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Sample records for acid brilliant blue

  1. Nile blue and brilliant cresyl blue as redox indicators in iron(II) titrations.

    PubMed

    Sriramam, K

    1975-01-01

    Nile Blue and Brilliant Cresyl Blue, two compounds related to diaminophenoxazine, have been studied as indicators in titrations of iron(II) with cerium(IV)(in hydrochloric, sulphuric and perchloric acid media), dichromate, vanadate and permanganate. They are particularly suited for titrations in a fairly concentrated sulphuric acid medium and for titrations with dilute solutions. A probable indicator mechanism is suggested.

  2. Brilliant Blue G assisted epiretinal membrane surgery.

    PubMed

    Totan, Yüksel; Güler, Emre; Dervişoğulları, Mehmet Serdar

    2014-01-01

    We report intensely staining epiretinal membrane (ERM) with Brilliant Blue G (BBG) under air for two minutes. ERM peeling was performed in 21 cases. After removal of posterior hyaloid, 0.2 mL BBG was first applied on the macula, to stain ERM under air conditions for 2 minutes. Internal limiting membrane (ILM) was intensely stained and peeled in all cases following ERM removal. In 4 cases, the ERM was also observed to be intensely stained with BBG and peeled with an ILM forceps. Postoperatively, the ganglion cell layer thickness was lower in three of the cases, however VA improved in all cases and multifocal electroretinogram revealed no toxicity. Light microscopy of ERM revealed masses of cells whereas; the ILM did not. The increased staining characteristics of ERM and ILM may be resulted from longer contact time of BBG under air pressure.

  3. Adsorption of Methylene Blue, Bromophenol Blue, and Coomassie Brilliant Blue by α-chitin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dhananasekaran, Solairaj; Palanivel, Rameshthangam; Pappu, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Expelling of dyestuff into water resource system causes major thread to the environment. Adsorption is the cost effective and potential method to remove the dyes from the effluents. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the adsorption of dyestuff (Methylene Blue (MB), Bromophenol Blue (BPB) and Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB)) by α-chitin nanoparticles (CNP) prepared from Penaeus monodon (Fabricius, 1798) shell waste. On contrary to the most recognizable adsorption studies using chitin, this is the first study using unique nanoparticles of ⩽50 nm used for the dye adsorption process. The results showed that the adsorption process increased with increase in the concentration of CNP, contact time and temperature with the dyestuff, whereas the adsorption process decreased with increase in the initial dye concentration and strong acidic pH. The results from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed that the interaction between dyestuff and CNP involved physical adsorption. The adsorption process obeys Langmuir isotherm (R (2) values were 0.992, 0.999 and 0.992 for MB, BPB and CBB, and RL value lies between 0 and 1 for all the three dyes) and pseudo second order kinetics (R (2) values were 0.996, 0.999 and 0.996 for MB, BPB and CBB) more effectively. The isotherm and kinetic models confirmed that CNP can be used as a suitable adsorbent material for the removal of dyestuff from effluents.

  4. Adsorption of Methylene Blue, Bromophenol Blue, and Coomassie Brilliant Blue by α-chitin nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dhananasekaran, Solairaj; Palanivel, Rameshthangam; Pappu, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Expelling of dyestuff into water resource system causes major thread to the environment. Adsorption is the cost effective and potential method to remove the dyes from the effluents. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the adsorption of dyestuff (Methylene Blue (MB), Bromophenol Blue (BPB) and Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB)) by α-chitin nanoparticles (CNP) prepared from Penaeus monodon (Fabricius, 1798) shell waste. On contrary to the most recognizable adsorption studies using chitin, this is the first study using unique nanoparticles of ⩽50 nm used for the dye adsorption process. The results showed that the adsorption process increased with increase in the concentration of CNP, contact time and temperature with the dyestuff, whereas the adsorption process decreased with increase in the initial dye concentration and strong acidic pH. The results from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed that the interaction between dyestuff and CNP involved physical adsorption. The adsorption process obeys Langmuir isotherm (R2 values were 0.992, 0.999 and 0.992 for MB, BPB and CBB, and RL value lies between 0 and 1 for all the three dyes) and pseudo second order kinetics (R2 values were 0.996, 0.999 and 0.996 for MB, BPB and CBB) more effectively. The isotherm and kinetic models confirmed that CNP can be used as a suitable adsorbent material for the removal of dyestuff from effluents. PMID:26843977

  5. Optimal parameters for laccase-mediated destaining of Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250-stained polyacrylamide gels

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Yang, Xiaodan; Ye, Xiuyun; Lin, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Destaining of Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250-stained polyacrylamide gels with fungal laccase” [1]. Laccase is a class of multicopper oxidases that can catalyze oxidation of recalcitrant dyestuffs. This article describes optimal parameters for destaining of polyacrylamide gels, stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250, with laccase from basidiomycete Cerrena sp. strain HYB07. Effects of laccase activity, mediator type and concentration, temperature and time on destaining of polyacrylamide gels were evaluated with respect to gel background intensity and protein band signals, and the optimal destaining effects were obtained with 15 U mL−1 laccase and 2 μM ABTS at 37 °C after 2 h. PMID:26955647

  6. Flow pathways of bromide and Brilliant Blue FCF tracers in caliche soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobles, M. M.; Wilding, L. P.; Lin, H. S.

    2010-10-01

    Land use of caliche soils in limestone regions of Texas is increasingly shifting from traditional ranchland to residential and industrial development. However, little information is available on water flow and solute transport through soils of these landscapes, or their potential suitability for wastewater disposal and bioremediation. This study determined the impacts of landscape position on soil hydrologic functions by using Brilliant Blue FCF and Br - tracers to characterize flow pathways through soils of stepped terrains. Aqueous tracer solution was applied to surface (and in some cases subsurface) horizons of selected riser, tread, floodplain, and upland summit sites. Brilliant Blue FCF and Br - pathways were analyzed based on vertical sections excavated through each application site. While Brilliant Blue FCF demonstrated preferential flow along macropores, Br - moved through soil matrix primarily in piston flow pattern. In most cases, Br - was less retarded and moved to greater vertical and horizontal distances than Brilliant Blue FCF. Cemented Bk, Bkm, C, Cr, Crk, and R horizons acted as aquitards, resulting in considerable horizontal transport of both tracers beyond the direct infiltration zone. Significant volumes of limestone rock clasts, together with soil, were involved in solute transport and thus contributed to the soil's ability to serve as bioremediation and moisture storage media. High limestone gravel content and rapid solute transport through subsurface horizons to aquitards in deep riser soils indicate that they may serve as hydrological recharge sites with potential for ephemeral water tables, increased water storage and greater bioremediation potential. Shallow tread sites may be capable of producing seasonal saturation above restrictive horizons and increased surface runoff, becoming local hydrological discharge sites. This could conceivably lead to surface water contamination; however, these locales are hydrologically buffered by recharge

  7. [Preparation of procion brilliant blue-doped silica nanorods and their recognition properties for proteins].

    PubMed

    Deng, Qiliang; Chen, Yang; Wu, Jianhua; Li, Yanli; Liu, Chunjing; Song, Weijing

    2011-09-01

    Protein enrichment and separation is one of the pivotal preliminary steps of proteomics studies, which is important to medical diagnosis and treatment. In this study, procion brilliant blue-doped silica nanorod was prepared via self-assembly sol-gel technology without any additional template. Procion brilliant blue was covalently linked to 3-aminopropyltriethyloxy silane in ethanol. Tetraethylorthosilane (TEOS) was then added into the mixture, subsequently hydrolyzed and co-condensed for 3 h under stirring. The resulted nanorods were isolated by centrifugation, re-dispersed in deionized water, and centrifuged again. This wash process was repeated three times. Finally, the nanorods were dried under vacuum. Procion brilliant blue acted simultaneously as a self-assembly template during the preparation process, and subsequently as recognition probe for proteins. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image showed that the nanotubes were 2-16 microm in length and 200-500 nm in diameter. The obtained nanorods were further characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSA), separately. All these results indicated that procion brilliant blue were successfully doped into silica nanorods. The recognition property of nanorods for bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated under static condition. The resulted nanorods showed high binding capacity (57.6 mg/g) for BSA and fast adsorption equilibrium (within 60 min). The nanorods were also evaluated with four typical proteins, hemoglobin, trypsin, lysozyme and pepsin, with different relative molecular masses and isoelectric points. The results indicated that the prepared nanorods exhibited the highest binding capacity for trypsin (87.5 mg/g) and the least binding for hemoglobin (Hb, 3.0 mg/g). This easy preparation protocol and excellent recognition property make the prepared materials a bright future in proteomics research. PMID:22233075

  8. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue, colorant food additives, on human blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kus, Esra; Eroglu, Halil Erhan

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic dyes over fifty are used in many areas including the food industry around the world. Sunset Yellow FCF and Brilliant Blue FCF are used as colorant food additives in many food products. The present study investigated the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue. Genotoxic and cytotoxic activities of the food additives were evaluated in lymphocyte cell cultures using mitotic index, replication index and micronucleus assay. Mitotic index frequencies and replication index values were decreased and micronucleus frequency was increased with increasing concentrations of Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue. The changes in mitotic index and micronucleus are statistically significant (p<0.05). The results show that the Sunset Yellow and Brilliant Blue can have cytotoxic and genotoxic potential. It care must be taken when using these materials as a food additive.

  9. Destaining of Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250-stained polyacrylamide gels with fungal laccase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Yang, Xiaodan; Ye, Xiuyun; Lin, Juan

    2016-01-15

    An enzyme-based method for destaining polyacrylamide gels stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250 is described. Distilled water supplemented with diluted fermentation broth of a laccase-producing white-rot fungus, Cerrena sp., was used for gel destaining, and a clear gel background was obtained in 2 h at 37 °C. Sensitivity of protein detection was 10 ng. The method did not require organic solvents or changing the destaining solution. Due to simultaneous gel destaining and dye decolorization, the colorless destaining solution can be disposed of directly. Laccase destaining of polyacrylamide gels was simple, efficient, and environmentally friendly. PMID:26475566

  10. Determination of Poly(Diallyldimethylammonium Chloride) via Spectrophotometric Titration with Coomassie Brilliant Blue G Dye.

    PubMed

    Shyichuk, Alexander; Ziółkowska, Dorota; Lamkiewicz, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) is used as organic coagulant in water purification and auxiliary agent in paper production. Determination of PDDA in aqueous solutions is carried out usually by means of polyelectrolyte titration using streaming current detector or o-Toluidine Blue dye for endpoint recognition. The proposed method of PDDA assay takes advantage of Coomassie Brilliant Blue G dye having strong affinity to cationic macromolecules. Titration of PDDA solution with the dye is carried out measuring absorbance at 585 nm. Inflection points of the obtained zigzag photometric curves have good repeatability provided that titration rate is low enough to attain endpoint for 1 hour or more. The method assures rectilinear calibration (R² = 0.999 5) in the broad range of PDDA concentrations from 0.3 to 9.6 mg · dm⁻³.

  11. Evaluation of the Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 method for urinary protein.

    PubMed

    Lott, J A; Stephan, V A; Pritchard, K A

    1983-11-01

    The Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 method for protein in urine has been evaluated for analytical accuracy and clinical applicability. Extremely simple to perform, the test exhibits good precision and sensitivity. The color developed per gram of protein is protein-type dependent, so no single protein standard is completely satisfactory. Color intensity is linearly related to concentration up to 1500 mg/L when used with a manual bichromatic method. Accuracy was clinically acceptable for patients with a variety of protein-losing diseases, and for patients having received renal transplants; however, the method underestimates urinary light-chain proteins. In athletes and premature neonates, we observed increased protein excretion during periods of stress. The upper reference limit for protein excretion in healthy adults is about 120 mg/24 h.

  12. Spectroscopic studies of brilliant cresyl blue/water-soluble sulfonated calix[4]arene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Pham, T.H.; Sanchez Pena, M.; Agbaria, R.A.; Warner, I.M.

    1998-07-01

    Water-soluble sulfonated calix[4]arene (SCX4) was used as the host molecule for the guest dye(probe), Brilliant Cresyl Blue (BCB), which is commonly employed for studies of various biological systems. Absorption and fluorescence techniques were employed for the analysis of this system. The formation of a complex between the BCB dye and SCX4 results in a decrease in the BCB fluorescence intensity. A study of the changes in absorption and of temperature effects on the fluorescence of BCB/SCX4 was conducted. The binding constant for BCB/SCX4 at room temperature was estimated to be 8.49{times}10{sup 3}thinspM{sup {minus}1}. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  13. Triacontanol hormone stimulates population, growth and Brilliant Blue R dye removal by common duckweed from culture media.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, Nur Koçberber; Duygu, Ergin; Dönmez, Gönül

    2010-10-15

    This work is focussed on assessing the potentialities of Lemna minor (L.) for the treatment of reactive dyes polluted wastewaters and investigating the possibility of bioremoval performance stimulation by adding triacontanol hormone to the cultures. In the vast literature describing removal of reactive dyes, considering the lack of reports using of common duckweed in wastewater treatment apparently due to the inadequate efficiency. In the present study, the experiments showed that 1 mg l(-1) triacontanol stimulated duckweed growth. The effect of different dye types (Reactive Orange 14, Reactive Red 120, Reactive Black 5, Brilliant Blue R, and Reactive Brilliant Blue R) onto duckweed growth was tested. Plants grew at most in media with Brilliant Blue R. The highest biomass, in terms of frond number (87+/-1.5) were accompanied with 59.6% maximum dye removal were found in samples containing 2.5 mg l(-1) initial Brilliant Blue R and 1 mg l(-1) triacontanol, indicating hormonal stimulation of both activities. The results presented here that L. minor (L.) could be used effectively to treat wastewaters containing dye.

  14. Molecular spectroscopic studies on the interaction of glycosaminoglycans with brilliant cresol blue and its analytical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuzhen; Li, Na; Zhao, Fenglin; Li, Ke'an; Tong, Shenyang

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of brilliant cresol blue (BCB) with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparin (Hep) and chondroitin 4-sulfate (CS), in aqueous solution has been studied by spectrophotometry and light scattering spectroscopy. Absorbance of BCB at 632 and 594 nm decreased on addition of Hep or CS with the appearance of a new blue-shifted absorption band at 550 nm, which indicated that new metachromatic complex formed. The linear decrease in absorbance of BCB at 632 nm was observed. In addition, Hep was more effective than CS (1.7 times) in decreasing absorbance of BCB. The stoichiometry of Hep or CS with BCB was determined by spectrophotometric titration and the MacIntosh extraction method. The result showed that the stoichiometry of BCB/Hep was 1.8 times that of BCB/CS. These results suggested that the interaction between GAGs and BCB was the result of electrostatic forces, and the differences between Hep and CS were attributed to the different negative charge numbers on repetitive disaccharides unit. Studies on the effects of alcohol and urea indicated that GAGs only interacted with the aggregates of BCB. Moreover, a strong light scattering signal was observed after mixing BCB with GAGs. Furthermore, the light scattering intensity at light scattering bands was proportional to the concentration of Hep or CS added when the concentration of BCB was constant.

  15. Coomassie Brilliant Blue removal/disposal from gel destain and used gel stain in an environment-friendly manner.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; Dorri, Yaser

    2012-01-01

    Toxic reagents are employed to destain Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB) stained gels. We tested the efficacy of various paper adsorbents in adsorbing CBB released from gels during destaining. Kimwipes were the most efficient, followed by Teri towels, multifold towels, and Whatman (numbers 1 and 3) filter papers. Three Kimwipes added during destaining of a CBB-stained mini-gel helped adsorb the released dye. Thus, stain removal with Kimwipes helps reduce destain use and organic waste accumulation, enables recycling of nonradioactive destaining solution, and is 7.5-fold cheaper than an available method for CBB disposal. Next, we used Kimwipes to deplete the dye from a used CBB staining solution awaiting proper disposal by our Institutional Safety Office. Seventy-five Kimwipes successfully helped remove the dye from a 0.05% CBB staining solution in 5 to 10 min. The blue-colored Kimwipes did not release the stain even when squeezed dry after incubation in various salts, water, or acid solutions for five weeks. The CBB removed thus can be simply disposed as solid waste and will not leach out from solid landfills. Kimwipes, thus, enables CBB disposal in an environmentally friendly manner and allows recycling of destaining solution.

  16. Coomassie Brilliant Blue removal/disposal from gel destain and used gel stain in an environment-friendly manner.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; Dorri, Yaser

    2012-01-01

    Toxic reagents are employed to destain Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB) stained gels. We tested the efficacy of various paper adsorbents in adsorbing CBB released from gels during destaining. Kimwipes were the most efficient, followed by Teri towels, multifold towels, and Whatman (numbers 1 and 3) filter papers. Three Kimwipes added during destaining of a CBB-stained mini-gel helped adsorb the released dye. Thus, stain removal with Kimwipes helps reduce destain use and organic waste accumulation, enables recycling of nonradioactive destaining solution, and is 7.5-fold cheaper than an available method for CBB disposal. Next, we used Kimwipes to deplete the dye from a used CBB staining solution awaiting proper disposal by our Institutional Safety Office. Seventy-five Kimwipes successfully helped remove the dye from a 0.05% CBB staining solution in 5 to 10 min. The blue-colored Kimwipes did not release the stain even when squeezed dry after incubation in various salts, water, or acid solutions for five weeks. The CBB removed thus can be simply disposed as solid waste and will not leach out from solid landfills. Kimwipes, thus, enables CBB disposal in an environmentally friendly manner and allows recycling of destaining solution. PMID:22585526

  17. Environmentally safe removal/disposal of Coomassie Brilliant Blue from gel destain and used gel stain.

    PubMed

    Dorri, Yaser; Kurien, Biji T

    2010-09-15

    Gel destaining following Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB) staining involves the use of toxic reagents. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of various paper adsorbents in adsorbing CBB. Kimwipes adsorbed the best, followed by Teri towels, multifold towels, and Whatman numbers 1 and 3 filter papers. Three Kimwipes completely adsorbed the dye released from a CBB-stained mini-gel. Nonradioactive destain solution can, therefore, be recycled for destaining CBB-stained gels. Stain removal with Kimwipes helps in reducing destain use and in reducing organic liquid waste, and it is 7.5-fold cheaper compared with an available method for CBB disposal. Following this, we determined the suitability of this procedure to remove the dye from a used CBB staining solution awaiting proper disposal by our Institutional Safety Office. The dye from a 0.05% CBB staining solution could be removed in 5 to 10 min using 75 Kimwipes. The CBB-adsorbed Kimwipes did not release the stain when squeezed dry even after incubation in various salts over 1week and in water for 5 weeks. The CBB removed allows its easy disposal as solid waste and will not leach out from solid landfills. Thus, stain removal with Kimwipes helps in disposing CBB in an environmentally friendly manner and allows recycling of destaining solution. PMID:20507825

  18. Safety of brilliant cresyl blue staining protocols on human granulosa and cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Alcoba, Diego Duarte; Conzatti, Maiara; Ferreira, Gustavo Dias; Pimentel, Anita Mylius; Kussler, Ana Paula; Capp, Edison; von Eye Corleta, Helena; Brum, Ilma Simoni

    2016-02-01

    The selection of human immature oocytes destined for in vitro maturation (IVM) is performed according to their cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) morphology. In animal models, oocyte pre-selection with brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) staining improves fertilization and blastocyst rates and even increases the number of calves born. As the granulosa cells and cumulus cells (GCs and CCs) have a close relationship with the oocyte and are available in in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs, applying BCB staining to these cells may help to elucidate whether BCB shows toxicity to human oocytes and to determine the safest protocol for this dye. GCs and CCs were isolated from 24 patients who underwent controlled ovarian stimulation. After 48 h, cells were exposed to: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) with or without phenol red, DPBS and mDPBS for 60 min; 13, 20 and 26 μM BCB for 60 min; and 60, 90 or 120 min to 13 μM BCB. Cellular viability was tested using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and trypan blue assays. The 20 and 26 μM BCB exposures resulted in lower cell viability, similar to when cells were exposed to BCB for 90 or 120 min. GCs and CCs viabilities were equal among control group and 13 μM BCB group after 60 min. BCB staining was not toxic to GCs and CCs when the regime of 13 μM BCB for 60 min was used. Due to the close molecular/biochemical relationship between these cells and the gamete, we propose that it is unlikely that the use of BCB could interfere with the viability/health of human oocytes. PMID:25921213

  19. Safety of brilliant cresyl blue staining protocols on human granulosa and cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Alcoba, Diego Duarte; Conzatti, Maiara; Ferreira, Gustavo Dias; Pimentel, Anita Mylius; Kussler, Ana Paula; Capp, Edison; von Eye Corleta, Helena; Brum, Ilma Simoni

    2016-02-01

    The selection of human immature oocytes destined for in vitro maturation (IVM) is performed according to their cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) morphology. In animal models, oocyte pre-selection with brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) staining improves fertilization and blastocyst rates and even increases the number of calves born. As the granulosa cells and cumulus cells (GCs and CCs) have a close relationship with the oocyte and are available in in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs, applying BCB staining to these cells may help to elucidate whether BCB shows toxicity to human oocytes and to determine the safest protocol for this dye. GCs and CCs were isolated from 24 patients who underwent controlled ovarian stimulation. After 48 h, cells were exposed to: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) with or without phenol red, DPBS and mDPBS for 60 min; 13, 20 and 26 μM BCB for 60 min; and 60, 90 or 120 min to 13 μM BCB. Cellular viability was tested using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and trypan blue assays. The 20 and 26 μM BCB exposures resulted in lower cell viability, similar to when cells were exposed to BCB for 90 or 120 min. GCs and CCs viabilities were equal among control group and 13 μM BCB group after 60 min. BCB staining was not toxic to GCs and CCs when the regime of 13 μM BCB for 60 min was used. Due to the close molecular/biochemical relationship between these cells and the gamete, we propose that it is unlikely that the use of BCB could interfere with the viability/health of human oocytes.

  20. Phytoremediation potential of Petunia grandiflora Juss., an ornamental plant to degrade a disperse, disulfonated triphenylmethane textile dye Brilliant Blue G.

    PubMed

    Watharkar, Anuprita D; Khandare, Rahul V; Kamble, Apurva A; Mulla, Asma Y; Govindwar, Sanjay P; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2013-02-01

    Phytoremediation provides an ecofriendly alternative for the treatment of pollutants like textile dyes. The purpose of this study was to explore phytoremediation potential of Petunia grandiflora Juss. by using its wild as well as tissue-cultured plantlets to decolorize Brilliant Blue G (BBG) dye, a sample of dye mixture and a real textile effluent. In vitro cultures of P. grandiflora were obtained by seed culture method. The decolorization experiments were carried out using wild as well as tissue-cultured plants independently. The enzymatic analysis of the plant roots was performed before and after decolorization of BBG. Metabolites formed after dye degradation were analyzed using UV-vis spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Phytotoxicity studies were performed. Characterization of dye mixture and textile effluent was also studied. The wild and tissue-cultured plants of P. grandiflora showed the decolorized BBG up to 86 %. Significant increase in the activities of lignin peroxidase, laccase, NADH-2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol reductase, and tyrosinase was found in the roots of the plants. Three metabolites of BBG were identified as 3-{[ethyl(phenyl)amino]methyl}benzenesulfonic acid, 3-{[methyl (phenyl)amino]methyl}benzenesulfonic amino acid, and sodium-3-[(cyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-ylideneamino)methyl]benzenesulfonate. Textile effluent sample and a synthetic mixture of dyes were also decolorized by P. grandiflora. Phytotoxicity test revealed the nontoxic nature of metabolites. P. grandiflora showed the potential to decolorize and degrade BBG to nontoxic metabolites. The plant has efficiently treated a sample of dye mixture and textile effluent.

  1. Complexation study of brilliant cresyl blue with beta-cyclodextrin and its derivatives by UV-vis and fluorospectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Feng; Jiang, Zi-Tao; Guo, Yu-Xian; Li, Rong

    2008-01-01

    The complexation reactions of brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD), mono[2-O-(2-hydroxypropyl)]-beta-CD (2-HP-beta-CD), mono[2-O-(2-hydroxyethyl)]-beta-CD (2-HE-beta-CD), and heptakis(2,6-di-methyl) -beta-CD (DM-beta-CD) were investigated using UV-vis and fluorospectrometry. The complexation between BCB and CDs could inhibit the aggregation of BCB molecules and could cause its absorbance at 634nm gradually increasing. The fluorescence of BCB was also enhanced with the addition of CDs. The fluorescence enhancement was more notable in neutral and acidic media than in basic media. Hildebrand-Benesi equation was used to calculate the formation constants of beta-CDs with BCB based on the fluorescence differences in the CDs solution. The stoichiometry ratio was found to be 1:1. The complexing capacities of beta-CD and its three derivatives were compared and the results followed the order: 2-HP-beta-CD>2-HE-beta-CD>DM-beta-CD>beta-CD. The effect of temperature on the formation of BCB-beta-CD inclusion complexes has also been examined. The results revealed that the formation constants decreased with the increase of temperature from 1038.9 to 491.6l/mol. Enthalpy and entropy values were calculated and the values were -25.77kJ/mol and 35.04J/kmol, respectively. The thermodynamic measurements suggest that the inclusive process was enthalpic favor. The release of high-energy water molecules and Van der Waals force played an important role in the inclusive process.

  2. Complexation study of brilliant cresyl blue with β-cyclodextrin and its derivatives by UV-vis and fluorospectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing-Feng; Jiang, Zi-Tao; Guo, Yu-Xian; Li, Rong

    2008-01-01

    The complexation reactions of brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), mono[2- O-(2-hydroxypropyl)]-β-CD (2-HP-β-CD), mono[2- O-(2-hydroxyethyl)]-β-CD (2-HE-β-CD), and heptakis(2,6-di-methyl) -β-CD (DM-β-CD) were investigated using UV-vis and fluorospectrometry. The complexation between BCB and CDs could inhibit the aggregation of BCB molecules and could cause its absorbance at 634 nm gradually increasing. The fluorescence of BCB was also enhanced with the addition of CDs. The fluorescence enhancement was more notable in neutral and acidic media than in basic media. Hildebrand-Benesi equation was used to calculate the formation constants of β-CDs with BCB based on the fluorescence differences in the CDs solution. The stoichiometry ratio was found to be 1:1. The complexing capacities of β-CD and its three derivatives were compared and the results followed the order: 2-HP-β-CD > 2-HE-β-CD > DM-β-CD > β-CD. The effect of temperature on the formation of BCB-β -CD inclusion complexes has also been examined. The results revealed that the formation constants decreased with the increase of temperature from 1038.9 to 491.6 l/mol. Enthalpy and entropy values were calculated and the values were -25.77 kJ/mol and 35.04 J/kmol, respectively. The thermodynamic measurements suggest that the inclusive process was enthalpic favor. The release of high-energy water molecules and Van der Waals force played an important role in the inclusive process.

  3. Complexation study of brilliant cresyl blue with beta-cyclodextrin and its derivatives by UV-vis and fluorospectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Feng; Jiang, Zi-Tao; Guo, Yu-Xian; Li, Rong

    2008-01-01

    The complexation reactions of brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD), mono[2-O-(2-hydroxypropyl)]-beta-CD (2-HP-beta-CD), mono[2-O-(2-hydroxyethyl)]-beta-CD (2-HE-beta-CD), and heptakis(2,6-di-methyl) -beta-CD (DM-beta-CD) were investigated using UV-vis and fluorospectrometry. The complexation between BCB and CDs could inhibit the aggregation of BCB molecules and could cause its absorbance at 634nm gradually increasing. The fluorescence of BCB was also enhanced with the addition of CDs. The fluorescence enhancement was more notable in neutral and acidic media than in basic media. Hildebrand-Benesi equation was used to calculate the formation constants of beta-CDs with BCB based on the fluorescence differences in the CDs solution. The stoichiometry ratio was found to be 1:1. The complexing capacities of beta-CD and its three derivatives were compared and the results followed the order: 2-HP-beta-CD>2-HE-beta-CD>DM-beta-CD>beta-CD. The effect of temperature on the formation of BCB-beta-CD inclusion complexes has also been examined. The results revealed that the formation constants decreased with the increase of temperature from 1038.9 to 491.6l/mol. Enthalpy and entropy values were calculated and the values were -25.77kJ/mol and 35.04J/kmol, respectively. The thermodynamic measurements suggest that the inclusive process was enthalpic favor. The release of high-energy water molecules and Van der Waals force played an important role in the inclusive process. PMID:17433764

  4. Oral Triphenylmethane Food Dye Analog, Brilliant Blue G, Prevents Neuronal Loss in APPSwDI/NOS2-/- Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Jacob A; Erisir, Alev; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Reducing amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation is a promising strategy for developing Alzheimer's Disease (AD) therapeutics. We recently reported that a triphenylmethane food dye analog, Brilliant Blue G (BBG), is a dose-dependent modulator of in vitro amyloid-β aggregation and cytotoxicity in cell-based assays. Following up on this recent work, we sought to further evaluate this novel modulator in a therapeutically-relevant AD transgenic mouse model. BBG was orally administered to APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mice for three months in order to assess its biocompatibility, its permeability across the blood-brain barrier, and its efficacy at rescuing AD pathology. The results showed that BBG was well-tolerated, caused no significant weight change/unusual behavior, and was able to significantly cross the AD blood-brain barrier in APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mice. Immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analysis of the brain sections revealed that BBG was able to significantly prevent neuronal loss and reduce intracellular APP/Aβ in hippocampal neurons. This is the first report of 1) the effect of Brilliant Blue G on neuronal loss in a transgenic animal model of AD, 2) oral administration of BBG to affect a protein conformation/aggregation disease, and 3) electron microscopic ultrastructural analysis of AD pathology in APPSwDI/NOS2-/- mice.

  5. Colloidal chitin stained with Remazol Brilliant Blue R, a useful substrate to select chitinolytic microorganisms and to evaluate chitinases.

    PubMed

    Gómez Ramírez, M; Rojas Avelizapa, L I; Rojas Avelizapa, N G; Cruz Camarillo, R

    2004-02-01

    A simple and sensitive method based on the use of colloidal chitin stained with Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBB) is proposed to evaluate chitinase activity. If this colloidal-stained substrate is included as a carbon source in a liquid medium, this technique allows the selection or the comparison of chitinolytic microorganisms. The colloidal substrate is proportionally solubilized and the dye released is spectrophotometrically quantified at 595 nm. The procedures used for the staining and fixing of RBB in the colloidal chitin, and a comparison with the commercial substrate chitin-azure, are presented. The influence of several physicochemical and enzymatic parameters on the release of dyes is also shown. Both stained substrates were used for studying the effect of pH, substrate concentration, temperature and time on the chitinase reaction of Bacillus thuringiensis Bt-107.

  6. Highly efficient decomposition of Remazol Brilliant Blue R using tubular reactor coated with thin layer of PdO.

    PubMed

    Javaid, Rahat; Qazi, Umair Yaqub; Kawasaki, Shin-Ichiro

    2016-09-15

    In this work, we propose a novel approach to dye decomposition under subcritical water conditions using a continuous-flow tubular reactor coated with thin layer of PdO as a catalyst. Remazole Brilliant Blue R was used as an example of synthetic dyes. Hydrogen peroxide was used as an environmental-friendly oxidant as it leaves no residues after treatment. The effect of temperature, pressure and dye concentration on total organic carbon (TOC) removal were studied. 99.9% of TOC removal was achieved at 300 °C and 10 MPa pressure within a short residence time of 3.2 s. This method provided an efficient and rapid process that has a potential for treating a wide range of textile wastewaters. PMID:27322817

  7. Bioflocculant production by Haloplanus vescus and its application in acid brilliant scarlet yellow/red removal.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chun-Ying; Chen, Hong-Gao; Cao, Gang; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Jian-Gang

    2016-01-01

    A novel bioflocculant MBF057 produced by a salt-tolerant Haloplanus vescus HW0579 was investigated in this study. The effects of culture conditions such as initial pH, inoculum size, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of K-acid wastewater on MBF0579 production were studied. The result showed that 8.09 g/L purified MBF0579 was extracted with the following optimized conditions: 780 mg/L COD of K-acid wastewater as carbon source, inoculum size 12.5%, and initial pH 7.0. The biopolymer contained 78.6% polysaccharides and 21.1% proteins. The highest flocculating rate of 81.86 and 95.07% for the COD and chroma of acid brilliant scarlet gelb rot (yellow/red, GR) dye wastewater were achieved at a dosage of 150 mg/L, pH 2.0 and contact time 100 min. Overall, these findings indicate bioflocculation offers an effective alternative method of decreasing acid brilliant scarlet GR during dye wastewater treatment.

  8. Bioflocculant production by Haloplanus vescus and its application in acid brilliant scarlet yellow/red removal.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chun-Ying; Chen, Hong-Gao; Cao, Gang; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Jian-Gang

    2016-01-01

    A novel bioflocculant MBF057 produced by a salt-tolerant Haloplanus vescus HW0579 was investigated in this study. The effects of culture conditions such as initial pH, inoculum size, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of K-acid wastewater on MBF0579 production were studied. The result showed that 8.09 g/L purified MBF0579 was extracted with the following optimized conditions: 780 mg/L COD of K-acid wastewater as carbon source, inoculum size 12.5%, and initial pH 7.0. The biopolymer contained 78.6% polysaccharides and 21.1% proteins. The highest flocculating rate of 81.86 and 95.07% for the COD and chroma of acid brilliant scarlet gelb rot (yellow/red, GR) dye wastewater were achieved at a dosage of 150 mg/L, pH 2.0 and contact time 100 min. Overall, these findings indicate bioflocculation offers an effective alternative method of decreasing acid brilliant scarlet GR during dye wastewater treatment. PMID:26901711

  9. Electrochemical Determination of Brilliant Blue and Tartrazine Based on an Ionic Liquid-Modified Expanded Graphite Paste Electrode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenchang; Chen, Ye; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xue; Chen, Zhidong

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive electrochemical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of Brilliant Blue (BB) and tartrazine (Tz) using an ionic liquid-modified expanded graphite paste electrode (IL-EGPE). The IL-EGPE was prepared by mixing ionic liquid-expanded graphite composite (IL-EG) with solid paraffin. Compared with the EGPE, the IL-EGPE remarkably enhanced the electrocatalytic oxidation signals of BB and Tz. Under optimal experimental conditions, the designed IL-EGPE exhibited wide linear responses to BB and Tz ranging from 5.0×10(-9) to 4.0×10(-6) M and 1.0×10(-8) to 1.0×10(-6) M, respectively. The detection limits for BB and Tz were 2.0×10(-9) M (1.6 ng/mL) and 3.3×10(-9) M (1.8 ng/mL) at an S/N of 3, respectively. This electrode showed good reproducibility, stability, and reusability. The proposed method was successfully applied in the simultaneous determination of BB and Tz in a soft drink with satisfactory results.

  10. Mechanism of Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 binding to cetyltrimethylammonium bromide: an interference with the Bradford assay.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Mahdi; Nabatchian, Fariba; Vaisi-Raygani, Asad; Torabi, Mojgan

    2013-03-15

    The Bradford protein assay is a popular method because of its rapidity, sensitivity, and relative specificity. This method is subject to some interference by nonprotein compounds. In this study, we describe the interference of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) with the Bradford assay. This interference is based on the interaction of Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 (CBB) with this cationic detergent. This study suggests that both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions are involved in the interaction of CTAB and CBB. The anionic and neutral forms of CBB bind to CTAB by electrostatic attraction, which accelerates hydrophobic interactions of these CBB forms and the hydrophobic tail of CTAB. Consequently, the hydrophobic regions of the dominant free cationic form of CBB dye compete for the tail of CTAB with two other forms of the dye and gradually displace the primary hydrophobic interactions and rearrange the primary CBB-CTAB complex. This interaction of CTAB and CBB dye produces a primary 650-nm-absorbing complex that then gradually rearranges to a complex that shows an absorbance shoulder at 800-950 nm. This study conclusively shows a strong response of CBB to CTAB that causes a time-dependent and nearly additive interference with the Bradford assay. This study also may promote an application of CBB for CTAB quantification.

  11. Production of laccase and decolouration of the textile dye Remazol Brilliant Blue R in temporary immersion bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Couto, Susana

    2011-10-30

    Laccase production by Trametes pubescens grown on sunflower-seed shells (SS) under solid-state fermentation (SFF) conditions in temporary immersion bioreactors was studied. Three immersion cycles were considered: 1 min immersed and 9 min non-immersed, 1 min immersed and 30 min non-immersed and 1 min immersed and 60 min non-immersed. The latter led to the highest laccase activities (4000-6000 Ul(-1)). Also, the in vitro and in vivo decolouration of the recalcitrant textile dye Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) was assessed. It was found that RBBR (133.33 mg l(-1)) was efficiently decolourised by T. pubencens grown on SS under SSF conditions in temporary immersion bioreactors in five successive batches. The percentage of RBBR decolouration was higher than 55% in 4h and around 70% in 24h in all the batches. However, it was found that RBBR decolouration by the crude culture filtrates was more advantageous. Thus, an RBBR decolouration percentage of nearly 80% in 2h was obtained. PMID:21868156

  12. Equilibrium, Thermodynamics, and Kinetic Sorption Studies for the Removal of Coomassie Brilliant Blue on Wheat Bran as a Low-Cost Adsorbent

    PubMed Central

    Ata, Sadia; Imran Din, Muhammad; Rasool, Atta; Qasim, Imran; Ul Mohsin, Ijaz

    2012-01-01

    The sorption studies of coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) from aqueous solution have been carried out on wheat bran (WB). Coomassie brilliant blue on wheat bran was used to study the adsorption behavior under various parameters such as pH, dosage amount, and contact time. It was observed that under optimized conditions up to 95.70% dye could be removed from solution onto WB. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were used to elaborate the results. Freundlich model was found to be fitted well and favored multilayer adsorption. The Freundlich constants n and KF were determined as 0.53 and 2.5 × 10−4. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS studied were taking into account, showed spontaneous and favorable reaction for coomassie brilliant blue on wheat bran. The maximum adsorption capacity qm was found to be 6.410 mg/g. The investigations show that non treated WB is a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of dyes from textile industry effluents. PMID:22567559

  13. Effect of Distance and Duration of Illumination on Retinal Ganglion Cells Exposed to Varying Concentrations of Brilliant Blue Green

    PubMed Central

    Chalam, Kakarla V.; Li, Wenhua; Koushan, Keyvan; Grover, Sandeep; Balaiya, Sankarathi

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to determine the safety parameters of using brilliant blue green (BBG) for chromovitrectomy by assessing the cytotoxicity of BBG on cultured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) exposed to illumination. Methods RGCs were exposed to two concentrations of BBG (0.25 and 0.5 mg/mL) under metal halide illumination at varying distances (1 and 2.5 cm), intensities (990 and 2,000 Fc), and durations (1, 5 and 15 minutes). Cell viability was assessed using the WST-1 and CellTiter 96® AQueous One solution cell proliferation assays. Results Using the WST-1 assay, with high-intensity illumination, viability of RGCs ranged from 97.5±16.4% of controls with minimum BBG and light exposure (0.25 mg/mL BBG and illuminated for 1 minute at 2.5 cm distance) to 53.1±11.3% of controls with maximum BBG and light exposure (0.50 mg/mL and illuminated for 15 minutes at 1 cm distance; P < 0.01). With medium-intensity illumination, RGCs showed better viability, ranging from 95.1±7.2% of controls with minimum BBG and light exposure to 72.3±12.8% of controls with maximum BBG and light exposure. CellTiter 96® AQueous One assay showed similar results. Conclusion RGCs seem to safely tolerate up to 5 minutes of exposure to 0.5 mg/mL BBG under diffuse medium-intensity illumination (990 Fc). PMID:26015816

  14. Ligninolytic activity patterns of Pleurotus ostreatus obtained by submerged fermentation in presence of 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and remazol brilliant blue R dye.

    PubMed

    Grandes-Blanco, Amado I; Díaz-Godínez, Gerardo; Téllez-Téllez, Maura; Delgado-Macuil, Raúl J; Rojas-López, Marlon; Bibbins-Martínez, Martha D

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP) and decolorization of Remazol brilliant blue R dye (RBB), added to culture media of Pleurotus ostreatus developed in submerged fermentation, and the laccase, manganese peroxidase and veratryl alcohol oxidase activities produced in these systems were evaluated. Both compounds were removed from the culture medium mainly by enzymatic action. These compounds decreased the specific growth rate and the effect on the maximal biomass values was not important. The enzymatic activities were increased by DMP and/or RBB; however, the DMP showed a higher inducer effect on all enzymes than RBB. On the other hand, the RBB showed a larger inducer effect on manganese peroxidase activity than on the laccases and veratryl alcohol oxidase activities. These results show that DMP was a better inducer of ligninolytic enzymes than dye, and the process of dye decolorization and degradation of DMP requires the action of all enzymes of the ligninolytic complex.

  15. A novel use for coomassie brilliant blue (R250) in protein gel-drying procedure and assessing the electro-transferring efficiency.

    PubMed

    Dibas, A I; Yorio, T

    1996-03-27

    The present study provides an alternative method for protein-gel drying. Rat brain protein extracts were separated using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) followed by staining with coomassie brilliant blue (R-250). The stained gel was then subjected to electroblotting on nitrocellulose membranes. This method exhibited four advantages: 1 ) it eliminated problems associated with gel-drying (e.g., ,shrinkage of gel), 2) it allowed assessment of the efficiency of electro-transfer, 3) it significantly reduced the time of gel-drying procedure by an average of 40 minutes and 4) it facilitated visualizing electro-transferred proteins with the same efficiency as the common amidoblack staining technique. In conclusion, the described method is simple, economical and introduces several applications.

  16. Oxidative degradation of food dye E133 Brilliant Blue FCF Liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry identification of the degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Gosetti, F; Gianotti, V; Angioi, S; Polati, S; Marengo, E; Gennaro, M C

    2004-10-29

    This paper is devoted to the evaluation of the degradation pathway of the E133 Brilliant Blue FCF (C.I. 42090) that is largely used in the food industry. The degradation is studied in oxidation conditions obtained by addition of potassium persulfate at different persulfate to dye molar ratios under natural sunlight irradiation. The degradation pathway of the dye passes through a species coloured in dark blue and then gives rise to uncoloured species. Due to the low volatility and the poor thermal stability of the dye, reversed-phase liquid chromatography associated to mass spectrometry and tandom mass spectrometry was employed to follow the kinetics of degradation and identify some intermediates. The identification of organic species still present in the decoloured dye and the value of COD obtained in these conditions show evidence that complete decolorization does not correspond to complete mineralisation. No direct information of toxicity is available for the uncoloured degradation products but the further formation of aromatic amines can not be excluded.

  17. Hydrogen bonding plays a significant role in the binding of coomassie brilliant blue-R to hemoglobin: FT-IR, fluorescence and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Maity, Mritunjoy; Dolui, Sandip; Maiti, Nakul C

    2015-12-14

    An analog of coomassie brilliant blue-R (CBB-R) was recently found to act as an antagonist to ATP-sensitive purinergic receptors (P2X7R) and has potential to be used in medicine. With the aim of understanding its transportation and distribution through blood, in this investigation, we measured the binding parameters of CBB-R with bovine hemoglobin (BHG). The molecule specifically bound to a single binding site of the protein with a stoichiometric ratio of 1 : 1 and the observed binding constant Ka was 3.5, 2.5, 2.0 and 1.5 × 10(5) M(-1) at 20 °C, 27 °C, 37 °C and 45 °C, respectively. The measured respective ΔG(0) values of the binding at four temperatures were -30.45, -22.44, -18.04 and -11.95 kJ mol(-1). The ΔH(0) (change in enthalpy) and ΔS(0) (change in entropy) values were -23.6 kJ mol(-1) and -70.66 J mol(-1) respectively in the binding process. The negative value of ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) indicated that the binding of the molecule was thermodynamically favorable. The best energy structure in the molecular docking analysis revealed that CBB-R preferred to be intercalated in the cavity among the α2, β1 and β2 subunits and the binding location was 7.4 Å away from Trp37 in the β2 subunit. The binding of the molecule with the protein was stabilized by hydrogen bonds involving the side chain of two amino acid residues. The residues were Lys104 and Glu101 in the β2 subunit. The binding was further stabilized via hydrogen bond formation between the amide group of the peptide backbone (residue Tyr145 of the β1 subunit) and CBB-R. A shift of the amide I (-C=O stretching) band frequency of ∼8 cm(-1) to low energy was ascribed to the hydrogen bond interaction involving the polypeptide carbonyl of the protein and the CBB-R molecule. In addition, two π-cation interactions between Lys99 of the α2 subunit and Lys104 of the β2 subunit and CBB-R contributed favorably in the binding processes. No substantial change in the soret and Q absorption bands of BHG

  18. Effects of cilostamide and/or forskolin on the meiotic resumption and development competence of growing ovine oocytes selected by brilliant cresyl blue staining.

    PubMed

    Azari-Dolatabad, Nima; Rahmani, H R; Hajian, M; Ostadhosseini, S; Hosseini, S M; Nasr-Esfahani, M H

    2016-05-01

    The relevance of low developmental competence of in vitro-matured oocyte to the incomplete/delayed cytoplasmic maturation, and the heterogeneity of retrieved oocytes is well established in several species. A short phase of prematuration culture was used to allow better oocyte cytoplasmic maturation. The preselection of growing and fully grown oocytes has been proposed to improve developmental competency. This study investigated the effects of phosphodiesterase type 3-specific inhibitor, cilostamide, and adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, on the resumption of meiosis and developmental competence of growing ovine oocytes selected by brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) staining. Results indicate that cilostamide, forskolin, and their combination significantly (P < 0.05) increased the percentage of growing (BCB-) oocytes maintained at the germinal vesicle stage. However, only forskolin significantly (P < 0.05) increased the yield and quality of blastocysts derived from BCB- oocytes compared with non-BCB-treated oocytes. We conclude that a short prematuration culture with forskolin may improve the in vitro developmental competency of growing oocytes in ovine. PMID:26879998

  19. The Effect of Melatonin on Maturation, Glutathione Level and Expression of H MGB1 Gene in Brilliant Cresyl Blue (BCB) Stained Immature Oocyte

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Maryam; Salehi, Mohammad; Masteri Farahani, Reza; Dehghani, Maryam; Abadi, Mohammad; Novin, Marefat Ghaffari; Nourozian, Mohsen; Hosseini, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Nutrients and antioxidants in the medium of immature oocyte have a profound effect on maturation, fertilization and development of resulting embryos. In this study the effects of melatonin as an antioxidant agent on maturation, glutathione level and expression of High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) gene were evaluated in immature oocytes of mice stained with brilliant cresyl blue (BCB). Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, immature oocytes were harvested from ovaries of Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice. Oocytes were stained with 26 μM BCB for 90 minutes and transferred to in vitro maturation medium containing varying doses of melatonin (10-12, 10-9, 10-6, 10-3 M) and without melatonin, for 22-24 hours. Maturation was monitored using an inverted microscope. Glutathione was assessed by monochlorobimane (MCB) staining and HMGB1 expression in mature oocyte was analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Melatonin in the concentration of 10-6 M had the most effect on maturation and HMGB1 expression of BCB+ oocytes (p<0.05). Meanwhile melatonin had no effects on glutathione levels. Additionally in immature BCB- oocytes, compared to the control group, melatonin did not affect cytoplasm maturation (p>0.05). Conclusion: In vitro treatment with melatonin increases the maturation and HMGB1 expression in BCB+ immature oocytes and has no significant effect on glutathione levels. PMID:24381853

  20. Featured Molecules: Ascorbic Acid and Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-05-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for May are featured in several articles in this issue. "Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?" discusses the pharmaceutical uses of methylene blue and its development as the first synthetic drug used against a specific disease. The JCE Classroom Activity "Out of the Blue" and the article "Greening the Blue Bottle" feature methylene blue and ascorbic acid as two key ingredients in the formulation of the blue bottle. You can also see a colorful example of these two molecules in action on the cover. "Sailing on the 'C': A Vitamin Titration with a Twist" describes an experiment to determine the vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content of citrus fruits and challenges students, as eighteenth-century sea captains, to decide the best fruit to take on a long voyage. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  1. Gene Expression of Monocarboxylate Transporters and Oocyte-secreted Factors in Bovine Cumulus-oocyte Complexes Selected by Brilliant Cresyl Blue.

    PubMed

    Lopes, E F; Marques, L S; Duranti, R G; de Oliveira, A T D; Lopes, R F F; Rodrigues, J L

    2015-10-01

    Oocyte selection based on the brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) staining test has been successfully used to differentiate between competent and incompetent bovine oocytes. Here, the expression of genes involved in transport of monocarboxylates (Mct1-4) and oogenesis specific genes (Bmp15, Gdf9 and Has2) in BCB+ and BCB- selected immature and mature bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) was evaluated. In order to find specific molecular markers to characterize successful oocyte maturation, our study was also aimed at identifying the expression of Mcts and oogenesis specific genes in denuded oocytes and cumulus cells. Immature COCs morphological appropriate were (i) stained with 26 mm BCB for 90 min before IVM, (ii) exposed to same incubation conditions as stained COCs, but without BCB (holding group) or (iii) transferred into a maturation medium immediately after morphological selection (control group). mRNA expression was investigated by RT-PCR in COCs before and after IVM. No relationship was observed in the relative expression of Has2, Gdf9, Bmp15 or Mct1, 2 and 4 transcripts between BCB+ and BCB- COCs. Transcripts analysis showed that Gdf9 and Bmp15 in BCB+, BCB- and holding groups were up-regulated (p < 0.05) before IVM, while Has2 was up-regulated (p < 0.01) after IVM in the control group. Other genes remained stable during maturation (Mct1, 2 and 4). Our results showed, for the first time, Mct1, 2 and 4 expression in bovine COCs. Mct1 and Mct4 transcripts were present in denuded oocytes and cumulus cell, while Mct2 was detected only in cumulus cells. These differences between the three isoforms in localization suggest unique roles for each in monocarboxylate transport during maturation.

  2. Artificial neural network-genetic algorithm based optimization for the adsorption of methylene blue and brilliant green from aqueous solution by graphite oxide nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Zeinali, N; Ghaedi, A M; Teimuori, M; Tashkhourian, J

    2014-05-01

    In this study, graphite oxide (GO) nano according to Hummers method was synthesized and subsequently was used for the removal of methylene blue (MB) and brilliant green (BG). The detail information about the structure and physicochemical properties of GO are investigated by different techniques such as XRD and FTIR analysis. The influence of solution pH, initial dye concentration, contact time and adsorbent dosage was examined in batch mode and optimum conditions was set as pH=7.0, 2 mg of GO and 10 min contact time. Employment of equilibrium isotherm models for description of adsorption capacities of GO explore the good efficiency of Langmuir model for the best presentation of experimental data with maximum adsorption capacity of 476.19 and 416.67 for MB and BG dyes in single solution. The analysis of adsorption rate at various stirring times shows that both dyes adsorption followed a pseudo second-order kinetic model with cooperation with interparticle diffusion model. Subsequently, the adsorption data as new combination of artificial neural network was modeled to evaluate and obtain the real conditions for fast and efficient removal of dyes. A three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model is applicable for accurate prediction of dyes removal percentage from aqueous solution by GO following conduction of 336 experimental data. The network was trained using the obtained experimental data at optimum pH with different GO amount (0.002-0.008 g) and 5-40 mg/L of both dyes over contact time of 0.5-30 min. The ANN model was able to predict the removal efficiency with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA), a linear transfer function (purelin) at output layer and a tangent sigmoid transfer function (tansig) at hidden layer with 10 and 11 neurons for MB and BG dyes, respectively. The minimum mean squared error (MSE) of 0.0012 and coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.982 were found for prediction and modeling of MB removal, while the respective value for BG was the

  3. Osmolarity and spectrophotometric property of brilliant blue green define the degree of toxicity on retinal pigment epithelial cells exposed to surgical endoilluminator

    PubMed Central

    Balaiya, Sankarathi; Sambhav, Kumar; Cook, William B; Chalam, Kakarla V

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of varying concentrations of brilliant blue green (BBG) and their different biochemical characteristics on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells under xenon light source illumination at varying distances to identify safe parameters for intraoperative use. Methods Human retinal RPE cells (ARPE-19) were exposed to two concentrations (0.25 and 0.50 mg/mL) of BBG and illuminated with a xenon surgical illuminator at varying distances (10 and 25 mm), intensity levels, and time intervals (1, 5, and 15 minutes). Additionally, the effect of osmolarity was examined by diluting BBG in different concentrations of glucose. Cytotoxicity of BBG and osmolarity effects on cell viability were evaluated using a WST-1 assay. Light absorption and emission characteristic of BBG in different solvents were measured using a plate reader at different wavelengths. Lastly, the activity of caspase-3 was also studied. Results Cell viability of ARPE-19 cells was 77.4%±12.7%, 78.7%±17.0%, and 65.0%±19.7% at 1, 5, and 15 minutes to exposure of high illumination xenon light at 10 mm (P<0.05) compared to controls. At both distances of illumination (10 and 25 mm), similar cell viabilities were seen between 1 and 5 minutes of exposure. However, there was a decline in viability when the illumination was carried out to 15 minutes in all groups (P<0.05). There was no significant reduction in cell viability in presence or absence of xenon light in different osmolar solutions concentrations of glucose (P>0.05). Maximal light absorption of BBG was noted between 540 and 680 nm. Activated caspase-3 level was not significant in both the concentrations of BBG (P>0.05). Conclusion Our findings suggest that BBG at 0.25 mg/mL during vitreoretinal surgery is safe and not toxic to RPE cells up to 5 minutes under focal high illumination (10 mm) and up to 15 minutes under medium diffuse illumination (25 mm). BBG was safe to be mixed with isotonic glucose solution at the

  4. Poly(brilliant green) and poly(thionine) modified carbon nanotube coated carbon film electrodes for glucose and uric acid biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ghica, M Emilia; Brett, Christopher M A

    2014-12-01

    Poly(brilliant green) (PBG) and poly(thionine) (PTH) films have been formed on carbon film electrodes (CFEs) modified with carbon nanotubes (CNT) by electropolymerisation using potential cycling. Voltammetric and electrochemical impedance characterisation were performed. Glucose oxidase and uricase, as model enzymes, were immobilised on top of PBG/CNT/CFE and PTH/CNT/CFE for glucose and uric acid (UA) biosensing. Amperometric determination of glucose and UA was carried out in phosphate buffer pH 7.0 at -0.20 and +0.30 V vs. SCE, respectively, and the results were compared with other similarly modified electrodes existing in the literature. An interference study and recovery measurements in natural samples were successfully performed, indicating these architectures to be good and promising biosensor platforms.

  5. Poly(brilliant green) and poly(thionine) modified carbon nanotube coated carbon film electrodes for glucose and uric acid biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ghica, M Emilia; Brett, Christopher M A

    2014-12-01

    Poly(brilliant green) (PBG) and poly(thionine) (PTH) films have been formed on carbon film electrodes (CFEs) modified with carbon nanotubes (CNT) by electropolymerisation using potential cycling. Voltammetric and electrochemical impedance characterisation were performed. Glucose oxidase and uricase, as model enzymes, were immobilised on top of PBG/CNT/CFE and PTH/CNT/CFE for glucose and uric acid (UA) biosensing. Amperometric determination of glucose and UA was carried out in phosphate buffer pH 7.0 at -0.20 and +0.30 V vs. SCE, respectively, and the results were compared with other similarly modified electrodes existing in the literature. An interference study and recovery measurements in natural samples were successfully performed, indicating these architectures to be good and promising biosensor platforms. PMID:25159399

  6. Buffalo embryos produced by handmade cloning from oocytes selected using brilliant cresyl blue staining have better developmental competence and quality and are closer to embryos produced by in vitro fertilization in terms of their epigenetic status and gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Sushil K; Sandhu, Anjit; Neerukattu, Venkata S; Singh, Karn P; Selokar, Naresh L; Singla, Suresh K; Chauhan, Manmohan S; Manik, Radhey S; Palta, Prabhat

    2015-04-01

    We compared handmade cloned (HMC) buffalo blastocysts produced from oocytes stained with Brilliant Cresyl Blue (BCB) and classified into those with blue (BCB+) or colorless cytoplasm (BCB-). The blastocyst rate was higher (p<0.001) for BCB+ than for BCB- oocytes (43.41 ± 2.54 vs. 22.74 ± 1.76%). BCB+ blastocysts had inner cell mass (ICM) cell number, ICM-to-trophectoderm ratio, global level of H3K18ac, apoptotic index, and expression level of BCL-XL, but not that of CASPASE-3, similar to that of blastocysts produced through in vitro fertilization (IVF), which was higher (p<0.05) than that of BCB- blastocysts. The global level of H3K9me2, which was similar in BCB+ and BCB- blastocysts, was higher (p<0.01) than that in IVF blastocysts. The expression level of OCT4 and SOX2 was higher (p<0.05) and that of GATA2 was lower (p<0.05) in BCB+ than that in BCB- blastocysts, whereas that of DNMT1, DNMT3a, NANOG, and CDX2 was not significantly different between the two groups. The expression level of DNMT1, OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 was lower (p<0.05) and that of CDX2 was higher (p<0.05) in BCB+ than in IVF blastocysts. In conclusion, because BCB+ blastocysts have better developmental competence and are closer to IVF blastocysts in terms of quality, epigenetic status, and gene expression than BCB- blastocysts, BCB staining can be used effectively for selection of developmentally competent oocytes for HMC.

  7. Methylene Blue-Ascorbic Acid: An Undergraduate Experiment in Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snehalatha, K. C.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise involving methylene blue and L-ascorbic acid in a simple clock reaction technique to illustrate the basic concepts of chemical kinetics. If stock solutions are supplied and each type of experiment takes no more than half an hour, the entire investigation can be completed in three practical sessions of three hours…

  8. Biosorption of Acid Blue 290 (AB 290) and Acid Blue 324 (AB 324) dyes on Spirogyra rhizopus.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ayla; Akkaya, Gönül; Turabik, Meral

    2006-07-31

    In this study, the biosorption of Acid Blue 290 and Acid Blue 324 on Spirogyra rhizopus, a green algae growing on fresh water, was studied with respect to initial pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and biosorbent concentration. The optimum initial pH and temperature values for AB 290 and AB 324 biosorption were found to be 2.0, 30 degrees C and 3.0, 25 degrees C, respectively. It was observed that the adsorbed AB 290 and AB 324 amounts increased with increasing the initial dye concentration up to 1500 and 750 mg/L, respectively. The Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Koble-Corrigan isotherm models were applied to the experimental equilibrium data and the isotherm constants were determined by using Polymath 4.1 software. The monolayer coverage capacities of S. rhizopus for AB 290 and AB 324 dyes were found as 1356.6 mg/g and 367.0 mg/g, respectively. The intraparticle diffusion model and the pseudo-second order kinetic model were applied to the experimental data in order to describe the removal mechanism of these acidic dyes by S. rhizopus. The pseudo-second order kinetic model described very well the biosorption kinetics of AB 290 and AB 324 dyes. Thermodynamic studies showed that the biosorption of AB 290 and AB 324 on S. rhizopus was exothermic in nature.

  9. A DISTANT QUASAR'S BRILLIANT LIGHT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The arrow in this image, taken by a ground-based telescope, points to a distant quasar, the brilliant core of an active galaxy residing billions of light-years from Earth. As light from this faraway object travels across space, it picks up information on galaxies and the vast clouds of material between galaxies as it moves through them. The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope decoded the quasar's light to find the spectral 'fingerprints' of highly ionized (energized) oxygen, which had mixed with invisible clouds of hydrogen in intergalactic space. The quasar's brilliant beam pierced at least four separate filaments of the invisible hydrogen laced with the telltale oxygen. The presence of oxygen between the galaxies implies there are huge quantities of hydrogen in the universe. Credits: WIYN Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona. The telescope is owned and operated by the University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories.

  10. From sanddabs to blue whales: the pervasiveness of domoic acid.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Kathi A; Bargu, Sibel; Kieckhefer, Tom; Silver, Mary W

    2002-07-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is a potent food web transferred algal toxin that has caused dramatic mortality events involving sea birds and sea lions. Although no confirmed DA toxicity events have been reported in whales, here we present data demonstrating that humpback and blue whales are exposed to the toxin and consume DA contaminated prey. Whale fecal samples were found to contain DA at levels ranging from 10 to 207microg DA g(-1) feces via HPLC-UV methods. SEM analysis of whale feces containing DA, collected from krill-feeding whales, revealed the presence of diatom frustules identified as Pseudo-nitzschia australis, a known DA producer. Humpback whales were observed feeding on anchovies and sardines that contained DA at levels ranging from 75 to 444microg DA g(-1) viscera. DA contamination of whale feces and fish occurred only during blooms of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia. Additionally, several novel fish species collected during a toxic diatom bloom were tested for DA. Fish as diverse as benthic sanddabs and pelagic albacore were found to contain the neurotoxin, suggesting that DA permeates benthic as well as pelagic communities.

  11. From sanddabs to blue whales: the pervasiveness of domoic acid.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Kathi A; Bargu, Sibel; Kieckhefer, Tom; Silver, Mary W

    2002-07-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is a potent food web transferred algal toxin that has caused dramatic mortality events involving sea birds and sea lions. Although no confirmed DA toxicity events have been reported in whales, here we present data demonstrating that humpback and blue whales are exposed to the toxin and consume DA contaminated prey. Whale fecal samples were found to contain DA at levels ranging from 10 to 207microg DA g(-1) feces via HPLC-UV methods. SEM analysis of whale feces containing DA, collected from krill-feeding whales, revealed the presence of diatom frustules identified as Pseudo-nitzschia australis, a known DA producer. Humpback whales were observed feeding on anchovies and sardines that contained DA at levels ranging from 75 to 444microg DA g(-1) viscera. DA contamination of whale feces and fish occurred only during blooms of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia. Additionally, several novel fish species collected during a toxic diatom bloom were tested for DA. Fish as diverse as benthic sanddabs and pelagic albacore were found to contain the neurotoxin, suggesting that DA permeates benthic as well as pelagic communities. PMID:12076651

  12. Decoloration of aqueous Brilliant Green by using glow discharge electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinzhang; Yu, Jie; Li, Yan; He, Xiaoyan; Bo, Lili; Pu, Lumei; Yang, Wu; Lu, Quanfang; Yang, Zhiming

    2006-09-01

    This paper described a plasma degradation of Brilliant Green (BG) by glow discharge electrolysis. Various influencing factors such as the voltage, the distance between cathode and anode were examined. Ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectra, gas chromatogram-mass spectrum (GC-MS), and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were used to monitor the degradation process and to identify the major oxidation intermediates. It was confirmed that benzoic acid, 1,2,3,4,5,6-cyclohexanehexaol, and carboxylic acids (e.g., oxalic acid, succinic acid and hydroxyacetic acid) were produced in the degradation process. The results showed that BG rapidly underwent degradation and eventually mineralized into CO(2) and H(2)O. PMID:16603310

  13. Biosorption of methyl blue onto tartaric acid modified wheat bran from aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tartaric acid modified wheat bran was utilized as adsorbent to remove methyl blue, a basic dye from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were carried out to study the effect of various experimental parameters such as initial solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage, on dye adsorption. The results showed that the modification of wheat bran by tartaric acid significantly improved its adsorption capacity, and made this material a suitable adsorbent to remove methyl blue. The adsorption capacity of modified wheat bran was about 1.6 times higher than that of unmodified one. The amount of methyl blue adsorbed was found to vary with initial solution pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time and initial methyl blue concentration. Kinetics study showed that the overall adsorption rate of methyl blue was illustrated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The applicability of the Langmuir and Freundlich models for the data was tested. Both models adequately described the experimental data of the biosorption of methyl blue. The maximum adsorption capacity for methyl blue calculated from Langmuir model was 25.18 mg/g. The study has shown the effectiveness of modified wheat bran in the removal of methyl blue, and that it can be considered as an attractive alternative to the more expensive technologies used in wastewater treatment. PMID:23369295

  14. Phosphatidic acid inhibits blue light-induced stomatal opening via inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 [corrected].

