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Sample records for acid building blocks

  1. Succinic Acid-A Model Building Block for Chemical Production from Renewable Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Werpy, Todd A.; Frye, John G.; Holladay, John E.

    2006-04-01

    One of the major considerations for the development of new technologies that can be utilized in a corn wet mill for the production of new chemical products is the concept of platform building blocks. This concept is based on the fact that a single building block has the potential to create a significant number of final products. Succinic acid represents a building block that can be used as a starting material for producing a large number of commodity and specialty chemicals.

  2. Efficient ytterbium triflate catalyzed microwave-assisted synthesis of 3-acylacrylic acid building blocks.

    PubMed

    Tolstoluzhsky, Nikita V; Gorobets, Nikolay Yu; Kolos, Nadezhda N; Desenko, Sergey M

    2008-01-01

    The derivatives of 4-(hetero)aryl-4-oxobut-2-enoic acid are useful as building blocks in the synthesis of biologically active compounds. An efficient general protocol for the synthesis of these building blocks was developed. This method combines microwave assistance and ytterbium triflate catalyst and allows the fast preparation of the target acids starting from different (hetero)aromatic ketones and glyoxylic acid monohydrate giving pure products in 52-75% isolated yields.

  3. Facile synthesis of glycosylated Fmoc amino acid building blocks assisted by microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nianhuan; Fung, Gabriel; Malekan, Hamed; Ye, Long; Kurth, Mark J; Lam, Kit S

    2010-10-13

    The synthesis of glycosylated Fmoc amino acids by reaction of mono- and disaccharide peracetates with Fmoc amino acids having free carboxyl groups was rapidly promoted by Lewis acids (SnCl(4), BF(3)·Et(2)O) under microwave irradiation. The products are useful building blocks for the synthesis of glycopeptides. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Solid-phase route to Fmoc-protected cationic amino acid building blocks.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Jacob Dahlqvist; Linderoth, Lars; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Franzyk, Henrik

    2012-10-01

    Diamino acids are commonly found in bioactive compounds, yet only few are commercially available as building blocks for solid-phase peptide synthesis. In the present work a convenient, inexpensive route to multiple-charged amino acid building blocks with varying degree of hydrophobicity was developed. A versatile solid-phase protocol leading to selectively protected amino alcohol intermediates was followed by oxidation to yield the desired di- or polycationic amino acid building blocks in gram-scale amounts. The synthetic sequence comprises loading of (S)-1-(p-nosyl)aziridine-2-methanol onto a freshly prepared trityl bromide resin, followed by ring opening with an appropriate primary amine, on-resin N(β)-Boc protection of the resulting secondary amine, exchange of the N(α)-protecting group, cleavage from the resin, and finally oxidation in solution to yield the target γ-aza substituted building blocks having an Fmoc/Boc protection scheme. This strategy facilitates incorporation of multiple positive charges into the building blocks provided that the corresponding partially protected di- or polyamines are available. An array of compounds covering a wide variety of γ-aza substituted analogs of simple neutral amino acids as well as analogs displaying high bulkiness or polycationic side chains was prepared. Two building blocks were incorporated into peptide sequences using microwave-assisted solid-phase peptide synthesis confirming their general utility.

  5. Pentafluorosulfanyldifluoroacetic acid: rebirth of a promising building block.

    PubMed

    Matsnev, Andrej V; Qing, Si-Yan; Stanton, Mark A; Berger, Kyle A; Haufe, Günter; Thrasher, Joseph S

    2014-05-02

    Three novel, easily scalable routes for the synthesis of pentafluorosulfanyldifluoroacetic acid, SF5CF2C(O)OH, are described. Reactions of its acid chloride with amines and alcohols led to a small library of 15 amides and five esters, respectively. The reaction of the acid chloride with phenylmagnesium bromide gave the corresponding acetophenone. Pentafluorosulfanyldifluoroacetonitrile was obtained from pentafluorosulfanyldifluoroacetamide by dehydration with diphosphorus pentoxide.

  6. Arjunolic acid: A promising new building block for nanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Braja G.; Maity, Gopal C.; Pramanik, Subhash R.

    2005-11-01

    Arjunolic acid, the major extractable constituent of the heavy wood of textit{Terminalia Arjuna}, has the potential to be used as a rigid and functional molecular framework for the construction of nanosized supramolecular architectures and nanomaterials. The nanosized triterpenoid, arjunolic acid, showed efficient gelation of various organic solvents at low concentrations. The low molecular mass gelator molecules self-assembled in the solvents to form fibers of nanometer diameters. The movement of the solvent molecules was hindered inside the fibrous network leading to the formation of a gel.

  7. Building Minds by Block Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montopoli, Linda

    Noting that the process of playing with blocks supports the groundwork for learning in every area of a child's growth, this paper discusses specific uses of building blocks in the early childhood curriculum to develop a child's physical, social, emotional, artistic, language, scientific and mathematics growth. The paper outlines the contributions…

  8. From synthesis to function via iterative assembly of N-methyliminodiacetic acid boronate building blocks.

    PubMed

    Li, Junqi; Grillo, Anthony S; Burke, Martin D

    2015-08-18

    The study and optimization of small molecule function is often impeded by the time-intensive and specialist-dependent process that is typically used to make such compounds. In contrast, general and automated platforms have been developed for making peptides, oligonucleotides, and increasingly oligosaccharides, where synthesis is simplified to iterative applications of the same reactions. Inspired by the way natural products are biosynthesized via the iterative assembly of a defined set of building blocks, we developed a platform for small molecule synthesis involving the iterative coupling of haloboronic acids protected as the corresponding N-methyliminodiacetic acid (MIDA) boronates. Here we summarize our efforts thus far to develop this platform into a generalized and automated approach for small molecule synthesis. We and others have employed this approach to access many polyene-based compounds, including the polyene motifs found in >75% of all polyene natural products. This platform further allowed us to derivatize amphotericin B, the powerful and resistance-evasive but also highly toxic last line of defense in treating systemic fungal infections, and thereby understand its mechanism of action. This synthesis-enabled mechanistic understanding has led us to develop less toxic derivatives currently under evaluation as improved antifungal agents. To access more Csp(3)-containing small molecules, we gained a stereocontrolled entry into chiral, non-racemic α-boryl aldehydes through the discovery of a chiral derivative of MIDA. These α-boryl aldehydes are versatile intermediates for the synthesis of many Csp(3) boronate building blocks that are otherwise difficult to access. In addition, we demonstrated the utility of these types of building blocks in accessing pharmaceutically relevant targets via an iterative Csp(3) cross-coupling cycle. We have further expanded the scope of the platform to include stereochemically complex macrocyclic and polycyclic molecules

  9. Microbiologically produced carboxylic acids used as building blocks in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Andreas; Specht, Robert; Müller, Roland A; Stottmeister, Ulrich; Yovkova, Venelina; Otto, Christina; Holz, Martina; Barth, Gerold; Heretsch, Philipp; Thomas, Franziska A; Sicker, Dieter; Giannis, Athanassios

    2012-01-01

    Oxo- and hydroxy-carboxylic acids are of special interest in organic synthesis. However, their introduction by chemical reactions tends to be troublesome especially with regard to stereoselectivity. We describe herein the biotechnological preparation of selected oxo- and hydroxycarboxylic acids under "green" conditions and their use as promising new building blocks. Thereby, our biotechnological goal was the development of process fundamentals regarding the variable use of renewable raw materials, the development of a multi purpose bioreactor and application of a pilot plant with standard equipment for organic acid production to minimize the technological effort. Furthermore the development of new product isolation procedures, with the aim of direct product recovery, capture of products or single step operation, was necessary. The application of robust and approved microorganisms, also genetically modified, capable of using a wide range of substrates as well as producing a large spectrum of products, was of special importance. Microbiologically produced acids, like 2-oxo-glutaric acid and 2-oxo-D-gluconic acid, are useful educts for the chemical synthesis of hydrophilic triazines, spiro-connected heterocycles, benzotriazines, and pyranoic amino acids. The chiral intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, (2R,3S)-isocitric acid, is another promising compound. For the first time our process provides large quantities of enantiopure trimethyl (2R,3S)-isocitrate which was used in subsequent chemical transformations to provide new chiral entities for further usage in total synthesis and pharmaceutical research.Oxo- and hydroxy-carboxylic acids are of special interest in organic synthesis. However, their introduction by chemical reactions tends to be troublesome especially with regard to stereoselectivity. We describe herein the biotechnological preparation of selected oxo- and hydroxycarboxylic acids under "green" conditions and their use as promising new building

  10. Shortcut access to peptidosteroid conjugates: building blocks for solid-phase bile acid scaffold decoration by convergent ligation.

    PubMed

    Verzele, Dieter; Figaroli, Sara; Madder, Annemieke

    2011-12-07

    We present three versatile solid-supported scaffold building blocks based on the (deoxy)cholic acid framework and decorated with handles for further derivatization by modern ligation techniques such as click chemistry, Staudinger ligation or native chemical ligation. Straightforward procedures are presented for the synthesis and analysis of the steroid constructs. These building blocks offer a new, facile and shorter access route to bile acid-peptide conjugates on solid-phase with emphasis on heterodipodal conjugates with defined spatial arrangements. As such, we provide versatile new synthons to the toolbox for bile acid decoration.

  11. Manipulation of partially oriented hydroxyapatite building blocks to form flowerlike bundles without acid-base regulation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhenliang; Wang, Zihao; Chen, Jingdi; Zhong, Shengnan; Hu, Yimin; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-06-01

    The application of hydroxyapatite (HAP) in different fields depends greatly on its morphology, composition and structure. Besides, the main inorganic building blocks of human bones and teeth are also HAP. Therefore, accurate shape and aggregation control and of hydroxyapatite particles will be of great interest. Herein, oriented bundles of flowerlike HAP nanorods were successfully prepared through hydrothermal treatment without acid-base regulation, with the mono-alkyl phosphate (MAP) and sodium citrate as surfactant and chelating agent, respectively. The prepared samples were characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and zeta potential, the pH value and conductivity value of suspension were characterized by pH meter and conductivity measurement. The results showed that the MAP and citrate play an important role in assembly of HAP nanorods without acid-base regulation. Citrate calcium complex could decompose slowly and release citrate ions at hydrothermal conditions. Besides, the further decomposition of citrate ions could release aconitic acid as the reaction time prolongs. Moreover, the possible scheme for the formation process was discussed in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nucleic acids and smart materials: advanced building blocks for logic systems.

    PubMed

    Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-09-03

    Logic gates can convert input signals into a defined output signal, which is the fundamental basis of computing. Inspired by molecular switching from one state to another under an external stimulus, molecular logic gates are explored extensively and recognized as an alternative to traditional silicon-based computing. Among various building blocks of molecular logic gates, nucleic acid attracts special attention owing to its specific recognition abilities and structural features. Functional materials with unique physical and chemical properties offer significant advantages and are used in many fields. The integration of nucleic acids and functional materials is expected to bring about several new phenomena. In this Progress Report, recent progress in the construction of logic gates by combining the properties of a range of smart materials with nucleic acids is introduced. According to the structural characteristics and composition, functional materials are categorized into three classes: polymers, noble-metal nanomaterials, and inorganic nanomaterials. Furthermore, the unsolved problems and future challenges in the construction of logic gates are discussed. It is hoped that broader interests in introducing new smart materials into the field are inspired and tangible applications for these constructs are found. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Undecylenic acid: a valuable and physiologically active renewable building block from castor oil.

    PubMed

    Van der Steen, Marijke; Stevens, Christian V

    2009-01-01

    A lot of attention is currently being paid to the transition to a biobased economy. In this movement, most efforts concentrate on the development of bioenergy applications including bioethanol, biodiesel, thermochemical conversion of biomass, and others. However, in the energy sector other nonbiomass alternatives are known, whereas no valuable alternatives are available when thinking about chemical building blocks. Therefore, it is also essential to develop new routes for the synthesis of bio-based chemicals and materials derived thereof. Such intermediates can originate either from plants or from animals. Castor oil is a non-edible oil extracted from the seeds of the castor bean plant Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae), which grows in tropical and subtropical areas. Globally, around one million tons of castor seeds are produced every year, the leading producing areas being India, PR China, and Brazil.2 10-Undecenoic acid or undecylenic acid is a fatty acid derived from castor oil that, owing to its bifunctional nature, has many possibilities to develop sustainable applications.

  14. omega-Hydrazino linear polyethylenimine: a monoconjugation building block for nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    Pons, Bénédicte; Mouhoubi, Lila; Adib, Abdennaji; Godzina, Przemyslaw; Behr, Jean-Paul; Zuber, Guy

    2006-02-01

    Nonviral gene therapy requires efficient vectors that are able to deliver nucleic acids inside the targeted cell nucleus. Developing new tools for the synthesis of supramolecular vectors with improved transfection efficiency and better biodistribution is therefore a crucial issue. Here we describe the synthesis of a 140-mer linear polyethylenimine (L-PEI) terminated at one end by a highly nucleophilic hydrazine residue. This cationic polymer, whose backbone is well known for its remarkable gene-delivery efficiency, constitutes a building block for omega-regioselective conjugation to molecules through the formation of stable linkages such as the hydrazone bonds. To demonstrate the potential of the omega-hydrazino linear polyethylenimine, human serum transferrin, a ligand that is well know to improve gene-delivery systems, was used as a model of sensitive material. The blood protein was oxidized to generate an aldehyde function and was subsequently conjugated to hydrazino PEI. The new polyethylenimine-transferrin (PEI-Tf) vector was purified and was shown to condense plasmid DNA into compact superstructures compatible with cellular uptake. Finally, the cellular-binding and gene-delivery properties of PEI/DNA polyplexes incorporating different quantities of transferrin were evaluated by FACS analysis and luciferase assay.

  15. White biotechnology for green chemistry: fermentative 2-oxocarboxylic acids as novel building blocks for subsequent chemical syntheses.

    PubMed

    Stottmeister, U; Aurich, A; Wilde, H; Andersch, J; Schmidt, S; Sicker, D

    2005-12-01

    Functionalized compounds, which are difficult to produce by classical chemical synthesis, are of special interest as biotechnologically available targets. They represent useful building blocks for subsequent organic syntheses, wherein they can undergo stereoselective or regioselective reactions. "White Biotechnology" (as defined by the European Chemical Industry [ http://www.europabio.org/white_biotech.htm ], as part of a sustainable "Green Chemistry,") supports new applications of chemicals produced via biotechnology. Environmental aspects of this interdisciplinary combination include: Use of renewable feedstock Optimization of biotechnological processes by means of: New "high performance" microorganisms On-line measurement of substrates and products in bioreactors Alternative product isolation, resulting in higher yields, and lower energy demand In this overview we describe biotechnologically produced pyruvic, 2-oxopentaric and 2-oxohexaric acids as promising new building blocks for synthetic chemistry. In the first part, the microbial formation of 2-oxocarboxylic acids (2-OCAs) in general, and optimization of the fermentation steps required to form pyruvic acid, 2-oxoglutaric acid, and 2-oxo-D-gluconic acid are described, highlighting the fundamental advantages in comparison to chemical syntheses. In the second part, a set of chemical formula schemes demonstrate that 2-OCAs are applicable as building blocks in the chemical synthesis of, e.g., hydrophilic triazines, spiro-connected heterocycles, benzotriazines, and pyranoic amino acids. Finally, some perspectives are discussed.

  16. Fmoc-modified amino acids and short peptides: simple bio-inspired building blocks for the fabrication of functional materials.

    PubMed

    Tao, Kai; Levin, Aviad; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud

    2016-07-11

    Amino acids and short peptides modified with the 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) group possess eminent self-assembly features and show distinct potential for applications due to the inherent hydrophobicity and aromaticity of the Fmoc moiety which can promote the association of building blocks. Given the extensive study and numerous publications in this field, it is necessary to summarize the recent progress concerning these important bio-inspired building blocks. Therefore, in this review, we explore the self-organization of this class of functional molecules from three aspects, i.e., Fmoc-modified individual amino acids, Fmoc-modified di- and tripeptides, and Fmoc-modified tetra- and pentapeptides. The relevant properties and applications related to cell cultivation, bio-templating, optical, drug delivery, catalytic, therapeutic and antibiotic properties are subsequently summarized. Finally, some existing questions impeding the development of Fmoc-modified simple biomolecules are discussed, and corresponding strategies and outlooks are suggested.

  17. The Building Blocks of Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Betty O.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses teaching techniques for teaching about rocks, minerals, and the differences between them. Presents a model-building activity that uses plastic building blocks to build crystal and rock models. (YDS)

  18. The Building Blocks of Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Betty O.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses teaching techniques for teaching about rocks, minerals, and the differences between them. Presents a model-building activity that uses plastic building blocks to build crystal and rock models. (YDS)

  19. Design and synthesis of an Fmoc-SPPS-compatible amino acid building block mimicking the transition state of phosphohistidine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Eerland, Martijn F; Hedberg, Christian

    2012-02-17

    The synthesis of a sulfonamide-based transition-state (TS) analogue of enzymatic phosphohistidine dephosphorylation as an amino acid building block is presented, together with the proof-of-concept of its incorporation into peptides. Key features include final global acidolytic protective group removal as well as full compatibility with standard Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). The peptides are designed as inhibitors of phosphohistidine phosphatase and as a pull-down probe for identification of phosphohistidine phosphatases, respectively.

  20. Solar power building block

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, W.T.

    1982-04-20

    A building unit for exterior walls and the like comprising a molded block of glass having a recess in the side face which is to face the exterior, the recess having a side wall and an open outer end on which a fresnel lens is disposed, the inner end of the recess having a solar cell disposed therein so that sunlight passing through the fresnel lens impinges on the solar cell for the generation of electric power together with a battery disposed within a cavity molded in the block connected by a circuit to the solar cell for storing the generated electric power for subsequent use as needed in a residence or the like. A further embodiment has attached to the interior wall a black painted duct containing vertical radiant fins. This unit contains a ''window'' through which the concentrated radiation is directed by the lens arrangement of the side walls and front lens to create a highly energetic radiant impingement upon the black duct heating it. Air flowing vertically in the duct is used for heating of interior air or removal of superheated interior air by using the force of the rising air for an '' air cooling'' effect.

  1. Synthesis of enantiopure trifluoromethyl building blocks via a highly chemo- and diastereoselective nucleophilic trifluoromethylation of tartaric acid-derived diketones.

    PubMed

    Massicot, Fabien; Monnier-Benoit, Nicolas; Deka, Naba; Plantier-Royon, Richard; Portella, Charles

    2007-02-16

    A highly diastereoselective nucleophilic mono(trifluoromethylation) of a tartaric acid-based diketone, using trifluoromethyl(trimethyl)silane, afforded the corresponding gamma-keto trifluoromethylcarbinol. The scope and limitation of this reaction was studied. The acidic removal of the acetonide moiety protecting the two hydroxyl groups of the adducts was unsuccessful. Bis(O-methylation) of the aromatic derivatives under basic conditions, followed by acidic hydrolysis and oxidative cleavage, led to two different enantiopure products: an alpha-aryl-alpha-methoxy-alpha-trifluoromethyl ethanal and an alpha-aryl-alpha-methoxycarboxylic acid. The overall process is eventually an interesting way to convert one natural chiral raw material into two functionalized enantiopure building blocks including a trifluoromethyl one.

  2. Building Curriculum during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Blocks are not just for play! In this article, Nicole Andrews describes observing the interactions of three young boys enthusiastically engaged in the kindergarten block center of their classroom, using blocks in a building project that displayed their ability to use critical thinking skills, physics exploration, and the development of language…

  3. Tricarboranyl pentaerythritol-based building block.

    PubMed

    Mollard, Alexis; Zharov, Ilya

    2006-12-11

    A new tricarborane building block based on pentaerythritol was prepared for applications in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Its X-ray single-crystal structure revealed a high degree of steric congestion. To enable the attachment of the building block to other moieties, a succinimidyl linker has been introduced at the focal point, and a generation-2 hexacarborane-containing dendron carrying 60 boron atoms has been prepared using a 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)propionic acid core.

  4. Biopolymers Containing Unnatural Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-06-30

    Although the main chain structure of polymers has a profound effect on their materials properties, the side groups can also have dramatic effects on their properties including conductivity, liquid crystallinity, hydrophobicity, elasticity and biodegradability. Unfortunately control over the side chain structure of polymers remains a challenge – it is difficult to control the sequence of chain elongation when mixtures of monomers are polymerized, and postpolymerization side chain modification is made difficult by polymer effects on side chain reactivity. In contrast, the mRNA templated synthesis of polypeptides on the ribosome affords absolute control over the primary sequence of the twenty amino acid monomers. Moreover, the length of the biopolymer is precisely controlled as are sites of crosslinking. However, whereas synthetic polymers can be synthesized from monomers with a wide range of chemically defined structures, ribosomal biosynthesis is largely limited to the 20 canonical amino acids. For many applications in material sciences, additional building blocks would be desirable, for example, amino acids containing metallocene, photoactive, and halogenated side chains. To overcome this natural constraint we have developed a method that allows unnatural amino acids, beyond the common twenty, to be genetically encoded in response to nonsense or frameshift codons in bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells with high fidelity and good yields. Here we have developed methods that allow identical or distinct noncanonical amino acids to be incorporated at multiple sites in a polypeptide chain, potentially leading to a new class of templated biopolymers. We have also developed improved methods for genetically encoding unnatural amino acids. In addition, we have genetically encoded new amino acids with novel physical and chemical properties that allow selective modification of proteins with synthetic agents. Finally, we have evolved new metal-ion binding sites in proteins

  5. Building Blocks for Personal Brands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the four essential building blocks for personal brands: (1) name; (2) message; (3) channels; and (4) bridges. However, outstanding building materials can only take a person so far. The author emphasizes that vision, determination, faith, a sense of humor, and humility are also required.

  6. Building Blocks for Personal Brands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the four essential building blocks for personal brands: (1) name; (2) message; (3) channels; and (4) bridges. However, outstanding building materials can only take a person so far. The author emphasizes that vision, determination, faith, a sense of humor, and humility are also required.

  7. Synthesis of a conformationally constrained δ-amino acid building block.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Elaine; Pes, Lara; Ortin, Yannick; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Paradisi, Francesca

    2013-02-01

    Conformationally restricted amino acids are important components in peptidomimetics and drug design. Herein, we describe the synthesis of a novel, non-proteinogenic constrained delta amino acid containing a cyclobutane ring, cis-3(aminomethyl)cyclobutane carboxylic acid (ACCA). The synthesis of the target amino acid was achieved in seven steps, with the key reaction being a base induced intramolecular nucleophilic substitution. A small library of dipeptides was prepared through the coupling of ACCA with proteinogenic amino acids.

  8. Caesium fluoride-promoted Stille coupling reaction: an efficient synthesis of 9Z-retinoic acid and its analogues using a practical building block.

    PubMed

    Okitsu, Takashi; Iwatsuka, Kinya; Wada, Akimori

    2008-12-21

    A highly efficient and rapid total synthesis of 9Z-retinoic acid was accomplished by caesium fluoride-promoted Stille coupling reaction; using a common building block, 9Z-retinoic acid analogues were also prepared by the same method without isomerisation of the Z-double bond.

  9. C-3 epimers of sugar amino acids as foldameric building blocks: improved synthesis, useful derivatives, coupling strategies.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Adrienn; Csordás, Barbara; Zsoldos-Mády, Virág; Pintér, István; Farkas, Viktor; Perczel, András

    2017-02-01

    To obtain key sugar derivatives for making homooligomeric foldamers or α/β-chimera peptides, economic and multigram scale synthetic methods were to be developed. Though described in the literature, the cost-effective making of both 3-amino-3-deoxy-ribofuranuronic acid (H-t X-OH) and its C-3 epimeric stereoisomer, the 3-amino-3-deoxy-xylofuranuronic acid (H-c X-OH) from D-glucose is described here. The present synthetic route elaborated is (1) appropriate for large-scale synthesis; (2) reagent costs reduced (e.g. by a factor of 400); (3) yields optimized are ~80% or higher for all six consecutive steps concluding -t X- or -c X- and (4) reaction times shortened. Thus, a new synthetic route step-by-step optimized for yield, cost, time and purification is given both for D-xylo and D-ribo-amino-furanuronic acids using sustainable chemistry (e.g. less chromatography with organic solvents; using continuous-flow reactor). Our study encompasses necessary building blocks (e.g. -X-OMe, -X-O(i)Pr, -X-NHMe, Fmoc-X-OH) and key coupling reactions making -Aaa-t X-Aaa- or -Aaa-t X-t X-Aaa- type "inserts". Completed for both stereoisomers of X, including the newly synthesized Fmoc-c X-OH, producing longer oligomers for drug design and discovery is more of a reality than a wish.

  10. A common building block for the syntheses of amorfrutin and cajaninstilbene acid libraries toward efficient binding with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Aidhen, Indrapal S; Mukkamala, Ramesh; Weidner, Christopher; Sauer, Sascha

    2015-01-16

    A common building block for the synthesis of amorfrutin and cajaninstilbene acid derivatives has been developed. The library of synthesized compounds has enabled identification of new nontoxic ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) and potential inhibitors of the transcriptional corepressor protein NCoR. The biological data holds promise in identification of new potential leads for the antidiabetic drug discovery process.

  11. Formamide as the main building block in the origin of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Giovanna; Saladino, Raffaele; Crestini, Claudia; Ciciriello, Fabiana; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2007-08-16

    The simplest molecules grouping the four most common elements of the universe H,C,O and N (with the exception of the biologically inert He) are isocyanate HNCO and formamide H2NCOH. Reasons for the availability of formamide on prebiotic Earth are presented. We review evidence showing that formamide in the presence of largely available catalysts and by moderate heating yields the complete set of nucleic bases necessary for the formation of nucleic acids. Formamide also favours the formation of acyclonucleosides and the phosphorylation and trans-phosphorylation of nucleosides, thus providing a plausible chemical frame for the passage from a simple one-carbon compound to nucleic polymers. Physico-chemical conditions exist in which formamide favours the stability of the phosphoester bonds in nucleic polymers relative to that of the same bonds in monomers. Starting from a formamide-laden environment subject only to the laws of chemistry, a hypothesis is outlined sketching the passage towards an aqueous world in which Darwinian rules apply.

  12. EcdGHK are Three Tailoring Iron Oxygenases for Amino Acid Building Blocks of the Echinocandin Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Cacho, Ralph A; Chiou, Grace; Garg, Neil K; Tang, Yi; Walsh, Christopher T

    2013-01-01

    The echinocandins are a small group of fungal N-acylated cyclic hexapeptides that are fungicidal for candida strains and fungistatic for aspergilli by targeting cell wall 1,3-β-glucan synthases. The side chains of all six amino acid building blocks have hydroxyl groups, including the nonproteinogenic 4R,5R-dihydroxy-Orn1, 4R-OH-Pro3, 3S, 4S-dihydroxy-homoTyr4 and 3S-OH-4S-Me-Pro6. The echinocandin (ecd) gene cluster contains two predicted nonheme mononuclear iron oxygenase genes (ecdG,K) and one encoding a P450 type heme protein (ecdH). Deletion of the ecdH gene in the producing Emericella rugulosa generates an echinocandin scaffold (echinocandin D) lacking both hydroxyl groups on Orn1. Correspondingly, the ΔecdG strain failed to hydroxylate C3 of the homoTyr residue, and purified EcdG hydroxylated free L-homoTyr at C3. The ΔecdK strain failed to generate mature echinocandin unless supplemented with either 4R-Me-Pro or 3S-OH-4S-Me-Pro, indicating blockage of a step upstream of Me-Pro formation. Purified EcdK is a Leu 5-hydroxylase, acting iteratively at C5 to yield γ-Me-Glu-γ-semialdehyde in equilibrium with the cyclic imine product. Evaluation of deshydroxyechinocandin scaffolds in in vitro anticandidal assays revealed up to 3-fold loss of potency for the ΔecdG scaffolds, but a 3-fold gain of potency for the ΔecdH scaffold, in line with prior results on deoxyechinocandin homologs. PMID:23451921

  13. Periodic distributions of hydrophobic amino acids allows the definition of fundamental building blocks to align distantly related proteins.

    PubMed

    Baussand, J; Deremble, C; Carbone, A

    2007-05-15

    Several studies on large and small families of proteins proved in a general manner that hydrophobic amino acids are globally conserved even if they are subjected to high rate substitution. Statistical analysis of amino acids evolution within blocks of hydrophobic amino acids detected in sequences suggests their usage as a basic structural pattern to align pairs of proteins of less than 25% sequence identity, with no need of knowing their 3D structure. The authors present a new global alignment method and an automatic tool for Proteins with HYdrophobic Blocks ALignment (PHYBAL) based on the combinatorics of overlapping hydrophobic blocks. Two substitution matrices modeling a different selective pressure inside and outside hydrophobic blocks are constructed, the Inside Hydrophobic Blocks Matrix and the Outside Hydrophobic Blocks Matrix, and a 4D space of gap values is explored. PHYBAL performance is evaluated against Needleman and Wunsch algorithm run with Blosum 30, Blosum 45, Blosum 62, Gonnet, HSDM, PAM250, Johnson and Remote Homo matrices. PHYBAL behavior is analyzed on eight randomly selected pairs of proteins of >30% sequence identity that cover a large spectrum of structural properties. It is also validated on two large datasets, the 127 pairs of the Domingues dataset with >30% sequence identity, and 181 pairs issued from BAliBASE 2.0 and ranked by percentage of identity from 7 to 25%. Results confirm the importance of considering substitution matrices modeling hydrophobic contexts and a 4D space of gap values in aligning distantly related proteins. Two new notions of local and global stability are defined to assess the robustness of an alignment algorithm and the accuracy of PHYBAL. A new notion, the SAD-coefficient, to assess the difficulty of structural alignment is also introduced. PHYBAL has been compared with Hydrophobic Cluster Analysis and HMMSUM methods. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry method for basic building block analysis of low molecular weight heparins prepared through nitrous acid depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaojun; Guo, Zhimou; Yu, Mengqi; Lin, Chao; Sheng, Anran; Wang, Zhiyu; Linhardt, Robert J; Chi, Lianli

    2017-01-06

    Low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) are important anticoagulant drugs that are prepared through depolymerization of unfractionated heparin. Based on the types of processing reactions and the structures of the products, LMWHs can be divided into different classifications. Enoxaparin is prepared by benzyl esterification and alkaline depolymerization, while dalteparin and nadroparin are prepared through nitrous acid depolymerization followed by borohydride reduction. Compositional analysis of their basic building blocks is an effective way to provide structural information on heparin and LMWHs. However, most current compositional analysis methods have been limited to heparin and enoxaparin. A sensitive and comprehensive approach is needed for detailed investigation of the structure of LMWHs prepared through nitrous acid depolymerization, especially their characteristic saturated non-reducing end (NRE) and 2,5-anhydro-d-mannitol reducing end (RE). A maltose modified hydrophilic interaction column offers improved separation of complicated mixtures of acidic disaccharides and oligosaccharides. A total of 36 basic building blocks were unambiguously identified by high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (MS). Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS/MS quantification was developed and validated in the analysis of dalteparin and nadroparin samples. Each group of building blocks revealed different aspects of the properties of LMWHs, such as functional motifs required for anticoagulant activity, the structure of heparin starting materials, cleavage sites in the depolymerization reaction, and undesired structural modifications resulting from side reactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Polymeric assembly of hyperbranched building blocks to establish tunable nanoplatforms for lysosome acidity-responsive gene/drug co-delivery.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hui-Zhen; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xu-Li; Yang, Bin; Chen, Wei-Hai; Chen, Si; Chen, Gang; Zhao, Yi-Fang; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-07-01

    This study plans to develop a nanoparticle technology that can assemble different polymeric "building blocks" with various desired functionalities into one nanosystem in a pH-dependent manner. For this purpose, polymeric building blocks were specifically designed with hyperbranched architectures, and orthogonal pH-reversible phenylboronic acid-diols were taken as "joints" to integrate them together. To verify the idea, a corona-core dual-polymer nanoassembly was prepared as the vehicle for lysosomotropic gene/drug co-delivery. Phenylboronic acid modified hyperbranched oligoethylenimine (OEI-PBA) was arranged to cluster around the hydrophobic core composed of hyperbranched polyglycerol, just by mixing two polymers in an appropriate ratio at neutral conditions. Compared with the parent OEI-PBA, this nanoassembly demonstrated better capture of plasmid DNA, highly enhanced activity for cellular transport and gene transfection (up to 100 fold), the ability to further load hydrophobic drugs, lysosome acidity-targeting pH-dependent release of both carried cargoes, and improved cell-biocompatibility. To evaluate its potential for combinational gene/drug therapy, in vitro experiments using the therapeutic p53 gene and antitumor doxorubicin as models were carried out. This intracellular co-delivery led to apparently synergetic anti-cancer effects in cultured cancer cells. This dynamic paradigm shows interesting features including easy manipulation, reversible conjugation, lysosome-targeting pH-responsiveness, high co-delivery efficiency, and functional expandability by further accommodating other building blocks.

