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Sample records for acid buffer solution

  1. Comparison of peak shape in hydrophilic interaction chromatography using acidic salt buffers and simple acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Heaton, James C; Russell, Joseph J; Underwood, Tim; Boughtflower, Robert; McCalley, David V

    2014-06-20

    The retention and peak shape of neutral, basic and acidic solutes was studied on hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) stationary phases that showed both strong and weak ionic retention characteristics, using aqueous-acetonitrile mobile phases containing either formic acid (FA), ammonium formate (AF) or phosphoric acid (PA). The effect of organic solvent concentration on the results was also studied. Peak shape was good for neutrals under most mobile phase conditions. However, peak shapes for ionised solutes, particularly for basic compounds, were considerably worse in FA than AF. Even neutral compounds showed deterioration in performance with FA when the mobile phase water concentration was reduced. The poor performance in FA cannot be entirely attributed to the negative impact of ionic retention on ionised silanols on the underlying silica base materials, as results using PA at lower pH (where their ionisation is suppressed) were inferior to those in AF. Besides the moderating influence of the salt cation on ionic retention, it is likely that salt buffers improve peak shape due to the increased ionic strength of the mobile phase and its impact on the formation of the water layer on the column surface. PMID:24813934

  2. Improving impurities clearance by amino acids addition to buffer solutions for chromatographic purifications of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Takashi; Hosono, Mareto

    2015-07-15

    The performance of amino acids in Protein A affinity chromatography, anion exchange chromatography and cation exchange chromatography for monoclonal antibody purification was investigated. Glycine, threonine, arginine, glutamate, and histidine were used as buffer components in the equilibration, washing, and elution steps of these chromatographies. Improved clearance of impurity, high molecular weight species (HMW) and host cell proteins (HCP) was observed in the purification processes when using the amino acids as base-buffer constituents, additives or eluents compared with that of buffers without these amino acids. In addition, we designed a buffer system in which the mobile phases were composed of only a single amino acid, histidine, and applied it to the above three chromatographies. Effective HMW and HCP clearance was also obtained in this manner. These results suggest that amino acids may enhance impurity clearance during the purification of monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26057847

  3. The erosion kinetics of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements in acidic buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Hazar-Yoruc, Binnaz; Bavbek, Andac Barkin; Özcan, Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the erosion kinetics of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements in acidic buffer solutions as a function of time. Disc shaped specimens were prepared from conventional (Ketac-Cem: KTC) and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji Plus: FP) and immersed in three acidic buffer solutions (0.01 M) namely, acetic acid/sodium acetate (AA(B)), lactic acid/sodium lactate (LA(B)) and citric acid/sodium citrate (CA(B)) with a constant pH of 4.1 and stored for 1, 8, 24, 48, 80, 120 and 168 h. F concentration was determined using ion-specific electrode. Si, Ca and Al concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Ca, Al, Si and F solubility rates in both FP and KTC were the highest in CA(B) solution. The erosion rates of both FP and KTC in all buffer solutions increased as a function of immersion time. The amount of F eluted from FP was more than that of KTC. The total amount of elements released from FP was less than KTC in all solutions. PMID:23207217

  4. In situ measurement of reaction volume and calculation of pH of weak acid buffer solutions under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Min, Stephen K; Samaranayake, Chaminda P; Sastry, Sudhir K

    2011-05-26

    Direct measurements of reaction volume, so far, have been limited to atmospheric pressure. This study describes a method for in situ reaction volume measurements under pressure using a variable volume piezometer. Reaction volumes for protonic ionization of weak acid buffering agents (MES, citric acid, sulfanilic acid, and phosphoric acid) were measured in situ under pressure up to 400 MPa at 25 °C. The methodology involved initial separation of buffering agents within the piezometer using gelatin capsules. Under pressure, the volume of the reactants was measured at 25 °C, and the contents were heated to 40 °C to dissolve the gelatin and allow the reaction to occur, and cooled to 25 °C, where the volume of products was measured. Reaction volumes were used to calculate pH of the buffer solutions as a function of pressure. The results show that the measured reaction volumes as well as the calculated pH values generally quite agree with their respective theoretically predicted values up to 100 MPa. The results of this study highlight the need for a comprehensive theory to describe the pressure behavior of ionization reactions in realistic systems especially at higher pressures. PMID:21542618

  5. Electrodialysis operation with buffer solution

    DOEpatents

    Hryn, John N.; Daniels, Edward J.; Krumdick, Greg K.

    2009-12-15

    A new method for improving the efficiency of electrodialysis (ED) cells and stacks, in particular those used in chemical synthesis. The process entails adding a buffer solution to the stack for subsequent depletion in the stack during electrolysis. The buffer solution is regenerated continuously after depletion. This buffer process serves to control the hydrogen ion or hydroxide ion concentration so as to protect the active sites of electrodialysis membranes. The process enables electrodialysis processing options for products that are sensitive to pH changes.

  6. In situ ellipsometric investigation of stainless steel corrosion behavior in buffered solutions with amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnichenko, M. V.; Pham, M. T.; Chevolleau, T.; Poperenko, L. V.; Maitz, M. F.

    2003-02-01

    The corrosion of metals is associated both with a release of ions and changes in optical surface properties. In this study, these two effects were correlated by a potentiodynamic corrosion test and in situ probing of the surface by ellipsometry. The studies were carried out with stainless steel (SS) AISI 304 and 316 in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and in Dulbecco's modified minimal essential medium (DMEM) at pH 7.4. In both media, 304 steel is more susceptible to corrosion than 316 grade. The 316 steel shows a higher corrosion potential and higher corrosion current density in PBS than in DMEM, for 304 steel this behavior is vice versa. Ellipsometry demonstrated a higher sensitivity than potentiodynamics to surface modification in the cathodic area. In DMEM the removal of a surface layer at negative potential and a further repassivation with increasing potential was characteristic. In PBS a surface layer started to grow immediately. X-ray photoelectron spectra of this layer formed in PBS are consistent with iron phosphate. Its formation is inhibited in DMEM; the presence of amino acids is discussed as the reason.

  7. Matching phosphate and maleate buffer systems for dissolution of weak acids: Equivalence in terms of buffer capacity of bulk solution or surface pH?

    PubMed

    Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2016-06-01

    The development of in vitro dissolution tests able to anticipate the in vivo fate of drug products has challenged pharmaceutical scientists over time, especially in the case of ionizable compounds. In the seminal model proposed by Mooney et al. thirty-five years ago, the pH at the solid-liquid interface (pH0) was identified as a key parameter in predicting dissolution rate. In the current work it is demonstrated that the in vitro dissolution of the weak acid ibuprofen in maleate and phosphate buffer systems is a function of the pH0, which in turn is affected by properties of the drug and the medium. The reported pH0 for ibuprofen dissolution in bicarbonate buffer, the predominant buffer species in the human small intestine under fasting conditions, can be achieved by reducing the phosphate buffer concentration to 5.0mM or the maleate buffer concentration to 2.2mM. Using this approach to identify the appropriate buffer/buffer capacity combination for in vitro experiments in FaSSIF-type media, it would be possible to increase the physiological relevance of this important biopharmaceutics tool. However, the necessity of monitoring and adjusting the bulk pH during the experiments carried out in 5.0mM phosphate or 2.2mM maleate buffers must also be taken into consideration. PMID:27032508

  8. An evaluation of MES (2(N-Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) and Amberlite IRC-50 as pH buffers for nutrient solution studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B. G.; Salisbury, F. B.

    1985-01-01

    All buffering agents used to stabilize pH in hydroponic research have disadvantages. Inorganic buffers are absorbed and may become phytotoxic. Solid carbonate salts temporarily mitigate decreasing pH but provide almost no protection against increasing pH, and they alter nutrient absorption. Exchange resins are more effective, but we find that they remove magnesium and manganese from solution. We have tested 2(N-Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) as a buffering agent at concentrations of 1 and 10 mol m-3 (1 and 10 mM) with beans, corn, lettuce, tomatoes, and wheat. MES appears to be biologically inert and does not interact significantly with other solution ions. Relative growth rates among controls and MES treatments were nearly identical for each species during the trial period. The pH was stabilized by 1 mol m-3 MES. This buffer warrants further consideration in nutrient research.

  9. An evaluation of MES (2(N-Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) and Amberlite IRC-50 as pH buffers for nutrient solution studies.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, B G; Salisbury, F B

    1985-01-01

    All buffering agents used to stabilize pH in hydroponic research have disadvantages. Inorganic buffers are absorbed and may become phytotoxic. Solid carbonate salts temporarily mitigate decreasing pH but provide almost no protection against increasing pH, and they alter nutrient absorption. Exchange resins are more effective, but we find that they remove magnesium and manganese from solution. We have tested 2(N-Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) as a buffering agent at concentrations of 1 and 10 mol m-3 (1 and 10 mM) with beans, corn, lettuce, tomatoes, and wheat. MES appears to be biologically inert and does not interact significantly with other solution ions. Relative growth rates among controls and MES treatments were nearly identical for each species during the trial period. The pH was stabilized by 1 mol m-3 MES. This buffer warrants further consideration in nutrient research. PMID:11539688

  10. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Siddharam M.; Desai, Raviraj G.; Arabbi, Kashinath C.; Prakash, Ved

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objectives The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Materials and Methods Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 370c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of p<0.05. Results Two-Way ANOVA showed significant differences in bond strength of the luting cements (p<0.05) and core materials (p<0.05) and the interactions (p<0.05). Pairwise comparison of luting cements by HOLM-SIDAK test, showed that the RMGIC luting cement had higher shear bond strength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Conclusion Shear bond strength of

  11. Acid neutralizing processes in an alpine watershed front range, Colorado, U.S.A.-1: Buffering capacity of dissolved organic carbon in soil solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iggy, Litaor M.; Thurman, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    Soil interstitial waters in the Green Lakes Valley, Front Range, Colorado were studied to evaluate the capacity of the soil system to buffer acid deposition. In order to determine the contribution of humic substances to the buffering capacity of a given soil, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and pH of the soil solutions were measured. The concentration of the organic anion, Ai-, derived from DOC at sample pH and the concentration of organic anion, Ax- at the equivalence point were calculated using carboxyl contents from isolated and purified humic material from soil solutions. Subtracting Ax- from Ai- yields the contribution of humic substances to the buffering capacity (Aequiv.-). Using this method, one can evaluate the relative contribution of inorganic and organic constituents to the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of the soil solutions. The relative contribution of organic acids to the overall ANC was found to be extremely important in the alpine wetland (52%) and the forest-tundra ecotone (40%), and somewhat less important in the alpine tundra sites (20%). A failure to recognize the importance of organic acids in soil solutions to the ANC will result in erroneous estimates of the buffering capacity in the alpine environment of the Front Range, Colorado. ?? 1988.

  12. Thermodynamic characteristics of molecular interactions between L-tryptophan and nicotinic acid and uracyl in aqueous buffer solutions at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badelin, V. G.; Tyunina, E. Yu.; Mezhevoi, I. N.; Tarasova, G. N.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between L-tryptophan (Trp) and nicotinic acid (NA) and uracyl (Ur) in aqueous buffer solutions (pH 7.35) at different ratios of reagents is studied via the calorimetry of dissolution. The enthalpies of dissolution of the amino acid in the buffer solutions of the ligands at 298.15 K are obtained. The stoichiometric compositions of the complexes being formed and binding constants have been determined. The values of the thermodynamic characteristics for the complex formation of L-tryptophan with nicotinic acid and uracyl are calculated. It is shown that the formation of molecular complexes with 1 : 2 composition is stabilized by the entropy factor for the Trp-NA system, and by the enthalpy factor for the Trp-Ur system.

  13. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H3PO4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid.

  14. Efficiency of buffered aqueous carboxylic acid solutions and organic solvents to absorb SO/sub 2/ from industrial flue gas; solubility data from gas-liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Sanza, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    Nine adsorbents were examined. These potential candidates for flue gas desulfurization included 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone, tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), both 0.5 M and 1.0 M solutions of citric acid and glycolic acid, buffered to pH's of 4.5 and 3.8, and pure water. Infinite dilution activity coefficients of SO/sub 2/ were obtained by gas-liquid chromatography in a trial solvent of Nitrobenzene, and then in systems of 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and TBP, independently. The solubility data of SO/sub 2/ was derived and found to be comparable to data obtained from a classical bubble-sparger apparatus. Solubility data was then programmed into an absorber-stripper computer simulator in order to calculate the various concentration and temperature profiles that would exist, the degree of desulfurization, and the steam consumption for all nine systems. Concentrated solutions of citric acid buffered to a low pH exhibited the most favorable conditions for application in direct steam regeneration processes. 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone yielded better performance than TBP did with high-pressure indirect steam used for stripping. Comparison between the aqueous solution systems which employed direct steam, and the organic systems which used indirect steam was inconclusive.

  15. DISTRIBUTION OF LANTHANIDE AND ACTINIDE ELEMENTS BETWEEN BIS-(2-ETHYLHEXYL)PHOSPHORIC ACID AND BUFFERED LACTATE SOLUTIONS CONTAINING SELECTED COMPLEXANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, Tracy S.; Diprete, David P.; Thompson, Major C.

    2013-04-15

    With the renewed interest in the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle, the TALSPEAK process is being considered for the separation of Am and Cm from the lanthanide fission products in a next generation reprocessing plant. However, an efficient separation requires tight control of the pH which likely will be difficult to achieve on a large scale. To address this issue, we measured the distribution of lanthanide and actinide elements between aqueous and organic phases in the presence of complexants which were potentially less sensitive to pH control than the diethylenetriaminepentaacetic (DTPA) used in the process. To perform the extractions, a rapid and accurate method was developed for measuring distribution coefficients based on the preparation of lanthanide tracers in the Savannah River National Laboratory neutron activation analysis facility. The complexants tested included aceto-, benzo-, and salicylhydroxamic acids, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN), and ammonium thiocyanate (NH{sub 4}SCN). The hydroxamic acids were the least effective of the complexants tested. The separation factors for TPEN and NH{sub 4}SCN were higher, especially for the heaviest lanthanides in the series; however, no conditions were identified which resulted in separations factors which consistently approached those measured for the use of DTPA.

  16. On the Preparation of Buffer Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Bruce M.; Kessick, Michael A.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a method, suitable for use on programmable calculators, which allows calculation of the pH and ionic strength (I) of a mixed solution of salts of an acid or amounts necessary to produce a solution of a particular pH and I. Includes limitations when using the calculations described. (SK)

  17. Reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride using buffered alkaline ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Ting; Liang, Chenju

    2015-10-01

    Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) was recently discovered as a novel in-situ chemical reduction (ISCR) reagent for remediating chlorinated solvents in the subsurface. For this ISCR process, the maintenance of an alkaline pH is essential. This study investigated the possibility of the reduction of carbon tetrachloride (CT) using alkaline AA solution buffered by phosphate and by NaOH. The results indicated that CT was reduced by AA, and chloroform (CF) was a major byproduct at a phosphate buffered pH of 12. However, CT was completely reduced by AA in 2M NaOH without CF formation. In the presence of iron/soil minerals, iron could be reduced by AA and Fe(2+) tends to precipitate on the mineral surface to accelerate CT degradation. A simultaneous transfer of hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination would occur under phosphate buffered pH 12. This implies that a high alkaline environment is a crucial factor for maintaining the dominant pathway of two electron transfer from dianionic AA to dehydroascorbic acid, and to undergo dichloroelimination of CT. Moreover, threonic acid and oxalic acid were identified to be the major AA decomposition products in alkaline solutions. PMID:25912910

  18. Electrochemical behaviour of silver in borate buffer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaky, Ayman M.; Assaf, Fawzi H.; Abd El Rehim, Sayed S.; Mohamed, Basheer M.

    2004-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of Ag in aqueous 0.15 M borax and 0.15 M boric acid buffer solution was studied under various conditions using cyclic voltammetry and potentiostatic techniques. It was found that the anodic polarization curve of Ag in borate buffer solution was characterized by the appearance of two potential regions, active and passive, prior to the oxygen evolution reaction. The active potential region was characterized by the appearance of three anodic peaks, the first two peaks A 1 and A 2 correspond to the oxidation of Ag and formation of [Ag(OH) 2] - soluble compound and a passive film of Ag 2O on the electrode surface. The third anodic peak corresponds to the conversion of both [Ag(OH) 2] - and Ag 2O to Ag 2O 2. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the existence of Ag 2O and Ag 2O 2 passive layers on the electrode surface potentiodynamically polarized up to 800 mV. Potentiostatic current transient measurements showed that the formation of Ag 2O and Ag 2O 2 involves a nucleation and growth mechanism under diffusion control.

  19. Use of buffered hypochlorite solution for disinfecting fibrescopes.

    PubMed Central

    Coates, D; Death, J E

    1982-01-01

    The possible use of sodium hypochlorite solution buffered to pH 7.6 and containing 100 ppm available chlorine (avCl) for disinfecting fibrescopes was investigated. A flexible fibrescope experimentally contaminated with Pseudomonas putida, Mycobacterium fortuitum, or Bacillus subtilis spores was effectively disinfected within 10 m in repeatedly and without any observable adverse effect on the instrument. The corrosive nature of buffered hypochlorite was investigated by immersing various fibrescope components and metal wires in solutions of different strength for long periods and examining them for damage. Stainless steel, platinum, glass, Teflon, polythene and epoxy resin were apparently unaffected whereas polyurethane, rubber and other metals tested were damaged to different extents. Buffered hypochlorite solutions may have many applications pertaining to the disinfection of items which are either thermolabile or require rapid effective disinfection. PMID:6802880

  20. CHEMICAL SOLUTION DEPOSITION BASED OXIDE BUFFERS AND YBCO COATED CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2011-01-01

    We have reviewed briefly the growth of buffer and high temperature superconducting oxide thin films using a chemical solution deposition (CSD) method. In the Rolling-Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrates (RABiTS) process, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, utilizes the thermo mechanical processing to obtain the flexible, biaxially oriented copper, nickel or nickel-alloy substrates. Buffers and Rare Earth Barium Copper Oxide (REBCO) superconductors have been deposited epitaxially on the textured nickel alloy substrates. The starting substrate serves as a template for the REBCO layer, which has substantially fewer weak links. Buffer layers play a major role in fabricating the second generation REBCO wire technology. The main purpose of the buffer layers is to provide a smooth, continuous and chemically inert surface for the growth of the REBCO film, while transferring the texture from the substrate to the superconductor layer. To achieve this, the buffer layers need to be epitaxial to the substrate, i.e. they have to nucleate and grow in the same bi-axial texture provided by the textured metal foil. The most commonly used RABiTS multi-layer architectures consist of a starting template of biaxially textured Ni-5 at.% W (Ni-W) substrate with a seed (first) layer of Yttrium Oxide (Y2O3), a barrier (second) layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ), and a Cerium Oxide (CeO2) cap (third) layer. These three buffer layers are generally deposited using physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques such as reactive sputtering. On top of the PVD template, REBCO film is then grown by a chemical solution deposition. This article reviews in detail about the list of oxide buffers and superconductor REBCO films grown epitaxially on single crystal and/or biaxially textured Ni-W substrates using a CSD method.

  1. Solution properties of polygalacturonic acid

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, R. W.; Spires, I. P. C.; Tipton, K. F.

    1969-01-01

    1. The specimen of polygalacturonic acid used in these studies was shown to contain very little neutral sugar, methyl ester groups or ash, and only residues of galacturonic acid. Its electrophoretic homogeneity was examined in pyridine–acetic acid buffer at pH6·5 and in borate buffer at pH9·2. The distribution of effective particle weights was shown to be fairly narrow. 2. The pH-titration curve of the polymer gave a pK value of 3·7. 3. The interaction of the polymer with Ruthenium Red was studied and titration curves were obtained for the spectral shifts associated with the formation of a complex. 4. Optical-rotatory-dispersion studies showed that the Drude constant, λc, was dependent on pH. 5. Polygalacturonic acid was shown to display non-Newtonian properties in solution and to have an anomalously high relative specific viscosity at low concentrations. 6. Studies were made of the pH-dependence of the sedimentation coefficient of the polymer. 7. These results are discussed in terms of the structure of the molecule and their relevance to the properties of pectic substances. PMID:5343801

  2. Nacre surface transformation to hydroxyapatite in a phosphate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ming; Ratner, Buddy D

    2003-10-01

    Nacre, also known as mother-of-pearl, constitutes the inner layer of mollusc shells. Nacre is a natural composite material consisting mostly of calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystal form and some organic matter. Previous studies have shown that geological aragonite, coral and nacre can convert hydrothermally to hydroxyapatite (HAP) in phosphate solution by a solid-state topotactic ion-exchange reaction. This conversion typically occurs within the range of 140-260 degrees C, although higher temperatures are possible. In this work, we have found that nacre can transform to HAP in a phosphate buffer solution at room temperature via a surface reaction. The morphology of the nacre-transformed HAP surface was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The HAP surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). A layer covered with packed particles was found in contrast to the tablet structure typical of nacre surfaces. XPS and SIMS indicated that the mineral phase of the nacre surface had converted from an aragonite phase to an HAP phase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that phosphate (PO(4)) bands appeared after nacre was soaked in a phosphate buffer and the intensity of the PO(4) bands increased with exposure time. The FTIR was consistent with XPS and SIMS results. We suggest that this surface reaction occurs by a dissolution-precipitation mechanism. Calcium ions are released from the nacre surface, react with phosphate ions in the buffer solution, and then precipitate as HAP on the nacre surface. PMID:12853263

  3. A Simple and Universal Method for Making up Buffer Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, Clive

    1988-01-01

    Uses a method which involves weighing out an amount of the appropriate weak acid or base and dissolving it in distilled water close to the final volume. Solution is then titrated with strong acid or base to give the desired pH. Provides three examples. (MVL)

  4. Stability of biodegradable waterborne polyurethane films in buffered saline solutions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying Yi; Hung, Kun-Che; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The stability of polyurethane (PU) is of critical importance for applications such as in coating industry or as biomaterials. To eliminate the environmental concerns on the synthesis of PU which involves the use of organic solvents, the aqueous-based or waterborne PU (WBPU) has been developed. WBPU, however, may be unstable in an electrolyte-rich environment. In this study, the authors reported the stability of biodegradable WBPU in the buffered saline solutions evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Various biodegradable WBPU films were prepared by spin coating on coverslip glass, with a thickness of ∼300 nm. The surface AFM images of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) diol-based WBPU revealed nanoglobular structure. The same feature was observed when 20% molar of the PCL diol soft segment was replaced by polyethylene butylenes adipate diol. After hydration in buffered saline solutions for 24 h, the surface domains generally increased in sizes and became irregular in shape. On the other hand, when the soft segment was replaced by 20% poly(l-lactide) diol, a meshlike surface structure was demonstrated by AFM. When the latter WBPU was hydrated, the surface domains appeared to be disconnected. Results from the attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the surface chemistry of WBPU films was altered after hydration. These changes were probably associated with the neutralization of carboxylate by ions in the saline solutions, resulting in the rearrangements of soft and hard segments and causing instability of the WBPU. PMID:26296357

  5. Defining the buffering process by a triprotic acid without relying on Stewart-electroneutrality considerations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minhtri K; Kao, Liyo; Kurtz, Ira

    2011-01-01

    Upon the addition of protons to an aqueous solution, a component of the H+ load will be bound i.e. buffered. In an aqueous solution containing a triprotic acid, H+ can be bound to three different states of the acid as well as to OH- ions that are derived from the auto-ionization of H2O. In quantifying the buffering process of a triprotic acid, one must define the partitioning of H+ among the three states of the acid and also the OH- ions in solution in order to predict the equilibrium pH value. However, previous quantitative approaches that model triprotic acid titration behaviour and used to predict the equilibrium pH rely on the mathematical convenience of electroneutrality/charge balance considerations. This fact has caused confusion in the literature, and has led to the assumption that charge balance/electroneutrality is a causal factor in modulating proton buffering (Stewart formulation). However, as we have previously shown, although charge balance can be used mathematically as a convenient tool in deriving various formulae, electroneutrality per se is not a fundamental physicochemical parameter that is mechanistically involved in the underlying buffering and proton transfer reactions. The lack of distinction between a mathematical tool, and a fundamental physicochemical parameter is in part a reason for the current debate regarding the Stewart formulation of acid-base analysis. We therefore posed the following question: Is it possible to generate an equation that defines and predicts the buffering of a triprotic acid that is based only on H+ partitioning without incorporating electroneutrality in the derivation? Towards this goal, we derived our new equation utilizing: 1) partitioning of H+ buffering; 2) conservation of mass; and 3) acid-base equilibria. In validating this model, we compared the predicted equilibrium pH with the measured pH of an aqueous solution consisting of Na2HPO4 to which HCl was added. The measured pH values were in excellent agreement

  6. Ligand-enhanced electrokinetic remediation of metal-contaminated marine sediments with high acid buffering capacity.

    PubMed

    Masi, Matteo; Iannelli, Renato; Losito, Gabriella

    2016-06-01

    The suitability of electrokinetic remediation for removing heavy metals from dredged marine sediments with high acid buffering capacity was investigated. Laboratory-scale electrokinetic remediation experiments were carried out by applying two different voltage gradients to the sediment (0.5 and 0.8 V/cm) while circulating water or two different chelating agents at the electrode compartments. Tap water, 0.1 M citric acid and 0.1 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solutions were used respectively. The investigated metals were Zn, Pb, V, Ni and Cu. In the unenhanced experiment, the acid front could not propagate due to the high acid buffering capacity of the sediments; the production of OH(-) ions at the cathode resulted in a high-pH environment causing the precipitation of CaCO3 and metal hydroxides. The use of citric acid prevented the formation of precipitates, but solubilisation and mobilisation of metal species were not sufficiently achieved. Metal removal was relevant when EDTA was used as the conditioning agent, and the electric potential was raised up to 0.8 V/cm. EDTA led to the formation of negatively charged complexes with metals which migrated towards the anode compartment by electromigration. This result shows that metal removal from sediments with high acid buffering capacity may be achieved by enhancing the electrokinetic process by EDTA addition when the acidification of the medium is not economically and/or environmentally sustainable. PMID:26490900

  7. Hydrolysis of chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole in various pH buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashok K; Zimmerman, William T; Lowrie, Chris; Chapleo, Simon

    2014-04-23

    The hydrolysis reactions of [(14)C]-chlorantraniliprole (CLAP) and cyantraniliprole (CNAP) were investigated in sterile buffer solutions at pH 4, 7, and 9. Both compounds displayed similar degradation reactions. The reactions observed were intramolecular cyclizations and rearrangements instead of the anticipated amide hydrolysis to carboxylic acids. Despite a minor difference in their structures, the degradation rates for the two compounds were substantially different. The reaction rates were examined at multiple temperatures to understand the mechanistic aspects of the underlying transformations. Similarities and differences in the hydrolysis behavior of these compounds in various pH values and temperatures are described. PMID:24694259

  8. Analysis of Natural Buffer Systems and the Impact of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, David C.; Yoder, Claude H.; Higgs, Andrew T.; Obley, Matt L.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Leber, Phyllis A.

    2005-01-01

    The environmental significance of acid rain on water systems of different buffer capacities is discussed. The most prevalent natural buffer system is created by the equilibrium between carbonate ions and carbon dioxide.

  9. [Bicarbonate instead of lactate buffered substitution solution for continuous hemofiltration in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Olbricht, C J; Huxmann-Nägeli, D; Bischoff, H

    1990-04-01

    The substitution fluids applied in continuous haemofiltration contain 40 mmol/l of lactate. This is unphysiological, since administration of large amounts of lactate lowers the phosphorylation potential and increases catabolism. With bicarbonate-buffered fluid three problems may arise: 1. Precipitation of calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate; 2. pH is usually 8.4; 3. evaporation of CO2 increases pH. To solve these problems we applied a two-component system consisting of a glass bottle with 160 ml sodium bicarbonate 8.4% and a bag with 4.5 l of acidic solution. Prior to use, the bicarbonate was infused into the bag. The values of Ca++, Mg++, bicarbonate, and pH in this final substitution solution were constant during a 24 hr period after mixing. Precipitation of Ca++ and Mg++ carbonate was prevented by 3 mmol/l of lactic acid in the solution. The pH was 7.37. Evaporation of CO2 was prevented by bags made of special plastic sheeting. The solution was then applied in 7 intensive-care patients suffering from acute renal failure treated by continuous arteriovenous haemofiltration. No side effects of the solution were observed during six days of treatment. The values of Ca++, bicarbonate, pH, and pCO2 remained constant under clinical routine conditions. Hence, bicarbonate-buffered substitution solution is recommended for continuous haemofiltration. Continuous haemofiltration is now also available for patients with impaired liver function and increased lactate levels. PMID:2360710

  10. What's in your buffer? Solute altered millisecond motions detected by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Wong, Madeline; Khirich, Gennady; Loria, J Patrick

    2013-09-17

    To date, little work has been conducted on the relationship between solute and buffer molecules and conformational exchange motion in enzymes. This study uses solution NMR to examine the effects of phosphate, sulfate, and acetate in comparison to MES- and HEPES-buffered references on the chemical shift perturbation and millisecond, chemical, or conformational exchange motions in the enzyme ribonuclease A (RNase A), triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) and HisF. The results indicate that addition of these solutes has a small effect on (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts for RNase A and TIM but a significant effect for HisF. For RNase A and TIM, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiments, however, show significant solute-dependent changes in conformational exchange motions. Some residues show loss of millisecond motions relative to the reference sample upon addition of solute, whereas others experience an enhancement. Comparison of exchange parameters obtained from fits of dispersion data indicates changes in either or both equilibrium populations and chemical shifts between conformations. Furthermore, the exchange kinetics are altered in many cases. The results demonstrate that common solute molecules can alter observed enzyme millisecond motions and play a more active role than what is routinely believed. PMID:23991940

  11. Performance improvement of polymer solar cells by using a solution processible titanium chelate as cathode buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhan'ao; Yang, Chunhe; Zhou, Erjun; Wang, Xiang; Li, Yongfang

    2007-07-01

    A solution processible titanium chelate, titanium (diisopropoxide) bis (2,4-pentanedionate) (TIPD), was used as the cathode buffer layer in the polymer solar cells (PSCs) based on the blend of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester. Introducing TIPD buffer layer reduced the interface resistance between the active layer and Al electrode, leading to a lower device resistance. The power conversion efficiency of the PSC with TIPD buffer layer reached 2.52% under the illumination of AM1.5, 100mW/cm2, which is increased by 51.8% in comparison with that (1.66%) of the device without TIPD buffer layer under the same experimental conditions.

  12. Impact of solute concentration on the electrocatalytic conversion of dissolved gases in buffered solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-01

    To maintain local pH levels near the electrode during electrochemical reactions, the use of buffer solutions is effective. Nevertheless, the critical effects of the buffer concentration on electrocatalytic performances have not been discussed in detail. In this study, two fundamental electrochemical reactions, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), on a platinum rotating disk electrode are chosen as model gas-related aqueous electrochemical reactions at various phosphate concentrations. Our detailed investigations revealed that the kinetic and limiting diffusion current densities for both the ORR and HOR logarithmically decrease with increasing solute concentration (log |jORR | = - 0.39 c + 0.92 , log |jHOR | = - 0.35 c + 0.73) . To clarify the physical aspects of this phenomenon, the electrolyte characteristics are addressed: with increasing phosphate concentration, the gas solubility decrease, the kinematic viscosity of the solution increase and the diffusion coefficient of the dissolved gases decrease. The simulated limiting diffusion currents using the aforementioned parameters match the measured ones very well (log |jORR | = - 0.43 c + 0.99 , log |jHOR | = - 0.40 c + 0.54) , accurately describing the consequences of the electrolyte concentration. These alterations of the electrolyte properties associated with the solute concentration are universally applicable to other aqueous gas-related electrochemical reactions because the currents are purely determined by mass transfer of the dissolved gases.

  13. Calorimetric and Diffractometric Evidence for the Sequential Crystallization of Buffer Components and the Consequential pH Swing in Frozen Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaramurthi, Prakash; Shalaev, Evgenyi; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2010-06-22

    Sequential crystallization of succinate buffer components in the frozen solution has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffractometry (both laboratory and synchrotron sources). The consequential pH shifts were monitored using a low-temperature electrode. When a solution buffered to pH < pK{sub a2} was cooled from room temperature (RT), the freeze-concentrate pH first increased and then decreased. This was attributed to the sequential crystallization of succinic acid, monosodium succinate, and finally disodium succinate. When buffered to pH > pK{sub a2}, the freeze-concentrate pH first decreased and then increased due to the sequential crystallization of the basic (disodium succinate) followed by the acidic (monosodium succinate and succinic acid) buffer components. XRD provided direct evidence of the crystallization events in the frozen buffer solutions, including the formation of disodium succinate hexahydrate [Na{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}COO){sub 2} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O]. When the frozen solution was warmed in a differential scanning calorimeter, multiple endotherms attributable to the melting of buffer components and ice were observed. When the frozen solutions were dried under reduced pressure, ice sublimation was followed by dehydration of the crystalline hexahydrate to a poorly crystalline anhydrate. However, crystalline succinic acid and monosodium succinate were retained in the final lyophiles. The pH and the buffer salt concentration of the prelyo solution influenced the crystalline salt content in the final lyophile. The direction and magnitude of the pH shift in the frozen solution depended on both the initial pH and the buffer concentration. In light of the pH-sensitive nature of a significant fraction of pharmaceuticals (especially proteins), extreme care is needed in both the buffer selection and its concentration.

  14. Enhancement of the absorption of CO{sub 2} in alkaline buffer solutions: Joint action of two enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, G.; Chenlo, F.; Pereira, G.; Vazquez, P.

    1999-05-01

    The authors measured the absorption of CO{sub 2} in alkaline 0.5 M/0.5 M sodium carbonate/bicarbonate buffers containing either saccharose and sodium arsenite or saccharose and formaldehyde. Absorption enhancement increased upon increasing the concentration of either of the catalysts, but the joint action of the two was always less than the sum of their individual effects, the difference being a function of the acidities and concentrations of the catalysts and the pH of the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer solution

  15. Degradation of ascorbic acid in ethanolic solutions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Tsai, Yi-Chin; Fu, Chi-Chang; Wu, James Swi-Bea

    2012-10-24

    Ascorbic acid occurs naturally in many wine-making fruits. The industry also uses ascorbic acid as an antioxidant and color stabilizer in the making of alcoholic beverages including white wine, wine cooler, alcopop, and fruit liqueur. However, the degradation of ascorbic acid itself may cause browning and the deterioration of color quality. This study was aimed to monitor the degradation of ascorbic acid, the formation of degradation products, and the browning in storage of ascorbic acid containing 0-40% (v/v) ethanolic solutions buffered at pH 3.2 as models of alcoholic beverages. The results show that ascorbic acid degradation in the ethanolic solutions during storage follows first-order reaction, that the degradation and browning rates increase with the increase of ethanol concentration, that the activation energy for the degradation of ascorbic acid is in the range 10.35-23.10 (kcal/mol), that 3-hydroxy-2-pyrone is an indicator and a major product of ascorbic acid degradation, and that aerobic degradation pathway dominants over anaerobic pathway in ascorbic acid degradation in ethanolic solutions. PMID:22994409

  16. Development of buffer layers by chemical solution deposition for YBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, Yalcin

    Short length YBCO coated conductors have been fabricated by vacuum thin film deposition techniques. However, the fabrication process increases the cost, and makes them impractical to use for commercial applications even if they are fabricated in kilometer lengths. YBCO coated conductors could be available in the market with a cheaper price by developing non-vacuum deposition techniques. The objective of this research was to investigate development of buffer layers by chemical solution deposition technique for YBCO coated conductors. Buffer layer structures are mainly used to prevent metal ion diffusion, and to reduce the lattice mismatch between YBCO and the metallic substrate. The technical approach, which was adapted here, is the reel-to-reel sol-gel dip coating process to fabricate long length coatings by developing buffer layers' chemical solutions. Rolling assisted biaxially textured Ni substrates were used for deposition of buffer layers. Cold rolled Ni strips were heat-treated at certain conditions to form biaxially textured structure, which became templates for textured growth of buffer layers that is necessary to obtain high critical current in the coated conductors. CeO2 was chosen as a buffer layers because it has been recognized as one of the best cap layers. Growth of highly textured, crack free, pinhole free and smooth CeO2 buffer layers have been demonstrated by chemical solution deposition technique on biaxially textured substrates. A new buffer layer with pseudocubic lattice parameters matching YBCO, (Eu0.893Yb0.107)2O3, was developed for the first time by using a mixture of Eu2O 3 and Yb2O3 to eliminate lattice mismatch, which adversely affected the critical current of the coated conductors. Highly textured (Eu0.893Yb0.107)2O3 buffer layers were deposited on biaxially textured Ni substrates by chemical solution deposition technique. Finally, the growth of CeO2 and (Eu0.893Yb 0.107)2O3 buffer layers were investigated on oxide layers because both Ce

  17. Redox buffered hydrofluoric acid etchant for the reduction of galvanic attack during release etching of MEMS devices having noble material films

    DOEpatents

    Hankins, Matthew G.

    2009-10-06

    Etchant solutions comprising a redox buffer can be used during the release etch step to reduce damage to the structural layers of a MEMS device that has noble material films. A preferred redox buffer comprises a soluble thiophosphoric acid, ester, or salt that maintains the electrochemical potential of the etchant solution at a level that prevents oxidation of the structural material. Therefore, the redox buffer preferentially oxidizes in place of the structural material. The sacrificial redox buffer thereby protects the exposed structural layers while permitting the dissolution of sacrificial oxide layers during the release etch.

  18. Fluid transport by the cornea endothelium is dependent on buffering lactic acid efflux.

    PubMed

    Li, Shimin; Kim, Edward; Bonanno, Joseph A

    2016-07-01

    Maintenance of corneal hydration is dependent on the active transport properties of the corneal endothelium. We tested the hypothesis that lactic acid efflux, facilitated by buffering, is a component of the endothelial fluid pump. Rabbit corneas were perfused with bicarbonate-rich (BR) or bicarbonate-free (BF) Ringer of varying buffering power, while corneal thickness was measured. Perfusate was collected and analyzed for lactate efflux. In BF with no added HEPES, the maximal corneal swelling rate was 30.0 ± 4.1 μm/h compared with 5.2 ± 0.9 μm/h in BR. Corneal swelling decreased directly with [HEPES], such that with 60 mM HEPES corneas swelled at 7.5 ± 1.6 μm/h. Perfusate [lactate] increased directly with [HEPES]. Similarly, reducing the [HCO3 (-)] increased corneal swelling and decreased lactate efflux. Corneal swelling was inversely related to Ringer buffering power (β), whereas lactate efflux was directly related to β. Ouabain (100 μM) produced maximal swelling and reduction in lactate efflux, whereas carbonic anhydrase inhibition and an monocarboxylic acid transporter 1 inhibitor produced intermediate swelling and decreases in lactate efflux. Conversely, 10 μM adenosine reduced the swelling rate to 4.2 ± 0.8 μm/h and increased lactate efflux by 25%. We found a strong inverse relation between corneal swelling and lactate efflux (r = 0.98, P < 0.0001). Introducing lactate in the Ringer transiently increased corneal thickness, reaching a steady state (0 ± 0.6 μm/h) within 90 min. We conclude that corneal endothelial function does not have an absolute requirement for bicarbonate; rather it requires a perfusing solution with high buffering power. This facilitates lactic acid efflux, which is directly linked to water efflux, indicating that lactate flux is a component of the corneal endothelial pump. PMID:27225657

  19. A biogeochemical comparison of two well-buffered catchments with contrasting histories of acid deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, J.B.; Kram, P.; Hruska, J.; Bullen, T.D.

    2004-01-01

    Much of the biogeochemical cycling research in catchments in the past 25 years has been driven by acid deposition research funding. This research has focused on vulnerable base-poor systems; catchments on alkaline lithologies have received little attention. In regions of high acid loadings, however, even well-buffered catchments are susceptible to forest decline and episodes of low alkalinity in streamwater. As part of a collaboration between the Czech and U.S. Geological Surveys, we compared biogeochemical patterns in two well-studied, well-buffered catchments: Pluhuv Bor in the western Czech Republic, which has received high loading of atmospheric acidity, and Sleepers River Research Watershed in Vermont, U.S.A., where acid loading has been considerably less. Despite differences in lithology, wetness, forest type, and glacial history, the catchments displayed similar patterns of solute concentrations and flow. At both catchments, base cation and alkalinity diluted with increasing flow, whereas nitrate and dissolved organic carbon increased with increasing flow. Sulfate diluted with increasing flow at Sleepers River, while at Pluhuv Bor the sulfate-flow relation shifted from positive to negative as atmospheric sulfur (S) loadings decreased and soil S pools were depleted during the 1990s. At high flow, alkalinity decreased to near 100 ??eq L-1 at Pluhuv Bor compared to 400 ??eq L-1 at Sleepers River. Despite the large amounts of S flushed from Pluhuv Bor soils, these alkalinity declines were caused solely by dilution, which was greater at Pluhuv Bor relative to Sleepers River due to greater contributions from shallow flow paths at high flow. Although the historical high S loading at Pluhuv Bor has caused soil acidification and possible forest damage, it has had little effect on the acid/base status of streamwater in this well-buffered catchment. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  20. Tested Demonstrations: Buffer Capacity of Various Acetic Acid-Sodium Acetate Systems: A Lecture Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Craig J.; Panek, Mary G.

    1985-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a lecture experiment which uses indicators to illustrate the concept of differing buffer capacities by titrating acetic acid/sodium acetate buffers with 1.0 molar hydrochloric acid and 1.0 molar sodium hydroxide. A table with data used to plot the titration curve is included. (JN)

  1. Influence of solid-state acidity on the decomposition of sucrose in amorphous systems II (effect of buffer).

    PubMed

    Alkhamis, Khouloud A

    2009-04-01

    It was of interest to investigate the solid-state acidity using indicator probe molecules and sucrose degradation. Amorphous samples containing lactose, sucrose, buffers (citrate, malate, tartarate, or phosphate) with different pH values, and sodium chloride (to adjust the ionic strength) were prepared by freeze-drying. The lyophiles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and Karl Fischer titrimetry. The solid-state acidity of all lyophiles was measured using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and suitable indicators (thymol blue or bromophenol blue). Selected lyophiles were subjected to a temperature of 60 degrees C and were analyzed for sucrose degradation using the Trinder kit. The results obtained from this study have shown that good correlation can be obtained between the solid-state acidity and the molar ratio of the salt and the acid in solution. The degradation of sucrose in the lyophiles is extremely sensitive to the solid-state acidity and might be able to provide a better estimate for the acidity than the indicator probe molecules. The Hammett acidity-rate profile for sucrose degradation in the lyophiles (using four different buffers) was also obtained. The profile showed similarity to the pH-rate profile in solution, and no buffer catalysis for sucrose degradation was detected in this study. PMID:19016102

  2. Influence of buffered and unbuffered acetylsalicylic acid on dental enamel and dentine in human teeth: an in vitro pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rogalla, K; Finger, W; Hannig, M

    1992-06-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to investigate the erosive effect of buffered and unbuffered acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on dental enamel and dentine in human teeth by scanning electron microscopy. In order to standardize the specimens and to improve comparability the dental enamel and dentine were superficially abraded. The enamel and dentine specimens were therefore particularly sensitive to the influences of acid agents. Concentrated solution of buffered chewable ASA tablets (500 mg ASA and 300 mg calcium carbonate in 5 ml water) showed no changes in the enamel surface structure after exposure times of 1 min, 5 min and 60 min. In contrast, minimal corrosive effects were already seen after exposure of the enamel surface to the unbuffered ASA solutions for 1 min. After exposure times of 5 min and 60 min erosion of the enamel was more pronounced. Immersion in the unbuffered ASA solution led to clearly visible micromorphological changes on the dentine surfaces even after exposure for 1 min. Exposure of the dentine specimens to the buffered ASA solutions led to only very slight changes in the surface morphology. Therefore, the scanning electron micrograph after exposure to buffered ASA is comparable to the picture of untreated dentine. PMID:1513188

  3. An oral sodium citrate-citric acid non-particulate buffer in humans.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, J J; Payne, K A

    1996-11-01

    We have investigated the effect on the pH of the gastric fluid of a single dose of sodium citrate 0.3 mol litre-1 (antacid) and a solution containing sodium citrate dehydrate (100 mg ml-1) with citric acid monohydrate (66 mg ml-1) (buffer). The dose for both solutions was 0.4 ml kg-1 via a nasogastric tube. Each group comprised 10 patients undergoing neurosurgical operations of 5-7 h duration. A control group of 10 patients received no gastric solution. The pH of the gastric aspirate was measured hourly using a Metrohm 632 digital pH meter (Synectics Medical, Sweden). Mean baseline gastric pH was 2.64 (SD 1.71). In the control group, pH increased to 4.4 (1.51) at 5 h, returning to baseline at 7 h. In the antacid group, pH increased to 6.11 (0.47) at 15 min and decreased to 3.70 (1.94) at 7 h (P < 0.01). In the buffer group, pH was stable at 3.80-3.95 (0.22) over 7 h (P > 0.01). Total mean gastric aspirate was 0.5 ml kg-1. PMID:8957982

  4. Critical evaluation of buffering solutions for pKa determination by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Fuguet, Elisabet; Reta, Mario; Gibert, Carme; Rosés, Martí; Bosch, Elisabeth; Ràfols, Clara

    2008-07-01

    The performance of the most common and also some other less common CE buffers has been tested for the pKa determination of several types of compounds (pyridine, amines, and phenols). The selected buffers cover a pH ranging from 3.7 to 11.8. Whereas some buffers, like acetic acid/acetate, BisTrisH+/BisTris, TrisH+/Tris, CHES/CHES-, and CAPS/CAPS- can be used with all type of analytes, others like ammonium/ammonia, butylammonium/butylammonia, ethylammonium/ethylammonia, diethylammonium/diethylammonia, and hydrogenphosphate/phosphate are not recommended because they interact with a wide range of compounds. The rest of the tested buffers (dihydrogenphosphate/hydrogenphosphate, MES/MES-, HEPES/HEPES-, and boric acid/borate) can show specific interactions depending on the nature of the analytes, and their use in some applications should be restricted. PMID:18546174

  5. Influence of phosphate ions on buffer capacity of soil humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguta, P.; Sokołowska, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The object of this study was to determine change of natural buffer capacity of humic acids by strong buffering agents, which were phosphate ions. Studies were carried out on the humic acids extracted from peat soils. Additional information was obtained by determination of water holding capacity, density, ash and pH for peats and optical parameter Q4/6 for humic acids. Humic acid suspensions exhibited the highest buffer properties at low pH and reached maximum at pH ~ 4. Phosphates possessed buffer properties in the pH range from 4.5 to 8.0. The maximum of buffering was at pH~6.8 and increased proportionally with an increase in the concentration of phosphate ions. The study indicated that the presence of phosphate ions may strongly change natural buffer capacity of humic acids by shifting buffering maximum toward higher pH values. Significant correlations were found for the degree of the secondary transformation with both the buffer capacity and the titrant volume used during titration.

  6. The Determination of the pH of Standard Buffer Solution: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, K. R.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment which shows: (1) how measurements of the reaction electromotive force for the cell (Pt/glass/NaCl(aq,m),buffer/AgCl/Ag/Pt) can be utilized in determining the absolute pH of the buffer; and (2) the demonstration of the use of the Debye-Huckel model of an electrolyte solution in solving an important electrochemical problem.…

  7. The Effect of Crystallizing and Non-crystallizing Cosolutes on Succinate Buffer Crystallization and the Consequent pH Shift in Frozen Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaramurthi, Prakash; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2011-09-06

    To effectively inhibit succinate buffer crystallization and the consequent pH changes in frozen solutions. Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD), the crystallization behavior of succinate buffer in the presence of either (i) a crystallizing (glycine, mannitol, trehalose) or (ii) a non-crystallizing cosolute (sucrose) was evaluated. Aqueous succinate buffer solutions, 50 or 200 mM, at pH values 4.0 or 6.0 were cooled from room temperature to -25 C at 0.5 C/min. The pH of the solution was measured as a function of temperature using a probe designed to function at low temperatures. The final lyophiles prepared from these solutions were characterized using synchrotron radiation. When the succinic acid solution buffered to pH 4.0, in the absence of a cosolute, was cooled, there was a pronounced shift in the freeze-concentrate pH. Glycine and mannitol, which have a tendency to crystallize in frozen solutions, remained amorphous when the initial pH was 6.0. Under this condition, they also inhibited buffer crystallization and prevented pH change. At pH 4.0 (50 mM initial concentration), glycine and mannitol crystallized and did not prevent pH change in frozen solutions. While sucrose, a non-crystallizing cosolute, did not completely prevent buffer crystallization, the extent of crystallization was reduced. Sucrose decomposition, based on XRD peaks attributable to {beta}-D-glucose, was observed in frozen buffer solutions with an initial pH of 4.0. Trehalose completely inhibited crystallization of the buffer components when the initial pH was 6.0 but not at pH 4.0. At the lower pH, the crystallization of both trehalose dihydrate and buffer components was evident. When retained amorphous, sucrose and trehalose effectively inhibited succinate buffer component crystallization and the consequent pH shift. However, when trehalose crystallized or sucrose degraded to yield a crystalline decomposition product, crystallization of buffer was

  8. [Alanine solution as enzyme reaction buffer used in A to O blood group conversion].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Bo; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Yin-Ze; Tan, Ying-Xia; Bao, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Ying-Li; Ji, Shou-Ping; Gong, Feng; Gao, Hong-Wei

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of alanine solution as α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase enzyme reaction buffer on the enzymatic activity of A antigen. The binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in different reaction buffer such as alanine solution, glycine solution, normal saline (0.9% NaCl), PBS, PCS was detected by Western blot. The results showed that the efficiency of A to O conversion in alanine solution was similar to that in glycine solution, and Western blot confirmed that most of enzymes blinded with RBC in glycine or alanine solution, but few enzymes blinded with RBC in PBS, PCS or normal saline. The evidences indicated that binding of enzyme with RBC was a key element for A to O blood group conversion, while the binding ability of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase with RBC in alanine or glycine solution was similar. It is concluded that alanine solution can be used as enzyme reaction buffer in A to O blood group conversion. In this buffer, the α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase is closely blinded with RBC and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase plays efficient enzymatic activity of A antigen. PMID:24989301

  9. Comparison of Ring-Buffer-Based Packet Capture Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Steven Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Traditional packet-capture solutions using commodity hardware incur a large amount of overhead as packets are copied multiple times by the operating system. This overhead slows sensor systems to a point where they are unable to keep up with high bandwidth traffic, resulting in dropped packets. Incomplete packet capture files hinder network monitoring and incident response efforts. While costly commercial hardware exists to capture high bandwidth traffic, several software-based approaches exist to improve packet capture performance using commodity hardware.

  10. Acidity of frozen electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Carmen; Boxe, C S; Guzman, M I; Colussi, A J; Hoffmann, M R

    2006-04-20

    Ice is selectively intolerant to impurities. A preponderance of implanted anions or cations generates electrical imbalances in ice grown from electrolyte solutions. Since the excess charges are ultimately neutralized via interfacial (H(+)/HO(-)) transport, the acidity of the unfrozen portion can change significantly and permanently. This insufficiently recognized phenomenon should critically affect rates and equilibria in frozen media. Here we report the effective (19)F NMR chemical shift of 3-fluorobenzoic acid as in situ probe of the acidity of extensively frozen electrolyte solutions. The sign and magnitude of the acidity changes associated with freezing are largely determined by specific ion combinations, but depend also on solute concentration and/or the extent of supercooling. NaCl solutions become more basic, those of (NH(4))(2)SO(4) or Na(2)SO(4) become more acidic, while solutions of the 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid zwitterion barely change their acidity upon freezing. We discuss how acidity scales based on solid-state NMR measurements could be used to assess the degree of ionization of weak acids and bases in frozen media. PMID:16610849

  11. Myocardial protection against global ischemia with Krebs-Henseleit buffer-based cardioplegic solution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Krebs-Henseleit buffer is the best perfusion solution for isolated mammalian hearts. We hypothesized that a Krebs-Henseleit buffer-based cardioplegic solution might provide better myocardial protection than well-known crystalloid cardioplegic solutions because of its optimal electrolyte and glucose levels, presence of buffer systems, and mild hyperosmolarity. Methods Isolated Langendorff-perfused rat hearts were subjected to either global ischemia without cardioplegia (controls) or cardioplegic arrest for either 60 or 180 min, followed by 120 min of reperfusion. The modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer-based cardioplegic solution (mKHB) and St. Thomas’ Hospital solution No. 2 (STH2) were studied. During global ischemia, the temperatures of the heart and the cardioplegic solutions were maintained at either 37°C (60 min of ischemia) or 22°C (moderate hypothermia, 180 min of ischemia). Hemodynamic parameters were registered throughout the experiments. The infarct size was determined through histochemical examination. Results Cardioplegia with the mKHB solution at moderate hypothermia resulted in a minimal infarct size (5 ± 3%) compared to that in the controls and STH2 solution (35 ± 7% and 19 ± 9%, respectively; P < 0.001, for both groups vs. the mKHB group). In contrast to the control and STH2-treated hearts, no ischemic contracture was registered in the mKHB group during the 180-min global ischemia. At normothermia, the infarct sizes were 4 ± 3%, 72 ± 6%, and 70 ± 12% in the mKHB, controls, and STH2 groups, respectively (P < 0.0001). In addition, cardioplegia with mKHB at normothermia prevented ischemic contracture and improved the postischemic functional recovery of the left ventricle (P < 0.001, vs. STH2). Conclusions The data suggest that the Krebs-Henseleit buffer-based cardioplegic might be superior to the standard crystalloid solution (STH2). PMID:23547937

  12. Separation of Trivalent Actinides from Lanthanides in an Acetate Buffer Solution Using Cyanex 301

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; Dean R. Peterman; Terry A. Todd; Richard D. Tillotson

    2006-05-01

    The separation of trivalent actinides from the lanthanides using the active extractant in the Cyanex 301 reagent, bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid, was studied. Specifically, the extractant was studied for an ammonium acetate/acetic acid buffered feed that would result from a transuranic separation process utilizing an ammonium acetate strip solution. Separation factors of 241Am from 154Eu with this extractant, as a function of total acetate concentration and pH, have been measured. Additionally, the extraction behavior of stable La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, and Eu was measured. Separation factors were typically very high for Am from Eu at a pH ranging from 3.8 to 5.8 and a total acetate concentration ranging from 0.2 M to 1.0 M. However, separation factors across the lanthanide series varied considerably and resulted in separation of the lighter lanthanides from the heavier lanthanides at the higher pH’s.

  13. Multi-ion sensing of buffer solutions using terahertz chemical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimune, Kosuke; Okawa, Yuki; Sakai, Kenji; Kiwa, Toshihiko; Tsukada, Keiji

    2014-12-01

    Terahertz chemical microscopy (TCM) has been proposed and developed to visualize electric potential and/or chemical changes in water solutions. To simultaneously detect two types of ions mixed in buffer solutions, five membranes for sodium ions and four membranes for potassium ions were integrated on a sensing plate, and the selectivity to each ion was evaluated. The results suggest that TCM can be used for multi-ion sensing in mixed solutions.

  14. Buffer capacities of podzolic and peat gleyic podzolic soils to sulfuric and nitric acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, N. B.; Alekseeva, S. A.; Shashkova, G. V.; Dronova, T. Ya.; Sokolova, T. A.

    2007-04-01

    Soil samples from the main genetic horizons of pale podzolic and peat gleyic podzolic soils from the Central Forest Reserve were subjected to a continuous potentiometric titration by sulfuric and nitric acids. The sulfate sorption capacity was determined in soil mineral horizons. The buffer capacity of mineral horizons of both soils to sulfuric acid was found to be higher than that to the nitric acid. This is explained by the sorption of sulfates via the mechanism of ligand exchange with the release of hydroxyl groups from the surfaces of Fe and Al hydroxide particles and edge faces of clay crystallites. The buffer capacity of organic horizons of the pale podzolic soil to sulfuric acid proved to be higher than that to nitric acid; in organic horizons of the peat gleyic podzolic soil, the buffer capacity to sulfuric acid was lower than that to nitric acid. The reasons for this phenomenon have yet to be investigated.

  15. Thick lanthanum zirconate buffer layers from water-based precursor solutions on Ni-5%W substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Vyshnavi; Lommens, Petra; De Buysser, Klaartje; Huehne, Ruben; Van Driessche, Isabel

    2011-11-15

    In this work, water-based precursor solutions suitable for dip-coating of thick La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (LZO) buffer layers for coated conductors on Ni-5%W substrates were developed. The solutions were prepared based on chelate chemistry using water as the main solvent. The effect of polymer addition on the maximum crack-free thickness of the deposited films was investigated. This novel solution preparation method revealed the possibility to grow single, crack-free layers with thicknesses ranging 100-280 nm with good crystallinity and an in-plane grain misalignment with average FWHM of 6.55{sup o}. TEM studies illustrated the presence of nanovoids, typical for CSD-LZO films annealed under Ar-5%H{sub 2} gas flow. The appropriate buffer layer action of the film in preventing the Ni diffusion was studied using XPS. It was found that the Ni diffusion was restricted to the first 30 nm of a 140 nm thick film. The surface texture of the film was improved using a seed layer. - Graphical abstract: Thick LZO buffer layers from water-based precursor solutions were synthesized and their crystallinity, microstructure and buffer layer action were studied. The buffer layer action of the LZO layer was substantial to restrict the Ni penetration within 30 nm of a 140 nm thick film. Highlights: > LZO buffer layers with high thicknesses for use in coated conductors were prepared. > Prepared from water-based solutions. > Polymeric PVP increases the crack-free critical thickness of thick films. > Thick films showed good barrier action against Ni penetration. > Seed layers promote epitaxial growth of thick layers.

  16. Dopamine-melanin film deposition depends on the used oxidant and buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Bernsmann, Falk; Ball, Vincent; Addiego, Frédéric; Ponche, Arnaud; Michel, Marc; Gracio, José Joaquin de Almeida; Toniazzo, Valérie; Ruch, David

    2011-03-15

    The deposition of "polydopamine" films, from an aqueous solution containing dopamine or other catecholamines, constitutes a new and versatile way to functionalize solid-liquid interfaces. Indeed such films can be deposited on almost all kinds of materials. Their deposition kinetics does not depend markedly on the surface chemistry of the substrate, and the films can reach thickness of a few tens of nanometers in a single reaction step. Up to now, even if a lot is known about the oxidation mechanism of dopamine in solution, only little information is available to describe the deposition mechanism on surfaces either by oxidation in solution or by electrodeposition. The deposition kinetics of melanin was only investigated from dopamine solutions using oxygen or ammonium persulfate as an oxidant and from a tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane (Tris) containing buffer solutions at pH 8.5. Many other oxidants could be used, and the buffer agent containing a primary amine group may influence the deposition process. Herein we show that the deposition kinetics of melanin from dopamine containing buffers at pH 8.5 can be markedly modified using Cu(2+) instead of O2 as an oxidant: the deposition kinetics remains linear up to thicknesses of more than 70 nm, whereas the film growth stops at 45 ± 5 nm in the presence of 02. In addition, the films prepared from Cu(2+) containing solutions display an absorption spectrum with defined peaks at 320 and 370 nm, which are absent in the spectra of films prepared in oxygenated solutions. The replacement of Tris buffer by phosphate buffer also has a marked effect on the melanin deposition kinetics. PMID:21332218

  17. EQUALIZING THE ELECTRIC FIELD INTENSITY WITHIN CHICK BRAIN IMMERSED IN BUFFER SOLUTION AT DIFFERENT CARRIER FREQUENCIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presented here are the numerical relationships between incident power densities that produce the same average electric field intensity within a chick brain half immersed in buffered saline solution and exposed to a uniform electromagnetic field at carrier frequencies of 50, 147, ...