    PubMed

    Takemiya, Atsushi; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Stomata open in response to blue light under a background of red light. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits blue light-dependent stomatal opening, an effect essential for promoting stomatal closure in the daytime to prevent water loss. However, the mechanisms and molecular targets of this inhibition in the blue light signaling pathway remain unknown. Here, we report that phosphatidic acid (PA), a phospholipid second messenger produced by ABA in guard cells, inhibits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a positive regulator of blue light signaling, and PA plays a role in stimulating stomatal closure in Vicia faba. Biochemical analysis revealed that PA directly inhibited the phosphatase activity of the catalytic subunit of V. faba PP1 (PP1c) in vitro. PA inhibited blue light-dependent stomatal opening but did not affect red light- or fusicoccin-induced stomatal opening. PA also inhibited blue light-dependent H(+) pumping and phosphorylation of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. However, PA did not inhibit the autophosphorylation of phototropins, blue light receptors for stomatal opening. Furthermore, 1-butanol, a selective inhibitor of phospholipase D, which produces PA via hydrolysis of phospholipids, diminished the ABA-induced inhibition of blue light-dependent stomatal opening and H(+) pumping. We also show that hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, which are intermediates in ABA signaling, inhibited the blue light responses of stomata and that 1-butanol diminished these inhibitions. From these results, we conclude that PA inhibits blue light signaling in guard cells by PP1c inhibition, accelerating stomatal closure, and that PP1 is a cross talk point between blue light and ABA signaling pathways in guard cells.

  15. Red Shoe-Blue Shoe: An Acid-Base Demonstration with a Fashionable Twist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breyer, Arthur C.; Uzelmeier, Calvin E.

    1998-01-01

    Illustrates that acid-base indicators come in many forms and the reversible effects that acids and bases have on the colors of such indicators. An object is dyed in an indicator, which causes the object to turn dark blue at pH less than 3.0 to 5.0. Suggests using dyeable fabric shoes and other cotton articles. (PVD)

  16. Self-powered biosensor for ascorbic acid with a Prussian blue electrochromic display.

    PubMed

    Zloczewska, Adrianna; Celebanska, Anna; Szot, Katarzyna; Tomaszewska, Dorota; Opallo, Marcin; Jönsson-Niedziolka, Martin

    2014-04-15

    We report on the development of a nanocarbon based anode for sensing of ascorbic acid (AA). The oxidation of AA on this anode occurs at a quite low overpotential which enables the anode to be connected to a biocathode to form an ascorbic acid/O2 biofuel cell that functions as a self-powered biosensor. In conjunction with a Prussian blue electrochromic display the anode can also work as a truly self-powered sensor. The oxidation of ascorbic acid at the anode leads to a reduction of the Prussian blue in the display. The reduced form of Prussian blue, called Prussian white, is transparent. The rate of change from blue to colourless is dependent on the concentration of ascorbic acid. The display can easily be regenerated by connecting it to the biocathode which returns the Prussian blue to its oxidized form. In this way we have created the first self-powered electrochromic sensor that gives quantitative information about the analyte concentration. This is demonstrated by measuring the concentration of ascorbic acid in orange juice. The reported quantitative read-out electrochromic display can serve as a template for the creation of cheap, miniturizable sensors for other relevant analytes.

  17. Brilliant Star in a Colourful Neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    A spectacular new image from ESO's Wide Field Imager at the La Silla Observatory in Chile shows the brilliant and unusual star WR 22 and its colourful surroundings. WR 22 is a very hot and bright star that is shedding its atmosphere into space at a rate many millions of times faster than the Sun. It lies in the outer part of the dramatic Carina Nebula from which it formed. Very massive stars live fast and die young. Some of these stellar beacons have such intense radiation passing through their thick atmospheres late in their lives that they shed material into space many millions of times more quickly than relatively sedate stars such as the Sun. These rare, very hot and massive objects are known as Wolf-Rayet stars [1], after the two French astronomers who first identified them in the mid-nineteenth century, and one of the most massive ones yet measured is known as WR 22. It appears at the centre of this picture, which was created from images taken through red, green and blue filters with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. WR 22 is a member of a double star system and has been measured to have a mass at least 70 times that of the Sun. WR 22 lies in the southern constellation of Carina, the keel of Jason's ship Argo in Greek mythology. Although the star lies over 5000 light-years from the Earth it is so bright that it can just be faintly seen with the unaided eye under good conditions. WR 22 is one of many exceptionally brilliant stars associated with the beautiful Carina Nebula (also known as NGC 3372) and the outer part of this huge region of star formation in the southern Milky Way forms the colourful backdrop to this image. The subtle colours of the rich background tapestry are a result of the interactions between the intense ultraviolet radiation coming from hot massive stars, including WR 22, and the vast gas clouds, mostly hydrogen, from which they formed. The central part of this enormous complex

  18. Regulation of ascorbic acid metabolism by blue LED light irradiation in citrus juice sacs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lancui; Ma, Gang; Yamawaki, Kazuki; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hikaru; Yoshioka, Terutaka; Ohta, Satoshi; Kato, Masaya

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, the effects of red and blue LED lights on the accumulation of ascorbic acid (AsA) were investigated in the juice sacs of three citrus varieties, Satsuma mandarin, Valencia orange, and Lisbon lemon. The results showed that the blue LED light treatment effectively increased the AsA content in the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties, whereas the red LED light treatment did not. By increasing the blue LED light intensity, the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties accumulated more AsA. Moreover, continuous irradiation with blue LED light was more effective than pulsed irradiation for increasing the AsA content in the juice sacs of the three citrus varieties. Gene expression results showed that the modulation of AsA accumulation by blue LED light was highly regulated at the transcription level. The up-regulation of AsA biosynthetic genes (CitVTC1, CitVTC2, CitVTC4, and CitGLDH), AsA regeneration genes (CitMDAR1, CitMDAR2, and CitDHAR) and two GSH-producing genes (CitGR and CitchGR) contributed to these increases in the AsA content in the three citrus varieties.

  19. Interaction of nucleic acids with Coomassie Blue G-250 in the Bradford assay.

    PubMed

    Wenrich, Broc R; Trumbo, Toni A

    2012-09-15

    The Bradford assay has been used reliably for decades to quantify protein in solution. The analyte is incubated in acidic solution of Coomassie Blue G-250 dye, during which reversible ionic and nonionic binding interactions form. Bradford assay color yields were determined for salmon, bovine, shrimp, and kiwi fruit genomic DNA; baker's yeast RNA; bovine serum albumin (BSA); and hen egg lysozyme. Pure DNA and RNA bound the dye, with color yields of 0.0017 mg⁻¹ cm⁻¹ and 0.0018 mg⁻¹ cm⁻¹, respectively. The nucleic acid-Coomassie Blue response was significant, at roughly 9% of that for BSA and 18% of that for lysozyme.

  20. Hyaluronic Acid Modified Hollow Prussian Blue Nanoparticles Loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin for Targeting Thermochemotherapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lijia; Shao, Shangmin; Wang, Yang; Yang, Yongbo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported the fabrication of a multifunctional nanoplatform by modifying hollow Prussian blue nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid grafting polyethylene glycol, followed by loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin for tumor-targeted thermochemotherapy. It was found that the surface modification of hollow Prussian blue nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid grafting polyethylene endowed a great colloidal stability, long blood circulation time and the capability for targeting Hela cells over-expressing the CD44 receptor. The obtained nanoagent exhibited efficient photothermal effect and a light triggered and stepwise release behavior of 10-hydroxycamptothecin due to the strong optical absorption in the near-infrared region. The investigations on the body weight change, histological injury and blood biochemical indexes showed that such nanoagent had excellent biocompatibility for medical application. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments proved that the combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy through the agent of hyaluronic acid modified Prussian blue nanoparticles loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin could significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy compared with either therapy alone because of a good synergetic effect.

  1. Hyaluronic Acid Modified Hollow Prussian Blue Nanoparticles Loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin for Targeting Thermochemotherapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Lijia; shao, shangmin; Wang, Yang; Yang, Yongbo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported the fabrication of a multifunctional nanoplatform by modifying hollow Prussian blue nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid grafting polyethylene glycol, followed by loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin for tumor-targeted thermochemotherapy. It was found that the surface modification of hollow Prussian blue nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid grafting polyethylene endowed a great colloidal stability, long blood circulation time and the capability for targeting Hela cells over-expressing the CD44 receptor. The obtained nanoagent exhibited efficient photothermal effect and a light triggered and stepwise release behavior of 10-hydroxycamptothecin due to the strong optical absorption in the near-infrared region. The investigations on the body weight change, histological injury and blood biochemical indexes showed that such nanoagent had excellent biocompatibility for medical application. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments proved that the combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy through the agent of hyaluronic acid modified Prussian blue nanoparticles loading 10-hydroxycamptothecin could significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy compared with either therapy alone because of a good synergetic effect. PMID:26722372

  2. Citric acid modified kenaf core fibres for removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Sajab, Mohd Shaiful; Chia, Chin Hua; Zakaria, Sarani; Jani, Saad Mohd; Ayob, Mohd Khan; Chee, Kah Leong; Khiew, Poi Sim; Chiu, Wee Siong

    2011-08-01

    Chemically modified kenaf core fibres were prepared via esterification in the presence of citric acid (CA). The adsorption kinetics and isotherm studies were carried out under different conditions to examine the adsorption efficiency of CA-treated kenaf core fibres towards methylene blue (MB). The adsorption capacity of the kenaf core fibres increased significantly after the citric acid treatment. The values of the correlation coefficients indicated that the Langmuir isotherm fitted the experimental data better than the Freundlich isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity of the CA-treated kenaf core fibres was found to be 131.6mg/g at 60°C. Kinetic models, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion, were employed to describe the adsorption mechanism. The kinetic data were found to fit pseudo-second-order model equation as compared to pseudo-first-order model. The adsorption of MB onto the CA-treated kenaf core fibres was spontaneous and endothermic.

  3. Red- and blue-shifted hydrogen bonds in the cis-trans noncyclic formic acid dimer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pan-Pan; Qiu, Wen-Yuan

    2009-08-01

    The cis-trans noncyclic formic acid dimer was studied by means of MP2 method with 6-31G(d,p), 6-31+G(d,p) and 6-311+G(d,p) basis sets. It exhibits simultaneously red-shifted O-H...O and blue-shifted C-H...O hydrogen bonds. AIM and NBO analyses are performed at the MP2/6-31+G(d,p) level to explore their properties and origins. AIM analysis provides the evidence that the O-H bond becomes weaker and the C-H bond becomes stronger upon the hydrogen bond formations. Intermolecular and intramolecular hyperconjugations have important influence on the electron densities in the X-H (X = O, C) sigma bonding orbital and its sigma* antibonding orbital. The electron densities in the two orbitals are closely connected with the X-H (X = O, C) bond length, and they are used to quantitatively estimate the bond length variation. The larger amount of charge transfer in the red-shifted O-H...O hydrogen bond is due to its favorable H...O electron channel, whereas the H...O electron channel in the blue-shifted C-H...O hydrogen bond is weaker. Structural reorganization effects shorten the C-H bond by approximately 30% when compared to the C-H bond contraction upon the dimerization. Strikingly, it leads to a small elongation and a slight red shift of the O-H bond. Both rehybridization and repolarization result in the X-H (X = O, C) bond contraction, but their effects on the O-H bond do not hold a dominant position. The hydrogen-bonding processes go through the electrostatic attractions, van der Waals interactions, charge-transfer interactions, hydrogen-bonding interactions and electrostatic repulsions. Electrostatic attractions are of great importance on the origin of the red-shifted O-H...O hydrogen bond, especially the strong H(delta+)...O(delta-) attraction. For the blue-shifted C-H...O hydrogen bond, the considerable nucleus-nucleus repulsion between H and O atoms caused by the strong electrostatic attraction between C and O atoms is a possible reason for the C-H bond contraction and

  4. The Duke of Edinburgh's Award: A "Simply Brilliant" Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lico, Abner

    2008-01-01

    While speaking to Gold Award Achievers in Toronto in 2002, Tony Comper, past President and Chief Executive Officer of the BMO Financial Group, referred to the Duke of Edinburgh's (DofE) Award as a program "so brilliantly simple, it's simply brilliant." This ironic statement has echoed in the Ontario division of the DofE Award ever since. This…

  5. Terpenoids, flavonoids and caffeic acid derivatives from Salvia viridis L. cvar. Blue Jeans.

    PubMed

    Rungsimakan, Supattra; Rowan, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    Three diterpenoids, 1-oxomicrostegiol (1), viroxocin (2), viridoquinone (3), were isolated from the roots of Salvia viridis L. cvar. Blue Jeans. Five known diterpenoids, microstegiol (4), 7α-acetoxy-14-hydroxy-8,13-abietadiene-11,12-dione (5; 7-O-acetylhorminone tautomer), 7α,14-dihydroxy-8,13-abietadiene-11,12-dione (6; horminone tautomer), ferruginol and salvinolonyl 12-methyl ether (7) were also found in the roots together with 1-docosyl ferulate (8), and a mixture of 2-(4'-alkoxyphenyl) ethyl alkanoates (9). Two lupane triterpenoids, 2α-acetoxy-lup-20(29)-en-3β-ol (10), and 3β-acetoxy-lup-20(29)-en-2α-ol (11) were found in the aerial parts together with known compounds, lup-20(29)-ene-2α,3β-diol (12), ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, β-sitosterol and β-sitosterol glucoside. A known phenylpropanoid, trans-verbascoside (or acteoside; 13), was the main constituent in the polar fraction of the aerial part, and it is now reported in the genus Salvia for the first time. Other polyphenolic compounds were cis-verbascoside (14), leucosceptoside A (15), martynoside (16), caffeic acid, 6-O-caffeoyl-glucose (18), rosmarinic acid, salidroside, luteolin-7-O-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-galactopyranoside, luteolin-7-O-β-galactopyranoside, luteolin-7-O-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-glucopyranoside, luteolin-7-O-β-glucopyranoside, and apigenin-7-O-β-glucopyranoside. The structures were determined by 1D-, 2D-NMR and HR-ESI-MS techniques. Compounds 6, 10, ferruginol, ursolic acid and oleanolic acid exhibited antibacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 775) with MIC 50 μM, 25 μM, 50 μM, 12.5 μM, 12.5 μM respectively. Ferruginol, ursolic acid and oleanolic acid were also active against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6571), and Bacillus cereus (ATCC 2599) with MIC 12.5-50 μM. 4 was also active against S.aureus (ATCC 6571) with MIC 50 μM. These values are consistent with previous studies on the antimicrobial activity of Salvia diterpenoids.

  6. Histochemical study of the biphasic cellular pattern of tubular adenoid cystic carcinoma with azophloxine, amidoblack and acid blue.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, A; Eleftheriadis, E; Martis, C

    1989-01-01

    A tubular adenoid cystic carcinoma of the soft palate was studied histochemically using tannic acid-phosphomolybdic acid-Azophloxine (TPAzf), tannic acid-phosphomolybdic acid-Amidoblack (TPA) and tannic acid-phosphomolybdic acid-Acid Blue techniques. At the periphery of some tumor nests a few spindle cells were noted stained intensely red, blue-green and dark blue with TPAzf, TPA and TPAcB respectively. The apical portion or the whole cytoplasm of the cuboidal, eosinophilic cells that lined the central lumina of most neoplastic nests showed a similar tinctorial behavior. On the basis of their location and staining properties, the spindle cells were recognized as myoepithelial. On the other hand, the tinctorial behavior of eosinophilic cells was attributed to the dye binding by a conspicuous terminal bar-terminal web system or by tonofibrils accumulated in their cytoplasm as a result of squamous metaplasia. An inverse relation between the presence of myoepithelial cells at the periphery of tumor nests and the increasing thickness of terminal bar-terminal web system or the appearance of numerous tonofibrils in the eosinophilic cells was also noted.

  7. Histochemical study of the biphasic cellular pattern of tubular adenoid cystic carcinoma with azophloxine, amidoblack and acid blue.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, A; Eleftheriadis, E; Martis, C

    1989-01-01

    A tubular adenoid cystic carcinoma of the soft palate was studied histochemically using tannic acid-phosphomolybdic acid-Azophloxine (TPAzf), tannic acid-phosphomolybdic acid-Amidoblack (TPA) and tannic acid-phosphomolybdic acid-Acid Blue techniques. At the periphery of some tumor nests a few spindle cells were noted stained intensely red, blue-green and dark blue with TPAzf, TPA and TPAcB respectively. The apical portion or the whole cytoplasm of the cuboidal, eosinophilic cells that lined the central lumina of most neoplastic nests showed a similar tinctorial behavior. On the basis of their location and staining properties, the spindle cells were recognized as myoepithelial. On the other hand, the tinctorial behavior of eosinophilic cells was attributed to the dye binding by a conspicuous terminal bar-terminal web system or by tonofibrils accumulated in their cytoplasm as a result of squamous metaplasia. An inverse relation between the presence of myoepithelial cells at the periphery of tumor nests and the increasing thickness of terminal bar-terminal web system or the appearance of numerous tonofibrils in the eosinophilic cells was also noted. PMID:2551212

  8. Sensitivity of high-elevation streams in the Southern Blue Ridge Province to acidic deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Hudy, M.; Fowler, D.; Van Den Avyle, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Southern Blue Ridge Province, which encompasses parts of northern Georgia, eastern Tennessee, and western North Carolina, has been predicted to be sensitive to impacts from acidic deposition, owing to the chemical composition of the bedrock geology and soils. This study confirms the predicted potential sensitivity, quantifies the level of total alkalinity and describes the chemical characteristics of 30 headwater streams of this area. Water chemistry was measured five times between April 1983 and June 1984 at first and third order reaches of each stream during baseflow conditions. Sensitivity based on total alkalinity and the Calcite Saturation Index indicates that the headwater streams of the Province are vulnerable to acidification. Total alkalinity and p11 were generally higher in third order reaches (mean, 72 ?eq/? and 6.7) than in first order reaches (64 ?eq/? and 6.4). Ionic concentrations were low, averaging 310 and 340 ?eq/? in first and third order reaches, respectively. A single sampling appears adequate for evaluating sensitivity based on total alkalinity, but large temporal variability requires multiple sampling for the detection of changes in pH and alkalinity over time. Monitoring of stream water should continue in order to detect any subtle effects of acidic deposition on these unique resource systems.

  9. Hormonal diterpenoids derived from ent-kaurenoic acid are involved in the blue-light avoidance response of Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Sho; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are diterpenoid hormones that regulate growth and development in flowering plants. The moss Physcomitrella patens has part of the GA biosynthetic pathway from geranylgeranyl diphosphate to ent-kaurenoic acid via ent-kaurene, but it does not produce GA. Disruption of the ent-kaurene synthase gene in P. patens suppressed caulonemal differentiation. Application of ent-kaurene or ent-kaurenoic acid restored differentiation, suggesting that derivative(s) of ent-kaurenoic acid, but not GAs, are endogenous regulator(s) of caulonemal cell differentiation. The protonemal growth of P. patens shows an avoidance response under unilateral blue light. Physiological studies using gene mutants involved in ent-kaurene biosynthesis confirmed that diterpenoid(s) regulate the blue-light response. Here, we discuss the implications of these findings, and provide data for the ent-kaurene oxidase gene-disrupted mutant.

  10. Kinetics and thermodynamic studies for removal of acid blue 129 from aqueous solution by almond shell

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Efficiency and performance of Almond shell (AS) adsorbent for the removal and recovery of Acid Blue 129 (AB129) from wastewater is presented in this report. The influence of variables including pH, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage, particle size, contact time and temperature on the dye removal have been investigated in batch method by one at a time optimization method. The experimental equilibrium data were tested by four widely used isotherm models namely, Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D–R). It was found that adsorption of AB129 on AS well with the Langmuir isotherm model, implying monolayer coverage of dye molecules onto the surface of the adsorbent. More than 98% removal efficiency was obtained within 14 min at adsorbent dose of 0.4 g for initial dye concentration of 40 mg/L at pH 2. Kinetics of the adsorption process was tested by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics, and intraparticle diffusion mechanism. Pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided a better correlation for the experimental data studied in comparison to the pseudo-first-order model. Calculation of various thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibb’s free energy, entropy and enthalpy of the on-going adsorption process indicate feasibility and endothermic nature of AB129 adsorption on all adsorbents. This work can be used in design of adsorption columns for dyes removal. PMID:24620822

  11. Effects of methylene blue in acute lung injury induced by oleic acid in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cassiano Silveira, Ana Paula; Vento, Daniella Alves; Albuquerque, Agnes Afrodite Sumarelli; Celotto, Andrea Carla; Tefé-Silva, Cristiane; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Rubens de Nadai, Tales; Rodrigues, Alfredo José; Poli-Neto, Omero Benedicto

    2016-01-01

    Background In acute lung injury (ALI), rupture of the alveolar-capillary barrier determines the protein-rich fluid influx into alveolar spaces. Previous studies have reported that methylene blue (MB) attenuates such injuries. This investigation was carried out to study the MB effects in pulmonary capillary permeability. Methods Wistar rats were divided into five groups: (I) Sham: saline bolus; (II) MB, MB infusion for 2 h; (III) oleic acid (OA), OA bolus; (IV) MB/OA, MB infusion for 2 h, and at 5 min after from the beginning, concurrently with an OA bolus; and (V) OA/MB, OA bolus, and after 2 h, MB infusion for 2 h. After 4 h, blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and lung tissue were collected from all groups for analysis of plasma and tissue nitric oxide, calculation of the wet weight to dry weight ratio (WW/DW), and histological examination of lung tissue. Statistical analysis was performed using nonparametric test. Results Although favourable trends have been observed for permeability improvement parameters (WW/WD and protein), the results were not statistically significant. However, histological analysis of lung tissue showed reduced lesion areas in both pre- and post-treatment groups. Conclusions The data collected using this experimental model was favourable only through macroscopic and histological analysis. These observations are valid for both MB infusions before or after induction of ALI. PMID:26855944

  12. Continuous Decolorization of Acid Blue 62 Solution in an Enzyme Membrane Reactor.

    PubMed

    Lewańczuk, Marcin; Bryjak, Jolanta

    2015-09-01

    This paper focuses on using an enzyme membrane reactor (EMR) for the effective continuous decolorization of Acid Blue 62 (AB62). The following factors were considered for the effective use of Cerrena unicolor laccase immobilized in the EMR volume: the enzyme was stable in six successive runs in a batch reactor; no aeration was necessary; AB62 and the oxidized products were sorbed onto the membrane but were not rejected; and the enzyme was stable in the EMR system. It is obvious that any continuous process must be predictable, and thus, the objective was to verify the process model experimentally. For this reason, a proper isoenzyme kinetic equation was selected and the parameters were evaluated. The obtained kinetic parameters were used to plan processes and to verify their applicability to long-term AB62 decolorization, and a very good agreement between the calculated and the measured data was obtained. In the main designed continuous decolorization process, the conversion reached 98 % and was stable for 4 days. The membrane reactor with C. unicolor laccase appears to be very promising for AB62 decolorization.

  13. [Adsorption behavior of copper ion and methylene blue on citric acid- esterified wheat straw].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Zhong, Ke-Ding; Feng, Min; Liu, Xing-Yan; Gong, Ren-Min

    2008-03-01

    A cationic adsorbent with carboxyl groups derived from citric acid- esterified wheat straw (EWS) was prepared by the method of solid phase preparation, and a batch experiment was conducted to study the adsorption behaviors of Cu (II) and methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution on the EWS under conditions of different initial pH, adsorbent dosage, adsorbate concentration, and contact time. The results showed that the maximum adsorption of Cu (II) and MB was obtained when the initial solution pH was > or = 4.0. 96% of Cu (II) in 100 mg x L(-1) Cu solution and 99% of MB in 250 mg x L(-1) dye solution could be removed by > or = 2.0 g x L(-1) of EWS. The adsorption of Cu (II) and MB fitted the Langmuir sorption isothermal model. The maximum removal capacity (Qm) of EWS was 79.37 mg x g(-1) for Cu (II) and 312.50 mg x g(-1) for MB, and the adsorption equilibrium of Cu (II) and MB was reached within 75 min and 5 h, respectively. The adsorption processes of Cu (II) and MB could be described by pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic functions, respectively.

  14. Removal of colour and COD from wastewater containing acid blue 22 by electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Panizza, Marco; Cerisola, Giacomo

    2008-05-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of synthetic wastewater containing acid blue 22 on a boron-doped diamond electrode (BDD) was studied, using cyclic voltammetry and bulk electrolysis. The influence of current density, dye concentration, flow rate, and temperature was investigated, in order to find the best conditions for COD and colour removal. It was found that, during oxidation, a polymeric film, causing BDD deactivation, was formed in the potential region of water stability, and that it was removed by anodic polarisation at high potentials in the region of O(2) evolution. Bulk electrolysis results showed that the electrochemical process was suitable for completely removing COD and effectively decolourising wastewaters, due to the production of hydroxyl radicals on the diamond surface. In particular, under optimal experimental conditions of flow rates (i.e. 300 dm(3) h(-1)) and current density (i.e. 20 mA cm(-2)), 97% of COD was removed in 12h electrolysis, with 70 kWh m(-3) energy consumption.

  15. Photovoltage kinetics of the acid-blue and acid-purple forms of bacteriorhodopsin: evidence for no net charge transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Moltke, S; Heyn, M P

    1995-01-01

    Time-resolved photovoltage measurements were performed with the acid-blue (bR605A) and acid-purple (bR565A) forms of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) in the time range from 25 ns to 100 s. The bR605A and bR565A pigments were formed by titration with H2SO4 in the absence and presence of 150 mM KCI, respectively. Qualitatively the kinetics of the charge displacement in these two states are similar and consist of two fast phases in one direction (100 ns bandwidth limited and approximately 1 microsecond) followed by a decay in the opposite direction via one component for bR605A (4.4 +/- 0.6 ms) or two components for bR565A (33 +/- 8 microseconds and 3.6 +/- 0.5 ms). The transient photovoltage signal returns exactly to the initial value after several milliseconds, well before the passive discharge of the electrical measuring system at 2 s. We conclude that no net charge transfer occurs in either bR605A or bR565A. The direction of the fast components is opposite that of net proton translocation in bR at pH 7. So, if the charge that moves back and forth is due to a proton, it moves first in the direction of the cytoplasmic side of the membrane (< 1 microsecond) and returns to its initial position via the 4.4 ms (bR605A) or the 33 microseconds and 3.6 ms (bR565A) decay components. The amplitude of the charge motion in both low pH forms is too large to be due to isomerization alone and is comparable to one of the major components in bR at pH 7.2 PMID:8580350

  16. Regulation of primary metabolic pathways in oyster mushroom mycelia induced by blue light stimulation: accumulation of shikimic acid.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masanobu; Kimura, Ninako; Miura, Ryuhei

    2015-02-27

    Shikimic acid is a key intermediate in the aromatic amino acid pathway as well as an important starting material for the synthesis of Tamiflu, a potent and selective inhibitor of the neuraminidase enzyme of influenza viruses A and B. Here we report that in oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) mycelia cultivated in the dark, stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes induces the accumulation of shikimic acid. An integrated analysis of primary metabolites, gene expression and protein expression suggests that the accumulation of shikimic acid caused by blue light stimulation is due to an increase in 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAHPS, EC2.5.1.54), the rate-determining enzyme in the shikimic acid pathway, as well as phosphofructokinase (PFK, EC2.7.1.11) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC1.1.1.49), the rate-determining enzymes in the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. This stimulation results in increased levels of phosphoenolpyruvic acid (PEP) and erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P), the starting materials of shikimic acid biosynthesis.

  17. Regulation of primary metabolic pathways in oyster mushroom mycelia induced by blue light stimulation: accumulation of shikimic acid.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masanobu; Kimura, Ninako; Miura, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    Shikimic acid is a key intermediate in the aromatic amino acid pathway as well as an important starting material for the synthesis of Tamiflu, a potent and selective inhibitor of the neuraminidase enzyme of influenza viruses A and B. Here we report that in oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) mycelia cultivated in the dark, stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes induces the accumulation of shikimic acid. An integrated analysis of primary metabolites, gene expression and protein expression suggests that the accumulation of shikimic acid caused by blue light stimulation is due to an increase in 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAHPS, EC2.5.1.54), the rate-determining enzyme in the shikimic acid pathway, as well as phosphofructokinase (PFK, EC2.7.1.11) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC1.1.1.49), the rate-determining enzymes in the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. This stimulation results in increased levels of phosphoenolpyruvic acid (PEP) and erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P), the starting materials of shikimic acid biosynthesis. PMID:25721093

  18. Regulation of Primary Metabolic Pathways in Oyster Mushroom Mycelia Induced by Blue Light Stimulation: Accumulation of Shikimic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Masanobu; Kimura, Ninako; Miura, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    Shikimic acid is a key intermediate in the aromatic amino acid pathway as well as an important starting material for the synthesis of Tamiflu, a potent and selective inhibitor of the neuraminidase enzyme of influenza viruses A and B. Here we report that in oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) mycelia cultivated in the dark, stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes induces the accumulation of shikimic acid. An integrated analysis of primary metabolites, gene expression and protein expression suggests that the accumulation of shikimic acid caused by blue light stimulation is due to an increase in 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAHPS, EC2.5.1.54), the rate-determining enzyme in the shikimic acid pathway, as well as phosphofructokinase (PFK, EC2.7.1.11) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC1.1.1.49), the rate-determining enzymes in the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. This stimulation results in increased levels of phosphoenolpyruvic acid (PEP) and erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P), the starting materials of shikimic acid biosynthesis. PMID:25721093

  19. Bioremoval of Basic Violet 3 and Acid Blue 93 by Pseudomonas putida and its adsorption isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arunarani, A; Chandran, Preethy; Ranganathan, B V; Vasanthi, N S; Sudheer Khan, S

    2013-02-01

    Basic Violet 3 and Acid Blue 93 are the most important group of synthetic colourants extensively used in textile industries for dyeing cotton, wool, silk and nylon. Release of these dye pollutants in to the environment adversely affects the human health and aquatic organisms. The present study we used Pseudomonas putida MTCC 4910 for the adsorptive removal of Basic Violet 3 and Acid Blue 93 from the aqueous solutions. The pH (4-9) and NaCl concentrations (1mM-1M) did not influence the adsorption process. The equilibrium adsorption process fitted well to Freundlich model than Langmuir model. The kinetics of adsorption fitted well by pseudo-second-order. Thus in the present study an attempt has been made to exploit the dye removal capability of P. putida MTCC 4910, and it was found to be an efficient microbe that could be used for bio removal of dyes from textile effluents.

  20. The avoidance and aggregative movements of mesophyll chloroplasts in C(4) monocots in response to blue light and abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Maai, Eri; Shimada, Shouu; Yamada, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Tatsuo; Miyake, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka

    2011-05-01

    In C(4) plants, mesophyll (M) chloroplasts are randomly distributed along the cell walls, whereas bundle sheath chloroplasts are located in either a centripetal or centrifugal position. It was reported previously that only M chloroplasts aggregatively redistribute to the bundle sheath side in response to extremely strong light or environmental stresses. The aggregative movement of M chloroplasts is also induced in a light-dependent fashion upon incubation with abscisic acid (ABA). The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and red/blue light in the aggregative movement of M chloroplasts are examined here in two distinct subtypes of C(4) plants, finger millet and maize. Exogenously applied hydrogen peroxide or ROS scavengers could not change the response patterns of M chloroplast movement to light and ABA. Blue light irradiation essentially induced the rearrangement of M chloroplasts along the sides of anticlinal walls, parallel to the direction of the incident light, which is analogous to the avoidance movement of C(3) chloroplasts. In the presence of ABA, most of the M chloroplasts showed the aggregative movement in response to blue light but not red light. Together these results suggest that ROS are not involved in signal transduction for the aggregative movement, and ABA can shift the blue light-induced avoidance movement of C(4)-M chloroplasts to the aggregative movement.

  1. Desorption and photodegradation of methylene blue from modified sugarcane bagasse surface by acid TiO2 hydrosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jun-Xia; Chi, Ru-An; Guo, Jia; Zhang, Yue-Fei; Xu, Zhi-Gao; Xiao, Chun-Qiao

    2012-02-01

    Waste sugarcane bagasse (SCB) was modified by pyromellitic dianhydride to improve its adsorption capacity for cationic dyes. Results showed that the adsorption capacity of the modified SCB for methylene blue was 564 mg g-1, which was about 12 times than that obtained on the unmodified SCB. Methylene blue loaded modified SCB was regenerated by a self-clean eluent: TiO2 hydrosol with pH ranged from 1 to 4, and HNO3 solution with the same pH range was tested at the same time for comparison. Results showed that desorption kinetics of methylene blue in the hydrosol systems fit two-step kinetic model and controlled mainly by the slow step. As a self-clean eluent, acid hydrosol could firstly desorb and then photodegrade methylene blue under sunlight irradiation. After five desorption-photodegradation cycles, 78.3% of the absorbed dyes could be desorbed by using hydrosol (pH 2) as eluent. The hydrosol could be continuously used in desorption and photodegradation process, which would economize large volume of the eluent and moreover it would not bring secondary pollution.

  2. A histochemical comparison of methylene-blue/acid fuchsin with hematoxylin and eosin for differentiating calcification of stromal tissue.

    PubMed

    Gupta, K; Kale, A D; Hallikeremath, S R; Kotrashetti, V S

    2012-05-01

    Benign and malignant connective tissue tumors consist of a fibrous component that contains varying amounts of one or more types of bone or other calcified tissue. Diagnosis of these connective tissue tumors often poses challenges for pathologists, because it is difficult to differentiate the organic matrix of osteoid from hyalinized stroma. To establish a definitive diagnosis, it sometimes is advantageous to demonstrate histologically by special staining either the type of calcification or the presence or absence of calcification. We compared the efficacy of methylene blue-acid fuchsin (MB-AF) to hematoxylin and eosin (H-E) for connective tissue tumors suspected to contain calcifications and to devise an optimal staining technique for calcification that would be specific, simple, and cost- and time-effective. We examined 50 benign and 45 malignant connective tissue tumors that were suspected to contain calcifications. Sections were stained with H-E and MB-AF and evaluated. MB-AF stained bone pink, which contrasted with blue soft tissue. After MB-AF staining, osteoid was faint pink in a blue stromal background. Osteoid was not visualized in H-E stained sections; it was stained the same shade of pink as stromal tissue. Dystrophic calcification and cementum could be identified equally well using either staining technique, but contrast was better after H-E staining. MB-AF staining of bone was comparable to H-E staining and could be used effectively to stain bone and osteoid. MB-AF is a simple, single step procedure. It also stains cementum blue with faint blue rimming and dystrophic calcification bluish-pink, but it cannot be used as a specific stain for types of calcification other than bone and osteoid.

  3. Methylene blue adsorption onto swede rape straw (Brassica napus L.) modified by tartaric acid: equilibrium, kinetic and adsorption mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanfang; Zhou, Hui; Liu, Guohua; Qiao, Jun; Wang, Jinhua; Lu, Haiying; Yang, Linzhang; Wu, Yonghong

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a promising and competitive bioadsorbent with the abundant of source, low price and environmentally friendly characters to remove cationic dye from wastewater. The swede rape straw (Brassica napus L.) modified by tartaric acid (SRSTA) was prepared, characterized and used to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution at varied operational conditions (including MB initial concentrations, adsorbent dose, etc.). Results demonstrated that the equilibrium data was well fitted by Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum MB adsorption capacity of SRSTA was 246.4 mg g(-1), which was comparable to the results of some previous studied activated carbons. The higher dye adsorption capacity could be attributed to the presence of more functional groups such as carboxyl group on the surface of SRSTA. The adsorption mechanism was also discussed. The results indicate that SRSTA is a promising and valuable absorbent to remove methylene blue from wastewater.

  4. Studies on the ion-association of methylene blue and salicylic acid in neat and mixed binary solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Soumen; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar; Kundu, Subrata; Nath, Sudip; Panigrahi, Sudipa; Praharaj, Snigdhamayee; Pal, Tarasankar

    2005-05-01

    Thiazine dye, methylene blue forms 1:1 ion-associate with salicylic acid in aqueous phase and the ion-associate can be extracted in a series of non-polar non-coordinating solvent systems. The influence of different parameters on the process of ion-association has been studied. The suitability of a number of phenolic precursors for the formation of ion-associate with methylene blue has been tested. Charge-transfer absorption band of the dye molecules in relation to ion-pair has been followed in a sequence of neat and mixed binary solvents and the dependence of the absorption maxima has been found to correlate well with the solvent polarity.

  5. Sugar and organic acid accumulation in guard cells of Vicia faba in response to red and blue light

    SciTech Connect

    Talbott, L.D.; Zeiger, E. )

    1993-08-01

    Changes in neutral sugar and organic acid content of guard cells were quantitated by high-performance liquid chromatography during stomatal opening in different light qualities. Sonicated Vicia faba epidermal peels were irradiated with 10 [mu]mol m[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1] of blue light, a fluence rate insufficient for the activation of guard cell photosynthesis, or 125 [mu]mol m[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1] of red light, in the presence of 1mM KCl, 0.1 mM CaCl[sub 2]. The low-fluence-rate blue light stimulated an average net stomatal opening of 4.7 [mu]m in 2 h, whereas the saturating fluence rate of red light stimulated an average net opening of 3.8 [mu]m in 2 h. Under blue light, the malate content of guard cells increased to 173% of the initial level during the first 30 min of opening and declined as opening continued. Sucrose levels continuously rose throughout the blue light-stimulated opening, reaching 215% of the initial level after 2 h. The starch hydrolysis products maltose and maltotriose remained elevated at all times. Under red light, guard cells showed very little increase in organic acid or maltose levels, whereas sucrose levels increased to 208% of the initial level after 2 h. Total measured organic metabolite concentrations were correlated with stomatal apertures in all cases except where substantial malate increases occurred. These results support the hypothesis that light quality modulates alternative mechanisms of osmotic accumulation guard cells, including potassium uptake, photosynthetic sugar production, and starch breakdown. 29 refs., 5 figs., 2 tab.

  6. Biocontrol of blue and gray mold diseases of pear fruit by integration of antagonistic yeast with salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; Chen, Jishuang; Chen, Rongle; Huang, Bin; Liu, Donghong; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2007-05-30

    This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the biocontrol yeast Cryptococcus laurentii and salicylic acid (SA) in suppressing the blue and gray mould rots in pear fruit and to explore possible mode of action involved. Our results showed that the combined treatment of pear fruit with C. laurentii with SA at 100 microg ml(-1) resulted in a remarkably improved control of Penicillium expansum and Botrytis cinerea infections, including the pre-inoculated P. expansum, in comparison with the application of C. laurentii or SA alone. The biocontrol yeast C. laurentii proliferated rapidly within the first 24 h of incubation in pear fruit wounds. Although SA at 100 microg ml(-1) neither affected the population growth of C. laurentii nor directly inhibited the blue mold when the inoculation concentrations of P. expansum were above 5 x 10(2) spore per ml in vivo, it induced the fruit resistance to the blue and gray mold rots when the time interval between SA treatment and pathogens inoculation was more than 48 h, being associated with a rapid and strong activation of the peroxidase activity in pear fruit. Thus we assume that SA may be regarded as a secondary defense line in a combination of C. laurentii and SA, which could reinforce the biocontrol efficacy of C. laurentii by induction of the fruit natural resistance.

  7. Computational study on the roles of amino acid residues in the active site formation mechanism of blue-light photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryuma; Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji; Yamato, Takahisa

    2015-07-01

    To examine the functional roles of the active site methionine (M-site) and glutamic acid (E-site) residues of blue-light photoreceptors, we performed in silico mutation at the M-site in a systematic manner and focused on the hydrogen bonding between the E-site and the substrate: the cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimer (CPD). Fragment molecular orbital calculations with electron correlations demonstrated that substitution of the M-site methionine with either alanine or glutamine always destabilizes the interaction energy between the E-site and the CPD by more than 12.0 kcal/mol, indicating that the methionine and glutamic acid residues cooperatively facilitate the enzymatic reaction in the active site.

  8. Bonney's blue cystitis: a warning.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Chapple, C R; Payne, S D; Milroy, E J; Warwick, R T

    1989-03-01

    The instillation of diluted Bonney's blue into the bladder during gynaecological operations has been quite common practice over the last 50 years. Bonney's blue is composed of a 1:1 mixture of brilliant green and crystal violet dissolved in ethanol (90%) or industrial methylated spirit. Before insertion into the bladder this solution must be diluted with water to a 0.5% solution. Failure to do this will result in a severe inflammatory reaction within the bladder. The degree of resultant damage depends upon the duration of exposure. Persistent pain is a feature of this condition, although the other symptoms (frequency and urgency) may settle in time. Two cases of chemical cystitis resulting from the use of undiluted Bonney's blue are described to illustrate the possible consequences. Both patients were awarded 6-figure sums as compensation.

  9. Blue moons and Martian sunsets.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Kurt; Chakrabarty, Rajan; Moosmüller, Hans

    2014-03-20

    The familiar yellow or orange disks of the moon and sun, especially when they are low in the sky, and brilliant red sunsets are a result of the selective extinction (scattering plus absorption) of blue light by atmospheric gas molecules and small aerosols, a phenomenon explainable using the Rayleigh scattering approximation. On rare occasions, dust or smoke aerosols can cause the extinction of red light to exceed that for blue, resulting in the disks of the sun and moon to appear as blue. Unlike Earth, the atmosphere of Mars is dominated by micron-size dust aerosols, and the sky during sunset takes on a bluish glow. Here we investigate the role of dust aerosols in the blue Martian sunsets and the occasional blue moons and suns on Earth. We use the Mie theory and the Debye series to calculate the wavelength-dependent optical properties of dust aerosols most commonly found on Mars. Our findings show that while wavelength selective extinction can cause the sun's disk to appear blue, the color of the glow surrounding the sun as observed from Mars is due to the dominance of near-forward scattering of blue light by dust particles and cannot be explained by a simple, Rayleigh-like selective extinction explanation.

  10. Blue moons and Martian sunsets.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Kurt; Chakrabarty, Rajan; Moosmüller, Hans

    2014-03-20

    The familiar yellow or orange disks of the moon and sun, especially when they are low in the sky, and brilliant red sunsets are a result of the selective extinction (scattering plus absorption) of blue light by atmospheric gas molecules and small aerosols, a phenomenon explainable using the Rayleigh scattering approximation. On rare occasions, dust or smoke aerosols can cause the extinction of red light to exceed that for blue, resulting in the disks of the sun and moon to appear as blue. Unlike Earth, the atmosphere of Mars is dominated by micron-size dust aerosols, and the sky during sunset takes on a bluish glow. Here we investigate the role of dust aerosols in the blue Martian sunsets and the occasional blue moons and suns on Earth. We use the Mie theory and the Debye series to calculate the wavelength-dependent optical properties of dust aerosols most commonly found on Mars. Our findings show that while wavelength selective extinction can cause the sun's disk to appear blue, the color of the glow surrounding the sun as observed from Mars is due to the dominance of near-forward scattering of blue light by dust particles and cannot be explained by a simple, Rayleigh-like selective extinction explanation. PMID:24663457

  11. Effect of crossbreeding with Limousine, Rubia Gallega and Belgium Blue on meat quality and fatty acid profile of Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Gonzalo; Iglesias, Antonio; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Sanchez, Luciano; Cantalapiedra, Jesus; Lorenzo, Jose Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The object of this work was to study the effects of crossbreeding on meat quality and fatty acid profile of Holstein calves. Samples were taken from Longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle of 36 calves of three different groups (Holstein crossed with Rubia Gallega (HF×RG), Holstein crossed with Limousine (HF×LI) and Holstein crossed with Belgian Blue (HF×BB)). Significant differences were observed in carcass weight and killing out percentage (P < 0.001) among, groups reaching the highest values in the HF×BB group (228 kg and 59.4%, respectively), while the cross with Limousine presented the lowest values for carcass weight (191 kg) and the cross with Rubia Gallega showed the lowest killing out percentages (54.9%). Meat from HF×RG animals was redder (a* 13.31) and lightest (L* 39.55) than meat from HF×LI and HF×BB groups. With regard to fatty acid profile, the saturated fatty acids were the most abundant fatty acid, followed by monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids in the three groups. Crossbreeding did not affect the proportion of fatty acid. Finally, live weight, cold carcass weight, killing out, shear force, L* from LT, b*from LT, a* from fat, b* from fat, C14:0, C15:0, C16:0, C18:0, C18:3n-6, MUFA and price-to-sales ratio were the selected variables from discriminant analysis to classify the types of crossbreeding.

  12. Exploring the Effects of Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids on Allergy Using a HEK-Blue Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nayyar; Barrow, Colin J.; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2016-01-01

    Background: Allergic reactions can result in life-threatening situations resulting in high economic costs and morbidity. Therefore, more effective reagents are needed for allergy treatment. A causal relationship has been suggested to exist between the intake of omega-3/6 fatty acids, such as docosahexanoic acid (DHA), eicosapentanoic acid (EPA), docosapentanoic acid (DPA) and arachidonic acid (AA), and atopic individuals suffering from allergies. In allergic cascades, the hallmark cytokine IL-4 bind to IL-4 receptor (IL-4R) and IL-13 binds to IL-13 receptor (IL-13R), this activates the STAT6 phosphorylation pathway leading to gene activation of allergen-specific IgE antibody production by B cells. The overall aim of this study was to characterize omega-3/6 fatty acids and their effects on STAT6 signaling pathway that results in IgE production in allergic individuals. Methods: The fatty acids were tested in vitro with a HEK-Blue IL-4/IL-13 reporter cell line model, transfected with a reporter gene that produces an enzyme, secreted embryonic alkaline phosphatase (SEAP). SEAP acts as a substitute to IgE when cells are stimulated with bioactive cytokines IL-4 and/or IL-13. Results: We have successfully used DHA, EPA and DPA in our studies that demonstrated a decrease in SEAP secretion, as opposed to an increase in SEAP secretion with AA treatment. A statistical Student’s t-test revealed the significance of the results, confirming our initial hypothesis. Conclusion: We have successfully identified and characterised DHA, EPA, DPA and AA in our allergy model. While AA was a potent stimulator, DHA, EPA and DPA were potential inhibitors of IL-4R/IL-13R signalling, which regulates the STAT6 induced pathway in allergic cascades. Such findings are significant in the future design of dietary therapeutics for the treatment of allergies. PMID:26861314

  13. Effect of crossbreeding with Limousine, Rubia Gallega and Belgium Blue on meat quality and fatty acid profile of Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Gonzalo; Iglesias, Antonio; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Sanchez, Luciano; Cantalapiedra, Jesus; Lorenzo, Jose Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The object of this work was to study the effects of crossbreeding on meat quality and fatty acid profile of Holstein calves. Samples were taken from Longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle of 36 calves of three different groups (Holstein crossed with Rubia Gallega (HF×RG), Holstein crossed with Limousine (HF×LI) and Holstein crossed with Belgian Blue (HF×BB)). Significant differences were observed in carcass weight and killing out percentage (P < 0.001) among, groups reaching the highest values in the HF×BB group (228 kg and 59.4%, respectively), while the cross with Limousine presented the lowest values for carcass weight (191 kg) and the cross with Rubia Gallega showed the lowest killing out percentages (54.9%). Meat from HF×RG animals was redder (a* 13.31) and lightest (L* 39.55) than meat from HF×LI and HF×BB groups. With regard to fatty acid profile, the saturated fatty acids were the most abundant fatty acid, followed by monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids in the three groups. Crossbreeding did not affect the proportion of fatty acid. Finally, live weight, cold carcass weight, killing out, shear force, L* from LT, b*from LT, a* from fat, b* from fat, C14:0, C15:0, C16:0, C18:0, C18:3n-6, MUFA and price-to-sales ratio were the selected variables from discriminant analysis to classify the types of crossbreeding. PMID:25706373

  14. The blue man: burn from muriatic acid combined with chlorinated paint in an adult pool construction worker.

    PubMed

    O'Cleireachain, Marc R; Macias, Luis H; Richey, Karen J; Pressman, Melissa A; Shirah, Gina R; Caruso, Daniel M; Foster, Kevin N; Matthews, Marc R

    2014-01-01

    Muriatic acid (hydrochloric acid), a common cleaning and resurfacing agent for concrete pools, can cause significant burn injuries. When coating a pool with chlorinated rubber-based paint, the pool surface is initially cleansed using 31.45% muriatic acid. Here we report a 50-year-old Hispanic male pool worker who, during the process of a pool resurfacing, experienced significant contact exposure to a combination of muriatic acid and blue chlorinated rubber-based paint. Confounding the clinical situation was the inability to efficiently remove the chemical secondary to the rubber-based nature of the paint. Additionally, vigorous attempts were made to remove the rubber paint using a variety of agents, including bacitracin, chlorhexidine soap, GOOP adhesive, and Johnson's baby oil. Resultant injuries were devastating fourth-degree burns requiring an immediate operative excision and amputation. Despite aggressive operative intervention and resuscitation, he continued to have severe metabolic derangements and ultimately succumbed to his injuries. We present our attempts at debridement and the system in place to manage patients with complex chemical burns.

  15. Poly(amic acid)-modified biomass of baker's yeast for enhancement adsorption of methylene blue and basic magenta.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun-xia; Li, Bu-hai; Sun, Xiao-mei; Yuan, Jun; Chi, Ru-an

    2010-03-01

    In this study, poly(amic acid)-modified biomass was prepared to improve the adsorption capacities for two cationic dyes, methylene blue and basic magenta. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and potentiometric titration demonstrated that a large number of imide, amine, and carboxyl groups were introduced on the biomass surface, and the concentrations of these functional groups were calculated to be 0.27, 1.08, and 1.08 mmol g(-1) by using the first derivative method. According to the Langmuir equation, the maximum uptake capacities (q(m)) for methylene blue and basic magenta were 680.3 and 353.4 mg g(-1), respectively, which were 13- and sevenfold than that obtained on the unmodified biomass. Adsorption kinetics study showed that the completion of the adsorption process needed only 40 min, which is faster than the common sorbent such as activated carbon and resin. Experimental results showed that pH and ionic strength had little effect on the capacity of the modified biomass, indicating that the modified biomass had good potential for practical use.

  16. Does acute lead (Pb) contamination influence membrane fatty acid composition and freeze tolerance in intertidal blue mussels in arctic Greenland?

    PubMed

    Thyrring, Jakob; Juhl, Bodil Klein; Holmstrup, Martin; Blicher, Martin E; Sejr, Mikael K

    2015-11-01

    In their natural habitats, organisms are exposed to multiple stressors. Heavy metal contamination stresses the cell membrane due to increased peroxidation of lipids. Likewise, sub-zero air temperatures potentially reduce membrane functionality in ectothermal animals. We tested if acute lead (Pb) exposure for 7 days would influence survival in intertidal blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) after exposure to realistic sub-zero air temperatures. A full factorial experiment with five tissue Pb concentrations between 0 and 3500 μg Pb/g and six sub-zero temperatures from 0 to -17 °C were used to test the hypothesis that sub-lethal effects of Pb may increase the lethality caused by freezing in blue mussels exposed to temperatures simulating Greenland winter conditions. We found a significant effect of temperature on mortality. However, the short-term exposure to Pb did not result in any effects of Pb, nor did we find interactions between Pb and temperature. We analysed the relative abundance of major phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in the gill tissue, but we found no significant effect of Pb tissue concentration on PLFA composition. Results suggest that Pb accumulation has limited effects on freeze tolerance and does not induce membrane damage in terms of persistent lipid peroxidation.

  17. Methylene blue adsorption from aqueous solution by activated carbon: effect of acidic and alkaline solution treatments.

    PubMed

    Ijagbemi, Christianah O; Chun, Ji I; Han, Da H; Cho, Hye Y; O, Se J; Kim, Dong S

    2010-01-01

    The removal of Methylene Blue (MB) from aqueous solution using activated carbon (AC) has been investigated. Adsorption experiments were conducted and the maximum adsorption capacity was determined. The effect of experimental parameters such as pH, dye concentration and temperature were studied on the adsorption process. Equilibrium data were mathematically modeled using the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models to describe the equilibrium isotherms at different dye concentrations and temperature. Parameters of best-fit model were calculated and discussed. To understand the mechanism of adsorption, kinetic models were employed to follow the adsorption processes; the pseudo-first-order best described the adsorption of MB onto AC. It was found that pH plays a major role in the adsorption process; adsorption capacity was influenced by the physical and surface chemical properties of carbon and the pH of the solution. 99.0% MB removal was achieved at equilibrium.

  18. Phytoremediation potential of duckweed (Lemna minor L.) in degradation of C.I. Acid Blue 92: artificial neural network modeling.

    PubMed

    Khataee, A R; Movafeghi, A; Torbati, S; Salehi Lisar, S Y; Zarei, M

    2012-06-01

    In present study, the potential of duckweed (Lemna minor L.) for degradation of an azo dye C.I. Acid Blue 92 (AB92) has been investigated. The effect of operational parameters such as initial dye concentration, pH, temperature and amount of plant on the efficiency of biological decolorization process was determined. The reusability of Lemna minor L. in long term repetitive operations was also examined. Growth and some biochemical parameters (photosynthetic pigments content, superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase activity) were used to detect the toxic effects of AB92 on duckweed plant. The biological degradation compounds formed in the present process were analyzed by GC-MS technique. In addition, an artificial neural network (ANN) model was expanded to predict the biological decolorization efficiency. The obtained data indicated that ANN provide realistic predictive performance (R(2)=0.954).

  19. Ascorbic acid enhances oxidative stress tolerance and biological control efficacy of Pichia caribbica against postharvest blue mold decay of apples.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaolan; Zhang, Hongyin; Yang, Qiya; Komla, Mahunu Gustav; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Shuyun

    2014-07-30

    The effect of ascorbic acid (VC) on improving oxidative stress tolerance of Pichia caribbica and biocontrol efficacy against blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum on apples was investigated. P. caribbica showed susceptibility to the oxidative stress in vitro test, and 250 μg/mL VC treatment improved its oxidative stress tolerance. The higher viability exhibited by VC-treated yeast was associated with a lower intracellular ROS level. The activities of antioxidant enzymes of P. caribbica were improved by VC treatment, including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). Additionally, VC-treated yeast exhibited greater biocontrol activity against P. expansum and faster growth when stored at 25 and 4 °C, respectively, compared to the performance of the non-VC-treated yeast. In response to the VC treatment under oxidative stress, several differentially expressed proteins were identified in P. caribbica, and most of the poteins were confirmed to be related to basic metabolism. Therefore, the application of ascorbic acid is a useful approach to improve oxidative stress tolerance of P. caribbica and its biocontrol efficacy on apples. PMID:25029482

  20. Ascorbic acid enhances oxidative stress tolerance and biological control efficacy of Pichia caribbica against postharvest blue mold decay of apples.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaolan; Zhang, Hongyin; Yang, Qiya; Komla, Mahunu Gustav; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Shuyun

    2014-07-30

    The effect of ascorbic acid (VC) on improving oxidative stress tolerance of Pichia caribbica and biocontrol efficacy against blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum on apples was investigated. P. caribbica showed susceptibility to the oxidative stress in vitro test, and 250 μg/mL VC treatment improved its oxidative stress tolerance. The higher viability exhibited by VC-treated yeast was associated with a lower intracellular ROS level. The activities of antioxidant enzymes of P. caribbica were improved by VC treatment, including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). Additionally, VC-treated yeast exhibited greater biocontrol activity against P. expansum and faster growth when stored at 25 and 4 °C, respectively, compared to the performance of the non-VC-treated yeast. In response to the VC treatment under oxidative stress, several differentially expressed proteins were identified in P. caribbica, and most of the poteins were confirmed to be related to basic metabolism. Therefore, the application of ascorbic acid is a useful approach to improve oxidative stress tolerance of P. caribbica and its biocontrol efficacy on apples.

  1. Simultaneous determination of cation exchange capacity and surface area of acid activated bentonite powders by methylene blue sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yener, Nilgün; Biçer, Cengiz; Önal, Müşerref; Sarıkaya, Yüksel

    2012-01-01

    To distinguish the ion exchanged and physically adsorbed methylene blue cations (MB+) on ionic surfaces, acid activated bentonite samples were used as porous adsorbents. A natural calcium bentonite (CaB) sample from Enez/Edirne, Turkey, was acid activated at 90 °C for 16 h with various HCl/CaB ratios. The irreversible exchange and physical adsorption of MB+ cations on the ionic solids have simultaneously occurred. The ion exchanged (mex) and physically adsorbed (mad) MB+ contents were obtained as the values of sorption capacity at c = 0 and the increase to a plateaus of adsorption isotherms, respectively. The mad value was taken to be monolayer adsorption capacity. Cation exchange capacity (CEC) and specific surface area (SMB) for each sample were calculated from the mex and mad values, respectively. Also, the BET specific surface areas (SBET) and pore size distribution were determined from low temperature nitrogen adsorption/desorption data. A linear correlation between the SMB and SBET values was found.

  2. Isolation, characterization, and amino acid sequences of auracyanins, blue copper proteins from the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McManus, J. D.; Brune, D. C.; Han, J.; Sanders-Loehr, J.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Tollin, G.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Three small blue copper proteins designated auracyanin A, auracyanin B-1, and auracyanin B-2 have been isolated from the thermophilic green gliding photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. All three auracyanins are peripheral membrane proteins. Auracyanin A was described previously (Trost, J. T., McManus, J. D., Freeman, J. C., Ramakrishna, B. L., and Blankenship, R. E. (1988) Biochemistry 27, 7858-7863) and is not glycosylated. The two B forms are glycoproteins and have almost identical properties to each other, but are distinct from the A form. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis apparent monomer molecular masses are 14 (A), 18 (B-2), and 22 (B-1) kDa. The amino acid sequences of the B forms are presented. All three proteins have similar absorbance, circular dichroism, and resonance Raman spectra, but the electron spin resonance signals are quite different. Laser flash photolysis kinetic analysis of the reactions of the three forms of auracyanin with lumiflavin and flavin mononucleotide semiquinones indicates that the site of electron transfer is negatively charged and has an accessibility similar to that found in other blue copper proteins. Copper analysis indicates that all three proteins contain 1 mol of copper per mol of protein. All three auracyanins exhibit a midpoint redox potential of +240 mV. Light-induced absorbance changes and electron spin resonance signals suggest that auracyanin A may play a role in photosynthetic electron transfer. Kinetic data indicate that all three proteins can donate electrons to cytochrome c-554, the electron donor to the photosynthetic reaction center.

  3. Indole-3-acetic acid improves postharvest biological control of blue mold rot of apple by Cryptococcus laurentii.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; Chen, Jishuang; Lu, Huangping; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2009-03-01

    Cryptococcus laurentii is a well-known postharvest biocontrol yeast; however, it cannot provide satisfactory levels of decay control when used alone. Here, we evaluated the effects of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), a plant growth regulator, on the biocontrol efficacy of the yeast antagonist C. laurentii against blue mold rot caused by Penicillium expansum in apple fruit. Results showed that the addition of IAA at 20 microg/ml to suspensions of C. laurentii greatly enhanced inhibition of mold rot in apple wounds compared with that observed with C. laurentii alone. The addition of IAA at 20 microg/ml or lower did not influence the population growth of C. laurentii in wounds, but adverse effects were seen on C. laurentii when the concentration of IAA was increased to 200 microg/ml or above in vitro and in vivo. P. expansum infection in apple wounds was not inhibited when the pathogen was inoculated into the fruit wounds within 2 h after application of IAA; however, infection was reduced when inoculated more than 12 h after IAA application. Treatment of wounds with IAA at 20 microg/ml 24 h before pathogen inoculation resulted in significant inhibition of P. expansum spore germination and host infection. Application of IAA at 20 microg/ml also reduced P. expansum infection when it was applied 48 h before pathogen inoculation in the intact fruit. Thus, IAA could reinforce the biocontrol efficacy of C. laurentii in inhibiting blue mold of apple fruit by induction of the natural resistance of the fruit.

  4. Does the marine biotoxin okadaic acid cause DNA fragmentation in the blue mussel and the pacific oyster?

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Moira; O'Halloran, John; O'Brien, Nora M; van Pelt, Frank F N A M

    2014-10-01

    Two bivalve species of global economic importance: the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis and the pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas were exposed in vivo, to the diarrhoetic shellfish toxin okadaic acid (OA), and impacts on DNA fragmentation were measured. Shellfish were exposed using two different regimes, the first was a single (24 h) exposure of 2.5 nM OA (∼0.1 μg/shellfish) and algal feed at the beginning of the trial (T0), after which shellfish were only fed algae. The second was daily exposure of shellfish to two different concentrations of OA mixed with the algal feed over 7 days; 1.2 nM OA (∼0.05 μg OA/shellfish/day) and 50 nM OA (∼2 μg OA/shellfish/day). Haemolymph and hepatopancreas cells were extracted following 1, 3 and 7 days exposure. Cell viability was measured using the trypan blue exclusion assay and remained above 85% for both cell types. DNA fragmentation was examined using the single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. A significant increase in DNA fragmentation was observed in the two cell types from both species relative to the controls. This increase was greater in the pacific oyster at the higher toxin concentration. However, there was no difference in the proportion of damage measured between the two cell types, and a classic dose response was not observed, increasing toxin concentration did not correspond to increased DNA fragmentation. PMID:25440785

  5. Free amino acid pattern in blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) exposed to crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Soini, J.; Rantamaeki, P.

    1985-12-01

    In this study the authors investigated changes of free amino acid levels in different tissues of Mytilus edulis exposed to low concentrations of crude oil in a short term study. This investigation was accomplished in the northern area of the Baltic Sea, in the Archipelago of Turku. In this area the salinity of the sea water varies between 6-7%. Mytilus edulis lives there in its extreme conditions and it is therefore especially sensitive to disturbances in its environment.

  6. Abscisic acid and blue light signaling pathways in chloroplast movements in Arabidopsis mesophyll.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Janowiak, Franciszek; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and phototropins act antagonistically to control stomatal movements. Here, we investigated the role of ABA in phototropin-directed chloroplast movements in mesophyll cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. We analyzed the expression of phototropins at mRNA and protein level under the influence of ABA. PHOT1 mRNA level was decreased by ABA in the dark while it was insensitive to ABA in light. PHOT2 mRNA level was independent of the hormone treatment. The levels of phototropin proteins were down-regulated by ABA, both in darkness and light. No impact of exogenous ABA on amplitudes and kinetics of chloroplast movements was detected. Chloroplast responses in wild type Arabidopsis and three mutants, abi4, abi2 (abscisic acid insensitive4, 2) and aba1 (abscisic acid1), were measured to account for endogenous ABA signaling. The chloroplast responses were slightly reduced in abi2 and aba1 mutants in strong light. To further investigate the effect, abi2 and aba1 mutants were supplemented with exogenous ABA. In the aba1 mutant, the reaction was rescued but in abi2 it was unaffected. Our results show that ABA is not directly involved in phototropin-controlled chloroplast responses in mature leaves of Arabidopsis. However, the disturbance of ABA biosynthesis and signaling in mutants affects some elements of the chloroplast movement mechanism. In line with its role as a stress hormone, ABA appears to enhance plant sensitivity to light and promote the chloroplast avoidance response.

