lactobacillus bacteria can efficiently utilize glucose from cellulose films hydrolysis without the need of clarification of the liqueurs. PMID:26293409

  19. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20(th) century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes. PMID:27599577

  20. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20th century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes. PMID:27599577

  1. Relativistic breakdown in planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2007-04-15

    In 2003, a new electrical breakdown mechanism involving the production of runaway avalanches by positive feedback from runaway positrons and energetic photons was introduced. This mechanism, which shall be referred to as 'relativistic feedback', allows runaway discharges in gases to become self-sustaining, dramatically increasing the flux of runaway electrons, the accompanying high-energy radiation, and resulting ionization. Using detailed Monte Carlo calculations, properties of relativistic feedback are investigated. It is found that once relativistic feedback fully commences, electrical breakdown will occur and the ambient electric field, extending over cubic kilometers, will be discharged in as little as 2x10{sup -5} s. Furthermore, it is found that the flux of energetic electrons and x rays generated by this mechanism can exceed the flux generated by the standard relativistic runaway electron model by a factor of 10{sup 13}, making relativistic feedback a good candidate for explaining terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and other high-energy phenomena observed in the Earth's atmosphere.

  2. Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide program/project teams necessary instruction and guidance in the best practices for Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and WBS dictionary development and use for project implementation and management control. This handbook can be used for all types of NASA projects and work activities including research, development, construction, test and evaluation, and operations. The products of these work efforts may be hardware, software, data, or service elements (alone or in combination). The aim of this document is to assist project teams in the development of effective work breakdown structures that provide a framework of common reference for all project elements. The WBS and WBS dictionary are effective management processes for planning, organizing, and administering NASA programs and projects. The guidance contained in this document is applicable to both in-house, NASA-led effort and contracted effort. It assists management teams from both entities in fulfilling necessary responsibilities for successful accomplishment of project cost, schedule, and technical goals. Benefits resulting from the use of an effective WBS include, but are not limited to: providing a basis for assigned project responsibilities, providing a basis for project schedule development, simplifying a project by dividing the total work scope into manageable units, and providing a common reference for all project communication.

  3. Electrical Breakdown in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjalmarson, Harold; Zutavern, Fred; Kambour, Kenneth; Moore, Chris; Mar, Alan

    During electron breakdown of a solid subjected to a large electric field, impact ionization causes growth of an electron-hole plasma. This growth process is opposed by Auger recombination of the electron-hole pairs. In our work, such breakdown is investigated by obtaining steady-state solutions to the Boltzmann equation. In these calculations, the carriers are heated by the electric field and cooled by phonon emission. Our results imply that breakdown may lead to high carrier-density current filaments. Conductive filaments have been observed in optically-triggered, high-power photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices being developed at Sandia Labs. The relationship between the steady-state computed solutions to the observed filaments will be discussed in the presentation. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Photosynthetic production of itaconic acid in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Chin, Taejun; Sano, Mei; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ohara, Hitomi; Aso, Yuji

    2015-02-10

    Here, we report the photosynthetic production of itaconic acid (IA), a promising building block, from carbon dioxide (CO₂) by Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. The engineered PCC6803 strain expressing cis-aconitate decarboxylase, the key enzyme in IA biosynthesis, produced 0.9 mg/L and 14.5 mg/L of IA at production rates of 42.8 μgL(-1)day(-1) and 919.0 μgL(-1)day(-1), under conditions of constant bubbling with air and 5% CO₂, respectively. This is the first report on the possibility of IA production from CO₂ via the photosynthetic process in cyanobacteria. PMID:25554635

  5. Microbial Products Trigger Amino Acid Exudation from Plant Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Donald A.; Fox, Tama C.; King, Maria D.; Bhuvaneswari, T.V.; Teuber, Larry R.

    2004-01-01

    Plants naturally cycle amino acids across root cell plasma membranes, and any net efflux is termed exudation. The dominant ecological view is that microorganisms and roots passively compete for amino acids in the soil solution, yet the innate capacity of roots to recover amino acids present in ecologically relevant concentrations is unknown. We find that, in the absence of culturable microorganisms, the influx rates of 16 amino acids (each supplied at 2.5 μm) exceed efflux rates by 5% to 545% in roots of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), Medicago truncatula, maize (Zea mays), and wheat (Triticum aestivum). Several microbial products, which are produced by common soil microorganisms such as Pseudomonas bacteria and Fusarium fungi, significantly enhanced the net efflux (i.e. exudation) of amino acids from roots of these four plant species. In alfalfa, treating roots with 200 μm phenazine, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, or zearalenone increased total net efflux of 16 amino acids 200% to 2,600% in 3 h. Data from 15N tests suggest that 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol blocks amino acid uptake, whereas zearalenone enhances efflux. Thus, amino acid exudation under normal conditions is a phenomenon that probably reflects both active manipulation and passive uptake by microorganisms, as well as diffusion and adsorption to soil, all of which help overcome the innate capacity of plant roots to reabsorb amino acids. The importance of identifying potential enhancers of root exudation lies in understanding that such compounds may represent regulatory linkages between the larger soil food web and the internal carbon metabolism of the plant. PMID:15347793

  6. An overview of conjugated linoleic acid: microbial production and application.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Zahra; Khosravi-Darani, Kianoush

    2014-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has attracted considerable attention in health due to its important physiological properties proved in several in vivo experiments. Many bacteria, especially some probiotics, are able to produce CLA from the linoleic acid (LA) present in milk. In this review, CLA production by microorganisms is described. Then factors on the influencing the microbial production and the initial CLA content in milk fat are introduced. After a glimpse on the content of CLA in dairy products and human body, health benefits of CLA including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, antiathrosclerosis and anti-osteoporosis properties, as well as prevention of body fat increase and function as stimulator of the immunity system are explained. PMID:25138090

  7. Succinic acid production from lignocellulosic hydrolysate by Basfia succiniciproducens.

    PubMed

    Salvachúa, Davinia; Smith, Holly; St John, Peter C; Mohagheghi, Ali; Peterson, Darren J; Black, Brenna A; Dowe, Nancy; Beckham, Gregg T

    2016-08-01

    The production of chemicals alongside fuels will be essential to enhance the feasibility of lignocellulosic biorefineries. Succinic acid (SA), a naturally occurring C4-diacid, is a primary intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and a promising building block chemical that has received significant industrial attention. Basfia succiniciproducens is a relatively unexplored SA-producing bacterium with advantageous features such as broad substrate utilization, genetic tractability, and facultative anaerobic metabolism. Here B. succiniciproducens is evaluated in high xylose-content hydrolysates from corn stover and different synthetic media in batch fermentation. SA titers in hydrolysate at an initial sugar concentration of 60g/L reached up to 30g/L, with metabolic yields of 0.69g/g, and an overall productivity of 0.43g/L/h. These results demonstrate that B. succiniciproducens may be an attractive platform organism for bio-SA production from biomass hydrolysates. PMID:27179951

  8. Covalent interaction of ascorbic acid with natural products

    PubMed Central

    Kesinger, Nicholas G.; Stevens, Jan F.

    2009-01-01

    While ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) is mostly known as a cofactor for proline hydroxylase and as a biological antioxidant, it also forms covalent bonds with natural products which we here refer to as ‘ascorbylation’. A number of natural products containing an ascorbate moiety has been isolated and characterized from a variety of biological sources, ranging from marine algae to flowering plants. Most of these compounds are formed as a result of nucleophilic substitution or addition by ascorbate, e.g. the ascorbigens from Brassica species are ascorbylated indole derivatives. Some ascorbylated tannins appear to be formed from electrophilic addition to dehydroascorbic acid. There are also examples of annulations of ascorbate with dietary polyphenols, e.g., epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and resveratrol derivatives. Herein is a survey of thirty-three ascorbylated natural products and their reported biological activities. PMID:19875138

  9. Combinatorial Effects of Fatty Acid Elongase Enzymes on Nervonic Acid Production in Camelina sativa

    PubMed Central

    Huai, Dongxin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Chunyu; Cahoon, Edgar B.; Zhou, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) with chain lengths of 20 carbons and longer provide feedstocks for various applications; therefore, improvement of VLCFA contents in seeds has become an important goal for oilseed enhancement. VLCFA biosynthesis is controlled by a multi-enzyme protein complex referred to as fatty acid elongase, which is composed of β-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), β-ketoacyl-CoA reductase (KCR), β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase (HCD) and enoyl reductase (ECR). KCS has been identified as the rate-limiting enzyme, but little is known about the involvement of other three enzymes in VLCFA production. Here, the combinatorial effects of fatty acid elongase enzymes on VLCFA production were assessed by evaluating the changes in nervonic acid content. A KCS gene from Lunaria annua (LaKCS) and the other three elongase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana were used for the assessment. Five seed-specific expressing constructs, including LaKCS alone, LaKCS with AtKCR, LaKCS with AtHCD, LaKCS with AtECR, and LaKCS with AtKCR and AtHCD, were transformed into Camelina sativa. The nervonic acid content in seed oil increased from null in wild type camelina to 6-12% in LaKCS-expressing lines. However, compared with that from the LaKCS-expressing lines, nervonic acid content in mature seeds from the co-expressing lines with one or two extra elongase genes did not show further increases. Nervonic acid content from LaKCS, AtKCR and AtHCD co-expressing line was significantly higher than that in LaKCS-expressing line during early seed development stage, while the ultimate nervonic acid content was not significantly altered. The results from this study thus provide useful information for future engineering of oilseed crops for higher VLCFA production. PMID:26121034

  10. Combinatorial Effects of Fatty Acid Elongase Enzymes on Nervonic Acid Production in Camelina sativa.

    PubMed

    Huai, Dongxin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Chunyu; Cahoon, Edgar B; Zhou, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) with chain lengths of 20 carbons and longer provide feedstocks for various applications; therefore, improvement of VLCFA contents in seeds has become an important goal for oilseed enhancement. VLCFA biosynthesis is controlled by a multi-enzyme protein complex referred to as fatty acid elongase, which is composed of β-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), β-ketoacyl-CoA reductase (KCR), β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase (HCD) and enoyl reductase (ECR). KCS has been identified as the rate-limiting enzyme, but little is known about the involvement of other three enzymes in VLCFA production. Here, the combinatorial effects of fatty acid elongase enzymes on VLCFA production were assessed by evaluating the changes in nervonic acid content. A KCS gene from Lunaria annua (LaKCS) and the other three elongase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana were used for the assessment. Five seed-specific expressing constructs, including LaKCS alone, LaKCS with AtKCR, LaKCS with AtHCD, LaKCS with AtECR, and LaKCS with AtKCR and AtHCD, were transformed into Camelina sativa. The nervonic acid content in seed oil increased from null in wild type camelina to 6-12% in LaKCS-expressing lines. However, compared with that from the LaKCS-expressing lines, nervonic acid content in mature seeds from the co-expressing lines with one or two extra elongase genes did not show further increases. Nervonic acid content from LaKCS, AtKCR and AtHCD co-expressing line was significantly higher than that in LaKCS-expressing line during early seed development stage, while the ultimate nervonic acid content was not significantly altered. The results from this study thus provide useful information for future engineering of oilseed crops for higher VLCFA production. PMID:26121034

  11. Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Dodge, Cleveland; Chendrayan, Krishnachetty; Quinby, Helen L.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention relates to an anaerobic bacterial culture of Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 which solubilizes lead oxide under anaerobic conditions in coal and industrial wastes and therefore presents a method of removing lead from such wastes before they are dumped into the environment. The rate of lead dissolution during logarithmic growth of the bacteria in 40 ml medium containing 3.32 .mu.moles of lead as lead oxide was 0.042 .mu.moles ml.sup.-1 hr.sup.-1. Dissolution of lead oxide by the bacterial isolate is due to the production of metabolites and acidity in the culture medium. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 can be used in the recovery of strategic metals from ores and wastes and also for the production of lactic acid for commercial purposes. The process yields large quantities of lactic acid as well as lead complexed in a stable form with said acids.

  12. Metabolic engineering of acid resistance elements to improve acid resistance and propionic acid production of Propionibacterium jensenii.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ningzi; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Liu, Long

    2016-06-01

    Propionic acid (PA) and its salts are widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. Microbial production of PA by propionibacteria is a typical product-inhibited process, and acid resistance is crucial in the improvement of PA titers and productivity. We previously identified two key acid resistance elements-the arginine deaminase and glutamate decarboxylase systems-that protect propionibacteria against PA stress by maintaining intracellular pH homeostasis. In this study, we attempted to improve the acid resistance and PA production of Propionibacterium jensenii ATCC 4868 by engineering these elements. Specifically, five genes (arcA, arcC, gadB, gdh, and ybaS) encoding components of the arginine deaminase and glutamate decarboxylase systems were overexpressed in P. jensenii. The activities of the five enzymes in the engineered strains were 26.7-489.0% higher than those in wild-type P. jensenii. The growth rates of the engineered strains decreased, whereas specific PA production increased significantly compared with those of the wild-type strain. Among the overexpressed genes, gadB (encoding glutamate decarboxylase) increased PA resistance and yield most effectively; the PA resistance of P. jensenii-gadB was more than 10-fold higher than that of the wild-type strain, and the production titer, yield, and conversion ratio of PA reached 10.81 g/L, 5.92 g/g cells, and 0.56 g/g glycerol, representing increases of 22.0%, 23.8%, and 21.7%, respectively. We also investigated the effects of introducing these acid resistance elements on the transcript levels of related enzymes. The results showed that the expression of genes in the engineered pathways affected the expression of the other genes. Additionally, the intracellular pools of amino acids were altered as different genes were overexpressed, which may further contribute to the enhanced PA production. This study provides an effective strategy for improving PA production in propionibacteria; this

  13. Physiological heterogeneity of Pseudomonas taetrolens during lactobionic acid production.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Saúl; Rendueles, Manuel; Díaz, Mario

    2012-12-01

    Physiological heterogeneity constitutes a critical parameter in biotechnological systems since both metabolite yield and productivity are often hampered by the presence of undesired physiological cell subpopulations. In the present study, the physiological status and functionality of Pseudomonas taetrolens cells were monitored by multiparameter flow cytometry during fermentative lactobionic acid production at the shake-flask and bioreactor scale. In shake-flask fermentation, the onset of the lactobionic acid production phase was accompanied by a progressive loss of cellular metabolic activity, membrane polarization, and membrane integrity concomitantly to acidification. In fact, population dynamics has shown the prevalence of damaged and dead subpopulations when submitted to a pH < 4 from 16 h onwards. Furthermore, fluorescence-activated cell sorting revealed that these sublethally injured cells were nonculturable. In contrast, P. taetrolens cells exhibited a robust physiological status during bioreactor cultivations performed with a pH-shifted strategy at 6.5, remaining predominantly healthy and metabolically active (>96 %) as well as maintaining bioconversion efficiency throughout the course of the fermentation. Additionally, an assessment of the seed culture's physiological robustness was carried out in order to determine the best seed culture age. Results showed that bioreactor culture performance, growth, and lactobionic acid production efficiency were strongly dependent on the physiological heterogeneity displayed by the seed culture. This study provides the most suitable criteria for optimizing lactobionic acid production efficiency through a novel flow cytometric-based approach based on the physiological status of P. taetrolens. It also constitutes a valuable, broad-ranging methodology for the enhancement of microbial bioprocesses involved in the production of secondary metabolites. PMID:22777280

  14. Unusal pattern of product inhibition: batch acetic acid fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bar, R.; Gainer, J.L.; Kirwan, D.J.

    1987-04-20

    The limited tolerance of microorganisms to their metabolic products results in inhibited growth and product formation. The relationship between the specific growth rate, micro, and the concentration of an inhibitory product has been described by a number of mathematical models. In most cases, micro was found to be inversely proportional to the product concentration and invariably the rate of substrate utilization followed the same pattern. In this communication, the authors report a rather unusual case in which the formation rate of a product, acetic acid, increased with a decreasing growth rate of the microorganism, Acetobacter aceti. Apparently, a similar behavior was mentioned in a review report with respect to Clostridium thermocellum in a batch culture but was not published in the freely circulating literature. The fermentation of ethanol to acetic acid, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/OH + O/sub 2/ = CH/sub 3/COOH + H/sub 2/O is clearly one of the oldest known fermentations. Because of its association with the commercial production of vinegar it has been a subject of extensive but rather technically oriented studies. Suprisingly, the uncommon uncoupling between the inhibited microbial growth and the product formation appears to have been unnoticed. 13 references.

  15. Enhanced production of docosahexaenoic acid in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guiming; Jiang, Xudong; Ou, Qin; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Mingfu; Sun, Guozhi; Wang, Zhao; Sun, Jie; Ge, Tangdong

    2014-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), one of the important polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with pharmaceutical and nutraceutical effects, may be obtained through diet or synthesized in vivo from dietary a-linolenic acid (ALA). However, the accumulation of DHA in human body or other mammals relies on the intake of high dose of DHA for a certain period of time, and the bioconversion of dietary ALA to DHA is very limited. Therefore the mammalian cells are not rich in DHA. Here, we report a new technology for increased production of DHA in mammalian cells. By using transient transfection method, Siganus canaliculatus Δ4 desaturase was heterologously expressed in chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and simultaneously, mouse Δ6-desaturase and Δ5-desaturase were overexpressed. The results demonstrated that the overexpression of Δ6/Δ5-desaturases significantly enhanced the ability of transfected cells to convert the added ALA to docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) which in turn get converted into DHA directly and efficiently by the heterologously expressed Δ4 desaturase. This technology provides the basis for potential utility of these gene constructs in the creation of transgenic livestock for increased production of DHA/related products to meet the growing demand of this important PUFA. PMID:24788769

  16. Valproic Acid Induces Antimicrobial Compound Production in Doratomyces microspores

    PubMed Central

    Zutz, Christoph; Bacher, Markus; Parich, Alexandra; Kluger, Bernhard; Gacek-Matthews, Agnieszka; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin; Strauss, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in public health is the rising number of antibiotic resistant pathogens and the lack of novel antibiotics. In recent years there is a rising focus on fungi as sources of antimicrobial compounds due to their ability to produce a large variety of bioactive compounds and the observation that virtually every fungus may still contain yet unknown so called “cryptic,” often silenced, compounds. These putative metabolites could include novel bioactive compounds. Considerable effort is spent on methods to induce production of these “cryptic” metabolites. One approach is the use of small molecule effectors, potentially influencing chromatin landscape in fungi. We observed that the supernatant of the fungus Doratomyces (D.) microsporus treated with valproic acid (VPA) displayed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and two methicillin resistant clinical S. aureus isolates. VPA treatment resulted in enhanced production of seven antimicrobial compounds: cyclo-(L-proline-L-methionine) (cPM), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, cyclo-(phenylalanine-proline) (cFP), indole-3-carboxylic acid, phenylacetic acid (PAA) and indole-3-acetic acid. The production of the antimicrobial compound phenyllactic acid was exclusively detectable after VPA treatment. Furthermore three compounds, cPM, cFP, and PAA, were able to boost the antimicrobial activity of other antimicrobial compounds. cPM, for the first time isolated from fungi, and to a lesser extent PAA, are even able to decrease the minimal inhibitory concentration of ampicillin in MRSA strains. In conclusion we could show in this study that VPA treatment is a potent tool for induction of “cryptic” antimicrobial compound production in fungi, and that the induced compounds are not exclusively linked to the secondary metabolism. Furthermore this is the first discovery of the rare diketopiperazine cPM in fungi. Additionally we could demonstrate that cPM and PAA boost antibiotic activity

  17. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound. PMID:27226531

  18. A fluidized-bed continuous bioreactor for lactic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, G.F.; Fonta, J.P.

    1988-05-01

    A laboratory bioreactor consists of a fluidized bed of monosized activated carbon coated with a biofilm of the homolactic fermentative organism Streptococcus thermophilus. Biofilm growth moves the carbon through the bed, and adsorption of substrate and product at the bottom and top of the bed respectively reduces their inhibitory effects on the organism. Theory shows that high reactor productivity and rapid recirculation of carbon through the bed require a biofilm thickness of 25 to 45% of the carbon particle radius on particles fed into the base of the bed. This could not be achieved in practice due to the fragility of the biofilm. Product concentration was higher than expected from measurements of product inhibition, possibly because it is the undissociated form of the acid that both inhibits metabolism and adsorbs on the activated carbon. The observed productivity of 12 gm/1 hr could be greatly increased by ph control. 13 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Succinic acid production from acid hydrolysate of corn fiber by Actinobacillus succinogenes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kequan; Jiang, Min; Wei, Ping; Yao, Jiaming; Wu, Hao

    2010-01-01

    Dilute acid hydrolysate of corn fiber was used as carbon source for the production of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes NJ113. The optimized hydrolysis conditions were obtained by orthogonal experiments. When corn fiber particles were of 20 mesh in size and treated with 1.0% sulfuric acid at 121 degrees C for 2 h, the total sugar yield could reach 63.3%. It was found that CaCO(3) neutralization combined with activated carbon adsorption was an effective method to remove fermentation inhibitors especially furfural that presented in the acid hydrolysate of corn fiber. Only 5.2% of the total sugar was lost, while 91.9% of furfural was removed. The yield of succinic acid was higher than 72.0% with the detoxified corn fiber hydrolysate as the carbon source in anaerobic bottles or 7.5 L fermentor cultures. It was proved that the corn fiber hydrolysate could be an alternative to glucose for the production of succinic acid by A. succinogenes NJ113. PMID:18830824

  20. Environmental evaluation of eicosapentaenoic acid production by Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Pérez-López, Paula; González-García, Sara; Allewaert, Céline; Verween, Annick; Murray, Patrick; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, Ma Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) play an important role in human health. Due to the increased market demand, the production of PUFAs from potential alternative sources such as microalgae is receiving increased interest. The aim of this study was to perform a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the biotechnological production of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) from the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, followed by the identification of avenues to improve its environmental profile. The LCA tackles two production schemes of P. tricornutum PUFAs with an EPA content of 36%: lab and pilot scales. The results at lab scale show that both the electricity requirements and the production of the extraction agent (chloroform) have significant influence on the life cycle environmental performance of microalgal EPA production. An alternative method based on hexane was proposed to replace chloroform and environmental benefits were identified. Regarding the production of EPA at pilot scale, three main environmental factors were identified: the production of the nitrogen source required for microalgae growing, the transport activities and electricity requirements. Improvement alternatives were proposed and discussed concerning: a) the use of nitrogen based fertilizers, b) the valorization of the residual algal paste as soil conditioner and, c) the anaerobic digestion of the residual algal paste for bioenergy production. Encouraging environmental benefits could be achieved if sodium nitrate was substituted by urea, calcium nitrate or ammonium nitrate, regardless the category under assessment. In contrast, minor improvement was found when valorizing the residual algal paste as mineral fertilizer, due to its overall low content in N and P. Concerning the biogas production from the anaerobic digestion, the improvement on the environmental profile was also limited due to the discrepancy between the potential energy production from the algal paste and the high electricity requirements in

  1. Carboxylic acid production from brewer's spent grain via mixed culture fermentation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; Wan, Caixia

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed at investigating carboxylic acid production from brewer's spent grain (BSG) via mixed culture fermentation. The results showed that the distribution of fermentation products was significantly affected by pH conditions and the addition of electron donors. Lactic acid was the dominant component under acidic and alkaline conditions while volatile fatty acids (VFAs) became dominant under the neutral condition. Furthermore, the neutral condition favored the chain elongation of carboxylic acids, especially with ethanol as the electron donor. Ethanol addition enhanced valeric acid and caproic acid production by 44% and 167%, respectively. Lactic acid addition also had positive effects on VFAs production under the neutral condition but limited to C2-C4 products. As a result, propionic acid and butyric acid production was increased by 109% and 152%, respectively. These findings provide substantial evidence for regulating carboxylic acid production during mixed culture fermentation of BSG by controlling pH and adding electron donors. PMID:25698409

  2. Lactide Synthesis and Chirality Control for Polylactic acid Production.

    PubMed

    Van Wouwe, Pieter; Dusselier, Michiel; Vanleeuw, Evelien; Sels, Bert

    2016-05-10

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is a very promising biodegradable, renewable, and biocompatible polymer. Aside from its production, its application field is also increasing, with use not only in commodity applications but also as durables and in biomedicine. In the current PLA production scheme, the most expensive part is not the polymerization itself but obtaining the building blocks lactic acid (LA) and lactide, the actual cyclic monomer for polymerization. Although the synthesis of LA and the polymerization have been studied systematically, reports of lactide synthesis are scarce. Most lactide synthesis methods are described in patent literature, and current energy-intensive, aselective industrial processes are based on archaic scientific literature. This Review, therefore, highlights new methods with a technical comparison and description of the different approaches. Water-removal methodologies are compared, as this is a crucial factor in PLA production. Apart from the synthesis of lactide, this Review also emphasizes the use of chemically produced racemic lactic acid (esters) as a starting point in the PLA production scheme. Stereochemically tailored PLA can be produced according to such a strategy, giving access to various polymer properties. PMID:27071863

  3. Lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for riboflavin production

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Kiran; De, Sachinandan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Consumers are increasingly becoming aware of their health and nutritional requirements, and in this context, vitamins produced in situ by microbes may suit their needs and expectations. B groups vitamins are essential components of cellular metabolism and among them riboflavin is one of the vital vitamins required by bacteria, plants, animals and humans. Here, we focus on the importance of microbial production of riboflavin over chemical synthesis. In addition, genetic abilities for riboflavin biosynthesis by lactic acid bacteria are discussed. Genetically modified strains by employing genetic engineering and chemical analogues have been developed to enhance riboflavin production. The present review attempts to collect the currently available information on riboflavin production by microbes in general, while placing greater emphasis on food grade lactic acid bacteria and human gut commensals. For designing riboflavin‐enriched functional foods, proper selection and exploitation of riboflavin‐producing lactic acid bacteria is essential. Moreover, eliminating the in situ vitamin fortification step will decrease the cost of food production. PMID:26686515

  4. Lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for riboflavin production.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Kiran; Tomar, Sudhir Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2016-07-01

    Consumers are increasingly becoming aware of their health and nutritional requirements, and in this context, vitamins produced in situ by microbes may suit their needs and expectations. B groups vitamins are essential components of cellular metabolism and among them riboflavin is one of the vital vitamins required by bacteria, plants, animals and humans. Here, we focus on the importance of microbial production of riboflavin over chemical synthesis. In addition, genetic abilities for riboflavin biosynthesis by lactic acid bacteria are discussed. Genetically modified strains by employing genetic engineering and chemical analogues have been developed to enhance riboflavin production. The present review attempts to collect the currently available information on riboflavin production by microbes in general, while placing greater emphasis on food grade lactic acid bacteria and human gut commensals. For designing riboflavin-enriched functional foods, proper selection and exploitation of riboflavin-producing lactic acid bacteria is essential. Moreover, eliminating the in situ vitamin fortification step will decrease the cost of food production. PMID:26686515

  5. Technology and economic assessment of lactic acid production and uses

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, R.; Tsai, S.P.

    1996-03-01

    Lactic acid has been an intermediate-volume specialty chemical (world production {approximately}50,000 tons/yr) used in a wide range of food-processing and industrial applications. Potentially, it can become a very large-volume, commodity-chemical intermediate produced from carbohydrates for feedstocks of biodegradable polymers, oxygenated chemicals, environmentally friendly ``green`` solvents, and other intermediates. In the past, efficient and economical technologies for the recovery and purification of lactic acid from fermentation broths and its conversion to the chemical or polymer intermediates had been the key technology impediments and main process cost centers. Development and deployment of novel separations technologies, such as electrodialysis with bipolar membranes, extractive and catalytic distillations, and chemical conversion, can enable low-cost production with continuous processes in large-scale operations. The emerging technologies can use environmentally sound lactic acid processes to produce environmentally useful products, with attractive process economics. These technology advances and recent product and process commercialization strategies are reviewed and assessed.

  6. Bio-based production of organic acids with Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Wieschalka, Stefan; Blombach, Bastian; Bott, Michael; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2013-01-01

    The shortage of oil resources, the steadily rising oil prices and the impact of its use on the environment evokes an increasing political, industrial and technical interest for development of safe and efficient processes for the production of chemicals from renewable biomass. Thus, microbial fermentation of renewable feedstocks found its way in white biotechnology, complementing more and more traditional crude oil-based chemical processes. Rational strain design of appropriate microorganisms has become possible due to steadily increasing knowledge on metabolism and pathway regulation of industrially relevant organisms and, aside from process engineering and optimization, has an outstanding impact on improving the performance of such hosts. Corynebacterium glutamicum is well known as workhorse for the industrial production of numerous amino acids. However, recent studies also explored the usefulness of this organism for the production of several organic acids and great efforts have been made for improvement of the performance. This review summarizes the current knowledge and recent achievements on metabolic engineering approaches to tailor C. glutamicum for the bio-based production of organic acids. We focus here on the fermentative production of pyruvate, l-and d-lactate, 2-ketoisovalerate, 2-ketoglutarate, and succinate. These organic acids represent a class of compounds with manifold application ranges, e.g. in pharmaceutical and cosmetics industry, as food additives, and economically very interesting, as precursors for a variety of bulk chemicals and commercially important polymers. Funding Information Work in the laboratories of the authors was supported by the Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe (FNR) of the Bundesministerium für Ernährung, Landwirtschaft und Verbraucherschutz (BMELV; FNR Grants 220-095-08A and 220-095-08D; Bio-ProChemBB project, ERA-IB programme), by the Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt (DBU Grant AZ13040/05) and the Evonik Degussa AG. PMID

  7. Production of γ-Amino Butyric Acid in Tea Leaves wit Treatment of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yuko; Hayakawa, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Hiroshi

    Lactic acid bacteria was searched for producing termented tea that contained a lot of γ-amino butyric acid(GABA). Also examined were the growth condition, GABA production and changes in catechin contents in the tea leaves. Lactobacillus brevis L12 was found to be suitable for the production of fermented tea since it gave as much GABA as gabaron tea when tea leaves being suspended with water at 10% and incubated for 4 days at 25°C. The amount of GABA produced was more than calculated based upon the content of glutamic acid in tea leaves. It is probable to assume that glutamate derived from glutamine and theanine is converted into GABA.

  8. Control of product selectivity using solid acids for the catalytic addition of phenol to hydroxy fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The acid catalyzed reactions of hydroxy fatty acids, such as ricinoleic and lesquerolic, in the presence of phenolics can lead to four products or product groups. These include simple dehydration to dienoic acids, cyclization to epoxides, Friedel-Crafts alkylations of the double bonds, or ether for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10664 - Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic). 721.10664 Section 721.10664... SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10664 Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic)....

  10. 40 CFR 721.10664 - Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic). 721.10664 Section 721.10664... SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10664 Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic)....

  11. 40 CFR 415.280 - Applicability; description of the boric acid production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... boric acid production subcategory. 415.280 Section 415.280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Boric Acid Production Subcategory § 415.280 Applicability; description of the boric acid... production of boric acid from ore-mined borax and from borax produced by the Trona process....

  12. Metabolic engineering in the biotechnological production of organic acids in the tricarboxylic acid cycle of microorganisms: Advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xian; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Organic acids, which are chemically synthesized, are also natural intermediates in the metabolic pathways of microorganisms, among which the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the most crucial route existing in almost all living organisms. Organic acids in the TCA cycle include citric acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, l-malic acid, and oxaloacetate, which are building-block chemicals with wide applications and huge markets. In this review, we summarize the synthesis pathways of these organic acids and review recent advances in metabolic engineering strategies that enhance organic acid production. We also propose further improvements for the production of organic acids with systems and synthetic biology-guided metabolic engineering strategies. PMID:25902192

  13. Towards sustainable sources for omega-3 fatty acids production.

    PubMed

    Adarme-Vega, T Catalina; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Schenk, Peer M

    2014-04-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docohexaenoic acid (DHA), provide significant health benefits for brain function/development and cardiovascular conditions. However, most EPA and DHA for human consumption is sourced from small fatty fish caught in coastal waters and, with depleting global fish stocks, recent research has been directed towards more sustainable sources. These include aquaculture with plant-based feeds, krill, marine microalgae, microalgae-like protists and genetically-modified plants. To meet the increasing demand for EPA and DHA, further developments are needed towards land-based sources. In particular large-scale cultivation of microalgae and plants is likely to become a reality with expected reductions in production costs, yield increasese and the adequate addressing of genetically modified food acceptance issues. PMID:24607804

  14. Spectral characterization of acid weathering products on Martian basaltic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yant, Marcella; Rogers, A. Deanne; Nekvasil, Hanna; Zhao, Yu-Yan Sara; Bristow, Tom

    2016-03-01

    For the first time, direct infrared spectral analyses of glasses with Martian compositions, altered under controlled conditions, are presented in order to assess surface weathering and regolith development on Mars. Basaltic glasses of Irvine and Backstay composition were synthesized and altered using H2SO4-HCl acid solutions (pH 0-4). Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman, and infrared spectral measurements were acquired for each reaction product. Infrared spectra were also acquired from previously synthesized and altered glasses with Pathfinder-measured compositions. Acid alteration on particles in the most acidic solutions (pH ≤ 1) yielded sulfate-dominated visible near infrared (VNIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) spectra with some silica influence. Spectral differences between alteration products from each starting material were present, reflecting strong sensitivity to changes in mineral assemblage. In the TIR, alteration features were preserved after reworking and consolidation. In the VNIR, hydrated sulfate features were present along with strong negative spectral slopes. Although such signatures are found in a few isolated locations on Mars with high-resolution spectrometers, much of the Martian surface lacks these characteristics, suggesting the following: acid alteration occurred at pH ≥ 2; small amounts of sulfates were reworked with unaltered material; there is a prevalence of intermediate-to-high silica glass in Martian starting materials (more resistant to acid alteration); primary or added sulfur were lacking; alteration features are obscured by dust; and/or large-scale, pervasive, acid sulfate weathering of the Martian surface did not occur. These results highlight the need to better understand the spectral properties of altered Martian surface material in order to enhance the interpretation of remote spectra for altered terrains.