  16. Dynamic Covalent Nanoparticle Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rational and generalisable methods for engineering surface functionality will be crucial to realising the technological potential of nanomaterials. Nanoparticle‐bound dynamic covalent exchange combines the error‐correcting and environment‐responsive features of equilibrium processes with the stability, structural precision, and vast diversity of covalent chemistry, defining a new and powerful approach for manipulating structure, function and properties at nanomaterial surfaces. Dynamic covalent nanoparticle (DCNP) building blocks thus present a whole host of possibilities for constructing adaptive systems, devices and materials that incorporate both nanoscale and molecular functional components. At the same time, DCNPs have the potential to reveal fundamental insights regarding dynamic and complex chemical systems confined to nanoscale interfaces. PMID:27312526

  17. Nanostructured particles from multi scale building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampsey, J. Eric

    Nanotechnology has emerged as one of the most exciting new and developing fields in science today. New nanoscale materials and devices such as nanoparticles, nanocomposites, nanowires, and nanosensors could revolutionize the 21st century in the same way that the transistor and Internet led to the information age. One key component in developing these new technologies is to assemble individual atomic and molecular building blocks into larger structures with fundamentally new properties and functions. Nature is very efficient at assembling multi scale building blocks such as proteins, lipids, and minerals into nanostructured materials such as bone, teeth, diatoms, eggshells, seashells, cell membranes, and DNA. Surfactant and colloidal building block can also be assembled into different nanoscale materials and devices by utilizing hydrophobic/hydrophilic and other surface interactions. Using these concepts, this dissertation focuses on the syntheses and applications of nanostructured particles assembled from multi scale building blocks. Important factors in the synthesis of the particles include particle size, particle morphology, pore size and pore structure. Five different types of nanostructured particles assembled from different multi scale building blocks are demonstrated in this work: (1) Spherical metal/silica mesoporous particles with high surface areas and controllable pore sizes, pore structures, and metal content are synthesized from surfactant, silicate, and metal building blocks for catalytic applications; (2) Mesoporous hollow spheres with controllable pore sizes and pore structures are synthesized from surfactant, silica, and polystyrene building blocks; (3) Spherical mesoporous carbon particles with controllable pore sizes and pore structures are templated from silica particles assembled from silica and surfactant building blocks; (4) Spherical mesoporous, microporous, and bimodal carbon particles are synthesized from sucrose and silica building blocks

  18. A Self-Assembled Aggregate Composed of a Fatty Acid Membrane and the Building Blocks of Biological Polymers Provides a First Step in the Emergence of Protocells

    PubMed Central

    Black, Roy A.; Blosser, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    We propose that the first step in the origin of cellular life on Earth was the self-assembly of fatty acids with the building blocks of RNA and protein, resulting in a stable aggregate. This scheme provides explanations for the selection and concentration of the prebiotic components of cells; the stabilization and growth of early membranes; the catalysis of biopolymer synthesis; and the co-localization of membranes, RNA and protein. In this article, we review the evidence and rationale for the formation of the proposed aggregate: (i) the well-established phenomenon of self-assembly of fatty acids to form vesicles; (ii) our published evidence that nucleobases and sugars bind to and stabilize such vesicles; and (iii) the reasons why amino acids likely do so as well. We then explain how the conformational constraints and altered chemical environment due to binding of the components to the membrane could facilitate the formation of nucleosides, oligonucleotides and peptides. We conclude by discussing how the resulting oligomers, even if short and random, could have increased vesicle stability and growth more than their building blocks did, and how competition among these vesicles could have led to longer polymers with complex functions. PMID:27529283

  19. Building Trades. Block II. Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    Twelve informational lessons and eleven manipulative lessons are provided on foundations as applied to the building trades. Informational lessons cover land measurements; blueprint reading; level instruments; building and site planning; building site preparation; laying out building lines; soil preparation and special evacuation; concrete forms;…

  20. Poly(Acrylic Acid-b-Styrene) Amphiphilic Multiblock Copolymers as Building Blocks for the Assembly of Discrete Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Anna C.; Zhu, Jiahua; Pochan, Darrin J.; Jia, Xinqiao; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2011-01-01

    In order to expand the utility of current polymeric micellar systems, we have developed amphiphilic multiblock copolymers containing alternating blocks of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(styrene). Heterotelechelic poly(tert-butyl acrylate-b-styrene) diblock copolymers containing an α-alkyne and an ω-azide were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), allowing control over the molecular weight while maintaining narrow polydispersity indices. The multiblock copolymers were constructed by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition of azide-alkyne end functional diblock copolymers which were then characterized by 1H NMR, FT-IR and SEC. The tert-butyl moieties of the poly(tert-butyl acrylate-b-styrene) multiblock copolymers were easily removed to form the poly(acrylic acid-b-styrene) multiblock copolymer ((PAA-PS)9), which contained up to 9 diblock repeats. The amphiphilic multiblock (PAA-PS)9 (Mn = 73.3 kg/mol) was self-assembled by dissolution into tetrahydrofuran and extensive dialysis against deionized water for 4 days. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) for (PAA-PS)9 was determined by fluorescence spectroscopy using pyrene as a fluorescent probe and was found to be very low at 2 × 10-4 mg/mL. The (PAA-PS)9 multiblock was also analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The hydrodynamic diameter of the particles was found to be 11 nm. Discrete spherical particles were observed by TEM with an average particle diameter of 14 nm. The poly(acrylic acid) periphery of the spherical particles should allow for future conjugation of biomolecules. PMID:21552373

  1. Formation of Methylamine and Ethylamine in Extraterrestrial Ices and Their Role as Fundamental Building Blocks of Proteinogenic α-amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förstel, Marko; Bergantini, Alexandre; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Góbi, Sándor; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2017-08-01

    The -CH-NH2 moiety represents the fundamental building block of all proteinogenic amino acids, with the cyclic amino acid proline being a special case (-CH-NH- in proline). Exploiting a chemical retrosynthesis, we reveal that methylamine (CH3NH2) and/or ethylamine (CH3CH2NH2) are essential precursors in the formation of each proteinogenic amino acid. In the present study we elucidate the abiotic formation of methylamine and ethylamine from ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) ices exposed to secondary electrons generated by energetic cosmic radiation in cometary and interstellar model ices. Our experiments show that methylamine and ethylamine are crucial reaction products in irradiated ices composed of ammonia and methane. Using isotopic substitution studies we further obtain valuable information on the specific reaction pathways toward methylamine. The very recent identification of methylamine and ethylamine together with glycine in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko underlines their potential to the extraterrestrial formation of amino acids.

  2. Building blocks for subleading helicity operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.

    2016-05-01

    On-shell helicity methods provide powerful tools for determining scattering amplitudes, which have a one-to-one correspondence with leading power helicity operators in the Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) away from singular regions of phase space. We show that helicity based operators are also useful for enumerating power suppressed SCET operators, which encode subleading amplitude information about singular limits. In particular, we present a complete set of scalar helicity building blocks that are valid for constructing operators at any order in the SCET power expansion. We also describe an interesting angular momentum selection rule that restricts how these building blocks can be assembled.

  3. Building blocks for subleading helicity operators

    SciTech Connect

    Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.

    2016-05-24

    On-shell helicity methods provide powerful tools for determining scattering amplitudes, which have a one-to-one correspondence with leading power helicity operators in the Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) away from singular regions of phase space. We show that helicity based operators are also useful for enumerating power suppressed SCET operators, which encode subleading amplitude information about singular limits. In particular, we present a complete set of scalar helicity building blocks that are valid for constructing operators at any order in the SCET power expansion. In conclusion, we also describe an interesting angular momentum selection rule that restricts how these building blocks can be assembled.

  4. Microwave spectroscopy of biomolecular building blocks.

    PubMed

    Alonso, José L; López, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Microwave spectroscopy, considered as the most definitive gas phase structural probe, is able to distinguish between different conformational structures of a molecule, because they have unique spectroscopic constants and give rise to distinct individual rotational spectra.Previously, application of this technique was limited to molecular specimens possessing appreciable vapor pressures, thus discarding the possibility of studying many other molecules of biological importance, in particular those with high melting points, which had a tendency to undergo thermal reactions, and ultimately degradation, upon heating.Nowadays, the combination of laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy techniques, in supersonic jets, has enabled the gas-phase study of such systems. In this chapter, these techniques, including broadband spectroscopy, as well as results of their application into the study of the conformational panorama and structure of biomolecular building blocks, such as amino acids, nucleic bases, and monosaccharides, are briefly discussed, and with them, the tools for conformational assignation - rotational constants, nuclear quadrupole coupling interaction, and dipole moment.

  5. Conference on Building Blocks to Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Board of Education, Columbus.

    This document reproduces several papers that were delivered at the Ohio Department of Education's statewide ESEA Title I conference 1971, the theme of which was "Building Blocks to Success"; this typifies how Ohio school administrators and teachers have designed Title I programs to help educationally disadvantaged children experience…

  6. Single molecule magnets from magnetic building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, W.; Paretzki, A.; Cervetti, C.; Hohloch, S.; Rauschenbach, S.; Kern, K.; Dressel, M.; Bogani, L.; M&üLler, P.

    2013-03-01

    We provide a basic set of magnetic building blocks that can be rationally assembled, similar to magnetic LEGO bricks, in order to create a huge variety of magnetic behavior. Using rare-earth centers and multipyridine ligands, fine-tuning of intra and intermolecular exchange interaction is demonstrated. We have investigated a series of molecules with monomeric, dimeric and trimeric lanthanide centers using SQUID susceptometry and Hall bar magnetometry. A home-made micro-Hall-probe magnetometer was used to measure magnetic hysteresis loops at mK temperatures and fields up to 17 T. All compounds show hysteresis below blocking temperatures of 3 to 4 K. The correlation of the assembly of the building blocks with the magnetic properties will be discussed.

  7. Competitive hydrogen bonds associated with the effect of primycin antibiotic on oleic acid as a building block of plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Virág, Eszter; Pesti, Miklós; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor

    2010-03-01

    Interaction of primycin antibiotic with oleic acid was investigated to understand the effect of primycin on lipid membranes at a molecular level. The thermodynamic parameters of the complex formation were determined by photoluminescence studies. Results highlight the presence of two interactions between the interacted species according to the cases in which one or two hydrogen bonds stabilize the molecular complexes. Although both interactions result in similar Gibbs-free enthalpy change at room temperature, the enthalpy and entropy changes associated with the formation of single or double hydrogen bonds are quite different. Quantum chemical and anisotropy decay studies validated that the formation of a single or double hydrogen bond between these species is driven by entropy in the former or enthalpy in the latter case. Owing to the resultant quite different temperature dependence of these two interactions, after detailed examinations in a cellular environment, this property could have importance in application of primycin on differently fevered bodies.

  8. Pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylic) acid and 2-aminopyridine as building blocks of a novel proton transfer compound: Solution and X-ray crystal structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, A.; Moosavi, S. M.; Kordestani, D.; Maddah, B.; Shamsipur, M.; Aghabozorg, H.; Ramezanipour, F.; Kickelbick, G.

    2007-02-01

    The synthesis of a novel proton transfer compound (2-apyH)(pdtcH), L, derived from pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylic) acid, (pdtcH 2), is reported. This compound was prepared from the reaction between pdtcH 2, and 2-aminopyridine, (2-apy), in water as solvent. The characterization was performed using 1H and 13C solution NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystal structure analysis reveals that intra- and intermolecular proton transfer from the diacid pdtcH 2 to the base 2-apy results in the formation of a supramolecular network, which is self-assembled via non-covalent interactions. The monocationic (2-apyH) + and monoanionic (pdtcH) - building blocks are connected through H-bonding, π-π interactions and ion-pairing simultaneously as shown in the X-ray crystal structure. The monoanionic fragments are located almost parallel to each other and the cationic species have also situations nearly parallel to each other, positioning almost perpendicular to anions. The aqueous solution studies were accomplished by spectrophotometric and potentiometric pH titrations. The most abundant proton transfer species present at pH < 6 is (2-apyH)(pdtcH), in support of association between (2-apyH) + and (pdtcH) - in L, being similar to that observed by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystal structure analysis.

  9. Prebiotic synthesis of nucleic acids and their building blocks at the atomic level - merging models and mechanisms from advanced computations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Šponer, Judit E; Szabla, Rafał; Góra, Robert W; Saitta, A Marco; Pietrucci, Fabio; Saija, Franz; Di Mauro, Ernesto; Saladino, Raffaele; Ferus, Martin; Civiš, Svatopluk; Šponer, Jiří

    2016-07-27

    The origin of life on Earth is one of the most fascinating questions of contemporary science. Extensive research in the past decades furnished diverse experimental proposals for the emergence of first informational polymers that could form the basis of the early terrestrial life. Side by side with the experiments, the fast development of modern computational chemistry methods during the last 20 years facilitated the use of in silico modelling tools to complement the experiments. Modern computations can provide unique atomic-level insights into the structural and electronic aspects as well as the energetics of key prebiotic chemical reactions. Many of these insights are not directly obtainable from the experimental techniques and the computations are thus becoming indispensable for proper interpretation of many experiments and for qualified predictions. This review illustrates the synergy between experiment and theory in the origin of life research focusing on the prebiotic synthesis of various nucleic acid building blocks and on the self-assembly of nucleotides leading to the first functional oligonucleotides.

  10. Synthesis of aromatic glycoconjugates. Building blocks for the construction of combinatorial glycopeptide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Nörrlinger, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Summary New aromatic glycoconjugate building blocks based on the trifunctional 3-aminomethyl-5-aminobenzoic acid backbone and sugars linked to the backbone by a malonyl moiety were prepared via peptide coupling. The orthogonally protected glycoconjugates, bearing an acetyl-protected glycoside, were converted into their corresponding acids which are suitable building blocks for combinatorial glycopeptide synthesis. PMID:25383116

  11. Porous polymers based on aryleneethynylene building blocks.

    PubMed

    Bunz, Uwe H F; Seehafer, Kai; Geyer, Florian L; Bender, Markus; Braun, Ingo; Smarsly, Emanuel; Freudenberg, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Porous conjugated polymers are synthesized by metal-catalyzed coupling reactions. The progress for porous polymers when planar or tetrahedral building blocks are connected by alkyne units into novel materials is highlighted. The most prominent reaction for the buildup of the microporous alkyne-bridged polymers is the Sonogashira reaction, connecting alkynes to aromatic iodides or bromides. The availability of the building blocks and the potency of the Sonogashira reaction allow preparing a large variety of intrinsically porous polymeric materials, in which rigid struts connect multipronged centers. The microporous polymers are used as catalysts and as storage materials for gases and sensors. Postfunctionalization schemes, understanding of structure-property relationships, and the quest for high porosity are pertinent.

  12. Building blocks for subleading helicity operators

    DOE PAGES

    Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.

    2016-05-24

    On-shell helicity methods provide powerful tools for determining scattering amplitudes, which have a one-to-one correspondence with leading power helicity operators in the Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) away from singular regions of phase space. We show that helicity based operators are also useful for enumerating power suppressed SCET operators, which encode subleading amplitude information about singular limits. In particular, we present a complete set of scalar helicity building blocks that are valid for constructing operators at any order in the SCET power expansion. In conclusion, we also describe an interesting angular momentum selection rule that restricts how these building blocks canmore » be assembled.« less

  13. Superatoms as Building Blocks of New Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-24

    REPORT Superatoms as Building Blocks of New Materials 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: During the last couple of decades or so, the subject...scanned from -0.8 V to 0.8 V at the scan rate of 100 mV/s. Dashed line represents the blank experiment with DMF and 0.1 M LiBF4 . (b) Tauc plot

  14. Fast and Facile Synthesis of 4-Nitrophenyl 2-Azidoethylcarbamate Derivatives from N-Fmoc-Protected α-Amino Acids as Activated Building Blocks for Urea Moiety-Containing Compound Library.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Ying; Chang, Li-Te; Chen, Hung-Wei; Yang, Chia-Ying; Hsin, Ling-Wei

    2017-03-13

    A fast and facile synthesis of a series of 4-nitrophenyl 2-azidoethylcarbamate derivatives as activated urea building blocks was developed. The N-Fmoc-protected 2-aminoethyl mesylates derived from various commercially available N-Fmoc-protected α-amino acids, including those having functionalized side chains with acid-labile protective groups, were directly transformed into 4-nitrophenyl 2-azidoethylcarbamate derivatives in 1 h via a one-pot two-step reaction. These urea building blocks were utilized for the preparation of a series of urea moiety-containing mitoxantrone-amino acid conjugates in 75-92% yields and parallel solution-phase synthesis of a urea compound library consisted of 30 members in 38-70% total yields.

  15. A general approach to chiral building blocks via direct amino acid-catalyzed cascade three-component reductive alkylations: formal total synthesis of HIV-1 protease inhibitors, antibiotic agglomerins, brefeldin A, and (R)-gamma-hexanolide.

    PubMed

    Ramachary, Dhevalapally B; Vijayendar Reddy, Y

    2010-01-01

    Multicatalysis cascade (MCC) process for the synthesis of highly substituted chiral building blocks (2-alkyl-CH-acids, 2-alkylcyclohexane-1,3-diones, 2-alkylcyclopentane-1,3-diones, and H-P ketone analogues) is presented based on the cascade three-component reductive alkylation's (TCRA) platform. Herein, we developed the high-yielding alkylation of a variety of CH-acids with (R)-glyceraldehyde acetonide/(S)-Garner aldehyde and Hantzsch ester through amino acid-catalyzed TCRA reaction without racemization at the alpha-position to carbonyl. Direct sequential combination of the L-proline-catalyzed TCRA reaction with other reactions like cascade alkylation/ketenization/esterification (A/K/E), alkylation/ketenization/esterification/alkylation (A/K/E/A), Brønsted acid-catalyzed cascade hydrolysis/lactonization/esterification (H/L/E), hydrolysis/esterification (H/E), hydrolysis/oxy-Michael/dehydration (H/OM/DH), and Robinson annulation (RA) of CH-acids, chiral aldehydes, Hantzsch ester, diazomethane, methyl vinyl ketone, various active olefins, and acetylenes furnished the highly functionalized chiral building blocks in good to high yields with excellent diastereoselectivities. In this context, many of the pharmaceutically applicable chiral building blocks were prepared via MCC reactions.

  16. Routing System for Building Block Layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nang-Ping

    With the advent VLSI, layout techniques become more and more crucial to IC design. An automatic building block layout system is a useful tool to deal with the increasing complexity of custom chip layout problem. An approach to the routing part of this layout system is proposed. This routing system can handle arbitrarily shaped rectilinear blocks with pins on the boundary. A feature of this system is its ability to shift blocks at any moment so that better placement and hence better routing can be achieved. The system minimizes layout area and assures 100% routing completion. A relative placement is the input to this routing system. The prerouting analysis will calculate the expected routing density around each block and the routing space is allocated accordingly. The "bottleneck" idea is introduced to represent the critical regions of the layout plane where the congestion of routing is most likely to occur. It also serves as a link between blocks whereby all information are easily updated when some blocks have to move their positions. A weighted "global routing graph" is constructed to reflect the current routing situation associated with bottlenecks. The global routing of each signal is done by a "Steiner-Tree-on-Graphs" (STOG) algorithm. The basic element of STOG is a three-point Steiner-Tree-on-Graphs algorithm. Some theoretical results are derived and an efficient algorithm is developed based on them. STOG has reasonable computational complexities and yields very good results from experimental tests. In the detailed routing phase, an existing channel router and a switch-box router are called for track assignment. Special emphasis has been put on terminal position alignment between two neighboring channels to avoid unnecessary jogs. The power and ground will be allowed different wire width and routed on the metal layer. Several examples have been tested against this routing system. It has achieved very compact layout in short running time.

  17. Metabolomics analysis: Finding out metabolic building blocks

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new methodology for the analysis of metabolic networks. We use the notion of strongly connected components of a graph, called in this context metabolic building blocks. Every strongly connected component is contracted to a single node in such a way that the resulting graph is a directed acyclic graph, called a metabolic DAG, with a considerably reduced number of nodes. The property of being a directed acyclic graph brings out a background graph topology that reveals the connectivity of the metabolic network, as well as bridges, isolated nodes and cut nodes. Altogether, it becomes a key information for the discovery of functional metabolic relations. Our methodology has been applied to the glycolysis and the purine metabolic pathways for all organisms in the KEGG database, although it is general enough to work on any database. As expected, using the metabolic DAGs formalism, a considerable reduction on the size of the metabolic networks has been obtained, specially in the case of the purine pathway due to its relative larger size. As a proof of concept, from the information captured by a metabolic DAG and its corresponding metabolic building blocks, we obtain the core of the glycolysis pathway and the core of the purine metabolism pathway and detect some essential metabolic building blocks that reveal the key reactions in both pathways. Finally, the application of our methodology to the glycolysis pathway and the purine metabolism pathway reproduce the tree of life for the whole set of the organisms represented in the KEGG database which supports the utility of this research. PMID:28493998

  18. Building blocks for correlated superconductors and magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Sarrao, J. L.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; ...

    2015-04-01

    Recent efforts at Los Alamos to discover strongly correlated superconductors and hard ferromagnets are reviewed. While serendipity remains a principal engine of materials discovery, design principles and structural building blocks are beginning to emerge that hold potential for predictive discovery. Successes over the last decade with the so-called “115” strongly correlated superconductors are summarized, and more recent efforts to translate these insights and principles to novel hard magnets are discussed. While true “materials by design” remains a distant aspiration, progress is being made in coupling empirical design principles to electronic structure simulation to accelerate and guide materials design and synthesis.

  19. Building blocks for correlated superconductors and magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrao, J. L.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; Batista, C. D.; Zhu, J.-X.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-04-01

    Recent efforts at Los Alamos to discover strongly correlated superconductors and hard ferromagnets are reviewed. While serendipity remains a principal engine of materials discovery, design principles and structural building blocks are beginning to emerge that hold potential for predictive discovery. Successes over the last decade with the so-called “115” strongly correlated superconductors are summarized, and more recent efforts to translate these insights and principles to novel hard magnets are discussed. While true “materials by design” remains a distant aspiration, progress is being made in coupling empirical design principles to electronic structure simulation to accelerate and guide materials design and synthesis.

  20. Building blocks for correlated superconductors and magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrao, J. L.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; Batista, C. D.; Zhu, J. -X.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-04-01

    Recent efforts at Los Alamos to discover strongly correlated superconductors and hard ferromagnets are reviewed. While serendipity remains a principal engine of materials discovery, design principles and structural building blocks are beginning to emerge that hold potential for predictive discovery. In addition, successes over the last decade with the so-called “115” strongly correlated superconductors are summarized, and more recent efforts to translate these insights and principles to novel hard magnets are discussed. While true “materials by design” remains a distant aspiration, progress is being made in coupling empirical design principles to electronic structure simulation to accelerate and guide materials design and synthesis.

  1. A building block for hardware belief networks

    PubMed Central

    Behin-Aein, Behtash; Diep, Vinh; Datta, Supriyo

    2016-01-01

    Belief networks represent a powerful approach to problems involving probabilistic inference, but much of the work in this area is software based utilizing standard deterministic hardware based on the transistor which provides the gain and directionality needed to interconnect billions of them into useful networks. This paper proposes a transistor like device that could provide an analogous building block for probabilistic networks. We present two proof-of-concept examples of belief networks, one reciprocal and one non-reciprocal, implemented using the proposed device which is simulated using experimentally benchmarked models. PMID:27443521

  2. Building blocks for correlated superconductors and magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrao, J. L.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; Batista, C. D.; Zhu, J.-X.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-04-01

    Recent efforts at Los Alamos to discover strongly correlated superconductors and hard ferromagnets are reviewed. While serendipity remains a principal engine of materials discovery, design principles and structural building blocks are beginning to emerge that hold potential for predictive discovery. Successes over the last decade with the so-called "115" strongly correlated superconductors are summarized, and more recent efforts to translate these insights and principles to novel hard magnets are discussed. While true "materials by design" remains a distant aspiration, progress is being made in coupling empirical design principles to electronic structure simulation to accelerate and guide materials design and synthesis.

  3. Birth of a nanoscience building block.

    PubMed

    Alivisatos, A Paul

    2008-08-01

    The first Kavli Prize in Nanoscience has recognized two giants of the field, Louis Brus and Sumio Ijima, who have helped to lay the foundation of the field of nanoscience through their efforts to develop two of the most fundamental nanoscience building blocks: colloidal quantum dots and the carbon nanotube. In this Focus, I provide a brief history on the birth of the field of semiconductor nanoparticles, or quantum dots, and outline the contributions that Louis Brus has made in this area, which have served to advance the field of nanoscience in vast and far-reaching ways.

  4. Hydration effects on the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks.

    PubMed

    Assis Oliveira, Leonardo Bruno; L Fonseca, Tertius; Costa Cabral, Benedito J; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2016-08-28

    Theoretical results for the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks in the gas phase and water are presented. The building blocks presently investigated include the monomeric species DHI (5,6-dihydroxyindole) or hydroquinone (HQ), DHICA (5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid), indolequinone (IQ), quinone methide (MQ), two covalently bonded dimers [HM ≡ HQ + MQ and IM ≡ IQ + MQ], and two tetramers [HMIM ≡ HQ + IM, IMIM ≡ IM + IM]. The electronic properties in water were determined by carrying out sequential Monte Carlo/time dependent density functional theory calculations. The results illustrate the role played by hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions in the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks in a polar environment. In water, the dipole moments of monomeric species are significantly increased ([54-79]%) relative to their gas phase values. Recently, it has been proposed that the observed enhancement of the higher-energy absorption intensity in eumelanin can be explained by excitonic coupling among eumelanin protomolecules [C.-T. Chen et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 3859 (2014)]. Here, we are providing evidence that for DHICA, IQ, and HMIM, the electronic absorption toward the higher-energy end of the spectrum ([180-220] nm) is enhanced by long-range Coulombic interactions with the water environment. It was verified that by superposing the absorption spectra of different eumelanin building blocks corresponding to the monomers, dimers, and tetramers in liquid water, the behaviour of the experimental spectrum, which is characterised by a nearly monotonic decay from the ultraviolet to the infrared, is qualitatively reproduced. This result is in keeping with a "chemical disorder model," where the broadband absorption of eumelanin pigments is determined by the superposition of the spectra associated with the monomeric and oligomeric building blocks.

  5. Hydration effects on the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assis Oliveira, Leonardo Bruno; L. Fonseca, Tertius; Costa Cabral, Benedito J.; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical results for the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks in the gas phase and water are presented. The building blocks presently investigated include the monomeric species DHI (5,6-dihydroxyindole) or hydroquinone (HQ), DHICA (5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid), indolequinone (IQ), quinone methide (MQ), two covalently bonded dimers [HM ≡ HQ + MQ and IM ≡ IQ + MQ], and two tetramers [HMIM ≡ HQ + IM, IMIM ≡ IM + IM]. The electronic properties in water were determined by carrying out sequential Monte Carlo/time dependent density functional theory calculations. The results illustrate the role played by hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions in the electronic properties of eumelanin building blocks in a polar environment. In water, the dipole moments of monomeric species are significantly increased ([54-79]%) relative to their gas phase values. Recently, it has been proposed that the observed enhancement of the higher-energy absorption intensity in eumelanin can be explained by excitonic coupling among eumelanin protomolecules [C.-T. Chen et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 3859 (2014)]. Here, we are providing evidence that for DHICA, IQ, and HMIM, the electronic absorption toward the higher-energy end of the spectrum ([180-220] nm) is enhanced by long-range Coulombic interactions with the water environment. It was verified that by superposing the absorption spectra of different eumelanin building blocks corresponding to the monomers, dimers, and tetramers in liquid water, the behaviour of the experimental spectrum, which is characterised by a nearly monotonic decay from the ultraviolet to the infrared, is qualitatively reproduced. This result is in keeping with a "chemical disorder model," where the broadband absorption of eumelanin pigments is determined by the superposition of the spectra associated with the monomeric and oligomeric building blocks.

  6. The Cellular Building Blocks of Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, J.M.; Doi, A.; Garcia, A.J.; Elsen, F.P.; Koch, H.; Wei, A.D.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory brainstem neurons fulfill critical roles in controlling breathing: they generate the activity patterns for breathing and contribute to various sensory responses including changes in O2 and CO2. These complex sensorimotor tasks depend on the dynamic interplay between numerous cellular building blocks that consist of voltage-, calcium-, and ATP-dependent ionic conductances, various ionotropic and metabotropic synaptic mechanisms, as well as neuromodulators acting on G-protein coupled receptors and second messenger systems. As described in this review, the sensorimotor responses of the respiratory network emerge through the state-dependent integration of all these building blocks. There is no known respiratory function that involves only a small number of intrinsic, synaptic, or modulatory properties. Because of the complex integration of numerous intrinsic, synaptic, and modulatory mechanisms, the respiratory network is capable of continuously adapting to changes in the external and internal environment, which makes breathing one of the most integrated behaviors. Not surprisingly, inspiration is critical not only in the control of ventilation, but also in the context of “inspiring behaviors” such as arousal of the mind and even creativity. Far-reaching implications apply also to the underlying network mechanisms, as lessons learned from the respiratory network apply to network functions in general. PMID:23720262

  7. The cellular building blocks of breathing.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, J M; Doi, A; Garcia, A J; Elsen, F P; Koch, H; Wei, A D

    2012-10-01

    Respiratory brainstem neurons fulfill critical roles in controlling breathing: they generate the activity patterns for breathing and contribute to various sensory responses including changes in O2 and CO2. These complex sensorimotor tasks depend on the dynamic interplay between numerous cellular building blocks that consist of voltage-, calcium-, and ATP-dependent ionic conductances, various ionotropic and metabotropic synaptic mechanisms, as well as neuromodulators acting on G-protein coupled receptors and second messenger systems. As described in this review, the sensorimotor responses of the respiratory network emerge through the state-dependent integration of all these building blocks. There is no known respiratory function that involves only a small number of intrinsic, synaptic, or modulatory properties. Because of the complex integration of numerous intrinsic, synaptic, and modulatory mechanisms, the respiratory network is capable of continuously adapting to changes in the external and internal environment, which makes breathing one of the most integrated behaviors. Not surprisingly, inspiration is critical not only in the control of ventilation, but also in the context of "inspiring behaviors" such as arousal of the mind and even creativity. Far-reaching implications apply also to the underlying network mechanisms, as lessons learned from the respiratory network apply to network functions in general. © 2012 American Physiological Society

  8. Bacterial production of short-chain organic acids and trehalose from levulinic acid: a potential cellulose-derived building block as a feedstock for microbial production.

    PubMed

    Habe, Hiroshi; Sato, Shun; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kirimura, Kohtaro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2015-02-01

    Levulinic acid (LA) is a platform chemical derived from cellulosic biomass, and the expansion of LA utilization as a feedstock is important for production of a wide variety of chemicals. To investigate the potential of LA as a substrate for microbial conversion to chemicals, we isolated and identified LA-utilizing bacteria. Among the six isolated strains, Pseudomonas sp. LA18T and Rhodococcus hoagie LA6W degraded up to 70 g/L LA in a high-cell-density system. The maximal accumulation of acetic acid by strain LA18T and propionic acid by strain LA6W was 13.6 g/L and 9.1 g/L, respectively, after a 4-day incubation. Another isolate, Burkholderia stabilis LA20W, produced trehalose extracellularly in the presence of 40 g/L LA to approximately 2 g/L. These abilities to produce useful compounds supported the potential of microbial LA conversion for future development and cellulosic biomass utilization.

  9. Determining Possible Building Blocks of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; O'Brien, K. M.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: One of the fundamental questions concerning the formation of the Earth is what is it made out of. The Earth appears to have condensed out of material from the solar nebula. We sample this "primitive" material in the form of chondritic meteorites. One of the most important constraints on possible building blocks for the Earth is the Earth#s oxygen iso-topic composition. Rocks from the Earth and Moon plot along a line (the terrestrial fractionation line) in diagrams of delta(sup 17)O (% relative to Standard Mean Ocean Water or SMOW) versus delta(sup 18)O (% relative to SMOW). Chondritic meteorites fall above and below this line. Distances from this line are given as Delta(sup 17)O (%) (= delta(sup 17)O - 0.52 x delta(sup 18)O).