  7. Abscisic acid and blue light signaling pathways in chloroplast movements in Arabidopsis mesophyll.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Janowiak, Franciszek; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and phototropins act antagonistically to control stomatal movements. Here, we investigated the role of ABA in phototropin-directed chloroplast movements in mesophyll cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. We analyzed the expression of phototropins at mRNA and protein level under the influence of ABA. PHOT1 mRNA level was decreased by ABA in the dark while it was insensitive to ABA in light. PHOT2 mRNA level was independent of the hormone treatment. The levels of phototropin proteins were down-regulated by ABA, both in darkness and light. No impact of exogenous ABA on amplitudes and kinetics of chloroplast movements was detected. Chloroplast responses in wild type Arabidopsis and three mutants, abi4, abi2 (abscisic acid insensitive4, 2) and aba1 (abscisic acid1), were measured to account for endogenous ABA signaling. The chloroplast responses were slightly reduced in abi2 and aba1 mutants in strong light. To further investigate the effect, abi2 and aba1 mutants were supplemented with exogenous ABA. In the aba1 mutant, the reaction was rescued but in abi2 it was unaffected. Our results show that ABA is not directly involved in phototropin-controlled chloroplast responses in mature leaves of Arabidopsis. However, the disturbance of ABA biosynthesis and signaling in mutants affects some elements of the chloroplast movement mechanism. In line with its role as a stress hormone, ABA appears to enhance plant sensitivity to light and promote the chloroplast avoidance response. PMID:27486921

  8. Predawn and high intensity application of supplemental blue light decreases the quantum yield of PSII and enhances the amount of phenolic acids, flavonoids, and pigments in Lactuca sativa

    PubMed Central

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of blue light intensity and timing, two cultivars of lettuce [Lactuca sativa cv. “Batavia” (green) and cv. “Lollo Rossa” (red)] were grown in a greenhouse compartment in late winter under natural light and supplemental high pressure sodium (SON-T) lamps yielding 90 (±10) μmol m−2 s−1 for up to 20 h, but never between 17:00 and 21:00. The temperature in the greenhouse compartments was 22/11°C day/night, respectively. The five light-emitting diode (LED) light treatments were Control (no blue addition), 1B 06-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 06:00 to 08:00), 1B 21-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 21:00 to 08:00), 2B 17-19 (Blue at 80 μmol m−2 s−1 from 17:00 to 19:00), and 1B 17-19 (Blue at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 17:00 to 19:00). Total fresh and dry weight was not affected with additional blue light; however, plants treated with additional blue light were more compact. The stomatal conductance in the green lettuce cultivar was higher for all treatments with blue light compared to the Control. Photosynthetic yields measured with chlorophyll fluorescence showed different response between the cultivars; in red lettuce, the quantum yield of PSII decreased and the yield of non-photochemical quenching increased with increasing blue light, whereas in green lettuce no difference was observed. Quantification of secondary metabolites showed that all four treatments with additional blue light had higher amount of pigments, phenolic acids, and flavonoids compared to the Control. The effect was more prominent in red lettuce, highlighting that the results vary among treatments and compounds. Our results indicate that not only high light level triggers photoprotective heat dissipation in the plant, but also the specific spectral composition of the light itself at low intensities. However, these plant responses to light are cultivar dependent. PMID:25767473

  9. Remazol Brilliant Blue R decolourization by the laccase from Trametes trogii.

    PubMed

    Mechichi, Tahar; Mhiri, Nejla; Sayadi, Sami

    2006-08-01

    The decolourization of the recalcitrant dye RBBR by the culture filtrate of Trametes trogii and its isolated laccase was investigated. Both filtrates from Cu-induced cultures as well as purified laccase decolourized the dye RBBR. The purified laccase decolourized the dye down to 97% of 100 mg l(-1) initial concentration of RBBR when only 0.2U ml(-1) of laccase was used in the reaction mixture. The effects of different physicochemical parameters were tested and optimal decolourization rates occurred at pH 5 and at a temperature of 50 degrees C. Decolourization of RBBR occurred in the presence of metal ions which could be found in textile industry effluents. Of all the metal ions tested, FeCl2 was the most inhibiting for the decolourization. HBT was shown to have no effect on the decolourization of RBBR at low concentration, while at a concentration of 5 mM it slightly inhibited decolourization. The presence of aromatic compounds was found to be inhibiting for the decolourization at a concentration of 10 mM, but not at 0.1 mM, while at 1 mM only ortho-diphenols were inhibiting. Probing the effect of methanol it was found that higher concentrations caused a decrease in the decolourization rate of RBBR. The effect of laccase inhibitors on the decolourization of RBBR was tested with L-cysteine, SDS and EDTA. It was demonstrated that L-cysteine was the most inhibiting substrate for the decolourization while SDS was only inhibiting at 10 mM concentration and ETDA was not inhibiting at all tested concentrations.

  10. Nutritional Manipulation of Primate Retinas, V: Effects of Lutein, Zeaxanthin, and n–3 Fatty Acids on Retinal Sensitivity to Blue-Light–Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Felix M.; Snodderly, D. Max; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Schalch, Wolfgang; Koepcke, Wolfgang; Gerss, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Blue-light photooxidative damage has been implicated in the etiology of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The macular pigment xanthophylls lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) and n–3 fatty acids may reduce this damage and lower the risk of AMD. This study investigated the effects of the lifelong absence of xanthophylls followed by L or Z supplementation, combined with the effects of n–3 fatty acid deficiency, on acute blue-light photochemical damage. Methods. Subjects included eight rhesus monkeys with no lifelong intake of xanthophylls and no detectable macular pigment. Of these, four had low n–3 fatty acid intake and four had adequate intakes. Control subjects had typical L, Z, and n–3 fatty acid intake. Retinas received 150-μm-diameter exposures of low-power 476-nm laser light at 0.5 mm (∼2°) eccentricity, which is adjacent to the macular pigment peak, and parafoveally at 1.5 mm (∼6°). Exposures of xanthophyll-free animals were repeated after supplementation with pure L or Z for 22 to 28 weeks. Ophthalmoscopically visible lesion areas were plotted as a function of exposure energy, with greater slopes of the regression lines indicating greater sensitivity to damage. Results. In control animals, the fovea was less sensitive to blue-light–induced damage than the parafovea. Foveal protection was absent in xanthophyll-free animals but was evident after supplementation. In the parafovea, animals low in n–3 fatty acids showed greater sensitivity to damage than animals with adequate levels. Conclusions. After long-term xanthophyll deficiency, L or Z supplementation protected the fovea from blue light–induced damage, whereas adequate n–3 fatty acid levels reduced the damage in the parafovea. PMID:21245404

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of the heterogeneous catalyzed oxidative decolorization of Acid-Blue 92 using bimetallic metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-sharkawy, Rehab G.; El-din, Ahmed S. Badr; Etaiw, Safaa El-din H.

    2011-09-01

    The kinetics study of the oxidative decolorization of Acid-Blue 92 has been investigated by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed with bimetallic metal-organic frameworks. The used metal-organic frameworks (MOF) are [Ph 3SnCu(CN) 2·L] where L = pyrazine (pyz) 1, methylpyrazine (mepyz) 2, 4,4'-bipyridine (bpy) 3, trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene (tbpe) 4 or 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane (bpe) 5. The reaction was followed by conventional UV-Vis spectrophotometer at λmax = 571 nm. The reaction exhibited first-order kinetics with respect to [dye] and [H 2O 2]. The reactivity of the catalysts depends on the type of the medium and thereafter decreases in strong alkaline media. Addition of NaCl enhances the reaction rate. Also, the irradiation of the reaction with UV-light enhanced the rate of AB-92 mineralization by about 86.9%. The reaction was entropy-controlled as confirmed by the isokinetic relationship. A reaction mechanism was proposed with the formation of free radicals as an oxidant.

  12. Extractional spectrophotometric analysis of metronidazole, tinidazole, ornidazole and secnidazole bases through acid-dye complexation using bromothymol blue dye.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Khaled M; Salama, Ismail; Mostafa, Samia; El-Sadek, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    An easy, precise and valid extractional-spectrophotometric technique is described for the assessment of metronidazole (MNZ), tinidazole (TNZ), ornidazole (ONZ) and secnidazole (SNZ) in pure state and in their pharmaceutical formulations. The technique includes first the reduction of above cited drugs using HCl and zinc powder, then the formation of intense yellow colored ion-association complex species (1:3 drug/dye) using bromothymol blue (BTB) in a buffered aqueous acidic medium at pH 3-3.50. The colored products are extracted into dichloromethane and quantitatively determined at 416-420 nm. The experimental operating factors influencing the ion-pairs development were studied and optimized to obtain the maximum color intensity. The Beer plots are obeyed in the concentration ranges 2.50-22.50, 2.50-30, 7.50-35 and 5-30 μgml-1 for MNZ, TNZ, ONZ and SNZ, respectively, with correlation coefficients not less than 0.9995. The proposed technique is recommended for the routine quality control analysis of the investigated drugs in commercial tablets with no observed interference from common pharmaceutical adjuvants. Results of such analysis were statistically validated and through recovery studies, showing excellent agreement with those achieved by the reported techniques. PMID:22186332

  13. Brilliant iridescence of Morpho butterfly wing scales is due to both a thin film lower lamina and a multilayered upper lamina.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, M A; Stavenga, D G

    2016-05-01

    Butterflies belonging to the nymphalid subfamily, Morphinae, are famous for their brilliant blue wing coloration and iridescence. These striking optical phenomena are commonly explained as to originate from multilayer reflections by the ridges of the wing scales. Because the lower lamina of the scales of related nymphalid butterflies, the Nymphalinae, plays a dominant role in the wing coloration, by acting as a thin film reflector, we investigated single blue scales of three characteristic Morpho species: M. epistrophus, M. helenor and M. cypris. The experimental data obtained by spectrophotometry, scatterometry and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that also in the Morpho genus the lower lamina of both the cover and ground scales acts as an optical thin film reflector, contributing importantly to the blue structural coloration of the wings. Melanin pigment has a contrast-enhancing function in a sub-class of ground scales. PMID:27072662

  14. Fast and highly-efficient removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution by poly(styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid)-sodium-modified magnetic colloidal nanocrystal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu-Bei; Lv, Shao-Nan; Cheng, Chang-Jing; Ni, Guo-Li; Xie, Xiao-Wa; Huang, Wei; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic colloidal nanocrystal clusters (MCNCs) modified with different amounts of poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) sodium (PSSMA) have been prepared through simple one-step solvothermal method for removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution. The prepared MCNCs are characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption technique and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Moreover, effects of the solution pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, ionic strength and initial dye concentration on MB adsorption onto the MCNCs are systematically investigated. The PSSMA-modified MCNCs show fast and highly-efficient MB removal capacity, which dramatically depends on the immobilization amounts of PSSMA, solution pH and adsorbent dosage. Their adsorption kinetics and isotherms exhibit that the kinetics and equilibrium adsorptions can be well-described by pseudo-second-order kinetic and Langmuir model, respectively. These magnetic nanocomposites, with high separation efficiency, low production cost and recyclable property, are promising as functional adsorbents for efficient removal of cationic organic pollutants from aqueous solution.

  15. Brilliant camouflage: photonic crystals in the diamond weevil, Entimus imperialis

    PubMed Central

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Michielsen, Kristel; Kuipers, Jeroen; De Raedt, Hans; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    2012-01-01

    The neotropical diamond weevil, Entimus imperialis, is marked by rows of brilliant spots on the overall black elytra. The spots are concave pits with intricate patterns of structural-coloured scales, consisting of large domains of three-dimensional photonic crystals that have a diamond-type structure. Reflectance spectra measured from individual scale domains perfectly match model spectra, calculated with anatomical data and finite-difference time-domain methods. The reflections of single domains are extremely directional (observed with a point source less than 5°), but the special arrangement of the scales in the concave pits significantly broadens the angular distribution of the reflections. The resulting virtually angle-independent green coloration of the weevil closely approximates the colour of a foliaceous background. While the close-distance colourful shininess of E. imperialis may facilitate intersexual recognition, the diffuse green reflectance of the elytra when seen at long-distance provides cryptic camouflage. PMID:22378806

  16. Cystic acne improved by photodynamic therapy with short-contact 5-aminolevulinic acid and sequential combination of intense pulsed light and blue light activation.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy with short-contact 5-aminolevulinic acid (Levulan Kerastick, Dusa Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) and activation by intense pulsed light in an initial treatment and blue light in 3 subsequent treatments has resulted in significant improvement in severity of acne, reduction in the number of lesions, improvement in skin texture, and smoothing of scar edges in an Asian patient with severe (class 4) facial cystic acne and scarring. PMID:16302560

  17. Respiratory, acid-base, and metabolic responses of the Christmas Island blue crab, Cardisoma hirtipes (Dana), during simulated environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Dela-Cruz, J; Morris, S

    1997-01-01

    The dependency of the Christmas Island blue crab, Cardisoma hirtipes, on fresh water for respiratory gas exchange and transport was investigated in laboratory simulations. The gas exchange rates of air-breathing C. hirtipes were similar to those of other land crabs but decreased to 20% in submerged crabs. Crabs with access to air maintained arterial and pulmonary O2 content (CO2) and partial pressure (PO2), while in submerged crabs the PO2 and CO2 rapidly decreased (by 50%). There was no anaerobiosis, but haemolymph glucose concentration and cardiac output decreased when crabs were submersed, which suggests a hypometabolic state. Submersion induced a metabolic rather than a respiratory alkalosis, and since respiratory gas exchange was low, CO2 excretion to water was unimportant. Cardisoma hirtipes haemocyanin (Hc) has high O2 affinity but low pH sensitivity, which facilitates O2 uptake from hypoxic environments. The high Hc-O2 affinity supports O2 loading but may prevent access to a venous O2 reserve. Calcium, magnesium, and urate, but not L-lactate, were effectors of Hc-O2 affinity. In submerged crabs increased circulating urate maintained haemolymph O2 content. The CO2 capacitance and nonbicarbonate buffering of the haemolymph were relatively low. A significant Haldane effect seemed important for CO2 excretion but would require CO2 and O2 exchange to occur at the same organ (gills or lungs). Submersion interferes with respiration and is not needed for haemolymph acid-base balance; thus; C. hirtipes is an air-breathing crab.

  18. Performance, kinetics, and equilibrium of methylene blue adsorption on biochar derived from eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Chen, Dongmei; Wan, Shungang; Yu, Zebin

    2015-12-01

    Biochar derived from eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids at low temperatures was utilized as adsorbent to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed that the carboxyl group was introduced on the biochar surface. Adsorption experiment data indicated that eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric acid showed higher MB adsorption efficiency than that modified with tartaric and acetic acids. Pseudo-second-order kinetics was the most suitable model for describing MB adsorption on biochar compared with pseudo-first-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models. The calculated values of ΔG(0) and ΔH(0) indicated the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the adsorption process. MB adsorption on biochar followed the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacities for eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids were 178.57, 99.01, and 29.94 mg g(-1), respectively, at 35°C.

  19. Blue Note

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2016-07-12

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  20. Blue Note

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Argonne's Murray Gibson is a physicist whose life's work includes finding patterns among atoms. The love of distinguishing patterns also drives Gibson as a musician and Blues enthusiast."Blue" notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale.The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting.

  1. Yang-Yang equilibrium statistical mechanics: A brilliant method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xi-Wen; Chen, Yang-Yang

    2016-03-01

    Yang and Yang in 1969 [J. Math. Phys. 10, 1115 (1969)] for the first time proposed a rigorous approach to the thermodynamics of the one-dimensional system of bosons with a delta-function interaction. This paper was a breakthrough in exact statistical mechanics, after Yang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 19, 1312 (1967)] published his seminal work on the discovery of the Yang-Baxter equation in 1967. Yang and Yang’s brilliant method yields significant applications in a wide range of fields of physics. In this paper, we briefly introduce the method of the Yang-Yang equilibrium statistical mechanics and demonstrate a fundamental application of the Yang-Yang method for the study of thermodynamics of the Lieb-Liniger model with strong and weak interactions in a whole temperature regime. We also consider the equivalence between the Yang-Yang’s thermodynamic Bethe ansatz equation and the thermodynamics of the ideal gas with the Haldane’s generalized exclusion statistics.

  2. Yang-Yang Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics: A Brilliant Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xi-Wen; Chen, Yang-Yang

    C. N. Yang and C. P. Yang in 1969 (J. Math. Phys. 10, 1115 (1969)) for the first time proposed a rigorous approach to the thermodynamics of the one-dimensional system of bosons with a delta-function interaction. This paper was a breakthrough in exact statistical mechanics, after C. N. Yang (Phys. Rev. Lett. 19, 1312 (1967)) published his seminal work on the discovery of the Yang-Baxter equation in 1967. Yang and Yang's brilliant method yields significant applications in a wide range of fields of physics. In this communication, we briefly introduce the method of the Yang-Yang equilibrium statistical mechanics and demonstrate a fundamental application of the Yang-Yang method for the study of thermodynamics of the Lieb-Liniger model with strong and weak interactions in a whole temperature regime. We also consider the equivalence between the Yang-Yang's thermodynamic Bethe ansatz equation and the thermodynamics of the ideal gas with the Haldane's generalized exclusion statistics.

  3. Spectrophotometric investigation of the interactions between cationic (C.I. Basic Blue 9) and anionic (C.I. Acid Blue 25) dyes in adsorption onto extracted cellulose from Posidonia oceanic in single and binary system.

    PubMed

    Ben Douissa, Najoua; Dridi-Dhaouadi, Sonia; Mhenni, Mohamed Farouk

    2016-01-01

    Extracted cellulose from Posidonia oceanica was used as an adsorbent for removal of a cationic (Basic blue 9, BB) and anionic textile dye (Acid blue 25, AB) from aqueous solution in single dye system. Characterization of the extracted cellulose and extracted cellulose-dye systems were performed using several techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta potential and Boehm acid-base titration method. Adsorption tests showed that the extracted cellulose presented higher adsorption of BB than AB in single dye system, revealing that electrostatic interactions are responsible, in the first instance, for the dye-adsorbent interaction. In single dye systems, the extracted cellulose presented the maximum adsorption capacities of BB and AB at 0.955 mmol.g(-1) and 0.370 mmol.g(-1), respectively. Adsorption experiments of AB dye on extracted cellulose saturated by BB dye exhibited the release of the latter dye from the sorbent which lead to dye-dye interaction in aqueous solution due to electrostatic attraction between both species. Interaction of BB and AB dyes were investigated using spectrophotometric analysis and results demonstrated the formation of a molecular complex detected at wavelengths 510 and 705 nm when anionic (AB) and cationic (BB) dye were taken in equimolar proportions. The adsorption isotherm of AB, taking into account the dye-dye interaction was investigated and showed that BB dye was released proportionately by AB equilibrium concentration. It was also observed that AB adsorption is widely enhanced when the formation of the molecular complex is disadvantaged.

  4. Spectrophotometric investigation of the interactions between cationic (C.I. Basic Blue 9) and anionic (C.I. Acid Blue 25) dyes in adsorption onto extracted cellulose from Posidonia oceanic in single and binary system.

    PubMed

    Ben Douissa, Najoua; Dridi-Dhaouadi, Sonia; Mhenni, Mohamed Farouk

    2016-01-01

    Extracted cellulose from Posidonia oceanica was used as an adsorbent for removal of a cationic (Basic blue 9, BB) and anionic textile dye (Acid blue 25, AB) from aqueous solution in single dye system. Characterization of the extracted cellulose and extracted cellulose-dye systems were performed using several techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta potential and Boehm acid-base titration method. Adsorption tests showed that the extracted cellulose presented higher adsorption of BB than AB in single dye system, revealing that electrostatic interactions are responsible, in the first instance, for the dye-adsorbent interaction. In single dye systems, the extracted cellulose presented the maximum adsorption capacities of BB and AB at 0.955 mmol.g(-1) and 0.370 mmol.g(-1), respectively. Adsorption experiments of AB dye on extracted cellulose saturated by BB dye exhibited the release of the latter dye from the sorbent which lead to dye-dye interaction in aqueous solution due to electrostatic attraction between both species. Interaction of BB and AB dyes were investigated using spectrophotometric analysis and results demonstrated the formation of a molecular complex detected at wavelengths 510 and 705 nm when anionic (AB) and cationic (BB) dye were taken in equimolar proportions. The adsorption isotherm of AB, taking into account the dye-dye interaction was investigated and showed that BB dye was released proportionately by AB equilibrium concentration. It was also observed that AB adsorption is widely enhanced when the formation of the molecular complex is disadvantaged. PMID:27148723

  5. Rate of phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue complex formation in acidic persulfate digested sample matrix for total dissolved phosphorus determination: importance of post-digestion pH adjustment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Jia-Zhong

    2008-10-19

    Acidic persulfate oxidation is one of the most common procedures used to digest dissolved organic phosphorus compounds in water samples for total dissolved phosphorus determination. It has been reported that the rates of phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue complex formation were significantly reduced in the digested sample matrix. This study revealed that the intermediate products of persulfate oxidation, not the slight change in pH, cause the slowdown of color formation. This effect can be remedied by adjusting digested samples pH to a near neural to decompose the intermediate products. No disturbing effects of chlorine on the phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue formation in seawater were observed. It is noted that the modification of mixed reagent recipe cannot provide near neutral pH for the decomposition of the intermediate products of persulfate oxidation. This study provides experimental evidence not only to support the recommendation made in APHA standard methods that the pH of the digested sample must be adjusted to within a narrow range of sample, but also to improve the understanding of role of residue from persulfate decomposition on the subsequent phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue formation.

  6. A pilot plant study of the degradation of Brilliant Green dye using ozone microbubbles: mechanism and kinetics of reaction.

    PubMed

    Khuntia, Snigdha; Majumder, Subrata Kumar; Ghosh, Pallab

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation of Brilliant Green dye was performed using ozone microbubbles in a pilot plant scale. Decolourisation was very effective at both acidic and alkaline pH. The colour of the aqueous solution was below detectable limit after 30 min at 1.7 mg/s ozone generation rate. The reaction between the dye and ozone was first-order in nature with respect to both ozone and the dye. The enhancement factor increased with increasing dye concentration. The samples were analysed by the ultra-violet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy. From the GC-MS analysis, 13 intermediates were detected as oxidation products of this dye at various stages of oxidation. The changes in the FTIR spectra showed the destruction of the dye and the formation of new compounds. The oxidation mechanism was divided into two reaction pathways. The mineralisation of Brilliant Green was up to 80% in 60 min, as determined by total organic carbon analysis.

  7. Guard cells in albino leaf patches do not respond to photosynthetically active radiation, but are sensitive to blue light, CO2 and abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Roelfsema, M Rob G; Konrad, Kai R; Marten, Holger; Psaras, George K; Hartung, Wolfram; Hedrich, Rainer

    2006-08-01

    Stomatal openings can be stimulated by light through two signalling pathways. The first pathway is blue light specific and involves phototropins, while the second pathway mediates a response to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). This second pathway was studied with the use of albino Vicia faba plants and variegated leaves of Chlorophytum comosum. Treatment of V. faba with norflurazon (Nf) inhibits the synthesis of carotenoids and leads to albino leaves with guard cells that lack functional green chloroplasts. Guard cells in albino leaf patches of C. comosum, however, do contain photosynthetically active chloroplasts. Stomata in albino leaf patches of both plants did not respond to red light, although blue light could still induce stomatal opening. This shows that the response to PAR is not functioning in albino leaf patches, even though guard cells of C. comosum harbour chloroplasts. Stomata of Nf-treated plants still responded to CO2 and abscisic acid (ABA). The size of Nf-treated guard cells was increased, but impalement studies with double-barrelled microelectrodes revealed no changes in ion-transport properties at the plasma membrane of guard cells. Blue light could hyperpolarize albino guard cells by triggering outward currents with peak values of 37 pA in albino plants and 51 pA in green control cells. Because of the inhibition of carotenoid biosynthesis, Nf-treated V. faba plants contained only 4% of the ABA content found in green control plants. The ABA dose dependence of anion channel activation in guard cells was shifted in these plants, causing a reduced response to 10 microM ABA. These data show that despite the dramatic changes in physiology caused by Nf, the gross responsiveness of guard cells to blue light, CO2 and ABA remains unaltered. Stomata in albino leaf patches, however, do not respond to PAR, but require photosynthetically active mesophyll cells for this response.

  8. Regional characteristics of land use in Northeast and Southern Blue Ridge Province: Associations with acid rain effects on surface-water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liegel, Leon; Cassell, David; Stevens, Donald; Shaffer, Paul; Church, Robbins

    1991-03-01

    The Direct/Delayed Response Project (DDRP) is one of several studies being conducted by the United States Environmental Protection Agency to assess risk to surface waters from acidic deposition in the eastern United States. In one phase of DDRP, land use, wetland, and forest cover data were collected for statistical samples of 145 Northeast lake and 35 Southern Blue Ridge Province stream watersheds in the United States. Land-use and other data then were extrapolated from individual to target watershed populations. Project statistical design allows summarization of results for various subsets of the target population. This article discusses results and implications of the land-use and land-cover characterization for both regions. Forest cover was the primary land use in both regions. In the Northeast, developed (agriculture and urban) land was positively associated with surface-water chemistry values for acid neutralizing capacity, Ca plus Mg, pH, and sulfate in the Pocono/Catskill subregion. Extensive wetlands and beaver activity occur in parts of the Northeast region, whereas topography limits wetland and riparian development in the Southern Blue Ridge Province. Northeast soils have low sulfate adsorption capacity, most watersheds are near sulfur steady state, and lake sulfate concentrations are controlled principally by levels of sulfur deposition. Net annual sulfur retention in Northeast watersheds is positively correlated with occurrence of wetlands and beaver impoundments. In contrast, most Southern Blue Ridge Province soils have high sulfate adsorption capacities, resulting in high net watershed sulfur retention. At the present time, stream sulfate concentrations and percent sulfur retention are controlled principally by soil chemical properties related to adsorption rather than atmospheric deposition and land use.

  9. Pulmonary blue bodies.

    PubMed

    Koss, M N; Johnson, F B; Hochholzer, L

    1981-03-01

    Pulmonary blue bodies are intra-alveolar laminated basophilic concretions of uncertain etiology. Blue bodies were studied in lung biopsy specimens from 10 patients. The patients ranged in age from 47 to 69 years and were predominantly men. Three had a history of overt exposure to environmental dusts such as sawdust and asbestos, and two showed occasional ferruginous bodies in the lung, raising the possibility of pneumoconiosis. In eight cases there was interstitial pneumonitis, which resembled desquamative interstitial pneumonia by light microscopy but which was often seen to be patchy and asymmetrically distributed in the lung by chest x-ray examination. Of two other patients, one had xanthogranulomatous inflammation and the other, necrotizing granulomatous inflammation. Light and electron microscopic, histochemical, microchemical, and x-ray diffraction studies of blue bodies were also performed. Calcium carbonate is a major component of blue bodies and is responsible for their birefringence in unstained sections and ready solubility in acid solutions. Blue bodies also contain a mucopolysaccharide matrix and iron. We offer the hypothesis that blue bodies (calcium carbonate) are a product of histiocytic catabolism.

  10. UV-A light-induced photodegradation of Acid Blue 113 in the presence of Sm-doped ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandiyarajan, Thangaraj; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Karthikeyan, Balasubramanian; Sathishkumar, Panneerselvam; Mansilla, Héctor D.; Contreras, David; Ruiz, José

    2015-05-01

    In this report, optical and photocatalytic degradation of Acid Blue 113 (AB 113) has been investigated in an aqueous heterogeneous media containing pure and Sm-doped ZnO nanostructures which were prepared by a simple wet chemical route. X-ray diffraction measurement confirmed that the prepared nanostructures were in hexagonal wurtzite structure and the dopant Sm ion was incorporated into the Zn lattice. Interesting morphological changes involving a nanosheet-star-spherical transition were observed upon Sm doping and annealing, which were identified through transmission electron microscope. Optical absorption measurements showed an exciton absorption band and a band gap narrowing with respect to the Sm concentrations. The photodegradation of Acid Blue 113 under UV-A radiation by using pure and Sm-doped ZnO nanostructures showed that samarium played an important role in the significant improvement of the photodegradation efficiency and the optimum amount of Sm ion was found to be 1 mmol %. Further, the possible degradation mechanism was proposed herein.

  11. Adsorptive removal of methylene blue by CuO-acid modified sepiolite as effective adsorbent and its regeneration with high-temperature gas stream.

    PubMed

    Su, Chengyuan; Wang, Liang; Chen, Menglin; Huang, Zhi; Lin, Xiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic adsorption of methylene blue dye onto CuO-acid modified sepiolite was investigated. Meanwhile, the equilibrium and kinetic data of the adsorption process were studied to understand the adsorption mechanism. Furthermore, a high-temperature gas stream was applied to regenerate the adsorbent. The results showed that the Langmuir isotherm model was applied to describe the adsorption process. The positive value of enthalpy change indicated that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. In the dynamic adsorption process, the best adsorption performance was achieved when the ratio of column height to diameter was 2.56 and the treatment capacity was 6 BV/h. The optimal scenario for regeneration experiments was the regeneration temperature of 550-650 °C, the space velocity of 100 min(-1) and the regeneration time of 10 min. The effective adsorption of CuO-acid modified sepiolite was kept for 12 cycles of adsorption and regeneration. PMID:27533859

  12. The green-absorbing Drosophila Rh6 visual pigment contains a blue-shifting amino acid substitution that is conserved in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Ernesto; Farrell, David M; Zheng, Lijun; Phistry, Meridee; Bagg, Eve E; Britt, Steven G

    2009-02-27

    The molecular mechanisms that regulate invertebrate visual pigment absorption are poorly understood. Through sequence analysis and functional investigation of vertebrate visual pigments, numerous amino acid substitutions important for this adaptive process have been identified. Here we describe a serine/alanine (S/A) substitution in long wavelength-absorbing Drosophila visual pigments that occurs at a site corresponding to Ala-292 in bovine rhodopsin. This S/A substitution accounts for a 10-17-nm absorption shift in visual pigments of this class. Additionally, we demonstrate that substitution of a cysteine at the same site, as occurs in the blue-absorbing Rh5 pigment, accounts for a 4-nm shift. Substitutions at this site are the first spectrally significant amino acid changes to be identified for invertebrate pigments sensitive to visible light and are the first evidence of a conserved tuning mechanism in vertebrate and invertebrate pigments of this class. PMID:19126545

  13. Enzyme-mediated bacterial biodegradation of an azo dye (C.I. Acid blue 113): reuse of treated dye wastewater in post-tanning operations.

    PubMed

    Senthilvelan, T; Kanagaraj, J; Panda, R C

    2014-11-01

    "Dyeing" is a common practice used to color the hides during the post-tanning operations in leather processing generating plenty of wastewater. The waste stream containing dye as pollutant is severely harmful to living beings. An azo dye (C.I. Acid Blue 113) has been biodegraded effectively by bacterial culture mediated with azoreductase enzyme to reduce the pollution load in the present investigation. The maximum rate of dye degradation was found to be 96 ± 4 and 92 ± 4 % for the initial concentrations of 100 and 200 mg/l, respectively. The enzyme activity was measured using NADH as a substrate. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis was confirmed that the transformation of azo linkage could be transformed into N2 or NH3 or incorporated into complete biomass. Breaking down of dye molecules to various metabolites (such as aniline, naphthalene-1,4-diamine, 3-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 8-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 5,8-diaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) was confirmed by gas chromatography and mass spectra (GC-MS) and mass (electrospray ionization (ESI)) spectra analysis. The treated wastewater could be reused for dyeing operation in the leather processing, and the properties of produced leather were evaluated by conventional methods that revealed to have improved dye penetration into the grain layer of experimental leather sample and resulted in high levelness of dyeing, which helps to obtain the desired smoothness and soft leather properties.

  14. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by the blue pigment VINAMON® Blue BX FW - a phthalocyanine blue in a vinyl glove.

    PubMed

    Weimann, Stefanie; Skudlik, Christoph; John, Swen Malte

    2010-10-01

    A 44-year-old metalworker suffered from severe hand eczema in spite of treatment with corticosteroid ointments. He had been using protective cotton gloves with blue PVC anti-slip dots on the finger tips. On clinical examination, the backs of both hands were erythematous and thickened while the finger tips showed vesicles. There was a positive patch test reaction to the blue PVC dots of an unworn cotton glove at 72, 96, 120 hours. To identify the causative chemicals, we carried out further patch tests using ingredients of the glove and cupric sulfate. The patient reacted to the blue dye VYNAMON(®) Blue BX FW (PB 15) at two concentrations - 10% at 72 and 96 hours, and 50% at 48 and 72 hours. This dye is a very strong and brilliant blue with red-copper tones and resistant to fire and weathering. The cupric-phthalocyanine complexes are used as pigments in cosmetics (e. g. CI 74160, 74180, 74260). To the best of our knowledge, no allergic reactions to this dye have been described, particularly not in gloves.

  15. Hypothesis about brilliant lights by bioluminescent photons in near death experiences.

    PubMed

    Bókkon, István; Salari, Vahid

    2012-07-01

    In near death experiences (NDEs), seeing a brilliant light may arise in the recovery period following cardiac arrest, but the subjects can think that these experiences had happened during the actual period itself. Here we hypothesize a biophysical explanation about the encounter with a brilliant light in NDEs. Accordingly, meeting brilliant light in NDEs is due to the reperfusion that induces unregulated overproduction of free radicals and excited biomolecules among them in numerous parts in the visual system. Unregulated free radicals and excited species can produce a transient increase of bioluminescent photons in different areas of the visual system. If this excess of bioluminescent photon emission exceeds a threshold, they can appear as (phosphene) lights in our mind. In other words, seeing a brilliant light in NDEs may due to bioluminescent photons simultaneously generated in the recovery phase of numerous areas of the visual system and the brain interprets these intrinsic bioluminescent photons as if they were originated from the external visual world. Although our biophysical explanation about brilliant light phenomenon in NDEs can be promising, we do not reject further potential notions.

  16. N-acetylcysteine, Ascorbic Acid, and Methylene Blue for the Treatment of Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning: Still Beneficial?

    PubMed Central

    Gheshlaghi, Farzad; Lavasanijou, Mohamad Reza; Moghaddam, Noushin Afshar; Khazaei, Majid; Behjati, Mohaddeseh; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Intentional and accidental intoxication with aluminium phosphide (ALP) remains a clinical problem, especially in the Middle East region. Considering the high mortality rate besides lack of any recommended first option drug for its treatment, this study was aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), vitamin C (Vit C), and methylene blue; both in isolate and also in combination, for the treatment of ALP intoxication in a rat model. Materials and Methods: In this experimental animal study, 80 male Wistar rats in eight groups were intoxicated with ALP (12.5 mg/kg) and treated with a single dose of NAC (100 mg/kg) or Vit C (500–1,000 mg/kg) or methylene blue (1 mg/kg/5 min, 0.1%) or two of these agents or all three of them (controls were not treated). Rats were monitored regarding the parameters of drug efficacy as increased survival time and reduced morbidity and mortality rate for 3 consecutive days to ensure toxin neutralization. Macroscopic changes were recorded and biopsy sections were taken from brain, cerebellum, kidney, liver, and heart for microscopic evaluation regarding cellular hypoxia. Results: The mean survival times of rats exposed to ALP and treated with VitC + NAC was 210.55±236.22 minutes. In analysis of survival times, there was a significant difference between Group 5 which received VitC + NAC and the other groups (P < 0.01). Serum magnesium levels after death were higher than normal (P = 0.01). Conclusions: Despite the higher survival rate of antioxidant-treated rats compared with controls, this difference was not statistically significant. PMID:26862259

  17. Decolorization and degradation of Disperse Blue 79 and Acid Orange 10, by Bacillus fusiformis KMK5 isolated from the textile dye contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kolekar, Yogesh M; Pawar, Shrikant P; Gawai, Kachru R; Lokhande, Pradeep D; Shouche, Yogesh S; Kodam, Kisan M

    2008-12-01

    The release of azo dyes into the environment is a concern due to coloration of natural waters and due to the toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of the dyes and their biotransformation products. The dye degrading bacterial strain KMK 5 was isolated from the textile dyes contaminated soil of Ichalkaranji, Maharashtra, India. It was identified as Bacillus fusiformis based on the biochemical and morphological characterization as well as 16S rDNA sequencing. KMK 5 could tolerate and degrade azo dyes, Disperse Blue 79 (DB79) and Acid Orange 10 (AO10) under anoxic conditions. Complete mineralization of DB79 and AO10 at the concentration of 1.5g/l was observed within 48h. This degradation potential increased the applicability of this microorganism for the dye removal.

  18. Biodegradation of azo dyes acid red 183, direct blue 15 and direct red 75 by the isolate Penicillium oxalicum SAR-3.

    PubMed

    Saroj, Samta; Kumar, Karunesh; Pareek, Nidhi; Prasad, R; Singh, R P

    2014-07-01

    Soils contaminated with dyes were collected and screened for obtaining potential fungal strains for the degradation of azo dyes. A strain that demonstrated broad spectrum ability for catabolizing different azo dyes viz. Acid Red 183 (AR 183), Direct Blue 15 (DB 15) and Direct Red 75 (DR 75) at 100 mg L(-1) concentration was subsequently identified as Penicillium oxalicum SAR-3 based on 18S and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA gene sequence analysis. The strain has shown remarkably higher levels of degradation (95-100%) for almost all the dyes within 120 h at 30°C at pH 7.0. Notable levels of manganese peroxidase (659.4 ± 20 UL(-1)) during dye decolorization indicated the involvement of this enzyme in the decolorization process. The dyes following decolorization were catabolized as evident by spectroscopic analyses.

  19. Biodegradation of C.I. Acid Blue 92 by Nasturtium officinale: Study of Some Physiological Responses and Metabolic Fate of Dye.

    PubMed

    Torbati, S; Movafeghi, A; Khataee, A R

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of aquatic vascular plant, Nasturtium officinale, for degradation of C.I. Acid Blue 92 (AB92). The effect of operational parameters such as initial dye concentration, plant biomass, pH, and temperature on the efficiency of biological decolorization process was determined. The reusability of the plant in long term repetitive operations confirmed the biological degradation process. The by-products formed during biodegradation process were identified by GC-MS technique. The effects of the dye on several plant physiological responses such as photosynthetic pigments content and antioxidant enzymes activity were investigated. The content of chlorophyll and carotenoids was significantly reduced at 20 mg/L of the dye. The activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were remarkably increased in the plant root verifying their importance in plant tolerance to the dye contamination.

  20. Acid blue 29 decolorization and mineralization by anodic oxidation with a cold gas spray synthesized Sn-Cu-Sb alloy anode.

    PubMed

    do Vale-Júnior, Edilson; Dosta, Sergi; Cano, Irene Garcia; Guilemany, Josep Maria; Garcia-Segura, Sergi; Martínez-Huitle, Carlos Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The elevated cost of anodic materials used in the anodic oxidation for water treatment of effluents undermines the real application of these technologies. The study of novel alternative materials more affordable is required. In this work, we report the application of Sn-Cu-Sb alloys as cheap anodic material to decolorize azo dye Acid Blue 29 solutions. These anodes have been synthesized by cold gas spray technologies. Almost complete decolorization and COD abatement were attained after 300 and 600 min of electrochemical treatment, respectively. The influence of several variables such as supporting electrolyte, pH, current density and initial pollutant concentration has been investigated. Furthermore, the release and evolution of by-products was followed by HPLC to better understand the oxidative power of Sn-Cu-Sb electrodes.

  1. Biodegradation of C.I. Acid Blue 92 by Nasturtium officinale: Study of Some Physiological Responses and Metabolic Fate of Dye.

    PubMed

    Torbati, S; Movafeghi, A; Khataee, A R

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of aquatic vascular plant, Nasturtium officinale, for degradation of C.I. Acid Blue 92 (AB92). The effect of operational parameters such as initial dye concentration, plant biomass, pH, and temperature on the efficiency of biological decolorization process was determined. The reusability of the plant in long term repetitive operations confirmed the biological degradation process. The by-products formed during biodegradation process were identified by GC-MS technique. The effects of the dye on several plant physiological responses such as photosynthetic pigments content and antioxidant enzymes activity were investigated. The content of chlorophyll and carotenoids was significantly reduced at 20 mg/L of the dye. The activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were remarkably increased in the plant root verifying their importance in plant tolerance to the dye contamination. PMID:25409244

  2. Nanocrystalline semiconductor doped rare earth oxide for the photocatalytic degradation studies on Acid Blue 113: A di-azo compound under UV slurry photoreactor.

    PubMed

    Suganya Josephine, G A; Mary Nisha, U; Meenakshi, G; Sivasamy, A

    2015-11-01

    Preventive measures for the control of environmental pollution and its remediation has received much interest in recent years due to the world-wide increase in the contamination of water bodies. Contributions of these harmful effluents are caused by the leather processing, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, textile, agricultural and other chemical industries. Nowadays, advanced oxidation processes considered to be better option for the complete destruction of organic contaminants in water and wastewater. Acid Blue 113 is a most widely used di-azo compound in leather, textile, dying and food industry as a color rending compound. In the present study, we have reported the photo catalytic degradation of Acid Blue 113 using a nanocrystalline semiconductor doped rare earth oxide as a photo catalyst under UV light irradiation. The photocatalyst was prepared by a simple precipitation technique and were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, UV-DRS and FE-SEM analysis. The experimental results proved that the prepared photo catalyst was nanocrystalline and highly active in the UV region. The UV-DRS results showed the band gap energy was 3.15eV for the prepared photo catalyst. The photodegradation efficiency was analyzed by various experimental parameters such as pH, catalyst dosage, variation of substrate concentration and effect of electrolyte addition. The photo degradation process followed a pseudo first order kinetics and was continuously monitored by UV-visible spectrophotometer. The experimental results proved the efficacy of the nanocrystalline zinc oxide doped dysprosium oxide which are highly active under UV light irradiations. It is also suggested that the prepared material would find wider applications in environmental remediation technologies to remove the carcinogenic and toxic moieties present in the industrial effluents.

  3. Nanocrystalline semiconductor doped rare earth oxide for the photocatalytic degradation studies on Acid Blue 113: A di-azo compound under UV slurry photoreactor.

    PubMed

    Suganya Josephine, G A; Mary Nisha, U; Meenakshi, G; Sivasamy, A

    2015-11-01

    Preventive measures for the control of environmental pollution and its remediation has received much interest in recent years due to the world-wide increase in the contamination of water bodies. Contributions of these harmful effluents are caused by the leather processing, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, textile, agricultural and other chemical industries. Nowadays, advanced oxidation processes considered to be better option for the complete destruction of organic contaminants in water and wastewater. Acid Blue 113 is a most widely used di-azo compound in leather, textile, dying and food industry as a color rending compound. In the present study, we have reported the photo catalytic degradation of Acid Blue 113 using a nanocrystalline semiconductor doped rare earth oxide as a photo catalyst under UV light irradiation. The photocatalyst was prepared by a simple precipitation technique and were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, UV-DRS and FE-SEM analysis. The experimental results proved that the prepared photo catalyst was nanocrystalline and highly active in the UV region. The UV-DRS results showed the band gap energy was 3.15eV for the prepared photo catalyst. The photodegradation efficiency was analyzed by various experimental parameters such as pH, catalyst dosage, variation of substrate concentration and effect of electrolyte addition. The photo degradation process followed a pseudo first order kinetics and was continuously monitored by UV-visible spectrophotometer. The experimental results proved the efficacy of the nanocrystalline zinc oxide doped dysprosium oxide which are highly active under UV light irradiations. It is also suggested that the prepared material would find wider applications in environmental remediation technologies to remove the carcinogenic and toxic moieties present in the industrial effluents. PMID:26025644

  4. Europe Unveils 20-Year Plan for Brilliant Future in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Astronomy is enjoying a golden age of fundamental, exciting discoveries. Europe is at the forefront, thanks to 50 years of progress in cooperation. To remain ahead over the next two to three decades, Europe must prioritise and coordinate the investment of its financial and human resources even more closely. The ASTRONET network, backed by the entire European scientific community, supported by the European Commission, and coordinated by the CNRS, today presents its Roadmap for a brilliant future for European astronomy. ESO's European Extremely Large Telescope is ranked as one of two top-priority large ground-based projects. Astronet and the E-ELT ESO PR Photo 43a/08 The E-ELT Europe is a leader in astronomy today, with the world's most successful optical observatory, ESO's Very Large Telescope, and cutting-edge facilities in radio astronomy and in space. In an unprecedented effort demonstrating the potential of European scientific cooperation, all of European astronomy is now joining forces to define the scientific challenges for the future and construct a common plan to address them in a cost-effective manner. In 2007, a top-level Science Vision was prepared to assess the most burning scientific questions over the next quarter century, ranging from dark energy to life on other planets. European astronomy now presents its Infrastructure Roadmap, a comprehensive 20-year plan to coordinate national and community investments to meet these challenges in a cost-effective manner. The Roadmap not only prioritises the necessary new frontline research facilities from radio telescopes to planetary probes, in space and on the ground, but also considers such key issues as existing facilities, human resources, ICT infrastructure, education and outreach, and cost -- of operations as well as construction. This bold new initiative -- ASTRONET -- was created by the major European funding agencies with support from the European Commission and is coordinated by the National Institute

  5. Europe Unveils 20-Year Plan for Brilliant Future in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Astronomy is enjoying a golden age of fundamental, exciting discoveries. Europe is at the forefront, thanks to 50 years of progress in cooperation. To remain ahead over the next two to three decades, Europe must prioritise and coordinate the investment of its financial and human resources even more closely. The ASTRONET network, backed by the entire European scientific community, supported by the European Commission, and coordinated by the CNRS, today presents its Roadmap for a brilliant future for European astronomy. ESO's European Extremely Large Telescope is ranked as one of two top-priority large ground-based projects. Astronet and the E-ELT ESO PR Photo 43a/08 The E-ELT Europe is a leader in astronomy today, with the world's most successful optical observatory, ESO's Very Large Telescope, and cutting-edge facilities in radio astronomy and in space. In an unprecedented effort demonstrating the potential of European scientific cooperation, all of European astronomy is now joining forces to define the scientific challenges for the future and construct a common plan to address them in a cost-effective manner. In 2007, a top-level Science Vision was prepared to assess the most burning scientific questions over the next quarter century, ranging from dark energy to life on other planets. European astronomy now presents its Infrastructure Roadmap, a comprehensive 20-year plan to coordinate national and community investments to meet these challenges in a cost-effective manner. The Roadmap not only prioritises the necessary new frontline research facilities from radio telescopes to planetary probes, in space and on the ground, but also considers such key issues as existing facilities, human resources, ICT infrastructure, education and outreach, and cost -- of operations as well as construction. This bold new initiative -- ASTRONET -- was created by the major European funding agencies with support from the European Commission and is coordinated by the National Institute

  6. An unusually brilliant transient in the galaxy M85.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, S R; Ofek, E O; Rau, A; Cenko, S B; Soderberg, A M; Fox, D B; Gal-Yam, A; Capak, P L; Moon, D S; Li, W; Filippenko, A V; Egami, E; Kartaltepe, J; Sanders, D B

    2007-05-24

    Historically, variable and transient sources have both surprised astronomers and provided new views of the heavens. Here we report the discovery of an optical transient in the outskirts of the lenticular galaxy Messier 85 in the Virgo cluster. With a peak absolute R magnitude of -12, this event is distinctly brighter than novae, but fainter than type Ia supernovae (which are expected in a population of old stars in lenticular galaxies). Archival images of the field do not show a luminous star at that position with an upper limit in the g filter of about -4.1 mag, so it is unlikely to be a giant eruption from a luminous blue variable star. Over a two-month period, the transient source emitted radiation energy of almost 10(47) erg and subsequently faded in the optical sky. It is similar to, but six times more luminous at peak than, an enigmatic transient in the galaxy M31 (ref. 1). A possible origin of M85 OT2006-1 is a stellar merger. If so, searches for similar events in nearby galaxies will not only allow study of the physics of hyper-Eddington sources, but also probe an important phase in the evolution of stellar binary systems.

  7. An unusually brilliant transient in the galaxy M85.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, S R; Ofek, E O; Rau, A; Cenko, S B; Soderberg, A M; Fox, D B; Gal-Yam, A; Capak, P L; Moon, D S; Li, W; Filippenko, A V; Egami, E; Kartaltepe, J; Sanders, D B

    2007-05-24

    Historically, variable and transient sources have both surprised astronomers and provided new views of the heavens. Here we report the discovery of an optical transient in the outskirts of the lenticular galaxy Messier 85 in the Virgo cluster. With a peak absolute R magnitude of -12, this event is distinctly brighter than novae, but fainter than type Ia supernovae (which are expected in a population of old stars in lenticular galaxies). Archival images of the field do not show a luminous star at that position with an upper limit in the g filter of about -4.1 mag, so it is unlikely to be a giant eruption from a luminous blue variable star. Over a two-month period, the transient source emitted radiation energy of almost 10(47) erg and subsequently faded in the optical sky. It is similar to, but six times more luminous at peak than, an enigmatic transient in the galaxy M31 (ref. 1). A possible origin of M85 OT2006-1 is a stellar merger. If so, searches for similar events in nearby galaxies will not only allow study of the physics of hyper-Eddington sources, but also probe an important phase in the evolution of stellar binary systems. PMID:17522679

  8. 2-Pentanone Production from Hexanoic Acid by Penicillium roqueforti from Blue Cheese: Is This the Pathway Used in Humans?

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Graham A.

    2014-01-01

    Production of 2-pentanone, a methylketone, is increased in fasting ketotic humans. Its origin is unknown. We hypothesised that it is formed via β-oxidation of hexanoic acid by the peroxisomal pathway proposed for methylketone-producing fungi and yeasts. We used Penicillium roqueforti cultured on fat (margarine) to investigate 2-pentanone production. Headspace gas of incubates of the mould with a range of substrates was analysed using solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Consistent with the proposed pathway, 2-pentanone was formed from hexanoic acid, hexanoyl-CoA, hexanoylcarnitine, and ethyl-3-oxohexanoic acid but not from ethylhexanoic, 2-ethylhexanoic, octanoic, or myristic acids, octanoylcarnitine, or pentane. However, the products from deuterated (D) hexanoic-D11 acid and hexanoic-2, 2-D2 acid were 9D- and 2D-2-pentanone, respectively, and not 8D- and 1D-2-pentanone as predicted. When incubated under 18O2/14N2, there was only a very small enrichment of [16O2]- with [18O2]-containing 2-pentanone. These are new observations. They could be explained if hydrogen ions removed from hexanoyl-CoA by acyl-CoA oxidase at the commencement of β-oxidation were cycled through hydrogen peroxide and reentered the pathway through hydration of hexenoyl-CoA. This would protect other proteins from oxidative damage. Formation of 2-pentanone through a β-oxidation cycle similar to Penicillium roqueforti would be consistent with observations in humans. PMID:25143966

  9. 77 FR 19744 - Advanced BioPhotonics, Inc., Advanced Viral Research Corp., Brantley Capital Corp., Brilliant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Advanced BioPhotonics, Inc., Advanced Viral Research Corp., Brantley Capital Corp., Brilliant... information concerning the securities of Advanced BioPhotonics, Inc. because it has not filed any...

  10. A novel electrochemical sensor for the analysis of β-agonists: the poly(acid chrome blue K)/graphene oxide-nafion/glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoyun; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2013-09-15

    A novel modified electrode was constructed by the electro-polymerization of 4,5-dihydroxy-3-[(2-hydroxy-5-sulfophenyl)azo]-2,7-naphthalenedisulfonic acid trisodium salt (acid chrome blue K (ACBK)) at a graphene oxide (GO)-nafion modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The characterization of an electrochemically synthesized poly-ACBK/GO-nafion film was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, and the results were interpreted and compared at each stage of the electrode construction. Electrochemical oxidation of eight β-agonists - clenbuterol, salbutamol, terbutaline, ractopamine, dopamine, dobutamine, adrenaline, and isoprenaline, was investigated by CV at the different electrodes. At the poly-ACBK/GO-nafion/GCE, the linear sweep voltammetry peak currents of the eight β-agonists increased linearly with their concentrations in the range of 1.0-36.0 ng mL(-1), respectively, and their corresponding limits of detection (LODs) were within the 0.58-1.46 ng mL(-1) range. This electrode showed satisfactory reproducibility and stability, and was used successfully for the quantitative analysis of clenbuterol in pork samples.

  11. Sequence variation in the coding region of the melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R) is not associated with plumage variation in the blue-crowned manakin (Lepidothrix coronata).

    PubMed

    Cheviron, Z A; Hackett, Shannon J; Brumfield, Robb T

    2006-07-01

    Avian plumage traits are the targets of both natural and sexual selection. Consequently, genetic changes resulting in plumage variation among closely related taxa might represent important evolutionary events. The molecular basis of such differences, however, is unknown in most cases. Sequence variation in the melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R) is associated with melanistic phenotypes in many vertebrate taxa, including several avian species. The blue-crowned manakin (Lepidothrix coronata), a widespread, sexually dichromatic passerine, exhibits striking geographic variation in male plumage colour across its range in southern Central America and western Amazonia. Northern males are black with brilliant blue crowns whereas southern males are green with lighter blue crowns. We sequenced 810 bp of the MC1R coding region in 23 individuals spanning the range of male plumage variation. The only variable sites we detected among L. coronata sequences were four synonymous substitutions, none of which were strictly associated with either plumage type. Similarly, comparative analyses showed that L. coronata sequences were monomorphic at the three amino acid sites hypothesized to be functionally important in other birds. These results demonstrate that genes other than MC1R underlie melanic plumage polymorphism in blue-crowned manakins. PMID:16769631

  12. Draining and salting as responsible key steps in the generation of the acid-forming potential of cheese: Application to a soft blue-veined cheese.

    PubMed

    Gore, Ecaterina; Mardon, Julie; Lebecque, Annick

    2016-09-01

    A disregarded nutritional feature of cheeses is their high acid-forming potential when ingested, which is associated with deleterious effects on consumers' health. This work aimed to characterize the acid-forming potential of a blue-veined cheese during manufacturing to identify the main steps of the process involved in this phenomenon. Sampling was performed on 3 batches at 10 steps of the cheese-making process: reception of raw milk, pasteurization, maturation of milk, coagulation, stirring, draining of the curds, and 4 ripening stages: 21, 28, 42, and 56d. The acid-forming potential of each sample was evaluated by (1) the calculation of the potential renal acid load (PRAL) index (considering protein, Cl, P, Na, K, Mg, and Ca contents), and (2) its organic anion content (lactate and citrate), considered as alkalinizing elements. Draining and salting were identified as the main steps responsible for generation of the acid-forming potential of cheese. The draining process induced an increase in the PRAL index from 1.2mEq/100g in milk to 10.4mEq/100g in drained curds due to the increase in dry matter and the loss of alkaline minerals into the whey. The increase in PRAL value (20.3mEq/100g at d 56) following salting resulted from an imbalance between the strong acidogenic elements (Cl, P, and proteins) and the main alkalinizing ones (Na and Ca). Particularly, Cl had a major effect on the PRAL value. Regarding organic anions, draining induced a loss of 93% of the citrate content in initial milk. The lactate content increased as fermentation occurred (1,297.9mg/100g in drained curds), and then decreased during ripening (519.3mg/100g at d 56). This lactate level probably helps moderate the acidifying potential of end products. Technological strategies aimed at limiting the acid-forming potential of cheeses are proposed and deserve further research to evaluate their nutritional relevance.

  13. Target loads of atmospheric sulfur deposition for the protection and recovery of acid-sensitive streams in the Southern Blue Ridge Province.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Timothy J; Cosby, Bernard J; Jackson, William A

    2011-11-01

    An important tool in the evaluation of acidification damage to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems is the critical load (CL), which represents the steady-state level of acidic deposition below which ecological damage would not be expected to occur, according to current scientific understanding. A deposition load intended to be protective of a specified resource condition at a particular point in time is generally called a target load (TL). The CL or TL for protection of aquatic biota is generally based on maintaining surface water acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) at an acceptable level. This study included calibration and application of the watershed model MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) to estimate the target sulfur (S) deposition load for the protection of aquatic resources at several future points in time in 66 generally acid-sensitive watersheds in the southern Blue Ridge province of North Carolina and two adjoining states. Potential future change in nitrogen leaching is not considered. Estimated TLs for S deposition ranged from zero (ecological objective not attainable by the specified point in time) to values many times greater than current S deposition depending on the selected site, ANC endpoint, and evaluation year. For some sites, one or more of the selected target ANC critical levels (0, 20, 50, 100μeq/L) could not be achieved by the year 2100 even if S deposition was reduced to zero and maintained at that level throughout the simulation. Many of these highly sensitive streams were simulated by the model to have had preindustrial ANC below some of these target values. For other sites, the watershed soils contained sufficiently large buffering capacity that even very high sustained levels of atmospheric S deposition would not reduce stream ANC below common damage thresholds.

  14. Target loads of atmospheric sulfur deposition for the protection and recovery of acid-sensitive streams in the Southern Blue Ridge Province.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Timothy J; Cosby, Bernard J; Jackson, William A

    2011-11-01

    An important tool in the evaluation of acidification damage to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems is the critical load (CL), which represents the steady-state level of acidic deposition below which ecological damage would not be expected to occur, according to current scientific understanding. A deposition load intended to be protective of a specified resource condition at a particular point in time is generally called a target load (TL). The CL or TL for protection of aquatic biota is generally based on maintaining surface water acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) at an acceptable level. This study included calibration and application of the watershed model MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) to estimate the target sulfur (S) deposition load for the protection of aquatic resources at several future points in time in 66 generally acid-sensitive watersheds in the southern Blue Ridge province of North Carolina and two adjoining states. Potential future change in nitrogen leaching is not considered. Estimated TLs for S deposition ranged from zero (ecological objective not attainable by the specified point in time) to values many times greater than current S deposition depending on the selected site, ANC endpoint, and evaluation year. For some sites, one or more of the selected target ANC critical levels (0, 20, 50, 100μeq/L) could not be achieved by the year 2100 even if S deposition was reduced to zero and maintained at that level throughout the simulation. Many of these highly sensitive streams were simulated by the model to have had preindustrial ANC below some of these target values. For other sites, the watershed soils contained sufficiently large buffering capacity that even very high sustained levels of atmospheric S deposition would not reduce stream ANC below common damage thresholds. PMID:21816535

  15. Design, Synthesis, and Photophysical Properties of Pyrroloquinoline-Based Compounds Showing Strong Blue Fluorescence as Potential Dyes for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Carta, Davide; Balasso, Anna; Caliceti, Paolo; Ferlin, Maria Grazia

    2015-11-01

    A small library of 3-ethylpyrrolo[3,2-f]quinoline derivatives was synthesized to identify a novel class of dyes for use in biological studies. According to the spectroscopic analyses performed to evaluate the fluorimetric parameters of quantum yield and brightness, 7-methyl- and 6,7-dimethylpyrroloquinolin(9)one derivatives were found to be the best blue luminescent dyes for biological applications. To enhance the luminescence profiles and to obtain probes that could be conjugated to functional groups of supramolecular drug delivery systems, these compounds were further modified at position 3 to obtain 3-heptanoic acid and 3-aminohexylpyrroloquinolin(9)one methylated derivatives. The most brilliant 6,7-dimethyl-3-aminohexylpyrroloquinolinone hydrochloride was conjugated to pullulan, a biocompatible polysaccharide used to produce colloidal systems for drug delivery. Comparative studies showed that this compound can be properly exploited as a blue fluorescent label in biological investigations, namely cell trafficking and pharmacokinetics/biodistribution studies. These molecules possess higher fluorescence efficiency than commercial dyes in biological media, making them suitable alternatives to commercially available products in current use. PMID:26447862

  16. Hydrophilic and blue fluorescent N-doped carbon dots from tartaric acid and various alkylol amines under microwave irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minghan; Xu, Shusheng; Yang, Zhi; Shu, Mengjun; He, Guili; Huang, Da; Zhang, Liling; Li, Li; Cui, Daxiang; Zhang, Yafei

    2015-09-01

    The desired control of particle size, doping element composition, and surface structure of carbon dots (CDs) are vital for understanding the fluorescence mechanism and exploring their potential applications. Herein, nitrogen-doped CDs (N-doped CDs) have been synthesized with tartaric acid and various alkylol amines (monoethanolamine, biethanolamine and triethanolamine) under microwave irradiation. A systematic investigation was performed to characterize the N-doped CDs. It is found that with increasing nitrogen proportion, the fluorescent quantum yield and lifetime of N-doped CDs increases, whereas cell toxicity decreases. In other words, N-doped CDs synthesized by tartaric acid and monoethanolamine have the highest nitrogen content, the highest fluorescent quantum yield, the longest lifetime and the lowest cell toxicity. A corresponding mechanism has been proposed. Moreover, as-synthesized N-doped CDs have been applied for selectively detecting the Fe3+ ion and writing letters as a fluorescent ink.The desired control of particle size, doping element composition, and surface structure of carbon dots (CDs) are vital for understanding the fluorescence mechanism and exploring their potential applications. Herein, nitrogen-doped CDs (N-doped CDs) have been synthesized with tartaric acid and various alkylol amines (monoethanolamine, biethanolamine and triethanolamine) under microwave irradiation. A systematic investigation was performed to characterize the N-doped CDs. It is found that with increasing nitrogen proportion, the fluorescent quantum yield and lifetime of N-doped CDs increases, whereas cell toxicity decreases. In other words, N-doped CDs synthesized by tartaric acid and monoethanolamine have the highest nitrogen content, the highest fluorescent quantum yield, the longest lifetime and the lowest cell toxicity. A corresponding mechanism has been proposed. Moreover, as-synthesized N-doped CDs have been applied for selectively detecting the Fe3+ ion and writing

  17. Indian Jujuba Seed Powder as an Eco-Friendly and a Low-Cost Biosorbent for Removal of Acid Blue 25 from Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, L. Sivarama; Reddy, A. Sreenath; Zuhairi, W. Y. Wan; Taha, M. R.; Reddy, A. Varada

    2014-01-01

    Indian jujuba seed powder (IJSP) has been investigated as a low-cost and an eco-friendly biosorbent, prepared for the removal of Acid Blue 25 (AB25) from aqueous solution. The prepared biomaterial was characterized by using FTIR and scanning electron microscopic studies. The effect of operation variables, such as IJSP dosage, contact time, concentration, pH, and temperature on the removal of AB25 was investigated, using batch biosorption technique. Removal efficiency increased with increase of IJSP dosage but decreased with increase of temperature. The equilibrium data were analyzed by the Langmuir and the Freundlich isotherm models. The data fitted well with the Langmuir model with a maximum biosorption capacity of 54.95 mg g−1. The pseudo-second-order kinetics was the best for the biosorption of AB25 by IJSP, with good correlation. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy change (ΔG0), standard enthalpy changes (ΔH0), and standard entropy changes (ΔS0) were analyzed. The removal of AB25 from aqueous solution by IJSP was a spontaneous and exothermic adsorption process. The results suggest that IJSP is a potential low-cost and an eco-friendly biosorbent for the AB25 removal from synthetic AB25 wastewater. PMID:25383360

  18. Fabrication of granular activated carbons derived from spent coffee grounds by entrapment in calcium alginate beads for adsorption of acid orange 7 and methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Won; Choi, Brian Hyun; Hwang, Min-Jin; Jeong, Tae-Un; Ahn, Kyu-Hong

    2016-11-01

    Biomass-based granular activated carbon was successfully prepared by entrapping activated carbon powder derived from spent coffee grounds into calcium-alginate beads (SCG-GAC) for the removal of acid orange 7 (AO7) and methylene blue (MB) from aqueous media. The dye adsorption process is highly pH-dependent and essentially independent of ionic effects. The adsorption kinetics was satisfactorily described by the pore diffusion model, which revealed that pore diffusion was the rate-limiting step during the adsorption process. The equilibrium isotherm and isosteric heat of adsorption indicate that SCG-GAC possesses an energetically heterogeneous surface and operates via endothermic process in nature. The maximum adsorption capacities of SCG-GAC for AO7 (pH 3.0) and MB (pH 11.0) adsorption were found to be 665.9 and 986.8mg/g at 30°C, respectively. Lastly, regeneration tests further confirmed that SCG-GAC has promising potential in its reusability, showing removal efficiency of more than 80% even after seven consecutive cycles.