  15. Enhanced Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guiming; Jiang, Xudong; Ou, Qin; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Mingfu; Sun, Guozhi; Wang, Zhao; Sun, Jie; Ge, Tangdong

    2014-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), one of the important polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with pharmaceutical and nutraceutical effects, may be obtained through diet or synthesized in vivo from dietary a-linolenic acid (ALA). However, the acumulation of DHA in human body or other mammals relies on the intake of high dose of DHA for a certain period of time, and the bioconversion of dietary ALA to DHA is very limited. Therefore the mammalian cells are not rich in DHA. Here, we report a new technology for increased prodution of DHA in mammalian cells. By using transient transfection method, Siganus canaliculatus Δ4 desaturase was heterologously expressed in chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and simultaneously, mouse Δ6-desaturase and Δ5-desaturase were overexpressed. The results demonstrated that the overexpression of Δ6/Δ5-desaturases significantly enhanced the ability of transfected cells to convert the added ALA to docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) which in turn get converted into DHA directly and efficiently by the heterologously expressed Δ4 desaturase. This technology provides the basis for potential utility of these gene constructs in the creation of transgenic livestock for increased production of DHA/related products to meet the growing demand of this important PUFA. PMID:24788769

  16. Development of an industrializable fermentation process for propionic acid production.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Chris C; Cox, Brad M; Rodriguez, Brandon A

    2014-05-01

    Propionic acid (PA) is a short-chain fatty acid with wide industrial application including uses in pharmaceuticals, herbicides, cosmetics, and food preservatives. As a three-carbon building block, PA also has potential as a precursor for high-volume commodity chemicals such as propylene. Currently, most PA is manufactured through petrochemical routes, which can be tied to increasing prices and volatility due to difficulty in demand forecasting and feedstock availability. Herein described are research advancements to develop an industrially feasible, renewable route to PA. Seventeen Propionibacterium strains were screened using glucose and sucrose as the carbon source to identify the best platform strain. Propionibacterium acidipropionici ATCC 4875 was selected as the platform strain and subsequent fermentation optimization studies were performed to maximize productivity and yield. Fermentation productivity was improved three-fold to exceed 2 g/l/h by densifying the inoculum source. Byproduct levels, particularly lactic and succinic acid, were reduced by optimizing fermentor headspace pressure and shear. Following achievement of commercially viable productivities, the lab-grade medium components were replaced with industrial counterparts to further reduce fermentation costs. A pure enzymatically treated corn mash (ECM) medium improved the apparent PA yield to 0.6 g/g (PA produced/glucose consumed), but it came at the cost of reduced productivity. Supplementation of ECM with cyanocobalamin restored productivity to near lab-grade media levels. The optimized ECM recipe achieved a productivity of 0.5 g/l/h with an apparent PA yield of 0.60 g/g corresponding to a media cost <1 USD/kg of PA. These improvements significantly narrow the gap between the fermentation and incumbent petrochemical processes, which is estimated to have a manufacturing cost of 0.82 USD/kg in 2017. PMID:24627047

  17. Biosynthesis of Phosphonic and Phosphinic Acid Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, William W.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2009-01-01

    Natural products containing carbon-phosphorus bonds (phosphonic and phosphinic acids) have found widespread use in medicine and agriculture. Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the biochemistry and biology of these compounds with the cloning of the biosynthetic gene clusters for several family members. This review discusses the commonalities and differences in the molecular logic that lies behind the biosynthesis of these compounds. The current knowledge regarding the metabolic pathways and enzymes involved in the production of a number of natural products, including the approved antibiotic fosfomycin, the widely used herbicide phosphinothricin, and the clinical candidate for treatment of malaria FR900098, is presented. Many of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of these compounds catalyze chemically and biologically unprecedented transformations and a wealth of new biochemistry has been revealed through their study. These studies have also suggested new strategies for natural product discovery. PMID:19489722

  18. On Preliminary Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, W. H.; Petersen, D.

    2013-12-01

    The preliminary breakdown phase of a negative cloud-to-ground lightning flash was observed in detail. Observations were made with a Photron SA1.1 high-speed video camera operating at 9,000 frames per second, fast optical sensors, a flat-plate electric field antenna covering the SLF to MF band, and VHF and UHF radio receivers with bandwidths of 20 MHz. Bright stepwise extensions of a negative leader were observed at an altitude of 8 km during the first few milliseconds of the flash, and were coincident with bipolar electric field pulses called 'characteristic pulses'. The 2-D step lengths of the preliminary processes were in excess of 100 meters, with some 2-D step lengths in excess of 200 meters. Smaller and shorter unipolar electric field pulses were superposed onto the bipolar electric field pulses, and were coincident with VHF and UHF radio pulses. After a few milliseconds, the emerging negative stepped leader system showed a marked decrease in luminosity, step length, and propagation velocity. Details of these events will be discussed, including the possibility that the preliminary breakdown phase consists not of a single developing lightning leader system, but of multiple smaller lightning leader systems that eventually join together into a single system.

  19. Production of ascorbic acid releasing biomaterials for pelvic floor repair

    PubMed Central

    Mangır, Naşide; Bullock, Anthony J.; Roman, Sabiniano; Osman, Nadir; Chapple, Christopher; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Objective An underlying abnormality in collagen turnover is implied in the occurrence of complications and recurrences after mesh augmented pelvic floor repair surgeries. Ascorbic acid is a potent stimulant of collagen synthesis. The aim of this study is to produce ascorbic acid releasing poly-lactic acid (PLA) scaffolds and evaluate them for their effects on extracellular matrix production and the strength of the materials. Materials and methods Scaffolds which contained either l-ascorbic acid (AA) and Ascorbate-2-Phosphate (A2P) were produced with emulsion electrospinning. The release of both drugs was measured by UV spectrophotometry. Human dermal fibroblasts were seeded on scaffolds and cultured for 2 weeks. Cell attachment, viability and total collagen production were evaluated as well as mechanical properties. Results No significant differences were observed between AA, A2P, Vehicle and PLA scaffolds in terms of fibre diameter and pore size. The encapsulation efficiency and successful release of both AA and A2P were demonstrated. Both AA and A2P containing scaffolds were significantly more hydrophilic and stronger in both dry and wet states compared to PLA scaffolds. Fibroblasts produced more collagen on scaffolds containing either AA or A2P compared to cells grown on control scaffolds. Conclusion This study is the first to directly compare the two ascorbic acid derivatives in a tissue engineered scaffold and shows that both AA and A2P releasing electrospun PLA scaffolds increased collagen production of fibroblasts to similar extents but AA scaffolds seemed to be more hydrophilic and stronger compared to A2P scaffolds. Statement of significance Mesh augmented surgical repair of the pelvic floor currently relies on non-degradable materials which results in severe complications in some patients. There is an unmet and urgent need for better pelvic floor repair materials. Our current understanding suggests that the ideal material should be able to better

  20. Roles of urea production, ammonium excretion, and amino acid oxidation in acid-base balance.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, W

    1986-02-01

    Atkinson and colleagues recently proposed several concepts that contrast with traditional views: first, that acid-base balance is regulated chiefly by the reactions leading to urea production in the liver; second, that ammonium excretion by the kidney plays no role in acid-base homeostasis; and third, that ammonium does not stimulate ureagenesis (except indirectly). To examine these concepts, plasma ions other than bicarbonate are categorized as 1) fixed cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, symbolized M+) and anions (Cl-), 2) buffer anions (A-), 3) other anions (X-), and 4) ammonium plus charged amino groups (N+). Since electroneutrality dictates that M+ + N+ = Cl- + HCO3- + A- + X-, it follows that delta HCO3- = delta(M+ - Cl-) - delta A- - delta X- + delta N+. Therefore acid-base disturbances (changes in HCO3-) can be categorized as to how they affect bodily content and hence plasma concentration of each of these four types of ions. The stoichiometry of ureagenesis, glutamine hydrolysis, ammonium and titratable acid excretion, oxidation of neutral, acidic, and basic amino acids, and oxidation of methionine, phosphoserine, and protein are examined to see how they alter these quantities. It is concluded that 1) although ureagenesis is pH dependent and also counteracts a tendency of amino acid oxidation to cause alkalosis, this tendency is inherently limited by the hyperammonemia (delta N+) that necessarily accompanies it, 2) ammonium excretion is equivalent to hydrogen excretion in its effects on acid-base balance if, and only if, it occurs in exchange for sodium or is accompanied by chloride excretion and only when the glutamate generated by glutamine hydrolysis is oxidized.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3511732

  1. Microbial production of glyceric acid, an organic acid that can be mass produced from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Habe, Hiroshi; Shimada, Yuko; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Hattori, Hiromi; Ano, Yoshitaka; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai; Itagaki, Masayuki; Watanabe, Kunihiro; Yanagishita, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Sakaki, Keiji

    2009-12-01

    Glyceric acid (GA), an unfamiliar biotechnological product, is currently produced as a small by-product of dihydroxyacetone production from glycerol by Gluconobacter oxydans. We developed a method for the efficient biotechnological production of GA as a target compound for new surplus glycerol applications in the biodiesel and oleochemical industries. We investigated the ability of 162 acetic acid bacterial strains to produce GA from glycerol and found that the patterns of productivity and enantiomeric GA compositions obtained from several strains differed significantly. The growth parameters of two different strain types, Gluconobacter frateurii NBRC103465 and Acetobacter tropicalis NBRC16470, were optimized using a jar fermentor. G. frateurii accumulated 136.5 g/liter of GA with a 72% d-GA enantiomeric excess (ee) in the culture broth, whereas A. tropicalis produced 101.8 g/liter of d-GA with a 99% ee. The 136.5 g/liter of glycerate in the culture broth was concentrated to 236.5 g/liter by desalting electrodialysis during the 140-min operating time, and then, from 50 ml of the concentrated solution, 9.35 g of GA calcium salt was obtained by crystallization. Gene disruption analysis using G. oxydans IFO12528 revealed that the membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase (mADH)-encoding gene (adhA) is required for GA production, and purified mADH from G. oxydans IFO12528 catalyzed the oxidation of glycerol. These results strongly suggest that mADH is involved in GA production by acetic acid bacteria. We propose that GA is potentially mass producible from glycerol feedstock by a biotechnological process. PMID:19837846

  2. The Sugar Model: Catalysis by Amines and Amino Acid Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2001-02-01

    Ammonia and amines (including amino acids) were shown to catalyze the formation of sugars from formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, and the subsequent conversion of sugars to carbonyl-containing products under the conditions studied (pH 5.5 and 50°C). Sterically unhindered primary amines were better catalysts than ammonia, secondary amines, and sterically hindered primary amines (i.e. α-aminoisobutyric acid). Reactions catalyzed by primary amines initially consumed formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde about 15-20 times faster than an uncatalyzed control reaction. The amine-catalyzed reactions yielded aldotriose (glyceraldehyde), ketotriose (dihydroxyacetone), aldotetroses (erythrose and threose), ketotetrose (erythrulose), pyruvaldehyde, acetaldehyde, glyoxal, pyruvate, glyoxylate, and several unindentified carbonyl products. The concentrations of the carbonyl products, except pyruvate and ketotetrose, initially increased and then declined during the reaction, indicating their ultimate conversion to other products (like larger sugars or pyruvate). The uncatalyzed control reaction yielded no pyruvate or glyoxylate, and only trace amounts of pyruvaldehyde, acetaldehyde and glyoxal. In the presence of 15 mM catalytic primary amine, such as alanine, the rates of triose and pyruvaldehyde of synthesis were about 15-times and 1200-times faster, respectively, than the uncatalyzed reaction. Since previous studies established that alanine is synthesized from glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde via pyruvaldehyde as its direct precursor, the demonstration that the alanine catalyzes the conversion of glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde to pyruvaldehyde indicates that this synthetic pathway is capable of autocatalysis. The relevance of this synthetic process, named the Sugar Model, to the origin of life is discussed.

  3. The sugar model: catalysis by amines and amino acid products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    Ammonia and amines (including amino acids) were shown to catalyze the formation of sugars from formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, and the subsequent conversion of sugars to carbonylcontaining products under the conditions studied (pH 5.5 and 50 degrees C). Sterically unhindered primary amines were better catalysts than ammonia, secondary amines, and sterically hindered primary amines (i.e. alpha-aminoisobutyric acid). Reactions catalyzed by primary amines initially consumed formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde about 15-20 times faster than an uncatalyzed control reaction. The amine-catalyzed reactions yielded aldotriose (glyceraldehyde), ketotriose (dihydroxyacetone), aldotetroses (erythrose and threose), ketotetrose (erythrulose), pyruvaldehyde, acetaldehyde, glyoxal, pyruvate, glyoxylate, and several unindentified carbonyl products. The concentrations of the carbonyl products, except pyruvate and ketotetrose, initially increased and then declined during the reaction, indicating their ultimate conversion to other products (like larger sugars or pyruvate). The uncatalyzed control reaction yielded no pyruvate or glyoxylate, and only trace amounts of pyruvaldehyde, acetaldehyde and glyoxal. In the presence of 15 mM catalytic primary amine, such as alanine, the rates of triose and pyruvaldehyde of synthesis were about 15-times and 1200-times faster, respectively, than the uncatalyzed reaction. Since previous studies established that alanine is synthesized from glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde via pyruvaldehyde as its direct precursor, the demonstration that the alanine catalyzes the conversion of glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde to pyruvaldehyde indicates that this synthetic pathway is capable of autocatalysis. The relevance of this synthetic process, named the Sugar Model, to the origin of life is discussed.

  4. Microbial production and applications of 5-aminolevulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuli; Zhang, Guangming; Li, Xiangkun; Zhang, Jie

    2014-09-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), an important intermediate in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in organisms, has been widely applied in many fields, such as medicine, agriculture, and the food industry, due to its biochemical characteristics. Research efforts supporting the microbial production of ALA have received increasing interest due to its dominant advantages over chemical synthesis, including higher yields, lesser pollutant emissions, and a lesser monetary cost. ALA synthesis using photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) is a promising approach in various microbial synthesis methods. In this review, recent advances on the microbial production of ALA with an emphasis on PSB are summarized, the key enzymes in the biosynthesis pathway (especially the relationship between key enzymes and key genes) are detailed, regulation strategies are described, and the significant influencing factors on the ALA biosynthesis and application of ALA are outlined. Furthermore, the eco-friendly perspective involving the combination of wastewater treatment and microbial production of ALA is conceived. PMID:25022665

  5. Breakdown and partial discharges in magnetic liquids.

    PubMed

    Herchl, F; Marton, K; Tomčo, L; Kopčanský, P; Timko, M; Koneracká, M; Kolcunová, I

    2008-05-21

    The dielectric properties (permittivity, loss factor, dielectric breakdown strength) of magnetic liquids were investigated. The magnetic liquids were composed of magnetite particles coated with oleic acid as surfactant and dispersed in transformer oil. To determine their dielectric properties they were subjected to a uniform magnetic field at high alternating electric fields up to 14 MV m(-1). Nearly constant permittivity of magnetic liquid with particle volume concentration Φ = 0.0019 as a function of electric field was observed. Magnetic liquids with concentrations Φ = 0.019 and 0.032 showed significant changes of permittivity and loss factor dependent on electric and magnetic fields. The best concentration of magnetic fluid was found at which partial current impulse magnitudes were the lowest. The breakdown strength distribution of the magnetic liquid with Φ = 0.0025 was fitted with the Duxbury-Leath, Weibull and Gauss distribution functions. PMID:21694240

  6. Vanadium phosphate catalysts for biodiesel production from acid industrial by-products.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Carina; Correia, M Joana Neiva; Carvalho, Renato; Henriques, Carlos; Bordado, João; Dias, Ana Paula Soares

    2013-04-10

    Biodiesel production from high acidity industrial by-products was studied using heterogeneous acid catalysts. These by-products contain 26-39% of free fatty acids, 45-66% of fatty acids methyl esters and 0.6-1.1% of water and are consequently inadequate for direct basic catalyzed transesterification. Macroporous vanadyl phosphate catalysts with V/P=1 (atomic ratio) prepared via sol-gel like technique was used as catalyst and it was possible to produce in one reaction batch a biodiesel contain 87% and 94% of FAME, depending on the by-product used as raw material. The initial FAME content in the by-products had a beneficial effect on the reactions because they act as a co-solvent, thus improving the miscibility of the reaction mixture components. The water formed during esterification process seems to hinder the esters formation, possibly due to competitive adsorption with methanol and to the promotion of the FAME hydrolysis reaction.The observed catalyst deactivation seems to be related to the reduction of vanadium species. However, spent catalysts can be regenerated, even partially, by reoxidation of the reduced vanadium species with air. PMID:22902409

  7. Does exercise stimulate protein breakdown in humans. Isotopic approaches to the problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.R.

    1987-10-01

    Protein metabolism in exercise has been investigated for 100 yr, yet it is still unclear if exercise induces an increased rate of protein breakdown. We have recently addressed this general question in a series of experiments in human subjects using stable isotopic tracers. In this paper, the results of those studies are reviewed. We have found that in light exercise the de-carboxylation of leucine is increased. However, urea production is not increased correspondingly, nor is the rate of incorporation into urea of nitrogen from either leucine or lysine. Further complicating the picture is the fact that lysine de-carboxylation is not markedly elevated in exercise. From these studies, we must conclude that isotopic techniques which have achieved general acceptance in other circumstances cannot reliably be used to answer the question of whether exercise stimulates protein breakdown in humans. However, these methods do provide results which enable a better understanding of the metabolism of the individual amino acids in exercise.

  8. Analysis of mycolic acid cleavage products and cellular fatty acids of Mycobacterium species by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M A; Moss, C W; Silcox, V A; Good, R C

    1986-04-01

    After growth and experimental conditions were established, the mycolic acid cleavage products, constituent fatty acids, and alcohols of representative strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. smegmatis, M. fortuitum complex, M. kansasii, M. gordonae, and M. avium complex were determined by capillary gas chromatography. Reproducible cleavage of mycolic acid methyl esters to tetracosanoic (24:0) or hexacosanoic (26:0) acid methyl esters was achieved by heating the sample in a high-temperature muffle furnace. The major constituent fatty acids in all species were hexadecanoic (16:0) and octadecenoic (18:1 omega 9-c, oleic) acids. With the exception of M. gordonae, 10-methyloctadecanoic acid was found in all species; moreover, M. gordonae was the only species tested which contained 2-methyltetradecanoic acid. M. kansasii was characterized by the presence of 2,4-dimethyltetradecanoic acid, M. avium complex by 2-eicosanol, and M. tuberculosis by 26:0 mycolic acid cleavage product. The mycolic acid cleavage product in the other five species tested was 24:0. Although a limited number of strains and species were tested, preliminary results indicate that this gas chromatographic method can be used to characterize mycobacterial cultures by their mycolic acid cleavage products and constituent fatty acid and alcohol content. PMID:3084554

  9. The effect of oxalic and itaconic acids on threo-Ds-isocitric acid production from rapeseed oil by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Allayarov, Ramil K; Lunina, Julia N; Morgunov, Igor G

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxalic and itaconic acids, the inhibitors of the isocitrate lyase, on the production of isocitric acid by the wild strain Yarrowia lipolytica VKM Y-2373 grown in the medium containing rapeseed oil was studied. In the presence of oxalic and itaconic acids, strain Y. lipolytica accumulated in the medium isocitric acid (70.0 and 82.7 g/L, respectively) and citric acid (23.0 and 18.4 g/L, respectively). In control experiment, when the inhibitors were not added to the medium, the strain accumulated isocitric and citric acids at concentrations of 62.0 and 28.0 g/L, respectively. Thus, the use of the oxalic and itaconic acids as additives to the medium is a simple and convenient method of isocitric acid production with a minimum content of citric acid. PMID:26851896

  10. Putrescine production from different amino acid precursors by lactic acid bacteria from wine and cider.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Antonella; Pietroniro, Roberta; Doria, Francesca; Pessione, Enrica; Garcia-Moruno, Emilia

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the production of biogenic amines and particularly putrescine in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) related to wine and cider. We applied an analytical protocol that involves the use of PCR and TLC techniques to determine the production of putrescine from different precursors. Moreover, we also studied the ability of the Lactobacillus and Pediococcus tested to produce histamine and tyramine. The results showed that the majority of the Lactobacillus brevis analyzed harbour both AgDI and tdc genes and are tyramine and putrescine producers. Conversely, among the other LAB tested, only one Lactobacillus hilgardii and one Pediococcus pentosaceus produced putrescine. The AgDI gene was also detected in two other LAB (Lactobacillus mali and Pediococcus parvulus), but no putrescine production was observed. Finally, hdc gene and histamine production were found in strains (L. hilgardii 5211, isolated from wine, and Lactobacillus casei 18, isolated from cider) that were not putrescine producers. PMID:23685467

  11. Grammatical Errors and Communication Breakdown.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomiyama, Machiko

    This study investigated the relationship between grammatical errors and communication breakdown by examining native speakers' ability to correct grammatical errors. The assumption was that communication breakdown exists to a certain degree if a native speaker cannot correct the error or if the correction distorts the information intended to be…

  12. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10126 Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo... CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10126 Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato...

  14. Microbial production of fatty acid-derived fuels and chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Lennen, Rebecca M; Pfleger, Brian F

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid metabolism is an attractive route to produce liquid transportation fuels and commodity oleochemicals from renewable feedstocks. Recently, genes and enzymes, which comprise metabolic pathways for producing fatty acid-derived compounds (e.g. esters, alkanes, olefins, ketones, alcohols, polyesters) have been elucidated and used in engineered microbial hosts. The resulting strains often generate products at low percentages of maximum theoretical yields, leaving significant room for metabolic engineering. Economically viable processes will require strains to approach theoretical yields, particularly for replacement of petroleum-derived fuels. This review will describe recent progress toward this goal, highlighting the scientific discoveries of each pathway, ongoing biochemical studies to understand each enzyme, and metabolic engineering strategies that are being used to improve strain performance. PMID:23541503

  15. Breakdown of organic insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    Solar cells and their associated electrical interconnects and leads were encapsulated in transparent elastomeric materials. Their purpose in a photovoltaic module, one of the most important for these elastomeric encapsulation materials, is to function as electrical insulation. This includes internal insulation between adjacent solar cells, between other encapsulated electrical parts, and between the total internal electrical circuitry and external metal frames, grounded areas, and module surfaces. Catastrophic electrical breakdown of the encapsulant insulation materials or electrical current through these materials or module edges to external locations can lead to module failure and can create hazards to humans. Electrical insulation stability, advanced elastomeric encapsulation materials are developed which are intended to be intrinsically free of in-situ ionic impurities, have ultralow water absorption, be weather-stable (UV, oxygen), and have high mechanical flexibility. Efforts to develop a method of assessing the life potential of organic insulation materials in photovoltaic modules are described.

  16. Ethanesulfonic acid-based esterification of industrial acidic crude palm oil for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Hayyan, Adeeb; Mjalli, Farouq S; Hashim, Mohd Ali; Hayyan, Maan; AlNashef, Inas M; Al-Zahrani, Saeed M; Al-Saadi, Mohammed A

    2011-10-01

    An industrial grade acidic crude palm oil (ACPO) pre-treatment process was carried out using ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) as a catalyst in the esterification reaction. ESA was used in different dosages to reduce free fatty acid (FFA) to a minimum level for the second stage of biodiesel production via alkaline transesterification reaction. Different process operating conditions were optimized such as ESA dosage (0.25-3.5% wt/wt), methanol to ACPO molar ratio (1:1-20:1), reaction temperature (40-70 °C), and reaction time (3-150 min). This study revealed the potential use of abundant quantities of ACPO from oil palm mills for biodiesel production. The lab scale results showed the effectiveness of the pre-treatment process using ESA catalyst. Three consecutive catalyst recycling runs were achieved without significant degradation in its performance. Second and third reuse runs needed more reaction time to achieve the target level of FFA content. Esterification and transesterification using ESA and KOH respectively is proposed for biodiesel industrial scale production. The produced biodiesel meets the international standards specifications for biodiesel fuel (EN 14214 and ASTM D6751). PMID:21855329

  17. Engineering a cyanobacterial cell factory for production of lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Angermayr, S Andreas; Paszota, Michal; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2012-10-01

    Metabolic engineering of microorganisms has become a versatile tool to facilitate production of bulk chemicals, fuels, etc. Accordingly, CO(2) has been exploited via cyanobacterial metabolism as a sustainable carbon source of biofuel and bioplastic precursors. Here we extended these observations by showing that integration of an ldh gene from Bacillus subtilis (encoding an l-lactate dehydrogenase) into the genome of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 leads to l-lactic acid production, a phenotype which is shown to be stable for prolonged batch culturing. Coexpression of a heterologous soluble transhydrogenase leads to an even higher lactate production rate and yield (lactic acid accumulating up to a several-millimolar concentration in the extracellular medium) than those for the single ldh mutant. The expression of a transhydrogenase alone, however, appears to be harmful to the cells, and a mutant carrying such a gene is rapidly outcompeted by a revertant(s) with a wild-type growth phenotype. Furthermore, our results indicate that the introduction of a lactate dehydrogenase rescues this phenotype by preventing the reversion. PMID:22865063

  18. 40 CFR 721.10629 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10629 Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic)....

  19. 40 CFR 721.10629 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10629 Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic)....

  20. Perspectives of engineering lactic acid bacteria for biotechnological polyol production.

    PubMed

    Monedero, Vicente; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J

    2010-04-01

    Polyols are sugar alcohols largely used as sweeteners and they are claimed to have several health-promoting effects (low-caloric, low-glycemic, low-insulinemic, anticariogenic, and prebiotic). While at present chemical synthesis is the only strategy able to assure the polyol market demand, the biotechnological production of polyols has been implemented in yeasts, fungi, and bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a group of microorganisms particularly suited for polyol production as they display a fermentative metabolism associated with an important redox modulation and a limited biosynthetic capacity. In addition, LAB participate in food fermentation processes, where in situ production of polyols during fermentation may be useful in the development of novel functional foods. Here, we review the polyol production by LAB, focusing on metabolic engineering strategies aimed to redirect sugar fermentation pathways towards the synthesis of biotechnologically important sugar alcohols such as sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol. Furthermore, possible approaches are presented for engineering new fermentation routes in LAB for production of arabitol, ribitol, and erythritol. PMID:20180114

  1. Process for chemical reaction of amino acids and amides yielding selective conversion products

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Jonathan E.

    2006-05-23

    The invention relates to processes for converting amino acids and amides to desirable conversion products including pyrrolidines, pyrrolidinones, and other N-substituted products. L-glutamic acid and L-pyroglutamic acid provide general reaction pathways to numerous and valuable selective conversion products with varied potential industrial uses.

  2. Glycolic acid production in the engineered yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycolic acid is a C2 hydroxy acid that is a widely used chemical compound. It can be polymerised to produce biodegradable polymers with excellent gas barrier properties. Currently, glycolic acid is produced in a chemical process using fossil resources and toxic chemicals. Biotechnological production of glycolic acid using renewable resources is a desirable alternative. Results The yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis are suitable organisms for glycolic acid production since they are acid tolerant and can grow in the presence of up to 50 g l-1 glycolic acid. We engineered S. cerevisiae and K. lactis for glycolic acid production using the reactions of the glyoxylate cycle to produce glyoxylic acid and then reducing it to glycolic acid. The expression of a high affinity glyoxylate reductase alone already led to glycolic acid production. The production was further improved by deleting genes encoding malate synthase and the cytosolic form of isocitrate dehydrogenase. The engineered S. cerevisiae strain produced up to about 1 g l-1 of glycolic acid in a medium containing d-xylose and ethanol. Similar modifications in K. lactis resulted in a much higher glycolic acid titer. In a bioreactor cultivation with d-xylose and ethanol up to 15 g l-1 of glycolic acid was obtained. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of engineering yeast to produce glycolic acid. Prior to this work glycolic acid production through the glyoxylate cycle has only been reported in bacteria. The benefit of a yeast host is the possibility for glycolic acid production also at low pH, which was demonstrated in flask cultivations. Production of glycolic acid was first shown in S. cerevisiae. To test whether a Crabtree negative yeast would be better suited for glycolic acid production we engineered K. lactis in the same way and demonstrated it to be a better host for glycolic acid production. PMID:24053654

  3. Calcium- and calmodulin-regulated breakdown of phospholipid by microsomal membranes from bean cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Paliyath, G.; Thompson, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin in the regulation of phospholipid breakdown by microsomal membranes from bean cotyledons has been obtained by following the formation of radiolabeled degradation products from (U-/sup 14/C)phosphatidylcholine. Three membrane-associated enzymes were found to mediate the breakdown of (U-/sup 14/C) phosphatidylcholine, viz. phospholipase D phosphatidic acid phosphatase and lipolytic acyl hydrolase. Phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid phosphatase were both stimulated by physiological levels of free Ca/sup 2 +/, whereas lipolytic acyl hydrolase proved to be insensitive to Ca/sup 2 +/. Phospholipase D was unaffected by calmodulin, but the activity of phosphatidic acid phosphatase was additionally stimulated by nanomolar levels of calmodulin in the presence of 15 micromolar free Ca/sup 2 +/. Calmidazolium, a calmodulin antagonist, inhibited phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity at IC/sub 50/ values ranging from 10 to 15 micromolar. Thus, the Ca/sup 2 +/-induced stimulation of phosphatidic acid phosphatase appears to be mediated through calmodulin, whereas the effect of Ca/sup 2 +/ on phospholipase D is independent of calmodulin. The role of Ca/sup 2 +/ as a second messenger in the initiation of membrane lipid degradation is discussed.

  4. Metabolic modeling of fumaric acid production by Rhizopus arrhizus

    SciTech Connect

    Gangl, I.C.; Weigand, W.W.; Keller, F.A.

    1991-12-31

    A metabolic model is developed for fumaric acid production by Rhizopus arrhizus. The model describes the reaction network and the extents of reaction in terms of the concentrations of the measurable species. The proposed pathway consists of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway and two pathways to FA production, both of which require CO{sub 2} fixation (the forward and the reverse TCA cycles). Relationships among the measurable quantities, in addition to those obtainable by a macroscopic mass balance, are found by invoking a pseudo-steady-state assumption on the nonaccumulating species in the pathway. Applications of the metabolic model, such as verifying the proposed pathway, obtaining the theoretical yield and selectivity, and detecting experimental errors, are discussed.

  5. Aspergillus oryzae nrtA affects kojic acid production.

    PubMed

    Sano, Motoaki

    2016-09-01

    We analyzed the role of the nitrate transporter-encoding gene (nrtA) of Aspergillus oryzae by gene disruption. Southern hybridization analysis indicated that homologous recombination occurred at the resident nrtA locus. Real-time PCR showed that the nrtA gene was strongly inducible by NaNO3. The nrtA disruptant did not exhibit normal growth when nitrate was available as the sole nitrogen source. These results indicate that NrtA is essential for nitrate uptake in A. oryzae. Kojic acid (KA) production was inhibited by the addition of a small amount of sodium nitrate. The nrtA-disrupted strain was deficient in the uptake of nitrate. As a result, KA production in this strain was not considerably affected by the presence of nitrate. PMID:27108780

  6. Relationship between morphology and itaconic acid production by Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qian; Liu, Jie; Liu, Liming

    2014-02-28

    The morphology of filamentous fungi closely correlates with the productivity in submerged culture. Using itaconic acid (IA) production by Aspergillus terreus as a research model, the quantitative relationship between the growth form of A. terreus and IA production was investigated. IA fermentation was scaled up from shake flasks to a 7 L stirred tank bioreactor based on the quantitative relationship. Our results demonstrated the following: (1) Three morphologies of A. terreus were formed by changing the inoculum level and shape of the flask. (2) Investigation of the effects of the three morphologies on broth rheology and IA production revealed the higher yield of IA on dry cell weight (DCW, IA/DCW) and yield of glucose on DCW (consumed glucose/DCW) were achieved during clump growth of A. terreus. (3) By varying the KH2PO4 concentration and culture temperature, the relationships between clump diameter and IA production were established, demonstrating that the yield of IA on DCW (R(2) = 0.9809) and yield of glucose on DCW (R(2) = 0.9421) were closely correlated with clump diameter. The optimum clump diameter range for higher IA production was 0.40-0.50 mm. (4) When the clump diameter was controlled at 0.45 mm by manipulating the mechanical stress in a 7 L fermentor, the yield of IA on DCW and yield of glucose on DCW were increased by 25.1% and 16.3%, respectively. The results presented in this study provide a potential approach for further enhancement of metabolite production by filamentous fungi. PMID:24169454

  7. Enhancement of lipid production and fatty acid profiling in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CC1010 for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Karpagam, R; Preeti, R; Ashokkumar, B; Varalakshmi, P

    2015-11-01

    Lipid from microalgae is one of the putative oil resources to facilitate the biodiesel production during this era of energy dissipation and environmental pollution. In this study, the key parameters such as biomass productivity, lipid productivity and lipid content were evaluated at the early stationary phase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CC1010 cultivated in nutrient starved (nitrogen, phosphorous), glucose (0.05%, 0.1%, 0.15% and 0.2%) and vitamin B12 supplementation (0.001%, 0.002% and 0.003%) in Tris-Acetate-Phosphate (TAP) medium. The lipid content in nitrogen starved media was 61% which is 2.34 folds higher than nutrient sufficient TAP medium. Glucose supplementation has lead to proportional increase in biomass productivity with the increasing concentration of glucose whereas vitamin B12 supplementations had not shown any influence in lipid and biomass production. Further, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling of C. reinhardtii, CC 1010 has revealed more than 80% of total SFA (saturated fatty acid) and MUFA (mono unsaturated fatty acid) content. Quality checking parameters of biodiesel like cetane number, saponification value, iodine number and degree of unsaturation were analyzed and the biodiesel fuel properties were found to be appropriate as per the international standards, EN 14214 and ASTM D6751. Conclusively, among all the treatments, nitrogen starvation with 0.1% glucose supplementation had yielded high lipid content in C. reinhardtii, CC 1010. PMID:25838071

  8. Method for continuous production of aromatic carboxylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, K.J.

    1988-12-20

    This patent describes a method for the continuous production of an aromatic carboxylic acid product in a pressurized oxidation reactor by liquid-phase, exothermic oxidation of an aromatic alkyl feed with an oxygen-containing gas, in the presence of an aromatic alkyl feed with an oxygen-containing gas, in the presence of an oxidation catalyst and in an aqueous monocarboxylic C/sub 2/ to C/sub 6/ aliphatic acid solvent medium, wherein the heat generated during the course of the oxidation is removed from the reactor by vaporization of a portion of the reaction medium and water, wherein the resulting vapors are condensed in part in a reflux loop externally of the oxidation reactor to produce a condensate and a gaseous phase, and wherein at least a portion of the condensate is returned to the oxidation reactor, the improvement comprising a method for controlling within desired limits the concentration of water in the oxidation reactor, which comprises: partitioning the vapors into a parallel condensate having a relatively lesser water-to-solvent weight ratio and a vapor phase having a relatively greater water-to-solvent weight ratio; returning the partial condensate directly to the oxidation reactor as a direct reflux stream; withdrawing the vapor phase from the reflux loop as a vapor stream; subjecting the withdrawn vapor stream to heat exchange while decreasing the vapor stream pressure to less than the oxidation reactor pressure to thereby produce an aqueous aliphatic acid stream having a water-to-solvent weight ratio greater than that of the direct reflux stream.