  10. Alkoxyallenes as building blocks for organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Reinhold; Reissig, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-05-07

    Alkoxyallenes are unusually versatile C3 building blocks in organic synthesis. Hence this tutorial review summarizes the most important transformations, including subsequent reactions and their applications in the synthesis of relevant compounds, e.g. natural products. The reactivity patterns involved and the synthons derived from alkoxyallenes are presented. Often alkoxyallenes can serve as substitutes of acrolein or acrolein acetals, utilisation of which has already led to interesting products. Most important is the use of lithiated alkoxyallenes which smoothly react with a variety of electrophiles and lead to products with unique substitution patterns. The heterocycles or carbocycles formed are intermediates for the stereoselective synthesis of natural products or for the preparation of other structurally relevant compounds. The different synthons being put into practice by the use of lithiated alkoxyallenes in these variations will be discussed.

  11. Organ printing: tissue spheroids as building blocks.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Visconti, Richard P; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Forgacs, Gabor; Drake, Christopher J; Markwald, Roger R

    2009-04-01

    Organ printing can be defined as layer-by-layer additive robotic biofabrication of three-dimensional functional living macrotissues and organ constructs using tissue spheroids as building blocks. The microtissues and tissue spheroids are living materials with certain measurable, evolving and potentially controllable composition, material and biological properties. Closely placed tissue spheroids undergo tissue fusion - a process that represents a fundamental biological and biophysical principle of developmental biology-inspired directed tissue self-assembly. It is possible to engineer small segments of an intraorgan branched vascular tree by using solid and lumenized vascular tissue spheroids. Organ printing could dramatically enhance and transform the field of tissue engineering by enabling large-scale industrial robotic biofabrication of living human organ constructs with "built-in" perfusable intraorgan branched vascular tree. Thus, organ printing is a new emerging enabling technology paradigm which represents a developmental biology-inspired alternative to classic biodegradable solid scaffold-based approaches in tissue engineering.

  12. Naphthodithiophenes: emerging building blocks for organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Takimiya, Kazuo; Osaka, Itaru

    2015-02-01

    Linear-fused naphthodithiophenes (NDTs) are emerging building blocks in the development of new semiconducting small molecules, oligomers, and polymers. The promising nature of NDT-based materials as organic semiconductors has been demonstrated by superior device characteristics in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic photovoltaics (OPVs) in the last few years. In particular, it is quite impressive that a power conversion efficiency as high as 8.2% has been achieved for a single-junction OPV cell consisting of NDT-based semiconducting polymers and a fullerene derivative in such a short period of time. Here, we provide an overview of recent synthetic evolutions in NDT chemistry and progress in NDT-based materials, especially conjugated oligomers and polymers and their applications to OFETs and OPVs. Copyright © 2014 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Determining Possible Building Blocks of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; O'Brien, K. M.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: One of the fundamental questions concerning the formation of the Earth is what is it made out of. The Earth appears to have condensed out of material from the solar nebula. We sample this "primitive" material in the form of chondritic meteorites. One of the most important constraints on possible building blocks for the Earth is the Earth#s oxygen iso-topic composition. Rocks from the Earth and Moon plot along a line (the terrestrial fractionation line) in diagrams of delta(sup 17)O (% relative to Standard Mean Ocean Water or SMOW) versus delta(sup 18)O (% relative to SMOW). Chondritic meteorites fall above and below this line. Distances from this line are given as Delta(sup 17)O (%) (= delta(sup 17)O - 0.52 x delta(sup 18)O).

  14. HUBBLE AND KECK DISCOVER GALAXY BUILDING BLOCK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a very small, faint galaxy 'building block' newly discovered by a unique collaboration between ground- and space-based telescopes. Hubble and the 10-meter Keck Telescopes in Hawaii joined forces, using a galaxy cluster which acts as gravitational lens to detect what scientists believe is one of the smallest very distant objects ever found. The galaxy cluster Abell 2218 was used by a team of European and American astronomers led by Richard Ellis (Caltech) in their systematic search for intrinsically faint distant star-forming systems. Without help from Abell 2218's exceptional magnifying power to make objects appear about 30 times brighter, the galaxy building block would have been undetectable. In the image to the right, the object is seen distorted into two nearly identical, very red 'images' by the gravitational lens. The image pair represents the magnified result of a single background object gravitationally lensed by Abell 2218 and viewed at a distance of 13.4 billion light-years. The intriguing object contains only one million stars, far fewer than a mature galaxy, and scientists believe it is very young. Such young star-forming systems of low mass at early cosmic times are likely to be the objects from which present-day galaxies have formed. In the image to the left, the full overview of the galaxy cluster Abell 2218 is seen. This image was taken by Hubble in 1999 at the completion of Hubble Servicing Mission 3A. Credit: NASA, ESA, Richard Ellis (Caltech) and Jean-Paul Kneib (Observatoire Midi-Pyrenees, France) Acknowledgment: NASA, A. Fruchter and the ERO Team (STScI and ST-ECF)

  15. HUBBLE AND KECK DISCOVER GALAXY BUILDING BLOCK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a very small, faint galaxy 'building block' newly discovered by a unique collaboration between ground- and space-based telescopes. Hubble and the 10-meter Keck Telescopes in Hawaii joined forces, using a galaxy cluster which acts as gravitational lens to detect what scientists believe is one of the smallest very distant objects ever found. The galaxy cluster Abell 2218 was used by a team of European and American astronomers led by Richard Ellis (Caltech) in their systematic search for intrinsically faint distant star-forming systems. Without help from Abell 2218's exceptional magnifying power to make objects appear about 30 times brighter, the galaxy building block would have been undetectable. In the image to the right, the object is seen distorted into two nearly identical, very red 'images' by the gravitational lens. The image pair represents the magnified result of a single background object gravitationally lensed by Abell 2218 and viewed at a distance of 13.4 billion light-years. The intriguing object contains only one million stars, far fewer than a mature galaxy, and scientists believe it is very young. Such young star-forming systems of low mass at early cosmic times are likely to be the objects from which present-day galaxies have formed. In the image to the left, the full overview of the galaxy cluster Abell 2218 is seen. This image was taken by Hubble in 1999 at the completion of Hubble Servicing Mission 3A. Credit: NASA, ESA, Richard Ellis (Caltech) and Jean-Paul Kneib (Observatoire Midi-Pyrenees, France) Acknowledgment: NASA, A. Fruchter and the ERO Team (STScI and ST-ECF)

  16. Chiral Perylene Diimides: Building Blocks for Ionic Self‐Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Echue, Geraldine; Lloyd‐Jones, Guy C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A chiral perylene diimide building block has been prepared based on an amine derivative of the amino acid l‐phenylalanine. Detailed studies were carried out into the self‐assembly behaviour of the material in solution and the solid state using UV/Vis, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy. For the charged building block BTPPP, the molecular chirality of the side chains is translated into the chiral supramolecular structure in the form of right‐handed helical aggregates in aqueous solution. Temperature‐dependent UV/Vis studies of BTPPP in aqueous solution showed that the self‐assembly behaviour of this dye can be well described by an isodesmic model in which aggregation occurs to generate short stacks in a reversible manner. Wide‐angle X‐ray diffraction studies (WXRD) revealed that this material self‐organises into aggregates with π–π stacking distances typical for π‐conjugated materials. TEM investigations revealed the formation of self‐assembled structures of low order and with no expression of chirality evident. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarised optical microscopy (POM) were used to investigate the mesophase properties. Optical textures representative of columnar liquid–crystalline phases were observed for solvent‐annealed samples of BTPPP. The high solubility, tunable self‐assembly and chiral ordering of these materials demonstrate their potential as new molecular building blocks for use in the construction of chiro‐optical structures and devices. PMID:25689392

  17. Galactic Building Blocks Seen Swarming Around Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-02-01

    Green Bank, WV - A team of astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) has made the first conclusive detection of what appear to be the leftover building blocks of galaxy formation -- neutral hydrogen clouds -- swarming around the Andromeda Galaxy, the nearest large spiral galaxy to the Milky Way. This discovery may help scientists understand the structure and evolution of the Milky Way and all spiral galaxies. It also may help explain why certain young stars in mature galaxies are surprisingly bereft of the heavy elements that their contemporaries contain. Andromeda Galaxy This image depicts several long-sought galactic "building blocks" in orbit of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). The newfound hydrogen clouds are depicted in a shade of orange (GBT), while gas that comprises the massive hydrogen disk of Andromeda is shown at high-resolution in blue (Westerbork Sythesis Radio Telescope). CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF, WSRT (Click on Image for Larger Version) "Giant galaxies, like Andromeda and our own Milky Way, are thought to form through repeated mergers with smaller galaxies and through the accretion of vast numbers of even lower mass 'clouds' -- dark objects that lack stars and even are too small to call galaxies," said David A. Thilker of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. "Theoretical studies predict that this process of galactic growth continues today, but astronomers have been unable to detect the expected low mass 'building blocks' falling into nearby galaxies, until now." Thilker's research is published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Other contributors include: Robert Braun of the Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy; Rene A.M. Walterbos of New Mexico State University; Edvige Corbelli of the Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri in Italy; Felix J. Lockman and Ronald Maddalena of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virginia; and Edward Murphy of the

  18. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey AREAWAY BETWEEN CELL BLOCK AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey AREAWAY BETWEEN CELL BLOCK AND EXTERIOR WALLS, SOUTH BLOCK, EAST SIDE Lanny Miyamoto, Photographer October 1958 - Baltimore City Jail, 801 Van Buren & East Madison Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  19. Engineering the formation of secondary building blocks within hollow interiors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Liu, Xiao; Ma, Yi; Li, Mingrun; Zhao, Jiao; Xin, Hongchuan; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Yan; Li, Can; Yang, Qihua

    2012-03-15

    Secondary building blocks within the cavities of primary silica-architecture building blocks are successfully engineered. The immobilized surfactant directs the selective dissolution and reassembly of dissolved silicate species for the formation of secondary building blocks (hollow nanospheres/nanorods; see figure). Supported TiO(2) on nanostructures with multilevel interiors is shown to exhibit significantly enhanced activity in photocatalytic H(2) production. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Quaterpyrroles as building blocks for the synthesis of expanded porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Anguera, Gonzalo; Kauffmann, Brice; Borrell, José I; Borrós, Salvador; Sánchez-García, David

    2015-05-01

    A new family of quaterpyrroles and their application as building blocks for the synthesis of macrocycles is reported. The preparation of these quaterpyrroles consisted of two synthetic steps: bromination of 2,2'-bipyrroles bearing two electron-withdrawing groups followed by Suzuki coupling with 1-(tert-butoxycarbonyl)pyrrole-2-boronic acid. The resulting quaterpyrroles have been used to prepare an octaphyrin and a substituted cyclo[8]pyrrole. Additionally, the synthesis of a new macrocycle containing the quaterpyrrole and 2,5-di(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)thiophene moieties is presented.

  1. View of the administration building, cell blocks seven and eight, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the administration building, cell blocks seven and eight, looking from the southwest wall, facing east - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. Building Blocks for Sustainable Communities: Assistance from Grantees

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA awarded Building Blocks for Sustainable Communities grants to four nonprofit organizations with extensive expertise in community sustainability. These organizations deliver technical assistance to communities.

  3. Preparation of Halogenated Fluorescent Diaminophenazine Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Koepf, Matthieu; Lee, Shin Hee; Brennan, Bradley J.; Méndez-Hernández, Dalvin D.; Batista, Victor S.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.

    2015-10-16

    A short, convenient, and scalable protocol for the one-pot synthesis of a series of fluorescent 7,8-dihalo-2,3-diaminophenazines is introduced. The synthetic route is based on the oxidative condensation of 4,5-dihalo-1,2-diaminobenzenes in aqueous conditions. The resulting diaminophenazines could be attractive intermediates for the preparation of polyfunctional phenazines and extended polyheteroacenes. We find that the undesired hydroxylation byproducts, typically obtained in aqueous conditions, are completely suppressed by addition of a stoichiometric amount of acetone during the oxidation step allowing for selective formation of 7,8-dihalo-2,2-dimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]phenazine derivatives with good to excellent yields. Under reductive conditions, the imidazolidine ring can be hydrolyzed into the desired 7,8-dihalo-2,3-diaminophenazines. Furthermore, we report a selective route under highly reducing conditions to monohydrodeaminate the 2,3-di(methylamino) phenazine derivatives, which allows for further structural variations of these phenazine building blocks. All of these derivatives are luminescent, with measured fluorescence quantum-yields of up to 80% in ethanol for the more rigid structures, highlighting the potential of such materials to provide new fluorophores.

  4. In Search of the Ultimate Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerard

    1996-11-01

    From 1960 until 1990 theoretical physicists and experimentalists worked together to probe deeper and deeper into the basic structure of matter, moving closer to an understanding of the ultimate building blocks of the universe. Gerard 't Hooft was closely involved in many of the advances in modern theoretical physics that led to improved understanding of elementary particles, and this is a first-hand account of one of the most creative and exciting periods of discovery in the history of physics. Using language a layperson can understand, this narrative touches on many central topics and ideas, such as quarks and quantum physics; supergravity, superstrings and superconductivity; the Standard Model and grand unification; eleven-dimensional space time and black holes. This fascinating personal account of the past thirty years in one of the most dramatic areas in twentieth-century physics will be of interest to professional physicists and physics students, as well as the educated general reader with an interest in one of the most exciting scientific detective stories ever.

  5. Building Blocks: Enmeshing Technology and Creativity with Artistic Pedagogical Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Katherine J.; Perry, Beth; Edwards, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Using the analogy of children's building blocks, the reader is guided through the results of a research study that explored the use of three Artistic Pedagogical Technologies (APTs). "Building blocks" was the major theme that emerged from the data. Sub-themes included developing community, enhancing creativity, and risk taking. The…

  6. Trihaloethenes as versatile building blocks for organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Adriana S; Magauer, Thomas

    2016-06-15

    This review highlights the chemistry of trihaloethene building blocks with a special focus on commercially available 1,1,2-trichloroethene. The topics surveyed herein include the use of trihaloethenes as C2-building blocks for transition metal-catalyzed coupling reactions, addition, elimination and cycloaddition reactions as well as natural product syntheses.

  7. Countering Depression with the Five Building Blocks of Resilience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotberg, Edith H.

    1999-01-01

    Provides strategies for reducing the risk of youth retreating into depression when faced with adversities in life, by helping them develop the building blocks of resilience (trust, autonomy, initiative, industry, identity). Reports that these building blocks have proven effective in fostering and strengthening resilience. (Author/JDM)

  8. Data Policy Construction Set - Building Blocks from Childhood Constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Dirk; Paul-Stueve, Thilo; Jobmann, Alexandra; Farrenkopf, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    A complete construction set of building blocks usually comes with instructions and these instruction include building stages. The products of these building stages usually build from very general parts become highly specialized building parts for very unique features of the whole construction model. This sounds very much like the construction or organization of an interdisciplinary research project, institution or association, doesn't it! The creation process of an overarching data policy for a project group or institution is exactly the combination of individual interests with the common goal of a collaborative data policy and can be compared with the building stages of a construction set of building blocks and the building instructions. Keeping this in mind we created the data policy construction set of textual building blocks. This construction set is subdivided into several building stages or parts each containing multiple building blocks as text blocks. By combining building blocks of all subdivisions it is supposed to create a cascading data policy document. Cascading from the top level as a construction set provider for all further down existing levels such as project, themes, work packages or Universities, faculties, institutes down to the working level of working groups. The working groups are picking from the remaining building blocks in the provided construction set the suitable blocks for its working procedures to create a very specific policy from the available construction set provided by the top level community. Nevertheless, if a working group realized that there are missing building blocks or worse that there are missing building parts, then they have the chance to add the missing pieces to the construction set of direct an future use. This cascading approach enables project or institution wide application of the encoded rules from the textual level on access to data storage infrastructure. This structured approach is flexible enough to allow for

  9. Microporous solids designed from molecular building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Charles Earnest

    The synthesis, characterization, and application of porous materials has experienced explosive growth in the last fifty years. An increased number of technologies are based on the unique properties of rigid, open framework solids in areas such as molecular and ionic separations, sensors, and catalysts. However, until recently, the only well characterized solids that have seen extensive application were metal oxide frameworks such as the aluminosilicate zeolites and aluminophosphates. The syntheses of these materials have lacked the ability to design and control the properties of the solid. Therefore, this work has focused on the concept of directed synthesis employing molecular building blocks in an attempt to tailor open framework systems based on simple chemical functionality. Towards this goal, highly symmetric molecular species with well defined reactive sites have been polymerized through metal centers in the presence of templating agents and potential guests. Highly crystalline solids were obtained using a variety of techniques including vapor and gel diffusion, recrystallization, and hydrothermal synthesis. Complete characterization of the structure and properties has been achieved using elemental microanalysis, infrared spectroscopy, powder and single crystal x-ray analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and gas chromatography. These new materials are based on the linking of germanium sulfide cages and polycarboxylic aromatic rings with transition metal ions. The fundamental problems of interpenetrating networks, poor structural rigidity in the absence of guests, and low crystallinity have been overcome to produce highly selective, stable frameworks capable of ion exchange, molecular selectivity, and potentially catalysis. Furthermore, the concept of selectivity based on electronic character and functionality has been introduced and demonstrated. This unique property is believed to be the result of metal center accessibility in

  10. NANOSTRUCTURED METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS VIA BUILDING BLOCK SYNTHESES

    SciTech Connect

    Craig E. Barnes

    2013-03-05

    A broadly applicable methodology has been developed to prepare new single site catalysts on silica supports. This methodology requires of three critical components: a rigid building block that will be the main structural and compositional component of the support matrix; a family of linking reagents that will be used to insert active metals into the matrix as well as cross link building blocks into a three dimensional matrix; and a clean coupling reaction that will connect building blocks and linking agents together in a controlled fashion. The final piece of conceptual strategy at the center of this methodology involves dosing the building block with known amounts of linking agents so that the targeted connectivity of a linking center to surrounding building blocks is obtained. Achieving targeted connectivities around catalytically active metals in these building block matrices is a critical element of the strategy by which single site catalysts are obtained. This methodology has been demonstrated with a model system involving only silicon and then with two metal-containing systems (titanium and vanadium). The effect that connectivity has on the reactivity of atomically dispersed titanium sites in silica building block matrices has been investigated in the selective oxidation of phenols to benezoquinones. 2-connected titanium sites are found to be five times as active (i.e. initial turnover frequencies) than 4-connected titanium sites (i.e. framework titanium sites).

  11. Supramolecular Hydrogels Made of the Basic Biological Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xuewen; Zhou, Jie; Xu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    As a consequence of the self-assembly of small organic molecules in water, supramolecular hydrogels are evolving from serendipitous events during organic synthesis to become a new type of materials that promise increased applications in biomedicine. In this focus review, we describe the recent development on the use of basic biological building blocks for creating molecules that act as hydrogelators and the potential applications of the corresponding hydrogels. After introducing the concept of supramolecular hydrogels and defining the scope of this review, we briefly describe the methods for making and characterizing supramolecular hydrogels. Then, we discuss representative hydrogelators according to the categories of their building blocks, such as amino acids, nucleobases, and saccharides, and highlight the applications of the hydrogels when necessary. Finally, we offer our perspectives and outlooks on this fast-growing field at the interface of organic chemistry, materials, biology, and medicine. By providing a snapshot for chemists, engineers, and medical scientists, we hope that this focus review will contribute to the development of multidisciplinary research on supramolecular hydrogels for a wide range of applications in different fields. PMID:24623474

  12. CYP703 Is an Ancient Cytochrome P450 in Land Plants Catalyzing in-Chain Hydroxylation of Lauric Acid to Provide Building Blocks for Sporopollenin Synthesis in Pollen[W

    PubMed Central

    Morant, Marc; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Schaller, Hubert; Pinot, Franck; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle; Bak, Søren

    2007-01-01

    CYP703 is a cytochrome P450 family specific to land plants. Typically, each plant species contains a single CYP703. Arabidopsis thaliana CYP703A2 is expressed in the anthers of developing flowers. Expression is initiated at the tetrad stage and restricted to microspores and to the tapetum cell layer. Arabidopsis CYP703A2 knockout lines showed impaired pollen development and a partial male-sterile phenotype. Scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy of pollen from the knockout plants showed impaired pollen wall development with absence of exine. The fluorescent layer around the pollen grains ascribed to the presence of phenylpropanoid units in sporopollenin was absent in the CYP703A2 knockout lines. Heterologous expression of CYP703A2 in yeast cells demonstrated that CYP703 catalyzes the conversion of medium-chain saturated fatty acids to the corresponding monohydroxylated fatty acids, with a preferential hydroxylation of lauric acid at the C-7 position. Incubation of recombinant CYP703 with methanol extracts from developing flowers confirmed that lauric acid and in-chain hydroxy lauric acids are the in planta substrate and product, respectively. These data demonstrate that in-chain hydroxy lauric acids are essential building blocks in sporopollenin synthesis and enable the formation of ester and ether linkages with phenylpropanoid units. This study identifies CYP703 as a P450 family specifically involved in pollen development. PMID:17496121

  13. New 1:1 and 2:1 salts in the `DL-norvaline-maleic acid' system as an example of assembling various crystal structures from similar supramolecular building blocks.

    PubMed

    Arkhipov, Sergey G; Losev, Evgeniy A; Boldyreva, Elena V

    2017-01-01

    Molecular salts and cocrystals of amino acids have potential applications as molecular materials with nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, piezoelectric, and other various target physical properties. The wide choice of amino acids and coformers makes it possible to design various crystal structures. The amino acid-maleic acid system provides a perfect example of a rich variety of crystal structures with different stoichiometries, symmetries and packing motifs built from the molecular building blocks, which are either exactly the same, or differ merely by protonation or as optical isomers. The present paper reports the crystal structures of two new salts of the DL-norvaline-maleic acid system with 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries, namely DL-norvalinium hydrogen maleate, C5H12NO2(+)·C4H3O4(-), (I), and DL-norvalinium hydrogen maleate-DL-norvaline, C5H12NO2(+)·C4H3O4(-)·C5H11NO2, (II). These are the first examples of molecular salts of DL-norvaline with an organic anion. The crystal structure of (I) has the same C2(2)(12) structure-forming motif which is common for hydrogen maleates of amino acids. The structure of (II) has dimeric cations. Of special interest is that the single crystals of (I) which are originally formed on crystallization from aqueous solution transform into single crystals of (II) if stored in the mother liquor for several hours.

  14. Ionization of amphiphilic acidic block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Colombani, Olivier; Lejeune, Elise; Charbonneau, Céline; Chassenieux, Christophe; Nicolai, Taco

    2012-06-28

    The ionization behavior of an amphiphilic diblock copolymer poly(n-butyl acrylate(50%)-stat-acrylic acid(50%))(100)-block-poly(acrylic acid)(100) (P(nBA(50%)-stat-AA(50%))(100)-b-PAA(100), DH50) and of its equivalent triblock copolymer P(nBA(50%)-stat-AA(50%))(100)-b-PAA(200)-b-P(nBA(50%)-stat-AA(50%))(100) (TH50) were studied by potentiometric titration either in pure water or in 0.5 M NaCl. These polymers consist of a hydrophilic acidic block (PAA) connected to a hydrophobic block, P(nBA(50%)-stat-AA(50%))(100), whose hydrophobic character has been mitigated by copolymerization with hydrophilic units. We show that all AA units, even those in the hydrophobic block could be ionized. However, the AA units within the hydrophobic block were less acidic than those in the hydrophilic block, resulting in the preferential ionization of the latter block. The preferential ionization of PAA over that of P(nBA(50%)-stat-AA(50%))(100) was stronger at higher ionic strength. Remarkably, the covalent bonds between the PAA and P(nBA(50%)-stat-AA(50%))(100) blocks in the diblock or the triblock did not affect the ionization of each block, although the self-association of the block copolymers into spherical aggregates modified the environment of the PAA blocks compared to when PAA was molecularly dispersed.

  15. DNA Building Blocks Can Be Made in Space

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA-funded researchers have evidence that some building blocks of DNA, the molecule that carries the genetic instructions for life, found in meteorites were likely created in space. The research g...

  16. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey NORTH CELL BLOCK, WEST SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey NORTH CELL BLOCK, WEST SIDE Blakeslee-Lane, Photographer October 1958 - Baltimore City Jail, 801 Van Buren & East Madison Streets, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  17. Big Questions: The Ultimate Building Blocks of Matter

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Standard Model of particle physics treats quarks and leptons as having no size at all. Quarks are found inside protons and neutrons and the most familiar lepton is the electron. While the best measurements to date support that idea, there is circumstantial evidence that suggests that perhaps the these tiny particles might be composed of even smaller building blocks. This video explains this circumstantial evidence and introduces some very basic ideas of what those building blocks might be.

  18. Big Questions: The Ultimate Building Blocks of Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-11-06

    The Standard Model of particle physics treats quarks and leptons as having no size at all. Quarks are found inside protons and neutrons and the most familiar lepton is the electron. While the best measurements to date support that idea, there is circumstantial evidence that suggests that perhaps the these tiny particles might be composed of even smaller building blocks. This video explains this circumstantial evidence and introduces some very basic ideas of what those building blocks might be.

  19. A Difluorobenzoxadiazole Building Block for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Li, Yunke; Hunt, Adrian; Zhang, Jianquan; Yao, Huatong; Li, Zhengke; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Fei; Ade, Harald; Yan, He

    2016-03-02

    A difluorobenzoxadiazole building block is synthesized and utilized to construct a conjugated polymer leading to high-performance thick-film polymer solar cells with a V(OC) of 0.88 V and a power conversion efficiency of 9.4%. This new building block can be used in many possible polymer structures for various organic electro-nic applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Building Trades. Block III. Floor Framing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This document contains three units of a course on floor framing to be used as part of a building trades program. Each unit consists, first, of an informational lesson, with complete lesson plan for the teacher's use. Included in each lesson plan are the lesson aim; lists of teaching aids, materials, references, and prerequisites for students;…

  1. Building Trades. Block III. Floor Framing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This document contains three units of a course on floor framing to be used as part of a building trades program. Each unit consists, first, of an informational lesson, with complete lesson plan for the teacher's use. Included in each lesson plan are the lesson aim; lists of teaching aids, materials, references, and prerequisites for students;…

  2. The 10 Building Blocks of High-Performing Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Bodenheimer, Thomas; Ghorob, Amireh; Willard-Grace, Rachel; Grumbach, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Our experiences studying exemplar primary care practices, and our work assisting other practices to become more patient centered, led to a formulation of the essential elements of primary care, which we call the 10 building blocks of high-performing primary care. The building blocks include 4 foundational elements—engaged leadership, data-driven improvement, empanelment, and team-based care—that assist the implementation of the other 6 building blocks—patient-team partnership, population management, continuity of care, prompt access to care, comprehensiveness and care coordination, and a template of the future. The building blocks, which represent a synthesis of the innovative thinking that is transforming primary care in the United States, are both a description of existing high-performing practices and a model for improvement. PMID:24615313

  3. Intercultural Communication Activities in the Classroom: Turning Stumbling Blocks into Building Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Randy K.

    This paper explores behavior patterns that inhibit effective communication in everyday, educational, and business cross-cultural settings. Opportunities to change these inhibiting patterns, metaphorically referred to as "stumbling blocks," into building blocks or tools for successful intercultural understandings are discussed in the…

  4. MECs: "Building Blocks" for Creating Biological and Chemical Instruments.

    PubMed

    Hill, Douglas A; Anderson, Lindsey E; Hill, Casey J; Mostaghim, Afshin; Rodgers, Victor G J; Grover, William H

    2016-01-01

    The development of new biological and chemical instruments for research and diagnostic applications is often slowed by the cost, specialization, and custom nature of these instruments. New instruments are built from components that are drawn from a host of different disciplines and not designed to integrate together, and once built, an instrument typically performs a limited number of tasks and cannot be easily adapted for new applications. Consequently, the process of inventing new instruments is very inefficient, especially for researchers or clinicians in resource-limited settings. To improve this situation, we propose that a family of standardized multidisciplinary components is needed, a set of "building blocks" that perform a wide array of different tasks and are designed to integrate together. Using these components, scientists, engineers, and clinicians would be able to build custom instruments for their own unique needs quickly and easily. In this work we present the foundation of this set of components, a system we call Multifluidic Evolutionary Components (MECs). "Multifluidic" conveys the wide range of fluid volumes MECs operate upon (from nanoliters to milliliters and beyond); "multi" also reflects the multiple disciplines supported by the system (not only fluidics but also electronics, optics, and mechanics). "Evolutionary" refers to the design principles that enable the library of MEC parts to easily grow and adapt to new applications. Each MEC "building block" performs a fundamental function that is commonly found in biological or chemical instruments, functions like valving, pumping, mixing, controlling, and sensing. Each MEC also has a unique symbol linked to a physical definition, which enables instruments to be designed rapidly and efficiently using schematics. As a proof-of-concept, we use MECs to build a variety of instruments, including a fluidic routing and mixing system capable of manipulating fluid volumes over five orders of magnitude, an

  5. Building blocks of the Milky Way's accreted spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oirschot, Pim; Starkenburg, Else; Helmi, Amina; Nelemans, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    In the Λcold dark matter model of structure formation, a stellar spheroid grows by the assembly of smaller galaxies, the so-called building blocks. Combining the Munich-Groningen semi-analytical model of galaxy formation with the high-resolution Aquarius simulations of dark matter haloes, we study the assembly history of the stellar spheroids of six Milky Way-mass galaxies, focusing on building block properties such as mass, age and metallicity. These properties are compared to those of the surviving satellites in the same models. We find that the building blocks have higher star formation rates on average, and this is especially the case for the more massive objects. At high redshift, these dominate in star formation over the satellites, whose star formation time-scales are longer on average. These differences ought to result in a larger α-element enhancement from Type II supernovae in the building blocks (compared to the satellites) by the time Type Ia supernovae would start to enrich them in iron, explaining the observational trends. Interestingly, there are some variations in the star formation time-scales of the building blocks amongst the simulated haloes, indicating that [α/Fe] abundances in spheroids of other galaxies might differ from those in our own Milky Way.

  6. Planetary Building Blocks Found in Surprising Place

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This graph of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows that an extraordinarily low-mass brown dwarf, or 'failed star,' is circled by a disc of planet-building dust. The brown dwarf, called OTS 44, is only 15 times the mass of Jupiter, making it the smallest known brown dwarf to host a planet-forming disc.

    Spitzer was able to see this unusual disc by measuring its infrared brightness. Whereas a brown dwarf without a disc (red dashed line) radiates infrared light at shorter wavelengths, a brown dwarf with a disc (orange line) gives off excess infrared light at longer wavelengths. This surplus light comes from the disc itself and is represented here as a yellow dotted line. Actual data points from observations of OTS 44 are indicated with orange dots. These data were acquired using Spitzer's infrared array camera.

  7. Synthesis and alkylation of aza-glycinyl dipeptide building blocks.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ramos, Yesica; Lubell, William D

    2013-12-01

    Aza-glycinyl dipeptides are useful building blocks for the synthesis of a diverse array of azapeptides. The construction of the aza-glycine residue is however challenging, because of the potential for side reactions, such as those leading to formation of oxadiazalone, hydantoin and symmetric urea by-products. Employing N,N'-disuccinimidyl carbonate to activate benzophenone hydrazone, we have developed a more efficient approach for the synthesis of aza-glycinyl dipeptides. Alkylation of the semicarbazone of the resulting protected aza-glycinyl dipeptides using tetraethylammonium hydroxide and propargyl bromide provided an efficient entry into the aza-propargylglycinyl peptide building blocks, which have served previously in various reactions including Sonogashira cross-couplings, dipolar cycloadditions and intramolecular exo-dig cycloadditions to furnish a variety of azapeptide building blocks.

  8. Principles of nanostructure design with protein building blocks.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Zheng, Jie; Zanuy, David; Haspel, Nurit; Wolfson, Haim; Alemán, Carlos; Nussinov, Ruth

    2007-07-01

    Currently there is increasing interest in nanostructures and their design. Nanostructure design involves the ability to predictably manipulate the properties of the self-assembly of autonomous units. Autonomous units have preferred conformational states. The units can be synthetic material science-based or derived from functional biological macromolecules. Autonomous biological building blocks with available structures provide an extremely rich and useful resource for design. For proteins, the structural databases contain large libraries of protein molecules and their building blocks with a range of shapes, surfaces, and chemical properties. The introduction of engineered synthetic residues or short peptides into these can expand the available chemical space and enhance the desired properties. Here we focus on the principles of nanostructure design with protein building blocks.