  19. Isolation and molecular identification of lactic acid bacteria and Bifidobacterium spp. from faeces of the blue-fronted Amazon parrot in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Allegretti, L; Revolledo, L; Astolfi-Ferreira, C S; Chacón, J L; Martins, L M; Seixas, G H F; Ferreira, A J P

    2014-12-01

    In Brazil, the blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva) is a common pet. The faecal microbiota of these birds include a wide variety of bacterial species, the majority of which belong to the Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) clade. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in the diversity and abundance of LAB and Bifidobacterium spp. in the cloacae between wild and captive birds and to select, identify and characterise LAB for consideration as a parrot probiotic. Cloacal swabs were collected from 26 wild and 26 captive birds. Bacterial DNA was extracted, and the 16S rRNA genes were amplified. The numbers of PCR-positive Enterococcus, Pediococcus, and Lactobacillus species isolated from wild and captive birds were significantly different (P<0.05). Enterococcus was the most frequently isolated genus, followed by Pediococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus and Bifidobacterium. Enterococcus faecium, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus coryniformis, Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis and Bifidobacterium bifidum were the most frequently isolated species from all birds. This study increases our understanding of the faecal microbiota, and may help to improve the nutrition and habitat management of captive and wild parrots. The bacterial population identified in the faecal microbiota of clinically healthy wild and captive parrots can serve as a database to analyse variations in the gut microbiota of pathogen-infected parrots and to develop probiotics specific to these genera.

  20. Indian jujuba seed powder as an eco-friendly and a low-cost biosorbent for removal of acid blue 25 from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Krishna, L Sivarama; Reddy, A Sreenath; Zuhairi, W Y Wan; Taha, M R; Reddy, A Varada

    2014-01-01

    Indian jujuba seed powder (IJSP) has been investigated as a low-cost and an eco-friendly biosorbent, prepared for the removal of Acid Blue 25 (AB25) from aqueous solution. The prepared biomaterial was characterized by using FTIR and scanning electron microscopic studies. The effect of operation variables, such as IJSP dosage, contact time, concentration, pH, and temperature on the removal of AB25 was investigated, using batch biosorption technique. Removal efficiency increased with increase of IJSP dosage but decreased with increase of temperature. The equilibrium data were analyzed by the Langmuir and the Freundlich isotherm models. The data fitted well with the Langmuir model with a maximum biosorption capacity of 54.95 mg g(-1). The pseudo-second-order kinetics was the best for the biosorption of AB25 by IJSP, with good correlation. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy change (ΔG(0)), standard enthalpy changes (ΔH(0)), and standard entropy changes (ΔS(0)) were analyzed. The removal of AB25 from aqueous solution by IJSP was a spontaneous and exothermic adsorption process. The results suggest that IJSP is a potential low-cost and an eco-friendly biosorbent for the AB25 removal from synthetic AB25 wastewater. PMID:25383360

  1. Mycosporine-like Amino Acids and Other Phytochemicals Directly Detected by High-Resolution NMR on Klamath (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae) Blue-Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Righi, Valeria; Parenti, Francesca; Schenetti, Luisa; Mucci, Adele

    2016-09-01

    This study describes for the first time the use of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on Klamath (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, AFA) blue-green algae directly on powder suspension. These algae are considered to be a "superfood", due to their complete nutritional profile that has proved to have important therapeutic effects. The main advantage of NMR spectroscopy is that it permits the detection of a number of metabolites all at once. The Klamath alga metabolome was revealed to be quite complex, and the most peculiar phytochemicals that can be detected directly on algae by NMR are mycosporine-like amino acids (porphyra-334, P334; shinorine, Shi) and low molecular weight glycosides (glyceryl β-d-galactopyranoside, GalpG; glyceryl 6-amino-6-deoxy-α-d-glucopyranoside, ADG), all compounds with a high nutraceutical value. The presence of cis-3,4-DhLys was revealed for the first time. This molecule could be involved in the anticancer properties ascribed to AFA.

  2. Mycosporine-like Amino Acids and Other Phytochemicals Directly Detected by High-Resolution NMR on Klamath (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae) Blue-Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Righi, Valeria; Parenti, Francesca; Schenetti, Luisa; Mucci, Adele

    2016-09-01

    This study describes for the first time the use of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on Klamath (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, AFA) blue-green algae directly on powder suspension. These algae are considered to be a "superfood", due to their complete nutritional profile that has proved to have important therapeutic effects. The main advantage of NMR spectroscopy is that it permits the detection of a number of metabolites all at once. The Klamath alga metabolome was revealed to be quite complex, and the most peculiar phytochemicals that can be detected directly on algae by NMR are mycosporine-like amino acids (porphyra-334, P334; shinorine, Shi) and low molecular weight glycosides (glyceryl β-d-galactopyranoside, GalpG; glyceryl 6-amino-6-deoxy-α-d-glucopyranoside, ADG), all compounds with a high nutraceutical value. The presence of cis-3,4-DhLys was revealed for the first time. This molecule could be involved in the anticancer properties ascribed to AFA. PMID:27537083

  3. Synergic adsorption in the simultaneous removal of acid blue 25 and heavy metals from water using a Ca(PO3)2-modified carbon.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Gómez, R; Rivera-Ramírez, D A; Hernández-Montoya, V; Bonilla-Petriciolet, A; Durán-Valle, C J; Montes-Morán, M A

    2012-01-15

    We report the simultaneous adsorption of acid blue 25 dye (AB25) and heavy metals (Zn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cd(2+)) on a low-cost activated carbon, whose adsorption properties have been improved via a surface chemistry modification using a calcium solution extracted from egg shell wastes. Specifically, we have studied the removal performance of this adsorbent using the binary aqueous systems: AB25-Cd(2+), AB25-Ni(2+) and AB25-Zn(2+). Multi-component kinetic and equilibrium experiments have been performed and used to identify and characterize the synergic adsorption in the simultaneous removal of these pollutants. Our results show that the presence of AB25 significantly favors the removal of heavy metals and may increase the adsorption capacities up to six times with respect to the results obtained using the mono-cationic metallic systems, while the adsorption capacities of AB25 are not affected by the presence of metallic ions. It appears that this anionic dye favors the electrostatic interactions with heavy metals or may create new specific sites for adsorption process. In particular, heavy metals may interact with the -SO(3)(-) group of AB25 and to the hydroxyl and phosphoric groups of this adsorbent. A response surface methodology model has been successfully used for fitting multi-component adsorption data.

  4. Fabrication of granular activated carbons derived from spent coffee grounds by entrapment in calcium alginate beads for adsorption of acid orange 7 and methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Won; Choi, Brian Hyun; Hwang, Min-Jin; Jeong, Tae-Un; Ahn, Kyu-Hong

    2016-11-01

    Biomass-based granular activated carbon was successfully prepared by entrapping activated carbon powder derived from spent coffee grounds into calcium-alginate beads (SCG-GAC) for the removal of acid orange 7 (AO7) and methylene blue (MB) from aqueous media. The dye adsorption process is highly pH-dependent and essentially independent of ionic effects. The adsorption kinetics was satisfactorily described by the pore diffusion model, which revealed that pore diffusion was the rate-limiting step during the adsorption process. The equilibrium isotherm and isosteric heat of adsorption indicate that SCG-GAC possesses an energetically heterogeneous surface and operates via endothermic process in nature. The maximum adsorption capacities of SCG-GAC for AO7 (pH 3.0) and MB (pH 11.0) adsorption were found to be 665.9 and 986.8mg/g at 30°C, respectively. Lastly, regeneration tests further confirmed that SCG-GAC has promising potential in its reusability, showing removal efficiency of more than 80% even after seven consecutive cycles. PMID:27494099

  5. Time-resolved spectral studies of blue-green fluorescence of artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. Var. Scolymus) leaves: identification of chlorogenic acid as one of the major fluorophores and age-mediated changes.

    PubMed

    Morales, Fermín; Cartelat, Aurélie; Alvarez-Fernández, Ana; Moya, Ismael; Cerovic, Zoran G

    2005-12-14

    Synchrotron radiation and the time-correlated single-photon counting technique were used to investigate the spectral and time-resolved characteristics of blue-green fluorescence (BGF) of artichoke leaves. Leaves emitted BGF under ultraviolet (UV) excitation; the abaxial side was much more fluorescent than the adaxial side, and in both cases, the youngest leaves were much more fluorescent than the oldest ones. The BGF of artichoke leaves was dominated by the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids. A decrease in the percentage of BGF attributable to the very short kinetic component (from 42 to 20%), in the shape of the BGF excitation spectra, and chlorogenic acid concentrations indicate that there is a loss of hydroxycinnamic acid with leaf age. Studies on excitation, emission, and synchronized fluorescence spectra of leaves and trichomes and chlorogenic acid contents indicate that chlorogenic acid is one of the main blue-green fluorophores in artichoke leaves. Results of the present study indicate that 20-42% (i.e., the very short kinetic component) of the overall BGF is emitted by chlorogenic acid. Time-resolved BGF measurements could be a means to extract information on chlorogenic acid fluorescence from the overall leaf BGF.

  6. Color vision: retinal blues.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jamie; Esposti, Federico; Lagnado, Leon

    2012-08-21

    Two complementary studies have resolved the circuitry underlying green-blue color discrimination in the retina. A blue-sensitive interneuron provides the inhibitory signal required for computing green-blue color opponency.

  7. The Blue Bottle Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandaveer, Walter R., IV; Mosher, Mel

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modification of the classic Blue Bottle demonstration that involves the alkaline glucose reduction of methylene blue. Uses other indicators in the classic Blue Bottle to produce a rainbow of colors. (JRH)

  8. Microsecond Deprotonation of Aspartic Acid and Response of the α/β Subdomain Precede C-Terminal Signaling in the Blue Light Sensor Plant Cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Thöing, Christian; Oldemeyer, Sabine; Kottke, Tilman

    2015-05-13

    Plant cryptochromes are photosensory receptors that regulate various central aspects of plant growth and development. These receptors consist of a photolyase homology region (PHR) carrying the oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, and a cryptochrome C-terminal extension (CCT), which is essential for signaling. Absorption of blue/UVA light leads to formation of the FAD neutral radical as the likely signaling state, and ultimately activates the CCT. Little is known about the signal transfer from the flavin to the CCT. Here, we investigated the photoreaction of the PHR by time-resolved step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy complemented by UV-vis spectroscopy. The first spectrum at 500 ns shows major contributions from the FAD anion radical, which is demonstrated to then be protonated by aspartic acid 396 to the neutral radical within 3.5 μs. The analysis revealed the existence of three intermediates characterized by changes in secondary structure. A marked loss of β-sheet structure is observed in the second intermediate evolving with a time constant of 500 μs. This change is accompanied by a conversion of a tyrosine residue, which is identified as the formation of a tyrosine radical in the UV-vis. The only β-sheet in the PHR is located within the α/β subdomain, ∼25 Å away from the flavin. This subdomain has been previously attributed a role as a putative antenna binding site, but is now suggested to have evolved to a component in the signaling of plant cryptochromes by mediating the interaction with the CCT.

  9. Photocatalytic degradation of acid blue 74 in water using Ag-Ag2O-Zno nanostuctures anchored on graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umukoro, Eseoghene H.; Peleyeju, Moses G.; Ngila, Jane C.; Arotiba, Omotayo A.

    2016-01-01

    Water pollution due to industrial effluents from industries which utilize dyes in the manufacturing of their products has serious implications on aquatic lives and the general environment. Thus, there is need for the removal of dyes from wastewater before being discharged into the environment. In this study, a nanocomposite consisting of silver, silver oxide (Ag2O), zinc oxide (ZnO) and graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized, characterized and photocatalytically applied in the degradation (and possibly mineralization) of organic pollutants in water treatment process. The Ag-Ag2O-ZnO nanostructure was synthesized by a co-precipitation method and calcined at 400 °C. It was functionalized using 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane and further anchored on carboxylated graphene oxide via the formation of an amide bond to give the Ag-Ag2O-ZnO/GO nanocomposite. The prepared nanocomposite was characterized by UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and Raman spectroscopy. The applicability of Ag-Ag2O-ZnO/GO nanocomposite as a photocatalyst was investigated in the photocatalytic degradation of acid blue 74 dye under visible light irradiation in synthetic wastewater containing the dye. The results indicated that Ag-Ag2O-ZnO/GO nanocomposite has a higher photocatalytic activity (90% removal) compared to Ag-Ag2O-ZnO (85% removal) and ZnO (75% removal) respectively and thus lends itself to application in water treatment, where the removal of organics is very important.

  10. Evaluation of antioxidant enzymes activities and identification of intermediate products during phytoremediation of an anionic dye (C.I. Acid Blue 92) by pennywort (Hydrocotyle vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Vafaei, Fatemeh; Movafeghi, Ali; Khataee, Alireza

    2013-11-01

    The potential of pennywort (Hydrocotyle vulgaris) for phytoremediation of C.I. Acid Blue 92 (AB92) was evaluated. The effects of various experimental parameters including pH, temperature, dye concentration and plant weight on dye removal efficiency were investigated. The results showed that the optimal condition for dye removal were pH 3.5 and temperature 25 degree C. Moreover, the absolute dye removal enhanced with increase in the initial dye concentration and plant weight. Pennywort showed the same removal efficiency in repeated experiments (four runs) as that obtained from the first run (a 6-day period). Therefore, the ability of the plant in consecutive removal of AB92 confirmed the biodegradation process. Accordingly, a number of produced intermediate compounds were identified. The effect of treatment on photosynthesis and antioxidant defense system including superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase in plant roots and leaves were evaluated. The results revealed a reduction in photosynthetic pigments content under dye treatments. Antioxidant enzyme responses showed marked variations with respect to the plant organ and dye concentration in the liquid medium. Overall, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activity under AB92 stress in the roots was much higher than that in the leaves. Nevertheless, no significant increase in malondialdehyde content was detected in roots or leaves, implying that the high efficiency of antioxidant system in the elimination of reactive oxygen species. Based on these results, pennywort was founded to be a capable species for phytoremediation of AB92-contaminated water, may be effective for phytoremediation dye-contaminated polluted aquatic ecosystems.

  11. Evaluation of antioxidant enzymes activities and identification of intermediate products during phytoremediation of an anionic dye (C.I. Acid Blue 92) by pennywort (Hydrocotyle vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Vafaei, Fatemeh; Movafeghi, Ali; Khataee, Alireza

    2013-11-01

    The potential of pennywort (Hydrocotyle vulgaris) for phytoremediation of C.I. Acid Blue 92 (AB92) was evaluated. The effects of various experimental parameters including pH, temperature, dye concentration and plant weight on dye removal efficiency were investigated. The results showed that the optimal condition for dye removal were pH 3.5 and temperature 25 degree C. Moreover, the absolute dye removal enhanced with increase in the initial dye concentration and plant weight. Pennywort showed the same removal efficiency in repeated experiments (four runs) as that obtained from the first run (a 6-day period). Therefore, the ability of the plant in consecutive removal of AB92 confirmed the biodegradation process. Accordingly, a number of produced intermediate compounds were identified. The effect of treatment on photosynthesis and antioxidant defense system including superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase in plant roots and leaves were evaluated. The results revealed a reduction in photosynthetic pigments content under dye treatments. Antioxidant enzyme responses showed marked variations with respect to the plant organ and dye concentration in the liquid medium. Overall, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activity under AB92 stress in the roots was much higher than that in the leaves. Nevertheless, no significant increase in malondialdehyde content was detected in roots or leaves, implying that the high efficiency of antioxidant system in the elimination of reactive oxygen species. Based on these results, pennywort was founded to be a capable species for phytoremediation of AB92-contaminated water, may be effective for phytoremediation dye-contaminated polluted aquatic ecosystems. PMID:24552049

  12. Adverse reaction; patent blue turning patient blue.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Meera; Hart, Matthew; Ahmed, Farid; McPherson, Sandy

    2012-11-30

    The authors report a severe anaphylactic reaction to Patent Blue V dye used in sentinel node biopsy for lymphatic mapping during breast cancer surgery to stage the axilla. Patent Blue dye is the most widely used in the UK; however, adverse reactions have been reported with the blue dye previously. This case highlights that reactions may not always be immediately evident and to be vigilant in all patients that have undergone procedures using blue dye. If the patients are not responding appropriately particularly during an anaesthetic, one must always think of a possible adverse reaction to the dye. All surgical patients should give consent for adverse reactions to patent blue dye preoperatively. Alternative agents such as methylene blue are considered.

  13. Enhanced decolorization of Solar brilliant red 80 textile dye by an indigenous white rot fungus Schizophyllum commune IBL-06

    PubMed Central

    Asgher, Muhammad; Yasmeen, Qamar; Iqbal, Hafiz Muhammad Nasir

    2013-01-01

    An indigenously isolated white rot fungus, Schizophyllum commune IBL-06 was used to decolorize Solar brilliant red 80 direct dye in Kirk’s basal salts medium. In initial screening study, the maximum decolorization (84.8%) of Solar brilliant red 80 was achieved in 7 days shaking incubation period at pH 4.5 and 30 °C. Different physical and nutritional factors including pH, temperature and fungal inoculum density were statistically optimized through Completely Randomized Design (CRD), to enhance the efficiency of S. commune IBL-06 for maximum decolorization of Solar brilliant red 80 dye. The effects of inexpensive carbon and nitrogen sources were also investigated. Percent dye decolorization was determined by a reduction in optical density at the wavelength of maximum absorbance (λmax, 590 nm). Under optimum conditions, the S. commune IBL-06 completely decolorized (100%) the Solar brilliant red 80 dye using maltose and ammonium sulfate as inexpensive carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively in 3 days. S. commune IBL-06 produced the three major ligninolytic enzymes lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganase peroxidase (MnP) and lacaase (Lac) during the decolorization of Solar brilliant red 80. LiP was the major enzyme (944 U/mL) secreted by S. commune IBL-06 along with comparatively lower activities of MnP and Laccase. PMID:24235871

  14. Blue cures blue but be cautious

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Pranav; Bindra, V. K.; Kapoor, Seema; Jain, Vivek; Saxena, K. K.

    2011-01-01

    Methemoglobinemia is a disorder characterized by the presence of >1% methemoglobin (metHb) in the blood. Spontaneous formation of methemoglobin is normally counteracted by protective enzyme systems, for example, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) methemoglobin reductase. Methemoglobinemia is treated with supplemental oxygen and methylene blue (1–2 mg/kg) administered slow intravenously, which acts by providing an artificial electron acceptor for NADPH methemoglobin reductase. But known or suspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a relative contraindication to the use of methylene blue because G6PD is the key enzyme in the formation of NADPH through pentose phosphate pathway and G6PD-deficient individuals generate insufficient NADPH to efficiently reduce methylene blue to leukomethylene blue, which is necessary for the activation of the NADPH-dependent methemoglobin reductase system. So, we should be careful using methylene blue in methemoglobinemia patient before G6PD levels. PMID:22219589

  15. The Blue Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, J. Joel

    1973-01-01

    Describes some of the advantages of an elementary science activity in which students discover that blowing through a straw into a bromthymol blue solution changes the color to yellow. Directions are provided for preparing the bromthymol blue solution. (JR)

  16. Gospel and Blues Improvisation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smallwood, Richard

    1980-01-01

    The similarities and differences between blues and gospel music are identified and the author suggests that both blues and gospel music have inherent improvisational qualities. Methods of capitalizing on these qualities are presented. Selected readings and recordings are included. (KC)

  17. Greening the Blue Bottle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellman, Whitney E.; Noble, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    Compares the revised Blue Bottle formulation to the classical Blue Bottle. Indicates that the revised formulation gives a somewhat bluer solution, but initially slower reduction when compared to the classical formulation. (Author/KHR)

  18. Blue-green algae

    MedlinePlus

    Blue-green algae” describes a large and diverse group of simple, plant-like organisms found in salt water and some large fresh water lakes. Blue-green algae products are used for many conditions, but so ...

  19. Solvent dependence of ultrafast ground state recovery of the triphenylmethane dyes, brilliant green and malachite green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Yutaka; Ando, Yoshito; Okada, Tadashi

    1999-10-01

    We have studied femtosecond ground state recovery dynamics of the triphenylmethane dyes brilliant green (BG) and malachite green (MG) by pump-probe spectroscopy at the center wavelength of 635 nm with a time resolution of 33 fs. The ultrafast recovery of the ground state bleach was highly nonexponential and depended on the solvent viscosity, although all time constants were shorter than the solvation times obtained from other measurements. We observed a plateau or a rise component in the signal, which indicates an intermediate state. The rise time showed a viscosity dependence, even in the ultrafast time domain. It should be noted that the decay times were always longer for BG than MG, while the rise time did not show a solute dependence. The torsional motion of the amino-substituted phenyl group may be involved in the ultrafast process to the intermediate state, but lack of a solute dependence indicates that only a small conformational change is involved.

  20. BRILLIANT PEBBLES: A METHOD FOR DETECTION OF VERY LARGE INTERSTELLAR GRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Socrates, Aristotle; Draine, Bruce T. E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu

    2009-09-01

    A photon of wavelength {lambda} {approx} 1 {mu}m interacting with a dust grain of radius a{sub p} {approx} 1 mm (a 'pebble') undergoes scattering in the forward direction, largely within a small characteristic diffraction angle {theta}{sub s} {approx} {lambda}/a{sub p} {approx} 100''. Though millimeter-size dust grains contribute negligibly to the interstellar medium's visual extinction, the signal they produce in scattered light may be detectable, especially for variable sources. Observations of light scattered at small angles allow for the direct measurement of the large grain population; variable sources can also yield tomographic information of the interstellar medium's mass distribution. The ability to detect brilliant pebble halos requires a careful understanding of the instrument point-spread function.

  1. High-intensity and high-brightness source of moderated positrons using a brilliant γ beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, C.; Schreckenbach, K.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, large efforts are conducted toward the development of highly brilliant γ beams via Compton back scattering of photons from a high-brilliance electron beam, either on the basis of a normal-conducting electron linac or a (super-conducting) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). Particularly, ERLs provide an extremely brilliant electron beam, thus enabling the generation of highest-quality γ beams. A 2.5 MeV γ beam with an envisaged intensity of 1015 photons s-1, as ultimately envisaged for an ERL-based γ-beam facility, narrow band width (10-3), and extremely low emittance (10-4 mm2 mrad2) offers the possibility to produce a high-intensity bright polarized positron beam. Pair production in a face-on irradiated W converter foil (200 μm thick, 10 mm long) would lead to the emission of 2×1013 (fast) positrons per second, which is four orders of magnitude higher compared to strong radioactive 22Na sources conventionally used in the laboratory. Using a stack of converter foils and subsequent positron moderation, a high-intensity low-energy beam of moderated positrons can be produced. Two different source setups are presented: a high-brightness positron beam with a diameter as low as 0.2 mm, and a high-intensity beam of 3×1011 moderated positrons per second. Hence, profiting from an improved moderation efficiency, the envisaged positron intensity would exceed that of present high-intensity positron sources by a factor of 100.

  2. Why aye-ayes see blue.

    PubMed

    Melin, Amanda D; Moritz, Gillian L; Fosbury, Robert A E; Kawamura, Shoji; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2012-03-01

    The capacity for cone-mediated color vision varies among nocturnal primates. Some species are colorblind, having lost the functionality of their short-wavelength-sensitive-1 (SWS1) opsin pigment gene. In other species, such as the aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis), the SWS1 gene remains intact. Recent studies focused on aye-ayes indicate that this gene has been maintained by natural selection and that the pigment has a peak sensitivity (lambda(max)) of 406 nm, which is -20 nm closer to the ultraviolet region of the spectrum than in most primates. The functional significance behind the retention and unusual lambda(max) of this opsin pigment is unknown, and it is perplexing given that all mammals are presumed to be colorblind in the dark. Here we comment on this puzzle and discuss recent findings on the color vision intensity thresholds of terrestrial vertebrates with comparable optics to aye-ayes. We draw attention to the twilight activities of aye-ayes and report that twilight is enriched in short-wavelength (bluish) light. We also show that the intensity of twilight and full moonlight is probably sufficient to support cone-mediated color vision. We speculate that the intact SWS1 opsin pigment gene of aye-ayes is a crepuscular adaptation and we report on the blueness of potential visual targets, such as scent marks and the brilliant blue arils of Ravenala madagascariensis.

  3. Why aye-ayes see blue.

    PubMed

    Melin, Amanda D; Moritz, Gillian L; Fosbury, Robert A E; Kawamura, Shoji; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2012-03-01

    The capacity for cone-mediated color vision varies among nocturnal primates. Some species are colorblind, having lost the functionality of their short-wavelength-sensitive-1 (SWS1) opsin pigment gene. In other species, such as the aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis), the SWS1 gene remains intact. Recent studies focused on aye-ayes indicate that this gene has been maintained by natural selection and that the pigment has a peak sensitivity (lambda(max)) of 406 nm, which is -20 nm closer to the ultraviolet region of the spectrum than in most primates. The functional significance behind the retention and unusual lambda(max) of this opsin pigment is unknown, and it is perplexing given that all mammals are presumed to be colorblind in the dark. Here we comment on this puzzle and discuss recent findings on the color vision intensity thresholds of terrestrial vertebrates with comparable optics to aye-ayes. We draw attention to the twilight activities of aye-ayes and report that twilight is enriched in short-wavelength (bluish) light. We also show that the intensity of twilight and full moonlight is probably sufficient to support cone-mediated color vision. We speculate that the intact SWS1 opsin pigment gene of aye-ayes is a crepuscular adaptation and we report on the blueness of potential visual targets, such as scent marks and the brilliant blue arils of Ravenala madagascariensis. PMID:24006536

  4. Synthesis and application of photolithographically patternable deep blue emitting poly(3,6-dimethoxy-9,9-dialkylsilafluorene)s.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Jeffrey J; Maier-Flaig, Florian; Wolf, Thomas J A; Unterreiner, Andreas-Neil; Lemmer, Uli; Ozin, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    Poly(silafluorene)s (PSFs) are promising light-emitting materials with brilliant solid-state blue luminescence, high quantum efficiency, excellent solubility, and improved thermal and chemical stability. PSFs are reported to have high electron affinity and conductivity originating from σ*-π* conjugation between the σ*-antibonding orbital of the exocyclic Si-C bond and the π* antibonding orbital of the butadiene fragment, a promising characteristic for improved charge carrier balance in OLEDs. In this paper, we present a protocol for photopatterning derivatives of poly(3,6-dimethoxy-9,9-dialkylsilafluorenes) with resolutions exceeding 10 μm. The procedure begins by converting polymers (Mn = 50-55 kg/mol, PDI = 1.8) with cyclohexenyl and norbornenyl containing side chains to their respective epoxides using the Prilezhaev reaction and m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid (m-CPBA). Using the I-line (365 nm) of a Karl Suss MA6 mask aligner, a 1 s UV light exposure of the photoacid generator (PAG) bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)iodonium hexafluoro-phosphate (DtBPI-PF6) generates sufficient protons to catalyze epoxide ring-opening and form a bridging network of covalent C-O bonds which renders the material insoluble in developing solvents such as toluene or THF. The resultant cross-linked material possess characteristic blue photoluminescence with solid state quantum yields >80%. Polymer films have excellent transparency (with a measured Eg ≈ 3.0 eV). Energy levels determined using cyclic voltammetry were -5.7 and -2.7 eV for HOMO and LUMO, respectively. Additionally, several device applications are demonstrated which incorporate cross-linked films. These include examples of solid state lasing in the region of 420-450 nm from cross-linked films on second order corrugated silica substrates (Λ = 200 nm). OLEDs were also prepared with a cross-linked emitting layer as part of a trilayer device which we report to have a maximum external quantum efficiency of 3.2% at 33 mA/cm(2) and a

  5. Mongolian blue spots

    MedlinePlus

    Mongolian spots; Congenital dermal melanocytosis; Dermal melanocytosis ... Mongolian blue spots are common among persons who are of Asian, Native American, Hispanic, East Indian, and African descent. The color ...

  6. Detection and identification of dyes in blue writing inks by LC-DAD-orbitrap MS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiran; Luo, Yiwen; Yang, Xu; Xiang, Ping; Shen, Min

    2016-04-01

    In the field of forensic questioned document examination, to identify dyes detected in inks not only provides a solid foundation for ink discrimination in forged contents identification, but also facilitates the investigation of ink origin or the study regarding ink dating. To detect and identify potential acid and basic dyes in blue writing inks, a liquid chromatography-diode array detection-Orbitrap mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-Orbitrap MS) method was established. Three sulfonic acid dyes (Acid blue 1, Acid blue 9 and Acid red 52) and six triphenylmethane basic dyes (Ethyl violet, Crystal violet, Methyl violet 2B, Basic blue 7, Victoria blue B and Victoria blue R) were employed as reference dyes for method development. Determination of the nine dyes was validated to evaluate the instrument performance, and it turned out to be sensitive and stable enough for quantification. The method was then applied in the screening analysis of ten blue roller ball pen inks and twenty blue ballpoint pen inks. As a result, including TPR (a de-methylated product of Crystal violet), ten known dyes and four unknown dyes were detected in the inks. The latter were further identified as a de-methylated product of Victoria blue B, Acid blue 104, Acid violet 49 and Acid blue 90, through analyzing their characteristic precursor and product ions acquired by Orbitrap MS with good mass accuracy. The results showed that the established method is capable of detecting and identifying potential dyes in blue writing inks. PMID:26894843

  7. Brilliant high-power diode lasers based on broad area lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, V.; Koesters, A.; Koenig, H.; Strauss, U.

    2008-02-01

    Within the German national research project "Briolas" Osram Semiconductors and Laserline GmbH cooperated in the subproject "Brilasi" which focused mainly on Brilliant Laser Diodes for Industrial Applications. The project was finished in December 2007 and lasted more than three years. Laserline and Osram are investigating the performance of broad area diode lasers with a bar width from 1.0 to 10.0 mm in high brilliance diode laser beam sources. Within the program different fibre coupled laser sources are built up: 1. Fibre coupled diode laser beam source with a Beam Parameter Product (BBP) of 40 mmxmrad built from diode laser bars with 10 mm bar width. 2. Fibre coupled diode laser beam source with a BBP of 20 mmxmrad built from Mini-Bars with a bar width of 3.0 mm and 8 emitters. These Different solutions are characterized regarding the electro optical performance. The laser output characteristics are determined for the diode laser device as well as the complete beam source. Lifetime tests are conducted to determine the long term stability of the prototypes and the different chip material.

  8. Recovery of Salmonella by Using Selenite Brilliant Green Sulfa Enrichment Broth

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiao-tang; Yuo, Chung-Yee; Shen, Hui-Ching; Li, A-Mai; Chen, Chao-yu; Chou, Jui-ling; Huang, Shiao-ping

    1999-01-01

    The efficacy and sensitivity of selenite brilliant green sulfa enrichment (SBG) broth for the isolation of Salmonella from fecal specimens were evaluated by using both clinical and artificially infected (artificial) fecal specimens. An examination of 1,588 clinical fecal specimens found Salmonella in 296 specimens, including 89 cases detected by the direct-plating xylose-lysine-desoxycholate method and an additional 207 cases detected after enrichment with SBG broth. Therefore, the recovery of Salmonella with SBG broth is increased 3.3-fold over that by the direct-plating method alone. Furthermore, the isolation rate of Salmonella is higher when using SBG broth than when using gram-negative (GN) broth or GN broth supplemented with sodium selenite. To determine the sensitivity for the recovery of Salmonella, artificial specimens containing various amounts of Salmonella were prepared and analyzed. The results indicated that the sensitivity is also higher with SBG broth than with GN broth. Moreover, the optimal incubation period for SBG broth can be extended to 24 h. In conclusion, the SBG enrichment method provides a higher recovery rate of Salmonella from fecal specimens. PMID:10565941

  9. Decolorization of synthetic brilliant green carpet industry dye through fungal co-culture technology.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Simpal; Naraian, Ram

    2016-09-15

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of fungal co-culture for the decolorization of synthetic brilliant green carpet industry dye. For this purpose two lignocellulolytic fungi Pleurotus florida (PF) and Rhizoctonia solani (RS) were employed. The study includes determination of enzyme profiles (laccase and peroxidase), dye decolorization efficiency of co-culture and crude enzyme extracts. Both fungi produced laccase and Mn peroxidase and successfully decolorized solutions of different concentrations (2.0, 4.0, 6.0, & 8.0(w/v) of dye. The co-culture resulted highest 98.54% dye decolorization at 2% (w/v) of dye as compared to monocultures (82.12% with PF and 68.89% with RS) during 12 days of submerged fermentation. The lower levels of dyes were rapidly decolorized, while higher levels in slow order as 87.67% decolorization of 8% dye. The promising achievement of the study was remarkable decolorizing efficiency of co-culture over monocultures. The direct treatment of the mono and co-culture enzyme extracts to dye also influenced remarkable. The highest enzymatic decolorization was through combined (PF and RS) extracts, while lesser by monoculture extracts. Based on the observations and potentiality of co-culture technology; further it can be exploited for the bioremediation of areas contaminated with hazardous environmental pollutants including textile and other industry effluents.

  10. Dosimetric characterisation of aqueous solution of brilliant green for low-dose food irradiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Hasan M.; Anwer, Mohammad; Chaudhry, Zahid S.

    2002-03-01

    Dosimetric characterisation of aqueous solution of brilliant green has been studied spectrophotometrically for possible applications in low-dose food irradiation dosimetry. Absorption spectra of unirradiated and irradiated solutions were determined which showed two absorption bands with peaks at 427 and 626 nm and a decrease in absorption as the radiation dose is increased. Radiation-induced bleaching of the dye was measured at wavelengths of maximum absorbance (427 and 626 nm) as well as at 550 and 570 nm. At all these wavelengths, the decrease in absorbance of the dosimeter was linear with respect to the absorbed dose from 20 to 120 Gy. However, the upper dose limit was increased to 200 Gy when the negative logarithm of the absorbance ( - log A ) was plotted versus absorbed dose. The stability of dosimetric solution during post-irradiation storage in dark at room temperature showed that after some initial bleaching within the first 5 h of irradiation the response was stable for about 18 days. The effect of different light and temperature conditions to which a dosimeter may be exposed during commercial irradiation has been discussed.

  11. Blue Ocean Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orem, Donna

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a concept called the "blue ocean thinking strategy," developed by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne, professors at INSEAD, an international graduate school of business in France. The "blue ocean" thinking strategy considers opportunities to create new markets for services, rather than focusing solely on…

  12. Blue Willow Story Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  13. Brilliant Structurally Colored Films with Invariable Stop-Band and Enhanced Mechanical Robustness Inspired by the Cobbled Road.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Wang, Fen; Wang, Lei; Lin, Ying; Zhu, Jianfeng

    2016-08-31

    Recently, structural colors have attracted great concentrations because the coloration is free from chemical- or photobleaching. However, the color saturation and mechanical robustness are generally competitive properties in the fabrication of PCs (photonic crystals) films. Besides, the structure of PCs and their derivatives are easy to be invaded by liquids and lead to band gap shifts due to the change of refractive index or periodicity. To solve those problems, we infiltrate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) into the intervals between regularly arrayed hollow SiO2 nanospheres, inspired by the cobbled road prepared by embedding stone in the bulk cement matrix. Consequently, the as-prepared PCs films show brilliant colors, invariable stop-bands, and excellent mechanical robustness. Moreover, the water contact angle even reached 166° after a sandpaper abrasion test. The combination of brilliant colors, invariable stop-bands, and excellent robustness is significant for potential application in paint and external decoration of architectures. PMID:27509171

  14. The low photo-inactivation rate of bacteria in human plasma II. Inhibition of methylene blue bleaching in plasma and effective bacterial destruction by the addition of dilute acetic acid to human plasma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Cesario, Thomas C; Li, Runze; Er, Ali O; Rentzepis, Peter M

    2015-10-01

    Methylene blue (MB) and other photo-sensitizer molecules have been recognized as effective means for the inactivation of bacteria and other pathogens owing to their ability to photo-generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) including singlet oxygen. These reactive species react with the membrane of the bacteria causing their destruction. However, the efficiency of MB to destroy bacteria in plasma is very low because the MB 660 nm absorption band, that is responsible for the ROS generation, is bleached. The bleaching of MB, in plasma, is caused by the attachment of a hydrogen atom to the central ring nitrogen of MB, which destroys the ring conjugation and forms Leuco-MB which does not absorb in the 600 nm region. In this paper we show that addition of dilute acetic acid, ∼10(-4) M, to human plasma, prevents H-atom attachment to MB, allowing MB to absorb at 660 nm, generates singlet oxygen and thus inactivates bacteria. The mechanism proposed, for preventing MB bleaching in plasma, is based on the oxidation of cysteine to cystine, by reaction with added dilute acetic acid, thus eliminating the availability of the thiol hydrogen atom which attaches to the MB nitrogen. It is expected that the addition of acetic acid to plasma will be effective in the sterilization of plasma and killing of bacteria in wounds and burns.

  15. From blue jeans to blue genes.

    PubMed

    Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka

    2009-03-01

    Cutaneous venous anomalies are common. They are blue and vary in size, number, and location and account for most consultations at specialized interdisciplinary clinics for vascular anomalies. Venous lesions are clinically important because they cause pain, dysfunction, destruction of adjacent tissues, and esthetic concern. Only resection and sclerotherapy are helpful, although not always curative. Understanding etiopathogenesis could help design animal models and develop novel therapeutic approaches. John B. Mulliken, MD, envisioned a project to uncover the genetic basis of an inherited form of venous malformation in a large New England family. Recruitment of 2 young fellows resulted in a collaborative project that unraveled the searched-for gene and its mutation. This was an opening for a new era in vascular anomalies. Two blue genes' mutations were discovered, which account for most, if not all, of the inherited forms of venous anomalies, but other genes as well, for rheologically diverse lesions. Differential diagnosis and management has improved, and animal models are being made. This was achieved through the help of Dr Mulliken, who inspired 2 young investigators in blue jeans to find 2 blue genes.

  16. [Preparation and characterization of Zn/Cr-LDHs and their removal performances of reactive brilliant orange X-GN].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Rong; Wu, Ping-Xiao

    2012-07-01

    Zn/Cr-LDHs with cationic ratios of 1:1 to 1:5 were prepared using the co-precipitation method. After preparation of the layered double hydroxides, 2:1 Zn/Cr-LDHs were calcined at 300, 400 and 500 degrees C in a Muffle furnace for 2 h. The obtained mixed oxides are also called calcined layered double hydroxides (Zn/Cr-LDO). Structures of the obtained materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and BET analysis. Experiments were then carried out to investigate the removal of reactive brilliant orange X-GN by 2:1 Zn/Cr-LDHs and Zn/Cr-LDO under ultraviolet light and in dark conditions. The results showed that the removal capacity of 2:1 Zn/Cr-LDHs was not affected by ultraviolet light. Under the irradiation of ultraviolet light, the removal rate of reactive brilliant orange X-GN by Zn/Cr-LDO was twice as high as that in dark conditions, which demonstrated its photocatalysis property and its removal of reactive brilliant orange X-GN by the combined action of absorption and photocatalysis. PMID:23002623

  17. Preservation of glutamic acid-iron chelate into montmorillonite to efficiently degrade Reactive Blue 19 in a Fenton system under sunlight irradiation at neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhujian; Wu, Pingxiao; Gong, Beini; Yang, Shanshan; Li, Hailing; Zhu, Ziao; Cui, Lihua

    2016-05-01

    To further enhance the visible light responsive property and the chemical stability of Fe/clay mineral catalysts, glutamic acid-iron chelate intercalated montmorillonite (G-Fe-Mt) was developed. The physiochemical properties of G-Fe-Mt were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), etc. The results showed that glutamic acid-iron chelates were successfully intercalated into the gallery of montmorillonite and the intercalated glutamic acid-iron chelate molecules were well preserved. The product G-Fe-Mt displayed excellent catalytic performance in heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction under sunlight irradiation at acidic and neutral pH values. The chelation and the visible light responsiveness of glutamic acid produce a synergistic effect leading to greatly enhanced sunlight-Fenton reaction catalyzed by the heterogeneous G-Fe-Mt under neutral pH. G-Fe-Mt is a promising catalyst for advanced oxidation processes.

  18. Blue ocean strategy.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2004-10-01

    Despite a long-term decline in the circus industry, Cirque du Soleil profitably increased revenue 22-fold over the last ten years by reinventing the circus. Rather than competing within the confines of the existing industry or trying to steal customers from rivals, Cirque developed uncontested market space that made the competition irrelevant. Cirque created what the authors call a blue ocean, a previously unknown market space. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profitable and rapid. In red oceans--that is, in all the industries already existing--companies compete by grabbing for a greater share of limited demand. As the market space gets more crowded, prospects for profits and growth decline. Products turn into commodities, and increasing competition turns the water bloody. There are two ways to create blue oceans. One is to launch completely new industries, as eBay did with online auctions. But it's much more common for a blue ocean to be created from within a red ocean when a company expands the boundaries of an existing industry. In studying more than 150 blue ocean creations in over 30 industries, the authors observed that the traditional units of strategic analysis--company and industry--are of limited use in explaining how and why blue oceans are created. The most appropriate unit of analysis is the strategic move, the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market-creating business offering. Creating blue oceans builds brands. So powerful is blue ocean strategy, in fact, that a blue ocean strategic move can create brand equity that lasts for decades. PMID:15559577

  19. Blue ocean strategy.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2004-10-01

    Despite a long-term decline in the circus industry, Cirque du Soleil profitably increased revenue 22-fold over the last ten years by reinventing the circus. Rather than competing within the confines of the existing industry or trying to steal customers from rivals, Cirque developed uncontested market space that made the competition irrelevant. Cirque created what the authors call a blue ocean, a previously unknown market space. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profitable and rapid. In red oceans--that is, in all the industries already existing--companies compete by grabbing for a greater share of limited demand. As the market space gets more crowded, prospects for profits and growth decline. Products turn into commodities, and increasing competition turns the water bloody. There are two ways to create blue oceans. One is to launch completely new industries, as eBay did with online auctions. But it's much more common for a blue ocean to be created from within a red ocean when a company expands the boundaries of an existing industry. In studying more than 150 blue ocean creations in over 30 industries, the authors observed that the traditional units of strategic analysis--company and industry--are of limited use in explaining how and why blue oceans are created. The most appropriate unit of analysis is the strategic move, the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market-creating business offering. Creating blue oceans builds brands. So powerful is blue ocean strategy, in fact, that a blue ocean strategic move can create brand equity that lasts for decades.

  20. Intense, brilliant micro γ-beams in nuclear physics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Gasilov, S.; Lang, C.; Thirolf, P. G.; Jentschel, M.; Diehl, R.; Schroer, C.; Barty, C. P. J.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2011-06-01

    900, we can obtain small spots for each of the beamlets. While focusing the beamlets to a much smaller spot size, we can bend them effectively with micro wedges to e.g. parallel beamlets. We can monochromatize these γ beamlets within the rocking curve of a common Laue crystal, using an additional angle selection by a collimator to reach a strongly reduced band width of 10-4 - 10-6. We propose the use of a further lens/wedge arrays or Bragg reflection to superimpose the beamlets to a very small total γ beam spot. Many experiments gain much from the high beam resolution and the smaller focal spot. This new γ optics requires high resolution diagnostics, where we want to optimize the focusing, using very thin target wires of a specific nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) isotope to monitor the focusing for the resonance energy. With such beams we can explore new nuclear physics of higher excited states with larger level densities. New phenomena, like the transition from chaotic to regular nuclear motion, weakly-bound halo states or states decaying by tunneling can be studied. The higher level density also allows to probe parity violating nuclear forces more sensitively. This γ optics improves many applications, like a more brilliant positron source, a more brilliant neutron source, higher specific activity of medical radioisotopes or NRF micro-imaging.

  1. Ink-native electrophoresis: an alternative to blue-native electrophoresis more suitable for in-gel detection of enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Keisuke; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kameshita, Isamu; Ishida, Atsuhiko

    2013-09-15

    Blue-native electrophoresis (BNE) is a useful technique for analyzing protein complexes, but the Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) dye used in BNE often hampers in-gel detection of enzymatic activity. Here we report an improved method, termed ink-native electrophoresis (INE), in which Pelikan 4001 fountain pen ink is used as a charge-shifting agent instead of CBB. INE is more suitable than BNE for in-gel detection of protein kinase activity after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and its performance in protein complex separation is comparable to that of conventional BNE. INE may provide a powerful tool to isolate and analyze various protein complexes. PMID:23747281

  2. A practical method to generate brilliant hard x-rays with a tabletop electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Amano, D.; Miyade, H.

    1995-12-31

    With electron storage rings not only synchrotron radiation(SR) but also bremsstrahlung(BS) from a thin target placed in the electron orbit are mechanisms to generate brilliant x-ray beams. The calculated brilliance of BS with a 50 MeV storage ring, which is nearly 10{sup 13} photons/s, mrad{sup 2}, mm{sup 2}, 0.1% band width for 100 keV x-rays, exceeds that of SR from a 1 GeV storage ring. This photon energy spectrum is almost constant and extend up to the electron energy. The reasons for this high brilliance with this new radiation scheme is that the electron beams penetrating the thin target are utilized repeatedly, the narrow angular divergence of BS is determined by the kinematics of relativistic electron as same as SR, and the x-ray source size of the order of 1 {mu}m is determined by the size of thin target instead of electron beam sizes. Continuous injection of electron beam to the storage ring at full energy is the way to keep high and constant beam current. Peak current and repetition rate determine x-ray out put power. Note that the power of x-ray beam is also provided from a RF cavity of the storage ring. In this paper we will report some experimental results and discuss further application on a coherent bremsstrahlung generated from a set of stacked foils placed in the electron orbit of the ring. Resulting from these investigations the photon storage ring which is based on a 50 MeV exact circular electron storage ring could provide wide range of coherent and incoherent radiations from far infrared to hard x-ray in a practical amount of radiation power.

  3. Blue Ribbon Panel Report

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog by the NCI acting director thanking the cancer community for contributing to the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel report, which was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board on September 7.

  4. Utilizing laser interference lithography to fabricate hierarchical optical active nanostructures inspired by the blue Morpho butterfly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Radwanul H.; Faisal, Abrar; Hünig, Ruben; Bartels, Carolin; Wacker, Irene; Lemmer, Uli; Hoelscher, Hendrik

    2014-09-01

    The famous non-iridescent blue of the Morpho butter by is caused by a `Christmas tree' like nanostructure which is a challenge for common fabrication techniques. Here, we introduce a method to fabricate this complex morphology utilizing dual beam interference lithography. We add a reflective coating below the photoresist to create a second interference pattern in vertical direction by exploiting the back reflection from the substrate. This vertical pattern exposes the lamella structure into the photosensitive polymer while the horizontal interference pattern determines the distance of the ridges. The photosensitive polymer is chosen accordingly to create the Christmas tree' like tapered shape. The resulting artificial Morpho replica shows brilliant non-iridescent blue up to an incident angle of 40. Its optical properties are close to the original Morpho structure because the refractive index of the polymer is close to chitin. Moreover, the biomimetic surface is water repellent with a contact angle of 110.

  5. An anion channel in Arabidopsis hypocotyls activated by blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, M. H.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A rapid, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane in seedling stems is one of the earliest effects of blue light detected in plants. It appears to play a role in transducing blue light into inhibition of hypocotyl (stem) elongation, and perhaps other responses. The possibility that activation of a Cl- conductance is part of the depolarization mechanism was raised previously and addressed here. By patch clamping hypocotyl cells isolated from dark-grown (etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings, blue light was found to activate an anion channel residing at the plasma membrane. An anion-channel blocker commonly known as NPPB 15-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid] potently and reversibly blocked this anion channel. NPPB also blocked the blue-light-induced depolarization in vivo and decreased the inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation. These results indicate that activation of this anion channel plays a role in transducing blue light into growth inhibition.

  6. Determination of green, blue and yellow artificial food colorants and their abuse in herb-coloured green Easter beers on tap.

    PubMed

    Stachová, Ivana; Lhotská, Ivona; Solich, Petr; Šatínský, Dalibor

    2016-07-01

    Beer is one of the most popular alcoholic beverages worldwide. For consumer acceptance, significant factors are its taste, flavour and colour. This study determines selected synthetic green, blue and yellow food colorants in popular Easter herb-coloured green beers on tap produced in breweries on Holy Thursday. The abuse of beer colouring with Tartrazine (E 102), Quinoline yellow (E 104), Sunset yellow (E 110), Patent blue (E 131), Indigo carmine (E 132), Brilliant blue FCF (E 133), Green S (E 142) and Fast green FCF (E 143) was assessed in 11 green beer samples purchased in local restaurants. HPLC was used for the separation and detection of artificial colorants with diode-array detection and a Chromolith Performance CN 100 × 4.6 mm column with guard pre-column Chromolith CN 5 × 4.6 mm. Separation was performed in gradient elution with mobile phase containing methanol-aqueous 2% ammonium acetate at pH 7.0. The study showed that eight beers (70%) marketed in the Czech Republic contained artificial colorants (Tartrazine and Brilliant blue FCF). The concentration of colorants found in analysed green herb-coloured beers ranged from 1.58 to 3.49 mg l(-)(1) for Tartrazine, 0.45-2.18 mg l(-)(1) for Brilliant blue, while Indigo carmine was detected only once at concentration 2.36 mg l(-)(1). Only three beers showed no addition of the synthetic colorants. However, the levels of artificial colorants found in beers marketed in the Czech region were very low and did not show a serious risk for consumers' health. PMID:27295128

  7. Determination of green, blue and yellow artificial food colorants and their abuse in herb-coloured green Easter beers on tap.

    PubMed

    Stachová, Ivana; Lhotská, Ivona; Solich, Petr; Šatínský, Dalibor

    2016-07-01

    Beer is one of the most popular alcoholic beverages worldwide. For consumer acceptance, significant factors are its taste, flavour and colour. This study determines selected synthetic green, blue and yellow food colorants in popular Easter herb-coloured green beers on tap produced in breweries on Holy Thursday. The abuse of beer colouring with Tartrazine (E 102), Quinoline yellow (E 104), Sunset yellow (E 110), Patent blue (E 131), Indigo carmine (E 132), Brilliant blue FCF (E 133), Green S (E 142) and Fast green FCF (E 143) was assessed in 11 green beer samples purchased in local restaurants. HPLC was used for the separation and detection of artificial colorants with diode-array detection and a Chromolith Performance CN 100 × 4.6 mm column with guard pre-column Chromolith CN 5 × 4.6 mm. Separation was performed in gradient elution with mobile phase containing methanol-aqueous 2% ammonium acetate at pH 7.0. The study showed that eight beers (70%) marketed in the Czech Republic contained artificial colorants (Tartrazine and Brilliant blue FCF). The concentration of colorants found in analysed green herb-coloured beers ranged from 1.58 to 3.49 mg l(-)(1) for Tartrazine, 0.45-2.18 mg l(-)(1) for Brilliant blue, while Indigo carmine was detected only once at concentration 2.36 mg l(-)(1). Only three beers showed no addition of the synthetic colorants. However, the levels of artificial colorants found in beers marketed in the Czech region were very low and did not show a serious risk for consumers' health.

  8. Prophylaxis and reversal of ifosfamide encephalopathy with methylene-blue.

    PubMed

    Küpfer, A; Aeschlimann, C; Wermuth, B; Cerny, T

    1994-03-26

    The antineoplastic ifosfamide produces dose-dependent signs of neurotoxicity. After ifosfamide overdose in a patient, we found excessive urinary excretion of glutaric acid and sarcosine, which is compatible with glutaric aciduria type II, a defect in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation that results from defective electron transfer to flavoproteins. We therefore used the electron-accepting drug methylene-blue as an antidote for ifosfamide encephalopathy. In one patient, ifosfamide neurotoxicity was rapidly reversed by methylene-blue 50 mg intravenously. In another patient with previous episodes of ifosfamide encephalopathy, methylene-blue was administered orally prophylactically. No symptoms of neurotoxicity were noted.

  9. Microsporidia and Candida spores: their discrimination by Calcofluor, trichrome-blue and methylene-blue combination staining.

    PubMed

    Schottelius, J; Kuhn, E M; Enriquez, R

    2000-06-01

    Faeces of immunocompromised patients are often contaminated with the chitin-containing spores of microsporidia and Candida, which exclude the use of the chitin-specific fluorescent brightener Calcofluor white M2R for the identification of microsporidian spores. We developed a combination staining of Calcofluor white M2R with modified trichrome-blue staining and subsequent methylene-blue incubation which permits discrimination between these two types of spores. As a basis for diagnosis, a difference in the fluorescence pattern (365-440 nm) is combined with a difference in the light microscopic staining pattern. Under fluorescence conditions microsporidia spores have a spotted, brilliant white Calcofluor fluorescence and can easily be identified, while Candida spores show a reddish purple colour. Under the light microscope microsporidian spores show a light red colour with nonstained vacuole spots or strips in contrast to the yeast spores with their red-brown colour. This combination technique offers a highly specific means for the diagnosis of microsporidia spores in faeces.

  10. Exploring the ability of Sphingobacterium sp. ATM to degrade textile dye Direct Blue GLL, mixture of dyes and textile effluent and production of polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid using waste biomass generated after dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kurade, Mayur B; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Joshi, Swati M; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2010-10-15

    The degradation of textile effluent using microorganisms has been studied extensively, but disposal of generated biomass after dye degradation is a serious problem. Among all tested microorganisms, isolated Sphingobacterium sp. ATM effectively decolorized (100%) the dye Direct Blue GLL (DBGLL) and simultaneously it produced (64%) polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid (PHD). The organism decolorized DBGLL at 300 mg l(-1) concentration within 24 h of dye addition and gave optimum production of PHD. The organism also decolorized three combinations of mixture of dyes. The organism decolorized textile effluent too when it was combined with medium. The organism produced a maximum of 66% and 61% PHD while decolorizing mixture of dyes and textile effluent respectively. Molasses was found to be more significant within all carbon sources used. The activity of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase was found to be higher after 24 h of addition of DBGLL. The enzymes responsible for dye degradation, viz. veratryl alcohol oxidase, laccase, DCIP (2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol) reductase, riboflavin reductase, and azo reductase were found to be induced during decolorization process of DBGLL and mixture of dyes. There was significant reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD). FTIR analysis of samples before and after decolorization of dye confirmed the biotransformation of DBGLL.

  11. Structural Insights into 2,2′-Azino-Bis(3-Ethylbenzothiazoline-6-Sulfonic Acid) (ABTS)-Mediated Degradation of Reactive Blue 21 by Engineered Cyathus bulleri Laccase and Characterization of Degradation Products

    PubMed Central

    Kenzom, T.; Srivastava, P.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes are currently used for the treatment of different reactive dyes which involve use of toxic catalysts. Peroxidases are reported to be effective on such dyes and require hydrogen peroxide and/or metal ions. Cyathus bulleri laccase, expressed in Pichia pastoris, catalyzes efficient degradation (78 to 85%) of reactive azo dyes (reactive black 5, reactive orange 16, and reactive red 198) in the presence of synthetic mediator ABTS [2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)]. This laccase was engineered to degrade effectively reactive blue 21 (RB21), a phthalocyanine dye reported to be decolorized only by peroxidases. The 816-bp segment (toward the C terminus) of the lcc gene was subjected to random mutagenesis and enzyme variants (Lcc35, Lcc61, and Lcc62) were selected based on increased ABTS oxidizing ability. Around 78 to 95% decolorization of RB21 was observed with the ABTS-supplemented Lcc variants in 30 min. Analysis of the degradation products by mass spectrometry indicated the formation of several low-molecular-weight compounds. Mapping the mutations on the modeled structure implicated residues both near and far from the T1 Cu site that affected the catalytic efficiency of the mutant enzymes on ABTS and, in turn, the rate of oxidation of RB21. Several inactive clones were also mapped. The importance of geometry as well as electronic changes on the reactivity of laccases was indicated. PMID:25261507

  12. Structural insights into 2,2'-azino-Bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS)-mediated degradation of reactive blue 21 by engineered Cyathus bulleri Laccase and characterization of degradation products.

    PubMed

    Kenzom, T; Srivastava, P; Mishra, S

    2014-12-01

    Advanced oxidation processes are currently used for the treatment of different reactive dyes which involve use of toxic catalysts. Peroxidases are reported to be effective on such dyes and require hydrogen peroxide and/or metal ions. Cyathus bulleri laccase, expressed in Pichia pastoris, catalyzes efficient degradation (78 to 85%) of reactive azo dyes (reactive black 5, reactive orange 16, and reactive red 198) in the presence of synthetic mediator ABTS [2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)]. This laccase was engineered to degrade effectively reactive blue 21 (RB21), a phthalocyanine dye reported to be decolorized only by peroxidases. The 816-bp segment (toward the C terminus) of the lcc gene was subjected to random mutagenesis and enzyme variants (Lcc35, Lcc61, and Lcc62) were selected based on increased ABTS oxidizing ability. Around 78 to 95% decolorization of RB21 was observed with the ABTS-supplemented Lcc variants in 30 min. Analysis of the degradation products by mass spectrometry indicated the formation of several low-molecular-weight compounds. Mapping the mutations on the modeled structure implicated residues both near and far from the T1 Cu site that affected the catalytic efficiency of the mutant enzymes on ABTS and, in turn, the rate of oxidation of RB21. Several inactive clones were also mapped. The importance of geometry as well as electronic changes on the reactivity of laccases was indicated.

  13. Structural insights into 2,2'-azino-Bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS)-mediated degradation of reactive blue 21 by engineered Cyathus bulleri Laccase and characterization of degradation products.

    PubMed

    Kenzom, T; Srivastava, P; Mishra, S

    2014-12-01

    Advanced oxidation processes are currently used for the treatment of different reactive dyes which involve use of toxic catalysts. Peroxidases are reported to be effective on such dyes and require hydrogen peroxide and/or metal ions. Cyathus bulleri laccase, expressed in Pichia pastoris, catalyzes efficient degradation (78 to 85%) of reactive azo dyes (reactive black 5, reactive orange 16, and reactive red 198) in the presence of synthetic mediator ABTS [2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)]. This laccase was engineered to degrade effectively reactive blue 21 (RB21), a phthalocyanine dye reported to be decolorized only by peroxidases. The 816-bp segment (toward the C terminus) of the lcc gene was subjected to random mutagenesis and enzyme variants (Lcc35, Lcc61, and Lcc62) were selected based on increased ABTS oxidizing ability. Around 78 to 95% decolorization of RB21 was observed with the ABTS-supplemented Lcc variants in 30 min. Analysis of the degradation products by mass spectrometry indicated the formation of several low-molecular-weight compounds. Mapping the mutations on the modeled structure implicated residues both near and far from the T1 Cu site that affected the catalytic efficiency of the mutant enzymes on ABTS and, in turn, the rate of oxidation of RB21. Several inactive clones were also mapped. The importance of geometry as well as electronic changes on the reactivity of laccases was indicated. PMID:25261507

  14. Exploring the ability of Sphingobacterium sp. ATM to degrade textile dye Direct Blue GLL, mixture of dyes and textile effluent and production of polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid using waste biomass generated after dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kurade, Mayur B; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Joshi, Swati M; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2010-10-15

    The degradation of textile effluent using microorganisms has been studied extensively, but disposal of generated biomass after dye degradation is a serious problem. Among all tested microorganisms, isolated Sphingobacterium sp. ATM effectively decolorized (100%) the dye Direct Blue GLL (DBGLL) and simultaneously it produced (64%) polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid (PHD). The organism decolorized DBGLL at 300 mg l(-1) concentration within 24 h of dye addition and gave optimum production of PHD. The organism also decolorized three combinations of mixture of dyes. The organism decolorized textile effluent too when it was combined with medium. The organism produced a maximum of 66% and 61% PHD while decolorizing mixture of dyes and textile effluent respectively. Molasses was found to be more significant within all carbon sources used. The activity of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase was found to be higher after 24 h of addition of DBGLL. The enzymes responsible for dye degradation, viz. veratryl alcohol oxidase, laccase, DCIP (2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol) reductase, riboflavin reductase, and azo reductase were found to be induced during decolorization process of DBGLL and mixture of dyes. There was significant reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD). FTIR analysis of samples before and after decolorization of dye confirmed the biotransformation of DBGLL. PMID:20591565

  15. Low frequency ultrasound (42 kHz) assisted degradation of Acid Blue 113 in the presence of visible light driven rare earth nanoclusters loaded TiO2 nanophotocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, Panneerselvam; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Rozas, Oscar; Mansilla, Héctor D; Gracia-Pinilla, M A; Anandan, Sambandam

    2014-09-01

    An attempt has been made to render the visible light driven photocatalytic activity to the TiO2 nanocatalysts by loading 1 wt% of rare earth (RE) nanoclusters (Gd(3+), Nd(3+) and Y(3+)) using a low frequency (42 kHz) producing commercial sonicator. The STEM-HAADF analysis confirms that the RE nanoclusters were residing at the surface of the TiO2. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses confirm that the loading of RE nanoclusters cannot make any significant changes in the crystal structure of TiO2. However, the optical properties of the resulted nanocatalysts were significantly modified and the nanocatalysts were employed to study the sonocatalytic, photocatalytic and sonophotocatalytic decolorization as well as mineralization of Acid Blue 113 (AB113). Among the experimented nanocatalysts maximum degradation of AB113 was achieved in the presence Y(3+)-TiO2 nanocatalysts. The decolorization of AB113 in the presence and absence of Y(3+) loaded TiO2 ensues the following order sonolysis

  16. Low frequency ultrasound (42 kHz) assisted degradation of Acid Blue 113 in the presence of visible light driven rare earth nanoclusters loaded TiO2 nanophotocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, Panneerselvam; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Rozas, Oscar; Mansilla, Héctor D; Gracia-Pinilla, M A; Anandan, Sambandam

    2014-09-01

    An attempt has been made to render the visible light driven photocatalytic activity to the TiO2 nanocatalysts by loading 1 wt% of rare earth (RE) nanoclusters (Gd(3+), Nd(3+) and Y(3+)) using a low frequency (42 kHz) producing commercial sonicator. The STEM-HAADF analysis confirms that the RE nanoclusters were residing at the surface of the TiO2. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses confirm that the loading of RE nanoclusters cannot make any significant changes in the crystal structure of TiO2. However, the optical properties of the resulted nanocatalysts were significantly modified and the nanocatalysts were employed to study the sonocatalytic, photocatalytic and sonophotocatalytic decolorization as well as mineralization of Acid Blue 113 (AB113). Among the experimented nanocatalysts maximum degradation of AB113 was achieved in the presence Y(3+)-TiO2 nanocatalysts. The decolorization of AB113 in the presence and absence of Y(3+) loaded TiO2 ensues the following order sonolysis

  17. Effects of acid mine drainage from an abandoned copper mine, Britannia Mines, Howe Sound, British Columbia, Canada, on transplanted blue mussels (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Grout, J A; Levings, C D

    2001-04-01

    Juvenile mussels (Mytilus edulis) were transplanted to Howe Sound, British Columbia, Canada, along an apparent pollution gradient of acid mine drainage (AMD) from an abandoned copper (Cu) mine. Cages containing 75 mussels each were placed at a total of 15 stations and were exposed to concentrations of dissolved Cu in surface waters ranging from 5 to 1009 micrograms/l for a period of 41 days. Mussels located at stations closer to the source of AMD at the mouth of Britannia Creek bioaccumulated higher concentrations of Cu and zinc (Zn) in their tissues. Mussel growth was adversely affected by Cu tissue concentrations above 20 micrograms/g dry wt., while declines in survival and condition index occurred in mussels that bioaccumulated greater than 40 micrograms/g dry wt. Cu. Tissue Zn concentrations (117-192 micrograms/g dry wt.) were likely not high enough to have a direct impact on mussel health. Reduced survival of transplanted mussels was supported by an absence of natural mussels in contaminated areas. Phytoplankton was also severely reduced in areas contaminated by mine waters. Based on the weight of evidence, AMD from the Britannia mine had a deleterious impact on mussel survival in a zone extending at least 2.1 km to the north and 1.7 km to the south of Britannia Creek on the east shore of Howe Sound.