  9. Occurrence and role of lactic acid bacteria in seafood products.

    PubMed

    Françoise, Leroi

    2010-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in fish flesh has long been disregarded because the high post-mortem pH, the low percentage of sugars, the high content of low molecular weight nitrogenous molecules and the low temperature of temperate waters favor the rapid growth of pH-sensitive psychrotolerant marine Gram-negative bacteria like Pseudomonas, Shewanella and Photobacterium. In seafood packed in both vacuum (VP) and modified atmosphere (MAP) packaging commonly CO(2) enriched, the growth of the Gram-negative aerobic bacteria group (predominantly pseudomonads) is effectively inhibited and the number reached by LAB during storage is higher than that achieved in air but always several log units lower than the trimethylamine oxide (TMA-O) reducing and CO(2)-resistant organisms (Shewanella putrefaciens and Photobacterium phosphoreum). Accordingly, LAB are not of much concern in seafood neither aerobically stored nor VP and MAP. However, they may acquire great relevance in lightly preserved fish products (LPFP), including those VP or MAP. Fresh fish presents a very high water activity (aw) value (0.99). However, aw is reduced to about 0.96 when salt (typically 6% WP) is added to the product. As a result, aerobic Gram-negative bacteria are inhibited, which allows the growth of other organisms more resistant to reduced aw, i.e. LAB, and then they may acquire a central role in the microbial events occurring in the product. Changes in consumers' habits have led to an increase of convenient LPFP with a relative long shelf-life (at least 3 weeks) which, on the other hand, may constitute a serious problem from a safety perspective since Listeria monocytogenes and sometimes Clostridium botulinum (mainly type E) may able to grow. In any case the LAB function in marine products is complex, depending on species, strains, interaction with other bacteria and the food matrix. They may have no particular effect or they may be responsible for spoilage and, in certain cases, they may even exert

  10. RF breakdown experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, L.; Vlieks, A.; Pearson, C.; Caryotakis, G.; Luhmann, N.C.

    1999-05-01

    RF breakdown is a critical issue in the conditioning of klystrons, accelerator sections, and rf components for the next linear collider (NLC), as well as other high gradient accelerators and high power microwave sources. SLAC is conducting a series of experiments using an X-band traveling wave ring to characterize the processes and trigger mechanisms associated with rf breakdown. The goal of the research is to identify materials, processes, and manufacturing methods that will increase the breakdown threshold and minimize the time required for conditioning. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Breakdown in the pretext tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Benesch, J.F.

    1981-06-01

    Data are presented on the application of ion cyclotron resonance RF power to preionization in tokamaks. We applied 0.3-3 kW at 12 MHz to hydrogen and obtained a visible discharge, but found no scaling of breakdown voltage with any parameter we were able to vary. A possible explanation for this, which implies that higher RF power would have been much more effective, is discussed. Finally, we present our investigation of the dV/dt dependence of breakdown voltage in PRETEXT, a phenomenon also seen in JFT-2. The breakdown is discussed in terms of the physics of Townsend discharges.

  12. High gradient RF breakdown studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Lisa Leanne

    Higher accelerating gradients are required by future demands for TeV electron linear colliders. With higher energy comes the challenge of handling stronger electromagnetic fields in the accelerator structures and in the microwave sources that supply the power. A limit on the maximum field gradient is imposed by rf electrical breakdown. Investigating methods to achieve higher gradients and to better understand the mechanisms involved in the rf breakdown process has been the focal point of this study. A systematic series of rf breakdown experiments have been conducted at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center utilizing a transmission cavity operating in the TM020 mode. A procedure was developed to examine the high gradient section of the cavity in an electron microscope. The results have revealed that breakdown asymmetry exists between opposing high gradient surfaces. During breakdown, a plasma formation is detected localized near the surface with no visible evidence of an arc traversing the gap. These findings support the theory that high frequency rf breakdown is a single surface phenomenon. Other results from this study have shown that breakdown can occur at relatively low voltages when surface irregularities exist and along grain boundaries. A series of steps have been developed through this study that have significantly reduced the number of breakdowns that occur along grain boundaries. Testing under various vacuum conditions (10-11--10 -5 Torr) have revealed that while the breakdown threshold remained the same, the field emitted current density increased by almost two orders of magnitude. This suggests that the total field emitted current density is not the critical parameter in the initiation of high frequency vacuum breakdown. In the course of this study, microparticles were carefully tracked before and after rf processing. The outcome of this research suggests that expensive cleanroom facilities may not offer any advantage over practicing good cleaning and

  13. Production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid from glycerol by acid tolerant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Mugesh; Ashok, Somasundar; Park, Sunghoon

    2014-07-01

    The biological production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) has attracted significant attention because of its industrial importance. The low titer, yield and productivity, all of which are related directly or indirectly to the toxicity of 3-HP, have limited the commercial production of 3-HP. The aim of this study was to identify and select a 3-HP tolerant Escherichia coli strain among nine strains reported to produce various organic acids efficiently at high titer. When transformed with heterologous glycerol dehydratase, reactivase and aldehyde dehydrogenase, all nine E. coli strains produced 3-HP from glycerol but the level of 3-HP production, protein expression and activities of the important enzymes differed significantly according to the strain. Two E. coli strains, W3110 and W, showed higher levels of growth than the others in the presence of 25 g/L 3-HP. In the glycerol fed-batch bioreactor experiments, the recombinant E. coli W produced a high level of 3-HP at 460 ± 10 mM (41.5 ± 1.1 g/L) in 48 h with a yield of 31 % and a productivity of 0.86 ± 0.05 g/L h. In contrast, the recombinant E. coli W3110 produced only 180 ± 8.5 mM 3-HP (15.3 ± 0.8 g/L) in 48 h with a yield and productivity of 26 % and 0.36 ± 0.02 g/L h, respectively. This shows that the tolerance to and the production of 3-HP differ significantly among the well-known, similar strains of E. coli. The titer and productivity obtained with E. coli W were the highest reported thus far for the biological production of 3-HP from glycerol by E. coli. PMID:24788379

  14. Nonlinear Theory and Breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The main points of recent theoretical and computational studies on boundary-layer transition and turbulence are to be highlighted. The work is based on high Reynolds numbers and attention is drawn to nonlinear interactions, breakdowns and scales. The research focuses in particular on truly nonlinear theories, i.e. those for which the mean-flow profile is completely altered from its original state. There appear to be three such theories dealing with unsteady nonlinear pressure-displacement interactions (I), with vortex/wave interactions (II), and with Euler-scale flows (III). Specific recent findings noted for these three, and in quantitative agreement with experiments, are the following. Nonlinear finite-time break-ups occur in I, leading to sublayer eruption and vortex formation; here the theory agrees with experiments (Nishioka) regarding the first spike. II gives rise to finite-distance blowup of displacement thickness, then interaction and break-up as above; this theory agrees with experiments (Klebanoff, Nishioka) on the formation of three-dimensional streets. III leads to the prediction of turbulent boundary-layer micro-scale, displacement-and stress-sublayer-thicknesses.

  15. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 414) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  16. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 444) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14 ) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  17. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-10-13

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  18. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-09-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  19. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.

    1989-04-20

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF{sub 6}. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has traveled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 9 figs.

  20. Co-culture-inducible bacteriocin production in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chanos, Panagiotis; Mygind, Tina

    2016-05-01

    It is common knowledge that microorganisms have capabilities, like the production of antimicrobial compounds, which do not normally appear in ideal laboratory conditions. Common antimicrobial discovery techniques require the isolation of monocultures and their individual screening against target microorganisms. One strategy to achieve expression of otherwise hidden antimicrobials is induction by co-cultures. In the area of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria, there has been some research focusing into the characteristics of co-culture-inducible bacteriocin production and particularly the molecular mechanism(s) of such interactions. No clear relationship has been seen between bacteriocin-inducing and bacteriocin-producing microorganisms. The three-component regulatory system seems to be playing a central role in the induction, but inducing compounds have not been identified or characterized. However, the presence of the universal messenger molecule autoinducer-2 has been associated in some cases with the co-culture-inducible bacteriocin phenotype and it may play the role in the additional regulation of the three-component regulatory system. Understanding the mechanisms of induction would facilitate the development of strategies for screening and development of co-culture bacteriocin-producing systems and novel products as well as the perseverance of such systems in food and down to the intestinal tract, possibly conferring a probiotic effect on the host. PMID:27037694

  1. Large-scale production of anhydrous nitric acid and nitric acid solutions of dinitrogen pentoxide

    DOEpatents

    Harrar, Jackson E.; Quong, Roland; Rigdon, Lester P.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for a large scale, electrochemical production of anhydrous nitric acid and N.sub.2 O.sub.5. The method includes oxidizing a solution of N.sub.2 O.sub.4 /aqueous-HNO.sub.3 at the anode, while reducing aqueous HNO.sub.3 at the cathode, in a flow electrolyzer constructed of special materials. N.sub.2 O.sub.4 is produced at the cathode and may be separated and recycled as a feedstock for use in the anolyte. The process is controlled by regulating the electrolysis current until the desired products are obtained. The chemical compositions of the anolyte and catholyte are monitored by measurement of the solution density and the concentrations of N.sub.2 O.sub.4.

  2. Integrated Production of Xylonic Acid and Bioethanol from Acid-Catalyzed Steam-Exploded Corn Stover.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junjun; Rong, Yayun; Yang, Jinlong; Zhou, Xin; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Lingling; Chen, Jiahui; Yong, Qiang; Yu, Shiyuan

    2015-07-01

    High-efficiency xylose utilization is one of the restrictive factors of bioethanol industrialization. However, xylonic acid (XA) as a new bio-based platform chemical can be produced by oxidation of xylose with microbial. So, an applicable technology of XA bioconversion was integrated into the process of bioethanol production. After corn stover was pretreated with acid-catalyzed steam-explosion, solid and liquid fractions were obtained. The liquid fraction, also named as acid-catalyzed steam-exploded corn stover (ASC) prehydrolyzate (mainly containing xylose), was catalyzed with Gluconobacter oxydans NL71 to prepare XA. After 72 h of bioconversion of concentrated ASC prehydrolyzate (containing 55.0 g/L of xylose), the XA concentration reached a peak value of 54.97 g/L, the sugar utilization ratio and XA yield were 94.08 and 95.45 %, respectively. The solid fraction was hydrolyzed to produce glucose with cellulase and then fermented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae NL22 to produce ethanol. After 18 h of fermentation of concentrated enzymatic hydrolyzate (containing 86.22 g/L of glucose), the ethanol concentration reached its highest value of 41.48 g/L, the sugar utilization ratio and ethanol yield were 98.72 and 95.25 %, respectively. The mass balance showed that 1 t ethanol and 1.3 t XA were produced from 7.8 t oven dry corn stover. PMID:25947618

  3. Increased fracture penetration and productivity using xanthan gelled acid in massive carbonate formations

    SciTech Connect

    Molon, J.P.; Fox, K.B.

    1983-03-01

    A measurable improvement in productivity can be achieved using xanthan gelled acid to stimulate carbonate formations. Well productivity results were compared to conventional acid fracture treatments. The significant improvements over classical acid fracturing techniques are due to the improved control of acid leakoff rates, retarded reaction rate and improved fracture width maintenance. The difficulties involved in acid fracturing massive Middle East carbonate formations are discussed and solutions are proposed using gelled acid technology. Some limitations in computer predictions of acid fracturing results are also discussed.

  4. Furfural production from Eucalyptus wood using an Acidic Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Peleteiro, Susana; Santos, Valentín; Garrote, Gil; Parajó, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Eucalyptus globulus wood samples were treated with hot, compressed water to separate hemicelluloses (as soluble saccharides) from a solid phase mainly made up of cellulose and lignin. The liquid phase was dehydrated, and the resulting solids (containing pentoses as well as poly- and oligo- saccharides made up of pentoses) were dissolved and reacted in media containing an Acidic Ionic Liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate) and a co-solvent (dioxane). The effects of the reaction time on the product distribution were studied at temperatures in the range 120-170°C for reaction times up to 8h, and operational conditions leading to 59.1% conversion of the potential substrates (including pentoses and pentose structural units in oligo- and poly- saccharides) into furfural were identified. PMID:27112846

  5. Role of solid acid catalysts in bio diesel production.

    PubMed

    Shivayogimath, C B; Sunita, G; Manoj Kumar, B

    2009-07-01

    Biodiesel is gaining importance as an alternate source of attractive fuel because of depleting fossil fuel resources. It is produced by trans-esterification, in which oil or fat reacts with a monohydric alcohol in presence of a catalyst. In the present work, trans-esterification of sunflower oil with methanol is carried out by using zirconia supported isopoly and heteropoly tungstates (HPAs) as catalysts. Effects of reaction parameters, such as catalyst types and its concentration, molar ratio of sunflower oil to methanol, reaction temperature and time, have been optimized to get higher conversion of sunflower oil and the product distribution of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) in the trans-esterfication reaction. PMID:21117436

  6. Origin of haloacetic acids in milk and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Cardador, Maria Jose; Gallego, Mercedes

    2016-04-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are formed during the process of water disinfection. Therefore their presence in foods can be correlated with the addition of or contact with treated water. To determine the origin of HAAs in milk and dairy products, firstly a chromatographic method was developed for their determination. The sample treatment involves deproteination of milk followed by derivatization/extraction of the HAAs in the supernatant. About 20% of the foods analyzed contained two HAAs - which in no case exceeded 2 μg L(-1), that can be ascribed to contamination from sanitizers usually employed in the dairy industry. The process of boiling tap water (containing HAAs) for the preparation of powdered infant formula did not remove them; therefore it would be advisable to prepare this type of milk with mineral water (free of HAAs). In addition, it is possible to establish if the milk has been adulterated with treated water through the determination of HAAs. PMID:26593550

  7. 40 CFR 415.280 - Applicability; description of the boric acid production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Boric Acid Production Subcategory § 415.280 Applicability; description of the boric acid... production of boric acid from ore-mined borax and from borax produced by the Trona process. ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Applicability; description of the...

  8. 40 CFR 415.280 - Applicability; description of the boric acid production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Boric Acid Production Subcategory § 415.280 Applicability; description of the boric acid... production of boric acid from ore-mined borax and from borax produced by the Trona process. ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the...

  9. 40 CFR 415.280 - Applicability; description of the boric acid production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Boric Acid Production Subcategory § 415.280 Applicability; description of the boric acid... production of boric acid from ore-mined borax and from borax produced by the Trona process. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the...

  10. 40 CFR 415.280 - Applicability; description of the boric acid production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CATEGORY Boric Acid Production Subcategory § 415.280 Applicability; description of the boric acid... production of boric acid from ore-mined borax and from borax produced by the Trona process. ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the...

  11. Aspergillus oryzae-based cell factory for direct kojic acid production from cellulose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Kojic acid (5-Hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-pyrone) is one of the major secondary metabolites in Aspergillus oryzae. It is widely used in food, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. The production cost, however, is too high for its use in many applications. Thus, an efficient and cost-effective kojic acid production process would be valuable. However, little is known about the complete set of genes for kojic acid production. Currently, kojic acid is produced from glucose. The efficient production of kojic acid using cellulose as an inexpensive substrate would help establish cost-effective kojic acid production. Results A kojic acid transcription factor gene over-expressing the A. oryzae strain was constructed. Three genes related to kojic acid production in this strain were transcribed in higher amounts than those found in the wild-type strain. This strain produced 26.4 g/L kojic acid from 80 g/L glucose. Furthermore, this strain was transformed with plasmid harboring 3 cellulase genes. The resultant A. oryzae strain successfully produced 0.18 g/L of kojic acid in 6 days of fermentation from the phosphoric acid swollen cellulose. Conclusions Kojic acid was produced directly from cellulose material using genetically engineered A. oryzae. Because A. oryzae has efficient protein secretion ability and secondary metabolite productivity, an A. oryzae-based cell factory could be a platform for the production of various kinds of bio-based chemicals. PMID:24885968

  12. Lactic acid production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae without PDC or ADH deletion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of lactic acid from renewable sugars has received growing attention as lactic acid can be used for making renewable and bio-based plastics. However, most prior studies have focused on production of lactic acid from glucose despite cellulosic hydrolysates contain xylose as well as glucose....

  13. Optimization of ascorbic acid-2-phosphate production from ascorbic acid using resting cell of Brevundimonas diminuta.

    PubMed

    Shin, Woo-Jung; Kim, Byung-Yong; Bang, Won-Gi

    2007-05-01

    With the aim to produce ascorbic acid-2-phosphate (AsA-2-P) from L-ascorbic acid (AsA, Vitamin C), nine bacteria conferring the ability to transform AsA to AsA-2-P were isolated from soil samples alongside known strains from culture collections. Most isolates were classified to the genus Brevundimonas by 16S phylogenetic analysis. Among them, Brevundimonas diminuta KACC 10306 was selected as the experimental strain because of its the highest productivity of AsA-2-P. The optimum set of conditions for the AsA-2-P production from AsA using resting cells as the source of the enzyme was also investigated. The optimum cultivation time was 16 h and the cell concentration was 120 g/l (wet weight). The optimum concentrations of AsA and pyrophosphate were 550 mM and 450 mM, respectively. The most effective buffer was 50 mM sodium formate. The optimum pH was 4.5 and temperature was 40 degrees C. Under the above conditions, 27.5 g/l of AsA-2-P was produced from AsA after 36 h of incubation, which corresponded to a 19.7% conversion efficiency based on the initial concentration of AsA. PMID:18051298

  14. Bacterial production of free fatty acids from freshwater macroalgal cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Hoovers, Spencer W.; Marner, Wesley D.; Brownson, Amy K.; Lennen, Rebecca M.; Wittkopp, Tyler M.; Yoshitani, Jun; Zulkifly, Shahrizim; Graham, Linda E.; Chaston, Sheena D.; McMahon, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    The predominant strategy for using algae to produce biofuels relies on the overproduction of lipids in microalgae with subsequent conversion to biodiesel (methyl-esters) or green diesel (alkanes). Conditions that both optimize algal growth and lipid accumulation rarely overlap, and differences in growth rates can lead to wild species outcompeting the desired lipid-rich strains. Here, we demonstrate an alternative strategy in which cellulose contained in the cell walls of multicellular algae is used as a feedstock for cultivating biofuel-producing micro-organisms. Cellulose was extracted from an environmental sample of Cladophora glomerata-dominated periphyton that was collected from Lake Mendota, WI, USA. The resulting cellulose cake was hydrolyzed by commercial enzymes to release fermentable glucose. The hydrolysis mixture was used to formulate an undefined medium that was able to support the growth, without supplementation, of a free fatty acid (FFA)-overproducing strain of Escherichia coli (Lennen et. al 2010). To maximize free fatty acid production from glucose, an isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible vector was constructed to express the Umbellularia californica acyl–acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase. Thioesterase expression was optimized by inducing cultures with 50 μM IPTG. Cell density and FFA titers from cultures grown on algae-based media reached 50% of those (~90 μg/mL FFA) cultures grown on rich Luria–Bertani broth supplemented with 0.2% glucose. In comparison, cultures grown in two media based on AFEX-pretreated corn stover generated tenfold less FFA than cultures grown in algae-based media. This study demonstrates that macroalgal cellulose is a potential carbon source for the production of biofuels or other microbially synthesized compounds. PMID:21643704

  15. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo- prope...

  16. OCCURRENCE AND TOXICITY OF IODO-ACID DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo...

  17. Effect of Surfactants on Production of Oxygenated Unsaturated Fatty Acids by Bacillus megaterium ALA2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacillus megaterium ALA2 (NRRL B-21660) produces many oxygenated unsaturated fatty acids from linoleic acid. Its major product, 12,13,17-trihydroxy-9(Z)-octadecenoic acid (12,13,17-THOA), inhibits the growth of some plant pathogenic fungi. Because hydrophobic fatty acids need to be evenly disperse...

  18. Production of levulinic acid and use as a platform chemical for derived products

    SciTech Connect

    Bozell, J.J.; Moens, L.; Elliott, D.C.; Wang, Y.; Neuenscwander, G.G.; Fitzpatrick, S.W.; Bilski, R.J.; Jarnefeld, J.L.

    1999-07-01

    Levulinic acid (LA) can be produced cost effectively and in high yield from renewable feedstocks in a new industrial process. The technology is being demonstrated on a one ton/day scale at a facility in South Glens Falls, New York. Low cost LA can be used as a platform chemical for the production of a wide range of value-added products. This research has demonstrated that LA can be converted to methyltetrahydrofuran (MTHF), a solvent and fuel extender. MTHF is produced in {gt}80% molar yield via a single stage catalytic hydrogenation process. A new preparation of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (DALA), a broad spectrum herbicide from LA has also been developed. Each step in this new process proceeds in high ({gt}80%) yield and affords DALA (as the hydrochloride salt) in greater than 90% purity, giving a process that could be commercially viable. LA is also being investigated as a starting material for the production of diphenolic acid (DPA), a direct replacement for bisphenol A.

  19. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase-mediated hypochlorous acid production by nitroxides

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Martin D.; Bottle, Steven E.; Fairfull-Smith, Kathryn E.; Malle, Ernst; Whitelock, John M.; Davies, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue damage resulting from the extracellular production of HOCl (hypochlorous acid) by the MPO (myeloperoxidase)-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system of activated phagocytes is implicated as a key event in the progression of a number of human inflammatory diseases. Consequently, there is considerable interest in the development of therapeutically useful MPO inhibitors. Nitroxides are well established antioxidant compounds of low toxicity that can attenuate oxidative damage in animal models of inflammatory disease. They are believed to exert protective effects principally by acting as superoxide dismutase mimetics or radical scavengers. However, we show here that nitroxides can also potently inhibit MPO-mediated HOCl production, with the nitroxide 4-aminoTEMPO inhibiting HOCl production by MPO and by neutrophils with IC50 values of approx. 1 and 6 μM respectively. Structure–activity relationships were determined for a range of aliphatic and aromatic nitroxides, and inhibition of oxidative damage to two biologically-important protein targets (albumin and perlecan) are demonstrated. Inhibition was shown to involve one-electron oxidation of the nitroxides by the compound I form of MPO and accumulation of compound II. Haem destruction was also observed with some nitroxides. Inhibition of neutrophil HOCl production by nitroxides was antagonized by neutrophil-derived superoxide, with this attributed to superoxide-mediated reduction of compound II. This effect was marginal with 4-aminoTEMPO, probably due to the efficient superoxide dismutase-mimetic activity of this nitroxide. Overall, these data indicate that nitroxides have considerable promise as therapeutic agents for the inhibition of MPO-mediated damage in inflammatory diseases. PMID:19379130

  20. Kinetics and Products of Heterogeneous Oxidation of Oleic acid, Linoleic acid and Linolenic acid in Aerosol Particles by Hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nah, T.; Leone, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    A significant mass fraction of atmospheric aerosols is composed of a variety of oxidized organic compounds with varying functional groups that may affect the rate at which they chemically age. Here we study the heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with different sub-micron, alkenoic acid particles: Oleic acid (OA), Linoleic acid (LA), and Linolenic acid (LNA), in the presence of H2O2 and O2. This research explores how OH addition reactions initiate chain reactions that rapidly transform the chemical composition of an organic particle. Particles are chemically aged in a photochemical flow tube reactor where they are exposed to OH radicals (~ 1011 molecule cm-3 s) that are produced by the photolysis of H2O2 at 254 nm. The aerosols are then sized and their composition analyzed via Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization (APCI). Detailed kinetic measurements show that the reactive uptake coefficient is larger than 1, indicating the presence of secondary chemistry occurring in the condensed phase. Reactive uptake coefficient is found to scale linearly with the number of double bonds present in the molecule. In addition, the reactive uptake coefficient is found to depend sensitively upon the concentrations of O2 in the photochemical flow tube reactor, indicating that O2 plays a role in secondary chemistry. In the absence of O2 the reactive uptake coefficient increases to ~ 8, 5 and 3 for LNA, LA, and OA, respectively. The reactive uptake coefficient approaches values of 6, 4 and 2 for LNA, LA, and OA respectively when 18% of the total nitrogen flow is replaced with O2. Mechanistic pathways and products will also be presented herein.

  1. Cleaner production of citric acid by recycling its extraction wastewater treated with anaerobic digestion and electrodialysis in an integrated citric acid-methane production process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Su, Xian-Feng; Bao, Jia-Wei; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2015-01-01

    To solve the pollution problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid production, an integrated citric acid-methane production process was proposed. Extraction wastewater was treated through anaerobic digestion and the anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) was recycled for the next batch of citric acid fermentation, thus eliminating wastewater discharge and reducing water consumption. Excessive Na(+) contained in ADE could significantly inhibit citric acid fermentation in recycling and was removed by electrodialysis in this paper. Electrodialysis performance was improved after pretreatment of ADE with air stripping and activated carbon adsorption to remove precipitable metal ions and pigments. Moreover, the concentrate water was recycled and mixed with feed to improve the water recovery rate above 95% in electrodialysis treatment, while the dilute water was collected for citric acid fermentation. The removal rate of Na(+) in ADE was above 95% and the citric acid production was even higher than that with tap water. PMID:25898079

  2. Runaway breakdown and electrical discharges in thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, Gennady; Roussel-Dupré, Robert

    2010-12-01

    This review considers the precise role played by runaway breakdown (RB) in the initiation and development of lightning discharges. RB remains a fundamental research topic under intense investigation. The question of how lightning is initiated and subsequently evolves in the thunderstorm environment rests in part on a fundamental understanding of RB and cosmic rays and the potential coupling to thermal runaway (as a seed to RB) and conventional breakdown (as a source of thermal runaways). In this paper, we describe the basic mechanism of RB and the conditions required to initiate an observable avalanche. Feedback processes that fundamentally enhance RB are discussed, as are both conventional breakdown and thermal runaway. Observations that provide clear evidence for the presence of energetic particles in thunderstorms/lightning include γ-ray and X-ray flux intensifications over thunderstorms, γ-ray and X-ray bursts in conjunction with stepped leaders, terrestrial γ-ray flashes, and neutron production by lightning. Intense radio impulses termed narrow bipolar pulses (or NBPs) provide indirect evidence for RB particularly when measured in association with cosmic ray showers. Our present understanding of these phenomena and their enduring enigmatic character are touched upon briefly.

  3. Productivity of concentrated hyaluronic acid using a Maxblend fermentor.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, S; Nagatsuru, M; Shibutani, M; Yamamoto, S; Hasebe, S

    1999-01-01

    Application of the Maxblend impeller to the fermentative production of hyaluronic acid (HA) was investigated. A 2-m3-scale fermentor fitted with this impeller (MBF) was used and the main fermentation was started with 85% of the nominal volume containing the pre-culture broth and medium. The kinetic characteristics of the MBF were compared with those of a conventional-type fermentor fitted with a turbine blade (TBN). The HA production yield in the MBF was over 20% higher than that in the TBN under the operating conditions of a high aeration rate and low vessel pressure since the broth viscosity increased. The apparent viscosity of the broth at the end of the cultivation rose to about 70 Pa.s. The molecular weight of the HA produced was independent of the agitation speed within the investigated range, and no significant difference was observed between the viscosity-average molecular weights of the HA obtained in the two types of fermentor, each having an estimated value of 4.3 x 10(6) under the same agitation power. PMID:16232576

  4. A Simple Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Fixation and Acid Production in CAM Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John R. L.; McWha, James A.

    1976-01-01

    Described is an experiment investigating carbon dioxide fixation in the dark and the diurnal rhythm of acid production in plants exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism. Included are suggestions for four further investigations. (SL)

  5. Production of citric and oxalic acids and solubilization of calcium phosphate by Penicillium bilaii.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, J E; Kuiack, C

    1992-01-01

    An isolate of Penicillium bilaii previously reported to solubilize mineral phosphates and enhance plant uptake of phosphate was studied. Using agar media with calcium phosphate and the pH indicator alizarin red S, the influence of the medium composition on phosphate solubility and medium acidification was recorded. The major acidic metabolites produced by P. bilaii in a sucrose nitrate liquid medium were found to be oxalic acid and citric acid. Citric acid production was promoted under nitrogen-limited conditions, while oxalic acid production was promoted under carbon-limited conditions. Citric acid was produced in both growth and stationary phases, but oxalic acid production occurred only in stationary phase. When submerged cultures which normally produce acid were induced to sporulate, the culture medium shifted toward alkaline rather than acid reaction with growth. PMID:1622211

  6. Degradation of Fructans and Production of Propionic Acid by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are Enhanced by the Shortage of Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Adamberg, Signe; Tomson, Katrin; Vija, Heiki; Puurand, Marju; Kabanova, Natalja; Visnapuu, Triinu; Jõgi, Eerik; Alamäe, Tiina; Adamberg, Kaarel

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is commonly found in the human colon and stabilizes its ecosystem by catabolism of various polysaccharides. A model of cross-talk between the metabolism of amino acids and fructans in B. thetaiotaomicron was proposed. The growth of B. thetaiotaomicron DSM 2079 in two defined media containing mineral salts and vitamins, and supplemented with either 20 or 2 amino acids, was studied in an isothermal microcalorimeter. The polyfructans inulin (from chicory) and levan (synthesized using levansucrase from Pseudomonas syringae), two fructooligosaccharide preparations with different composition, sucrose and fructose were tested as substrates. The calorimetric power-time curves were substrate specific and typically multiauxic. A surplus of amino acids reduced the consumption of longer oligosaccharides (degree of polymerization > 3). Bacterial growth was not detected either in the carbohydrate free medium containing amino acids or in the medium with inulin as a sole carbohydrate. In amino acid-restricted medium, fermentation leading to acetic acid formation was dominant at the beginning of growth (up to 24 h), followed by increased lactic acid production, and mainly propionic and succinic acids were produced at the end of fermentation. In the medium supplemented with 20 amino acids, the highest production of d-lactate (82 ± 33 mmol/gDW) occurred in parallel with extensive consumption (up to 17 mmol/gDW) of amino acids, especially Ser, Thr, and Asp. The production of Ala and Glu was observed at growth on all substrates, and the production was enhanced under amino acid deficiency. The study revealed the influence of amino acids on fructan metabolism in B. thetaiotaomicron and showed that defined growth media are invaluable in elucidating quantitative metabolic profiles of the bacteria. Levan was shown to act as an easily degradable substrate for B. thetaiotaomicron. The effect of levan on balancing or modifying colon microbiota will

  7. Degradation of Fructans and Production of Propionic Acid by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are Enhanced by the Shortage of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Adamberg, Signe; Tomson, Katrin; Vija, Heiki; Puurand, Marju; Kabanova, Natalja; Visnapuu, Triinu; Jõgi, Eerik; Alamäe, Tiina; Adamberg, Kaarel

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is commonly found in the human colon and stabilizes its ecosystem by catabolism of various polysaccharides. A model of cross-talk between the metabolism of amino acids and fructans in B. thetaiotaomicron was proposed. The growth of B. thetaiotaomicron DSM 2079 in two defined media containing mineral salts and vitamins, and supplemented with either 20 or 2 amino acids, was studied in an isothermal microcalorimeter. The polyfructans inulin (from chicory) and levan (synthesized using levansucrase from Pseudomonas syringae), two fructooligosaccharide preparations with different composition, sucrose and fructose were tested as substrates. The calorimetric power-time curves were substrate specific and typically multiauxic. A surplus of amino acids reduced the consumption of longer oligosaccharides (degree of polymerization > 3). Bacterial growth was not detected either in the carbohydrate free medium containing amino acids or in the medium with inulin as a sole carbohydrate. In amino acid-restricted medium, fermentation leading to acetic acid formation was dominant at the beginning of growth (up to 24 h), followed by increased lactic acid production, and mainly propionic and succinic acids were produced at the end of fermentation. In the medium supplemented with 20 amino acids, the highest production of d-lactate (82 ± 33 mmol/gDW) occurred in parallel with extensive consumption (up to 17 mmol/gDW) of amino acids, especially Ser, Thr, and Asp. The production of Ala and Glu was observed at growth on all substrates, and the production was enhanced under amino acid deficiency. The study revealed the influence of amino acids on fructan metabolism in B. thetaiotaomicron and showed that defined growth media are invaluable in elucidating quantitative metabolic profiles of the bacteria. Levan was shown to act as an easily degradable substrate for B. thetaiotaomicron. The effect of levan on balancing or modifying colon microbiota will

  8. FORMATION OF ACIDIC TRACE ORGANIC BY-PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF HUMIC ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for concentrating and analyzing acidic trace organics produced by the chlorination of humic acids at concentrations approximating common drinking water levels is described. Data are compared from several humic acid sources. Specific compound analyses of the extracts were...