  9. Sodium phosphaethynolate as a building block for heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodan; Alidori, Simone; Puschmann, Florian Frank; Santiso-Quinones, Gustavo; Benkő, Zoltán; Li, Zhongshu; Becker, Gerd; Grützmacher, Hans-Friedrich; Grützmacher, Hansjörg

    2014-02-03

    Phosphorus-containing heterocycles have evolved from laboratory curiosities to functional components, such as ligands in catalytically active metal complexes or molecular constituents in electronic devices. The straightforward synthesis of functionalized heterocycles on a larger scale remains a challenge. Herein, we report the use of the phosphaethynolate (OCP)(-) anion as a building block for various sterically unprotected and functionalized hydroxy substituted phosphorus heterocycles. Because the resulting heterocycles are themselves anions, they are building blocks in their own right and allow further facile functionalization. This property may be of interest in coordination chemistry and material science.

  10. Determining Possible Building Blocks of the Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; OBrien, K. M.

    2004-01-01

    One of the fundamental questions concerning planetary formation is exactly what material did the planets form from? All the planets in our solar system are believed to have formed out of material from the solar nebula. Chondritic meteorites appear to sample this primitive material. Chondritic meteorites are generally classified into 13 major groups, which have a variety of compositions. Detailed studies of possible building blocks of the terrestrial planets require samples that can be used to estimate the bulk chemistry of these bodies. This study will focus on trying to determine possible building blocks of Earth and Mars since samples of these two planets can be studied in detail in the laboratory.

  11. Large space erectable structures - building block structures study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. H.; Skoumal, D. E.; Straayer, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A modular planar truss structure and a long slender boom concept identified as building block approaches to construction of large spacecraft configurations are described. The concepts are compatible in weight and volume goals with the Space Transportation System, use standard structural units, and represent high on-orbit productivity in terms of structural area or beam length. Results of structural trade studies involving static and dynamic analyses of a single module and rigid body deployment analyses to assess kinetics and kinematics of automatic deployment of the building block modules are presented.

  12. Isolated galaxies: residual of primordial building blocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galletta, G.; Rodighiero, G.; Bettoni, D.; Moles, M.; Varela, J.

    2006-09-01

    Context: .The mass assembly is believed to be the dominant process of early galaxy formation. This mechanism of galaxy building can proceed either by repeated major mergers with other systems, or by means of accretion of matter from the surrounding regions. Aims: .In this paper we compare the properties of local disk galaxies that appear isolated, i.e., not tidally affected by other galaxies during the last few Gyr within the volume given by cz≤ 5000 km s-1, with those galaxies at z values from 0.25 to 5. Methods: .Effective radii for 203 isolated galaxies and 1645 galaxies from the RC3 have been collected and the two samples have been analyzed statistically. A similar comparison has been made with half light radii studied at high z from the literature. Results: .We found that isolated galaxies are, in general, smaller than other present epoch galaxies from the RC3. We notice the lack of systems larger than 7 kpc among them. Their size distribution appears to be similar to that of galaxies at 1.4 ≤ z ≤ 2. The models of the merging history also indicate that the isolated galaxies did stop their merging process at about that redshift, evolving passively since then. The galaxy density seems to have remained unchanged since that epoch Conclusions: .Isolated galaxies appear to be the end products of the merging process, as proposed by the hierarchical accretion scenario at around z=1.4. For this class of galaxies, this was the last significant merging event in their lives, and they have evolved passively since then. This is confirmed by the analytical estimate of the merging fraction with z and by the comparison with sizes of distant galaxies.

  13. Charge-tunable indium-organic frameworks built from cationic, anionic, and neutral building blocks.

    PubMed

    Bu, Fei; Lin, Qipu; Zhai, Quan-Guo; Bu, Xianhui; Feng, Pingyun

    2015-10-14

    By using the same ligand, 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDA), and varying synthetic conditions (especially the In(3+)/FDA ratio), it is possible to access three unique building blocks of indium, demonstrating charge-switching from a positive trimer to a negative monomer and leading to the synthesis of In-MOFs with tunable framework charge.

  14. QM Computations on Complete Nucleic Acids Building Blocks: Analysis of the Sarcin-Ricin RNA Motif Using DFT-D3, HF-3c, PM6-D3H, and MM Approaches.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Holger; Havrila, Marek; Šponer, Jiřı

    2014-06-10

    A set of conformations obtained from explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Sarcin-Ricin internal loop (SRL) RNA motif is investigated using quantum mechanical (QM, TPSS-D3/def2-TZVP DFT-D3) and molecular mechanics (MM, AMBER parm99bsc0+χol3 force field) methods. Solvent effects are approximated using implicit solvent methods (COSMO for DFT-D3; GB and PB for MM). Large-scale DFT-D3 optimizations of the full 11-nucleotide motif are compared to MM results and reveal a higher flexibility of DFT-D3 over the MM in the optimization procedure. Conformational energies of the SRL motif expose significant differences in the DFT-D3 and MM energy descriptions that explain difficulties in MD simulations of the SRL motif. The TPSS-D3 data are in excellent agreement with results obtained by the hybrid functionals PW6B95-D3 and M06-2X. Computationally more efficient methods such as PM6-D3H and HF-3c show promising but partly inconsistent results. It is demonstrated that large-scale DFT-D3 computations on complete nucleic acids building blocks are a viable tool to complement the picture obtained from MD simulations and can be used as benchmarks for faster computational methods. Methodological challenges of large-scale QM computations on nucleic acids such as missing solvent-solute interactions and the truncation of the studied systems are discussed.

  15. Origami-inspired building block and parametric design for mechanical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Ma, Hua; Feng, Mingde; Yan, Leilei; Wang, Jiafu; Wang, Jun; Qu, Shaobo

    2016-08-01

    An origami-based building block of mechanical metamaterials is proposed and explained by introducing a mechanism model based on its geometry. According to our model, this origami mechanism supports response to uniaxial tension that depends on structure parameters. Hence, its mechanical properties can be tunable by adjusting the structure parameters. Experiments for poly lactic acid (PLA) samples were carried out, and the results are in good agreement with those of finite element analysis (FEA). This work may be useful for designing building blocks of mechanical metamaterials or other complex mechanical structures.

  16. Statistical analysis of atmospheric turbulence about a simulated block building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steely, S. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An array of towers instrumented to measure the three components of wind speed was used to study atmospheric flow about a simulated block building. Two-point spacetime correlations of the longitudinal velocity component were computed along with two-point spatial correlations. These correlations are in good agreement with fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics. The two-point spatial correlations computed directly were compared with correlations predicted by Taylor's hypothesis and excellent agreement was obtained at the higher levels which were out of the building influence. The correlations fall off significantly in the building wake but recover beyond the wake to essentially the same values in the undisturbed, higher regions.

  17. Synthesis and Minisci Reactions of Organotrifluoroborato Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Presset, Marc; Fleury-Brégeot, Nicolas; Oehlrich, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Copper-catalyzed borylation of a variety of organic halides with bis(pinacolato)diboron allows the preparation of diverse potassium organotrifluoroborates. The reactions are mild and general, providing access to a variety of interesting, boron-containing building blocks, including those containing piperidine, pyrrole, azetidine, tetrahydropyran and oxetane substructures. Representative Minisci reactions are reported for select examples. PMID:23594305

  18. Using Building-Block Puzzles to Practice Drawing Organic Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdik, Ender

    2005-01-01

    A study uses a thought-provoking, pencil-and-paper activity to aid students in writing organic reaction mechanisms. Organic and functional groups that constitute the formulas of organic and inorganic reactants, ionic intermediates, and products are presented as building blocks, which must be placed correctly in a given puzzle so that they bind…

  19. Building Blocks for Transport-Class Hybrid and Turboelectric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Amy; Bowman, Cheryl; Jansen, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    NASA has been investing in research efforts to define potential vehicles that use hybrid and turboelectric propulsion to enable savings in fuel burn and carbon usage. This paper overviews the fundamental building blocks that have been derived from those studies and details what key performance parameters have been defined, what key ground and flight tests need to occur, and highlights progress toward each.

  20. Helical organic nanotubes from simple chiral building blocks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Huang, Kun; Pao, Chih-Ning; Hu, Zuming; Lu, Yunfeng

    2013-10-01

    Utilizing simple organic chiral (S)-(-)- and (R)-(+)- 1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diamino as building blocks, one-dimensional chiral nanofibers/tubes were assembled via a simple process. Morphology and structure of the building blocks and the assemblies were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), while formation and properties of the assemblies were studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Circular dichroism (CD) spectropolarimeter. Results show that left-handed and right-handed nanofibers were successfully assembled via this method, and the structure and morphology of the assembled nanofibers are heavily dependent on assembling conditions and intrinsic molecular information of the building blocks. Additionally, water contact angle measurements were conducted to investigate surface wetting properties of the nanotubes, indicating a superhydrophobic surface and the possibility of achieving novel and additional properties by assembling building blocks into an ordered supermolecular structure. This work provides a simple method to prepare helical organic nanomaterials of interest for various applications.

  1. Phytoproteins in green leaves as building blocks for photosynthesis of gold nanoparticles: An efficient electrocatalyst towards the oxidation of ascorbic acid and the reduction of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Megarajan, Sengan; Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Rajendra Kumar Reddy, G; Suresh Kumar, P; Anbazhagan, Veerappan

    2016-02-01

    Herein, we present a simple and green method for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using the phytoproteins of spinach leaves. Under ambient sunlight irradiation, the isolated phytoprotein complex from spinach leaves reduces the gold chloride aqueous solution and stabilizes the formed AuNPs. As prepared nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS). The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) maximum for AuNPs was observed at 520 nm. The zeta potential value estimated for the AuNPs is -27.0 mV, indicating that the NPs are well separated. Transmission electron micrographs revealed that the particles are spherical in nature with the size range from 10 to 15 nm. AuNPs act as a catalyst in the degradation of an azo dye, methyl orange in an aqueous environment. The reduction rate was determined to be pseudo-first order. Electrocatalytic efficiency of the synthesized AuNPs via this green approach was studied by chronoamperometry using ascorbic acid and hydrogen peroxide as a model compound for oxidation and reduction, respectively. Electrocatalytic studies indicate that the gold nanoparticles can be used to detect ascorbic acid and hydrogen peroxide in micromolar concentrations with response time less than 3s.

  2. A building block approach towards novel nonlinear optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, Ajit

    The purpose of the present research is to develop and apply a building block approach towards the design of novel nonlinear optical (NLO) materials, capable of exhibiting enhanced Two-Photon Absorption (TPA) behavior. These materials have potential applications in biological imaging, microfabrication, sensing, photodynamic cancer therapy, optical limiting and ultrafast switching. Electronic structure, symmetry and intermolecular forces are vital for designing the right building block. The next step is to connect them to form macromolecules. However, besides covalent bonding, aggregation and self assembly of building blocks can also be utilized, which renders the strategies for materials design less reliant on chemical synthesis. The application of building block approach was illustrated using several examples, including rigid, two-dimensional architectures. These enabled the investigation of macrostructures that were synthetically inaccessible as well as demonstrated the influence of symmetry on TPA behavior. Electronic coupling between building blocks and excited state dynamics were the observed reasons for enhanced TPA. In an attempt to investigate strong coupling that would extend over the entire chromophore, novel "endless" nano-cavities were examined for their TPA behavior. Using the tools of ultrafast spectroscopy, complete delocalization was proved in these materials. Similar enhancement in giant porphyrin macrocycles, which mimic natural light harvesting systems, was observed. Another approach to harness the coupling between small building blocks in a synergistic fashion is to arrange them into branched architectures. The influence of pi-character of branching units on the charge transfer character, which in turn influences the TPA behavior, was examined. Using excited state studies, not only was it observed that alkene pi-bridging resulted in enhancement of TPA behavior over alkyne pi-bridging, but also the mechanism for cooperative enhancement upon

  3. One-step synthesis of functional pNR/rGO composite as a building block for enhanced ascorbic acid biosensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Zhai, Junfeng; Zhu, Chengzhou; Han, Lei; Ren, Wen; Dong, Shaojun

    2017-08-15

    An electrochemical sensor for ascorbic acid (AA) was prepared via an one-step electrochemical approach by reducing graphene oxide (rGO) and co-polymerizing neutral red (NR) and rGO to form a pNR/rGO hybrid film on the glassy carbon electrode (pNR/rGO-GCE). Structures and properties of the obtained pNR/rGO film were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and UV-vis techniques. A significant decrease of charge-transfer resistance (Rct) from over 20,000 Ω for pNR-GCE to 130 Ω for pNR/rGO-GCE was validated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement. Particularly, electrochemical data revealed that pNR/rGO film could effectively enhance the electron transfer between AA and electrode, and thus reduce the overpotential of AA oxidation. Two linear regression areas with 0.05-0.75 mM and 0.9-24.9 mM, detection limit with 1.4 μM, and stability over 2 weeks were obtained. The coexisting distractions such as dopamine, uric acid and glucose were detected and eliminated. Moreover, the pNR/rGO-GCE gave the same determination results as that obtained with HPLC when measuring real samples, including vitamin C beverage and human serum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesis of novel enantiopure fluorinated building blocks from acyclic chiral allylsilanes.

    PubMed

    Tredwell, Matthew; Tenza, Kenny; Pacheco, Ma Carmen; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2005-09-29

    [reaction: see text] Homochiral beta-fluorinated gamma,delta-unsaturated carboxylic acids with an allylic fluorinated stereogenic center are available from the corresponding enantiopure allylsilanes. The key step for introduction of the fluorine substituent is an electrophilic fluorodesilylation reaction carried out in the presence of Selectfluor. Reduction of the resulting beta-fluorinated pentenoic acid into the corresponding fluorinated alcohol was also performed leading to the formation of an enantiopure second-generation fluorinated building block.

  5. COMPRESSOR BUILDING, TRA626. ELEVATIONS. WINDOWS. WALL SECTIONS. PUMICE BLOCK BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    COMPRESSOR BUILDING, TRA-626. ELEVATIONS. WINDOWS. WALL SECTIONS. PUMICE BLOCK BUILDING HOUSED COMPRESSORS FOR AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION EXPERIMENTS. MTR-626-IDO-2S, 3/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0626-00-396-110535, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Effective Light Directed Assembly of Building Blocks with Microscale Control.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Ngoc-Duy; Luo, Rongcong; Christine, Maria Tankeh Asuncion; Lin, Weikang Nicholas; Shih, Wei-Chuan; Goh, James Cho-Hong; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2017-06-01

    Light-directed forces have been widely used to pattern micro/nanoscale objects with precise control, forming functional assemblies. However, a substantial laser intensity is required to generate sufficient optical gradient forces to move a small object in a certain direction, causing limited throughput for applications. A high-throughput light-directed assembly is demonstrated as a printing technology by introducing gold nanorods to induce thermal convection flows that move microparticles (diameter = 40 µm to several hundreds of micrometers) to specific light-guided locations, forming desired patterns. With the advantage of effective light-directed assembly, the microfluidic-fabricated monodispersed biocompatible microparticles are used as building blocks to construct a structured assembly (≈10 cm scale) in ≈2 min. The control with microscale precision is approached by changing the size of the laser light spot. After crosslinking assembly of building blocks, a novel soft material with wanted pattern is approached. To demonstrate its application, the mesenchymal stem-cell-seeded hydrogel microparticles are prepared as functional building blocks to construct scaffold-free tissues with desired structures. This light-directed fabrication method can be applied to integrate different building units, enabling the bottom-up formation of materials with precise control over their internal structure for bioprinting, tissue engineering, and advanced manufacturing. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Adolescent Boys' and Girls' Block Constructions Differ in Structural Balance: A Block-Building Characteristic Related to Math Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Beth M.; Pezaris, Elizabeth E.; Bassi, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Two studies were conducted on block building in adolescents, assessing middle school (Study 1) and high school students (Study 2). Students were asked to build something interesting with blocks. In both samples, the same pattern of gender differences were found; boys built taller structures than girls, and balanced a larger number of blocks on a…

  8. Adolescent Boys' and Girls' Block Constructions Differ in Structural Balance: A Block-Building Characteristic Related to Math Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Beth M.; Pezaris, Elizabeth E.; Bassi, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Two studies were conducted on block building in adolescents, assessing middle school (Study 1) and high school students (Study 2). Students were asked to build something interesting with blocks. In both samples, the same pattern of gender differences were found; boys built taller structures than girls, and balanced a larger number of blocks on a…

  9. Development of potential manufacturing routes for substituted thiophenes--preparation of halogenated 2-thiophenecarboxylic acid derivatives as building blocks for a new family of 2,6-dihaloaryl 1,2,4-triazole insecticides.

    PubMed

    Hull, John W; Romer, Duane R; Podhorez, David E; Ash, Mezzie L; Brady, Christine H

    2007-09-04

    readily converted to the acid chloride 2 with SOCl2. The successful development of efficient synthetic routes to the halogenated thiophene building blocks 4-bromo-3-methyl-2-thiophenecarbonyl chloride 1, 3,4,5-trichloro-2-thiophenecarbonyl chloride 2, and 3,4,5-trichloro-2-thiophenecarbonitrile 3 paved the way for the development of viable commercial processes for XR-693 and XR-906, members of a new class of 2,6-dihaloaryl 1,2,4-triazole insecticides that exhibit selective activity against aphids, mites, and whiteflies coupled with low mammalian toxicity. The process development work for the experimental insecticide target molecules XR-693 and XR-906 will be the topic of a forthcoming paper.

  10. Development of potential manufacturing routes for substituted thiophenes – Preparation of halogenated 2-thiophenecarboxylic acid derivatives as building blocks for a new family of 2,6-dihaloaryl 1,2,4-triazole insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Hull, John W; Romer, Duane R; Podhorez, David E; Ash, Mezzie L; Brady, Christine H

    2007-01-01

    , which was readily converted to the acid chloride 2 with SOCl2. Conclusion The successful development of efficient synthetic routes to the halogenated thiophene building blocks 4-bromo-3-methyl-2-thiophenecarbonyl chloride 1, 3,4,5-trichloro-2-thiophenecarbonyl chloride 2, and 3,4,5-trichloro-2-thiophenecarbonitrile 3 paved the way for the development of viable commercial processes for XR-693 and XR-906, members of a new class of 2,6-dihaloaryl 1,2,4-triazole insecticides that exhibit selective activity against aphids, mites, and whiteflies coupled with low mammalian toxicity. The process development work for the experimental insecticide target molecules XR-693 and XR-906 will be the topic of a forthcoming paper. PMID:17784956

  11. Using carbon dioxide as a building block in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Wu, Lipeng; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2015-01-20

    Carbon dioxide exits in the atmosphere and is produced by the combustion of fossil fuels, the fermentation of sugars and the respiration of all living organisms. An active goal in organic synthesis is to take this carbon--trapped in a waste product--and re-use it to build useful chemicals. Recent advances in organometallic chemistry and catalysis provide effective means for the chemical transformation of CO₂ and its incorporation into synthetic organic molecules under mild conditions. Such a use of carbon dioxide as a renewable one-carbon (C1) building block in organic synthesis could contribute to a more sustainable use of resources.

  12. Development of a prototype self-configuring building block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hung-Yu; Tsui, Chi-Leung; Wu, Wen-Jong; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2011-04-01

    The paper presents the concept and construction of a prototype self-configuring building block for potential application in smart dynamic structure. The design contains several modular self-configuring blocks with integrated controllers, gear trains, extending arms and magnetic latches. The structure could be reconfigured via the connection and disconnection of magnetic latch between the modules. Through the coordination of the individual cubes themselves, the entire structure can reassemble via pushing and pulling the individual components into almost any desired shape. Information as to the current location or the next necessary movement could be passed from cube to cube by a physical connection between the cubes or remotely through broadcast signals. To provide the hardware strategy, we present the mechanical design of the self-configure modules and their latch mechanism of Halbach array. In the end, we will discuss our proposed application in dynamic building structure and storage management.

  13. Mission building blocks for outer solar system exploration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, D.; Tarver, P.; Moore, J.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the technological building blocks required for exploring the outer planets with maximum scientific yields under stringent resource constraints. Two generic spacecraft types are considered: the Mariner and the Pioneer. Following a discussion of the outer planet mission constraints, the evolutionary development of spacecraft, probes, and propulsion building blocks is presented. Then, program genealogies are shown for Pioneer and Mariner missions and advanced propulsion systems to illustrate the soundness of a program based on spacecraft modification rather than on the development of new spacecraft for each mission. It is argued that, for minimum costs, technological advancement should occur in an evolutionary manner from mission to mission. While this strategy is likely to result in compromises on specific missions, the realization of the overall objectives calls for an advance commitment to the entire mission series.

  14. Developing Building Blocks with Space Agencies: The Keys to Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poupat, Jean-Luc

    2014-08-01

    In their continuous efforts to offer building blocks for the European space industry, space agencies have supported the development of processing bricks dedicated to different applications such as platform computer or image compression.Since 25 years, Airbus Defence and Space (ex- Astrium) has developed more than 60 different ASICs components with their associated environment and has contributed to the achievements of some of these building blocks now available for the European space market and beyond.This paper proposes to come back on these developments that have led to products now operating in space in order to analyse the key elements behind their success. It will also demonstrate that the hardware components are nothing without a good ecosystem.

  15. Discrete fracture patterns of virus shells reveal mechanical building blocks.

    PubMed

    Ivanovska, Irena L; Miranda, Roberto; Carrascosa, Jose L; Wuite, Gijs J L; Schmidt, Christoph F

    2011-08-02

    Viral shells are self-assembled protein nanocontainers with remarkable material properties. They combine simplicity of construction with toughness and complex functionality. These properties make them interesting for bionanotechnology. To date we know little about how virus structure determines assembly pathways and shell mechanics. We have here used atomic force microscopy to study structural failure of the shells of the bacteriophage Φ29. We observed rigidity patterns following the symmetry of the capsid proteins. Under prolonged force exertion, we observed fracture along well-defined lines of the 2D crystal lattice. The mechanically most stable building block of the shells was a trimer. Our approach of "reverse engineering" the virus shells thus made it possible to identify stable structural intermediates. Such stable intermediates point to a hierarchy of interactions among equal building blocks correlated with distinct next-neighbor interactions. The results also demonstrate that concepts from macroscopic materials science, such as fracture, can be usefully employed in molecular engineering.

  16. 2016 Summer Series - Kenneth Cheung: Building Blocks for Aerospace Structures

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-16

    Strong, ultra-lightweight materials are expected to play a key role in the design of future aircraft and space vehicles. Lower structural mass leads to improved performance, maneuverability, efficiency, range and payload capacity. Dr. Kenneth Cheung is developing cellular composite building blocks, or digital materials, to create transformable aerostructures. In his presentation, Dr. Cheung will discuss the implications of the digital materials and morphing structures.

  17. 51. Owsley Block, 43 East Park, 1889. This building features ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Owsley Block, 43 East Park, 1889. This building features projecting bay window units, and curved balconies on the upper two floors, and modernized storefronts at the ground level. It was built for William Owsley, who served a Mayor of Butte 1884-1885. It originally had two storefronts, with lodgings and meeting rooms for clubs above. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  18. Building block for an orthonormal-lattice-filter adaptive network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, W. F.

    1980-07-01

    The recent algorithm for a multistage multichannel orthonormal lattice filter proposed by M. Aftab Alam is a welcome addition to the library of adaptive-processing algorithms and provides a flexible alternative to the conventional approach of an optimum Weiner filter. This algorithm is based on a Gram-Schmidt orthonormalization procedure which is similar to cascade adaptive processing techniques described in earlier works. One of the most desirable features of this type of processing network is that it can be implemented with simple one-stage orthogonal-filter building blocks which directly filter the input data samples. These building blocks are the major subject of this report, and a particular configuration is developed based on a modified version of the familiar Howells-Applebaum algorithm. It can be implemented in either analog or digital form, data storage is not required, it is unconditionally stable, speed of convergence is no longer a problem, and the design is simple. The performance characteristics of a complete orthogonal-lattice-filter network operating in the spacial domain were simulated for example cases of one, two, and three strong incoherent signal sources spaced within a beamwidth for a eight-element linear-array antenna. The adaptive spacial filter patterns and the transient responses demonstrate that the building block has sufficient transient-response speed and control to permit full use of the processing capabilities inherent in a Gram-Schmidt cascade network.

  19. Advances in metabolic pathway and strain engineering paving the way for sustainable production of chemical building blocks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Bio-based production of chemical building blocks from renewable resources is an attractive alternative to petroleum-based platform chemicals. Metabolic pathway and strain engineering is the key element in constructing robust microbial chemical factories within the constraints of cost effective production. Here we discuss how the development of computational algorithms, novel modules and methods, omics-based techniques combined with modeling refinement are enabling reduction in development time and thus advance the field of industrial biotechnology. We further discuss how recent technological developments contribute to the development of novel cell factories for the production of the building block chemicals: adipic acid, succinic acid and 3-hydroxypropionic acid.

  20. Direct synthesis of stereodefined and functionalized dienes as valuable building blocks.

    PubMed

    Maulide, Nuno; Souris, Caroline; Frébault, Frédéric; Luparia, Marco; Audisio, Davide

    2014-01-01

    We have reported a direct and stereoselective synthesis of functionalized dienoic carboxylates from the simple bicyclic lactone 1. The use of oxygen- or nitrogen-based nucleophiles in a domino allylic alkylation/4π-electrocyclic ring opening affords reliable access to dienes with interesting functionalities. Alternatively, halide substitution offers synthesis of other classes of functionalized dienoic acids. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of such dienoic products as key building blocks in various transformations as well as natural product synthesis.

  1. SRA Real Math Building Blocks PreK. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "SRA Real Math Building Blocks PreK" (also referred to as "Building Blocks for Math") is a supplemental mathematics curriculum designed to develop preschool children's early mathematical knowledge through various individual and small- and large-group activities. It uses "Building Blocks for Math PreK" software,…

  2. High-performance thermoelectric nanocomposites from nanocrystal building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Maria; Luo, Zhishan; Genç, Aziz; Piveteau, Laura; Ortega, Silvia; Cadavid, Doris; Dobrozhan, Oleksandr; Liu, Yu; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Zebarjadi, Mona; Arbiol, Jordi; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Cabot, Andreu

    2016-03-01

    The efficient conversion between thermal and electrical energy by means of durable, silent and scalable solid-state thermoelectric devices has been a long standing goal. While nanocrystalline materials have already led to substantially higher thermoelectric efficiencies, further improvements are expected to arise from precise chemical engineering of nanoscale building blocks and interfaces. Here we present a simple and versatile bottom-up strategy based on the assembly of colloidal nanocrystals to produce consolidated yet nanostructured thermoelectric materials. In the case study on the PbS-Ag system, Ag nanodomains not only contribute to block phonon propagation, but also provide electrons to the PbS host semiconductor and reduce the PbS intergrain energy barriers for charge transport. Thus, PbS-Ag nanocomposites exhibit reduced thermal conductivities and higher charge carrier concentrations and mobilities than PbS nanomaterial. Such improvements of the material transport properties provide thermoelectric figures of merit up to 1.7 at 850 K.

  3. Image Chunking: Defining Spatial Building Blocks for Scene Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    mumgs0.USmusa 7.AUWOJO 4. CIUTAC Rm6ANT Wuugme*j James V/. Mlahoney DACA? 6-85-C-00 10 NOQ 1 4-85-K-O 124 Artificial Inteligence Laboratory US USS 545...0197 672 IMAGE CHUWING: DEINING SPATIAL UILDING PLOCKS FOR 142 SCENE ANRLYSIS(U) MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH CAIIAIDGE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAO J...Technical Report 980 F-Image Chunking: Defining Spatial Building Blocks for Scene DTm -Analysis S ELECTED James V. Mahoney’ MIT Artificial Intelligence

  4. Optimal control for Rydberg quantum technology building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Matthias M.; Pichler, Thomas; Montangero, Simone; Calarco, Tommaso

    2016-04-01

    We consider a platform for quantum technology based on Rydberg atoms in optical lattices where each atom encodes one qubit of information and external lasers can manipulate their state. We demonstrate how optimal control theory enables the functioning of two specific building blocks on this platform: We engineer an optimal protocol to perform a two-qubit phase gate and to transfer the information within the lattice among specific sites. These two elementary operations allow to design very general operations like storage of atoms and entanglement purification as, for example, needed for quantum repeaters.

  5. Monolayer graphene oxide as a building block for artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Geoffrey W.; Liu, Jefferson Z.

    2013-01-01

    The electromechanical actuation of a highly ordered compound of graphene oxide (GO) is shown via ab initio simulations to produce high-performance quantum-mechanical responses, which mimic the behaviour of mammalian skeletal muscle. In addition to large expansive strains (˜10%), this GO compound (asymmetrically unzipped C4O) exhibits large contractive strains of -4.8% upon -0.15 e/C-atom electron injection. Furthermore, as these contractive strains are coupled with equally high stresses (˜100 GPa) and short response times (˜1 ns), we show that this GO material meets all of the functional requirements of an artificial muscle building block.

  6. Fault-tolerant building-block computer study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rennels, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Ultra-reliable core computers are required for improving the reliability of complex military systems. Such computers can provide reliable fault diagnosis, failure circumvention, and, in some cases serve as an automated repairman for their host systems. A small set of building-block circuits which can be implemented as single very large integration devices, and which can be used with off-the-shelf microprocessors and memories to build self checking computer modules (SCCM) is described. Each SCCM is a microcomputer which is capable of detecting its own faults during normal operation and is described to communicate with other identical modules over one or more Mil Standard 1553A buses. Several SCCMs can be connected into a network with backup spares to provide fault-tolerant operation, i.e. automated recovery from faults. Alternative fault-tolerant SCCM configurations are discussed along with the cost and reliability associated with their implementation.

  7. Fuel-Mediated Transient Clustering of Colloidal Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    van Ravensteijn, Bas G P; Hendriksen, Wouter E; Eelkema, Rienk; van Esch, Jan H; Kegel, Willem K

    2017-07-26

    Fuel-driven assembly operates under the continuous influx of energy and results in superstructures that exist out of equilibrium. Such dissipative processes provide a route toward structures and transient behavior unreachable by conventional equilibrium self-assembly. Although perfected in biological systems like microtubules, this class of assembly is only sparsely used in synthetic or colloidal analogues. Here, we present a novel colloidal system that shows transient clustering driven by a chemical fuel. Addition of fuel causes an increase in hydrophobicity of the building blocks by actively removing surface charges, thereby driving their aggregation. Depletion of fuel causes reappearance of the charged moieties and leads to disassembly of the formed clusters. This reassures that the system returns to its initial, equilibrium state. By taking advantage of the cyclic nature of our system, we show that clustering can be induced several times by simple injection of new fuel. The fuel-mediated assembly of colloidal building blocks presented here opens new avenues to the complex landscape of nonequilibrium colloidal structures, guided by biological design principles.

  8. Plasmonic Metasurfaces with Tailored Linear and Nonlinear Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memarzadeh, Babak

    Plasmonic metasurface is an array of sub-wavelength plasmonic particle which is designed to obtain unusual performances by employing the localized surface plasmon (LSP). The dependency of the LSP on the geometry and the material of the plasmonic sub-wavelength particle have opened a wide range of applications for plasmonic metasurfaces. In the first chapter there is brief review of metamaterials and plasmonic metasurfaces. In the second chapter we present the concept of transmitarray concentrator implemented in optics. Planar concentric loop antennas are used as the elements for a 21 x 21 array to concentrate the incident plane wave at a desired distance. Finite difference time domain is used to obtain the performance of the periodic array of each element on the transmitarray and then free space dyadic greens function is employed to find the field distribution at each point, to show the focusing behavior of the metasurface. Third chapter investigates the concept of multi-layered tripod frequency selective surfaces in infrared. A full wave analysis based on finite difference time domain technique is applied to comprehensively characterize the structure and obtain the performance for both normal and oblique waves (for TE and TM polarizations). The layered tripod structure can be envisioned as a mean to realize cascaded LC circuit configurations achieving desired filter performance. A wide stop-band IR nano-filter which is almost independent of incident angle and polarization is demonstrated. Chapter 4 is concentrated on a functional metasurface building block which is multi-material loops. Plasmonic nano loops has been shown to be a capable candidate for creating building blocks of metasurfaces to manipulate the light in desired ways. Concentric loops can couple to each other strongly or weakly based on the relevant designs. The low-coupled multi-material loop metasurface can be employed as a frequency selective surface with number of separated bands. On the other

  9. Energetics of Radical Formation in Eumelanin Building Blocks: Implications for Understanding Photoprotection Mechanisms in Eumelanin.