  18. Optimization of submerged fermentation conditions for immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid production by Penicillium roqueforti isolated from blue-molded cheeses: enhanced production by ultraviolet and gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ismaiel, Ahmed A; Ahmed, Ashraf S; El-Sayed, El-Sayed R

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is a promising drug owing to its immunosuppressive and biological activities. In this study, two strains of Penicillium roqueforti designated as AG101 and LG109 were selected among several strains isolated from Roquefort cheese samples on the basis of their activity for MPA-producing ability. The appropriate fermentation conditions necessary for MPA biosynthesis by the two respective fungal strains were investigated. These conditions included selection of the cultivation medium, agitation rate, incubation temperature, fermentation time, pH value, inoculum size, and fermentation medium volume. Maximum MPA productivities were maintained when the fermentation process was carried out using a medium composed of (g l(-1)): Sucrose, 30; peptone, 5.0; KH2PO4, 1.0; MgSO4·7H2O, 0.5 and KCl, 0.5; pH 6.0, inoculated with an inoculum size of 6.0 % (v/v), and incubated at 25 °C for 10 days at 120 rpm. The potentiality of both P. roqueforti strains for further improvement of MPA production was applied by mutagenesis through exposure to irradiation by ultraviolet rays (UV, 254 nm) for different periods of time and gamma rays at various doses (KGy). The dry cell weight of both irradiated fungal strains showed a greater reduction when irradiated either with UV or gamma rays. However, the MPA yield of both strains was increased by 1.27-1.39 fold when irradiated with UV rays and by 2.11-2.33 fold when irradiated with gamma rays, as compared with the respective controls (non-irradiated cultures). These findings indicate the future possibility to reduce the cost of producing fermentation-based drugs.

  19. Succinylation-Alcian Blue Staining of Mucins on Polyvinylidene Difluoride Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Akihiko; Dong, Weijie; Matsuno, Yu-ki

    2015-01-01

    Alcian blue staining has been widely used to visualize acidic mucins and mucopolysaccharides in supported molecular matrix electrophoresis (SMME) and on membrane transferred from electrophoresis gels. Mucins with low acidic glycan content, however, cannot be stained with Alcian blue, which is one of the major drawbacks of this staining method. On the other hand, periodic acid-Schiff staining can selectively visualize glycoproteins, including mucins, regardless of the acidic residue content; however, periodic acid-Schiff staining decomposes glycans. Here, we introduce succinylation-Alcian blue staining as an alternative staining method to visualize mucins, regardless of the acidic residue content, and without glycan decomposition. PMID:26139280

  20. Could microwave induced catalytic oxidation (MICO) process over CoFe2O4 effectively eliminate brilliant green in aqueous solution?

    PubMed

    Ju, Yongming; Wang, Xiaoyan; Qiao, Junqin; Li, Guohua; Wu, You; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Xiuyu; Xu, Zhencheng; Qi, Jianying; Fang, Jiande; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2013-12-15

    In this study, we adopted the chemical co-precipitation (CP) method and sol-gel method followed by calcination at temperatures of 100-900°C for 12h to synthesize CoFe2O4 materials, which were further characterized by TEM, XRD and XPS techniques. The properties of CoFe2O4 materials were evaluated in a microwave (MW) induced catalytic oxidation (MICO) process for the elimination of brilliant green (BG). The results showed that: (1) the removal rates of BG gradually decreased over a series of CoFe2O4 materials prepared by CP method and calcinated with 100-700°C (except 900°C) for 12h within three reuse cycles; for comparison, no removal of BG was obtained over CoFe2O4 synthesized by sol-gel method and CoFe2O4-900 (CP); (2) no hydroxyl radicals were captured with salicylic acid used as molecular probe in the MICO process; (3) MW irradiation enhanced the release of residual NaOH within the microstructure of CoFe2O4 and further discolored BG, because BG is sensitive to pH; (4) granular activated carbon (GAC), an excellent MW-absorbing material possessing higher dielectric loss tangent compared to that of a series of CoFe2O4 materials, could not remove BG in suspensions at a higher efficiency, even if the loading amount was 20 g L(-1). Accordingly, MICO process over CoFe2O4 materials and GAC could not effectively eliminate BG in suspensions. PMID:24220199

  1. Learning the Blues. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This lesson introduces students to the "blues," one of the most distinctive and influential elements of African-American musical tradition. With this lesson plan, students can take a virtual field trip to Memphis, Tennessee, one of the prominent centers of blues activities, and explore the history of the blues in the work of W. C. Handy and a…

  2. The Blue Emu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Descalzi, Doug; Gillett, John; Gordon, Carlton; Keener, ED; Novak, Ken; Puente, Laura

    1993-01-01

    The primary goal in designing the Blue Emu was to provide an airline with a cost efficient and profitable means of transporting passengers between the major cities in Aeroworld. The design attacks the market where a demand for inexpensive transportation exists and for this reason the Blue Emu is an attractive investment for any airline. In order to provide a profitable aircraft, special attention was paid to cost and economics. For example, in manufacturing, simplicity was stressed in structural design to reduce construction time and cost. Aerodynamic design employed a tapered wing which reduced the induced drag coefficient while also reducing the weight of the wing. Even the propulsion system was selected with cost effectiveness in mind, yet also to maintain the marketability of the aircraft. Thus, in every aspect of the design, consideration was given to economics and marketability of the final product.

  3. Voyager 1 'Blue Movie'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This is the original Voyager 'Blue Movie' (so named because it was built from Blue filter images). It records the approach of Voyager 1 during a period of over 60 Jupiter days. Notice the difference in speed and direction of the various zones of the atmosphere. The interaction of the atmospheric clouds and storms shows how dynamic the Jovian atmosphere is.

    As Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 66 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). This time-lapse movie uses images taken every time Jupiter longitude 68W passed under the spacecraft. These images were acquired in the Blue filter from Jan. 6 to Feb. 3 1979. The spacecraft flew from 58 million kilometers to 31 million kilometers from Jupiter during that time.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  4. Staining of proteins in gels with Coomassie G-250 without organic solvent and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Ann-Marie; Besir, H Uuml Seyin

    2009-01-01

    In classical protein staining protocols using Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB), solutions with high contents of toxic and flammable organic solvents (Methanol, Ethanol or 2-Propanol) and acetic acid are used for fixation, staining and destaining of proteins in a gel after SDS-PAGE. To speed up the procedure, heating the staining solution in the microwave oven for a short time is frequently used. This usually results in evaporation of toxic or hazardous Methanol, Ethanol or 2-Propanol and a strong smell of acetic acid in the lab which should be avoided due to safety considerations. In a protocol originally published in two patent applications by E.M. Wondrak (US2001046709 (A1), US6319720 (B1)), an alternative composition of the staining solution is described in which no organic solvent or acid is used. The CBB is dissolved in bidistilled water (60-80 mg of CBB G-250 per liter) and 35 mM HCl is added as the only other compound in the staining solution. The CBB staining of the gel is done after SDS-PAGE and thorough washing of the gel in bidistilled water. By heating the gel during the washing and staining steps, the process can be finished faster and no toxic or hazardous compounds are evaporating. The staining of proteins occurs already within 1 minute after heating the gel in staining solution and is fully developed after 15-30 min with a slightly blue background that is destained completely by prolonged washing of the stained gel in bidistilled water, without affecting the stained protein bands. PMID:19684570

  5. The failure analysis, redesign, and final preparation of the Brilliant Eyes Thermal Storage Unit for flight testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, T.; Whitney, Brian

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the engineering thought process behind the failure analysis, redesign, and rework of the flight hardware for the Brilliant Eyes Thermal Storage Unit (BETSU) experiment. This experiment was designed to study the zero-g performance of 2-methylpentane as a suitable phase change material. This hydrocarbon served as the cryogenic storage medium for the BETSU experiment which was flown 04 Mar 94 on board Shuttle STS-62. Ground testing had indicated satisfactory performance of the BETSU at the 120 Kelvin design temperature. However, questions remained as to the micro-gravity performance of this unit; potential deviations in ground (1 g) versus space flight (0 g) performance, and how the unit would operate in a realistic space environment undergoing cyclical operation. The preparations and rework performed on the BETSU unit, which failed initial flight qualification, give insight and lessons learned to successfully develop and qualify a space flight experiment.

  6. The Frequency of "Brilliant" and "Genius" in Teaching Evaluations Predicts the Representation of Women and African Americans across Fields.

    PubMed

    Storage, Daniel; Horne, Zachary; Cimpian, Andrei; Leslie, Sarah-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Women and African Americans-groups targeted by negative stereotypes about their intellectual abilities-may be underrepresented in careers that prize brilliance and genius. A recent nationwide survey of academics provided initial support for this possibility. Fields whose practitioners believed that natural talent is crucial for success had fewer female and African American PhDs. The present study seeks to replicate this initial finding with a different, and arguably more naturalistic, measure of the extent to which brilliance and genius are prized within a field. Specifically, we measured field-by-field variability in the emphasis on these intellectual qualities by tallying-with the use of a recently released online tool-the frequency of the words "brilliant" and "genius" in over 14 million reviews on RateMyProfessors.com, a popular website where students can write anonymous evaluations of their instructors. This simple word count predicted both women's and African Americans' representation across the academic spectrum. That is, we found that fields in which the words "brilliant" and "genius" were used more frequently on RateMyProfessors.com also had fewer female and African American PhDs. Looking at an earlier stage in students' educational careers, we found that brilliance-focused fields also had fewer women and African Americans obtaining bachelor's degrees. These relationships held even when accounting for field-specific averages on standardized mathematics assessments, as well as several competing hypotheses concerning group differences in representation. The fact that this naturalistic measure of a field's focus on brilliance predicted the magnitude of its gender and race gaps speaks to the tight link between ability beliefs and diversity.

  7. The Frequency of "Brilliant" and "Genius" in Teaching Evaluations Predicts the Representation of Women and African Americans across Fields.

    PubMed

    Storage, Daniel; Horne, Zachary; Cimpian, Andrei; Leslie, Sarah-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Women and African Americans-groups targeted by negative stereotypes about their intellectual abilities-may be underrepresented in careers that prize brilliance and genius. A recent nationwide survey of academics provided initial support for this possibility. Fields whose practitioners believed that natural talent is crucial for success had fewer female and African American PhDs. The present study seeks to replicate this initial finding with a different, and arguably more naturalistic, measure of the extent to which brilliance and genius are prized within a field. Specifically, we measured field-by-field variability in the emphasis on these intellectual qualities by tallying-with the use of a recently released online tool-the frequency of the words "brilliant" and "genius" in over 14 million reviews on RateMyProfessors.com, a popular website where students can write anonymous evaluations of their instructors. This simple word count predicted both women's and African Americans' representation across the academic spectrum. That is, we found that fields in which the words "brilliant" and "genius" were used more frequently on RateMyProfessors.com also had fewer female and African American PhDs. Looking at an earlier stage in students' educational careers, we found that brilliance-focused fields also had fewer women and African Americans obtaining bachelor's degrees. These relationships held even when accounting for field-specific averages on standardized mathematics assessments, as well as several competing hypotheses concerning group differences in representation. The fact that this naturalistic measure of a field's focus on brilliance predicted the magnitude of its gender and race gaps speaks to the tight link between ability beliefs and diversity. PMID:26938242

  8. 21 CFR 74.2101 - FD&C Blue No. 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... principally of 3- benzenesulfonic acid, and smaller amounts of 4- benzenesulfonic acid and 2- benzenesulfonic acid to form the leuco base. The leuco base is then oxidized with lead dioxide and acid, or with...)ammonium hydroxide inner salt. Additionally, FD&C Blue No. 1 is manufactured by the acid...

  9. 21 CFR 74.2101 - FD&C Blue No. 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... principally of 3- benzenesulfonic acid, and smaller amounts of 4- benzenesulfonic acid and 2- benzenesulfonic acid to form the leuco base. The leuco base is then oxidized with lead dioxide and acid, or with...)ammonium hydroxide inner salt. Additionally, FD&C Blue No. 1 is manufactured by the acid...

  10. 21 CFR 74.2101 - FD&C Blue No. 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... principally of 3- benzenesulfonic acid, and smaller amounts of 4- benzenesulfonic acid and 2- benzenesulfonic acid to form the leuco base. The leuco base is then oxidized with lead dioxide and acid, or with...)ammonium hydroxide inner salt. Additionally, FD&C Blue No. 1 is manufactured by the acid...

  11. 21 CFR 74.2101 - FD&C Blue No. 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... principally of 3- benzenesulfonic acid, and smaller amounts of 4- benzenesulfonic acid and 2- benzenesulfonic acid to form the leuco base. The leuco base is then oxidized with lead dioxide and acid, or with...)ammonium hydroxide inner salt. Additionally, FD&C Blue No. 1 is manufactured by the acid...

  12. 21 CFR 74.2101 - FD&C Blue No. 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... principally of 3- benzenesulfonic acid, and smaller amounts of 4- benzenesulfonic acid and 2- benzenesulfonic acid to form the leuco base. The leuco base is then oxidized with lead dioxide and acid, or with...)ammonium hydroxide inner salt. Additionally, FD&C Blue No. 1 is manufactured by the acid...

  13. The Blue Marble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This spectacular Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 'blue marble' image is based on the most detailed collection of true-color imagery of the entire Earth to date. Using a collection of satellite-based observations, scientists and visualizers stitched together months of observations of the land surface, oceans, sea ice, and clouds into a seamless, true-color mosaic of every square kilometer (.386 square mile) of our planet. Most of the information contained in this image came from MODIS, illustrating MODIS' outstanding capacity to act as an integrated tool for observing a variety of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric features of the Earth. The land and coastal ocean portions of this image is based on surface observations collected from June through September 2001 and combined, or composited, every eight days to compensate for clouds that might block the satellite's view on any single day. Global ocean color (or chlorophyll) data was used to simulate the ocean surface. MODIS doesn't measure 3-D features of the Earth, so the surface observations were draped over topographic data provided by the U.S. Geological Survey EROS Data Center. MODIS observations of polar sea ice were combined with observations of Antarctica made by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's AVHRR sensor-the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The cloud image is a composite of two days of MODIS imagery collected in visible light wavelengths and a third day of thermal infra-red imagery over the poles. A large collection of imagery based on the blue marble in a variety of sizes and formats, including animations and the full (1 km) resolution imagery, is available at the Blue Marble page. Image by Reto Stockli, Render by Robert Simmon. Based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  14. Strong blue and white photoluminescence emission of BaZrO{sub 3} undoped and lanthanide doped phosphor for light emitting diodes application

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, V.H.; De la Rosa, E.; Salas, P.; Velazquez-Salazar, J.J.

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, we report the obtained strong broadband blue photoluminescence (PL) emission centered at 427 nm for undoped BaZrO{sub 3} observed after 266 nm excitation of submicron crystals prepared by hydrothermal/calcinations method. This emission is enhanced with the introduction of Tm{sup 3+} ions and is stronger than the characteristic PL blue emission of such lanthanide. The proposed mechanism of relaxation for host lattice emission is based on the presence of oxygen vacancies produced during the synthesis process and the charge compensation due to the difference in the electron valence between dopant and substituted ion in the host. Brilliant white light emission with a color coordinate of (x=0.29, y=0.32) was observed by combining the blue PL emission from the host with the green and red PL emission from Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions, respectively. The color coordinate can be tuned by changing the ratio between blue, green and red band by changing the concentration of lanthanides. - Graphical abstract: Strong blue emission from undoped BaZrO{sub 3} phosphor and white light emission by doping with Tb{sup 3+} (green) and Eu{sup 3+} (red) after 266 nm excitation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blue emission from BaZrO{sub 3} phosphor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blue emission enhanced with Tm{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer White light from BaZrO{sup 3+} phosphor.

  15. Blue emitting undecaplatinum clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Indranath; Bhuin, Radha Gobinda; Bhat, Shridevi; Pradeep, T.

    2014-07-01

    A blue luminescent 11-atom platinum cluster showing step-like optical features and the absence of plasmon absorption was synthesized. The cluster was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) suggest a composition, Pt11(BBS)8, which was confirmed by a range of other experimental tools. The cluster is highly stable and compatible with many organic solvents.A blue luminescent 11-atom platinum cluster showing step-like optical features and the absence of plasmon absorption was synthesized. The cluster was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) suggest a composition, Pt11(BBS)8, which was confirmed by a range of other experimental tools. The cluster is highly stable and compatible with many organic solvents. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experimental procedures, instrumentation, chromatogram of the crude cluster; SEM/EDAX, DLS, PXRD, TEM, FT-IR, and XPS of the isolated Pt11 cluster; UV/Vis, MALDI MS and SEM/EDAX of isolated 2 and 3; and 195Pt NMR of the K2PtCl6 standard. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02778g

  16. Blue ocean leadership.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2014-05-01

    Ten years ago, two INSEAD professors broke ground by introducing "blue ocean strategy," a new model for discovering uncontested markets that are ripe for growth. In this article, they apply their concepts and tools to what is perhaps the greatest challenge of leadership: closing the gulf between the potential and the realized talent and energy of employees. Research indicates that this gulf is vast: According to Gallup, 70% of workers are disengaged from their jobs. If companies could find a way to convert them into engaged employees, the results could be transformative. The trouble is, managers lack a clear understanding of what changes they could make to bring out the best in everyone. Here, Kim and Mauborgne offer a solution to that problem: a systematic approach to uncovering, at each level of the organization, which leadership acts and activities will inspire employees to give their all, and a process for getting managers throughout the company to start doing them. Blue ocean leadership works because the managers' "customers"-that is, the people managers oversee and report to-are involved in identifying what's effective and what isn't. Moreover, the approach doesn't require leaders to alter who they are, just to undertake a different set of tasks. And that kind of change is much easier to implement and track than changes to values and mind-sets.

  17. Blue ocean leadership.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2014-05-01

    Ten years ago, two INSEAD professors broke ground by introducing "blue ocean strategy," a new model for discovering uncontested markets that are ripe for growth. In this article, they apply their concepts and tools to what is perhaps the greatest challenge of leadership: closing the gulf between the potential and the realized talent and energy of employees. Research indicates that this gulf is vast: According to Gallup, 70% of workers are disengaged from their jobs. If companies could find a way to convert them into engaged employees, the results could be transformative. The trouble is, managers lack a clear understanding of what changes they could make to bring out the best in everyone. Here, Kim and Mauborgne offer a solution to that problem: a systematic approach to uncovering, at each level of the organization, which leadership acts and activities will inspire employees to give their all, and a process for getting managers throughout the company to start doing them. Blue ocean leadership works because the managers' "customers"-that is, the people managers oversee and report to-are involved in identifying what's effective and what isn't. Moreover, the approach doesn't require leaders to alter who they are, just to undertake a different set of tasks. And that kind of change is much easier to implement and track than changes to values and mind-sets. PMID:24956870

  18. Laser Induced Blue Luminescence Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Haiyong; Duan, Yanmin; Zhang, Ge; Zhang, Yaoju; Yang, Fugui

    2011-09-01

    Laser induced strange blue luminescence in several Raman crystals has been investigated. The blue luminescence at about 473 nm has the characteristic of no orientation and only produced in the crystal where the fundament laser oscillated. The experimental results show that the blue luminescence must result from the fundamental laser around 1.0 µm rather than Stokes-shifting. The spectrum detected is similar for different crystals. This blue luminescence is obviously strange and inconsistent with traditional luminescence theories, which maybe a brand-new luminescence theory.

  19. Investigation of the chemical origin and evidential value of differences in the SERS spectra of blue gel inks.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yen Cheng; Lee, Wendy W Y; Bell, Steven E J

    2016-08-15

    Highly swellable polymer films doped with Ag nanoparticle aggregates (poly-SERS films) have been used to record very high signal : noise ratio, reproducible surface-enhanced (resonance) Raman (SER(R)S) spectra of in situ dried ink lines and their constituent dyes using both 633 and 785 nm excitation. These allowed the chemical origins of differences in the SERRS spectra of different inks to be determined. Initial investigation of pure samples of the 10 most common blue dyes showed that the dyes which had very similar chemical structures such as Patent Blue V and Patent Blue VF (which differ only by a single OH group) gave SERRS spectra in which the only indications that the dye structure had been changed were small differences in peak positions or relative intensities of the bands. SERRS studies of 13 gel pen inks were consistent with this observation. In some cases inks from different types of pens could be distinguished even though they were dominated by a single dye such as Victoria Blue B (Zebra Surari) or Victoria Blue BO (Pilot Acroball) because their predominant dye did not appear in other inks. Conversely, identical spectra were also recorded from different types of pens (Pilot G7, Zebra Z-grip) because they all had the same dominant Brilliant Blue G dye. Finally, some of the inks contained mixtures of dyes which could be separated by TLC and removed from the plate before being analysed with the same poly-SERS films. For example, the Pentel EnerGel ink pen was found to give TLC spots corresponding to Erioglaucine and Brilliant Blue G. Overall, this study has shown that the spectral differences between different inks which are based on chemically similar, but nonetheless distinct dyes, are extremely small, so very close matches between SERRS spectra are required for confident identification. Poly-SERS substrates can routinely provide the very stringent reproducibility and sensitivity levels required. This, coupled with the awareness of the reasons

  20. Pluto’s Blue Haze

    NASA Video Gallery

    The sky on Pluto is blue! Kind of. This is Pluto in an Minute. So it’s not exactly the case that the sky on Pluto is blue, rather, what the New Horizons science team has found in recent images do...

  1. Water quality in the Blue Creek arm of Lake Eufaula and Blue Creek, Oklahoma, March-October 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurklin, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Based on samples collected bimonthly for major inorganic and trace elements and monthly for biota and bacteria, water from the Blue Creek arm of Lake Eufaula and Blue Creek is suitable for most uses when compared to water-quality standards or criteria. Concentrations of most chemical constituents gradually increased from spring to fall. The concentrations generally were within established drinking-water standards, with the exception of iron and manganese. Using water-quality determinations and biologic indicators, the water from Blue Creek arm of Lake Eufaula and Blue Creek is: (1) Soft and acidic with little mineral content and conductivity; (2) calm or very slowly moving; and (3) warm and enriched with organic matter.

  2. Chemical and structural evaluation of activated carbon prepared from jute sticks for Brilliant Green dye removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Asadullah, Mohammad; Asaduzzaman, Mohammad; Kabir, Mohammad Shajahan; Mostofa, Mohammad Golam; Miyazawa, Tomohisa

    2010-02-15

    Activated carbons have been prepared from jute sticks by chemical activation using ZnCl(2) and physical activation using steam for the removal of Brilliant Green dye from aqueous solution. The activated carbons and charcoal prepared from jute sticks were characterized by evaluating the surface chemistry, structural features and surface morphology. The maximum BET surface area was obtained to be 2304 m(2)/g for chemical activated carbon (ACC) while it is 730 and 80 m(2)/g for steam activated carbon (ACS) and charcoal, respectively. The FT-IR spectra exhibited that the pyrolysis and steam activation of jute sticks resulted in the release of aliphatic and O-containing functional groups by thermal effect. However, the release of functional groups is the effect of chemical reaction in the ZnCl(2) activation process. A honeycomb-type carbon structure in ACC was formed as observed on SEM images. Although charcoal and ACC were prepared at 500 degrees C the ACC exhibited much lower Raman sensitivity due to the formation of condensed aromatic ring systems. Due to high surface area and high porous structure with abundance of functional groups, the ACC adsorbed dye molecules with much higher efficiency than those of ACS and charcoal.

  3. The potential for human exposure, direct and indirect, to the suspected carcinogenic triphenylmethane dye Brilliant Green from green paper towels.

    PubMed

    Oplatowska, Michalina; Donnelly, Ryan F; Majithiya, Rita J; Glenn Kennedy, D; Elliott, Christopher T

    2011-08-01

    Triphenylmethanes - Malachite Green (MG), Crystal Violet (CV) and Brilliant Green (BG) are dyes with known genotoxic and carcinogenic properties. Apart from being illegally used in aquaculture for treatment of fish diseases they are also applied in industry such as paper production to colour paper towels widely used in hospitals, factories and other locations for hand drying after washing. The present study provides evidence that the triphenylmethane dye (BG) present in green paper towels can migrate through the skin even when the exposure time is short (30-300 s). The transfer of the dye from the towel to food (fish) was also studied and a high amount of colour was found to migrate during overnight exposure. The risk to humans associated with these two dye transfer studies was assessed using a 'margin of exposure approach' on the basis of the toxicological data available for the closely related dye MG and its metabolite Leucomalachite Green. The data indicated that the risk associated with the use of triphenylmethane containing paper towels is of a similar proportion to the risk associated with consumption of fish contaminated with these dyes due to the illegal application in aquaculture. PMID:21596089

  4. New CNT/poly(brilliant green) and CNT/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) based electrochemical enzyme biosensors.

    PubMed

    Barsan, Madalina M; Pifferi, Valentina; Falciola, Luigi; Brett, Christopher M A

    2016-07-13

    A combination of the electroactive polymer poly(brilliant green) (PBG) or conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) with carbon nanotubes to obtain CNT/PBG and CNT/PEDOT modified carbon film electrodes (CFE) has been investigated as a new biosensor platform, incorporating the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx) as test enzyme, alcohol oxidase (AlcOx) or alcohol dehydrogenase (AlcDH). The sensing parameters were optimized for all biosensors based on CNT/PBG/CFE, CNT/PEDOT/CFE platforms. Under optimized conditions, both GOx biosensors exhibited very similar sensitivities, while in the case of AlcOx and AlcDH biosensors, AlcOx/CNT/PBG/CFE was found to give a higher sensitivity and lower detection limit. The influence of dissolved O2 on oxidase-biosensor performance was investigated and was shown to be different for each enzyme. Comparisons were made with similar reported biosensors, showing the advantages of the new biosensors, and excellent selectivity against potential interferents was successfully demonstrated. Finally, alcohol biosensors were successfully used for the determination of ethanol in alcoholic beverages. PMID:27237835

  5. Experimental ATR device for real-time FTIR imaging of living cells using brilliant synchrotron radiation sources.

    PubMed

    Mariangela, Cestelli-Guidi; Seydou, Yao; Diego, Sali; Sabine, Castano; Augusto, Marcelli; Petibois, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we present the design of an original Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR)-based device designed for an IR microscope coupled to a FPA detector and optimized for in-vivo cell imaging. The optical element has been designed to perform real time experiments of cell biochemical processes. The device includes a manually removable Ge-crystal that guarantees an ease manipulation during the cell culture and a large flat surface to support the cell growth and the required change of the culture wells. This layout will allow performing sequential ATR IR imaging with the crystal immersed in the culture wells, minimizing contributions due to water vapors in the optical system. Using existing brilliant synchrotron radiation sources this ATR device may collect images at the surface of the Ge crystal at a sub-cellular spatial resolution with a penetration depth of the evanescent wave inside the sample of ~500 nm within few seconds. A brief summary of the cellular components that should be detected with such optical device is also presented.

  6. Synchrotron powder diffraction on Aztec blue pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Del Río, M.; Gutiérrez-León, A.; Castro, G. R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Solís, C.; Sánchez-Hernández, R.; Robles-Camacho, J.; Rojas-Gaytán, J.

    2008-01-01

    Some samples of raw blue pigments coming from an archaeological rescue mission in downtown Mexico City have been characterized using different techniques. The samples, some recovered as a part of a ritual offering, could be assigned to the late Aztec period (XVth century). The striking characteristic of these samples is that they seem to be raw pigments prior to any use in artworks, and it was possible to collect a few μg of pigment after manual grain selection under a microscopy monitoring. All pigments are made of indigo, an organic colorant locally known as añil or xiuhquilitl. The colorant is always found in combination with an inorganic matrix, studied by powder diffraction. In one case the mineral base is palygorskite, a rare clay mineral featuring micro-channels in its structure, well known as the main ingredient of the Maya blue pigment. However, other samples present the minerals sepiolite (a clay mineral of the palygorskite family) and calcite. Another sample contains barite, a mineral never reported in prehispanic paints. We present the results of characterization using high resolution powder diffraction recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM25A, SpLine beamline) complemented with other techniques. All of them gave consistent results on the composition. A chemical test on resistance to acids was done, showing a high resistance for the palygorskite and eventually sepiolite compounds, in good agreement with the excellent resistance of the Maya blue.

  7. The food dye FD&C Blue No. 1 is a selective inhibitor of the ATP release channel Panx1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Jackson, David George; Dahl, Gerhard

    2013-05-01

    The food dye FD&C Blue No. 1 (Brilliant Blue FCF [BB FCF]) is structurally similar to the purinergic receptor antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG), which is a well-known inhibitor of the ionotropic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). The P2X7R functionally interacts with the membrane channel protein pannexin 1 (Panx1) in inflammasome signaling. Intriguingly, ligands to the P2X7R, regardless of whether they are acting as agonists or antagonists at the receptor, inhibit Panx1 channels. Thus, because both P2X7R and Panx1 are inhibited by BBG, the diagnostic value of the drug is limited. Here, we show that the food dye BB FCF is a selective inhibitor of Panx1 channels, with an IC50 of 0.27 µM. No significant effect was observed with concentrations as high as 100 µM of BB FCF on P2X7R. Differing by just one hydroxyl group from BB FCF, the food dye FD&C Green No. 3 exhibited similar selective inhibition of Panx1 channels. A reverse selectivity was observed for the P2X7R antagonist, oxidized ATP, which in contrast to other P2X7R antagonists had no significant inhibitory effect on Panx1 channels. Based on its selective action, BB FCF can be added to the repertoire of drugs to study the physiology of Panx1 channels. Furthermore, because Panx1 channels appear to be involved directly or indirectly through P2X7Rs in several disorders, BB FCF and derivatives of this "safe" food dye should be given serious consideration for pharmacological intervention of conditions such as acute Crohn's disease, stroke, and injuries to the central nervous system.

  8. Blue ellipticals in compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zepf, Stephen E.; Whitmore, Bradley C.

    1990-01-01

    By studying galaxies in compact groups, the authors examine the hypothesis that mergers of spiral galaxies make elliptical galaxies. The authors combine dynamical models of the merger-rich compact group environment with stellar evolution models and predict that roughly 15 percent of compact group ellipticals should be 0.15 mag bluer in B - R color than normal ellipticals. The published colors of these galaxies suggest the existence of this predicted blue population, but a normal distribution with large random errors can not be ruled out based on these data alone. However, the authors have new ultraviolet blue visual data which confirm the blue color of the two ellipticals with blue B - R colors for which they have their own colors. This confirmation of a population of blue ellipticals indicates that interactions are occurring in compact groups, but a blue color in one index alone does not require that these ellipticals are recent products of the merger of two spirals. The authors demonstrate how optical spectroscopy in the blue may distinguish between a true spiral + spiral merger and the swallowing of a gas-rich system by an already formed elliptical. The authors also show that the sum of the luminosity of the galaxies in each group is consistent with the hypothesis that the final stage in the evolution of compact group is an elliptical galaxy.

  9. Hazards of solar blue light

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, Tsutomu

    2008-06-01

    Short-wavelength visible light (blue light) of the Sun has caused retinal damage in people who have stared fixedly at the Sun without adequate protection. The author quantified the blue-light hazard of the Sun according to the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines by measuring the spectral radiance of the Sun. The results showed that the exposure limit for blue light can be easily exceeded when people view the Sun and that the solar blue-light hazard generally increases with solar elevation, which is in accordance with a model of the atmospheric extinction of sunlight. Viewing the Sun can be very hazardous and therefore should be avoided except at very low solar elevations.

  10. Covalent anthocyanin-flavonol complexes from the violet-blue flowers of Allium 'Blue Perfume'.

    PubMed

    Saito, Norio; Nakamura, Maiko; Shinoda, Koichi; Murata, Naho; Kanazawa, Toshinari; Kato, Kazuhisa; Toki, Kenjiro; Kasai, Hiroko; Honda, Toshio; Tatsuzawa, Fumi

    2012-08-01

    Three covalent anthocyanin-flavonol complexes (pigments 1-3) were extracted from the violet-blue flower of Allium 'Blue Perfume' with 5% acetic acid-MeOH solution, in which pigment 1 was the dominant pigment. These three pigments are based on delphinidin 3-glucoside as their deacylanthocyanin and were acylated with malonyl kaempferol 3-sophoroside-7-glucosiduronic acid or malonyl-kaempferol 3-p-coumaroyl-tetraglycoside-7-glucosiduronic acid in addition to acylation with acetic acid. By spectroscopic and chemical methods, the structures of these three pigments 1-3 were determined to be: pigment 1, (6(I)-O-(delphinidin 3-O-(3(I)-O-(acetyl)-β-glucopyranoside(I))))(2(VI)-O-(kaempferol 3-O-(2(II)-O-(3(III)-O-(β-glucopyranosyl(V))-β-glucopyranosyl(III))-4(II)-O-(trans-p-coumaroyl)-6(II)-O-(β-glucopyranosyl(IV))-β-glucopyranoside(II))-7-O-(β-glucosiduronic acid(VI)))) malonate; pigment 2, (6(I)-O-(delphinidin 3-O-(3(I)-O-(acetyl)-β-glucopyranoside(I))))(2(VI)-O-(kaempferol 3-O-(2(II)-O-β-glucopyranosyl(III))-β-glucopyranoside(II))-7-O-(β-glucosiduronic acid(VI)))); and pigment 3, (6(I)-O-(delphinidin 3-O-(3(I)-O-(acetyl)-β-glucopyranoside(I))))(2(VI)-O-(kaempferol 3-O-(2(II)-O-(3(III)-O-(β-glucopyranosyl(V))-β-glucopyranosyl(III))-4(II)-O-(cis-p-coumaroyl)-6(II)-O-(β-glucopyranosyl(IV))-β-glucopyranoside(II))-7-O-(β-glucosiduronic acid(VI)))) malonate. The structure of pigment 2 was analogous to that of a covalent anthocyanin-flavonol complex isolated from Allium schoenoprasum where delphinidin was observed in place of cyanidin. The three covalent anthocyanin-flavonol complexes (pigment 1-3) had a stable violet-blue color with three characteristic absorption maxima at 540, 547 and 618nm in pH 5-6 buffer solution. From circular dichroism measurement of pigment 1 in the pH 6.0 buffer solution, cotton effects were observed at 533 (+), 604 (-) and 638 (-) nm. Based on these results, these covalent anthocyanin-flavonol complexes were presumed to maintain a

  11. Boric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Borax poisoning ... The main symptoms of boric acid poisoning are blue-green vomit, diarrhea, and a bright red rash on the skin. Other symptoms may include: Blisters Collapse Coma Convulsions Drowsiness ...

  12. Phototropin 1 and dim-blue light modulate the red light de-etiolation response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihai; M Folta, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Light signals regulate seedling morphological changes during de-etiolation through the coordinated actions of multiple light-sensing pathways. Previously we have shown that red-light-induced hypocotyl growth inhibition can be reversed by addition of dim blue light through the action of phototropin 1 (phot1). Here we further examine the fluence-rate relationships of this blue light effect in short-term (hours) and long-term (days) hypocotyl growth assays. The red stem-growth inhibition and blue promotion is a low-fluence rate response, and blue light delays or attenuates both the red light and far-red light responses. These de-etiolation responses include blue light reversal of red or far-red induced apical hook opening. This response also requires phot1. Cryptochromes (cry1 and cry2) are activated by higher blue light fluence-rates and override phot1's influence on hypocotyl growth promotion. Exogenous application of auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid abolished the blue light stem growth promotion in both hypocotyl growth and hook opening. Results from the genetic tests of this blue light effect in auxin transporter mutants, as well as phytochrome kinase substrate mutants indicated that aux1 may play a role in blue light reversal of red light response. Together, the phot1-mediated adjustment of phytochrome-regulated photomorphogenic events is most robust in dim blue light conditions and is likely modulated by auxin transport through its transporters. PMID:25482790

  13. "That Was Brilliant!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Penny; Fleetwood, Colin; Garnett, Rosie; Metcalfe, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors report on the Top Marks project and some of the successful activities that made assessment "real." The aim of Top Marks project was to "invigorate the assessment of science with fun, relevance, real-life and engagement". The project involved collaboration between schools and primary science consultants from the Centre…

  14. "Clothed in triple blues": sorting out the Italian blues.

    PubMed

    Bimler, David; Uusküla, Mari

    2014-04-01

    Cross-cultural comparisons of color perception and cognition often feature versions of the "similarity sorting" procedure. By interpreting the assignment of two color samples to different groups as an indication that the dissimilarity between them exceeds some threshold, sorting data can be regarded as low-resolution similarity judgments. Here we analyze sorting data from speakers of Italian, Russian, and English, applying multidimensional scaling to delineate the boundaries between perceptual categories while highlighting differences between the three populations. Stimuli were 55 color swatches, predominantly from the blue region. Results suggest that at least two Italian words for "blue" are basic, a similar situation to Russian, in contrast to English where a single "blue" term is basic. PMID:24695190

  15. "Clothed in triple blues": sorting out the Italian blues.

    PubMed

    Bimler, David; Uusküla, Mari

    2014-04-01

    Cross-cultural comparisons of color perception and cognition often feature versions of the "similarity sorting" procedure. By interpreting the assignment of two color samples to different groups as an indication that the dissimilarity between them exceeds some threshold, sorting data can be regarded as low-resolution similarity judgments. Here we analyze sorting data from speakers of Italian, Russian, and English, applying multidimensional scaling to delineate the boundaries between perceptual categories while highlighting differences between the three populations. Stimuli were 55 color swatches, predominantly from the blue region. Results suggest that at least two Italian words for "blue" are basic, a similar situation to Russian, in contrast to English where a single "blue" term is basic.

  16. Comparative studies of Remazol Brillant Blue removal by immobilized organisms; investigation of metabolites by GC/MS and FTIR spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, Hatice Ardag; Topuz, Merve Canpolat

    2015-01-01

    Reactive dyes are important chemical pollutants from textile industries. Treatment of effluents from dye-based industries poses a major problem, and biotreatment with white rot fungi seems to be a viable option. The biological treatment of synthetic dyes at a low cost and in the shortest possible time is used especially in dye and textile industries and leads to pollution in the wastewater dumped into the environment by these industries. For this study, decolorization of the recalcitrant dye Remazol Brilliant Blue R by immobilized Pleurotus ostreatus and Coprinus plicatilis was investigated. This dye was removed 100% (dye concentration: 10.0 mg/L) by both immobilized organisms. Extracellular ligninolytic enzyme activities were also measured during the decolorization. There was an attempt to identify metabolites with FTIR spectrometry and GC/MS at the end of the decolorization. These results indicated that the samples did not include any detectable metabolite. PMID:25905752

  17. Borax methylene blue: a spectroscopic and staining study.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, P T; Russo, A; Reynolds, C; Lillie, R D

    1978-07-01

    Borax methylene blue is quite stable at room temperatures of 22-25 C. At 30 C polychroming is slow; during 50 days in a water bath at this temperature the absorption peak moves from 665 to 656 nm. At 35 C, the absorption peak reaches 660 nm in 7 days, 654 nm in 14. At 60 C polychroming is rapid, the absorption peak reaching 640-620 nm in 3 days. When the pH of the borax methylene blue solutions, normally about 9.0, is adjusted to pH 6.5, the absorption peak remains at 665 nm even when incubated at 60 C for extended periods. When used as a blood stain 0.4 ml borax methylene blue (1% methylene blue in 1% borax), 4 ml acetone, 2 ml borax-acid phosphate buffer to bring the solution to pH 6.5, and distilled water to make 40 ml, with 0.2 ml 1% eosin added just before using, an excellent Nocht-Giemsa type stain is achieved after 30 minutes staining. The material plasmodia P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. berghei stain moderate blue with dark red chromatin and green to black pigment granules. The study confirms Malachowski's 1891 results and explains Gautier's 1896-98 failure to duplicate it.

  18. The blue-collar brain.

    PubMed

    Van Orden, Guy; Hollis, Geoff; Wallot, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

  19. Agminated blue nevus - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Lisboa, Alice Paixão; Silvestre, Keline Jácome; Pedreira, Renata Leite; Alves, Natália Ribeiro de Magalhães; Obadia, Daniel Lago; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna

    2016-01-01

    Blue nevi are benign melanocytic lesions located in the deeper reticular dermis, consequence of failure of melanocytic migration into the dermal-epidermal junction from the neural crest. Lesions are usually asymptomatic and solitary, but may present in a multiple or agminated (grouped) pattern. The agminated subtype is formed when bluish-pigmented lesions cluster together in a well-defined area. Lesions can be flat or raised. We report the case of a patient who presented multiple bluish macules (1-3 mm in diameter) grouped on the left upper back. Dermoscopy and anatomic pathological examination were consistent with blue nevus.

  20. Blue light emitting thiogallate phosphor

    DOEpatents

    Dye, Robert C.; Smith, David C.; King, Christopher N.; Tuenge, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    A crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor of the formula RGa.sub.2 S.sub.4 :Ce.sub.x where R is selected from the group consisting of calcium, strontium, barium and zinc, and x is from about 1 to 10 atomic percent, the phosphor characterized as having a crystalline microstructure on the size order of from about 100 .ANG. to about 10,000 .ANG. is provided together with a process of preparing a crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor by depositing on a substrate by CVD and resultant thin film electroluminescent devices including a layer of such deposited phosphor on an ordinary glass substrate.

  1. The Blue-Collar Brain

    PubMed Central

    Van Orden, Guy; Hollis, Geoff; Wallot, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body’s tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior. PMID:22719730

  2. Crater Lake: blue through time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.; Buktenica, Mark; Collier, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Blue is the color of constancy, hence the term true blue. The unearthly blueness of Crater Lake reflects its pristine character and gives scientists a focal point for studying human impacts on aquatic environments over long periods of time. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Park Service, and Oregon State University have systematically studied the lake for the last two decades. Long-term monitoring of this lake is a priority of Crater Lake National Park and will continue far into the future.

  3. The blue-collar brain.

    PubMed

    Van Orden, Guy; Hollis, Geoff; Wallot, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior. PMID:22719730

  4. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Dinh C.; Faulkner, George E.

    1990-01-01

    A blue-green laser (450-550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm.sup.3+. The Tm.sup.+ is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP.

  5. Blue-green upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, D.C.; Faulkner, G.E.

    1990-08-14

    A blue-green laser (450--550 nm) uses a host crystal doped with Tm[sup 3+]. The Tm[sup 3+] is excited through upconversion by a red pumping laser and an IR pumping laser to a state which transitions to a relatively lower energy level through emissions in the blue-green band, e.g., 450.20 nm at 75 K. The exciting laser may be tunable dye lasers or may be solid-state semiconductor laser, e.g., GaAlAs and InGaAlP. 3 figs.

  6. Singing' the Black and Blues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Diane

    2004-01-01

    It is so obvious that the sky is blue in the daytime and black at night, but it took the smartest humans thousands of years of observation, thought, discussion, conjecture, and analysis to finally come up with answers that make scientific sense as to why the sky is these colors. This article discusses light and the scientific research…

  7. The Taos Blue Lake Ceremony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodine, John J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the Blue Lake Ceremony of the Taos Pueblo Indians of New Mexico. Reproduces the 1906 account of the ceremony by anthropologist Matilda Coxe Stevenson and notes modern verification and change. Discusses the importance of this annual August pilgrimage and initiation rite to the preservation of Taos culture. (SV)

  8. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-05-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations.

  9. Preparation and characterization of polylactic acid microspheres containing water-soluble dyes using a novel w/o/w emulsion solvent evaporation method.

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Yoshida, K; Goto, S

    1996-01-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres containing soluble dyes as water-soluble model compounds were prepared using the water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) emulsion solvent evaporation method. Addition of electrolytes such as NaCl or CaCl2 into the external aqueous phase significantly improved brilliant blue (BB) entrapment efficiency compared to the case of no additives. NaCl was the most effective for obtaining high entrapment efficiency (80-90% of theoretical BB content). The average diameter of the obtained microspheres was in the region of 10-20 microns in all cases. PLA microspheres containing 5 and 10% (w/w) BB exhibited the so-called burst release. The release rate decreased with decrease in the internal aqueous droplet volume in the preparation process. In particular, with PLA microspheres containing 5% (w/w) BB, those prepared with the smallest internal droplet volume (63 microliter), the initial burst release was reduced significantly, and 50% (w/w) of the loaded BB remained in the microspheres for 7 days. PMID:8999126

  10. Ready-to-use strip for L-ascorbic acid visual detection based on polyaniline/polyamide 66 nano-fibers/nets membranes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yanan; Li, Yan; Si, Yang; Wang, Xueqin; Li, Faxue; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2015-11-01

    A ready-to-use L-ascorbic acid (L-AA) colorimetric strip based on polyaniline (PANI)/polyamide 66 (PA 66) nanofiber/net (NFN) membrane with spider-web-like structure was fabricated through a facile bend electrospinning/netting process. Introduction of PANI component into the membrane turns the strip undergoes a brilliant brown-to-green color transition within 30 min upon incubation with L-AA. Moreover, ascribing to the three-dimensional microscopic structural, continuous pore channels, and distinctive nano-nets structure, the color change that is caused by 50 ppb L-AA can be easily perceived by naked eyes. Furthermore, RGB (red-green-blue) digital parameters that obtained from photographs of the strips were automatically read out via an iPhone. Subsequently, the parameters were converted into a color-difference map and processed statistically through principal component analysis, then used to elaborate standard curve. Combining the map and curve, we realized a method for assaying and quantifying L-AA concentration in real food samples, which avoids the time-consuming sample preparation, expensive laboratory techniques, and specialized personnel needed to carry out conventional analytical methods. PMID:26452940

  11. Ready-to-use strip for L-ascorbic acid visual detection based on polyaniline/polyamide 66 nano-fibers/nets membranes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yanan; Li, Yan; Si, Yang; Wang, Xueqin; Li, Faxue; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2015-11-01

    A ready-to-use L-ascorbic acid (L-AA) colorimetric strip based on polyaniline (PANI)/polyamide 66 (PA 66) nanofiber/net (NFN) membrane with spider-web-like structure was fabricated through a facile bend electrospinning/netting process. Introduction of PANI component into the membrane turns the strip undergoes a brilliant brown-to-green color transition within 30 min upon incubation with L-AA. Moreover, ascribing to the three-dimensional microscopic structural, continuous pore channels, and distinctive nano-nets structure, the color change that is caused by 50 ppb L-AA can be easily perceived by naked eyes. Furthermore, RGB (red-green-blue) digital parameters that obtained from photographs of the strips were automatically read out via an iPhone. Subsequently, the parameters were converted into a color-difference map and processed statistically through principal component analysis, then used to elaborate standard curve. Combining the map and curve, we realized a method for assaying and quantifying L-AA concentration in real food samples, which avoids the time-consuming sample preparation, expensive laboratory techniques, and specialized personnel needed to carry out conventional analytical methods.

  12. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ultramarine blue is a blue pigment obtained by calcining a mixture of kaolin, sulfur, sodium carbonate, and... order to vary the shade. The pigment is a complex sodium aluminum sulfo-silicate having the...

  13. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ultramarine blue is a blue pigment obtained by calcining a mixture of kaolin, sulfur, sodium carbonate, and... order to vary the shade. The pigment is a complex sodium aluminum sulfo-silicate having the...

  14. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ultramarine blue is a blue pigment obtained by calcining a mixture of kaolin, sulfur, sodium carbonate, and... order to vary the shade. The pigment is a complex sodium aluminum sulfo-silicate having the...

  15. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ultramarine blue is a blue pigment obtained by calcining a mixture of kaolin, sulfur, sodium carbonate, and... order to vary the shade. The pigment is a complex sodium aluminum sulfo-silicate having the...

  16. The Blues Poetry of Langston Hughes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Edward E.

    1971-01-01

    The author discusses the criteria of the blues as an American art form. He then shows how Langston Hughes captures the mood, the feeling, the rhythm and the impact of the blues in his poetry. (Author/LF)

  17. Enhancement of Taihu blue algae anaerobic digestion efficiency by natural storage.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hengfeng; Lu, Minfeng; Zhao, Mingxing; Huang, Zhenxing; Ren, Hongyan; Yan, Qun; Ruan, Wenquan

    2013-12-01

    Taihu blue algae after different storage time from 0 to 60 d were anaerobic fermented to evaluate their digestibility and process stability. Results showed that anaerobic digestion (AD) of blue algae under 15 d natural storage led to the highest CH4 production of 287.6 mL g(-1) VS at inoculum substrate ratio 2.0, demonstrating 36.69% improvement comparing with that from fresh algae. Storage of blue algae led to cell death, microcystins (MCs) release and VS reduction by spontaneous fermentation. However, it also played an important role in removing algal cell wall barrier, pre-hydrolysis and pre-acidification, leading to the improvement in CH4 yield. Closer examination of volatile fatty acids (VFA) variation, VS removal rates and key enzymes change during AD proved short storage time (≤ 15 d) of blue algae had higher efficiencies in biodegradation and methanation. Furthermore, AD presented significant biodegradation potential for MCs released from Taihu blue algae.

  18. Metal Complex Pigment Involved in the Blue Sepal Color Development of Hydrangea.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kin-ichi; Yamada, Tomomi; Ito, Daisuke; Kondo, Tadao; Yoshida, Kumi

    2015-09-01

    Anthocyanins exhibit various vivid colors from red through purple to blue and are potential sources of food colorants. However, their usage is restricted because of their instability, especially as a blue colorant. The blue sepal color of Hydrangea macrophylla is due to a metal complex named "hydrangea-blue complex" composed of delphinidin 3-O-glucoside, 1, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 2, and/or 5-O-p-coumaroylquinic acid, 3, as copigments, and Al(3+) in aqueous solution at approximately pH 4.0. However, the ratio of each component ins not stoichiometric, but is fluctuates within a certain range. The hydrangea-blue complex exists only in aqueous solution, exhibiting a stable blue color, but attempts at crystallization have failed; therefore, the structure remains obscure. To clarify the basis of the character of the hydrangea-blue pigment and to obtain its structural information, we studied the mixing conditions to reconstruct the same blue color as observed in the sepals. In highly concentrated sodium acetate buffer (6 M, pH 4.0) we could measure (1)H NMR of both the hydrangea-blue complex composed of 1 (5 mM), 2 (10 mM), and Al(3+) (10 mM) and a simple 1-Al(3+) complex. We also recorded the spectra of complexes composed with structurally different anthocyanins and copigments. Comparison of those signals indicated that in the hydrangea-blue complex 1 might be under equilibrium between chelating and nonchelating structures having an interaction with 2. PMID:26006163

  19. Metal Complex Pigment Involved in the Blue Sepal Color Development of Hydrangea.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kin-ichi; Yamada, Tomomi; Ito, Daisuke; Kondo, Tadao; Yoshida, Kumi

    2015-09-01

    Anthocyanins exhibit various vivid colors from red through purple to blue and are potential sources of food colorants. However, their usage is restricted because of their instability, especially as a blue colorant. The blue sepal color of Hydrangea macrophylla is due to a metal complex named "hydrangea-blue complex" composed of delphinidin 3-O-glucoside, 1, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 2, and/or 5-O-p-coumaroylquinic acid, 3, as copigments, and Al(3+) in aqueous solution at approximately pH 4.0. However, the ratio of each component ins not stoichiometric, but is fluctuates within a certain range. The hydrangea-blue complex exists only in aqueous solution, exhibiting a stable blue color, but attempts at crystallization have failed; therefore, the structure remains obscure. To clarify the basis of the character of the hydrangea-blue pigment and to obtain its structural information, we studied the mixing conditions to reconstruct the same blue color as observed in the sepals. In highly concentrated sodium acetate buffer (6 M, pH 4.0) we could measure (1)H NMR of both the hydrangea-blue complex composed of 1 (5 mM), 2 (10 mM), and Al(3+) (10 mM) and a simple 1-Al(3+) complex. We also recorded the spectra of complexes composed with structurally different anthocyanins and copigments. Comparison of those signals indicated that in the hydrangea-blue complex 1 might be under equilibrium between chelating and nonchelating structures having an interaction with 2.

  20. Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  1. The Physics of the Blues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. Murray

    2009-03-01

    In looking at the commonalities between music and science, one sees that the musician's palette is based on the principles of physics. The pitch of a musical note is determined by the frequency of the sound wave. The scales that musicians use to create and play music can be viewed as a set of rules. What makes music interesting is how musicians develop those rules and create ambiguity with them. I will discuss the evolution of western musical scales in this context. As a particular example, ``Blue'' notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale. The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting. Live keyboard demonstrations will be used. Beyond any redeeming entertainment value the talk will emphasize the serious connections between science and art in music. Nevertheless tips will be accepted.

  2. Blue Shield Plan Physician Participation

    PubMed Central

    Yett, Donald E.; Der, William; Ernst, Richard L.; Hay, Joel W.

    1981-01-01

    Many Blue Shield Plans offer participation agreements to physicians that are structurally similar to the participation provisions of Medicaid programs. This paper examines physicians' participation decisions in two such Blue Shield Plans where the participation agreements were on an all-or-nothing basis. The major results show that increases in the Plans' reasonable fees or fee schedules significantly raise the probability of participation, and that physicians with characteristics associated with “low quality” are significantly more likely to participate than are physicians with characteristics associated with “high quality.” In this sense the results highlight the tradeoff that must be faced in administering governmental health insurance policy. On the one hand, restricting reasonable and scheduled fees is the principal current tool for containing expenditures on physicians' services. Yet these restrictions tend to depress physicians' willingness to participate in government programs, thereby reducing access to high quality care by the populations those programs were designed to serve. PMID:10309468

  3. Blue light regulated shade avoidance.

    PubMed

    Keuskamp, Diederik H; Keller, Mercedes M; Ballaré, Carlos L; Pierik, Ronald

    2012-04-01

    Most plants grow in dense vegetation with the risk of being out-competed by neighboring plants. These neighbors can be detected not only through the depletion in light quantity that they cause, but also through the change in light quality, which plants perceive using specific photoreceptors. Both the reduction of the red:far-red ratio and the depletion of blue light are signals that induce a set of phenotypic traits, such as shoot elongation and leaf hyponasty, which increase the likelihood of light capture in dense plant stands. This set of phenotypic responses are part of the so called shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). This addendum discusses recent findings on the regulation of the SAS of Arabidopsis thaliana upon blue light depletion. Keller et al. and Keuskamp et al. show that the low blue light attenuation induced shade avoidance response of seedling and rosette-stage A. thaliana plants differ in their hormonal regulation. These studies also show there is a regulatory overlap with the R:FR-regulated SAS.

  4. Models of Individual Blue Stragglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, Alison

    This chapter describes the current state of models of individual blue stragglers. Stellar collisions, binary mergers (or coalescence), and partial or ongoing mass transfer have all been studied in some detail. The products of stellar collisions retain memory of their parent stars and are not fully mixed. Very high initial rotation rates must be reduced by an unknown process to allow the stars to collapse to the main sequence. The more massive collision products have shorter lifetimes than normal stars of the same mass, while products between low mass stars are long-lived and look very much like normal stars of their mass. Mass transfer can result in a merger, or can produce another binary system with a blue straggler and the remnant of the original primary. The products of binary mass transfer cover a larger portion of the colour-magnitude diagram than collision products for two reasons: there are more possible configurations which produce blue stragglers, and there are differing contributions to the blended light of the system. The effects of rotation may be substantial in both collision and merger products, and could result in significant mixing unless angular momentum is lost shortly after the formation event. Surface abundances may provide ways to distinguish between the formation mechanisms, but care must be taken to model the various mixing mechanisms properly before drawing strong conclusions. Avenues for future work are outlined.

  5. Uncovering Blue Diffuse Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bethan; Koposov, Sergey; Stark, Daniel; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) and the star-formation within their chemically pristine environments are fundamental to our understanding of the galaxy formation process at early times. However, traditional emission-line surveys detect only the brightest metal-poor galaxies where star-formation occurs in compact, starbursting environments, and thereby give us only a partial view of the dwarf galaxy population. To avoid such biases, we have developed a new search algorithm based on the morphological, rather then spectral, properties of XMPs and have applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database of images. Using this novel approach, we have discovered ~100 previously undetected, faint blue galaxies, each with isolated HII regions embedded in a diffuse continuum. In this talk I will present the first results from follow-up optical spectroscopy of this sample, which reveals these blue diffuse dwarfs (BDDs) to be young, very metal-poor and actively forming stars despite their intrinsically low luminosities. I will present evidence showing that BDDs appear to bridge the gap between quiescent dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies and blue compact galaxies (BCDs) and as such offer an ideal opportunity to assess how star-formation occurs in more `normal' metal-poor systems.

  6. Localized Eruptive Blue Nevi after Herpes Zoster

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Fany; Arrese, Jorge E.; Nikkels, Arjen F.

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old White man presented with a dozen small, well-restricted, punctiform, asymptomatic, blue-gray macules on the left shoulder. A few months earlier, he had been treated with oral acyclovir for herpes zoster (HZ) affecting the left C7–C8 dermatomes. All the blue macules appeared over a short period of time and then remained stable. The patient had not experienced any previous trauma or had tattooing in this anatomical region. The clinical diagnosis suggested blue nevi. Dermatoscopy revealed small, well-limited, dark-blue, compact, homogeneous areas evoking dermal blue nevi. An excisional biopsy was performed and the histological examination confirmed a blue nevus. As far as we are aware of, this is the first report of eruptive blue nevi following HZ, and it should be included in the differential diagnosis of zosteriform dermatoses responding to an isotopic pathway. In addition, a brief review concerning eruptive nevi is presented. PMID:27462219

  7. Inflation and alternatives with blue tensor spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi; Xue, Wei E-mail: wei.xue@sissa.it

    2014-10-01

    We study the tilt of the primordial gravitational waves spectrum. A hint of blue tilt is shown from analyzing the BICEP2 and POLARBEAR data. Motivated by this, we explore the possibilities of blue tensor spectra from the very early universe cosmology models, including null energy condition violating inflation, inflation with general initial conditions, and string gas cosmology, etc. For the simplest G-inflation, blue tensor spectrum also implies blue scalar spectrum. In general, the inflation models with blue tensor spectra indicate large non-Gaussianities. On the other hand, string gas cosmology predicts blue tensor spectrum with highly Gaussian fluctuations. If further experiments do confirm the blue tensor spectrum, non-Gaussianity becomes a distinguishing test between inflation and alternatives.

  8. Localized Eruptive Blue Nevi after Herpes Zoster.

    PubMed

    Colson, Fany; Arrese, Jorge E; Nikkels, Arjen F

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old White man presented with a dozen small, well-restricted, punctiform, asymptomatic, blue-gray macules on the left shoulder. A few months earlier, he had been treated with oral acyclovir for herpes zoster (HZ) affecting the left C7-C8 dermatomes. All the blue macules appeared over a short period of time and then remained stable. The patient had not experienced any previous trauma or had tattooing in this anatomical region. The clinical diagnosis suggested blue nevi. Dermatoscopy revealed small, well-limited, dark-blue, compact, homogeneous areas evoking dermal blue nevi. An excisional biopsy was performed and the histological examination confirmed a blue nevus. As far as we are aware of, this is the first report of eruptive blue nevi following HZ, and it should be included in the differential diagnosis of zosteriform dermatoses responding to an isotopic pathway. In addition, a brief review concerning eruptive nevi is presented. PMID:27462219

  9. Cloacolith in a blue-fronted amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva).

    PubMed

    Beaufrère, Hugues; Nevarez, Javier; Tully, Thomas N

    2010-06-01

    A 4-year-old blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva) was admitted for vocalization secondary to constipation. Saline infusion cloacoscopy revealed the presence of a 2-cm-diameter cloacolith within the coprodeum that was obstructing the rectal opening. The cloacolith was fragmented with a pair of biopsy forceps and the pieces removed. The cloacolith was subsequently analyzed and was composed of 100% uric acid salts. The bird improved completely and was able to defecate normally after the procedure. Cloacoliths are relative uncommon cloacal conditions, and this case documents cloacoscopic findings, rectal obstruction, and confirmation of its uric acid composition by urolith analysis.

  10. Organic/Inorganic Complex Pigments: Ancient Colors Maya Blue

    SciTech Connect

    Polette-Niewold, L.A.; Manciu, F.S.; Torres, B.; Alvarado, M.; Jr.; Chianelli, R.R.

    2009-06-04

    Maya Blue is an ancient blue pigment composed of palygorskite clay and indigo. It was used by the ancient Maya and provides a dramatic background for some of the most impressive murals throughout Mesoamerica. Despite exposure to acids, alkalis, and chemical solvents, the color of the Maya Blue pigment remains unaltered. The chemical interaction between palygorskite and indigo form an organic/inorganic complex with the carbonyl oxygen of the indigo bound to a surface Al{sup 3+} in the Si-O lattice. In addition indigo will undergo an oxidation to dehydroindigo during preparation. The dehydro-indigo molecule forms a similar but stronger complex with the Al{sup 3+}. Thus, Maya Blue varies in color due to the mixed indigo/dehydroindigo complex. The above conclusions are the result of application of multiple techniques (X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis/thermal gravimetric analysis, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopy) to the characterization of the organic/inorganic complex. A picture of the bonding of the organic molecule to the palygorskite surface forming a surface complex is developed and supported by the results of density functional theory calculations. We also report that other organic molecules such as thioindigo form similar organic/inorganic complexes thus, opening an entirely new class of complex materials for future applications.