  9. Wastes from bioethanol and beer productions as substrates for l(+) lactic acid production - A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Djukić-Vuković, Aleksandra; Mladenović, Dragana; Radosavljević, Miloš; Kocić-Tanackov, Sunčica; Pejin, Jelena; Mojović, Ljiljana

    2016-02-01

    Waste substrates from bioethanol and beer productions are cheap, abundant and renewable substrates for biorefinery production of lactic acid (LA) and variability in their chemical composition presents a challenge in their valorisation. Three types of waste substrates, wasted bread and wasted potato stillage from bioethanol production and brewers' spent grain hydrolysate from beer production were studied as substrates for the production of l(+) LA and probiotic biomass by Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469. The correlation of the content of free alpha amino nitrogen and the production of LA was determined as a critical characteristic of the waste media for efficient LA production by L. rhamnosus on the substrates which contained equal amount of fermentable sugars. A maximal LA productivity of 1.54gL(-1)h(-1) was obtained on wasted bread stillage media, whilst maximal productivities achieved on the potato stillage and brewers' spent grain hydrolysate media were 1.28gL(-1)h(-1)and 0.48gL(-1)h(-1), respectively. A highest LA yield of 0.91gg(-1) was achieved on wasted bread stillage media, followed by the yield of 0.81gg(-1) on wasted potato stillage and 0.34gg(-1) on brewers' spent grain hydrolysate media. The kinetics of sugar consumption in the two stillage substrates were similar while the sugar conversion in brewers' spent grain hydrolysate was slower and less efficient due to significantly lower content of free alpha amino nitrogen. The lignocellulosic hydrolysate from beer production required additional supplementation with nitrogen. PMID:26639411

  10. Study on the kinetics and transformation products of salicylic acid in water via ozonation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruikang; Zhang, Lifeng; Hu, Jiangyong

    2016-06-01

    As salicylic acid is one of widely used pharmaceuticals, its residue has been found in various environmental water systems e.g. wastewater, surface water, treated water and drinking water. It has been reported that salicylic acid can be efficiently removed by advanced oxidation processes, but there are few studies on its transformation products and ozonation mechanisms during ozonation process. The objective of this study is to characterize the transformation products, investigate the degradation mechanisms at different pH, and propose the ozonation pathways of salicylic acid. The results showed that the rate of degradation was about 10 times higher at acidic condition than that at alkaline condition in the first 1 min when 1 mg L(-1) of ozone solution was added into 1 mg L(-1) of salicylic acid solution. It was proposed that ozone direct oxidation mechanism dominates at acidic condition, while indirect OH radical mechanism dominates at alkaline condition. A two stages pseudo-first order reaction was proposed at different pH conditions. Various hydroxylation products, carbonyl compounds and carboxylic acids, such as 2,5-dihydroxylbenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxylbenzoic acid, catechol, formaldehyde, glyoxal, acetaldehyde, maleic acid, acetic acid and oxalic acid etc. were identified as ozonation transformation products. In addition, acrylic acid was identified, for the first time, as ozonation transformation products through high resolution liquid chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometer. The information demonstrated in this study will help us to better understand the possible effects of ozonation products on the water quality. The degradation pathways of salicylic acid by ozonation in water sample were proposed. As both O3 and OH radical were important in the reactions, the degradation pathways of salicylic acid by ozonation in water sample were proposed at acidic and basic conditions. To our knowledge, there was no integrated study reported on the ozonation of

  11. Fermentative production of shikimic acid: a paradigm shift of production concept from plant route to microbial route.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Priyanka; Rawat, Garima; Yadav, Sweta; Saxena, R K

    2013-11-01

    Different physiological and nutritional parameters affect the fermentative production of shikimic acid. In our study, Citrobacter freundii initially produced 0.62 g/L of shikimic acid in 72 h. However, when process optimization was employed, 5.11 g/L of shikimic acid was produced in the production medium consisting of glucose (5.0 %), asparagine (4.5 %), CaCO3 (2.0 %), at pH 6.0, when inoculated with 6 % inoculum and incubated at 30 ± 1 °C, 200 rpm for 60 h. Preliminary fed-batch studies have resulted in the production of 9.11 g/L of shikimic acid on feeding the production medium by 20 g/L of glucose at 24 h of the fermentation run. Production of similar amount of shikimic acid was observed when the optimized conditions were employed in a 10-L bioreactor as obtained in shake flask conditions. A total of 9.11 g/L of shikimic acid was produced in 60 h. This is approximately 14.69-fold increase in shikimic acid production when compared to the initial un-optimized production conditions. This has also resulted in the reduction of the production time. The present study provides useful information to the industrialists seeking environmentally benign technology for the production of bulk biomolecules through manipulation of various chemical parameters. PMID:23543261

  12. Production of 14-oxo-cis-11-eicosenoic acid from lesquerolic acid by genetically variable Sphingobacterium multivorum strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to explore the extent of microbial conversion of lesquerolic acid (LQA; 14-hydroxy-cis-11-eicosenoic acid) by whole cell catalysis and to identify the newly converted product. Among 17 environmental isolates selected from compost amended with soybean oil and unsatura...

  13. Increased Production of Fatty Acids and Triglycerides in Aspergillus oryzae by Enhancing Expressions of Fatty Acid Synthesis-Related Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Tamano, Koichi; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Karagiosis, Sue A.; Culley, David E.; Deng, Shuang; Collett, James R.; Umemura, Myco; Koike, Hideaki; Baker, Scott E.; Machida, Masa

    2013-01-01

    Microbial production of fats and oils is being developedas a means of converting biomass to biofuels. Here we investigate enhancing expression of enzymes involved in the production of fatty acids and triglycerides as a means to increase production of these compounds in Aspergillusoryzae. Examination of the A.oryzaegenome demonstrates that it contains twofatty acid synthases and several other genes that are predicted to be part of this biosynthetic pathway. We enhancedthe expressionof fatty acid synthesis-related genes by replacing their promoters with thepromoter fromthe constitutively highly expressedgene tef1. We demonstrate that by simply increasing the expression of the fatty acid synthasegenes we successfullyincreasedtheproduction of fatty acids and triglyceridesby more than two fold. Enhancement of expression of the fatty acid pathway genes ATP-citrate lyase and palmitoyl-ACP thioesteraseincreasedproductivity to a lesser extent.Increasing expression ofacetyl-CoA carboxylase caused no detectable change in fatty acid levels. Increases in message level for each gene were monitored usingquantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our data demonstrates that a simple increase in the abundance of fatty acid synthase genes can increase the detectable amount of fatty acids.

  14. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED... fermentation product. Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product may be safely used in animal feed... glutamic acid. (b) It is used or intended for use as follows: (1) In poultry feed as a source of protein...

  15. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED... fermentation product. Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product may be safely used in animal feed... glutamic acid. (b) It is used or intended for use as follows: (1) In poultry feed as a source of protein...

  16. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED... fermentation product. Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product may be safely used in animal feed... glutamic acid. (b) It is used or intended for use as follows: (1) In poultry feed as a source of protein...

  17. 21 CFR 573.500 - Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED... fermentation product. Condensed, extracted glutamic acid fermentation product may be safely used in animal feed... glutamic acid. (b) It is used or intended for use as follows: (1) In poultry feed as a source of protein...

  18. Massive production of farnesol-derived dicarboxylic acids in mice treated with the squalene synthase inhibitor zaragozic acid A.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, S; Bostedor, R; Kurtz, M M; Bergstrom, J D; Bansal, V S

    1998-07-01

    The zaragozic acids are potent inhibitors of squalene synthase. In vivo studies in mice confirmed our earlier observations that inhibition of squalene synthase by zaragozic acid A was accompanied by an increase in the incorporation of label from [3H]mevalonate into farnesyl-diphosphate (FPP)-derived isoprenoic acids (J. D. Bergstrom et al., 1993, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90, 80-84). Farnesyl-diphosphate-derived metabolites appear transiently in the liver. We were unable to detect any farnesol formation in the zaragozic acid-treated animals which indicates that FPP is readily converted to farnesoic acid and dicarboxylic acids in the liver. These metabolites were found to be produced only in the liver and not in the kidney. trans-3,7-Dimethyl-2-octaen-1,8-dioic acid and 3, 7-dimethyloctan-1,8-dioic acid were identified as the major end products of farnesyl-diphosphate metabolism in the urine of mice treated with zaragozic acid A. Quantitative analysis of these FPP-derived dicarboxylic acids by gas-liquid chromatography revealed that approximately 11 mg of total dicarboxylic acids is excreted per day into the urine of a mouse after 3 days of treatment with zaragozic acid A. PMID:9647670

  19. [Bacterial contamination of infant urine samples obtained from filter papers used in neuroblastoma-screening tests. (6) Protective effects of preaddition of chlorhexidine digluconate in filter papers or containers for urine on bacterial break-down of creatinine, vanillylmandelic acid and homovanillic acid].

    PubMed

    Imai, J; Iwata, H; Gotoh, K; Mori, H; Kawai, M

    1992-10-01

    The effects of chlorhexidine digluconate preadded to urine samples for a neuroblastoma-screening test in preventing the break-down of creatinine (Cre), vanillylmandelic acid (VMA), and homovanillic acid (HVA) by creatinine-cleaving bacteria and the influence of the added disinfectant on the HPLC determination of urinary Cre, VMA, vanillillactic acid (VLA) and HVA. Laboratory or field experiments showed that preadded disinfectant (0.02% volume) nearly completely inhibited the growth of the bacteria and satisfactorily protected urinary Cre, VMA, and HVA from bacterial decomposition. Chlorhexidine digluconate was comparable to benzalkonium chloride in its inhibitory effects on the growth and activities of creatinine-cleaving bacteria. Unlike benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine digluconate added to urine samples gave no troubles in subsequent analytical processes. Addition of the disinfectant (0.02% volume) to standard Cre, VMA, VLA, and HVA solution did not affect retention times and sensitivities in HPLC analyses. To estimate influences of the added disinfectant on the serial HPLC determinations of VMA, VLA, and HVA on a large number of urine samples (40, 80, 120, 160, 200, or 5, 500), HPLC analyses were performed on standard VMA, VLA, and HVA solution with repeated injection of the disinfectant in great amounts into a column. The results showed no appreciable changes in the retention times and sensitivities of VMA, VLA, and HVA, and almost complete elution of the disinfectant retained on the column were possible with water-methanol (1:1, 2:8) or methanol washing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1467545

  20. Plasma breakdown and combustion ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, Donald H.; Tran, Phuoc

    2001-10-01

    Ignition in chemically reactive media and electrical breakdown are among the most widely used transient processes. The two phenomena operate together during electrical (and laser) spark ignition of combustible gases. Analogs between them show up in Semenov's early (1920's) work on chemical chain reactions and on thermal breakdown of dielectrics. Both breakdown and ignition are under active study today. The energy source for breakdown is an applied electric field, and that for ignition, an applied flux of heat or radicals. Electrons and intermediate reactants are the corresponding driver particles, with a velocity difference that implies a vast difference in the growth rates for the two processes. Combustion takes place in a fuel-oxidant mixture, and an ignited reaction can proceed until the fuel or oxidant is depleted, while a (non-afterglow, non-fusion) plasma is sustained by an external power supply. The energy balance, propagation behavior, and time evolution of some specific forms of plasma breakdown and chemical ignition are further compared in order to illustrate their physical nature.

  1. 2′-Deoxyriboguanylurea, the primary breakdown product of 5-aza-2′-deoxyribocytidine, is a mutagen, an epimutagen, an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferases and an inducer of 5-azacytidine-type fragile sites

    PubMed Central

    Lamparska, Katarzyna; Clark, Jarrod; Babilonia, Gail; Bedell, Victoria; Yip, Wesley; Smith, Steven S.

    2012-01-01

    5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5azaC-dR) has been employed as an inhibitor of DNA methylation, a chemotherapeutic agent, a clastogen, a mutagen, an inducer of fragile sites and a carcinogen. However, its effects are difficult to quantify because it rapidly breaks down in aqueous solution to the stable compound 2′-deoxyriboguanylurea (GuaUre-dR). Here, we used a phosphoramidite that permits the introduction of GuaUre-dR at defined positions in synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides to demonstrate that it is a potent inhibitor of human DNA methyltransferase 1 (hDNMT1) and the bacterial DNA methyltransferase (M.EcoRII) and that it is a mutagen that can form productive base pairs with either Guanine or Cytosine. Pure GuaUre-dR was found to be an effective demethylating agent and was able to induce 5azaC-dR type fragile sites FRA1J and FRA9E in human cells. Moreover, we report that demethylation associated with C:G → G:C transversion and C:G → T:A transition mutations was observed in human cells exposed to pure GuaUre-dR. The data suggest that most of the effects attributed to 5azaC-dR are exhibited by its stable primary breakdown product. PMID:22850746

  2. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank; Boddupalli, Sekhar S.

    2005-08-30

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  3. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank; Boddupalli, Sekhar S.

    2011-08-23

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  4. Mammalian Cell Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of the Haloacetic Acids, A Major Class of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are disinfection by-products (DBPs) that are formed during the disinfection of drinking water, wastewaters and recreational pool waters. Currently, five HAAs [bromoacetic acid (BAA), dibromoacetic acid (DBAA), chloroacetic acid (CAA), dichloroacetic ac...

  5. Glucose and insulin administration while maintaining normoglycemia inhibits whole body protein breakdown and synthesis after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Hatzakorzian, Roupen; Shum-Tim, Dominique; Wykes, Linda; Hülshoff, Ansgar; Bui, Helen; Nitschmann, Evan; Lattermann, Ralph; Schricker, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the effect of insulin administered as part of a hyperinsulinemic-normoglycemic clamp on protein metabolism after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. Eighteen patients were studied, with nine patients in the control group receiving standard metabolic care and nine patients receiving insulin (5 mU·kg(-1)·min(-1)). Whole body glucose production, protein breakdown, synthesis, and oxidation were determined using stable isotope tracer kinetics (l-[1-(13)C]leucine, [6,6-(2)H2]glucose) before and 6 h after the procedure. Plasma amino acids, cortisol, and lactate were also measured. Endogenous glucose production (preoperatively 10.0 ± 1.6, postoperatively 3.7 ± 2.5 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1); P = 0.0001), protein breakdown (preoperatively 105.3 ± 9.8, postoperatively 85.2 ± 9.2 mmol·kg(-1)·h(-1); P = 0.0005) and synthesis (preoperatively 88.7 ± 8.7, postoperatively 72.4 ± 8.4 mmol·kg(-1)·h(-1); P = 0.0005) decreased in the presence of hyperinsulinemia, whereas both parameters remained unchanged in the control group. A positive correlation between endogenous glucose production and protein breakdown was observed in the insulin group (r(2) = 0.385). Whole body protein oxidation and balance decreased after surgery in patients receiving insulin without reaching statistical significance. In the insulin group the plasma concentrations of 13 of 20 essential and nonessential amino acids decreased to a significantly greater extent than in the control group. In summary, supraphysiological hyperinsulinemia, while maintaining normoglycemia, decreased whole body protein breakdown and synthesis in patients undergoing CABG surgery. However, net protein balance remained negative. PMID:25257875

  6. Bioconverted Products of Essential Fatty Acids as Potential Antimicrobial Agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review deals with the recent findings on the microbial conversion of essential fatty acids (EFAs) through Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 NRRL-B-18602, and the antimicrobial properties of bioconverted essential fatty acids, with particular emphasis on n-3 or n-6 fatty acids. The first section deals...

  7. Production of Lipase and Oxygenated Fatty Acids from Vegetable Oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable oils such as soybean oil and corn oil are cheap raw materials. Various value-added oxygenated fatty acids have been produced from unsaturated fatty acids such as oleic and linoleic acid by biotransformation. Lipase from the non-pathogenic yeast Candida cylindracea is another important va...

  8. Production of methyl-vinyl ketone from levulinic acid

    DOEpatents

    Dumesic, James A.; West; Ryan M.

    2011-06-14

    A method for converting levulinic acid to methyl vinyl ketone is described. The method includes the steps of reacting an aqueous solution of levulinic acid, over an acid catalyst, at a temperature of from room temperature to about 1100 K. Methyl vinyl ketone is thereby formed.

  9. Simultaneous characterization of elemental segregation and cementite networks in high carbon steel products by spatially-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boué-Bigne, Fabienne

    2014-06-01

    The reliable characterization of the level of elemental segregation and of the extent of grain-boundary cementite networks in high carbon steel products is a prerequisite for checking product quality, for the purpose of product release to customers, and to investigate the presence of defects that may have led to mechanical property failure of the product. Current methods for the characterization of segregation and cementite networks rely on two different methods of sample etching followed by visual observation, where quality scores are given based on human perception and judgment. With the continuous demand on increasing quality, some of the conventional characterization methods and their associated scoring boards have lost relevance for the precision of characterization that is required today to distinguish between a product that will perform well and one that will not. In order to move away from a qualitative, human perception based situation for the scoring of the severity of segregation and cementite networks, a new method of data evaluation based on spatially-resolved LIBS measurements was developed to provide quantitative and simultaneous characterization of both types of defects. The quantitative assessment of segregation and cementite networks is based on the acquisition of carbon concentration maps. The ability to produce rapid scanning measurements of micro and macro-scale features with adequate spatial resolution makes LIBS the measurement method of preference for this purpose. The characterization of both different defects is extracted simultaneously and from the same carbon concentration map following a series of statistical treatment and data extraction rules. LIBS results were validated against recognized methods and were applied to a significant number of routine samples. The new LIBS method offers a step change improvement in reliability for the characterization of segregation and cementite networks in steel products over the conventional methods

  10. Lipid production on free fatty acids by oleaginous yeasts under non-growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaobing; Jin, Guojie; Wang, Yandan; Shen, Hongwei; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2015-10-01

    Microbial lipids produced by oleaginous yeasts serve as promising alternatives to traditional oils and fats for the production of biodiesel and oleochemicals. To improve its techno-economics, it is pivotal to use wastes and produce high quality lipids of special fatty acid composition. In the present study, four oleaginous yeasts were tested to use free fatty acids for lipid production under non-growth conditions. Microbial lipids of exceptionally high fatty acid relative contents, e.g. those contained over 70% myristic acid or 80% oleic acid, were produced that may be otherwise inaccessible by growing cells on various carbon sources. It was found that Cryptococcus curvatus is a robust strain that can efficiently use oleic acid as well as even-numbered saturated fatty acids with carbon atoms ranging from 10 to 20. Our results provided new opportunity for the production of functional lipids and for the exploitation of organic wastes rich in free fatty acids. PMID:26159379

  11. Breakdown properties of epoxy nanodielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Cantoni, Claudia; More, Karren Leslie; James, David Randy; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; Ellis, Alvin R

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in polymeric dielectric nanocomposites have shown that these novel materials can improve design of high voltage (hv) components and systems. Some of the improvements can be listed as reduction in size (compact hv systems), better reliability, high energy density, voltage endurance, and multifunctionality. Nanodielectric systems demonstrated specific improvements that have been published in the literature by different groups working with electrical insulation materials. In this paper we focus on the influence of in-situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles on the dielectric breakdown characteristics of an epoxy-based nanocomposite system. The in-situ synthesis of the particles creates small nanoparticles on the order of 10 nm with narrow size distribution and uniform particle dispersion in the matrix. The breakdown strength of the nanocomposite was studied as a function of TiO{sub 2} concentration at cryogenic temperatures. It was observed that between 2 and 6wt% yields high breakdown values for the nanodielectric.

  12. Vortex breakdown incipience: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Stanley A.; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The sensitivity of the onset and the location of vortex breakdowns in concentrated vortex cores, and the pronounced tendency of the breakdowns to migrate upstream have been characteristic observations of experimental investigations; they have also been features of numerical simulations and led to questions about the validity of these simulations. This behavior seems to be inconsistent with the strong time-like axial evolution of the flow, as expressed explicitly, for example, by the quasi-cylindrical approximate equations for this flow. An order-of-magnitude analysis of the equations of motion near breakdown leads to a modified set of governing equations, analysis of which demonstrates that the interplay between radial inertial, pressure, and viscous forces gives an elliptic character to these concentrated swirling flows. Analytical, asymptotic, and numerical solutions of a simplified non-linear equation are presented; these qualitatively exhibit the features of vortex onset and location noted above.

  13. Electrical breakdown in tissue electroporation.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Enric; Klein, Nina; Mikus, Paul; Stehling, Michael K; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-11-27

    Electroporation, the permeabilization of the cell membrane by brief, high electric fields, has become an important technology in medicine for diverse application ranging from gene transfection to tissue ablation. There is ample anecdotal evidence that the clinical application of electroporation is often associated with loud sounds and extremely high currents that exceed the devices design limit after which the devices cease to function. The goal of this paper is to elucidate and quantify the biophysical and biochemical basis for this phenomenon. Using an experimental design that includes clinical data, a tissue phantom, sound, optical, ultrasound and MRI measurements, we show that the phenomenon is caused by electrical breakdown across ionized electrolysis produced gases near the electrodes. The breakdown occurs primarily near the cathode. Electrical breakdown during electroporation is a biophysical phenomenon of substantial importance to the outcome of clinical applications. It was ignored, until now. PMID:26482855

  14. Microbial production of amino acids and derived chemicals: synthetic biology approaches to strain development.

    PubMed

    Wendisch, Volker F

    2014-12-01

    Amino acids are produced at the multi-million-ton-scale with fermentative production of l-glutamate and l-lysine alone being estimated to amount to more than five million tons in the year 2013. Metabolic engineering constantly improves productivities of amino acid producing strains, mainly Corynebacterium glutamicum and Escherichia coli strains. Classical mutagenesis and screening have been accelerated by combination with intracellular metabolite sensing. Synthetic biology approaches have allowed access to new carbon sources to realize a flexible feedstock concept. Moreover, new pathways for amino acid production as well as fermentative production of non-native compounds derived from amino acids or their metabolic precursors were developed. These include dipeptides, α,ω-diamines, α,ω-diacids, keto acids, acetylated amino acids and ω-amino acids. PMID:24922334

  15. Production of lactic acid using a new homofermentative Enterococcus faecalis isolate.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Mohan Raj; Talluri, Suvarna; Christopher, Lew P

    2015-03-01

    Lactic acid is an intermediate-volume specialty chemical for a wide range of food and industrial applications such as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and chemical syntheses. Although lactic acid production has been well documented, improved production parameters that lead to reduced production costs are always of interest in industrial developments. In this study, we describe the production of lactic acid at high concentration, yield and volumetric productivity utilizing a novel homofermentative, facultative anaerobe Enterococcus faecalis CBRD01. The highest concentration of 182 g lactic acid l(-1) was achieved after 38 h of fed-batch fermentation on glucose. The bacterial isolate utilized only 2-13% of carbon for its growth and energy metabolism, while 87-98% of carbon was converted to lactic acid at an overall volumetric productivity of 5 g l(-1)  h(-1). At 13 h of fermentation, the volumetric productivity of lactate production reached 10.3 g l(-1)  h(-1), which is the highest ever reported for microbial production of lactic acid. The lactic acid produced was of high purity as formation of other metabolites was less than 0.1%. The present investigation demonstrates a new opportunity for enhanced production of lactic acid with potential for reduced purification costs. PMID:24894833

  16. Enhanced phenylpyruvic acid production with Proteus vulgaris in fed-batch and continuous fermentation.

    PubMed

    Coban, Hasan B; Demirci, Ali; Patterson, Paul H; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    Phenylpyruvic acid is a deaminated form of phenylalanine and is used in various areas such as development of cheese and wine flavors, diagnosis of phenylketonuria, and to decrease excessive nitrogen accumulation in the manure of farm animals. However, reported phenylpyruvic acid fermentation studies in the literature have been usually performed at shake-flask scale with low production. In this study, phenylpyruvic acid production was evaluated in bench-top bioreactors by conducting fed-batch and continuous fermentation for the first time. As a result, maximum phenylpyruvic acid concentrations increased from 1350 mg/L (batch fermentation) to 2958 mg/L utilizing fed-batch fermentation. Furthermore, phenylpyruvic acid productivity was increased from 48 mg/L/hr (batch fermentation) to 104 and 259 mg/L/hr by conducting fed-batch and continuous fermentation, respectively. Overall, this study demonstrated that fed-batch and continuous fermentation significantly improved phenylpyruvic acid production in bench-scale bioreactor production. PMID:25569523

  17. Effects of fatty acid activation on photosynthetic production of fatty acid-based biofuels in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Direct conversion of solar energy and carbon dioxide to drop in fuel molecules in a single biological system can be achieved from fatty acid-based biofuels such as fatty alcohols and alkanes. These molecules have similar properties to fossil fuels but can be produced by photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Results Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 mutant strains containing either overexpression or deletion of the slr1609 gene, which encodes an acyl-ACP synthetase (AAS), have been constructed. The complete segregation and deletion in all mutant strains was confirmed by PCR analysis. Blocking fatty acid activation by deleting slr1609 gene in wild-type Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 led to a doubling of the amount of free fatty acids and a decrease of alkane production by up to 90 percent. Overexpression of slr1609 gene in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 had no effect on the production of either free fatty acids or alkanes. Overexpression or deletion of slr1609 gene in the Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 mutant strain with the capability of making fatty alcohols by genetically introducing fatty acyl-CoA reductase respectively enhanced or reduced fatty alcohol production by 60 percent. Conclusions Fatty acid activation functionalized by the slr1609 gene is metabolically crucial for biosynthesis of fatty acid derivatives in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. It is necessary but not sufficient for efficient production of alkanes. Fatty alcohol production can be significantly improved by the overexpression of slr1609 gene. PMID:22433663

  18. Genotype, production system and sex effects on fatty acid composition of meat from goat kids.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mustafa; Demirel, Gulcan; Yakan, Akın; Ekiz, Bülent; Tölü, Cemil; Savaş, Türker

    2015-02-01

    Two trials were performed to assess the meat fatty acid profile of goat kids from different genotypes, production systems and sex. In the first trial, genotype effect was determined in 24 suckling male kids from Turkish Saanen, Maltese and Gokceada breeds. In the second trial, male and female Gokceada Goat kids were used to compare the effect of extensive and semi-intensive production systems on fatty acid composition of meat. Significant genotype effect was observed in the percentages of myristic acid (C14:0), palmitic acid (C16:0), oleic acid (C18:1 n-9), linolenic acid (C18:3 n-3), arachidonic acid (C20:4 n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 n-3), despite no differences on the ratios of polyunsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids (PUFA/SFA) and n-6/n-3 (P > 0.05). The effect of production system had also significant effects on fatty acids, but sex only influenced significantly stearic acid (C18:0), C18:1 n-9 and C18:3 n-3 fatty acids and total PUFA level and PUFA/SFA ratio. This study confirms that dairy breeds are prone to produce higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids in their muscle. Meanwhile, meat from Gokceada goat kids, which is one of the indigenous breeds in Turkey, had similar PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 ratios to Turkish Saanen and Maltase. PMID:25186278

  19. Production and applications of carbohydrate-derived sugar acids as generic biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Mehtiö, Tuomas; Toivari, Mervi; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Harlin, Ali; Penttilä, Merja; Koivula, Anu

    2016-10-01

    This review considers the chemical and biotechnological synthesis of acids that are obtained by direct oxidation of mono- or oligosaccharide, referred to as sugar acids. It focuses on sugar acids which can be readily derived from plant biomass sources and their current and future applications. The three main classes of sugar acids are aldonic, aldaric and uronic acids. Interest in organic acids derived from sugars has recently increased, as part of the interest to develop biorefineries which produce not only biofuels, but also chemicals to replace those currently derived from petroleum. More than half of the most desirable biologically produced platform chemicals are organic acids. Currently, the only sugar acid with high commercial production is d-gluconic acid. However, other sugar acids such as d-glucaric and meso-galactaric acids are being produced at a lower scale. The sugar acids have application as sequestering agents and binders, corrosion inhibitors, biodegradable chelators for pharmaceuticals and pH regulators. There is also considerable interest in the use of these molecules in the production of synthetic polymers, including polyamides, polyesters and hydrogels. Further development of these sugar acids will lead to higher volume production of the appropriate sugar acids and will help support the next generation of biorefineries. PMID:26177333

  20. Production of Butyric Acid and Butanol from Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    David E. Ramey; Shang-Tian Yang

    2005-08-25

    Environmental Energy Inc has shown that BUTANOL REPLACES GASOLINE - 100 pct and has no pollution problems, and further proved it is possible to produce 2.5 gallons of butanol per bushel corn at a production cost of less than $1.00 per gallon. There are 25 pct more Btu-s available and an additional 17 pct more from hydrogen given off, from the same corn when making butanol instead of ethanol that is 42 pct more Btu-s more energy out than it takes to make - that is the plow to tire equation is positive for butanol. Butanol is far safer to handle than gasoline or ethanol. Butanol when substituted for gasoline gives better gas mileage and does not pollute as attested to in 10 states. Butanol should now receive the same recognition as a fuel alcohol in U.S. legislation as ethanol. There are many benefits to this technology in that Butanol replaces gasoline gallon for gallon as demonstrated in a 10,000 miles trip across the United States July-August 2005. No modifications at all were made to a 1992 Buick Park Avenue; essentially your family car can go down the road on Butanol today with no modifications, Butanol replaces gasoline. It is that simple. Since Butanol replaces gasoline more Butanol needs to be made. There are many small farms across America which can grow energy crops and they can easily apply this technology. There is also an abundance of plant biomass present as low-value agricultural commodities or processing wastes requiring proper disposal to avoid pollution problems. One example is in the corn refinery industry with 10 million metric tons of corn byproducts that pose significant environmental problems. Whey lactose presents another waste management problem, 123,000 metric tons US, which can now be turned into automobile fuel. The fibrous bed bioreactor - FBB - with cells immobilized in the fibrous matrix packed in the reactor has been successfully used for several organic acid fermentations, including butyric and propionic acids with greatly increased

  1. Induced production of 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate by jasmonic acid and methyl jasmonate in sprouts and leaves of pak choi (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis).

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Melanie; Hanschen, Franziska S; Schreiner, Monika; Glatt, Hansruedi; Zrenner, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Pak choi plants (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis) were treated with different signaling molecules methyl jasmonate, jasmonic acid, linolenic acid, and methyl salicylate and were analyzed for specific changes in their glucosinolate profile. Glucosinolate levels were quantified using HPLC-DAD-UV, with focus on induction of indole glucosinolates and special emphasis on 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate. Furthermore, the effects of the different signaling molecules on indole glucosinolate accumulation were analyzed on the level of gene expression using semi-quantitative realtime RT-PCR of selected genes. The treatments with signaling molecules were performed on sprouts and mature leaves to determine ontogenetic differences in glucosinolate accumulation and related gene expression. The highest increase of indole glucosinolate levels, with considerable enhancement of the 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate content, was achieved with treatments of sprouts and mature leaves with methyl jasmonate and jasmonic acid. This increase was accompanied by increased expression of genes putatively involved in the indole glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway. The high levels of indole glucosinolates enabled the plant to preferentially produce the respective breakdown products after tissue damage. Thus, pak choi plants treated with methyl jasmonate or jasmonic acid, are a valuable tool to analyze the specific protection functions of 1-methoxy-indole-3-carbinole in the plants defense strategy in the future. PMID:23873294

  2. Induced Production of 1-Methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl Glucosinolate by Jasmonic Acid and Methyl Jasmonate in Sprouts and Leaves of Pak Choi (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Melanie; Hanschen, Franziska S.; Schreiner, Monika; Glatt, Hansruedi; Zrenner, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Pak choi plants (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis) were treated with different signaling molecules methyl jasmonate, jasmonic acid, linolenic acid, and methyl salicylate and were analyzed for specific changes in their glucosinolate profile. Glucosinolate levels were quantified using HPLC-DAD-UV, with focus on induction of indole glucosinolates and special emphasis on 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate. Furthermore, the effects of the different signaling molecules on indole glucosinolate accumulation were analyzed on the level of gene expression using semi-quantitative realtime RT-PCR of selected genes. The treatments with signaling molecules were performed on sprouts and mature leaves to determine ontogenetic differences in glucosinolate accumulation and related gene expression. The highest increase of indole glucosinolate levels, with considerable enhancement of the 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate content, was achieved with treatments of sprouts and mature leaves with methyl jasmonate and jasmonic acid. This increase was accompanied by increased expression of genes putatively involved in the indole glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway. The high levels of indole glucosinolates enabled the plant to preferentially produce the respective breakdown products after tissue damage. Thus, pak choi plants treated with methyl jasmonate or jasmonic acid, are a valuable tool to analyze the specific protection functions of 1-methoxy-indole-3-carbinole in the plants defense strategy in the future. PMID:23873294

  3. Influence of cabbage processing methods and prebiotic manipulation of colonic microflora on glucosinolate breakdown in man.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Zoë; Louis, Petra; Mihajlovski, Agnès; Rungapamestry, Vanessa; Ratcliffe, Brian; Duncan, Alan J

    2007-08-01

    Glucosinolate consumption from brassica vegetables has been implicated in reduction of cancer risk. The isothiocyanate breakdown products of glucosinolates appear to be particularly important as chemoprotective agents. Before consumption, brassica vegetables are generally cooked, causing the plant enzyme, myrosinase, to be denatured, influencing the profile of glucosinolate breakdown products produced. Some human intestinal microflora species show myrosinase-like activity (e.g. bifidobacteria). We aimed to increase bifidobacteria by offering a prebiotic (inulin) in a randomised crossover study. Six volunteers consumed inulin (10 g/d) for 21 d followed by a 21 d control period (no inulin). Treatment periods were reversed for the remaining six volunteers. During the last 5 d of each period two cabbage-containing meals were consumed. Total urine output was collected for 24 h following each meal. Cabbage was microwaved for 2 min (lightly cooked) or 5.5 min (fully cooked). Faecal samples were collected at the start and after the inulin and control treatments. Bifidobacteria were enumerated by real-time PCR. Allyl isothiocyanate production was quantified by measuring urinary excretion of allyl mercapturic acid (AMA). Bifidobacteria increased following prebiotic supplementation (P < 0.001) but there was no impact of this increase on AMA excretion. AMA excretion was greater following consumption of lightly cooked cabbage irrespective of prebiotic treatment (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the most effective way to increase isothiocyanate production may be to limit the length of time that brassica vegetables are cooked prior to consumption. PMID:17403273

  4. Lipid and fatty acid metabolism in Ralstonia eutropha: relevance for the biotechnological production of value-added products.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Sebastian L; Lu, Jingnan; Stahl, Ulf; Brigham, Christopher J

    2014-02-01

    Lipid and fatty acid metabolism has been well studied in model microbial organisms like Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The major precursor of fatty acid biosynthesis is also the major product of fatty acid degradation (β-oxidation), acetyl-CoA, which is a key metabolite for all organisms. Controlling carbon flux to fatty acid biosynthesis and from β-oxidation allows for the biosynthesis of natural products of biotechnological importance. Ralstonia eutropha can utilize acetyl-CoA from fatty acid metabolism to produce intracellular polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). R. eutropha can also be engineered to utilize fatty acid metabolism intermediates to produce different PHA precursors. Metabolism of lipids and fatty acids can be rerouted to convert carbon into other value-added compounds like biofuels. This review discusses the lipid and fatty acid metabolic pathways in R. eutropha and how they can be used to construct reagents for the biosynthesis of products of industrial importance. Specifically, how the use of lipids or fatty acids as the sole carbon source in R. eutropha cultures adds value to these biotechnological products will be discussed here. PMID:24343766

  5. Shakedown operations in commercial production of sulfuric acid from acid tar

    SciTech Connect

    Perfil'ev, V.M.; Golyshev, V.B.; Goncharenko, A.D.; Shtafinskaya, A.M.; Sushchev, V.S.