  18. Acanthamoeba encystment: multifactorial effects of buffers, biocides, and demulcents present in contact lens care solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Christopher J; Lynch, Shawn C; Rah, Marjorie J; Millard, Kimberly A; Morris, Timothy W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether agents which are purportedly capable of inducing encystment of Acanthamoeba can recapitulate the signal when tested in differing formulations. Methods In accordance with the International Standard ISO 19045, Acanthamoeba castellanii ATCC 50370 trophozoites were cultured in antibiotic-free axenic medium, treated with test solutions, and encystment rates plus viability were measured via bright field and fluorescent microscopy. Test solutions included phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), borate-buffered saline, biguanide- and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-based biocides, propylene glycol (PG) and povidone (POV) ophthalmic demulcents, and one-step H2O2-based contact lens disinfection systems. Results Only PBS solutions with 0.25 ppm polyaminopropyl biguanide (PAPB) and increasing concentrations of PG and POV stimulated A. castellanii encystment in a dose-dependent manner, whereas PBS solutions containing 3% H2O2 and increasing concentrations of PG and POV did not stimulate encystment. Borate-buffered saline and PBS/citrate solutions containing PG also did not stimulate encystment. In addition, no encystment was observed after 24 hours, 7 days, or 14 days of exposures of trophozoites to one-step H2O2 contact lens disinfection products or related solutions. Conclusion The lack of any encystment observed when trophozoites were treated with existing or new one-step H2O2 contact lens care products, as well as when trophozoites were exposed to various related test solutions, confirms that Acanthamoeba encystment is a complex process which depends upon simultaneous contributions of multiple factors including buffers, biocides, and demulcents. PMID:26508829

  19. Development and evaluation of acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet for mixed vaginal infections.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohd Aftab; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Khan, Zeenat Iqbal; Khar, Roop Krishen; Ali, Mushir

    2007-01-01

    An acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet was developed for the treatment of genitourinary tract infections. From the bioadhesion experiment and release studies it was found that polycarbophil and sodium carboxymethylcellulose is a good combination for an acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet. Sodium monocitrate was used as a buffering agent to provide acidic pH (4.4), which is an attribute of a healthy vagina. The effervescent mixture (citric acid and sodium bicarbonate) along with a superdisintegrant (Ac-Di-sol) was used to enhance the swellability of the bioadhesive tablet. The drugs clotrimazole (antifungal) and metronidazole (antiprotozoal as well as an antibacterial) were used in the formulation along with Lactobacillus acidophilus spores to treat mixed vaginal infections. From the ex vivo retention study it was found that the bioadhesive polymers hold the tablet for more than 24 hours inside the vaginal tube. The hardness of the acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal tablet was optimized, at 4 to 5 kg hardness the swelling was found to be good and the cumulative release profile of the developed tablet was matched with a marketed conventional tablet (Infa-V). The in vitro spreadability of the swelled tablet was comparable to the marketed gel. In the in vitro antimicrobial study it was found that the acid-buffering bioadhesive tablet produces better antimicrobial action than marketed intravaginal drug delivery systems (Infa-V, Candid-V and Canesten 1). PMID:18181530

  20. Exciton-blocking phosphonic acid-treated anode buffer layers for organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Jeramy D.; Song, Byeongseop; Griffith, Olga; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate significant improvements in power conversion efficiency of bilayer organic photovoltaics by replacing the exciton-quenching MoO3 anode buffer layer with an exciton-blocking benzylphosphonic acid (BPA)-treated MoO3 or NiO layer. We show that the phosphonic acid treatment creates buffers that block up to 70% of excitons without sacrificing the hole extraction efficiency. Compared to untreated MoO3 anode buffers, BPA-treated NiO buffers exhibit a ˜ 25% increase in the near-infrared spectral response in diphenylanilo functionalized squaraine (DPSQ)/C60-based bilayer devices, increasing the power conversion efficiency under 1 sun AM1.5G simulated solar illumination from 4.8 ± 0.2% to 5.4 ± 0.3%. The efficiency can be further increased to 5.9 ± 0.3% by incorporating a highly conductive exciton blocking bathophenanthroline (BPhen):C60 cathode buffer. We find similar increases in efficiency in two other small-molecule photovoltaic systems, indicating the generality of the phosphonic acid-treated buffer approach to enhance exciton blocking.

  1. Buffer interference with protein dynamics: a case study on human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Long, Dong; Yang, Daiwen

    2009-02-18

    Selection of suitable buffer types is often a crucial step for generating appropriate protein samples for NMR and x-ray crystallographic studies. Although the possible interaction between MES buffer (2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) and proteins has been discussed previously, the interaction is usually thought to have no significant effects on the structures of proteins. In this study, we demonstrate the direct, albeit weak, interaction between MES and human liver fatty acid binding protein (hLFABP). Rather than affecting the structure of hLFABP, we found that the dynamics of hLFABP, which were previously proposed to be relevant to its functions, were significantly affected by the binding of hLFABP with MES. Buffer interference with protein dynamics was also demonstrated with Bis-Tris buffer, which is quite different from MES and fatty acids in terms of their molecular structures and properties. This result, to our knowledge, is the first published report on buffer interference with protein dynamics on a microsecond to millisecond timescale and could represent a generic problem in the studies of functionally relevant protein dynamics. Although being a fortuity, our finding of buffer-induced changes in protein dynamics offers a clue to how hLFABP accommodates its ligands. PMID:19217864

  2. Leaching with Penicillium simplicissimum: Influence of Metals and Buffers on Proton Extrusion and Citric Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Andreas; Burgstaller, Wolfgang; Schinner, Franz

    1991-01-01

    In the presence of insoluble metal oxides (industrial filter dust, zinc oxide, synthetic mixture of metal oxides), Penicillium simplicissimum developed the ability to excrete considerable amounts of citric acid (>100 mM). Parallel with the increase of citric acid concentration in the culture broth, zinc was solubilized from zinc oxide. The adsorption of filter dust onto the mycelium (the pellets formed were less than 1 mm in diameter) was required for not only the citric acid excretion but also the leaching of zinc. When the filter dust was replaced with a synthetic mixture of metal oxides or with zinc oxide in combination with trace elements, levels of adsorption and citric acid production were observed to be similar to those in experiments where industrial filter dust was used. The two most important properties of the filter dust were its heavy-metal content and its buffering capacity. These properties were simulated by adding heavy metals in soluble form (as chlorides, sulfates, or nitrates) or soluble buffers to the medium. Both heavy metals and buffers were not able to induce a citric acid efflux. As with citric acid production by Aspergillus niger, the addition of manganese lowered citric acid excretion (by 40% with metal oxide-induced citric acid efflux and by 100% with urea-induced citric acid efflux). Copper antagonized the effect of manganese. The mechanism for the bulk of citric acid excretion by P. simplicissimum, however, seemed to be different from that described for citric acid accumulation by A. niger. Because of the inefficiency of metals in solubilized form and of soluble buffers to induce a strong citric acid efflux, adsorption of an insoluble metal compound (zinc oxide) turned out to be essential. Surface phenomena possibly involving the plasma membrane H+-ATPase are thought to participate in the induction of citric acid excretion by P. simplicissimum in the presence of industrial filter dust. PMID:16348442

  3. Hydrogen production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells using a substrate without buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Song, Young-Hyun; Hidayat, Syarif; Kim, Han-Ki; Park, Joo-Yang

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to use substrate without buffer solution in a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC) for hydrogen production under continuous flow condition (10 cell pairs of RED stacks, HRT=5, 7.5, and 15h). Decreasing in the HRT (increasing in the organic matter) made cell current stable and increased. Hydrogen gas was produced at a rate of 0.61m(3)-H2/m(3)-Van/d in H-MREC, with a COD removal efficiency of 81% (1.55g/L/d) and a Coulombic efficiency of 41%. This MREC system without buffer solution could successfully produce hydrogen gas at a consistent rate. PMID:26888336

  4. Leaching with Penicillium simplicissimum: Influence of metals and buffers on proton extrusion and citric acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, A.; Burgstaller, W.; Schinner, F. )

    1991-03-01

    In the presence of insoluble metal oxides (industrial filter dust, zinc oxide, synthetic mixture of metal oxides), Penicillium simplicissimum developed the ability to excrete considerable amounts of citric acid (>100 mM). Parallel with the increase of citric acid concentration in the culture broth, zinc was solubilized from zinc oxide. The adsorption of filter dust onto the mycelium (the pellets formed were less than 1 mm in diameter) was required for not only the citric acid excretion but also the leaching of zinc. When the filter dust was replaced with a synthetic mixture of metal oxides or with zinc oxide in combination with trace elements, levels of adsorption and citric acid production were observed to be similar to those in experiments where industrial filter dust was used. The two most important properties of the filter dust were its heavy-metal content and its buffering capacity. These properties were simulated by adding heavy metals in soluble form (as chlorides, sulfates, or nitrates) or soluble buffers to the medium. Both heavy metals and buffers were not able to induce a citric acid efflux. As with citric acid production by Aspergillus niger, the addition of manganese lowered citric acid excretion (by 40% with metal oxide-induced citric acid efflux and by 100% with urea-induced citric acid efflux). Copper antagonized the effect of manganese. The mechanism for the bulk of citric acid excretion by P. simplicissimum, however, seemed to be different from that described for citric acid accumulation by A. niger. Because of the inefficiency of metals in solubilized form and of soluble buffers to induce a strong citric acid efflux, adsorption of an insoluble metal compound (zinc oxide) turned out to be essential.

  5. Closed-form solutions of performability. [modeling of a degradable buffer/multiprocessor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Methods which yield closed form performability solutions for continuous valued variables are developed. The models are similar to those employed in performance modeling (i.e., Markovian queueing models) but are extended so as to account for variations in structure due to faults. In particular, the modeling of a degradable buffer/multiprocessor system is considered whose performance Y is the (normalized) average throughput rate realized during a bounded interval of time. To avoid known difficulties associated with exact transient solutions, an approximate decomposition of the model is employed permitting certain submodels to be solved in equilibrium. These solutions are then incorporated in a model with fewer transient states and by solving the latter, a closed form solution of the system's performability is obtained. In conclusion, some applications of this solution are discussed and illustrated, including an example of design optimization.

  6. Interference by morpholine ethanesulfonic acid (MES) and related buffers in phenolic oxidation by peroxidase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While characterizing the kinetic parameters of apoplastic phenolic oxidation by peroxidase, we found anomalies caused by the 4-morpholine ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer being used. In the presence of MES, certain phenolics appeared not to be oxidized by peroxidase, yet the oxidant, H2O2, was uti...

  7. Ions in hyaluronic acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horkay, Ferenc; Basser, Peter J.; Londono, David J.; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2009-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is an anionic biopolymer that is almost ubiquitous in biological tissues. An attempt is made to determine the dominant features that account for both its abundance and its multifunctional role, and which set it apart from other types of biopolymers. A combination of osmotic and scattering techniques is employed to quantify its dynamic and static properties in near-physiological solution conditions, where it is exposed both to mono- and divalent counterions. An equation of state is derived for the osmotic pressure Π in the semidilute concentration region, in terms of two variables, the polymer concentration c and the ionic strength J of the added salt, according to which Π =1.4×103c9/4/J3/4 kPa, where c and J are expressed in mole. Over the physiological ion concentration range, the effect of the sodium chloride and calcium chloride on the osmotic properties of HA solutions is fully accounted for by their contributions to the ionic strength. The absence of precipitation, even at high CaCl2 concentrations, distinguishes this molecule from other biopolymers such as DNA. Dynamic light scattering measurements reveal that the collective diffusion coefficient in HA solutions exceeds that in aqueous solutions of typical neutral polymers by a factor of approximately 5. This property ensures rapid adjustment to, and recovery from, stress applied to HA-containing tissue. Small angle x-ray scattering measurements confirm the absence of appreciable structural reorganization over the observed length scale range 10-1000 Å, as a result of calcium-sodium ion exchange. The scattered intensity in the transfer momentum range q >0.03 Å-1 varies as 1/q, indicating that the HA chain segments in semidilute solutions are linear over an extended concentration range. The osmotic compression modulus c ∂Π/∂c, a high value of which is a prerequisite in structural biopolymers, is several times greater than in typical neutral polymer solutions.

  8. An investigation using atomic force microscopy nanoindentation of dental enamel demineralization as a function of undissociated acid concentration and differential buffer capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michele E.; Shellis, R. Peter

    2007-02-01

    Acidic drinks and foodstuffs can demineralize dental hard tissues, leading to a pathological condition known as dental erosion, which is of increasing clinical concern. The first step in enamel dissolution is a demineralization of the outer few micrometres of tissue, which results in a softening of the structure. The primary determinant of dissolution rate is pH, but the concentration of undissociated acid, which is related to buffer capacity, also appears to be important. In this study, atomic force microscopy nanoindentation was used to measure the first initial demineralization (softening) induced within 1 min by exposure to solutions with a range of undissociated acid concentration and natural pH of 3.3 or with an undissociated acid concentration of 10 mmol l-1 and pH adjusted to 3.3. The results indicate that differential buffering capacity is a better determinant of softening than undissociated acid concentration. Under the conditions of these experiments, a buffer capacity of >3 mmol l-1 pH-1 does not have any further effect on dissolution rate. These results imply that differential buffering capacity should be used for preference over undissociated acid concentration or titratable acidity, which are more commonly employed in the literature.

  9. Chemiluminescence flow biosensor for glucose using Mg-Al carbonate layered double hydroxides as catalysts and buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihua; Liu, Fang; Lu, Chao

    2012-01-01

    In this work, serving as supports in immobilizing luminol reagent, catalysts of luminol chemiluminescence (CL), and buffer solutions for the CL reaction, Mg-Al-CO(3) layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were found to trigger luminol CL in weak acid solutions (pH 5.8). The silica sol-gel with glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase was immobilized in the first half of the inside surface of a clear quartz tube, and luminol-hybrid Mg-Al-CO(3) LDHs were packed in the second half. Therefore, a novel CL flow-through biosensor for glucose was constructed in weak acid solutions. The CL intensity was linear with glucose concentration in the range of 0.005-1.0mM, and the detection limit for glucose (S/N=3) was 0.1 μM. The proposed biosensor exhibited excellent stability, high reproducibility and high selectivity for the determination of glucose and has been successfully applied to determine glucose in human plasma samples with satisfactory results. The success of this work has broken the bottleneck of the pH incompatibility between luminol CL and enzyme activity. PMID:22770831

  10. Solution Preserves Nucleic Acids in Body-Fluid Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    A solution has been formulated to preserve deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) in specimens of blood, saliva, and other bodily fluids. Specimens of this type are collected for diagnostic molecular pathology, which is becoming the method of choice for diagnosis of many diseases. The solution makes it possible to store such specimens at room temperature, without risk of decomposition, for subsequent analysis in a laboratory that could be remote from the sampling location. Thus, the solution could be a means to bring the benefits of diagnostic molecular pathology to geographic regions where refrigeration equipment and diagnostic laboratories are not available. The table lists the ingredients of the solution. The functions of the ingredients are the following: EDTA chelates divalent cations that are necessary cofactors for nuclease activity. In so doing, it functionally removes these cations and thereby retards the action of nucleases. EDTA also stabilizes the DNA helix. Tris serves as a buffering agent, which is needed because minor contaminants in an unbuffered solution can exert pronounced effects on pH and thereby cause spontaneous degradation of DNA. SDS is an ionic detergent that inhibits ribonuclease activity. SDS has been used in some lysis buffers and as a storage buffer for RNA after purification. The use of the solution is straightforward. For example, a sample of saliva is collected by placing a cotton roll around in the subject's mouth until it becomes saturated, then the cotton is placed in a collection tube. Next, 1.5 mL of the solution are injected directly into the cotton and the tube is capped for storage at room temperature. The effectiveness of the solution has been demonstrated in tests on specimens of saliva containing herpes simplex virus. In the tests, the viral DNA, as amplified by polymerase chain reaction, was detected even after storage for 120 days.

  11. Growth and Characterization of La2Zr2O7 Buffer Layers Deposited by Chemical Solution Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armenio, A. Angrisani; Augieri, A.; Fabbri, F.; Freda, R.; Galluzzi, V.; Mancini, A.; Rizzo, F.; Rufoloni, A.; Vannozzi, A.; Sotgiu, G.; Pompeo, N.; Torokhtii, K.; Silva, E.; Bemporad, E.; Contini, G.; Celentano, G.

    The deposition and characterization of La2Zr2O7 thin films deposited by metal-organic decomposition method on both single crystal SrTiO3 and cube textured Ni-5 at.%W substrates are presented. Metal acetylacetonates in propionic acid solution was used. The results showed that LZO films are epitaxially grown with smooth surface with rms roughness around 2 nm. YBa2Cu3O7-δ films, deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique on LZO buffer layers, showed critical temperature of 90 K and critical current density in self magnetic field Jc = 1.6 and 13 MA/cm2 at 77 K and 4.2 K, respectively. A better Jc retention in magnetic field for YBCO films deposited on LZO/STO than YBCO on bare STO is observed indicating a rather strong vortex pinning as confirmed by microwave measurements.

  12. Alteration of the surface charge of aluminum goethites by a sulfonic acid buffer.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera

    2004-07-01

    Four samples of synthetic low-substitution Al-goethites (mol% Al<10) were incubated with 10 mM NaClO4 and 5 mM MES buffer (MES buffer (2-[N-morpholino]ethanesulfonic acid) at pH 5. It was found that MES buffer, although commonly used to control pH, profoundly affected the results of our electrophoretic mobility measurements. The presence of MES buffer caused a large decrease in EM values for unsubstituted goethite, from 5.7 +/- 0.7 to 1.8 +/- 0.4 m2 v(-1) s(-1), while increases in Al substitution in goethite led to a progressive increase in EM values. The charge reversal following addition of MES buffer to suspension containing Al-goethites was explained by specific sorption that, at pH 5, is thought to occur via cation surface complexation because of (i) sulfonate induced-dipole or (ii) N and O lone-pair dipole-dipole interactions with structural Fe. PMID:15158383

  13. Analysis of the amino acids of soy globulins by AOT reverse micelles and aqueous buffer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jun; Lu, Zhifang; Ling, Xiangqing; Deng, Peng; Zhu, Qingjun; Du, Fangling

    2011-10-01

    The 7S and 11S globulins from soybean proteins using reverse micelle and aqueous buffer extraction methods were characterized by using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and their amino acid compositions were also evaluated. SDS-PAGE did not show electrophoretic differences between 7S and 11S globulin subunits with two extraction methods. SEM analysis showed that the AOT reverse micelle processing of 7S and 11S globulins induced a reduction of droplet size. Some individual amino acid contents of 7S and 11S globulins using two extraction methods were different, some were similar. In all the samples, the glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and leucine were the dominant amino acids while the cystine and methionine were the first-limiting amino acids. The proportion of essential amino acids to the total amino acids (E/T) of the 7S globulin from aqueous buffer and reverse micelles was similar. While significant differences were obtained in the proportion of E/T of the 11S globulin. PMID:21647686

  14. A resin-buffered nutrient solution for controlling metal speciation in the algal bottle assay.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, L; Merckx, R; Smolders, E

    2012-06-15

    Metal speciation in solution is uncontrolled during algal growth in the traditional algal bottle assay. A resin-buffered nutrient solution was developed to overcome this problem and this was applied to test the effect of chloride (Cl⁻) on cadmium (Cd) uptake. Standard nutrient solution was enriched with 40 mM of either NaNO₃ or NaCl, and was prepared to contain equal Cd²⁺ but varying dissolved Cd due to the presence of CdCl(n)(2-n) complexes. Both solutions were subsequently used in an algal assay in 100 mL beakers that contained only the solution (designated "-R") or contained the solution together with a cation exchange sulfonate resin (2 g L⁻¹, designated "+R") as a deposit on the bottom of the beaker. Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata was grown for 72 h (1.4 × 10⁵-1.4 × 10⁶ cells mL⁻¹) in stagnant solution and shaken three times a day. Growth was unaffected by the presence of the resin (p>0.05). The Cd concentrations in solution of the -R devices decreased with 50-58% of initial values due to Cd uptake. No such changes were found in the +R devices or in abiotic controls. Cd uptake was unaffected by either NaNO₃ or NaCl treatment in the +R device, confirming that Cd²⁺ is the preferred Cd species in line with the general concept of metal bioavailability. In contrast, Cd uptake in the -R devices was two-fold larger in the NaCl treatment than in the NaNO₃ treatment (p<0.001), suggesting that CdCl(n)(2-n) complexes are bioavailable in this traditional set-up. However this bioavailability is partially, but not completely, an apparent one, because of the considerable depletion of solution ¹⁰⁹Cd in this set-up. Resin-buffered solutions are advocated in the algal bottle assay to control trace metal supply and to better identify the role of metal complexes on bioavailability. PMID:22447105

  15. Dissolution properties of co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations in buffer and biorelevant media.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, A T; DeClerck, L; Löbmann, K; Grohganz, H; Rades, T; Laitinen, R

    2015-07-01

    Co-amorphous formulations, particularly binary drug-amino acid mixtures, have been shown to provide enhanced dissolution for poorly-soluble drugs and improved physical stability of the amorphous state. However, to date the dissolution properties (mainly intrinsic dissolution rate) of the co-amorphous formulations have been tested only in buffers and their supersaturation ability remain unexplored. Consequently, dissolution studies in simulated intestinal fluids need to be conducted in order to better evaluate the potential of these systems in increasing the oral bioavailability of biopharmaceutics classification system class II drugs. In this study, solubility and dissolution properties of the co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine, gibenclamide-serine, glibenclamide-threonine and glibenclamide-serine-threonine were studied in phosphate buffer pH 7.2 and biorelevant media (fasted and fed state simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF and FeSSIF, respectively)). The co-amorphous formulations were found to provide a long-lasting supersaturation and improve the dissolution of the drugs compared to the crystalline and amorphous drugs alone in buffer. Similar improvement, but in lesser extent, was observed in biorelevant media suggesting that a dissolution advantage observed in aqueous buffers may overestimate the advantage in vivo. However, the results show that, in addition to stability advantage shown earlier, co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations provide dissolution advantage over crystalline drugs in both aqueous and biorelevant conditions. PMID:26373205

  16. Basics of base in hemodialysis solution: Dialysate buffer production, delivery and decontamination

    PubMed Central

    Desai, N.

    2015-01-01

    Hemodialysis requires the use of high volumes of freshly prepared, clean dialysate to foster the removal of low molecular weight metabolites (i.e., urea) and to correct the electrolyte and acid-base imbalance of chronic renal failure. Dialysate is produced by mixing clean, AAMI grade water with both an acid and base concentrate. This purpose of this report is to describe production, mixing and delivery of the buffer component of dialysate, and to also to address the cost, safety and feasibility of producing online bicarbonate. As endotoxin contaminated dialysate has been associated with the release of key mediators in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases associated with long-term hemodialysis therapy, aspects of disinfecting a bicarbonate delivery loop are also addressed. PMID:26199467

  17. Properties of a new acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal formulation (ACIDFORM).

    PubMed

    Garg, S; Anderson, R A; Chany, C J; Waller, D P; Diao, X H; Vermani, K; Zaneveld, L J

    2001-07-01

    Vaginal prophylactic methodology may prevent heterosexual transmission of the HIV and other sexually transmitted disease-causing organisms as well as unplanned pregnancies. A new delivery system (ACIDFORM) was designed with acid-buffering, bioadhesive, and viscosity-retaining properties to (1) maintain the acidic vaginal milieu (the low pH inactivates many pathogens and spermatozoa), (2) form a protective layer over the vaginal/cervical epithelium (minimizing contact with pathogenic organisms), and (3) provide long-term vaginal retention. A Phase I clinical study with ACIDFORM provided initial information about its safety and showed the formation of a layer over the vaginal/cervical epithelium [1; Amaral et al., Contraception 1999;60:361-6]. To study the properties of the gel (without active ingredient) in more detail, ACIDFORM's acid-buffering, bioadhesive, viscosity-retaining, and spermicidal properties were compared in vitro to marketed formulations, and its long-term stability was assessed. ACIDFORM, either when titrated with NaOH or when mixed directly with semen, is highly acid buffering and much more effective than Aci-Jel, a commercial acid-buffering vaginal product. ACIDFORM adheres well to two model membranes (excised sheep vagina and cellophane) and is more bioadhesive than Conceptrol, Advantage S, Replens, Aci-Jel, and K-Y jelly. On dilution, ACIDFORM also retains its viscosity better than these marketed products. ACIDFORM is spermicidal and is stable for at least 2 years. These results suggest that ACIDFORM has advantages over presently marketed vaginal delivery systems. The gel may either be useful by itself as an antimicrobial contraceptive product or as a formulation vehicle for an active ingredient with antimicrobial and/or contraceptive properties. PMID:11535216

  18. Development anmd testing of electrophoresis solutions. Task I.1: Development of optimal buffer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Two buffers were explored for testing: low ionic strength electrophoresis buffer with and without density gradient material. It was found that the electrophoresis routine was better tolerated when Ficoll was present. The results of a viability study of primary human fetal kidney (HFK-1) cells at the first passage are shown. Cell strain HFK-1 was used in several experiments at the first and second passage. The HFK consisted mainly of fibroblasts, and HFK-1 has a high epithelioid cell content. The chromosomes of HFK were examined and found to be euploid. The stock medium for cell electrophoresis is described. In this solution density gradient solutes such as sucrose and Ficoll are dissolved to bring the osmolarity to 0.30. Its ionic strength is less than 0.01M, and its conductivity is usually 0.0011 mho/cm. Methods for viability determination included direct microscopic counting of the percent cells attached and spread within 24 hr of plating test cultures or electrophoretically separated fractions. The Cytograf viability assay concept was tested, and shown that blue stained cells scatter less light into the 0.8 to 3.3 deg angular interval than do unstained cells.

  19. Effect of Buffers on Aqueous Solute-Exclusion Zones around Ion-Exchange Resins

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jian-ming; Wexler, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Interaction between charged surfaces in aqueous solution is a fundamental feature of colloid science. Theoretically, surface potential falls to half its value at a distance equal to a Debye length, which is typically on the order of tens to hundreds of nanometers. This potential prevents colloids from aggregating. On the other hand, long-range surface effects have been frequently reported. Here we report additional long-range effects. We find that charged latex particles in buffer solutions are uniformly excluded from several-hundred-micron-thick shells surrounding ion-exchange beads. Exclusion is observed whether the beads are charged similarly or oppositely to the particles. Hence, electrostatic interactions between bead and microsphere do not cause particle exclusion. Rather, exclusion may be the consequence of water molecules re-orienting to produce a more ordered structure, which then excludes the particles. PMID:19185312

  20. Development of Solution Buffer Layers for RABiTS Based YBCO Coated Conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Qiu, Xiaofeng; List III, Frederick Alyious; Zhang, Yifei; Li, Xiaoping; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; Thieme, C. L. H.; Rupich, M. W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The main objective of this research is to find a suitable alternate solution based seed layer for the standard RABiTS three-layer architecture of physical vapor deposited CeO cap/YSZ barrier/Y O seed on Ni-5%W metal tape. In the present work, we have identified CeO buffer layer as a potential replacement for Y O seeds. Using a metal-organic deposition (MOD) process, we have grown smooth, crack-free, epitaxial thin films of CeO (pure and Zr, Cu and Gd-doped) directly on biaxially textured Ni-5W substrates in short lengths. Detailed XRD studies indicate that a single epitaxial CeO phase with slightly improved out-of-plane texture compared to the texture of the underlying Ni-W substrates can be achieved in pure, undoped CeO samples. We have also demonstrated the growth of YSZ barrier layers on pure CeO seeds using sputtering. Both sputtered CeO cap layers and MOD-YBCO films were grown epitaxially on these YSZ-buffered MOD-CeO /Ni-5W substrates. High critical currents per unit width, of 264 A/cm (critical current density, of 3.3 MA/cm ) at 77 K and 0.01 T was achieved for 0.8 m thick MOD-YBCO films grown on MOD-CeO seeds. These results indicate that CeO films can be grown directly on Ni-5W substrates and still support high performance YBCO coated conductors. This work holds promise for a route for producing low-cost buffer architecture for RABiTS based YBCO coated conductors.

  1. Development of Solution Buffer Layers for RABiTS Based YBCO Coated Conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Qiu, Xiaofeng; Kim, Kyunghoon; Shi, D.; Zhang, Yifei; Li, Xiaoping; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; Thieme, C. L. H.; Rupich, M. W.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to find a suitable alternate solution based seed layer for the standard RABiTS three-layer architecture of physical vapor deposited CeO2 cap/YSZ barrier/Y2O3 seed on Ni-5%W metal tape. In the present work, we have identified CeO2 buffer layer as a potential replacement for Y2O3 seeds. Using a metal-organic deposition (MOD) process, we have grown smooth, crack-free, epitaxial thin films of CeO2 (both pure and Zr, Cu and Gd-doped) directly on biaxially textured Ni-5W substrates in short lengths. Detailed XRD studies indicate that a single epitaxial CeO2 phase with slightly improved out-of-plane texture compared to the texture of underlying Ni-W substrates can be achieved in pure, undoped CeO2 samples. We have also demonstrated the growth of YSZ barrier layers on pure CeO2 seeds using sputtering. Both sputtered CeO2 cap layers and MOD-YBCO films were grown epitaxially on these YSZ-buffered MOD-CeO2/Ni-5W substrates. High critical currents per unit width, Ic of 264 A/cm (critical current density, Jc of 3.3 MA/cm2) at 77 K and 0.01 T was achieved for 0.8 m thick MOD-YBCO films grown on MOD-CeO2 seeds. These results indicate that CeO2 films can be grown directly on Ni-5W substrates and still support high performance YBCO coated conductors. This work holds promise for a route for producing low-cost buffer architecture for RABiTS based YBCO coated conductors.

  2. Critical zinc[sup +2] activities for sour orange determined with chelator-buffered nutrient solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Swietlik, D.; Zhang, L. )

    1994-07-01

    Chelator-buffered nutrient solutions were used to study the effect of different levels of Zn activity in the rhizosphere on growth and nutritive responses of various tissues of sour orange seedlings. The seedlings were grown for 3 months in a growth chamber in a hydroponic culture containing from 5 to 69 [mu]m and 5 to 101 [mu]m total Zn in Expts. 1 and 2, respectively. Zn[sup +2] activities were calculated with a computerized chemical equilibrium model, and buffered by inclusion of a chelator, diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA), at 74 and 44 [mu]m in excess of the sum of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, and Co in Expts. 1 and 2, respectively. The use of DTPA-buffered solutions proved successful in imposing varying degrees of Zn deficiency. The deficiency was confirmed by leaf symptomatology, leaf chemical analyses, i.e., <16 mg[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1] Zn, and responses to foliar sprays and application of Zn to the roots. Growth parameters varied in their sensitivity to Zn deficiency, i.e., root dry weight < leaf number and white root growth < stem dry weight < leaf dry weight < shoot elongation and leaf area. The critical activities, expressed as pZn = [minus]log(Zn[sup +2]), were [approximately]10.2 [+-] 0.2 for root dry weight, 10.1 [+-] 0.2 for leaf number and white root growth, 10.0 [+-] 0.2 for stem dry weight, 9.9 [+-] 0.2 for leaf dry weight, and 9.8 [+-] 0.2 for shoot growth and leaf area. Increases in growth were observed in response to Zn applications even in the absence of visible Zn-deficiency symptoms. Seedlings containing > 23 mg[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1] Zn in leaves did not respond to further additions of Zn to the nutrient solution. Zinc foliar sprays were less effective than Zn applications to the roots in alleviating severe Zn deficiency because foliar-absorbed Zn was not translocated from the top of the roots and thus could not correct Zn deficiency in the roots.

  3. Effect of phosphate buffer concentration on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores suspended in parenteral solutions.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, C A; Smith, G M; Pflug, I J

    1978-09-01

    The effect of various quantities of Butterfield phosphate buffer added to four parenteral solutions on the survival of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores heated at 121 degrees C was determined. The effect of the addition of phosphate buffer on spore survival varied with the parenteral solution. Spore survival was increased or decreased, depending upon the composition of the parenteral solution and the buffer concentration. The results obtained in these experiments attest to the fact that environmental factors, including the type of ions present and ionic concentration, affect the heat destruction rate of B. stearothermophilus spores. Therefore, the sterilization requirements of a product such as a parenteral solution may be affected by small changes in formulation. PMID:727778

  4. Effect of phosphate buffer concentration on the heat resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores suspended in parenteral solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, C A; Smith, G M; Pflug, I J

    1978-01-01

    The effect of various quantities of Butterfield phosphate buffer added to four parenteral solutions on the survival of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores heated at 121 degrees C was determined. The effect of the addition of phosphate buffer on spore survival varied with the parenteral solution. Spore survival was increased or decreased, depending upon the composition of the parenteral solution and the buffer concentration. The results obtained in these experiments attest to the fact that environmental factors, including the type of ions present and ionic concentration, affect the heat destruction rate of B. stearothermophilus spores. Therefore, the sterilization requirements of a product such as a parenteral solution may be affected by small changes in formulation. PMID:727778

  5. The passivity of Type 316L stainless steel in borate buffer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicic, Igor; Macdonald, Digby D.

    2008-09-01

    The passivity of Type 316 SS in borate buffer solution (pH 8.35), in the steady-state, has been explored using a variety of electrochemical techniques, including potentiostatic polarization, Mott Schottky analysis, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The study shows that the passive film is an n-type semiconductor with a donor density that is essentially independent of voltage across the passive state. The passive current density is also found to be voltage-independent, but the thickness of the barrier layer depends linearly on the applied voltage. These observations are consistent with the predictions of the Point Defect Model, noting that the point defects within the barrier layer of the passive film are metal interstitials or oxygen vacancies, or both. No evidence for p-type behavior was obtained, indicating that cation vacancies do not have a significant population density in the film compared with the two donors (cation interstitials and oxygen vacancies).

  6. Covalent binding of biological samples to solid supports for scanning probe microscopy in buffer solution.

    PubMed Central

    Karrasch, S; Dolder, M; Schabert, F; Ramsden, J; Engel, A

    1993-01-01

    Scanning force microscopy allows imaging of biological molecules in their native state in buffer solution. To this end samples have to be fixed to a flat solid support so that they cannot be displaced by the scanning tip. Here we describe a method to achieve the covalent binding of biological samples to glass surfaces. Coverslips were chemically modified with the photoactivatable cross-linker N-5-azido-2-nitrobenzoyloxysuccinimide. Samples are squeezed between derivatized coverslips and then cross-linked to the glass surface by irradiation with ultraviolet light. Such samples can be imaged repeatedly by the scanning force microscope without loss of image quality, whereas identical but not immobilized samples are pushed away by the stylus. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:8312482

  7. Dephosphorization of Steelmaking Slag by Leaching with Acidic Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yong; Diao, Jiang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Xiaosa; Zhang, Tao; Xie, Bing

    2015-12-01

    In the present paper, dephosphorization of steelmaking slag by leaching with acidic aqueous solution composed of citric acid, sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid and ion-exchanged water was investigated. The buffer solution of C6H8O7-NaOH-HCl system prevented changes in the pH values. Kinetic parameters including leaching temperature, slag particle size and pH values of the solution were optimized. The results showed that temperature has no obvious effect on the dissolution ratio of phosphorus. However, it has a significant effect on the dissolution ratio of iron. The dephosphorization rate increases with the decrease of slag particle size and the pH value of the solution. Over 90% of the phosphorus can be dissolved in the solution while the corresponding leaching ratio of iron was only 30% below the optimal condition. Leaching kinetics of dephosphorization follow the unreacted shrinking core model with a rate controlled step by the solid diffusion layer, the corresponding apparent activation energy being 1.233 kJ mol-1. A semiempirical kinetic equation was established. After leaching, most of the nC2S-C3P solid solution in the steelmaking slag was selectively dissolved in the aqueous solution and the iron content in the solid residue was correspondingly enriched.

  8. Nitric acid recovery from waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A. S.

    1959-04-14

    The recovery of nitric acid from aqueous nitrate solutions containing fission products as impurities is described. It is desirable to subject such solutions to concentration by evaporation since nitric acid is regenerated thereby. A difficulty, however, is that the highly radioactive fission product ruthenium is volatilized together with the nitric acid. It has been found that by adding nitrous acid, ruthenium volatilization is suppressed and reduced to a negligible degree so that the distillate obtained is practically free of ruthenium.

  9. Labile synthetic cadmium complexes are not bioavailable to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata in resin buffered solutions.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, L; Merckx, R; Smolders, E

    2012-11-15

    The Free Ion Activity Model (FIAM) predicts that cadmium (Cd) uptake by organisms is identical for solutions with the same free Cd(2+) concentration and inorganic composition. Clear exceptions to the FIAM have been shown for Cd uptake by plant roots, periphyton and human cells where labile Cd complexes increase bioavailability and which has been attributed to their role in enhancing Cd diffusion towards the uptake cells. Here, we assessed the role of labile Cd complexes on Cd uptake by algae, for which diffusion limitations should be less pronounced due to their smaller size. Long-term (3 days) Cd uptake by the green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata was measured in resin buffered solutions with or without synthetic ligands and at three Cd(2+) ion activities (pCd 8.2-5.7). The free Cd(2+) activity was maintained during the test using a metal-selective resin located in the algal bottles. Total dissolved Cd increased up to 35-fold by adding the synthetic ligands at constant Cd(2+) activity. In contrast, Cd uptake by algae increased maximally 2.8 fold with increasing concentration of the synthetic ligands and the availability of the complexes were maximally 5.2% relative to Cd(2+) for NTA and CDTA complexes. It is concluded that labile Cd complexes do not greatly enhance Cd bioavailability to the unicellular algae and calculations suggest that Cd transport from solution to these small cells is not rate limiting. PMID:22903064

  10. ELECTROLYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Alter, H.W.; Barney, D.L.

    1958-09-30

    A process is presented for the treatment of radioactivc waste nitric acid solutions. The nitric acid solution is neutralized with an alkali metal hydroxide in an amount sufficient to precipitate insoluble hydroxides, and after separation of the precipitate the solution is electrolyzed to convert the alkali nitrate formed, to alkali hydroxide, gaseous ammonla and oxygen. The solution is then reusable after reducing the volume by evaporating the water and dissolved ammonia.

  11. Acid-base buffering of soils in transitional and transitional-accumulative positions of undisturbed southern-taiga landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusakova, E. S.; Ishkova, I. V.; Tolpeshta, I. I.; Sokolova, T. A.

    2012-05-01

    The method of continuous potentiometric titration (CPT) of soil water suspensions was used to evaluate the acid-base buffering of samples from the major genetic horizons of podzolic soils on a slope and soddy gley soils on the adjacent floodplain of a rivulet. In the soils of the slope, the buffering to acid upon titration from the pH of the initial titration point (ITP) to pH 3 in all the horizons was 1.5-2.0 times lower than that in the podzolic soils of the leveled interfluve, which could be due to the active leaching of exchangeable bases and oxalate-soluble aluminum and iron compounds with the later soil flows. In the soddy gley soils, the buffering to acid in the mineral horizons was 2-10 times higher than that in the podzolic soils. A direct dependence of the soil buffering to acid on the total content of exchangeable bases and on the content of oxalate-soluble aluminum compounds was found. A direct dependence of the buffering to basic upon titration from the ITP to pH 10 on the contents of the oxalate-soluble aluminum and organic matter was observed in the mineral horizons of all the studied soils. The soil treatment with Tamm's reagent resulted in the decrease of the buffering to acid in the soddy gley soils of the floodplain, as well as in the decrease of the buffering to basic in the soils on the slopes and in the soddy gley soils. It was also found that the redistribution of the mobile aluminum compounds between the eluvial, transitional, and transitional-accumulative positions in the undisturbed southern taiga landscapes leads to significant spatial differentiation of the acid-base buffering of the mineral soil horizons with a considerable increase in the buffer capacity of the soils within the transitional-accumulative terrain positions.

  12. Effects of acidic solutions on sexual reproduction of Pteridium aquilinum

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.; Conway, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of acidic solutions on spermatozoid motility and fertilization of gametophytes of Pteridium aquilinum. Buffered solutions (approx 0.0025 m) were used to simulate exposures to acidic precipitation for up to a 3.5 hr exposure. Experimental results suggest that the spermatozoid population can be subdivided into several groups with respect to pH sensitivity: About 25% spermatozoids are immobile one min after exposure to pH 6.1 buffer while about an equal percentage remain motile after 30 min exposure to buffer of pH 5.1. Between these two response extremes are two other subpopulations. One is quite sensitive to pH but shows some recovery if pH is between 5.6 and 6.1, while the second subpopulation does not seem to exhibit any motility recovery at all but is more resistant to acidity than the first subpopulation. To complement experiments that evaluate spermatozoid responses, experiments were performed to view the process of fertilization under controlled environmental conditions as well as under the canopy of a forest. Fertilization of gametophytes in uncovered petri dishes under a forest canopy was similar to results in aseptic culture after gametophytes were exposed to various pH levels and 86.6 micrometers sulfate. Fertilization at pH 4.5 and 3.6 was about one-half that occurring at pH 6.1. Fertilization in gametophytes exposed to pH 3.0 was about 10-20% of that occurring at pH 6.1. Addition of 86.6 micrometers sulfate decreased fertilization under all culture conditions. These experimental results suggest that fertilization in p. Aquilinum may be used as a bioindicator of contaminants in rainwater. The results demonstrate that spermatozoid motility (and the process of fertilization) is more acid sensitive than gametophytic and sporophytic tissues.

  13. Contributions of separate reactions to the acid-base buffering of soils in brook floodplains (Central Forest State Reserve)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, T. A.; Tolpeshta, I. I.; Rusakova, E. S.

    2016-04-01

    The acid-base buffering of gleyic gray-humus soils developed in brook floodplains and undisturbed southern-taiga landscapes has been characterized by the continuous potentiometric titration of soil water suspensions. During the interaction with an acid, the major amount of protons (>80%) is consumed for the displacement of exchangeable bases and the dissolution of Ca oxalates. In the O and AY horizons, Mn compounds make the major contribution (2-15%) to the acid buffering. The buffer reactions with the participation of Al compounds make up from 0.5 to 1-2% of the total buffering capacity, and the protonation of the surface OH groups of kaolinite consumes 2-3% of the total buffering capacity. The deprotonation of OH groups on the surface of Fe hydroxides (9-43%), the deprotonation of OH groups on the surface of illite crystals (3-19%), and the dissolution of unidentified aluminosilicates (9-14%) are the most significant buffer reactions whose contributions have been quantified during the interaction with a base. The contribution of the deprotonation of OH groups on the surface of kaolinite particles is lower (1-5%) because of the small specific surface area of this mineral, and that of the dissolution of Fe compounds is insignificant. In the AY horizon, the acid and base buffering of soil in the rhizosphere is higher than beyond the rhizosphere because of the higher contents of organic matter and nonsilicate Fe and Al compounds.

  14. Plasma levels of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid after oral ingestion of plain and buffered acetylsalicylic acid in relation to bleeding time and thrombocyte function.

    PubMed

    Proost, J H; Van Imhoff, G W; Wesseling, H

    1983-02-25

    Buffered acetylsalicylic acid (Alka Seltzer, B-ASA) and plain aspirin (P-ASA) tablets were compared as to their effects on bleeding time and platelet function in eight healthy male volunteers. Two doses (500 and 1000 mg) of each preparation were investigated in a cross-over design, each volunteer being his own control in each dose group (n=4). Both preparations disturbed platelet aggregation to the same extent. Bleeding time increased after both preparations, though significantly more after the buffered preparation than after plain acetylsalicylic acid, irrespective of the dosage. The 1000 mg dose prolonged bleeding time significantly more than the 500 mg dose, irrespective of the preparation. Kinetic analysis showed that B-ASA gave higher peak plasma levels of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and accordingly salicylic acid peak levels were also higher after the buffered preparation. It is concluded that B-ASA in equi-analgesic doses prolongs bleeding time more than the plain preparation. Since it is less agressive on the gastro-intestinal mucosa, its use may be advantageous in situations where acetylsalicylic acid induced loss of platelet aggregation is desired. However, the risk of prolonged bleeding--e.g. after tooth extractions--is probably higher after the buffered preparation. PMID:6844122

  15. An exploratory study into students' conceptual understanding of acid/base principles associated with chemical buffer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGowan, Catherine Elizabeth

    The overall objective of this research project was to provide an insight into students' conceptual understanding of acid/base principles as it relates to the comprehension and correct application of scientific concepts during a problem-solving activity. The difficulties experienced learning science and in developing appropriate problem-solving strategies most likely are predetermined by students' existing conceptual and procedural knowledge constructs; with the assimilation of newly acquired knowledge hindering or aiding the learning process. Learning chemistry requires a restructuring of content knowledge which will allow the individual to assemble and to integrate his/her own perception of science with instructional knowledge. The epistemology of constructivism, the theoretical grounding for this research project, recognizes the student's role as an active participant in the learning process. The study's design was exploratory in nature and descriptive in design. The problem-solving activity, the preparation of a chemical buffer solution at pH of 9, was selected and modified to reflect and meet the study's objective. Qualitative research methods (i.e., think aloud protocols, retrospective interviews, survey questionnaires such as the Scale of Intellectual Development (SID), and archival data sources) were used in the collection and assessment of data. Given its constructivist grounding, simplicity, and interpretative view of knowledge acquisition and learning of collegiate aged individuals, the Perry Intellectual and Ethical Development Model (1970) was chosen as the applied model for evaluation student cognition. The study's participants were twelve traditional college age students from a small, private liberal arts college. All participants volunteered for the project and had completed or were completing a general college chemistry course at the time of the project. Upon analysis of the data the following observations and results were noted: (1) students

  16. THE EFFECT OF THE PH OF PH BUFFERED NUTRIENT SOLUTIONS ON NICKEL HYPERACCUMULATION BY ALYSSUM CORSICUM AND BERKHEYA CODDII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is hypothesized that plant hyperaccumulation of Ni evolved as a defense mechanism against diseases and insects. Two hyperaccumulators, Alyssum corsicum and Berkheya coddii, were compared to cabbage (Brassica oleracea) grown in MES-HEPES buffered nutrient solutions and maintained at four pH levels...

  17. Influence of amino acids, buffers, and ph on the γ-irradiation-induced degradation of alginates.

    PubMed

    Ulset, Ann-Sissel T; Mori, Hideki; Dalheim, Marianne Ø; Hara, Masayuki; Christensen, Bjørn E

    2014-12-01

    Alginate-based biomaterials and medical devices are commonly subjected to γ-irradiation as a means of sterilization, either in the dry state or the gel (hydrated) state. In this process the alginate chains degrade randomly in a dose-dependent manner, altering alginates' material properties. The addition of free radical scavenging amino acids such as histidine and phenylalanine protects the alginate significantly against degradation, as shown by monitoring changes in the molecular weight distributions using SEC-MALLS and determining the pseudo first order rate constants of degradation. Tris buffer (0.5 M), but not acetate, citrate, or phosphate buffers had a similar effect on the degradation rate. Changes in pH itself had only marginal effects on the rate of alginate degradation and on the protective effect of amino acids. Contrary to previous reports, the chemical composition (M/G profile) of the alginates, including homopolymeric mannuronan, was unaltered following irradiation up to 10 kGy. PMID:25412478

  18. Substituent Effects on the Photodeprotection Reactions of Selected Ketoprofen Derivatives in Phosphate Buffered Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingyue; Li, Ming-De; Huang, Jinqing; Li, Tianlu; Liu, Han; Li, Xuechen; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-01-01

    Photodeprotection is an important reaction that has been attracting broad interest for use in a variety of applications. Recent advances in ultrafast and vibrational time-resolved spectroscopies can facilitate obtaining data to help unravel the reaction mechanisms involving in the photochemical reactions of interest. The kinetics and reaction mechanisms for the photodeprotection reactions of ketoprofen derivatives containing three different substituents (ibuprofen, Br and I) were investigated by femtosecond transient absorption (fs-TA) and nanosecond time-resolved resonance Raman (ns-TR3) spectroscopy methods in phosphate buffered solutions (PBS). Fs-TA allows us to detect the decay kinetics of the triplet species as the key precursor for formation of a carbanion species for three different substituents attached to ketoprofen. To characterize the structural and electronic properties of the corresponding carbanion and triplet intermediates, TR3 spectroscopic experiments were conducted. The transient spectroscopy work reveals that the different substituents affect the photodecarboxylation reaction to produce carbon dioxide which in turn influences the generation of the carbanion species which determines the rate of the photorelease of the functional groups attached on the ketoprofen parent molecule. The fingerprint TR3 spectroscopy results suggest that ketoprofen derivatives may be deactivated to produce a triplet carbanion when increasing the atom mass of the halogen atoms. PMID:26899243

  19. Monolayer formation of luminescent germanium nanoparticles on silica surface in aqueous buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Shirahata, Naoto

    2014-03-01

    The present paper reports monolayer formation of germanium nanoparticles (Ge NPs) on silica substrate. The NPs were prepared by hydride reduction of GeCl4, which is encapsulated with an inverse micelle of dimethyldioctylammonium bromide, with lithium aluminum hydride, and subsequent hydrogermylation of allylamine in the presence of platinum catalyst. The resultant NPs showed the blue photoluminescence property. Due to the terminal amine, the NPs were soluble highly in aqueous buffer solution. To fabricate a monolayer of Ge NPs, the chemical reactivity of the NPs was studied using a multi-functional microarray in which different kinds of siloxane monolayers were periodically aligned on a silica substrate. We observed using fluorescence microscope whether the terminal amines of the NPs recognize the specific monolayers in the microarray. In terms of fluorescence observation, the entire surface of the monolayer-covered microsize-domains emits uniformly the blue light. This suggests a high degree of coverage of the luminescent NPs covering over the monolayer regions in the microarray, and implies the non-occurrence of quenching through energy transfer between adjacent NPs. PMID:24745276

  20. Graphene ultrathin film electrode for detection of lead ions in acetate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaomeng; Liu, Erjia

    2013-01-15

    Few-layer graphene ultrathin films were synthesized via solid-state carbon diffusion from amorphous carbon (a-C) thin layers sputtering coated on Si substrates with or without a SiO(2) layer, which an a-C layer was covered by a nickel (Ni) layer as a catalyst. When the Ni/a-C bilayer coated samples were heated at 1000°C the carbon (C) atoms from the a-C layers diffused into the top Ni layers to form a C rich surface. Upon rapid cooling, the C atoms accumulated on the surface of the Ni layers and formed graphene ultrathin films through nucleation and growth processes. The formation of graphene ultrathin films was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), electron diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and 4-point probe. The synthesized graphene ultrathin films were used as working electrodes for detection of trace heavy metal ions (Pb(2+), as low as 7 nM) in acetate buffer solutions (pH 5.3) using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV). The effects of substrate surface condition and Ni layer thickness on the structure and electrochemical properties of graphene ultrathin film electrodes were investigated in detail. Compared to conventional diamond-like carbon (DLC) electrodes, the graphene electrodes developed in this study had better repeatability, higher sensitivity and higher resistance to passivation caused by surface active species. PMID:23200357

  1. Substituent Effects on the Photodeprotection Reactions of Selected Ketoprofen Derivatives in Phosphate Buffered Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingyue; Li, Ming-De; Huang, Jinqing; Li, Tianlu; Liu, Han; Li, Xuechen; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-02-01

    Photodeprotection is an important reaction that has been attracting broad interest for use in a variety of applications. Recent advances in ultrafast and vibrational time-resolved spectroscopies can facilitate obtaining data to help unravel the reaction mechanisms involving in the photochemical reactions of interest. The kinetics and reaction mechanisms for the photodeprotection reactions of ketoprofen derivatives containing three different substituents (ibuprofen, Br and I) were investigated by femtosecond transient absorption (fs-TA) and nanosecond time-resolved resonance Raman (ns-TR3) spectroscopy methods in phosphate buffered solutions (PBS). Fs-TA allows us to detect the decay kinetics of the triplet species as the key precursor for formation of a carbanion species for three different substituents attached to ketoprofen. To characterize the structural and electronic properties of the corresponding carbanion and triplet intermediates, TR3 spectroscopic experiments were conducted. The transient spectroscopy work reveals that the different substituents affect the photodecarboxylation reaction to produce carbon dioxide which in turn influences the generation of the carbanion species which determines the rate of the photorelease of the functional groups attached on the ketoprofen parent molecule. The fingerprint TR3 spectroscopy results suggest that ketoprofen derivatives may be deactivated to produce a triplet carbanion when increasing the atom mass of the halogen atoms.

  2. Substituent Effects on the Photodeprotection Reactions of Selected Ketoprofen Derivatives in Phosphate Buffered Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingyue; Li, Ming-De; Huang, Jinqing; Li, Tianlu; Liu, Han; Li, Xuechen; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-01-01

    Photodeprotection is an important reaction that has been attracting broad interest for use in a variety of applications. Recent advances in ultrafast and vibrational time-resolved spectroscopies can facilitate obtaining data to help unravel the reaction mechanisms involving in the photochemical reactions of interest. The kinetics and reaction mechanisms for the photodeprotection reactions of ketoprofen derivatives containing three different substituents (ibuprofen, Br and I) were investigated by femtosecond transient absorption (fs-TA) and nanosecond time-resolved resonance Raman (ns-TR(3)) spectroscopy methods in phosphate buffered solutions (PBS). Fs-TA allows us to detect the decay kinetics of the triplet species as the key precursor for formation of a carbanion species for three different substituents attached to ketoprofen. To characterize the structural and electronic properties of the corresponding carbanion and triplet intermediates, TR(3) spectroscopic experiments were conducted. The transient spectroscopy work reveals that the different substituents affect the photodecarboxylation reaction to produce carbon dioxide which in turn influences the generation of the carbanion species which determines the rate of the photorelease of the functional groups attached on the ketoprofen parent molecule. The fingerprint TR(3) spectroscopy results suggest that ketoprofen derivatives may be deactivated to produce a triplet carbanion when increasing the atom mass of the halogen atoms. PMID:26899243

  3. Buffer capacity of biologics--from buffer salts to buffering by antibodies.

    PubMed

    Karow, Anne R; Bahrenburg, Sven; Garidel, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Controlling pH is essential for a variety of biopharmaceutical process steps. The chemical stability of biologics such as monoclonal antibodies is pH-dependent and slightly acidic conditions are favorable for stability in a number of cases. Since control of pH is widely provided by added buffer salts, the current study summarizes the buffer characteristics of acetate, citrate, histidine, succinate, and phosphate buffers. Experimentally derived values largely coincide with values calculated from a model that had been proposed in 1922 by van Slyke. As high concentrated protein formulations become more and more prevalent for biologics, the self-buffering potential of proteins becomes of relevance. The current study provides information on buffer characteristics for pH ranges down to 4.0 and up to 8.0 and shows that a monoclonal antibody at 50 mg/mL exhibits similar buffer capacity as 6 mM citrate or 14 mM histidine (pH 5.0-6.0). Buffer capacity of antibody solutions scales linearly with protein concentration up to more than 200 mg/mL. At a protein concentration of 220 mg/mL, the buffer capacity resembles the buffer capacity of 30 mM citrate or 50 mM histidine (pH 5.0-6.0). The buffer capacity of monoclonal antibodies is practically identical at the process relevant temperatures 5, 25, and 40°C. Changes in ionic strength of ΔI=0.15, in contrast, can alter the buffer capacity up to 35%. In conclusion, due to efficient self-buffering by antibodies in the pH range of favored chemical stability, conventional buffer excipients could be dispensable for pH stabilization of high concentrated protein solutions. PMID:23296746

  4. The formation of stable pH gradients with weak monovalent buffers for isoelectric focusing in free solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Richard A.; Thormann, Wolfgang; Graham, Aly; Bier, Milan

    1985-01-01

    Two methods which utilize simple buffers for the generation of stable pH gradients (useful for preparative isoelectric focusing) are compared and contrasted. The first employs preformed gradients comprised of two simple buffers in density-stabilized free solution. The second method utilizes neutral membranes to isolate electrolyte reservoirs of constant composition from the separation column. It is shown by computer simulation that steady-state gradients can be formed at any pH range with any number of components in such a system.

  5. Understanding, Deriving, and Computing Buffer Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbansky, Edward T.; Schock, Michael R.

    2000-12-01

    The concept of buffer capacity appears in varied disciplines, including bio-, geo-, analytical, and environmental chemistry, physiology, medicine, dentistry, and agriculture. Unfortunately, however, derivation and systematic calculation of buffer capacity is a topic that seems to be neglected in the undergraduate analytical chemistry curriculum. In this work, we give an account of the development of the buffer capacity concept and derive the buffer capacity contribution equations for buffer systems containing mono-, di-, and triprotic weak acids (and their conjugate bases) and aluminum(III), which undergoes hydrolysis. A brief review of pH is provided because pH is involved in applying buffer capacity to the real world. In addition, we discuss evaluation of the equations, numerical approximation of buffer capacity when an analytic solution is not derived, and the mathematical properties of the buffer capacity expressions.

  6. A nitrilo-tri-acetic-acid/acetic acid route for the deposition of epitaxial cerium oxide films as high temperature superconductor buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Thuy, T.T.; Lommens, P.; Narayanan, V.; Van de Velde, N.; De Buysser, K.; Herman, G.G.; Cloet, V.; Van Driessche, I.

    2010-09-15

    A water based cerium oxide precursor solution using nitrilo-tri-acetic-acid (NTA) and acetic acid as complexing agents is described in detail. This precursor solution is used for the deposition of epitaxial CeO{sub 2} layers on Ni-5at%W substrates by dip-coating. The influence of the complexation behavior on the formation of transparent, homogeneous solutions and gels has been studied. It is found that ethylenediamine plays an important role in the gelification. The growth conditions for cerium oxide films were Ar-5% gas processing atmosphere, a solution concentration level of 0.25 M, a dwell time of 60 min at 900 {sup o}C and 5-30 min at 1050 {sup o}C. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), pole figures and spectroscopic ellipsometry were used to characterize the CeO{sub 2} films with different thicknesses. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) was used to determine the carbon residue level in the surface of the cerium oxide film, which was found to be lower than 0.01%. Textured films with a thickness of 50 nm were obtained. - Graphical abstract: Study of the complexation and hydrolysis behavior of Ce{sup 4+} ions in the presence of nitrilo-tri-acetic acid and the subsequent development of an aqueous chemical solution deposition route suited for the processing of textured CeO{sub 2} buffer layers on Ni-W tapes.

  7. Artificially MoO3 graded ITO anodes for acidic buffer layer free organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye-Min; Kim, Seok-Soon; Kim, Han-Ki

    2016-02-01

    We report characteristics of MoO3 graded ITO anodes prepared by a RF/DC graded sputtering for acidic poly(3,4-ethylene dioxylene thiophene):poly(styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS)-free organic solar cells (OSCs). Graded sputtering of the MoO3 buffer layer on top of the ITO layer produced MoO3 graded ITO anodes with a sheet resistance of 12.67 Ω/square, a resistivity of 2.54 × 10-4 Ω cm, and an optical transmittance of 86.78%, all of which were comparable to a conventional ITO anode. In addition, the MoO3 graded ITO electrode showed a greater work function of 4.92 eV than that (4.6 eV) of an ITO anode, which is beneficial for hole extraction from an organic active layer. Due to the high work function of MoO3 graded ITO electrodes, the acidic PEDOT:PSS-free OSCs fabricated on the MoO3 graded ITO electrode exhibited a power conversion efficiency 3.60% greater than that of a PEDOT:PSS-free OSC on the conventional ITO anode. The successful operation of PEDOT:PSS-free OSCs indicates simpler fabrication steps for cost-effective OSCs and elimination of interfacial reactions caused by the acidic PEDOT:PSS layer for reliable OSCs.

  8. The stability of DLC film on nitrided CoCrMo alloy in phosphate buffer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. F.; Liu, B.; Wu, B. J.; Liu, J.; Sun, H.; Leng, Y. X.; Huang, N.

    2014-07-01

    CoCrMo alloy is often used as the material for metal artificial joint, but metal debris and metal ions are the main concern on tissue inflammation or tissue proliferation for metal prosthesis. In this paper, nitrogen ion implantation and diamond like carbon (DLC) film composite treatment was used to reduce the wear and ion release of biomedical CoCrMo substrate. The mechanical properties and stability of N-implanted/DLC composite layer in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) was evaluated to explore the full potential of N-implanted/DLC composite layer as an artificial joint surface modification material. The results showed that the DLC film on N implanted CoCrMo (N-implanted/DLC composite layer) had the higher surface hardness and wear resistance than the DLC film on virgin CoCrMo alloy, which was resulted from the strengthen effect of the N implanted layer on CoCrMo alloy. After 30 days immersion in PBS, the structure of DLC film on virgin CoCrMo or on N implanted CoCrMo had no visible change. But the adhesion and corrosion resistance of DLC on N implanted CoCrMo (N-implanted/DLC composite layer) was weakened due to the dissolution of the N implanted layer after 30 days immersion in PBS. The adhesion reduction of N-implanted/DLC composite layer was adverse for in vivo application in long term. So researcher should be cautious to use N implanted layer as an inter-layer for increasing CoCrMo alloy load carrying capacity in vivo environment.