  11. Organic/inorganic complex pigments: ancient colors Maya Blue.

    PubMed

    Polette-Niewold, Lori Ann; Manciu, Felicia S; Torres, Brenda; Alvarado, Manuel; Chianelli, Russell R

    2007-11-01

    Maya Blue is an ancient blue pigment composed of palygorskite clay and indigo. It was used by the ancient Maya and provides a dramatic background for some of the most impressive murals throughout Mesoamerica. Despite exposure to acids, alkalis, and chemical solvents, the color of the Maya Blue pigment remains unaltered. The chemical interaction between palygorskite and indigo form an organic/inorganic complex with the carbonyl oxygen of the indigo bound to a surface Al(3+) in the Si-O lattice. In addition indigo will undergo an oxidation to dehydroindigo during preparation. The dehydro-indigo molecule forms a similar but stronger complex with the Al(3+). Thus, Maya Blue varies in color due to the mixed indigo/dehydroindigo complex. The above conclusions are the result of application of multiple techniques (X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis/thermal gravimetric analysis, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopy) to the characterization of the organic/inorganic complex. A picture of the bonding of the organic molecule to the palygorskite surface forming a surface complex is developed and supported by the results of density functional theory calculations. We also report that other organic molecules such as thioindigo form similar organic/inorganic complexes thus, opening an entirely new class of complex materials for future applications.

  12. Polish Terms for "Blue" in the Perspective of Vantage Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanulewicz, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    The Polish set of terms for blue includes, inter alia, the following adjectives: "niebieski" "blue", "blekitny" "(sky) blue", "granatowy" "navy blue", "lazurowy" "azure", "modry" "(intense) blue" and "siny" "(grey) violet-blue". The adjective "niebieski" is the basic term; however, it shares some of its functions with "blekitny", which is…

  13. Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Michele M.; Jamieson, Christopher G.; Lal, Geeta

    1996-01-01

    Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, an uncommon condition, is manifested by gastrointestinal and skin hemangiomas and gastrointestinal hemorrhage causing anemia. The authors report a unique case of the syndrome in association with a congenital cardiac malformation. A 26-year-old woman presented with iron-deficiency anemia after the birth of her first child. She had a history of skin and gastrointestinal hemangiomas and tetralogy of Fallot. Endoscopy revealed multiple new intestinal hemangiomas, which were removed through enterotomies with resolution of the anemia. Iron therapy was prescribed, and her condition was stable at follow-up 5 years later. PMID:8599795

  14. Spectroscopy of blue stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, K. J.; Warnock, A., III; Nations, H. L.; Barden, S. C.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra have been obtained for the brightest objects from a list of blue stellar objects found in a Palomar Schmidt field centered on Kapteyn Selected Area 28. Four of the objects presented here comprise a complete sample of objects with UV excess and magnitudes brighter than or equal to B = 16.3 mag. The object with the largest UV excess is a previously undiscovered quasar of redshift 0.25 and cataloged B magnitude of 15.6 mag. The object shows some evidence of variability. Spectroscopy for one bright object in a companion field centered on Selected Area 29 is also presented.

  15. Formation of nanoparticles of blue haze enhanced by anthropogenic pollution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renyi; Wang, Lin; Khalizov, Alexei F; Zhao, Jun; Zheng, Jun; McGraw, Robert L; Molina, Luisa T

    2009-10-20

    The molecular processes leading to formation of nanoparticles of blue haze over forested areas are highly complex and not fully understood. We show that the interaction between biogenic organic acids and sulfuric acid enhances nucleation and initial growth of those nanoparticles. With one cis-pinonic acid and three to five sulfuric acid molecules in the critical nucleus, the hydrophobic organic acid part enhances the stability and growth on the hydrophilic sulfuric acid counterpart. Dimers or heterodimers of biogenic organic acids alone are unfavorable for new particle formation and growth because of their hydrophobicity. Condensation of low-volatility organic acids is hindered on nano-sized particles, whereas ammonia contributes negligibly to particle growth in the size range of 3-30 nm. The results suggest that initial growth from the critical nucleus to the detectable size of 2-3 nm most likely occurs by condensation of sulfuric acid and water, implying that anthropogenic sulfur emissions (mainly from power plants) strongly influence formation of terrestrial biogenic particles and exert larger direct and indirect climate forcing than previously recognized.

  16. Anti-Cytomegalovirus Activity of the Anthraquinone Atanyl Blue PRL

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Zohaib; Al-Mahdi, Zainab; Zhu, Yali; McKee, Zachary; Parris, Deborah S.; Parikh, Hardik I.; Kellogg, Glen E.; Kuchta, Alison; McVoy, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) causes significant disease in immunocompromised patients and serious birth defects if acquired in utero. Available CMV antivirals target the viral DNA polymerase, have significant toxicities, and suffer from resistance. New drugs targeting different pathways would be beneficial. The anthraquinone emodin is proposed to inhibit herpes simplex virus by blocking the viral nuclease. Emodin and related anthraquinones are also reported to inhibit CMV. In the present study, emodin reduced CMV infectious yield with an EC50 of 4.9 μM but was cytotoxic at concentrations only two-fold higher. Related anthraquinones acid blue 40 and alizarin violet R inhibited CMV at only high concentrations (238–265 μM) that were also cytotoxic. However, atanyl blue PRL inhibited infectious yield of CMV with an EC50 of 6.3 μM, significantly below its 50% cytotoxic concentration of 216 μM. Atanyl blue PRL reduced CMV infectivity and inhibited spread. When added up to one h after infection, it dramatically reduced CMV immediate early protein expression and blocked viral DNA synthesis. However, it had no antiviral activity when added 24 h after infection. Interestingly, atanyl blue PRL inhibited nuclease activities of purified CMV UL98 protein with IC50 of 4.5 and 9.3 μM. These results indicate that atanyl blue PRL targets very early post-entry events in CMV replication and suggest it may act through inhibition of UL98, making it a novel CMV inhibitor. This compound may provide valuable insights into molecular events that occur at the earliest times post-infection and serve as a lead structure for antiviral development. PMID:25499125

  17. Blue space geographies: Enabling health in place.

    PubMed

    Foley, Ronan; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Drawing from research on therapeutic landscapes and relationships between environment, health and wellbeing, we propose the idea of 'healthy blue space' as an important new development Complementing research on healthy green space, blue space is defined as; 'health-enabling places and spaces, where water is at the centre of a range of environments with identifiable potential for the promotion of human wellbeing'. Using theoretical ideas from emotional and relational geographies and critical understandings of salutogenesis, the value of blue space to health and wellbeing is recognised and evaluated. Six individual papers from five different countries consider how health can be enabled in mixed blue space settings. Four sub-themes; embodiment, inter-subjectivity, activity and meaning, document multiple experiences within a range of healthy blue spaces. Finally, we suggest a considerable research agenda - theoretical, methodological and applied - for future work within different forms of blue space. All are suggested as having public health policy relevance in social and public space.

  18. Blue Photoluminescence From Silacyclobutene Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernisz, Udo

    1999-04-01

    Organosilicon compounds in which the Si atom is bound to an aromatic moiety such as a phenyl group, exhibit strong blue photoluminescence when excited with UV light (for example at a wavelength of 337 nm). This phenomenon was investigated quantitatively at room temperature and at the temperature of liquid nitrogen (78 K) by measuring the emission and excitation spectra of the total luminescence, and of the phosphorescence, for a silacyclobutene compound in which two phenyl groups are joined across the C=C double bond of the ring. The effect of a series of organic substituents on the Si atom was investigated as well as the time dependence of the phosphorescence intensity decay for this class of materials. A tentative model of the energy levels in this compound is proposed. The observation of visible blue emission -- in contrast to photoluminescence in the UV from the aromatic groups -- is explained by the Si-C bond lowering the energy of the molecular orbitals, an effect that is currently under study for a range of Si-containing compounds. Synthesis of the silacyclobutene compounds was performed at the laboratory of Prof. N. Auner, now at J.W. Goethe Universität, Frankfurt, Germany. His contributions, and those of his collaborators, to the work reported here are gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Geothermal Technologies Program Blue Ribbon Panel Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-06-17

    The Geothermal Technologies Program assembled a geothermal Blue Ribbon Panel on March 22-23, 2011 in Albuquerque, New Mexico for a guided discussion on the future of geothermal energy in the United States and the role of the DOE Program. The Geothermal Blue Ribbon Panel Report captures the discussions and recommendations of the experts. An addendum is available here: http://www.eere.energy.gov/geothermal/pdfs/gtp_blue_ribbon_panel_report_addendum10-2011.pdf

  20. The Blue Dots Initiative and Roadmapping Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudé du Foresto, V.

    2010-10-01

    The Blue Dots initiative (a grassroot effort to build a scientific community in Europe around the exoplanet theme) is introduced. The Blue Dots activities include the elaboration of a roadmap towards the spectroscopic characterization of habitable exoplanets, a summary of which is presented here. While the roadmap will need to be updated regularly, it is expected that the methodology developed within Blue Dots will provide a durable framework for the elaboration of future revisions.

  1. Morphological responses of wheat to blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Bugbee, B.

    1992-01-01

    Blue light significantly increased tillering in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants grown at the same photosynthetic photon flux (PPF). Plants were grown under two levels of blue light (400-500 nm) in a controlled environment with continuous irradiation. Plants received either 50 micromoles m-2 s-1 of blue light or 2 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light from filtered metal halide lamps at a total irradiance of 200 micromoles m-2 s-1 PPF (400-700 nm). Plants tillered an average of 25% more under the higher level of blue light. Blue light also caused a small, but consistent, increase in main culm development, measured as Haun stage. Leaf length was reduced by higher levels of blue light, while plant dry-mass was not significantly affected by blue light. Applying the principle of equivalent light action, the results suggest that tillering and leaf elongation are mediated by the blue-UV light receptor(s) because phytochrome photoequilibrium for each treatment were nearly identical.

  2. Extractive spectrophotometric methods for determination of diltiazem HCl in pharmaceutical formulations using bromothymol blue, bromophenol blue and bromocresol green.

    PubMed

    Rahman, N; Hejaz-Azmi, S N

    2000-12-01

    Three simple and sensitive extractive spectrophotometric methods have been described for the assay of diltiazem hydrochloride either in pure form or in pharmaceutical formulations. The developed methods involve formation of coloured chloroform extractable ion-pair complexes of the drug with bromothymol blue (BTB), bromophenol blue (BPB) and bromocresol green (BCG) in acidic medium. The extracted complexes showed absorbance maxima at 415 nm for all three methods. Beer's law is obeyed in the concentration ranges 2.5-20.0, 2.5-10.0 and 2.5-12.5 microg ml(-1) with BTB, BPB and BCG, respectively. The methods have been applied to the determination of drug in commercial tablets and capsules. Results of analysis were validated statistically and through recovery studies.

  3. Anion channels and the stimulation of anthocyanin accumulation by blue light in Arabidopsis seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noh, B.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Activation of anion channels by blue light begins within seconds of irradiation in seedlings and is related to the ensuing growth inhibition. 5-Nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB) is a potent, selective, and reversible blocker of these anion channels in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we show that 20 microM NPPB blocked 72% of the blue-light-induced accumulation of anthocyanin pigments in seedlings. Feeding biosynthetic intermediates to wild-type and tt5 seedlings provided evidence that NPPB prevented blue light from up-regulating one or more steps between and including phenylalanine ammonia lyase and chalcone isomerase. NPPB was found to have no significant effect on the blue-light-induced increase in transcript levels of PAL1, CHS, CHI, or DFR, which are genes that encode anthocyanin-biosynthetic enzymes. Immunoblots revealed that NPPB also did not inhibit the accumulation of the chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, or flavanone-3-hydroxylase proteins. This is in contrast to the reduced anthocyanin accumulation displayed by a mutant lacking the HY4 blue-light receptor, as hy4 displayed reduced expression of the above enzymes. Taken together, the data indicate that blue light acting through HY4 leads to an increase in the amount of biosynthetic enzymes but blue light must also act through a separate, anion-channel-dependent system to create a fully functional biosynthetic pathway.

  4. Anion Channels and the Stimulation of Anthocyanin Accumulation by Blue Light in Arabidopsis Seedlings1

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Bosl; Spalding, Edgar P.

    1998-01-01

    Activation of anion channels by blue light begins within seconds of irradiation in seedlings and is related to the ensuing growth inhibition. 5-Nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB) is a potent, selective, and reversible blocker of these anion channels in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we show that 20 μm NPPB blocked 72% of the blue-light-induced accumulation of anthocyanin pigments in seedlings. Feeding biosynthetic intermediates to wild-type and tt5 seedlings provided evidence that NPPB prevented blue light from up-regulating one or more steps between and including phenylalanine ammonia lyase and chalcone isomerase. NPPB was found to have no significant effect on the blue-light-induced increase in transcript levels of PAL1, CHS, CHI, or DFR, which are genes that encode anthocyanin-biosynthetic enzymes. Immunoblots revealed that NPPB also did not inhibit the accumulation of the chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, or flavanone-3-hydroxylase proteins. This is in contrast to the reduced anthocyanin accumulation displayed by a mutant lacking the HY4 blue-light receptor, as hy4 displayed reduced expression of the above enzymes. Taken together, the data indicate that blue light acting through HY4 leads to an increase in the amount of biosynthetic enzymes, but blue light must also act through a separate, anion-channel-dependent system to create a fully functional biosynthetic pathway. PMID:9489009

  5. Blue angioedema of eyelip after patent blue injection for lymphatic mapping procedure.

    PubMed

    Weng, P-W; Hsu, H-M; Chen, T-W; Hsieh, C-B; Chang, T-M; Chen, V T K; Yu, J-C

    2007-07-01

    Sentinel node biopsy using patent blue dye in breast cancer is a well-documented procedure to assess the axillary status. We presented an unusual and previously unreported complication of simple blue angioedema over bilaterally periorbital tissue after blue dye injection.

  6. Blue moons and large fires.

    PubMed

    Porch, W M

    1989-05-15

    Theoretical analysis of simulations of optical effects from the 1950 Canadian forest fires has revealed what conditions are necessary for large fires to cause blue moons and suns. This study shows how large fires can be used to improve our understanding of long range pollution transport on a global scale as well as the evolution of aerosol radiative effects so important to global climate studies. The most important aerosol characteristics are the initial submicron smoke particle concentration and areal extent of the fire and its effect on fire plume dispersion. Capping clouds above the fire and near saturation humidity effects are simulated and found to help establish anomalous optical effects. Data are included showing probable anomalous extinction events associated with concentrated fire plumes.

  7. Long-persistence blue phosphors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, William M. (Inventor); Jia, Weiyi (Inventor); Lu, Lizhu (Inventor); Yuan, Huabiao (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to phosphors including long-persistence blue phosphors. Phosphors of the invention are represented by the general formula: MO . mAl.sub.2 O.sub.3 :Eu.sup.2+,R.sup.3+ wherein m is a number ranging from about 1.6 to about 2.2, M is Sr or a combination of Sr with Ca and Ba or both, R.sup.3+ is a trivalent metal ion or trivalent Bi or a mixture of these trivalent ions, Eu.sup.2+ is present at a level up to about 5 mol % of M, and R.sup.3+ is present at a level up to about 5 mol % of M. Phosphors of this invention include powders, ceramics, single crystals and single crystal fibers. A method of manufacturing improved phosphors and a method of manufacturing single crystal phosphors are also provided.

  8. Spectroscopic investigation on sonodynamic and sonocatalytic damage of BSA molecules by Thymol Blue (TB) derivants under ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dandan; Li, Ying; Gao, Jingqun; Wang, Baoxin

    2014-07-15

    In this paper, the Thymol Blue derivants including Thymol Blue (thymolsulfonphthalein), Thymol Blue-DA (3,3'-Bis [N,N-bis (carboxymethyl) aminomethyl] thymolsulfonphthalein) and Thymol Blue-DA-Fe(III) (3,3'-Bis [N,N-bis (carboxymethyl) aminomethyl] thymolsulfonphthalein-Ferrous(III)) were adopted as sonosensitizers to study the sonodynamic and sonocatalytic activities under ultrasonic irradiation. At first, the interaction of Thymol Blue derivants with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. On that basis, the sonodynamic and sonocatalytic damages of Thymol Blue derivants to BSA under ultrasonic irradiation were investigated by the combination of UV-vis, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Meanwhile, some influenced factors (ultrasonic irradiation time, Thymol Blue derivants concentration and ionic strength) on the damaging degree of BSA molecules were also reviewed. In addition, synchronous fluorescence spectra were used to estimate the binding and damage sites of Thymol Blue derivants to BSA. Finally, the generation of ROS during sonodynamic and sonocatalytic processes was confirmed by the method of Oxidation-Extraction Spectrometry (OEP). Perhaps, this paper may offer some important subjects for the study of Thymol Blue derivants in sonodynamic therapy (SDT) and sonocatalytic therapy (SCT) technologies for tumor treatment and the effect of the amino acid and central metal.

  9. Spectroscopic investigation on sonodynamic and sonocatalytic damage of BSA molecules by Thymol Blue (TB) derivants under ultrasonic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dandan; Li, Ying; Gao, Jingqun; Wang, Baoxin

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the Thymol Blue derivants including Thymol Blue (thymolsulfonphthalein), Thymol Blue-DA (3,3‧-Bis [N,N-bis (carboxymethyl) aminomethyl] thymolsulfonphthalein) and Thymol Blue-DA-Fe(III) (3,3‧-Bis [N,N-bis (carboxymethyl) aminomethyl] thymolsulfonphthalein-Ferrous(III)) were adopted as sonosensitizers to study the sonodynamic and sonocatalytic activities under ultrasonic irradiation. At first, the interaction of Thymol Blue derivants with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. On that basis, the sonodynamic and sonocatalytic damages of Thymol Blue derivants to BSA under ultrasonic irradiation were investigated by the combination of UV-vis, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Meanwhile, some influenced factors (ultrasonic irradiation time, Thymol Blue derivants concentration and ionic strength) on the damaging degree of BSA molecules were also reviewed. In addition, synchronous fluorescence spectra were used to estimate the binding and damage sites of Thymol Blue derivants to BSA. Finally, the generation of ROS during sonodynamic and sonocatalytic processes was confirmed by the method of Oxidation-Extraction Spectrometry (OEP). Perhaps, this paper may offer some important subjects for the study of Thymol Blue derivants in sonodynamic therapy (SDT) and sonocatalytic therapy (SCT) technologies for tumor treatment and the effect of the amino acid and central metal.

  10. Sequestration of Methylene Blue into Polyelectrolyte Complex Coacervates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mengmeng; Zacharia, Nicole S

    2016-08-01

    Polyelectrolyte complex coacervation is a process that has been proposed as a model for protocell formation due to its ability to compartmentalize chemicals in solution without a membrane. During the liquid-liquid phase separation that results in water rich and polyelectrolyte rich phases, small molecules present in solution selectively partition to one phase over the other. This sequestration is based on relative affinities. Here, a study of the sequestration of methylene blue (MB) into the complex coacervate phase of three pairs of synthetic polyelectrolytes is presented; branched polyethylene imine with polyacrylic acid, polyvinyl sulfonate, or poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid). These materials are characterized with UV-vis, zeta potential measurements, and dynamic light scattering. The branched polyethylene imine/poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) system is shown to have a significantly higher sequestration capacity for the MB as compared to either of the other two systems, based on π-π interactions which are not possible in the other systems. PMID:27336461

  11. Quirks of dye nomenclature. 1. Evans blue.

    PubMed

    Cooksey, C J

    2014-02-01

    The history, origin, identity, chemistry and use of Evans blue dye are described along with the first application to staining by Herbert McLean Evans in 1914. In the 1930s, the dye was marketed under the name, Evans blue dye, which was profoundly more acceptable than the ponderous chemical name. PMID:23957706

  12. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Great blue heron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Short, Henry L.; Cooper, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    The great blue heron is the largest, most widely distributed, and best known of the American herons (Henny 1972). Great blue herons occur in a variety of habitats from freshwater lakes and rivers to brackish marshes, lagoons, mangrove areas, and coastal wetlands (Spendelow and Patton in prep.).

  13. 21 CFR 73.50 - Ultramarine blue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... million. Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. (c) Uses and restrictions. The color additive ultramarine blue may be safely used for coloring salt intended for animal feed subject to the restriction that the quantity of ultramarine blue does not exceed 0.5 percent by weight of the salt. (d)...

  14. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available. Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of…

  15. In vivo protein crystallization in combination with highly brilliant radiation sources offers novel opportunities for the structural analysis of post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Duszenko, Michael; Redecke, Lars; Mudogo, Celestin Nzanzu; Sommer, Benjamin Philip; Mogk, Stefan; Oberthuer, Dominik; Betzel, Christian

    2015-08-01

    During the last decade, the number of three-dimensional structures solved by X-ray crystallography has increased dramatically. By 2014, it had crossed the landmark of 100 000 biomolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. This tremendous increase in successfully crystallized proteins is primarily owing to improvements in cloning strategies, the automation of the crystallization process and new innovative approaches to monitor crystallization. However, these improvements are mainly restricted to soluble proteins, while the crystallization and structural analysis of membrane proteins or proteins that undergo major post-translational modifications remains challenging. In addition, the need for relatively large crystals for conventional X-ray crystallography usually prevents the analysis of dynamic processes within cells. Thus, the advent of high-brilliance synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources and the establishment of serial crystallography (SFX) have opened new avenues in structural analysis using crystals that were formerly unusable. The successful structure elucidation of cathepsin B, accomplished by the use of microcrystals obtained by in vivo crystallization in baculovirus-infected Sf9 insect cells, clearly proved that crystals grown intracellularly are very well suited for X-ray analysis. Here, methods by which in vivo crystals can be obtained, isolated and used for structural analysis by novel highly brilliant XFEL and synchrotron-radiation sources are summarized and discussed.

  16. Synthesis of highly uniform Cu2O spheres by a two-step approach and their assembly to form photonic crystals with a brilliant color.

    PubMed

    Su, Xin; Chang, Jie; Wu, Suli; Tang, Bingtao; Zhang, Shufen

    2016-03-21

    Monodisperse semiconductor colloidal spheres with a high refractive index hold great potential for building photonic crystals with a strong band gap, but the difficulty in separating the nucleation and growth processes makes it challenging to prepare highly uniform semiconductor colloidal spheres. Herein, real monodisperse Cu2O spheres were prepared via a hot-injection & heating-up two-step method using diethylene glycol as a milder reducing agent. The diameter of the as prepared Cu2O spheres can be tuned from 90 nm to 190 nm precisely. The SEM images reveal that the obtained Cu2O spheres have a narrow size distribution, which permits their self-assembly to form photonic crystals. The effects of precursor concentration and heating rates on the size and morphology of the Cu2O spheres were investigated in detail. The results indicate that the key points of the method include the burst nucleation to form seeds at a high temperature followed by rapid cooling to prevent agglomeration, and appropriate precursor concentration as well as a moderate growth rate during the further growth process. Importantly, photonic crystal films exhibiting a brilliant structural color were fabricated with the obtained monodisperse Cu2O spheres as building blocks, proving the possibility of making photonic crystals with a strong band gap. The developed method was also successfully applied to prepare monodisperse CdS spheres with diameters in the range from 110 nm to 210 nm. PMID:26931519

  17. In vivo protein crystallization in combination with highly brilliant radiation sources offers novel opportunities for the structural analysis of post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Duszenko, Michael; Redecke, Lars; Mudogo, Celestin Nzanzu; Sommer, Benjamin Philip; Mogk, Stefan; Oberthuer, Dominik; Betzel, Christian

    2015-08-01

    During the last decade, the number of three-dimensional structures solved by X-ray crystallography has increased dramatically. By 2014, it had crossed the landmark of 100 000 biomolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. This tremendous increase in successfully crystallized proteins is primarily owing to improvements in cloning strategies, the automation of the crystallization process and new innovative approaches to monitor crystallization. However, these improvements are mainly restricted to soluble proteins, while the crystallization and structural analysis of membrane proteins or proteins that undergo major post-translational modifications remains challenging. In addition, the need for relatively large crystals for conventional X-ray crystallography usually prevents the analysis of dynamic processes within cells. Thus, the advent of high-brilliance synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources and the establishment of serial crystallography (SFX) have opened new avenues in structural analysis using crystals that were formerly unusable. The successful structure elucidation of cathepsin B, accomplished by the use of microcrystals obtained by in vivo crystallization in baculovirus-infected Sf9 insect cells, clearly proved that crystals grown intracellularly are very well suited for X-ray analysis. Here, methods by which in vivo crystals can be obtained, isolated and used for structural analysis by novel highly brilliant XFEL and synchrotron-radiation sources are summarized and discussed. PMID:26249677

  18. Cyanobacterial Blue Color Formation during Lysis under Natural Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Kiyomi; Tomita, Koji; Hasegawa, Masateru; Bober, Beata; Harada, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce numerous volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as β-cyclocitral, geosmin, and 2-methylisoborneol, which show lytic activity against cyanobacteria. Among these compounds, only β-cyclocitral causes a characteristic color change from green to blue (blue color formation) in the culture broth during the lysis process. In August 2008 and September 2010, the lysis of cyanobacteria involving blue color formation was observed at Lake Tsukui in northern Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. We collected lake water containing the cyanobacteria and investigated the VOCs, such as β-cyclocitral, β-ionone, 1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-phenylethanol, as well as the number of cyanobacterial cells and their damage and pH changes. As a result, the following results were confirmed: the detection of several VOCs, including β-cyclocitral and its oxidation product, 2,2,6-trimethylcyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid; the identification of phycocyanin based on its visible spectrum; the lower pH (6.7 and 5.4) of the lysed samples; and characteristic morphological change in the damaged cyanobacterial cells. We also encountered the same phenomenon on 6 September 2013 in Lake Sagami in northern Kanagawa Prefecture and obtained almost the same results, such as blue color formation, decreasing pH, damaged cells, and detection of VOCs, including the oxidation products of β-cyclocitral. β-Cyclocitral derived from Microcystis has lytic activity against Microcystis itself but has stronger inhibitory activity against other cyanobacteria and algae, suggesting that the VOCs play an important role in the ecology of aquatic environments. PMID:25662969

  19. Cryptochrome 1 controls tomato development in response to blue light.

    PubMed

    Ninu; Ahmad; Miarelli; Cashmore; Giuliano

    1999-06-01

    Cryptochrome genes (CRY) are a novel class of plant genes encoding proteins that bear a strong resemblance to photolyases, a rare class of flavoproteins that absorb light in the blue (B) and UV-A regions of the spectrum and utilise it for photorepair of UV-damaged DNA. In Arabidopsis, both CRY1 and CRY2 are implicated in numerous blue light-dependent responses, including inhibition of hypocotyl elongation, leaf and cotyledon expansion, pigment biosynthesis, stem growth and internode elongation, control of flowering time and phototropism. No information about the in vivo function of CRY genes is available in other plant species. The tomato CRY1 gene (TCRY1) encodes a protein of 679 amino acids, which shows 78% identity and 88% similarity to Arabidopsis CRY1. In order to verify the in vivo function of TCRY1, we constructed antisense tomato plants using the C-terminal portion of the gene. Partial repression of both mRNA and protein levels was observed in one of the transformants. The progeny from this transformant showed an elongated hypocotyl under blue but not under red light. This character co-segregated with the transgene and was dependent on transgene dosage. An additional, partially elongated phenotype was observed in adult plants grown in the greenhouse under dim light and short days with no artificial illumination. This phenotype was suppressed by artificial illumination of both short and long photoperiods. The synthesis of anthocyanins under blue light was reduced in antisense seedlings. In contrast, carotenoid and chlorophyll levels and second positive phototropic curvature were essentially unaltered.

  20. Blue color formation of cyanobacteria with beta-cyclocitral.

    PubMed

    Harada, Ken-Ichi; Ozaki, Keiko; Tsuzuki, Sayaka; Kato, Hajime; Hasegawa, Masateru; Kuroda, Emilia K; Arii, Suzue; Tsuji, Kiyomi

    2009-11-01

    Volatile compounds, such as beta-cyclocitral, geosmin, and 2-methylisoborneol, from cyanobacteria showed a lytic activity against cyanobacteria. Particularly, beta-cyclocitral caused an interesting color change in the culture broth from green to blue during the lysis process. In the present study, the lytic behavior of various cyanobacteria with beta-cyclocitral was investigated, and a mechanism for the blue color formation was developed. beta-Cyclocitral lysed both the laboratory strains of any genera and bloom samples including many species of cyanobacteria, and caused the characteristic color change from green to blue. beta-Cyclocitral provided a characteristic behavior, such that the absorption maxima of chlorophyll-a and beta-carotene disappeared, but that of phycocyanin still remained after 12 h, which indicated that beta-cyclocitral decomposed chlorophyll-a and beta-carotene rapidly, so that the inherent colors from the tolerant water-soluble pigments became observable in the cultured broth. This phenomenon was confirmed by another experiment using Phormidium (NIES-611), which showed a pink color derived from phycoerythrin. beta-Cyclocitral was more easily oxidized when compared with similar aldehyde compounds, so that the pH of the solution quickly decreased to 4.5. An oxidation product of beta-cyclocitral in water solution was isolated and identified as 2,6,6-trimethylcyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid. This study provides support that beta-cyclocitral derived from cyanobacteria plays an important role in the lysis of cyanobacteria and participates in the blue color formation under natural conditions.

  1. Cyanobacterial blue color formation during lysis under natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Arii, Suzue; Tsuji, Kiyomi; Tomita, Koji; Hasegawa, Masateru; Bober, Beata; Harada, Ken-ichi

    2015-04-01

    Cyanobacteria produce numerous volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as β-cyclocitral, geosmin, and 2-methylisoborneol, which show lytic activity against cyanobacteria. Among these compounds, only β-cyclocitral causes a characteristic color change from green to blue (blue color formation) in the culture broth during the lysis process. In August 2008 and September 2010, the lysis of cyanobacteria involving blue color formation was observed at Lake Tsukui in northern Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. We collected lake water containing the cyanobacteria and investigated the VOCs, such as β-cyclocitral, β-ionone, 1-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-phenylethanol, as well as the number of cyanobacterial cells and their damage and pH changes. As a result, the following results were confirmed: the detection of several VOCs, including β-cyclocitral and its oxidation product, 2,2,6-trimethylcyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid; the identification of phycocyanin based on its visible spectrum; the lower pH (6.7 and 5.4) of the lysed samples; and characteristic morphological change in the damaged cyanobacterial cells. We also encountered the same phenomenon on 6 September 2013 in Lake Sagami in northern Kanagawa Prefecture and obtained almost the same results, such as blue color formation, decreasing pH, damaged cells, and detection of VOCs, including the oxidation products of β-cyclocitral. β-Cyclocitral derived from Microcystis has lytic activity against Microcystis itself but has stronger inhibitory activity against other cyanobacteria and algae, suggesting that the VOCs play an important role in the ecology of aquatic environments.

  2. Anguilla: tranquility wrapped in blue.

    PubMed

    Langmaid, P

    Anguilla is the most northerly of the Leeward Islands, situated at 63.05 W, 18.12 N for those of my colleagues still able to afford a boat with transatlantic capability after the new contract, and wishing to visit. Sixteen miles long and three and a half miles wide at its widest point, Anguilla is an independent British Crown Colony, and home to around 7000 citizens, mainly of African descent and some of Irish descent. It is an uncrowded, easy-to-explore island with a spinal road running the length of the island, and 'natural' roads leading to the beaches and some villages. There are 12 miles of beaches where white sand (VMK A1) meets crystal clear, turquoise blue water, at a comfortable 75 degrees F. Is this the answer to 'Ski with occlusion', the ultimate postgraduate course venue? Probably, until another dentist from deep in the Pacific writes in to the Journal with a view from his/her surgery.

  3. Blue protein with red fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Swagatha; Yu, Chi-Li; Ferraro, Daniel J.; Sudha, Sai; Pal, Samir Kumar; Schaefer, Wayne F.; Gibson, David T.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2016-01-01

    The walleye (Sander vitreus) is a golden yellow fish that inhabits the Northern American lakes. The recent sightings of the blue walleye and the correlation of its sighting to possible increased UV radiation have been proposed earlier. The underlying molecular basis of its adaptation to increased UV radiation is the presence of a protein (Sandercyanin)–ligand complex in the mucus of walleyes. Degradation of heme by UV radiation results in the formation of Biliverdin IXα (BLA), the chromophore bound to Sandercyanin. We show that Sandercyanin is a monomeric protein that forms stable homotetramers on addition of BLA to the protein. A structure of the Sandercyanin–BLA complex, purified from the fish mucus, reveals a glycosylated protein with a lipocalin fold. This protein–ligand complex absorbs light in the UV region (λmax of 375 nm) and upon excitation at this wavelength emits in the red region (λmax of 675 nm). Unlike all other known biliverdin-bound fluorescent proteins, the chromophore is noncovalently bound to the protein. We provide here a molecular rationale for the observed spectral properties of Sandercyanin. PMID:27688756

  4. [Biodegradation of reactive turquoise blue].

    PubMed

    Fu, L; Wen, X; Xu, L; Qian, Y

    2001-07-01

    In this study, the anaerobic degradation and the aerobic degradation of a kind of reactive dye--Reactive Turquoise Blue(RTB) were compared. The results proved that anaerobic sludge could only decompose RTB in the presence of glucose while aerobic sludge decomposed RTB with or without the presence of glucose (RTB of 20 mg/L was reduced by 37.4% through 24 hours' aerobic treatment with RTB as sole carbon source). The enhancement of glucose concentration was beneficial for both anaerobic and aerobic degradation of RTB: the anaerobic and the aerobic removal efficiencies were respectively 81.5% and 73.6% with RTB of 20 mg/L and glucose of 1200 mg/L. In the influent RTB concentration also had influence on the activity of anaerobic and aerobic microorganisms. When glucose concentration was 800 mg/L or 1200 mg/L and RTB concentration was 20 mg/L to 100 mg/L, anaerobic removal efficiency of RTB was higher than aerobic removal efficiency by 4.9%-27.2%, which meant that anaerobic bacteria is more powerful than aerobic bacteria in terms of RTB removal.

  5. Blue outliers among intermediate redshift quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziani, P.; Sulentic, J. W.; Stirpe, G. M.; Dultzin, D.; Del Olmo, A.; Martínez-Carballo, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    [OIII]λ 5007 "blue outliers"—that are suggestive of outflows in the narrow line region of quasars—appear to be much more common at intermediate z (high luminosity) than at low z. About 40~% of quasars in a Hamburg ESO intermediate z sample of 52 sources qualify as "blue outliers" (i.e., quasars with [OIII]λλ 4959,5007 lines showing large systematic blueshifts with respect to rest frame). We discuss major findings on what has become an intriguing field in active galactic nuclei research and stress the relevance of "blue outliers" to feedback and host galaxy evolution.

  6. Blue jays nest in an unusual structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, Erin L.; Lyons, Curtis P.; Sedgwick, James A.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a successful Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) nest in an unusual structure on the side of a building.  The nest was located near the edge of the species' range along the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado.  The nest was completely obvious, suggesting that the structure itself provided adequate cover and sercurity for the jays.  Blue Jays appear to be declining in some areas of the United States such as the Southeast.  Structures such as the one we describe may be more useful in attracting Blue Jays than the nesting platforms available commercially.

  7. Concurrent protein synthesis is required for in vivo chitin synthesis in postmolt blue crabs

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, M.N. )

    1990-12-01

    Chitin synthesis in crustaceans involves the deposition of a protein-polysaccharide complex at the apical surface of epithelial cells which secrete the cuticle or exoskeleton. The present study involves an examination of in vivo incorporation of radiolabeled amino acids and amino sugars into the cuticle of postmolt blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus. Rates of incorporation of both 3H leucine and 3H threonine were linear with respect to time of incubation. Incorporation of 3H threonine into the endocuticle was inhibited greater than 90% in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor, puromycin. Linear incorporation of 14C glucosamine into the cuticle was also demonstrated; a significant improvement of radiolabeling was achieved by using 14C-N-acetylglucosamine as the labeled precursor. Incorporation of 3H-N-acetylglucosamine into the cuticle of postmolt blue crabs was inhibited 89% by puromycin, indicating that concurrent protein synthesis is required for the deposition of chitin in the blue crab. Autoradiographic analysis of control vs. puromycin-treated crabs indicates that puromycin totally blocks labeling of the new endocuticle with 3H glucosamine. These results are consistent with the notion that crustacean chitin is synthesized as a protein-polysaccharide complex. Analysis of the postmolt and intermolt blue crab cuticle indicates that the exoskeleton contains about 60% protein and 40% chitin. The predominant amino acids are arginine, glutamic acid, alanine, aspartic acid, and threonine.

  8. Extraction of prussian blue into chloroform in the presence of ajatin.

    PubMed

    Galík, A; Vopravilová, J

    1974-04-01

    Extraction of Prussian Blue into chloroform in the presence of ajatin (dimethyl-lauryl-benzylammonium bromide) is proposed for the concentration and determination of ferrocyanide ion. Optimum concentrations of sulphuric acid and of ajatin have been established and the selectivity of the extraction has been investigated. Ways of eliminating some interferences are discussed.

  9. First report of Penicillium crustosum causing blue mold on stored apple fruit in Serbia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium crustosum Thom causes blue mold on pome fruits and is also regularly found on cheese, nuts and soil. The fungus produces an array of mycotoxins that impact human health, including penitrem A, roquefortine C, terrestric acid, and cyclopenol. In January and February 2013, decayed apples, ‘...

  10. 21 CFR 74.102 - FD&C Blue No. 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Blue No. 2 is principally the disodium salt of 2-(1,3-dihydro-3-oxo-5-sulfo-2H-indol-2-ylidene)-2,3-dihydro-3-oxo-1H-indole-5-sulfonic acid (CAS Reg. No. 860-22-0) with smaller amounts of the disodium salt... Reg. No. 54947-75-0) and the sodium salt of...

  11. 21 CFR 74.102 - FD&C Blue No. 2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Blue No. 2 is principally the disodium salt of 2-(1,3-dihydro-3-oxo-5-sulfo-2H-indol-2-ylidene)-2,3-dihydro-3-oxo-1H-indole-5-sulfonic acid (CAS Reg. No. 860-22-0) with smaller amounts of the disodium salt... Reg. No. 54947-75-0) and the sodium salt of...

  12. Photophysics of poly(p-pyridine): Blue electroluminescent devices from a soluble conjugated polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Jessen, S.W.; Gebler, D.D.; Wang, Y.Z.

    1995-12-01

    Poly({rho}-pyridine) (PPy) is a conjugated polymer which luminesces strongly in the blue wavelength region. PPy is soluble in hydrochloric or formic acid and is stable in air. We report the fluorescence and transient absorption spectrum of PPy in the visible region.

  13. Evaluation of fruit quality and susceptibility to blue mold of nine Asian pear cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nine Asian pear cultivars (Atago, Hosui, Isiiwase, Kosui, Olympic, Shinko, Shinsui, Ya Li, and Yoinashi) were evaluated for quality (firmness, titratable acidity, and soluble solids) and susceptibility to the blue mold pathogen Penicillium expansum. Fruit were grown at the University of Maryland Ext...

  14. Blue Ribbon Commission Tour of Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Saueressig

    2010-07-14

    The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future toured the Department of Energy's Hanford Site on July 14, 2010. Commission members, invited guests, and members of the public visited facilities that store high-level, radioactive waste.

  15. Blue Ribbon Commission Tour of Hanford Site

    ScienceCinema

    Paul Saueressig

    2016-07-12

    The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future toured the Department of Energy's Hanford Site on July 14, 2010. Commission members, invited guests, and members of the public visited facilities that store high-level, radioactive waste.

  16. Blue Ribbon Panel Report Cover Letter

    Cancer.gov

    The letter from NCI Acting Director Douglas R. Lowy, M.D., to Vice President Biden that accompanied the Blue Ribbon Panel final report, thanking the Vice President for his commitment to and leadership of the Cancer Moonshot.

  17. Blue Ribbon Panel 2016 Video Playlist

    Cancer.gov

    Blue Ribbon Panel members discuss recommendations from the panel report that was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board. The playlist includes an overview video and 10 videos on the specific recommendations.

  18. Blue Ribbon Panel Report - BRP - Cancer Moonshot

    Cancer.gov

    The Blue Ribbon Panel Report outlines 10 recommendations to accelerate progress against cancer. The panel was established to ensure that the Cancer Moonshot's approaches are grounded in the best science.

  19. Blue Origin Conducts Pad Escape Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Blue Origin conducted a successful pad escape test Oct. 19 at the company's West Texas launch site, firing its pusher escape motor and launching a full-scale suborbital crew capsule from a simulate...

  20. Blue Origin Tests BE-3 Engine

    NASA Video Gallery

    Blue Origin successfully fires the thrust chamber assembly for its new 100,000 pound thrust BE-3 liquid oxygen, liquid hydrogen rocket engine. As part of the company's Reusable Booster System (RBS)...

  1. Phototherapy with turquoise versus blue light.

    PubMed

    Ebbesen, F; Agati, G; Pratesi, R

    2003-09-01

    Preterm jaundiced infants were treated by phototherapy with a new turquoise fluorescent lamp. This was more effective in reducing plasma total bilirubin in relation to light irradiance than the ubiquitously used blue fluorescent lamp.

  2. Bactobilin: blue bile pigment isolated from Clostridium tetanomorphum.

    PubMed Central

    Brumm, P J; Fried, J; Friedmann, H C

    1983-01-01

    A blue bile pigment, possessing four acetic and four propionic acid side chains has been isolated from extracts of the anaerobic microorganism Clostridium tetanomorphum and in smaller amounts from Propionibacterium shermanii. The compound could be prepared in larger amounts by incubation of C. tetanomorphum enzyme extracts with added delta-aminolevulinic acid. The ultraviolet-visible, infrared, and proton magnetic resonance spectra of the pigment indicate a chromophore of the biliverdin type. Field-desorption mass spectrometry of the purified methyl ester showed a strong molecular ion at m/e = 962. This corresponds to the molecular weight expected for the octamethyl ester of a bilatriene type of bile pigment structurally derived from uroporphyrin III or I. Of the five possible structures, two could be eliminated by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The name bactobilin is proposed for this previously unreported bile pigment. PMID:6575387

  3. Studies on plasma processing of blue dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, S. K.; P, Sindhoora L.; Mishra, S. C.; Mishra, B.

    2015-02-01

    Plasma smelting was carried out using blue dust and petroleum coke mixtures for five different compositions. By altering percentage of reductant and type of plasma forming gas, recovery rate and degree of metallization were calculated in order to examine the extent of reduction of blue dust. The products were characterized by XRD and optical microscopy techniques. The results of these investigations exhibited that highest degree of metallization and recovery rate of about 98% and 86% respectively, were achieved for nitrogen plasma smelted products.

  4. Blue-white screening liquid can eliminate false positives in blue-white colony screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y S

    2016-06-10

    Although blue-white screening based on α-complementation has been widely used in the screening of genetically modified bacteria, only a single blue-white screening is typically not enough to eliminate false positives. Sometimes, a secondary blue-white screening for the target colonies is required. In this study, two methods were used to investigate the feasibility of secondary blue-white screening for target colonies on lysogeny broth (LB)-ampicillin agar plates. The first method consisted of covering the target colonies grown on LB-ampicillin plate medium with a sterilized filter paper soaked in a solution of 60 μL 20 mg/mL X-gal and 8 μL 20% IPTG. The second method was that blue and white colonies were randomly selected from the blue-white screening plate medium and then re-streaked onto the blue-white screening medium. The colonies were then treated by two methods and incubated at 37°C for 12 h. The results showed that some of the white colonies treated by the two methods showed results similar to the colonies grown on the blue-white screening medium. These results indicate that the target colonies grown on blue-white screening medium can still be used to carry out a secondary blue-white screening. Thus, a blue-white screening liquid was successfully developed. Using the blue-white screening liquid, false positives can be eliminated directly based on the color of the target colonies. This will greatly improve the screening efficiency of positive clones and has important practical implications.

  5. Blue-white screening liquid can eliminate false positives in blue-white colony screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y S

    2016-01-01

    Although blue-white screening based on α-complementation has been widely used in the screening of genetically modified bacteria, only a single blue-white screening is typically not enough to eliminate false positives. Sometimes, a secondary blue-white screening for the target colonies is required. In this study, two methods were used to investigate the feasibility of secondary blue-white screening for target colonies on lysogeny broth (LB)-ampicillin agar plates. The first method consisted of covering the target colonies grown on LB-ampicillin plate medium with a sterilized filter paper soaked in a solution of 60 μL 20 mg/mL X-gal and 8 μL 20% IPTG. The second method was that blue and white colonies were randomly selected from the blue-white screening plate medium and then re-streaked onto the blue-white screening medium. The colonies were then treated by two methods and incubated at 37°C for 12 h. The results showed that some of the white colonies treated by the two methods showed results similar to the colonies grown on the blue-white screening medium. These results indicate that the target colonies grown on blue-white screening medium can still be used to carry out a secondary blue-white screening. Thus, a blue-white screening liquid was successfully developed. Using the blue-white screening liquid, false positives can be eliminated directly based on the color of the target colonies. This will greatly improve the screening efficiency of positive clones and has important practical implications. PMID:27323169

  6. Blue-phase liquid crystal droplets

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, José A.; Zhou, Ye; Rahimi, Mohammad; Bukusoglu, Emre; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Blue phases of liquid crystals represent unique ordered states of matter in which arrays of defects are organized into striking patterns. Most studies of blue phases to date have focused on bulk properties. In this work, we present a systematic study of blue phases confined into spherical droplets. It is found that, in addition to the so-called blue phases I and II, several new morphologies arise under confinement, with a complexity that increases with the chirality of the medium and with a nature that can be altered by surface anchoring. Through a combination of simulations and experiments, it is also found that one can control the wavelength at which blue-phase droplets absorb light by manipulating either their size or the strength of the anchoring, thereby providing a liquid–state analog of nanoparticles, where dimensions are used to control absorbance or emission. The results presented in this work also suggest that there are conditions where confinement increases the range of stability of blue phases, thereby providing intriguing prospects for applications. PMID:26460039

  7. Vibrio azureus emits blue-shifted light via an accessory blue fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Susumu; Karatani, Hajime; Wada, Minoru; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2012-04-01

    Luminous marine bacteria usually emit bluish-green light with a peak emission wavelength (λ(max) ) at about 490 nm. Some species belonging to the genus Photobacterium are exceptions, producing an accessory blue fluorescent protein (lumazine protein: LumP) that causes a blue shift, from λ(max)  ≈ 490 to λ(max)  ≈ 476 nm. However, the incidence of blue-shifted light emission or the presence of accessory fluorescent proteins in bacteria of the genus Vibrio has never been reported. From our spectral analysis of light emitted by 16 luminous strains of the genus Vibrio, it was revealed that most strains of Vibrio azureus emit a blue-shifted light with a peak at approximately 472 nm, whereas other Vibrio strains emit light with a peak at around 482 nm. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism underlying this blue shift in V. azureus NBRC 104587(T) . Here, we describe the blue-shifted light emission spectra and the isolation of a blue fluorescent protein. Intracellular protein analyses showed that this strain had a blue fluorescent protein (that we termed VA-BFP), the fluorescent spectrum of which was almost identical to that of the in vivo light emission spectrum of the strain. This result strongly suggested that VA-BFP was responsible for the blue-shifted light emission of V. azureus.

  8. Synthesis of highly uniform Cu2O spheres by a two-step approach and their assembly to form photonic crystals with a brilliant color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xin; Chang, Jie; Wu, Suli; Tang, Bingtao; Zhang, Shufen

    2016-03-01

    Monodisperse semiconductor colloidal spheres with a high refractive index hold great potential for building photonic crystals with a strong band gap, but the difficulty in separating the nucleation and growth processes makes it challenging to prepare highly uniform semiconductor colloidal spheres. Herein, real monodisperse Cu2O spheres were prepared via a hot-injection & heating-up two-step method using diethylene glycol as a milder reducing agent. The diameter of the as prepared Cu2O spheres can be tuned from 90 nm to 190 nm precisely. The SEM images reveal that the obtained Cu2O spheres have a narrow size distribution, which permits their self-assembly to form photonic crystals. The effects of precursor concentration and heating rates on the size and morphology of the Cu2O spheres were investigated in detail. The results indicate that the key points of the method include the burst nucleation to form seeds at a high temperature followed by rapid cooling to prevent agglomeration, and appropriate precursor concentration as well as a moderate growth rate during the further growth process. Importantly, photonic crystal films exhibiting a brilliant structural color were fabricated with the obtained monodisperse Cu2O spheres as building blocks, proving the possibility of making photonic crystals with a strong band gap. The developed method was also successfully applied to prepare monodisperse CdS spheres with diameters in the range from 110 nm to 210 nm.Monodisperse semiconductor colloidal spheres with a high refractive index hold great potential for building photonic crystals with a strong band gap, but the difficulty in separating the nucleation and growth processes makes it challenging to prepare highly uniform semiconductor colloidal spheres. Herein, real monodisperse Cu2O spheres were prepared via a hot-injection & heating-up two-step method using diethylene glycol as a milder reducing agent. The diameter of the as prepared Cu2O spheres can be tuned from 90 nm to

  9. Daytime Blue Light Enhances the Nighttime Circadian Melatonin Inhibition of Human Prostate Cancer Growth.

    PubMed

    Dauchy, Robert T; Hoffman, Aaron E; Wren-Dail, Melissa A; Hanifin, John P; Warfield, Benjamin; Brainard, George C; Xiang, Shulin; Yuan, Lin; Hill, Steven M; Belancio, Victoria P; Dauchy, Erin M; Smith, Kara; Blask, David E

    2015-12-01

    Light controls pineal melatonin production and temporally coordinates circadian rhythms of metabolism and physiology in normal and neoplastic tissues. We previously showed that peak circulating nocturnal melatonin levels were 7-fold higher after daytime spectral transmittance of white light through blue-tinted (compared with clear) rodent cages. Here, we tested the hypothesis that daytime blue-light amplification of nocturnal melatonin enhances the inhibition of metabolism, signaling activity, and growth of prostate cancer xenografts. Compared with male nude rats housed in clear cages under a 12:12-h light:dark cycle, rats in blue-tinted cages (with increased transmittance of 462-484 nm and decreased red light greater than 640 nm) evinced over 6-fold higher peak plasma melatonin levels at middark phase (time, 2400), whereas midlight-phase levels (1200) were low (less than 3 pg/mL) in both groups. Circadian rhythms of arterial plasma levels of linoleic acid, glucose, lactic acid, pO2, pCO2, insulin, leptin, and corticosterone were disrupted in rats in blue cages as compared with the corresponding entrained rhythms in clear-caged rats. After implantation with tissue-isolated PC3 human prostate cancer xenografts, tumor latency-to-onset of growth and growth rates were markedly delayed, and tumor cAMP levels, uptake-metabolism of linoleic acid, aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), and growth signaling activities were reduced in rats in blue compared with clear cages. These data show that the amplification of nighttime melatonin levels by exposing nude rats to blue light during the daytime significantly reduces human prostate cancer metabolic, signaling, and proliferative activities.

  10. Daytime Blue Light Enhances the Nighttime Circadian Melatonin Inhibition of Human Prostate Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Dauchy, Robert T; Hoffman, Aaron E; Wren-Dail, Melissa A; Hanifin, John P; Warfield, Benjamin; Brainard, George C; Xiang, Shulin; Yuan, Lin; Hill, Steven M; Belancio, Victoria P; Dauchy, Erin M; Smith, Kara; Blask, David E

    2015-01-01

    Light controls pineal melatonin production and temporally coordinates circadian rhythms of metabolism and physiology in normal and neoplastic tissues. We previously showed that peak circulating nocturnal melatonin levels were 7-fold higher after daytime spectral transmittance of white light through blue-tinted (compared with clear) rodent cages. Here, we tested the hypothesis that daytime blue-light amplification of nocturnal melatonin enhances the inhibition of metabolism, signaling activity, and growth of prostate cancer xenografts. Compared with male nude rats housed in clear cages under a 12:12-h light:dark cycle, rats in blue-tinted cages (with increased transmittance of 462–484 nm and decreased red light greater than 640 nm) evinced over 6-fold higher peak plasma melatonin levels at middark phase (time, 2400), whereas midlight-phase levels (1200) were low (less than 3 pg/mL) in both groups. Circadian rhythms of arterial plasma levels of linoleic acid, glucose, lactic acid, pO2, pCO2, insulin, leptin, and corticosterone were disrupted in rats in blue cages as compared with the corresponding entrained rhythms in clear-caged rats. After implantation with tissue-isolated PC3 human prostate cancer xenografts, tumor latency-to-onset of growth and growth rates were markedly delayed, and tumor cAMP levels, uptake–metabolism of linoleic acid, aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), and growth signaling activities were reduced in rats in blue compared with clear cages. These data show that the amplification of nighttime melatonin levels by exposing nude rats to blue light during the daytime significantly reduces human prostate cancer metabolic, signaling, and proliferative activities. PMID:26678364

  11. Comparison of Alcian Blue, Trypan Blue, and Toluidine Blue for Visualization of the Primo Vascular System Floating in Lymph Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Un; Han, Jae Won; Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Lee, Seung Hwan; Cha, Richard; Chang, Byung-Soo; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2015-01-01

    The primo vascular system (PVS), floating in lymph ducts, was too transparent to be observed by using a stereomicroscope. It was only detectable with the aid of staining dyes, for instance, Alcian blue, which was injected into the lymph nodes. Some dyes were absorbed preferentially by the PVS than the lymph wall. It remains a standing problem to know what dyes are absorbed better by the PVS than the lymph walls. Such information would be useful to unravel the biochemical properties of the PVS that are badly in need for obtaining large amount of PVS specimens. In the current work we tried two other familiar dyes which were used in PVS research before. We found that Trypan blue and toluidine blue did not visualize the PVS. Trypan blue was cleared by the natural washing. Toluidine blue did not stain the PVS, but it did leave stained spots in the lymph wall and its surrounding tissues, and it leaked out of the lymph wall to stain surrounding connective tissues. These completely different behaviors of the three dyes were found for the first time in the current work and provide valuable information to elucidate the mechanism through which some special dyes stained the PVS preferentially compared to the lymphatic wall. PMID:26379749

  12. Variations on the "Blue-Bottle" Demonstration Using Food Items That Contain FD&C Blue #1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staiger, Felicia A.; Peterson, Joshua P.; Campbell, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    Erioglaucine dye (FD&C Blue #1) can be used instead of methylene blue in the classic "blue-bottle" demonstration. Food items containing FD&C Blue #1 and reducing species such as sugars can therefore be used at the heart of this demonstration, which simply requires the addition of strong base such as sodium hydroxide lye.

  13. Use of big data by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Helm-Murtagh, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    The health care industry is grappling with the challenges of working with and analyzing large, complex, diverse data sets. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina provides several promising examples of how big data can be used to reduce the cost of care, to predict and manage health risks, and to improve clinical outcomes.

  14. 75 FR 65525 - Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division of Wellpoint, Inc., Green Bay, Wisconsin (the subject firm... Employment and Training Administration Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division of Wellpoint, Inc., Green Bay, WI; Notice of Negative Determination...

  15. Blue cotton, Blue Rayon and Blue Chitin in the analysis of heterocyclic aromatic amines--a review.

    PubMed

    Skog, Kerstin

    2004-03-25

    Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are a group of compounds formed when protein-rich foods, such as meat or fish, are prepared under normal cooking conditions, such as frying, grilling, or broiling. To evaluate and estimate the risks associated with HCAs contained in the diet, it is important to determine the levels in cooked foods, and the levels of HCAs and metabolites in the body. HCAs are normally found at low amounts in a complex matrix, which necessitates a good purification method and a sensitive detection system. The objective of this review was to briefly present the current knowledge on the use of Blue Cotton, Blue Rayon and Blue Chitin in the analysis of HCAs.

  16. Quantitative densitometry of proteins stained with coomassie blue using a Hewlett Packard scanjet scanner and Scanplot software.

    PubMed

    Vincent, S G; Cunningham, P R; Stephens, N L; Halayko, A J; Fisher, J T

    1997-01-01

    In the present study we evaluated the performance of a software/scanner system that employed the Hewlett Packard (HP) ScanJet Plus and Scanplot Software for densitometric quantification of protein loads stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Gels with bovine serum albumin (BSA) standards, ranging from 0.125 to 10 micrograms, were scanned using reflectance densitometry with 127 microns step size in both the x and y directions and a resolution of 200 dots per inch. Densitometric volume was calculated for each protein band from scanner output in the tagged image file format (TIFF) by a customized software package, Scanplot V. 4.05 (Cunningham Engineering). Protein loads between 0.125 and 10.0 micrograms vs. volume were fit by a second-order regression: Volume = -0.58 x protein load2 + 16.82 x protein load + 7.87 (r = 0.991, p < 0.01). The same gels were scanned and quantified using a transmittance laser densitometer; densitometric volumes measured by both systems were highly correlated (r2 = 0.981, p < 0.01). Additional gels of BSA, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (myosin), and actin displayed linear relationships between protein loads up to 4.0 micrograms and densitometric volume reflecting unique dye binding properties. We conclude that accurate and reproducible quantitative densitometry of SDS-PAGE can be performed using the HP ScanJet Plus scanner and Scanplot software.

  17. Triboelectric Nanogenerators for Blue Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Khan, Usman; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2016-07-26

    Blue energy in the form of ocean waves offers an enormous energy resource. However, it has yet to be fully exploited in order to make it available for the use of mankind. Blue energy harvesting is a challenging task as the kinetic energy from ocean waves is irregular in amplitude and is at low frequencies. Though electromagnetic generators (EMGs) are well-known for harvesting mechanical kinetic energies, they have a crucial limitation for blue energy conversion. Indeed, the output voltage of EMGs can be impractically low at the low frequencies of ocean waves. In contrast, triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are highly suitable for blue energy harvesting as they can effectively harvest mechanical energies from low frequencies (<1 Hz) to relatively high frequencies (∼kHz) and are also low-cost, lightweight, and easy to fabricate. Several important steps have been taken by Wang's group to develop TENG technology for blue energy harvesting. In this Perspective, we describe some of the recent progress and also address concerns related to durable packaging of TENGs in consideration of harsh marine environments and power management for an efficient power transfer and distribution for commercial applications. PMID:27408982

  18. Triboelectric Nanogenerators for Blue Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Khan, Usman; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2016-07-26

    Blue energy in the form of ocean waves offers an enormous energy resource. However, it has yet to be fully exploited in order to make it available for the use of mankind. Blue energy harvesting is a challenging task as the kinetic energy from ocean waves is irregular in amplitude and is at low frequencies. Though electromagnetic generators (EMGs) are well-known for harvesting mechanical kinetic energies, they have a crucial limitation for blue energy conversion. Indeed, the output voltage of EMGs can be impractically low at the low frequencies of ocean waves. In contrast, triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are highly suitable for blue energy harvesting as they can effectively harvest mechanical energies from low frequencies (<1 Hz) to relatively high frequencies (∼kHz) and are also low-cost, lightweight, and easy to fabricate. Several important steps have been taken by Wang's group to develop TENG technology for blue energy harvesting. In this Perspective, we describe some of the recent progress and also address concerns related to durable packaging of TENGs in consideration of harsh marine environments and power management for an efficient power transfer and distribution for commercial applications.

  19. Room-Temperature Liquid Crystal Blue Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taushanoff, Stefanie; van Le, Khoa; Twieg, Robert; Jakli, Antal

    2009-03-01

    The ``blue phases'' of a highly chiral liquid crystal are defect-studded structures of double-twist cylinders that are laced together. The three phases, BPI*, BPII* and BPIII* differ only in the packing of the double-twist cylinders. Until recently, blue phases were of limited practical use because they appeared for only a very narrow temperature range. Mixtures that show BPI* and BPII* phases for wide temperature ranges at or around room temperature are now available [1]. Relatively wide temperature BPIII (the blue fog) phase so far was available only at very high temperatures [2]. Here we present mixtures with room-temperature wide range BPIII* phase and compare the ability of chiral dopants to form the different blue phases in a base nematic mixture. PDLC films cast with blue-phase material are also examined.[3pt] [1] H. Coles and M. Pivnenko, Nature 2005 436-18 997-1000 [0pt] [2] C. V. Yelamaggad, I. S. Shashikala, G. Liao, D.S. Shankar Rao, S. K. Prasad , Q. Li A. Jakli, Chem. Mater Comm, 2006, 18, 6100-6102

  20. Leader streamers nature of blue jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raizer, Y. P.; Milikh, G. M.; Shneider, M. N.

    2007-06-01

    A new model of blue jets as a lightning-related phenomenon is proposed. A blue jet consists of the bi-leader, whose top part is seen on photos as a “trunk of a tree”, and is capped at the topside of the leader by its streamer zone. The latter is shown as tall and narrow branches of “the tree”. It is shown that the time independent fractal blue jet model does not provide an adequate description of blue jets and streamer zone of a leader. It ignores an important fact of the fast loss of the streamer channel conductivity due to the electron attachment to the oxygen. The top streamer branches were born mostly prior to the bottom branches not as result of branching, but formed by the leader tip. It was shown that due to transfer of the high potential of the edge of the thundercloud by the leader, long streamers of blue jets can be sustained by moderate cloud charge. The streamer length is estimated along with the height at which the streamers can reach the ionosphere. The propagation of a streamer in the atmosphere of exponentially falling density N and in the self-consistent electric field of the streamer zone was computed. It was found that the critical external field ES required for unlimited streamer growth satisfies the similarity law ES/N⋍const. The similarity law was numerically studied in a wide range of N.

  1. October Fireball: Brief and Brilliant

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Saturday, Oct. 2, 2010 at approximately 8:50 p.m. CDT, cameras operated by NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., recorded a slow-moving firebal...

  2. Brilliant Writing Tips for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copus, Julia

    2010-01-01

    With tips on punctuation, style, grammar and essay structure, this handy guide provides succinct and practical guidance on students most common areas of concern in their written work. Each tip is supplemented by authentic examples of student writing, suggested re-writes, and appropriate self-help exercises. This book contains four parts. Part I:…

  3. Evaluation of stream chemistry and watershed characteristics in the Appalachian Plateau and Blue Ridge regions of Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Janicki, A.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to examine the stream chemistry data from the Maryland Synoptic Stream Chemistry Survey (MSSCS) from the Appalachian Plateau and Blue Ridge regions in an attempt to identify those factors regulating acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in the streams of these regions. The MSSCS data indicated a wide range in stream ANC in these two regions, from acidic (ANC < 0 micro-eq/L) to highly alkaline (ANC > 1000 micro-eq/L) streams. The widespread spatial variation in bedrock geology in the Appalachian Plateau and Blue Ridge regions is primarily responsible for this degree of spatial variability in stream ANC in these regions. Secondary effects due to land use on stream ANC were found in the Blue Ridge. Atmospheric deposition appears to be the primary regional source of acidity in the streams of western Maryland.

  4. The correlation of blue shift of photoluminescence and morphology of silicon nanoporous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jumaili, Batool E. B.; Talib, Zainal A.; Josephine L., Y.; Paiman, Suriati B.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Al-Jumaily, Abdulmajeed H. J.; Ramizy, Asmiet; Abdulateef, Sinan A.; Muh'd, Ibrahim B.; Mofdal, Manahil E. E.