    1985-07-01

    The authors describe process technology for processing acid tars to obtain sulfuric acid by means of high temperature splitting to regenerate spent sulfuric acid contaminated with organic impurities. An illustration presents a simplified flow plan for acid tar processing. The authors conclude, from experience with this unit, that process indexes meet design requirements, in particular with respect to the degree of decomposition of the acid tar, the temperature conditions the SO/sub 2/ conversion, the SO/sub 3/ adsorption, and the quality and quantity of the oleum and commercial sulfuric acid obtained.

  6. Production of Diethyl Terephthalate from Biomass-Derived Muconic Acid.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rui; Lu, Fang; Chen, Jiazhi; Yu, Weiqiang; Huang, Qianqian; Zhang, Junjie; Xu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    We report a cascade synthetic route to directly obtain diethyl terephthalate, a replacement for terephthalic acid, from biomass-derived muconic acid, ethanol, and ethylene. The process involves two steps: First, a substituted cyclohexene system is built through esterification and Diels-Alder reaction; then, a dehydrogenation reaction provides diethyl terephthalate. The key esterification reaction leads to improved solubility and modulates the electronic properties of muconic acid, thus promoting the Diels-Alder reaction with ethylene. With silicotungstic acid as the catalyst, nearly 100% conversion of muconic acid was achieved, and the cycloadducts were formed with more than 99.0% selectivity. The palladium-catalyzed dehydrogenation reaction preferentially occurs under neutral or mildly basic conditions. The total yield of diethyl terephthalate reached 80.6% based on the amount of muconic acid used in the two-step synthetic process. PMID:26592149

  7. 40 CFR 721.10211 - Octadecanoic acid, reaction products with diethylenetriamine and urea, acetates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10211 Octadecanoic acid, reaction... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as octadecanoic acid, reaction products with... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Octadecanoic acid, reaction...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids,...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10211 - Octadecanoic acid, reaction products with diethylenetriamine and urea, acetates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10211 Octadecanoic acid, reaction... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as octadecanoic acid, reaction products with... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Octadecanoic acid, reaction...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10211 - Octadecanoic acid, reaction products with diethylenetriamine and urea, acetates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10211 Octadecanoic acid, reaction... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as octadecanoic acid, reaction products with... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Octadecanoic acid, reaction...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10211 - Octadecanoic acid, reaction products with diethylenetriamine and urea, acetates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10211 Octadecanoic acid, reaction... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as octadecanoic acid, reaction products with... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Octadecanoic acid, reaction...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids,...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids,...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids,...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids,...

  16. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V.

    2012-02-21

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  17. Recombinant microorganisms for increased production of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Jian; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V

    2013-04-30

    Disclosed are recombinant microorganisms for producing organic acids. The recombinant microorganisms express a polypeptide that has the enzymatic activity of an enzyme that is utilized in the pentose phosphate cycle. The recombinant microorganism may include recombinant Actinobacillus succinogenes that has been transformed to express a Zwischenferment (Zwf) gene. The recombinant microorganisms may be useful in fermentation processes for producing organic acids such as succinic acid and lactic acid. Also disclosed are novel plasmids that are useful for transforming microorganisms to produce recombinant microorganisms that express enzymes such as Zwf.

  18. Threshold criteria for undervoltage breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, James E.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2008-05-01

    The conditions under which an externally supplied pulse of electrons will induce breakdown in an undervoltaged, low-gain discharge gap are experimentally and theoretically explored. The minimum number of injected electrons required to achieve breakdown in a parallel-plate gap is measured in argon at pd values of 3-10 Torr m using ultraviolet laser pulses to photoelectrically release electrons from the cathode. This value was found to scale inversely with voltage at constant pd and with pressure within the parameter range explored. A dimensionless theoretical description of the phenomenon is formulated and numerically solved. It is found that a significant fraction of the charge on the plates must be injected for breakdown to be achieved at low gain. It is also found that fewer electrons are required as the gain due to electron-impact ionization (α process) is increased, or as the sensitivity of the α process to electric field is enhanced by increasing the gas pressure. A predicted insensitivity to ion mobility implies that the breakdown is determined during the first electron avalanche when space-charge distortion is greatest.

  19. Engineering Yarrowia lipolytica for production of medium-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Charles D; Zhang, Shuyan; Rao, Christopher V

    2015-09-01

    Lipids are naturally derived products that offer an attractive, renewable alternative to petroleum-based hydrocarbons. While naturally produced long-chain fatty acids can replace some petroleum analogs, medium-chain fatty acid would more closely match the desired physical and chemical properties of currently employed petroleum products. In this study, we engineered Yarrowia lipolytica, an oleaginous yeast that naturally produces lipids at high titers, to produce medium-chain fatty acids. Five different acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases with specificity for medium-chain acyl-ACP molecules were expressed in Y. lipolytica, resulting in formation of either decanoic or octanoic acid. These novel fatty acid products were found to comprise up to 40 % of the total cell lipids. Furthermore, the reduction in chain length resulted in a twofold increase in specific lipid productivity in these engineered strains. The medium-chain fatty acids were found to be incorporated into all lipid classes. PMID:26129951

  20. Succinic acid production with metabolically engineered E. coli recovered from two-stage fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiang-Feng; Jiang, Min; Chen, Ke-Quan; Xu, Bing; Liu, Shu-Wen; Wei, Ping; Ying, Han-Jie

    2010-10-01

    Escherichia coli AFP111 cells recovered from spent two-stage fermentation broth were investigated for additional production of succinic acid under anaerobic conditions. Recovered cells produced succinic acid in an aqueous environment with no nutrient supplementation except for glucose and MgCO(3). In addition, initial glucose concentration and cell density had a significant influence on succinic acid mass yield and productivity. Although the final concentration of succinic acid from recovered cells was lower than from two-stage fermentation, an average succinic acid mass yield of 0.85 g/g was achieved with an average productivity of 1.81 g/l h after three rounds of recycling, which was comparable to two-stage fermentation. These results suggested that recovered cells might be reused for the efficient production of succinic acid. PMID:20495946

  1. Detection and Quantification of Valerenic Acid in Commercially Available Valerian Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Ruth H.; Muldowney, Ciaran A.; Mohamed, Rabab; Keohane, Fiona; Shanahan, Catherine; Walsh, John J.; Kavanagh, Pierce V.

    2007-01-01

    Several valerian-containing products sold in pharmacies were evaluated to verify the presence of Valeriana officinalis by identifying the presence of valerenic acid found only in species of Valeriana. The content of valerenic acid was found to vary considerably in the products analyzed, thus emphasizing the importance of standardizing herbal…

  2. 40 CFR 721.10464 - Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10464 Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction products...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10251 - Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10251 Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, reaction products...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10251 - Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10251 Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty acids, reaction products...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10464 - Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10464 Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction products...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10251 - Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10251 Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, reaction products...

  7. Effects of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) extract on volatile fatty acid production by rumen bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: To determine the effects of hops extract, on in vitro volatile fatty acid (VFA) production by bovine rumen microorganisms. Methods and Results: When mixed rumen microbes were suspended in media containing carbohydrates, the initial rates of VFA production were suppressed by beta-acid rich hops...

  8. Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production

    SciTech Connect

    Donal F. Day

    2009-03-31

    The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of

  9. Diversity of Δ12 fatty acid desaturases in santalaceae and their role in production of seed oil acetylenic fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Okada, Shoko; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Damcevski, Katherine; Gibb, Nerida; Wood, Craig; Hamberg, Mats; Haritos, Victoria S

    2013-11-01

    Plants in the Santalaceae family, including the native cherry Exocarpos cupressiformis and sweet quandong Santalum acuminatum, accumulate ximenynic acid (trans-11-octadecen-9-ynoic acid) in their seed oil and conjugated polyacetylenic fatty acids in root tissue. Twelve full-length genes coding for microsomal Δ12 fatty acid desaturases (FADs) from the two Santalaceae species were identified by degenerate PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted amino acid sequences placed five Santalaceae FADs with Δ12 FADs, which include Arabidopsis thaliana FAD2. When expressed in yeast, the major activity of these genes was Δ12 desaturation of oleic acid, but unusual activities were also observed: i.e. Δ15 desaturation of linoleic acid as well as trans-Δ12 and trans-Δ11 desaturations of stearolic acid (9-octadecynoic acid). The trans-12-octadecen-9-ynoic acid product was also detected in quandong seed oil. The two other FAD groups (FADX and FADY) were present in both species; in a phylogenetic tree of microsomal FAD enzymes, FADX and FADY formed a unique clade, suggesting that are highly divergent. The FADX group enzymes had no detectable Δ12 FAD activity but instead catalyzed cis-Δ13 desaturation of stearolic acid when expressed in yeast. No products were detected for the FADY group when expressed recombinantly. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that the FADY genes were expressed in leaf rather than developing seed of the native cherry. FADs with promiscuous and unique activities have been identified in Santalaceae and explain the origin of some of the unusual lipids found in this plant family. PMID:24062307

  10. Diversity of Δ12 Fatty Acid Desaturases in Santalaceae and Their Role in Production of Seed Oil Acetylenic Fatty Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Shoko; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Damcevski, Katherine; Gibb, Nerida; Wood, Craig; Hamberg, Mats; Haritos, Victoria S.

    2013-01-01

    Plants in the Santalaceae family, including the native cherry Exocarpos cupressiformis and sweet quandong Santalum acuminatum, accumulate ximenynic acid (trans-11-octadecen-9-ynoic acid) in their seed oil and conjugated polyacetylenic fatty acids in root tissue. Twelve full-length genes coding for microsomal Δ12 fatty acid desaturases (FADs) from the two Santalaceae species were identified by degenerate PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted amino acid sequences placed five Santalaceae FADs with Δ12 FADs, which include Arabidopsis thaliana FAD2. When expressed in yeast, the major activity of these genes was Δ12 desaturation of oleic acid, but unusual activities were also observed: i.e. Δ15 desaturation of linoleic acid as well as trans-Δ12 and trans-Δ11 desaturations of stearolic acid (9-octadecynoic acid). The trans-12-octadecen-9-ynoic acid product was also detected in quandong seed oil. The two other FAD groups (FADX and FADY) were present in both species; in a phylogenetic tree of microsomal FAD enzymes, FADX and FADY formed a unique clade, suggesting that are highly divergent. The FADX group enzymes had no detectable Δ12 FAD activity but instead catalyzed cis-Δ13 desaturation of stearolic acid when expressed in yeast. No products were detected for the FADY group when expressed recombinantly. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that the FADY genes were expressed in leaf rather than developing seed of the native cherry. FADs with promiscuous and unique activities have been identified in Santalaceae and explain the origin of some of the unusual lipids found in this plant family. PMID:24062307

  11. Production of amino acids using auxotrophic mutants of methylotrophic bacillus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Richard S.; Flickinger, Michael C.; Schendel, Frederick J.; Guettler, Michael V.

    2001-07-17

    A method of producing amino acids by culturing an amino acid auxotroph of a biologically pure strain of a type I methylotrophic bacterium of the genus Bacillus which exhibits sustained growth at 50.degree. C. using methanol as a carbon and energy source and requiring vitamin B.sub.12 and biotin is provided.

  12. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants.

  13. Caffeic Acid Derivatives in Dried Lamiaceae and Echinacea purpurea Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentrations of caffeic acid derivatives within Lamiaceae and Echinacea (herb, spice, tea, and dietary supplement forms) readily available in the U.S. marketplace (n=72) were determined. After the first identification of chicoric acid in Ocimum basilicum (basil), the extent to which chicoric a...

  14. Lactic acid production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae without PDC or ADH deletion.

    PubMed

    Turner, Timothy L; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Kim, Soo Rin; Subramaniam, Vijay; Steffen, David; Skory, Christopher D; Jang, Ji Yeon; Yu, Byung Jo; Jin, Yong-Su

    2015-10-01

    Production of lactic acid from renewable sugars has received growing attention as lactic acid can be used for making renewable and bio-based plastics. However, most prior studies have focused on production of lactic acid from glucose despite that cellulosic hydrolysates contain xylose as well as glucose. Microbial strains capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose into lactic acid are needed for sustainable and economic lactic acid production. In this study, we introduced a lactic acid-producing pathway into an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting xylose. Specifically, ldhA from the fungi Rhizopus oryzae was overexpressed under the control of the PGK1 promoter through integration of the expression cassette in the chromosome. The resulting strain exhibited a high lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced lactic acid from glucose or xylose. Interestingly, we observed that the engineered strain exhibited substrate-dependent product formation. When the engineered yeast was cultured on glucose, the major fermentation product was ethanol while lactic acid was a minor product. In contrast, the engineered yeast produced lactic acid almost exclusively when cultured on xylose under oxygen-limited conditions. The yields of ethanol and lactic acid from glucose were 0.31 g ethanol/g glucose and 0.22 g lactic acid/g glucose, respectively. On xylose, the yields of ethanol and lactic acid were <0.01 g ethanol/g xylose and 0.69 g lactic acid/g xylose, respectively. These results demonstrate that lactic acid can be produced from xylose with a high yield by S. cerevisiae without deleting pyruvate decarboxylase, and the formation patterns of fermentations can be altered by substrates. PMID:26043971

  15. [Some considerations about the use of carbon sources in jasmonic acid production.].

    PubMed

    Almeida González, G; Klibansky Delgado, M; Altuna Seijas, B; Eng Sánchez, F; Legrá Mora, S; Armenteros Galarraga, S

    1999-09-01

    The effect of different carbon sources as sucrose, fructose, glucose and molasses were studied in relation to jasmonic acid production. The best results were obtained with a simple medium made up by final molasses, potassium nitrate and acid potassium phosphate, without the addition of other salts like Fe, Zn, Cu, Mo, etc. This alternative guaranteed a 100% increase in jasmonic acid production, compared to pattern medium, since a concentration of 2.08 g/l was obtained. PMID:18473562

  16. Efficient lactobionic acid production from whey by Pseudomonas taetrolens under pH-shift conditions.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Saúl; Rendueles, Manuel; Díaz, Mario

    2011-10-01

    Lactobionic acid finds applications in the fields of pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and medicine. The production of lactobionic acid from whey by Pseudomonas taetrolens was studied in shake-flasks and in a bioreactor. Shake-flask experiments showed that lactobionic acid was a non-growth associated product. A two-stage pH-shift bioconversion strategy with a pH-uncontrolled above 6.5 during the growth phase and maintained at 6.5 during cumulative production was adopted in bioreactor batch cultures. An inoculation level of 30% promoted high cell culture densities that triggered lactobionic acid production at a rate of 1.12 g/Lh. This methodology displayed efficient bioconversion with cheese whey as an inexpensive substrate for lactobionic acid production. PMID:21862326

  17. Effect of amino acids and vitamins on laccase production by the bird's nest fungus Cyathus bulleri.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Shikha; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2002-08-01

    Various amino acids, their analogues and vitamins have shown stimulatory as well as inhibitory effects on laccase production by Cyathus bulleri. DL-methionine, DL-tryptophan, glycine and DL-valine stimulated laccase production, while L-cysteine monohydrochloride completely inhibited the enzyme production. Among vitamins tested biotin, riboflavin and pyridoxine hydrochloride were found to induce laccase production. PMID:12137266

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Formulations in Cardiovascular Disease: Dietary Supplements are Not Substitutes for Prescription Products.

    PubMed

    Fialkow, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid products are available as prescription formulations (icosapent ethyl, omega-3-acid ethyl esters, omega-3-acid ethyl esters A, omega-3-carboxylic acids) and dietary supplements (predominantly fish oils). Most dietary supplements and all but one prescription formulation contain mixtures of the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Products containing both EPA and DHA may raise low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). In clinical trials, the EPA-only prescription product, icosapent ethyl, did not raise LDL-C compared with placebo. To correct a common misconception, it is important to note that omega-3 fatty acid dietary supplements are not US FDA-approved over-the-counter drugs and are not required to demonstrate safety and efficacy prior to marketing. Conversely, prescription products are supported by extensive clinical safety and efficacy investigations required for FDA approval and have active and ongoing safety monitoring programs. While omega-3 fatty acid dietary supplements may have a place in the supplementation of diet, they generally contain lower levels of EPA and DHA than prescription products and are not approved or intended to treat disease. Perhaps due to the lack of regulation of dietary supplements, EPA and DHA levels may vary widely within and between brands, and products may also contain unwanted cholesterol or fats or potentially harmful components, including toxins and oxidized fatty acids. Accordingly, omega-3 fatty acid dietary supplements should not be substituted for prescription products. Similarly, prescription products containing DHA and EPA should not be substituted for the EPA-only prescription product, as DHA may raise LDL-C and thereby complicate the management of patients with dyslipidemia. PMID:27138439

  19. Methodology and determination of tetradecabromo-1, 4-diphenoxybenzene flame retardant and breakdown by-products in sediments from the Laurentian Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Trouborst, Lennart; Chu, Shaogang; Chen, Da; Letcher, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Tetradecabromo-1,4-diphenoxybenzene (TeDB-DiPhOBz) is a brominated polyphenyl ether flame retardant (FR) that is known to photolytically degrade to produce lower brominated polybrominated-diphenoxybenzenes (PB-DiPhOBzs), which may be precursors to MeO-PB-DiPhOBzs recently reported in the Great Lakes herring gulls eggs. To our knowledge, there are no reports on TeDB-DiPhOBz or other PB-DiPhOBz by-products in any environmental sample. The present study analyzed for the presence of PB-DiPhOBzs (including TeDB-DiPhOBz) and MeO-PB-DiPhOBzs in surficial sediment from sites in Saginaw Bay in western Lake Huron (n = 7), and in comparison to southern Lake Huron (open water) (n = 5) and Lake Erie (n = 3) sediment collected in the summers of 2012 or 2013. To analyze for possible PB-DiPhOBzs (Br14–Br0), the first known analytical method was developed for extraction and cleanup of sediment samples, and analysis by HPLC–atmospheric pressure photoionization (−)-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. The overall recovery efficiency was optimized to on average 33–104% progressing from Br14- to Br10-PB-DiPhOBzs. Br10- to Br14-PB-DiPhOBz detection and quantification limits ranged from 0.05 to 0.15 ng g(−1) dw and 0.17 to 0.49 ng g(−1) dw, respectively. Although this is the first report, PB-DiPhOBzs (Br14–Br10) and MeO-PB-DiPhOBzs were not detectable in any sediment sample. This included a site near the mouth of the highly FR-contaminated Saginaw River, near the confined disposal facility (CDF) located in Saginaw Bay at Channel-Shelter Island, which receives dredged sediment from the Saginaw River. Our findings suggest sediments from the presently studied sites in the Great Lakes ecosystem are not a sink for TeDB-DiPhOBz and PB-DiPhOBz by-product contaminants. PMID:25463260

  20. In vitro bile acid binding and short-chain fatty acid profile of flax fiber and ethanol co-products.

    PubMed

    Fodje, Adele M L; Chang, Peter R; Leterme, Pascal

    2009-10-01

    Fibers from flaxseed and co-products from ethanol production could be potential sources of dietary fiber in human diet. In vitro fermentation and bile acid binding models were used to investigate the metabolic effects of lignaMax (Bioriginal Food and Science Corp., Saskatoon, SK, Canada) flax meal, spent flax meal, soluble flax gum, wheat insoluble fiber (WIF), and rye insoluble fiber (RIF). Wheat and rye bran were used as reference samples. Bile acid binding of substrates was analysed at taurocholate ([(14)C]taurocholate) concentration of 12.5 mM. Soluble flax gum showed the highest bile acid binding (0.57 micromol/mg of fiber) (P acid binding between wheat bran (0.2 micromol/mg of fiber) and WIF (0.26 micromol/mg of fiber). RIF had higher (P acid binding (0.20 micromol/mg of fiber) than rye bran (0.13 micromol/mg of fiber). Substrates were hydrolyzed and incubated with pig fecal samples. Short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) profile and gas accumulation (G(f)) were compared. Soluble flax gum generated the highest amount of acetic and propionic acids. SCFA profiles of wheat/rye brans and WIF/RIF were similar (except for butyric acid). G(f) for soluble flax gum was greater (P < .001) than that of spent flax meal. G(f) values of the wheat samples were similar, whereas the G(f) of the rye bran was higher (P < .001) than that of RIF. Fractional degradation rate (micro(t = T/2)) (P < .001) was also recorded. The highest mu(t = T/2) was observed for the soluble flax gum. Oil-depleted flaxseed fractions and WIF/RIF (co-products from ethanol production) could be potential sources of dietary fiber in human nutrition. PMID:19857071

  1. Fatty acid synthesis in Escherichia coli and its applications towards the production of fatty acid based biofuels.

    PubMed

    Janßen, Helge Jans; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The idea of renewable and regenerative resources has inspired research for more than a hundred years. Ideally, the only spent energy will replenish itself, like plant material, sunlight, thermal energy or wind. Biodiesel or ethanol are examples, since their production relies mainly on plant material. However, it has become apparent that crop derived biofuels will not be sufficient to satisfy future energy demands. Thus, especially in the last decade a lot of research has focused on the production of next generation biofuels. A major subject of these investigations has been the microbial fatty acid biosynthesis with the aim to produce fatty acids or derivatives for substitution of diesel. As an industrially important organism and with the best studied microbial fatty acid biosynthesis, Escherichia coli has been chosen as producer in many of these studies and several reviews have been published in the fields of E. coli fatty acid biosynthesis or biofuels. However, most reviews discuss only one of these topics in detail, despite the fact, that a profound understanding of the involved enzymes and their regulation is necessary for efficient genetic engineering of the entire pathway. The first part of this review aims at summarizing the knowledge about fatty acid biosynthesis of E. coli and its regulation, and it provides the connection towards the production of fatty acids and related biofuels. The second part gives an overview about the achievements by genetic engineering of the fatty acid biosynthesis towards the production of next generation biofuels. Finally, the actual importance and potential of fatty acid-based biofuels will be discussed. PMID:24405789

  2. Fatty acid synthesis in Escherichia coli and its applications towards the production of fatty acid based biofuels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The idea of renewable and regenerative resources has inspired research for more than a hundred years. Ideally, the only spent energy will replenish itself, like plant material, sunlight, thermal energy or wind. Biodiesel or ethanol are examples, since their production relies mainly on plant material. However, it has become apparent that crop derived biofuels will not be sufficient to satisfy future energy demands. Thus, especially in the last decade a lot of research has focused on the production of next generation biofuels. A major subject of these investigations has been the microbial fatty acid biosynthesis with the aim to produce fatty acids or derivatives for substitution of diesel. As an industrially important organism and with the best studied microbial fatty acid biosynthesis, Escherichia coli has been chosen as producer in many of these studies and several reviews have been published in the fields of E. coli fatty acid biosynthesis or biofuels. However, most reviews discuss only one of these topics in detail, despite the fact, that a profound understanding of the involved enzymes and their regulation is necessary for efficient genetic engineering of the entire pathway. The first part of this review aims at summarizing the knowledge about fatty acid biosynthesis of E. coli and its regulation, and it provides the connection towards the production of fatty acids and related biofuels. The second part gives an overview about the achievements by genetic engineering of the fatty acid biosynthesis towards the production of next generation biofuels. Finally, the actual importance and potential of fatty acid-based biofuels will be discussed. PMID:24405789

  3. L-Lactic Acid Production by Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 10863

    PubMed Central

    Senedese, Ana Lívia Chemeli; Maciel Filho, Rubens; Maciel, Maria Regina Wolf

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid has been shown to have the most promising application in biomaterials as poly(lactic acid). L. rhamnosus ATCC 10863 that produces L-lactic acid was used to perform the fermentation and molasses was used as substrate. A solution containing 27.6 g/L of sucrose (main composition of molasses) and 3.0 g/L of yeast extract was prepared, considering the final volume of 3,571 mL (14.0% (v/v) inoculum). Batch and fed batch fermentations were performed with temperature of 43.4°C and pH of 5.0. At the fed batch, three molasses feed were applied at 12, 24, and 36 hours. Samples were taken every two hours and the amounts of lactic acid, sucrose, glucose, and fructose were determined by HPLC. The sucrose was barely consumed at both processes; otherwise the glucose and fructose were almost entirely consumed. 16.5 g/L of lactic acid was produced at batch and 22.0 g/L at fed batch. Considering that lactic acid was produced due to the low concentration of the well consumed sugars, the final amount was considerable. The cell growth was checked and no substrate inhibition was observed. A sucrose molasses hydrolysis is suggested to better avail the molasses fermentation with this strain, surely increasing the L-lactic acid. PMID:25922852

  4. Production and Degradation of Oxalic Acid by Brown Rot Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Espejo, Eduardo; Agosin, Eduardo

    1991-01-01

    Our results show that all of the brown rot fungi tested produce oxalic acid in liquid as well as in semisolid cultures. Gloeophyllum trabeum, which accumulates the lowest amount of oxalic acid during decay of pine holocellulose, showed the highest polysaccharide-depolymerizing activity. Semisolid cultures inoculated with this fungus rapidly converted 14C-labeled oxalic acid to CO2 during cellulose depolymerization. The other brown rot fungi also oxidized 14C-labeled oxalic acid, although less rapidly. In contrast, semisolid cultures inoculated with the white rot fungus Coriolus versicolor did not significantly catabolize the acid and did not depolymerize the holocellulose during decay. Semisolid cultures of G. trabeum amended with desferrioxamine, a specific iron-chelating agent, were unable to lower the degree of polymerization of cellulose or to oxidize 14C-labeled oxalic acid to the extent or at the rate that control cultures did. These results suggest that both iron and oxalic acid are involved in cellulose depolymerization by brown rot fungi. PMID:16348522

  5. Cinnamic acid increases lignin production and inhibits soybean root growth.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Victor Hugo; Lima, Rogério Barbosa; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Böhm, Paulo Alfredo Feitoza; Marchiosi, Rogério; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes Lucio; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamic acid is a known allelochemical that affects seed germination and plant root growth and therefore influences several metabolic processes. In the present work, we evaluated its effects on growth, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) oxidase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) activities and lignin monomer composition in soybean (Glycine max) roots. The results revealed that exogenously applied cinnamic acid inhibited root growth and increased IAA oxidase and C4H activities. The allelochemical increased the total lignin content, thus altering the sum and ratios of the p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S) lignin monomers. When applied alone or with cinnamic acid, piperonylic acid (PIP, a quasi-irreversible inhibitor of C4H) reduced C4H activity, lignin and the H, G, S monomer content compared to the cinnamic acid treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenously applied cinnamic acid can be channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway via the C4H reaction, resulting in an increase in H lignin. In conjunction with enhanced IAA oxidase activity, these metabolic responses lead to the stiffening of the cell wall and are followed by a reduction in soybean root growth. PMID:23922685

  6. The fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) gene product catalyzes Δ4 desaturation to yield n-3 docosahexaenoic acid and n-6 docosapentaenoic acid in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hui Gyu; Park, Woo Jung; Kothapalli, Kumar S. D.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is a Δ4-desaturated C22 fatty acid and the limiting highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA) in neural tissue. The biosynthesis of Δ4-desaturated docosanoid fatty acids 22:6n-3 and 22:5n-6 are believed to proceed via a circuitous biochemical pathway requiring repeated use of a fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) protein to perform Δ6 desaturation on C24 fatty acids in the endoplasmic reticulum followed by 1 round of β-oxidation in the peroxisomes. We demonstrate here that the FADS2 gene product can directly Δ4-desaturate 22:5n-3→22:6n-3 (DHA) and 22:4n-6→22:5n-6. Human MCF-7 cells lacking functional FADS2-mediated Δ6-desaturase were stably transformed with FADS2, FADS1, or empty vector. When incubated with 22:5n-3 or 22:4n-6, FADS2 stable cells produce 22:6n-3 or 22:5n-6, respectively. Similarly, FADS2 stable cells when incubated with d5-18:3n-3 show synthesis of d5-22:6n-3 with no labeling of 24:5n-3 or 24:6n-3 at 24 h. Further, both C24 fatty acids are shown to be products of the respective C22 fatty acids via elongation. Our results demonstrate that the FADS2 classical transcript mediates direct Δ4 desaturation to yield 22:6n-3 and 22:5n-6 in human cells, as has been widely shown previously for desaturation by fish and many other organisms.—Park, H. G., Park, W. J., Kothapalli, K. S. D., Brenna, J. T. The fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) gene product catalyzes Δ4 desaturation to yield n-3 docosahexaenoic acid and n-6 docosapentaenoic acid in human cells. PMID:26065859

  7. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum. PMID:26168906

  8. Milk production responses to dietary stearic acid vary by production level in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Piantoni, P; Lock, A L; Allen, M S

    2015-03-01

    Effects of stearic acid supplementation on feed intake and metabolic and production responses of dairy cows with a wide range of milk production (32.2 to 64.4 kg/d) were evaluated in a crossover design experiment with a covariate period. Thirty-two multiparous Holstein cows (142±55 d in milk) were assigned randomly within level of milk yield to treatment sequence. Treatments were diets supplemented (2% of diet dry matter) with stearic acid (SA; 98% C18:0) or control (soyhulls). The diets were based on corn silage and alfalfa and contained 24.5% forage neutral detergent fiber, 25.1% starch, and 17.3% crude protein. Treatment periods were 21 d with the final 4 d used for data and sample collection. Compared with the control, SA increased dry matter intake (DMI; 26.1 vs. 25.2 kg/d) and milk yield (40.2 vs. 38.5 kg/d). Stearic acid had no effect on the concentration of milk components but increased yields of fat (1.42 vs. 1.35 kg/d), protein (1.19 vs. 1.14 kg/d), and lactose (1.96 vs. 1.87 kg/d). The SA treatment increased 3.5% fat-corrected milk (3.5% FCM; 40.5 vs. 38.6 kg/d) but did not affect feed efficiency (3.5% FCM/DMI, 1.55 vs. 1.53), body weight, or body condition score compared with the control. Linear interactions between treatment and level of milk yield during the covariate period were detected for DMI and yields of milk, fat, protein, lactose, and 3.5% FCM; responses to SA were positively related to milk yield of cows. The SA treatment increased crude protein digestibility (67.4 vs. 65.5%), tended to increase neutral detergent fiber digestibility (43.6 vs. 42.3%), decreased fatty acid (FA) digestibility (56.6 vs. 76.1%), and did not affect organic matter digestibility. Fatty acid yield response, calculated as the additional FA yield secreted in milk per unit of additional FA intake, was only 13.3% for total FA and 8.2% for C18:0 plus cis-9 C18:1. Low estimated digestibility of the SA supplement was at least partly responsible for the low FA yield response

  9. Expression of dehydratase domains from a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase increases the production of fatty acids in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Oyola-Robles, Delise; Rullán-Lind, Carlos; Carballeira, Néstor M; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel

    2014-02-01

    Increasing the production of fatty acids by microbial fermentation remains an important step toward the generation of biodiesel and other portable liquid fuels. In this work, we report an Escherichia coli strain engineered to overexpress a fragment consisting of four dehydratase domains from the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthase enzyme complex from the deep-sea bacterium, Photobacterium profundum. The DH1-DH2-UMA enzyme fragment was excised from its natural context within a multi-enzyme PKS and expressed as a stand-alone protein. Fatty acids were extracted from the cell pellet, esterified with methanol and quantified by GC-MS analysis. Results show that the E. coli strain expressing the DH tetradomain fragment was capable of producing up to a 5-fold increase (80.31 mg total FA/L culture) in total fatty acids over the negative control strain lacking the recombinant enzyme. The enhancement in production was observed across the board for all the fatty acids that are typically made by E. coli. The overexpression of the DH tetradomain did not affect E. coli cell growth, thus showing that the observed enhancement in fatty acid production was not a result of effects associated with cell density. The observed enhancement was more pronounced at lower temperatures (3.8-fold at 16 °C, 3.5-fold at 22 °C and 1.5-fold at 30 °C) and supplementation of the media with 0.4% glycerol did not result in an increase in fatty acid production. All these results taken together suggest that either the dehydration of fatty acid intermediates are a limiting step in the E. coli fatty acid biosynthesis machinery, or that the recombinant dehydratase domains used in this study are also capable of catalyzing thioester hydrolysis of the final products. The enzyme in this report is a new tool which could be incorporated into other existing strategies aimed at improving fatty acid production in bacterial fermentations toward accessible biodiesel precursors. PMID:24411456

  10. Expression of dehydratase domains from a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase increases the production of fatty acids in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Oyola-Robles, Delise; Rullán-Lind, Carlos; Carballeira, Néstor M.; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel

    2014-01-01

    Increasing the production of fatty acids by microbial fermentation remains an important step towards the generation of biodiesel and other portable liquid fuels. In this work, we report an Escherichia coli strain engineered to overexpress a fragment consisting of four dehydratase domains from the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthase enzyme complex from the deep-sea bacterium, Photobacterium profundum. The DH1-DH2-UMA enzyme fragment was excised from its natural context within a multi-enzyme PKS and expressed as a stand-alone protein. Fatty acids were extracted from the cell pellet, esterified with methanol and quantified by GC-MS analysis. Results show that the E. coli strain expressing the DH tetradomain fragment was capable of producing up to a 5-fold increase (80.31 mg total FA/L culture) in total fatty acids over the negative control strain lacking the recombinant enzyme. The enhancement in production was observed across the board for all the fatty acids that are typically made by E. coli. The overexpression of the DH tetradomain did not affect E. coli cell growth, thus showing that the observed enhancement in fatty acid production was not a result of effects associated with cell density. The observed enhancement was more pronounced at lower temperatures (3.8-fold at 16 °C, 3.5-fold at 22 °C and 1.5-fold at 30 °C) and supplementation of the media with 0.4% glycerol did not result in an increase in fatty acid production. All these results taken together suggest that either the dehydration of fatty acid intermediates are a limiting step in the E. coli fatty acid biosynthesis machinery, or that the recombinant dehydratase domains used in this study are also capable of catalyzing thioester hydrolysis of the final products. The enzyme in this report is a new tool which could be incorporated into other existing strategies aimed at improving fatty acid production in bacterial fermentations towards accessible biodiesel precursors. PMID:24411456

  11. Direct production of biodiesel from high-acid value Jatropha oil with solid acid catalyst derived from lignin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Solid acid catalyst was prepared from Kraft lignin by chemical activation with phosphoric acid, pyrolysis and sulfuric acid. This catalyst had high acid density as characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDX) and Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) method analyses. It was further used to catalyze the esterification of oleic acid and one-step conversion of non-pretreated Jatropha oil to biodiesel. The effects of catalyst loading, reaction temperature and oil-to-methanol molar ratio, on the catalytic activity of the esterification were investigated. Results The highest catalytic activity was achieved with a 96.1% esterification rate, and the catalyst can be reused three times with little deactivation under optimized conditions. Biodiesel production from Jatropha oil was studied under such conditions. It was found that 96.3% biodiesel yield from non-pretreated Jatropha oil with high-acid value (12.7 mg KOH/g) could be achieved. Conclusions The catalyst can be easily separated for reuse. This single-step process could be a potential route for biodiesel production from high-acid value oil by simplifying the procedure and reducing costs. PMID:22145867

  12. In Vitro Metabolism of Photolytic Breakdown Products of Tetradecabromo-1,4-diphenoxybenzene Flame Retardant in Herring Gull and Rat Liver Microsomal Assays.