    PubMed

    Agapito, Filipe; Cabral, Benedito J Costa

    2016-12-22

    The supramolecular structure of melanin pigments is characterized by a high concentration of radical species. Therefore, the energetics of the radical formation in melanin building blocks is key for understanding the structure and the electronic properties of the pigments at the molecular level. Nevertheless, the radical energetics of even the simplest melanin building blocks are largely unknown. In order to address this fundamental issue, the bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs) for the melanin monomers 5,6-dihydroxy-1H-indole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA), 1H-indole-5,6-diol (DHI), and 1H-indole-5,6-dione (IQ) were determined through high-accuracy ab initio quantum chemistry methods. Our results provide strong evidence of the importance on BDEs for explaining the experimentally observed dependence of the antioxidant properties of eumelanin pigments on the DHICA/DHI ratio, and the role that these two species play on the photoprotection mechanism.

  10. Quantitative NMR Approach to Optimize the Formation of Chemical Building Blocks from Abundant Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Elliot, Samuel G; Tolborg, Søren; Sádaba, Irantzu; Taarning, Esben; Meier, Sebastian

    2017-07-21

    The future role of biomass-derived chemicals relies on the formation of diverse functional monomers in high yields from carbohydrates. Recently, it has become clear that a series of α-hydroxy acids, esters, and lactones can be formed from carbohydrates in alcohol and water solvents using tin-containing catalysts such as Sn-Beta. These compounds are potential building blocks for polyesters bearing additional olefin and alcohol functionalities. An NMR approach was used to identify, quantify, and optimize the formation of these building blocks in the Sn-Beta-catalyzed transformation of abundant carbohydrates. Record yields of the target molecules can be achieved by obstructing competing reactions through solvent selection. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. PUS Services Software Building Block Automatic Generation for Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candia, S.; Sgaramella, F.; Mele, G.

    2008-08-01

    The Packet Utilization Standard (PUS) has been specified by the European Committee for Space Standardization (ECSS) and issued as ECSS-E-70-41A to define the application-level interface between Ground Segments and Space Segments. The ECSS-E- 70-41A complements the ECSS-E-50 and the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) recommendations for packet telemetry and telecommand. The ECSS-E-70-41A characterizes the identified PUS Services from a functional point of view and the ECSS-E-70-31 standard specifies the rules for their mission-specific tailoring. The current on-board software design for a space mission implies the production of several PUS terminals, each providing a specific tailoring of the PUS services. The associated on-board software building blocks are developed independently, leading to very different design choices and implementations even when the mission tailoring requires very similar services (from the Ground operative perspective). In this scenario, the automatic production of the PUS services building blocks for a mission would be a way to optimize the overall mission economy and improve the robusteness and reliability of the on-board software and of the Ground-Space interactions. This paper presents the Space Software Italia (SSI) activities for the development of an integrated environment to support: the PUS services tailoring activity for a specific mission. the mission-specific PUS services configuration. the generation the UML model of the software building block implementing the mission-specific PUS services and the related source code, support documentation (software requirements, software architecture, test plans/procedures, operational manuals), and the TM/TC database. The paper deals with: (a) the project objectives, (b) the tailoring, configuration, and generation process, (c) the description of the environments supporting the process phases, (d) the characterization of the meta-model used for the generation, (e) the

  12. Modular assembly of superstructures from polyphenol-functionalized building blocks.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junling; Tardy, Blaise L; Christofferson, Andrew J; Dai, Yunlu; Richardson, Joseph J; Zhu, Wei; Hu, Ming; Ju, Yi; Cui, Jiwei; Dagastine, Raymond R; Yarovsky, Irene; Caruso, Frank

    2016-12-01

    The organized assembly of particles into superstructures is typically governed by specific molecular interactions or external directing factors associated with the particle building blocks, both of which are particle-dependent. These superstructures are of interest to a variety of fields because of their distinct mechanical, electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Here, we establish a facile route to a diverse range of superstructures based on the polyphenol surface-functionalization of micro- and nanoparticles, nanowires, nanosheets, nanocubes and even cells. This strategy can be used to access a large number of modularly assembled superstructures, including core-satellite, hollow and hierarchically organized supraparticles. Colloidal-probe atomic force microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations provide detailed insights into the role of surface functionalization and how this facilitates superstructure construction. Our work provides a platform for the rapid generation of superstructured assemblies across a wide range of length scales, from nanometres to centimetres.

  13. Modular assembly of superstructures from polyphenol-functionalized building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junling; Tardy, Blaise L.; Christofferson, Andrew J.; Dai, Yunlu; Richardson, Joseph J.; Zhu, Wei; Hu, Ming; Ju, Yi; Cui, Jiwei; Dagastine, Raymond R.; Yarovsky, Irene; Caruso, Frank

    2016-12-01

    The organized assembly of particles into superstructures is typically governed by specific molecular interactions or external directing factors associated with the particle building blocks, both of which are particle-dependent. These superstructures are of interest to a variety of fields because of their distinct mechanical, electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Here, we establish a facile route to a diverse range of superstructures based on the polyphenol surface-functionalization of micro- and nanoparticles, nanowires, nanosheets, nanocubes and even cells. This strategy can be used to access a large number of modularly assembled superstructures, including core-satellite, hollow and hierarchically organized supraparticles. Colloidal-probe atomic force microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations provide detailed insights into the role of surface functionalization and how this facilitates superstructure construction. Our work provides a platform for the rapid generation of superstructured assemblies across a wide range of length scales, from nanometres to centimetres.

  14. Linked supramolecular building blocks for enhanced cluster formation

    DOE PAGES

    McLellan, Ross; Palacios, Maria A.; Beavers, Christine M.; ...

    2015-01-09

    Methylene-bridged calix[4]arenes have emerged as extremely versatile ligand supports in the formation of new polymetallic clusters possessing fascinating magnetic properties. Metal ion binding rules established for this building block allow one to partially rationalise the complex assembly process. The ability to covalently link calix[4]arenes at the methylene bridge provides significantly improved control over the introduction of different metal centres to resulting cluster motifs. Clusters assembled from bis-calix[4]arenes and transition metal ions or 3d-4f combinations display characteristic features of the analogous calix[4]arene supported clusters, thereby demonstrating an enhanced and rational approach towards the targeted synthesis of complex and challenging structures.

  15. Hydrotalcite catalysis for the synthesis of new chiral building blocks.

    PubMed

    Rodilla, Jesus M; Neves, Patricia P; Pombal, Sofia; Rives, Vicente; Trujillano, Raquel; Díez, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of hydrotalcites for the synthesis of two chiral building blocks in a simple way is described as a new and green methodology. The synthesis of these compounds implies a regioselective Baeyer-Villiger reaction in a very selective way with ulterior opening and lactonisation. This methodology should be considered green for the use of hydrogen peroxide as the only oxidant and hydrotalcites as the catalyst, and because no residues are produced apart from water. The procedure is very adequate for using in gram scale, in order to increase the value of the obtained compounds. The conditions are excellent and can be applied for nonstable compounds, as they are very mild. The synthesised compounds are magnific starting materials for the synthesis of biologically active or natural compounds. The use of a cheap, commercial and chiral compound as carvone disposable in both enantiomeric forms adds an extra value to this methodology.

  16. Nanoporous Gold as a Platform for a Building Block Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Wittstock, Arne; Wichmann, Andre; Baeumer, Marcus

    2012-09-25

    The porous bulk materials are of great interest in catalysis because they can be employed in heterogeneous gas and liquid phase catalysis, electrocatalysis, and in electrocatalytic sensing. Nanoporous gold gained considerable attraction in this context because it is the prime example of a corrosion-derived nanoporous bulk metal. Moreover, the material was shown to be a very active and selective Au type catalyst for a variety of oxidation reactions. In leveraging the functionalization of the surface of the material with various additives, its catalytic applications can be extended and tuned. In this review, we will summarize recent developments in using nanoporous gold as the platform for the development of high performance catalytic materials by adding metals, metal oxides, and molecular functionalities as building blocks.

  17. Linked supramolecular building blocks for enhanced cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Ross; Palacios, Maria A.; Beavers, Christine M.; Teat, Simon J.; Piligkos, Stergios; Brechin, Euan K.; Dalgarno, Scott J.

    2015-01-09

    Methylene-bridged calix[4]arenes have emerged as extremely versatile ligand supports in the formation of new polymetallic clusters possessing fascinating magnetic properties. Metal ion binding rules established for this building block allow one to partially rationalise the complex assembly process. The ability to covalently link calix[4]arenes at the methylene bridge provides significantly improved control over the introduction of different metal centres to resulting cluster motifs. Clusters assembled from bis-calix[4]arenes and transition metal ions or 3d-4f combinations display characteristic features of the analogous calix[4]arene supported clusters, thereby demonstrating an enhanced and rational approach towards the targeted synthesis of complex and challenging structures.

  18. Triethynylmethanol Derivatives: Stable Acetylenic Building Blocks for Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Prenzel, Dominik; Sander, Tim; Gebhardt, Julian; Soni, Himadri; Hampel, Frank; Görling, Andreas; Maier, Sabine; Tykwinski, Rik R

    2017-02-03

    The synthesis of non-conjugated, carbon-rich building blocks is described, based on a basic scaffold of triethynylmethanol (TEtM). The substitution of the ethynyl groups can be easily varied (including R3 Si, H, Br), and this allows structural tuning for stabilization, synthetic derivatization, and adsorption on Ag(111) or Au(111). X-ray crystallography helps to explain the surprising stability of the selected derivatives in the solid state, and an unusual form of hydrogen bonding is identified from these analyses. Preliminary efforts to achieve surface-based reactions on Ag(111) and Au(111) are outlined experimentally and computationally. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Key Building Blocks via Enzyme-Mediated Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Thomas; Pietruszka, Jörg

    Biocatalytic approaches to valuable building blocks in organic synthesis have emerged as an important tool in the last few years. While first applications were mainly based on hydrolases, other enzyme classes such as oxidoreductases or lyases moved into the focus of research. Nowadays, a vast number of biotransformations can be found in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries delivering fine chemicals or drugs. The mild reaction conditions, high stereo-, regio-, and chemoselectivities, and the often shortened reaction pathways lead to economical and ecological advantages of enzymatic conversions. Due to the enormous number of enzyme-mediated syntheses, the present chapter is not meant to be a complete review, but to deliver comprehensive insights into well established enzymatic systems and recent advances in the application of enzymes in natural product synthesis. Furthermore, it is focused on the most frequently used enzymes or enzyme classes not covered elsewhere in the present volume.

  20. Enabling technologies and building blocks for large planetary orbiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncy, J.; Roser, X.; Couzin, P.

    2013-09-01

    Thales Alenia Space reports how, beyond ExoMars, enabling technologies and their corresponding building blocks for large orbiters and mother ships will play a key-role in the exploration of our System. We first make a census of the targets, of the induced missions for the next decades and of the constraints they place on the physical and functional architecture of the main spacecraft. As a function of the maturity of the related technologies, and of the urgency of scientific and exploration needs, we then introduce the time dimension per target and mission type, as an input for establishing a future comprehensive road map. We conclude by recalling the most urgent developments.

  1. Azobenzene: A Photoactive Building Block for Supramolecular Architectures.

    PubMed

    Baroncini, Massimo; Bergamini, Giacomo

    2017-01-05

    The development of nanoscale systems capable to perform specific functions under external control is a challenging task and a fascinating objective in Chemistry. Photochromic compounds undergo radical changes in their physico-chemical properties upon light excitation, for this reason they are valuable building blocks for the construction of photo-controllable molecular devices, machines and materials. The E-Z photoisomerization of azobenzene has been known for almost 80 years and - owing to its high efficiency and excellent reversibility - has been widely employed to introduce an element of photo-control in a large variety of compounds, biomolecules, nanosystems and materials. Here we present some of our research results highlighting how this outstanding photochrome can be utilized to develop systems with light-induced functionalities.

  2. IMPATT power building blocks for 20 GHz spaceborne transmit amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmus, J.; Cho, Y.; Degruyl, J.; Ng, E.; Giannakopoulos, A.; Okean, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    Single-stage circulator coupled IMPATT building block constituents of a 20-GHz solid state power amplifier (SSPA) currently under development for spaceborne downlink transmitter usage have been demonstrated as providing 1.5 to 2.0W RF power output at 4 to 5 dB operating gain over a 1 GHz bandwidth. Using either commercially available or recently developed in-house GaAs Schottky Read-profile IMPATT diodes, DC/RF power added efficiencies of 14 to 15% were achieved in these amplifier stages. A two stage IMPATT driver amplifier with similar RF output power capability exhibited 13 + or - 0.5 dB operating gain over a 1 GHz bandwidth.

  3. Network Motifs: Simple Building Blocks of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milo, R.; Shen-Orr, S.; Itzkovitz, S.; Kashtan, N.; Chklovskii, D.; Alon, U.

    2002-10-01

    Complex networks are studied across many fields of science. To uncover their structural design principles, we defined ``network motifs,'' patterns of interconnections occurring in complex networks at numbers that are significantly higher than those in randomized networks. We found such motifs in networks from biochemistry, neurobiology, ecology, and engineering. The motifs shared by ecological food webs were distinct from the motifs shared by the genetic networks of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae or from those found in the World Wide Web. Similar motifs were found in networks that perform information processing, even though they describe elements as different as biomolecules within a cell and synaptic connections between neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans. Motifs may thus define universal classes of networks. This approach may uncover the basic building blocks of most networks.

  4. Sequence-defined polymers via orthogonal allyl acrylamide building blocks.

    PubMed

    Porel, Mintu; Alabi, Christopher A

    2014-09-24

    Biological systems have long recognized the importance of macromolecular diversity and have evolved efficient processes for the rapid synthesis of sequence-defined biopolymers. However, achieving sequence control via synthetic methods has proven to be a difficult challenge. Herein we describe efforts to circumvent this difficulty via the use of orthogonal allyl acrylamide building blocks and a liquid-phase fluorous support for the de novo design and synthesis of sequence-specific polymers. We demonstrate proof-of-concept via synthesis and characterization of two sequence-isomeric 10-mer polymers. (1)H NMR and LCMS were used to confirm their chemical structure while tandem MS was used to confirm sequence identity. Further validation of this methodology was provided via the successful synthesis of a sequence-specific 16-mer polymer incorporating nine different monomers. This strategy thus shows promise as an efficient approach for the assembly of sequence-specific functional polymers.

  5. Nanoporous Gold as a Platform for a Building Block Catalyst

    DOE PAGES

    Wittstock, Arne; Wichmann, Andre; Baeumer, Marcus

    2012-09-25

    The porous bulk materials are of great interest in catalysis because they can be employed in heterogeneous gas and liquid phase catalysis, electrocatalysis, and in electrocatalytic sensing. Nanoporous gold gained considerable attraction in this context because it is the prime example of a corrosion-derived nanoporous bulk metal. Moreover, the material was shown to be a very active and selective Au type catalyst for a variety of oxidation reactions. In leveraging the functionalization of the surface of the material with various additives, its catalytic applications can be extended and tuned. In this review, we will summarize recent developments in using nanoporousmore » gold as the platform for the development of high performance catalytic materials by adding metals, metal oxides, and molecular functionalities as building blocks.« less

  6. The building block approach to airborne pod structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Jan D.

    2011-05-01

    The certification and testing of new airborne structures is a costly undertaking. This paper presents which measures can be taken to limit the cost and certification required in order to improve the capabilities of the current airborne as-sets, by applying a building block approach to the design and certification of airborne pod structures. A simple way of improving aircraft capabilities is by adding external pod structures, which has been performed for many applications over many years. However, this paper describes a truly modular approach, in which a typical airborne pod structure may be reconfigured to many various roles, with only limited re-certification requirements. Using existing or general aerodynamic shapes, the basic outer shape for the external store is defined, which is then combined with a modular substructure which can accommodate a large variety of electronic and/or optical sensors. This also allows the airborne pod structure to perform several intelligence collecting operations during the same sortie, thereby limiting the time spent near the danger area. The re-use of existing substructure modules reduces the cost and leadtime of the design phase allowing for a rapid entry into service. The modular design, relying on proven interface systems between the building blocks, significantly reduces risk involved in new programs. The certification process is also discussed in order to optimize the use of the pod structure modularity and certification requirements in order to simplify the certification task, by drawing similarity to existing designs. Finally the paper covers how modularity is implemented in new composite pod designs with stealth capabilities.

  7. High-performance thermoelectric nanocomposites from nanocrystal building blocks

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Maria; Luo, Zhishan; Genç, Aziz; Piveteau, Laura; Ortega, Silvia; Cadavid, Doris; Dobrozhan, Oleksandr; Liu, Yu; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Zebarjadi, Mona; Arbiol, Jordi; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Cabot, Andreu

    2016-01-01

    The efficient conversion between thermal and electrical energy by means of durable, silent and scalable solid-state thermoelectric devices has been a long standing goal. While nanocrystalline materials have already led to substantially higher thermoelectric efficiencies, further improvements are expected to arise from precise chemical engineering of nanoscale building blocks and interfaces. Here we present a simple and versatile bottom–up strategy based on the assembly of colloidal nanocrystals to produce consolidated yet nanostructured thermoelectric materials. In the case study on the PbS–Ag system, Ag nanodomains not only contribute to block phonon propagation, but also provide electrons to the PbS host semiconductor and reduce the PbS intergrain energy barriers for charge transport. Thus, PbS–Ag nanocomposites exhibit reduced thermal conductivities and higher charge carrier concentrations and mobilities than PbS nanomaterial. Such improvements of the material transport properties provide thermoelectric figures of merit up to 1.7 at 850 K. PMID:26948987

  8. Identifying the evolutionary building blocks of the cardiac conduction system.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bjarke; Boukens, Bastiaan J D; Postma, Alex V; Gunst, Quinn D; van den Hoff, Maurice J B; Moorman, Antoon F M; Wang, Tobias; Christoffels, Vincent M

    2012-01-01

    The endothermic state of mammals and birds requires high heart rates to accommodate the high rates of oxygen consumption. These high heart rates are driven by very similar conduction systems consisting of an atrioventricular node that slows the electrical impulse and a His-Purkinje system that efficiently activates the ventricular chambers. While ectothermic vertebrates have similar contraction patterns, they do not possess anatomical evidence for a conduction system. This lack amongst extant ectotherms is surprising because mammals and birds evolved independently from reptile-like ancestors. Using conserved genetic markers, we found that the conduction system design of lizard (Anolis carolinensis and A. sagrei), frog (Xenopus laevis) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) adults is strikingly similar to that of embryos of mammals (mouse Mus musculus, and man) and chicken (Gallus gallus). Thus, in ectothermic adults, the slow conducting atrioventricular canal muscle is present, no fibrous insulating plane is formed, and the spongy ventricle serves the dual purpose of conduction and contraction. Optical mapping showed base-to-apex activation of the ventricles of the ectothermic animals, similar to the activation pattern of mammalian and avian embryonic ventricles and to the His-Purkinje systems of the formed hearts. Mammalian and avian ventricles uniquely develop thick compact walls and septum and, hence, form a discrete ventricular conduction system from the embryonic spongy ventricle. Our study uncovers the evolutionary building plan of heart and indicates that the building blocks of the conduction system of adult ectothermic vertebrates and embryos of endotherms are similar.

  9. Comprehensive Identification and Quantitation of Basic Building Blocks for Low-Molecular Weight Heparin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaojun; Sheng, Anran; Liu, Xinyue; Shi, Feng; Jin, Lan; Xie, Shaoshuai; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Chi, Lianli

    2016-08-02

    Low-molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) are widely used anticoagulant drugs. They inherit the heterogeneous backbone sequences of the parent heparin, while the chemical depolymerization process modifies the nonreducing end (NRE) and reducing end (RE) of their sugar chains. Some side reactions may also occur and increase the structural complexity of LMWHs. It is important to precisely characterize the structures of LMWHs, especially their chemical modifications, to ensure drug quality and safety. Compositional analysis provides a powerful approach to reveal the building blocks that make up the LMWHs, which are the mutual consequence of the heparin starting materials and the manufacturing process. Here, we introduce a comprehensive analytical method to recover the most basic building blocks of LMWHs. A strategy of combining both enzymatic digestion and oxidative degradation of LMWH was used to make the NRE, RE, and backbone structures differentiable from one another. Satisfactory separation, identification, and quantitation were achieved by coupling hydrophilic interaction chromatography with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating under the multiple reaction monitoring mode. After enzymatic digestion, over 30 species were detected, with both natural and chemically modified heparin basic building blocks. Two novel structures, including a trisaccharide containing two glucosamine residues and a tetrasaccharide containing a 3-O-sulfated uronic acid residue, were discovered. Reduced and oxidatively degraded samples were analyzed to provide the complementary information on both termini of LMWHs. The reproducibility of this method was evaluated, and enoxaparin injections were analyzed to demonstrate the application of this method for evaluating the sameness of LMWH products.

  10. Incorporating GIS building data and census housing statistics for sub-block-level population estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, S.-S.; Wang, L.; Qiu, X.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a deterministic model for sub-block-level population estimation based on the total building volumes derived from geographic information system (GIS) building data and three census block-level housing statistics. To assess the model, we generated artificial blocks by aggregating census block areas and calculating the respective housing statistics. We then applied the model to estimate populations for sub-artificial-block areas and assessed the estimates with census populations of the areas. Our analyses indicate that the average percent error of population estimation for sub-artificial-block areas is comparable to those for sub-census-block areas of the same size relative to associated blocks. The smaller the sub-block-level areas, the higher the population estimation errors. For example, the average percent error for residential areas is approximately 0.11 percent for 100 percent block areas and 35 percent for 5 percent block areas.

  11. Fault-tolerant computer study. [logic designs for building block circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rennels, D. A.; Avizienis, A. A.; Ercegovac, M. D.

    1981-01-01

    A set of building block circuits is described which can be used with commercially available microprocessors and memories to implement fault tolerant distributed computer systems. Each building block circuit is intended for VLSI implementation as a single chip. Several building blocks and associated processor and memory chips form a self checking computer module with self contained input output and interfaces to redundant communications buses. Fault tolerance is achieved by connecting self checking computer modules into a redundant network in which backup buses and computer modules are provided to circumvent failures. The requirements and design methodology which led to the definition of the building block circuits are discussed.

  12. Theoretical and technological building blocks for an innovation accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Harmelen, F.; Kampis, G.; Börner, K.; van den Besselaar, P.; Schultes, E.; Goble, C.; Groth, P.; Mons, B.; Anderson, S.; Decker, S.; Hayes, C.; Buecheler, T.; Helbing, D.

    2012-11-01

    Modern science is a main driver of technological innovation. The efficiency of the scientific system is of key importance to ensure the competitiveness of a nation or region. However, the scientific system that we use today was devised centuries ago and is inadequate for our current ICT-based society: the peer review system encourages conservatism, journal publications are monolithic and slow, data is often not available to other scientists, and the independent validation of results is limited. The resulting scientific process is hence slow and sloppy. Building on the Innovation Accelerator paper by Helbing and Balietti [1], this paper takes the initial global vision and reviews the theoretical and technological building blocks that can be used for implementing an innovation (in first place: science) accelerator platform driven by re-imagining the science system. The envisioned platform would rest on four pillars: (i) Redesign the incentive scheme to reduce behavior such as conservatism, herding and hyping; (ii) Advance scientific publications by breaking up the monolithic paper unit and introducing other building blocks such as data, tools, experiment workflows, resources; (iii) Use machine readable semantics for publications, debate structures, provenance etc. in order to include the computer as a partner in the scientific process, and (iv) Build an online platform for collaboration, including a network of trust and reputation among the different types of stakeholders in the scientific system: scientists, educators, funding agencies, policy makers, students and industrial innovators among others. Any such improvements to the scientific system must support the entire scientific process (unlike current tools that chop up the scientific process into disconnected pieces), must facilitate and encourage collaboration and interdisciplinarity (again unlike current tools), must facilitate the inclusion of intelligent computing in the scientific process, must facilitate

  13. Biorefineries for the production of top building block chemicals and their derivatives.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sol; Song, Chan Woo; Shin, Jae Ho; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-03-01

    Due to the growing concerns on the climate change and sustainability on petrochemical resources, DOE selected and announced the bio-based top 12 building blocks and discussed the needs for developing biorefinery technologies to replace the current petroleum based industry in 2004. Over the last 10 years after its announcement, many studies have been performed for the development of efficient technologies for the bio-based production of these chemicals and derivatives. Now, ten chemicals among these top 12 chemicals, excluding the l-aspartic acid and 3-hydroxybutyrolactone, have already been commercialized or are close to commercialization. In this paper, we review the current status of biorefinery development for the production of these platform chemicals and their derivatives. In addition, current technological advances on industrial strain development for the production of platform chemicals using micro-organisms will be covered in detail with case studies on succinic acid and 3-hydroxypropionic acid as examples.

  14. Dispersions of aramid nanofibers: a new nanoscale building block.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Cao, Keqin; Sui, Lang; Qi, Ying; Zhu, Jian; Waas, Anthony; Arruda, Ellen M; Kieffer, John; Thouless, M D; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2011-09-27

    Stable dispersions of nanofibers are virtually unknown for synthetic polymers. They can complement analogous dispersions of inorganic components, such as nanoparticles, nanowires, nanosheets, etc. as a fundamental component of a toolset for design of nanostructures and metamaterials via numerous solvent-based processing methods. As such, strong flexible polymeric nanofibers are very desirable for the effective utilization within composites of nanoscale inorganic components such as nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and others. Here stable dispersions of uniform high-aspect-ratio aramid nanofibers (ANFs) with diameters between 3 and 30 nm and up to 10 μm in length were successfully obtained. Unlike the traditional approaches based on polymerization of monomers, they are made by controlled dissolution of standard macroscale form of the aramid polymer, that is, well-known Kevlar threads, and revealed distinct morphological features similar to carbon nanotubes. ANFs are successfully processed into films using layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly as one of the potential methods of preparation of composites from ANFs. The resultant films are transparent and highly temperature resilient. They also display enhanced mechanical characteristics making ANF films highly desirable as protective coatings, ultrastrong membranes, as well as building blocks of other high performance materials in place of or in combination with carbon nanotubes.

  15. Dispersions of Aramid Nanofibers: A New Nanoscale Building Block

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ming; Cao, Keqin; Sui, Lang; Qi, Ying; Zhu, Jian; Waas, Anthony; Arruda, Ellen M.; Kieffer, John; Thouless, M. D.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2011-09-27

    Stable dispersions of nanofibers are virtually unknown for synthetic polymers. They can complement analogous dispersions of inorganic components, such as nanoparticles, nanowires, nanosheets, etc. as a fundamental component of a toolset for design of nanostructures and metamaterials via numerous solvent-based processing methods. As such, strong flexible polymeric nanofibers are very desirable for the effective utilization within composites of nanoscale inorganic components such as nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and others. Here stable dispersions of uniform high-aspect-ratio aramid nanofibers (ANFs) with diameters between 3 and 30 nm and up to 10 μm in length were successfully obtained. Unlike the traditional approaches based on polymerization of monomers, they are made by controlled dissolution of standard macroscale form of the aramid polymer, that is, well-known Kevlar threads, and revealed distinct morphological features similar to carbon nanotubes. ANFs are successfully processed into films using layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly as one of the potential methods of preparation of composites from ANFs. The resultant films are transparent and highly temperature resilient. They also display enhanced mechanical characteristics making ANF films highly desirable as protective coatings, ultrastrong membranes, as well as building blocks of other high performance materials in place of or in combination with carbon nanotubes.

  16. Building Blocks for Reliable Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations. Examples relevant to turbulent flow computations are included.

  17. A generalized locomotion CPG architecture based on oscillatory building blocks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhijun; França, Felipe M G

    2003-07-01

    Neural oscillation is one of the most extensively investigated topics of artificial neural networks. Scientific approaches to the functionalities of both natural and artificial intelligences are strongly related to mechanisms underlying oscillatory activities. This paper concerns itself with the assumption of the existence of central pattern generators (CPGs), which are the plausible neural architectures with oscillatory capabilities, and presents a discrete and generalized approach to the functionality of locomotor CPGs of legged animals. Based on scheduling by multiple edge reversal (SMER), a primitive and deterministic distributed algorithm, it is shown how oscillatory building block (OBB) modules can be created and, hence, how OBB-based networks can be formulated as asymmetric Hopfield-like neural networks for the generation of complex coordinated rhythmic patterns observed among pairs of biological motor neurons working during different gait patterns. It is also shown that the resulting Hopfield-like network possesses the property of reproducing the whole spectrum of different gaits intrinsic to the target locomotor CPGs. Although the new approach is not restricted to the understanding of the neurolocomotor system of any particular animal, hexapodal and quadrupedal gait patterns are chosen as illustrations given the wide interest expressed by the ongoing research in the area.

  18. Origami building blocks: Generic and special four-vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, Scott; van Hecke, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Four rigid panels connected by hinges that meet at a point form a four-vertex, the fundamental building block of origami metamaterials. Most materials designed so far are based on the same four-vertex geometry, and little is known regarding how different geometries affect folding behavior. Here we systematically categorize and analyze the geometries and resulting folding motions of Euclidean four-vertices. Comparing the relative sizes of sector angles, we identify three types of generic vertices and two accompanying subtypes. We determine which folds can fully close and the possible mountain-valley assignments. Next, we consider what occurs when sector angles or sums thereof are set equal, which results in 16 special vertex types. One of these, flat-foldable vertices, has been studied extensively, but we show that a wide variety of qualitatively different folding motions exist for the other 15 special and 3 generic types. Our work establishes a straightforward set of rules for understanding the folding motion of both generic and special four-vertices and serves as a roadmap for designing origami metamaterials.

  19. Dispersions of Aramid Nanofibers: A New Nanoscale Building Block

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Cao, Keqin; Sui, Lang; Qi, Ying; Zhu, Jian; Waas, Anthony; Arruda, Ellen M.; Kieffer, John; Thouless, M. D.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    Stable dispersions of nanofibers are virtually unknown for synthetic polymers. They can complement analogous dispersions of inorganic components, such as nanoparticles, nanowires, nanosheets, etc as a fundamental component of a toolset for design of nanostructures and metamaterials via numerous solvent-based processing methods. As such, strong flexible polymeric nanofibers are very desirable for the effective utilization within composites of nanoscale inorganic components such as nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and others. Here stable dispersions of uniform high-aspect-ratio aramid nanofibers (ANFs) with diameters between 3 and 30 nm and up to 10 μm in length were successfully obtained. Unlike the traditional approaches based on polymerization of monomers, they are made by controlled dissolution of standard macroscale form of the aramid polymer, i.e. well known Kevlar threads, and revealed distinct morphological features similar to carbon nanotubes. ANFs are successfully processed into films using layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly as one of the potential methods of preparation of composites from ANFs. The resultant films are transparent and highly temperature resilient. They also display enhanced mechanical characteristics making ANF films highly desirable as protective coatings, ultrastrong membranes, as well as building blocks of other high performance materials in place of or in combination with carbon nanotubes. PMID:21800822

  20. Building Blocks for Reliable Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations.

  1. Building Blocks for Reliable Complex Nonlinear Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk describes some of the building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of numerical simulation of multiscale complex nonlinear problems. The focus is on relating PAR of numerical simulations with complex nonlinear phenomena of numerics. To isolate sources of numerical uncertainties, the possible discrepancy between the chosen partial differential equation (PDE) model and the real physics and/or experimental data is set aside. The discussion is restricted to how well numerical schemes can mimic the solution behavior of the underlying PDE model for finite time steps and grid spacings. The situation is complicated by the fact that the available theory for the understanding of nonlinear behavior of numerics is not at a stage to fully analyze the nonlinear Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The discussion is based on the knowledge gained for nonlinear model problems with known analytical solutions to identify and explain the possible sources and remedies of numerical uncertainties in practical computations. Examples relevant to turbulent flow computations are included.