  9. Responses of soil buffering capacity to acid treatment in three typical subtropical forests.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Wang, Ying-Ping; Yu, Mengxiao; Li, Kun; Shao, Yijing; Yan, Junhua

    2016-09-01

    Elevated anthropogenic acid deposition can significantly affect forest ecosystem functioning by changing soil pH, nutrient balance, and chemical leaching and so on. These effects generally differ among different forests, and the dominant mechanisms for those observed responses often vary, depending on climate, soil conditions and vegetation types. Using soil monoliths (0-40cm) from pine forest (pioneer), coniferous and broadleaved mixed forest (transitional) and broadleaved forest (mature) in southern China, we conducted a leaching experiment with acid treatments at different pH levels (control: pH≈4.5; pH=3.5; pH=2.5). We found that pH3.5 treatment significantly reduced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in leachate from the pioneer forest soil. pH2.5 treatment significantly increased concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Al(3+), Fe(3+) and DOC in leachate from the pioneer forest soil, and also concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-), Mg(2+), Al(3+), Fe(3+) and DOC in leachate from the transitional forest soil. All acid treatments had no significant effects on concentrations of these chemicals in leachate from the mature forest soil. The responses can be explained by the changes in soil pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and concentrations of Al and Fe. Our results showed that acid buffering capacity of the pioneer or transitional forest soil was lower than that of the mature forest soil. Therefore preserving mature forests in southern China is important for reducing the adverse impacts of high acid deposition on stream water quality at present and into the future. PMID:27185346

  10. Stabilizing effect of citrate buffer on the photolysis of riboflavin in aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Sheraz, Muhammad Ali; Ahmed, Sofia; Kazi, Sadia Hafeez; Mirza, Tania; Aminuddin, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    In the present investigation the photolysis of riboflavin (RF) in the presence of citrate species at pH 4.0–7.0 has been studied. A specific multicomponent spectrophotometric method has been used to assay RF in the presence of photoproducts during the reactions. The overall first-order rate constants (kobs) for the photolysis of RF range from 0.42 to 1.08×10–2 min−1 in the region. The values of kobs have been found to decrease with an increase in citrate concentration indicating an inhibitory effect of these species on the rate of reaction. The second-order rate constants for the interaction of RF with total citrate species causing inhibition range from 1.79 to 5.65×10–3 M−1 min−1 at pH 4.0–7.0. The log k–pH profiles for the reactions at 0.2–1.0 M citrate concentration show a gradual decrease in kobs and the value at 1.0 M is more than half compared to that of k0, i.e., in the absence of buffer, at pH 5.0. Divalent citrate ions cause a decrease in RF fluorescence due to the quenching of the excited singlet state resulting in a decrease in the rate of reaction and consequently leading to the stabilization of RF solutions. The greater quenching of fluorescence at pH 4.0 compared to that of 7.0 is in accordance with the greater concentration of divalent citrate ions (99.6%) at that pH. The trivalent citrate ions exert a greater inhibitory effect on the rate of RF photolysis compared to that of the divalent citrate ions probably as a result of excited triplet state quenching. The values of second-order rate constants for the interaction of divalent and trivalent citrate ions are 0.44×10–2 and 1.06×10–3 M–1 min–1, respectively, indicating that the trivalent ions exert a greater stabilizing effect, compared to the divalent ions, on RF solutions. PMID:25755977

  11. Highly sensitive and selective detection of Al(III) ions in aqueous buffered solution with fluorescent peptide-based sensor.

    PubMed

    In, Byunggyu; Hwang, Gi Won; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2016-09-15

    A fluorescent sensor based on a tripeptide (SerGluGlu) with a dansyl fluorophore detected selectively Al(III) among 16 metal ions in aqueous buffered solutions without any organic cosolvent. The peptide-based sensor showed a highly sensitive turn on response to aluminium ion with high binding affinity (1.84×10(4)M(-1)) in aqueous buffered solutions. The detection limit (230nM, 5.98ppb) of the peptide-based sensor was much lower than the maximum allowable level (7.41μM) of aluminium ions in drinking water demanded by EPA. The binding mode of the peptide sensor with aluminium ions was characterized using ESI mass spectrometry, NMR titration, and pH titration experiments. PMID:27503680

  12. Diffusion of sulfuric acid in concentrated solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Umino, S.; Newman, J. )

    1993-08-01

    Aqueous sulfuric acid is an economically important chemical reagent. It is one of the largest volume chemical commodities, finding uses in fertilizer production, petroleum refining, extraction of metals from their ores, production of inorganic pigments, pickling of iron and steel, synthesis of surface-active agents, and as a reactant in the lead-acid storage battery. The restricted diffusion method was used to measure the differential diffusion coefficient of sulfuric acid in water at 25 C for the concentration range from 0.3 to 7.5 molar. The concentration gradients of diffusing species were observed by Rayleigh interferometry. Experimental transport data are analyzed with concentrated solution theory of electrolytes in order to elucidate macroscopic transport characteristics of sulfuric acid in terms of specific binary interactions in solution. Results indicate that the transport properties of sulfuric acid are determined by the hydrogen ion-water molecule.

  13. Reference electrode for strong oxidizing acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Rigdon, Lester P.; Harrar, Jackson E.; Bullock, Sr., Jack C.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    1990-01-01

    A reference electrode for the measurement of the oxidation-reduction potentials of solutions is especially suitable for oxidizing solutions such as highly concentrated and fuming nitric acids, the solutions of nitrogen oxides, N.sub.2 O.sub.4 and N.sub.2 O.sub.5, in nitric acids. The reference electrode is fabricated of entirely inert materials, has a half cell of Pt/Ce(IV)/Ce(III)/70 wt. % HNO.sub.3, and includes a double-junction design with an intermediate solution of 70 wt. % HNO.sub.3. The liquid junctions are made from Corning No. 7930 glass for low resistance and negligible solution leakage.

  14. Solution-processed In2S3 buffer layer for chalcopyrite thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lan; Lin, Xianzhong; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Wolf, Christian; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch.; Klenk, Reiner

    2016-02-01

    We report a route to deposit In2S3 thin films from air-stable, low-cost molecular precursor inks for Cd-free buffer layers in chalcopyrite-based thin film solar cells. Different precursor compositions and processing conditions were studied to define a reproducible and robust process. By adjusting the ink properties, this method can be applied in different printing and coating techniques. Here we report on two techniques, namely spin-coating and inkjet printing. Active area efficiencies of 12.8% and 12.2% have been achieved for In2S3-buffered solar cells respectively, matching the performance of CdS-buffered cells prepared with the same batch of absorbers.

  15. Separation of proteins and peptides by capillary electrophoresis in acid buffers containing high concentrations of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Miksík, I; Deyl, Z

    1999-08-01

    Separations of proteins at acid pH in the presence of a high concentration of surfactant [sodium laurylsulfate (SDS), 50 mmol/l] was investigated. The purpose of using high concentrations of SDS as background electrolyte modifier was threefold: First, the surfactant exerts a washing effect upon the capillary wall thus preventing binding of analytes and possible clogging of the capillary. Second, it was revealed that even under very acid conditions (below pH 3) the surfactant is capable of forming associates with protein analytes which still bear considerable negative charge and can be separated on this basis. Third, the system can be applied not only for protein mixtures sufficiently soluble in neutral to alkaline media (leukocyte lysates, standard proteins), but it can be used also with proteins, that are under such conditions virtually insoluble and their solubilization is possible in acid buffers only (eggshell proteins or collagen CNBr fragments). The result was that adsorption to the capillary wall was minimized and the analytes were separated as negatively charged associates with high efficiency. With collagen fragments partition was possible on the affinity differences of the peptides to the surfactant micelles and inner wall of the capillary. Theoretical plate counts approaching 100,000 were easily achieved even with proteins which under the more conventional operation conditions exhibit considerable sticking to the capillary wall. The other feature of this system is that the associates move very rapidly to the anode. Owing to the low pH, endoosmotic flow is negligible, and therefore the system has to be operated at reversed polarity. PMID:10480258

  16. Aspirin absorption rates and platelet inhibition times with 325-mg buffered aspirin tablets (chewed or swallowed intact) and with buffered aspirin solution.

    PubMed

    Feldman, M; Cryer, B

    1999-08-15

    Large clinical trials such as the second International Study of Infarct Survival routinely gave patients with myocardial infarction a chewed aspirin, yet there are no data to show whether chewing of aspirin is better, or worse, than swallowing a whole tablet. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled study to determine whether chewing aspirin or administering it in solution accelerates its absorption and antiplatelet activity. On separate days, 12 fasting volunteers ingested 325 mg of buffered aspirin, either by chewing a tablet for 30 seconds before swallowing it with 4 ounces of water, swallowing a whole tablet with 4 ounces of water, or drinking 4 ounces of Alka Seltzer. Frequent blood samples were obtained for serum aspirin, salicylate, and thromboxane B2 (TxB2) concentrations. With all formulations of aspirin, serum TxB2 decreased 50% when the plasma aspirin concentration reached approximately 1,000 ng/ml. A 50% and 90% decrease in serum TxB2 occurred more quickly after chewing a tablet than after a tablet was swallowed whole. For example, the t 50% for serum TxB2 inhibition was 5.0 +/- 0.6 minutes with the chewed tablet versus 12.0 +/- 2.3 minutes when the tablet was swallowed (p = 0.01). A 50% decrease in serum TxB2 occurred 7.6 +/- 1.2 minutes after Alka Seltzer solution (p = 0.04 vs chewing a tablet; p = 0.13 vs swallowing a whole tablet). Chewing an aspirin tablet is the most effective way of accelerating absorption of aspirin into the blood and shortening the time required for an antiplatelet effect. PMID:10468077

  17. Electrical conductivity of acidic sulfate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, Hiroshi; Peters, Ernest; Awakura, Yasuhiro; Park, Sung Kook

    1987-03-01

    The electrical conductivities of the aqueous solution system of H2SO4-MSO4 (involving ZnSO4, MgSO4, Na2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4), reported by Tozawa et al., were examined in terms of a (H2O) and H+ ion concentration. The equations to compute the concentrations of various species in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions containing metal sulfates were derived for a typical example of the H2SO4-ZnSO4-MgSO4-(Na2SO4)-H2O system. It was found that the H+ ion concentrations in concentrated sulfuric acid solutions corresponding to practical zinc electrowinning solutions are very high and remain almost constant with or without the addition of metal sulfates. The addition of metal sulfates to aqueous sulfuric acid solution causes a decrease in electrical conductivity, and this phenomenon is attributed to a decrease in water activity, which reflects a decrease in the amount of free water. The relationship between conductivity and water activity at a constant H+ ion concentration is independent of the kind of sulfates added. On the other hand, any increase in H+ ion concentration results in an increase in electrical conductivity. A novel method for the prediction of electrical conductivity of acidic sulfate solution is proposed that uses the calculated data of water activity and the calculated H+ ion concentration. Also, the authors examined an extension of the Robinson-Bower equation to calculate water activity in quarternary solutions based on molarity instead of molality, and found that such calculated values are in satisfactory agreement with those determined experimentally by a transpiration method.

  18. Proposing buffer zones and simple technical solutions for safeguarding river water quality and public health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podimata, M. V.; Bekri, E. S.; Yannopoulos, P. C.

    2012-04-01

    Alfeios River Basin (ARB) constitutes one of the major hydrologic basins (≈3650km2) of Peloponnisos peninsula in Southern Greece. It is drained by Alfeios River and its tributaries, such as Lousios, Ladhon, Erymanthos, Kladheos, Selinous etc. The present manuscript takes a closer look at the importance of tributary basins and focuses on Erymanthos sub-basin that covers about 360 km2. Erymanthos River springs from Erymanthos Mountain that reaches altitudes of 2200 m and discharges 10 m3/sec, approximately, during the winter period, presenting a sound decrease from half to about an order of magnitude during summertime. Two factors stand out as reasons to select Erymanthos sub-basin as a case study. First, the sub-basin presents a significant variety of ecosystems and comprises a very important river system, since Erymanthos Tributary satisfies, among other uses, drinking water supply for a great majority of citizens in the region. Second, authors' experience of the study area in Research Program Pythagoras II, funded by the European Social Fund (ESF) and the Operational Program for Educational and Vocational Training II (EPEAEK II) of Greece, offers a basis for better understanding of the real problems in the area. Erymanthos watershed, in fact, faces a lot of pressures, in several levels, provoked by human activities and Erymanthos Tributary is vulnerable to pollution. Recognizing the importance of clean water for healthy people, a developing economy, and a sustainable environment, the challenge of the present paper is elaborating human-induced pressures in the study area, analyzing their effects, estimating pollution factors and proposing integrated solutions/tools and a number of methodologies/initiatives used to overcome the problem of contaminating water supply in a catchment that lacks of wastewater treatment and disposal systems. The preservation of a good ecological status in Erymanthos River is not only a necessity for achieving the goals of EU Water

  19. Interference by Mes [2-(4-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid] and related buffers with phenolic oxidation by peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Baker, C Jacyn; Mock, Norton M; Roberts, Daniel P; Deahl, Kenneth L; Hapeman, Cathleen J; Schmidt, Walter F; Kochansky, Jan

    2007-11-01

    While characterizing the kinetic parameters of apoplastic phenolic oxidation by peroxidase, we found anomalies caused by the Mes [2-(4-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid] buffer being used. In the presence of Mes, certain phenolics appeared not to be oxidized by peroxidase, yet the oxidant, H(2)O(2), was utilized. This anomaly seems to be due to the recycling of the phenolic substrate. The reaction is relatively inefficient, but at buffer concentrations of 10 mM or greater the recycling effect is nearly 100% with substrate concentrations less than 100 microM. The recycling effect is dependent on substrate structure, occurring with 4'-hydroxyacetophenone but not with 3',5'-dimethoxy-4'-hydroxyacetophenone (acetosyringone). Characterization of the reaction parameters suggests that the phenoxyl radical from the peroxidase reaction interacts with Mes, causing the reduction and regeneration of the phenol. Similar responses occurred with related buffers such as Hepes [4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid] and Pipes [piperazine-1,4-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid)]. Results from this work and other reports in the literature indicate that great care is required in interpreting any results involving these buffers under oxidizing conditions. PMID:17893045

  20. Buffering effects of calcium salts in kimchi: lowering acidity, elevating lactic acid bacterial population and dextransucrase activity.

    PubMed

    Chae, Seo Eun; Moon, Jin Seok; Jung, Jee Yun; Kim, Ji-Sun; Eom, Hyun-Ju; Kim, So-Young; Yoon, Hyang Sik; Han, Nam Soo

    2009-12-01

    This study investigates the buffering effects of calcium salts in kimchi on total acidity, microbial population, and dextransucrase activity. Calcium chloride or calcium carbonate was added in dongchimi-kimchi, a watery-radish kimchi, and their effects on various biochemical attributes were analyzed. The addition of 0.1% calcium chloride produced a milder decrease in the pH after 24 days of incubation, which allowed the lactic acid bacteria to survive longer than in the control. In particular, the heterofermentative Leuconostoc genus population was 10-fold higher than that in the control. When sucrose and maltose were also added along with the calcium salts, the dextransucrase activity in the kimchi was elevated and a higher concentration of isomaltooligosaccharides was synthesized when compared with the control. Calcium chloride was determined as a better activator compound of dextransucrase than calcium carbonate, probably because of its higher solubility. Therefore, the results of this study confirm the ability of the proposed approach to modulate the kimchi fermentation process and possibly enhance the quality of kimchi based on the addition of dietary calcium salts. PMID:20075632

  1. Size Control of (99m)Tc-tin Colloid Using PVP and Buffer Solution for Sentinel Lymph Node Detection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Colloidal particle size is an important characteristic that allows mapping sentinel nodes in lymphoscintigraphy. This investigation aimed to introduce different ways of making a (99m)Tc-tin colloid with a size of tens of nanometers. All agents, tin fluoride, sodium fluoride, poloxamer-188, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), were mixed and labeled with (99m)Tc. Either phosphate or sodium bicarbonate buffers were used to adjust the pH levels. When the buffers were added, the size of the colloids increased. However, as the PVP continued to increase, the size of the colloids was controlled to within tens of nanometers. In all samples, phosphate buffer added PVP (30 mg) stabilized tin colloid ((99m)Tc-PPTC-30) and sodium bicarbonate solution added PVP (50 mg) stabilized tin colloid ((99m)Tc-BPTC-50) were chosen for in vitro and in vivo studies. (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 (<20 nm) was primarily located in bone marrow and was then secreted through the kidneys, and (99m)Tc-PPTC-30 (>100 nm) mainly accumulated in the liver. When a rabbit was given a toe injection, the node uptake of (99m)Tc-PPTC-30 decreased over time, while (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 increased. Therefore, (99m)Tc-BPTC-50 could be a good candidate radiopharmaceutical for sentinel node detection. The significance of this study is that nano-sized tin colloid can be made very easily and quickly by PVP. PMID:26028937

  2. Robust Benzo[g, h, i ]perylenetriimide Dye-Sensitized Electrodes in Air-Saturated Aqueous Buffer Solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Cheng; Williams, René M; Reek, Joost N H; Brouwer, Albert M

    2016-04-11

    Highly electron deficient benzo[ghi]perylenetriimide (BPTI) chromophores were persistently anchored to a metal oxide electrode surface and reversible formation of their radical anions was shown in air-saturated aqueous buffer solution. Our results show a very low reaction-rate constant of BPTI(.-) with O2 (k=1.92±0.05×10(-2)  s(-1) ). BPTI is a robust chromophore that can be used as the electron acceptor in molecule-based artificial photosynthetic devices for direct water splitting in aqueous phase. PMID:26928886

  3. Speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Hlushak, S; Simonin, J P; De Sio, S; Bernard, O; Ruas, A; Pochon, P; Jan, S; Moisy, P

    2013-02-28

    In this study, speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid at 25 °C was assessed in two independent ways. First, Raman experiments were carried out and interpreted in terms of free nitrate ions, ion pairs and neutral HNO(3) molecules. In parallel, a model was developed to account for the formation of these two kinds of pairs. It was based on an extension of the binding mean spherical approximation (BiMSA), or associative MSA (AMSA), in which the size and the charge of the ions in the chemical pair may differ from those of the free ions. A simultaneous fit of the osmotic coefficient and of the proportion of free ions (obtained from Raman spectroscopy experiments) led to an estimation of the speciation in nitric acid solutions. The result obtained using this procedure was compared with the estimation obtained from the Raman experiments. PMID:23258765

  4. In Vivo Predictive Dissolution: Comparing the Effect of Bicarbonate and Phosphate Buffer on the Dissolution of Weak Acids and Weak Bases.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Brian J; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Amidon, Gordon L; Amidon, Gregory E

    2015-09-01

    Bicarbonate is the main buffer in the small intestine and it is well known that buffer properties such as pKa can affect the dissolution rate of ionizable drugs. However, bicarbonate buffer is complicated to work with experimentally. Finding a suitable substitute for bicarbonate buffer may provide a way to perform more physiologically relevant dissolution tests. The dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs was conducted in bicarbonate and phosphate buffer using rotating disk dissolution methodology. Experimental results were compared with the predicted results using the film model approach of (Mooney K, Mintun M, Himmelstein K, Stella V. 1981. J Pharm Sci 70(1):22-32) based on equilibrium assumptions as well as a model accounting for the slow hydration reaction, CO2 + H2 O → H2 CO3 . Assuming carbonic acid is irreversible in the dehydration direction: CO2 + H2 O ← H2 CO3 , the transport analysis can accurately predict rotating disk dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in bicarbonate buffer. The predictions show that matching the dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in phosphate and bicarbonate buffer is possible. The phosphate buffer concentration necessary to match physiologically relevant bicarbonate buffer [e.g., 10.5 mM (HCO3 (-) ), pH = 6.5] is typically in the range of 1-25 mM and is very dependent upon drug solubility and pKa . PMID:25980464

  5. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  6. Biomimetic apatite formation on calcium phosphate-coated titanium in Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline solution containing CaCl(2) with and without fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cen; Lee, In-Seop; Zhang, Sheng-Min; Yang, Hyeong Cheol

    2010-06-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) thin films with different degrees of crystallinity were coated on the surfaces of commercially pure titanium by electron beam evaporation. The details of apatite nucleation and growth on the coating layer were investigated in Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline solutions containing calcium chloride (DPBS) or DPBS with fibronectin (DPBSF). The surfaces of the samples were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The concentrations of fibronectin and calcium ions (Ca(2+)) were monitored by the bicinchoninic acid method (BCA) and use of a calcium assay kit (DICA-500), respectively. Apatite initially formed at the fastest rate on the CaP-coated samples with the lowest degree of crystallinity and reached the maximum Ca(2+) concentration after immersion in DPBS solution for 15min. After 15min the concentration of Ca(2+) decreased with the growth of apatite on the coating layers. For all the samples the maximum Ca(2+) concentration in the DPBS solutions decreased with increasing crystallinity and immersion time to reach the maximum concentration increased. The presence of fibronectin in the DPBS solutions delayed the formation and affected the morphology of the apatite. Fibronectin incorporated into apatite deposited on the surface of titanium did not affect its biological activity in terms of promoting osteoblast adhesion. PMID:19962459

  7. Photoelectrochemical study of pitting on iron in borate buffer solution containing inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.; Chen, L.; Cai, S.

    1997-01-01

    The photoelectrochemical behavior and the susceptibility of iron to pitting in borate buffer containing chloride ions (Cl{sup {minus}}) were investigated in the presence and absence of inhibitor PC-604, which is a mixture of polyhydric alcohol phosphoric easter and polyphosphoric ester of various molecular weights. Measurements of the band gap (E{sub g}) of the passive film on iron showed inhibitor concentration and passivation time did not interfere with E{sub g}. Photocurrent and photocurrent transients increased with increasing inhibitor quantities and passivation times at constant potential. The decay time-constant of the photocurrent transient was investigated as a specific parameter of the film. Data showed this parameter was related to pitting susceptibility of the passive film on iron.

  8. Halogenated earth abundant metalloporphyrins as photostable sensitizers for visible-light-driven water oxidation in a neutral phosphate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Cheng; Reek, Joost N H; Williams, René M; Brouwer, Albert M

    2016-06-01

    Very photostable tetrachloro-metalloporphyrins were developed as sensitizers for visible-light-driven water oxidation coupled to cobalt based water-oxidation catalysts in concentrated (0.1 M) phosphate buffer solution. Potassium persulfate (K2S2O8) acts as a sacrificial electron acceptor to oxidize the metalloporphyrin photosensitizers in their excited states. The radical cations thus produced drive the cobalt based water-oxidation catalysts: Co4O4-cubane and Co(NO3)2 as pre-catalyst for cobalt-oxide (CoOx) nanoparticles. Two different metalloporphyrins (Cu(ii) and Ni(ii)) both showed very high photostability in the photocatalytic reaction, as compared to non-halogenated analogues. This indicates that photostability primarily depends on the substitution of the porphyrin macrocycle, not on the central metal. Furthermore, our molecular design strategy not only positively increases the electrochemical potential by 120-140 mV but also extends the absorption spectrum up to ∼600 nm. As a result, the solar photon capturing abilities of halogenated metalloporphyrins (Cu(ii) and Ni(ii)) are comparable to that of the natural photosynthetic pigment, chlorophyll a. We successfully demonstrate long-term (>3 h) visible-light-driven water oxidation using our molecular system based on earth-abundant (first-row transition) metals in concentrated phosphate buffer solution. PMID:27197873

  9. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  10. Pictorial Analogies XI: Concentrations and Acidity of Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortman, John J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents pictorial analogies of several concepts relating to solutions for chemistry students. These include concentration of solution, strength of solution, supersaturated solution, and conjugate acid-base pairs. Among the examples are comparison of acid strength to percentage of strong soldiers or making supersaturated solution analogous to a…

  11. Rapid analysis of acid in etching and pickling solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbina, V.P.; Chinokalov, V.Ya.

    1995-02-01

    A computational method for determining sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in two-component etching solutions has been proposed. The method makes use of linear relationships, assuming that the sum of free and bound acid in solution remains constant.

  12. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  13. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  14. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  15. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-06

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

  16. Effect of Phosphate-Buffered Solution Corrosion on the Ratcheting Fatigue Behavior of a Duplex Mg-Li-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin; Yu, Dunji; Gao, Li-Lan; Gao, Hong

    2016-05-01

    This work reports the uniaxial ratcheting and fatigue behavior of a duplex Mg-Li-Al alloy under the influence of phosphate-buffered solution corrosion. Microstructural observations reveal pitting and filament corrosion defects, which impair the load-bearing capacity of the alloy and cause stress concentration, thus leading to an accelerated accumulation of ratcheting strain and shortened fatigue life under the same nominal loading conditions. Comparing Smith model, Smith-Watson-Topper model, and Paul-Sivaprasad-Dhar model, a ratcheting fatigue life prediction model based on the Broberg damage rule and the Paul-Sivaprasad-Dhar model was proposed, and the model yielded a superior prediction for the studied magnesium alloy.

  17. Electrochemical Behavior of Pure Copper in Phosphate Buffer Solutions: A Comparison Between Micro- and Nano-Grained Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imantalab, O.; Fattah-alhosseini, A.; Keshavarz, M. K.; Mazaheri, Y.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, electrochemical behavior of annealed (micro-) and nano-grained pure copper (fabricated by accumulative roll bonding process) in phosphate buffer solutions of various pH values ranging from 10.69 to 12.59 has been studied. Before any electrochemical measurements, evaluation of microstructure was obtained by optical microscope and transmission electron microscopy. To investigate the electrochemical behavior of the samples, the potentiodynamic polarization, Mott-Schottky analysis, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were carried out. Potentiodynamic polarization plots and EIS measurements revealed that as a result of grain refinement, the passive behavior of the nano-grained sample was improved compared to that of annealed pure copper. Also, Mott-Schottky analysis indicated that the passive films behaved as p-type semiconductors and grain refinement did not change the semiconductor type of passive films.

  18. Containment of nitric acid solutions of Plutonium-238

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimus, M. A. H.; Silver, G. L.; Pansoy-Hjelvik, L.; Ramsey, K. B.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion of various metals that could be used to contain nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 has been studied. Tantalum and tantalum/2.5% tungsten resisted the test solvent better than 304L stainless steel and several INCONEL alloys. The solvent used to imitate nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 contained 70% nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, and ammonium hexanitratocerate.

  19. A simple ratiometric and colorimetric chemosensor for the selective detection of fluoride in DMSO buffered solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hu; Shu, Qinghai; Jin, Shaohua; Li, Bingjun; Zhu, Jiaping; Li, Lijie; Chen, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    A derivative of squaramide (cyclobuta[b]quinoxaline-1, 2(3H, 8H)-dione) has been synthesized for the ratiometric and colorimetric sensing of F- in aqueous solution in competitive fashion. With F-, probe 1 showed a highly selective naked-eye detectable color change along with a characteristic UV-Vis absorbance over other tested ions, which probably originates from the deprotonation occurred between 1 and F-, as proved by the 1H NMR titration experiments and DFT calculations.

  20. Selective Conversion of 5-Hydroxymethylfuraldehyde Using Cp*Ir Catalysts in Aqueous Formate Buffer Solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Peng; Xu, Yong-Jian; Zhu, Rui; Cui, Min-Shu; Li, Xing-Long; Deng, Jin; Fu, Yao

    2016-05-23

    The highly selective hydrogenation/hydrolytic ring-opening reaction of 5-hydroxymethylfuraldehyde (5-HMF) was catalyzed by homogeneous Cp*Ir(III) half-sandwich complexes to produce 1-hydroxy-2,5-hexanedione (HHD). Adjustment of pH was found to regulate the distribution of products and reaction selectivity, and full conversion of 5-HMF to HHD with 99 % selectivity was achieved at pH 2.5. A mechanistic study revealed that the hydrolysis/ring-opening reaction of 2,5-bis-(hydroxymethyl)furan is the important intermediate reaction step. In addition, an isolated yield of 85 % for HHD was obtained in a 10 g-scale experiment, and the reaction with fructose as the starting material also led to a 98 % GC yield (71.9 % to fructose) of HHD owing to the excellent tolerance of the catalyst under acidic conditions. PMID:27075722

  1. Adsorption mechanism of acids and bases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography in weak buffered mobile phases designed for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    The overloaded band profiles of five acido-basic compounds were measured, using weakly buffered mobile phases. Low buffer concentrations were selected to provide a better understanding of the band profiles recorded in LC/MS analyses, which are often carried out at low buffer concentrations. In this work, 10 {micro}L samples of a 50 mM probe solution were injected into C{sub 18}-bonded columns using a series of five buffered mobile phases at {sub W}{sup S}pH between 2 and 12. The retention times and the shapes of the bands were analyzed based on thermodynamic arguments. A new adsorption model that takes into account the simultaneous adsorption of the acidic and the basic species onto the endcapped adsorbent, predicts accurately the complex experimental profiles recorded. The adsorption mechanism of acido-basic compounds onto RPLC phases seems to be consistent with the following microscopic model. No matter whether the acid or the base is the neutral or the basic species, the neutral species adsorbs onto a large number of weak adsorption sites (their saturation capacity is several tens g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of 0.1 L/g). In contrast, the ionic species adsorbs strongly onto fewer active sites (their saturation capacity is about 1 g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of a few L/g). From a microscopic point of view and in agreement with the adsorption isotherm of the compound measured by frontal analysis (FA) and with the results of Monte-Carlo calculations performed by Schure et al., the first type of adsorption sites are most likely located in between C{sub 18}-bonded chains and the second type of adsorption sites are located deeper in contact with the silica surface. The injected concentration (50 mM) was too low to probe the weakest adsorption sites (saturation capacity of a few hundreds g/L with an equilibrium constant of one hundredth of L/g) that are located at the very interface between the C{sub 18}-bonded layer and the bulk

  2. Ink-jet printing of SrTiO3 buffer layers from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollefeyt, G.; Clerick, S.; Vermeir, P.; Feys, J.; Hühne, R.; Lommens, P.; Van Driessche, I.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, fully a-axis oriented SrTiO3 thin films were synthesized by ink-jet printing of water-based precursor inks. The developed precursor solution or ‘ink’ was optimized in terms of rheology, leading to the ejection of single droplets showing a maximum contact angle of 12° on (100) oriented single crystal LaAlO3 substrates. By using the appropriate ink-jet deposition parameters and thermal treatment, well-textured and dense SrTiO3 films of 130 nm thickness were obtained. The biaxial texture is maintained up to the surface of the films, leading to the formation of (h00)-oriented terraces. As shown by transmission electron microscopy, excellent texture transfer was achieved from the SrTiO3 film to the YBa2Cu3O7 - δ layer deposited by pulsed laser deposition. Outstanding superconducting properties were obtained with critical current densities up to 3.6 MA cm-2 in self-field at 77 K, demonstrating that these sustainable SrTiO3 films meet the requirements to be used as growing template for high quality superconducting coatings.

  3. Preparation of DNA films for studies under vacuum conditions. The influence of cations in buffer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śmiałek, M. A.; Balog, R.; Jones, N. C.; Field, D.; Mason, N. J.

    2010-10-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine the optimum conditions required for the preparation of uniform films of supercoiled plasmid DNA to be used in irradiation experiments under high vacuum conditions. Investigations reveal that significant damage to the DNA molecules occurs due to the evacuation process when films were formed from DNA samples in ultra high purity water only. A variety of bases were tested for their possible protective capabilities and sodium hydroxide solution was found to be the most effective in maintaining the supercoiled structure of plasmid DNA during the preparation process. Using a transmission electron microscope we also examined the structure of the DNA films which are formed upon evacuation and how the proposed adducts influence the preparation process. It was found that the addition of bases cause the DNA to aggregate, noting that a base is required for the stability of the DNA molecules. The experimental results presented in this paper show that it may not be possible to perform experiments on so-called pure DNA under vacuum with no stabilizers being added to the sample before the evacuation process.

  4. Preparation of bi-axially aligned YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ film on CeO 2-buffered MgO by chemical solution deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagiwa, K.; Hiei, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Kim, S. B.; Matsumoto, K.; Ikuta, H.; Mizutani, U.; Hirabayashi, I.

    2000-06-01

    We have succeeded in preparing in-plane aligned YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (Y123) film by chemical solution deposition (CSD) processing on CeO 2 (100)-buffered MgO (100) substrates. The CeO 2 buffer film was deposited on MgO (100) single crystalline substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). For CSD coating, a homogeneous coating solution having a molar ratio of Y:Ba:Cu=1:2:3, was prepared by dissolving metal naphthenates in toluene. This solution was spin-coated both on the YSZ (100) and on the CeO 2-buffered MgO (100) single crystalline substrates. The precursor films were calcined at 425°C and fired at various temperatures under low oxygen partial pressure ( pO 2). All Y123 films showed strong (00 n) peaks, which correspond to c-axis orientation perpendicular to the substrates and their a/ b-axes were in-plane aligned. We confirmed that CeO 2 buffer is usable for CSD processing. While the Y123 films on the YSZ reacted with the substrate forming BaZrO 3 phase and did not show sufficient superconducting properties. The Tc,zero value of the Y123 film prepared on CeO 2-buffered MgO substrate was 91.5 K and Jc was 1.2×10 5 A/cm 2 at 77 K, 0 T.

  5. The suitability of tris(hydroxylmethyl) aminomethane (THAM) as a buffering system for hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) hydrophilic matrices containing a weak acid drug.

    PubMed

    Pygall, Samuel R; Kujawinski, Sarah; Timmins, Peter; Melia, Colin D

    2010-03-15

    There are few studies of alkalising pH-modifiers in HPMC hydrophilic matrices. These agents may be incorporated to provide microenvironmental buffering and facilitate pH-independent release of weak acid drugs. This study compared tris(hydroxylmethyl) aminomethane (THAM, TRIS, tromethamine, trometamol) with sodium citrate as internal buffering agents for HPMC (4000 cps) 2208 and 2910 matrices containing felbinac, a weak acid drug which exhibits pH-dependent solubility. Drug release at pH 1.2 and 7.5 was accelerated by both buffers, but THAM-buffered matrices provided extended, diffusion-based release kinetics, without loss of matrix integrity at high buffer concentrations. Release kinetics appeared to be independent of media pH. THAM did not depress the sol-gel transition temperature or suppress HPMC particle swelling, and had minimal effects on gel layer formation. Sodium citrate promoted greater thickness of the early gel layer than THAM. Measurements of internal gel layer pH showed that both buffers produced a rapid alkalisation of the gel layer which was progressively lost. As result of its higher pK(a) and molar ratio on a percent weight basis, THAM provided a higher internal pH and a greater longevity of pH modification. It is concluded that THAM offers a useful buffering option for weak acid drugs in HPMC-based systems. PMID:20005935

  6. Nitric acid uptake by sulfuric acid solutions under stratospheric conditions - Determination of Henry's Law solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reihs, Christa M.; Golden, David M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1990-01-01

    The uptake of nitric acid by sulfuric acid solutions representative of stratospheric particulate at low temperatures was measured to determine the solubility of nitric acid in sulfuric acid solutions as a function of H2SO4 concentration and solution temperature. Solubilities are reported for sulfuric acid solutions ranging from 58 to 87 wt pct H2SO4 over a temperature range from 188 to 240 K, showing that, in general, the solubility of nitric acid increases with decreasing sulfuric acid concentration and with decreasing temperature. The measured solubilities indicate that nitric acid in the global stratosphere will be found predominantly in the gas phase.

  7. The acid-base buffer capacity of podzolic soils and its changes under the impact of treatment with the Mehra-Jackson and Tamm reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimova, Yu. G.; Maryakhina, N. N.; Tolpeshta, I. I.; Sokolova, T. A.

    2010-10-01

    The acid-base buffer capacity before and after the treatment with the Mehra-Jackson and Tamm reagents was assessed by continuous potentiometric titration for the main genetic horizons of two profiles of podzolic soils in the Central Forest State Reserve. The total buffer capacity was calculated in the pH range from the initial titration point (ITP) to 3 for the acid titration and from the ITP to 10 for the base titration, as well as the buffer capacities in the pH intervals of 0.25. It was found that both treatments abruptly decreased the base buffer capacity, which reached 70-90% in the E horizons. The high direct linear correlation of the difference between the total base buffer capacities before and after each treatment with the content of Fe in the Tamm extract was revealed. From the results obtained, a conclusion was drawn that finely dispersed Fe hydroxides were the main solid-phase constituents ensuring the base buffer capacity, and the deprotonation of hydroxyl groups on the surface of Fe hydroxides was the essential buffer reaction during the base titration.

  8. Chemical transformations of CO2 in trifluoroacetic acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnetskaya, M. V.; Ivanova, M. S.; Svichkarev, O. M.; Budynina, E. M.; Mel'nikov, M. Ya.

    2013-05-01

    It is established that a conversion reaction of carbon dioxide takes place at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in aqueous solutions of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), which leads to the formation of oxalic acid and heavier polymerized products.

  9. Corrosion Behavior of Ultra-fine Grained 1050 Aluminum Alloy Fabricated by ARB Process in a Buffer Borate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-alhosseini, A.; Gashti, S. O.

    2015-09-01

    Accumulative roll bonding (ARB) has been used as a severe plastic deformation process for the industrial production of ultra-fine grained (UFG) and nano-crystalline sheets with excellent mechanical properties. In the present study, the effect of the ARB process on the corrosion behavior of UFG and nano-crystalline 1050 aluminum alloy in a buffer borate solution (pH 5.5) has been investigated. The result of microhardness tests revealed that microhardness values increase with an increasing number of ARB cycles. A sharp increase in microhardness is seen after three ARB cycles, whereas moderate additional increases are observed afterward for up to nine cycles. Also, the XRD results showed that the mean crystallite size decreased to about 91 nm after nine cycles. The potentiodynamic plots show that as a result of ARB, the corrosion behavior of the UFG and nano-crystalline specimens improves, compared to the annealed 1050 aluminum alloy. Moreover, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements showed that the polarization resistance increases with an increasing number of ARB cycles.

  10. The bacteriophage phi29 head-tail connector imaged at high resolution with the atomic force microscope in buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Müller, D J; Engel, A; Carrascosa, J L; Vélez, M

    1997-05-15

    The surfaces of two- and three-dimensional phi29 connector crystals were imaged in buffer solution by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Both topographies show a rectangular unit cell with dimensions of 16.5 nm x 16.5 nm. High resolution images of connectors from the two-dimensional crystal surface show two connectors per unit cell confirming the p42(1)2 symmetry. The height of the connector was estimated to be at least 7.6 nm, a value close to that found in previous studies using different techniques. The 12 subunits of the wide connector domain were clearly resolved and showed a right-handed vorticity. The channel running along the connector had a diameter of 3.7 nm in the wide domain, while it was 1.7 nm in the narrow domain end, thus suggesting a tronco-conical channel shape. Moreover, the narrow connector end appears to be rather flexible. When the force applied to the stylus was between 50 and 100 pN, the connector end was fully extended. At forces of approximately 150 pN, these ends were pushed towards the crystal surface. The complementation of the AFM data with the three-dimensional reconstruction obtained from electron microscopy not only confirmed the model proposed, but also offers new insights that may help to explain the role of the connector in DNA packing. PMID:9184202

  11. Repassivation behavior of 316L stainless steel in borate buffer solution: Kinetics analysis of anodic dissolution and film formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haisong; Sun, Dongbai; Yu, Hongying

    2015-12-01

    The repassivation behavior of metals or alloys after oxide film damage determines the development of local corrosion and corrosion resistance. In this work, the repassivation kinetics of 316L stainless steel (316L SS) are investigated in borate buffer solution (pH 9.1) by using the abrading electrode technique. The current densities flowing from bare 316L SS surface are measured by potentiostatic method and analyzed to characterize repassivation kinetics. The initial stages of current decay (t < 500 ms) are discussed according to a film growth model, which describes the initial current transient should be divided into substrate dissolution current and passive film formation current based on Avrami kinetics. Then the two independent components are analyzed individually. The film formation rate and the thickness of film are compared in different applied potential. It is shown that anodic dissolution dominates the repassivation for a short time during the early times, and a higher applied potential will promote the anodic dissolution of metal. The film growth rate increases slightly with increasing in potential. Correspondingly, increase in applied potential from 0 VSCE to 0.8 VSCE results in thicker monolayer, which covers the whole bare surface at the time of θ = 1. The electric field strengths through the thin passive film could reach 3.97 × 106 V cm-1.

  12. Acidification and buffering mechanisms in acid sulfate soil wetlands of the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia.

    PubMed

    Glover, Fiona; Whitworth, Kerry L; Kappen, Peter; Baldwin, Darren S; Rees, Gavin N; Webb, John A; Silvester, Ewen

    2011-04-01

    The acid generation mechanisms and neutralizing capacities of sulfidic sediments from two inland wetlands have been studied in order to understand the response of these types of systems to drying events. The two systems show vastly different responses to oxidation, with one (Bottle Bend (BB) lagoon) having virtually no acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and the other (Psyche Bend (PB) lagoon) an ANC that is an order of magnitude greater than the acid generation potential. While BB strongly acidifies during oxidation the free acid generation is less than that expected from the measured proton production and consumption processes, with additional proton consumption attributed to the formation of an acid-anion (chloride) FeIII (oxyhydr)oxide product, similar to akaganéite (Fe(OH)2.7Cl0.3). While such products can partially attenuate the acidification of these systems, resilience to acidification is primarily imparted by sediment ANC. PMID:21375259

  13. An experimental study of zinc chloride speciation from 300 to 600 °C and 0.5 to 2.0 kbar in buffered hydrothermal solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cygan, G.L.; Hemley, J.J.; d'Angelo, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    The solubility of sphalerite (ZnS) was measured in KCl-HCl-H2O solutions at 300-600??C and 0.5-2.0 kbar. The silicate assemblage K-feldspar-muscovite (or andalusite)-quartz was used to buffer the solution to acid conditions, resulting in the total solubility reaction 2K+ + KAl2AlSi3O10(OH)2 + 6SiO2 + ZnS + nCl- = ZnCln(2-n) + 3KAlSi3O8 + H2S. (muscovite) (quartz) (sphalerite) (K-feldspar) A computer retrieval technique was used to derive average chloride ligand numbers for chlorozinc species at 0.25-2.0 molal total chloride. This technique mathematically solves for the average ligand number using a series of pertinent chemical relations at P and T. Mono- and di-chlorozinc species were found to predominate throughout the pressure-temperature-composition range investigated. The logarithms of the first and second dissociation constants for ZnCl20 were evaluated over the P-T range; for example, at 1 kbar, the values -0.41 and -1.42 were computed for the logarithm of the first dissociation constant, while -7.62 and -10.57 were computed for the logarithm of the second dissociation constant, for 400 and 500??C, respectively. Results are compared to past studies conducted at subcritical conditions and differ in that we find no evidence for more highly coordinated chloro-zinc species except possibly for ZnCl3- at 600??C, 1 and 2 kbar. Our results are consistent with electrostatic theory, which favors lower charged to neutral molecules in low dielectric-constant media. ?? 1994.

  14. PH BUFFERING IN FOREST SOIL ORGANIC HORIZONS: RELEVANCE TO ACID PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples of organic surface horizons (Oi, Oe, Oa) from New York State forest soils were equilibrated with 0 to 20 cmol HNO3 Kg(-1) soil in the laboratory by a batch technique designed to simulate reactions of acid precipitation with forest floors. Each organic horizon retained a c...

  15. Long-term stability of earthen materials in contact with acidic tailings solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S.R.; Erikson, R.L.; Gee, G.W.

    1982-11-01

    The objectives of the studies documented in this report were to use experimental and geochemical computer modeling tools to assess the long-term environmental impact of leachate movement from acidic uranium mill tailings. Liner failure (i.e., an increase in the permeability of the liner material) was not found to be a problem when various acidic tailings solutions leached through liner materials for periods up to 3 years. On the contrary, materials that contained over 30% clay showed a decrease in permeability with time in the laboratory columns. The high clay materials tested appear suitable for lining tailings impoundment ponds. The decreases in permeability are attributed to pore plugging resulting from the precipitation of minerals and solids. This precipitation takes place due to the increase in pH of the tailings solution brought about by the buffering capacity of the soil. Geochemical modeling predicts, and x-ray characterization confirms, that precipitation of solids from solution is occurring in the acidic tailings solution/liner interactions studied. In conclusion the same mineralogical changes and contaminant reactions predicted by geochemical modeling and observed in laboratory studies were found at a drained evaporation pond (Lucky Mc in Wyoming) with a 4 year history of acid attack.

  16. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  17. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-03-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 5 figs.

  18. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1990-12-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  19. Effect of Organic Acid Additions on the General and Localized Corrosion Susceptibility of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Ilevbare, G O; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-28

    Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids.

  20. REDUCTION OF ACIDITY OF NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS BY USE OF FORMALDEHYDE

    DOEpatents

    Healy, T.V.

    1958-05-20

    A continuous method is described of concentrating by evaporation and reducing the nitrate ion content of an aqueous solution of metallic salts containing nitric acid not in excess of 8N. It consists of heating the solution and then passing formaldehyde into the heated solution to bring about decomposition of the nitric acid. The evolved gases containing NO are contacted countercurrently with an aqueous metal salt solution containing nitric acid in excess of 8N so as to bring about decomposition of the nitric acid and lower the normality to at least 8N, whereupon it is passed into the body of heated solution.

  1. Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  2. Effect of HEPES buffer on the uptake and transport of P-glycoprotein substrates and large neutral amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuanghui; Pal, Dhananjay; Shah, Sujay J.; Kwatra, Deep; Paturi, Kalyani D.; Mitra, Ashim. K.

    2010-01-01

    HEPES has been widely employed as an organic buffer agent in cell culture medium as well as uptake and transport experiments in vitro. However, concentrations of HEPES used in such studies vary from one laboratory to another. In this study, we investigated the effect of HEPES on the uptake and bidirectional transport of P-gp substrates employing both Caco-2 and MDCK-MDR1 cells. ATP-dependent uptake of glutamic acid was also examined. ATP production was further quantified applying ATP Determination Kit. An addition of HEPES to the cellular washing and incubation media significantly altered the uptake and transport of P-gp substrates in both Caco-2 and MDCK-MDR1 cells. Uptake of P-gp substrates substantially diminished as the HEPES concentration was raised to 25 mM. Bidirectional (A-B and B-A) transport studies revealed that permeability ratio of PappB-A to PappA-B in the presence of 25 mM HEPES was significantly higher than control. The uptake of phenylalanine is an ATP-independent process, whereas the accumulation of glutamic acid is ATP-dependent. While phenylalanine uptake remained unchanged glutamic acid uptake was elevated with the addition of HEPES. Verapamil is an inhibitor of P-gp mediated uptake, elevation of cyclosporine uptake in the presence of 5 μM verapamil was compromised by the presence of 25 mM HEPES. The results of ATP assay indicated that HEPES stimulated the production of ATP. This study suggests that the addition of HEPES in the medium modulated the energy dependent efflux and uptake processes. The effect of HEPES on P-gp mediated drug efflux and transport may provide some mechanistic insight into possible reasons for inconsistencies in the results reported from various laboratories. PMID:20163160

  3. Decomposition Studies of Triphenylboron, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboric Acid in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions Containing Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.; Peterson, R. A.

    1997-02-11

    This report documents the copper-catalyzed chemical kinetics of triphenylboron, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboric acid (3PB, 2PB and PBA) in aqueous alkaline solution contained in carbon-steel vessels between 40 and 70 degrees C.

  4. Controlled release of acidic drugs in compendial and physiological hydrogen carbonate buffer from polymer blend-coated oral solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Wulff, R; Rappen, G-M; Koziolek, M; Garbacz, G; Leopold, C S

    2015-09-18

    The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of "Eudragit® RL/Eudragit® L55" (RL/L55) blend coatings for a pH-independent release of acidic drugs. A coating for ketoprofen and naproxen mini tablets was developed showing constant drug release rate under pharmacopeial two-stage test conditions for at least 300 min. To simulate drug release from the mini tablets coated with RL/L55 blends in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, drug release profiles in Hanks buffer pH 6.8 were recorded and compared with drug release profiles in compendial media. RL/L55 blend coatings showed increased drug permeability in Hanks buffer pH 6.8 compared to phosphate buffer pH 6.8 due to its higher ion concentration. However, drug release rates of acidic drugs were lower in Hanks buffer pH 6.8 because of the lower buffer capacity resulting in reduced drug solubility. Further dissolution tests were performed in Hanks buffer using pH sequences simulating the physiological pH conditions in the GI tract. Drug release from mini tablets coated with an RL/L55 blend (8:1) was insensitive to pH changes of the medium within the pH range of 5.8-7.5. It was concluded that coatings of RL/L55 blends show a high potential for application in coated oral drug delivery systems with a special focus on pH-independent release of acidic drugs. PMID:26093053

  5. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part I. Regeneration of Amine-Carboxylic Acid Extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

    1990-03-01

    Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, succinic acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration

  6. Nylon Dissolution in Nitric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    KESSINGER, GLENF.

    2004-06-16

    H Area Operations is planning to process Pu-contaminated uranium scrap in support of de-inventory efforts. Nylon bags will be used to hold materials to be dissolved in H-Canyon. Based on this set of twelve nylon dissolutions, it is concluded that (when other variables are held constant): increased acid concentration results in increased dissolution rates; increased acid concentration results in a lower dissolution onset temperature; little, if any, H plus is consumed during the depolymerization process; and 2.0-3.0 M HNO3, with 0.025 M KF and 2 g/L B, is satisfactory for the dissolution of nylon bag materials to be used during H-Canyon processing.

  7. Raman spectra of amino acids and their aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyong; Zhu, Xian; Fan, Qi; Wan, Xueliang

    2011-03-01

    Amino acids are the basic "building blocks" that combine to form proteins and play an important physiological role in all life-forms. Amino acids can be used as models for the examination of the importance of intermolecular bonding in life processes. Raman spectra serve to obtain information regarding molecular conformation, giving valuable insights into the topology of more complex molecules (peptides and proteins). In this paper, amino acids and their aqueous solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons of certain values for these frequencies in amino acids and their aqueous solutions are given. Spectra of solids when compared to those of the solute in solution are invariably much more complex and almost always sharper. We present a collection of Raman spectra of 18 kinds of amino acids ( L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, cystine, L-glutamic acid, L-glycine, L-histidine, L-isoluecine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-phenylalanine, L-methionone, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-valine) and their aqueous solutions that can serve as references for the interpretation of Raman spectra of proteins and biological materials.

  8. Polymerization of beta-amino acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have compared carbonyl diimidazole (CDI) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as activating agents for the oligomerization of negatively-charged alpha- and beta-amino acids in homogeneous aqueous solution. alpha-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using CDI, but not by EDAC. beta-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using EDAC, but not by CDI. Aspartic acid, an alpha- and beta-dicarboxylic acid is oligomerized efficiently by both reagents. These results are explained in terms of the mechanisms of the reactions, and their relevance to prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  9. Vacuum-jacketed hydrofluoric acid solution calorimeter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.

    1965-01-01

    A vacuum-jacketed metal calorimeter for determining heats of solution in aqueous HF was constructed. The reaction vessel was made of copper and was heavily gold plated. The calorimeter has a cooling constant of 0.6 cal-deg -1-min-1, approximately 1/4 that of the air-jacketed calorimeters most commonly used with HF. It reaches equilibrium within 10 min after turning off the heater current. Measurements of the heat of solution of reagent grade KCl(-100 mesh dried 2 h at 200??C) at a mole ratio of 1 KCl to 200 H2O gave ??H = 4198??11 cal at 25??C. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

  10. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Gary A [Kennewick, WA; Smith, Jeffrey W [Lancaster, OH; Ihle, Nathan C [Walla Walla, WA

    1984-01-01

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with portland cement to form concrete.

  11. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, G.A.; Smith, J.W.; Ihle, N.C.

    1982-07-08

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with Portland cement to form concrete.

  12. Immunolocalization of MAP-2 in routinely formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded guinea pig brain sections using microwave irradiation: a comparison of different combinations of antibody clones and antigen retrieval buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Kan, Robert K; Pleva, Christina M; Hamilton, Tracey A; Petrali, John P

    2005-04-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of different microwave pretreatment methods to retrieve microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) immunoreactivity in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded guinea pig brain sections. Brain sections, microwave pretreated in boiling sodium citrate, citric acid, Tris hydrochloride, and EDTA buffers of pH 4, 6, and 8, were labeled with four different clones of MAP-2 monoclonal antibodies. No MAP-2 immunoreactivity was observed in control sections processed without microwave pretreatment. Optimal MAP-2 immunoreactivity was observed only when MAP-2 antibody clone AP18 was used in conjunction with citric acid buffer of pH 6.0. Using this combination, brain sections from nerve agent soman-exposed guinea pigs were found to exhibit marked reduction in MAP-2 immunostaining in the hippocampus. These observations suggest that the clone of the antibody in addition to the type and pH of antigen retrieval (AR) solution are important variables to be considered for establishing an optimal AR technique. When studying counterpart antigens of species other than that to which the antibodies were originally raised, different antibody clones must be tested in combination with different microwave-assisted AR (MAR) methods. This MAR method makes it possible to conduct retrospective studies on archival guinea pig brain paraffin blocks to evaluate changes in neuronal MAP-2 expression as a consequence of chemical warfare nerve agent toxicity. PMID:15817147

  13. Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

    1983-07-26

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  14. RECOVERY OF ACTINIDES FROM AQUEOUS NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Ader, M.

    1963-11-19

    A process of recovering actinides is presented. Tetravalent actinides are extracted from rare earths in an aqueous nitric acid solution with a ketone and back-extracted from the ketone into an aqueous medium. The aqueous actinide solution thus obtained, prior to concentration by boiling, is sparged with steam to reduce its ketone to a maximum content of 3 grams per liter. (AEC)

  15. Phosphorylation of Glyceric Acid in Aqueous Solution Using Trimetaphosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Vera; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    The phosphorylation of glyceric acid is an interesting prebiotic reaction because it converts a simple, potentially prebiotic organic molecule into phosphate derivatives that are central to carbohydrate metabolism. We find that 0.05 M glyceric acid in the presence of 0.5 M trimetaphosphate in alkaline solution gives a mixture of 2- and 3-phosphoglyceric acids in combined yields of up to 40%.

  16. Reduction of Plutonium in Acidic Solutions by Mesoporous Carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons-Moss, Tashi; Jones, Stephen; Wang, Jinxiu; Wu, Zhangxiong; Uribe, Eva; Zhao, Dongyuan; Nitsche, Heino

    2015-12-19

    Batch contact experiments with several porous carbon materials showed that carbon solids spontaneously reduce the oxidation state of plutonium in 1-1.5 M acid solutions, without significant adsorption. The final oxidation state and rate of Pu reduction varies with the solution matrix, and also depends on the surface chemistry and surface area of the carbon. It was demonstrated that acidic Pu(VI) solutions can be reduced to Pu(III) by passing through a column of porous carbon particles, offering an easy alternative to electrolysis with a potentiostat.

  17. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM ACIDIC SOLUTIONS USING NO2

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A; Robert Pierce, R; James Laurinat, J

    2006-08-22

    Chloride (Cl{sup -}) salt processing in strong acids is used to recycle plutonium (Pu) from pyrochemical residues. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is studying the potential application of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) gas to effectively convert dissolved pyrochemical salt solutions to chloride-free solutions and improve recovery operations. An NO{sub 2} sparge has been shown to effectively remove Cl{sup -} from solutions containing 6-8 M acid (H{sup +}) and up to 5 M Cl{sup -}. Chloride removal occurs as a result of the competition of at least two reactions, one which is acid-dependent. Below 4 M H+, NO2 reacts with Cl- to produce nitrosyl chloride (ClNO). Between 6 M and 8 M H{sup +}, the reaction of hydrochloric acid (HCl) with nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), facilitated by the presence of NO{sub 2}, strongly affects the rate of Cl{sup -} removal. The effect of heating the acidic Cl{sup -} salt solution without pre-heating the NO{sub 2} gas has minimal effect on Cl{sup -} removal rates when the contact times between NO{sub 2} and the salt solution are on the order of seconds.

  18. Evaluation of localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, J.; Holmes, D.; Yau, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    Zirconium is prone to localized corrosion in acidic chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}) solutions contaminated by oxidizing ions, such as ferric or cupric ions. This tendency can be reduced by ensuring that the zirconium surface is clean and smooth. The effect of surface condition on localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions was predicted using potentiodynamic polarization scans. Predictions were confirmed by mass-loss tests on various combinations of surface finish and acid concentrations. A real-time indication of localized corrosion was derived by monitoring electrochemical noise produced between two similar electrodes immersed in an acidic chloride solution. Electrochemical noise monitoring correlated well with predictions from the potentiodynamic polarization and mass-loss experiments. Electrochemical noise results showed a more anodic potential caused by ferric ion (Fe{sup 3+}) contamination might be necessary for localized corrosion but that it was not a sufficient condition. A clean zirconium surface reduced localized corrosion of zirconium.

  19. Influence of D-Penicillamine on the Viscosity of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jing; Krause, Wendy E.; Colby, Ralph H.

    2006-03-01

    Polyelectrolyte hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan) is an important component in synovial fluid. Its presence results in highly viscoelastic solutions with excellent lubricating and shock-absorbing properties. In comparison to healthy synovial fluid, diseased fluid has a reduced viscosity. In osteoarthritis this reduction in viscosity results from a decline in both the molecular weight and concentration of hyaluronic acid HA. Initial results indicate that D-penicillamine affects the rheology of bovine synovial fluid, a model synovial fluid solution, and its components, including HA. In order to understand how D-penicillamine modifies the viscosity of these solutions, the rheological properties of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) with D-penicillamine were studied as function of time, D-penicillamine concentration (0 -- 0.01 M), and storage conditions. Penicillamine has a complex, time dependent effect on the viscosity of NaHA solutions---reducing the zero shear rate viscosity of a 3 mg/mL NaHA in PBS by ca. 40% after 44 days.

  20. Buffer Therapy for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maria de Lourdes C; Silva, Ariosto S; Bailey, Kate M; Kumar, Nagi B; Sellers, Thomas A; Gatenby, Robert A; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Gillies, Robert J

    2012-08-15

    Oral administration of pH buffers can reduce the development of spontaneous and experimental metastases in mice, and has been proposed in clinical trials. Effectiveness of buffer therapy is likely to be affected by diet, which could contribute or interfere with the therapeutic alkalinizing effect. Little data on food pH buffering capacity was available. This study evaluated the pH and buffering capacity of different foods to guide prospective trials and test the effect of the same buffer (lysine) at two different ionization states. Food groups were derived from the Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire. Foods were blended and pH titrated with acid from initial pH values until 4.0 to determine "buffering score", in mmol H(+)/pH unit. A "buffering score" was derived as the mEq H(+) consumed per serving size to lower from initial to a pH 4.0, the postprandial pH of the distal duodenum. To differentiate buffering effect from any metabolic byproduct effects, we compared the effects of oral lysine buffers prepared at either pH 10.0 or 8.4, which contain 2 and 1 free base amines, respectively. The effect of these on experimental metastases formation in mice following tail vein injection of PC-3M prostate cancer cells were monitored with in vivo bioluminescence. Carbohydrates and dairy products' buffering score varied between 0.5 and 19. Fruits and vegetables showed a low to zero buffering score. The score of meats varied between 6 and 22. Wine and juices had negative scores. Among supplements, sodium bicarbonate and Tums(®) had the highest buffering capacities, with scores of 11 and 20 per serving size, respectively. The "de-buffered" lysine had a less pronounced effect of prevention of metastases compared to lysine at pH 10. This study has demonstrated the anti-cancer effects of buffer therapy and suggests foods that can contribute to or compete with this approach to manage cancer. PMID:24371544

  1. 137Cs desorption from lichen using acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čučulović, A. A.; Veselinović, D.; Miljanić, S. S.