    PubMed

    Su, Guanyong; Greaves, Alana K; Teclechiel, Daniel; Letcher, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    Tetradecabromo-1,4-diphenoxybenzene (TeDB-DiPhOBz) is used as a flame retardant chemical and has been hypothesized to be the precursor of methoxylated polybrominated diphenoxybenzene (MeO-PB-DiPhOBz) contaminants reported in herring gulls from sites across the Laurentian Great Lakes. Here, by irradiating the parent TeDB-DiPhOBz (solution 1) with natural sunlight or UV, we prepared three solutions where solution 2 was dominated by the Br8-11-PB-DiPhOBzs, along with Br5-8-PB-DiPhOBzs (solution 3) and Br4-6-PB-DiPhOBzs (solution 4). The in vitro metabolism of TeDB-DiPhOBz and PB-DiPhOBzs was investigated using harvested wild herring gull (Larus argentatus) and adult male Wister-Han rat liver microsomal assays. After a 90 min incubation period of solution 1 in gull or rat microsomal assays, there was no significant (p > 0.05) depletion of TeDB-DiPhOBz. OH-PB-DiPhOBz metabolites were detectable after gull and rat microsomal assay incubation with solutions 3 or 4, and showed clear species-specific differences. Also detected were two polybrominated hydroxylated metabolites having polybenzofuran structures. Overall, this study suggested that TeDB-DiPhOBz is slowly metabolized in vitro, and also indicated that if wild herring gulls are exposed (e.g., via the diet) to photolytic products of TeDB-DiPhOBz, OH-PB-DiPhOBz and other metabolites could be formed. OH-PH-DiPhOBz are likely precursors to MeO-PB-DiPhOBz contaminants that we reported previously in eggs of wild Great Lakes herring gulls. PMID:27351066

  13. Production of p-hydroxybenzoic acid from p-coumaric acid by Burkholderia glumae BGR1.

    PubMed

    Jung, Da-Hye; Kim, Eun-Jung; Jung, Eunok; Kazlauskas, Romas J; Choi, Kwon-Young; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2016-07-01

    p-Coumaric acid (pCA) is abundant in biomass with low lignin content, such as straw and stubble from rye, wheat, and barley. pCA can be isolated from biomass and used for the synthesis of aromatic hydrocarbons. Here, we report engineering of the natural pathway for conversion of pCA into p-hydroxybenzoic acid (pHBA) to increase the amount of pHBA that accumulates more than 100-fold. Burkholderia glumae strain BGR1 (BGR1) grows efficiently on pCA as a sole carbon source via a CoA-dependent non-β-oxidation pathway. This pathway removes two carbons from pCA as acetyl-CoA yielding p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and subsequently oxidizes it to pHBA. To increase the amount of accumulated pHBA in BGR1, we first deleted two genes encoding enzymes that degrade pHBA in the β-ketoadipate pathway. At 10 mM of pCA, the double deletion mutant BGR1_PB4 (Δphb3hΔbcl) accumulated pHBA with 95% conversion, while the control BGR1 accumulated only with 11.2% conversion. When a packed bed reactor containing immobilized BGR1_PB4 cells was operated at a dilution rate 0.2 h(-1) , the productivity of pHBA was achieved at 9.27 mg/L/h for 134 h. However, in a batch reactor at 20 mM pCA, growth of BGR1_PB4 was strongly inhibited, resulting in a low conversion of 19.3%. To further increase the amount of accumulated pCA, we identified the first enzyme in the pathway, p-hydroxcinnmaoyl-CoA synthetase II (phcs II), as the rate-limiting enzyme. Over expression of phcs II using a Palk promoter in a batch reaction at 20 mM of pCA yielded 99.0% conversion to pHBA, which is the highest concentration of pHBA ever reported using a biological process. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1493-1503. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26693833

  14. ANALYSIS OF ARACHIDONIC ACID METABOLITE AND PLATELET ACTIVATING FACTOR PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolites of arachidonic acid ("eicosanoids") and platelet activating factor are important bioactive lipids that may be involved in the pathobiological alterations in animals induced by pollutant exposure. nalysis of these substances in biological tissue and fluids is important...

  15. Comparison of Bacillus monooxygenase genes for unique fatty acid production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews Bacillus genes encoding monooxygenase enzymes producing unique fatty acid metabolites. Specifically, it examines standard monooxygenase electron transfer schemes and related domain structures of these fused domain enzymes on route to understanding the observed oxygenase activiti...

  16. Fermentation and recovery process for lactic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, S.P.; Moon, S.H.; Coleman, R.

    1995-11-07

    A method is described for converting starch to glucose and fermenting glucose to lactic acid, including simultaneous saccharification and fermentation through use of a novel consortium of bacterial strains. 2 figs.

  17. The global regulator LaeA controls production of citric acid and endoglucanases in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    Linde, Tore; Zoglowek, Marta; Lübeck, Mette; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Lübeck, Peter Stephensen

    2016-08-01

    The global regulatory protein LaeA is known for regulating the production of many kinds of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus species, as well as sexual and asexual reproduction, and morphology. In Aspergillus carbonarius, it has been shown that LaeA regulates production of ochratoxin. We have investigated the regulatory effect of LaeA on production of citric acid and cellulolytic enzymes in A. carbonarius. Two types of A. carbonarius strains, having laeA knocked out or overexpressed, were constructed and tested in fermentation. The knockout of laeA significantly decreased the production of citric acid and endoglucanases, but did not reduce the production of beta-glucosidases or xylanases. The citric acid accumulation was reduced with 74-96 % compared to the wild type. The endoglucanase activity was reduced with 51-78 %. Overexpression of LaeA seemed not to have an effect on citric acid production or on cellulose or xylanase activity. PMID:27169528

  18. Infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emissions from energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Clayton S.; Brown, E.; Hommerich, Uwe; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Samuels, Alan C.; Snyder, A. Peter

    2011-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has shown great promise for applications in chemical, biological, and explosives (CBE) sensing and has significant potential for real time standoff detection and analysis. We have studied LIBS emissions in the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral region for potential applications in CBE sensing. Detailed MIR-LIBS studies were performed for several energetic materials for the first time. In this study, the IR signature spectral region between 4 - 12 um was mined for the appearance of MIR-LIBS emissions that are directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as partially dissociated and recombination molecular species.

  19. Mechanisms of volatile production from non-sulfur amino acids by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Dong Uk; Lee, Eun Joo; Feng, Xi; Zhang, Wangang; Lee, Ji Hwan; Jo, Cheorun; Nam, Kichang

    2016-02-01

    Non-sulfur amino acid monomers were used to study the mechanisms of volatile production in meat by irradiation. Irradiation not only produced many volatiles but also increased the amounts of volatiles from non-sulfur amino acid monomers. The major reaction mechanisms involved in volatile production from each group of the amino acids by irradiation differ significantly. However, we speculate that the radiolysis of amino acid side chains were the major mechanism. In addition, Strecker degradation, especially the production of aldehydes from aliphatic group amino acids, and deamination, isomerization, decarboxylation, cyclic reaction and dehydrogenation of the initial radiolytic products were also contributed to the production of volatile compounds. Each amino acid monomers produced different odor characteristics, but the intensities of odor from all non-sulfur amino acid groups were very weak. This indicated that the contribution of volatiles produced from non-sulfur amino acids was minor. If the volatile compounds from non-sulfur amino acids, especially aldehydes, interact with other volatiles compounds such as sulfur compounds, however, they can contribute to the off-odor of irradiated meat significantly.

  20. Contents of phenolic acids, alkyl- and alkenylresorcinols, and avenanthramides in commercial grain products.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Pirjo; Pihlava, Juha-Matti; Hellström, Jarkko

    2005-10-19

    The contents of free and total phenolic acids and alk(en)ylresorcinols were analyzed in commercial products of eight grains: oat (Avena sativa), wheat (Triticum spp.), rye (Secale cerale), barley (Hordeum vulgare), buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum), millet (Panicum miliaceum), rice (Oryza sativa), and corn (Zea mays). Avenanthramides were determined in three oat products. Free phenolic acids, alk(en)ylresorcinols, and avenanthramides were extracted with methanolic acetic acid, 100% methanol, and 80% methanol, respectively, and quantified by HPLC. The contents of total phenolic acids were quantified by HPLC analysis after alkaline and acid hydrolyses. The highest contents of total phenolic acids were in brans of wheat (4527 mg/kg) and rye (4190 mg/kg) and in whole-grain flours of these grains (1342 and 1366 mg/kg, respectively). In other products, the contents varied from 111 mg/kg (white wheat bread) to 765 mg/kg (whole-grain rye bread). Common phenolic acids found in the grain products were ferulic acid (most abundant), ferulic acid dehydrodimers, sinapic acid, and p-coumaric acid. The grain products were found to contain either none or only low amounts of free phenolic acids. The content of avenanthramides in oat flakes (26-27 mg/kg) was about double that found in oat bran (13 mg/kg). The highest contents of alk(en)ylresorcinols were observed in brans of rye (4108 mg/kg) and wheat (3225 mg/kg). In addition, whole-grain rye products (rye bread, rye flour, and whole-wheat flour) contained considerable levels of alk(en)ylresorcinols (524, 927, and 759 mg/kg, respectively). PMID:16218677

  1. Microbial production of specialty organic acids from renewable and waste materials.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Saúl; Rendueles, Manuel; Díaz, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Microbial production of organic acids has become a fast-moving field due to the increasing role of these compounds as platform chemicals. In recent years, the portfolio of specialty fermentation-derived carboxylic acids has increased considerably, including the production of glyceric, glucaric, succinic, butyric, xylonic, fumaric, malic, itaconic, lactobionic, propionic and adipic acid through innovative fermentation strategies. This review summarizes recent trends in the use of novel microbial platforms as well as renewable and waste materials for efficient and cost-effective bio-based production of emerging high-value organic acids. Advances in the development of robust and efficient microbial bioprocesses for producing carboxylic acids from low-cost feedstocks are also discussed. The industrial market scenario is also reviewed, including the latest information on the stage of development for producing these emerging bio-products via large-scale fermentation. PMID:24754448

  2. Biotechnological production of alpha-keto acids: Current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Alpha-keto (α-keto) acids are used widely in feeds, food additives, pharmaceuticals, and in chemical synthesis processes. Although most α-keto acids are currently produced by chemical synthesis, their biotechnological production from renewable carbohydrates is a promising new approach. In this mini-review, we first present the different types of α-keto acids as well as their applications; next, we summarize the recent progresses in the biotechnological production of some important α-keto acids; namely, pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate, α-ketoisovalerate, α-ketoisocaproate, phenylpyruvate, α-keto-γ-methylthiobutyrate, and 2,5-diketo-d-gluconate. Finally, we discuss the future prospects as well as favorable directions for the biotechnological production of keto acids that ultimately would be more environment-friendly and simpler compared with the production by chemical synthesis. PMID:27575335

  3. Scaleable production and separation of fermentation-derived acetic acid. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-08

    Half of U.S. acetic acid production is used in manufacturing vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) and is economical only in very large production plants. Nearly 80% of the VAM is produced by methanol carbonylation, which requires high temperatures and exotic construction materials and is energy intensive. Fermentation-derived acetic acid production allows for small-scale production at low temperatures, significantly reducing the energy requirement of the process. The goal of the project is to develop a scaleable production and separation process for fermentation-derived acetic acid. Synthesis gas (syngas) will be fermented to acetic acid, and the fermentation broth will be continuously neutralized with ammonia. The acetic acid product will be recovered from the ammonium acid broth using vapor-based membrane separation technology. The process is summarized in Figure 1. The two technical challenges to success are selecting and developing (1) microbial strains that efficiently ferment syngas to acetic acid in high salt environments and (2) membranes that efficiently separate ammonia from the acetic acid/water mixture and are stable at high enough temperature to facilitate high thermal cracking of the ammonium acetate salt. Fermentation - Microbial strains were procured from a variety of public culture collections (Table 1). Strains were incubated and grown in the presence of the ammonium acetate product and the fastest growing cultures were selected and incubated at higher product concentrations. An example of the performance of a selected culture is shown in Figure 2. Separations - Several membranes were considered. Testing was performed on a new product line produced by Sulzer Chemtech (Germany). These are tubular ceramic membranes with weak acid functionality (see Figure 3). The following results were observed: (1) The membranes were relatively fragile in a laboratory setting; (2) Thermally stable {at} 130 C in hot organic acids; (3) Acetic acid rejection > 99%; and (4

  4. The production of ω-hydroxy palmitic acid using fatty acid metabolism and cofactor optimization in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sung, Changmin; Jung, Eunok; Choi, Kwon-Young; Bae, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Minsuk; Kim, Joonwon; Kim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Pyoung Il; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxylated fatty acids (HFAs) are used as important precursors for bulk and fine chemicals in the chemical industry. Here, to overproduce long-chain (C16-C18) fatty acids and hydroxy fatty acid, their biosynthetic pathways including thioesterase (Lreu_0335) from Lactobacillus reuteri DSM20016, β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (fabZ) from Escherichia coli, and a P450 system (i.e., CYP153A from Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8 and camA/camB from Pseudomonas putida ATCC17453) were overexpressed. Acyl-CoA synthase (fadD) involved in fatty acid degradation by β-oxidation was also deleted in E. coli BW25113. The engineered E. coli FFA4 strain without the P450 system could produce 503.0 mg/l of palmitic (C16) and 508.4 mg/l of stearic (C18) acids, of which the amounts are ca. 1.6- and 2.3-fold higher than those of the wild type. On the other hand, the E. coli HFA4 strain including the P450 system for ω-hydroxylation could produce 211.7 mg/l of ω-hydroxy palmitic acid, which was 42.1 ± 0.1 % of the generated palmitic acid, indicating that the hydroxylation reaction was the rate-determining step for the HFA production. For the maximum production of ω-hydroxy palmitic acid, NADH, i.e., an essential cofactor for P450 reaction, was overproduced by the integration of NAD(+)-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from Candida boidinii into E. coli chromosome and the deletion of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Finally, the NADH-level-optimized E. coli strain produced 610 mg/l of ω-hydroxy palmitic acid (ω-HPA), which was almost a threefold increase in its yield compared to the same strain without NADH overproduction. PMID:25957153

  5. Mutagenic by-products from chlorination of humic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, J.R.; Ringhand, H.P.; Coleman, W.E.; Schenck, K.M.; Munch, J.W.; Streicher, R.P.; Kaylor, W.H.; Kopfler, F.C.

    1986-11-01

    Chlorination of humic and fulvic acid results in the formation of direct-acting mutagenicity, detectable in the Salmonella/microsome assay (Ames test). This mutagenicity is being characterized as part of an overall effort aimed at evaluating potential health risks associated with the presence of mutagenic chemicals in drinking water. A number of chlorinated organic compounds, including several known mutagens, have been identified and quantified in diethyl either extracts of chlorinated humic acid solutions. However, the total mutagenicity of these compounds accounts for only about 7% of the original mutagenicity. Synergistic or antagonistic interactions among the identified components have been ruled out as possible explanations for the failure to account for a higher percentage of the activity. Recent progress has been made to separate the activity into neutral and strong acid fractions. Further isolation of the strong acids by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) has resulted in the purification of the mutagenicity into a major peak of activity with a specific mutagenicity of about 20,000 TA100 revertants per milligram. Several trichlorohydroxyfuranone isomers have been tentatively identified in this fraction. The contribution of these types of compounds to the mutagenicity of chlorinated humic acid is under investigation.

  6. 16 years research on lactic acid production with yeast - ready for the market?

    PubMed

    Sauer, Michael; Porro, Danilo; Mattanovich, Diethard; Branduardi, Paola

    2010-01-01

    The use of plastic produced from non-renewable resources constitutes a major environmental problem of the modern society. Polylactide polymers (PLA) have recently gained enormous attention as one possible substitution of petroleum derived polymers. A prerequisite for high quality PLA production is the provision of optically pure lactic acid, which cannot be obtained by chemical synthesis in an economical way. Microbial fermentation is therefore the commercial option to obtain lactic acid as monomer for PLA production. However, one major economic hurdle for commercial lactic acid production as basis for PLA is the costly separation procedure, which is needed to recover and purify the product from the fermentation broth. Yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae (bakers yeast) offer themselves as production organisms because they can tolerate low pH and grow on mineral media what eases the purification of the acid. However, naturally yeasts do not produce lactic acid. By metabolic engineering, ethanol was exchanged with lactic acid as end product of fermentation. A vast amount of effort has been invested into the development of yeasts for lactic acid production since the first paper on this topic by Dequin and Barre appeared 1994. Now yeasts are very close to industrial exploitation - here we summarize the developments in this field. PMID:21415900

  7. Production of γ-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid by Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 containing cyanobacterial fatty acid desaturase genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuewei; He, Qingfang; Peng, Zhenying; Yu, Jinhui; Bian, Fei; Li, Youzhi; Bi, Yuping

    2015-11-01

    Genetic modification is useful for improving the nutritional qualities of cyanobacteria. To increase the total unsaturated fatty acid content, along with the ratio of ω-3/ω-6 fatty acids, genetic engineering can be used to modify fatty acid metabolism. Synechococcus sp. PCC7002, a fast-growing cyanobacterium, does not contain a Δ6 desaturase gene and is therefore unable to synthesize γ-linolenic acid (GLA) and stearidonic acid (SDA), which are important in human health. In this work, we constructed recombinant vectors Syd6D, Syd15D and Syd6Dd15D to express the Δ15 desaturase and Δ6 desaturase genes from Synechocystis PCC6803 in Synechococcus sp. PCC7002, with the aim of expressing polyunsaturated fatty acids. Overexpression of the Δ15 desaturase gene in Synechococcus resulted in 5.4 times greater accumulation of α-linolenic acid compared with the wild-type while Δ6 desaturase gene expression produced both GLA and SDA. Co-expression of the two genes resulted in low-level accumulation of GLA but much larger amounts of SDA, accounting for as much to 11.64% of the total fatty acid content.

  8. Production of γ-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid by Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 containing cyanobacterial fatty acid desaturase genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuewei; He, Qingfang; Peng, Zhenying; Yu, Jinhui; Bian, Fei; Li, Youzhi; Bi, Yuping

    2016-07-01

    Genetic modification is useful for improving the nutritional qualities of cyanobacteria. To increase the total unsaturated fatty acid content, along with the ratio of ω-3/ω-6 fatty acids, genetic engineering can be used to modify fatty acid metabolism. Synechococcus sp. PCC7002, a fast-growing cyanobacterium, does not contain a Δ6 desaturase gene and is therefore unable to synthesize γ-linolenic acid (GLA) and stearidonic acid (SDA), which are important in human health. In this work, we constructed recombinant vectors Syd6D, Syd15D and Syd6Dd15D to express the Δ15 desaturase and Δ6 desaturase genes from Synechocystis PCC6803 in Synechococcus sp. PCC7002, with the aim of expressing polyunsaturated fatty acids. Overexpression of the Δ15 desaturase gene in Synechococcus resulted in 5.4 times greater accumulation of α-linolenic acid compared with the wild-type while Δ6 desaturase gene expression produced both GLA and SDA. Co-expression of the two genes resulted in low-level accumulation of GLA but much larger amounts of SDA, accounting for as much to 11.64% of the total fatty acid content.

  9. Proposed RF Breakdown Studies at the AWA

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Spentzouris, L.; Yusof, Z.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    A study of breakdown mechanism has been initiated at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). Breakdown may include several factors such as local field enhancement, explosive electron emission, Ohmic heating, tensile stress produced by electric field, and others. The AWA is building a dedicated facility to test various models for breakdown mechanisms and to determine the roles of different factors in the breakdown. We plan to trigger breakdown events with a high-powered laser at various wavelengths (IR to UV) to determine the role of explosive electron emission in the breakdown process. Another experimental idea follows from the recent work on a Schottky-enabled photoemission in an RF photoinjector [1] that allows us to determine in situ the field enhancement factor on a cathode surface. Monitoring the field enhancement factor before and after the breakdown can shed some light on a number of observations such as the crater formation process.

  10. Dehydration and oxidation of cellulose hydrolysis products in acidic solution

    SciTech Connect

    Garves, K.

    1981-01-01

    The dehydration of cotton cellulose in aqueous solutions in the presence of Ac/sub 2/O, AcOH, HCl, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or HBr proceeded by hydrolysis to carbohydrates with acetate groups, followed by conversion to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (I) and then, to levulinic acid (II) accompanied by humic acids. For the formation of I, HCl was a more efficient and selective catalyst than H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and the formation of II was promoted by high acid and H/sub 2/O concentrations in the medium. The addition of FeCl/sub 3/ to the dehydration mixture with HCl and continuous distillation led to the isolation of furfural.

  11. Biochemical characterization of polyunsaturated fatty acid synthesis in Schizochytrium: release of the products as free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Metz, James G; Kuner, Jerry; Rosenzweig, Bradley; Lippmeier, James C; Roessler, Paul; Zirkle, Ross

    2009-06-01

    In marine bacteria and some thraustochytrids (marine stramenopiles) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are produced de novo by PUFA synthases. These large, multi-domain enzymes carry out the multitude of individual reactions required for conversion of malonyl-CoA to the final LC-PUFA products. Here we report on the release of fatty acids from the PUFA synthase found in Schizochytrium, a thraustochytrid that has been developed as a commercial source for DHA-enriched biomass and oil. Data from in vitro activity assays indicate that the PUFAs are released from the enzyme as free fatty acids (FFAs). Addition of ATP and Mg(2+) to in vitro assays facilitates appearance of radiolabel from (14)C-malonyl-CoA in a triacylglycerol fraction, suggesting the involvement of acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). Furthermore, addition of triascin C, an inhibitor of ACSs, to the assays blocks this conversion. When the Schizochytrium PUFA synthase is expressed in Escherichia coli, the products of the enzyme accumulate as FFAs, suggesting that the thioesterase activity required for fatty acid release is an integral part of the PUFA synthase. PMID:19272783

  12. Production of Structured Triacylglycerols Containing Palmitic Acids at sn-2 Position and Docosahexaenoic Acids at sn-1, 3 Positions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjun; Guo, Yongli; Sun, Zhaomin; Jie, Xu; Li, Zhaojie; Wang, Jingfeng; Wang, Yuming; Xue, Changhu

    2015-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation has been shown well-established health benefits that justify their use as functional ingredients in healthy foods and nutraceutical products. Structured triacylglycerols rich in 1,3-docosahexenoyl-2-palmitoyl-sn-glycerol were produced from algal oil (Schizochytrium sp) which was prepared by a two-step process. Novozym 435 lipase was used to produce tripalmitin. Tripalmitin was then used to produce the final structured triacylglycerol (STAG) through interesterification reactions using Lipozyme RM IM. The optimum conditions for the enzymatic reaction were a mole ratio of tripalmitin/fatty acid ethyl esters 1:9, 60°C, 10% enzyme load (wt % of substrates), 10 h; the enzymatic product contained 51.6% palmitic acid (PA), 30.13% docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3) and 5.33% docosapentanoic acid (DPA, C22:5 n-3), 12.15% oleic acid (OLA). This STAG can be used as a functional ingredient in dietary supplementation to provide the benefits of DHA. PMID:26521813

  13. Method for construction of bacterial strains with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark I.; Sanville-Millard, Cynthia; Chatterjee, Ranjini

    2000-01-01

    A fermentation process for producing succinic acid is provided comprising selecting a bacterial strain that does not produce succinic acid in high yield, disrupting the normal regulation of sugar metabolism of said bacterial strain, and combining the mutant bacterial strain and selected sugar in anaerobic conditions to facilitate production of succinic acid. Also provided is a method for changing low yield succinic acid producing bacteria to high yield succinic acid producing bacteria comprising selecting a bacterial strain having a phosphotransferase system and altering the phosphotransferase system so as to allow the bacterial strain to simultaneously metabolize different sugars.

  14. The Monosodium Glutamate Story: The Commercial Production of MSG and Other Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Addison

    2004-03-01

    Examples of the industrial synthesis of pure amino acids are presented. The emphasis is on the synthesis of ( S )-glutamic acid and, to a lesser extent, ( S )-lysine and ( R,S )-methionine. These amino acids account for about 90% of the total world production of amino acids, ( S )-glutamic acid being used as a flavor-enhancing additive (MSG) for the human diet, and ( S )-lysine and ( R,S )-methionine as supplements for the feeding of domestic animals. Examples include chemical, enzymatic, and fermentation synthesis, and two clever continuous processes for the resolution of enantiomers. See Featured Molecules .

  15. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2002-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  16. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

    1998-06-23

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria. 2 figs.

  17. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  18. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2001-09-25

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  19. Aqueous Phase Photo-Oxidation of Succinic Acid: Changes in Hygroscopic Properties and Reaction Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, P. K.; Ninokawa, A.; Hofstra, J.; de Lijser, P.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have been identified as important factors in understanding climate change. The extent to which aerosols affect climate is determined, in part, by hygroscopic properties which can change as a result of atmospheric processing. Dicarboxylic acids, components of atmospheric aerosol, have a wide range of hygroscopic properties and can undergo oxidation and photolysis reactions in the atmosphere. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of succinic acid aerosol, a non-hygroscopic four carbon dicarboxylic acid, were measured with a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and compared to reaction products resulting from the aqueous phase photo-oxidation reaction of hydrogen peroxide and succinic acid. Reaction products were determined and quantified using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a function of hydrogen peroxide:succinic acid concentration ratio and photolysis time. Although reaction products include larger non-hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. adipic acid) and smaller hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. malonic and oxalic acids), comparison of hygroscopic growth curves to Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) predictions suggests that the hygroscopic properties of many of the product mixtures are largely independent of the hygroscopicity of the individual components. This study provides a framework for future investigations to fully understand and predict the role of chemical reactions in altering atmospheric conditions that affect climate.

  20. Fed-batch production of poly-3-hydroxydecanoate from decanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Ramsay, Juliana A; Ramsay, Bruce A

    2016-01-20

    Decanoic acid is an ideal substrate for the synthesis of medium-chain-length poly-3-hydroxyalkanoate (MCL-PHA), but its use for this purpose has only previously been studied in shake-flasks likely due to its surfactant properties, low aqueous solubility and high melting temperature. A fed-batch fermentation process was developed for the production of MCL-PHA from decanoic acid using Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Decanoic acid was kept in liquid form by heating or by mixing with acetic acid to prevent crystallization. Different ratios of decanoic acid:acetic acid:glucose (DA:AA:G) were fed to produce a specific growth rate of 0.15 h(-1). This method produced a maximum of 39 g L(-1) dry biomass containing 67% MCL-PHA when the DA:AA:G ratio was 5:1:4. However, a declining growth rate occurred in the late stage of fermentation, resulting in decanoic acid accumulation in the bioreactor leading to foaming. The duration of MCL-PHA production was extended by shifting from exponential to linear feeding before accumulation of decanoic acid. This resulted in 75 g L(-1) biomass containing 74% PHA and an overall PHA productivity of 1.16 g L(-1)h(-1) with the production of each gram of PHA requiring only 1.16 g of decanoic acid. The final PHA composition (on a molar basis) was 78% 3-hydroxydecanoate, 11% 3-hydroxyoctanoate and 11% 3-hydroxyhexanoate. PMID:26689481

  1. The effect of biotin on the production of succinic acid by Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, N.P.; Davison, B.H.; Thompson, J.E.

    1995-07-01

    Succinic acid is an intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and therefore, is found in almost all plant and animal cells, albeit at very low concentrations. It has a very wide usage range, which includes applications in agriculture, food, medicine, plastics, cosmetics, textiles, plating and waste-gas scrubbing. Succinic acid currently is produced commercially by chemical processes. A fermentation process for its production is of great interest because in such process, renewable resources such as corn-derived glucose can be used as starting material. There is not a current biological process for the commercial production of succinic acid. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the isolation and screening of succinic acid-producing microorganisms. The anaerobic bacterium, Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens, is considered among the best direct succinic acid producers. A number of patents concerning the production of succinic acid by this organism have been issued. Our first attempt to develop a biological process for the production of succinic acid by A. succiniciproducens involved fermentation media improvement, in particular the use of supplemented nutrients. In this note, we show that higher yield of succinic acid could be achieved by supplementing the fermentation media with biotin, as a potential nutrient supplement representative.

  2. Enhanced itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger using genetic modification and medium optimization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aspergillus niger was selected as a host for producing itaconic acid due to its versatile and tolerant character in various growth environments, and its extremely high capacity of accumulating the precursor of itaconic acid: citric acid. Expressing the CAD gene from Aspergillus terreus opened the metabolic pathway towards itaconic acid in A. niger. In order to increase the production level, we continued by modifying its genome and optimizing cultivation media. Results Based on the results of previous transcriptomics studies and research from other groups, two genes : gpdA encoding the glyceraldehyde −3-dehydrogenase (GPD) and hbd1 encoding a flavohemoglobin domain (HBD) were overexpressed in A. niger. Besides, new media were designed based on a reference medium for A. terreus. To analyze large numbers of cultures, we developed an approach for screening both fungal transformants and various media in 96-well micro-titer plates. The hbd1 transformants (HBD 2.2/2.5) did not improve itaconic acid titer while the gpdA transformant (GPD 4.3) decreased the itaconic acid production. Using 20 different media, copper was discovered to have a positive influence on itaconic acid production. Effects observed in the micro-titer plate screening were confirmed in controlled batch fermentation. Conclusions The performance of gpdA and hbd1 transformants was found not to be beneficial for itaconic acid production using the tested cultivation conditions. Medium optimization showed that, copper was positively correlated with improved itaconic acid production. Interestingly, the optimal conditions for itaconic acid clearly differ from conditions optimal for citric- and oxalic acid production. PMID:22925689

  3. Enhanced succinic acid production in Aspergillus saccharolyticus by heterologous expression of fumarate reductase from Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Lübeck, Mette; Ahring, Birgitte K; Lübeck, Peter S

    2016-02-01

    Aspergillus saccharolyticus exhibits great potential as a cell factory for industrial production of dicarboxylic acids. In the analysis of the organic acid profile, A. saccharolyticus was cultivated in an acid production medium using two different pH conditions. The specific activities of the enzymes, pyruvate carboxylase (PYC), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and fumarase (FUM), involved in the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) branch, were examined and compared in cells harvested from the acid production medium and a complete medium. The results showed that ambient pH had a significant impact on the pattern and the amount of organic acids produced by A. saccharolyticus. The wild-type strain produced higher amount of malic acid and succinic acid in the pH buffered condition (pH 6.5) compared with the pH non-buffered condition. The enzyme assays showed that the rTCA branch was active in the acid production medium as well as the complete medium, but the measured enzyme activities were different depending on the media. Furthermore, a soluble NADH-dependent fumarate reductase gene (frd) from Trypanosoma brucei was inserted and expressed in A. saccharolyticus. The expression of the frd gene led to an enhanced production of succinic acid in frd transformants compared with the wild-type in both pH buffered and pH non-buffered conditions with highest amount produced in the pH buffered condition (16.2 ± 0.5 g/L). This study demonstrates the feasibility of increasing succinic acid production through the cytosolic reductive pathway by genetic engineering in A. saccharolyticus. PMID:26521243

  4. Top value platform chemicals: bio-based production of organic acids.

    PubMed

    Becker, Judith; Lange, Anna; Fabarius, Jonathan; Wittmann, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Driven by the quest for sustainability, recent years have seen a tremendous progress in bio-based production routes from renewable raw materials to commercial goods. Particularly, the production of organic acids has crystallized as a competitive and fast-evolving field, related to the broad applicability of organic acids for direct use, as polymer building blocks, and as commodity chemicals. Here, we review recent advances in metabolic engineering and industrial market scenarios with focus on organic acids as top value products from biomass, accessible through fermentation and biotransformation. PMID:26360870

  5. Optimum production and characterization of an acid protease from marine yeast Metschnikowia reukaufii W6b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Peng, Ying; Wang, Xianghong; Chi, Zhenming

    2010-12-01

    The marine yeast strain W6b isolated from sediment of the South China Sea was found to produce a cell-bound acid protease. The crude acid protease produced by this marine yeast showed the highest activity at pH 3.5 and 40 °C. The optimal pH and temperature for the crude acid protease were in agreement with those for acid protease produced by the terrestrial yeasts. The optimal medium of the acid protease production was seawater containing 1.0% glucose, 1.5% casein, and 0.5% yeast extract, and the optimal cultivation conditions of the acid protease production were pH 4.0, a temperature of 25 °C and a shaking speed of 140 rmin-1. Under the optimal conditions, 72.5 UmL-1 of acid protease activity could be obtained in cell suspension within 48 h of fermentation at shake flask level. The acid protease production was induced by high-molecular-weight nitrogen sources and repressed by low-molecular-weight nitrogen sources. Skimmed-milk-clotting test showed that the crude acid protease from the cell suspension of the yeast W6b had high skimmed milk coagulability. The acid protease produced by M. reukaufii W6b may have highly potential applications in cheese, food and fermentation industries.