  2. PSD95 nanoclusters are postsynaptic building blocks in hippocampus circuits

    PubMed Central

    Broadhead, Matthew J.; Horrocks, Mathew H.; Zhu, Fei; Muresan, Leila; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Fricker, David; Kopanitsa, Maksym V.; Duncan, Rory R.; Klenerman, David; Komiyama, Noboru H.; Lee, Steven F.; Grant, Seth G. N.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular features of synapses in the hippocampus underpin current models of learning and cognition. Although synapse ultra-structural diversity has been described in the canonical hippocampal circuitry, our knowledge of sub-synaptic organisation of synaptic molecules remains largely unknown. To address this, mice were engineered to express Post Synaptic Density 95 protein (PSD95) fused to either eGFP or mEos2 and imaged with two orthogonal super-resolution methods: gated stimulated emission depletion (g-STED) microscopy and photoactivated localisation microscopy (PALM). Large-scale analysis of ~100,000 synapses in 7 hippocampal sub-regions revealed they comprised discrete PSD95 nanoclusters that were spatially organised into single and multi-nanocluster PSDs. Synapses in different sub-regions, cell-types and locations along the dendritic tree of CA1 pyramidal neurons, showed diversity characterised by the number of nanoclusters per synapse. Multi-nanocluster synapses were frequently found in the CA3 and dentate gyrus sub-regions, corresponding to large thorny excrescence synapses. Although the structure of individual nanoclusters remained relatively conserved across all sub-regions, PSD95 packing into nanoclusters also varied between sub-regions determined from nanocluster fluorescence intensity. These data identify PSD95 nanoclusters as a basic structural unit, or building block, of excitatory synapses and their number characterizes synapse size and structural diversity. PMID:27109929

  3. The Evolution of Galaxies II - Basic Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, Marc; Stasińska, Grazina; Schaerer, Daniel

    2002-07-01

    Galaxies have a history. This has become clear from recent sky surveys which have shown that distant galaxies, formed early in the life of the Universe, differ from the nearby ones. New observational windows at ultraviolet, infrared and millimetric wavelengths (provided by ROSAT, IRAM, IUE, IRAS, ISO) have revealed that galaxies contain a wealth of components: very hot gas, atomic hydrogen, molecules, dust, dark matter ... A significant advance is expected due to new instruments (VLT, FIRST, XMM) which will allow one to explore the most distant Universe. Three Euroconferences have been planned to punctuate this new epoch in galactic research, bringing together specialists in various fields of Astronomy. The first one, held in Granada (Spain) in May 2000, addressed the observational clues. The second one took place in October 2001 in St Denis de la Réunion (France) and reviewed the basic building blocks and small-scale processes in galaxy evolution. The third one will take place in July 2002 in Kiel (Germany) and will be devoted to the overall modelling of galaxy evolution. This book contains the proceedings of the second conference. It is suitable for researchers and PhD students in Astrophysics. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-0622-5

  4. Interpenetrating metal-organic frameworks formed by self-assembly of tetrahedral and octahedral building blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yongming; Lan Yaqian; Xu Yanhong; Su Zhongmin; Li Shunli; Zang Hongying; Xu Guangjuan

    2009-11-15

    To investigate the relationship between topological types and molecular building blocks (MBBs), we have designed and synthesized a series of three-dimensional (3D) interpenetrating metal-organic frameworks based on different polygons or polyhedra under hydrothermal conditions, namely [Cd(bpib){sub 0.5}(L{sup 1})] (1), [Cd(bpib){sub 0.5}(L{sup 2})].H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd(bpib){sub 0.5}(L{sup 3})] (3) and [Cd(bib){sub 0.5}(L{sup 1})] (4), where bpib=1,4-bis(2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-imidazol-1-yl)butane, bib=1,4-bis(1H-imidazol-1-yl)butane, H{sub 2}L{sup 1}=4-(4-carboxybenzyloxy)benzoic acid, H{sub 2}L{sup 2}=4,4'-(ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))dibenzoic acid and H{sub 2}L{sup 3}=4,4'-(1,4-phenylenebis(methylene))bis(oxy)dibenzoic acid, respectively. Their structures have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, and thermogravimetric (TG) analyses. Compounds 1-3 display alpha-Po topological nets with different degrees of interpenetration based on the similar octahedral [Cd{sub 2}(-COO){sub 4}] building blocks. Compound 4 is a six-fold interpenetrating diamondoid net based on tetrahedral MBBs. By careful inspection of these structures, we find that various carboxylic ligands and N-donor ligands with different coordination modes and conformations, and metal centers with different geometries are important for the formation of the different MBBs. It is believed that different topological types lie on different MBBs with various polygons or polyhedra. Such as four- and six-connected topologies are formed by tetrahedral and octahedral building blocks. In addition, with the increase of carboxylic ligands' length, the degrees of interpenetration have been changed in the alpha-Po topological nets. And the luminescent properties of these compounds have been investigated in detail. - Graphical abstract: A series of three-dimensional interpenetrating metal-organic frameworks based on different polygons or polyhedra

  5. MECs: "Building Blocks" for Creating Biological and Chemical Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Douglas A.; Anderson, Lindsey E.; Hill, Casey J.; Mostaghim, Afshin; Rodgers, Victor G. J.

    2016-01-01

    The development of new biological and chemical instruments for research and diagnostic applications is often slowed by the cost, specialization, and custom nature of these instruments. New instruments are built from components that are drawn from a host of different disciplines and not designed to integrate together, and once built, an instrument typically performs a limited number of tasks and cannot be easily adapted for new applications. Consequently, the process of inventing new instruments is very inefficient, especially for researchers or clinicians in resource-limited settings. To improve this situation, we propose that a family of standardized multidisciplinary components is needed, a set of “building blocks” that perform a wide array of different tasks and are designed to integrate together. Using these components, scientists, engineers, and clinicians would be able to build custom instruments for their own unique needs quickly and easily. In this work we present the foundation of this set of components, a system we call Multifluidic Evolutionary Components (MECs). “Multifluidic” conveys the wide range of fluid volumes MECs operate upon (from nanoliters to milliliters and beyond); “multi” also reflects the multiple disciplines supported by the system (not only fluidics but also electronics, optics, and mechanics). “Evolutionary” refers to the design principles that enable the library of MEC parts to easily grow and adapt to new applications. Each MEC “building block” performs a fundamental function that is commonly found in biological or chemical instruments, functions like valving, pumping, mixing, controlling, and sensing. Each MEC also has a unique symbol linked to a physical definition, which enables instruments to be designed rapidly and efficiently using schematics. As a proof-of-concept, we use MECs to build a variety of instruments, including a fluidic routing and mixing system capable of manipulating fluid volumes over five

  6. Continuous flow synthesis of α-halo ketones: essential building blocks of antiretroviral agents.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Vagner D; Gutmann, Bernhard; Miranda, Leandro S M; de Souza, Rodrigo O M A; Kappe, C Oliver

    2014-02-21

    The development of a continuous flow process for the multistep synthesis of α-halo ketones starting from N-protected amino acids is described. The obtained α-halo ketones are chiral building blocks for the synthesis of HIV protease inhibitors, such as atazanavir and darunavir. The synthesis starts with the formation of a mixed anhydride in a first tubular reactor. The anhydride is subsequently combined with anhydrous diazomethane in a tube-in-tube reactor. The tube-in-tube reactor consists of an inner tube, made from a gas-permeable, hydrophobic material, enclosed in a thick-walled, impermeable outer tube. Diazomethane is generated in the inner tube in an aqueous medium, and anhydrous diazomethane subsequently diffuses through the permeable membrane into the outer chamber. The α-diazo ketone is produced from the mixed anhydride and diazomethane in the outer chamber, and the resulting diazo ketone is finally converted to the halo ketone with anhydrous ethereal hydrogen halide. This method eliminates the need to store, transport, or handle diazomethane and produces α-halo ketone building blocks in a multistep system without racemization in excellent yields. A fully continuous process allowed the synthesis of 1.84 g of α-chloro ketone from the respective N-protected amino acid within ~4.5 h (87% yield).

  7. Tailoring Building Blocks and Their Boundary Interaction for the Creation of New, Potentially Superhard, Carbon Materials.

    PubMed

    Yao, Mingguang; Cui, Wen; Du, Mingrun; Xiao, Junping; Yang, Xigui; Liu, Shijie; Liu, Ran; Wang, Fei; Cui, Tian; Sundqvist, Bertil; Liu, Bingbing

    2015-07-08

    A strategy for preparing hybrid carbon structures with amorphous carbon clusters as hard building blocks by compressing a series of predesigned two-component fullerides is presented. In such constructed structures the building blocks and their boundaries can be tuned by changing the starting components, providing a way for the creation of new hard/superhard materials with desirable properties.

  8. Block Building: Its Role in Children's Learning as Seen by One Elementary School Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werbizky, Lydia

    1991-01-01

    The role of block building in children's learning was studied by a student teacher who observed a teacher's block building curriculum in a combined first and second grade class. The purpose was to clarify the linkage between thinking and doing, spoken intention and actual consequences, and planning and spontaneity in the curriculum. The cycle of…

  9. The Development of Spatial Skills through Interventions Involving Block Building Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Beth M.; Andrews, Nicole; Schindler, Holly; Kersh, Joanne E.; Samper, Alexandra; Copley, Juanita

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the use of block-building interventions to develop spatial-reasoning skills in kindergartners. Two intervention conditions and a control condition were included to determine, first, whether the block building activities themselves benefited children's spatial skills, and secondly, whether a story context further improved…

  10. Development of Test Article Building Block (TABB) for deployable platform systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.; Barbour, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    The concept of a Test Article Building Block (TABB) is described. The TABB is a ground test article that is representative of a future building block that can be used to construct LEO and GEO deployable space platforms for communications and scientific payloads. This building block contains a main housing within which the entire structure, utilities, and deployment/retraction mechanism are stowed during launch. The end adapter secures the foregoing components to the housing during launch. The main housing and adapter provide the necessary building-block-to-building-block attachments for automatically deployable platforms. Removal from the shuttle cargo bay can be accomplished with the remote manipulator system (RMS) and/or the handling and positioning aid (HAPA). In this concept, all the electrical connections are in place prior to launch with automatic latches for payload attachment provided on either the end adapters or housings. The housings also can contain orbiter docking ports for payload installation and maintenance.

  11. Development of a Deterministic Ethernet Building blocks for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidi, C.; Jakovljevic, Mirko

    2015-09-01

    The benefits of using commercially based networking standards and protocols have been widely discussed and are expected to include reduction in overall mission cost, shortened integration and test (I&T) schedules, increased operations flexibility, and hardware and software upgradeability/scalability with developments ongoing in the commercial world. The deterministic Ethernet technology TTEthernet [1] diploid on the NASA Orion spacecraft has demonstrated the use of the TTEthernet technology for a safety critical human space flight application during the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1). The TTEthernet technology used within the NASA Orion program has been matured for the use within this mission but did not lead to a broader use in space applications or an international space standard. Therefore TTTech has developed a new version which allows to scale the technology for different applications not only the high end missions allowing to decrease the size of the building blocks leading to a reduction of size weight and power enabling the use in smaller applications. TTTech is currently developing a full space products offering for its TTEthernet technology to allow the use in different space applications not restricted to launchers and human spaceflight. A broad space market assessment and the current ESA TRP7594 lead to the development of a space grade TTEthernet controller ASIC based on the ESA qualified Atmel AT1C8RHA95 process [2]. In this paper we will describe our current TTEthernet controller development towards a space qualified network component allowing future spacecrafts to operate in significant radiation environments while using a single onboard network for reliable commanding and data transfer.

  12. The building blocks of the full body ownership illusion

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, Antonella; Slater, Mel

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has reported that it is not difficult to give people the illusion of ownership over an artificial body, providing a powerful tool for the investigation of the neural and cognitive mechanisms underlying body perception and self consciousness. We present an experimental study that uses immersive virtual reality (IVR) focused on identifying the perceptual building blocks of this illusion. We systematically manipulated visuotactile and visual sensorimotor contingencies, visual perspective, and the appearance of the virtual body in order to assess their relative role and mutual interaction. Consistent results from subjective reports and physiological measures showed that a first person perspective over a fake humanoid body is essential for eliciting a body ownership illusion. We found that the illusion of ownership can be generated when the virtual body has a realistic skin tone and spatially substitutes the real body seen from a first person perspective. In this case there is no need for an additional contribution of congruent visuotactile or sensorimotor cues. Additionally, we found that the processing of incongruent perceptual cues can be modulated by the level of the illusion: when the illusion is strong, incongruent cues are not experienced as incorrect. Participants exposed to asynchronous visuotactile stimulation can experience the ownership illusion and perceive touch as originating from an object seen to contact the virtual body. Analogously, when the level of realism of the virtual body is not high enough and/or when there is no spatial overlap between the two bodies, then the contribution of congruent multisensory and/or sensorimotor cues is required for evoking the illusion. On the basis of these results and inspired by findings from neurophysiological recordings in the monkey, we propose a model that accounts for many of the results reported in the literature. PMID:23519597

  13. Pyrazine-imide complexes: reversible redox and MOF building blocks.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Matthew G; Miller, Reece G; Brooker, Sally

    2015-02-14

    The synthesis of the symmetric pyrazine imide ligand, N-(2-pyrazylcarbonyl)-2-pyrazinecarboxamide, (Hdpzca) and five new first row transition metal complexes of it are reported: [M(II)(dpzca)(2)], M(II) = Fe, Cu, Zn; [Cu(II)(dpzca)(H(2)O)(2)]BF(4), [Cu(II)(dpzca)(H(2)O)(3)](2)SiF(6). The crystal structures of Hdpzca, [Co(II)(dpzca)(2)], [Cu(II)(dpzca)(2)], {[Co(III)(dpzca)(2)](BF(4))}(2)·5CH(3)CN and [Cu(II)(dpzca)(H(2)O)(3))](2)SiF(6)·2H(2)O were determined and reveal an orthogonal positioning of the 'spare' pyrazine nitrogen atoms and 'spare' pairs of imide oxygen atoms. The [M(II)(dpzca)(2)] complexes are therefore useful six-coordinate building blocks for producing larger supramolecular assemblies. Two examples of secondary assembly of [M(II)(dpzca)(2)] complexes, with M = Co and Ni, with silver nitrate gave single crystals; {[Co(III)(dpzca)(2)Ag](NO(3))(2)·2H(2)O}n and {([Ni(II)(dpzca)(2)Ag(I)(1/2)](1/2NO(3))(xH(2)O}n were structurally characterised. The redox processes of [M(II)(dpzca)(2)], with M(II) = Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn, are reported and, as seen for M(II) = Co, reversible metal- and ligand-based redox processes are observed, with E(m)(M(II)/M(III)) values 0.15-0.24 V higher than for the analogous complexes of Hpypzca (non-symmetric pyridine/pyrazine imide ligand), and 0.35-0.36 V higher than for the complexes of Hbpca (symmetric pyridine imide ligand).

  14. From Synthesis to Function via Iterative Assembly of MIDA Boronate Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junqi; Grillo, Anthony S.; Burke, Martin D.

    2015-01-01

    Small molecules can powerfully benefit society, but the study and optimization of their function is too often impeded by the time-intensive and specialist-dependent process that is typically used to make them. In contrast, general and automated platforms have been developed for peptide, oligonucleotide, and increasingly oligosaccharide synthesis, resulting in on-demand access to these molecules, even for non-specialists. A more generalized and automated approach for making small molecules could similarly help shift the rate limiting step in small molecule science from synthesis to function. Targeting this goal, we have developed a fully automated and increasingly general platform for iterative coupling of boronate building blocks. Analogous to peptide synthesis, the process involves iterative coupling of haloboronic acids protected as the corresponding N-methyliminodiacetic acid (MIDA) boronates. This platform has enabled us and other groups to access many polyene natural products, including the polyene motifs in >75% of all polyene natural products. It further allowed us to derivatize and thereby understand the powerful but also highly toxic antifungal natural product amphotericin B, which has led to the development of less toxic derivatives currently under evaluation as drug candidates. We also discovered a stereocontrolled entry into chiral, non-racemic α-boryl aldehydes, which are versatile intermediates for the synthesis of many Csp3 boronate building blocks that are otherwise difficult to access. We have also expanded the scope of the platform to include Csp3-rich, polycyclic molecules using a linear-to-cyclized strategy, in which Csp3 boronate building blocks are iteratively assembled into linear precursors that are then cyclized into the cyclic frameworks found in many natural products and natural product-like structures. Enabled by the serendipitous discovery of a catch-and-release protocol for generally purifying MIDA boronate intermediates, the platform

  15. An Organolanthanide Building Block Approach to Single-Molecule Magnets.

    PubMed

    Harriman, Katie L M; Murugesu, Muralee

    2016-06-21

    and experimental chemistry allows us to shed light on the mechanisms and electronic properties that govern the slow relaxation dynamics inherent to this unique set of SMMs, thus providing insight into the role by which both symmetry and crystal field effects contribute to the magnetic properties. As we look to the future success of such materials in practical devices, we must gain an understanding of how the 4f elements communicate magnetically, a subject upon which there is still limited knowledge. As such, we have described our work on coupling mononuclear metallocenes to generate new dinuclear SMMs. Through a building block approach, we have been able to gain access to new double,- triple- and quadruple-decker complexes that possess remarkable properties; exhibiting TB of 12 K and Ueff above 300 K. Our goal is to develop a fundamental platform from which to study 4f coupling, while maintaining and enhancing the strict axiality of the anisotropy of the 4f ions. This Account will present a successful strategy employed in the production of novel and high-performing SMMs, as well as a clear overview of the lessons learned throughout.

  16. Price-Focused Analysis of Commercially Available Building Blocks for Combinatorial Library Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kalliokoski, Tuomo

    2015-10-12

    Combinatorial libraries are synthesized by combining smaller reagents (building blocks), the price of which is an important component of the total costs associated with the synthetic exercise. A significant portion of commercially available reagents are too expensive for large scale work. In this study, 13 commonly used reagent classes in combinatorial library synthesis (primary and secondary amines, carboxylic acids, alcohols, ketones, aldehydes, boronic acids, acyl halides, sulfonyl chlorides, isocyanates, isothiocyanates, azides and chloroformates) were analyzed with respect to the cost, physicochemical properties (molecular weight and calculated logP), chemical diversity, and 3D-likeness using a large data set. The results define the chemical space accessible under a constraint of limited financial resources.

  17. Hierarchical coassembly of DNA-triptycene hybrid molecular building blocks and zinc protoporphyrin IX.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rina; Singh, Sumit; Monisha, Mohan; Bhowmick, Sourav; Roy, Anindya; Das, Neeladri; Das, Prolay

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we describe the successful construction of composite DNA nanostructures by the self-assembly of complementary symmetrical 2,6,14-triptycenetripropiolic acid (TPA)-DNA building blocks and zinc protoporphyrin IX (Zn PpIX). DNA-organic molecule scaffolds for the composite DNA nanostructure were constructed through covalent conjugation of TPA with 5'-C12-amine-terminated modified single strand DNA (ssDNA) and its complementary strand. The repeated covalent conjugation of TPA with DNA was confirmed by using denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF). The biologically relevant photosensitizer Zn PpIX was used to direct the hybridization-mediated self-assembly of DNA-TPA molecular building blocks as well as a model guest molecule within the DNA-TPA supramolecular self-assembly. The formation of fiber-like composite DNA nanostructures was observed. Native PAGE, circular dichroism (CD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been utilized for analyzing the formation of DNA nanofibers after the coassembly. Computational methods were applied to discern the theoretical dimension of the DNA-TPA molecular building block of the nanofibers. A notable change in photocatalytic efficiency of Zn PpIX was observed when it was inside the TPA-DNA scaffold. The significant increase in ROS generation by Zn PpIX when trapped in this biocompatible DNA-TPA hybrid nanofiber may be an effective tool to explore photodynamic therapy (PDT) applications as well as photocatalytic reactions.

  18. Building a Case for Blocks as Kindergarten Mathematics Learning Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzer, Cathy; Gerhardt, Kacie; Coca, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Kindergarteners need access to blocks as thinking tools to develop, model, test, and articulate their mathematical ideas. In the current educational landscape, resources such as blocks are being pushed to the side and being replaced by procedural worksheets and academic "seat time" in order to address standards. Mathematics research…

  19. Building a Case for Blocks as Kindergarten Mathematics Learning Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzer, Cathy; Gerhardt, Kacie; Coca, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Kindergarteners need access to blocks as thinking tools to develop, model, test, and articulate their mathematical ideas. In the current educational landscape, resources such as blocks are being pushed to the side and being replaced by procedural worksheets and academic "seat time" in order to address standards. Mathematics research…

  20. The Development of Symbolic Representation: The Case of Building Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reifel, Stuart

    The symbolic representational block constructions of twenty 4-year-olds and twenty 7-year-olds were analyzed from Werner and Kaplan's (1963) theoretical perspective. Each child was read a story and then asked to use the blocks to represent the story. Older children included in their representations a larger number of features that were central to…

  1. Science Support: The Building Blocks of Active Data Curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillory, A.

    2013-12-01

    While the scientific method is built on reproducibility and transparency, and results are published in peer reviewed literature, we have come to the digital age of very large datasets (now of the order of petabytes and soon exabytes) which cannot be published in the traditional way. To preserve reproducibility and transparency, active curation is necessary to keep and protect the information in the long term, and 'science support' activities provide the building blocks for active data curation. With the explosive growth of data in all fields in recent years, there is a pressing urge for data centres to now provide adequate services to ensure long-term preservation and digital curation of project data outputs, however complex those may be. Science support provides advice and support to science projects on data and information management, from file formats through to general data management awareness. Another purpose of science support is to raise awareness in the science community of data and metadata standards and best practice, engendering a culture where data outputs are seen as valued assets. At the heart of Science support is the Data Management Plan (DMP) which sets out a coherent approach to data issues pertaining to the data generating project. It provides an agreed record of the data management needs and issues within the project. The DMP is agreed upon with project investigators to ensure that a high quality documented data archive is created. It includes conditions of use and deposit to clearly express the ownership, responsibilities and rights associated with the data. Project specific needs are also identified for data processing, visualization tools and data sharing services. As part of the National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) and National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO), the Centre for Environmental Data Archival (CEDA) fulfills this science support role of facilitating atmospheric and Earth observation data generating projects to ensure

  2. Biologically inspired strategy for programmed assembly of viral building blocks with controlled dimensions.

    PubMed

    Rego, Jennifer M; Lee, Jae-Hun; Lee, David H; Yi, Hyunmin

    2013-02-01

    Facile fabrication of building blocks with precisely controlled dimensions is imperative in the development of functional devices and materials. We demonstrate the assembly of nanoscale viral building blocks of controlled lengths using a biologically motivated strategy. To achieve this we exploit the simple self-assembly mechanism of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), whose length is solely governed by the length of its genomic mRNA. We synthesize viral mRNA of desired lengths using simple molecular biology techniques, and in vitro assemble the mRNA with viral coat proteins to yield viral building blocks of controlled lengths. The results indicate that the assembly of the viral building blocks is consistent and reproducible, and can be readily extended to assemble building blocks with genetically modified coat proteins (TMV1cys). Additionally, we confirm the potential utility of the TMV1cys viral building blocks with controlled dimensions via covalent and quantitative conjugation of fluorescent markers. We envision that our biologically inspired assembly strategy to design and construct viral building blocks of controlled dimensions could be employed to fabricate well-controlled nanoarchitectures and hybrid nanomaterials for a wide variety of applications including nanoelectronics and nanocatalysis.

  3. Biologically Inspired Strategy for the Assembly of Viral Building Blocks with Controlled Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rego, Jennifer M.

    I demonstrate the assembly of nanoscale viral building blocks of controlled lengths using a biologically motivated strategy. To achieve this I exploit the simple assembly mechanism of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), whose length is solely governed by the length of its genomic mRNA, using both the wildtype and genetically engineered (displaying cysteine residues) forms of the virus. The observed lengths of the viral building blocks correlate well with the expected lengths. Additionally, I demonstrate the assembly of viral building blocks of controlled length derived from the genetically engineered form of TMV displaying cysteine groups, which signifies that the mutation does not affect viral building block assembly. Next, I examine the application of WT viral building blocks as individual components for the assembly of 1 dimensional nanoarrays via biotin-streptavidin binding. Finally, I examine the application of genetically engineered 1cys viral building blocks as a biological template for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles, functionalization by small molecules and a component of a vertically patterned template. I envision that the biologically inspired assembly strategy to design and construct viral building blocks of controlled dimensions together with the applications explored could be employed to fabricate well-controlled nanoarchitectures and hybrid nanomaterials for a wide variety of applications.

  4. Modular assembly of primary metabolic building blocks: a chemical language in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Frank C

    2015-01-22

    The metabolome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, like that of other model organisms, remained largely uncharacterized until recent studies demonstrated the importance of small molecule-based signaling cascades for many aspects of nematode biology. These studies revealed that nematodes are amazingly skilled chemists: using simple building blocks from primary metabolism and a strategy of modular assembly, nematodes create complex molecular architectures that serve as signaling molecules. These nematode-derived modular metabolites (NDMMs) are based on the dideoxysugars ascarylose and paratose, which serve as scaffolds for the attachment of moieties from lipid, amino acid, neurotransmitter, and nucleoside metabolism. Although preliminary biosynthetic studies have confirmed the primary metabolism origin of some of the building blocks incorporated into NDMMs, the mechanisms that underlie their highly specific assembly are not understood. I argue that identification of new variants of primary metabolism-derived structures that serve important signaling functions in C. elegans and other nematodes provides a strong incentive for a comprehensive reanalysis of metabolism in higher animals, including humans.

  5. Modular assembly of primary metabolic building blocks: a chemical language in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The metabolome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, like that of other model organisms, remained largely uncharacterized until recent studies demonstrated the importance of small molecule-based signaling cascades for many aspects of nematode biology. These studies revealed that nematodes are amazingly skilled chemists: using simple building blocks from primary metabolism and a strategy of modular assembly, nematodes create complex molecular architectures that serve as signaling molecules. These nematode-derived modular metabolites (NDMMs) are based on the dideoxysugars ascarylose or paratose, which serve as scaffolds for attachment of moieties from lipid, amino acid, neurotransmitter, and nucleoside metabolism. Although preliminary biosynthetic studies have confirmed the primary metabolism origin of some of the building blocks incorporated into NDMMs, the mechanisms that underlie their highly specific assembly are not understood. Overall, I argue that identification of new variants of primary metabolism-derived structures that serve important signaling functions in C. elegans and other nematodes provides a strong incentive for a comprehensive re-analysis of metabolism in higher animals, including humans. PMID:25484238

  6. Reversal of β-oxidative pathways for the microbial production of chemicals and polymer building blocks.

    PubMed

    Kallscheuer, Nicolai; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael; Marienhagen, Jan

    2017-07-01

    β-Oxidation is the ubiquitous metabolic strategy to break down fatty acids. In the course of this four-step process, two carbon atoms are liberated per cycle from the fatty acid chain in the form of acetyl-CoA. However, typical β-oxidative strategies are not restricted to monocarboxylic (fatty) acid degradation only, but can also be involved in the utilization of aromatic compounds, amino acids and dicarboxylic acids. Each enzymatic step of a typical β-oxidation cycle is reversible, offering the possibility to also take advantage of reversed metabolic pathways for applied purposes. In such cases, 3-oxoacyl-CoA thiolases, which catalyze the final chain-shortening step in the catabolic direction, mediate the condensation of an acyl-CoA starter molecule with acetyl-CoA in the anabolic direction. Subsequently, the carbonyl-group at C3 is stepwise reduced and dehydrated yielding a chain-elongated product. In the last years, several β-oxidation pathways have been studied in detail and reversal of these pathways already proved to be a promising strategy for the production of chemicals and polymer building blocks in several industrially relevant microorganisms. This review covers recent advancements in this field and discusses constraints and bottlenecks of this metabolic strategy in comparison to alternative production pathways. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mn-based nanostructured building blocks: Synthesis, characterization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltran Huarac, Juan

    The quest for smaller functional elements of devices has stimulated increased interest in charge-transfer phenomena at the nanoscale. Mn-based nanostructured building blocks are particularly appealing given that the excited states of high-spin Mn2+ ions induce unusual d-d energy transfer processes, which is critical for better understanding the performance of electronic and spintronic devices. These nanostructures also exhibit unique properties superior to those of common Fe- and Co-based nanomaterials, including: excellent structural flexibility, enhanced electrochemical energy storage, effective ion-exchange dynamics, more comprehensive transport mechanisms, strong quantum yield, and they act as effective luminescent centers for more efficient visible light emitters. Moreover, Mn-based nanostructures (MBNs) are crucial for the design and assembly of inexpensive nanodevices in diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS), optoelectronics, magneto-optics, and field-effect transistors, owing to the great abundance and low-cost of Mn. Nonetheless, the paucity of original methods and techniques to fabricate new multifunctional MBNs that fulfill industrial demands limits the sustainable development of innovative technology in materials sciences. In order to meet this critical need, in this thesis we develop and implement novel methods and techniques to fabricate zero- and one-dimensional highly-crystalline new-generation MBNs conducive to the generation of new technology, and provide alternative and feasible miniaturization strategies to control and devise at nanometric precision their size, shape, structure and composition. Herein, we also establish the experimental conditions to grow Mn-based nanowires (NWs), nanotubes (NTs), nanoribbons (NRs), nanosaws (NSs), nanoparticles (NPs) and nanocomposites (NCs) via chemical/physical deposition and co-precipitation chemical routes, and determine the pertinent arrangements to our experimental schemes in order to extend our bottom

  8. Cosmic "Dig" Reveals Vestiges of the Milky Way's Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    Peering through the thick dust clouds of our galaxy's "bulge" (the myriads of stars surrounding its centre), and revealing an amazing amount of detail, a team of astronomers has unveiled an unusual mix of stars in the stellar grouping known as Terzan 5. Never observed anywhere in the bulge before, this peculiar "cocktail" of stars suggests that Terzan 5 is in fact one of the bulge's primordial building blocks, most likely the relic of a proto-galaxy that merged with the Milky Way during its very early days. "The history of the Milky Way is encoded in its oldest fragments, globular clusters and other systems of stars that have witnessed the entire evolution of our galaxy," says Francesco Ferraro from the University of Bologna, lead author of a paper appearing in this week's issue of the journal Nature. "Our study opens a new window on yet another piece of our galactic past." Like archaeologists, who dig through the dust piling up on top of the remains of past civilisations and unearth crucial pieces of the history of mankind, astronomers have been gazing through the thick layers of interstellar dust obscuring the bulge of the Milky Way and have unveiled an extraordinary cosmic relic. The target of the study is the star cluster Terzan 5. The new observations show that this object, unlike all but a few exceptional globular clusters, does not harbour stars which are all born at the same time - what astronomers call a "single population" of stars. Instead, the multitude of glowing stars in Terzan 5 formed in at least two different epochs, the earliest probably some 12 billion years ago and then again 6 billion years ago. "Only one globular cluster with such a complex history of star formation has been observed in the halo of the Milky Way: Omega Centauri," says team member Emanuele Dalessandro. "This is the first time we see this in the bulge." The galactic bulge is the most inaccessible region of our galaxy for astronomical observations: only infrared light can

  9. Plastic Fibre Reinforced Soil Blocks as a Sustainable Building Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, C. K. Subramania; Nambiar, E. K. Kunhanandan; Abraham, Benny Mathews

    2012-10-01

    Solid waste management, especially the huge quantity of waste plastics, is one of the major environmental concerns nowadays. Their employability in block making in the form of fibres, as one of the methods of waste management, can be investigated through a fundamental research. This paper highlights the salient observations from a systematic investigation on the effect of embedded fibre from plastic waste on the performance of stabilised mud blocks. Stabilisation of the soil was done by adding cement, lime and their combination. Plastic fibre in chopped form from carry bags and mineral water bottles were added (0.1% & 0.2% by weight of soil) as reinforcement. The blocks were tested for density, and compressive strength, and observed failure patterns were analysed. Blocks with 0.1% of plastic fibres showed an increase in strength of about 3 to 10%. From the observations of failure pattern it can be concluded that benefits of fibre reinforcement includes both improved ductility in comparison with raw blocks and inhibition of crack propogation after its initial formation.

  10. Polymorphic Ring-Shaped Molecular Clusters Made of Shape-Variable Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Salguero, Keitel; Hamada, Shogo; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M.; Murata, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembling molecular building blocks able to dynamically change their shapes, is a concept that would offer a route to reconfigurable systems. Although simulation studies predict novel properties useful for applications in diverse fields, such kinds of building blocks, have not been implemented thus far with molecules. Here, we report shape-variable building blocks fabricated by DNA self-assembly. Blocks are movable enough to undergo shape transitions along geometrical ranges. Blocks connect to each other and assemble into polymorphic ring-shaped clusters via the stacking of DNA blunt-ends. Reconfiguration of the polymorphic clusters is achieved by the surface diffusion on mica substrate in response to a monovalent salt concentration. This work could inspire novel reconfigurable self-assembling systems for applications in molecular robotics.

  11. Stereoselective Synthesis of Dienyl-Carboxylate Building Blocks: Formal Synthesis of Inthomycin C

    PubMed Central

    Souris, Caroline; Frébault, Frédéric; Patel, Ashay; Audisio, Davide; Houk, K. N.; Maulide, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    A direct synthesis of stereodefined halodienes is reported. Those key building blocks enable a concise access to polyenic products, as demonstrated in a modular synthesis of Inthomycin C. PMID:23763296

  12. A Working Model of Protein Synthesis Using Lego(TM) Building Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templin, Mark A.; Fetters, Marcia K.