    2009-09-01

    Desoprtion of 137Cs from samples of Cetraria islandica lichen using HCl ( A) and HNO3 ( B) acid solutions with pH values from 2.00 to 3.75 was investigated. After five consecutive desorptions lasting 24 h it was shown that between 52.2% (solution B pH 3.28) and 72.2% (solution A pH 2.00) of 137Cs was desorbed from the lichen and the initial desorptions were the most successful. Lichen desorbed with the stated solutions did not undergo structural changes. The amount of absorbed water from solutions A and B, used for desorption from lichen, in relation to the starting volume (expressed in %) showed that solution concentration did not take place. Lichen act as neutralizing agents because the pH of the lichen thallus is higher than the pH value of the solution used

  2. Optimization of the Energy Level Alignment between the Photoactive Layer and the Cathode Contact Utilizing Solution-Processed Hafnium Acetylacetonate as Buffer Layer for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lu; Li, Qiuxiang; Shi, Zhenzhen; Liu, Hao; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Fuzhi; Zhang, Bing; Dai, Songyuan; Lin, Jun; Tan, Zhan'ao

    2016-01-13

    The insertion of an appropriate interfacial buffer layer between the photoactive layer and the contact electrodes makes a great impact on the performance of polymer solar cells (PSCs). Ideal interfacial buffer layers could minimize the interfacial traps and the interfacial barriers caused by the incompatibility between the photoactive layer and the electrodes. In this work, we utilized solution-processed hafnium(IV) acetylacetonate (Hf(acac)4) as an effective cathode buffer layer (CBL) in PSCs to optimize the energy level alignment between the photoactive layer and the cathode contact, with the short-circuit current density (Jsc), open-circuit voltage (Voc), and fill factor (FF) all simultaneously improved with Hf(acac)4 CBL, leading to enhanced power conversion efficiencies (PCEs). Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) and scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) were performed to confirm that the interfacial dipoles were formed with the same orientation direction as the built-in potential between the photoactive layer and Hf(acac)4 CBL, benefiting the exciton separation and electron transport/extraction. In addition, the optical characteristics and surface morphology of the Hf(acac)4 CBL were also investigated. PMID:26684416

  3. Corrosion behavior of Mg-3Zn/bioglass (45S5) composite in simulated body fluid (SBF) and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ab llah, N.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Daud, Z. C.; Zaludin, M. A. F.; Jamal, Z. A. Z.; Idris, M. S.; Osman, R. A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Magnesium has emerged as promising materials in biomaterials research due to its good mechanical and physical properties closer to human bones. However, magnesium has poor corrosion resistance to chloride ions that exist in human blood plasma thus preventing its application in biomedical. The addition of zinc and bioglass can reduce magnesium corrosion rate. In this work, the effect of different solution media (Simulated Body Fluid and Phosphate Buffered Saline) to the corrosion behavior of Mg-Zn/bioglass (45S5) composites was investigated. The composites of Mg-3Zn added with 5, 10, 15, 20, 15 and 30 wt. % bioglass were fabricated by powder metallurgy. The composites were prepared by mixing at 140 rpm for 1 hour, pressing at 500 MPa and sintering in an argon environment at a temperature of 450°C for 3 hours. Sintered samples were immersed in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) and Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) in order to investigate the corrosion behavior. Samples mass loss was determined after 3 days of immersion. Samples microstructure and corrosion products were analyzed using optical microscope and x-ray diffraction (XRD) respectively. The results revealed that the samples immersed in the Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) shows lower mass loss compare to the samples immersed in the Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) for all composition except for Mg-3Zn without bio-glass. The results indicated that the existence of high phosphate ions in PBS has retarded the corrosion rate of composite Mg-3Zn/45S5. The pH value of the PBS solution after immersion showed significant increase between 10.3 and 11.09. Diffraction pattern (XRD) showed the presence of Mg(OH)2 as the major corrosion product for samples immersed in the SBF and PBS solutions. The mass loss of samples decreased with the addition of bio-glass.

  4. Sodium mefenamate as a solution for the formulation and dissolution problems of mefenamic acid.

    PubMed

    Bani-Jaber, Ahmad; Hamdan, Imad; Al-Khalidi, Bashar

    2007-08-01

    Sodium salt formation of mefenamic acid (MA) was studied as a way to solve the formulation and dissolution problems of MA. For this purpose, sodium salt of mefenamic acid (Na-MA) was prepared by reacting MA powder with equimolar sodium hydroxide in an aqueous phase, and consequently, Na-MA solution was obtained. The resultant solution was lyophilized and Na-MA powder was collected. The salt formation was confirmed by the results of fourier transformation-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies on Na-MA powder in comparison to MA powder. Na-MA powder was assessed for direct compressibility, in comparison to MA powder, when formulated as a mixture with minimum amount of Avicel((R)) pH 101 and then compressed into tablets using a hydraulic tablet press. Na-MA tablets exhibited satisfactory hardness and friability, and did not show capping or lamination. On the other hand, some MA tablets showed capping or lamination upon compression and all the tested MA tablets for friability capped. Na-MA tablets were also studied for drug dissolution, in comparison to MA tablets, in water, a pH 7.4 phosphate buffer, and a pH 7.4 phosphate buffer after soaking in 0.1 m HCl. Under these different dissolution conditions, Na-MA tablets showed much higher dissolution rate and extent than MA tablets. The results of the study suggested that Na-MA can be considered as a solution form for the formulation and dissolution problems of MA. PMID:17666833

  5. Effect of Ethephon, Indole Butyric Acid, and Treatment Solution pH on Rooting and on Ethylene Levels within Mung Bean Cuttings.

    PubMed

    Mudge, K W; Swanson, B T

    1978-02-01

    Light-grown mung bean (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) cuttings were treated with buffered and nonbuffered solutions of Ethephon, indole butyric acid (IBA), and the combination of both. Ethephon treatment resulted in increased tissue ethylene levels with increasing solution pH, but had no effect on rooting. IBA treatment had no effect on tissue ethylene levels, but strongly promoted rooting. Combinations of Ethephon and IBA had no effect on rooting of mung bean cuttings beyond that obtained by IBA alone. PMID:16660274

  6. Thermal and Environmental Stability of Semi-Transparent Perovskite Solar Cells for Tandems Enabled by a Solution-Processed Nanoparticle Buffer Layer and Sputtered ITO Electrode.

    PubMed

    Bush, Kevin A; Bailie, Colin D; Chen, Ye; Bowring, Andrea R; Wang, Wei; Ma, Wen; Leijtens, Tomas; Moghadam, Farhad; McGehee, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    A sputtered oxide layer enabled by a solution-processed oxide nanoparticle buffer layer to protect underlying layers is used to make semi-transparent perovskite solar cells. Single-junction semi-transparent cells are 12.3% efficient, and mechanically stacked tandems on silicon solar cells are 18.0% efficient. The semi-transparent perovskite solar cell has a T 80 lifetime of 124 h when operated at the maximum power point at 100 °C without additional sealing in ambient atmosphere under visible illumination. PMID:26880196

  7. Buffer Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Maria de Lourdes C; Silva, Ariosto S.; Bailey, Kate M.; Kumar, Nagi B.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Oral administration of pH buffers can reduce the development of spontaneous and experimental metastases in mice, and has been proposed in clinical trials. Effectiveness of buffer therapy is likely to be affected by diet, which could contribute or interfere with the therapeutic alkalinizing effect. Little data on food pH buffering capacity was available. This study evaluated the pH and buffering capacity of different foods to guide prospective trials and test the effect of the same buffer (lysine) at two different ionization states. Food groups were derived from the Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire. Foods were blended and pH titrated with acid from initial pH values until 4.0 to determine “buffering score”, in mmol H+/pH unit. A “buffering score” was derived as the mEq H+ consumed per serving size to lower from initial to a pH 4.0, the postprandial pH of the distal duodenum. To differentiate buffering effect from any metabolic byproduct effects, we compared the effects of oral lysine buffers prepared at either pH 10.0 or 8.4, which contain 2 and 1 free base amines, respectively. The effect of these on experimental metastases formation in mice following tail vein injection of PC-3M prostate cancer cells were monitored with in vivo bioluminescence. Carbohydrates and dairy products’ buffering score varied between 0.5 and 19. Fruits and vegetables showed a low to zero buffering score. The score of meats varied between 6 and 22. Wine and juices had negative scores. Among supplements, sodium bicarbonate and Tums® had the highest buffering capacities, with scores of 11 and 20 per serving size, respectively. The “de-buffered” lysine had a less pronounced effect of prevention of metastases compared to lysine at pH 10. This study has demonstrated the anti-cancer effects of buffer therapy and suggests foods that can contribute to or compete with this approach to manage cancer. PMID:24371544

  8. UV-ozone-treated MoO3 as the hole-collecting buffer layer for high-efficiency solution-processed SQ:PC71BM photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qian-Qian; Yang, Dao-Bin; Zhao, Su-Ling; Huang, Yan; Xu, Zheng; Gong, Wei; Fan, Xing; Liu, Zhi-Fang; Huang, Qing-Yu; Xu, Xu-Rong

    2014-03-01

    The enhanced performance of a squaraine compound, with 2,4-bis[4-(N,N-diisobutylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine as the donor and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) as the acceptor, in solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices is obtained by using UV-ozone-treated MoO3 as the hole-collecting buffer layer. The optimized thickness of the MoO3 layer is 8 nm, at which the device shows the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) among all devices, resulting from a balance of optical absorption and charge transport. After being treated by UV-ozone for 10 min, the transmittance of the MoO3 film is almost unchanged. Atomic force microscopy results show that the treated surface morphology is improved. A high PCE of 3.99% under AM 1.5 G illumination (100 mW/cm2) is obtained.

  9. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27093053

  10. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Raheem; Shah, Majid Ali; Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27093053

  11. Aquatic photolysis: photolytic redox reactions between goethite and adsorbed organic acids in aqueous solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Cunningham, K.M.; Weiner, Eugene R.

    1993-01-01

    Photolysis of mono and di-carboxylic acids that are adsorbed onto the surface of the iron oxyhydroxide (goethite) results in an oxidation of the organic material and a reduction from Fe(III) to Fe(II) in the iron complex. There is a subsequent release of Fe2+ ions into solution. At constant light flux and constant solution light absorption, the factors responsible for the degree of photolytic reaction include: the number of lattice sites that are bonded by the organic acid; the rate of acid readsorption to the surface during photolysis; the conformation and structure of the organic acid; the degree of oxidation of the organic acid; the presence or absence of an ??-hydroxy group on the acid, the number of carbons in the di-acid chain and the conformation of the di-acid. The ability to liberate Fe(III) at pH 6.5 from the geothite lattice is described by the lyotropic series: tartrate>citrate> oxalate > glycolate > maleate > succinate > formate > fumarate > malonate > glutarate > benzoate = butanoate = control. Although a larger amount of iron is liberated, the series is almost the same at pH 5.5 except that oxalate > citrate and succinate > maleate. A set of rate equations are given that describe the release of iron from the goethite lattice. It was observed that the pH of the solution increases during photolysis if the solutions are not buffered. There is evidence to suggest the primary mechanism for all these reactions is an electron transfer from the organic ligand to the Fe(III) in the complex. Of all the iron-oxyhydroxide materials, crystalline goethite is the least soluble in water; yet, this study indicates that in an aqueous suspension, iron can be liberated from the goethite lattice. Further, it has been shown that photolysis can occur in a multiphase system at the sediment- water interface which results in an oxidation of the organic species and release of Fe2+ to solution where it becomes available for further reaction. ?? 1993.

  12. γ-Irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negron-Mendoza, Alicia; Graff, Rebecca L.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1980-12-01

    The γ-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the non-volatile products. Thin layer chromotography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the γ-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  13. Highly accurate boronimeter assay of concentrated boric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, R.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The Random-Walk Boronimeter has successfully been used as an on-line indicator of boric acid concentration in an operating commercial pressurized water reactor. The principle has been adapted for measurement of discrete samples to high accuracy and to concentrations up to 6000 ppm natural boron in light water. Boric acid concentration in an aqueous solution is a necessary measurement in many nuclear power plants, particularly those that use boric acid dissolved in the reactor coolant as a reactivity control system. Other nuclear plants use a high-concentration boric acid solution as a backup shutdown system. Such a shutdown system depends on rapid injection of the solution and frequent surveillance of the fluid to ensure the presence of the neutron absorber. The two methods typically used to measure boric acid are the chemical and the physical methods. The chemical method uses titration to determine the ionic concentration of the BO[sub 3] ions and infers the boron concentration. The physical method uses the attenuation of neutrons by the solution and infers the boron concentration from the neutron absorption properties. This paper describes the Random-Walk Boronimeter configured to measure discrete samples to high accuracy and high concentration.

  14. Polymerization of Pu(IV) in aqueous nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Friedman, H.A.; Osborne, M.M.

    1980-10-01

    The polymerization of Pu(IV) in aqueous nitric acid solutions has been studied spectrophotometrically both to establish the influence of large UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} concentrations on the polymerization rates and, more generally, to review the influence of the major parameters on the polymer reaction. Typically, experiments have been performed at 50{sup 0}C and with 0.05 M Pu in nitric acid solutions that vary in acidity from 0.07 to 0.4 M. An induction period usually precedes the polymer growth stage during which time nucleation of primary hydrolysis products occurs. Uranyl nitrate retards the polymerization reaction by approximately 35% in spite of the counteracting influence of the nitrate ions associated with this solute. The rate of polymer formation, expressed as d(percent polymer)/dt, has been shown to depend on the total plutonium concentration in reactions where the Pu(IV) concentration remained constant; and it is therefore suggested that the polymer reaction rate is not first order with respect to the concentration of plutonium as was previously thought. It has been shown further that accurate acid determinations on stock reagents are essential in order to obtain reliable polymerization experiments. Satisfactory procedures for these analyses did not exist, so appropriate modifications to the iodate precipitation methods were developed. The most ideal plutonium reagent material has been shown to be crystalline Pu(IV) nitrate because it can be added directly to acid solutions without the occurrence of unintentional hydrolysis reactions.

  15. Real-time HD Exchange Kinetics of Proteins from Buffered Aqueous Solution with Electrothermal Supercharging and Top-Down Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Going, Catherine C.; Xia, Zijie; Williams, Evan R.

    2016-02-01

    Electrothermal supercharging (ETS) with electrospray ionization produces highly charged protein ions from buffered aqueous solutions in which proteins have native folded structures. ETS increases the charge of ribonuclease A by 34%, whereas only a 6% increase in charge occurs for a reduced-alkylated form of this protein, which is unfolded and its structure is ~66% random coil in this solution. These results indicate that protein denaturation that occurs in the ESI droplets is the primary mechanism for ETS. ETS does not affect the extent of solution-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) that occurs for four proteins that have significantly different structures in solution, consistent with a droplet lifetime that is considerably shorter than observable rates of HDX. Rate constants for HDX of ubiquitin are obtained with a spatial resolution of ~1.3 residues with ETS and electron transfer dissociation of the 10+ charge-state using a single capillary containing a few μL of protein solution in which HDX continuously occurs. HDX protection at individual residues with ETS HDX is similar to that with reagent supercharging HDX and with solution-phase NMR, indicating that the high spray potentials required to induce ETS do not lead to HD scrambling.

  16. Real-time HD Exchange Kinetics of Proteins from Buffered Aqueous Solution with Electrothermal Supercharging and Top-Down Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Going, Catherine C; Xia, Zijie; Williams, Evan R

    2016-06-01

    Electrothermal supercharging (ETS) with electrospray ionization produces highly charged protein ions from buffered aqueous solutions in which proteins have native folded structures. ETS increases the charge of ribonuclease A by 34%, whereas only a 6% increase in charge occurs for a reduced-alkylated form of this protein, which is unfolded and its structure is ~66% random coil in this solution. These results indicate that protein denaturation that occurs in the ESI droplets is the primary mechanism for ETS. ETS does not affect the extent of solution-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) that occurs for four proteins that have significantly different structures in solution, consistent with a droplet lifetime that is considerably shorter than observable rates of HDX. Rate constants for HDX of ubiquitin are obtained with a spatial resolution of ~1.3 residues with ETS and electron transfer dissociation of the 10+ charge-state using a single capillary containing a few μL of protein solution in which HDX continuously occurs. HDX protection at individual residues with ETS HDX is similar to that with reagent supercharging HDX and with solution-phase NMR, indicating that the high spray potentials required to induce ETS do not lead to HD scrambling. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26919868

  17. Real-time HD Exchange Kinetics of Proteins from Buffered Aqueous Solution with Electrothermal Supercharging and Top-Down Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Going, Catherine C.; Xia, Zijie; Williams, Evan R.

    2016-06-01

    Electrothermal supercharging (ETS) with electrospray ionization produces highly charged protein ions from buffered aqueous solutions in which proteins have native folded structures. ETS increases the charge of ribonuclease A by 34%, whereas only a 6% increase in charge occurs for a reduced-alkylated form of this protein, which is unfolded and its structure is ~66% random coil in this solution. These results indicate that protein denaturation that occurs in the ESI droplets is the primary mechanism for ETS. ETS does not affect the extent of solution-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) that occurs for four proteins that have significantly different structures in solution, consistent with a droplet lifetime that is considerably shorter than observable rates of HDX. Rate constants for HDX of ubiquitin are obtained with a spatial resolution of ~1.3 residues with ETS and electron transfer dissociation of the 10+ charge-state using a single capillary containing a few μL of protein solution in which HDX continuously occurs. HDX protection at individual residues with ETS HDX is similar to that with reagent supercharging HDX and with solution-phase NMR, indicating that the high spray potentials required to induce ETS do not lead to HD scrambling.

  18. Dynamics of Liquid Plugs of Buffer and Surfactant Solutions in a Micro-Engineered Pulmonary Airway Model

    PubMed Central

    Tavana, Hossein; Kuo, Chuan-Hsien; Lee, Qian Yi; Mosadegh, Bobak; Huh, Dongeun; Christensen, Paul J.; Grotberg, James B.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2009-01-01

    We describe a bio-inspired microfluidic system that resembles pulmonary airways and enables on-chip generation of airway occluding liquid plugs from a stratified air-liquid two-phase flow. User-defined changes in the air stream pressure facilitated by mechanical components and tuning the wettability of the microchannels enable generation of well-defined liquid plugs. Significant differences are observed in liquid plug generation and propagation when surfactant is added to the buffer. The plug flow patterns suggest a protective role of surfactant for airway epithelial cells against pathological flow-induced mechanical stresses. We discuss the implications of the findings for clinical settings. This approach and the described platform will enable systematic investigation of the effect of different degrees of fluid mechanical stresses on lung injury at the cellular level and administration of exogenous therapeutic surfactants. PMID:20017471

  19. Explaining the Spatial Variability in Stream Acid Buffering Chemistry and Aquatic Biota in the Neversink River Watershed, Catskill Mountains, New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpold, A. A.; Walter, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    The Neversink River Watershed (NRW) originates at the highest point in the Catskill Mountains and is sensitive to changing patterns in acidic deposition, precipitation, and air temperature. Despite reductions in fossil fuel emission since the Clean Air Act, past acidic deposition has accelerated the leaching of cations from the soil and reduced the stores of base cations necessary for buffering stream acidity. The goal of this study was to investigate connections between different watershed ‘features’ and the apparently complex spatial patterns of stream buffering chemistry (specifically, acid neutralizing capacity ANC and Ca concentrations) and aquatic biota (macroinvertebrate and fish populations). The ten nested NRW watersheds (2.0 km^2 to 176.0 km^2) have relatively homogeneous bedrock geology, forested cover, and soil series; therefore, we hypothesized that differing distributions of hydrological flowpaths between the watersheds control the variability in stream buffering chemistry and aquatic biota. However because the flowpath distributions are not directly measurable, this study used step-wise linear regression to develop relationships between watershed ‘features’ and buffering chemistry. The regression results showed that the mean ratio of precipitation to stream runoff (or runoff ratio) from twenty non-winter storm events explained more than 81% of the variability in mean summer ANC and Ca concentrations. The results also suggested that steeper (higher mean slope) more channelized watersheds (larger drainage density) are more susceptible to stream acidity and negative impacts on biota. A simple linear relationship (using no discharge or water chemistry measurements) was able to explain buffering chemistry and aquatic biota populations in 17 additional NRW watersheds (0.3 km^2 to 160.0 km^2), including 60-80% of the variability in macroinvertebrate populations (EPT richness and BAP) and 50-60% of the variability in fish density and species richness

  20. Highly efficient low-bandgap polymer solar cells with solution-processed and annealing-free phosphomolybdic acid as hole-transport layers.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xu; Shen, Liang; Yao, Mengnan; Liu, Yan; Yu, Wenjuan; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2015-03-11

    We demonstrate a novel solution-processed method to fabricate a stable anode buffer layer without any annealing process. As we know, buffer layers in polymer solar cells (PSCs) are always prepared by the traditional high-vacuum thermal evaporation or annealing-treated spin-coating methods, but the fabricating processes are complicated and time-consuming. Here, a solution method without any annealing to fabricate phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) as anode buffers is presented, which brings an obvious improvement of power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 1.75% to 6.57% by optimizing the PMA concentrations and interface pretreatment with device structure shown as ITO/TiO2/PCDTBT:PC70BM/PMA/Ag. The improvement is ascribed to the fine energy-level matching and perfect surface modification. This annealing-free method greatly simplifies the device fabrication process and supplies a wide way to achieve a large area fabrication for PSCs. PMID:25695125

  1. Methanol Uptake by Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Essin, A. M.; Golden, D. M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global methanol budget is currently unbalanced, with source terms significantly larger than the sinks terms. To evaluate possible losses of gaseous methanol to sulfate aerosols, the solubility and reactivity of methanol in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols is under investigation. Methanol will partition into sulfate aerosols according to its Henry's law solubility. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H*, for cold (196 - 220 K) solutions ranging between 45 and 70 wt % H2SO4. We have found that methanol solubility ranges from approx. 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 7) M/atm for UT/LS conditions. Solubility increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. Although methanol is slightly more soluble than are acetone and formaldehyde, current data indicate that uptake by clean aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and any rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H is not significant over our experimental time scale for solutions below 80 wt % H2SO4. To confirm this directly, results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique will also be presented.

  2. [Investigation on mechanism of pyrite oxidation in acidic solutions].

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Yi, Xiao-Yun; Dang, Zhi; Liu, Yun

    2012-11-01

    The mechanism of pyrite oxidation in acidic solutions was investigated by electrochemical analysis methods, such as open-circuit potential, cyclic voltammetry, Tafel polarization curve and anodic polarization curve, using a pyrite-carbon paste electrode as working electrode. The results showed that the oxidation process of pyrite in acidic solutions was via a two-step reaction: the first step was the dissolution of iron moiety and formation of a passivation film composed of elemental sulphur, metal-deficient sulfide and polysulfide; the second step was the further oxidation of these intermediate products to SO4(2-). The final reaction products of pyrite oxidation were Fe3+ and SO4(2-) in acidic solutions. In addition, the open-circuit potential and corrosion potential were positively shifted, the peak current and the corrosion current were increased with the increase in concentration of H2SO4 solutions. This indicated that increased acidity of the system was advantageous to the oxidation of pyrite. PMID:23323425

  3. Iron buffer system in the water column and partitioning in the sediments of the naturally acidic Lake Caviahue, Neuquén, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, J. M.; Diaz, M. M.; Schultz, S.; Temporetti, P.; Pedrozo, F.

    2016-05-01

    Sedimentary iron partitioning was studied for five sediment strata (16 cm depth) at three sampling sites of the naturally-occurring acidic Lake Caviahue (Patagonia, Argentina). Additionally, water column iron was modeled based on five-year period input loadings to study a possible iron buffer system. The partition coefficient between the water column and the total iron content of the sediments was also addressed. Sedimentary iron was found to be distributed, on average, in the following forms: exchangeable (6%), iron oxides (4%), pyrite and reactive organic matter (38%) and residual (non-andesitic) materials with a high content of humic acids (52%). Furthermore, we found that the dissolved iron in the lake was nearly constant throughout the five year period we studied. This is consistent with the existence of an iron buffer system in the lake at pH between 2.0 and 3.0, which may cause differential iron precipitation at the delta of the volcanic river with respect to the deeper northern and southern arms. Sedimentary iron measurements taken at the delta further support the existence of a buffer system, where it was found that the iron content in the sub-superficial stratum (2 cm) was double that of the remainder of the vertical profile at the same site.

  4. Buffer Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Kelly

    2000-01-01

    Presents a science experiment in which students test the buffering capacity of household products such as shampoo, hand lotion, fizzies candy, and cola. Lists the standards addressed in this experiment and gives an example of a student lab write-up. (YDS)

  5. The effects of secular calcium and magnesium concentration changes on the thermodynamics of seawater acid/base chemistry: Implications for Eocene and Cretaceous ocean carbon chemistry and buffering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hain, Mathis P.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Higgins, John A.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2015-05-01

    Reconstructed changes in seawater calcium and magnesium concentration ([Ca2+], [Mg2+]) predictably affect the ocean's acid/base and carbon chemistry. Yet inaccurate formulations of chemical equilibrium "constants" are currently in use to account for these changes. Here we develop an efficient implementation of the MIAMI Ionic Interaction Model to predict all chemical equilibrium constants required for carbon chemistry calculations under variable [Ca2+] and [Mg2+]. We investigate the impact of [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] on the relationships among the ocean's pH, CO2, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), saturation state of CaCO3 (Ω), and buffer capacity. Increasing [Ca2+] and/or [Mg2+] enhances "ion pairing," which increases seawater buffering by increasing the concentration ratio of total to "free" (uncomplexed) carbonate ion. An increase in [Ca2+], however, also causes a decline in carbonate ion to maintain a given Ω, thereby overwhelming the ion pairing effect and decreasing seawater buffering. Given the reconstructions of Eocene [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] ([Ca2+]~20 mM; [Mg2+]~30 mM), Eocene seawater would have required essentially the same DIC as today to simultaneously explain a similar-to-modern Ω and the estimated Eocene atmospheric CO2 of ~1000 ppm. During the Cretaceous, at ~4 times modern [Ca2+], ocean buffering would have been at a minimum. Overall, during times of high seawater [Ca2+], CaCO3 saturation, pH, and atmospheric CO2 were more susceptible to perturbations of the global carbon cycle. For example, given both Eocene and Cretaceous seawater [Ca2+] and [Mg2+], a doubling of atmospheric CO2 would require less carbon addition to the ocean/atmosphere system than under modern seawater composition. Moreover, increasing seawater buffering since the Cretaceous may have been a driver of evolution by raising energetic demands of biologically controlled calcification and CO2 concentration mechanisms that aid photosynthesis.

  6. Free flow cell electrophoresis using zwitterionic buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodkey, R. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Studies of a zwitterionic buffer formulated for cell electrophoresis were done using the McDonnell-Douglas Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System. Standard buffers were analyzed for their stability in the electrical field and the results showed that both buffers tested were inherently unstable. Further, titration studies showed that the standards buffers buffered poorly at the pH employed for electrophoresis. The zwitterionic buffer buffered well at its nominal pH and was shown to be stable in the electrical field. Comparative studies of the buffer with standard cell separation buffers using formalin fixed rabbit and goose red blood cells showed that the zwitterionic buffer gave better resolution of the fixed cells. Studies with viable hybridoma cells showed that buffer Q supported cell viability equal to Hank's Balanced Salt Solution and that hybridoma cells in different stages of the growth cycle demonstrated reproducible differences in electrophoretic mobility.

  7. Effect of temperature and solvent composition on acid dissociation equilibria, I: Sequenced (s)(s)pKa determination of compounds commonly used as buffers in high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy detection.

    PubMed

    Padró, Juan M; Acquaviva, Agustín; Tascon, Marcos; Gagliardi, Leonardo G; Castells, Cecilia B

    2012-05-01

    A new automated and rapid potentiometric method for determining the effect of organic-solvent composition on pK(a) has been developed. It is based on the measurements of pH values of buffer solutions of variable solvent compositions using a combined glass electrode. Additions of small volumes of one precisely thermostated solution into another, both containing exactly the same analytical concentrations of the buffer components, can produce continuous changes in the solvent composition. Two sequences of potential measurements, one of increasing and the other of decreasing solvent content, are sufficient to obtain the pK(a) values of the acidic compound within the complete solvent-composition range in about 2h. The experimental design, procedures, and calculations needed to convert the measured pH into the thermodynamic pK(a) values are thoroughly discussed. This rapid and automated method allows the systematic study of the effect of solvent compositions and temperatures on the pK(a). It has been applied to study the dissociation constants of two monoprotic acids: formic acid and triethylamine:HCl in acetonitrile/water mixtures within the range from 0 to 90% (v/v) at temperatures between 20°C and 60°C. These volatile compounds are frequently used to control the pH of the mobile phase in HPLC, especially in methods coupled to mass-spectrometry detection. The obtained pK(a) values are in excellent agreement with those previously reported. The results were fitted to empirical functions between pK(a) and temperature and composition. These equations, which can be used to estimate the pK(a) of these substances at any composition and temperature, would be highly useful in practical work during chromatographic method development. PMID:22502616

  8. Growth of thick La2Zr2O7 buffer layers for coated conductors by polymer-assisted chemical solution deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yong; Xia, Yudong; Guo, Chunsheng; Cheng, C. H.; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Han

    2015-06-01

    La2Zr2O7 (LZO) epitaxial films have been deposited on LaAlO3 (LAO) (1 0 0) single-crystal surface and bi-axially textured NiW (2 0 0) alloy substrate by polymer-assisted chemical solution deposition, and afterwards studied with XRD, SEM and AFM approaches. Highly in-plane and out-of-plane oriented, dense, smooth, crack free and with a sufficient thickness (>240 nm) LZO buffer layers have been obtained on LAO (1 0 0) single-crystal surface; The films deposited on NiW (2 0 0) alloy substrate are also found with high degree in-plane and out-of-plane texturing, good density with pin-hole-free, micro-crack-free nature and a thickness of 300 nm. Highly epitaxial 500 nm thick YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) thin film exhibits the self-field critical current density (Jc) reached 1.3 MA/cm2 at 77 K .These results demonstrate the LZO epi-films obtained with current techniques have potential to be a buffer layer for REBCO coated conductors.

  9. In-Line Desalting of Proteins from Buffer and Synthetic Urine Solution Prior to ESI-MS Analysis via a Capillary-Channeled Polymer Fiber Microcolumn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdette, Carolyn Q.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2013-06-01

    Presented here is a novel in-line solid phase extraction (SPE) method utilizing a capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fiber microcolumn prior to introduction to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The high permeability of the microcolumn allows for operation under syringe pump or HPLC driven flow, ultimately providing greater mass spectral clarity and accurate molecular weight determinations for different protein/buffer combinations. Studies presented here focus on the desalting of several target proteins from a standard phosphate buffered saline (PBS) matrix and a synthetic urine solution prior to ESI-MS determinations. In every case, responses for μM-level proteins in PBS improve from the situation of not permitting molecular weight determinations to values that are precise to better than ±10 Da, without internal standards, with relative improvements in the signal-to-background ratios (S/B) on the order of 3,000×. De-salting of a myoglobin-spiked (12 μM) synthetic urine results in equally-improved spectral quality.

  10. Hydrolysis kinetics of lead silicate glass in acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Rafi Ali; Sadrnezhaad, Sayed Khatibuleslam; Raisali, Gholamreza; Hamidi, Amir

    2009-06-01

    Hydrolysis kinetics of the lead silicate glass (LSG) with 40 mol% PbO in 0.5 N HNO 3 aqueous acid solution was investigated. The surface morphology and the gel layer thickness were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) were used to determine the composition of the gel layer and the aqueous solution, respectively. The silicon content of the dissolution products was determined by using weight-loss data and compositions of the gel layer and the solution. The kinetic parameters were determined using the shrinking-core-model (SCM) for rate controlling step. The activation energy obtained for hydrolysis reaction was Qche = 56.07 kJ/mole. The diffusion coefficient of the Pb ions from the gel layer was determined by using its concentration in solution and in LSG. The shrinkage of the sample and the gel layer thickness during dissolution process were determined.

  11. Solution Processing of Cadmium Sulfide Buffer Layer and Aluminum-Doped Zinc Oxide Window Layer for Thin Films Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mahboob; Islam, Mohammad; Achour, Amine; Hayat, Ansar; Ahsan, Bilal; Rasheed, Haroon; Salam, Shahzad; Mujahid, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (Al:ZnO) thin films are used as buffer layer and front window layer, respectively, in thin film solar cells. CdS and Al:ZnO thin films were produced using chemical bath deposition (CBD) and sol-gel technique, respectively. For CBD CdS, the effect of bath composition and temperature, dipping time and annealing temperature on film properties was investigated. The CdS films are found to be polycrystalline with metastable cubic crystal structure, dense, crack-free surface morphology and the crystallite size of either few nanometers or 12-17 nm depending on bath composition. In case of CdS films produced with 1:2 ratio of Cd and S precursors, spectrophotometer studies indicate quantum confinement effect, owing to extremely small crystallite size, with an increase in Eg value from 2.42 eV (for bulk CdS) to 3.76 eV along with a shift in the absorption edge toward 330 nm wavelength. The optimum annealing temperature is 400°C beyond which film properties deteriorate through S evaporation and CdO formation. On the other hand, Al:ZnO films prepared via spin coating of precursor sols containing 0.90-1.10 at.% Al show that, with an increase in Al concentration, the average grain size increases from 28 nm to 131 nm with an associated decrease in root-mean-square roughness. The minimum value of electrical resistivity, measured for the films prepared using 0.95 at.% Al in the precursor sol, is 2.7 × 10-4 Ω ṡ cm. The electrical resistivity value rises upon further increase in Al doping level due to introduction of lattice defects and Al segregation to the grain boundary area, thus limiting electron transport through it.

  12. A mechanistic study of copper electropolishing in phosphoric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansson, Andrew

    The microelectronics industry is using copper as the interconnect material for microchips. A study of copper electropolishing is important for the process development of a new, low downforce approach, which is being developed to replace chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of the copper overburden. A promising technology is a combination of electropolishing with conventional CMP. Electropolishing of copper in phosphoric acid has been studied for, more than 70 years. Previous work has shown that the polishing rate, as measured by current density is directly related to the viscosity of the electrolyte. Also, the limiting species is water. In this study, a multidimensional design of experiments was performed to develop an in-depth model of copper electropolishing. Phosphoric acid was mixed with alcohols of different molecular weight and related viscosity to investigate how the solvents' properties affected polishing. The alcohols used were methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, butanol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol. The limiting current densities and electrochemical behavior of each solution was measured by potentiodynamic and potentiostatic experiments. Also, the kinematic viscosity and density were measured to determine the dynamic viscosity to investigate the relationship of current density and viscosity. Water, methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol solutions were also examined at 20°C to 60°C. Next, the relative percentage of dissociated phosphoric acid was measured by Raman spectroscopy for each polishing solution. Raman spectroscopy was also used to measure the relative dissociation of phosphoric acid inside the polishing film. Additionally, wafers were electropolished and electrochemical mechanically polished to investigate the effects of the different solvents, fluid flow, current, and potential. The results of these experiments have shown that the molecular mass and the ability of the solvent to dissociate phosphoric acid are the primary electrolyte properties that

  13. Multiphase chemistry of ozone on fulvic acids solutions.

    PubMed

    Brigante, Marcello; D'Anna, Barbara; Conchon, Pierre; George, Christian

    2008-12-15

    By means of a wetted-wall flow tube, we studied the multiphase chemistry of ozone on aqueous solutions containing fulvic acids (FA), taken as proxies for atmospheric "humic like substances", so-called HULIS. In these experiments, the loss of gaseous O3 was monitored by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy at the reactor outlet (i.e., after contact between the gaseous and liquid phases). Measurements are reported in terms of dimensionless uptake coefficients (gamma) in the range from 1.6 x 10(-7) to 1.3 x 10(-5) depending on ozone gas phase concentration (in the range from 6.6 to 34.4 x 10(11) molecules cm(-3)) and fulvic acid aqueous concentration (in the range from 0.25 to 2.5 mg L(-1)) and pH (in the range from 2.5 to 9.2). The measured kinetics were observed to follow a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type mechanism, in which O3 first adsorbs on the liquid surface and then reacts with the Fulvic Acid molecules. The reported uptake coefficients are greatly increased over those measured on pure water, demonstrating that the presence in solution of fulvic acids does greatly enhance the uptake kinetics. Accordingly, the chemical interactions of fulvic acids (or HULIS) may be a driving force for the uptake of ozone on liquid organic aerosols and can also represent an important mechanism for the O3 deposition to the rivers and lakes. PMID:19174887

  14. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose in zinc chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N.J.; Xu, Q.; Chen, L.F.

    1995-12-31

    The efficient conversion of cellulosic materials to ethanol has been hindered by the low yield of sugars, the high energy consumption in pretreatment processes, and the difficulty of recycling the pre-treatment agents. Zinc chloride may provide an alternative for pre-treating biomass prior to the hydrolysis of cellulose. The formation of a zinc-cellulose complex during the pretreatment of cellulose improves the yield of glucose in both the enzymatic and acid hydrolysis of cellulose. Low-temperature acid hydrolysis of cellulose in zinc chloride solution is carried out in two stages, a liquefaction stage and a saccharification stage. Because of the formation of zinc-cellulose complex in the first stage, the required amount of acid in the second stage has been decreased significantly. In 67% zinc chloride solution, a 99.5% yield of soluble sugars has been obtained at 70{degrees}C and 0.5M acid concentration. The ratio of zinc chloride to cellulose has been reduced from 4.5 to 1.5, and the yield of soluble sugars is kept above 80%. The rate of hydrolysis is affected by the ratio of zinc chloride to cellulose, acid concentration, and temperature.

  15. Effects of ultrasonic processing on degradation of salvianolic acid B in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y X; Zhang, L; Lu, L; Liu, E H; Shi, C Z

    2016-09-10

    To evaluate the stability of salvianolic acid B (Sal B) under ultrasound-assisted extraction in the pharmaceutical industry, degradation of Sal B under ultrasonic irradiation was investigated as the function of buffer concentration, pH, and temperature. With regard to Sal-B concentration, a first-order degradation process was determined, with 10% change in assay from its initial concentration as t90=4.81h, under maximum stability acidic conditions (pH 2.0) and at 25°C. The logkpH-pH profile described by specific acid-base catalysis and water molecules supported the experimental results. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses revealed 7 major degradation products whose structures were characterized by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. A primary degradation pathway involved cleavage of the ester bond and ring-opening of benzofuran in Sal B was proposed. The complete degradation pathway of Sal B was also proposed. Results showed that ultrasonic irradiation leads to degradation of Sal B in aqueous solution. PMID:27442887

  16. Contribution of light scattering to the circular dichroism of deoxyribonucleic acid films, deoxyribonucleic acid-polylysine complexes, and deoxyribonucleic acid particles in ethanolic buffers

    SciTech Connect

    Maestre, M.F.; Reich, C.

    1980-01-01

    The contribution of scattering to the circular dichroism (CD) of DNA films with twisted structures, DNA-polylysine complexes, and condensed DNA aggregates in ethanolic buffers of defined salt concentrations has been studied by the use of novel measuring techniques. These techniques include fluorscat cuvettes, fluorescence-detected circular dichroism (FDCD) methods, backscattering capturing devices, and beam-mounted goniometer detectors. The result of the experimental measurement is that DNA films can be made which have very large ellipticities or CD at sharp specific wavelengths. The sign of these ellipticities is related to the handedness of the twists, with a right-handed twist producing large positive rotations and a left-handed one producing negative rotations. The film shows nodal angles at which the interaction with light is minimal. The scattering patterns of both films, DNA-polylysine particles and DNA-EtOH condensates, show that the main interaction is light scattering produced by a resonance phenomenon similar to that produced in cholestric liquid crystals and twisted-nematic liquid crystals. It is proposed that the so-called psi-type CD spectrum is a manifestation of a side-by-side packing of DNA molecules with a long-range twisting order whose helical parameters match the helical parameter of circularly polarized light at specific resonance or critical wavelengths. Application of the Bragg law for cholesteric liquid crystals gives the periodicity of the long-range ordered structures. 9 figures.

  17. Solution influence on biomolecular equilibria - Nucleic acid base associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; Burt, S. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Various attempts to construct an understanding of the influence of solution environment on biomolecular equilibria at the molecular level using computer simulation are discussed. First, the application of the formal statistical thermodynamic program for investigating biomolecular equilibria in solution is presented, addressing modeling and conceptual simplications such as perturbative methods, long-range interaction approximations, surface thermodynamics, and hydration shell. Then, Monte Carlo calculations on the associations of nucleic acid bases in both polar and nonpolar solvents such as water and carbon tetrachloride are carried out. The solvent contribution to the enthalpy of base association is positive (destabilizing) in both polar and nonpolar solvents while negative enthalpies for stacked complexes are obtained only when the solute-solute in vacuo energy is added to the total energy. The release upon association of solvent molecules from the first hydration layer around a solute to the bulk is accompanied by an increase in solute-solvent energy and decrease in solvent-solvent energy. The techniques presented are expectd to displace less molecular and more heuristic modeling of biomolecular equilibria in solution.

  18. Electrodialysis synthesis of concentrated solutions of perrhenic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palant, A. A.; Bryukvin, V. A.; Levin, A. M.; Reshetova, O. V.

    2011-03-01

    The presented results demonstrate the possibility of electrodialysis production of concentrated solutions of perrhenic acid (HReO4 concentration >400 g/l). KReO4 is used as a precursor. The investigations are performed in a three-chamber electrodialysis cell in a continuous mode. The optimal processing parameters are as follows: the current is 3-5 A, the voltage is 30-40 V, and the anode chamber temperature is 20-25°C. Grade AR-0 ammonium perrhenate is precipitated from the obtained HReO4 solution.

  19. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Kalina, Dale G.; Kaplan, Louis; Mason, George W.

    1985-01-01

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions with an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  20. Studies on the adsorption of americium on alumina from aqueous nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Subba Rao, M.; Gaikwad, A.M.; Rao, V.K.; Natarajan, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports a study on the adsorption of Am(III) on alumina from oxalic acid-nitric acid solutions. Distribution coefficients for Am(III) on alumina at different oxalic acid-nitric acid concentrations have been determined and optimum conditions for loading and elution of Am from alumina columns have been established. Separation of Am from Pu and the effects of other ions, such as U(VI) and Fe(III), have also been studied. Am and Pu recoveries better than 99.5% were obtained. 3 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  1. DC diaphragm discharge in water solutions of selected organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyhnankova, Edita J.; Hammer, Malte U.; Reuter, Stephan; Krcma, Frantisek

    2015-07-01

    Effect of four simple organic acids water solution on a DC diaphragm discharge was studied. Efficiency of the discharge was quantified by the hydrogen peroxide production determined by UV-VIS spectrometry of a H2O2 complex formed with specific titanium reagent. Automatic titration was used to study the pH behaviour after the plasma treatment. Optical emission spectroscopy overview spectra were recorded and detailed spectra of OH band and Hβ line were used to calculate the rotational temperature and comparison of the line profile (reflecting electron concentration) in the acid solutions. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  2. Interaction of Ethyl Alcohol Vapor with Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the uptake of ethyl alcohol (ethanol) vapor by sulfuric acid solutions over the range approx.40 to approx.80 wt % H2SO4 and temperatures of 193-273 K. Laboratory studies used a fast flow-tube reactor coupled to an electron-impact ionization mass spectrometer for detection of ethanol and reaction products. The uptake coefficients ((gamma)) were measured and found to vary from 0.019 to 0.072, depending upon the acid composition and temperature. At concentrations greater than approx.70 wt % and in dilute solutions colder than 220 K, the values approached approx.0.07. We also determined the effective solubility constant of ethanol in approx.40 wt % H2SO4 in the temperature range 203-223 K. The potential implications to the budget of ethanol in the global troposphere are briefly discussed.

  3. Complexation of buffer constituents with neutral complexation agents: part I. Impact on common buffer properties.

    PubMed

    Riesová, Martina; Svobodová, Jana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Beneš, Martin; Tesařová, Eva; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2013-09-17

    The complexation of buffer constituents with the complexation agent present in the solution can very significantly influence the buffer properties, such as pH, ionic strength, or conductivity. These parameters are often crucial for selection of the separation conditions in capillary electrophoresis or high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and can significantly affect results of separation, particularly for capillary electrophoresis as shown in Part II of this paper series (Beneš, M.; Riesová, M.; Svobodová, J.; Tesařová, E.; Dubský, P.; Gaš, B. Anal. Chem. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ac401381d). In this paper, the impact of complexation of buffer constituents with a neutral complexation agent is demonstrated theoretically as well as experimentally for the model buffer system composed of benzoic acid/LiOH or common buffers (e.g., CHES/LiOH, TAPS/LiOH, Tricine/LiOH, MOPS/LiOH, MES/LiOH, and acetic acid/LiOH). Cyclodextrins as common chiral selectors were used as model complexation agents. We were not only able to demonstrate substantial changes of pH but also to predict the general complexation characteristics of selected compounds. Because of the zwitterion character of the common buffer constituents, their charged forms complex stronger with cyclodextrins than the neutral ones do. This was fully proven by NMR measurements. Additionally complexation constants of both forms of selected compounds were determined by NMR and affinity capillary electrophoresis with a very good agreement of obtained values. These data were advantageously used for the theoretical descriptions of variations in pH, depending on the composition and concentration of the buffer. Theoretical predictions were shown to be a useful tool for deriving some general rules and laws for complexing systems. PMID:23889602

  4. Use of a molecular form technique for the penetration of supersaturated solutions of salicylic acid across silicone membranes and human skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Leveque, N; Raghavan, S L; Lane, M E; Hadgraft, J

    2006-08-01

    Permeation enhancement of salicylic acid (SA) from supersaturated solutions formed using a 'molecular form' technique was investigated. In a conventional cosolvent technique, two solvents are used, one in which the drug is considerably more soluble than the other. Propylene glycol and water have been predominantly used as cosolvents to create supersaturation in skin permeation enhancement. In this paper, we report the use of buffer solutions with different pHs as media for producing different molecular forms. Supersaturated solutions were prepared using pH 8:pH 2 (80:20 v/v), which gave a nominal pH when mixed of around 5. Model silicone membranes and human skin were used. Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) was employed to stabilise the supersaturated states. Stability data showed that while the SA supersaturated solutions without HPMC crystallised between 15 min and 46 h depending on the degree of supersaturation, the solutions with HPMC were stable for more than 2 months. The flux of SA increased with the degree of saturation for solutions prepared in a 80:20 buffer pH 8/buffer pH 2 mixture. Although the fluxes of SA with and without HPMC were similar both through silicone membrane and human skin, HPMC was found to be effective in increasing the stability of supersaturated solutions of SA. PMID:16650701

  5. Solubility of chlorine in aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Mahir; Oktay, Münir; Kocakerim, M Muhtar; Copur, Mehmet

    2005-03-17

    The solubility of chlorine in aqueous hydrochloric acid solutions was studied. The effects of HCl concentration and temperature on the solubility were evaluated, and the thermodynamic parameters of the dissolution were calculated. It was found that the solubility isotherms had a minimum at about 0.5M HCl concentration at all the temperatures studied and that solubility decreased with the increase of temperature at all the HCl concentration range investigated. PMID:15752843

  6. Recovery of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with activated coals

    SciTech Connect

    Troshkina, I.D.; Naing, K.Z.; Ushanova, O.N.; P'o, V.; Abdusalomov, A.A.

    2006-09-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic characteristics of rhenium sorption from sulfuric acid solutions (pH 2) by activated coals produced from coal raw materials (China) were studied. Constants of the Henry equation describing isotherms of rhenium sorption by activated coals were calculated. The effective diffusion coefficients of rhenium in the coals were determined. The dynamic characteristics of rhenium sorption and desorption were determined for the activated coal with the best capacity and kinetic characteristics.

  7. Acid mine drainage: An economic total resource recovery solution

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, R.L.; Clarke, S.R.; Brackenbury, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    A common feature of abandoned hard rock mines and subterranean coal mines is the creation of toxic and acidic solution often containing iron, copper, zinc, lead, cadmium, manganese and alkaline earth and alkali metals. A process is described which sequentially removes heavy metals using electrochemical ion exchange and rotating cylinder electrodes. Studies summarized indicate recovery of copper, zinc, iron, and aluminum oxide; selective stripping of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and lead; and recovery of water acceptable for drinking after removal of heavy metals.

  8. Surface tensions of solutions containing dicarboxylic acid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Young; Hildemann, Lynn M.

    2014-06-01

    Organic solutes tend to lower the surface tension of cloud condensation nuclei, allowing them to more readily activate. The surface tension of various dicarboxylic acid aerosol mixtures was measured at 20 °C using the Wilhelmy plate method. At lower concentrations, the surface tension of a solution with equi-molar mixtures of dicarboxylic acids closely followed that of a solution with the most surface-active organic component alone. Measurements of surface tension for these mixtures were lower than predictions using Henning's model and the modified Szyszkowski equation, by ˜1-2%. The calculated maximum surface excess (Γmax) and inverse Langmuir adsorption coefficient (β) from the modified Szyszkowski equation were both larger than measured values for 6 of the 7 mixtures tested. Accounting for the reduction in surface tension in the Köhler equation reduced the critical saturation ratio for these multi-component mixtures - changes were negligible for dry diameters of 0.1 and 0.5 μm, but a reduction from 1.0068 to 1.0063 was seen for the 4-dicarboxylic acid mixture with a dry diameter of 0.05 μm.

  9. Chromatography of alkaline earths and transition metals on tin(iv) arsenosilicate and arsenophosphate thin layers in buffered EDTA solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Anwar, S.; Khan, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    The complex forming ability of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid at various pH values and the ion exchange behavior of tin(IV) arsenosilicate and arsenophosphate cation exchangers have been combined in a chromatographic study of some metal ions. As a result some interesting observations have been made, which have led to certain analytically difficult separations such as Ca/sup 2 +/ -Sr/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/ -Ba/sup 2 +/ and Hg/sup 2 +/ from Cu/sup 2 +/, Ni/sup 2 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Co/sup 2 +/ and Mn/sup 2 +/.

  10. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions.

    PubMed

    Ash, Christopher; Drábek, Ondřej; Tejnecký, Václav; Jehlička, Jan; Michon, Ninon; Borůvka, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Shredded card (SC) was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE) carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water). We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4). Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons) before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49) were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC). In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC). In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC). In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil), and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC). A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption). SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing. PMID:26900684

  11. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Christopher; Drábek, Ondřej; Tejnecký, Václav; Jehlička, Jan; Michon, Ninon; Borůvka, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Shredded card (SC) was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE) carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water). We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4). Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons) before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49) were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC). In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC). In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC). In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil), and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC). A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption). SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing. PMID:26900684

  12. Dehydration and oxidation of cellulose hydrolysis products in acidic solution

    SciTech Connect

    Garves, K.

    1981-01-01

    The dehydration of cotton cellulose in aqueous solutions in the presence of Ac/sub 2/O, AcOH, HCl, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or HBr proceeded by hydrolysis to carbohydrates with acetate groups, followed by conversion to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (I) and then, to levulinic acid (II) accompanied by humic acids. For the formation of I, HCl was a more efficient and selective catalyst than H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and the formation of II was promoted by high acid and H/sub 2/O concentrations in the medium. The addition of FeCl/sub 3/ to the dehydration mixture with HCl and continuous distillation led to the isolation of furfural.

  13. The Application of Electrodialysis to Desalting an Amino Acid Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, Vicente; Montiel, Vicente; González-García, José; Expósito, Eduardo; Iniesta, Jesús; Bonete, Pedro; Inglés, Marina

    2000-11-01

    One of the main difficulties in preparing pharmaceutical products is isolating them from aqueous solutions of high salt concentration, as a high purity must be obtained. Several methods that employ organic solvents are normally used. In this paper, a novel method, electrodialysis, is presented together with its application to the desalting of an industrial effluent comprising an amino acid (p-hydroxyphenylglycine) with a high salt content (ammonium sulfate and sodium dihydrogenphosphate). It was possible to remove more than 70% of the initial salt content. From this solution with a low salt content, it is possible to isolate the amino acid with a higher purity. This experiment will enable the student to gain a useful knowledge of this technique and to work with typical figures of merit of electrodialysis such as current efficiency, electrical energy consumption, production of the process, removal of salt, and loss of amino acid. In addition the student learns the use of chromatographic techniques applied to the analysis of amino acids (HPLC) and salts (IC).

  14. Methanol Uptake By Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols in the global budget of methanol, the solubility and reactivity of CH3OH in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions are under investigation. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H(*), for methanol dissolution into 45 to 70 percent by weight H2SO4. We find that methanol solubility ranges from 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 8) M/atm and increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and all rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Our data indicate that simple uptake by aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These results differ from those recently reported in the literature, and an explanation of this disparity will be presented. In addition to solvation, reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H may proceed in the atmosphere but is not significant under our experimental conditions. Results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique confirm this directly. In addition, the extent of methanol sequestration via formation of mono- and dimethylsulfate will be evaluated under several atmospheric conditions.

  15. Experimental equilibrium between acid gases and ethanolamine solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bhairi, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    The general subject area of this study is equilibrium solubility of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in solutions of some common ethanolamines. The amines studied are most widely used in the area of gas sweetening. They include monoethanolamine, diglycolamine, diethanolamine and methyldiethanolamine. Only limited data are available for some of these amines. The process involved developing simple apparatus and procedure for investigating the equilibrium solubility of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in aqueous alkanolamine solutions. The procedure uses a single equilibrium cell. No gas chromatograph nor liquid chemical analysis is required. Measurements of the solubility were made in different amine solution concentrations at acid gas partial pressures to 1000 psia and temperatures from 77 to 240{degree}F. The method used was found to be sound as indicated by the consistency and reproducibility of the data.

  16. The appearance of Ti3+ states in solution-processed TiOx buffer layers in inverted organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhidkov, Ivan S.; McLeod, John A.; Kurmaev, Ernst Z.; Korotin, Michael A.; Kukharenko, Andrey I.; Savva, Achilleas; Choulis, Stelios A.; Korotin, Danila M.; Cholakh, Seif O.

    2016-07-01

    We study the low-temperature solution processed TiOx films and device structures using core level and valence X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electronic structure calculations. We are able to correlate the fraction of Ti3+ present as obtained from Ti 2p core level XPS with the intensity of the defect states that appear within the band gap as observed with our valence XPS. Constructing an operating inverted organic photovoltaic (OPV) using the TiOx film as an electron selective contact may increase the fraction of Ti3+ present. We provide evidence that the number of charge carriers in TiOx can be significantly varied and this might influence the performance of inverted OPVs.

  17. CdS and Cd-Free Buffer Layers on Solution Phase Grown Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1- x)4 :Band Alignments and Electronic Structure Determined with Femtosecond Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, Richard; Barkhouse, Aaron; Wang, Wei; Yu, Luo; Shao, Xiaoyan; Mitzi, David; Hiroi, Homare; Sugimoto, Hiroki

    2013-12-02

    The heterojunctions formed between solution phase grown Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1- x)4(CZTS,Se) and a number of important buffer materials including CdS, ZnS, ZnO, and In2S3, were studied using femtosecond ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (fs-UPS) and photovoltage spectroscopy. With this approach we extract the magnitude and direction of the CZTS,Se band bending, locate the Fermi level within the band gaps of absorber and buffer and measure the absorber/buffer band offsets under flatband conditions. We will also discuss two-color pump/probe experiments in which the band bending in the buffer layer can be independently determined. Finally, studies of the bare CZTS,Se surface will be discussed including our observation of mid-gap Fermi level pinning and its relation to Voc limitations and bulk defects.

  18. Effect of phytic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and chitosan solutions on microhardness of the human radicular dentin

    PubMed Central

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Jaiswal, Shikha; Bansal, Parul; Arora, Rohit; Raj, Shalya; Malhotra, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of phytic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and chitosan solutions on the microhardness of human radicular dentin. Materials and Methods: Thirty dentin specimens were randomly divided into three groups of 10 specimens each according to the irrigant used: G1 — 1% phytic acid, G2 — 17% EDTA, and G3 — 0.2% chitosan. A standardized volume of each chelating solution was used for 3 min. Dentin microhardness was measured before and after application at the cervical, middle, and apical levels with a Vickers indenter under a 200-g load and a 10-s dwell time. The results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student's t test. Results: Microhardness of the radicular dentin varied at the cervical, middle, and apical levels. EDTA had the greatest overall effect, causing a sharp percentage reduction in dentin microhardness with a significant difference from phytic acid and chitosan (P = 0.002). However, phytic acid and chitosan differed insignificantly from each other (P = 0.887). Conclusion: All tested chelating solutions reduced microhardness of the radicular dentin layer at all the levels. However, reduction was least at the apical level. EDTA caused more reduction in dentin microhardness than chitosan while phytic acid reduced the least. PMID:27099428

  19. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the •NO2 radical.

  20. Concentration-Purification of Uranium from an Acid Leaching Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guettaf, H.; Becis, A.; Ferhat, K.; Hanou, K.; Bouchiha, D.; Yakoubi, K.; Ferrad, F.

    2009-11-01

    Chemical processes for the elaboration of uranium concentrate from uranium ore have been studied. This process is composed of successive units operations: crushing, milling, acid conventional leaching, filtration-washing, purification-concentration by ion exchange resins and uranium precipitation. The acid leaching operating conditions allow us to obtain a recovery uranium rate of 93%. The uranium concentration of the pregnant solution is approximately of 1.2 g/l. This value justifies the use of ion exchange resins to the concentration-purification of our pregnant solution. We have noticed that the pregnant solution contains a relatively high phosphate concentration which causes a premature uranium precipitation at pH=1.8. This pH value is in general, considered optimal to obtain the highest amount of fixed uranium by the anionic resin. To avoid the precipitation of uranium, the pH=1.5 has been fixed. We have obtained at this condition a good adsorption capacity. A 75% uranium concentrate have been elaborated, but the filtration of this concentrate has been very difficult. We have also noticed an excessive sulphate concentration. In order to improve this process, we have tested nitrates as eluant at different operating conditions.

  1. Anodic dissolution of nickel in acidic chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Aal, E. E. Abd; Zakria, W.; Diab, A.; El Haleem, S. M. Abd

    2003-04-01

    The anodic dissolution of nickel was studied galvanostatically in hydrochloric acid solutions of various concentrations. The reaction orders of chloride ion and hydrogen ion concentrations were found to be 0.5 and 1.0, respectively. An anodic Tafel slope equal to 120 ± 10 mV · decade-1 was obtained. The dissolution rate of nickel at constant acid concentration was increased with stirring of the solution and increasing temperature. The activation energy, ΔH, for the anodic dissolution process was found to be 12 kcal · mol-1. The presence of oxygen in solutions assisted the passivation process. The effect of addition of aniline and some of its derivatives (o-, m-, and p-anisidine) as inhibitors on the dissolution kinetics of Ni in 1 M HCl was also investigated. These compounds inhibited the anodic dissolution of nickel without affecting the Tafel slope, indicating that the adsorption of such inhibitors could not interfere with the mechanism of metal dissolution.

  2. Airborne soil dust and its importance in buffering of atmospheric acidity and critical load assessment, over the semi arid tract of northern India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Disha; Kulshrestha, Umesh

    Airborne soil dust and its importance in buffering of atmospheric acidity and critical load assessment, over the semi arid tract of northern India. The Critical Load approach alongwith integrated assessment models has been used in the European nations for policy formations to reduce acidic emissions. This unique approach was applied to assess the of vulnerability of natural systems to the present day atmospheric pollution scenario. The calculated values of critical loads of sulphur ( 225 - 275 eq/ha/yr) and nitrogen (298 - 303 eq/ha/yr), for the soil system in Delhi, were calculated with respect to Anjan grass, Hibiscus and Black siris. The present loads of sulphur (PL(S) = 26.40 eq/ha/yr) and nitrogen (PL(N) = 36.51 eq/ha/yr) were found to be much lower than their critical loads without posing any danger of atmospheric acidic deposition on the soil systems. The study indicated that the system is still protective due to high pH of soil. The nature of buffering capability of calcium derived from soil dust can be considered as a natural tool to combat acidification in the Indian region. The results showed that the pollution status in Delhi is still within the safe limits. However, at the pace at which the city is growing, it is likely that in coming decades, it may exceed these critical values. In order to set deposition limits and avoid adverse effects of acidic deposition this approach can be applied in India too. Such approach is very useful, not only in abating pollution but also in devising means of cost optimal emission abatement strategies.

  3. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.

    2012-02-22

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. For 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 10.5 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2 g/L and 0.25 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}.