  6. Bio-production of lactobionic acid: current status, applications and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Saúl; Rendueles, Manuel; Díaz, Mario

    2013-12-01

    Lactobionic acid has appeared on the commercial scene as a versatile polyhydroxy acid with numerous promising applications in the food, medicine, pharmaceutical, cosmetics and chemical industries. This high value-added bio-product has recently received growing attention as a bioactive compound, providing an excellent chemical platform for the synthesis of novel potentially biocompatible and biodegradable drug delivery vehicles. Recent advances in tissue engineering and nanomedicine have also underlined the increased importance of this organic acid as a key biofunctionalization agent. The growing commercial relevance of lactobionic acid has therefore prompted the development of novel systems for its biotechnological production that are both sustainable and efficient. The present review explores recent advances and studies related to lactobionic acid bio-production, whether through microbial or enzymatic approaches, highlighting the key bioprocessing conditions for enhanced bio-production. Detailed overviews of the current microbial cell factories as well as downstream processing methodologies for lactobionic acid production are also presented. Furthermore, the potential prospects and current applications of this polyhydroxy acid are also discussed, with an emphasis on the role of lactobionic acid as a key platform in the development of novel drugs, biomaterials, nanoparticles and biopolymer systems. PMID:23651661

  7. Lactic Acid Bateria - Friend or Foe? Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Production of Polysaccharides and Fuel Ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been widely used in the production of fermented foods and as probiotics. Alternan is a glucan with a distinctive backbone structure of alternating alpha-(1,6) and alpha-(1,3) linkages produced by the LAB Leuconostoc mesenteroides. In recent years, improved strains f...

  8. Lactic Acid Bacteria – Friend or Foe? Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Production of Polysaccharides and Fuel Ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been widely used in the production of fermented foods and as probiotics. Alternan is a glucan with a distinctive backbone structure of alternating a-(1,6) and a-(1,3) linkages produced by the LAB Leuconostoc mesenteroides. In recent years, we have developed improved...

  9. Production of 14-oxo-cis-11-eicosenoic acid from lesquerolic acid by Sphingobacterium multivorum NRRL B-23212

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to explore the extent of microbial conversion of lesquerolic acid (LQA) by whole cell catalysis and to identify the newly converted products. Among compost isolates including NRRL strains B-23212 (Sphingobacterium multivorum), B-23213 (Acinetobacter sp.), B-23257 (En...

  10. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10428 - Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine. 721.10428 Section 721.10428 Protection of...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10428 - Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine. 721.10428 Section 721.10428 Protection of...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment...

  17. New process makes production of highly acid gas economical

    SciTech Connect

    Gazzi, L.; Cotone, G.; Rescalli, C.; Soldati, G.F.; Vetere, A.

    1982-08-01

    Development of cryogenic processing combined with a new solvent for removing H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ from natural gas has significantly reduced the costs for plant equipment and the energy needed to run it. This results in much lower treatment costs per Mcf and makes natural gas containing as much as 80% acid gas profitable to produce.

  18. Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Keller, Fred A.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2003-12-09

    A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

  19. PRODUCTION OF MANNITOL BY LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: A REVIEW

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannitol, a naturally occurring polyol, can be produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) by fermentation. Some homofermentative LAB produce small amounts of mannitol from glucose. Several heterofermentative LAB can produce mannitol effectively from fructose. In this article, a review on mannitol pro...

  20. Immobilization of Actinobacillus succinogenes by adhesion or entrapment for the production of succinic acid.

    PubMed

    Corona-González, Rosa Isela; Miramontes-Murillo, Ricardo; Arriola-Guevara, Enrique; Guatemala-Morales, Guadalupe; Toriz, Guillermo; Pelayo-Ortiz, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    The production of succinic acid was studied with entrapped and adsorbed Actinobacillus succinogenes. The adsorption of fermentation products (organic acids in the concentration range of 1-20 g/L) on different supports was evaluated. It was found that succinic acid was adsorbed in small quantities on diatomite and zeolite (12.6 mg/g support). The highest production of succinic acid was achieved with A. succinogenes entrapped in agar beads. Batch fermentations with immobilized cells were carried out with glucose concentrations ranging from 20 to 80 g/L. Succinic acid (43.4 g/L) was obtained from 78.3g/L glucose, and a high productivity (2.83 g/Lh) was obtained with a glucose concentration of 37.6g/L. For repeated batch fermentations (5 cycles in 72 h) with immobilized cells in agar, the total glucose consumed was 147.55 g/L, while the production of succinic acid was 107 g/L. Immobilized cells reduced significantly the fermentation time, yield, productivity and final concentration of succinic acid. PMID:24844165

  1. Domoic acid production near California coastal upwelling zones, June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Trainer, V L.; Adams, Nicolaus G.; Bill, Brian D.; Stehr, Carla M.; Wekell, John C.; Moeller, Peter; Busman, Mark; Woodruff, Dana L. )

    2000-01-01

    Sea lion mortalities in central California during May and June 1998 were traced to their ingestion of sardines and anchovies that had accumulated the neurotoxin domoic acid. The detection of toxin in urine, feces, and stomach contents of several sea lions represents the first proven occurrence of domoic acid transfer through the food chain to a marine mammal. The pennate diatoms, Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and P. australis, were the dominant, toxin-producing phytoplankton constituting algal blooms near Monterey Bay, Half Moon Bay, and Oceano Dunes, areas where sea lions with neurological symptoms stranded. Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia were also found near Morrow Bay, Point Conception, Point Arguello, and Santa Barbara, demonstrating that these species were widespread along the central California coast in June 1998. Measurements of domoic acid during three cruises in early June showed the highest cellular toxin levels in P. multiseries near Point A?o Nuevo and in P. australis from Morro w Bay. Maximum cellular domoic acid levels were observed within 20 km of the coast between 0 and 5 m depth, although toxin was also measured to depths of 40 m. Hydrographic data indicated that the highest toxin levels and greatest numbers of toxic cells were positioned in water masses associated with upwelling zones near coastal headlands. Nutrient levels at these sites were less than those typically measured during periods of active upwelling, due to the 1998 El Ni?o event. The flow of cells and/or nutrients from coastal headlands into embayments where cells can multiply in a stratified environment is a possible mechanism of bloom development along the central California coast. This coupling of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia growth near upwelling zones with physical processes involved in cell transport will be understood only when long-term measurements are made at several key coastal locations, aiding in our capability to predict domoic-acid producing algal blooms.

  2. Catalytic performance of hybrid nanocatalyst for levulinic acid production from glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya'aini, Nazlina; Amin, Nor Aishah Saidina

    2012-11-01

    Levulinic acid is one of the potential and versatile biomass-derived chemicals. Product analysis via HPLC revealed that the heterogeneous dehydration of glucose over hybrid nanocatalyst exhibited better performance compared to single catalyst. Hybrid nanocatalyst containing H-Y zeolite and CrCl3 could substitute homogenous acid catalyst for attaining high levulinic acid yield. Different CrC3 and H-Y zeolite weight ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 were prepared according to the wetness impregnation method. The hybrid catalyst with a 1:1 weight ratio performed better compared to others with the highest levulinic acid yield reported (93.5%) at 140 °C, 180 min reaction time, 0.1 g catalyst loading and 0.1 g glucose feed. Characterization results revealed that properties such as surface area, mesoporosity and acidic strength of the catalyst have significant effects on glucose dehydration for levulinic acid production.

  3. Production of omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid by metabolic engineering of Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhixiong; Sharpe, Pamela L; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Yadav, Narendra S; Xie, Dongming; Short, David R; Damude, Howard G; Rupert, Ross A; Seip, John E; Wang, Jamie; Pollak, Dana W; Bostick, Michael W; Bosak, Melissa D; Macool, Daniel J; Hollerbach, Dieter H; Zhang, Hongxiang; Arcilla, Dennis M; Bledsoe, Sidney A; Croker, Kevin; McCord, Elizabeth F; Tyreus, Bjorn D; Jackson, Ethel N; Zhu, Quinn

    2013-08-01

    The availability of the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is currently limited because they are produced mainly by marine fisheries that cannot keep pace with the demands of the growing market for these products. A sustainable non-animal source of EPA and DHA is needed. Metabolic engineering of the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica resulted in a strain that produced EPA at 15% of dry cell weight. The engineered yeast lipid comprises EPA at 56.6% and saturated fatty acids at less than 5% by weight, which are the highest and the lowest percentages, respectively, among known EPA sources. Inactivation of the peroxisome biogenesis gene PEX10 was crucial in obtaining high EPA yields and may increase the yields of other commercially desirable lipid-related products. This technology platform enables the production of lipids with tailored fatty acid compositions and provides a sustainable source of EPA. PMID:23873085

  4. Structures of chlorophyll catabolites in bananas (Musa acuminata) reveal a split path of chlorophyll breakdown in a ripening fruit.

    PubMed

    Moser, Simone; Müller, Thomas; Holzinger, Andreas; Lütz, Cornelius; Kräutler, Bernhard

    2012-08-27

    The disappearance of chlorophyll is a visual sign of fruit ripening. Yet, chlorophyll breakdown in fruit has hardly been explored; its non-green degradation products are largely unknown. Here we report the analysis and structure elucidation of colorless tetrapyrrolic chlorophyll breakdown products in commercially available, ripening bananas (Musa acuminata, Cavendish cultivar). In banana peels, chlorophyll catabolites were found in an unprecedented structural richness: a variety of new fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (FCCs) and nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (NCCs) were detected. As a rule, FCCs exist only "fleetingly" and are hard to observe. However, in bananas several of the FCCs (named Mc-FCCs) were persistent and carried an ester function at the propionate side-chain. NCCs were less abundant, and exhibited a free propionic acid group, but functional modifications elsewhere. The modifications of NCCs in banana peels were similar to those found in NCCs from senescent leaves. They are presumed to be introduced by enzymatic transformations at the stage of the mostly unobserved, direct FCC-precursors. The observed divergent functional group characteristics of the Mc-FCCs versus those of the Mc-NCCs indicated two major "late" processing lines of chlorophyll breakdown in ripening bananas. The "last common precursor" at the branching point to either the persistent FCCs, or towards the NCCs, was identified as a temporarily abundant "secondary" FCC. The existence of two "downstream" branches of chlorophyll breakdown in banana peels, and the striking accumulation of persistent Mc-FCCs call for attention as to the still-elusive biological roles of the resulting colorless linear tetrapyrroles. PMID:22807397

  5. Structures of Chlorophyll Catabolites in Bananas (Musa acuminata) Reveal a Split Path of Chlorophyll Breakdown in a Ripening Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Simone; Müller, Thomas; Holzinger, Andreas; Lütz, Cornelius; Kräutler, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The disappearance of chlorophyll is a visual sign of fruit ripening. Yet, chlorophyll breakdown in fruit has hardly been explored; its non-green degradation products are largely unknown. Here we report the analysis and structure elucidation of colorless tetrapyrrolic chlorophyll breakdown products in commercially available, ripening bananas (Musa acuminata, Cavendish cultivar). In banana peels, chlorophyll catabolites were found in an unprecedented structural richness: a variety of new fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (FCCs) and nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (NCCs) were detected. As a rule, FCCs exist only "fleetingly" and are hard to observe. However, in bananas several of the FCCs (named Mc-FCCs) were persistent and carried an ester function at the propionate side-chain. NCCs were less abundant, and exhibited a free propionic acid group, but functional modifications elsewhere. The modifications of NCCs in banana peels were similar to those found in NCCs from senescent leaves. They are presumed to be introduced by enzymatic transformations at the stage of the mostly unobserved, direct FCC-precursors. The observed divergent functional group characteristics of the Mc-FCCs versus those of the Mc-NCCs indicated two major "late" processing lines of chlorophyll breakdown in ripening bananas. The "last common precursor" at the branching point to either the persistent FCCs, or towards the NCCs, was identified as a temporarily abundant "secondary" FCC. The existence of two "downstream" branches of chlorophyll breakdown in banana peels, and the striking accumulation of persistent Mc-FCCs call for attention as to the still-elusive biological roles of the resulting colorless linear tetrapyrroles. PMID:22807397

  6. Cyclic Sulfamidate Enabled Syntheses of Amino Acids, Peptides, Carbohydrates, and Natural Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article reviews the emergence of cyclic sulfamidates as versatile intermediatesfor the synthesis of unnatural amino acids, chalcogen peptides, modified sugars, drugs and drug candidates, and important natural products.

  7. Lactic acid production from Cellobiose and xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficient and rapid production of value-added chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass is an important step towards a sustainable society. Lactic acid, used for synthesizing the bioplastic polylactide, has been produced by microbial fermentation using primarily glucose. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates co...

  8. L-lactic acid production from cellobiose and xylose by engineered 1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficient and rapid production of value-added chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass is an important step towards a sustainable society. Lactic acid, used for synthesizing the bioplastic polylactide, has been produced by microbial fermentation using primarily glucose. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates co...

  9. High-yield production of biosugars from Gracilaria verrucosa by acid and enzymatic hydrolysis processes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Won; Hong, Chae-Hwan; Jeon, Sung-Wan; Shin, Hyun-Jae

    2015-11-01

    Gracilaria verrucosa, the red alga, is a suitable feedstock for biosugar production. This study analyzes biosugar production by the hydrolysis of G. verrucosa conducted under various conditions (i.e., various acid concentrations, substrate concentrations, reaction times, and enzyme dosages). The acid hydrolysates of G. verrucosa yielded a total of 7.47g/L (37.4%) and 10.63g/L (21.26%) of reducing sugars under optimal small (30mL) and large laboratory-scale (1L) hydrolysis processes, respectively. Reducing sugar obtained from acid and enzymatic hydrolysates were 10% higher, with minimum by-products, than those reported in other studies. The mass balance for the small laboratory-scale process showed that the acid and enzymatic hydrolysates had a carbohydrate conversion of 57.2%. The mass balance approach to the entire hydrolysis process of red seaweed for biosugar production can be applied to other saccharification processes. PMID:26299978

  10. Induction of micronuclei by palmitic acid and its unique radiolytic product 2-dodecylcyclobutanone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Palmitic acid (PA), one of the most abundant fatty acids in the human diet, can cause oxidative stress, DNA strand breakage, cellular necrosis and apoptosis in human and rodent cells in vitro. Radiolysis of PA leads to the formation of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB), a unique radiolytic product for...

  11. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V

    2014-11-18

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  12. Plant resistance mechanisms to air pollutants: rhythms in ascorbic acid production during growth under ozone stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Relationships between ozone (O3) tolerance and leaf ascorbic acid concentrations in O3-susceptible (O3-S) 'Hark' and O3-resistant (O3-R) 'Hood' soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., cultivars were examined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Leaf samples were analyzed at 4 intervals during a 24 h period. Soybean cultivars grown in the greenhouse with charcoal filtered (CF) and nonfiltered (NF) air showed daily oscillations in ascorbic acid production. Highest ascorbic acid levels in leaves during light coincided with highest concentrations of photochemical oxidants in the atmosphere at 2:00 p.m. The resistant genotype produced more ascorbic acid in its trifoliate leaves than did the corresponding susceptible genotype. Under CF air (an O3-reduced environment) O3-S and O3-R cultivars showed rhythms in ascorbic acid production. In NF air (an O3 stress environment) the O3-R cultivar alone showed rhythms in ascorbic acid production. Results indicated that superior O3 tolerance in the Hood soybean cultivar (compared with Hark) was associated with a greater increase in endogenous levels of ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid may scavenge free radicals and thereby protect cells from injury by O3 or other oxyradical products. Plants defend themselves against photochemical oxidant stress, such as O3, by several mechanisms. Experimental evidence indicates that antioxidant defense systems existing in plant tissues may function to protect cellular components from deleterious effects of photochemical oxidants through endogenous and exogenous controls.

  13. Integration of succinic acid and ethanol production within a corn or barley biorefinery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of succinic acid from glucose by Escherichia coli strain AFP184 was studied in a batch fermentor. The bases used for pH control included NaOH, KOH, NH4OH, and Na2CO3. The yield of succinic acid without and with carbon dioxide supplied by an adjacent ethanol fermentor using either corn or ...

  14. Margarine and spread products with oils rich in polyunsaturated fatty acid – organogel approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organogels have drawn increasing interest as alternatives to trans fatty acids and saturated fatty acids-containing hardstocks used in structured food products such as margarine, spread and shortening. In this research, organogels formed by plant wax and vegetable oil were evaluated in an actual mar...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction...

  9. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine...

  10. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H.; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V.

    2011-10-04

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  11. Comparative Study of SPORL and Dilute Acid Pretreatments of Spruce for Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The performance of two pretreatment methods, Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome Recalcitrance of Lignocellulose (SPORL) and Dilute Acid (DA), was compared in pretreating softwood (spruce) for fuel ethanol production under the same conditions of temperature (180°C), time (30 min), sulfuric acid loading...

  12. Engineering oilseeds for sustainable production of industrial and nutritional feedstocks: solving bottlenecks in fatty acid flux

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable oils provide a platform for the production of high-value fatty acids that can replace non-sustainable petroleum and oceanic sources of specialty chemicals and aquaculture feed. Recent efforts to engineer seeds of crop and model species to produce new types of fatty acid structures for thes...

  13. Capillary electrophoresis as a tool for evaluating lactic acid production from sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in the use of renewable resources for the production of bio-industrial chemicals and fuels is increasing. One industrial chemical that can be produced from renewable resources is lactic acid. Lactic acid is used in the food industry as a flavor compound, preservative, and to acidify produ...

  14. Measurement of Trans-Fatty Acids in Cereal Products Without Oil Extraction Using NIR Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy was evaluated as a rapid technique, to determine the trans-fatty acid content of ground cereal products. NIR spectra were obtained with a dispersive spectrometer and trans-fatty acids determined by modified AOAC Method 996.01. First derivative PLS1 mode...

  15. Breakdown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskowitz, Eva

    2006-01-01

    The multiplicity of ills facing the nation's public schools can depress even the most optimistic. In this article, the author presents her views about the school system and the negative effects that labor agreements have had on it. Her views on how to solve some seemingly intractable education problems have been informed by two experiences: her…

  16. [Progress in engineering Escherichia coli for production of high-value added organic acids and alcohols].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiming; Liu, Wei; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Haibo; Xian, Mo

    2013-10-01

    Confronted with the gradual exhaustion of the earth's fossil energy resources and the grimmer environmental deterioration, the bio-based process to produce high-value added platform chemicals from renewable biomass is attracting growing interest. Escherichia coli has been chosen as a workhouse for the production of many valuable chemicals due to various advantages, such as clear genetic background, convenient to be genetically modified and good growth properties with low nutrient requirements. Rational strain development of E. coli achieved by metabolic engineering strategies has provided new processes for efficiently biotechnological production of various high-value chemical building blocks. This review focuses on recent progresses in metabolic engineering of E. coli that lead to efficient recombinant biocatalysts for production of high-value organic acids such as succinic acid, 3-hydroxypropanoic acid and glucaric acid as well as alcohols like glycerol and xylitol. Besides, this review also discusses several other platform chemicals, including 2,5-furan dicarboxylic acid, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, itaconic acid, levulinic acid, 3-hydroxy-gamma-butyrolactone and sorbitol, which have not been produced by E. coli until now. PMID:24432652

  17. Microbial production of propionic acid and vitamin B12 using molasses or sugar.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Chanto, A; Afschar, A S; Wagner, F

    1994-06-01

    With a cell concentration of 125 g dry biomass l-1 and a dilution rate of 0.1 h-1, Propionibacterium acidipropionici produces 30 g propionic acid l-1 from sugar with a productivity of 3 g l-1 h-1. The yield of propionic acid is approx. 0.36-0.45 g propionic acid g-1 sucrose and is independent of the dilution rate and cell concentration. Acetic acid is an unwanted by-product in the production of propionic acid. The concentration of acetic acid only increases slightly when the cell concentration is increased. A two-stage fermentation process was developed for the conversion of sugar or molasses of various types to propionic acid and vitamin B12. By fermentation of blackstrap molasses (from sugar beet and sugar cane) in the first fermentation stage 17.7 g propionic acid l-1 with a yield of 0.5 g propionic acid g-1 carbohydrate was produced with a dilution rate of 0.25 h-1. In the second stage 49 mg vitamin B12 1-1 was produced at a dilution rate of 0.03 h-1. PMID:7765100

  18. Metaproteomics and ultrastructure characterization of Komagataeibacter spp. involved in high-acid spirit vinegar production.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Barrao, Cristina; Saad, Maged M; Cabello Ferrete, Elena; Bravo, Daniel; Chappuis, Marie-Luise; Ortega Pérez, Ruben; Junier, Pilar; Perret, Xavier; Barja, François

    2016-05-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are widespread microorganisms in nature, extensively used in food industry to transform alcohols and sugar alcohols into their corresponding organic acids. Specialized strains are used in the production of vinegar through the oxidative transformation of ethanol into acetic acid. The main AAB involved in the production of high-acid vinegars using the submerged fermentation method belong to the genus Komagataeibacter, characterized by their higher ADH stability and activity, and higher acetic acid resistance (15-20%), compared to other AAB. In this work, the bacteria involved in the production of high-acid spirit vinegar through a spontaneous acetic acid fermentation process was studied. The analysis using a culture-independent approach revealed a homogeneous bacterial population involved in the process, identified as Komagataeibacter spp. Differentially expressed proteins during acetic acid fermentation were investigated by using 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry. Most of these proteins were functionally related to stress response, the TCA cycle and different metabolic processes. In addition, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and specific staining of polysaccharide SDS-PAGE gels confirmed that Komagataeibacter spp. lacked the characteristic polysaccharide layer surrounding the outer membrane that has been previously reported to have an important role in acetic acid resistance in the genus Acetobacter. PMID:26742622

  19. l-(+)-Lactic acid production by Lactobacillus rhamnosus B103 from dairy industry waste.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Marcela Piassi; Coelho, Luciana Fontes; Sass, Daiane Cristina; Contiero, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid, which can be obtained through fermentation, is an interesting compound because it can be utilized in different fields, such as in the food, pharmaceutical and chemical industries as a bio-based molecule for bio-refinery. In addition, lactic acid has recently gained more interest due to the possibility of manufacturing poly(lactic acid), a green polymer that can replace petroleum-derived plastics and be applied in medicine for the regeneration of tissues and in sutures, repairs and implants. One of the great advantages of fermentation is the possibility of using agribusiness wastes to obtain optically pure lactic acid. The conventional batch process of fermentation has some disadvantages such as inhibition by the substrate or the final product. To avoid these problems, this study was focused on improving the production of lactic acid through different feeding strategies using whey, a residue of agribusiness. The downstream process is a significant bottleneck because cost-effective methods of producing high-purity lactic acid are lacking. Thus, the investigation of different methods for the purification of lactic acid was one of the aims of this work. The pH-stat strategy showed the maximum production of lactic acid of 143.7g/L. Following purification of the lactic acid sample, recovery of reducing sugars and protein and color removal were 0.28%, 100% and 100%, respectively. PMID:27266630

  20. Hydrogen production by photoelectrochemically splitting solutions of formic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Guo, Wenliang; Zhu, Yusong; Wu, Yuping

    2011-10-17

    A TiO₂/FTO (FTO=fluorine-doped tin oxide) electrode was prepared by dip-coating FTO in a suspension of TiO₂ prepared from a sol-gel method and was used as a photoanode to split an aqueous solution of formic acid to produce hydrogen. The surface of the TiO₂/FTO film was covered with assemblies of TiO₂ nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 20 nm. Under irradiation by using a Xe lamp, splitting of formic acid was performed at different applied current densities. Compared to splitting water or utilizing FTO and Pt foil as the anode, the splitting voltage is much lower and can be as low as -0.27 V. The results show that the splitting voltage is related to the concentration of free formate groups. The evolution rate of hydrogen measured by using gas chromatography is 130 μmol h⁻¹ at a current density of 20 mA cm⁻² and the energy-conversion efficiency can be 1.79 %. Photoelectrolysis of formic acid has the potential to be an efficient way to produce hydrogen with a high energy-conversion efficiency. PMID:21994155

  1. Glucose supplementation-induced changes in the Auxenochlorella protothecoides fatty acid composition suitable for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Izabela; Oleszek, Marta

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluates the effect of different concentrations of glucose supplementation on growth, lipid accumulation, and the fatty acid profile in the Auxenochlorella protothecoides. Addition of glucose promoted the growth rate and decreased the chlorophyll content. Compared with photoautotrophic cells, an increase in the lipid content was observed in mixotrophic cells. The glucose addition induced changes in the fatty acid profile. Higher content of saturated fatty acids was found in the case of cells growing in the glucose-free medium. Oleic acid was the predominant component in mixotrophic cells supplemented with 5gL(-1) glucose, while linoleic acids dominated in cultures supplemented with both 1 and 3gL(-1) glucose. The use of glucose was associated with decreased levels of linolenic acid and PUFA. The changes in the fatty acid profile in mixotrophic cells are favourable for biodiesel production. PMID:27485282

  2. Biosynthetic production of universally (13)C-labelled polyunsaturated fatty acids as reference materials for natural health product research.

    PubMed

    Le, Phuong Mai; Fraser, Catherine; Gardner, Graeme; Liang, Wei-Wan; Kralovec, Jaroslav A; Cunnane, Stephen C; Windust, Anthony J

    2007-09-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) have become important natural health products with numerous proven benefits related to brain function and cardiovascular health. Not only are omega-3 fatty acids available in a plethora of dietary supplements, but they are also increasingly being incorporated as triglycerides into conventional foods, including bread, milk, yoghurt and confectionaries. Recently, transgenic oil seed crops and livestock have been developed that enhance omega-3 fatty acid content. This diverse array of matrices presents a difficult analytical challenge and is compounded further by samples generated through clinical research. Stable isotope (13)C-labelled LCPUFA standards offer many advantages as research tools because they may be distinguished from their naturally abundant counterparts by mass spectrometry and directly incorporated as internal standards into analytical procedures. Further, (13)C-labelled LCPUFAs are safe to use as metabolic tracers to study uptake and metabolism in humans. Currently, (13)C-labelled LCPUFAs are expensive, available in limited supply and not in triglyceride form. To resolve these issues, marine heterotrophic microorganisms are being isolated and screened for LCPUFA production with a view to the efficient biosynthetic production of U-(13)C-labelled fatty acids using U-(13)C glucose as a carbon source. Of 37 isolates obtained, most were thraustochytrids, and either DHA or omega-6 docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-6) were produced as the major LCPUFA. The marine protist Hyalochlorella marina was identified as a novel source of EPA and omega-3 docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-3). As proof of principle, gram-level production of (13)C-labelled DHA has been achieved with high chemical purity ( >99%) and high (13)C incorporation levels (>90%), as confirmed by NMR and MS analyses. Finally, U-(13)C-DHA was enzymatically re-esterified to

  3. Photoautotrophic production of D-lactic acid in an engineered cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The world faces the challenge to develop sustainable technologies to replace thousands of products that have been generated from fossil fuels. Microbial cell factories serve as promising alternatives for the production of diverse commodity chemicals and biofuels from renewable resources. For example, polylactic acid (PLA) with its biodegradable properties is a sustainable, environmentally friendly alternative to polyethylene. At present, PLA microbial production is mainly dependent on food crops such as corn and sugarcane. Moreover, optically pure isomers of lactic acid are required for the production of PLA, where D-lactic acid controls the thermochemical and physical properties of PLA. Henceforth, production of D-lactic acid through a more sustainable source (CO2) is desirable. Results We have performed metabolic engineering on Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for the phototrophic synthesis of optically pure D-lactic acid from CO2. Synthesis of optically pure D-lactic acid was achieved by utilizing a recently discovered enzyme (i.e., a mutated glycerol dehydrogenase, GlyDH*). Significant improvements in D-lactic acid synthesis were achieved through codon optimization and by balancing the cofactor (NADH) availability through the heterologous expression of a soluble transhydrogenase. We have also discovered that addition of acetate to the cultures improved lactic acid production. More interestingly, 13C-pathway analysis revealed that acetate was not used for the synthesis of lactic acid, but was mainly used for synthesis of certain biomass building blocks (such as leucine and glutamate). Finally, the optimal strain was able to accumulate 1.14 g/L (photoautotrophic condition) and 2.17 g/L (phototrophic condition with acetate) of D-lactate in 24 days. Conclusions We have demonstrated the photoautotrophic production of D-lactic acid by engineering a cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803. The engineered strain shows an excellent D-lactic acid productivity from CO2. In

  4. Effects of Light and Temperature on Fatty Acid Production in Nannochloropsis Salina

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wagenen, Jonathan M.; Miller, Tyler W.; Hobbs, Samuel J.; Hook, Paul W.; Crowe, Braden J.; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2012-03-12

    Accurate prediction of algal biofuel yield will require empirical determination of physiological responses to the climate, particularly light and temperature. One strain of interest, Nannochloropsis salina, was subjected to ranges of light intensity (5-850 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and temperature (13-40 C); exponential growth rate, total fatty acids (TFA) and fatty acid composition were measured. The maximum acclimated growth rate was 1.3 day{sup -1} at 23 C and 250 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Fatty acids were detected by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) after transesterification to corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). A sharp increase in TFA containing elevated palmitic acid (C16:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:1) during exponential growth at high light was observed, indicating likely triacylglycerol accumulation due to photo-oxidative stress. Lower light resulted in increases in the relative abundance of unsaturated fatty acids; in thin cultures, increases were observed in palmitoleic and eicosapentaenoeic acids (C20:5{omega}3). As cultures aged and the effective light intensity per cell converged to very low levels, fatty acid profiles became more similar and there was a notable increase of oleic acid (C18:1{omega}9). The amount of unsaturated fatty acids was inversely proportional to temperature, demonstrating physiological adaptations to increase membrane fluidity. This data will improve prediction of fatty acid characteristics and yields relevant to biofuel production.

  5. 40 CFR 63.1218 - What are the standards for hydrochloric acid production furnaces that burn hazardous waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrochloric acid production furnaces that burn hazardous waste? 63.1218 Section 63.1218 Protection of... Fuel Boilers, Liquid Fuel Boilers, and Hydrochloric Acid Production Furnaces § 63.1218 What are the standards for hydrochloric acid production furnaces that burn hazardous waste? (a) Emission limits...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1218 - What are the standards for hydrochloric acid production furnaces that burn hazardous waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrochloric acid production furnaces that burn hazardous waste? 63.1218 Section 63.1218 Protection of..., Liquid Fuel Boilers, and Hydrochloric Acid Production Furnaces § 63.1218 What are the standards for hydrochloric acid production furnaces that burn hazardous waste? (a) Emission limits for existing sources....

  7. 40 CFR 63.1218 - What are the standards for hydrochloric acid production furnaces that burn hazardous waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrochloric acid production furnaces that burn hazardous waste? 63.1218 Section 63.1218 Protection of... Fuel Boilers, Liquid Fuel Boilers, and Hydrochloric Acid Production Furnaces § 63.1218 What are the standards for hydrochloric acid production furnaces that burn hazardous waste? (a) Emission limits...