    2002-01-01

    Uses Lego building blocks to improve the effectiveness of teaching about protein synthesis. Provides diagrams and pictures for a 2-3 day student activity. Discusses mRNA, transfer RNA, and a protein synthesis model. (MVL)

  13. A Working Model of Protein Synthesis Using Lego(TM) Building Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templin, Mark A.; Fetters, Marcia K.

    2002-01-01

    Uses Lego building blocks to improve the effectiveness of teaching about protein synthesis. Provides diagrams and pictures for a 2-3 day student activity. Discusses mRNA, transfer RNA, and a protein synthesis model. (MVL)

  14. Siloxanol-functionalized copper iodide cluster as a thermochromic luminescent building block.

    PubMed

    Perruchas, Sandrine; Desboeufs, Nicolas; Maron, Sébastien; Le Goff, Xavier F; Fargues, Alexandre; Garcia, Alain; Gacoin, Thierry; Boilot, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-16

    A copper iodide cluster bearing reactive silanol groups exhibits thermochromic luminescence properties sensitive to its chemical environment and is thus a suitable building block for the synthesis of optically active materials.

  15. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Ethylene: The Organic Chemical Industry's Most Important Building Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernelius, W. Conrad, Ed.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The value of ethylene, as the organic chemical industry's most important building block, is discussed. The discussion focuses on the source of ethylene, its various forms and functions, and the ways in which the forms are made. (SA)

  16. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Ethylene: The Organic Chemical Industry's Most Important Building Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernelius, W. Conrad, Ed.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The value of ethylene, as the organic chemical industry's most important building block, is discussed. The discussion focuses on the source of ethylene, its various forms and functions, and the ways in which the forms are made. (SA)

  17. Binding Blocks: Building the Universe One Nucleus at a Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diget, C. Aa.; Pastore, A.; Leech, K.; Haylett, T.; Lock, S.; Sanders, T.; Shelley, M.; Willett, H. V.; Keegans, J.; Sinclair, L.; Simpson, E. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new teaching and outreach activity based around the construction of a three-dimensional chart of isotopes using LEGO® bricks. The activity, "binding blocks", demonstrates nuclear and astrophysical processes through a seven-meter chart of all nuclear isotopes, built from over 26000 LEGO® bricks. It integrates A-Level and GCSE…

  18. The role of thought suppression in building mental blocks.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Megan; Weylin Sternglanz, R; Viswanathan, Uma; Wegner, Daniel M

    2008-12-01

    This research examined the role of thought suppression in the formation of mental blocks. In Experiment 1, participants were asked to generate a series of creative associates for two target words after initially suppressing a word that was semantically related to one of the two target words. Participants produced fewer responses, and experienced a greater sensation of being mentally blocked, when attempting to produce associates for the target word that was semantically related to the suppressed word. In Experiment 2, participants either thought about or suppressed a series of words prior to completing a word fragment completion task. Each word either corresponded exactly to one of the word fragment solutions (target primes) or resembled one of the solutions but was slightly different in its orthographic properties (negative primes). Participants performed most poorly on the items for which they had initially suppressed negative primes.

  19. Pattern Blocks: Building Algebraic Thinking with Progressive Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willcutt, Bob

    The books in this series provide an essential ingredient in the transition from concrete mathematical experience to the symbolic reasoning used in algebra. They aim to guide the student in building and extending manipulative patterns, collecting numerical data, and analyzing the results. The main objective of the activities in this book is for the…

  20. Building an organic block storage service at CERN with Ceph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ster, Daniel; Wiebalck, Arne

    2014-06-01

    Emerging storage requirements, such as the need for block storage for both OpenStack VMs and file services like AFS and NFS, have motivated the development of a generic backend storage service for CERN IT. The goals for such a service include (a) vendor neutrality, (b) horizontal scalability with commodity hardware, (c) fault tolerance at the disk, host, and network levels, and (d) support for geo-replication. Ceph is an attractive option due to its native block device layer RBD which is built upon its scalable, reliable, and performant object storage system, RADOS. It can be considered an "organic" storage solution because of its ability to balance and heal itself while living on an ever-changing set of heterogeneous disk servers. This work will present the outcome of a petabyte-scale test deployment of Ceph by CERN IT. We will first present the architecture and configuration of our cluster, including a summary of best practices learned from the community and discovered internally. Next the results of various functionality and performance tests will be shown: the cluster has been used as a backend block storage system for AFS and NFS servers as well as a large OpenStack cluster at CERN. Finally, we will discuss the next steps and future possibilities for Ceph at CERN.

  1. Designer amphiphilic proteins as building blocks for the intracellular formation of organelle-like compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Matthias C.; Schreiber, Andreas; von Olshausen, Philipp; Varga, Balázs R.; Kretz, Oliver; Joch, Barbara; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf; Eimer, Stefan; Kele, Péter; Schiller, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale biological materials formed by the assembly of defined block-domain proteins control the formation of cellular compartments such as organelles. Here, we introduce an approach to intentionally ‘program’ the de novo synthesis and self-assembly of genetically encoded amphiphilic proteins to form cellular compartments, or organelles, in Escherichia coli. These proteins serve as building blocks for the formation of artificial compartments in vivo in a similar way to lipid-based organelles. We investigated the formation of these organelles using epifluorescence microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The in vivo modification of these protein-based de novo organelles, by means of site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids, allows the introduction of artificial chemical functionalities. Co-localization of membrane proteins results in the formation of functionalized artificial organelles combining artificial and natural cellular function. Adding these protein structures to the cellular machinery may have consequences in nanobiotechnology, synthetic biology and materials science, including the constitution of artificial cells and bio-based metamaterials.

  2. Designer amphiphilic proteins as building blocks for the intracellular formation of organelle-like compartments.

    PubMed

    Huber, Matthias C; Schreiber, Andreas; von Olshausen, Philipp; Varga, Balázs R; Kretz, Oliver; Joch, Barbara; Barnert, Sabine; Schubert, Rolf; Eimer, Stefan; Kele, Péter; Schiller, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale biological materials formed by the assembly of defined block-domain proteins control the formation of cellular compartments such as organelles. Here, we introduce an approach to intentionally 'program' the de novo synthesis and self-assembly of genetically encoded amphiphilic proteins to form cellular compartments, or organelles, in Escherichia coli. These proteins serve as building blocks for the formation of artificial compartments in vivo in a similar way to lipid-based organelles. We investigated the formation of these organelles using epifluorescence microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The in vivo modification of these protein-based de novo organelles, by means of site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids, allows the introduction of artificial chemical functionalities. Co-localization of membrane proteins results in the formation of functionalized artificial organelles combining artificial and natural cellular function. Adding these protein structures to the cellular machinery may have consequences in nanobiotechnology, synthetic biology and materials science, including the constitution of artificial cells and bio-based metamaterials.

  3. The Building Blocks of Life Move from Ground to Tree to Animal and Back to Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    I generally use combinations of big words to describe my science, such as biogeochemistry, ecosystem ecology, nutrient cycling, stoichiometry, tropical deforestation, land-use change, agricultural intensification, eutrophication, greenhouse gas emissions, and sustainable development. I didn't expect to use any of these words, but I was surprised that I couldn't use some others that seem simple enough to me, such as farm, plant, soil, and forest. I landed on "building blocks" as my metaphor for the forms of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other elements that I study as they cycle through and among ecosystems. I study what makes trees and other kinds of life grow. We all know that they need the sun and that they take up water from the ground, but what else do trees need from the ground? What do animals that eat leaves and wood get from the trees? Just as we need building blocks to grow our bodies, trees and animals also need building blocks for growing their bodies. Trees get part of their building blocks from the ground and animals get theirs from what they eat. When animals poop and when leaves fall, some of their building blocks return to the ground. When they die, their building blocks also go back to the ground. I also study what happens to the ground, the water, and the air when we cut down trees, kill or shoo away the animals, and make fields to grow our food. Can we grow enough food and still keep the ground, water, and air clean? I think the answer is yes, but it will take better understanding of how all of those building blocks fit together and move around, from ground to tree to animal and back to ground.

  4. Combinatorial chemistry in nematodes: modular assembly of primary metabolism-derived building blocks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was the first animal to have its genome fully sequenced and has become an important model organism for biomedical research. However, like many other animal model systems, its metabolome remained largely uncharacterized, until recent investigations demonstrated the importance of small molecule-based signalling cascades for virtually every aspect of nematode biology. These studies have revealed that nematodes are amazingly skilled chemists: using simple building blocks from conserved primary metabolism and a strategy of modular assembly, C. elegans and other nematode species create complex molecular architectures to regulate their development and behaviour. These nematode-derived modular metabolites (NDMMs) are based on the dideoxysugars ascarylose or paratose, which serve as scaffolds for attachment of moieties from lipid, amino acid, carbohydrate, citrate, and nucleoside metabolism. Mutant screens and comparative metabolomics based on NMR spectroscopy and MS have so-far revealed several 100 different ascarylose (“ascarosides”) and a few paratose (“paratosides”) derivatives, many of which represent potent signalling molecules that can be active at femtomolar levels, regulating development, behaviour, body shape, and many other life history traits. NDMM biosynthesis appears to be carefully regulated as assembly of different modules proceeds with very high specificity. Preliminary biosynthetic studies have confirmed the primary metabolism origin of some NDMM building blocks, whereas the mechanisms that underlie their highly specific assembly are not understood. Considering their functions and biosynthetic origin, NDMMs represent a new class of natural products that cannot easily be classified as “primary” or “secondary”. We believe that the identification of new variants of primary metabolism-derived structures that serve important signalling functions in C. elegans and other nematodes provides a strong incentive for

  5. 1,5-Anhydro-D-fructose; a versatile chiral building block: biochemistry and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Søren M; Lundt, Inge; Marcussen, Jan; Yu, Shukun

    2002-05-13

    There is a steadily increasing need to expand sustainable resources, and carbohydrates are anticipated to play an important role in this respect, both for bulk and fine chemical preparation. The enzyme alpha-(1-->4)-glucan lyase degrades starch to 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose. This compound, which has three different functional properties, a prochiral center together with a permanent pyran ring, renders it a potential chiral building block for the synthesis of valuable and potentially biologically active compounds. 1,5-Anhydro-D-fructose is found in natural materials as a degradation product of alpha-(1-->4)-glucans. The occurrence of lyases and the metabolism of 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose are reviewed in the biological part of this article. In the chemical part, the elucidated structure of 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose will be presented together with simple stereoselective conversions into hydroxy/amino 1,5-anhydro hexitols and a nojirimycin analogue. Synthesis of 6-O-acylated derivatives of 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose substituted with long fatty acid residues is carried out using commercially available enzymes. Those reactions lead to compounds with potential emulsifying properties. The use of protected derivatives of 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose for the synthesis of natural products is likewise reviewed. The potential utilization of this chemical building block is far from being exhausted. Since 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose now is accessible in larger amounts through a simple-enzyme catalyzed degradation of starch by alpha-(1-->4)-glucan lyase, the application of 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose may be considered a valuable contribution to the utilization of carbohydrates as the most abundant resource of sustainable raw materials.

  6. Retinal bipolar cells: elementary building blocks of vision.

    PubMed

    Euler, Thomas; Haverkamp, Silke; Schubert, Timm; Baden, Tom

    2014-08-01

    Retinal bipolar cells are the first ‘projection neurons’ of the vertebrate visual system—all of the information needed for vision is relayed by this intraretinal connection. Each of the at least 13 distinct types of bipolar cells systematically transforms the photoreceptor input in a different way, thereby generating specific channels that encode stimulus properties, such as polarity, contrast, temporal profile and chromatic composition. As a result, bipolar cell output signals represent elementary ‘building blocks’ from which the microcircuits of the inner retina derive a feature-oriented description of the visual world.

  7. Binding blocks: building the Universe one nucleus at a time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diget, C. Aa; Pastore, A.; Leech, K.; Haylett, T.; Lock, S.; Sanders, T.; Shelley, M.; Willett, H. V.; Keegans, J.; Sinclair, L.; Simpson, E. C.; Binding Blocks Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    We present a new teaching and outreach activity based around the construction of a three-dimensional chart of isotopes using \\text{LEG}{{\\text{O}}\\circledR} bricks5. The activity, binding blocks, demonstrates nuclear and astrophysical processes through a seven-meter chart of all nuclear isotopes, built from over 26 000 \\text{LEG}{{\\text{O}}\\circledR} bricks. It integrates A-Level and GCSE curricula across areas of nuclear physics, astrophysics, and chemistry, including: nuclear decays (through the colours in the chart); nuclear binding energy (through tower heights); production of chemical elements in the cosmos; fusion processes in stars and fusion energy on Earth; as well as links to medical physics, particularly diagnostics and radiotherapy.

  8. Building block organisation of clusters in amylopectin from different structural types.

    PubMed

    Bertoft, Eric; Koch, Kristine; Aman, Per

    2012-06-01

    Clusters of chains consisting of tightly branched units of building blocks were isolated from 10 amylopectin samples possessing the 4 types of amylopectin with different internal unit chain profiles previously described. It was shown that clusters in types 1 and 2 amylopectins are larger than in types 3 and 4, but the average cluster size did not correspond to the ratio of short to long chains of the amylopectins. The size-distribution of the building blocks, having one or several branches, possessed generally only small differences between samples. However, the length of the interblock segments followed the type of amylopectin structure, so that type 1 amylopectins had shortest and type 4 the longest segments. The chains in the clusters were divided into characteristic groups probably being involved in the interconnection of two, three, and four - or more - building blocks. Long chains were typically found in high amounts in clusters from type 4 amylopectins, however, all cluster samples contained long chains. The results are discussed in terms of the building block structure of amylopectin, in which the blocks together with the interblock segments participate in a branched backbone building up the amorphous lamellae inside growth rings of the starch granules. In such a model, amylopectins with proportionally less long chains (types 1 and 2) possess a more extensively branched backbone compared to those with more long chains (types 3 and 4). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Conjugated block copolymers: A building block for high-performance organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Changhe

    State-of-the-art organic photovoltaics rely on kinetically trapped, partially phase-separated structures of donor/acceptor mixtures to create a high interfacial area for exciton dissociation and networks of bicontinuous phases for charge transport. Nevertheless, intrinsic structural disorder and weak intermolecular interactions in polymer blends limit the performance and stability of organic electronic devices. We demonstrate a potential strategy to control morphology and donor/acceptor heterojunctions through conjugated block copolymer poly(3-hexylthiophene)- block-poly((9,9-dioctylfluorene)-2,7-diyl-alt-[4,7-bis(thiophen-5-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole]-2',2''-diyl) (P3HT-b-PFTBT). Block copolymers can self-assemble into well-ordered nanostructures ideal for photovoltaic applications. When utilized as the photovoltaic active layer, P3HT-b-PFTBT block copolymer devices demonstrate thermal stability and photoconversion efficiency of 3% well beyond devices composed of the constituent polymer blends. Resonant soft X-ray scattering (RSOXS) is used to elucidate the structural origin for efficient block copolymer photovoltaics. Energy tuning in soft X-ray ranges gives RSOXS chemical sensitivity to characterize organic thin films with compositionally similar phases or complicated multiphase systems. RSOXS reveals that the remarkable performance of P3HT-b-PFTBT devices is due to self-assembly into nanoscale in-plane lamellar morphology, which not only establishes an equilibrium microstructure amenable for exciton dissociation but also provides pathways for efficient charge transport. Furthermore, we find evidence that covalent control of donor/acceptor interfaces in block copolymers has the potential to promote charge separation and optimize the photoconversion process by limiting charge recombination. To visualize the nanostructure in organic thin films, we introduce low energy-loss energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) as an important alternative

  10. Biobased building blocks for the rational design of renewable block polymers.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Angela L; Reno, Kaleigh H; Wool, Richard P; Epps, Thomas H

    2014-10-14

    Block polymers (BPs) derived from biomass (biobased) are necessary components of a sustainable future that relies minimally on petroleum-based plastics for applications ranging from thermoplastic elastomers and pressure-sensitive adhesives to blend compatibilizers. To facilitate their adoption, renewable BPs must be affordable, durable, processable, versatile, and reasonably benign. Their desirability further depends on the relative sustainability of the renewable resources and the methods employed in the monomer and polymer syntheses. Various strategies allow these BPs' characteristics to be tuned and enhanced for commercial applications, and many of these techniques also can be applied to manipulate the wide-ranging mechanical and thermal properties of biobased and self-assembling block polymers. From feedstock to application, this review article highlights promising renewable BPs, plus their material and assembly properties, in support of de novo design strategies that could revolutionize material sustainability.

  11. Piecemeal Buildup of the Genetic Code, Ribosomes, and Genomes from Primordial tRNA Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Derek; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The origin of biomolecular machinery likely centered around an ancient and central molecule capable of interacting with emergent macromolecular complexity. tRNA is the oldest and most central nucleic acid molecule of the cell. Its co-evolutionary interactions with aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase protein enzymes define the specificities of the genetic code and those with the ribosome their accurate biosynthetic interpretation. Phylogenetic approaches that focus on molecular structure allow reconstruction of evolutionary timelines that describe the history of RNA and protein structural domains. Here we review phylogenomic analyses that reconstruct the early history of the synthetase enzymes and the ribosome, their interactions with RNA, and the inception of amino acid charging and codon specificities in tRNA that are responsible for the genetic code. We also trace the age of domains and tRNA onto ancient tRNA homologies that were recently identified in rRNA. Our findings reveal a timeline of recruitment of tRNA building blocks for the formation of a functional ribosome, which holds both the biocatalytic functions of protein biosynthesis and the ability to store genetic memory in primordial RNA genomic templates. PMID:27918435

  12. Semiexperimental equilibrium structures for building blocks of organic and biological molecules: the B2PLYP route.

    PubMed

    Penocchio, Emanuele; Piccardo, Matteo; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-10-13

    The B2PLYP double hybrid functional, coupled with the correlation-consistent triple-ζ cc-pVTZ (VTZ) basis set, has been validated in the framework of the semiexperimental (SE) approach for deriving accurate equilibrium structures of molecules containing up to 15 atoms. A systematic comparison between new B2PLYP/VTZ results and several equilibrium SE structures previously determined at other levels, in particular B3LYP/SNSD and CCSD(T) with various basis sets, has put in evidence the accuracy and the remarkable stability of such model chemistry for both equilibrium structures and vibrational corrections. New SE equilibrium structures for phenylacetylene, pyruvic acid, peroxyformic acid, and phenyl radical are discussed and compared with literature data. Particular attention has been devoted to the discussion of systems for which lack of sufficient experimental data prevents a complete SE determination. In order to obtain an accurate equilibrium SE structure for these situations, the so-called templating molecule approach is discussed and generalized with respect to our previous work. Important applications are those involving biological building blocks, like uracil and thiouracil. In addition, for more general situations the linear regression approach has been proposed and validated.

  13. Cutinsomes as building-blocks of Arabidopsis thaliana embryo cuticle.

    PubMed

    Stępiński, Dariusz; Kwiatkowska, Maria; Wojtczak, Agnieszka; Domínguez, Eva; Heredia, Antonio; Popłońska, Katarzyna

    2017-08-02

    Cutinsomes, spherical nanoparticles containing cutin mono- and oligomers, are engaged in cuticle formation. Earlier they were revealed to participate in cuticle biosynthesis in Solanum lycopersicum fruit and Ornithogalum umbellatum ovary epidermis. Here, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunogold labeling with antibody against the cutinsomes were applied to aerial cotyledon epidermal cells of Arabidopsis thaliana mature embryos. TEM as well as gold particles conjugated with the cutinsome antibody revealed these structures in the cytoplasm, near the plasmalemma, in the cell wall and incorporated into the cuticle. Thus, the cutinsomes most probably are involved in the formation of A. thaliana embryo cuticle and this model plant is another species in which these specific structures participate in the building of cuticle in spite of the lack of the lipotubuloid metabolon. In addition, a mechanism of plant cuticle lipid biosynthesis based on current knowledge is proposed. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  14. Mean horizontal wind profiles measured in the atmospheric boundary layer about a simulated block building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Connell, J. R.; Hutto, M. L.; Fichtl, G.

    1977-01-01

    Instrumented wind towers are used to measure the three components of wind about a simulated block building. The mean horizontal wind profiles over the building are compared with wind profiles measured in the absence of the building and the wind speed deficit in the wake of the building is correlated. The turbulence intensity is of the order of 20% in the undisturbed flow whereas the free stream turbulence intensity of wind-tunnel studies is generally not more than 5%. The velocity profiles measured in the undisturbed flow zones support the representation of a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer with a logarithmic wind profile.

  15. Testing the robustness of the genetic algorithm on the floating building block representation

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, R.K.; Wu, A.S.

    1996-12-31

    Recent studies on a floating building block representation for the genetic algorithm (GA) suggest that there are many advantages to using the floating representation. This paper investigates the behavior of the GA on floating representation problems in response to three different types of pressures: (1) a reduction in the amount of genetic material available to the GA during the problem solving process, (2) functions which have negative-valued building blocks, and (3) randomizing non-coding segments. Results indicate that the GA`s performance on floating representation problems is very robust. Significant reductions in genetic material (genome length) may be made with relatively small decrease in performance. The GA can effectively solve problems with negative building blocks. Randomizing non-coding segments appears to improve rather than harm GA performance.

  16. Building blocks X-FAB SOI 0.18 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizel, J.-B.; Ahmad, S.; Callier, S.; Cornat, R.; Dulucq, F.; Fleury, J.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Raux, L.; de La Taille, C.; Thienpont, D.

    2015-02-01

    This work has been done in order to study a new technology provided by X-FAB named xt018. It is an SOI (Silicon On Insulator) technology with a minimal gate length of 180 nm. Building blocks have been done to test the advantages and drawbacks of this technology compared to the one currently used (AMS SiGe 0.35 μm). These building blocks have been designed to fit in an existing experience housed by the CALICE collaboration: the read-out chip for the Electromagnetic CALorimeter (ECAL) of the foreseen International Linear Collider (ILC). Performances will be compared to those of the SKIROC2 chip designed by the OMEGA laboratory, trying to fit the same requirements. The chip is being manufactured and will be back for measurements in December, the displayed results are only simulation results and thus the conclusions concerning the performances of these building blocks are subject to change.

  17. A general strategy for self-assembly of nanosized building blocks on liquid/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Shao-Yi; Qi, Hao; Wen, Wu-Cheng; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2012-08-06

    A family of water/oil interfaces is introduced to provide effective platforms for rapid fabrication of large-area self-assembled nanofilms composed of various nanosized building blocks, including nanoparticles (NPs), nanocubes (NC), nanowires (NWs), and nanosheets, at room temperature. As a general interfacial assembly method, NWs and NPs are co-assembled at the liquid/liquid interface. The as-prepared co-assembled Ag NW and Ag NC films show high surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) intensity, the SERS performance being strongly dependent on the number ratio of the two kinds of nanosized building blocks. The results demonstrate that this interfacial system provides a general method for the assembly of various nanosized building blocks with different shapes and dimensionalities, and thus paves an alternative pathway for further applications of macroscopic assemblies with different functionalities.

  18. Wrapping cytochrome c around single-wall carbon nanotube: engineered nanohybrid building blocks for infrared detection at high quantum efficiency.

    PubMed

    Gong, Youpin; Liu, Qingfeng; Wilt, Jamie Samantha; Gong, Maogang; Ren, Shenqiang; Wu, Judy

    2015-06-11

    Biomolecule cytochrome c (Cty c), a small molecule of a chain of amino acids with extraordinary electron transport, was helically wrapped around a semiconductive single-wall carbon nanotube (s-SWCNT) to form a molecular building block for uncooled infrared detection with two uniquely designed functionalities: exciton dissociation to free charge carriers at the heterojunction formed on the s-SWCNT/Cty c interface and charge transport along the electron conducting chain of Cty c (acceptor) and hole conducting channel through s-SWCNT (donor). Such a design aims at addressing the long-standing challenges in exciton dissociation and charge transport in an SWCNT network, which have bottlenecked development of photonic SWCNT-based infrared detectors. Using these building blocks, uncooled s-SWCNT/Cyt c thin film infrared detectors were synthesized and shown to have extraordinary photoresponsivity up to 0.77 A W(-1) due to a high external quantum efficiency (EQE) in exceeding 90%, which represents a more than two orders of magnitude enhancement than the best previously reported on CNT-based infrared detectors with EQE of only 1.72%. From a broad perspective, this work on novel s-SWCNT/Cyt c nanohybrid infrared detectors has developed a successful platform of engineered carbon nanotube/biomolecule building blocks with superior properties for optoelectronic applications.

  19. Constructing functional mesostructured materials from colloidal nanocrystal building blocks.

    PubMed

    Milliron, Delia J; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Llordes, Anna; Helms, Brett A

    2014-01-21

    tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) NCs. These dramatic effects emerge from reconstruction of the inorganic glass immediately adjacent to the NC interface. When co-assembling NCs with block copolymers, direct coordination of the polymer to NC surfaces again opens new opportunities for functional mesoscale constructs. We strip NCs of their native ligands and design block copolymers containing a NC tethering domain that bonds strongly, yet dynamically, to the resulting open coordination sites. This strategy enables their co-assembly at high volume fractions of NCs and leads to well-ordered mesoporous NC networks. We find these architectures to be exceptionally stable under chemical transformations driven by cation insertion, removal, and exchange. These developments offer a modular toolbox for arranging NCs deliberately with respect to heterogeneous elements and open space. We have control over metrics that define such architectures from the atomic scale (bonding and crystal structure) through the mesoscale (crystallite shapes and sizes and pore dimensions). By tuning these parameters and better understanding the interactions between components, we look forward to boundless opportunities to employ mesoscale structure, in tandem with composition, to develop functional materials.

  20. Final Technical Report - Commercially Important Carbohydrate Diacids - Building Blocks from Renewable Carbohydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kiely, Donald E.

    2009-01-07

    The primary objective of this project was to develop oxidation methods appropriate for the conversion of agriculturally derived simple sugars to their corresponding diacids (aldaric acids) for use as biobased chemical building blocks for new biodegradable polymers and other materials. Principal target diacids were D-glucaric, meso-xylaric, D-mannaric and L-arabinaric acid, each to be prepared by nitric acid oxidation of the naturally occurring precursor carbohydrates (monosaccharides) D-glucose, D-xylose, D-mannose and L-arabinose, respectively, all from hydrolysis of naturally abundant plant polysaccharides. These conversions were to be designed for scale up to a level suitable for transfer first to a pilot plant scale, and then to an industrial plant scale. The core of the project involved a comprehensive study of the title oxidation employing a computer controlled reactor. The plan of action involved defining experimental parameters to allow for control of the oxidations with considerable precision and reproducibility. The prototype oxidations were typically run using ca. 0.75 molar amounts of carbohydrate, with a goal of eventually doubling the reaction size when appropriate reaction parameters were established. During the course of the funding period for this grant, the fundamentals of reaction control were established for oxidation of D-glucose, a critical component of the project given the exothermic character of the reaction. The reactions were monitored using a reliable GC/MS protocol. The glucose to glucaric acid conversion represented the most important and potentially highest value conversion. During the grant period we were able to establish one workable system to carry out the glucose to glucaric acid conversion, but were not able to optimize the process or establish a protocol that was satisfactory for a scale up to a pilot plant scale. However, the work carried out showed the possibility that with appropriate innovation and continued effort, a

  1. Utilization of methylarenes as versatile building blocks in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Vanjari, Rajeshwer; Singh, Krishna Nand

    2015-11-21

    The development of practical and efficient methods for C-C and C-X bond formation has attracted a great deal of current attention with the advent of C-H functionalization reactions. Hydrocarbons are perhaps the most inexpensive and readily available materials, and utilisation of such materials for the synthesis of essential chemicals is virtually and economically pragmatic. The means to utilize easily accessible hydrocarbons not only represents a useful, potent and straightforward alternative, but also constitutes an excellent opportunity to improve our chemical knowledge about a relatively unexplored domain. Early examples using alkylarenes are generally limited to their conversion to aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and nitriles. This review intends to focus on the latest developments adopting modern strategies for sp(3) C-H functionalization of methylarenes to achieve a diverse range of important organic compounds.

  2. Characterization of an Indole-3-Acetamide Hydrolase from Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis and Its Application in Efficient Preparation of Both Enantiomers of Chiral Building Block 2,3-Dihydro-1,4-Benzodioxin-2-Carboxylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pradeep; Kaur, Suneet; Sharma, Amar Nath; Jolly, Ravinder S.

    2016-01-01

    Both the enantiomers of 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid are valuable chiral synthons for enantiospecific synthesis of therapeutic agents such as (S)-doxazosin mesylate, WB 4101, MKC 242, 2,3-dihydro-2-hydroxymethyl-1,4-benzodioxin, and N-[2,4-oxo-1,3-thiazolidin-3-yl]-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide. Pharmaceutical applications require these enantiomers in optically pure form. However, currently available methods suffer from one drawback or other, such as low efficiency, uncommon and not so easily accessible chiral resolving agent and less than optimal enantiomeric purity. Our interest in finding a biocatalyst for efficient production of enantiomerically pure 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid lead us to discover an amidase activity from Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis, which was able to kinetically resolve 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxyamide with E value of >200. Thus, at about 50% conversion, (R)-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid was produced in >99% e.e. The remaining amide had (S)-configuration and 99% e.e. The amide and acid were easily separated by aqueous (alkaline)-organic two phase extraction method. The same amidase was able to catalyse, albeit at much lower rate the hydrolysis of (S)-amide to (S)-acid without loss of e.e. The amidase activity was identified as indole-3-acetamide hydrolase (IaaH). IaaH is known to catalyse conversion of indole-3-acetamide (IAM) to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), which is phytohormone of auxin class and is widespread among plants and bacteria that inhabit plant rhizosphere. IaaH exhibited high activity for 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide, which was about 65% compared to its natural substrate, indole-3-acetamide. The natural substrate for IaaH indole-3-acetamide shared, at least in part a similar bicyclic structure with 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide, which may account for high activity of enzyme towards this un-natural substrate. To the best of

  3. Characterization of an Indole-3-Acetamide Hydrolase from Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis and Its Application in Efficient Preparation of Both Enantiomers of Chiral Building Block 2,3-Dihydro-1,4-Benzodioxin-2-Carboxylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pradeep; Kaur, Suneet; Sharma, Amar Nath; Jolly, Ravinder S

    2016-01-01

    Both the enantiomers of 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid are valuable chiral synthons for enantiospecific synthesis of therapeutic agents such as (S)-doxazosin mesylate, WB 4101, MKC 242, 2,3-dihydro-2-hydroxymethyl-1,4-benzodioxin, and N-[2,4-oxo-1,3-thiazolidin-3-yl]-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide. Pharmaceutical applications require these enantiomers in optically pure form. However, currently available methods suffer from one drawback or other, such as low efficiency, uncommon and not so easily accessible chiral resolving agent and less than optimal enantiomeric purity. Our interest in finding a biocatalyst for efficient production of enantiomerically pure 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid lead us to discover an amidase activity from Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis, which was able to kinetically resolve 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxyamide with E value of >200. Thus, at about 50% conversion, (R)-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid was produced in >99% e.e. The remaining amide had (S)-configuration and 99% e.e. The amide and acid were easily separated by aqueous (alkaline)-organic two phase extraction method. The same amidase was able to catalyse, albeit at much lower rate the hydrolysis of (S)-amide to (S)-acid without loss of e.e. The amidase activity was identified as indole-3-acetamide hydrolase (IaaH). IaaH is known to catalyse conversion of indole-3-acetamide (IAM) to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), which is phytohormone of auxin class and is widespread among plants and bacteria that inhabit plant rhizosphere. IaaH exhibited high activity for 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide, which was about 65% compared to its natural substrate, indole-3-acetamide. The natural substrate for IaaH indole-3-acetamide shared, at least in part a similar bicyclic structure with 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide, which may account for high activity of enzyme towards this un-natural substrate. To the best of

  4. LEGO® Bricks as Building Blocks for Centimeter-Scale Biological Environments: The Case of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Kara R.; Sizmur, Tom; Benomar, Saida; Miller, Anthony; Cademartiri, Ludovico

    2014-01-01

    LEGO bricks are commercially available interlocking pieces of plastic that are conventionally used as toys. We describe their use to build engineered environments for cm-scale biological systems, in particular plant roots. Specifically, we take advantage of the unique modularity of these building blocks to create inexpensive, transparent, reconfigurable, and highly scalable environments for plant growth in which structural obstacles and chemical gradients can be precisely engineered to mimic soil. PMID:24963716

  5. Reversible Redox Activity in Multicomponent Metal-Organic Frameworks Constructed from Trinuclear Copper Pyrazolate Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Tu, Binbin; Pang, Qingqing; Xu, Huoshu; Li, Xiaomin; Wang, Yulin; Ma, Zhen; Weng, Linhong; Li, Qiaowei

    2017-06-14

    Inorganic functionalization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), such as incorporation of multiple inorganic building blocks with distinct metals into one structure and further modulation of the metal charges, endows the porous materials with significant properties toward their applications in catalysis. In this work, by an exploration of the role of 4-pyrazolecarboxylic acid (H2PyC) in the formation of trinuclear copper pyrazolate as a metalloligand in situ, four new MOFs with multiple components in order were constructed through one-pot synthesis. This metalloligand strategy provides multicomponent MOFs with new topologies (tub for FDM-4 and tap for FDM-5) and is also compatible with a second organic linker for cooperative construction of complex MOFs (1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid for FDM-6 and 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid for FDM-7). The component multiplicity of these MOFs originates from PyC's ability to separate Cu and Zn on the basis of their differentiated binding affinities toward pyrazolate and carboxylate. These MOFs feature reversible and facile redox transformations between Cu(I)3(PyC)3 and Cu(II)3(μ-OH)(PyC)3(OH)3 without altering the connecting geometries of the units, thus further contributing to the significant catalytic activities in the oxidation of CO and aromatic alcohols and the decomposition of H2O2. This study on programming multiple inorganic components into one framework and modulating their electronic structures is an example of functionalizing the inorganic units of MOFs with a high degree of control.