  4. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which serve as scientific paradigms. Moreover, functional and comparative metagenomic studies are taking off and provide a wealth of insight in the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in a variety of applications, ranging from starters in complex fermentations to their marketing as probiotics. In this new era of high throughput analysis, biology has become big science. Hence, there is a need to systematically store the generated information, apply this in an intelligent way, and provide modalities for constructing self-learning systems that can be used for future improvements. This review addresses these systems solutions with a state of the art overview of the present paradigms that relate to the use of lactic acid bacteria in industrial applications. Moreover, an outlook is presented of the future developments that include the transition into practice as well as the use of lactic acid bacteria in synthetic biology and other next generation applications. PMID:21995776

  5. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Willem M

    2011-08-30

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which serve as scientific paradigms. Moreover, functional and comparative metagenomic studies are taking off and provide a wealth of insight in the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in a variety of applications, ranging from starters in complex fermentations to their marketing as probiotics. In this new era of high throughput analysis, biology has become big science. Hence, there is a need to systematically store the generated information, apply this in an intelligent way, and provide modalities for constructing self-learning systems that can be used for future improvements. This review addresses these systems solutions with a state of the art overview of the present paradigms that relate to the use of lactic acid bacteria in industrial applications. Moreover, an outlook is presented of the future developments that include the transition into practice as well as the use of lactic acid bacteria in synthetic biology and other next generation applications. PMID:21995776

  6. Acid retardation method in analysis of strongly acidic solutions by inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seregina, I F; Perevoznik, O A; Bolshov, M A

    2016-10-01

    Acid retardation on the sorbents as a technique for reduction of the acidity of the solutions prior to their analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was proposed and investigated. The proposed scheme provides substantial separation of the analytes and nitric acid, which allows direct introduction of the eluates in plasma without dilution. Two sorbents were examined - AV-17 anion-exchange resin and the Stirosorb 584 sorbent. Sorption and desorption of 38 elements on these sorbents were investigated. The efficiencies of the REEs' sorption on the anion-exchange and neutral sorbents were compared. The higher efficiency of the REEs and HNO3 separation was revealed for the neutral Stirosorb 584 sorbent. It was also found that most elements come out quantitatively of the column filled with the AV-17 resin after pumping 2-4mL of the solution. Wherein, the concentration of nitric acid decreased by 20 times. The anomalous behaviour of Ag, Pb, Th and U on the AV-17 resin was found. These analytes were eluted only after pumping 4 column volumes of deionized water. Na, K, Fe, Al and Li in concentrations within (50-1000mgL(-1)) range did not affect the recovery of REEs. The potential of ARM technique was demonstrate by the analysis of puriss. HNO3 and silverware. ARM enables to avoid dilution of highly acidic solutions prior to their introduction in ICP-MS. PMID:27474322

  7. Isolation and characterization of Chinese standard fulvic acid sub-fractions separated from forest soil by stepwise elution with pyrophosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yingchen; Wu, Fengchang; Xing, Baoshan; Meng, Wei; Shi, Guolan; Ma, Yan; Giesy, John P

    2015-01-01

    XAD-8 adsorption technique coupled with stepwise elution using pyrophosphate buffers with initial pH values of 3, 5, 7, 9, and 13 was developed to isolate Chinese standard fulvic acid (FA) and then separated the FA into five sub-fractions: FApH3, FApH5, FApH7, FApH9 and FApH13, respectively. Mass percentages of FApH3-FApH13 decreased from 42% to 2.5%, and the recovery ratios ranged from 99.0% to 99.5%. Earlier eluting sub-fractions contained greater proportions of carboxylic groups with greater polarity and molecular mass, and later eluting sub-fractions had greater phenolic and aliphatic content. Protein-like components, as well as amorphous and crystalline poly(methylene)-containing components were enriched using neutral and basic buffers. Three main mechanisms likely affect stepwise elution of humic components from XAD-8 resin with pyrophosphate buffers including: 1) the carboxylic-rich sub-fractions are deprotonated at lower pH values and eluted earlier, while phenolic-rich sub-fractions are deprotonated at greater pH values and eluted later. 2) protein or protein-like components can be desorbed and eluted by use of stepwise elution as progressively greater pH values exceed their isoelectric points. 3) size exclusion affects elution of FA sub-fractions. Successful isolation of FA sub-fractions will benefit exploration of the origin, structure, evolution and the investigation of interactions with environmental contaminants. PMID:25735451

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Chinese Standard Fulvic Acid Sub-fractions Separated from Forest Soil by Stepwise Elution with Pyrophosphate Buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yingchen; Wu, Fengchang; Xing, Baoshan; Meng, Wei; Shi, Guolan; Ma, Yan; Giesy, John P.

    2015-03-01

    XAD-8 adsorption technique coupled with stepwise elution using pyrophosphate buffers with initial pH values of 3, 5, 7, 9, and 13 was developed to isolate Chinese standard fulvic acid (FA) and then separated the FA into five sub-fractions: FApH3, FApH5, FApH7, FApH9 and FApH13, respectively. Mass percentages of FApH3-FApH13 decreased from 42% to 2.5%, and the recovery ratios ranged from 99.0% to 99.5%. Earlier eluting sub-fractions contained greater proportions of carboxylic groups with greater polarity and molecular mass, and later eluting sub-fractions had greater phenolic and aliphatic content. Protein-like components, as well as amorphous and crystalline poly(methylene)-containing components were enriched using neutral and basic buffers. Three main mechanisms likely affect stepwise elution of humic components from XAD-8 resin with pyrophosphate buffers including: 1) the carboxylic-rich sub-fractions are deprotonated at lower pH values and eluted earlier, while phenolic-rich sub-fractions are deprotonated at greater pH values and eluted later. 2) protein or protein-like components can be desorbed and eluted by use of stepwise elution as progressively greater pH values exceed their isoelectric points. 3) size exclusion affects elution of FA sub-fractions. Successful isolation of FA sub-fractions will benefit exploration of the origin, structure, evolution and the investigation of interactions with environmental contaminants.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Chinese Standard Fulvic Acid Sub-fractions Separated from Forest Soil by Stepwise Elution with Pyrophosphate Buffer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yingchen; Wu, Fengchang; Xing, Baoshan; Meng, Wei; Shi, Guolan; Ma, Yan; Giesy, John P.

    2015-01-01

    XAD-8 adsorption technique coupled with stepwise elution using pyrophosphate buffers with initial pH values of 3, 5, 7, 9, and 13 was developed to isolate Chinese standard fulvic acid (FA) and then separated the FA into five sub-fractions: FApH3, FApH5, FApH7, FApH9 and FApH13, respectively. Mass percentages of FApH3-FApH13 decreased from 42% to 2.5%, and the recovery ratios ranged from 99.0% to 99.5%. Earlier eluting sub-fractions contained greater proportions of carboxylic groups with greater polarity and molecular mass, and later eluting sub-fractions had greater phenolic and aliphatic content. Protein-like components, as well as amorphous and crystalline poly(methylene)-containing components were enriched using neutral and basic buffers. Three main mechanisms likely affect stepwise elution of humic components from XAD-8 resin with pyrophosphate buffers including: 1) the carboxylic-rich sub-fractions are deprotonated at lower pH values and eluted earlier, while phenolic-rich sub-fractions are deprotonated at greater pH values and eluted later. 2) protein or protein-like components can be desorbed and eluted by use of stepwise elution as progressively greater pH values exceed their isoelectric points. 3) size exclusion affects elution of FA sub-fractions. Successful isolation of FA sub-fractions will benefit exploration of the origin, structure, evolution and the investigation of interactions with environmental contaminants. PMID:25735451

  10. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang-Rong; Li, Hua-Bin; Li, Xiao-Yan; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2004-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a priority pollutant in the USA and many other countries. Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is environmentally favorable as the latter species is not toxic to most living organisms and also has a low mobility and bioavailability. Reduction of Cr(VI) by ascorbic acid (vitamin C) as a reductant was studied using potassium dichromate solution as the model pollutant. Effects of concentration of vitamin C, pH, temperature, irradiation and reaction time on the reduction of Cr(VI) were examined. Cr(VI) might be reduced by vitamin C not only in acidic conditions but also in weakly alkaline solutions. The reduction of Cr(VI) by vitamin C might occur not only under irradiation but also in the dark. Vitamin C is an important biological reductant in humans and animals, and not toxic. It is water-soluble and can easily permeate through various types of soils. The results indicate that vitamin C could be used in effective remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soils and groundwater in a wide range of pH, with or without sunlight. PMID:15488923

  11. Peak shapes of acids and bases under overloaded conditions in reversed-phase liquid chromatography, with weakly buffered mobile phases of various pH: A thermodynamic interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    We measured overloaded band profiles for a series of nine compounds (phenol, caffeine, 3-phenyl 1-propanol, 2-phenylbutyric acid, amphetamine, aniline, benzylamine, p-toluidine, and procainamidium chloride) on columns packed with four different C{sub 18}-bonded packing materials: XTerra-C{sub 18}, Gemini-C{sub 18}, Luna-C{sub 18}(2), and Halo-C{sub 18}, using buffered methanol-water mobile phases. The {sub W}{sup S}pH of the mobile phase was increased from 2.6 to 11.3. The buffer concentration (either phosphate, acetate, or carbonate buffers) was set constant at values below the maximum concentration of the sample in the band. The influence of the surface chemistry of the packing material on the retention and the shape of the peaks was investigated. Adsorbents having a hybrid inorganic/organic structure tend to give peaks exhibiting moderate or little tailing. The retention and the shape of the band profiles can easily be interpreted at {sub W}{sup S}pHs that are well above or well below the {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a} of the compound studied. In contrast, the peak shapes in the intermediary pH range (i.e., close to the compound {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a}) have rarely been studied. These shapes reveal the complexity of the competitive adsorption behavior of couples of acido-basic conjugated compounds at {sub W}{sup S}pHs that are close to their {sub W}{sup S}pK{sub a}. They also reveal the role of the buffer capacity on the resulting peak shape. With increasing {sub W}{sup S}pH, the overloaded profiles are first langmuirian (isotherm type I) at low {sub W}{sup S}pHs, they become S-shaped (isotherm type II), then anti-langmuirian (isotherm type III), S-shaped again at intermediate {sub W}{sup S}pHs, and finally return to a langmuirian shape at high {sub W}{sup S}pHs. A new general adsorption isotherm model that takes into account the dissociation equilibrium of conjugated acidic and basic species in the bulk mobile phase accounts for these transient band shapes. An

  12. Infrared optical constants of H2O ice, amorphous nitric acid solutions, and nitric acid hydrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Jordon, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We determined the infrared optical constants of nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dihydrate, nitric acid monohydrate, and solid amorphous nitric acid solutions which crystallize to form these hydrates. We have also found the infrared optical constants of H2O ice. We measured the transmission of infrared light throught thin films of varying thickness over the frequency range from about 7000 to 500/cm at temperatures below 200 K. We developed a theory for the transmission of light through a substrate that has thin films on both sides. We used an iterative Kramers-Kronig technique to determine the optical constants which gave the best match between measured transmission spectra and those calculated for a variety of films of different thickness. These optical constants should be useful for calculations of the infrared spectrum of polar stratospheric clouds.

  13. Effect of synovial fluid, phosphate-buffered saline solution, and water on the dissolution and corrosion properties of CoCrMo alloys as used in orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A C; Kilburn, M R; Papageorgiou, I; Allen, G C; Case, C P

    2005-06-15

    The corrosion and dissolution of high- and low-carbon CoCrMo alloys, as used in orthopedic joint replacements, were studied by immersing samples in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), water, and synovial fluid at 37 degrees C for up to 35 days. Bulk properties were analyzed with a fine ion beam microscope. Surface analyses by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy showed surprisingly that synovial fluid produced a thin oxide/hydroxide layer. Release of ions into solution from the alloy also followed an unexpected pattern where synovial fluid, of all the samples, had the highest Cr concentration but the lowest Co concentration. The presence of carbide inclusions in the alloy did not affect the corrosion or the dissolution mechanisms, although the carbides were a significant feature on the metal surface. Only one mechanism was recognized as controlling the thickness of the oxide/hydroxide interface. The analysis of the dissolved metal showed two mechanisms at work: (1) a protein film caused ligand-induced dissolution, increasing the Cr concentration in synovial fluid, and was explained by the equilibrium constants; (2) corrosion at the interface increased the Co in PBS. The effect of prepassivating the samples (ASTM F-86-01) did not always have the desired effect of reducing dissolution. The release of Cr into PBS increased after prepassivation. The metal-synovial fluid interface did not contain calcium phosphate as a deposit, typically found where samples are exposed to calcium rich bodily fluids. PMID:15900610

  14. Removal of arsenious acid from sulfuric acidic solution using ultrasound oxidation and goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Hosokawa, Ryota; Hangui, Shinji; Kawamura, Youhei; Sugawara, Katsuyasu

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the properties of synthetic goethite for the adsorption of As from strongly acidic solutions in ambient atmosphere under ultrasound irradiation. The goethite was successfully synthesized from iron-containing sulfuric acidic solution (1271 ppm) using an autoclave apparatus for 1 h at 0.12 MPa and 121 °C. The ratio of the iron eluted from the synthetic goethite to the acidic solution was only 0.58% at pH 2.1. Ultrasound irradiation (200 kHz, 200 W) was applied to oxidize 10 ppm of As(III) to As(V) at pH 2.2 for 60 min under various atmospheric conditions. Remarkably, the oxidation ratio of As(III) to As(V) is quite high (89.7%) at pH 2.2 in ambient atmosphere and is close to those obtained for Ar (95.3%) and O2 (95.9%) atmospheres. The As(III) removal ratio reached 94.5% after 60 min of irradiation. Therefore, goethite is a promising material for As adsorption using ultrasound oxidation in the acidic region in ambient atmosphere.

  15. Oligosaccharide-based Surfactant/Citric Acid Buffer System Stabilizes Lactate Dehydrogenase during Freeze-drying and Storage without the Addition of Natural Sugar.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shigesaburo; Kawai, Ryuichiro; Koga, Maito; Asakura, Kouichi; Takahashi, Isao; Osanai, Shuichi

    2016-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the maintenance effects of oligosaccharide-based surfactants on the enzymatic activity of a model protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), during freeze-drying and room temperature storage using the citric acid buffer system. Oligosaccharide-based surfactants, which exhibit a high glass transition temperature (Tg), promoted the eminent retention of enzymatic activity during these protocols, whereas monosaccharide-based surfactants with a low Tg displayed poor performance at high concentration, albeit much better than that of Tween 80 at middle concentration. The increase in the alkyl chain length did not exert positive effects as observed for the maintenance effect during freeze-thawing, but an amphiphilic nature and a glass forming ability were crucial for the effective stabilization at a low excipient concentration during freeze-drying. Even a low oligosaccharide-based surfactant content (0.1 mg mL(-1)) could maintain LDH activity during freeze-drying, but a high surfactant content (1.0 mg mL(-1)) was required to prevent buffer precipitation and retain high LDH activity on storage. Regarding storage, glass formation restricted molecular mobility in the lyophilized matrix, and LDH activity was effectively retained. The present results describe a strategy based on the glass-forming ability of surfactant-type excipients that affords a natural sugar-free formulation or an alternative use for polysorbate-type surfactants. PMID:27181251

  16. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates.

    PubMed

    Ahoranta, Sarita H; Kokko, Marika E; Papirio, Stefano; Özkaya, Bestamin; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of acidic solution containing 5g/L of Fe(II) and 10mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7h, 96-98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pH<2.4. As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the system. In shake flask experiments, As(V) sorbed onto jarosite better than As(III). Moreover, the sorption capacity of biogenic jarosite was significantly higher than that of synthetic jarosite. The developed bioprocess simultaneously and efficiently removes iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment. PMID:26705889

  17. Hydrogen production by photoelectrochemically splitting solutions of formic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Guo, Wenliang; Zhu, Yusong; Wu, Yuping

    2011-10-17

    A TiO₂/FTO (FTO=fluorine-doped tin oxide) electrode was prepared by dip-coating FTO in a suspension of TiO₂ prepared from a sol-gel method and was used as a photoanode to split an aqueous solution of formic acid to produce hydrogen. The surface of the TiO₂/FTO film was covered with assemblies of TiO₂ nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 20 nm. Under irradiation by using a Xe lamp, splitting of formic acid was performed at different applied current densities. Compared to splitting water or utilizing FTO and Pt foil as the anode, the splitting voltage is much lower and can be as low as -0.27 V. The results show that the splitting voltage is related to the concentration of free formate groups. The evolution rate of hydrogen measured by using gas chromatography is 130 μmol h⁻¹ at a current density of 20 mA cm⁻² and the energy-conversion efficiency can be 1.79 %. Photoelectrolysis of formic acid has the potential to be an efficient way to produce hydrogen with a high energy-conversion efficiency. PMID:21994155

  18. Conformation of poly(γ-glutamic acid) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Muroga, Yoshio; Nakaya, Asami; Inoue, Atsuki; Itoh, Daiki; Abiru, Masaya; Wada, Kaori; Takada, Masako; Ikake, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    Local conformation and overall conformation of poly(γ-DL-glutamic acid) (PγDLGA) and poly(γ-L-glutamic acid) (PγLGA) in aqueous solution was studied as a function of degree of ionization ε by (1) H-NMR, circular dichroism, and potentiometric titration. It was clarified that their local conformation is represented by random coil over an entire ε range and their overall conformation is represented by expanded random-coil in a range of ε > ε(*) , where ε(*) is about 0.3, 0.35, 0.45, and 0.5 for added-salt concentration of 0.02M, 0.05M, 0.1M, and 0.2M, respectively. In a range of ε < ε(*) , however, ε dependence of their overall conformation is significantly differentiated from each other. PγDLGA tends to aggregate intramolecularly and/or intermolecularly with decreasing ε, but PγLGA still behaves as expanded random-coil. It is speculated that spatial arrangement of adjacent carboxyl groups along the backbone chain essentially affects the overall conformation of PγGA in acidic media. PMID:26574908

  19. INTERACTION OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF CHLORINE WITH MALIC ACID, TARTARIC ACID, AND VARIOUS FRUIT JUICES, A SOURCE OF MUTAGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interactions of aqueous solutions of chlorine with some fruit acids (citric acid, DL-malic acid, and L-tartaric acid) at different pH values were studied. iethyl ether extraction followed by GC/MS analysis indicated that a number of mutagens (certain chlorinated propanones an...

  20. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part II. Recovery of Ammonia from Sour Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, L.J.; King, C.J.

    1990-03-01

    Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, SUCCiOlC acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The concentration

  1. The extraction of actinides from nitric acid solutions with diamides of dipicolinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapka, Joseph L.; Paulenova, Alena; Alyapyshev, Mikhail Yu; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Law, Jack D.; Herbst, R. Scott

    2010-03-01

    Diamides of dipicolinic acid (N,N'-diethyl-N,N'-ditolyl-dipicolinamide, EtTDPA) were synthesized and evaluated for their extraction capability for actinides. In this work the extractions of neptunium(V), protactinium(V), and thorium(IV) with EtTDPA in a polar fluorinated diluent from nitric acid were investigated. EtTDPA shows a high affinity for Th(IV) even at millimolar concentrations. Np(V) and Pa(V) are both reasonably extractable with EtTDPA; however, near saturated solutions are required to achieve appreciable distribution ratios. A comparison with previously published actinide extraction data is given.

  2. A Pollutant Transformation Laboratory Exercise for Environmental Chemistry: The Reduction of Nitrobenzenes by Anaerobic Solutions of Humic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunnivant, Frank M.; Reynolds, Mark-Cody

    2007-01-01

    The laboratory experiment, which acts as a capstone, integrated lecture-laboratory exercise involving solution preparation, pH buffers, [E[subscript]H] (reduction potential) buffers, organic reaction mechanisms, reaction kinetics, and instrumental analysis is presented. The students completing the lecture and laboratory exercises could gain a…

  3. Buffering agents modify the hydration landscape at charged interfaces.

    PubMed

    Trewby, William; Livesey, Duncan; Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2016-02-23

    Buffering agents are widely used to stabilise the pH of solutions in soft matter and biological sciences. They are typically composed of weak acids and bases mixed in an aqueous solution, and can interact electrostatically with charged surfaces such as biomembranes. Buffers can induce protein aggregation and structural modification of soft interfaces, but a molecular-level picture is still lacking. Here we use high-resolution atomic force microscopy to investigate the effect of five commonly used buffers, namely 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES), monosodium phosphate, saline sodium citrate (SSC) and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) on the hydration landscape of Muscovite mica in solution. Mica is an ideal model substrate due to its negative surface charge and identical lattice parameter when compared with gel-phase lipid bilayers. We show that buffer molecules can produce cohesive aggregates spanning over tens of nanometres of the interface. SSC, Tris and monosodium phosphate tend to create an amorphous mesh layer several molecules thick and with no preferential ordering. In contrast, MES and HEPES adopt epitaxial arrangements commensurate with the underlying mica lattice, suggesting that they offer the most suitable solution for high-resolution studies. To confirm that this effect persisted in biologically-relevant interfaces, the experiments were repeated on a silica-supported lipid bilayer. Similar trends were observed for this system using atomic force microscopy as well as ellipsometry. The effect of the buffering agents can be mitigated by the inclusion of salt which helps displace them from the interface. PMID:26837938

  4. Radiolysis gases from nitric acid solutions containing HSA and HAN

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1994-10-28

    The concentration of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the radiolytically produced off-gas from 2.76-4.25M HNO{sub 3}/PU solutions has been found to be greatly reduced in the presence of sulfamic acid (HSA) and hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN). The H{sub 2} concentration ([H{sub 2}]) is reduced from 35 percent to about 4 percent by dilution caused from an increase in the production rates of nitrogen (N{sub 2}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and oxygen (O{sub 2}) gases. The generation rate of H{sub 2} was not affected by HSA or HAN giving a measured radiolytic yield, G(H{sub 2}), value of 0.201 molecules/100 eV for 2.765M NO{sub 3}{sup -} solution (a value of 0.213 is predicted from previous data). The G(H{sub 2}) values are dependent on the solution nitrate concentration ([NO{sub 3}{sup -}]). The generation rates of N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} are not dependent on the [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] in this narrow range, but are dependent on the presence of HSA and the concentration of HAN. The percentage [H{sub 2}] for the 2.5 to 3.0M NO{sub 3}{sup -} range expected in the off- from the FB-Line Pu{sup +3} Hold Tanks is conservatively estimated to be about 3.5 to 4.5 % for Pu + 3 solutions initially containing 0.023M HAN/0.165M HSA. The upper limit [H{sub 2}] may actually be about 4.1 % (4.3 % at 90 % confidence limits) but more {open_quotes}initial{close_quotes} off-gas rate data is needed at about 2.9M [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] in Pu{sup +3} solution for verification. Addition of ascorbic acid had no effect on the off-gas rate of Pu{sup +3} solutions containing HSA and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations higher than those expected in the hold tanks. The maximum {open_quotes}hold time{close_quotes} for 50 grams/liter Pu{sup +3}/0.165M HSA/0.023M HAN/2.5-3.0M HNO{sub 3} solution is 20.3{+-}2.1 days. After this time the HSA initially present will become exhausted and the [H{sub 2}] will increase to 35 %. This hold time may be longer in [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] < 3.0M, but again more study is needed.

  5. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R. A.

    2012-03-12

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 °C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. At 25 °C, for 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 11 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2.5 g/L and 0.8 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The solubility of Gd in 4 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate at 10 °C is about 1.5 g/L. For 6 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate, the solubility of Gd at 10

  6. Optical properties of chitosan in aqueous solution of L- and D-ascorbic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinkina, Olga N.; Shipovskaya, Anna B.; Kazmicheva, Olga F.

    2016-04-01

    The optical properties of aqueous chitosan solutions in L- and D-ascorbic acids were studied by optical rotatory dispersion and spectrophotometry. The specific optical rotation [α] of all chitosan solutions tested was positive, in contrast to aqueous solutions of the ascorbic acid enantiomers, which exhibit an inverse relationship of [α] values. Significant differences in the absolute values of [α] of the chitosan solutions at polymer-acid ratios exceeding the equimolar one were found.

  7. Hexavalent uranium diffusion into soils from concentrated acidic and alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Pena, Jasquelin; Sutton, Stephen R.; Newville, Matthew

    2004-03-29

    Uranium contamination of soils and sediments often originates from acidic or alkaline waste sources, with diffusion being a major transport mechanism. Measurements of U(VI) diffusion from initially pH 2 and pH 11 solutions into a slightly alkaline Altamont soil and a neutral Oak Ridge soil were obtained through monitoring uptake from boundary reservoirs and from U concentration profiles within soil columns. The soils provided pH buffering, resulting in diffusion at nearly constant pH. Micro x-ray absorption near edge structure spectra confirmed that U remained in U(VI) forms in all soils. Time trends of U(VI) depletion from reservoirs, and U(VI) concentration profiles within soil columns yielded K{sub d} values consistent with those determined in batch tests at similar concentrations ({approx} 1 mM), and much lower than values for sorption at much lower concentrations (nM to {mu}M). These results show that U(VI) transport at high concentrations can be relatively fast at non-neutral pH, with negligible surface diffusion, because of weak sorption.

  8. [Uptake of fluoride into enamel and its effect on acid resistance by application of fluoride-releasing sealant--Part 2. Effect of application time and immersion time into buffer after its removal].

    PubMed

    Kato, K

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the amount of fluoride in the enamel, taken from a fluoride-releasing sealant (F + sealant) and acid resistance. The F + sealant was applied to the bovine enamel from 1 week to 6 months. After the removal of the F + sealant, the bovine teeth were immersed in phosphate buffer from 1 month to 6 months. At each time period, the enamel was biopsied with acid and its fluoride and calcium concentration were analyzed. Results were as follows: (1) It was suitable to immerse the teeth in 1M KOH solution for 2 days in order to remove the loosely bound fluoride produced by the fluoride application from the enamel. (2) The amount of fluoride in the surface enamel increased in proportion to the application time of F + sealant. (3) The amount of calcium dissolved from the enamel showed the significant decrease by the F + sealant application, while no difference was shown by the application time. (4) The amount of fluoride in the surface enamel acquired by the F + sealant was maintained for 6 months after the removal of the F + sealant. (5) The amount of calcium dissolved from the enamel showed no difference in the period of immersion time. PMID:2066630

  9. Effects of acid-etching solutions on human enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Fanchi, M; Breschi, L

    1995-06-01

    Nine noncarious human molars were extracted and stored in saline solution. Three standard occlusal cavities with beveled enamel margins were prepared on each tooth and etched with the etching solutions of three dentinal adhesive systems: (1) 37% phosphoric acid solution, (2) 4.3% oxalic acid and 2.6% aluminum salts solution, and (3) 10% maleic acid solution. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed that all the etching solutions affected the enamel surface morphology. The solution of oxalic acid and aluminum salts removed primarily the prism core material and partially the periphery of the prisms, but did not affect the nonbeveled enamel surface. Phosphoric and maleic acids removed both prism core materials and prism periphery; these specimens also showed areas in which no prism morphology could be detected. These two acids also removed apatite crystals from the prism core of the intact enamel surface. PMID:8602425

  10. Aspects of the chemical stability of mitomycin and porfiromycin in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Underberg, W J; Lingeman, H

    1983-05-01

    Aspects of the degradations of mitomycin and porfiromycin were studied. The initial degradation processes of the compounds in an acidic medium were investigated. Influences of pH, buffers, and other additives such as halogenides and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate [sodium 1,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate] were studied. The hydrogen ion catalyzes the degradation of both the uncharged and the protonated species. Anions also promote the degradation of the compounds in an acidic medium. Rate constants for all of the catalytic reactions could be determined. From the pH profiles, after correction for buffer influences, accurate pKa values for the aziridine nitrogens could be obtained. The protective influence of the dioctyl sulfosuccinate ion could be explained. From the data obtained a plausible mechanism for the initial acidic degradation reactions was developed. PMID:6864504

  11. Interaction of trace elements in acid mine drainage solution with humic acid.

    PubMed

    Suteerapataranon, Siripat; Bouby, Muriel; Geckeis, Horst; Fanghänel, Thomas; Grudpan, Kate

    2006-06-01

    The release of metal ions from a coal mining tailing area, Lamphun, Northern Thailand, is studied by leaching tests. Considerable amounts of Mn, Fe, Al, Ni and Co are dissolved in both simulated rain water (pH 4) and 10 mg L(-1) humic acid (HA) solution (Aldrich humic acid, pH 7). Due to the presence of oxidizing pyrite and sulfide minerals, the pH in both leachates decreases down to approximately 3 combined with high sulfate concentrations typical to acid mine drainage (AMD) water composition. Interaction of the acidic leachates upon mixing with ground- and surface water containing natural organic matter is simulated by subsequent dilution (1:100; 1:200; 1:300; 1:500) with a 10 mg L(-1) HA solution (ionic strength: 10(-3) mol L(-1)). Combining asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) with UV/Vis and ICP-MS detection allows for the investigation of metal ion interaction with HA colloid and colloid size evolution. Formation of colloid aggregates is observed by filtration and AsFlFFF depending on the degree of the dilution. While the average HA size is initially found to be 2 nm, metal-HA complexes are always found to be larger. Such observation is attributed to a metal induced HA agglomeration, which is found even at low coverage of HA functional groups with metal ions. Increasing the metal ion to HA ratio, the HA bound metal ions and the HA entities are growing in size from <3 to >450 nm. At high metal ion to HA ratios, precipitation of FeOOH phases and HA agglomeration due to colloid charge neutralization by complete saturation of HA complexing sites are responsible for the fact that most of Fe and Al precipitate and are found in a size fraction >450 nm. In the more diluted solutions, HA is more relevant as a carrier for metal ion mobilization. PMID:16631855

  12. Release of nitrous acid and nitrogen dioxide from nitrate photolysis in acidic aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Scharko, Nicole K; Berke, Andrew E; Raff, Jonathan D

    2014-10-21

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) is an abundant component of aerosols, boundary layer surface films, and surface water. Photolysis of NO3(-) leads to NO2 and HONO, both of which play important roles in tropospheric ozone and OH production. Field and laboratory studies suggest that NO3¯ photochemistry is a more important source of HONO than once thought, although a mechanistic understanding of the variables controlling this process is lacking. We present results of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy measurements of NO2 and HONO emitted during photodegradation of aqueous NO3(-) under acidic conditions. Nitrous acid is formed in higher quantities at pH 2-4 than expected based on consideration of primary photochemical channels alone. Both experimental and modeled results indicate that the additional HONO is not due to enhanced NO3(-) absorption cross sections or effective quantum yields, but rather to secondary reactions of NO2 in solution. We find that NO2 is more efficiently hydrolyzed in solution when it is generated in situ during NO3(-) photolysis than for the heterogeneous system where mass transfer of gaseous NO2 into bulk solution is prohibitively slow. The presence of nonchromophoric OH scavengers that are naturally present in the environment increases HONO production 4-fold, and therefore play an important role in enhancing daytime HONO formation from NO3(-) photochemistry. PMID:25271384

  13. Compatible solute influence on nucleic acids: Many questions but few answers

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Compatible solutes are small organic osmolytes including but not limited to sugars, polyols, amino acids, and their derivatives. They are compatible with cell metabolism even at molar concentrations. A variety of organisms synthesize or take up compatible solutes for adaptation to extreme environments. In addition to their protective action on whole cells, compatible solutes display significant effects on biomolecules in vitro. These include stabilization of native protein and nucleic acid structures. They are used as additives in polymerase chain reactions to increase product yield and specificity, but also in other nucleic acid and protein applications. Interactions of compatible solutes with nucleic acids and protein-nucleic acid complexes are much less understood than the corresponding interactions of compatible solutes with proteins. Although we may begin to understand solute/nucleic acid interactions there are only few answers to the many questions we have. I summarize here the current state of knowledge and discuss possible molecular mechanisms and thermodynamics. PMID:18522725

  14. Volumetric and UV absorption studies on understanding the solvation behavior of polyhydroxy solutes in l-ascorbic acid(aq) solutions at T=(288.15 to 318.15)K.

    PubMed

    Banipal, Parampaul K; Sharma, Mousmee; Banipal, Tarlok S

    2016-02-01

    Thermodynamic and spectroscopic data characterizing the solvation behavior of polyhydroxy compounds are in demand to get better understanding about the mechanisms of taste chemoreception, protein stabilization, etc. Apparent molar volumes for monosaccharides, disaccharides, derivatives, and polyols in (0.05, 0.15, 0.25 and 0.35) mol kg(-1) aqueous solutions of l-ascorbic acid have been determined from density data measured at (288.15, 298.15, 308.15 and 318.15)K under atmospheric pressure. Standard partial molar volumes at infinite-dilution and corresponding volumes of transfer of solutes from water to L-ascorbic acid(aq) have been calculated. Interaction coefficients and standard partial molar expansibilities have also been evaluated. The basic taste quality of studied solutes has been assessed from apparent massic volumes. UV absorption studies support the interactions between solutes and L-ascorbic acid. Influence of pH variation was taken into consideration while evaluating chemical behavior and stability of L-ascorbic acid in aqueous and buffer solutions. PMID:26304409

  15. EXAFS Study on the Reactions Between Iron And Fulvic Acid in Acid Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Schaik, J.W.J.van; Persson, I.; Kleja, D.B.; Gustafsson, J.P.

    2009-05-26

    Iron(III) competes with trace metals for binding sites on organic ligands. We used X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to determine the binding mode and oxidation state of iron in solutions initially containing only iron(III) and fulvic acid at pHs 2 and 4. EXAFS spectra were recorded at different times after sample preparation. Iron was octahedrally configured with inner-sphere Fe-O interactions at 1.98-2.10 {angstrom}, depending on the oxidation state of iron. Iron(III) formed complexes with fulvic acid within 15 min. Iron(III) was reduced to iron(II) with time at pH 2, whereas no significant reduction occurred at pH 4. No signs of dimeric/trimeric hydrolysis products were found in any of the solution samples (<0.45 {mu}m). However, the isolated precipitate of the pH 2 sample (>0.45 {mu}m) showed Fe{hor_ellipsis}Fe distances, indicating the presence of tightly packed iron(III) trimers and/or clusters of corner-sharing octahedra. It is suggested that the binding mode of iron(III) to fulvic acid at low pH may be phase-dependent: in solution mononuclear complexes predominate, whereas in the solid phase hydrolyzed polynuclear iron(III) complexes form, even at very low pH values. The observed pH dependence of iron(III) reduction was consistent with expected results based on thermodynamic calculations for model ligands.

  16. Large-scale production of anhydrous nitric acid and nitric acid solutions of dinitrogen pentoxide

    DOEpatents

    Harrar, Jackson E.; Quong, Roland; Rigdon, Lester P.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for a large scale, electrochemical production of anhydrous nitric acid and N.sub.2 O.sub.5. The method includes oxidizing a solution of N.sub.2 O.sub.4 /aqueous-HNO.sub.3 at the anode, while reducing aqueous HNO.sub.3 at the cathode, in a flow electrolyzer constructed of special materials. N.sub.2 O.sub.4 is produced at the cathode and may be separated and recycled as a feedstock for use in the anolyte. The process is controlled by regulating the electrolysis current until the desired products are obtained. The chemical compositions of the anolyte and catholyte are monitored by measurement of the solution density and the concentrations of N.sub.2 O.sub.4.

  17. Uptake of Hypobromous Acid (HOBr) by Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions: Low-Temperature Solubility and Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Ashbourn, Samatha F. M.; Rammer, Thomas A.; Golden, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is a key species linking inorganic bromine to the chlorine and odd hydrogen chemical families. We have measured the solubility of HOBr in 45 - 70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol composition. Over the temperature range 201 - 252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, with an effective Henry's law coefficient, H* = 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 7) mol/L/atm. H* is inversely dependent on temperature, with Delta H = -46.2 kJ/mol and Delta S = -106.2 J/mol/K for 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions. Our study includes temperatures which overlap both previous measurements of HOBr solubility. For uptake into aqueous 45 wt% H2SO4, the solubility can be described by log H* = 3665/T - 10.63. For 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4, log H* = 2412/T - 5.55. At temperatures colder than approx. 213 K, the solubility of HOBr in 45 wt% H2SO4 is noticeably larger than in 70 wt% H2SO4. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols should contain equilibrium concentrations of HOBr which equal or exceed those of HBr. Our measurements indicate chemical reaction of HOBr upon uptake into aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases followed by evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2, particularly at 70 wt% H2SO4.

  18. Evaluation of amine inhibitors for suitability as crevice buffering agents. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaweera, P.; Hettiarachchi, S.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes the results of a research effort to evaluate the suitability of some selected amines and amino acids as a crevice-buffering agents in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators. The amines may be useful for buffering acid crevices, and the amino acids, because they contain both acidic and basic groups, may be useful for acidic and caustic crevices. Five commercially available amines and two amino acids were studied during this research. The study involved (1) the hydrolysis of these commercially available amines and amino acids, including measurement of their kinetics of decomposition, in simulated steam generator bulk water at 290 C, and (2) determination of their thermal stability in a simulated crevice environment. The study showed that, although the high-molecular-weight amines undergo hydrothermal decomposition, they have a better buffering capacity than their low-molecular-weight counterparts at 290 C. The amines provide effective crevice buffering by increasing the pH of the crevice solution by as much as 2.84 and to 4.24 units in the experimental setup used in this program. It was concluded that polyamines provide excellent buffering of the simulated crevice environment at 290 C and morpholine remains the best low-molecular-weight amine investigated. However, detailed volatility studies of the amines were not considered in this work. Such data would be needed before in-plant testing to ensure that the amines can concentrate in steam generator crevices to the levels assumed in this study.

  19. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is reduced to pyrroloquinoline quinol (PQQH2) by vitamin C, and PQQH2 produced is recycled to PQQ by air oxidation in buffer solution at pH 7.4.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kazuo; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Nakano, Masahiko; Ikemoto, Kazuto

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the reaction of sodium salt of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQNa2) with vitamin C (Vit C) were performed in phosphate-buffered solution (pH 7.4) at 25 °C under nitrogen atmosphere, using UV-vis spectrophotometry. The absorption spectrum of PQQNa2 decreased in intensity due to the reaction with Vit C and was changed to that of pyrroloquinoline quinol (PQQH2, a reduced form of PQQ). One molecule of PQQ was reduced by two molecules of Vit C producing a molecule of PQQH2 in the buffer solution. PQQH2, thus produced, was recycled to PQQ due to air oxidation. PQQ and Vit C coexist in many biological systems, such as vegetables, fruits, as well as in human tissues. The results obtained suggest that PQQ is reduced by Vit C and functions as an antioxidant in biological systems, because it has been reported that PQQH2 shows very high free-radical scavenging and singlet-oxygen quenching activities in buffer solutions. PMID:26264520

  20. Dietary Supplementation of Benzoic Acid and Essential Oil Compounds Affects Buffering Capacity of the Feeds, Performance of Turkey Poults and Their Antioxidant Status, pH in the Digestive Tract, Intestinal Microbiota and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Giannenas, I.; Papaneophytou, C. P.; Tsalie, E.; Pappas, I.; Triantafillou, E.; Tontis, D.; Kontopidis, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Three trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of supplementation of a basal diet with benzoic acid or thymol or a mixture of essential oil blends (MEO) or a combination of benzoic acid with MEO (BMEO) on growth performance of turkey poults. Control groups were fed a basal diet. In trial 1, benzoic acid was supplied at levels of 300 and 1,000 mg/kg. In trial 2, thymol or the MEO were supplied at levels of 30 mg/kg. In trial 3, the combination of benzoic acid with MEO was evaluated. Benzoic acid, MEO and BMEO improved performance, increased lactic acid bacteria populations and decreased coliform bacteria in the caeca. Thymol, MEO and BMEO improved antioxidant status of turkeys. Benzoic acid and BMEO reduced the buffering capacity compared to control feed and the pH values of the caecal content. Benzoic acid and EOs may be suggested as an effective alternative to AGP in turkeys. PMID:25049947

  1. Isothermal heat measurements of TBP-nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; Cavin, W.S.

    1994-12-16

    Net heats of reaction were measured in an isothermal calorimeter for both single phase (organic) and two phase (organic and aqueous) TBP/HNO{sub 3} reacting solutions at temperatures above 100 C. The oxidation rate constant was determined to be 5.4E-4 min{sup {minus}1} at 110 C for an open ``vented`` system as compared to 1.33 E-3 min{sup {minus}1} in the closed system. The heat released per unit material oxidized was also reduced. The oxidation in both phases was found to be first order in nitric acid and pseudo-zero order in butylnitrate and water. The hydrolysis (esterification) rate constant determined by Nichols` (1.33E-3 min{sup {minus}1}) fit the experimental data from this work well. Forced evaporation of the volatile components by the product gases from oxidation resulted in a cooling mechanism which more than balanced the heat from the oxidation reaction in the two-phased systems. Rate expressions were derived and rate constants determined for both the single and two phase systems. An approximating mathematical model was developed to fit the experimental data and to extrapolate beyond the experimental conditions. This model shows that one foot of ``reacting`` 14.3M HNO{sub 3} aqueous phase solution at 121 C will transport sufficient water to the organic phase to replace evaporative losses, maintaining endothermicity, for organic layers up to 12.2 + 6.0 feet deep. If the pressure in a reacting system is allowed to increase due to insufficient venting the temperature of the organic phase would increase in temperature to reach a new equilibrium. The rate of oxidation would increase not only due to the increase in temperature but also from the increased concentration of dissolved HNO{sub 3} reduction products. Another important factor is that the cooling system described in this work becomes less effective as the total pressure increases. These factors probably contributed to the explosion at Tomsk.

  2. Development of myoglobin concentration and acid buffering capacity in harp (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals from birth to maturity.

    PubMed

    Lestyk, Keri C; Folkow, L P; Blix, A S; Hammill, M O; Burns, J M

    2009-11-01

    Pinnipeds rely on muscle oxygen stores to help support aerobic diving, therefore muscle maturation may influence the behavioral ecology of young pinnipeds. To investigate the pattern of muscle development, myoglobin concentration ([Mb]) and acid buffering ability (beta) was measured in ten muscles from 23 harp and 40 hooded seals of various ages. Adult [Mb] ranged from 28-97 to 35-104 mg g tissue(-1) in harp and hooded seals, respectively, with values increasing from the cervical, non-swimming muscles to the main swimming muscles of the lumbar region. Neonatal and weaned pup muscles exhibited lower (approximately 30% adult values) and less variable [Mb] across the body than adults. In contrast, adult beta showed little regional variation (60-90 slykes), while high pup values (approximately 75% adult values) indicate significant in utero development. These findings suggest that intra-uterine conditions are sufficiently hypoxic to stimulate prenatal beta development, but that [Mb] development requires additional postnatal signal such as exercise, and/or growth factors. However, because of limited development in both beta and [Mb] during the nursing period, pups are weaned with muscles with lower aerobic and anaerobic capacities than those of adults. PMID:19565249

  3. Dissolution reaction and surface iron speciation of UICC crocidolite in buffered solution at pH 7.4: A combined ICP-OES, XPS and TEM investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacella, Alessandro; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Turci, Francesco; Cremisini, Carlo; Montereali, Maria Rita; Nardi, Elisa; Atzei, Davide; Rossi, Antonella; Andreozzi, Giovanni B.

    2014-02-01

    The dissolution reaction and the surface modifications of crocidolite asbestos fibres incubated for 0.5, 1, 24, 48, 168 and 1440 h in a phosphate buffered solution at pH 7.4 with and without hydrogen peroxide were investigated. Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) was used to monitor the ion release into solution, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was performed to unveil the chemistry of the leached surface, and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) was carried out to monitor the structural modifications of the fibres. No significant differences were observed between dissolution experiments carried out with and without H2O2 with the exception of results after the first hour, from which it may be inferred that the dissolution proceeds faster in the presence of H2O2 but only in its very early steps. Congruent mobilization of Si and Mg from crocidolite was observed, increasing with time especially in the range between 1 and 48 h, while Ca decreased after 48 h and Fe was not detected at any incubation time. In the undersaturated conditions (0-48 h), dissolution rate of UICC crocidolite fibres has been estimated to be d(Si)/dt = 0.079 μmol h-1. The fibre surface modification is continuous with time: XPS results showed a regular depletion of Si and Mg and enrichment of Fe along dissolution. The Fe2p3/2 signal on the surface was fitted with four components at 709.0, 710.5, 711.6 and 712.8 eV binding energy values corresponding to: (i) Fe(II)-O and (ii) Fe(III)-O surrounded by oxygen atoms in the silicate structure, (iii) Fe(III)-OOH as a product of the dissolution process, and (iv) Fe in a phosphate precipitate (Fe-P), respectively. The evolution of Fe speciation on the crocidolite surface was followed by integrating the four photoemission peaks, and results showed that the oxidative environment promotes the formation of Fe(III)-O (up to 37% Fetot) and of Fe-P species (up to 16% Fetot), which are found on the fibre

  4. Electrocatalytic and photocatalytic hydrogen production from acidic and neutral-pH aqueous solutions using iron phosphide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Callejas, Juan F; McEnaney, Joshua M; Read, Carlos G; Crompton, J Chance; Biacchi, Adam J; Popczun, Eric J; Gordon, Thomas R; Lewis, Nathan S; Schaak, Raymond E

    2014-11-25

    Nanostructured transition-metal phosphides have recently emerged as Earth-abundant alternatives to platinum for catalyzing the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER), which is central to several clean energy technologies because it produces molecular hydrogen through the electrochemical reduction of water. Iron-based catalysts are very attractive targets because iron is the most abundant and least expensive transition metal. We report herein that iron phosphide (FeP), synthesized as nanoparticles having a uniform, hollow morphology, exhibits among the highest HER activities reported to date in both acidic and neutral-pH aqueous solutions. As an electrocatalyst operating at a current density of -10 mA cm(-2), FeP nanoparticles deposited at a mass loading of ∼1 mg cm(-2) on Ti substrates exhibited overpotentials of -50 mV in 0.50 M H2SO4 and -102 mV in 1.0 M phosphate buffered saline. The FeP nanoparticles supported sustained hydrogen production with essentially quantitative faradaic yields for extended time periods under galvanostatic control. Under UV illumination in both acidic and neutral-pH solutions, FeP nanoparticles deposited on TiO2 produced H2 at rates and amounts that begin to approach those of Pt/TiO2. FeP therefore is a highly Earth-abundant material for efficiently facilitating the HER both electrocatalytically and photocatalytically. PMID:25250976

  5. Online concentration by field-amplified sample injection in acidic buffer for analysis of fangchinoline and tetrandrine in herbal medicine by flow injection-micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lihong; Chen, Xingguo; Hu, Zhide

    2005-12-01

    A novel, rapid, and continuous online concentration approach based on field-amplified sample injection for the analysis of fangchinoline and tetrandrine was developed in this paper by combination of flow injection-MEKC. The BGE used was a solution composed of 75 mM H3PO4-triethylamine-2.5% v/v polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate-20% v/v methanol buffer (pH* 5.0). The analytes prepared in 50% v/v aqueous ethanol were used as the test analytes. Sample was injected electrokinetically between plugs of water. When the cations reached the boundary between the water plug and BGE, they slowed down and became concentrated. Thereafter, MEKC was initiated for the separation. This results in 6.8-8.9-fold improvement in concentration sensitivity relative to conventional CE methods. The separation could be achieved within 10 min and sample throughput rate can reach up to 50/h. The repeatability (defined as RSD) was 4.8, 4.4% with peak height evaluation and 3.6, 0.94% with peak area evaluation for TET and FAN, respectively. PMID:16259014

  6. Acid Solutions for Etching Corrosion-Resistant Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    New study characterized solutions for etching austenitic stainless steels, nickel-base alloys, and titanium alloys (annealed). Solutions recommended for use remove at least 0.4 mil of metal from surface in less than an hour. Solutions do not cause intergranular attack on metals for which they are effective, when used under specified conditions.

  7. Properties of Pb(0.92)La(0.08)Zr(0.52)Ti(0.48)O(3) thin films grown on SrRuO(3) buffered nickel and silicon substrates by chemical solution deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, M.; Ma, B.; Tong, S.; Koritala, R.; Balachandran, U.

    2012-01-01

    Ferroelectric film-on-foil capacitors are suitable to replace discrete passive components in the quest to develop electronic devices that show superior performance and are smaller in size. The film-on-foil approach is the most practical method to fabricate such components. Films of Pb{sub 0.92}La{sub 0.08}Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3} (PLZT) were deposited on SrRuO{sub 3} (SRO) buffer films over nickel and silicon substrates. High-quality polycrystalline SRO thin-film electrodes were first deposited by chemical solution deposition. A phase pure, dense, uniform microstructure with grain size <100 nm was obtained in films crystallized at 700 C. The room-temperature resistivity of the SRO films crystallized at 700 C was {approx}800-900 {mu}{Omega}-cm. The dielectric properties of sol-gel derived PLZT capacitors on SRO-buffered nickel were evaluated as a function of temperature, bias field, and frequency, and the results were compared to those of the same films on silicon substrates. The comparison demonstrated the integrity of the buffer layer and its compatibility with nickel substrates. Device-quality dielectric properties were measured on PLZT films deposited on SRO-buffered nickel foils and found to be superior to those for PLZT on SRO-buffered silicon and expensive platinized silicon. These results suggest that SRO films can act as an effective barrier layer on nickel substrates suitable for embedded capacitor applications.

  8. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  9. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  10. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  11. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  12. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  13. Chemical evaluation of soil-solution in acid forest soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    Soil-solution chemistry is commonly studied in forests through the use of soil lysimeters.This approach is impractical for regional survey studies, however, because lysimeter installation and operation is expensive and time consuming. To address these problems, a new technique was developed to compare soil-solution chemistry among red spruce stands in New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine. Soil solutions were expelled by positive air pressure from soil that had been placed in a sealed cylinder. Before the air pressure was applied, a solution chemically similar to throughfall was added to the soil to bring it to approximate field capacity. After the solution sample was expelled, the soil was removed from the cylinder and chemically analyzed. The method was tested with homogenized Oa and Bs horizon soils collected from a red spruce stand in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, a red spruce stand in east-central Vermont, and a mixed hardwood stand in the Catskill Mountains of New York. Reproducibility, effects of varying the reaction time between adding throughfall and expelling soil solution (5-65 minutes) and effects of varying the chemical composition of added throughfall, were evaluated. In general, results showed that (i) the method was reproducible (coefficients of variation were generally < 15%), (ii) variations in the length of reaction-time did not affect expelled solution concentrations, and (iii) adding and expelling solution did not cause detectable changes in soil exchange chemistry. Concentrations of expelled solutions varied with the concentrations of added throughfall; the lower the CEC, the more sensitive expelled solution concentrations were to the chemical concentrations of added throughfall. Addition of a tracer (NaBr) showed that the expelled solution was a mixture of added solution and solution that preexisted in the soil. Comparisons of expelled solution concentrations with concentrations of soil solutions collected by zero-tension and

  14. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of bromide by periodate in aqueous acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Szél, Viktor; Csekő, György; Horváth, Attila K

    2014-11-13

    The periodate–bromide reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically mainly in excess of bromide ion, monitoring the formation of the total amount of bromine at 450 nm at acidic buffered conditions and at a constant ionic strength in the presence of a phosphoric acid/dihydrogen phosphate buffer. The stoichiometry of the reaction was established to be strictly IO4(–) + 2Br(–) + 2H(+) → Br2 + IO3(–) + H2O. The formal kinetic order of the reactants was found to be perfectly one and two in the cases of periodate and bromide, respectively, but that of the hydrogen ion lies between one and two. We have also provided experimental evidence that dihydrogen phosphate accelerates the formation of bromine, suggesting the appearance of strong buffer assistance. On the basis of the experiments, a simple two-step kinetic model is proposed involving BrIO3 as a key intermediate that perfectly explains all of the experimental findings. Furthermore, we have also shown that in huge excess of bromide, the apparent rate coefficient obtained from the individual curve fitting method of the absorbance–time series is necessarily independent of the initial periodate concentration that may falsely be interpreted as the rate of bromine formation is also independent of the concentration of periodate. PMID:25365468

  15. Delayed fracture of Ni-Ti superelastic alloys in acidic and neutral fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Moriyama, Keiji; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Nagumo, Michihiko

    2004-04-01

    Hydrogen-related degradation of the mechanical properties of a Ni-Ti superelastic alloy has been examined by means of delayed fracture tests in acidic and neutral fluoride solutions and hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. Delayed fracture took place in both solutions; the time to fracture was shorter in the acidic solutions than in the neutral solutions with the same fluoride concentration. The time to fracture was reduced in both solutions when applied stress exceeded the critical stress for martensite transformation. In the acidic solutions, Ni-Ti superelastic alloy underwent general corrosion and absorbed substantial amounts of hydrogen. Fractographic features suggested that the delayed fracture in the acidic solutions was attributable to hydrogen embrittlement, whereas in the neutral solutions, a different fracture mode appeared associated with localized corrosion only in the vicinity of the fracture initiation area. In the neutral solutions, the amount of absorbed hydrogen was much less than that in the acidic solutions, and the delayed fracture was likely to be induced by active path corrosion accompanying hydrogen absorption. The results of the present study imply that the hydrogen-related degradation of performance of Ni-Ti superelastic alloys occurs in the presence of fluoride. PMID:14999757

  16. Solution properties and taste behavior of lactose monohydrate in aqueous ascorbic acid solutions at different temperatures: Volumetric and rheological approach.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Sinha, Biswajit

    2016-11-15

    The densities and viscosities of lactose monohydrate in aqueous ascorbic acid solutions with several molal concentrations m=(0.00-0.08)molkg(-1) of ascorbic acid were determined at T=(298.15-318.15)K and pressure p=101kPa. Using experimental data apparent molar volume (ϕV), standard partial molar volume (ϕV(0)), the slope (SV(∗)), apparent specific volumes (ϕVsp), standard isobaric partial molar expansibility (ϕE(0)) and its temperature dependence [Formula: see text] the viscosity B-coefficient and solvation number (Sn) were determined. Viscosity B-coefficients were further employed to obtain the free energies of activation of viscous flow per mole of the solvents (Δμ1(0≠)) and of the solute (Δμ2(0≠)). Effects of molality, solute structure and temperature and taste behavior were analyzed in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions; results revealed that the solutions are characterized predominantly by solute-solvent interactions and lactose monohydrate behaves as a long-range structure maker. PMID:27283672

  17. Influence of an acetate- and a lactate-based balanced infusion solution on acid base physiology and hemodynamics: an observational pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The current pilot study compares the impact of an intravenous infusion of Ringer’s lactate to an acetate-based solution with regard to acid–base balance. The study design included the variables of the Stewart approach and focused on the effective strong ion difference. Because adverse hemodynamic effects have been reported when using acetate buffered solutions in hemodialysis, hemodynamics were also evaluated. Methods Twenty-four women who had undergone abdominal gynecologic surgery and who had received either Ringer’s lactate (Strong Ion Difference 28 mmol/L; n = 12) or an acetate-based solution (Strong Ion Difference 36.8 mmol/L; n = 12) according to an established clinical protocol and its precursor were included in the investigation. After induction of general anesthesia, a set of acid–base variables, hemodynamic values and serum electrolytes was measured three times during the next 120 minutes. Results Patients received a mean dose of 4,054 ± 450 ml of either one or the other of the solutions. In terms of mean arterial blood pressure and norepinephrine requirements there were no differences to observe between the study groups. pH and serum HCO3- concentration decreased slightly but significantly only with Ringer’s lactate. In addition, the acetate-based solution kept the plasma effective strong ion difference more stable than Ringer’s lactate. Conclusions Both of the solutions provided hemodynamic stability. Concerning consistency of acid base parameters none of the solutions seemed to be inferior, either. Whether the slight advantages observed for the acetate-buffered solution in terms of stability of pH and plasma HCO3- are clinically relevant, needs to be investigated in a larger randomized controlled trial. PMID:22769740

  18. Evaluation of amino acid ester-based ionic liquids as buffer additives in CE for the separation of 2-arylpropionic acids nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Mavroudi, Maria C; Kapnissi-Christodoulou, Constantina P

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study is the CE performance evaluation for the separation of 2-arylpropionic acid nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In particular, the separation of indoprofen, carprofen, ketoprofen, ibuprofen, and flurbiprofen was obtained by supporting the BGE either with SDS or an amino acid ester-based ionic liquid (AAIL). The performance of these additives was evaluated by comparing migration times, efficiencies and %RSD values. The addition of the AAIL into the BGE provided baseline separation within 10 min, while in the case of SDS, the analytes eluted within 23 min. The optimum conditions involve a BGE of 100 mM Tris/10 mM sodium tetraboratedecahydrate (pH 8) and 40 mM l-alanine tert butyl ester lactate or 10 mM SDS and a temperature of 35°C for AAIL and 20°C for SDS. The run-to-run reproducibility was evaluated by computing the %RSD values of the EOF and the analyte peaks. When the AAIL was used, an excellent reproducibility was obtained, since all %RSD values were below 1.3%. On the contrary, the addition of SDS resulted in much higher RSD values (2.1-11.7%). The efficiency values of all analyte peaks were above 102 000 for l-AlaC4 Lac, in comparison to SDS, which provided efficiency values between 47000 and 76000. Finally, in an attempt to study the synergistic effect of SDS and AAIL, both additives were added into the BGE at concentrations of 10 and 40 mM, respectively. The results were similar to the ones obtained when SDS was used as the sole additive. PMID:24853394

  19. Process for the removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same

    DOEpatents

    Scheitlin, F.M.

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of /sup 226/Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  20. Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Scheitlin, Frank M.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  1. Separation of ions in acidic solution by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, M.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective method for separating ionic species according to differences in their electrophoretic mobilities. CE separations of amino acids by direct detection are difficult due to their similar electrophoretic mobilities and low absorbances. However, native amino acids can be separated by CE as cations at a low pH by adding an alkanesulfonic acid to the electrolyte carrier which imparts selectivity to the system. Derivatization is unnecessary when direct UV detection is used at 185 nm. Simultaneous speciation of metal cations such as vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V) can easily be performed without complexation prior to analysis. An indirect UV detection scheme for acidic conditions was also developed using guanidine as the background carrier electrolyte (BCE) for the indirect detection of metal cations. Three chapters have been removed for separate processing. This report contains introductory material, references, and general conclusions. 80 refs.

  2. Fabrication of organic FETs based on printing techniques and the improvement of FET properties by the insertion of solution-processable buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Eiji; Kanamori, Akira

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we developed multilayer deposition and patterning processes that can be used to fabricate all-printed, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) on the basis of vacuum-free, solution-processable soft-lithography techniques. We have used regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as a soluble p-type polymer semiconductor and (6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as a soluble n-type semiconductor, and cross-linked poly(vinyl phenol) (CL-PVP) as a low-temperature (<150 °C)-curable soluble polymer gate insulator. We have compared the electrical properties of OFETs with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), silver nanoparticles (NPs), and their composites (or multilayers) as printed source-drain (S-D) electrodes in order to fabricate vacuum-free, all-printed OFETs. The P3HT-OFETs with MWCNT S-D electrodes exhibited higher hole mobility and on/off ratios than the devices with Ag NP S-D electrodes owing to better contact at the MWCNT/P3HT interface. On the other hand, Ag/molybdenum oxide (MoO3) S-D electrodes considerably enhanced the hole injection and caused the reduction in the on/off ratio and the difficulty in turning off the devices. The PCBM-OFETs with MWCNT S-D electrodes also exhibited higher electron mobility that is almost comparable to that of P3HT-OFETs and lower threshold voltage, which was considered to be due to the enhanced electron injection at the electrode interface.

  3. Reprocessing system with nuclide separation based on chromatography in hydrochloric acid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Tachibana, Yu; Koyama, Shi-ichi

    2013-07-01

    We have proposed the reprocessing system with nuclide separation processes based on the chromatographic technique in the hydrochloric acid solution system. Our proposed system consists of the dissolution process, the reprocessing process, the minor actinide separation process, and nuclide separation processes. In the reprocessing and separation processes, the pyridine resin is used as a main separation media. It was confirmed that the dissolution in the hydrochloric acid solution is easily achieved by the plasma voloxidation and by the addition of oxygen peroxide into the hydrochloric acid solution.

  4. PROCESS OF SECURING PLUTONIUM IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS IN ITS TRIVALENT OXIDATION STATE

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, J.R.

    1958-08-26

    >Various processes for the recovery of plutonium require that the plutonium be obtalned and maintained in the reduced or trivalent state in solution. Ferrous ions are commonly used as the reducing agent for this purpose, but it is difficult to maintain the plutonium in a reduced state in nitric acid solutions due to the oxidizing effects of the acid. It has been found that the addition of a stabilizing or holding reductant to such solution prevents reoxidation of the plutonium. Sulfamate ions have been found to be ideally suitable as such a stabilizer even in the presence of nitric acid.

  5. VIRTUAL FRAME BUFFER INTERFACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    Large image processing systems use multiple frame buffers with differing architectures and vendor supplied user interfaces. This variety of architectures and interfaces creates software development, maintenance, and portability problems for application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program makes all frame buffers appear as a generic frame buffer with a specified set of characteristics, allowing programmers to write code which will run unmodified on all supported hardware. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface converts generic commands to actual device commands. The virtual frame buffer consists of a definition of capabilities and FORTRAN subroutines that are called by application programs. The virtual frame buffer routines may be treated as subroutines, logical functions, or integer functions by the application program. Routines are included that allocate and manage hardware resources such as frame buffers, monitors, video switches, trackballs, tablets and joysticks; access image memory planes; and perform alphanumeric font or text generation. The subroutines for the various "real" frame buffers are in separate VAX/VMS shared libraries allowing modification, correction or enhancement of the virtual interface without affecting application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program was developed in FORTRAN 77 for a DEC VAX 11/780 or a DEC VAX 11/750 under VMS 4.X. It supports ADAGE IK3000, DEANZA IP8500, Low Resolution RAMTEK 9460, and High Resolution RAMTEK 9460 Frame Buffers. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 150K. This program was developed in 1985.