    2016-07-01

    Porous silicon with diameters ranging from 6.41 to 7.12 nm were synthesized via electrochemical etching by varied anodization current density in ethanoic solutions containing aqueous hydrofluoric acid up to 65mA/cm2.The luminescence properties of the nanoporous at room temperature were analyzed via photoluminescence spectroscopy. Photoluminescence PL spectra exhibit a broad emission band in the range of 360-700 nm photon energy. The PL spectrum has a blue shift in varied anodization current density; the blue shift incremented as the existing of anodization although the intensity decreased. The current blue shift is owning to alteration of silicon nanocrystal structure at the superficies. The superficial morphology of the PS layers consists of unified and orderly distribution of nanocrystalline Si structures, have high porosity around (93.75%) and high thickness 39.52 µm.

  5. [BIOCHEMICAL RESPONSE OF BLUE MUSSELS MYTILUS EDULIS L. FROM THE WHITE SEA TO RAPID TEMPERATURE CHANGES].

    PubMed

    Fokina, N N; Lysenko, L A; Sukhovskaya, I V; Vdovichenko, E A; Borvinskaya, E V; Kantserova, N P; Krupnova, M Yu; Ruokolainen, T R; Smirnov, L P; Vysotskaya, R U; Bakhmet, I N; Nemova, N N

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a rapid temperature change on the biochemical status of blue mussels Mytilus edulis L. from the White Sea was studied under conditions of aquarium experiment. It is shown that modifications of the composition of reserve and structural lipids and their fatty acids, of the activity of lysosomal enzymes (β-glucosidases, cathepsins B and D), of calcium-dependent proteases of cytocol (calpains) and of the enzyme of the second phase of biotransformation of xenobiotics - glutathione-S-transferase, reflect an unspecific compensatory reaction of bivalves to stress action of environmental factors and indicate reconstruction of blue mussel metabolism as early as within first hours of temperature change. The initial high level of glutathione-S-transferase activity in control blue mussels as well as an increase of glutathione concentration in the course of experiment may facilitate successful exit of mussels from the state of reduced metabolism. PMID:26856072

  6. Sequence and evolution of the blue cone pigment gene in old and new world primates

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, D.M.; Cowing, J.A.; Patel, R.

    1995-06-10

    The sequences of the blue cone photopigments in the talapoin monkey (Miopithecus talapoin), an Old World primate, and in the marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a New World monkey, are presented. Both genes are composed of 5 exons separated by 4 introns. In this respect, they are identical to the human blue gene, and intron sizes are also similar. Based on the level of amino acid identity, both monkey pigments are members of the S branch of pigments. Alignment of these sequences with the human gene requires the insertion/deletion of two separate codons in exon 1. The silent site divergence between these primate blue genes indicates a separation of the Old and New World primate lineages around 43 million years ago. 41 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. The blue-to-green reflectance ratio and lake water quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piech, K. R.; Schott, J. R.; Stewart, K. M.

    1978-01-01

    Correlations between the relative values of the blue and green reflectances of a lake and water quality indices, such as depth of photic zone, Secchi disk transparency, attenuation coefficient, and chlorophyll concentration, have been observed during an intensive satellite, aircraft, and surface vessel study of Lake Ontario and Conesus Lake. Determinations of blue and green reflectances from Skylab S190A color imagery are in excellent agreement with values obtained from small-scale color imagery from aircraft. Further, the accuracy of the satellite data appears within that required for extrapolation to the water quality indices. The study has also determined that changes in chlorophyll, lignin, and humic acid concentration can be discriminated by the behavior of the blue-to-green reflectance ratio and the reflectances of the green and red bands.

  8. Photooxidative Death in Blue-Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Abeliovich, A.; Shilo, M.

    1972-01-01

    When incubated in the light under 100% oxygen, wild-type blue-green algae (Anacystis nidulans, Synechococcus cedrorum) die out rapidly at temperatures of 4 to 15 C, and at 35 C (or at 26 C in the case of S. cedrorum) in the absence of CO2. Photosynthesis is impaired in these cells long before they die. Blocking of photosystem II at high temperatures in the presence of CO2 sensitizes the algae to photooxidative death. Photooxidative death and bleaching of photosynthetic pigments are separable phenomena. Photooxidative conditions were demonstrated in Israeli fish ponds using A. nidulans as the test organism during dense summer blooms, when dissolved CO2 is low, and in winter, when water temperatures generally drop below 15 C. This finding suggests that photooxidative death may be responsible for the sudden decomposition of blue-green blooms in summer, and may be a factor in the absence of blue-green blooms in winter. PMID:4626540

  9. Bistable defect structures in blue phase devices.

    PubMed

    Tiribocchi, A; Gonnella, G; Marenduzzo, D; Orlandini, E; Salvadore, F

    2011-12-01

    Blue phases are liquid crystals made up by networks of defects, or disclination lines. While existing phase diagrams show a striking variety of competing metastable topologies for these networks, very little is known as to how to kinetically reach a target structure, or how to switch from one to the other, which is of paramount importance for devices. We theoretically identify two confined blue phase I systems in which by applying an appropriate series of electric field it is possible to select one of two bistable defect patterns. Our results may be used to realize new generation and fast switching energy-saving bistable devices in ultrathin surface treated blue phase I wafers. PMID:22182126

  10. Rapid Suppression of Growth by Blue Light

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    1981-01-01

    The inhibition of stem elongation in dark-grown seedlings by blue light was studied with marking techniques and with a high-resolution, growth-measuring apparatus. Blue light rapidly suppresses growth in a variety of cultivated species. In some species, the inhibition persists only during the period of irradiation, after which time growth quickly returns to the high dark rate, whereas, in other species, the light response has an additional long-term component which lasts for at least several hours in the dark. The long-term inhibition may be mediated by phytochrome, whereas the rapid, short-term component is specific to a blue-light receptor. The rapid inhibition of growth in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) requires high-energy blue irradiation, which is perceived directly by the growing region of the hypocotyl and inhibits all regions below the hook to the same extent. Detailed investigation of the kinetics of the inhibition in cucumber and in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) shows that, after a short lag period (20 to 30 seconds in cucumber, 60 to 70 seconds in sunflower), the growth rate declines in an exponential fashion to a lower rate, with a half-time of 15 to 25 seconds in cucumber and 90 to 150 seconds in sunflower. Excision of the hypocotyl greatly reduces the sensitivity of the growth rate to blue-light inhibition. Because of the rapid kinetics, the blue-light photoreceptor cannot affect cell enlargement by altering the supply of growth hormone or the sensitivity to hormones but probably operates more directly either on the biochemical process which loosens cell walls or on cell turgor. PMID:16661718

  11. Blue light inhibits proliferation of melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Anja; Distler, Elisabeth; Klapczynski, Anna; Arpino, Fabiola; Kuch, Natalia; Simon-Keller, Katja; Sticht, Carsten; van Abeelen, Frank A.; Gretz, Norbert; Oversluizen, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    Photobiomodulation with blue light is used for several treatment paradigms such as neonatal jaundice, psoriasis and back pain. However, little is known about possible side effects concerning melanoma cells in the skin. The aim of this study was to assess the safety of blue LED irradiation with respect to proliferation of melanoma cells. For that purpose we used the human malignant melanoma cell line SK-MEL28. Cell proliferation was decreased in blue light irradiated cells where the effect size depended on light irradiation dosage. Furthermore, with a repeated irradiation of the melanoma cells on two consecutive days the effect could be intensified. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting with Annexin V and Propidium iodide labeling did not show a higher number of dead cells after blue light irradiation compared to non-irradiated cells. Gene expression analysis revealed down-regulated genes in pathways connected to anti-inflammatory response, like B cell signaling and phagosome. Most prominent pathways with up-regulation of genes were cytochrome P450, steroid hormone biosynthesis. Furthermore, even though cells showed a decrease in proliferation, genes connected to the cell cycle were up-regulated after 24h. This result is concordant with XTT test 48h after irradiation, where irradiated cells showed the same proliferation as the no light negative control. In summary, proliferation of melanoma cells can be decreased using blue light irradiation. Nevertheless, the gene expression analysis has to be further evaluated and more studies, such as in-vivo experiments, are warranted to further assess the safety of blue light treatment.

  12. Red and blue lights induced oxidative stress tolerance promote cadmium rhizocomplexation in Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Abin; Prasad, M N V

    2014-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) accumulation and related stress responses have been investigated in red, blue and white lights exposed Oryza sativa L. cv MTU 7029. Cd translocation was reduced significantly by red and blue lights. Increase in amount of organic acids, thiols, and nutrients in the roots that cause Cd rhizocomplexation was the reason for reduction in Cd translocation. These effects were due to higher efficiency to perform photosynthesis and transpiration under red or blue lights compare with white light during Cd stress. Increased photosynthetic assimilate turnover was witnessed as a function of sugar content. Amount of redox regulators such as glutathione and ascorbate were also increased under red and blue light exposure. Together with up regulation of antioxidant enzyme activities, these metabolites ensured redox balance in presence of reactive oxygen species produced due to Cd toxicity. Protection of photosynthesis from Cd inducible oxidative stress ensured supplies of sugar intermediates essential for the synthesis of metal chelators in roots. Therefore, it was inferred that red and blue lights promote Cd rhizocomplexation and ameliorated Cd stress in rice seedlings.

  13. Analysis and characterization of anthocyanins and carotenoids in Japanese blue tomato.

    PubMed

    Ooe, Emi; Ogawa, Kenjirou; Horiuchi, Tadashi; Tada, Hiroyuki; Murase, Hiromi; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is rich in anthocyanins, which are polyphenolic pigments. This study aimed to analyze and characterize the anthocyanin composition in cultivated blue tomato in Japan. The extracts of peel, seed, and pulp of tomatoes were purified following which anthocyanins and lycopene contents were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Eleven types of anthocyanins were identified, including delphinidin, petunidin, and malvidin. Further, the antioxidant activity of anthocyanins was evaluated using 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt radical quenching assays and electron spin resonance. "Blue tomato" extracts exert antioxidant activity. Thus, we showed that petunidin was present in the "blue tomato" peel while lycopene was present in the peel and pulp. Additionally, the blue tomato peel extract was found to significantly inhibit H2O2-induced cell death in vitro. This is the first study on cell protective effects of Japanese blue tomato extract and petunidin in murine photoreceptor cells. PMID:26443075

  14. Adsorption thermodynamics of Methylene Blue onto bentonite.

    PubMed

    Hong, Song; Wen, Cheng; He, Jing; Gan, Fuxing; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2009-08-15

    The effect of temperature on the equilibrium adsorption of Methylene Blue dye from aqueous solution using bentonite was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed using three widely applied isotherms: Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson. A non-linear method was used for comparing the best fit of the isotherms. Best fit was found to be Redlich-Peterson isotherm. Thermodynamic parameters, such as DeltaG degrees, DeltaH degrees, and DeltaS degrees were calculated using adsorption equilibrium constant obtained from the Langmuir isotherm. Results suggested that the Methylene Blue adsorption on bentonite was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  15. Severe anaphylactic shock with methylene blue instillation.

    PubMed

    Dewachter, Pascale; Mouton-Faivre, Claudie; Tréchot, Philippe; Lleu, Jean-Claude; Mertes, Paul Michel

    2005-07-01

    We report a documented severe immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity reaction associated with use of 1% methylene blue for detection of tubal permeability occurring during general anesthesia. Clinical symptoms, biological assessment results, and cutaneous test positivity confirmed an anaphylactic reaction to methylene blue. This case report confirms the need for systematic allergological investigation of all drugs and substances administered during the perioperative period in the event of a hypersensitivity reaction occurring during anesthesia. Anesthesiologists should be aware of the possibility of hypersensitivity reactions involving any drug or substance used during surgery.

  16. Change in NO2 reveals Parade Blue is cleaner than APEC Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haoran; Liu, Cheng; Xie, Zhouqing; Xie, Pinhua; Xing, Chengzhi; Xu, Jin; Liu, Jianguo

    2016-04-01

    The spectacular Parade Blue (blue sky), and APEC Blue (blue sky) were renowned worldwide caused by the limiting discharge policy of the Chinese government. For evaluating the reduction of these two events, we analyzed the variation of NO2 columns Beijing by looking at a long-term monitoring using Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite observations from August 2014 to November 2015, covering Grand Military Parade (GMP, September 2015) and APEC (November 2014) period. We found that the NO2 columns abruptly decreased both GMP and APEC. However, change in the MAX-DOAS and the OMI NO2 during GMP was larger than during APEC via comparison with the same period in 2014, indicating Parade Blue is cleaner than APEC Blue. The spatial distribution of NO2 and backward trajectories together with meterological parameters suggested that GMP Blue may be due to the regional significant decreasing discharge in peripheral cities. No weekend effect during GMP further confirmed the role of controlling discharge. This study provides direct evidence that it is possible to clean air in China.

  17. When cheese gets the blues: Pseudomonas fluorescens as the causative agent of cheese spoilage.

    PubMed

    Martin, N H; Murphy, S C; Ralyea, R D; Wiedmann, M; Boor, K J

    2011-06-01

    A bacterial contamination of fresh, low-acid cheese that resulted in production of a blue fluorescent pigment on the surface of the cheese was determined to be caused by Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar IV, a gram-negative bacteria that produces a blue, nondiffusible pigment as well as the soluble pigment pyoverdin, which fluoresces under UV light. Ten isolates collected from contaminated cheese and environmental samples were initially identified as P. fluorescens using 16S rDNA sequencing, but only 8 of the isolates produced blue pigment and fluoresced under UV light when re-inoculated onto fresh, low-acid cheese. The Biolog Metabolic Fingerprint system (Biolog Inc., Hayward, CA) and the Analytical Profile Index (BioMerieux Vitek Inc., Hazelwood, MO) for nonenteric gram-negative species as well as EcoRI ribotyping did not differentiate between the isolates that produced blue color and those that did not. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis with the enzyme XbaI was able to distinguish between the isolates that produced pigment and those that did not and allowed for identification of a specific environmental site (i.e., an overhead cheese vat agitator system) as the likely source of product contamination. PMID:21605787

  18. When color fails: illicit blue tablets containing anabolic androgen steroids.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Donata; Castagna, Franca; Maietti, Sergio; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2013-09-01

    The necessity of specific, confirmatory tests in the identification of seized illicit products was highlighted by the analysis of eighteen heart shaped, blue tablets confiscated by Police at a street control in the North East of Italy. The tablets responded as amphetamines to a preliminary color test (Marquis); a subsequent, confirmatory assay by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of two anabolic androgen steroids (AAS), methandienone and methyltestosterone, in concentration of 1.7 and 1.5mg respectively per tablet; no trace of amphetamine-like or nitrogen containing compounds was found. The observed orange coloration was due to the reaction of concentrated sulphuric acid, contained in the Marquis reagent, with the Δ(4) C-3 keto group of steroids. The two AAS, banned under the world antidoping code, are not considered as psychoactive drugs of abuse in most countries, although their trafficking may entangle severe public health concerns. PMID:23770638

  19. Methylene blue adsorption on a DMPA lipid langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Giner Casares, Juan José; Camacho, Luis; Martín-Romero, Maria Teresa; López Cascales, José Javier

    2010-07-12

    Adsorption of methylene blue (MB) onto a dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) Langmuir air/water monolayer is studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, UV reflection spectroscopy and surface potential measurements. The free-energy profile associated with MB transfer from water to the lipid monolayer shows two minima of -66 and -60 kJ mol(-1) for its solid and gas phase, respectively, corresponding to a spontaneous thermodynamic process. From the position of the free-energy minima, it is possible to predict the precise location of MB in the interior of the DMPA monolayer. Thus, MB is accommodated in the phosphoryl or carbonyl region of the DMPA Langmuir air/water interface, depending on the isomorphic state (solid or gas phase, respectively). Reorientation of MB, measured from the bulk solution to the interior of the lipid monolayer, passes from a random orientation in bulk solution to an orientation parallel to the surface of the lipid monolayer when MB is absorbed. PMID:20544777

  20. Methylene blue adsorption on a DMPA lipid langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Giner Casares, Juan José; Camacho, Luis; Martín-Romero, Maria Teresa; López Cascales, José Javier

    2010-07-12

    Adsorption of methylene blue (MB) onto a dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) Langmuir air/water monolayer is studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, UV reflection spectroscopy and surface potential measurements. The free-energy profile associated with MB transfer from water to the lipid monolayer shows two minima of -66 and -60 kJ mol(-1) for its solid and gas phase, respectively, corresponding to a spontaneous thermodynamic process. From the position of the free-energy minima, it is possible to predict the precise location of MB in the interior of the DMPA monolayer. Thus, MB is accommodated in the phosphoryl or carbonyl region of the DMPA Langmuir air/water interface, depending on the isomorphic state (solid or gas phase, respectively). Reorientation of MB, measured from the bulk solution to the interior of the lipid monolayer, passes from a random orientation in bulk solution to an orientation parallel to the surface of the lipid monolayer when MB is absorbed.

  1. When color fails: illicit blue tablets containing anabolic androgen steroids.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Donata; Castagna, Franca; Maietti, Sergio; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2013-09-01

    The necessity of specific, confirmatory tests in the identification of seized illicit products was highlighted by the analysis of eighteen heart shaped, blue tablets confiscated by Police at a street control in the North East of Italy. The tablets responded as amphetamines to a preliminary color test (Marquis); a subsequent, confirmatory assay by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of two anabolic androgen steroids (AAS), methandienone and methyltestosterone, in concentration of 1.7 and 1.5mg respectively per tablet; no trace of amphetamine-like or nitrogen containing compounds was found. The observed orange coloration was due to the reaction of concentrated sulphuric acid, contained in the Marquis reagent, with the Δ(4) C-3 keto group of steroids. The two AAS, banned under the world antidoping code, are not considered as psychoactive drugs of abuse in most countries, although their trafficking may entangle severe public health concerns.

  2. T's and Blues. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    This compilation of journal articles provides basic information on abuse of Talwin, a mild prescription painkiller (T's), and Pyribenzamine, a nonprescription antihistimine (Blues). These two drugs, taken in combination, produce an effect similar to that produced by heroin. Stories from "Drug Survival News,""Emergency Medicine," and "FDA Consumer"…

  3. [The dangers of blue light: True story!].

    PubMed

    Renard, G; Leid, J

    2016-05-01

    The dangers of the blue light are the object of numerous publications, for both the scientific community and the general public. The new prolific development of light sources emitting potentially toxic blue light (415-455nm) ranges from LED (Light Emitting Diodes) lamps for interior lighting to television screens, computers, digital tablets and smartphones using OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) or AMOLED (Active-Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode) technology. First we will review some technical terms and the main characteristics of light perceived by the human eye. Then we will discuss scientific proof of the toxicity of blue light to the eye, which may cause cataract or macular degeneration. Analysis of the light spectra of several light sources, from natural light to LED lamps, will allow us to specify even better the dangers related to each light source. LED lamps, whether used as components for interior lighting or screens, are of concern if they are used for extended viewing times and at short distance. While we can protect ourselves from natural blue light by wearing colored glasses which filter out, on both front and back surfaces, the toxic wavelengths, it is more difficult to protect oneself from LED lamps in internal lighting, the use of which should be restricted to "white warmth" lamps (2700K). As far as OLED or AMOLED screens are concerned, the only effective protection consists of using them occasionally and only for a short period of time. PMID:27039979

  4. Blue whales respond to anthropogenic noise.

    PubMed

    Melcón, Mariana L; Cummins, Amanda J; Kerosky, Sara M; Roche, Lauren K; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise may significantly impact exposed marine mammals. This work studied the vocalization response of endangered blue whales to anthropogenic noise sources in the mid-frequency range using passive acoustic monitoring in the Southern California Bight. Blue whales were less likely to produce calls when mid-frequency active sonar was present. This reduction was more pronounced when the sonar source was closer to the animal, at higher sound levels. The animals were equally likely to stop calling at any time of day, showing no diel pattern in their sensitivity to sonar. Conversely, the likelihood of whales emitting calls increased when ship sounds were nearby. Whales did not show a differential response to ship noise as a function of the time of the day either. These results demonstrate that anthropogenic noise, even at frequencies well above the blue whales' sound production range, has a strong probability of eliciting changes in vocal behavior. The long-term implications of disruption in call production to blue whale foraging and other behaviors are currently not well understood. PMID:22393434

  5. Avoiding the Negative: Blue Jeans Baseball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggard, Bob

    1978-01-01

    Blue Jeans Baseball, for eight- to twelve-year old children, is based on the concept that everyone plays. No coaches are allowed; everyone bats once per inning; defensive players rotate positions. These and other rules reduce the emphasis on competition and increase the emphasis on skill development. (MJB)

  6. Blue whales respond to anthropogenic noise.

    PubMed

    Melcón, Mariana L; Cummins, Amanda J; Kerosky, Sara M; Roche, Lauren K; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise may significantly impact exposed marine mammals. This work studied the vocalization response of endangered blue whales to anthropogenic noise sources in the mid-frequency range using passive acoustic monitoring in the Southern California Bight. Blue whales were less likely to produce calls when mid-frequency active sonar was present. This reduction was more pronounced when the sonar source was closer to the animal, at higher sound levels. The animals were equally likely to stop calling at any time of day, showing no diel pattern in their sensitivity to sonar. Conversely, the likelihood of whales emitting calls increased when ship sounds were nearby. Whales did not show a differential response to ship noise as a function of the time of the day either. These results demonstrate that anthropogenic noise, even at frequencies well above the blue whales' sound production range, has a strong probability of eliciting changes in vocal behavior. The long-term implications of disruption in call production to blue whale foraging and other behaviors are currently not well understood.

  7. Quirks of dye nomenclature. 3. Trypan blue.

    PubMed

    Cooksey, C J

    2014-11-01

    Trypan blue is colorant from the 19(th) century that has an association with Africa as a chemotherapeutic agent against protozoan (Trypanosomal) infections, which cause sleeping sickness. The dye still is used for staining biopsies, living cells and organisms, and it also has been used as a colorant for textiles.

  8. Helping Blue-Collar Workers in Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidney Hillman Health Center, New York, NY.

    This conference examined both past and potential results of a mental health rehabilitation program serving members of a New York clothing union. This research-demonstration project, which is being conducted by the Sidney Hillman Health Center with union and management cooperation, represents an attempt to keep emotionally disturbed blue collar…

  9. Visualising DNA in Classrooms Using Nile Blue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Christine; Roche, Scott; McKay, David

    2008-01-01

    Giving students the opportunity to extract, manipulate and visualise DNA molecules enhances a constructivist approach to learning about modern techniques in biology and biotechnology Visualisation usually requires agarose gel electrophoresis and staining. In this article, we report on an alternative DNA stain, Nile Blue A, that may be used in the…

  10. Geographical Study of American Blues Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strait, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Music is not often utilized in teaching geography, despite the fact that many scholars orient their research around analyzing both the historical and spatial dimensions of musical expression. This article reports on the use of a teaching module that utilizes blues culture as a lens to understand the geographical history of the United States. The…

  11. Nanotubes based on monolayer blue phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, E.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate structural stability of monolayer zigzag and armchair blue phosphorus nanotubes by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational spectrum and electronic band structure are determined and analyzed as functions of the tube diameter and axial strain. The nanotubes are found to be semiconductors with a sensitive indirect band gap that allows flexible tuning.

  12. Practices of Blue Ribbon Catholic Schools, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kealey, Robert J., Comp.

    For almost 20 years, the U.S. Department of Education has invited schools to seek the Blue Ribbon School Award. A large number of Catholic schools have received this award. For this publication, the Department of Elementary Schools Executive Committee requested principals of awarded schools to write a short article on an exemplary school program…

  13. Miniaturized Blue Laser using Second Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaoka, Yasuo; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Mizuuchi, Kiminori; Yamamoto, Kazuhisa

    2000-06-01

    We demonstrate a miniaturized blue laser (5× 12× 1.5 mm3) using second harmonic generation (SHG), which consists of a quasi-phase-matched (QPM)-SHG waveguide device on an x-cut Mg-doped LiNbO3 substrate and a tunable distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) laser diode. By using the QPM-SHG waveguide device on an x-cut substrate, efficient optical coupling was realized without a half-wave plate, and the maximum coupling efficiency of 75% was achieved. The blue light power of 2 mW was generated for the fundamental coupling power of 20 mW, which agreed with a conversion efficiency of 10%. The mechanical stability of the planar-type butt-coupled SHG blue laser was examined, where the coupling efficiency was maintained constantly under the change of module temperature and the temperature cycle test from 10 to 60°C. We succeeded in downsizing the SHG blue laser to 0.1 cm3, which is sufficiently small for its application to optical disk systems.

  14. Blue Ridge Technical College Adult Reading Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Caren

    The development and implementation of a tutor training program designed to eliminate adult illiteracy in one area of North Carolina are described in this paper. Various sections of the paper provide information about (1) the history of the program, which was initiated by staff members at the learning center of the Blue Ridge Technical College in…

  15. The Blues/Rock Group Biography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Brian

    1974-01-01

    Blues and rock groups provide vivid topics for research and writing at the secondary level. Instructional suggestions acknowledge the abundance of both fact and flack noting the need for discrimination between the two by both teacher and student in the research and evaluation processes. (JH)

  16. Heparin sensing: Blue-chip binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shriver, Zachary; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2013-08-01

    Heparin is an anionic polysaccharide that has tremendous clinical importance as an anticoagulant. Several dyes have been developed that can detect heparin, and the latest example -- named Mallard Blue -- has now been shown to have excellent sensing properties under biologically relevant conditions.

  17. Kinematics of luminous blue compact galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Östlin, Göran; Amram, Philippe; Boulesteix, Jaques; Bergvall, Nils; Masegosa, Josefa; Márquez, Isabel

    We present results from a Fabry-Perot study of the Hα velocity fields and morphologies of a sample of luminous blue compact galaxies. We estimate masses from photometry and kinematics and show that many of these BCGs are not rotationally supported. Mergers or strong interactions appear to be the triggering mechanism of the extreme starbursts seen in these galaxies.

  18. Blue nano titania made in diffusion flames.

    PubMed

    Teleki, Alexandra; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2009-05-21

    Blue titanium suboxide nanoparticles (including Magneli phases) were formed directly without any post-processing or addition of dopants by combustion of titanium-tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) vapor at atmospheric pressure. Particle size, phase composition, rutile and anatase crystal sizes as well as the blue coloration were controlled by rapid quenching of the flame with a critical flow nozzle placed at various heights above the burner. The particles showed a broad absorption in the near-infrared region and retained their blue color upon storage in ambient atmosphere. A high concentration of paramagnetic Ti3+ centres was found in the substoichiometric particles by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Furthermore particles with controlled band gap energy from 3.2 to 3.6 eV were made by controlling the burner-nozzle-distance from 10 to 1 cm, respectively. The color robustness and extent of suboxidation could be further enhanced by co-oxidation of TTIP with hexamethyldisiloxane in the flame resulting in SiO2-coated titanium suboxide particles. The process is cost-effective and green while the particles produced can replace traditional blue colored, cobalt-containing pigments. PMID:19421486

  19. Identifying blues: an interview with lesbian blues musician and lyricist Gaye Adegbalola. Interview by Carmen Phelps.

    PubMed

    Adegbalola, Gaye

    2011-01-01

    In this interview, blues lyricist and musician Gaye Adegbalola shares with audiences how various political, social, and artistic influences have inspired her work since her activist years during the Black Arts Movement leading up to the present day. As a lesbian blues artist, Adegbalola's personal and artistic development implicates the often inextricable and intimate relationships between artistic production, political involvement, and individual fulfillment. PMID:21279914

  20. Chiral heteropoly blues and controllable switching of achiral polyoxometalate clusters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yizhan; Li, Haolong; Wu, Che; Yang, Yang; Shi, Lei; Wu, Lixin

    2013-04-22

    Managing the blues: Chiral heteropoly blues of achiral polyoxometalate clusters were created through an intermolecular interaction with a chiral organic compound. Controllable chiroptical switching of the cluster complexes was possible through reversible photochromism of the polyoxometalates (see picture).

  1. Developing the urban blue: Comparative health responses to blue and green urban open spaces in Germany.

    PubMed

    Völker, Sebastian; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Recently, new perspectives upon healthy urban open spaces propose that open spaces can be regarded as urban green or blue spaces. However, there has so far been very little research into blue environments and their benefits for mental well-being. Our article focuses on the effects of water in cities, "urban blue" (as compared to "urban green"), on human health and well-being. To assess the mental well-being of visitors, we conducted qualitative semi-standardised interviews (n=113), asking which differences in well-being occur when visiting urban green and blue spaces in high-density areas of the inner city in Dusseldorf and Cologne, Germany. Although we found many similarities, some health-enhancing effects for users turned out to be prominent for urban blue in the four conceptual therapeutic landscape dimensions: experienced, symbolic, social and activity space. These effects include enhanced contemplation, emotional bonding, participation, and physical activity. The results suggest that urban blue as a health-promoting factor needs more detailed and accurate determination and examination of its general and local health-enhancing effects.

  2. Developing the urban blue: Comparative health responses to blue and green urban open spaces in Germany.

    PubMed

    Völker, Sebastian; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Recently, new perspectives upon healthy urban open spaces propose that open spaces can be regarded as urban green or blue spaces. However, there has so far been very little research into blue environments and their benefits for mental well-being. Our article focuses on the effects of water in cities, "urban blue" (as compared to "urban green"), on human health and well-being. To assess the mental well-being of visitors, we conducted qualitative semi-standardised interviews (n=113), asking which differences in well-being occur when visiting urban green and blue spaces in high-density areas of the inner city in Dusseldorf and Cologne, Germany. Although we found many similarities, some health-enhancing effects for users turned out to be prominent for urban blue in the four conceptual therapeutic landscape dimensions: experienced, symbolic, social and activity space. These effects include enhanced contemplation, emotional bonding, participation, and physical activity. The results suggest that urban blue as a health-promoting factor needs more detailed and accurate determination and examination of its general and local health-enhancing effects. PMID:25475835

  3. Methylene Blue Causing Serotonin Syndrome Following Cystocele Repair.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Kailash; Cheung, Felix; Lee, Wai; Thalappillil, Richard; Florence, F Barry; Kim, Jason

    2016-11-01

    Methylene blue is an intravenously administered agent that may potentiate serotonin syndrome. The usage of methylene blue to evaluate ureters for injuries and patency during urological surgeries is recognized as common practice. However, there is no mention of serotonin syndrome caused by methylene blue in urological literature or for urological surgery. We report the first urological case in order to raise awareness of the risk for serotonin toxicity with utilizing methylene blue. PMID:27617215

  4. High resolution quantitative proteomics of HeLa cells protein species using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture(SILAC), two-dimensional gel electrophoresis(2DE) and nano-liquid chromatograpohy coupled to an LTQ-OrbitrapMass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Koehler, Christian J; Strozynski, Margarita; Treumann, Achim; Stein, Robert; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Schmid, Monika; Jungblut, Peter R

    2013-02-01

    The proteomics field has shifted over recent years from two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE)-based approaches to SDS-PAGE or gel-free workflows because of the tremendous developments in isotopic labeling techniques, nano-liquid chromatography, and high-resolution mass spectrometry. However, 2-DE still offers the highest resolution in protein separation. Therefore, we combined stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture of controls and apoptotic HeLa cells with 2-DE and the subsequent analysis of tryptic peptides via nano-liquid chromatography coupled to an LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer to obtain quantitative data using the methods with the highest resolving power on all levels of the proteomics workflow. More than 1,200 proteins with more than 2,700 protein species were identified and quantified from 816 Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 stained 2-DE spots. About half of the proteins were identified and quantified only in single 2-DE spots. The majority of spots revealed one to five proteins; however, in one 2-DE spot, up to 23 proteins were identified. Only half of the 2-DE spots represented a dominant protein with more than 90% of the whole protein amount. Consequently, quantification based on staining intensities in 2-DE gels would in approximately half of the spots be imprecise, and minor components could not be quantified. These problems are circumvented by quantification using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture. Despite challenges, as shown in detail for lamin A/C and vimentin, the quantitative changes of protein species can be detected. The combination of 2-DE with high-resolution nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry allowed us to identify proteomic changes in apoptotic cells that would be unobservable using any of the other previously employed proteomic workflows.

  5. High Resolution Quantitative Proteomics of HeLa Cells Protein Species Using Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture(SILAC), Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis(2DE) and Nano-Liquid Chromatograpohy Coupled to an LTQ-OrbitrapMass Spectrometer*

    PubMed Central

    Thiede, Bernd; Koehler, Christian J.; Strozynski, Margarita; Treumann, Achim; Stein, Robert; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Schmid, Monika; Jungblut, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    The proteomics field has shifted over recent years from two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE)-based approaches to SDS-PAGE or gel-free workflows because of the tremendous developments in isotopic labeling techniques, nano-liquid chromatography, and high-resolution mass spectrometry. However, 2-DE still offers the highest resolution in protein separation. Therefore, we combined stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture of controls and apoptotic HeLa cells with 2-DE and the subsequent analysis of tryptic peptides via nano-liquid chromatography coupled to an LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer to obtain quantitative data using the methods with the highest resolving power on all levels of the proteomics workflow. More than 1,200 proteins with more than 2,700 protein species were identified and quantified from 816 Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 stained 2-DE spots. About half of the proteins were identified and quantified only in single 2-DE spots. The majority of spots revealed one to five proteins; however, in one 2-DE spot, up to 23 proteins were identified. Only half of the 2-DE spots represented a dominant protein with more than 90% of the whole protein amount. Consequently, quantification based on staining intensities in 2-DE gels would in approximately half of the spots be imprecise, and minor components could not be quantified. These problems are circumvented by quantification using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture. Despite challenges, as shown in detail for lamin A/C and vimentin, the quantitative changes of protein species can be detected. The combination of 2-DE with high-resolution nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry allowed us to identify proteomic changes in apoptotic cells that would be unobservable using any of the other previously employed proteomic workflows. PMID:23033477

  6. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals that Red and Blue Light Regulate Growth and Phytohormone Metabolism in Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst].

    PubMed

    OuYang, Fangqun; Mao, Jian-Feng; Wang, Junhui; Zhang, Shougong; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which different light spectra regulate plant shoot elongation vary, and phytohormones respond differently to such spectrum-associated regulatory effects. Light supplementation can effectively control seedling growth in Norway spruce. However, knowledge of the effective spectrum for promoting growth and phytohormone metabolism in this species is lacking. In this study, 3-year-old Norway spruce clones were illuminated for 12 h after sunset under blue or red light-emitting diode (LED) light for 90 d, and stem increments and other growth traits were determined. Endogenous hormone levels and transcriptome differences in the current needles were assessed to identify genes related to the red and blue light regulatory responses. The results showed that the stem increment and gibberellin (GA) levels of the seedlings illuminated by red light were 8.6% and 29.0% higher, respectively, than those of the seedlings illuminated by blue light. The indoleacetic acid (IAA) level of the seedlings illuminated by red light was 54.6% lower than that of the seedlings illuminated by blue light, and there were no significant differences in abscisic acid (ABA) or zeatin riboside [ZR] between the two groups of seedlings. The transcriptome results revealed 58,736,166 and 60,555,192 clean reads for the blue-light- and red-light-illuminated samples, respectively. Illumina sequencing revealed 21,923 unigenes, and 2744 (approximately 93.8%) out of 2926 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be upregulated under blue light. The main KEGG classifications of the DEGs were metabolic pathway (29%), biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (20.49%) and hormone signal transduction (8.39%). With regard to hormone signal transduction, AUXIN-RESISTANT1 (AUX1), AUX/IAA genes, auxin-inducible genes, and early auxin-responsive genes [(auxin response factor (ARF) and small auxin-up RNA (SAUR)] were all upregulated under blue light compared with red light, which might have yielded the

  7. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals that Red and Blue Light Regulate Growth and Phytohormone Metabolism in Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.

    PubMed Central

    OuYang, Fangqun; Mao, Jian-Feng; Wang, Junhui; Zhang, Shougong; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which different light spectra regulate plant shoot elongation vary, and phytohormones respond differently to such spectrum-associated regulatory effects. Light supplementation can effectively control seedling growth in Norway spruce. However, knowledge of the effective spectrum for promoting growth and phytohormone metabolism in this species is lacking. In this study, 3-year-old Norway spruce clones were illuminated for 12 h after sunset under blue or red light-emitting diode (LED) light for 90 d, and stem increments and other growth traits were determined. Endogenous hormone levels and transcriptome differences in the current needles were assessed to identify genes related to the red and blue light regulatory responses. The results showed that the stem increment and gibberellin (GA) levels of the seedlings illuminated by red light were 8.6% and 29.0% higher, respectively, than those of the seedlings illuminated by blue light. The indoleacetic acid (IAA) level of the seedlings illuminated by red light was 54.6% lower than that of the seedlings illuminated by blue light, and there were no significant differences in abscisic acid (ABA) or zeatin riboside [ZR] between the two groups of seedlings. The transcriptome results revealed 58,736,166 and 60,555,192 clean reads for the blue-light- and red-light-illuminated samples, respectively. Illumina sequencing revealed 21,923 unigenes, and 2744 (approximately 93.8%) out of 2926 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be upregulated under blue light. The main KEGG classifications of the DEGs were metabolic pathway (29%), biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (20.49%) and hormone signal transduction (8.39%). With regard to hormone signal transduction, AUXIN-RESISTANT1 (AUX1), AUX/IAA genes, auxin-inducible genes, and early auxin-responsive genes [(auxin response factor (ARF) and small auxin-up RNA (SAUR)] were all upregulated under blue light compared with red light, which might have yielded the

  8. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals that Red and Blue Light Regulate Growth and Phytohormone Metabolism in Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst].

    PubMed

    OuYang, Fangqun; Mao, Jian-Feng; Wang, Junhui; Zhang, Shougong; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which different light spectra regulate plant shoot elongation vary, and phytohormones respond differently to such spectrum-associated regulatory effects. Light supplementation can effectively control seedling growth in Norway spruce. However, knowledge of the effective spectrum for promoting growth and phytohormone metabolism in this species is lacking. In this study, 3-year-old Norway spruce clones were illuminated for 12 h after sunset under blue or red light-emitting diode (LED) light for 90 d, and stem increments and other growth traits were determined. Endogenous hormone levels and transcriptome differences in the current needles were assessed to identify genes related to the red and blue light regulatory responses. The results showed that the stem increment and gibberellin (GA) levels of the seedlings illuminated by red light were 8.6% and 29.0% higher, respectively, than those of the seedlings illuminated by blue light. The indoleacetic acid (IAA) level of the seedlings illuminated by red light was 54.6% lower than that of the seedlings illuminated by blue light, and there were no significant differences in abscisic acid (ABA) or zeatin riboside [ZR] between the two groups of seedlings. The transcriptome results revealed 58,736,166 and 60,555,192 clean reads for the blue-light- and red-light-illuminated samples, respectively. Illumina sequencing revealed 21,923 unigenes, and 2744 (approximately 93.8%) out of 2926 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be upregulated under blue light. The main KEGG classifications of the DEGs were metabolic pathway (29%), biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (20.49%) and hormone signal transduction (8.39%). With regard to hormone signal transduction, AUXIN-RESISTANT1 (AUX1), AUX/IAA genes, auxin-inducible genes, and early auxin-responsive genes [(auxin response factor (ARF) and small auxin-up RNA (SAUR)] were all upregulated under blue light compared with red light, which might have yielded the

  9. 7 CFR 1217.2 - Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. 1217.2 Section 1217.2... Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.2 Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC means the 21-member committee representing businesses that manufacture softwood lumber...

  10. 7 CFR 1217.2 - Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. 1217.2 Section 1217.2... Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.2 Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC means the 21-member committee representing businesses that manufacture softwood lumber...

  11. 7 CFR 1217.2 - Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. 1217.2 Section 1217.2... Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1217.2 Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC. Blue Ribbon Commission or BRC means the 21-member committee representing businesses that manufacture softwood lumber...

  12. 77 FR 55895 - Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of permanent closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ). SUMMARY: The... Cincinnati advising that on August 29, 2012, it was permanently closing Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport...

  13. 49 CFR 173.216 - Asbestos, blue, brown or white.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Asbestos, blue, brown or white. 173.216 Section... Class 7 § 173.216 Asbestos, blue, brown or white. (a) Asbestos, blue, brown or white, includes each of the following hydrated mineral silicates: chrysolite, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite...

  14. Synthesis of mesoporous TiO2-curcumin nanoparticles for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue dye.

    PubMed

    Abou-Gamra, Z M; Ahmed, M A

    2016-07-01

    Herein, we demonstrate a facile route for synthesis a new photocatalyst based on TiO2-curcumin nanoparticles for photodegradation of methylene blue dye under UV and visible light irradiation. The photocatalyst was prepared by sol-gel method using chitosan as biodegradable polymer. The crystalline and the nanostructure were characteristic X-ray diffraction [XRD], adsorption-desorption isotherm and high resolution transmission electron microscopy [HRTEM]. However, the optical features of the samples were investigated by a UV-visible spectrophotometer. It is obvious to notice the removal of the majority of methylene blue dye on a pure titania surface via adsorption mechanism owing to the high surface area and to the organized mesoporous nature of the solid sample. Incorporation of curcumin on titania surface changes the removal direction from adsorption to the photocatalytic pathway. Various photocatalytic experiments were performed to investigate the influence of initial dye concentration, weight of catalyst, stirring and light intensity on the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue as primary pollutant model. Chemical oxygen demand [COD] test confirms the complete degradation of methylene blue dye. The exceptional photocatalytic reactivity of titania-curcumin nanoparticles is referred to reduction in band gap energy and to the facility of electron transfer from II* curcumin energy level to titania conduction band which increases the concentration of reactive oxygen superoxide radicals which in turn prevents the electron-hole recombination. The effect of various scavengers on the methylene blue dye degradation was investigated using ethanol, ascorbic acid and methyl viologen. The results have pointed out that O2(-) and HO(.) are considered the main active species in the degradation process. A plausible pathway and mechanism for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue by titania-curcumin nanoparticles were illustrated.

  15. Synthesis of mesoporous TiO2-curcumin nanoparticles for photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue dye.

    PubMed

    Abou-Gamra, Z M; Ahmed, M A

    2016-07-01

    Herein, we demonstrate a facile route for synthesis a new photocatalyst based on TiO2-curcumin nanoparticles for photodegradation of methylene blue dye under UV and visible light irradiation. The photocatalyst was prepared by sol-gel method using chitosan as biodegradable polymer. The crystalline and the nanostructure were characteristic X-ray diffraction [XRD], adsorption-desorption isotherm and high resolution transmission electron microscopy [HRTEM]. However, the optical features of the samples were investigated by a UV-visible spectrophotometer. It is obvious to notice the removal of the majority of methylene blue dye on a pure titania surface via adsorption mechanism owing to the high surface area and to the organized mesoporous nature of the solid sample. Incorporation of curcumin on titania surface changes the removal direction from adsorption to the photocatalytic pathway. Various photocatalytic experiments were performed to investigate the influence of initial dye concentration, weight of catalyst, stirring and light intensity on the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue as primary pollutant model. Chemical oxygen demand [COD] test confirms the complete degradation of methylene blue dye. The exceptional photocatalytic reactivity of titania-curcumin nanoparticles is referred to reduction in band gap energy and to the facility of electron transfer from II* curcumin energy level to titania conduction band which increases the concentration of reactive oxygen superoxide radicals which in turn prevents the electron-hole recombination. The effect of various scavengers on the methylene blue dye degradation was investigated using ethanol, ascorbic acid and methyl viologen. The results have pointed out that O2(-) and HO(.) are considered the main active species in the degradation process. A plausible pathway and mechanism for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue by titania-curcumin nanoparticles were illustrated. PMID:27107333

  16. Determination of low level sulfides in environmental waters by automated gas dialysis/methylene blue colorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Francom, D. Goodwin, L.R.; Dieken, F.P. )

    1990-01-01

    A sensitive and rapid automated method has been developed for the selective analysis of acid extractable sulfide in environmental samples by combining gas dialysis separation techniques with methylene blue detection procedures. Acid extractable sulfide is separated from the sample matrix by the gas dialysis membrane and subsequently trapped in a dilute sodium hydroxide receiving stream. This stream is reacted with N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and ferric chloride to produce methylene blue which is then quantitated colorimetrically at 660 nm. For standards and nonturbid environmental samples, there is good agreement between the results obtained by this procedure and the standard methylene blue method. The effect of interferences on the accurate determination of sulfide by both methods was also examined and it was found that cupric ions significantly interfered with sulfide estimation. To obtain adequate sulfide recoveries in tap water and environmental samples ascorbic acid must be added as an antioxidant. A detection limit of 2 {mu}g/L of sulfide has been obtained using this procedure.

  17. Phycobilisomes in Blue-Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, Ruth B.; Bowen, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    Fifteen species of freshwater blue-green algae, including unicellular, filamentous, and colonial forms, were subjected to a variety of fixatives, fixation conditions, and stains for comparison of the preservation of phycobilisomes. Absorption spectra of the corresponding in vivo and released photosynthetic pigments, in 10 of the species that were maintained in culture, demonstrated the presence of phycocyanin in all 10 species and phycoerythrin in only 2 of them. Spectroscope and electron microscope evidence was obtained for localization of phycobiliproteins in phycobilisomes of Nostoc muscorum. Phycobilisomes were observed in all species examined in situ, strenghening the hypothesis that phycobilisomes are common to all phycobiliprotein-containing photosynthetic blue-green algae. Images PMID:4204443

  18. Model of Blue Jet Formation and Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, Gennadiy; Shneider, Mikhail; Mokrov, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Upward-propagating luminous flashes above thunderstorms were discovered two decades ago. They were named blue jets (BJ) due to primarily blue color. It is broadly accepted that BJ are produced by a lightning leader running upward in the nonuniform atmosphere. It is also suggested that formation of a leader is governed by the contraction of the current of a streamer flash into a small radius channel. The paper presents results of simulations of the current contraction in the air as a function of the pressure, and convective heat removal time. It was shown that transition to the contracted state occurs in hysteresis mode in which contracted and diffusive stable states exist simultaneously. The critical current for the phase transition was obtained. Similarity methods were applied to the simulations of the critical contraction current, along with chosen observations of BJ, to study BJ formation and propagation in the atmosphere.

  19. Experiencing Blues at the Crossroads: A Place-Based Method for Teaching the Geography of Blues Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strait, John

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a pedagogical module that explores the geography of blues culture across the Mississippi Delta. By focusing on blues culture, rather than simply blues music itself, this project provides a forum for understanding the broader geographical conditions from which this musical form emerged. This module utilizes place-based…

  20. Starbursts in blue compact dwarf galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, Trinh Xuan

    1987-01-01

    All the arguments for a bursting mode of star formation in blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCD) are summarized. It is shown that spectral synthesis of far-ultraviolet spectra of BCDs constitutes a powerful way to study the star formation history in these galaxies. BCD luminosity functions show jumps and discontinuities. These jumps act like fossil records of the star-forming bursts, aiding in the counting and dating of the bursts.

  1. Accidental mydriasis from blue nightshade "lipstick".

    PubMed

    Rubinfeld, R S; Currie, J N

    1987-03-01

    A 7-year-old girl presented with bilaterally dilated pupils, nausea, and vomiting 2 days after head trauma. Pilocarpine pupil testing led to the correct diagnosis of pharmacologic pupillary dilation from an unexpected and unusual source of plant poisoning, Solanum dulcamara (blue nightshade). In patients with internal ophthalmoplegia, awareness of the possibility of pharmacologic mydriasis and correct use of topical pilocarpine testing can preclude the necessity for neuroradiologic and invasive diagnostic studies, even in cases with atypical or complex presentations.

  2. Eta Carinae and Other Luminous Blue Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.

    2006-01-01

    Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) are believed to be evolved, extremely massive stars close to the Eddington Limit and hence prone to bouts of large-scale, unstable mass loss. I discuss current understanding of the evolutionary state of these objects, the role duplicity may play and known physical characteristics of these stars using the X-ray luminous LBVs Eta Carinae and HD 5980 as test cases.

  3. Luminescence conversion of blue light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlotter, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schneider, J.

    Using blue-emitting GaN/6HSiC chips as primary light sources, we have fabricated green, yellow, red and white emitting LEDs. The generation of mixed colors, as turquoise and magenta is also demonstrated. The underlying physical principle is that of luminescence down-conversion (Stokes shift), as typical for organic luminescent dye molecules. A white emitting LED, using an inorganic converter, Y3Al5O12:Ce3+( ), has also been realized.

  4. Inhibition of germination of dormant barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) grains by blue light as related to oxygen and hormonal regulation.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Hai Ha; Sechet, Julien; Bailly, Christophe; Leymarie, Juliette; Corbineau, Françoise

    2014-06-01

    Germination of primary dormant barley grains is promoted by darkness and temperatures below 20 °C, but is strongly inhibited by blue light. Exposure under blue light at 10 °C for periods longer than five days, results in a progressive inability to germinate in the dark, considered as secondary dormancy. We demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of blue light is reinforced in hypoxia. The inhibitory effect of blue light is associated with an increase in embryo abscisic acid (ABA) content (by 3.5- to 3.8-fold) and embryo sensitivity to both ABA and hypoxia. Analysis of expression of ABA metabolism genes shows that increase in ABA mainly results in a strong increase in HvNCED1 and HvNCED2 expression, and a slight decrease in HvABA8'OH-1. Among the gibberellins (GA) metabolism genes examined, blue light decreases the expression of HvGA3ox2, involved in GA synthesis, increases that of GA2ox3 and GA2ox5, involved in GA catabolism, and reduces the GA signalling evaluated by the HvExpA11 expression. Expression of secondary dormancy is associated with maintenance of high embryo ABA content and a low HvExpA11 expression. The partial reversion of the inhibitory effect of blue light by green light also suggests that cryptochrome might be involved in this hormonal regulation. PMID:24256416

  5. Inhibition of germination of dormant barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) grains by blue light as related to oxygen and hormonal regulation.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Hai Ha; Sechet, Julien; Bailly, Christophe; Leymarie, Juliette; Corbineau, Françoise

    2014-06-01

    Germination of primary dormant barley grains is promoted by darkness and temperatures below 20 °C, but is strongly inhibited by blue light. Exposure under blue light at 10 °C for periods longer than five days, results in a progressive inability to germinate in the dark, considered as secondary dormancy. We demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of blue light is reinforced in hypoxia. The inhibitory effect of blue light is associated with an increase in embryo abscisic acid (ABA) content (by 3.5- to 3.8-fold) and embryo sensitivity to both ABA and hypoxia. Analysis of expression of ABA metabolism genes shows that increase in ABA mainly results in a strong increase in HvNCED1 and HvNCED2 expression, and a slight decrease in HvABA8'OH-1. Among the gibberellins (GA) metabolism genes examined, blue light decreases the expression of HvGA3ox2, involved in GA synthesis, increases that of GA2ox3 and GA2ox5, involved in GA catabolism, and reduces the GA signalling evaluated by the HvExpA11 expression. Expression of secondary dormancy is associated with maintenance of high embryo ABA content and a low HvExpA11 expression. The partial reversion of the inhibitory effect of blue light by green light also suggests that cryptochrome might be involved in this hormonal regulation.

  6. Automated detection of Antarctic blue whale calls.

    PubMed

    Socheleau, Francois-Xavier; Leroy, Emmanuelle; Pecci, Andres Carvallo; Samaran, Flore; Bonnel, Julien; Royer, Jean-Yves

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automated detection of Z-calls emitted by Antarctic blue whales (B. m. intermedia). The proposed solution is based on a subspace detector of sigmoidal-frequency signals with unknown time-varying amplitude. This detection strategy takes into account frequency variations of blue whale calls as well as the presence of other transient sounds that can interfere with Z-calls (such as airguns or other whale calls). The proposed method has been tested on more than 105 h of acoustic data containing about 2200 Z-calls (as found by an experienced human operator). This method is shown to have a correct-detection rate of up to more than 15% better than the extensible bioacoustic tool package, a spectrogram-based correlation detector commonly used to study blue whales. Because the proposed method relies on subspace detection, it does not suffer from some drawbacks of correlation-based detectors. In particular, it does not require the choice of an a priori fixed and subjective template. The analytic expression of the detection performance is also derived, which provides crucial information for higher level analyses such as animal density estimation from acoustic data. Finally, the detection threshold automatically adapts to the soundscape in order not to violate a user-specified false alarm rate. PMID:26627784

  7. Automated detection of Antarctic blue whale calls.

    PubMed

    Socheleau, Francois-Xavier; Leroy, Emmanuelle; Pecci, Andres Carvallo; Samaran, Flore; Bonnel, Julien; Royer, Jean-Yves

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automated detection of Z-calls emitted by Antarctic blue whales (B. m. intermedia). The proposed solution is based on a subspace detector of sigmoidal-frequency signals with unknown time-varying amplitude. This detection strategy takes into account frequency variations of blue whale calls as well as the presence of other transient sounds that can interfere with Z-calls (such as airguns or other whale calls). The proposed method has been tested on more than 105 h of acoustic data containing about 2200 Z-calls (as found by an experienced human operator). This method is shown to have a correct-detection rate of up to more than 15% better than the extensible bioacoustic tool package, a spectrogram-based correlation detector commonly used to study blue whales. Because the proposed method relies on subspace detection, it does not suffer from some drawbacks of correlation-based detectors. In particular, it does not require the choice of an a priori fixed and subjective template. The analytic expression of the detection performance is also derived, which provides crucial information for higher level analyses such as animal density estimation from acoustic data. Finally, the detection threshold automatically adapts to the soundscape in order not to violate a user-specified false alarm rate.

  8. QCD and the BlueGene

    SciTech Connect

    Vranas, P

    2007-06-18

    Quantum Chromodynamics is the theory of nuclear and sub-nuclear physics. It is a celebrated theory and one of its inventors, F. Wilczek, has termed it as '... our most perfect physical theory'. Part of this is related to the fact that QCD can be numerically simulated from first principles using the methods of lattice gauge theory. The computational demands of QCD are enormous and have not only played a role in the history of supercomputers but are also helping define their future. Here I will discuss the intimate relation of QCD and massively parallel supercomputers with focus on the Blue Gene supercomputer and QCD thermodynamics. I will present results on the performance of QCD on the Blue Gene as well as physics simulation results of QCD at temperatures high enough that sub-nuclear matter transitions to a plasma state of elementary particles, the quark gluon plasma. This state of matter is thought to have existed at around 10 microseconds after the big bang. Current heavy ion experiments are in the quest of reproducing it for the first time since then. And numerical simulations of QCD on the Blue Gene systems are calculating the theoretical values of fundamental parameters so that comparisons of experiment and theory can be made.

  9. Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) supported copper nanoclusters: glutathione enhanced blue photoluminescence for application in phosphor converted light emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenguang; Susha, Andrei S.; Chen, Bingkun; Reckmeier, Claas; Tomanec, Ondrej; Zboril, Radek; Zhong, Haizheng; Rogach, Andrey L.

    2016-03-01

    Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) supported Cu nanoclusters were synthesized by reduction of Cu(ii) ions with ascorbic acid in water, and initially showed blue photoluminescence with a quantum yield of 8%. An enhancement of the emission quantum yield has been achieved by treatment of Cu clusters with different electron-rich ligands, with the most pronounced effect (photoluminescence quantum yield of 27%) achieved with glutathione. The bright blue emission of glutathione treated Cu NCs is fully preserved in the solid state powder, which has been combined with commercial green and red phosphors to fabricate down-conversion white light emitting diodes with a high colour rendering index of 92.Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) supported Cu nanoclusters were synthesized by reduction of Cu(ii) ions with ascorbic acid in water, and initially showed blue photoluminescence with a quantum yield of 8%. An enhancement of the emission quantum yield has been achieved by treatment of Cu clusters with different electron-rich ligands, with the most pronounced effect (photoluminescence quantum yield of 27%) achieved with glutathione. The bright blue emission of glutathione treated Cu NCs is fully preserved in the solid state powder, which has been combined with commercial green and red phosphors to fabricate down-conversion white light emitting diodes with a high colour rendering index of 92. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The optical spectra of control experiments for Cu NC synthesis, optimization of the reaction conditions, and spectra for LEDs chips and blue LEDs. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00806b

  10. Interaction of omapatrilat with FD&C Blue No. 2 lake during dissolution of modified release tablets.

    PubMed

    Lobo, M; Patel, J; Kamins, G; Francis, R; Breza, B; Jerzewski, R

    2007-07-18

    The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism(s) of omapatrilat degradation observed during dissolution from modified release (MR) tablet formulations containing colorants. The tablets were manufactured by a dry granulation process employing roller compaction. The colorants were added intragranularly and included red and yellow iron oxides and FD&C Blue No. 2 lake and dye. Dissolution studies in pH 6 or 6.8 media do not indicate any omapatrilat degradation in the absence of colorants. In the presence of colorants the degradation rate of omapatrilat in pH 6.8 media was in the following order: blue lake>blue lake+yellow iron oxide>yellow and red iron oxides. Higher degradation was observed with MR tablets formulated with indigo carmine (dye) as opposed to tablets formulated with aluminum oxide or aluminum hydroxide (dye substrate portion of lake). The inclusion of tartaric acid and the photostabilizer, uric acid, in omapatrilat MR tablets containing the blue lake reduced the degradation significantly. The dissolution instability observed at pH 6.8 in the MR tablet formulated with FD&C Blue No. 2 Lake was attributed to the dye component of the lake. The instability was more pronounced at higher pH and in the absence of a photostabilizer.

  11. Effect on in vitro starch digestibility of Mexican blue maize anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Camelo-Méndez, Gustavo A; Agama-Acevedo, Edith; Sanchez-Rivera, Mirna M; Bello-Pérez, Luis A

    2016-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of blue maize extracts obtained by acid-methanol treatment on the nutritional in vitro starch fractions such as: rapidly digestive starch (RDS), slowly digestive starch (SDS) and resistant starch (RS) of native and gelatinized commercial maize starch. Chromatographic analysis (HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS) of blue maize extracts showed the presence of seven anthocyanins, where cyanidin-3-(6″-malonylglucoside) was the main. Blue maize extracts modified nutritional in vitro starch fractions (decrease of RDS) while RS content increased (1.17 and 2.02 times for native and gelatinized commercial maize starch, respectively) when anthocyanins extracts were added to starch up to 75% (starch weight). This preliminary observation provides the basis for further suitability evaluation of blue maize extract as natural starch-modifier by the possible anthocyanins-starch interaction. Anthocyanin extracts can be a suitable to produce functional foods with higher RS content with potential human health benefits.

  12. MoS{sub 2} nanotube exfoliation as new synthesis pathway to molybdenum blue

    SciTech Connect

    Visic, B.; Gunde, M. Klanjsek; Kovac, J.; Iskra, I.; Jelenc, J.; Remskar, M.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: . Display Omitted Highlights: ► New synthesis approach to obtaining molybdenum blue via exfoliated MoS{sub 2} nanotubes. ► Material is prone to self assembly and is stable in high vacuum. ► Molecules are as small as 2 nm and their clusters are up to tens of nanometers. ► Change in absorption and oxidation states from the precursor MoS{sub 2}. -- Abstract: Molybdenum blue-type materials are usually obtained by partially reducing Mo{sup VI+} in acidic solutions, while in the presented method it is formed in ethanol solution of exfoliated MoS{sub 2} nanotubes, where the MoS{sub 2} flakes are the preferential location for their growth. Material was investigated by means of scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, showing the structure and self assembly, while also confirming that it is stable in high vacuum with molecules as small as 1.6 nm and the agglomerates of few tens of nanometres. The ultraviolet–visible and photoelectron spectrometry show the change in absorption properties and oxidation states from MoS{sub 2} structure to molybdenum blue, while the presence of sulphur suggests that this is a new type of molybdenum blue material.

  13. Photo-degradation of methylene blue using Ta-doped ZnO nanoparticle

    SciTech Connect

    Kong Jizhou; Li Aidong; Li Xiangyu; Zhai Haifa; Zhang Wenqi; Gong Youpin; Li Hui; Wu Di

    2010-06-15

    A photocatalyst of Ta-doped ZnO was prepared by a modified Pechini-type method. The structural, morphological properties and photocatalytic activity of 1 mol % Ta-doped ZnO samples annealed at different temperatures were characterized. The photo-oxidation of methylene blue under the visible-light irradiation followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics according to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. It is found that the photocatalysis of 1% Ta-doped ZnO annealed at 700 {sup o}C showed excellent performance of the photodegradation of methylene blue, which was attributed to a competitive trade-off among the crystallinity, surface hydroxyl groups, and specific surface area. The processing parameter such as the pH value also played an important role in tuning the photocatalytic activity. The maximum photodecomposed rate was achieved at pH=8, and an novel model about the absorption of methylene blue on the surface of the catalysts was proposed. - Graphical abstract: This model describes the adsorption between the amphoteric behavior of the metal oxide and the cationic dye methylene blue (MB) on the surface of the catalyst at the acidic and alkaline condition.

  14. Effect on in vitro starch digestibility of Mexican blue maize anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Camelo-Méndez, Gustavo A; Agama-Acevedo, Edith; Sanchez-Rivera, Mirna M; Bello-Pérez, Luis A

    2016-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of blue maize extracts obtained by acid-methanol treatment on the nutritional in vitro starch fractions such as: rapidly digestive starch (RDS), slowly digestive starch (SDS) and resistant starch (RS) of native and gelatinized commercial maize starch. Chromatographic analysis (HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS) of blue maize extracts showed the presence of seven anthocyanins, where cyanidin-3-(6″-malonylglucoside) was the main. Blue maize extracts modified nutritional in vitro starch fractions (decrease of RDS) while RS content increased (1.17 and 2.02 times for native and gelatinized commercial maize starch, respectively) when anthocyanins extracts were added to starch up to 75% (starch weight). This preliminary observation provides the basis for further suitability evaluation of blue maize extract as natural starch-modifier by the possible anthocyanins-starch interaction. Anthocyanin extracts can be a suitable to produce functional foods with higher RS content with potential human health benefits. PMID:27283633

  15. The first direct evidence of pre-columbian sources of palygorskite for Maya Blue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, Dean E.; Bohor, Bruce F.; Neff, Hector; Feinman, Gary M.; Williams, Patrick Ryan; Dussubieux, Laure; Bishop, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Maya Blue, a nano-structured clay–organic complex of palygorskite and indigo, was used predominantly before the Spanish Conquest. It has fascinated chemists, material scientists, archaeologists and art historians for decades because it is resistant to the effect of acids, alkalis, and other reagents, and its rich color has persisted for centuries in the harsh tropical climate of southern Mesoamerica. One of its components, palygorskite, is part of modern Maya indigenous knowledge, and ethnohistoric and archaeological data suggest that its modern sources were probably utilized in Prehispanic times. Yet no direct evidence verifies that palygorskite was actually mined from these sources to make Maya Blue. Here we characterize these sources compositionally, and compare our analyses to those of Maya Blue from Chichén Itzá and Palenque. We demonstrate that the palygorskite in most of these samples came from modern mines, providing the first direct evidence for the use of these sources for making Maya Blue. These findings reveal that modern Maya indigenous knowledge about palygorskite, its mining, and its source locations, is at least seven centuries old.