  8. Update on the biochemistry of chlorophyll breakdown.

    PubMed

    Hörtensteiner, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    In land plants, chlorophyll is broken down to colorless linear tetrapyrroles in a highly conserved multi-step pathway. The pathway is termed the 'PAO pathway', because the opening of the chlorine macrocycle present in chlorophyll catalyzed by pheophorbide a oxygenase (PAO), the key enzyme of the pathway, provides the characteristic structural basis found in all further downstream chlorophyll breakdown products. To date, most of the biochemical steps of the PAO pathway have been elucidated and genes encoding many of the chlorophyll catabolic enzymes been identified. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the biochemistry of the PAO pathway and provides insight into recent progress made in the field that indicates that the pathway is more complex than thought in the past. PMID:22790503

  9. Microbial Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids from Lignocellulosic Biomass: Current Processes and Market

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Biological production of organic acids from conversion of biomass derivatives has received increased attention among scientists and engineers and in business because of the attractive properties such as renewability, sustainability, degradability, and versatility. The aim of the present review is to summarize recent research and development of short chain fatty acids production by anaerobic fermentation of nonfood biomass and to evaluate the status and outlook for a sustainable industrial production of such biochemicals. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) such as acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid have many industrial applications and are currently of global economic interest. The focus is mainly on the utilization of pretreated lignocellulosic plant biomass as substrate (the carbohydrate route) and development of the bacteria and processes that lead to a high and economically feasible production of VFA. The current and developing market for VFA is analyzed focusing on production, prices, and forecasts along with a presentation of the biotechnology companies operating in the market for sustainable biochemicals. Finally, perspectives on taking sustainable product of biochemicals from promise to market introduction are reviewed. PMID:27556042

  10. Microbial Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids from Lignocellulosic Biomass: Current Processes and Market.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Ivan; Westermann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Biological production of organic acids from conversion of biomass derivatives has received increased attention among scientists and engineers and in business because of the attractive properties such as renewability, sustainability, degradability, and versatility. The aim of the present review is to summarize recent research and development of short chain fatty acids production by anaerobic fermentation of nonfood biomass and to evaluate the status and outlook for a sustainable industrial production of such biochemicals. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) such as acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid have many industrial applications and are currently of global economic interest. The focus is mainly on the utilization of pretreated lignocellulosic plant biomass as substrate (the carbohydrate route) and development of the bacteria and processes that lead to a high and economically feasible production of VFA. The current and developing market for VFA is analyzed focusing on production, prices, and forecasts along with a presentation of the biotechnology companies operating in the market for sustainable biochemicals. Finally, perspectives on taking sustainable product of biochemicals from promise to market introduction are reviewed. PMID:27556042

  11. Improving succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes from raw industrial carob pods.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Margarida; Roca, Christophe; Reis, Maria A M

    2016-10-01

    Carob pods are an inexpensive by-product of locust bean gum industry that can be used as renewable feedstock for bio-based succinic acid. Here, for the first time, unprocessed raw carob pods were used to extract a highly enriched sugar solution, afterwards used as substrate to produce succinic acid using Actinobacillus succinogenes. Batch fermentations containing 30g/L sugars resulted in a production rate of 1.67gSA/L.h and a yield of 0.39gSA/g sugars. Taking advantage of A. succinogenes' metabolism, uncoupling cell growth from succinic acid production, a fed-batch mode was implemented to increase succinic acid yield and reduce by-products formation. This strategy resulted in a succinic acid yield of 0.94gSA/g sugars, the highest yield reported in the literature for fed-batch and continuous experiments, while maintaining by-products at residual values. Results demonstrate that raw carob pods are a highly efficient feedstock for bio-based succinic acid production. PMID:27394995

  12. Role of fatty acid composites in the toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles used in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Chang, JuOae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Alsulimani, Helal Hussain; Choi, Jee Eun; Lee, Joo-Kyung; Kim, AhYoung; Park, Bae Ho; Kim, Jonghan; Lee, HeaYeon

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in the cosmetic industry results in products with better efficacy and functionality. However, recent advances in molecular toxicology have revealed that NP exposure can promote cytotoxicity and oxidative damage, which has raised health concerns in the use of NPs in personal care products. Nevertheless, the mechanistic basis for the toxicity and safety of cosmetic NPs is poorly understood. The goal of the study was to determine the cytotoxicity and intracellular distribution of titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs containing fatty acid composites (palmitoleic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid and oleic acid) commonly used in cosmetic products. Two types of cells, human fibroblast skin cells and adenocarcinoma lung cells, were exposed to either bare TiO2 NPs or TiO2 NPs mixed with fatty acids for up to 48 hr. NMR analysis confirmed that the fatty acid composites remained in the NPs after wash. The cytotoxicity of TiO2 NPs was determined by cell viability measurement using quantitative confocal microscopy, and the localization of two different forms of TiO2 NPs were assessed using electron spectroscopic imaging with transmission electron microscopy. TiO2 NPs containing fatty acids posed significantly reduced cytotoxicity (80-88% decreases) than bare NPs in both cell types. Furthermore, there was less intracellular penetration of the NPs containing fatty acid composites compared with bare NPs. These results provide important insights into the role of fatty acids in protecting the cells from possible toxicity caused by NPs used in the production of cosmetic products. PMID:27432239

  13. d-lactic acid production from renewable lignocellulosic biomass via genetically modified Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yixing; Kumar, Amit; Hardwidge, Philip R; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko; Vadlani, Praveen V

    2016-03-01

    d-lactic acid is of great interest because of increasing demand for biobased poly-lactic acid (PLA). Blending poly-l-lactic acid with poly-d-lactic acid greatly improves PLA's mechanical and physical properties. Corn stover and sorghum stalks treated with 1% sodium hydroxide were investigated as possible substrates for d-lactic acid production by both sequential saccharification and fermentation and simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF). A commercial cellulase (Cellic CTec2) was used for hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass and an l-lactate-deficient mutant strain Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 ldhL1 and its derivative harboring a xylose assimilation plasmid (ΔldhL1-pCU-PxylAB) were used for fermentation. The SSCF process demonstrated the advantage of avoiding feedback inhibition of released sugars from lignocellulosic biomass, thus significantly improving d-lactic acid yield and productivity. d-lactic acid (27.3 g L(-1) ) and productivity (0.75 g L(-1) h(-1) ) was obtained from corn stover and d-lactic acid (22.0 g L(-1) ) and productivity (0.65 g L(-1) h(-1) ) was obtained from sorghum stalks using ΔldhL1-pCU-PxylAB via the SSCF process. The recombinant strain produced a higher concentration of d-lactic acid than the mutant strain by using the xylose present in lignocellulosic biomass. Our findings demonstrate the potential of using renewable lignocellulosic biomass as an alternative to conventional feedstocks with metabolically engineered lactic acid bacteria to produce d-lactic acid. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:271-278, 2016. PMID:26700935

  14. Internal structure of a vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    An axisymmetric vortex breakdown was well simulated by the vortex filament method. The agreement with the experiment was qualitatively good. In particular, the structure in the interior of the vortex breakdown was ensured to a great degree by the present simulation. The second breakdown, or spiral type, which occurs downstream of the first axisymmetric breakdown, was simulated more similarly to the experiment than before. It shows a kink of the vortex filaments and strong three-dimensionality. Furthermore, a relatively low velocity region was observed near the second breakdown. It was also found that it takes some time for this physical phenomenon to attain its final stage. The comparison with the experiment is getting better as time goes on. In this paper, emphasis is placed on the comparison of the simulated results with the experiment. The present results help to make clear the mechanism of a vortex breakdown.

  15. On a criterion for vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, R. E.; Gatski, T. B.; Grosch, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    A criterion for the onset of vortex breakdown is proposed. Based upon previous experimental, computational, and theoretical studies, an appropriately defined local Rossby number is used to delineate the region where breakdown occurs. In addition, new numerical results are presented which further validate this criterion. A number of previous theoretical studies concentrating on inviscid standing-wave analyses for trailing wing-tip vortices are reviewed and reinterpreted in terms of the Rossby number criterion. Consistent with previous studies, the physical basis for the onset of breakdown is identified as the ability of the flow to sustain such waves. Previous computational results are reviewed and re-evaluated in terms of the proposed breakdown criterion. As a result, the cause of breakdown occurring near the inflow computational boundary, common to several numerical studies, is identified. Finally, previous experimental studies of vortex breakdown for both leading edge and trailing wing-tip vortices are reviewed and quantified in terms of the Rossby number criterion.

  16. Organic compounds in lunar samples: pyrolysis products, hydrocarbons, amino acids.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Drew, D M; Hamilton, P B; Modzeleski, V E; Murphy, M E; Scott, W M; Urey, H C; Young, M

    1970-01-30

    Lunar fines and a chip from inside a rock pyrolyzed in helium at 700 degrees C gave methane, other gases, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Benzene/methanol extracts of fines yielded traces of high molecular weight alkanes and sulfur. Traces of glycine, alanine, ethanolamine, and urea were found in aqueous extracts. Biological controls and a terrestrial rock, dunite, subjected to exhaust from the lunar module descent engine showed a different amino acid distribution. Interpretation of the origin of the carbon compounds requires extreme care, because of possible contamination acquired during initial sample processing. PMID:5410553

  17. Reduction of breakdown threshold by metal nanoparticle seeding in a DC microdischarge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Jordan; Abboud, Jacques; Zhang, Zhili; Adams, Steven F.

    2015-01-01

    Significant reduction of the breakdown threshold in a DC microdischarge via seeding metal nanoparticles has been demonstrated. Compared to standard Paschen curves in dry air, reductions in the breakdown voltage of 5% to 25% were obtained for PD values (the product of pressure and electrode gap distance) ranging from 20 to 40 Torr-cm by seeding aluminum and iron nanoparticles with mean sizes of 75 nm and 80 nm, respectively. No secondary energy source was required to achieve this breakdown threshold reduction. From high-speed chemiluminescence imaging of the discharge evolution, breakdown was shown to be initiated at reduced voltages. Following breakdown, the increase in temperature ignited some of the nanoparticles near the cathode. Results suggest that possible charging of the nanoparticles within the gap may reduce the effective transient distance, leading to the threshold reduction.

  18. Inhibition of Large Neutral Amino Acid Transporters Suppresses Kynurenic Acid Production Via Inhibition of Kynurenine Uptake in Rodent Brain.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Airi; Kuroki, Yusuke; Urata, Tomomi; Mori, Noriyuki; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2016-09-01

    The tryptophan metabolite, kynurenic acid (KYNA), is a preferential antagonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor at endogenous brain concentrations. Recent studies have suggested that increases of brain KYNA levels are involved in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression, and regulation of KYNA production has become a new target for treatment of these diseases. Kynurenine (KYN), the immediate precursor of KYNA, is transported into astrocytes via large neutral amino acid transporters (LATs). In the present study, the effect of LATs regulation on KYN uptake and KYNA production was investigated in vitro and in vivo using an LATs inhibitor, 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH). In the in vitro study, cortical slices of rat brain were incubated with a physiological concentration of KYN and 3 µmol/L-3 mmol/L BCH. BCH inhibited KYNA production and KYN uptake in a dose-dependent manner, and their IC50 values were 90.7 and 97.4 µmol/L, respectively. In the in vivo study, mice were administered KYN (50 mg/kg BW) orally and BCH (200 mg/kg BW) intravenously. Administration of KYN increased brain KYN and KYNA levels compared with the mice treated with vehicle, whereas additional administration of BCH suppressed KYN-induced elevations in KYN and KYNA levels to 50 and 70 % in the brain. These results suggest that inhibition of LATs prevented the increase of KYNA production via blockade of KYN uptake in the brain in vitro and in vivo. LATs can be a target to modulate brain function by regulation of KYNA production in the brain. PMID:27161376

  19. Investigation of malic acid production in Aspergillus oryzae under nitrogen starvation conditions.

    PubMed

    Knuf, Christoph; Nookaew, Intawat; Brown, Stephen H; McCulloch, Michael; Berry, Alan; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-10-01

    Malic acid has great potential for replacing petrochemical building blocks in the future. For this application, high yields, rates, and titers are essential in order to sustain a viable biotechnological production process. Natural high-capacity malic acid producers like the malic acid producer Aspergillus flavus have so far been disqualified because of special growth requirements or the production of mycotoxins. As A. oryzae is a very close relative or even an ecotype of A. flavus, it is likely that its high malic acid production capabilities with a generally regarded as safe (GRAS) status may be combined with already existing large-scale fermentation experience. In order to verify the malic acid production potential, two wild-type strains, NRRL3485 and NRRL3488, were compared in shake flasks. As NRRL3488 showed a volumetric production rate twice as high as that of NRRL3485, this strain was selected for further investigation of the influence of two different nitrogen sources on malic acid secretion. The cultivation in lab-scale fermentors resulted in a higher final titer, 30.27 ± 1.05 g liter(-1), using peptone than the one of 22.27 ± 0.46 g liter(-1) obtained when ammonium was used. Through transcriptome analysis, a binding site similar to the one of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast transcription factor Msn2/4 was identified in the upstream regions of glycolytic genes and the cytosolic malic acid production pathway from pyruvate via oxaloacetate to malate, which suggests that malic acid production is a stress response. Furthermore, the pyruvate carboxylase reaction was identified as a target for metabolic engineering, after it was confirmed to be transcriptionally regulated through the correlation of intracellular fluxes and transcriptional changes. PMID:23892740

  20. Investigation of Malic Acid Production in Aspergillus oryzae under Nitrogen Starvation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Knuf, Christoph; Nookaew, Intawat; Brown, Stephen H.; McCulloch, Michael; Berry, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Malic acid has great potential for replacing petrochemical building blocks in the future. For this application, high yields, rates, and titers are essential in order to sustain a viable biotechnological production process. Natural high-capacity malic acid producers like the malic acid producer Aspergillus flavus have so far been disqualified because of special growth requirements or the production of mycotoxins. As A. oryzae is a very close relative or even an ecotype of A. flavus, it is likely that its high malic acid production capabilities with a generally regarded as safe (GRAS) status may be combined with already existing large-scale fermentation experience. In order to verify the malic acid production potential, two wild-type strains, NRRL3485 and NRRL3488, were compared in shake flasks. As NRRL3488 showed a volumetric production rate twice as high as that of NRRL3485, this strain was selected for further investigation of the influence of two different nitrogen sources on malic acid secretion. The cultivation in lab-scale fermentors resulted in a higher final titer, 30.27 ± 1.05 g liter−1, using peptone than the one of 22.27 ± 0.46 g liter−1 obtained when ammonium was used. Through transcriptome analysis, a binding site similar to the one of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast transcription factor Msn2/4 was identified in the upstream regions of glycolytic genes and the cytosolic malic acid production pathway from pyruvate via oxaloacetate to malate, which suggests that malic acid production is a stress response. Furthermore, the pyruvate carboxylase reaction was identified as a target for metabolic engineering, after it was confirmed to be transcriptionally regulated through the correlation of intracellular fluxes and transcriptional changes. PMID:23892740

  1. Time dependent breakdown in silicon dioxide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svensson, C.; Shumka, A.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted regarding the possible existence of a time-dependent breakdown mechanism in thermal oxides of the type used as gate oxide in MOS circuits. Questions of device fabrication are discussed along with details concerning breakdown measurements and the determination of C-V characteristics. A relatively large prebreakdown current observed in one of the cases is related to the time-dependent breakdown.

  2. An integrated bioconversion process for the production of L-lactic acid from starchy feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.P.; Moon, S.H.

    1997-07-01

    The potential market for lactic acid as the feedstock for biodegradable polymers, oxygenated chemicals, and specialty chemicals is significant. L-lactic acid is often the desired enantiomer for such applications. However, stereospecific lactobacilli do not metabolize starch efficiently. In this work, Argonne researchers have developed a process to convert starchy feedstocks into L-lactic acid. The processing steps include starch recovery, continuous liquefaction, and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. Over 100 g/L of lactic acid was produced in less than 48 h. The optical purity of the product was greater than 95%. This process has potential economical advantages over the conventional process.

  3. Production of organic acid esters from biomass - novel processes and concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, R.

    1981-01-01

    After low cost, low energy pretreatment, lignocellulose can be converted directly to volatile (C/sub 2/-C/sub 6/) organic acids by mixed-culture acidogenic fermentation. The principal components of lignocellulose (pectins, hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin) are all converted to organic acids in high yields. Esterification from dilute aqueous solutions using novel techniques based on adsorption, solvent extraction, or biochemical conversion could be an important method for recovering these acids and simultaneously producing liquid fuels or chemical feedstocks. Uses of organic acid esters and conceptual biomass conversion processes are outlined. The significance of these processes for substantially increasing liquid fuel productivity from biomass feedstocks are discussed.

  4. Catalytic Conversion of Biomass for the Production of Hydrogen; Decomposition of Formic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi Manzour, Faraz

    Highly active bimetallic catalysts were synthesized and used for the decomposition of formic acid for the production of hydrogen. Ruthenium alloys were prepared and resulted in a maximum formic acid conversion of 68% (after one hour at 180 °C) and a turnover frequency of 0.7/s (at 5 wt% formic acid). The most promising catalysts were characterized by the means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Kinetic studies were also carried out over these catalysts for the determination of reaction rate and turnover frequency. Promotion of Ru/C with tin, barium and cesium increased the formic acid conversion by 55%, 18% and 11% respectively.

  5. Docosahexaenoic acid (22:6, n-3) is metabolized to lipoxygenase reaction products in the retina.

    PubMed

    Bazan, N G; Birkle, D L; Reddy, T S

    1984-12-14

    Docosahexaenoic acid (22:6, n-3), a major component of retinal phospholipids, is a substrate for active lipoxygenation in intact canine retinas incubated in vitro with [U-14C]docosahexaenoic acid. The major lipoxygenase reaction product was identified by high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as 11-hydroxy-4,7,9-(trans)13,16,19 docosahexaenoic acid. Other mono- and di-hydroxy derivatives also were detected. The synthesis of these compounds was inhibited by the antioxidant and lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, but was not inhibited by indomethacin or esculetin. PMID:6240268

  6. Acid hydrolysis of sweet potato for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Hamdy, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were conducted to establish optimal conditions for the acid hydrolysis of sweet potato for maximal ethanol yield. The starch contents of two sweet potato cultivars (Georgia Red and TG-4), based on fresh weight, were 21.1 +/- 0.6% and 27.5 +/- 1.6%, respectively. The results of acid hydrolysis experiments showed the following: (1) both hydrolysis rate and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) concentration were a function of HCL concentration, temperature, and time; (2) the reducing sugars were rapidly formed with elevated concentrations of HCl and temperature, but also destroyed quickly; and (3) HMF concentration increased significantly with the concentration of HCl, temperature, and hydrolysis time. Maximum reducing sugar value of 84.2 DE and 0.056% HMF (based on wet weight) was achieved after heating 8% SPS for 15 min in 1N HCl at 110/sup 0/C. Degraded 8% SPS (1N HCl, 97/sup 0/C for 20 min or 110/sup 0/C for 10 min) was utilized as substrate for ethanol fermentation and 3.8% ethanol (v/v) was produced from 1400 mL fermented wort. This is equal to 41.6 g ethanol (200 proof) from 400 g of fresh sweet potato tuber (Georgia Red) or an ethanol yield potential of 431 gal of 200-proof ethanol/acre (from 500 bushel tubers/acre).

  7. Continuous Isosorbide Production From Sorbitol Using Solid Acid Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, R.; Holladay,J.; Jaffe, M.; Brunelle, D.

    2006-09-29

    This is a final report for a project funded by the US Department of Agriculture and managed by the US Department of Energy. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board was the principal contracting entity for the grant. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board subcontracted with General Electric, Pacific Northwest National Lab and New Jersey Institute of Technology to conduct research in this project. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board and General Electric provided cost share for the project. The purpose of this diverse collaboration was to integrate both the conversion and the polymer applications into one project and increase the likelihood of success. This project has led to additional collaborations among other polymer companies. The goals of the project were to develop a renewable route to isosorbide for commercialization that is economically competitive with all existing production technologies and to develop new applications for isosorbide in various products such as polymers and materials. Under this program a novel process for the production of isosorbide was developed and evaluated. The novel process converts corn based sorbitol into isosorbide using a solid catalyst with integrated water removal and product recovery. In addition the work under this program has identified several novel products based on isosorbide chemistries. These market applications include: epoxy resins, UV stabilizers, plasticizers and polyesters. These market applications have commercial interest within the current polymer industry. This report contains an overview summary of the accomplishments. Six inventions and four patent applications have been written as a result of this project. Additional data will be published in the patent applications. The data developed at New Jersey Institute of Technology was presented at two technical conferences held in June of 2006. Several companies have made inquiries about using this material in their products.

  8. Mechanisms of volatile production from sulfur-containing amino acids by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uk Ahn, Dong; Joo Lee, Eun; Feng, Xi; Zhang, Wangang; Lee, Ji Hwan; Jo, Cheorun; Nam, Kichang

    2016-02-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids were used to study the mechanisms of off-odor production in meat by irradiation. Irradiation not only increased the amounts of volatiles but also produced many new volatiles from sulfur-containing amino acid monomers. We speculate that the majority of the volatiles were the direct radiolytic products of the side chains, but Strecker degradation as well as deamination and decarboxylation of radiolytic products were also involved in the production of volatile compounds from sulfur amino acids. The volatile compounds produced in amino acids were not only the primary products of irradiation, but also the products of secondary chemical reactions after the primary compounds were produced. Cysteine and methionine produced odor characteristics similar to that of the irradiated meat, but the amounts of sulfur volatiles from methionine were far greater than that of cysteine. Although the present study was carried out using an amino acid model system, the information can be applied to the quality indexes of irradiated meats as well as other food products.

  9. Leaching with Penicillium simplicissimum: Influence of Metals and Buffers on Proton Extrusion and Citric Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Andreas; Burgstaller, Wolfgang; Schinner, Franz

    1991-01-01

    In the presence of insoluble metal oxides (industrial filter dust, zinc oxide, synthetic mixture of metal oxides), Penicillium simplicissimum developed the ability to excrete considerable amounts of citric acid (>100 mM). Parallel with the increase of citric acid concentration in the culture broth, zinc was solubilized from zinc oxide. The adsorption of filter dust onto the mycelium (the pellets formed were less than 1 mm in diameter) was required for not only the citric acid excretion but also the leaching of zinc. When the filter dust was replaced with a synthetic mixture of metal oxides or with zinc oxide in combination with trace elements, levels of adsorption and citric acid production were observed to be similar to those in experiments where industrial filter dust was used. The two most important properties of the filter dust were its heavy-metal content and its buffering capacity. These properties were simulated by adding heavy metals in soluble form (as chlorides, sulfates, or nitrates) or soluble buffers to the medium. Both heavy metals and buffers were not able to induce a citric acid efflux. As with citric acid production by Aspergillus niger, the addition of manganese lowered citric acid excretion (by 40% with metal oxide-induced citric acid efflux and by 100% with urea-induced citric acid efflux). Copper antagonized the effect of manganese. The mechanism for the bulk of citric acid excretion by P. simplicissimum, however, seemed to be different from that described for citric acid accumulation by A. niger. Because of the inefficiency of metals in solubilized form and of soluble buffers to induce a strong citric acid efflux, adsorption of an insoluble metal compound (zinc oxide) turned out to be essential. Surface phenomena possibly involving the plasma membrane H+-ATPase are thought to participate in the induction of citric acid excretion by P. simplicissimum in the presence of industrial filter dust. PMID:16348442

  10. Two-stage fermentation for 2-Ketogluconic acid production by Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuehong; Wei, Dong; Shi, Jiping; Mojović, Ljiljana; Han, Zengsheng; Hao, Jian

    2014-06-28

    2-Ketogluconic acid production by Klebsiella pneumoniae is a pH-dependent process, strictly proceeding under acidic conditions. Unfortunately, cell growth is inhibited by acidic conditions, resulting in low productivity of 2-ketogluconic acid. To overcome this deficiency, a two-stage fermentation strategy was exploited in the current study. During the first stage, the culture was maintained at neutral pH, favoring cell growth. During the second stage, the culture pH was switched to acidic conditions favoring 2-ketogluconic acid accumulation. Culture parameters, including switching time, dissolved oxygen levels, pH, and temperature were optimized for the fed-batch fermentation. Characteristics of glucose dehydrogenase and gluconate dehydrogenase were revealed in vitro, and the optimal pHs of the two enzymes coincided with the optimum culture pH. Under optimum conditions, a total of 186 g/l 2- ketogluconic acid was produced at 26 h, and the conversion ratio was 0.98 mol/mol. This fermentation strategy has successfully overcome the mismatch between optimum parameters required for cell growth and 2-ketogluconic acid accumulation, and this result has the highest productivity and conversion ratio of 2-ketogluconic and produced by microorganism. PMID:24572278

  11. Improved growth, productivity and quality of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants through application of shikimic acid

    PubMed Central

    Al-Amri, Salem M.

    2013-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of seed presoaking of shikimic acid (30, 60 and 120 ppm) on growth parameters, fruit productivity and quality, transpiration rate, photosynthetic pigments and some mineral nutrition contents of tomato plants. Shikimic acid at all concentrations significantly increased fresh and dry weights, fruit number, average fresh and dry fruit yield, vitamin C, lycopene, carotenoid contents, total acidity and fruit total soluble sugars of tomato plants when compared to control plants. Seed pretreatment with shikimic acid at various doses induces a significant increase in total leaf conductivity, transpiration rate and photosynthetic pigments (Chl. a, chl. b and carotenoids) of tomato plants. Furthermore, shikimic acid at various doses applied significantly increased the concentration of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in tomato leaves as compared to control non-treated tomato plants. Among all doses of shikimic acid treatment, it was found that 60 ppm treatment caused a marked increase in growth, fruit productivity and quality and most studied parameters of tomato plants when compared to other treatments. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed in total photosynthetic pigments, concentrations of nitrogen and potassium in leaves of tomato plants treated with 30 ppm of shikimic acid and control plants. According to these results, it could be suggested that shikimic acid used for seed soaking could be used for increasing growth, fruit productivity and quality of tomato plants growing under field conditions. PMID:24235870

  12. Citric acid production in Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b yeast when grown on waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Lv, Jinshun; Xu, Jiaxing; Zhang, Tong; Deng, Yuanfang; He, Jianlong

    2015-03-01

    In this study, citric acid was produced from waste cooking oil by Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b. To get the maximal yield of citric acid, the compositions of the medium for citric acid production were optimized, and our results showed that extra nitrogen and magnesium rather than vitamin B1 and phosphate were needed for CA accumulation when using waste cooking oil. The results also indicated that the optimal initial concentration of the waste cooking oil in the medium for citric acid production was 80.0 g/l, and the ideal inoculation size was 1 × 10(7) cells/l of medium. We also reported that during 10-l fermentation, 31.7 g/l of citric acid, 6.5 g/l of isocitric acid, 5.9 g/l of biomass, and 42.1 g/100.0 g cell dry weight of lipid were attained from 80.0 g/l of waste cooking oil within 336 h. At the end of the fermentation, 94.6 % of the waste cooking oil was utilized by the cells of Y. lipolytica SWJ-1b, and the yield of citric acid was 0.4 g/g waste cooking oil, which suggested that waste cooking oil was a suitable carbon resource for citric acid production. PMID:25488499

  13. Integrated production of cellulosic bioethanol and succinic acid from industrial hemp in a biorefinery concept.

    PubMed

    Kuglarz, Mariusz; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop integrated biofuel (cellulosic bioethanol) and biochemical (succinic acid) production from industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) in a biorefinery concept. Two types of pretreatments were studied (dilute-acid and alkaline oxidative method). High cellulose recovery (>95%) as well as significant hemicelluloses solubilization (49-59%) after acid-based method and lignin solubilization (35-41%) after alkaline H2O2 method were registered. Alkaline pretreatment showed to be superior over the acid-based method with respect to the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol productivity. With respect to succinic acid production, the highest productivity was obtained after liquid fraction fermentation originated from steam treatment with 1.5% of acid. The mass balance calculations clearly showed that 149kg of EtOH and 115kg of succinic acid can be obtained per 1ton of dry hemp. Results obtained in this study clearly document the potential of industrial hemp for a biorefinery. PMID:26551652

  14. Succinic acid production from xylose mother liquor by recombinant Escherichia coli strain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Honghui; Pan, Jiachuan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Jie; Li, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Zhou, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    Succinic acid (1,4-butanedioic acid) is identified as one of important building-block chemicals. Xylose mother liquor is an abundant industrial residue in xylitol biorefining industry. In this study, xylose mother liquor was utilized to produce succinic acid by recombinant Escherichia coli strain SD121, and the response surface methodology was used to optimize the fermentation media. The optimal conditions of succinic acid fermentation were as follows: 82.62 g L−1 total initial sugars, 42.27 g L−1 MgCO3 and 17.84 g L−1 yeast extract. The maximum production of succinic acid was 52.09 ± 0.21 g L−1 after 84 h with a yield of 0.63 ± 0.03 g g−1 total sugar, approaching the predicted value (53.18 g L−1). It was 1.78-fold of the production of that obtained with the basic medium. This was the first report on succinic acid production from xylose mother liquor by recombinant E. coli strains with media optimization using response surface methodology. This work suggested that the xylose mother liquor could be an alternative substrate for the economical production of succinic acid by recombinant E. coli strains. PMID:26019590

  15. Effects of dissolved CO2 levels on the growth of Mannheimia succiniciproducens and succinic acid production.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyohak; Lee, Jeong Wook; Choi, Sol; You, Jong Kyun; Hong, Won Hi; Lee, Sang Yup

    2007-12-15

    A capnophilic rumen bacterium Mannheimia succiniciproducens produces succinic acid as a major fermentation end product under CO(2)-rich anaerobic condition. Since succinic acid is produced by carboxylation of C3 compounds during the fermentation, intracellular CO(2) availability is important for efficient succinic acid formation. Here, we investigated the metabolic responses of M. succiniciproducens to the different dissolved CO(2) concentrations (0-260 mM). Cell growth was severely suppressed when the dissolved CO(2) concentration was below 8.74 mM. On the other hand, cell growth and succinic acid production increased proportionally as the dissolved CO(2) concentration increased from 8.74 to 141 mM. The yields of biomass and succinic acid on glucose obtained at the dissolved CO(2) concentration of 141 mM were 1.49 and 1.52 times higher, respectively, than those obtained at the dissolved CO(2) concentration of 8.74 mM. It was also found that the additional CO(2) source provided in the form of NaHCO(3), MgCO(3), or CaCO(3) had positive effects on cell growth and succinic acid production. However, growth inhibition was observed when excessive bicarbonate salts were added. By the comparison of the activities of key enzymes, it was found that PEP carboxylation by PEP carboxykinase (PckA) is the most important for succinic acid production as well as the growth of M. succiniciproducens by providing additional ATP. PMID:17570706

  16. Betaine and Beet Molasses Enhance L-Lactic Acid Production by Bacillus coagulans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ke; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important chemical with various industrial applications, and it can be efficiently produced by fermentation, in which Bacillus coagulans strains present excellent performance. Betaine can promote lactic acid fermentation as an effective osmoprotectant. Here, positive effect of betaine on fermentation by B. coagulans is revealed. Betaine could enhance lactic acid production by protecting l-LDH activity and cell growth from osmotic inhibition, especially under high glucose concentrations and with poor organic nitrogen nutrients. The fermentation with 0.05 g/L betaine could produce 17.9% more lactic acid compared to the fermentation without betaine. Beet molasses, which is rich in sucrose and betaine, was utilized in a co-feeding fermentation and raised the productivity by 22%. The efficient lactic acid fermentation by B. coagulans is thus developed by using betaine and beet molasses. PMID:24956474

  17. Laser-induced electric breakdown in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloembergen, N.

    1974-01-01

    A review is given of recent experimental results on laser-induced electric breakdown in transparent optical solid materials. A fundamental breakdown threshold exists characteristic for each material. The threshold is determined by the same physical process as dc breakdown, namely, avalanche ionization. The dependence of the threshold on laser pulse duration and frequency is consistent with this process. The implication of this breakdown mechanism for laser bulk and surface damage to optical components is discussed. It also determines physical properties of self-focused filaments.

  18. Trans Fatty Acids Induce Vascular Inflammation and Reduce Vascular Nitric Oxide Production in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Naomi G.; Pham, Matilda; Rizzo, Norma O.; Cheng, Andrew M.; Maloney, Ezekiel; Kim, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Intake of trans fatty acids (TFA), which are consumed by eating foods made from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This relation can be explained by many factors including TFA's negative effect on endothelial function and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. In this study we investigated the effects of three different TFA (2 common isomers of C18 found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and a C18 isomer found from ruminant-derived—dairy products and meat) on endothelial NF-κB activation and nitric oxide (NO) production. Human endothelial cells were treated with increasing concentrations of Elaidic (trans-C18:1 (9 trans)), Linoelaidic (trans-C18:2 (9 trans, 12 trans)), and Transvaccenic (trans-C18:1 (11 trans)) for 3 h. Both Elaidic and Linoelaidic acids were associated with increasing NF-κB activation as measured by IL-6 levels and phosphorylation of IκBα, and impairment of endothelial insulin signaling and NO production, whereas Transvaccenic acid was not associated with these responses. We also measured superoxide production, which has been hypothesized to be necessary in fatty acid-dependent activation of NF-κB. Both Elaidic acid and Linoelaidic acid are associated with increased superoxide production, whereas Transvaccenic acid (which did not induce inflammatory responses) did not increase superoxide production. We observed differential activation of endothelial superoxide production, NF-κB activation, and reduction in NO production by different C18 isomers suggesting that the location and number of trans double bonds effect endothelial NF-κB activation. PMID:22216328

  19. Oil Biotechnology: Value-Added Products and Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During my 40+ years research career, I have been working on "biocatalysis" of hydrophobic organic compounds, both petroleum oil and vegetable oil, to convert them to value-added products. "Biocatalysis" is defined as the use of a biocatalyst such as whole microbial cells or enzymes, in an aqueous o...

  20. The effect of dietary amino acid composition on egg production in blue tits

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, S. L.; Houston, D. C.

    1998-01-01

    Most studies on the interaction between food supply and reproduction in animals have assumed that energy is likely to be the factor limiting egg number and/or size. In this paper, we investigate whether dietary protein proximately constrains egg production in birds. We provisioned breeding blue tits with two food supplements that differed only in the concentration of five essential amino acids. Birds receiving a supplementary diet containing an amino acid balance close to that required for egg protein formation laid significantly larger clutches (18% greater) than control birds, whereas birds receiving an otherwise identical supplementary diet but without a favourable amino acid balance did not increase egg production. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that dietary amino acid composition may limit egg production in free-living birds.