  6. Multiple-acid equilibria in adsorption of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Husson, S.M.; King, C.J.

    1999-02-01

    Equilibria were measured for adsorption of carboxylic acids from aqueous, binary-acid mixtures of lactic and succinic acids and acetic and formic acids onto basic polymeric sorbents. The experimentally determined adsorption isotherms compared well with model predictions, confirming that simple extensions from adsorption of individual acids apply. Fixed-bed studies were carried out that establish the efficacy of chromatographic fractionation of lactic and succinic acids using basic polymeric sorbents. Finally, sequential thermal and solvent regeneration of lactic and acetic acid-laden sorbents was investigated as a method to fractionate among coadsorbed volatile and nonvolatile acids. Essentially complete removal of the acetic acid from the acid-laden sorbent was achieved by vaporization under the conditions used; a small amount of loss of lactic acid (about 11%) was observed.

  7. Effects of L-cysteine and N-acetyl-L-cysteine on 4-hydroxy-2, 5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (furaneol), 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural, and 5-methylfurfural formation and browning in buffer solutions containing either rhamnose or glucose and arginine.

    PubMed

    Haleva-Toledo, E; Naim, M; Zehavi, U; Rouseff, R L

    1999-10-01

    Solutions of L-cysteine (Cys) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (AcCys), containing glucose or rhamnose, with or without arginine, were buffered to pH 3, 5, and 7 and incubated at 70 degrees C for 48 h. Cys and AcCys inhibited the formation of (hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) from glucose and methylfurfural (MF) from rhamnose under acidic conditions. AcCys inhibited the accumulation of 4-hydroxy-2, 5-dimethyl- 3(2H)-furanone (DMHF, Furaneol) from rhamnose, but Cys, under our experimental conditions, enhanced Furaneol accumulation from rhamnose. Cys and AcCys reacted directly with Furaneol but not with HMF or MF. Both Cys and AcCys inhibited nonenzymatic browning at pH 7. At pH 3, however, Cys reacted with both glucose and rhamnose to produce unidentified compounds that increased the visible absorbency. PMID:10552780

  8. Temperature dependence of hydrogen-bond dynamics in acetic acid-water solutions.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Francesco; Bencivenga, Filippo; Gessini, Alessandro; Masciovecchio, Claudio

    2010-08-19

    An inelastic UV scattering experiment has been carried out on acetic acid-water solutions as a function of temperature and concentration. The analysis of experimental data indicates the presence of a crossover temperature (T(c) approximately 325 +/- 10 K). Above T(c), the energy of hydrogen bonds responsible for water-acetic acid and acetic acid-acetic acid interactions is strongly reduced. This leads to a reduction in the average number of water molecule interacting with acetic acid, as well as to a lower number of acetic acid clusters. The latter behavior can be mainly ascribed to a temperature change in the activation energy of carboxylic groups of acetic acid. These results may be also relevant to better understand the folding mechanism in protein-water solutions. PMID:20701390

  9. Mechanistic studies of nitrations and oxidations in solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide in nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Willmer, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanisms of nitrations in solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide in nitric acid of 1,2,4-trichloro-5-nitrobenzene and 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene have been proposed. The kinetics and products of the nitration, in the title medium, of substantially deactivated benzoic acids and benzaldehydes have been investigated. Kinetics of nitration of some substituted benzoic acids in nitric acid solutions containing dinitrogen pentaoxide or nitronium trifluoro-methanesulphonate (nitronium triflate) have been compared. Rate coefficients for reactions in dinitrogen pentaoxide solutions were generally similar to those from nitronium triflate solutions of the same estimated nitronium ion concentration. Yields of aromatic products of nitration of some benzoic acid derivatives in the nitric acid solutions have been determined. Nitrodecarboxylation of 4-fluorobenzoic acid occurs as a result of nitronium ion attach at C(1). The competition between oxidation to the corresponding benzoic acid and nitration in the aromatic ring of some substituted benzaldehydes has been probed by kinetic and product studies. 4-Carboxybenzaldehyde is nitrated but more deactivated substrates are predominantly oxidized. Rapid reversible gem-dinitrate formation occurs in concentrated dinitrogen pentaoxide solutions. The equilibrium extent of formation of [alpha]-deuterio-(4-nitropheny)-dinitratomethane from [alpha]-deuterio-4-nitrobenzaldehyde is reported. 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and the gem-dinitrate are oxidized in processes in which [alpha]-hydrogen loss is at least partially rate determining. The relative rates of oxidation in nitronium triflate solutions suggest that the [alpha]-hydrogen is removed as a hydride ion in that medium. There is evidence for the intrusion of a radical mechanism of nitration in concentrated solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide. (4-Nitrophenyl)dinitratomethane was produced on the addition of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde to a solution of dinitrogen pentaoxide in dichloromethane.

  10. Effect of acidic solutions on the surface degradation of a micro-hybrid composite resin.

    PubMed

    Münchow, Eliseu A; Ferreira, Ana Cláudia A; Machado, Raissa M M; Ramos, Tatiana S; Rodrigues-Junior, Sinval A; Zanchi, Cesar H

    2014-01-01

    Composite resins may undergo wear by the action of chemical substances (e.g., saliva, alcohol, bacterial acids) of the oral environment, which may affect the material's structure and surface properties. This study evaluated the effect of acidic substances on the surface properties of a micro-hybrid composite resin (Filtek Z-250). Eighty specimens were prepared, and baseline hardness and surface roughness (KMN0 and Ra0, respectively) were measured. The specimens were subjected to sorption (SO) and solubility (SL) tests according to ISO 4049:2009, but using different storage solutions: deionized water; 75/25 vol% ethanol/water solution; lactic acid; propionic acid; and acetic acid. The acids were used in two concentrations: PA and 0.02 N. pH was measured for all solutions and final hardness (KMN1) and surface roughness (Ra1) were measured. Data were analyzed with paired t-tests and one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=5%). All solutions decreased hardness and increased the Ra values, except for the specimens stored in water and 0.02 N lactic acid, which maintained the hardness. All solutions produced similar SO and SL phenomena, except for the 0.02 N lactic acid, which caused lower solubility than the other solutions. Ethanol showed the highest pH (6.6) and the 0.02 N lactic acid the lowest one (2.5). The solutions affected negatively the surface properties of the composite resin; in addition, an acidic pH did not seem to be a significant factor that intensifies the surface degradation phenomena. PMID:25250496

  11. Reactivity of the cadmium ion in concentrated phosphoric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    De Gyves, J; Gonzales, J; Louis, C; Bessiere, J

    1989-07-01

    The solvation transfer coefficients which characterize the changes of ion reactivity with phosphoric acid concentration have been calculated for cadmium from the constants of the successive chloride complexes, and for silver and diethyldithiophosphate from potentiometric measurements. They evidence the strong desolvation of the cadmium species in concentrated phosphoric acid media, causing a remarkable increase of its reactivity. They allow the results of liquid-liquid extraction, precipitation and flotation reactions to be correctly interpreted and their changes to be foreseen when the reagents are modified. PMID:18964794

  12. The Solubility of Xenon in Simple Organic Solvents and in Aqueous Amino Acid Solutions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himm, Jeffrey Frank

    We have measured the Ostwald solubility (L) of ('133)Xe in a variety of liquids, including normal alkanes, normal alkanols, and aqueous solutions of amino acids, NaCl, and sucrose. For the alkanes and alkanols, measurements were made in the temperature range from 10-50(DEGREES)C. Values of L were found to decrease with increasing temperature, and also with increasing chain length, for both series of solvents. Thermodynamic properties of solution (enthalpy and entropy of solution) are calculated using both mole fraction and number density scales. Results are interpreted using Uhlig's model of the solvation process. Measurements of L in aqueous amino acid solutions were made at 25(DEGREES)C. Concentrations of amino acids in solution varied from near saturation for each of the amino acids studied to pure water. In all solutions, except those with NaCl, L decreases linearly with increasing solution molarity. Hydration numbers (H), the mean number of water molecules associated with each solute molecule, were determined for each amino acid, for NaCl, and for sucrose. Values of H obtained ranged from near zero (arginine, H = 0.2 (+OR-) 0.5) to about 16 (NaCl, H = 16.25 (+OR-) 0.3).

  13. Moving single bubble sonoluminescence in phosphoric acid and sulphuric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Troia, A; Ripa, D Madonna; Spagnolo, R

    2006-04-01

    The phenomenon of sonoluminescence still presents some unsolved aspects. Recently [Y.T. Didenko, K. Suslick, Molecular Emission during Single Bubble Sonoluminescence, Nature 407 (2000) 877-879.], it was found that a single cavitating air bubble in polar aprotic liquids (including formamide and adiponitrile) can produce very strong sonoluminescence while undergoing macroscopic translation movements in the resonator, a condition known as moving single bubble sonoluminescing (MSBSL). Here we describe some experiments conducted in aqueous solutions of phosphoric and sulphuric acid. In these liquid media, it is possible to reproduce MSBSL and luminescence is emitted even if a trapped bubble is subjected to a strong shape instability, named in the literature "jittering phase". When a moving and luminescing bubble was present and the acoustic pressure gradually increased, we observed the generation of a discrete lattice of trapped bubbles. The bubbles in the lattice emit very intense light flashes and can change their position while maintaining the overall spatial distribution in time. Some preliminary results, obtained from Mie-scattering and measurements of relative light intensity, are reported. PMID:16309944

  14. The buffer capacity of airway epithelial secretions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dusik; Liao, Jie; Hanrahan, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 μl) volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO−3 is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β) increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO−3 secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO−3 secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions. PMID:24917822

  15. Standard addition method for free acid determination in solutions with hydrolyzable ions

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.

    1981-01-01

    The free acid content of solutions containing hydrolyzable ions has been determined potentiometrically by a standard addition method. Two increments of acid are added to the sample in a 1M potassium thiocyanate solution. The sample concentration is calculated by solution of three simultaneous Nernst equations. The method has been demonstrated for solutions containing Al/sup 3 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Ni/sup 2 +/, Th/sup 4 +/, or UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ with a metal-to-acid ratio of < 2.5. The method is suitable for determination of 10 ..mu..moles acid in 10 mL total volume. The accuracy is verifiable by reasonable agreement of the Nerst slopes found in the presence and absence of hydrolyzable ions. The relative standard deviation is < 2.5 percent.

  16. Thermodynamics of the complexation of arabinogalactan with salicylic and p-aminobenzoic acids in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudarisova, R. Kh.; Badykova, L. A.

    2016-03-01

    The thermodynamics of complexation of arabinogalactan with salicylic and p-aminobenzoic acids in aqueous solutions is studied by means spectroscopy. The standard thermodynamic characteristics (Δ H°; Δ G°; Δ S°) of complexation are calculated.

  17. Process for recovering uranium using an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid and alkaline stripping solution

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, R.E.; Magdics, A.

    1987-03-24

    A process is described for stripping uranium for a pregnant organic extractant comprising an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in a substantially water-immiscible organic diluent. The organic extractant contains tetravalent uranium and an alcohol or phenol modifier in a quantity sufficient to retain substantially all the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid in solution in the diluent during stripping. The process comprises adding an oxidizing agent to the organic extractant and thereby oxidizing the tetravalent uranium to the +6 state in the organic extractant, and contacting the organic extractant containing the uranium in the +6 state with a stripping solution comprising an aqueous solution of an alkali metal or ammonium carbonate or hydroxide thereby stripping uranium from the organic extractant into the stripping solution. The resulting barren organic extractant containing substantially all of the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in the diluent is separated from the stripping solution containing the stripped uranium, the barren extractant being suitable for recycle.

  18. Process for recovering uranium using an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid and alkaline stripping solution

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, R.E.; Magdics, A.

    1987-03-24

    A process is described for stripping uranium from a pregnant organic extractant comprising an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in a substantially water-immiscible organic diluent. The organic extractant contains tetravalent uranium and an alcohol or phenol modifier in a quantity sufficient to retain substantially all the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid in solution in the diluent during stripping. The process comprises adding an oxidizing agent to the organic extractant to and thereby oxidizing the tetravalent uranium to the +6 state in the organic extractant, and contacting the organic extractant containing the uranium in the +6 state with a stripping solution comprising an aqueous solution of an alkali metal or ammonium carbonate, nonsaturated in uranium. The uranium is stripped from, the organic extractant into the stripping solution, and the resulting barren organic extractant containing substantially all of the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in the diluent is separated from the stripping solution containing the stripped uranium, the barren extractant being suitable for recycle.

  19. Behaviors of acrylamide/itaconic acid hydrogels in uptake of uranyl ions from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Karadag, E.; Saraydin, D.; Gueven, O.

    1995-12-01

    In this study, adsorptions of uranyl ions from two different aqueous uranyl solutions by acrylamide-itaconic acid hydrogels were investigated by a spectroscopic method. The hydrogels were prepared by irradiating with {gamma}-radiation. In the experiment of uranyl ions adsorption, Type II adsorption was found. One gram of acrylamide-itaconic acid hydrogels sorbed 178-219 mg uranyl ions from the solutions of uranyl acetate, 42-76 mg uranyl ions from the aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate, while acrylamide hydrogel did not sorb any uranyl ion. For the hydrogel containing 40 mg of itaconic acid and irradiated to 3.73 kGy, swelling of the hydrogels was observed in water (1660%), in the aqueous solution of uranyl acetate (730%), and in the aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate (580%). Diffusions of water onto hydrogels were a non-Fickian type of diffusion, whereas diffusions of uranyl ions were a Fickian type of diffusion.

  20. Effect of various alkaline metal ions on electrochemical behavior of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Nobumitsu; Yamamoto, Yui

    2015-10-01

    The effect of various alkaline metal ions on electrochemical behavior of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution has been investigated. It was found that "the specific anodic oxidation peak" appears at the cathodic scan in cyclic voltammogram of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution containing Li2SO4, K2SO4, Na2SO4, Rb2SO4, or Cs2SO4. The height of the specific anodic oxidation peak varies with the alkaline sulfate in the solution; K2SO4 >> Na2SO4 > Cs2SO4 > Rb2SO4 > Li2SO4. It should be note that alkaline ions exist in lead sulfate formed on lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution containing potassium sulfate when the electrode was immersed in the solution at the rest potential for more than 1 h.

  1. Thermodynamic and Ultrasonic Properties of Ascorbic Acid in Aqueous Protic Ionic Liquid Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vickramjeet; Sharma, Gyanendra; Gardas, Ramesh L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report the thermodynamic and ultrasonic properties of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in water and in presence of newly synthesized ammonium based protic ionic liquid (diethylethanolammonium propionate) as a function of concentration and temperature. Apparent molar volume and apparent molar isentropic compression, which characterize the solvation state of ascorbic acid (AA) in presence of protic ionic liquid (PIL) has been determined from precise density and speed of sound measurements at temperatures (293.15 to 328.15) K with 5 K interval. The strength of molecular interactions prevailing in ternary solutions has been discussed on the basis of infinite dilution partial molar volume and partial molar isentropic compression, corresponding volume of transfer and interaction coefficients. Result has been discussed in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions occurring between ascorbic acid and PIL in ternary solutions (AA + water + PIL). PMID:26009887

  2. Environment and solute-solvent interaction effects on photo-physical behaviors of Folic acid and Folinic acid drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadem Sadigh, M.; Zakerhamidi, M. S.; Seyed Ahmadian, S. M.; Johari-Ahar, M.; Zare Haghighi, L.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, spectral properties of Folic acid and Folinic acid as widely used drugs in the treatment of some diseases have been studied in various environments with different polarity. Our results show that the absorption, emission and stokes shifts of solute molecules depend strongly on molecular surrounding characteristics, solute-solvent interactions and, different active groups in their chemical structures. In order to investigate the contribution of specific and nonspecific interactions on various properties of drug samples, the linear solvation energy relationships concept is used. Moreover, the calculated dipole moments by means of solvatochromic method show that the high values of dipole moments in excited state are due to local intramolecular charge transfer. Furthermore, the obtained results about molecular interactions can be extended to biological systems and can indicate completely the behaviors of Folic acid and Folinic acid in polar solvents such as water in body system.

  3. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK CLEANING: CORROSION RATE FOR ONE VERSUS EIGHT PERCENT OXALIC ACID SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-01-20

    Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed from

  4. Vapor-liquid equilibria for nitric acid-water and plutonium nitrate-nitric acid-water solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1980-01-01

    The liquid-vapor equilibrium data for nitric acid and nitric acid-plutnonium nitrate-water solutions were examined to develop correlations covering the range of conditions encountered in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The scanty available data for plutonium nitrate solutions are of poor quality but allow an order of magnitude estimate to be made. A formal thermodynamic analysis was attempted initially but was not successful due to the poor quality of the data as well as the complex chemical equilibria involved in the nitric acid and in the plutonium nitrate solutions. Thus, while there was no difficulty in correlating activity coefficients for nitric acid solutions over relatively narrow temperature ranges, attempts to extend the correlations over the range 25/sup 0/C to the boiling point were not successful. The available data were then analyzed using empirical correlations from which normal boiling points and relative volatilities can be obtained over the concentration ranges 0 to 700 g/l Pu, 0 to 13 M nitric acid. Activity coefficients are required, however, if estimates of individual component vapor pressures are needed. The required ternary activity coefficients can be approximated from the correlations.

  5. Antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of phosphoric acid solution compared to other root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    PRADO, Maíra; da SILVA, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; DUQUE, Thais Mageste; ZAIA, Alexandre Augusto; FERRAZ, Caio Cezar Randi; de ALMEIDA, José Flávio Affonso; GOMES, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoric acid has been suggested as an irrigant due to its effectiveness in removing the smear layer. Objectives : The purpose of this study was to compare the antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of a 37% phosphoric acid solution to other irrigants commonly used in endodontics. Material and Methods : The substances 37% phosphoric acid, 17% EDTA, 10% citric acid, 2% chlorhexidine (solution and gel), and 5.25% NaOCl were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity was tested against Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Actinomyces meyeri, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella nigrescens according to the agar diffusion method. The cytotoxicity of the irrigants was determined by using the MTT assay. Results : Phosphoric acid presented higher antimicrobial activity compared to the other tested irrigants. With regard to the cell viability, this solution showed results similar to those with 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine (gel and solution), whereas 17% EDTA and 10% citric acid showed higher cell viability compared to other irrigants. Conclusion : Phosphoric acid demonstrated higher antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity similar to that of 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine (gel and solution). PMID:26018307

  6. [Effect of amino acid solutions on the blood ammonia level].

    PubMed

    Sanjo, K; Harihara, Y; Kawasaki, S; Umekita, N; Idezuki, Y

    1985-09-01

    We have carried out several basic experiments on artificial liver support and found that the plasma free amino acid balance was lost after treatment according to this procedure. Application of fluid therapy--Using conventional amino acid preparations available on the market--Is not adequate during and after the treatment with artificial liver. Fluid therapy using mainly special amino acid preparations should have been established; preparations, named Todai Hospital fluid (THF), are intended to correct the deranged aminogram, supply nutrition and promote the improvement in symptoms. Furthermore, experimental animals with acute hepatic insufficiency of diverse severity were prepared and basic experiments were performed which these animals to see how the efficacy of THF developed. In the basic experiments, psychoneurotic symptoms and the electroencephalogram were improved with the lowering of the blood ammonia level. Clinically, THF was not only used as a therapeutic agent after treatment by artificial liver support in patients with fulminant hepatitis, but is also served as a further indication in hepatic encephalopathy accompanying chronic liver diseases in late stages. Improvement in encephalopathy was observed immediately after the administration of THF and persisted while the aminogram pattern returned to the premedication representation. There was more improvement in patients in whom ammonemia was complicated, and the blood ammonia level was reduced markedly. PMID:4088243

  7. Interfacial structures of acidic and basic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, C.; Ji, N.; Waychunas, G.; Shen, Y.R.

    2008-10-20

    Phase-sensitive sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was used to study water/vapor interfaces of HCl, HI, and NaOH solutions. The measured imaginary part of the surface spectral responses provided direct characterization of OH stretch vibrations and information about net polar orientations of water species contributing to different regions of the spectrum. We found clear evidence that hydronium ions prefer to emerge at interfaces. Their OH stretches contribute to the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum. Their charges create a positive surface field that tends to reorient water molecules more loosely bonded to the topmost water layer with oxygen toward the interface, and thus enhances significantly the 'liquid-like' band in the spectrum. Iodine ions in solution also like to appear at the interface and alter the positive surface field by forming a narrow double-charge layer with hydronium ions. In NaOH solution, the observed weak change of the 'liquid-like' band and disappearance of the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum indicates that OH{sup -} ions must also have excess at the interface. How they are incorporated in the interfacial water structure is however not clear.

  8. Acid-induced aggregation of human monoclonal IgG1 and IgG2: molecular mechanism and the effect of solution composition.

    PubMed

    Hari, Sanjay B; Lau, Hollis; Razinkov, Vladimir I; Chen, Shuang; Latypov, Ramil F

    2010-11-01

    The prevention of aggregation in therapeutic antibodies is of great importance to the biopharmaceutical industry. In our investigation, acid-induced aggregation of monoclonal IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies was studied at pH 3.5 as a function of salt concentration and buffer type. The extent of aggregation was estimated using a native cation-exchange chromatography (CEX) method based on the loss of soluble monomer. This approach allowed quantitative analysis of antibody aggregation kinetics for individual and mixed protein solutions. Information regarding the aggregation mechanism was gained by assessing stabilities of intact antibodies relative to their Fc and Fab fragments. The role of protein thermodynamic stability in aggregation was deduced from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The rate of aggregation under conditions mimicking the viral inactivation step during monoclonal antibody (mAb) processing was found to be strongly dependent on the antibody subclass (IgG1 vs IgG2). At 25 °C, IgG1s were resistant to low pH aggregation, but IgG2s aggregated readily in the presence of salt. The observed distinction between IgG1 and IgG2 aggregation resulted from differential stability of the corresponding C(H)2 domains. This was further confirmed by experimenting with an IgG1 molecule containing an aglycosylated C(H)2 domain. Interestingly, comparative analysis of two buffer systems (based on acetic acid vs citric acid) revealed differences in mAb aggregation under identical pH conditions. Evidence is provided for the importance of the total acid concentration for antibody aggregation at low pH. The effects of C(H)2 instability and solution composition on aggregation are significant and deserve careful consideration during the development of mAb- or Fc-based therapeutics. PMID:20843079

  9. Waste acid/metal solution reduction and recovery by vacuum distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.O.; Wilcox, W.A.; Johnson, N.T.; Bowdish, F.W.

    1995-07-01

    Processes involving distillation under reduced pressure were developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory several years ago to recover spent acid solutions generated during the manufacture of nuclear fuel for the N-Reactor at the Hanford site. Following construction and testing of a pilot-plant, the technology was licensed to Viatec Recovery Systems, Inc. for commercialization. The technology developed included specialized distillation and rectification of volatile acids, removal of water and/or volatile acid from sulfuric acid, and precipitation of salts. A key feature of the Waste Acid Detoxification and Reclamation (WADR) technology is the development and use of advanced thermoplastic and fluoropolymer materials of construction in all critical process equipment. The technology was then expanded to include crystallization to recover metal salts for possible reuse. Economic and environmental advantages of the procedures include recovery of acids for reuse, simplification or elimination of the disposal of waste solutions, and possible recovery of metals. Industries expected to benefit from such applications include galvanizing, electroplating, sand leaching and any where metals are cleaned in acid solutions. Currently a modular system has been assembled for recovery of several different spent acid solutions.

  10. Iron autoxidation in Mops and Hepes buffers.

    PubMed

    Tadolini, B

    1987-01-01

    Iron autoxidation in Mops and Hepes buffers is characterized by a lag phase that becomes shorter with increasing FeCl2 concentration and pH. During iron oxidation in these buffers a yellow colour develops in the solution. When the reaction is conducted in the presence of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT), blue formazan is formed. Of the many OH scavengers tested, mannitol and sorbitol are most effective in inhibiting Fe2+ oxidation, yellow colour development and NBT reduction. Some inhibition was also noted with catalase. The iron product of the oxidative reaction differs from Fe3+ in its absorption spectrum and its low reactivity with thiocyanate. Similar results are obtained when iron autoxidation is studied in unbuffered solutions brought to alkaline pH with NaOH. In phosphate buffer, no lag phase is evident and the absorption spectrum of the final solution is identical to that of Fe3+ in this buffer. The iron product reacts immediately with thiocyanate. When iron oxidation is conducted in the presence of NBT the formation of formazan is almost undetectable. Of the many compounds tested only catalase inhibits iron autoxidation in this buffer. The sequence of reactions leading to iron autoxidation in Good-type buffers thus resembles that occurring in unbuffered solutions brought to alkaline pH with NaOH and greatly differs from that occurring in phosphate buffer. These results are in agreement with the observation that these buffers have very low affinity for iron. The data presented define experimental conditions where Fe2+ is substantially stable for a considerable length of time in Mops buffer. PMID:3148493

  11. Silver-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Allylation of Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lei; Chen, He; Liu, Chao; Li, Chaozhong

    2016-05-01

    Direct decarboxylative radical allylation of aliphatic carboxylic acids is described. With K2S2O8 as the oxidant and AgNO3 as the catalyst, the reactions of aliphatic carboxylic acids with allyl sulfones in aqueous CH3CN solution gave the corresponding alkenes in satisfactory yields under mild conditions. This site-specific allylation method is applicable to all primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl acids and exhibits wide functional group compatibility. PMID:27065060

  12. Solution-phase secondary-ion mass spectrometry of protonated amino acids.

    PubMed

    Pettit, G R; Cragg, G M; Holzapfel, C W; Tuinman, A A; Gieschen, D P

    1987-04-01

    Although sulfolane proved unexpectedly to be a poor solvent for solution-phase secondary-ion mass spectrometry of underivatized amino acids in the presence of thallium(I) salts, glycerol was somewhat more effective. Also, the addition of trifluoromethanesulfonic acid proved more effective than addition of the metal in generating molecular ion complexes. A convenient and reliable method for rapidly determining amino acid molecular ions is based on these observations. PMID:3037939

  13. Acid-base properties of ionophore A23187 in methanol-water solutions and bound to unilamellar vesicles of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, R F; Taylor, R W; Pfeiffer, D R

    1982-05-11

    The acid-base properties of ionophore A23187 in methanol-water solutions (0--95% w/w) and bound to unilamellar vesicles of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine were examined by ultraviolet and fluorescence spectroscopy, and the spectral properties for the acidic and basic forms were defined under these conditions. Standard mixed-solvent buffers were employed to calibrate pH measurement in the methanol-water solvents. In 65% methanol-water, two protonation equilibria were observed, the most basic of which displayed a value for the logarithm of the protonation constant (log KH) of 7.19 +/- 0.05 at 25 degrees C and 0.05 M ionic strength. Instability of A23187 was encountered below pH approximately 4; however, decomposition was slow enough to allow log KH for the more acidic equilibrium to be estimated as 1.28. Comparison of these results to those obtained with the methyl ester of A23187 (log KH = 1.32) and literature values for other model compounds allowed assignment of the more basic equilibrium to the carboxylic acid moiety and the more acidic one to the N-methylamino substituent of the benzoxazole ring. log KH of the carboxylic acid increased from 5.69 +/- 0.05 to 9.37 +/- 0.05 over the range of solvent polarity encompassed by water to 95% methanol-water. Values for the ground state (absorption) and first excited state (fluorescence) were equal within experimental error. The logarithm of the protonation constant for the membrane-bound ionophore, measured under conditions where the surface potential generated by ionization did not significantly alter the equilibrium, was found to be 7.85 +/- 0.05 at 25 degrees C and at ionic strength of 0.05 M in the aqueous phase. The value agrees with that observed in 80% methanol-water, as does the wavelength of maximum fluorescence emission for the membrane-bound free acid. An interfacial location for the monoprotonated form of the benzoxazolate moiety is proposed, both above and below the membrane phase transition temperature. The

  14. The solvent extraction of Americium(III) by 2,6-bis[(diphenylphosphino)-methyl]pyridine N,P,P` trioxide from nitric acid and hydrochloric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, E.M.; Engelhardt, U.; Deere, T.P.; Rapko, B.M.; Paine, R.T.

    1997-12-31

    The liquid/liquid extractions of Am(III) from nitric acid and hydrochloric acid solutions with chloroform solutions of 2,6-bis[(diphenylphosphino)methyl]pyridine N,P,P{prime} trioxide will be described. Americium(III) extracts well from high concentration nitric acid solutions (D>3000 at 6M nitric acid) and can be back extracted from the organic phase at 0.01M Nitric Acid. Americium(III) exhibits modest extraction from hydrochloric acid solutions (D=2.2 at 5M hydrochloric acid) and can be back extracted from the organic phase at 0.1M hydrochloric acid. The ligand dependency data suggest that two ligand molecules are coordinated to americium in the nitric acid system and three ligand molecules are coordinated to the americium in the hydrochloric acid system.

  15. Dissolution of Simulated and Radioactive Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Sludges with Oxalic Acid & Citric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    STALLINGS, MARY

    2004-07-08

    This report presents findings from tests investigating the dissolution of simulated and radioactive Savannah River Site sludges with 4 per cent oxalic acid and mixtures of oxalic and citric acid previously recommended by a Russian team from the Khlopin Radium Institute and the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC). Testing also included characterization of the simulated and radioactive waste sludges. Testing results showed the following: Dissolution of simulated HM and PUREX sludges with oxalic and citric acid mixtures at SRTC confirmed general trends reported previously by Russian testing. Unlike the previous Russian testing six sequential contacts of a mixture of oxalic acid citric acids at a 2:1 ratio (v/w) of acid to sludge did not produce complete dissolution of simulated HM and PUREX sludges. We observed that increased sludge dissolution occurred at a higher acid to sludge ratio, 50:1 (v/w), compared to the recommended ratio of 2:1 (v/w). We observed much lower dissolution of aluminum in a simulated HM sludge by sodium hydroxide leaching. We attribute the low aluminum dissolution in caustic to the high fraction of boehmite present in the simulated sludge. Dissolution of HLW sludges with 4 per cent oxalic acid and oxalic/citric acid followed general trends observed with simulated sludges. The limited testing suggests that a mixture of oxalic and citric acids is more efficient for dissolving HM and PUREX sludges and provides a more homogeneous dissolution of HM sludge than oxalic acid alone. Dissolution of HLW sludges in oxalic and oxalic/citric acid mixtures produced residual sludge solids that measured at higher neutron poison to equivalent 235U weight ratios than that in the untreated sludge solids. This finding suggests that residual solids do not present an increased nuclear criticality safety risk. Generally the neutron poison to equivalent 235U weight ratios of the acid solutions containing dissolved sludge components are lower than those in the untreated

  16. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of Purex solvent

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.

    1984-05-21

    A process has been developed for the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from acidic waste solutions, and for the separation of these values from fission product and other values, which utilizes a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N, N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides, in combination with a phase modifier to form an extraction solution. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions.

  17. The amino acid's backup bone - storage solutions for proteomics facilities.

    PubMed

    Meckel, Hagen; Stephan, Christian; Bunse, Christian; Krafzik, Michael; Reher, Christopher; Kohl, Michael; Meyer, Helmut Erich; Eisenacher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics methods, especially high-throughput mass spectrometry analysis have been continually developed and improved over the years. The analysis of complex biological samples produces large volumes of raw data. Data storage and recovery management pose substantial challenges to biomedical or proteomic facilities regarding backup and archiving concepts as well as hardware requirements. In this article we describe differences between the terms backup and archive with regard to manual and automatic approaches. We also introduce different storage concepts and technologies from transportable media to professional solutions such as redundant array of independent disks (RAID) systems, network attached storages (NAS) and storage area network (SAN). Moreover, we present a software solution, which we developed for the purpose of long-term preservation of large mass spectrometry raw data files on an object storage device (OSD) archiving system. Finally, advantages, disadvantages, and experiences from routine operations of the presented concepts and technologies are evaluated and discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post-Identification Era. Guest Editors: Martin Eisenacher and Christian Stephan. PMID:23722089

  18. Heterogeneous freezing of single sulphuric acid solution droplets: laboratory experiments utilising an acoustic levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettner, M.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2004-03-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of single binary sulphuric acid solution droplets were measured in dependency of acid concentration down to temperatures as low as -70°C. In order to avoid influence of supporting substrates on the freezing characteristics, the droplets were suspended by means of an acoustic levitator. The droplets contained immersed particles of graphite, kaolin or montmorillonite in order to study the influence of the presence of such contamination on the freezing temperature. The radii of the suspended droplets spanned the range between 0,4 and 1,1 mm and the concentration of the sulphuric acid solution varied between 5 and 25 weight percent. The presence of the particles in the solution raises the freezing temperature with respect to homogeneous freezing of these solution droplets. The pure solution droplets can be supercooled up to 40° below the ice-acid solution thermodynamic equilibrium curve. Depending on the concentration of sulphuric acid and the nature of the impurity the polluted droplets froze between -11°C and -35°C. The experimental set-up, combining a deep freezer with a movable ultrasonic levitator and suitable optics, proved to be a useful approach for such investigations on individual droplets.

  19. Heterogeneous freezing of single sulfuric acid solution droplets: laboratory experiments utilizing an acoustic levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettner, M.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2004-09-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of single binary sulfuric acid solution droplets were measured in dependency of acid concentration down to temperatures as low as -50°C. In order to avoid influence of supporting substrates on the freezing characteristics, a new technique has been developed to suspend the droplet by means of an acoustic levitator. The droplets contained immersed particles of graphite, kaolin or montmorillonite in order to study the influence of the presence of such contamination on the freezing temperature. The radii of the suspended droplets spanned the range between 0.4 and 1.1mm and the concentration of the sulfuric acid solution varied between 5 and 14 weight percent. The presence of the particles in the solution raises the freezing temperature with respect to homogeneous freezing of these solution droplets. The pure solution droplets can be supercooled up to 40 degrees below the ice-acid solution thermodynamic equilibrium curve. Depending on the concentration of sulfuric acid and the nature of the impurity the polluted droplets froze between -11°C and -35°C. The new experimental set-up, combining a deep freezer with a movable ultrasonic levitator and suitable optics, proved to be a useful approach for such investigations on individual droplets.

  20. Hydrogen generation by tin corrosion in lactic acid solution promoted by sodium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyab, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    A method to produce high purity hydrogen using the corrosion of tin metal in lactic acid solutions is studied. The addition of sodium perchlorate has been also investigated for promoting the tin-lactic acid reaction. The data reveal that the rate of hydrogen production increases with increasing lactic acid concentration. The presence of perchlorate ions in lactic acid solution enhances the active dissolution of tin metal and tends to breakdown the passive film and promoting the hydrogen generation rate. Polarization measurements show that the breakdown potential (Epit) decreases with increase in sodium perchlorate concentration. An increase in temperature accelerates the rate of solubility of passive layer on the tin surface. Moreover, a synergistic effect of sodium perchlorate in combination with increasing the solution temperature is key in promoting the hydrogen generation rate. Results obtained from hydrogen and polarization measurements are in good agreement. These measurements are complemented with SEM, EDX and XRD examinations of the electrode surface.

  1. Control and monitoring of the localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, J.; Holmes, D.; Yau, T.L.

    1995-09-01

    Zirconium in acidic chloride solutions which are contaminated with ferric or cupric cations is prone to localized corrosion. This tendency can be reduced by ensuring that the zirconium surface is clean and smooth. In this paper, the effect of surface condition on the localized corrosion of zirconium in acidic chloride solutions is predicted with potentiodynamic scans. These predictions are confirmed by weight loss tests on various combinations of surface finish and acid concentrations. A real time indication of localized corrosion is seen by monitoring the electrochemical noise produced between two similar electrodes immersed in an acidic chloride solutions. Electrochemical noise monitoring correlates well with the predictions from potentiodynamic and weight loss experiments. The electrochemical noise results show that while an elevated (more anodic) potential caused by ferric ion contamination may be a necessary condition for localized corrosion, it is not a sufficient condition: A smooth, clean zirconium surface reduces the localized corrosion of zirconium.

  2. Growth behavior of anodic porous alumina formed in malic acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2013-11-01

    The growth behavior of anodic porous alumina formed on aluminum by anodizing in malic acid solutions was investigated. High-purity aluminum plates were electropolished in CH3COOH/HClO4 solutions and then anodized in 0.5 M malic acid solutions at 293 K and constant cell voltages of 200-350 V. The anodic porous alumina grew on the aluminum substrate at voltages of 200-250 V, and a black, burned oxide film was formed at higher voltages. The nanopores of the anodic oxide were only formed at grain boundaries of the aluminum substrate during the initial stage of anodizing, and then the growth region extended to the entire aluminum surface as the anodizing time increased. The anodic porous alumina with several defects was formed by anodizing in malic acid solution at 250 V, and oxide cells were approximately 300-800 nm in diameter.

  3. Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.; Pilot, T.F.; Meany, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The xanthine oxidase catalyzed oxidation of hypoxanthine was followed by monitoring the formation of uric acid at 290 nm. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase occurs in aqueous solutions of folic acid methotrexate and aminopterin. These compounds are known to dissociate upon exposure to ultraviolet light resulting in the formation of their respective 6-formylpteridine derivatives. The relative rates of dissociation were monitored spectrophotometrically by determining the absorbance of their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives at 500 nm. When aqueous solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate were exposed to uv light, a direct correlation was observed between the concentrations of the 6-formylpteridine derivatives existing in solution and the ability of these solutions to inhibit xanthine oxidase. The relative potency of the respective photolysis products were estimated.

  4. Investigating the Fluorescence Quenching of Doxorubicin in Folic Acid Solutions and its Relation to Ligand-Targeted Nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Husseini, Ghaleb A; Kanan, Sofian; Al-Sayah, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Folic acid (FA) is one of the most utilized moieties in active (ligand) drug delivery. The folate receptor is widely expressed on the surface of several cell lines and tumors; including ovarian, brain, kidney, breast, and lung cancers. During our previous experiments with Doxorubicin (Dox) encapsulated in folate-targeted micelles, we found that flow cytometry underestimated the amount of drug that accu- mulates inside cells. We attributed this effect to the quenching of Dox by FA and herein investigate this phenomenon in an attempt to obtain a correction factor that could be applied to the fluorescence of Dox in the presence of FA. Initially, we examine the effect of pH on the fluorescence spectra of FA, Dox, equimolar solutions of FA and Dox in water, HCI (0.1 M), and NaOH (0.1 M) solutions. We then measure the effect of the gradual increase of FA concentration on the fluorescence intensity of Dox in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solutions (pH of 7.4). Using the Stern-Volmer equation, we estimate the association constant of FA-Dox to be K(SV) = 1.5 x 10(4) M(-1). Such an association constant indicates that at the concentrations of FA used in targeted drug delivery systems, a significant concentration of Dox exists as FA-Dox complexes with a quenched fluorescence. Therefore, we conclude that when Dox is used in FA-active drug delivery systems, a correction factor is needed to predict the correct fluorescence intensity of agent in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27433596

  5. Electrochemical protection of zirconium in oxidizing hydrochloric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yuu, T-L.; Maguire, M.

    1984-06-01

    An electrochemical protection technique using cathodic polarization to maintain zirconium below its critical repassivation potential was used to avoid pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in hydrochloric acid (HCI) containing ferric ions (Fe/sup +3/). Corrosion and pit penetration rates are reported for pickled, abraded, and as-received surface conditions in 10, 20, and 37% HCI containing 50, 100, or 500 ppm Fe/sup +3/ at temperatures to boiling. The pickled surface was the least susceptible to pitting in the 64 day tests. Electrochemical protection is then evaluated for total immersion, partial immersion, U-bend, and constant strain rate tensile tests. Protection is effective in eliminating pitting and SCC in 10 and 20% HCI containing Fe/sup +3/.

  6. Acid gas absorption in aqueous solutions of mixed amines

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, E.B.; Ashour, S.S.; Sandall, O.C.

    1996-12-31

    A mass transfer model has been developed to describe the rate of absorption (or desorption) of H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} in aqueous blends of a tertiary and a secondary or a primary amine. The model is based on penetration theory, and all significant chemical reactions are incorporated in the model. The reactions are taken to be reversible, with reactions involving only a proton transfer considered to be at equilibrium. The particular amines studied in this research were methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), a tertiary amine, and diethanolamine (DEA), a secondary amine. Key physicochemical data needed in the model, such as diffusion coefficients, kinetic rate constants, and gas solubilities, were measured. Experimental absorption rates of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S were measured in a model gas-liquid contacting device and were compared with model predictions. Experiments were carried out for single amine solutions (both MDEA and DEA) and for amine blends.

  7. Solute-enhanced production of gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from aqueous solutions of levulinic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Dumesic, James A; Wettstein, Stephanie G; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif Ispir

    2015-02-24

    A method to produce levulinic acid (LA) and gamma-valerolactone (GVL) from biomass-derived cellulose or lignocellulose by selective extraction of LA using GVL and optionally converting the LA so isolated into GVL, with no purifications steps required to yield the GVL.

  8. Metabolic engineering of yeast to produce fatty acid-derived biofuels: bottlenecks and solutions.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Feng, Xueyang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid-derived biofuels can be a better solution than bioethanol to replace petroleum fuel, since they have similar energy content and combustion properties as current transportation fuels. The environmentally friendly microbial fermentation process has been used to synthesize advanced biofuels from renewable feedstock. Due to their robustness as well as the high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors and phage contamination, yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica have attracted tremendous attention in recent studies regarding the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, including fatty acids, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty alkanes. However, the native yeast strains cannot produce fatty acids and fatty acid-derived biofuels in large quantities. To this end, we have summarized recent publications in this review on metabolic engineering of yeast strains to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, identified the bottlenecks that limit the productivity of biofuels, and categorized the appropriate approaches to overcome these obstacles. PMID:26106371

  9. Metabolic engineering of yeast to produce fatty acid-derived biofuels: bottlenecks and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Feng, Xueyang

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid-derived biofuels can be a better solution than bioethanol to replace petroleum fuel, since they have similar energy content and combustion properties as current transportation fuels. The environmentally friendly microbial fermentation process has been used to synthesize advanced biofuels from renewable feedstock. Due to their robustness as well as the high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors and phage contamination, yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica have attracted tremendous attention in recent studies regarding the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, including fatty acids, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty alkanes. However, the native yeast strains cannot produce fatty acids and fatty acid-derived biofuels in large quantities. To this end, we have summarized recent publications in this review on metabolic engineering of yeast strains to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, identified the bottlenecks that limit the productivity of biofuels, and categorized the appropriate approaches to overcome these obstacles. PMID:26106371

  10. Common data buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, F.

    1981-01-01

    Time-shared interface speeds data processing in distributed computer network. Two-level high-speed scanning approach routes information to buffer, portion of which is reserved for series of "first-in, first-out" memory stacks. Buffer address structure and memory are protected from noise or failed components by error correcting code. System is applicable to any computer or processing language.

  11. Comparison of XAD macroporous resins for the concentration of fulvic acid from aqueous solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Five macroreticular, nonlonlc AmberlHe XAD resins were evaluated for concentration and Isolation of fulvlc acid from aqueous solution. The capacity of each resin for fulvlc acid was measured by both batch and column techniques. Elution efficiencies were determined by desorptlon with 0.1 N NaOH. Highest recoveries were obtained with the acrylic ester resins which proved to be most efficient for both adsorption and elution of fulvlc acid. Compared to the acrylic ester resins, usefulness of the styrene dvlnybenzene resins to remove fulvlc acid is limited because of slow diffusion-controlled adsorption and formation of charge-transfer complexes, which hinders elution. ?? 1979 American Chemical Society.

  12. Reaction behavior of Ni-Re alloys during direct current polarization in sulfuric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryukvin, V. A.; Elemesov, T. B.; Levchuk, O. M.; Bol'shikh, A. O.

    2016-01-01

    The macrokinetic regularities of the reactivity of synthesized Ni-Re (20 and 60 wt %) alloys in a sulfuric acid solution (100 g/L, 25-40°C) during direct current polarization are studied using physicochemical methods. The phase composition of the synthesized alloys is determined by the formation of solid solutions as a function of the initial Ni/Re weight ratio. These are two types of nickel solid solutions (Ni16Re0.2 and Ni14Re0.9) and one rhenium solution (Ni1.1Re). These solid solutions are anodically oxidized in the sequence of their structural rearrangement Ni16Re0.2 → Ni14Re0.9 → Ni1.1Re with a combined transition of the metals into an electrolyte solution. These solid solutions provide the reduction of Ni3+ to Ni2+ due to the depolarization ability of rhenium, being their component.

  13. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Khalid, Syed; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Morup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2015-10-03

    In this study, iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV–vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the othermore » two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.« less

  14. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Khalid, Syed; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Morup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2015-10-03

    In this study, iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV–vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the other two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.

  15. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Khalid, Syed; Zhang, Hengzhong; Mørup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV-vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the other two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.

  16. Extraction of palladium from acidic solutions with the use of carbon adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    O.N. Kononova; N.G. Goryaeva; N.B. Dostovalova; S.V. Kachin; A.G. Kholmogorov

    2007-08-15

    We studied the sorption of palladium(II) on LKAU-4, LKAU-7, and BAU carbon adsorbents from model hydrochloric acid solutions and the solutions of spent palladium-containing catalysts. It was found that sorbents based on charcoal (BAU) and anthracite (LKAU-4) were characterized by high sorption capacities for palladium. The kinetics of the saturation of carbon adsorbents with palladium(II) ions was studied, and it was found that more than 60% of the initial amount of Pd(II) was recovered in a 1-h contact of an adsorbent with a model solution. This value for the solutions of spent catalysts was higher than 35%.

  17. Bis(mesitoyl)phosphinic acid: photo-triggered release of metaphosphorous acid in solution.

    PubMed

    Fast, David E; Zalibera, Michal; Lauer, Andrea; Eibel, Anna; Schweigert, Caroline; Kelterer, Anne-Marie; Spichty, Martin; Neshchadin, Dmytro; Voll, Dominik; Ernst, Hanna; Liang, Yu; Dietliker, Kurt; Unterreiner, Andreas-Neil; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Grützmacher, Hansjörg; Gescheidt, Georg

    2016-08-01

    Bis(mesitoyl)phosphinic acid and its sodium salt display a unique photo-induced reactivity: both derivatives stepwise release two mesitoyl radicals and, remarkably, metaphosphorous acid (previously postulated as transient species in the gas phase), providing a new phosphorus-based reagent. PMID:27431207

  18. Isotherm-Based Thermodynamic Models for Solute Activities of Organic Acids with Consideration of Partial Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Lucy; Ohm, Peter B; Dutcher, Cari S

    2016-06-23

    Organic acids make up a significant fraction of the organic mass in atmospheric aerosol particles. The calculation of gas-liquid-solid equilibrium partitioning of the organic acid is therefore critical for accurate determination of atmospheric aerosol physicochemical properties and processes such as new particle formation and activation to cloud condensation nuclei. Previously, an adsorption isotherm-based statistical thermodynamic model was developed for capturing solute concentration-activity relationships for multicomponent aqueous solutions over the entire concentration range (Dutcher et al. J. Phys. Chem. C/A 2011, 2012, 2013), with model parameters for energies of adsorption successfully related to dipole-dipole electrostatic forces in solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions for both electrolytes and organics (Ohm et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015). However, careful attention is needed for weakly dissociating semivolatile organic acids. Dicarboxylic acids, such as malonic acid and glutaric acid are treated here as a mixture of nondissociated organic solute (HA) and dissociated solute (H(+) + A(-)). It was found that the apparent dissociation was greater than that predicted by known dissociation constants alone, emphasizing the effect of dissociation on osmotic and activity coefficient predictions. To avoid additional parametrization from the mixture approach, an expression was used to relate the Debye-Hückel hard-core collision diameter to the adjustable solute-solvent intermolecular distance. An improved reference state treatment for electrolyte-organic aqueous mixtures, such as that observed here with partial dissociation, has also been proposed. This work results in predictive correlations for estimation of organic acid and water activities for which there is little or no activity data. PMID:27222917

  19. A method for determining thermophysical properties of organic material in aqueous solutions: Succinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riipinen, I.; Svenningsson, B.; Bilde, M.; Gaman, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-12-01

    A method for determining evaporation rates and thermodynamic properties of aqueous solution droplets is introduced. The method combines evaporation rate measurements using modified TDMA technique with data evaluation using an accurate evaporation model. The first set of data has been collected and evaluated for succinic acid aqueous solution droplets. Evaporation rates of succinic acid solution droplets have been measured using a TDMA system at controlled relative humidity (65%) and temperature (298 K). A temperature-dependent expression for the saturation vapour pressure of pure liquid phase succinic acid at atmospheric temperatures has been derived by analysing the evaporation rate data with a numerical model. The obtained saturation vapour pressure of liquid phase succinic acid is ln( p) = 118.41 - 16204.8/ T - 12.452ln( T). The vapour pressure is in unit of Pascal and the temperature in Kelvin. A linear expression for the enthalpy of vaporization for liquid state succinic acid is also presented. According to the results presented in the following, a literature expression for the vapour pressure of liquid phase succinic acid defined for temperatures higher than 461 K [Yaws, C.L., 2003. Yaws' Handbook of Thermodynamic and Physical Properties of Chemical Compounds, Knovel] can be extrapolated to atmospheric temperatures with very good accuracy. The results also suggest that at 298 K the mass accommodation coefficient of succinic acid is unity or very close to unity.

  20. Gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions. [prebiotic significance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Graff, R. L.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1980-01-01

    The gamma-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the nonvolatile products. Thin layer chromatography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the gamma-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  1. Formation of amino acids by cobalt-60 irradiation of hydrogen cyanide solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, M. A.; Toste, A. P.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the pathway for the prebiotic origin of amino acids from hydrogen cyanide (HCN) under the action of ionizing radiation considered as an effective source of energy on the primitive earth. The irradiations were performed in a cobalt-60 source with a dose rate of 200,000 rad/hr. Seven naturally occurring amino acids are identified among the products formed by the hydrolysis of gamma-irradiated solutions of HCN: glycine, alanine, valine, serine, threonine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The identity of these amino acids is established by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Control experiments provided evidence that the amino acids are not the result of contamination.

  2. Supercritical fluid extraction of uranium and thorium from nitric acid solutions with organophosphorus reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G. |

    1995-10-01

    Extraction techniques for the recovery of uranium and transuranic elements from acid waste solutions are important in nuclear waste management. This paper examines the feasibility of extracting uranyl and thorium ions from nitric acid solutions with supercritical CO{sub 2} containing the different organophosphorus reagents. In this study, an organophosphorus reagent is dissolved in supercritical CO{sub 2} by passing the fluid through a reagent vessel placed upstream of the sample vessel in the extractor. Using TBPO or TOPO in supercritical CO{sub 2}, effective extraction of uranyl and thorium ions can be achieved even in dilute HNO{sub 3} solutions, thus yielding the possibility of reducing acidic waste volumes in nuclear waste treatment. The results may form the basis of a novel extraction process for the treatment of acidified nuclear wastes, while minimizing the production of secondary wastes. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Standard enthalpies of formation of α-aminobutyric acid and products of its dissociation in an aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernikov, V. V.; Krutova, O. N.

    2016-08-01

    Heats of solution of crystalline α-aminobutyric acid in water and in aqueous solutions of potassium hydroxide at 298.15 K are measured by means of direct calorimetry. Standard enthalpies of formation of the amino acid and products of its dissociation in an aqueous solution are calculated.

  4. Radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions by gamma ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wenbao; He, Yanquan; Ling, Yongsheng; Hei, Daqian; Shan, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jiatong

    2015-04-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid under gamma ray irradiation was investigated. Degradation experiments were performed with 100 mL sealed Pyrex glass vessels loaded with 80 mL of cyclohexanebutyric acid solutions at various initial concentrations of 10, 20, and 40 mg L-1. The absorbed doses were controlled at 0, 0.65, 1.95, 3.25, 6.5, 9.75, and 13 kGy. The results showed that gamma ray irradiation could effectively degrade cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions. The removal rate of cyclohexanebutyric acid increased significantly with the increase of absorbed dose and the decrease of its initial concentration. At the same time, the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was as effective as that of cyclohexanebutyric acid. The kinetic studies showed that the degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid followed pseudo first-order reaction. Above all, the proposed mechanism obtained when NaNO2, NaNO3 and tert-butanol were added showed that the •OH radical played a major role in the gamma degradation process of cyclohexanebutyric acid, while •H and eaq- played a minor role in the gamma degradation process. The degradation products were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) during cyclohexanebutyric acid degradation.

  5. Phase equilibria in a system of aqueous arginine with an octane solution of sulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvaeva, Z. I.; Koval'chuk, I. V.; Vodop'yanova, L. A.; Soldatov, V. S.

    2013-05-01

    The extraction of arginine (Arg) from aqueous salt (0.1 M NaCl) solutions with a sulfo extractant in a wide range of pH values and amino acid concentrations was studied. The 0.1 M solution of dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HD) in octane was used as an extractant. The degree of extraction was found to be high at pH 0.8-9.0. This can be explained by the effect of additional intermolecular interactions in the extractant phase involving the guanidine group of Arg.

  6. Distribution of zirconium in petroleum sulfoxides during extraction and sorption from nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Turanov, A.N.

    1988-11-20

    Petroleum sulfoxides (PSO) are effective extractants for several metals. We discussed the distribution of petroleum sulfoxides and zirconium between aqueous solutions of hydrochloric and nitric acid and organic solvents, and also the macroporous sorbent impregnated with PSO. For the investigation we used a macroposous copolymer of styrene with divinylbenzene. Our investigation showed a noticeable decrease in the contamination of the raffinates by petroleum sulfoxides and their more complete utilization as extractant of metals from solutions of acids when PSO is deposited on a macroporous copolymer of styrene with divinylbenzene.

  7. Distribution of trace impurities of metals during their adsorption from solutions of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Toranov, A.N.; Evseeva, N.K.; Kremenskaya, I.N.

    1986-09-01

    The phase distribution of trace impurities of metals between solutions of phosphoric acid and a polymer adsorbent based on a copolymer of styrene with divinylbenzene, impregnated with di-2-ethylhexyldithiophosphoric acid, was investigated. The influence of the composition of the aqueous and solid phases on the distribution coefficients of trace impurities of metals is discussed. It was shown that the coefficients of interfacial distribution in the case of adsorption by an impregnated adsorbent is higher than in the case of liquid extraction.

  8. Enhancement of metastable zone width for solution growth of potassium acid phthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, K.; Meera, K.; Ramasamy, P.

    1999-09-01

    A new method has been developed in which the addition of a small amount of ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA), a well-known chelating agent, enhances the metastable zone width significantly. Also, it has been found that this addition reduces the rate of nucleation and increases the growth rate of the crystal. This method has been employed for solution growth of potassium hydrogen phthalate (KC 8H 5O 4), which is also known as potassium acid phthalate (KAP).

  9. Stability of antimicrobial activity of peracetic acid solutions used in the final disinfection process.

    PubMed

    Costa, Solange Alves da Silva; Paula, Olívia Ferreira Pereira de; Silva, Célia Regina Gonçalves E; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira dos

    2015-01-01

    The instruments and materials used in health establishments are frequently exposed to microorganism contamination, and chemical products are used before sterilization to reduce occupational infection. We evaluated the antimicrobial effectiveness, physical stability, and corrosiveness of two commercial formulations of peracetic acid on experimentally contaminated specimens. Stainless steel specimens were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, blood, and saliva and then immersed in a ready peracetic acid solution: 2% Sekusept Aktiv (SA) or 0.25% Proxitane Alpha (PA), for different times. Then, washes of these instruments were plated in culture medium and colony-forming units counted. This procedure was repeated six times per day over 24 non-consecutive days. The corrosion capacity was assessed with the mass loss test, and the concentration of peracetic acid and pH of the solutions were measured with indicator tapes. Both SA and PA significantly eliminated microorganisms; however, the SA solution was stable for only 4 days, whereas PA remained stable throughout the experiment. The concentration of peracetic acid in the SA solutions decreased over time until the chemical was undetectable, although the pH remained at 5. The PA solution had a concentration of 500-400 mg/L and a pH of 2-3. Neither formulation induced corrosion and both reduced the number of microorganisms (p = 0.0001). However, the differences observed in the performance of each product highlight the necessity of establishing a protocol for optimizing the use of each one. PMID:25715037

  10. Sequence of morphological transitions in two-dimensional pattern growth from aqueous ascorbic Acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Paranjpe, A S

    2002-08-12

    A sequence of morphological transitions in two-dimensional dehydration patterns of aqueous solutions of ascorbic acid is observed with humidity as a control parameter. Change in morphology occurs due to humidity induced variation in the concentration of the metastable supersaturated solution phase formed after initial solvent evaporation. As percent humidity is varied from 40 to 80, patterns change from compact circular --> radial --> density modulated radial (a new morphology) --> density modulated circular --> density modulated dendritic (a new morphology) --> dense branching. PMID:12190528

  11. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2012-05-15

    A system is described for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizing a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate, in particular water-insoluble calcium carbonate or magnesium carbonate, is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide. Among other uses, the metal hydroxide formed can be employed to absorb acid gases such as carbon dioxide from a gas mixture. The invention can also generate hydrogen and oxidative gases such as oxygen or chlorine.

  12. New crystallization of fatty acids from aqueous ethanol solution combined with liquid-liquid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Kouji; Nomura, Yoshihisa; Tai, Kimihiko; Ueno, Yoshitaka; Fukui, Keisuke; Hirota, Syouji

    1999-06-01

    A new separation process of saturated fatty acids (lauric acid-myristic acid) using crystallization from an aqueous ethanol solution has been examined. There were two vessels in this separation process: an extraction vessel and a crystallization vessel. The fatty acids in the aqueous phase were first extracted from their organic phase (melt) in the extraction vessel. The fatty acids in the aqueous phase were continuously introduced to the crystallization vessel, and then the fatty acids were crystallized there. The crystals of the fatty acids were collected continuously above the aqueous phase in the crystallization vessel. In this process, the yield and the purity of the crystals over time were measured, and it was found that the purity of lauric acid increased unsteadily up to 0.98 mole fraction of lauric acid with an increase in the yield of the low yield range. The mole fraction of ethanol in the aqueous phase could be significant to control the relationship between the yield and the purity of the crystals. Three different mole fractions of lauric acid in the organic phase were used to be separated in this process. Moreover, the authors have considered the effective separations of this process, and the maximum yield and purity of the crystals have been estimated by a simple mass balance.

  13. Emergency cooling experiments with aqueous boric acid solution in the REWET-II facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kervinen, T.; Tuunanen, J.

    1987-01-01

    Although boron is widely used as soluble neutron poison in nuclear reactors (boric acid in pressurized water reactors, sodium pentaborate in boiling water reactors), there is a lack of experimental data about aqueous boron solution behavior during loss-of-coolant accidents. The main aims of the REWET boric acid experiments were to study the behavior of aqueous boric acid solution during long-term cooling of a nuclear reactor and to find out the circumstances in which boric acid crystallization takes place. In the experiments, carried out in the facility of a 19-fuel-rod simulator bundle, boric acid crystallization caused the uncovering of the bundle, which always occurred on the water surface. However, crossflows and backflows in a reactor presumably make the concentrations uniform and thus retard crystallization. Therefore, experimental investigations of aqueous boric acid solution behavior will be carried out for the next 2 yr in a larger scale experimental facility. The new facility will be a simulator of the Loviisa VVER-440 reactor with a scaling factor of 1:349 for power and volumes and 1:1 for elevations. The facility will contain a full-scale rod bundle.

  14. Alkali Treatment of Acidic Solution from Hanford K Basin Sludge Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    AA Bessonov; AB Yusov; AM Fedoseev; AV Gelis; AY Garnov; CH Delegard; GM Plavnik; LN Astafurova; MS Grigoriev; NA Budantseva; NN Krot; SI Nikitenko; TP Puraeva; VP Perminov; VP Shilov

    1998-12-22

    Nitric acid solutions will be created from the dissolution of Hanford K Basin sludge. These acidic dissolver solutions must be made alkaline by treatment with NaOH solution before they are disposed to ~ the Tank Waste Remediation System on the Hanford Site. During the alkali treatments, sodium diuranate, hydroxides of iron and aluminum, and radioelements (uranium, plutonium, and americium) will precipitate from the dissolver solution. Laboratory tests, discussed here, were pefiormed to provide information on these precipitates and their precipitation behavior that is important in designing the engineering flowsheet for the treatment process. Specifically, experiments were conducted to determine the optimum precipitation conditions; the completeness of uranium, plutonium, and americium precipitation; the rate of sedimentation; and the physico-chemical characteristics of the solids formed by alkali treatment of simulated acidic dissolver solutions. These experiments also determined the redistribution of uranium, plutonium, and americium flom the sodium di~ate and iron and al&inurn hydroxide precipitates upon contact with carbonate- and EDTA-bearing simulated waste solutions. Note: EDTA is the tetrasodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetate.