  16. Studying Mixing in Non-Newtonian Blue Maize Flour Suspensions Using Color Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Rojas-de Gante, Cecilia; García-Lara, Silverio; Ballescá-Estrada, Adriana; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-Newtonian fluids occur in many relevant flow and mixing scenarios at the lab and industrial scale. The addition of acid or basic solutions to a non-Newtonian fluid is not an infrequent operation, particularly in Biotechnology applications where the pH of Non-Newtonian culture broths is usually regulated using this strategy. Methodology and Findings We conducted mixing experiments in agitated vessels using Non-Newtonian blue maize flour suspensions. Acid or basic pulses were injected to reveal mixing patterns and flow structures and to follow their time evolution. No foreign pH indicator was used as blue maize flours naturally contain anthocyanins that act as a native, wide spectrum, pH indicator. We describe a novel method to quantitate mixedness and mixing evolution through Dynamic Color Analysis (DCA) in this system. Color readings corresponding to different times and locations within the mixing vessel were taken with a digital camera (or a colorimeter) and translated to the CIELab scale of colors. We use distances in the Lab space, a 3D color space, between a particular mixing state and the final mixing point to characterize segregation/mixing in the system. Conclusion and Relevance Blue maize suspensions represent an adequate and flexible model to study mixing (and fluid mechanics in general) in Non-Newtonian suspensions using acid/base tracer injections. Simple strategies based on the evaluation of color distances in the CIELab space (or other scales such as HSB) can be adapted to characterize mixedness and mixing evolution in experiments using blue maize suspensions. PMID:25401332

  17. MOCK OBSERVATIONS OF BLUE STRAGGLERS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sills, Alison; Glebbeek, Evert; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A. E-mail: e.glebbeek@astro.ru.nl E-mail: rasio@northwestern.edu

    2013-11-10

    We created artificial color-magnitude diagrams of Monte Carlo dynamical models of globular clusters and then used observational methods to determine the number of blue stragglers in those clusters. We compared these blue stragglers to various cluster properties, mimicking work that has been done for blue stragglers in Milky Way globular clusters to determine the dominant formation mechanism(s) of this unusual stellar population. We find that a mass-based prescription for selecting blue stragglers will select approximately twice as many blue stragglers than a selection criterion that was developed for observations of real clusters. However, the two numbers of blue stragglers are well-correlated, so either selection criterion can be used to characterize the blue straggler population of a cluster. We confirm previous results that the simplified prescription for the evolution of a collision or merger product in the BSE code overestimates their lifetimes. We show that our model blue stragglers follow similar trends with cluster properties (core mass, binary fraction, total mass, collision rate) as the true Milky Way blue stragglers as long as we restrict ourselves to model clusters with an initial binary fraction higher than 5%. We also show that, in contrast to earlier work, the number of blue stragglers in the cluster core does have a weak dependence on the collisional parameter Γ in both our models and in Milky Way globular clusters.

  18. Nile Blue derivatives as lysosomotropic photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chi-Wei; Shulok, Janine R.; Kirley, S. D.; Cincotta, Louis; Foley, James W.

    1991-06-01

    The benzophenoxazines, including several Nile blue analogues, are a unique group of dyes that localize selectively in animal tumors. Chemical modifications of Nile blue A can yield derivatives with high 1O2 quantum yields. These derivatives represent a group of potentially effective photosensitizers for selective phototherapy of malignant tumors. In vitro evaluation of these derivatives has indicated that those with high 1O2 yields are very effective in mediating the photocytotoxicity of tumor cells. This photodynamic effect is most likely mediated through the action of 1O2, since photoirradiation under D2O enhanced and under hypoxic conditions diminished the photocytotoxic action. The subcellular localization of these photosensitizers in bladder tumor cells in culture was examined by light and fluorescence microscopies as well as by histochemical and biochemical studies. The results indicate that these dyes are localized primarily in the lysosome. The cellular uptake and retention of these dyes is energy- and pH-dependent. Agents such as nigericin, which alter the transmembrane pH gradient, reduced uptake and enhanced efflux of the dyes, while agents such as valinomycin, which reduce cellular membrane potential, had no effect on the uptake. These findings are consistent with having ion-trapping as the mechanism for the uptake of these dyes. Photoirradiation of sensitizer-treated cells obliterated lysosomes in a light-dose and drug-dose dependent fashion. Release of the hydrolytic enzymes may be the main cause for subsequent cell death since the cytolytic effect was reduced by a specific inhibitor of lysosomal proteolytic enzyme. A lysosomotropic photosensitization mechanism is therefore proposed for the photocytotoxic action of the Nile blue derivatives. This mechanism may provide an approach to the development of new photosensitizers for the effective and selective destruction of malignant tumors.

  19. Slow-blue PanSTARRS transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Bruce, Alastair; Lawrence, Andy; Ward, Martin; Collinson, James; Elvis, Martin; Gezari, Suvi; Smartt, Steven; Smith, Ken; Wright, Darryl; Fraser, Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of 50 blue, nuclear "transients" in PanSTARRS-1 has revealed different types of extremely variable AGN. The majority show a gradual brightening by ~2 mag from the SDSS observation a decade ago and may represent a new class of AGN microlensed by foreground galaxies. Spectra from the William Herschel Telescope identify these as z~1 AGN with atypical spectroscopic properties. We present an analysis of their photometric and spectroscopic variability in an effort to constrain the detailed structure of the source AGN.

  20. Measuring star formation rates in blue galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Hunter, Deidre A.

    1987-01-01

    The problems associated with measurements of star formation rates in galaxies are briefly reviewed, and specific models are presented for determinations of current star formation rates from H alpha and Far Infrared (FIR) luminosities. The models are applied to a sample of optically blue irregular galaxies, and the results are discussed in terms of star forming histories. It appears likely that typical irregular galaxies are forming stars at nearly constant rates, although a few examples of systems with enhanced star forming activity are found among HII regions and luminous irregular galaxies.

  1. Blue, green, orange, and red upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Ping; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1998-01-01

    A laser for outputting visible light at the wavelengths of blue, green, orange and red light. This is accomplished through the doping of a substrate, such as an optical fiber or waveguide, with Pr.sup.3+ ions and Yb.sup.3+ ions. A light pump such as a diode laser is used to excite these ions into energy states which will produce lasing at the desired wavelengths. Tuning elements such as prisms and gratings can be employed to select desired wavelengths for output.

  2. Blue, green, orange, and red upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Xie, P.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1998-09-08

    A laser is disclosed for outputting visible light at the wavelengths of blue, green, orange and red light. This is accomplished through the doping of a substrate, such as an optical fiber or waveguide, with Pr{sup 3+} ions and Yb{sup 3+} ions. A light pump such as a diode laser is used to excite these ions into energy states which will produce lasing at the desired wavelengths. Tuning elements such as prisms and gratings can be employed to select desired wavelengths for output. 11 figs.

  3. Trypan blue dye for anterior segment surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Jhanji, V; Chan, E; Das, S; Zhang, H; Vajpayee, R B

    2011-01-01

    Use of vital dyes in ophthalmic surgery has gained increased importance in the past few years. Trypan blue (TB) has been a popular choice among anterior segment surgeons mainly due to its safety, ease of availability, and remarkable ability to enable an easy surgery in difficult situations mostly related to visibility of the targeted tissue. It is being used in cataract surgery since nearly a decade and its utilization has been extended to other anterior segment surgeries like trabeculectomy and corneal transplantation. This review will discuss the techniques and outcome of TB dye-assisted anterior segment surgeries. PMID:21681214

  4. Blue running of the primordial tensor spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk

    2014-07-01

    We examine the possibility of positive spectral index of the power spectrum of the primordial tensor perturbation produced during inflation in the light of the detection of the B-mode polarization by the BICEP2 collaboration. We find a blue tilt is in general possible when the slow-roll parameter decays rapidly. We present two known examples in which a positive spectral index for the tensor power spectrum can be obtained. We also briefly discuss other consistency tests for further studies on inflationary dynamics.

  5. Blue Marble Space Institute essay contest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-04-01

    The Blue Marble Space Institute of Science, based in Seattle, Wash., is inviting college students to participate in its essay contest. Essays need to address the question, "In the next 100 years, how can human civilization prepare for the long-term changes to the Earth system that will occur over the coming millennium?" According to the institute, the purpose of the contest is "to stimulate creative thinking relating to space exploration and global issues by exploring how changes in the Earth system will affect humanity's future."

  6. The curious conversion of Empire Blue Cross.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James C

    2003-01-01

    The for-profit conversion of Empire Blue Cross in New York challenges the case law and conventional policy wisdom that financial assets from formerly nonprofit organizations should be used to endow independent charitable foundations. The appropriation of Empire's assets by state government itself, and their subsequent deployment to subsidize health care institutions and repay political obligations, changes the conversion process from one that pits nonprofits against for-profits to one that pits private, nonprofit organizations against public-sector programs in the competition for new financial resources. PMID:12889758

  7. Biosynthetic gene clusters for relevant secondary metabolites produced by Penicillium roqueforti in blue cheeses.

    PubMed

    García-Estrada, Carlos; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2016-10-01

    Ripening of blue-veined cheeses, such as the French Bleu and Roquefort, the Italian Gorgonzola, the English Stilton, the Danish Danablu or the Spanish Cabrales, Picón Bejes-Tresviso, and Valdeón, requires the growth and enzymatic activity of the mold Penicillium roqueforti, which is responsible for the characteristic texture, blue-green spots, and aroma of these types of cheeses. This filamentous fungus is able to synthesize different secondary metabolites, including andrastins, mycophenolic acid, and several mycotoxins, such as roquefortines C and D, PR-toxin and eremofortins, isofumigaclavines A and B, and festuclavine. This review provides a detailed description of the main secondary metabolites produced by P. roqueforti in blue cheese, giving a special emphasis to roquefortine, PR-toxin and mycophenolic acid, and their biosynthetic gene clusters and pathways. The knowledge of these clusters and secondary metabolism pathways, together with the ability of P. roqueforti to produce beneficial secondary metabolites, is of interest for commercial purposes. PMID:27554495

  8. Biosynthetic gene clusters for relevant secondary metabolites produced by Penicillium roqueforti in blue cheeses.

    PubMed

    García-Estrada, Carlos; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2016-10-01

    Ripening of blue-veined cheeses, such as the French Bleu and Roquefort, the Italian Gorgonzola, the English Stilton, the Danish Danablu or the Spanish Cabrales, Picón Bejes-Tresviso, and Valdeón, requires the growth and enzymatic activity of the mold Penicillium roqueforti, which is responsible for the characteristic texture, blue-green spots, and aroma of these types of cheeses. This filamentous fungus is able to synthesize different secondary metabolites, including andrastins, mycophenolic acid, and several mycotoxins, such as roquefortines C and D, PR-toxin and eremofortins, isofumigaclavines A and B, and festuclavine. This review provides a detailed description of the main secondary metabolites produced by P. roqueforti in blue cheese, giving a special emphasis to roquefortine, PR-toxin and mycophenolic acid, and their biosynthetic gene clusters and pathways. The knowledge of these clusters and secondary metabolism pathways, together with the ability of P. roqueforti to produce beneficial secondary metabolites, is of interest for commercial purposes.

  9. UV/blue light-induced fluorescence for assessing apple maturity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Hyun Kwon; Lu, Renfu

    2005-11-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence has been researched for assessing fruit post-harvest quality and condition. The objective of this preliminary research was to investigate the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy for measuring apple fruit quality. Ultraviolet (UV) and blue light was used as an excitation source for inducing fluorescence in apples. Fluorescence spectra were measured from 'Golden Delicious' (GD) and 'Red Delicious' (RD) apples by using a visible/near-infrared spectrometer after one, three, and five minutes of continuous UV/blue light illumination. Standard destructive tests were performed to measure fruit firmness, skin and flesh color, soluble solids and acid content from the apples. Calibration models for each of the three illumination time periods were developed to predict fruit quality indexes. The results showed that fluorescence emission decreased steadily during the first three minutes of UV/blue light illumination and was stable within five minutes. The differences were minimal in the model prediction results based on fluorescence data at one, three or five minutes of illumination. Overall, better predictions were obtained for apple skin chroma and hue and flesh hue with values for the correlation coefficient of validation between 0.80 and 0.90 for both GD and RD. Relatively poor predictions were obtained for fruit firmness, soluble solids content, titrational acid, and flesh chroma. This research demonstrated that fluorescence spectroscopy is potentially useful for assessing selected quality attributes of apple fruit and further research is needed to improve fluorescence measurements so that better predictions of fruit quality can be achieved.

  10. Hexavalent molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue by S. marcescens strain Dr. Y6.

    PubMed

    Shukor, M Y; Habib, S H M; Rahman, M F A; Jirangon, H; Abdullah, M P A; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2008-04-01

    A molybdate-reducing bacterium has been locally isolated. The bacterium reduces molybdate or Mo(6+) to molybdenum blue (molybdate oxidation states of between 5+ and 6+). Different carbon sources such as acetate, formate, glycerol, citric acid, lactose, fructose, glucose, mannitol, tartarate, maltose, sucrose, and starch were used at an initial concentration of 0.2% (w/v) in low phosphate media to study their effect on the molybdate reduction efficiency of bacterium. All of the carbon sources supported cellular growth, but only sucrose, maltose, glucose, and glycerol (in decreasing order) supported molybdate reduction after 24 h of incubation. Optimum concentration of sucrose for molybdate reduction is 1.0% (w/v) after 24 h of static incubation. Ammonium sulfate, ammonium chloride, valine, OH-proline, glutamic acid, and alanine (in the order of decreasing efficiency) supported molybdate reduction with ammonium sulfate giving the highest amount of molybdenum blue after 24 h of incubation at 0.3% (w/v). The optimum molybdate concentration that supports molybdate reduction is between 15 and 25 mM. Molybdate reduction is optimum at 35 degrees C. Phosphate at concentrations higher than 5 mM strongly inhibits molybdate reduction. The molybdenum blue produced from cellular reduction exhibits a unique absorption spectrum with a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. The isolate was tentatively identified as Serratia marcescens Strain Dr.Y6 based on carbon utilization profiles using Biolog GN plates and partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogeny.

  11. Sustained effects of blue light on Streptococcus mutans in regrown biofilm.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Berneron, Julie; Steinberg, Doron; Featherstone, John D B; Feuerstein, Osnat

    2016-04-01

    In prior studies, exposure of Streptococcus mutans in biofilm to blue light using high fluences of up to 680 J/cm(2) did not interfere with bacterial capability to reform an initial biofilm; however, a delayed antibacterial effect was observed. Our aim was to determine the sustained effecttts of blue light-emitting diode (LED) curing light on the pathogenicity of the newly formed biofilm. S. mutans were grown to form biofilm that was exposed to blue light (wavelengths, 460-480 nm) for 1, 3, and 7 min (equivalent to 37, 112, and 262 J/cm(2), respectively). Then, bacteria were suspended and allowed to regrow into new biofilms. The regrown biofilms were assessed for bacterial quantification by optical density (OD) measurement and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), bacterial viability and extracellular polysaccharide production by fluorescent staining using confocal scanning laser microscopy, acid production by bacteria (acidogenicity), and bacterial survival at low pH (aciduricity) using qPCR. Bacterial growth in the regrown biofilms was increased when samples were previously exposed to light; however, under the confocal microscopy, a higher proportion of dead bacteria and a reduction in polysaccharide production were observed. The acidogenicity from the regrown biofilm was lowered as fluences of light increased. The aciduricity of the regrown biofilm was decreased, meaning less growth of bacteria into biofilm in low pH with increasing fluences. Blue light has sustained effects on S. mutans bacteria grown into new biofilm. Although bacterial growth in biofilm increased, bacterial viability and virulence characteristics were impaired. The cariogenic potential over time of S. mutans previously exposed to blue light when grown on tooth surfaces is yet to be determined.

  12. "Big Blue Marble" Fact Sheet and "Big Blue Marble" Program Content (Shows 1 through 78).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Telephone and Telegraph Corp., New York, NY.

    This booklet describes the content of 78 programs presented in the "Big Blue Marble" series, an international series of children's television shows sponsored by the International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation. The major sequence of subjects is given, as well as a description of each program's folktale adaptation (a regular feature) and…

  13. Mutagenicity studies on two triphenylmethane dyes, bromophenol blue and tetrabromophenol blue.

    PubMed

    Lin, G H; Brusick, D J

    1992-08-01

    Bromophenol blue and tetrabromophenol blue are two triphenylmethane dyes. Triphenylmethane derivatives and their structurally related compounds, such as fluoresceins and xathenes, are widely used as industrial dyes for foods, drugs, cosmetics, textiles, printing inks or laboratory indicators. Since a number of these types of dyes have been reported to be genotoxic, safety concerns on these two dyes of interest have been raised. Consequently, a battery of genetic toxicology assays, including the Ames Salmonella/microsome assay, L5178Y TK+/- mouse lymphoma assay, mouse micronucleus test and mitotic recombination assay with yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain D5, has been performed on each of the two dyes. The results of the evaluations indicate that both bromophenol blue and tetrabromophenol blue were not active and can be considered non-genotoxic for the three genetic endpoints assessed (gene mutation, chromosome aberrations and primary DNA damage). Genetic activities in some structurally related compounds of these dyes have been reported but may be attributed to the presence of mutagenic impurities rather than the compound itself.

  14. Periumbilical allergic contact dermatitis: blue jeans or belt buckles?

    PubMed

    Byer, Tara T; Morrell, Dean S

    2004-01-01

    Nickel is the most ubiquitous contact allergen among children and adolescents. Metal blue jeans buttons and belts have been noted to cause nickel dermatitis around the umbilicus. For these children, traditional teaching is strict avoidance of all pants with metal snaps/buttons, particularly blue jeans. In this study we tested 90 pairs of blue jeans and 47 belts for nickel using the dimethylglyoxime spot test. Only 10% of blue jeans tested positive, while 53% of belts tested positive. Furthermore, 10 pairs of nickel-negative blue jeans remained negative after 10 washings. Overall we found no resistance to testing in clothing stores. From these results, we recommend that patients with allergic contact dermatitis secondary to nickel need not strictly avoid blue jeans and metal belt buckles. Rather, families should be encouraged to use the dimethylglyoxime spot test to test these items for nickel prior to purchase.

  15. Fuzzy logic color detection: Blue areas in melanoma dermoscopy images.

    PubMed

    Lingala, Mounika; Stanley, R Joe; Rader, Ryan K; Hagerty, Jason; Rabinovitz, Harold S; Oliviero, Margaret; Choudhry, Iqra; Stoecker, William V

    2014-07-01

    Fuzzy logic image analysis techniques were used to analyze three shades of blue (lavender blue, light blue, and dark blue) in dermoscopic images for melanoma detection. A logistic regression model provided up to 82.7% accuracy for melanoma discrimination for 866 images. With a support vector machines (SVM) classifier, lower accuracy was obtained for individual shades (79.9-80.1%) compared with up to 81.4% accuracy with multiple shades. All fuzzy blue logic alpha cuts scored higher than the crisp case. Fuzzy logic techniques applied to multiple shades of blue can assist in melanoma detection. These vector-based fuzzy logic techniques can be extended to other image analysis problems involving multiple colors or color shades.

  16. Comparative study of calcium alginate, activated carbon, and their composite beads on methylene blue adsorption.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A F; Abdel-Mohsen, A M; Fouda, Moustafa M G

    2014-02-15

    Three adsorbents, calcium alginate beads (AB), sodium hydroxide activated carbon based coconut shells (C), and calcium alginate/activated carbon composite beads (ACB) were prepared. Their textural properties were characterized by N2-adsorption at -196°C and scanning electron microscopy. The porosity, surface area and total pore volume of C>ACB>AB, but AB adsorbent was more acidic function groups more than the other adsorbents. Adsorption experiments were conducted to examine the effects of adsorbent dosage, pH, time, temperature and initial concentration of methylene blue. Methylene blue adsorption on C, AB and ACB was observed at pH>6 to avoid the competition of H(+). The amount of dye adsorbed increases as the adsorbent dosage increase. Adsorption of dye follows pseudo-second order mechanism. Thermodynamic studies show spontaneous and endothermic nature of the overall adsorption process.

  17. Differential migration of Blue Grouse in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cade, Brian S.; Hoffman, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    We examined migration of adult Blue Grouse (Dendragapus obscurus) in north-central Colorado by radio tracking 13 males and 19 females. Elevational changes associated with movements to winter areas were greater for males (median = 488 m, range = 183-671 m) than females (median = 122 m, range = -61-760 m). Males (median = 10.5 km, range = 1.0-29.4 km) also moved farther than females (median = 1.0 km, range = 0.1-28.0 km), resulting in partial segregation of sexes during winter. Directional orientation of movements to wintering areas was nonrandom for long-distance (>3 km) migrants. Median elevational change (122 m) and distance (0.6 km) between the first-winter and first-breeding areas for seven juvenile females were similar to movements of adult females. Males (median = 7 July) departed breeding areas earlier than females (median = 11 August), but arrived (median = 14 October) on winter areas about the same time as females (median = 23 October). Both sexes exhibited fidelity to winter areas. The average distance between winter locations ranged from 94 to 312 m (median = 135 m) for 11 radio-marked adults, suggesting Blue Grouse were sedentary on their winter ranges.

  18. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications.

  19. Raphael Meldola, his blue and his times.

    PubMed

    Travis, A S

    2012-05-01

    Raphael Meldola (1849-1915), English industrial and academic chemist, spectroscopist, naturalist, educator and lobbyist for science, is today almost a forgotten scientist whose life is celebrated only with a medal awarded by the Royal Society of Chemistry that honors achievement by younger chemists. In the 1870-80s, however, he invented a number of important synthetic dyestuffs including the cotton dyes isamine blue and Meldola's blue, and also naphthol green B, all of which have had application in biology and medicine. I describe here the early emergence of the synthetic dye industry, the first science-based industry, Meldola's role in its development, and his own inventions. Meldola's wide ranging achievements in science led to appointments as president of important professional scientific and manufacturers' societies. He was a fervent disciple of natural selection, a correspondent of Charles Darwin, and a prominent 19(th)-century neo-Darwinian. In 1886, drawing on analogies with evolutionary theory, he warned the British that neglect of science, particularly chemistry, would lead to industrial decline and even extinction, though his message generally was ignored, at least until 1914.

  20. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications. PMID:27666663

  1. Blue LEDs feasibility for tissue fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dets, Sergiy M.; Denisov, Nikolay A.

    2000-04-01

    We considered the limited number of light-induced fluorescence applications for marketed ultra-bright blue LEDs where they can compete with versatile laser sources. Satisfactory optical output and miniature size as well as low power consumption of blue LEDs emitting at 470 nm allow to consider them as a promising alternatives to metal vapor or gas lasers used in many expires LIF applications. Available to authors LEDs form Hewlett-Packard, Micro Electronics Corp., Nichia Chemical Industries Ltd. and Toyoda Gosei Co. were tested to comply with demands to a tissue excitation source for portable spectroscopes. The optical performance of LEDs has shown that selected group of InGaN LEDs could be successfully used for that. The miniature illuminator that includes LED, focusing condenser, filter set and distal fiberoptic light concentrator was designed and tested in conjunction with portable CCD- equipped spectroscope. Operating in dark condition the proposed LED illuminator provides the level of fluorescence signal sufficient to detect spectral abnormalities in human Caucasian skin and excised gastrointestinal samples. All tissue autofluorescence data taken under LED illumination were compared with readings under He-Cd laser excitation and showed a good match. A new diagnostic designs based on LEDs were considered for clinical use.

  2. Twisted bilayer blue phosphorene: A direct band gap semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, D. A.; Duque, C. A.; Correa, J. D.; Suárez Morell, Eric

    2016-09-01

    We report that two rotated layers of blue phosphorene behave as a direct band gap semiconductor. The optical spectrum shows absorption peaks in the visible region of the spectrum and in addition the energy of these peaks can be tuned with the rotational angle. These findings makes twisted bilayer blue phosphorene a strong candidate as a solar cell or photodetection device. Our results are based on ab initio calculations of several rotated blue phosphorene layers.

  3. [Sensitive determination of Bi3+ by spectrofluorimetry based on graphene oxide-methylene blue system].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Qiu-ge; Guo, Peng; Zhou, Lin; Liu, Yan-ming

    2014-08-01

    Graphene oxide was prepared by the modified Hummers method and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The interaction of graphene with methylene blue was studied by UV absorption, the intensity of two main absorption peaks of methylene blue decreased significantly after the fluorescence was quenched, and the energy transfer didn't occur because the overlap of the absorption spectrum of GO and the emission spectrum of MB is too small. Therefore, the fluorescence quenching of MB and GO was static. When adding a certain amount of Bi3+ in the graphene-methylene blue system, Bi3+ replaces the methylene blue from the graphene-methylene blue complexes because Bi3+ has the smaller volume and is more positively charged. The methylene blue therefore dissociates from the GO-MB complexes, resulting in the recovery of fluorescence of the system. Furthermore, the fluorescence of the system increases with the increase in the amount of Bi3+ due to the enhanced amount of MB in the system. A novel spectrofluorimetric method was therefore developed for the sensitive determination of Bi3+. Some parameters including the concentration of methylene blue, the amount of graphene oxide, the amount of nitric acid and the sequence of reagent adding were optimized to obtain higher sensitivity. The fluorescence of the system was detected at an emission wavelength of 667 nm with excitation at 690 nm. Under the optimized conditions, the concentration of Bi3+ showed good linear relationships with the fluorescence intensity in the range of 0.5-100 micromol x L(-1), with correlation coefficients of r = 0.9955. The limits of detection for Bi3+ was 1.0 x 10(-8) mol x L(-1) (S/N=3). The selectivity of the proposed method was evaluated and the results showed that 1000-fold K+, Ca+, Na+, Mg2+, Cu2+; 100-fold Fe3+, Be2+, SiO2- Al3+, Ni2+, Sb3+, NO3-, Cl-, F-, and 20-fold Pb2+, Hg2+, Cd2+ had negligible interference with the determination of Bi3+. The method has advantages of

  4. The Return of the Blue Butterfly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Anabela

    2014-05-01

    The Return of the Blue Butterfly The English writer Charles Dickens once wrote: "I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free". But are they really? The work that I performed with a group of students from 8th grade, had a starting point of climate change and the implications it has on ecosystems. Joining the passion I have for butterflies, I realized that they are also in danger of extinction due to these climatic effects. Thus, it was easy to seduce my students wanting to know more. Luckily I found Dr. Paula Seixas Arnaldo, a researcher at the University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, who has worked on butterflies and precisely investigated this issue. Portugal is the southern limit of butterfly-blue (Phengaris alcon), and has been many years in the red book of endangered species. Butterfly-blue is very demanding of their habitat, and disappears very easily if ideal conditions are not satisfied. Increased fragmentation of landscapes and degradation of suitable habitats, are considered the greatest challenges of the conservation of Phengaris butterfly in Portugal. In recent decades, climate change has also changed butterfly-blue spatial distribution with a movement of the species northward to colder locations, and dispersion in latitude. Butterflies of Europe must escape to the North because of the heat. Dr. Paula Seixas Arnaldo and her research team began a project, completed in December 2013, wanted to preserve and restore priority habitats recognized by the European Union to help species in danger of disappearing with increasing temperature. The blue butterfly is extremely important because it is a key indicator of the quality of these habitats. In the field, the butterflies are monitored to collect all possible data in order to identify the key species. Butterflies start flying in early July and cease in late August. Mating takes about an hour and occurs in the first days of life. The gentian-peat (Gentiana pneumonanthe) serves as the host plant for

  5. Radiation sensitive indicator based on tetrabromophenol blue dyed poly(vinyl alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshir, W. B.

    2013-05-01

    Radiation sensitive indicators based on dyed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) containing acid- sensitive dye (tetrabromophenol blue, TBPB) and chloral hydrate (CCl3·CH·(OH)2, 2,2,2-trichloroethane-1,1-diol) have been developed. These plastic film dosimeters undergo color change from blue (the alkaline form of TBPB) to yellow (the acidic form of TBPB), indicating acid formation. The concentration of radiation formed acids in the films containing different concentrations of chloral hydrate was calculated at different doses. These films can be used as dosimeters for food irradiation applications where the maximum of the useful dose ranges are between 1 and 8 kGy depending on chloral hydrate concentration in the film. The films have the advantage of negligible humidity effects on response in the intermediate range of relative humidity from 0 to 70% as good post irradiation stability when stored in the dark at room temperature. The overall combined uncertainty (at 2σ) associated with measurement of response (ΔA mm-1) at 623 nm for dose range 1-8 kGy is 4.53%.

  6. A procedure for Alcian blue staining of mucins on polyvinylidene difluoride membranes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weijie; Matsuno, Yu-ki; Kameyama, Akihiko

    2012-10-16

    The isolation and characterization of mucins are critically important for obtaining insight into the molecular pathology of various diseases, including cancers and cystic fibrosis. Recently, we developed a novel membrane electrophoretic method, supported molecular matrix electrophoresis (SMME), which separates mucins on a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane impregnated with a hydrophilic polymer. Alcian blue staining is widely used to visualize mucopolysaccharides and acidic mucins on both blotted membranes and SMME membranes; however, this method cannot be used to stain mucins with a low acidic glycan content. Meanwhile, periodic acid-Schiff staining can selectively visualize glycoproteins, including mucins, but is incompatible with glycan analysis, which is indispensable for mucin characterizations. Here we describe a novel staining method, designated succinylation-Alcian blue staining, for visualizing mucins on a PVDF membrane. This method can visualize mucins regardless of the acidic residue content and shows a sensitivity 2-fold higher than that of Pro-Q Emerald 488, a fluorescent periodate Schiff-base stain. Furthermore, we demonstrate the compatibility of this novel staining procedure with glycan analysis using porcine gastric mucin as a model mucin. PMID:22950532

  7. Measuring Cell Death by Trypan Blue Uptake and Light Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Marfell, Brooke J; Christensen, Melinda E; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Trypan blue is a colorimetric dye that stains dead cells with a blue color easily observed using light microscopy at low resolution. The staining procedure is rapid and cells can be analyzed within minutes. The number of live (unstained) and dead (blue) cells can be counted using a hemocytometer on a basic upright microscope. Trypan blue staining is therefore a convenient assay for rapidly determining the overall viability of cells in a culture before commencing scientific experimentation, or for quantitating cell death following treatment with any cytotoxic stimuli. PMID:27371594

  8. Be an acid rain detective

    SciTech Connect

    Atwill, L.

    1982-07-01

    Acid rain is discussed in a question and answer format. The article is aimed at educating sport fishermen on the subject, and also to encourage them to write their congressmen, senators, and the President about the acid rain problem. The article also announces the availability of an acid rain test kit available through the magazine, ''Sports Afield.'' The kit consists of pH-test paper that turns different shades of pink and blue according to the pH of the water tested. The color of the test paper is then compared to a color chart furnished in the kit and an approximate pH can be determined.

  9. Croconic acid - An absorber in the Venus clouds?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Karen K.; Wolff, Andrew R.; Travis, Larry D.

    1989-01-01

    The absorbing species responsible for the UV cloud features and pale yellow hue of the Venus clouds is presently suggested to be the carbon monoxide-polymer croconic acid, which strongly absorbs in the blue and near-UV. Laboratory absorption-coefficient measurements of a dilute solution of croconic acid in sulfuric acid are used as the bases of cloud-scattering models; the Venus planetary albedo's observed behavior in the blue and near-UV are noted to be qualitatively reproduced. Attention is given to a plausible croconic acid-production mechanism for the Venus cloudtop region.

  10. Phototropins but not cryptochromes mediate the blue light-specific promotion of stomatal conductance, while both enhance photosynthesis and transpiration under full sunlight.

    PubMed

    Boccalandro, Hernán E; Giordano, Carla V; Ploschuk, Edmundo L; Piccoli, Patricia N; Bottini, Rubén; Casal, Jorge J

    2012-03-01

    Leaf epidermal peels of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants lacking either phototropins 1 and 2 (phot1 and phot2) or cryptochromes 1 and 2 (cry1 and cry2) exposed to a background of red light show severely impaired stomatal opening responses to blue light. Since phot and cry are UV-A/blue light photoreceptors, they may be involved in the perception of the blue light-specific signal that induces the aperture of the stomatal pores. In leaf epidermal peels, the blue light-specific effect saturates at low irradiances; therefore, it is considered to operate mainly under the low irradiance of dawn, dusk, or deep canopies. Conversely, we show that both phot1 phot2 and cry1 cry2 have reduced stomatal conductance, transpiration, and photosynthesis, particularly under the high irradiance of full sunlight at midday. These mutants show compromised responses of stomatal conductance to irradiance. However, the effects of phot and cry on photosynthesis were largely nonstomatic. While the stomatal conductance phenotype of phot1 phot2 was blue light specific, cry1 cry2 showed reduced stomatal conductance not only in response to blue light, but also in response to red light. The levels of abscisic acid were elevated in cry1 cry2. We conclude that considering their effects at high irradiances cry and phot are critical for the control of transpiration and photosynthesis rates in the field. The effects of cry on stomatal conductance are largely indirect and involve the control of abscisic acid levels.

  11. Jupiter in blue, ultraviolet and near infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These three images of Jupiter, taken through the narrow angle camera of NASA's Cassini spacecraft from a distance of 77.6 million kilometers (48.2 million miles) on October 8, reveal more than is apparent to the naked eye through a telescope.

    The image on the left was taken through the blue filter. The one in the middle was taken in the ultraviolet. The one on the right was taken in the near infrared.

    The blue-light filter is within the part of the electromagnetic spectrum detectable by the human eye. The appearance of Jupiter in this image is, consequently, very familiar. The Great Red Spot (below and to the right of center) and the planet's well-known banded cloud lanes are obvious. The brighter bands of clouds are called zones and are probably composed of ammonia ice particles. The darker bands are called belts and are made dark by particles of unknown composition intermixed with the ammonia ice.

    Jupiter's appearance changes dramatically in the ultraviolet and near infrared images. These images are near negatives of each other and illustrate the way in which observations in different wavelength regions can reveal different physical regimes on the planet.

    All gases scatter sunlight efficiently at short wavelengths; this is why the sky appears blue on Earth. The effect is even more pronounced in the ultraviolet. The gases in Jupiter's atmosphere, above the clouds, are no different. They scatter strongly in the ultraviolet, making the deep banded cloud layers invisible in the middle image. Only the very high altitude haze appears dark against the bright background. The contrast is reversed in the near infrared, where methane gas, abundant on Jupiter but not on Earth, is strongly absorbing and therefore appears dark. Again the deep clouds are invisible, but now the high altitude haze appears relatively bright against the dark background. High altitude haze is seen over the poles and the equator.

    The Great Red Spot, prominent in all images, is

  12. Blue-Print Autophagy: Potential for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Nadia; Costantini, Susan; Costantini, Maria

    2016-07-21

    The marine environment represents a very rich source of biologically active compounds with pharmacological applications. This is due to its chemical richness, which is claiming considerable attention from the health science communities. In this review we give a general overview on the marine natural products involved in stimulation and inhibition of autophagy (a type of programmed cell death) linked to pharmacological and pathological conditions. Autophagy represents a complex multistep cellular process, wherein a double membrane vesicle (the autophagosome) captures organelles and proteins and delivers them to the lysosome. This natural and destructive mechanism allows the cells to degrade and recycle its cellular components, such as amino acids, monosaccharides, and lipids. Autophagy is an important mechanism used by cells to clear pathogenic organism and deal with stresses. Therefore, it has also been implicated in several diseases, predominantly in cancer. In fact, pharmacological stimulation or inhibition of autophagy have been proposed as approaches to develop new therapeutic treatments of cancers. In conclusion, this blue-print autophagy (so defined because it is induced and/or inhibited by marine natural products) represents a new strategy for the future of biomedicine and of biotechnology in cancer treatment.

  13. Blue-Print Autophagy: Potential for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ruocco, Nadia; Costantini, Susan; Costantini, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment represents a very rich source of biologically active compounds with pharmacological applications. This is due to its chemical richness, which is claiming considerable attention from the health science communities. In this review we give a general overview on the marine natural products involved in stimulation and inhibition of autophagy (a type of programmed cell death) linked to pharmacological and pathological conditions. Autophagy represents a complex multistep cellular process, wherein a double membrane vesicle (the autophagosome) captures organelles and proteins and delivers them to the lysosome. This natural and destructive mechanism allows the cells to degrade and recycle its cellular components, such as amino acids, monosaccharides, and lipids. Autophagy is an important mechanism used by cells to clear pathogenic organism and deal with stresses. Therefore, it has also been implicated in several diseases, predominantly in cancer. In fact, pharmacological stimulation or inhibition of autophagy have been proposed as approaches to develop new therapeutic treatments of cancers. In conclusion, this blue-print autophagy (so defined because it is induced and/or inhibited by marine natural products) represents a new strategy for the future of biomedicine and of biotechnology in cancer treatment. PMID:27455284

  14. Optimization of Evans blue quantitation in limited rat tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hwai-Lee; Lai, Ted Weita

    2014-10-01

    Evans blue dye (EBD) is an inert tracer that measures plasma volume in human subjects and vascular permeability in animal models. Quantitation of EBD can be difficult when dye concentration in the sample is limited, such as when extravasated dye is measured in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) intact brain. The procedure described here used a very small volume (30 µl) per sample replicate, which enabled high-throughput measurements of the EBD concentration based on a standard 96-well plate reader. First, ethanol ensured a consistent optic path length in each well and substantially enhanced the sensitivity of EBD fluorescence spectroscopy. Second, trichloroacetic acid (TCA) removed false-positive EBD measurements as a result of biological solutes and partially extracted EBD into the supernatant. Moreover, a 1:2 volume ratio of 50% TCA ([TCA final] = 33.3%) optimally extracted EBD from the rat plasma protein-EBD complex in vitro and in vivo, and 1:2 and 1:3 weight-volume ratios of 50% TCA optimally extracted extravasated EBD from the rat brain and liver, respectively, in vivo. This procedure is particularly useful in the detection of EBD extravasation into the BBB-intact brain, but it can also be applied to detect dye extravasation into tissues where vascular permeability is less limiting.

  15. Blue-Print Autophagy: Potential for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Nadia; Costantini, Susan; Costantini, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment represents a very rich source of biologically active compounds with pharmacological applications. This is due to its chemical richness, which is claiming considerable attention from the health science communities. In this review we give a general overview on the marine natural products involved in stimulation and inhibition of autophagy (a type of programmed cell death) linked to pharmacological and pathological conditions. Autophagy represents a complex multistep cellular process, wherein a double membrane vesicle (the autophagosome) captures organelles and proteins and delivers them to the lysosome. This natural and destructive mechanism allows the cells to degrade and recycle its cellular components, such as amino acids, monosaccharides, and lipids. Autophagy is an important mechanism used by cells to clear pathogenic organism and deal with stresses. Therefore, it has also been implicated in several diseases, predominantly in cancer. In fact, pharmacological stimulation or inhibition of autophagy have been proposed as approaches to develop new therapeutic treatments of cancers. In conclusion, this blue-print autophagy (so defined because it is induced and/or inhibited by marine natural products) represents a new strategy for the future of biomedicine and of biotechnology in cancer treatment. PMID:27455284

  16. Blue Light Protects Against Temporal Frequency Sensitive Refractive Changes

    PubMed Central

    Rucker, Frances; Britton, Stephanie; Spatcher, Molly; Hanowsky, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Time spent outdoors is protective against myopia. The outdoors allows exposure to short-wavelength (blue light) rich sunlight, while indoor illuminants can be deficient at short-wavelengths. In the current experiment, we investigate the role of blue light, and temporal sensitivity, in the emmetropization response. Methods Five-day-old chicks were exposed to sinusoidal luminance modulation of white light (with blue; N = 82) or yellow light (without blue; N = 83) at 80% contrast, at one of six temporal frequencies: 0, 0.2, 1, 2, 5, 10 Hz daily for 3 days. Mean illumination was 680 lux. Changes in ocular components and corneal curvature were measured. Results Refraction, eye length, and choroidal changes were dependent on the presence of blue light (P < 0.03, all) and on temporal frequency (P < 0.03, all). In the presence of blue light, refraction did not change across frequencies (mean change −0.24 [diopters] D), while in the absence of blue light, we observed a hyperopic shift (>1 D) at high frequencies, and a myopic shift (>−0.6 D) at low frequencies. With blue light there was little difference in eye growth across frequencies (77 μm), while in the absence of blue light, eyes grew more at low temporal frequencies and less at high temporal frequencies (10 vs. 0.2 Hz: 145 μm; P < 0.003). Overall, neonatal astigmatism was reduced with blue light. Conclusions Illuminants rich in blue light can protect against myopic eye growth when the eye is exposed to slow changes in luminance contrast as might occur with near work. PMID:26393671

  17. A bolt out of the blue.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Joseph R

    2005-05-01

    Lightning is a particularly unsettling product of bad weather. It causes more deaths and injuries in the U.S. than either hurricanes or tornadoes do, and it strikes without warning, sometimes with nothing but blue sky overhead. In central Florida, where I live, thunderstorms are a daily occurrence during the summer, and so, ironically, people in the Sunshine State often spend their afternoons indoors to avoid the risk of death from the sky. Worldwide, lightning flashes about four million times a day, and bolts have even been observed on other planets. Yet despite its familiarity, we still do not know what causes lightning. It is a misconception that Benjamin Franklin solved the puzzle when he conducted his famous kite experiment in 1752. PMID:15882023

  18. Big Blue Transgenic Mouse lacl mutation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stiegler, G.L.; Stillwell, L.C. )

    1993-01-01

    In this report the authors describe a rapid general method for mutant blue plaque molecular analysis. The mutant analysis discussed here resulted from radon inhalation exposure. The described method circumvents Stratagene's plasmid isolation and ensuing sequence analysis of the entire lac1 gene. The authors have adapted the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis for localizing mutations within the lac1 coding region. Three overlapping PCR products of approximately 450 bp representing the entire lac1 coding region are used for SSCP analysis. Those PCR products with an altered SSCP electrophoretic migration focus the mutation to a smaller region of the lac1 gene that is analyzed by direct cycle sequencing. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Blue laser inorganic write-once media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing-Mau; Yeh, Ru-Lin

    2004-09-01

    With the advantages of low cost, portability and compliance with ROM disc, write once disk has become the most popular storage media for computer and audio/video application. In addition, write once media, like CD-R and DVD-/+ R, are used to store permanent or nonalterable information, such as financial data transitions, legal documentation, and medical data. Several write once recording materials, such as TeO[1], TeOPd[2] and Si/Cu [3] have been proposed to realize inorganic write once media. Moreover, we propose AlSi alloy [4] to be used for recording layer of write once media. It had good recording properties in DVD system although the reflectivity is too low to be used for DVD-R disk. In this paper, we report the further results in blue laser system, such as the static and dynamic characteristics of write once media.

  20. Approaches toward a blue semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.

    1989-01-01

    Possible approaches for obtaining semiconductor diode laser action in the blue region of the spectrum are surveyed. A discussion of diode lasers is included along with a review of the current status of visible emitters, presently limited to 670 nm. Methods are discussed for shifting laser emission toward shorter wavelengths, including the use of II-IV materials, the increase in the bandgap of III-V materials by addition of nitrogen, and changing the bandstructure from indirect to direct by incorporating interstitial atoms or by constructing superlattices. Non-pn-junction injection methods are surveyed, including avalanche breakdown, Langmuir-Blodgett diodes, heterostructures, carrier accumulation, and Berglund diodes. Prospects of inventing new multinary semiconducting materials are discussed, and a number of novel materials described in the literature are tabulated. New approaches available through the development of quantum wells and superlattices are described, including resonant tunneling and the synthesis of arbitrary bandgap materials through multiple quantum wells.

  1. A bolt out of the blue.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Joseph R

    2005-05-01

    Lightning is a particularly unsettling product of bad weather. It causes more deaths and injuries in the U.S. than either hurricanes or tornadoes do, and it strikes without warning, sometimes with nothing but blue sky overhead. In central Florida, where I live, thunderstorms are a daily occurrence during the summer, and so, ironically, people in the Sunshine State often spend their afternoons indoors to avoid the risk of death from the sky. Worldwide, lightning flashes about four million times a day, and bolts have even been observed on other planets. Yet despite its familiarity, we still do not know what causes lightning. It is a misconception that Benjamin Franklin solved the puzzle when he conducted his famous kite experiment in 1752.

  2. FIrpic: archetypal blue phosphorescent emitter for electroluminescence.

    PubMed

    Baranoff, Etienne; Curchod, Basile F E

    2015-05-14

    FIrpic is the most investigated bis-cyclometallated iridium complex in particular in the context of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) because of its attractive sky-blue emission, high emission efficiency, and suitable energy levels. In this Perspective we review the synthesis, structural characterisations, and key properties of this emitter. We also survey the theoretical studies and summarise a series of selected monochromatic electroluminescent devices using FIrpic as the emitting dopant. Finally we highlight important shortcomings of FIrpic as an emitter for OLEDs. Despite the large body of work dedicated to this material, it is manifest that the understanding of photophysical and electrochemical processes are only broadly understood mainly because of the different environment in which these properties are measured, i.e., isolated molecules in solvent vs. device. PMID:25388935

  3. Leader-Streamer Nature of Blue Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raizer, Y. P.; Milikh, G. M.; Shneider, M. N.

    2006-12-01

    A new model of Blue Jets (BJ's) is proposed and substantiated. It consists of the leader whose top part is seen on BJ photos as a "trunk of a tree", and of the streamer zone of the leader. The latter is shown as tall and narrow branches of "the tree". It is obtained that due to upward transfer of the high thundercloud potential by the leader, BJ streamers can be sustained by moderate cloud charges. The streamer length is estimated along with the height at which the streamers can escape into the ionosphere. The propagation of a streamer in the atmosphere of exponentially falling density N is computed. It is justified by the numerical simulations for a wide range of air density that the critical field Es required for unlimited streamer growth satisfies the similarity law Es/N = const. Shortcomings of the existing BJ models are discussed in detail.

  4. Blue Skies Research and the global economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braben, Donald W.

    2002-11-01

    Robert Solow's seminal work of the 1950s showed that science and technology are major sources of long-term global economic growth. But we have recently changed the ways that science and technology are managed. Industrial and academic research once thrived on individual freedom and flair. Progressively for the past three decades or so, however, research has been focused on short-term objectives selected by consensus. Global per-capita growth has steadily declined. Scientific enterprise is losing diversity. Blue Skies Research can help to restore diversity and to create the new technologies that can stimulate growth, but funding agencies nowadays rarely allow total freedom. A new coefficient of adventurousness is described. Its use, or other means, may help restore economic growth to its former levels.

  5. Blue Marble: Remote Characterization of Habitable Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolf, Neville; Lewis, Brian; Chartres, James; Genova, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The study of the nature and distribution of habitable environments beyond the Solar System is a key area for Astrobiology research. At the present time, our Earth is the only habitable planet that can be characterized in the same way that we might characterize planets beyond the Solar System. Due to limitations in our current and near-future technology, it is likely that extra-solar planets will be observed as single-pixel objects. To understand this data, we must develop skills in analyzing and interpreting the radiation obtained from a single pixel. These skills must include the study of the time variation of the radiation, and the range of its photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric properties. In addition, to understand whether we are properly analyzing the single pixel data, we need to compare it with a ground truth of modest resolution images in key spectral bands. This paper discusses the concept for a mission called Blue Marble that would obtain data of the Earth using a combination of spectropolarimetry, spectrophotometry, and selected band imaging. To obtain imagery of the proper resolution, it is desirable to place the Blue Marble spacecraft no closer than the outer region of cis-lunar space. This paper explores a conceptual mission design that takes advantage of low-cost launchers, bus designs and mission elements to provide a cost effective observing platform located at one of the stable Earth-moon Lagrangian points (L4, L5). The mission design allows for the development and use of novel technologies, such as a spinning moon sensor for attitude control, and leverages lessons-learned from previous low-cost spacecraft such as Lunar Prospector to yield a low-risk mission concept.

  6. Roquefortine C occurrence in blue cheese.

    PubMed

    Finoli, C; Vecchio, A; Galli, A; Dragoni, I

    2001-02-01

    Several strains of Penicillium are used for the production of mold-ripened cheeses, and some of them are able to produce mycotoxins. The aims of the research were the determination of roquefortine C and PR toxin in domestic and imported blue cheeses, the identification of the penicillia used as starter, and the investigation of their capacity for producing toxins in culture media. Roquefortine C was always found in the cheeses at levels ranging from 0.05 to 1.47 mg/kg, whereas the PR toxin was never found. The identification of the fungal strains present in the domestic cheeses included Penicillium glabrum, Penicillium roqueforti, and Penicillium cyclopium in the Gorgonzola "dolce" and Penicillium roqueforti in the Gorgonzola "naturale"; in one case, the presence of Penicillium crustosum was observed. The strains isolated from the foreign cheeses belonged to P. roqueforti. The strains were able to produce between 0.18 and 8.44 mg/liter of roquefortine in yeast extract sucrose medium and between 0.06 and 3.08 mg/liter and less than 0.05 mg/liter when inoculated in milk at 20 degrees C for 14 days and 4 degrees C for 24 days, respectively. Linear relations between production of roquefortine in culture media and cheeses did not emerge. PR toxin ranged from less than 0.05 to 60.30 mg/liter in yeast extract sucrose medium and was produced in milk at 20 degrees C from only one strain. The low levels and the relatively low toxicity of roquefortine make the consumption of blue cheese safe for the consumer.

  7. A microdestructive capillary electrophoresis method for the analysis of blue-pen-ink strokes on office paper.

    PubMed

    Calcerrada, Matías; González-Herráez, Miguel; Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen

    2015-06-26

    This manuscript describes the development of a capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for the detection of acid and basic dyes and its application to real samples, blue-pen-ink strokes on office paper. First, a capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method was developed for the separation of basic and acid dyes, by studying the separation medium (buffer nature, pH and relative amount of additive) and instrumental parameters (temperature, voltage and capillary dimensions). The method performance was evaluated in terms of selectivity, resolution (above 5 and 2 for acid dyes and basic dyes, respectively, except for two basic dye standards), LOD (lower than 0.4 mg/L) and precision as intraday and interday RSD values of peak migration times (lower than 0.6%). The developed method was then applied to 34 blue pens from different technologies (rollerball, ballpoint, markers) and with different ink composition (gel, water-based, oil-based). A microdestructive sample treatment using a scalpel to scratch 0.3mg of ink stroke was performed. The entire electropherogram profile allowed the visual discrimination between different types of ink and brands, being not necessary a statistical treatment. A 100% of discrimination was achieved between pen technologies, brands, and models, although non-reproducible zones in the electropherograms were found for blue gel pen samples. The two different batches of blue oil-based pens were also differentiated. Thus, this method provides a simple, microdestructive, and rapid analysis of different blue pen technologies which may complement the current analysis of questioned documents performed by forensic laboratories. PMID:26003620

  8. Underwater Chaotic Lidar using Blue Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Luke K.

    The thesis proposes and explores an underwater lidar system architecture based on chaotic modulation of recently introduced, commercially available, low cost blue laser diodes. This approach is experimentally shown to allow accurate underwater impulse response measurements while eliminating the need for several major components typically found in high-performance underwater lidar systems. The proposed approach is to: 1. Generate wideband, noise-like intensity modulation signals using optical chaotic modulation of blue-green laser diodes, and then 2. Use this signal source to develop an underwater chaotic lidar system that uses no electrical signal generator, no electro-optic modulator, no optical frequency doubler, and no large-aperture photodetector. The outcome of this thesis is the demonstration of a new underwater lidar system architecture that could allow high resolution ranging, imaging, and water profiling measurements in turbid water, at a reduced size, weight, power and cost relative to state-of-the-art high-performance underwater lidar sensors. This work also makes contributions to the state of the art in optics, nonlinear dynamics, and underwater sensing by demonstrating for the first time: 1. Wideband noise-like intensity modulation of a blue laser diode using no electrical signal generator or electro-optic modulator. Optical chaotic modulation of a 462 nm blue InGaN laser diode by self-feedback is explored for the first time. The usefulness of the signal to chaotic lidar is evaluated in terms of bandwidth, modulation depth, and autocorrelation peak-to-sidelobe-ratio (PSLR) using both computer and laboratory experiments. In laboratory experiments, the optical feedback technique is shown to be effective in generating wideband, noise-like chaotic signals with strong modulation depth when the diode is operated in an external-cavity dominated state. The modulation signal strength is shown to be limited by the onset of lasing within the diode's internal

  9. Underwater Chaotic Lidar using Blue Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Luke K.

    The thesis proposes and explores an underwater lidar system architecture based on chaotic modulation of recently introduced, commercially available, low cost blue laser diodes. This approach is experimentally shown to allow accurate underwater impulse response measurements while eliminating the need for several major components typically found in high-performance underwater lidar systems. The proposed approach is to: 1. Generate wideband, noise-like intensity modulation signals using optical chaotic modulation of blue-green laser diodes, and then 2. Use this signal source to develop an underwater chaotic lidar system that uses no electrical signal generator, no electro-optic modulator, no optical frequency doubler, and no large-aperture photodetector. The outcome of this thesis is the demonstration of a new underwater lidar system architecture that could allow high resolution ranging, imaging, and water profiling measurements in turbid water, at a reduced size, weight, power and cost relative to state-of-the-art high-performance underwater lidar sensors. This work also makes contributions to the state of the art in optics, nonlinear dynamics, and underwater sensing by demonstrating for the first time: 1. Wideband noise-like intensity modulation of a blue laser diode using no electrical signal generator or electro-optic modulator. Optical chaotic modulation of a 462 nm blue InGaN laser diode by self-feedback is explored for the first time. The usefulness of the signal to chaotic lidar is evaluated in terms of bandwidth, modulation depth, and autocorrelation peak-to-sidelobe-ratio (PSLR) using both computer and laboratory experiments. In laboratory experiments, the optical feedback technique is shown to be effective in generating wideband, noise-like chaotic signals with strong modulation depth when the diode is operated in an external-cavity dominated state. The modulation signal strength is shown to be limited by the onset of lasing within the diode's internal

  10. 77 FR 68117 - Blue Summit Wind, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Blue Summit Wind, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice... (Commission) Rules of Practice and Procedure 18 CFR 385.207(a)(2), Blue Summit Wind, LLC (Blue Summit) filed a...) interconnection facilities that deliver power from the Blue Summit's wind energy generator (Blue Summit...

  11. Arsenolipids in oil from blue whiting Micromesistius poutassou - evidence for arsenic-containing esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleshi, Mojtaba S.; Raber, Georg; Edmonds, John S.; Jensen, Kenneth B.; Francesconi, Kevin A.

    2014-12-01

    Arsenic-containing lipids in the oil from the blue whiting fish (Micromesistius poutassou) were separated into three broad polarity groups and investigated by HPLC and mass spectrometry. A total of 11 arsenolipids including 4 new compounds were identified. The polar lipid fraction constituting 24% of the total arsenolipid content (which totalled 2.16 μg As/g) contained four known dimethylarsinoyl fatty acids and three known dimethylarsinoyl hydrocarbons. The less polar fraction (ca 30% of the total arsenolipids) contained four new dimethylarsinoyl hydrocarbons with chain lengths 22-30 carbons, in addition to more complex arsenicals that hydrolysed to known dimethylarsinoyl fatty acids suggesting they were conjugated carboxylic acids, presumably esters. The rest of the lipid-soluble arsenic (ca 45% of the total) remained in the non-polar fraction together with the bulk of the fish oil lipids, a complex mixture of compounds that precluded identification of the small amounts of arsenolipids.

  12. Pathogenesis of blue fox parvovirus on blue fox kits and pregnant vixens.

    PubMed

    Veijalainen, P M; Smeds, E

    1988-11-01

    To study the pathogenicity of a newly isolated parvovirus of blue fox (Alopex lagopus), pregnant vixens and 43 kits of different ages were experimentally infected with the agent. The kits had no clinical signs of disease, even though most of them excreted virus in their feces, and they responded immunologically to viral exposure. Infection during pregnancy appeared to affect the fetuses. A group of 15 blue fox vixens inoculated with the virus produced a statistically smaller number of kits (78) than did 15 untreated controls (131). Vaccination with a homologous inactivated virus preparation appeared to afford protection against reproductive losses. After infection, 15 vaccinated vixens gave birth to 97 kits, compared with 54 kits born to a similar, non-vaccinated experimental group.

  13. BLUE JOINT WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, MONTANA, AND BLUE JOINT ROADLESS AREA, IDAHO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, Karen; Benham, John R.

    1984-01-01

    During field studies of the Blue Joint Wilderness Study Area, Montana, and the Blue Joint Roadless Area, Idaho, areas of substantiated resource potential for epithermal precious-metal vein deposits were identified in areas of hydrothermal alteration and fossil hot springs activity in the Eocene volcanic rocks. Areas with substantiated resource potential for cobalt, copper, silver, and barite resources of the sediment-hosted type were identified in the Proterozoic quartz schist of the eastern part of the area. Probable potential exists for molybdenum in a prophyry system; anomalously high molybdenum values are coincident with high values for precious and base metals and uranium in some places. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuel resources.

  14. Using the Blue Gourami in Ethological and Embryological Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Theresa; Pollak, Edward I.

    1981-01-01

    Lists advantages in the use of the blue gourami in laboratory experiments on reproduction and embryogenesis. Materials and procedures for maintaining and spawning blue gouramis are provided. Also includes details on microscopic examination of developing embryos and histological techniques for microscope slide preparation. (CS)

  15. Blue starters∷ Brief upward discharges from an intense Arkansas thunderstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Sentman, D. D.; Heavner, M. J.; Hampton, D. L.; Osborne, D. L.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    This paper documents the first observations of a new stratospheric electrical phenomenon associated with thunderstorms. On the night of 30 June (UT 1 July) 1994, 30 examples of these events, which we have called “blue starters,” were observed in a 6 m 44 s interval above the very energetic Arkansas thunderstorm where blue jets were first observed. The blue starters are distinguished from blue jets by a much lower terminal altitude. They are bright and blue in color, and protrude upward from the cloud top (17-18 km) to a maximum 25.5 km (83,655 ft.) in altitude. All blue starters events were recorded from two small areas near Texarkana, Texas/Arkansas where hail 7.0 cm in diameter was falling. Comparison to cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes revealed: 1. Blue starters were not observed to be coincident with either positive or negative CG flashes, but they do occur in the same general area as negative CG flashes; 2. Cumulative distributions of the negative CG flashes in ±5 s before and after the starter and within a radius of 50 km shows a significant reduction for about 3 s following the event in the two cells where starters and jets were observed. The energy deficit is approximately 109 J. It is possible that blue starters are a short-lived streamer phenomenon.

  16. The Blue Bottle Experiment and Pattern Formation in this System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamčíková, L'.; Ševčík, P.

    1997-09-01

    The methylene blue - saccharide - NaOH system, the so-called "Blue Bottle" experiment was investigated. When this system is poured into an open petri dish, spatial structures start to generate after an induction period. The induction period increases in the order of xylose < glucose < galactose < arabinose < mannose.

  17. How does the blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena lunulata) flash its blue rings?

    PubMed

    Mäthger, Lydia M; Bell, George R R; Kuzirian, Alan M; Allen, Justine J; Hanlon, Roger T

    2012-11-01

    The blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena lunulata), one of the world's most venomous animals, has long captivated and endangered a large audience: children playing at the beach, divers turning over rocks, and biologists researching neurotoxins. These small animals spend much of their time in hiding, showing effective camouflage patterns. When disturbed, the octopus will flash around 60 iridescent blue rings and, when strongly harassed, bite and deliver a neurotoxin that can kill a human. Here, we describe the flashing mechanism and optical properties of these rings. The rings contain physiologically inert multilayer reflectors, arranged to reflect blue-green light in a broad viewing direction. Dark pigmented chromatophores are found beneath and around each ring to enhance contrast. No chromatophores are above the ring; this is unusual for cephalopods, which typically use chromatophores to cover or spectrally modify iridescence. The fast flashes are achieved using muscles under direct neural control. The ring is hidden by contraction of muscles above the iridophores; relaxation of these muscles and contraction of muscles outside the ring expose the iridescence. This mechanism of producing iridescent signals has not previously been reported in cephalopods and we suggest that it is an exceptionally effective way to create a fast and conspicuous warning display.

  18. Why are blue visual pigments blue? A resonance Raman microprobe study.

    PubMed Central

    Loppnow, G R; Barry, B A; Mathies, R A

    1989-01-01

    A resonance Raman microscope has been developed to study the structure of the retinal prosthetic group in the visual pigments of individual photoreceptor cells. Raman vibrational spectra are obtained by focusing the probe laser on intact photoreceptors frozen on a 77 K cold stage. To elucidate the mechanism of wavelength regulation in blue visual pigments, we have used this apparatus to study the structure of the chromophore in the 440-nm absorbing pigment found in "green rods" of the toad (Bufo marinus). The 9-cis isorhodopsin form of the green rod pigment exhibits a 1662-cm-1 C = NH+ Schiff base stretching mode that shifts to 1636 cm-1 in deuterium-substituted H2O. This demonstrates that the Schiff base linkage to the protein is protonated. Protonation of the Schiff base is sufficient to explain the 440-nm absorption maximum of this pigment without invoking any additional protein-chromophore interactions. The absence of additional perturbations is supported by the observation that the ethylenic band and the perturbation-sensitive C-10-C-11 and C-14-C-15 stretching modes have the same frequency as those of the 9-cis protonated retinal Schiff base in solution. Our demonstration that a blue visual pigment contains an unperturbed protonated Schiff base provides experimental evidence that the protein charge perturbation responsible for the opsin shift in the 500-nm absorbing pigments is removed in the opsins of blue pigments, as suggested by the sequence data. PMID:2493645

  19. How does the blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena lunulata) flash its blue rings?

    PubMed

    Mäthger, Lydia M; Bell, George R R; Kuzirian, Alan M; Allen, Justine J; Hanlon, Roger T

    2012-11-01

    The blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena lunulata), one of the world's most venomous animals, has long captivated and endangered a large audience: children playing at the beach, divers turning over rocks, and biologists researching neurotoxins. These small animals spend much of their time in hiding, showing effective camouflage patterns. When disturbed, the octopus will flash around 60 iridescent blue rings and, when strongly harassed, bite and deliver a neurotoxin that can kill a human. Here, we describe the flashing mechanism and optical properties of these rings. The rings contain physiologically inert multilayer reflectors, arranged to reflect blue-green light in a broad viewing direction. Dark pigmented chromatophores are found beneath and around each ring to enhance contrast. No chromatophores are above the ring; this is unusual for cephalopods, which typically use chromatophores to cover or spectrally modify iridescence. The fast flashes are achieved using muscles under direct neural control. The ring is hidden by contraction of muscles above the iridophores; relaxation of these muscles and contraction of muscles outside the ring expose the iridescence. This mechanism of producing iridescent signals has not previously been reported in cephalopods and we suggest that it is an exceptionally effective way to create a fast and conspicuous warning display. PMID:23053367

  20. [Contribution of Trichrome Blue in the diagnosis of microsporidiosis].

    PubMed

    Honoré, P S; Houze, S; Sarfati, C; Challier, S; Kac, G; Le Bras, J; Derouin, F

    1996-01-01

    Detection of microsporidia belongs to the usual coprologic and urine detection of parasites from HIV seropositive patients. To improve the identification of microsporidial spores, several stains have been used. Trichrome Blue stain has been evaluated in this study. We first compared Trichrome Blue stain to Weber's trichrome for the detection of microsporidia in smears of stools received from HIV seropositive patients. No difference of sensibility has been demonstrated between the two stains, and Uvitex 2B used on the same samples has confirmed these results. Then, Trichrome Blue stain has been used for the detection of microsporidial spores in other specimens (40 samples of nasal mucus, conjonctival samples, duodenal biopsy and urine), also Giemsa and Uvitex 2B. The advantage of Trichrome Blue stain is its ready-to-use presentation, and faster realisation at higher temperature. Trichrome Blue stain is interesting as a confirmation technique or for laboratories which do not have fluorescent microscopy equipment.