  15. Reactive solute transport in an acidic stream: Experimental pH increase and simulation of controls on pH, aluminum, and iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.; Runkel, R.L.; Kimball, B.A.; McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    Solute transport simulations quantitatively constrained hydrologic and geochemical hypotheses about field observations of a pH modification in an acid mine drainage stream. Carbonate chemistry, the formation of solid phases, and buffering interactions with the stream bed were important factors in explaining the behavior of pH, aluminum, and iron. The precipitation of microcrystalline gibbsite accounted for the behavior of aluminum; precipitation of Fe(OH)3 explained the general pattern of iron solubility. The dynamic experiment revealed limitations on assumptions that reactions were controlled only by equilibrium chemistry. Temporal variation in relative rates of photoreduction and oxidation influenced iron behavior. Kinetic limitations on ferrous iron oxidation and hydrous oxide precipitation and the effects of these limitations on field filtration were evident. Kinetic restraints also characterized interaction between the water column and the stream bed, including sorption and desorption of protons from iron oxides at the sediment-water interface and post-injection dissolution of the precipitated aluminum solid phase.

  16. Laboratory evaluation of limestone and lime neutralization of acidic uranium mill tailings solution. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Opitz, B.E.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1984-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate a two-step neutralization scheme for treatment of acidic uranium mill tailings solutions. Tailings solutions from the Lucky Mc Mill and Exxon Highland Mill, both in Wyoming, were neutralized with limestone, CaCO/sub 3/, to an intermediate pH of 4.0 or 5.0, followed by lime, Ca(OH)/sub 2/, neutralization to pH 7.3. The combination limestone/lime treatment methods, CaCO/sub 3/ neutralization to pH 4 followed by neutralization with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to pH 7.3 resulted in the highest quality effluent solution with respect to EPA's water quality guidelines. The combination method is the most cost-effective treatment procedure tested in our studies. Neutralization experiments to evaluate the optimum solution pH for contaminant removal were performed on the same two tailings solutions using only lime Ca(OH)/sub 2/ as the neutralizing agent. The data indicate solution neutralization above pH 7.3 does not significantly increase removal of pH dependent contaminants from solution. Column leaching experiments were performed on the neutralized sludge material (the precipitated solid material which forms as the acidic tailings solutions are neutralized to pH 4 or above). The sludges were contacted with laboratory prepared synthetic ground water until several effluent pore volumes were collected. Effluent solutions were analyzed for macro ions, trace metals and radionuclides in an effort to evaluate the long term effectiveness of attenuating contaminants in sludges formed during solution neutralization. Neutralized sludge leaching experiments indicate that Ca, Na, Mg, Se, Cl, and SO/sub 4/ are the only constituents which show solution concentrations significantly higher than the synthetic ground water in the early pore volumes of long-term leaching studies.

  17. Experimental Shock Chemistry of Aqueous Amino Acid Solutions and the Cometary Delivery of Prebiotic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, Jennifer G.; Miller, Gregory H.; Ahrens, Michael J.; Winans, Randall E.

    2001-02-01

    A series of shock experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of the delivery of organic compounds to the Earth via cometary impacts. Aqueous solutions containing near-saturation levels of amino acids (lysine, norvaline, aminobutyric acid, proline, and phenylalanine) were sealed inside stainless steel capsules and shocked by ballistic impact with a steel projectile plate accelerated along a 12-m-long gun barrel to velocities of 0.5-1.9 km sec^-1. Pressure-temperature-time histories of the shocked fluids were calculated using 1D hydrodynamical simulations. Maximum conditions experienced by the solutions lasted 0.85-2.7 μs and ranged from 5.1-21 GPa and 412-870 K. Recovered sample capsules were milled open and liquid was extracted. Samples were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS). In all experiments, a large fraction of the amino acids survived. We observed differences in kinetic behavior and the degree of survivability among the amino acids. Aminobutyric acid appeared to be the least reactive, and phenylalanine appeared to be the most reactive of the amino acids. The impact process resulted in the formation of peptide bonds; new compounds included amino acid dimers and cyclic diketopiperazines. In our experiments, and in certain naturally occurring impacts, pressure has a greater influence than temperature in determining reaction pathways. Our results support the hypothesis that significant concentrations of organic material could survive a natural impact process.

  18. Experimental shock chemistry of aqueous amino acid solutions and the cometary delivery of prebiotic compounds.

    PubMed

    Blank, J G; Miller, G H; Ahrens, M J; Winans, R E

    2001-01-01

    A series of shock experiments were conducted to assess the feasibility of the delivery of organic compounds to the Earth via cometary impacts. Aqueous solutions containing near-saturation levels of amino acids (lysine, norvaline, aminobutyric acid, proline, and phenylalanine) were sealed inside stainless steel capsules and shocked by ballistic impact with a steel projectile plate accelerated along a 12-m-long gun barrel to velocities of 0.5-1.9 km sec-1. Pressure-temperature-time histories of the shocked fluids were calculated using 1D hydrodynamical simulations. Maximum conditions experienced by the solutions lasted 0.85-2.7 microseconds and ranged from 5.1-21 GPa and 412-870 K. Recovered sample capsules were milled open and liquid was extracted. Samples were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS). In all experiments, a large fraction of the amino acids survived. We observed differences in kinetic behavior and the degree of survivability among the amino acids. Aminobutyric acid appeared to be the least reactive, and phenylalanine appeared to be the most reactive of the amino acids. The impact process resulted in the formation of peptide bonds; new compounds included amino acid dimers and cyclic diketopiperazines. In our experiments, and in certain naturally occurring impacts, pressure has a greater influence than temperature in determining reaction pathways. Our results support the hypothesis that significant concentrations of organic material could survive a natural impact process. PMID:11296518

  19. Length Scale Dependence of the Dynamic Properties of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Horkay, Ferenc; Falus, Peter; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2010-12-07

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub NSE} measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, D{sub DLS}. This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, D{sub DLS} approaches D{sub NSE}, which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hueckel length.

  20. REDUCTION OF PLUTONIUM VALUES IN AN ACIDIC AQUEOUS SOLUTION WITH FORMALDEHYDE

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.M.

    1959-06-01

    A method is given for reducing Pu to the tetravalent state and lowering the high acidity of dissolver solutions containing U and Pu. Formaldehyde is added to the HNO/sub 3/ solution of U and Pu to effect a formaldehyde to HNO/sub 3/ molar ratio of 0.375:1 to 1.5:1. The Pu can then be removed from the solution by carrier precipitation using BiPO/sub 4/ or by ion exchange. (T.R.H.)

  1. Evaluation of ampouled tonometered buffer solutions as a quality-control system for pH, pCO2, and pO2 measurement.

    PubMed

    Maas, A H; Veefkind, A H; Van den Camp, R A; Teunissen, A J; Winckers, E K; Jansen, A P

    1977-09-01

    In response to the need for an adequate quality-control system for blood-pH and blood-gas analyzers, we investigated the practical application of ampouled phosphate-bicarbonate-chloride solutions tonometered with mixtures of carbon dioxide, oxygen, and nitrogen. This system offers three discrete sets of pH, pCO2, AND PO2 values, which are consistent with normal and pathophysiologically high and low values. The stated values were based on the U.S. National Bureau of Standards scale for pH and on gas analysis for pCO2 and pO2. Influence of temperature, air contact, calibration gas, and storage was established. Internal and external quality control by means of these ampoules is presented. The system is stable, accurate, precise, and suitable for simultaneous quality control of pH, pCO2, and pO2 measurements. PMID:19168

  2. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  3. Removal of ash from Indian Assam coking coal using sodium hydroxide and acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Shankar, R.H.

    2000-03-01

    Mineral matter (ash) removal from Assam coking coal by leaching with different concentrations of sodium hydroxide and acid (HCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HNO{sub 3}, and HF) solutions has been investigated at a temperature of 75 C. The parameters tested were concentration of NaOH, type of acid, concentration of acids, and number of acid leaching steps. Total ash removed increased with increase of NaOH and acid concentrations up to the range studied. For the same experimental conditions, treatment of caustic leached coal in HCl acid resulted in better demineralization than in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or HNO{sub 3} acid. In the NaOH-HNO{sub 3} leaching method, a higher concentration (>20%) of HNO{sub 3} acid had an adverse effect on the de-ashing of coal. The NaOH-HF leaching process has been found to be the most effective method of coal de-ashing. The two acid treatment steps (HCl-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/HCl-HNO{sub 3}) after caustic leaching are the next most effective methods of coal de-ashing. The removal of mineral matter (including S) from coal is expected to decrease the graphite reactivity and thus the atmospheric pollution (due to the generation of smaller quantities of CO and SO{sub 2} gases).

  4. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2014-07-01

    A system for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizes a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide.

  5. [Diffuse x-ray wide-angle scattering of polyglutamic acid in solution].

    PubMed

    Fedorov, B A; Becker, M; Damaschun, G; Damaschun, H; Gedicke, C; Zirwer, D

    1977-01-01

    The diffuse wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) of polyglutamic acid (PGA) in solution was studied using an x-ray diffractometer with small aperture of the primary beam. The scattering curve was recorded at an angular interval from (article: see text). The experimental scattering intensity of PGA with alpha-helical CD spectrum showed a maximum at 14.4 nm-1. Unordered PGA in solution yielded no maximum at this scattering angle. The studies have proved that the scattering theory can be applied to globular proteins in solution as well as to chain molecules in solution in this angular interval. The differences between the calculated scattering curves and the experimental curves indicate minor movements of the side chains of PGA in solutions and slight structuring of the solvent at the surface of the polypeptide chain. PMID:25547

  6. IMPROVEMENT UPON THE CARRIER PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONIUM IONS FROM NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    James, R.A.; Thompson, S.G.

    1958-12-23

    A process is reported for improving the removal of plutonlum by carrier precipitation by the addition of nitrite ions to a nitrlc acid solutlon of neutronirradiated unanium so as to destroy any hydrazine that may be present in the solution since the hydrazine tends to complex the tetravalent plutonium and prevents removal by the carrier precipltate, such as bismuth phospbate.

  7. Modification of vital wheat gluten with phosphoric acid to produce high free-solution capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat gluten reacts with phosphoric acid to produce natural superabsorbent gels. The gel properties are defined by Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE), and uptake of water, salt solutions, and aqueous ethanol. Temperatures above 120'C and dry cond...

  8. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  9. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  10. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  11. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  12. [Effects of UV Radiation on the Physicochemical Properties and Coagulation Properties of Humic Acid Solution].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-dong; Zhang, Ke; Fan, Qing-hai; Zheng, Dan

    2016-03-15

    To investigate the mechanism of UV light in promoting the removal of humic acid ( HA) by coagulation, the variations of the physical and chemical properties of the HA solution before and after UV light radiation were investigated. The effects of the changes in water quality conditions on the removal performance of HA in coagulation were also observed. Experimental results showed that except zeta potential, pH, chromaticity and viscosity of the HA solution exhibited varying degrees of decline after UV radiation. Further study showed that the impact of changes in viscosity of the solution on humic acid coagulation performance was relatively small. Under acidic conditions, the coagulation performance of HA significantly increased. The increase of zeta potential led to easy gathering of colloidal particles and improved the coagulation performance. Furthermore, except for HA with relative molecular mass of between (10-30) x 10³ and less than 10³, there was little variation in the proportion of low molecular weight HA, which may be an important reason that the coagulation performance of the humic acid solution increased after UV radiation. PMID:27337892

  13. Effect of acid solutions on plants studied by the optical beam deflection method.

    PubMed

    Nie, Liangjiao; Kuboda, Mitsutoshi; Inoue, Tomomi; Wu, Xingzheng

    2013-12-01

    The optical beam deflection method was applied to study the effects of acid solution on both a terrestial and aquatic plants Egeria and Cerastium, which are common aquatic plant and terrestial weed respectively. A probe beam from a He-Ne laser was passed through a vicinity of a leaf of the plants, which were put in culture dishes filled with acid solutions. Deflection signals of the probe beam were monitored and compared for acid solutions with different pH values. The results of Egria showed that the deflection signals changed dramatically when pH values of acid solutions were 2.0 and 3.0, while little at pH of 4.0 and 5.0. For Cerastium when pH were below 3.0, deflection signals changed greatly with time at the begining. After a certain period of time, deflection signals changed little with time. When pH value was above 4.0, deflection signals of Cerastium were still changing with time even after 20 hours. The results suggested that the damage threshold of pH was between 3.0 and 4.0 for both the land and aquatic plants. PMID:25078849

  14. PHYSICAL SOLUTIONS FOR ACID ROCK DRAINAGE AT REMOTE SITES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program, Activity III, Project 42, Physical Solutions for Acid Rock Drainage at Remote Sites, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy. A...

  15. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  16. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM FROM AQUEOUS ACIDIC SOLUTIONS OF NEUTRON IRRADIATED URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Bruce, F.R.

    1962-07-24

    A solvent extraction process was developed for separating actinide elements including plutonium and uranium from fission products. By this method the ion content of the acidic aqueous solution is adjusted so that it contains more equivalents of total metal ions than equivalents of nitrate ions. Under these conditions the extractability of fission products is greatly decreased. (AEC)

  17. Spray washing carcasses with alkaline solutions of lauric acid to reduce bacterial contamination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of lauric acid (LA)-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions to reduce carcass bacterial contamination was examined. Skin of carcasses was inoculated with a cecal paste containing antibiotic resistant strains of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimirum, and Campylobacter coli. In one trial, in...

  18. Solution blow spun Poly(lactic acid)/Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose nanofibers with antimicrobial properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanofibers containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and tetracycline hydrochloride (THC) were solution blow spun from two different solvents, chloroform/acetone (CA, 80:20 v/v) and 2,2,2-triflouroethanol (TFE). The diameter distribution, chemical, thermal, thermal stab...

  19. Ion flotation behaviour of thirty-one metal ions in mixed hydrochloric/nitric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Hualing, D; Zhide, H

    1989-06-01

    The ion flotation of 31 metal ions in hydrochloric/nitric acid solution with the cationic surfactant cetylpyridinium chloride was investigated. A 25-ml portion of 0.27-2.87 x 10(-4)M metal ion and 1.8-6.0 x 10(-4)M cetylpyridinium chloride solution in 0.17-3.4M acid mixture ([HCl]:[HNO(3)] = 2.4:1) was subjected to flotation in a cell, 22.5 cm high and 4.0 cm in diameter, for 5 min, with nitrogen bubbles. Ir(IV), Pt(IV), Ge(IV), Sn(IV), Bi(III), Au(III), Tl(III), Pd(II) and Sn(II) were floated from solution in 95-100% yield; Ru(III), Rh(III), Ir(III), Hg(II), Ag(I) and Tl(I) were partly floated, while Cr(VI), Ti(IV), Zr(IV), Ga(III), In(III), Fe(III), Sb(III), Al(III), Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), CD(II) and Pb(II) were floated with less than 20% yield. The flotation behaviour of these metal ions in the mixed acid system was compared with that in hydrochloric acid. The flotation is more efficient in the mixed acid system. PMID:18964771

  20. Effect of Tris-HCl buffer on DNA adsorption by a variety of soil constituents.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Kazutoshi; Kunito, Takashi; Sakai, Masao

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effect of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane hydrochloride (Tris-HCl) buffer (pH 7.0) as a bulk solution on the adsorption of DNA by gibbsite, goethite, montmorillonite, kaolinite, synthetic and natural allophanes, two humic acids and two andosols. The natural allophane, gibbsite, kaolinite and an andosol adsorbed significantly more DNA in a 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer than in a 0.1 M NaCl solution (t-test, P<0.005). In contrast, montmorillonite adsorbed significantly less DNA in the Tris-HCl than NaCl solution (P<0.05). Care should be taken when using Tris-HCl in studies on the adsorption of extracellular DNA molecules by soil particles. PMID:21487209

  1. Corrosion behavior of niobium coated 304 stainless steel in acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, T. J.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, B.; Hu, J.; Li, C.

    2016-04-01

    The niobium coating is fabricated on the surface of AISI Type 304 stainless steel (304SS) by using a high energy micro arc alloying technique in order to improvecorrosion resistance of the steel against acidic environments. The electrochemical corrosion resistance of the niobium coating in 0.7 M sulfuric acid solutions is evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and the open circuit potential versus time. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the niobium coating increases the free corrosion potential of the substrate by 110 mV and a reduction in the corrosion rate by two orders of magnitude compared to the substrate alone. The niobium coating maintains large impedance and effectively offers good protection for the substrate during the long-term exposure tests, which is mainly ascribed to the niobium coating acting inhibiting permeation of corrosive species. Finally, the corresponding electrochemical impedance models are proposed to elucidate the corrosion resistance behavior of the niobium coating in acid solutions.

  2. Effective Removal of Tetracycline from Aqueous Solution by Organic Acid-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Liang, Yuyan; Chen, Xuelan; Xu, Wei; Wu, Kesheng; Wei, Hua; Xiong, Yonghua

    2016-03-01

    Self-assembled iron oxide nanocomposites are good magnetic nano-adsorbents that can be prepared using simple methods. Four types of organic acid-functionalised (oleic acid, undecenoic acid, caprylic acid or hexanoic acid) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesised through a one-pot chemisorption method for the removal of tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solution. The undecenoic acid-coated MNPs (UA-MNPs) exhibited the highest adsorption efficiency and can be easily retrieved with a low-gradient magnetic separator (0.4 Tesla) at pH 5.0 aqueous solution. The TC adsorption process on the UA-MNPs followed the Langmuir isotherm and the maximum adsorption capacities increased from 86.96 mg g(-1) to 222.2 mg g(-1) with the increase in temperature from 288 K to 318 K. The kinetics of adsorption fits pseudo-second-order model perfectly with a rate constant, 5.946 g mg(-1) min(-1) at 298 K. The positive values of the enthalpy (AH) and the negative value of the free energy (AG) indicated an endothermic and spontaneous adsorption process of TC on the UA-MNPs. Moreover, the UA-MNPs possessed excellent ability to adsorb the other three major types of TC antibiotics, including chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline and doxycycline. PMID:27455621

  3. Detergent-assisted self assembly of fatty acid layers on mica in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, Sean; Yang, Jie

    1997-03-01

    Fatty acids are well known for their ability to form monolayers at air-water interfaces. The conventional method to coat a solid surface with mono or multi layers of fatty acids uses a Langmuir trough, via X- or Y- type coatings. The major advantage of the Langmuir trough is the ability to control the monolayer pressure. The limiting factors are, however, the restricted size of the substrate, the physical size of the Langmuir trough, and the coating procedure. To circumvent some of these drawbacks, we have developed a method to cover a solid mica substrate with fatty acids by detergent assisted self assembly in aqueous solutions. It has been found that a molecular layer of fatty acids, possibly complexed with some detergent, are self-assembled on the mica surface. Thickness measurements of these self-assembled layers suggest that the layer is composed of two monolayers of fatty acids in a bilayer arrangement. The presence of cations in the solution has some effect on the assembly of the molecular layer, and may alter the orientation of individual fatty acids in the layer. Structural characteristics of such self assembled molecular layers are studied with atomic force microscopy. Details of the method of the detergent assisted self assembly and some structural features of the assembled molecular layers will be presented.

  4. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhuang, Jinxing; Zong, Zichao; Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma. PMID:27183129

  5. Interaction of Atmospheric-Pressure Air Microplasmas with Amino Acids as Fundamental Processes in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhuang, Jinxing; Zong, Zichao; Zhang, Xianhui; Liu, Dongping; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Plasma medicine is a relatively new field that investigates potential applications of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas in bioengineering, such as for bacterial inactivation and degradation of organic molecules in water. In order to enunciate mechanisms of bacterial inactivation at molecular or atomic levels, we investigated the interaction of atmospheric-pressure air microplasmas with amino acids in aqueous solution by using high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Results show that the oxidation effect of plasma-induced species on the side chains of the amino acids can be categorized into four types, namely hydroxylation, nitration, dehydrogenation and dimerization. In addition, relative activities of amino acids resulting from plasma treatment come in descending order as follows: sulfur-containing carbon-chain amino acids > aromatic amino acids > five-membered ring amino acids > basic carbon-chain amino acids. Since amino acids are building blocks of proteins vital to the growth and reproduction of bacteria, these results provide an insight into the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by plasma. PMID:27183129

  6. Adsorptions of some heavy metal ions in aqueous solutions by acrylamide/maleic acid hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Saraydin, D.; Karadag, E.; Gueven, O.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, acrylamide-maleic acid (AAm/MA) hydrogels in the form of rod have been prepared by {gamma}-radiation. They have been used for adsorption of some heavy metal ions such as uranium, iron, and copper. For the hydrogel containing 40 mg of maleic acid and irradiated at 3.73 kGy, maximum and minimum swellings in the aqueous solutions of the heavy metal ions have been observed with water (1480%) and the aqueous solution of iron(III) nitrate (410%), respectively. Diffusions of water and heavy metal ions onto hydrogels have been found to be of the non-Fickian type of diffusion. In experiments of uranyl ions adsorption, Type II adsorption has been found. One gram of AAa/MA hydrogels sorbed 14-86 mg uranyl ions from solutions of uranyl acetate, 14-90 mg uranyl ions from solutions of uranyl nitrate, 16-39 mg iron ions from solutions of iron(IV) nitrate, and 28-81 mg copper ions from solutions of copper acetate, while acrylamide hydrogel did not sorb any heavy metals ions.

  7. Infusion of branched-chain enriched amino acid solution in patients with hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Freund, H; Dienstag, J; Lehrich, J; Yoshimura, N; Bradford, R R; Rosen, H; Atamian, S; Slemmer, E; Holroyde, J; Fischer, J E

    1982-08-01

    Hospitalized patients with hepatic insufficiency often suffer from severe catabolic states and are in urgent need of nutritional support during their acute illness. Protein intolerence, however, remains a significant problem with respect to the provision of adequate nutrition, either enterally or parenterally. The following report is an anecdotal series of 63 consecutive patients in a large urban hospital treated prospectively with nutritional support using a prototype high branched-chain amino acid solution (FO80) given by technique of total parenteral nutrition by the subclavian or internal jugular route with hypertonic dextrose. Sixty-three patients, of which 42 had chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) with acute decompensation and 17 with acute hepatic injury as well as four with hepatorenal syndrome, are the subject of this report. All required intravenous nutritional support and were either intolerant to commercially available parenteral nutrition solutions or were in hepatic encephalopathy at the time they were initially seen. The cirrhotic patients had been hospitalized for a mean of 14.5 +/- 1.9 days before therapy, had a mean bilirubin of 13 mg/100 ml, and had been in coma for 4.8 +/- 0.7 days despite standard therapy. Patients with acute hepatitis had been in the hospital for 16.2 +/- 4.1 days before therapy, had a mean bilirubin of 25 mg/100 ml, and had been in coma 5.2 +/- 1.6 days before therapy. Routine tests of liver function, blood chemistries, amino acids, EEGs, and complex neurological testing including Reitan trailmaking tests were used in the evaluation of these patients. Up to 120 grams of synthetic amino acid solution with hypertonic dextrose was tolerated in these patients with improvement noted in encephalopathy of at least one grade in 87% of the patients with cirrhosis and 75% of the patients with hepatitis. Nitrogen balance was achieved when 75 to 80 grams of synthetic amino acids were administered. Survival was 45% in the cirrhotic group

  8. Development of a stable solution of 5-aminolaevulinic acid for intracutaneous injection in photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    de Blois, A W; Grouls, R J E; Ackerman, E W; Wijdeven, W J A

    2002-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy using 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) as a photosensitiser is a new treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas. Until now ALA has been used topically as a cream. As this administration route leads sometimes to insufficient penetration in the skin, an intracutaneously injectable solution of ALA was developed. The influence of pH, concentration and temperature on the degradation of ALA in aqueous solution was investigated in order to optimise the formulation of the injection. In 0.1% ALA solutions with pH values between 4 and 8 a pH dependency of ALA degradation was shown, comprising fast decomposition at pH values higher than 7, whereas at a pH value of 6 or lower the solutions remained within the range of 90-110% of the initial concentration for at least 128 days. An increase of degradation rate with increasing concentrations became evident which is consistent with the supposed second-order degradation kinetics. After accelerated stability research at 63 degrees C and 85 degrees C a shelf life of 281 days for a 0.1% ALA solution pH 5 was calculated from an Arrhenius plot. A 2% ALA solution was proven to be isotonic. From our results a 0.1-2% ALA solution with pH 5 and an appropriate amount of sodium chloride to obtain isotonicity is recommended as an injectable solution. PMID:12181635

  9. The SVT Hit Buffer

    SciTech Connect

    Belforte, S.; Dell`Orso, M.; Donati, S.

    1996-06-01

    The Hit Buffer is part of the Silicon Vertex Tracker, a trigger processor dedicated to the reconstruction of particle trajectories in the Silicon Vertex Detector and the Central Tracking Chamber of the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The Hit Buffer is a high speed data-traffic node, where thousands of words are received in arbitrary order and simultaneously organized in an internal structured data base, to be later promptly retrieved and delivered in response to specific requests. The Hit Buffer is capable of processing data at a rate of 25 MHz, thanks to the use of special fast devices like Cache-Tag RAMs and high performance Erasable Programmable Logic Devices from the XILINX XC7300 family.

  10. Modeling Sucrose Hydrolysis in Dilute Sulfuric Acid Solutions at Pretreatment Conditions for Lignocellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, S.; Wickramasinghe, R.; Nagle, N. J.; Schell, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Agricultural and herbaceous feedstocks may contain appreciable levels of sucrose. The goal of this study was to evaluate the survivability of sucrose and its hydrolysis products, fructose and glucose, during dilute sulfuric acid processing at conditions typically used to pretreat lignocellulose biomass. Solutions containing 25 g/l sucrose with 0.1-2.0% (w/w) sulfuric acid concentrations were treated at temperatures of 160-200 C for 3-12 min. Sucrose was observed to completely hydrolyze at all treatment conditions. However, appreciable concentrations of fructose and glucose were detected and glucose was found to be significantly more stable than fructose. Different mathematical approaches were used to fit the kinetic parameters for acid-catalyzed thermal degradation of these sugars. Since both sugars may survive dilute acid pretreatment, they could provide an additional carbon source for production of ethanol and other bio-based products.

  11. Radiolysis of aqueous solutions of acetic acid in the presence of Na-montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos, S.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1990-01-01

    The gamma-irradiation of 0.8 mol dm-3 aqueous, oxygen-free acetic acid solutions was investigated in the presence or absence of Na-montmorillonite. H2, CH4, CO, CO2, and several polycarboxylic acids were formed in all systems. The primary characteristics observed in the latter system were: (1) Higher yield of the decomposition of acetic acid; (2) Lower yield of the formation of polycarboxylic acids; (3) No effect on the formation of methane; (4) Higher yield of the formation of carbon dioxide; and (5) The reduction of Fe3+ in the octahedral sites of Na-montmorillonite. A possible reaction scheme was proposed to account for the observed changes. The results are important in understanding heterogeneous processes in radiation catalysis and might be significant to prebiotic chemistry.

  12. Spectrofluorimetric study of the interaction of ciprofloxacin with amino acids in aqueous solution following solvatochromic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Kamal; Mobarrez, Mahsa; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz; Chaichi, Mohammad Javad

    Complexation of a fluoroquinolone derivative (ciprofloxacin), L, and some amino acids has been studied using spectrofluorimetric method. Results indicated that ciprofloxacin have a greater tendency to form a 1:1 complex with aspartic acid and arginine than the other tested molecules. The fluorescence of ciprofloxacin exhibits quenching process while it has been titrated with these amino acids. Formation constant values (Kf) for complex formed between ciprofloxacin and amino acids were also calculated. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° were studied too. Possible reasons for the observed stability sequence were discussed based on the structures proposed for the resulting complexes. Besides the solution studies, solvatochromic properties of the ciprofloxacin are discussed by studying its spectra in a selection of different solvents.

  13. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  14. Sulfuric acid thermoelectrochemical system and method

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Frank A.

    1989-01-01

    A thermoelectrochemical system in which an electrical current is generated between a cathode immersed in a concentrated sulfuric acid solution and an anode immersed in an aqueous buffer solution of sodium bisulfate and sodium sulfate. Reactants consumed at the electrodes during the electrochemical reaction are thermochemically regenerated and recycled to the electrodes to provide continuous operation of the system.

  15. In-line System to Produce High-Purity Acid Solutions.

    PubMed

    Masunaga, Hiroto; Higo, Yuji; Ishii, Mizuo; Maruyama, Noboru; Yamazaki, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a new device that generates a high-purity acid solution. It comprises three compartments divided by anion-exchange membranes and filled with ion-exchange resins. Fluorochemical cation-exchange membranes, which tolerate electrochemical wear and permit bulk flow, are inserted between each electrode and the anion-exchange resin. A bipolar boundary is a composite boundary comprising anion and cation exchangers. This device has four bipolar boundaries to separate the location of acid generation from the location where water is electrolyzed. It can tolerate high pressures, resist degradation due to electrolysis at the electrodes, and produce high-purity acid solutions that are free from gases and cationic impurities. The acid solution is generated on the basis of an electrokinetic phenomenon at the surfaces of ion-exchange resins and membranes in an electric field; its concentration can be controlled at rates from 0.01 to 100 μmol/min by adjusting the electrical current applied to the device. PMID:27302592

  16. The infrared optical constants of sulfuric acid at 250 K. [spectral reflectance measurement of aqueous solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkley, L. W.; Williams, D.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for measurements of the IR spectral reflectance at near-normal incidence of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid with acid concentrations of 75% and 95.6% by weight. Kramers-Kronig analyses of the reflectance data are employed to obtain values of the optical constants n(nu) and k(nu) in the spectral range from 400 to 6000 cm to the -1 power. The optical constants of these solutions at 250 K and 300 K are compared. It is found that in spectral regions remote from strong absorption bands, the values of the n(nu) indices obtained at 250 K agree with the values given by Lorentz-Lorenz correction of the same indices at 300 K. All absorption bands observed at 300 K are found to be present at 250 K with slight shifts in frequency and with significant differences in the k(nu) indices at the band maxima. Based on these results, it is concluded that the clouds of Venus probably consist of droplets of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid with acid concentrations of about 75% by weight.

  17. Effects of Solution Hydrodynamics on Corrosion Inhibition of Steel by Citric Acid in Cooling Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Asghari, E.; Mohammadi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in cooling water systems, which is often controlled using corrosion inhibitors. Solution hydrodynamics is one of the factors affecting corrosion inhibition of metals in these systems. The present work focuses on the study of the combined effects of citric acid concentration (as a green corrosion inhibitor) and fluid flow on corrosion of steel in simulated cooling water. Electrochemical techniques including Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used for corrosion studies. Laminar flow was simulated using a rotating disk electrode. The effects of solution hydrodynamics on inhibition performance of citric acid were discussed. The citric acid showed low inhibition performance in quiescent solution; however, when the electrode rotated at 200 rpm, inhibition efficiency increased remarkably. It was attributed mainly to the acceleration of inhibitor mass transport toward metal surface. The efficiencies were then decreased at higher rotation speeds due to enhanced wall shear stresses on metal surface and separation of adsorbed inhibitor molecules. This article is first part of authors' attempts in designing green inhibitor formulations for industrial cooling water. Citric acid showed acceptable corrosion inhibition in low rotation rates; thus, it can be used as a green additive to the corrosion inhibitor formulations.

  18. [Studies on carbonization of saccharides by using aqueous solution of various acids].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; He, An-Qi; Kang, Ting-Guo; Xia, Jin-Ming; Weng, Shi-Fu; Xu, Yi-Zhuang; Wu, Jin-Guang

    2014-09-01

    The authors tried to establish an approach to use acids to convert biomass into a fuel with higher carbon content and lower oxygen content in a zero-energy-consumption fashion. Considering that biomass is composed of monosaccharide, we used aqueous solutions of variation acids including hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid and perchloric acid to treat 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose at ambient temperature and pressure. Black substances were produced after a period of time when 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose were mixed with aqueous solutions containing 8 mol · L(-1) acids. The black substance was collected and characterized by using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Elemental analysis results indicate that the contents of carbon increases significantly in the black substances in comparison with 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose. Moreover, XPS results indicate that the content of oxygen in the black substance undergoes a significant decrease compared with pure 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose. In the XPS spectra, the is peaks of 2-deoxy-ribose, strong sub peak at 286. 05 eV, which is assigned to carbon linked to oxygen directly, dominate in the C is peak envelop. After treatment by HClO4, the peak decreased dramatically. This result also supports the conclusion that the content of oxygen in mono-saccharide is significantly reduced after treatment by acids. In the FTIR spectra of the black substances, strong peaks can be observed around 1 600 cm(-1), indicating that C==C bond is formed in the product. The above results suggest that treatments with acids may be developed as a new zero-energy-consumption approach to convert biomass in a new fuel with improved energy output efficiency. PMID:25532323

  19. Comparative behavior of titanium and zirconium in hydrofluoric-nitric acid pickling solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, E.M.M.; Hlawka, F.; Cornet, A. )

    1990-07-01

    The different behavior of titanium and zirconium in HF-HNO{sub 3} pickling solutions has been studied using electrochemical methods and Raman spectrometry. In each case, the depleting of the solutions during a pickling experiment could be correlated with the consumption of HF to form metal oxo or oxofluoro complexes. However, the mechanism of metal dissolution is quite different for the two metals. The titanium dissolution process in such solutions can be interpreted using a passivation model in which dissolution and passivation are two competing reactions at the surface of the bare metal. On the other hand, zirconium dissolution occurs through formation of an oxide film with ionic diffusion through the film being a rate-determining step. The particular role of strong acid added to the HF solution for pickling of titanium and zirconium is also discussed.

  20. Effect of tritium on corrosion behavior of chromium in 0.01 N sulfuric acid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Oyaidzu, M.; Isobe, K.; Hayashi, T.

    2015-03-15

    The effects of tritium on the corrosion behavior of chromium in 0.01 N sulfuric solution have been investigated in the present study. Electrochemical experiments have been carried our for pure chromium. At first, the concentration dependence of sulfuric acid solution on anodic polarization behavior of chromium was experimented, resulting in that 0.01 N one was found appropriate. The dependence of both dissolved oxygen and tritium concentration on anodic behavior of chromium were performed. It was found from that the self-passivation of chromium induced by dissolved oxygen was inhibited in tritiated solution resulting in the enhancement of the corrosion. As a consequence it is highly likely that the elution of chromium by highly oxidative radiolysis products would explain the passivation inhibitory effect of SUS304 stainless steel observed in tritiated solutions.

  1. Microbial shelf life determination of vacuum-packaged fresh beef treated with polylactic acid, lactic acid, and nisin solutions.

    PubMed

    Ariyapitipun, T; Mustapha, A; Clarke, A D

    1999-08-01

    The effectiveness of polylactic acid, lactic acid, nisin, and combinations of the acids and nisin on extending the shelf-life of raw beef was determined. Fresh beef pieces (5 by 5 by 2.5 cm) were dipped in a solution of 2% low molecular weight polylactic acid (LMW-PLA), 2% lactic acid (LA), 200 IU of nisin per ml, or the combinations of nisin in either 2% LMW-PLA or 2% LA. The samples were then drip-dried, vacuum-packaged, and stored at 4 degrees C for up to 56 days. The beef surface pH values and numbers of psychrotrophic aerobic bacteria, psychrotrophic and mesophilic Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas, and Lactobacillus were determined weekly for 56 days. The average surface pH values of the beef samples treated with 2% LMW-PLA or the combination of 200 IU of nisin per ml and 2% LMW-PLA were significantly reduced to 5.19 and 5.17, respectively, at day 0 (P < or = 0.05), while those decontaminated with 2% LA or 200 IU of nisin per ml in 2% LA solution were significantly decreased from 5.62 to 4.98 and 4.96, respectively. The 2% LMW-PLA, 2% LA, or the combinations of each acid and nisin showed immediate inhibitory effects on psychrotrophic aerobic bacteria (1.94, 2.36, 2.59, and 1.76 log reduction, respectively), psychrotrophic Enterobacteriaceae (1.37, 1.86, 1.77, and 1.35 log reduction, respectively), mesophilic Enterobacteriaceae (1.00, 1.00, 0.82, and 0.68 log reduction, respectively), and Pseudomonas (1.77, 1.57, 1.76, and 1.41 log reduction, respectively) on fresh beef (P < or = 0.05). The reduction was evident up to 56 days as seen by the numbers of Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas (P < or = 0.05). Because there was no interaction between treatments and storage times, the data in each period were combined and presented as effect of treatments on overall microbial counts of fresh beef. It was found that 2% LMW-PLA, 2% LA, and the combinations of each acid and nisin significantly lowered the population of the above organisms compared with the untreated control

  2. Collagen tissue treated with chitosan solutions in carbonic acid for improved biological prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Gallyamov, Marat O; Chaschin, Ivan S; Khokhlova, Marina A; Grigorev, Timofey E; Bakuleva, Natalia P; Lyutova, Irina G; Kondratenko, Janna E; Badun, Gennadii A; Chernysheva, Maria G; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2014-04-01

    Calcification of bovine pericardium dramatically shortens typical lifetimes of biological prosthetic heart valves and thus precludes their choice for younger patients. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate that the calcification is to be mitigated by means of treatment of bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid, i.e. water saturated with carbon dioxide at high pressure. This acidic aqueous fluid unusually combines antimicrobial properties with absolute biocompatibility as far as at normal pressure it decomposes spontaneously and completely into H2O and CO2. Yet, at high pressures it can protonate and dissolve chitosan materials with different degrees of acetylation (in the range of 16-33%, at least) without any further pretreatment. Even exposure of the bovine pericardium in pure carbonic acid solution without chitosan already favours certain reduction in calcification, somewhat improved mechanical properties, complete biocompatibility and evident antimicrobial activity of the treated collagen tissue. The reason may be due to high extraction ability of this peculiar compressed fluidic mixture. Moreover, exposure of the bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid introduces even better mechanical properties and highly pronounced antimicrobial activity of the modified collagen tissue against adherence and biofilm formation of relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. Yet, the most important achievement is the detected dramatic reduction in calcification for such modified collagen tissues in spite of the fact that the amount of the thus introduced chitosan is rather small (typically ca. 1wt.%), which has been reliably detected using original tritium labelling method. We believe that these improved properties are achieved due to particularly deep and uniform impregnation of the collagen matrix with chitosan from its pressurised solutions in carbonic acid. PMID:24582232

  3. pH-Responsive poly(itaconic acid-co-N-vinylpyrrolidone) hydrogels with reduced ionic strength loading solutions offer improved oral delivery potential for high isoelectric point-exhibiting therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Koetting, Michael C; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2014-08-25

    pH-Responsive hydrogels comprised of itaconic acid copolymerized with N-vinylpyrrolidone (P(IA-co-NVP)) were synthesized and tested as carriers for the oral delivery of high isoelectric point (pI) exhibiting therapeutic proteins. Swelling studies show that P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogels exhibit significantly greater and faster pH-responsive swelling than previously studied methacrylic acid-based hydrogels, achieving up to 68% greater equilibrium swelling and 10.4 times greater swelling in time-limited experiments. Using salmon calcitonin as a model high pI protein therapeutic, we show that P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogels exhibit significantly greater delivery potential than methacrylic acid-based hydrogels. Additionally, we show that utilizing a lower ionic strength solution during drug loading significantly improves drug delivery potential for high pI therapeutics. By using a 1.5mM PBS buffer rather than the standard 150 mM PBS buffer during loading, up to 83 times as much calcitonin can be delivered in neutral conditions, with up to a 9.6-fold improvement in percent release. Using P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogel microparticles and a low ionic strength loading solution, up to 48 μg calcitonin/mg hydrogel can be delivered in small intestinal conditions. Based on expected absorption in the small intestine, this is sufficient delivery potential for achieving therapeutic dosage via a single, regularly-sized pill taken daily. PMID:24853463

  4. Recovery of water and acid from leach solutions using direct contact membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Kesieme, Uchenna K; Milne, Nicholas; Cheng, Chu Yong; Aral, Hal; Duke, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes for the first time the use of direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) for acid and water recovery from a real leach solution generated by a hydrometallurgical plant. The leach solutions considered contained H2SO4 or HCl. In all tests the temperature of the feed solution was kept at 60 °C. The test work showed that fluxes were within the range of 18-33 kg/m(2)/h and 15-35 kg/m(2)/h for the H2SO4 and HCl systems, respectively. In the H2SO4 leach system, the final concentration of free acid in the sample solution increased on the concentrate side of the DCMD system from 1.04 M up to 4.60 M. The sulfate separation efficiency was over 99.9% and overall water recovery exceeded 80%. In the HCl leach system, HCl vapour passed through the membrane from the feed side to the permeate. The concentration of HCl captured in the permeate was about 1.10 M leaving behind only 0.41 M in the feed from the initial concentration of 2.13 M. In all the experiments, salt rejection was >99.9%. DCMD is clearly viable for high recovery of high quality water and concentrated H2SO4 from spent sulfuric acid leach solution where solvent extraction could then be applied to recover the sulfuric acid and metals. While HCl can be recovered for reuse using only DCMD. PMID:24569289

  5. Degradation of hydroxycinnamic acid mixtures in aqueous sucrose solutions by the Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Danny M T; Zhang, Zhanying; Doherty, William O S

    2015-02-11

    The degradation efficiencies and behaviors of caffeic acid (CaA), p-coumaric acid (pCoA), and ferulic acid (FeA) in aqueous sucrose solutions containing the mixture of these hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) were studied by the Fenton oxidation process. Central composite design and multiresponse surface methodology were used to evaluate and optimize the interactive effects of process parameters. Four quadratic polynomial models were developed for the degradation of each individual acid in the mixture and the total HCAs degraded. Sucrose was the most influential parameter that significantly affected the total amount of HCA degraded. Under the conditions studied there was a <0.01% loss of sucrose in all reactions. The optimal values of the process parameters for a 200 mg/L HCA mixture in water (pH 4.73, 25.15 °C) and sucrose solution (13 mass %, pH 5.39, 35.98 °C) were 77% and 57%, respectively. Regression analysis showed goodness of fit between the experimental results and the predicted values. The degradation behavior of CaA differed from those of pCoA and FeA, where further CaA degradation is observed at increasing sucrose and decreasing solution pH. The differences (established using UV/vis and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy) were because, unlike the other acids, CaA formed a complex with Fe(III) or with Fe(III) hydrogen-bonded to sucrose and coprecipitated with lepidocrocite, an iron oxyhydroxide. PMID:25585639

  6. Selective extraction of cesium from acidic nitrate solutions with didodecylnaphthalenesulfonic acid synergized with bis(tert-butylbenzo)-21-crown-7

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N. ); McDonough, J.A.; Bartsch, R.A. )

    1992-12-01

    The behavior of other crown ether-synergized sulfonic acid extraction systems suggested that the title system would be selective for cesium. Synthesis of the new lipophilic crown ether, bis[4(5)-tert-butylbenzo]-21-crown-7 (D(tBB)21C7), allowed testing of this hypothesis. Under nonloading conditions, the distribution coefficient for cesium between a toluene solution 0.025 M in didodecylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (HDDNS) and D(tBB)21C7 and an aqueous phase 0.1 M in nitric acid is 100 with separation factors of 1.2 from rubidium, 5.6 from potassium, and 294 from sodium. Under loading and competitive extraction conditions, the distribution coefficients were lower (5 for cesium), but the separation factors remained in the same order and of useful magnitude, 1.5 from rubidium, 6.4 from potassium, and 192 from sodium. Increasing the concentrations of D(tBB)21C7 and HDDNS in the organic phase gives higher distribution coefficients for cesium as did lower aqueous acid concentrations. 23 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Frog striated muscle is permeable to hydroxide and buffer anions.

    PubMed

    Venosa, R A; Kotsias, B A; Horowicz, P

    1994-04-01

    Hydroxide, bicarbonate and buffer anion permeabilities in semitendinosus muscle fibers of Rana pipiens were measured. In all experiments, the fibers were initially equilibrated in isotonic, high K2SO4 solutions at pHo = 7.2 buffered with phosphate. Two different methods were used to estimate permeabilities: (i) membrane potential changes were recorded in response to changes in external ion concentrations, and (ii) intracellular pH changes were recorded in response to changes in external concentrations of ions that alter intracellular pH. Constant field equations were used to calculate relative or absolute permeabilities. In the first method, to increase the size of the membrane potential change produced by a sudden change in anion entry, external K+ was replaced by Cs+ prior to changes of the anion under study. At constant external Cs+ activity, a hyperpolarization results from increasing external pH from 7.2 to 10.0 or higher, using either CAPS (3-[cyclohexylamino]-1-propanesulfonic acid) or CHES (2-[N-cyclohexylamino]-ethanesulfonic acid) as buffer. For each buffer, the protonated form is a zwitterion of zero net charge and the nonprotonated form is an anion. Using reported values of H+ permeability, calculations show that the reduction in [H+]o cannot account for the hyperpolarizations produced by alkaline solutions. Membrane hyperpolarization increases with increasing total external buffer concentration at constant external pH, and with increasing external pH at constant external buffer anion concentration. Taken together, these observations indicate that both OH- and buffer anions permeate the surface membrane. The following relative permeabilities were obtained at pHo = 10.0 +/- 0.3: (POH/PK) = 890 +/- 150, (PCAPS/PK) = 12 +/- 2, (PCHES/PK) = 5.3 +/- 0.9, and (PNO3/PK) = 4.7 +/- 0.5. PNO3/PK was independent of pHo up to 10.75. At pHo = 9.6, (PHCO3/PK) = 0.49 +/- 0.03; at pHo = 8.9, (PCl/PK) = 18 +/- 2 and at pHo = 7.1, (PHEPES/PK) = 20 +/- 2. In the second

  8. Zirconium complexes with lactic acid in the solution and solid states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkowicz, Paul Andrew

    Lactic acid complexes of zirconium are used in a great number of industrial applications. Among these is their use as crosslinking agents for hydraulic fracturing fluids used in secondary oil recovery operations. Because of a poor understanding of zirconium lactate complex chemistry and crosslinking reactions, however, the design of superior fluid systems is often not guided by sound chemical principles and leads to empirical guesswork. Zirconium lactate solutions were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, 1H, 13C, and 17O nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and potentiometry. The results indicate that lactic acid is coordinated bidentate to zirconium via the alcohol and carboxylate groups. The average number of lactate ligands per zirconium ion is approximately 2 and is demonstrated to be relatively constant from pH 4--9. The lability of the lactate complexes increases as the pH is decreased. The NMR data reveal that there are both large and small complex molecules present in solution, with the size of the complex depending on the extent of zirconium hydrolysis. Large complexes consist of lactic acid coordinated to polynuclear zirconium hydroxy ions. The molecular size of these complexes is sufficient to hinder their tumbling in solution and cause broadening of the measured NMR signals. Small complexes involve lactic acid coordinated to hydroxylated species containing fewer zirconium ions, such that the rotational motion in solution is sufficiently rapid to result in narrow NMR signals. Zirconium lactate complexes were precipitated from solution and analyzed in the solid state using FT-IR spectroscopy, 13C magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, thermal gravitational analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Two distinct types of crystalline compounds were synthesized with four lactate ligands per zirconium ion. The coordination of lactic acid to zirconium is different in the two compounds, with one showing

  9. PROCESS FOR EXTRACTING NEPTUNIUM AND PLUTONIUM FROM NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS OF SAME CONTAINING URANYL NITRATE WITH A TERTIARY AMINE

    DOEpatents

    Sheppard, J.C.

    1962-07-31

    A process of selectively extracting plutonium nitrate and neptunium nitrate with an organic solution of a tertiary amine, away from uranyl nitrate present in an aqueous solution in a maximum concentration of 1M is described. The nitric acid concentration is adjusted to about 4M and nitrous acid is added prior to extraction. (AEC)

  10. Copper-Sulfate Pentahydrate as a Product of the Waste Sulfuric Acid Solution Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, Radmila; Stevanović, Jasmina; Avramović, Ljiljana; Nedeljković, Dragutin; Jugović, Branimir; Stajić-Trošić, Jasna; Gvozdenović, Milica

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is synthesis of copper-sulfate pentahydrate from the waste sulfuric acid solution-mother liquor generated during the regeneration process of copper bleed solution. Copper is removed from the mother liquor solution in the process of the electrolytic treatment using the insoluble lead anodes alloyed with 6 mass pct of antimony on the industrial-scale equipment. As the result of the decopperization process, copper is removed in the form of the cathode sludge and is precipitated at the bottom of the electrolytic cell. By this procedure, the content of copper could be reduced to the 20 mass pct of the initial value. Chemical characterization of the sludge has shown that it contains about 90 mass pct of copper. During the decopperization process, the very strong poison, arsine, can be formed, and the process is in that case terminated. The copper leaching degree of 82 mass pct is obtained using H2SO4 aqueous solution with the oxygen addition during the cathode sludge chemical treatment at 80 °C ± 5 °C. Obtained copper salt satisfies the requirements of the Serbian Standard for Pesticide, SRPS H.P1. 058. Therefore, the treatment of waste sulfuric acid solutions is of great economic and environmental interest.

  11. Micellization properties of zwitterionic surfactants derived from nicotinic acid in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederkehr, N.A.; Kalyanasundaram, K.; Graetzel, M. ); Viscardi, G.; Savarino, P.; Barni, E. )

    1991-01-01

    Various properties of monomeric and micellar (aggregated) forms of a series of zwitterionic surfactants based on nicotinic acid (N-alkylnicotinic acids), R-NA (R = C{sub 8}, C{sub 10}, C{sub 12}, C{sub 14}, and C{sub 16}) have been determined in aqueous solution by utilization of a number of physical methods (visible light absorption, fluorescence probe analysis, surfactant tension measurements, and low-angle light scattering): protonation equilibria, extent of counterion adsorption, critical micellar temperature, critical micellar concentration, and micellar aggregation number.

  12. Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark L.; Horwitz, E. Philip; Bartsch, Richard A.; Barrans, Jr., Richard E.; Rausch, David

    1999-01-01

    A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution.

  13. Composition and process for separating cesium ions from an acidic aqueous solution also containing other ions

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bartsch, R.A.; Barrans, R.E. Jr.; Rausch, D.

    1999-03-30

    A crown ether cesium ion extractant is disclosed as is its synthesis. The crown ether cesium ion extractant is useful for the selective purification of cesium ions from aqueous acidic media, and more particularly useful for the isolation of radioactive cesium-137 from nuclear waste streams. Processes for isolating cesium ions from aqueous acidic media using the crown ether cesium extractant are disclosed as are processes for recycling the crown ether cesium extractant and processes for recovering cesium from a crown ether cesium extractant solution. 4 figs.

  14. Ferulic acid stabilizes a solution of vitamins C and E and doubles its photoprotection of skin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Lin, Jing-Yi; Gupta, Ravindra D; Tournas, Joshua A; Burch, James A; Selim, M Angelica; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A; Grichnik, James M; Zielinski, Jan; Pinnell, Sheldon R

    2005-10-01

    Ferulic acid is a potent ubiquitous plant antioxidant. Its incorporation into a topical solution of 15%l-ascorbic acid and 1%alpha-tocopherol improved chemical stability of the vitamins (C+E) and doubled photoprotection to solar-simulated irradiation of skin from 4-fold to approximately 8-fold as measured by both erythema and sunburn cell formation. Inhibition of apoptosis was associated with reduced induction of caspase-3 and caspase-7. This antioxidant formulation efficiently reduced thymine dimer formation. This combination of pure natural low molecular weight antioxidants provides meaningful synergistic protection against oxidative stress in skin and should be useful for protection against photoaging and skin cancer. PMID:16185284

  15. Direct determination of peracetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and acetic acid in disinfectant solutions by far-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Noboru; Yokota, Hiroshi; Hiraki, Satoru; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2005-04-01

    In this paper we propose a rapid and highly selective far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectroscopic method for the simultaneous determination of peracetic acid (PAA), hydrogen peroxide, and acetic acid (AA). For this purpose we developed a novel FUV spectrometer that enables us to measure the spectra down to 180 nm. Direct determination of PAA, H(2)O(2), and AA, the three main species in disinfectant solutions, was carried out by using their absorption bands in the 180-220-nm region. The proposed method does not require any reagents or catalysts, a calibration standard, and a complicated procedure for the analysis. The only preparation procedure requested is a dilution of H(2)O(2) with pure water to a concentration range lower than 0.2 wt % in the sample solutions. Usually, the required concentration range can be obtained by the 10 times volume dilution of the actual disinfectant solutions. As the measured sample does not leave any impurity for the disinfection, it can be reused completely by using a circulation system. The detection limit for PAA of the new FUV spectrometer was evaluated to be 0.002 wt %, and the dynamic ranges of the measured concentrations were from 0 to 0.05 wt %, from 0 to 0.2 wt %, and from 0 to 0.2 wt % for PAA, H(2)O(2), and AA, respectively. The response time for the simultaneous determination of the three species is 30 s, and the analysis is applicable even to the flowing samples. This method may become a novel approach for the continuous monitoring of PAA in disinfectant solutions on the process of sterilization. PMID:15801764

  16. Organic amendments increase soil solution phosphate concentrations in an acid soil: A controlled environment study

    SciTech Connect

    Schefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, R.

    2008-04-15

    Soil acidification affects at least 4 million hectares of agricultural land in Victoria, Australia. Low soil pH can inhibit plant growth through increased soluble aluminum (Al) concentrations and decreased available phosphorus (P). The addition of organic amendments may increase P availability through competition for P binding sites, solubilization of poorly soluble P pools, and increased solution pH. The effect of two organic amendments (lignite and compost) on P solubility in an acid soil was determined through controlled environment (incubation) studies. Three days after the addition of lignite and compost, both treatments increased orthophosphate and total P measured in soil solution, with the compost treatments having the greatest positive effect. Increased incubation time (26 days) increased soil solution P concentrations in both untreated and amended soils, with the greatest effect seen in total P concentrations. The measured differences in solution P concentrations between the lignite- and compost-amended treatments were likely caused by differences in solution chemistry, predominantly solution pH and cation dynamics. Soil amendment with lignite or compost also increased microbial activity in the incubation systems, as measured by carbon dioxide respiration. Based on the results presented, it is proposed that the measured increase in soil solution P with amendment addition was likely caused by both chemical and biological processes, including biotic and abiotic P solubilization reactions, and the formation of soluble organic-metal complexes.

  17. Pulsed field capillary electrophoresis of multikilobase length nucleic acids in dilute methyl cellulose solutions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Morris, M D

    1994-10-01

    Pulsed field capillary gel electrophoresis in dilute methyl cellulose solutions is used to separate nucleic acid fragments in the size range 75-23,000 base pairs. Field inversion is shown to increase resolution for fragments longer than about 500 base pairs. Methyl cellulose solutions as dilute as 0.01% can be used. Intermolecular hydrogen bonding is suggested as the cause of apparent cellulose fiber entanglement at concentrations below the calculated entanglement limit. The 1-kb DNA ladder and the lambda DNA/HindIII restriction fragment mixtures are each baseline resolved in a 28-cm capillary in less than 9 min at 180 V/cm (dc component). PMID:7978303

  18. Spectral and Acid-Base Properties of Hydroxyflavones in Micellar Solutions of Cationic Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkovska, N. A.; Barvinchenko, V. N.; Fedyanina, T. V.; Rugal', A. A.

    2014-09-01

    It has been shown that the spectral characteristics (intensity, position of the absorption band) and the acid-base properties in a series of structurally similar hydroxyflavones depend on the concentration of the cationic surfactants miramistin and decamethoxin in aqueous solutions, and the extent of their changes is more pronounced for hydrophobic quercetin than for hydrophilic rutin. For the first time, we have determined the apparent dissociation constants of quercetin and rutin in solutions of these cationic surfactants (pKa1) over a broad concentration range and we have established that they decrease in the series water-decamethoxin-miramistin.

  19. Three-dimensional patterns from the thin-film drying of amino acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuehua; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show the dried-in patterns from amino acid solutions which can be in the form of dots or networks. The three-dimensional lattice-gas Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model is applied to simulate the formation of dot-like and network-like particle structures from the evaporating thin films of solutions. A sigmoidal jump in the chemical potential value is implemented to obtain dual-scale structures with the grain size distribution peaking at two distinctive values. The simulated and experimental results are qualitatively comparable. PMID:26039636

  20. Three-dimensional patterns from the thin-film drying of amino acid solutions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuehua; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show the dried-in patterns from amino acid solutions which can be in the form of dots or networks. The three-dimensional lattice-gas Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model is applied to simulate the formation of dot-like and network-like particle structures from the evaporating thin films of solutions. A sigmoidal jump in the chemical potential value is implemented to obtain dual-scale structures with the grain size distribution peaking at two distinctive values. The simulated and experimental results are qualitatively comparable. PMID:26039636

  1. Ruminal buffers: temporal effects on buffering capacity and pH of ruminal fluid from cows fed a high concentrate diet.

    PubMed

    Le Ruyet, P; Tucker, W B

    1992-04-01

    In vitro characteristics of several buffers and alkalinizing agents commonly utilized to reduce ruminal acid load were evaluated. Ruminal fluid was collected from five cows consuming a diet containing concentrate and sorghum silage in a 68:32 ratio (DM basis). This fluid was incubated with either NaHCO3, a natural sodium sesquicarbonate, a multielement buffer or MgO (7.1 g/L of ruminal fluid), or no buffer for 48 h; flasks were removed and analyzed for pH, buffering capacity, and buffer value index every 12 h during the 48-h incubation. The buffer value index accounts simultaneously for alterations in pH and buffering capacity. Compared with the unbuffered control, all buffering compounds increased ruminal fluid buffer value index. However, the buffer value index separated these buffering compounds into two categories. The NaH-CO3 and sodium sesquicarbonate exhibited similar buffer value indexes; both were markedly higher than those for the multielement buffer and MgO. Although NaHCO3 and sodium sesquicarbonate each increased both ruminal fluid pH and buffering capacity sharply, the multielement buffer only increased pH and buffering capacity moderately. The increase in buffer value index for MgO primarily was due to an increase in pH. Both NaHCO3 and sodium sesquicarbonate were fully active within the first 12 h of incubation; activity of multielement buffer and MgO reached a plateau at 24 h. Compared with the multielement buffer and MgO, NaHCO3 and sodium sesquicarbonate should be more beneficial in preventing short-term postprandial increases in ruminal fluid hydrogen ion concentration; because of their slower release rates, the multielement buffer and MgO should help stabilize ruminal acid-base status, but efficacy might be reduced because of passage out of the rumen. PMID:1315810

  2. Electro-oxidation of methanol on Pt(111) in acid solutions: effects of electrolyte anions during electrocatalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Hirohito; Ito, Masatoki

    1995-10-01

    The electro-oxidation of methanol on a Pt(111) surface in both sulfuric and perchloric acid solutions was investigated by combined apparatus under both ultra-high vacuum and electrochemical environments. In sulfuric acid solution, a strong lateral interaction was observed between adsorbed bisulfate and CO derived from methanol. Coadsorption of CO derived from methanol with bisulfate ion yielded a (√7 × √7)-R19.1°-CO-bisulfate structure. In perchloric acid solution, however, no lateral interaction between adsorbed CO and perchlorate was seen. The difference in reaction rates of methanol oxidation in both solutions was explained by these specific anion adsorption effects.

  3. Color removal from acid and reactive dye solutions by electrocoagulation and electrocoagulation/adsorption processes.

    PubMed

    Bellebia, S; Kacha, S; Bouberka, Z; Bouyakoub, A Z; Derriche, Z

    2009-04-01

    In this study, electrocoagulation of Marine Blue Erionyl MR (acid dye) and electrocoagulation followed by adsorption of Brilliant Blue Levafix E-BRA (reactive dye) from aqueous solutions were investigated, using aluminum electrodes and granular activated carbon (GAC). In the electrocoagulation and adsorption of dyestuff solutions, the effects of current density, loading charge, pH, conductivity, stirring velocity, contact time, and GAC concentration were examined. The optimum conditions for the electrocoagulation process were identified as loading charges 7.46 and 1.49 F/m3, for a maximum abatement of 200 mg/L reactive and acid dye, respectively. The residual reactive dye concentration was completely removed with 700 mg/L GAC. The results of this investigation provide important data for the development of a combined process to remove significant concentrations of recalcitrant dyes from water, using moderate activated carbon energy and aluminum consumption, and thereby lowering the cost of treatment. PMID:19445327

  4. Uptake of formaldehyde by sulfuric acid solutions - Impact on stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Pfaff, Jeanne; Jayaweera, Indira; Prather, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    The study investigates the uptake of CH2O by low temperature sulfuric acid solutions representative of global stratospheric particulate. It is argued that if similar uptake occurs under stratospheric pressures of CH2O, i.e., 1000 times lower than used in the present study, then the removal of CH2O from the gas phase can take away a significant source of odd hydrogen in the mid- and high-latitude lower stratosphere. It is shown that with the inclusion of this reaction, concentrations of OH and H2O are reduced by as much as 4 percent under background levels of aerosols and more than 15 percent under elevated (volcanic) conditions. The accumulation of CH2O in stratospheric aerosols over a season, reaching about 1 M solutions, will alter the composition and may even change the reactivity of these sulfuric acid-water mixtures.

  5. Evaluation of the Magnesium Hydroxide Treatment Process for Stabilizing PFP Plutonium/Nitric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Baker, Aaron B.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2000-09-28

    This document summarizes an evaluation of the magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] process to be used at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for stabilizing plutonium/nitric acid solutions to meet the goal of stabilizing the plutonium in an oxide form suitable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99. During the treatment process, nitric acid solutions bearing plutonium nitrate are neutralized with Mg(OH)2 in an air sparge reactor. The resulting slurry, containing plutonium hydroxide, is filtered and calcined. The process evaluation included a literature review and extensive laboratory- and bench-scale testing. The testing was conducted using cerium as a surrogate for plutonium to identify and quantify the effects of key processing variables on processing time (primarily neutralization and filtration time) and calcined product properties.

  6. Competitive adsorption of boric acid and chromate onto alumina in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Demetriou, A; Pashalidis, I

    2014-01-01

    The competitive adsorption of boric acid and chromate from aqueous solutions by alumina has been investigated by spectrophotometry at pH 8, ionic strength = 0.0, 0.1 and 1.0 M NaClO4, T = 22 ± 3 °C and under normal atmospheric conditions. The experimental data show that addition of excess boric acid in the system leads to the increase of Cr(VI) concentration in solution, indicating the replacement of adsorbed chromate by boron on the alumina surface. Data evaluation results in the determination of the competition reaction constant and the formation constant of the Cr(VI) surface complexes, which are logKCr(VI)-B(III) = -3.5 ± 0.2 and logβ*Cr = 7.6 ± 0.3, respectively. PMID:24473309

  7. Separation of glycols from dilute aqueous solutions via complexation with boronic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Randel, L.A.; King, C.J.

    1991-07-01

    This work examines methods of separating low molecular weight glycols from dilute aqueous solution. Extraction into conventional solvents is generally not economical, since, in the literature reviewed, distribution ratios for the two- to four-carbon glycols are all less than one. Distribution ratios can be increased, however, by incorporating into the organic phase an extracting agent that will complex with the solute of interest. The extracting agent investigated in this work is 3-nitrophenylboronic acid (NPBA). NPBA, a boric acid derivative, reversibly complexes with many glycols. The literature on complexation of borate and related compounds with glycols, including mechanistic data, measurement techniques, and applications to separation processes, provides information valuable for designing experiments with NPBA and is reviewed herein. 88 refs., 15 figs., 24 tabs.

  8. Comparison of adhesive properties of water- and phosphate-buffer-washed cottonseed meals with cottonseed protein isolate on bonding maple and poplar veneers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water- and phosphate buffer (35 mM Na2HPO4/NaH2PO4, pH 7.5)-washed cottonseed meals (abbreviated as WCM and BCM, respectively) could be low-cost and environmentally friendly protein-based adhesives as their preparation does not involve corrosive alkali and acid solutions that are needed for cottonse...

  9. Removal of transition metals from dilute aqueous solution by carboxylic acid group containing absorbent polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new carboxylic acid group containing resin with cation exchange capacity, 12.67 meq/g has been used to remove Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ ions from dilute aqueous solution. The resin has Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ removal capacity, 216 mg/g, 154 mg/g and 180 mg/g, respectively. The selectivity of the resin to ...

  10. Shock wave synthesis of amino acids from solutions of ammonium formate and ammonium bicarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Chizuka; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Sekine, Toshimori; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of life's building blocks, such as amino acids and nucleobases, on the prebiotic Earth was a critical step for the beginning of life. Reduced species with low mass, such as ammonia, amines, or carboxylic acids, are potential precursors for these building blocks of life. These precursors may have been provided to the prebiotic ocean by carbonaceous chondrites and chemical reactions related to meteorite impacts on the early Earth. The impact of extraterrestrial objects on Earth occurred more frequently during this period than at present. Such impacts generated shock waves in the ocean, which have the potential to progress chemical reactions to form the building blocks of life from reduced species. To simulate shock-induced reactions in the prebiotic ocean, we conducted shock-recovery experiments on ammonium bicarbonate solution and ammonium formate solution at impact velocities ranging from 0.51 to 0.92 km/s. In the products from the ammonium formate solution, several amino acids (glycine, alanine, ß-alanine, and sarcosine) and aliphatic amines (methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, and butylamine) were detected, although yields were less than 0.1 mol % of the formic acid reactant. From the ammonium bicarbonate solution, smaller amounts of glycine, methylamine, ethylamine, and propylamine were formed. The impact velocities used in this study represent minimum cases because natural meteorite impacts typically have higher velocities and longer durations. Our results therefore suggest that shock waves could have been involved in forming life's building blocks in the ocean of prebiotic Earth, and potentially in aquifers of other planets, satellites, and asteroids.

  11. Chemical durability of glaze on Zsolnay architectural ceramics (Budapest, Hungary) in acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baricza, Ágnes; Bajnóczi, Bernadett; May, Zoltán; Tóth, Mária; Szabó, Csaba

    2015-04-01

    Zsolnay glazed architectural ceramics are among the most famous Hungarian ceramics, however, there is no profound knowledge about the deterioration of these building materials. The present study aims to reveal the influence of acidic solutions in the deterioration of Zsolnay ceramics. The studied ceramics are glazed roof tiles, which originate from two buildings in Budapest: one is located in the densely built-up city centre with high traffic rate and another one is in a city quarter with moderate traffic and more open space. The roof tiles represent the construction and the renovation periods of the buildings. The ceramics were mainly covered by lead glazes in the construction period and mainly alkali glazes in the renovation periods. The glaze of the tiles were coloured with iron (for yellow glaze) or chromium/copper/iron (for green glazes) in the case of the building located in the city centre, whereas cobalt was used as colorant and tin oxide as opacifier for the blue glaze of the ceramics of the other building. Six tiles were selected from each building. Sulphuric acid (H2SO4) solutions of pH2 and pH4 were used to measure the durability of the glazes up to 14 days at room temperature. The surfaces of the glazed ceramics after the treatment were measured by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDS techniques to determine the precipitated phases on the surface of the glaze. Electron microprobe analysis was used to quantitatively characterise phases found and to determine the chemical composition of the treated glaze. The recovered sulphuric acid solutions were measured with ICP-OES technique in order to quantify the extent of the ion exchange between the glaze and the solutions. There is a significant difference in the dissolution rates in the treatments with sulphuric acid solutions of pH2 and pH4, respectively. The solution of pH2 induced greater ion exchange (approx. 7-10 times) from the glaze compared to the solution of pH4. Alkali and alkali earth

  12. Glucose metabolic flux distribution of Lactobacillus amylophilus during lactic acid production using kitchen waste saccharified solution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Qunhui; Zou, Hui; Liu, Yingying; Wang, Juan; Gan, Kemin; Xiang, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The 13C isotope tracer method was used to investigate the glucose metabolic flux distribution and regulation in Lactobacillus amylophilus to improve lactic acid production using kitchen waste saccharified solution (KWSS). The results demonstrate that L. amylophilus is a homofermentative bacterium. In synthetic medium, 60.6% of the glucose entered the Embden–Meyerhof–Parnas (EMP) to produce lactic acid, whereas 36.4% of the glucose entered the pentose phosphate metabolic pathway (HMP). After solid–liquid separation of the KWSS, the addition of Fe3+ during fermentation enhanced the NADPH production efficiency and increased the NADH content. The flux to the EMP was also effectively increased. Compared with the control (60.6% flux to EMP without Fe3+ addition), the flux to the EMP with the addition of Fe3+ (74.3%) increased by 23.8%. In the subsequent pyruvate metabolism, Fe3+ also increased lactate dehydrogenase activity, and inhibited alcohol dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase, thereby increasing the lactic acid production to 9.03 g l−1, an increase of 8% compared with the control. All other organic acid by-products were lower than in the control. However, the addition of Zn2+ showed an opposite effect, decreasing the lactic acid production. In conclusion it is feasible and effective means using GC-MS, isotope experiment and MATLAB software to integrate research the metabolic flux distribution of lactic acid bacteria, and the results provide the theoretical foundation for similar metabolic flux distribution. PMID:23489617

  13. Adsorption of naphthalene from aqueous solution onto fatty acid modified walnut shells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mijia; Yao, Jun; Dong, Lifu; Sun, Jingjing

    2016-02-01

    The removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from aqueous solution is challenging to environmental technologists. Agricultural waste is apparently the most attractive materials in removing PAHs because of its abundance, renewability, and economic advantage. The adsorption of PAHs (e.g., naphthalene) onto walnut shell (WNS) and its fatty acid (e.g., capric acid, lauric acid, palmitic acid, and oleic acid)-modified equivalent were investigated in this work to develop low-cost biosorbents for hydrophobic organic compounds. Compared with other modified sorbents, oleic acid graftted walnut shell (OWNS) showed the maximum partition coefficient (4330 ± 8.8 L kg(-1)) because of its lowest polarity and highest aromaticity. The adsorption capacity (7210 μg g(-1)) of OWNS at the temperature of 298 K was observed for an initial naphthalene concentration of 25 mg L(-1) with contact time of 40 h, sorbent dosage of 1 g L(-1), and in neutral condition. Furthermore, the regeneration capability of OWNS implied that it was a promising biosorbent for naphthalene removal. PMID:26517393

  14. Exceptionally crystalline and conducting acid doped polyaniline films by level surface assisted solution casting approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthirath, Anand B.; Methattel Raman, Shijeesh; Varma, Sreekanth J.; Jayalekshmi, S.

    2016-04-01

    Emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PANI) was synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerisation method using ammonium persulfate as oxidant. Resultant emeraldine salt form of PANI was dedoped using ammonia solution and then re-doped with camphor sulphonic acid (CSA), naphthaline sulphonic acid (NSA), hydrochloric acid (HCl), and m-cresol. Thin films of these doped PANI samples were deposited on glass substrates using solution casting method with m-cresol as solvent. A level surface was employed to get homogeneous thin films of uniform thickness. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the films are exceptionally crystalline. The crystalline peaks observed in the XRD spectra can be indexed to simple monoclinic structure. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy studies provide convincing explanation for the exceptional crystallinity observed in these polymer films. FESEM and AFM images give better details of surface morphology of doped PANI films. The DC electrical conductivity of the samples was measured using four point probe technique. It is seen that the samples also exhibit quite high DC electrical conductivity, about 287 S/cm for CSA doped PANI, 67 S/cm for NSA doped PANI 65 S/cm for HCl doped PANI, and just below 1 S/cm for m-cresol doped PANI. Effect of using the level surface for solution casting is studied and correlated with the observed crystallinity.

  15. Supported bilayer electrophoresis under controlled buffer conditions.

    PubMed

    Monson, Christopher F; Pace, Hudson P; Liu, Chunming; Cremer, Paul S

    2011-03-15

    A pH controlled flow cell device was constructed to allow electrophoretic movement of charged lipids and membrane associated proteins in supported phospholipid bilayers. The device isolated electrolysis products near the electrodes from the electrophoresis process within the bilayer. This allowed the pH over the bilayer region to remain within ±0.2 pH units or better over many hours at salt concentrations up to 10 mM. Using this setup, it was found that the electrophoretic mobility of a dye conjugated lipid (Texas Red 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (TR-DHPE)) was essentially constant between pH 3.3 and 9.3. In contrast, streptavidin, which was bound to biotinylated lipids, shifted from migrating cathodically at acidic pH values to migrating anodically under basic conditions. This shift was due to the modulation of the net charge on the protein, which changed the electrophoretic forces experienced by the macromolecule. The addition of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) cushion beneath the bilayer or the increase in the ionic strength of the buffer solution resulted in a decrease of the electroosmotic force experienced by the streptavidin with little effect on the Texas Red-DHPE. As such, it was possible in part to control the electrophoretic and electroosmotic contributions to streptavidin independently of one another. PMID:21319743

  16. Improved pH buffering agent for sodium hypochlorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. R.; Veeder, L. N.

    1969-01-01

    Sodium citrate/citric acid was found to be an effective buffer for pH control when used with sodium hypochlorite. The mixture does not corrode aluminum. The buffer appears to form a type of conversion coating that may provide corrosion-resistant properties to aluminum in other applications.

  17. Self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes grown from a polymeric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Peng, Hui; Hsu, Chyong Fang; Kilmartin, Paul A.; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka

    2007-03-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanotubes were obtained by a self-assembly process, from a solution containing poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid) (PMVEA) by oxidative polymerization using ammonium persulfate as the oxidant. The size of the nanotubes was greatly affected by the weight ratio of polymeric acid to aniline as measured by SEM images. The outer diameter of the nanotubes increased from 65 to 160 nm as the weight ratio of PMVEA to aniline increased from 1 to 4 wt/wt%. The structural features of the nanotubes were characterized by FTIR, XPS and EPR spectroscopies, which confirmed the presence of the polymeric acid in the PANI nanotubes and their electronic conductive nature. The electrochemical properties were further analysed using cyclic voltammetry.

  18. Thermosensitivity of bile acid-based oligo(ethylene glycol) stars in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Strandman, Satu; Le Dévédec, Frantz; Zhu, X X

    2011-08-01

    Amphiphilic star-shaped oligo(ethylene glycol)s with a hydrophobic bile acid core and varying number of hydrophilic arms have been made. Their thermal behavior in aqueous solutions depends on the number rather than the length of the arms. The two-armed lithocholate derivative showed the strongest tendency for association and exhibited the lowest cloud point (79 °C) of the oligomers made, as well as another phase separation at a lower temperature (31 °C). The "double thermosensitivity" arising both from the salt-dependent LCST of the oligo(ethylene glycol) segments and the temperature-responsive self-assembly of amphiphilic bile acid derivative provides an interesting path in the design of bile acid-based smart materials. PMID:21661073

  19. The anodizing behavior of aluminum in malonic acid solution and morphology of the anodic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jianjun; Zuo, Yu

    2012-11-01

    The anodizing behavior of aluminum in malonic acid solution and morphology of the anodic films were studied. The voltage-time response for galvanostatic anodization of aluminum in malonic acid solution exhibits a conventional three-stage feature but the formation voltage is much higher. With the increase of electrolyte concentration, the electrolyte viscosity increases simultaneously and the high viscosity decreases the film growth rate. With the concentration increase of the malonic acid electrolyte, the critical current density that initiates local "burning" on the sample surface decreases. For malonic acid anodization, the field-assisted dissolution on the oxide surface is relatively weak and the nucleation of pores is more difficult, which results in greater barrier layer thickness and larger cell dimension. The embryo of the porous structure of anodic film has been created within the linear region of the first transient stage, and the definite porous structure has been established before the end of the first transient stage. The self-ordering behavior of the porous film is influenced by the electrolyte concentration, film thickness and the applied current density. Great current density not only improves the cell arrangement order but also brings about larger cell dimension.

  20. Interactions between variable-charge soils and acidic solutions containing fluoride: an investigation using repetitive extractions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mao-Xu; Jiang, Xin; Ji, Guo-Liang

    2004-08-01

    The reaction between two variable-charge soils and acidic solutions containing F was investigated with a repetitive extraction method. When added F concentration was 10(-4) mol/L, F did not markedly enhance solution pH in the whole prolonged extractions, in comparison with F-free acidic solution extractions. Most of the added F was adsorbed on soil surfaces and Al-F complexes were the dominant F species in solution. With increasing extractions, the fraction of Al-F slightly increased, arising from dissolution and/or desorption of Al. In comparison with F-free acidic solution extractions, F-induced Al dissolution did not significantly increase Al release, probably because of the modest reactivity of metal-F surface complexes at terminal sites at low F loading. The gradual decrease in Al release in the following extractions was due to the gradual depletion of readily reactive Al-containing mineral phases. In contrast to the low F loading, at an F concentration of 10(-3) mol/L, the pH was enhanced dramatically in the initial extraction and a high pH was maintained in the following extractions. In the initial extraction, the increase in negative surface charges and solution pH seemingly depressed proton-induced Al dissolution and enhanced readsorption of some positively charged Al-F complexes, resulting in low amounts of Al and F in solution. In the following several extractions, F-induced Al dissolution and desorption of Al-F complexes substantially enhanced the amounts of Al and F, and the fraction of Al-F complexes in solution. Several interconnected mechanisms such as ligand exchange, the release of OH(-) ions from soluble hydroxylated Al groups, desorption of Al as Al-F complexes, and F-induced breakdown of soil minerals were responsible for the alteration in pH, Al release, and the fraction of Al-F complexes in the later extractions. A molecular-level interpretation is needed in order to address the different impacts of varying F concentration levels on soil

  1. Properties of alkali-solubilized collagen solution crosslinked by N-hydroxysuccinimide activated adipic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yihui; Zhang, Min; Liu, Wentao; Li, Guoying

    2011-03-01

    The effect of N-hydroxysuccinimide activated adipic acid (NHS-AA) on the properties of alkali-solubilized collagen solutions was examined. The residual amino group content in crosslinked collagen, determined by trinitrobenzensulfonic acid (TNBS) assay, was decreased with increasing NHS-AA concentration. The results from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) indicated that the maximum denaturation temperature ( T d) of crosslinked collagen solution was about 4.2°C higher than that of un-crosslinked collagen solution (36.6°C). Moreover, the values of storage modulus ( G'), loss modulus ( G″) and complex viscosity ( η*), obtained by means of dynamic frequency sweeps, were increased as NHS-AA concentration added up to 1.5 mM, and then decreased slightly when further increased NHS-AA concentration. Besides, for collagen solution crosslinked with 1.5 mM NHS-AA, dynamic denaturation temperature ( T dd) was about 1.1°C lower than T d (40.8°C), and the Arrhenius-type time-temperature superposition (TTS) principle was applied to yield the activation energy to be 474.4 kJmol-1.

  2. EXAFS study of the speciation of protactinium(V) in aqueous hydrofluoric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    De Sio, Stéphanie M; Wilson, Richard E

    2014-12-01

    The speciation of protactinium(V) in hydrofluoric acid (HF) solutions was studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements were performed on an aqueous solution of 0.05 M protactinium(V) with various HF concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 27 M in order to probe the protactinium coordination sphere with respect to the identity and number of coordinating ligands. The resulting fits to the spectra suggest the presence of an eight-coordinate homoleptic fluoro complex in highly concentrated fluoride solutions (27 M), with equilibrium between seven- and eight-coordinate fluoro complexes at moderate acidities, and in more dilute solutions, results indicate that one water molecule is likely to replace a fluoride in the first coordination sphere, at a distance of 2.54-2.57 Å. Comparisons of this chemistry with group V metals, niobium and tantalum, are presented, and the potential implications for these results on the hydrolytic behavior of protactinium in aqueous systems are discussed. PMID:25389749

  3. Dose rate dependence of the speciation of neptunium in irradiated solutions of nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Precek, M.; Paulenova, A.; Mincher, B.J.; Mezyk, S.P.

    2013-07-01

    The effects of radiation on the redox speciation of neptunium are of interest due to their impact on the performance of separation of neptunium from highly radioactive solutions of dissolved used nuclear fuel. In this study, the influence of dose rate change from 0.4 kGy/h to 6 kGy/h was examined during irradiation of solutions of initially hexavalent 2.0-2.5 mM neptunium in nitric acid of two different concentrations (0.5 and 1 M). Results indicate that the immediate radiolytic steady-state concentration of neptunium(V) were depressed and its initial radiolytic yield was up to 2-times lower (in 1 M HNO{sub 3} solutions)during irradiations with the higher dose rate. The finding is explained on the basis of the enhancement of the role of oxidizing radicals during the radiolytic process. (authors)

  4. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of purex solvent

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Kalina, Dale G.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous solutions with an extraction solution containing an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms and phase modifiers in a water-immiscible hydrocarbon diluent. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions.

  5. Corrosion of some chromium-nickel steels and alloys in sulfuric acid solutions of sodium sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, D.K.; Glagolenko, Yu.V.; Ermolinskii, S.P.

    1988-05-01

    Steels 12Kh18N1OT and 10Kh17N13M3T and alloys 06KhN28MDT and 46KhNM were studied in sulfuric acid solutions containing sodium sulfite and sulfur dioxide to determine the effects of different concentrations of the corrosive constituents on the anodic and cathodic active and passive corrosion behavior of the metals. Polarization curves were obtained with a P-5827 M potentiostat. Addition of sulfite facilitated both electrode processes and the region of the reactive state was broadened due to the shift of passivation potentials to more positive values. The activating effect of sulfite reduction products were confirmed by tests of alloys in spent solutions. This increased likelihood of activation and the decrease of the solutions's own corrosion potential were both attributed to retardation of the cathodic process by lower valence sulfur compounds.

  6. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of Purex solvent

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.

    1986-03-04

    A process is described for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous solutions with an extraction solution containing an organic extractant having the formula as shown in a diagram where [phi] is phenyl, R[sup 1] is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R[sup 2] is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms and phase modifiers in a water-immiscible hydrocarbon diluent. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions. 6 figs.

  7. Aqueous solutions of acidic ionic liquids for enhanced stability of polyoxometalate-carbon supercapacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chenchen; Zhao, Enbo; Nitta, Naoki; Magasinski, Alexandre; Berdichevsky, Gene; Yushin, Gleb

    2016-09-01

    Nanocomposites based on polyoxometalates (POMs) nanoconfined in microporous carbons have been synthesized and used as electrodes for supercapacitors. The addition of the pseudocapacitance from highly reversible redox reaction of POMs to the electric double-layer capacitance of carbon lead to an increase in specific capacitance of ∼90% at 1 mV s-1. However, high solubility of POM in traditional aqueous electrolytes leads to rapid capacity fading. Here we demonstrate that the use of aqueous solutions of protic ionic liquids (P-IL) as electrolyte instead of aqueous sulfuric acid solutions offers an opportunity to significantly improve POM cycling stability. Virtually no degradation in capacitance was observed in POM-based positive electrode after 10,000 cycles in an asymmetric capacitor with P-IL aqueous electrolyte. As such, POM-based carbon composites may now present a viable solution for enhancing energy density of electrical double layer capacitors (EDLC) based on pure carbon electrodes.

  8. Complexation of U(VI) with 1-Hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonicAcid (HEDPA) in Acidic to Basic Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, W A; Rao, L; Zanonato, P; Garnov, A; Powell, B A; Nash, K L

    2007-01-24

    Complexation of U(VI) with 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) in acidic to basic solutions has been studied with multiple techniques. A number of 1:1 (UO{sub 2}H{sub 3}L), 1:2 (UO{sub 2}H{sub j}L{sub 2} where j = 4, 3, 2, 1, 0 and -1) and 2:2 ((UO{sub 2}){sub 2}H{sub j}L{sub 2} where j = 1, 0 and -1) complexes form, but the 1:2 complexes are the major species in a wide pH range. Thermodynamic parameters (formation constants, enthalpy and entropy of complexation) were determined by potentiometry and calorimetry. Data indicate that the complexation of U(VI) with HEDPA is exothermic, favored by the enthalpy of complexation. This is in contrast to the complexation of U(VI) with dicarboxylic acids in which the enthalpy term usually is unfavorable. Results from electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and {sup 31}P NMR have confirmed the presence of 1:1, 1:2 and 2:2 U(VI)-HEDPA complexes.

  9. Influence of acidic and alkaline waste solution properties on uranium migration in subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szecsody, Jim E.; Truex, Mike J.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Resch, Tom; Zhong, Lirong

    2013-08-01

    This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments have significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100 s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH 2) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca2 +, Mg2 +) and phosphate and a slow (100 s of hours) increase in silica, Al3 +, and K+, likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH 13) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10 s to 100 s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in not only uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity.

  10. Influence of Acidic and Alkaline Waste Solution Properties on Uranium Migration in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Wellman, Dawn M.; Resch, Charles T.; Zhong, Lirong

    2013-08-01

    This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments has significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH 2) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca2+, Mg2+) and phosphate and a slow (100s of hours) increase in silica, Al3+, and K+, likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH 13) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10s to 100s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity.

  11. Silica precipitation in acidic solutions: mechanism, pH effect, and salt effect.

    PubMed

    Gorrepati, Elizabeth A; Wongthahan, Pattanapong; Raha, Sasanka; Fogler, H Scott

    2010-07-01

    This study is the first to show that silica precipitation under very acidic conditions ([HCl] = 2-8 M) proceeds through two distinct steps. First, the monomeric form of silica is quickly depleted from solution as it polymerizes to form primary particles approximately 5 nm in diameter. Second, the primary particles formed then flocculate. A modified Smoluchowski equation that incorporates a geometric population balance accurately describes the exponential growth of silica flocs. Variation of the HCl concentration between 2 and 8 M further showed that polymerization to form primary particles and subsequent particle flocculation become exponentially faster with increasing acid concentration. The effect of salt was also studied by adding 1 M chloride salts to the solutions; it was found that salts accelerated both particle formation and growth rates in the order: AlCl(3) > CaCl(2) > MgCl(2) > NaCl > CsCl > no salt. It was also found that ionic strength, over cation identity, determines silica polymerization and particle flocculation rates. This research reveals that precipitation of silica products from acid dissolution of minerals can be studied apart from the mineral dissolution process. Thus, silica product precipitation from mineral acidization follows a two-step process--formation of 5 nm primary particles followed by particle flocculation--which becomes exponentially faster with increasing HCl concentration and with salts accelerating the process in the above order. This result has implications for any study of acid dissolution of aluminosilicate or silicate material. In particular, the findings are applicable to the process of acidizing oil-containing rock formations, a common practice of the petroleum industry where silica dissolution products encounter a low-pH, salty environment within the oil well. PMID:20536253

  12. Influence of acidic and alkaline waste solution properties on uranium migration in subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Szecsody, Jim E; Truex, Mike J; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Wellman, Dawn M; Resch, Tom; Zhong, Lirong

    2013-08-01

    This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments have significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100 s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH2) resulted in a rapid (<10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) and phosphate and a slow (100 s of hours) increase in silica, Al(3+), and K(+), likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH13) resulted in a rapid (<10h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10 s to 100 s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in not only uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity. PMID:23851265

  13. Equilibrium Studies of Dibutyltin(IV)-Zwitterionic Buffer Complexation.

    PubMed

    El-Gahami, M A; Albishri, H M

    2013-01-01

    Equilibrium studies in aqueous solution are reported for dibutyltin(IV) (DBT) complexes of the zwitterionic buffers "Good's buffers" Mes and Mops. Stoichiometric and formation constants of the complexes formed were determined at different temperatures and ionic strength 0.1 mol·L(-1) NaNO3. The results show that the best fit of the titration curves were obtained when the complexes ML, MLH-1, MLH-2 and MLH-3 were considered beside the hydrolysis product of the dibutyltin(IV) cation. The thermodynamic parameters ΔH (o), ΔS (o) and ΔG (o) calculated from the temperature dependence of the formation constant of the dibutyltin(IV) complexes with 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (Mes) and 3-(N-mor-pholino)-propanesulfonic acid (Mops) were investigated. The effect of dioxane as a solvent on the formation constants of DBT-Mes and DBT-Mops complexes decrease linearly with the increase of dioxane proportion in the medium. The concentration distribution of the various complexes species was evaluated as a function of pH. PMID:24273357

  14. Visualization of Buffer Capacity with 3-D "Topo" Surfaces: Buffer Ridges, Equivalence Point Canyons and Dilution Ramps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul

    2016-01-01

    BufCap TOPOS is free software that generates 3-D topographical surfaces ("topos") for acid-base equilibrium studies. It portrays pH and buffer capacity behavior during titration and dilution procedures. Topo surfaces are created by plotting computed pH and buffer capacity values above a composition grid with volume of NaOH as the x axis…

  15. Corrosion in low dielectric constant Si-O based thin films: Buffer concentration effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, F. W.; Lane, M. W.; Gates, S. M.

    2014-05-15

    Organosilicate glass (OSG) is often used as an interlayer dielectric (ILD) in high performance integrated circuits. OSG is a brittle material and prone to stress-corrosion cracking reminiscent of that observed in bulk glasses. Of particular concern are chemical-mechanical planarization techniques and wet cleans involving solvents commonly encountered in microelectronics fabrication where the organosilicate film is exposed to aqueous environments. Previous work has focused on the effect of pH, surfactant, and peroxide concentration on the subcritical crack growth of these films. However, little or no attention has focused on the effect of the conjugate acid/base concentration in a buffer. Accordingly, this work examines the “strength” of the buffer solution in both acidic and basic environments. The concentration of the buffer components is varied keeping the ratio of acid/base and therefore pH constant. In addition, the pH was varied by altering the acid/base ratio to ascertain any additional effect of pH. Corrosion tests were conducted with double-cantilever beam fracture mechanics specimens and fracture paths were verified with ATR-FTIR. Shifts in the threshold fracture energy, the lowest energy required for bond rupture in the given environment, G{sub TH}, were found to shift to lower values as the concentration of the base in the buffer increased. This effect was found to be much larger than the effect of the hydroxide ion concentration in unbuffered solutions. The results are rationalized in terms of the salient chemical bond breaking process occurring at the crack tip and modeled in terms of the chemical potential of the reactive species.

  16. Protection of copper surface with phytic acid against corrosion in chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Peca, Dunja; Pihlar, Boris; Ingrid, Milošev

    2014-01-01

    Phytic acid (inositol hexaphosphate) was tested as a corrosion inhibitor for copper in 3% sodium chloride. Phytic acid is a natural compound derived from plants, it is not toxic and can be considered as a green inhibitor. Electrochemical methods of linear polarization and potentiodynamic polarization were used to study the electrochemical behaviour and evaluate the inhibition effectiveness. To obtain the optimal corrosion protection the following experimental conditions were investigated: effect of surface pre-treatment (abrasion and three procedures of surface roughening), pre-formation of the layer of phytic acid, time of immersion and concentration of phytic acid. To evaluate the surface pre-treatment procedures the surface roughness and contact angle were measured. Optimal conditions for formation of phytic layer were selected resulting in the inhibition effectiveness of nearly 80%. Morphology and composition of the layer were further studied by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The layer of phytic acid with thickness in the nanometer range homogeneously covers the copper surface. The obtained results show that this natural compound can be used as a mildly effective corrosion inhibitor for copper in chloride solution. PMID:25286201

  17. Solubility of HOBr in Acidic Solution and Implications for Liberation of Halogens Via Aerosol Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Michelsen, R. R.; Rammer, T. A.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.

    2004-01-01

    Halogen species are known to catalytically destroy ozone in several regions of the atmosphere. In addition to direct catalytic losses, bromine compounds can indirectly enhance ozone loss through coupling to other radical families. Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is a key species in the linkage of BrOx to ClOx and HOx. The aqueous- phase coupling reaction HOBr + HCI (right arrow) BrCl + H2O may provide a pathway for chlorine activation on sulfate aerosols at temperatures warmer than those required for polar stratospheric cloud formation. We have measured t h e solubility of HOBr in 45 - 70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions. Over the temperature range 201 - 252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, H* = 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 7) mol dm(exp -3) atm(exp -1). The expected inverse dependence of H* on temperature was observed, but only a weak dependence on acidity was found. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that equilibrium concentrations of HOBr could equal or exceed those of HBr in upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols. Despite the high solubility of HOBr, aerosol volumes are not large enough to sequester a significant fraction of inorganic bromine from the gas phase. Our measurements of HOBr uptake in aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases show the evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2.

  18. Dissolution of nickel ferrite in aqueous solutions containing oxalic acid and ferrous salts

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, C.A.; Sileo, E.E.; Morando, P.J.; Blesa, M.A.

    2000-05-15

    The dissolution of nickel ferrite in oxalic acid and in ferrous oxalate-oxalic acid aqueous solution was studied. Nickel ferrite was synthesized by thermal decomposition of a mixed tartrate; the particles were shown to be coated with a thin ferric oxide layer. Dissolution takes place in two stages, the first one corresponding to the dissolution of the ferric oxide outer layer and the second one being the dissolution of Ni{sub 1.06}Fe{sub 1.96}O{sub 4}. The kinetics of dissolution during this first stage is typical of ferric oxides: in oxalic acid, both a ligand-assisted and a redox mechanism operates, whereas in the presence of ferrous ions, redox catalysis leads to a faster dissolution. The rate dependence on both oxalic acid and on ferrous ion is described by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood equation. In the second stage, Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics also describes the dissolution of iron and nickel from nickel ferrite. It may be concluded that oxalic acid operates to dissolve iron, and the ensuing disruption of the solid framework accelerates the release of nickel.

  19. Kinetic Study and Mathematical Model of Hemimorphite Dissolution in Low Sulfuric Acid Solution at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongsheng; Wei, Chang; Li, Cunxiong; Deng, Zhigan; Li, Minting; Li, Xingbin

    2014-10-01

    The dissolution kinetics of hemimorphite with low sulfuric acid solution was investigated at high temperature. The dissolution rate of zinc was obtained as a function of dissolution time under the experimental conditions where the effects of sulfuric acid concentration, temperature, and particle size were studied. The results showed that zinc extraction increased with an increase in temperature and sulfuric acid concentration and with a decrease in particle size. A mathematical model able to describe the process kinetics was developed from the shrinking core model, considering the change of the sulfuric acid concentration during dissolution. It was found that the dissolution process followed a shrinking core model with "ash" layer diffusion as the main rate-controlling step. This finding was supported with a linear relationship between the apparent rate constant and the reciprocal of squared particle radius. The reaction order with respect to sulfuric acid concentration was determined to be 0.7993. The apparent activation energy for the dissolution process was determined to be 44.9 kJ/mol in the temperature range of 373 K to 413 K (100 °C to 140 °C). Based on the shrinking core model, the following equation was established:

  20. Evaluation of poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) as a draw solute for forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Gimun; Jung, Bokyung; Han, Sungsoo; Hong, Seungkwan

    2015-09-01

    Poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) (PAspNa) was evaluated for its potential as a novel draw solute in forward osmosis (FO). The inherent advantages of PAspNa, such as good water solubility, high osmotic pressure, and nontoxicity, were first examined through a series of physicochemical analyses and atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Then, lab-scale FO tests were performed to evaluate its suitability in practical processes. Compared to other conventional inorganic solutes, PAspNa showed comparable water flux but significantly lower reverse solute flux, demonstrating its suitability as a draw solute. Moreover, fouling experiments using synthetic wastewater as a feed solution demonstrated that PAspNa reversely flowed to the feed side reduced inorganic scaling on the membrane active layer. The recyclability of PAspNa was studied using both nanofiltration (NF) and membrane distillation (MD) processes, and the results exhibited its ease of recovery. This research reported the feasibility and applicability of FO-NF or FO-MD processes using PAspNa for wastewater reclamation and brackish water desalination. PMID:26005789

  1. Leaching of lead from zinc leach residue in acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Mu, Wen-ning; Shen, Hong-tao; Liu, Shao-ming; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2015-05-01

    A process with potentially reduced environmental impacts and occupational hazards of lead-bearing zinc plant residue was studied to achieve a higher recovery of lead via a cost-effective and environmentally friendly process. This paper describes an optimization study on the leaching of lead from zinc leach residue using acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution. Six main process conditions, i.e., the solution pH value, stirring rate, concentration of CaCl2 aqueous solution, liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, leaching temperature, and leaching time, were investigated. The microstructure and components of the residue and tailing were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of experimental results, the optimum reaction conditions were determined to be a solution pH value of 1, a stirring rate of 500 r·min-1, a CaCl2 aqueous solution concentration of 400 g·L-1, a liquid-to-solid mass ratio of 7:1, a leaching temperature of 80°C, and a leaching time of 45 min. The leaching rate of lead under these conditions reached 93.79%, with an iron dissolution rate of 19.28%. Silica did not take part in the chemical reaction during the leaching process and was accumulated in the residue.

  2. Effect of wood ash application on soil solution chemistry of tropical acid soils: incubation study.

    PubMed

    Nkana, J C Voundi; Demeyer, A; Verloo, M G

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of wood ash application on soil solution composition of three tropical acid soils. Calcium carbonate was used as a reference amendment. Amended soils and control were incubated for 60 days. To assess soluble nutrients, saturation extracts were analysed at 15 days intervals. Wood ash application affects the soil solution chemistry in two ways, as a liming agent and as a supplier of nutrients. As a liming agent, wood ash application induced increases in soil solution pH, Ca, Mg, inorganic C, SO4 and DOC. As a supplier of elements, the increase in the soil solution pH was partly due to ligand exchange between wood ash SO4 and OH- ions. Large increases in concentrations of inorganic C, SO4, Ca and Mg with wood ash relative to lime and especially increases in K reflected the supply of these elements by wood ash. Wood ash application could represent increased availability of nutrients for the plant. However, large concentrations of basic cations, SO4 and NO3 obtained with higher application rates could be a concern because of potential solute transport to surface waters and groundwater. Wood ash must be applied at reasonable rates to avoid any risk for the environment. PMID:12365502

  3. Investigating the Influence of Polymers on Supersaturated Flufenamic Acid Cocrystal Solutions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Minshan; Wang, Ke; Hamill, Noel; Lorimer, Keith; Li, Mingzhong

    2016-09-01

    The development of enabling formulations is a key stage when demonstrating the effectiveness of pharmaceutical cocrystals to maximize the oral bioavailability for poorly water soluble drugs. Inhibition of drug crystallization from a supersaturated cocrystal solution through a fundamental understanding of the nucleation and crystal growth is important. In this study, the influence of the three polymers of polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and a copolymer of N-vinly-2-pyrrodidone (60%) and vinyl acetate (40%) (PVP-VA) on the flufenamic acid (FFA) crystallization from three different supersaturated solutions of the pure FFA and two cocrystals of FFA-NIC CO and FFA-TP CO has been investigated by measuring nucleation induction times and desupersaturation rates in the presence and absence of seed crystals. It was found that the competition of intermolecular hydrogen bonding among drug/coformer, drug/polymer, and coformer/polymer was a key factor responsible for maintaining supersaturation through nucleation inhibition and crystal growth modification in a cocrystal solution. The supersaturated cocrystal solutions with predissolved PEG demonstrated more effective stabilization in comparison to the pure FFA in the presence of the same polymer. In contrast, neither of the two cocrystal solutions, in the presence of PVP or PVP-VA, exhibited a better performance than the pure FFA with the same predissolved polymer. The study suggests that the selection of a polymeric excipient in a cocrystal formulation should not be solely dependent on the interplay of the parent drug and polymer without considering the coformer effects. PMID:27494289

  4. Simultaneous determination of nitric acid and uranium concentrations in aqueous solution from measurements of electrical conductivity, density, and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing plants handle aqueous solutions of nitric acid and uranium in large quantities. Automatic control of process operations requires reliable measurements of these solutes concentration, but this is difficult to directly measure. Physical properties such as solution density and electrical conductivity vary with solute concentration and temperature. Conductivity, density and temperature can be measured accurately with relatively simple and inexpensive devices. These properties can be used to determine solute concentrations will good correlations. This paper provides the appropriate correlations for solutions containing 2 to 6 Molar (M) nitric acid and 0 to 300 g/L uranium metal at temperatures from 25--90{degrees}C. The equations are most accurate below 5 M nitric acid, due to a broad maximum in the conductivity curve at 6 M. 12 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. The solute carrier family 10 (SLC10): beyond bile acid transport

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Tatiana Claro; Polli, James E.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    The solute carrier (SLC) family 10 (SLC10) comprises influx transporters of bile acids, steroidal hormones, various drugs, and several other substrates. Because the seminal transporters of this family, namely, sodium/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP; SLC10A1) and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2), were primarily bile acid transporters, the term “sodium bile salt cotransporting family” was used for the SLC10 family. However, this notion became obsolete with the finding of other SLC10 members that do not transport bile acids. For example, the sodium-dependent organic anion transporter (SOAT; SLC10A6) transports primarily sulfated steroids. Moreover, NTCP was shown to also transport steroids and xenobiotics, including HMG-CoA inhibitors (statins). The SLC10 family contains four additional members, namely, P3 (SLC10A3; SLC10A3), P4 (SLC10A4; SLC10A4), P5 (SLC10A5; SLC10A5) and SLC10A7 (SLC10A7), several of which were unknown or considered hypothetical until approximately a decade ago. While their substrate specificity remains undetermined, great progress has been made towards their characterization in recent years. SLC10A4 may participate in vesicular storage or exocytosis of neurotransmitters or mastocyte mediators, whereas SLC10A5 and SLC10A7 may be involved in solute transport and SLC10A3 may have a role as a housekeeping protein. Finally, the newly found role of bile acids in glucose and energy homeostasis, via the TGR5 receptor, sheds new light on the clinical relevance of ASBT and NTCP. The present mini-review provides a brief summary of recent progress on members of the SLC10 family. PMID:23506869

  6. The contribution of acidulant to the antibacterial activity of acid soluble α- and β-chitosan solutions and their films.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jooyeoun; Cavender, George; Zhao, Yanyun

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated individual contributions of dissolving acids (acetic acid, lactic acid, and hydrochloric acid) or acid solubilized chitosan to the antibacterial activity against Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli as solutions and dried films. Solutions containing chitosan showed significantly (P < 0.05) different inhibitory activity (measured as percentage of inhibition (PI), in percent) against L. innocua and E. coli, compared to equivalent acid solutions. This increase was calculated as additional inhibition (AI, in percent), which could be as high as 65% in solutions containing 300-320 kDa chitosan depending on the acid type, bacterial species, and the chitosan form (α or β). Solutions containing 4-5 kDa chitosan had lower AI and showed much greater variability among the different chitosan forms, acid types, and bacterial species. Higher molecular weight (Mw) chitosan also showed significantly higher levels of adsorption to bacterial cells than that of lower Mw samples, suggesting that the observed increase in inhibition was the result of surface phenomena. The contribution of acids to the antibacterial activity of chitosan films was assessed by comparing non-rinsed and rinsed films (rinsed in the appropriate broth to remove residual acids and active fragments formed on the dried film). Rinsing β-chitosan films has reduced PI by as much as 28% compared with non-rinsed films, indicating that part of the antibacterial activity of chitosan films is due to the presence of soluble acid compounds and/or other active fragments. Overall, both acidulant and chitosan were found to contribute to the antibacterial activity of acid solubilized α- and β-chitosan, with the exact antibacterial activity of chitosan varying based on the solution and film properties, suggesting a complex interaction. PMID:24196584

  7. Column chromatographic boron isotope separation at 5 and 17 MPa with diluted boric acid solution.

    PubMed

    Musashi, Masaaki; Oi, Takao; Matsuo, Motoyuki; Nomura, Masao

    2008-08-01

    Boron isotopic fractionation factor (S) between boron taken up in strongly basic anion exchange resin and boron in aqueous solution was determined by breakthrough column chromatography at 5 and 17 MPa at 25 degrees C, using 0.1 mM boric acid solution as feed solution. The S values obtained were 1.018 and 1.012, respectively, which were smaller than the value reported by using the same chromatographic method at the atmospheric pressure at 25 degrees C with the boron concentration of 10mM, but were larger than the values under the same condition with much higher concentration of 100 and 501 mM. Calculations based on the theory of isotope distribution between two phases estimated that 21% (5 MPa) and 47% (17 MPa) of boron taken up in the resin phase was in the three-coordinated B(OH)(3)-form, instead of in the four-coordinated B(OH)(4)-form, at high pressures even with a very diluted boric acid solution. We discussed the present results by introducing (1) hydration and (2) a partial molar volume difference between isotopic molecules. Borate may have been partially dehydrated upon transfer from the solution phase to the resin phase at high pressures, which resulted in smaller S values compared with those at the atmospheric pressure. Instead, it may be possible that the difference in the isotopic partial molar volume difference between B(OH)(3) and B(OH)(4)(-) caused the S value to decrease with increasing pressure. PMID:18585727

  8. Theoretical insights into the properties of amino acid ionic liquids in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xueying; Ai, Hongqi

    2016-07-01

    This report presents a systematic investigation of the interactions of water molecule(s) with a series of amino acid cations (Gly(+), Ala(+), Val(+), and Leu(+)), halogen anions (Cl(-), Br(-), BF4 (-), and PF6 (-)), and clusters (GlyCl) n (n = 1-5). The results reveal that H-bonds between amino acid ionic liquids (AAILs) and water molecules are crucial to the properties of aqueous solution of AAILs. The properties of AAIL in water solution depend on the alkyl chain of the amino acid cation, the size of the halogen anion, and the number of water molecules, which provides a certain theoretical basis for the design and application of new AAILs. A series of calculations for some different models showed that quadruple-GlyCl hydrate represents a basic unit for the Gly-water binary system, and can be employed as the simplest model for studying an AAIL-water cluster. On the basis of this model, the effects of water on the hygroscopicity, speed of solubility, viscosity, density, solution enthalpy, and polarity of the AAIL were also predicted. Most importantly, unlike traditional ILs, the novel GlyCl-type AAIL favors interaction of its cationic part, rather than its anionic part, with surrounding water molecules, thus amino acid cationic ILs expand the types of IL available, increasing the choice of ILs for different purposes. We hope that the application of this AAIL in many fields will lead to optimization of this class of compound and be of benefit to the environment. Graphical Abstract Quadruple-GlyCl hydrate represents the basic unit for a GlyCl-water binary system, which can be employed as the simplest model for studying an amino acid ionic liquid (AAIL)-water cluster. The effects of available water on some properties of AAIL are predicted. GlyCl-type AAIL is a novel IL, which prefers its cationic part over its anionic part for interaction with surrounding water molecules. The properties of AAIL in water solution can be adjusted by varying the ion used and the

  9. Structural and transport properties of Nafion in hydrobromic-acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kusoglu, A; Cho, KT; Prato, RA; Weber, AZ

    2013-12-01

    Proton-exchange membranes are key solid-state ion carriers in many relevant energy technologies including flow batteries, fuel cells, and solar-fuel generators. In many of these systems, the membranes are in contact with electrolyte solutions. In this paper, we focus on the impact of different HBr, a flow-battery and exemplary acid electrolyte, external concentrations on the conductivity of Nafion, a perfluorosulfonic acid membrane that is commonly used in many energy-related applications. The peak and then decrease in conductivity is correlated with measured changes in the water and HBr content within the membrane. In addition, small-angle x-ray scattering is used to probe the nanostructure to correlate how the interactions of the bromide ion with the fixed sulfonic-acid sites impact conductivity and hydrophilic domain distance. It is also shown that membrane pretreatment has a large impact on the underlying structure/function relationship. The obtained data and results are useful for delineation of optimal operating regimes for flow batteries and similar technologies as well as in understanding underlying structure/function relationships of ionomers in electrolyte solutions. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. An ATR-FTIR study of different phosphonic acids in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zenobi, María C; Luengo, Carina V; Avena, Marcelo J; Rueda, Elsa H

    2008-07-01

    An ATR-FIR study of the vibrational spectra of 1-hydroxyethane-1,1'-diphosphonic acid (HEDP), nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) and N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)aminomethylphosphonic acid (BHAMP) in aqueous solution is presented. The study was performed in the range of pH from 5 to 9, and bands assignments are given in the 2000-890 cm(-1) range. However, as phosphonates display bands due to the PO stretching vibration mainly in the 900-1200 cm(-1) range, the study is focused in this midinfrared region, which shows important changes as the pH changes, specially the nu(POH) at approximately 925 cm(-1) and nu(PO(3)(2-)) at approximately 970 cm(-1) vibrations. IR analyses give also evidences for the zwitterionic nature of BHAMP and NTMP in solution with a strong indication that the zwitterion in both compounds remains intact throughout the pH range investigated. The successive protonation steps with the decrease of pH were evidenced in the IR spectra of the three studied phosphonates. PMID:17826311

  11. An ATR-FTIR study of different phosphonic acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenobi, María C.; Luengo, Carina V.; Avena, Marcelo J.; Rueda, Elsa H.

    2008-07-01

    An ATR-FIR study of the vibrational spectra of 1-hydroxyethane-1,1'-diphosphonic acid (HEDP), nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) and N, N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)aminomethylphosphonic acid (BHAMP) in aqueous solution is presented. The study was performed in the range of pH from 5 to 9, and bands assignments are given in the 2000-890 cm -1 range. However, as phosphonates display bands due to the P sbnd O stretching vibration mainly in the 900-1200 cm -1 range, the study is focused in this midinfrared region, which shows important changes as the pH changes, specially the ν(P sbnd OH) at ˜925 cm -1 and ν(PO 32-) at ˜970 cm -1 vibrations. IR analyses give also evidences for the zwitterionic nature of BHAMP and NTMP in solution with a strong indication that the zwitterion in both compounds remains intact throughout the pH range investigated. The successive protonation steps with the decrease of pH were evidenced in the IR spectra of the three studied phosphonates.

  12. Electrical resistance response of polyaniline films to water, ethanol, and nitric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hong-Xing; Li, Meng-Meng; Yang, H.; Long, Yun-Ze; Sun, Xin

    2010-08-01

    This paper reports on electrical resistance vs. aging time for the response of polyaniline films under exposure to water, ethanol and nitric acid (HNO3) solution. Camphor sulfonic acid-doped polyaniline films were prepared by a “doping-dedoping-redoping" method, the morphology and microstructures of the films were characterized by a scanning electron microscope and an x-ray diffractometer, the electrical resistance was measured by a four-probe method. It was found that a lower amount of water molecules infiltrating the film can decrease the film's resistance possibly due to an enhancement of charge carrier transfer between polyaniline chains, whereas excessive water molecules can swell inter-chain distances and result in a quick increase of resistance. The resistance of the film under exposure to ethanol increases and becomes much larger than the original value. However, HNO3 solution can decrease the film's resistance sharply possibly owing to doping effect of protonic acid. These results can help to understand the conduction mechanism in polyaniline films, and also indicate that the films have potential application in chemical sensors.

  13. Corrosion property of 9Cr-ODS steel in nitric acid solution for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, M.; Koizumi, T.; Inoue, M.; Koyama, S.I.

    2013-07-01

    Corrosion tests of oxide dispersion strengthened with 9% Cr (9Cr-ODS) steel, which is one of the desirable materials for cladding tube of sodium-cooled fast reactors, in pure nitric acid solution, spent FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution were performed to understand the corrosion behavior in a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, the 9Cr-ODS steel with lower effective chromium content was evaluated to understand the corrosion behavior conservatively. As results, the tube-type specimens of the 9Cr-ODS steels suffered severe weight loss owing to active dissolution at the beginning of the immersion test in pure nitric acid solution in the range from 1 to 3.5 M. In contrast, the weight loss was decreased and they showed a stable corrosion in the higher nitric acid concentration, the dissolved FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution by passivation. The corrosion rates of the 9Cr-ODS steel in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and its simulated solution were 1-2 mm/y and showed good agreement with each other. The passivation was caused by the shift of corrosion potential to noble side owing to increase in nitric acid concentration or oxidative ions in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and the simulated spent fuel solution. (authors)

  14. Determination of nitric acid in highly radioactive solutions by the method of coulometric titration

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, V.S.; Kuperman, A.Ya.; Smirnov, Yu.A.

    1988-11-01

    A procedure, a cell, and an electronic block have been developed for a long-distance determination of nitric acid in highly radioactive industrial solutions by coulometric titration under hot chamber conditions. A solution of a mixture of ammonium and potassium oxalates was used for the background and anoide electrolytes. This solution prevents the hydrolysis of the metal ions and appreciably decreases the rate of accumulation of the acid in the anode chamber of the cell. Titration with 0.1-0.5 A currents is carried out with internal generation of hydroxyl ions. The cell was prepared from a radiation-resistant and transparent material, poly(methyl methacrylate). The anode and cathode chambers were separated by a cellophane membrane, reinforced by a porous glass filter. By using the electronic coulometric block working together with a pH-meter (EV-74 or I-130) and with an automatic titration block (BAT-15), the titration can be carried out automatically, and the determination results can be obtained in a digital form.

  15. Biosorption of methyl blue onto tartaric acid modified wheat bran from aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tartaric acid modified wheat bran was utilized as adsorbent to remove methyl blue, a basic dye from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were carried out to study the effect of various experimental parameters such as initial solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage, on dye adsorption. The results showed that the modification of wheat bran by tartaric acid significantly improved its adsorption capacity, and made this material a suitable adsorbent to remove methyl blue. The adsorption capacity of modified wheat bran was about 1.6 times higher than that of unmodified one. The amount of methyl blue adsorbed was found to vary with initial solution pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time and initial methyl blue concentration. Kinetics study showed that the overall adsorption rate of methyl blue was illustrated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The applicability of the Langmuir and Freundlich models for the data was tested. Both models adequately described the experimental data of the biosorption of methyl blue. The maximum adsorption capacity for methyl blue calculated from Langmuir model was 25.18 mg/g. The study has shown the effectiveness of modified wheat bran in the removal of methyl blue, and that it can be considered as an attractive alternative to the more expensive technologies used in wastewater treatment. PMID:23369295

  16. Biosorption of methyl blue onto tartaric acid modified wheat bran from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shuhua; Lai, Hong; Shi, Zhongliang

    2012-01-01

    Tartaric acid modified wheat bran was utilized as adsorbent to remove methyl blue, a basic dye from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were carried out to study the effect of various experimental parameters such as initial solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage, on dye adsorption. The results showed that the modification of wheat bran by tartaric acid significantly improved its adsorption capacity, and made this material a suitable adsorbent to remove methyl blue. The adsorption capacity of modified wheat bran was about 1.6 times higher than that of unmodified one. The amount of methyl blue adsorbed was found to vary with initial solution pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time and initial methyl blue concentration. Kinetics study showed that the overall adsorption rate of methyl blue was illustrated by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The applicability of the Langmuir and Freundlich models for the data was tested. Both models adequately described the experimental data of the biosorption of methyl blue. The maximum adsorption capacity for methyl blue calculated from Langmuir model was 25.18 mg/g. The study has shown the effectiveness of modified wheat bran in the removal of methyl blue, and that it can be considered as an attractive alternative to the more expensive technologies used in wastewater treatment. PMID:23369295

  17. Influence of Acidity on Uranyl Nitrate Association in Aqueous Solutions: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, Valmor F; Cui, Shengting; Khomami, Bamin; Ye, Xianggui; Smith, Rodney Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Uranyl ion complexation with water and nitrate is a key aspect of the uranium/plutonium extraction process. We have carried out a molecular dynamics simulation study to investigate this complexation process, including the molecular composition of the various complex species, the corresponding structure, and the equilibrium distribution of the complexes. The observed structures of the complexes suggest that in aqueous solution, uranyls are generally hydrated by 5 water molecules in the equatorial plane. When associating with nitrate ions, a water molecule is replaced by a nitrate ion, preserving the five-fold coordination and planar symmetry. Analysis of the pair correlation function between uranyl and nitrate suggests that nitrates bind to uranyl in aqueous solution mainly in a monodentate mode, although a small portion of bidentates occur. Dynamic association and dissociation between uranyls and nitrates take place in aqueous solution with a substantial amount of fluctuation in the number of various uranyl nitrate species. The average number of the uranyl mononitrate complexes shows a dependence on acid concentration consistent with equilibrium-constant analysis, namely, the concentration of [UO2NO3]+ increases with nitric acid concentration.

  18. Glucose metabolic flux distribution of Lactobacillus amylophilus during lactic acid production using kitchen waste saccharified solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Qunhui; Zou, Hui; Liu, Yingying; Wang, Juan; Gan, Kemin; Xiang, Juan

    2013-11-01

    The (13) C isotope tracer method was used to investigate the glucose metabolic flux distribution and regulation in Lactobacillus amylophilus to improve lactic acid production using kitchen waste saccharified solution (KWSS). The results demonstrate that L. amylophilus is a homofermentative bacterium. In synthetic medium, 60.6% of the glucose entered the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) to produce lactic acid, whereas 36.4% of the glucose entered the pentose phosphate metabolic pathway (HMP). After solid-liquid separation of the KWSS, the addition of Fe(3+) during fermentation enhanced the NADPH production efficiency and increased the NADH content. The flux to the EMP was also effectively increased. Compared with the control (60.6% flux to EMP without Fe(3+) addition), the flux to the EMP with the addition of Fe(3+) (74.3%) increased by 23.8%. In the subsequent pyruvate metabolism, Fe(3+) also increased lactate dehydrogenase activity, and inhibited alcohol dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase, thereby increasing the lactic acid production to 9.03 g l(-1) , an increase of 8% compared with the control. All other organic acid by-products were lower than in the control. However, the addition of Zn(2+) showed an opposite effect, decreasing the lactic acid production. In conclusion it is feasible and effective means using GC-MS, isotope experiment and MATLAB software to integrate research the metabolic flux distribution of lactic acid bacteria, and the results provide the theoretical foundation for similar metabolic flux distribution. PMID:23489617

  19. Photochemistry of nucleic acid bases and their thio- and aza-analogues in solution.

    PubMed

    Pollum, Marvin; Martínez-Fernández, Lara; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E

    2015-01-01

    The steady-state and time-resolved photochemistry of the natural nucleic acid bases and their sulfur- and nitrogen-substituted analogues in solution is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the experimental studies performed over the last 3-5 years that showcase topical areas of scientific inquiry and those that require further scrutiny. Significant progress has been made toward mapping the radiative and nonradiative decay pathways of nucleic acid bases. There is a consensus that ultrafast internal conversion to the ground state is the primary relaxation pathway in the nucleic acid bases, whereas the mechanism of this relaxation and the level of participation of the (1)πσ*, (1) nπ*, and (3)ππ* states are still matters of debate. Although impressive research has been performed in recent years, the microscopic mechanism(s) by which the nucleic acid bases dissipate excess vibrational energy to their environment, and the role of the N-glycosidic group in this and in other nonradiative decay pathways, are still poorly understood. The simple replacement of a single atom in a nucleobase with a sulfur or nitrogen atom severely restricts access to the conical intersections responsible for the intrinsic internal conversion pathways to the ground state in the nucleic acid bases. It also enhances access to ultrafast and efficient inter-system crossing pathways that populate the triplet manifold in yields close to unity. Determining the coupled nuclear and electronic pathways responsible for the significantly different photochemistry in these nucleic acid base analogues serves as a convenient platform to examine the current state of knowledge regarding the photodynamic properties of the DNA and RNA bases from both experimental and computational perspectives. Further investigations should also aid in forecasting the prospective use of sulfur- and nitrogen-substituted base analogues in photochemotherapeutic applications. PMID:25238718

  20. Chemisorption of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Powdered Activated Carbon Initiated by Persulfate in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Ma, Jun; Sedlak, David L

    2016-07-19

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a perfluorocarboxylic acid that is difficult to treat by most conventional methods. As a result, it is often removed from solution by adsorption on powdered activated carbon (PAC), followed by incineration of the spent carbon. To provide a new approach for treatment, PFOA was exposed to sulfate radicals (SO4(-•)) produced by thermolysis of persulfate (S2O8(2-)) in the presence of PAC. Under acidic conditions, thermal activation of persulfate resulted in transformation of PFOA to shorter-chain-length perfluorinated compounds, as previously reported. However, when thermolysis of persulfate occurred under circumneutral pH conditions in the presence of PAC, a new removal pathway for PFOA was observed. Under these conditions, the removal of PFOA was attributable to chemisorption, a process in which PAC catalyzed persulfate decomposition and reacted with the transformation products to produce covalently bound PFOA. At PAC concentrations between 200 and 1000 mg/L and an initial PFOA concentration of 0.5 μM, covalent bonding resulted in removal of 10-40% of the PFOA. Under these conditions, the process resulted in removal of more than half of a more hydrophilic perfluoroalkyl acid (i.e., perfluorobutanoic acid, PFBA), which was greater than the amount of PFBA removed by physical adsorption on PAC. Although the high reaction temperatures (i.e., 80 °C) and relatively high doses of PAC used in this study may be impractical for drinking water treatment, this process may be applied to the treatment of these recalcitrant compounds in industrial wastewater, reverse osmosis concentrate, and other waters that contain high concentrations of PFOA and other perfluorocarboxylic acids. PMID:27336204