  6. A packed building-block compensator (TETRIS-RT) and feasibility for IMRT delivery.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Keiichi; Fukuhara, Noboru; Kawakami, Hideyuki

    2005-07-01

    A packed building-block compensator (TETRIS-RT) for IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy) delivery has been proposed. The compensator contains two kinds of cubic blocks: x-ray absorbing blocks for intensity modulation and x-ray transparent blocks for packing. The packed blocks are placed inside a rectangular enclosure, and the resulting compensators can be attached to a linac gantry head through a rotatable mount for efficient multiportal IMRT. A fabrication device and a sorting device were also developed. The fabrication device can automatically stack two different types of blocks to produce a compensator while the sorting device can separate each type of the blocks for subsequent fabrication. Preliminary film experiments have shown that an additional leakage dose through the rounded edges of the ten-layered x-ray absorbing blocks was 0.9% of the delivered dose with a total shielded dose ratio of 10% including the peak leakage. It was observed that the proposed compensator may provide a highly modulated dose distribution. This suggests its feasibility for IMRT delivery with a limit of 1cm×1cm spatial resolution at isocenter in the plane perpendicular to the beam, and larger discrete intensity steps of approximately 10% compared to conventional compensators. Advantages of the proposed compensator include that the compensator blocks are reusable and can be utilized to automatically and quickly fabricate a compensator, thereby minimizing human labor. © 2005 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Small, monogenetic volcanoes: building blocks of the upper oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Isobel A.; Achenbach, Kay L.; Searle, Roger C.; Le Bas, Tim P.

    2010-05-01

    the products of single eruptions. Cones of all heights, but particularly those over 70m, are prone to collapse soon after forming. A variety of mechanisms are examined and collapse triggers may include: a) flank over-steepening, b) building on unstable material, and c) cutting by fissuring. Collapse scarps show two strong alignments, one ridge parallel and one at 30° to the ridge trend; however as cones always collapse downslope, these alignments may be due to the slope angles produced as a result of cone emplacement rather than first order controls on collapses themselves. We estimate the minimum magmatic flux to the surface for this segment to be at least 64,000m3 yr -1, which is equivalent to producing one average volume cone every 3.5 years.

  8. Markov model-based polymer assembly from force field-parameterized building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmaz, Vedat

    2015-03-01

    A conventional by hand construction and parameterization of a polymer model for the purpose of molecular simulations can quickly become very work-intensive and time-consuming. Using the example of polyglycerol, I present a polymer decompostion strategy yielding a set of five monomeric residues that are convenient for an instantaneous assembly and subsequent force field simulation of a polyglycerol polymer model. Force field parameters have been developed in accordance with the classical Amber force field. Partial charges of each unit were fitted to the electrostatic potential using quantum-chemical methods and slightly modified in order to guarantee a neutral total polymer charge. In contrast to similarly constructed models of amino acid and nucleotide sequences, the glycerol building blocks may yield an arbitrary degree of bifurcations depending on the underlying probabilistic model. The iterative development of the overall structure as well as the relation of linear to branching units is controlled by a simple Markov model which is presented with few algorithmic details. The resulting polymer is highly suitable for classical explicit water molecular dynamics simulations on the atomistic level after a structural relaxation step. Moreover, the decomposition strategy presented here can easily be adopted to many other (co)polymers.

  9. Identification of candidate molecules for the building blocks of life's earliest polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hud, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    Chemists have yet to find a plausible prebiotic route to RNA polymers, and most proposed mechanisms for prebiotic peptide synthesis are inefficient. We are exploring the hypothesis that RNA and peptides have both evolved from polymers with different chemical structures. We have found that molecules closely related to amino acids and the nucleobases of RNA, which were likely present on the prebiotic Earth, greatly facilitate the formation of polypeptides and RNA-like structures (Chen et al., 2014; Forsythe et al., 2015). The identification of molecules that may have served as precursors to the building blocks of extant polymers, or as prebiotic catalysts for biopolymer formation, has direct implications regarding which molecules that should be considered as possible signs of chemistries that can support the emergence of life in the universe. Furthermore, the possibility that life started with molecules that can be repeatedly cycled between their monomeric and polymeric states, as is still the case with extant biopolymers, suggests environmental characteristics that would have facilitated the formation and early evolution of functional biopolymers (Walker et al., 2012). M. C. Chen, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2014, 136, 5640-5646 J. G. Forsythe, et al., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. Engl., 2015, 54, 9871-9875. M.A. Walker, et al., PLoS ONE, 2012, 7, e34166.

  10. PBF Reactor Building (PER620). Detail of arrangement of highdensity blocks ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Reactor Building (PER-620). Detail of arrangement of high-density blocks and other basement shielding. Date: February 1966. Ebasco Services 1205 PER/PBF 620-A-7. INEEL index no. 761-0620-00-205-123070 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Here Comes the Future: Information Is the Building Block for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Delia

    2012-01-01

    The idea that information is the building block for learning is not new. In fact, it has been a core tenet of learning theory since the study of human cognition began. What's new about learning in the twenty-first century is that various dimensions of information have changed--expanding in every conceivable way. Information is now a "24-7"…

  12. Atomic structure and handedness of the building block of a biological assembly.

    PubMed

    Loquet, Antoine; Habenstein, Birgit; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2013-12-26

    Noncovalent supramolecular assemblies possess in general several unique subunit-subunit interfaces.The basic building block of such an assembly consists of several subunits and contains all unique interfaces. Atomic-resolution structures of monomeric subunits are typically accessed by crystallography or solution NMR and fitted into electron microscopy density maps. However, the structure of the intact building block in the assembled state remains unknown with this hybrid approach. Here, we present the solid-state NMR atomic structure of the building block of the type III secretion system needle. The building block structure consists of a homotetrameric subunit complex with three unique supramolecular interfaces. Side-chain positions at the interfaces were solved at atomic detail. The high-resolution structure reveals unambiguously the helical handedness of the assembly, determined to be right-handed for the type III secretion system needle.Additionally, the axial rise per subunit could be extracted from the tetramer structure and independently validated by mass-per-length measurements.

  13. MTR STACK, TRA71, DETAIL OF PUMICE BLOCK SERVICE BUILDING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR STACK, TRA-71-, DETAIL OF PUMICE BLOCK SERVICE BUILDING AT BASE OF STACK. CAMERA FACING SOUTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD52-1-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 5/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. CONTROL HOUSE, TRA620. MASONS ERECT PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. BUILDING WILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL HOUSE, TRA-620. MASONS ERECT PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. BUILDING WILL CONTROL ACCESS TO MTR AND OTHER "HOT" AND CLASSIFIED AREAS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 577. Unknown Photographer, 9/11/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. ELEVATIONS. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. BLOWER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. ELEVATIONS. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. BLOWER AND FILTER LOFT PLATFORM AND LADDER ON EAST SIDE. IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE MTR-632-IDO-4, 11/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-00-396-110563, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Chromophores arranged as "magnetic meta atoms": building blocks for molecular metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Langhals, Heinz; Hofer, Alexander

    2013-06-21

    Benzoperylenetriscarboximides were parallel arranged by stiff spacers where exciton interactions could be controlled by their distance. The most bathochromic electronic transition of the chromophores essentially exhibits only an electric component where an orthogonal magnetic component was established by the distance-controlled interaction of chromophores. Such arrangements were discussed as building blocks for molecular metamaterials.

  17. Stereoselective total synthesis of Oxylipin from open chain gluco-configured building block.

    PubMed

    Borkar, Santosh Ramdas; Aidhen, Indrapal Singh

    2017-04-18

    Total synthesis of naturally occurring Oxylipin has been achieved from open chain gluco-configured building block which is readily assembled from inexpensive and commercially available D-(+)-gluconolactone. Grignard reaction and Wittig olefination reactions are key steps for the requisite CC bond formation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Public Opinion on Youth, Crime and Race: A Guide for Advocates. Building Blocks for Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soler, Mark

    This guide summarizes public opinion research on youth and juvenile justice issues from the Building Blocks for Youth focus groups and various national polls. Overall, the public is less fearful about crime than in the past but believes juvenile crime is increasing. There is serious public concern about the effectiveness of the juvenile justice…

  19. Trainer's Guide to Building Blocks for Teaching Preschoolers with Special Needs [CD-ROM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Gail E.; Sandall, Susan R.; Schwartz, Ilene S.

    2010-01-01

    An essential teaching companion for instructors of pre-K educators, this convenient CD-ROM is a vivid blueprint for effective inclusive education using the popular "Building Blocks" approach. Following the structure of the bestselling textbook, this comprehensive guide helps teacher educators provide effective instruction on the three types of…

  20. "Looking through the Eyes of the Learner": Implementation of Building Blocks for Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Annolfo, Suzanne Cordier; Schumann, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    The Building Blocks for Student Engagement (BBSE) protocol was designed to provide a consistent framework of common language and a visual point of reference shared among students, teachers and school leaders to keep a laser-like focus on the instructional core and student engagement. Grounded in brain-based learning and implemented in urban,…

  1. Using Interlocking Toy Building Blocks to Assess Conceptual Understanding in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geyer, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    A current emphasis on teaching conceptual chemistry via the particulate nature of matter has led to the need for new, effective ways to assess students' conceptual understanding of this view of chemistry. This article provides a simple, inexpensive way to use interlocking toy building blocks (e.g., LEGOs) in both formative and summative…

  2. Effects of a Preschool Mathematics Curriculum: Summative Research on the "Building Blocks" Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.; Sarama, Julie

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a preschool mathematics program based on a comprehensive model of developing research-based software and print curricula. Building Blocks, funded by the National Science Foundation, is a curriculum development project focused on creating research-based, technology-enhanced mathematics materials for pre-K…

  3. Silicene Flowers: A Dual Stabilized Silicon Building Block for High-Performance Lithium Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinghao; Qiu, Xiongying; Kong, Debin; Zhou, Lu; Li, Zihao; Li, Xianglong; Zhi, Linjie

    2017-07-25

    Nanostructuring is a transformative way to improve the structure stability of high capacity silicon for lithium batteries. Yet, the interface instability issue remains and even propagates in the existing nanostructured silicon building blocks. Here we demonstrate an intrinsically dual stabilized silicon building block, namely silicene flowers, to simultaneously address the structure and interface stability issues. These original Si building blocks as lithium battery anodes exhibit extraordinary combined performance including high gravimetric capacity (2000 mAh g(-1) at 800 mA g(-1)), high volumetric capacity (1799 mAh cm(-3)), remarkable rate capability (950 mAh g(-1) at 8 A g(-1)), and excellent cycling stability (1100 mA h g(-1) at 2000 mA g(-1) over 600 cycles). Paired with a conventional cathode, the fabricated full cells deliver extraordinarily high specific energy and energy density (543 Wh kgca(-1) and 1257 Wh Lca(-1), respectively) based on the cathode and anode, which are 152% and 239% of their commercial counterparts using graphite anodes. Coupled with a simple, cost-effective, scalable synthesis approach, this silicon building block offers a horizon for the development of high-performance batteries.

  4. "Looking through the Eyes of the Learner": Implementation of Building Blocks for Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Annolfo, Suzanne Cordier; Schumann, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    The Building Blocks for Student Engagement (BBSE) protocol was designed to provide a consistent framework of common language and a visual point of reference shared among students, teachers and school leaders to keep a laser-like focus on the instructional core and student engagement. Grounded in brain-based learning and implemented in urban,…

  5. Transportable Payload Operations Control Center reusable software: Building blocks for quality ground data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahmot, Ron; Koslosky, John T.; Beach, Edward; Schwarz, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    The Mission Operations Division (MOD) at Goddard Space Flight Center builds Mission Operations Centers which are used by Flight Operations Teams to monitor and control satellites. Reducing system life cycle costs through software reuse has always been a priority of the MOD. The MOD's Transportable Payload Operations Control Center development team established an extensive library of 14 subsystems with over 100,000 delivered source instructions of reusable, generic software components. Nine TPOCC-based control centers to date support 11 satellites and achieved an average software reuse level of more than 75 percent. This paper shares experiences of how the TPOCC building blocks were developed and how building block developer's, mission development teams, and users are all part of the process.

  6. Sequence-Defined Oligomers from Hydroxyproline Building Blocks for Parallel Synthesis Applications.

    PubMed

    Kanasty, Rosemary L; Vegas, Arturo J; Ceo, Luke M; Maier, Martin; Charisse, Klaus; Nair, Jayaprakash K; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2016-08-08

    The functionality of natural biopolymers has inspired significant effort to develop sequence-defined synthetic polymers for applications including molecular recognition, self-assembly, and catalysis. Conjugation of synthetic materials to biomacromolecules has played an increasingly important role in drug delivery and biomaterials. We developed a controlled synthesis of novel oligomers from hydroxyproline-based building blocks and conjugated these materials to siRNA. Hydroxyproline-based monomers enable the incorporation of broad structural diversity into defined polymer chains. Using a perfluorocarbon purification handle, we were able to purify diverse oligomers through a single solid-phase extraction method. The efficiency of synthesis was demonstrated by building 14 unique trimers and 4 hexamers from 6 diverse building blocks. We then adapted this method to the parallel synthesis of hundreds of materials in 96-well plates. This strategy provides a platform for the screening of libraries of modified biomolecules.

  7. A 2D Substitutional Solid Solution through Hydrogen Bonding of Molecular Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Jennifer M; Lipton-Duffin, Josh; Fu, Chaoying; Taerum, Tyler; Perepichka, Dmitrii F; Rosei, Federico

    2017-09-26

    Two-dimensional (2D) molecular self-assembly allows for the formation of well-defined supramolecular layers with tailored geometrical, compositional, and chemical properties. To date, random intermixing and entropic effects in these systems have largely been associated with crystalline disorder and glassy phases. Here we describe a 2D crystalline self-assembled molecular system that exhibits random incorporation of substitutional molecules. The lattice is formed from a mixture of trimesic acid (TMA) and terthienobenzenetricarboxylic acid (TTBTA), C3-symmetric hydrogen-bonding units of very different sizes (0.79 and 1.16 nm, respectively), at the solution-highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) interface. Remarkably, the TTBTA substitutes into the TMA lattice at a fixed stoichiometry near 12%. The resulting lattice constant is consistent with Vegard's law prediction for an alloy with a composition TMA0.88TTBTA0.12, and the substrate orientation of the lattice is defined by an epitaxial relation with the HOPG substrate. The Gibbs free energy for the TMA/TTBTA lattice was elucidated by considering the entropy of intermixing, via Monte Carlo simulations of multiplicity of the substitutional lattices, and the enthalpy of intermixing, via density functional theory calculations. The latter show that both the bond enthalpy of the H-bonded lattice and the adsorption enthalpy of the molecule/substrate interactions play important roles. This work provides insight into the manifestation of entropy in a molecular crystal constrained by both epitaxy and intermolecular interactions and demonstrates that a randomly intermixed yet crystalline 2D solid can be formed through hydrogen bonding of molecular building blocks of very different size.

  8. Building Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Studies show that deteriorating school facilities take their toll on students' and teachers' health and morale. Classrooms should be accessible to the outdoors; clustered around a commons; adaptable and flexible; and aesthetically pleasing. Architects say natural lighting and noise reduction are routine parts of their job. Research studies support…

  9. The Exploitation of Versatile Building Blocks for the Self-Assembly of Novel Molecular Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilkington, M.; Gross, M.; Franz, P.; Biner, M.; Decurtins, S.; Stoeckli-Evans, H.; Neels, A.

    2001-07-01

    Using molecular building blocks to self-assemble lattices supporting long-range magnetic order is currently an active area of solid-state chemistry. Consequently, it is the realm of supramolecular chemistry that synthetic chemists are turning to in order to develop techniques for the synthesis of structurally well-defined supramolecular materials. In recent years we have investigated the versatility and usefulness of two classes of molecular building blocks, namely, tris-oxalato transition-metal (M. Pilkington and S. Decurtins, in "Magnetoscience-From Molecules to Materials," Wiley-VCH, 2000), and octacyanometalate complexes (Pilkington and Decurtins, Chimia 54, 593 (2001)), for applications in the field of molecule-based magnets. Anionic, tris-chelated oxalato building blocks are able to build up two-dimensional honeycomb-layered structural motifs as well as three-dimensional decagon frameworks. The discrimination between the crystallization of the two- or three-dimensional structures relies on the choice of the templating counterions (Decurtins, Chimia 52, 539 (1998); Decurtins et al. Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 273, 167 (1995); New J. Chem. 117 (1998)). These structural types display a range of ferro, ferri, and antiferromagnetic properties (Pilkington and Decurtins, in "Magnetoscience-From Molecules to Materials"). Octacyanometalate building blocks self-assemble to afford two new classes of cyano-bridged compounds namely, molecular clusters and extended three dimensional networks (J. Larionova et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 39, 1605 (2000); Pilkington et al., in preparation). The molecular cluster with a MnII9MoV6 core has the highest ground state spin value, S=51/2, reported to-date (Larionova et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 39, 1605 (2000)). In the high-temperature regime, the magnetic properties are characterized by ferromagnetic intracluster coupling. In the magnetic range below 44 K, the magnetic cluster signature is lost as possibly a bulk behavior starts to

  10. Interlocking Toy Building Blocks as Hands-On Learning Modules for Blind and Visually Impaired Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melaku, Samuel; Schreck, James O.; Griffin, Kameron; Dabke, Rajeev B.

    2016-01-01

    Interlocking toy building blocks (e.g., Lego) as chemistry learning modules for blind and visually impaired (BVI) students in high school and undergraduate introductory or general chemistry courses are presented. Building blocks were assembled on a baseplate to depict the relative changes in the periodic properties of elements. Modules depicting…

  11. Interlocking Toy Building Blocks as Hands-On Learning Modules for Blind and Visually Impaired Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melaku, Samuel; Schreck, James O.; Griffin, Kameron; Dabke, Rajeev B.

    2016-01-01

    Interlocking toy building blocks (e.g., Lego) as chemistry learning modules for blind and visually impaired (BVI) students in high school and undergraduate introductory or general chemistry courses are presented. Building blocks were assembled on a baseplate to depict the relative changes in the periodic properties of elements. Modules depicting…

  12. Building Blocks for Building Skills: An Inventory of Adult Learning Models and Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein-Collins, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    The skills of the workforce are an important contributor to the economic vitality of any region, leading economic developers to consider how to connect their efforts to workforce development and help to build the skills of adults generally. This report, produced for the U.S. Department of Labor's Workforce Innovation in Regional Economic…

  13. Efficient Risk Determination of Risk of Road Blocking by Means of MMS and Data of Buildings and Their Surrounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nose, Kazuhito; Hatake, Shuhei

    2016-06-01

    Massive earthquake named "Tonankai Massive earthquake" is predicted to occur in the near future and is feared to cause severe damage in Kinki District . "Hanshin-Awaji Massive Earthquake" in 1995 destroyed most of the buildings constructed before 1981 and not complying with the latest earthquake resistance standards. Collapsed buildings blocked roads, obstructed evacuation, rescue and firefighting operations and inflicted further damages.To alleviate the damages, it is important to predict the points where collapsed buildings are likely block the roads and to take precautions in advance. But big cities have an expanse of urban areas with densely-distributed buildings, and it requires time and cost to check each and every building whether or not it will block the road. In order to reduce blocked roads when a disaster strikes, we made a study and confirmed that the risk of road blocking can be determined easily by means of the latest technologies of survey and geographical information.

  14. Coarse-Grained Simulations of the Self-Assembly of DNA-Linked Gold Nanoparticle Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armistead, Charles

    The self-assembly of nanoparticles (NPs) of varying shape, size, and composition for the purpose of constructing useful nanoassemblies with tailored properties remains challenging. Although progress has been made to design anisotropic building blocks that exhibit the required control for the precise placement of various NPs within a defined arrangement, there still exists obstacles in the technology to maximize the programmability in the self-assembly of NP building blocks. Currently, the self-assembly of nanostructures involves much experimental trial and error. Computational modeling is a possible approach that could be utilized to facilitate the purposeful design of the self-assembly of NP building blocks into a desired nanostructure. In this report, a coarse-grained model of NP building blocks based on an effective anisotropic mono-functionalization approach, which has shown the ability to construct six building block configurations, was used to simulate various nanoassemblies. The purpose of the study was to validate the model's ability to simulate the self-assembly of the NP building blocks into nanostructures previously produced experimentally. The model can be programmed to designate up to six oligonucleotides attached to the surface of a Au NP building block, with a modifiable length and nucleotide sequence. The model successfully simulated the self-assembly of Au NP building blocks into a number of previously produced nanostructures and demonstrated the ability to produce visualizations of self-assembly as well as calculate interparticle distances and angles to be used for the comparison with the previous experimental data for validation of the model. Also, the model was used to simulate nanoassemblies which had not been produced experimentally for its further validation. The simulations showed the capability of the model to use specific NP building blocks and self-assemble. The coarse-grained NP building block model shows promise as a tool to complement

  15. Preparation of [18F]-N-(2-fluoro-ethyl)-N-methylamine as a building block for PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hoareau, Raphael; Gobbi, Luca; Grall-Ulsemer, Sandra; Martarello, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated the use of cyclic sulfamidates as precursors to yield secondary amines as building blocks for subsequent reaction with carboxylic acids and acyl chlorides. The preparation of the protonated form of [(18)F]-N-(2-fluoro-ethyl)-N-methylamine from the corresponding cyclic sulfamidate proceeded within a one pot two-step procedure (81 ± 12%, n = 10). The secondary amine reacted readily with acyl chlorides and/or carboxylic acids giving amides with yields ranging from 4 to 17% at the end of synthesis (182 ± 12 min). The new methodology provides a practical approach for the labelling of molecules where intramolecular cyclisation of precursors is favoured under typical radiofluorination conditions.

  16. Chemical evolution of biomolecule building blocks. Can thermodynamics explain the accumulation of glycine in the prebiotic ocean?

    PubMed

    Szori, Milán; Jójárt, Balázs; Izsák, Róbert; Szori, Kornél; Csizmadia, Imre G; Viskolcz, Béla

    2011-04-28

    It has always been a question of considerable scientific interest why amino acids (and other biomolecule building blocks) formed and accumulated in the prebiotic ocean. In this study, we suggest an answer to this question for the simplest amino acid, glycine. We have shown for the first time that classical equilibrium thermodynamics can explain the most likely selection of glycine (and the derivative of its dipeptide) in aqueous media, although glycine is not the lowest free energy structure among all (404) possible constitutional isomers. Species preceding glycine in the free energy order are either supramolecular complexes of small molecules or such molecules likely to dissociate and thus get back to the gas phase. Then, 2-hydroxyacetamide condensates yielding a thermodynamically favored derivative of glycine dipeptide providing an alternative way for peptide formation. It is remarkable that a simple equilibrium thermodynamic model can explain the accumulation of glycine and provide a reason for the importance of water in the formation process.

  17. Study of DNA coated nanoparticles as possible programmable self-assembly building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Högberg, Björn; Helmersson, Jing; Holm, Svante; Olin, Håkan

    2006-05-01

    Nanoparticles coated with single stranded DNA have been shown to efficiently hybridize to targets of complementary DNA. This property might be used to implement programmable (or algorithmic) self-assembly to build nanoparticle structures. However, we argue that a DNA coated nanoparticle by itself cannot be used as a programmable self-assembly building block since it does not have directed bonds. A general scheme for assembling and purifying nanoparticle eight-mers with eight geometrically well-directed bonds is presented together with some preliminary experimental work.

  18. Identification of Biomolecular Building Blocks by Recognition Tunneling: Stride towards Nanopore Sequencing of Biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Suman

    DNA, RNA and Protein are three pivotal biomolecules in human and other organisms, playing decisive roles in functionality, appearance, diseases development and other physiological phenomena. Hence, sequencing of these biomolecules acquires the prime interest in the scientific community. Single molecular identification of their building blocks can be done by a technique called Recognition Tunneling (RT) based on Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). A single layer of specially designed recognition molecule is attached to the STM electrodes, which trap the targeted molecules (DNA nucleoside monophosphates, RNA nucleoside monophosphates or amino acids) inside the STM nanogap. Depending on their different binding interactions with the recognition molecules, the analyte molecules generate stochastic signal trains accommodating their "electronic fingerprints". Signal features are used to detect the molecules using a machine learning algorithm and different molecules can be identified with significantly high accuracy. This, in turn, paves the way for rapid, economical nanopore sequencing platform, overcoming the drawbacks of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques. To read DNA nucleotides with high accuracy in an STM tunnel junction a series of nitrogen-based heterocycles were designed and examined to check their capabilities to interact with naturally occurring DNA nucleotides by hydrogen bonding in the tunnel junction. These recognition molecules are Benzimidazole, Imidazole, Triazole and Pyrrole. Benzimidazole proved to be best among them showing DNA nucleotide classification accuracy close to 99%. Also, Imidazole reader can read an abasic monophosphate (AP), a product from depurination or depyrimidination that occurs 10,000 times per human cell per day. In another study, I have investigated a new universal reader, 1-(2-mercaptoethyl)pyrene (Pyrene reader) based on stacking interactions, which should be more specific to the canonical DNA nucleosides. In addition

  19. Programming Colloidal Crystal Habit with Anisotropic Nanoparticle Building Blocks and DNA Bonds.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Matthew N; Lin, Hai-Xin; Girard, Martin; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-11-09

    Colloidal crystallization can be programmed using building blocks consisting of a nanoparticle core and DNA bonds to form materials with controlled crystal symmetry, lattice parameters, stoichiometry, and dimensionality. Despite this diversity of colloidal crystal structures, only spherical nanoparticles crystallized with BCC symmetry experimentally yield single crystals with well-defined crystal habits. Here, we use low-symmetry, anisotropic nanoparticles to overcome this limitation and to access single crystals with different equilibrium Wulff shapes: a cubic habit from cube-shaped nanoparticles, a rhombic dodecahedron habit from octahedron-shaped nanoparticles, and an octahedron habit from rhombic dodecahedron-shaped nanoparticles. The observation that one can control the microscopic shape of single crystals based upon control of particle building block and crystal symmetry has important fundamental and technological implications for this novel class of colloidal matter.

  20. Plasmid vectors and molecular building blocks for the development of genetic manipulation tools for Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, León A; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Canepa, Gaspar E; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2013-01-01

    The post genomic era revealed the need for developing better performing, easier to use and more sophisticated genetic manipulation tools for the study of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. In this work a series of plasmids that allow genetic manipulation of this protozoan parasite were developed. First of all we focused on useful tools to establish selection strategies for different strains and which can be employed as expression vectors. On the other hand molecular building blocks in the form of diverse selectable markers, modifiable fluorescent protein and epitope-tag coding sequences were produced. Both types of modules were harboured in backbone molecules conceived to offer multiple construction and sub-cloning strategies. These can be used to confer new properties to already available genetic manipulation tools or as starting points for whole novel designs. The performance of each plasmid and building block was determined independently. For illustration purposes, some simple direct practical applications were conducted.

  1. Dendrimers and Dendrons as Versatile Building Blocks for the Fabrication of Functional Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Sadik; Arslan, Mehmet; Sanyal, Rana; Sanyal, Amitav

    2016-04-15

    Hydrogels have emerged as a versatile class of polymeric materials with a wide range of applications in biomedical sciences. The judicious choice of hydrogel precursors allows one to introduce the necessary attributes to these materials that dictate their performance towards intended applications. Traditionally, hydrogels were fabricated using either polymerization of monomers or through crosslinking of polymers. In recent years, dendrimers and dendrons have been employed as well-defined building blocks in these materials. The multivalent and multifunctional nature of dendritic constructs offers advantages in either formulation or the physical and chemical properties of the obtained hydrogels. This review highlights various approaches utilized for the fabrication of hydrogels using well-defined dendrimers, dendrons and their polymeric conjugates. Examples from recent literature are chosen to illustrate the wide variety of hydrogels that have been designed using dendrimer- and dendron-based building blocks for applications, such as sensing, drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  2. Toward Controlled Hierarchical Heterogeneities in Giant Molecules with Precisely Arranged Nano Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Herein we introduce a unique synthetic methodology to prepare a library of giant molecules with multiple, precisely arranged nano building blocks, and illustrate the influence of minute structural differences on their self-assembly behaviors. The T8 polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles are orthogonally functionalized and sequentially attached onto the end of a hydrophobic polymer chain in either linear or branched configuration. The heterogeneity of primary chemical structure in terms of composition, surface functionality, sequence, and topology can be precisely controlled and is reflected in the self-assembled supramolecular structures of these giant molecules in the condensed state. This strategy offers promising opportunities to manipulate the hierarchical heterogeneities of giant molecules via precise and modular assemblies of various nano building blocks. PMID:27163025

  3. Microfluidic assembly kit based on laser-cut building blocks for education and fast prototyping

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Lukas C.; Kim, Honesty; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present an inexpensive rapid-prototyping method that allows researchers and children to quickly assemble multi-layered microfluidic devices from easily pre-fabricated building blocks. We developed low-cost (<$2) kits based on laser-cut acrylic building block pieces and double-sided tape that allow users to generate water droplets in oil, capture living cells, and conduct basic phototaxis experiments. We developed and tested a 90-min lesson plan with children aged 12–14 yr and provide here the instructions for teachers to replicate these experiments and lessons. All parts of the kit are easy to make or order. We propose to use such easy to fabricate kits in labs with no access to current microfluidic tools as well as in classroom environments to get exposure to the powerful techniques of microfluidics. PMID:26634013

  4. Hierarchical assembly of micro-/nano-building blocks: bio-inspired rigid structural functional materials.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong-Bin; Fang, Hai-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Han; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2011-07-01

    The huge diversity of hierarchical micro-/nano-rigid structures existing in biological systems is increasingly becoming a source of inspiration of materials scientists and engineers to create next-generation advanced functional materials. In the past decades, these multiscale hierarchical structures have been intensively investigated to show their contributions to high performance in mechanical properties. Recently, accompanied with the development of nanotechnology, some biologically hierarchical rigid structures have been duplicated and mimicked in artificial materials through hierarchical organization of micro-/nano-building blocks. In this critical review, we will present biological rigid structural models, functional micro-/nano-building blocks, and hierarchical assembly techniques for the manufacture of bio-inspired rigid structural functional materials (177 references).

  5. An analog implementation of biologically plausible neurons using CCII building blocks.

    PubMed

    Sharifipoor, Ozra; Ahmadi, Arash

    2012-12-01

    This study presents an analog implementation of the spiking neurons based on a piecewise-linear model. This model is a variation of the Izhikevich model, which is capable of reproducing different dynamic behaviors. The proposed circuit utilizes second generation current conveyors (CCII) building blocks. With the same topology and circuit values, this circuit can produce a wide variety of neuron behaviors just by tuning the reference current and voltage sources. In addition, since CCII can be considered as a building block for programmable analog arrays, based on the proposed circuit different neuron types can be implemented on programmable analog platforms. Simulation results are presented for different neuron behaviors with CMOS 350 nm ±1.5 V technology using HSPICE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Microfluidic assembly kit based on laser-cut building blocks for education and fast prototyping.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Lukas C; Kim, Honesty; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H

    2015-11-01

    Here, we present an inexpensive rapid-prototyping method that allows researchers and children to quickly assemble multi-layered microfluidic devices from easily pre-fabricated building blocks. We developed low-cost (<$2) kits based on laser-cut acrylic building block pieces and double-sided tape that allow users to generate water droplets in oil, capture living cells, and conduct basic phototaxis experiments. We developed and tested a 90-min lesson plan with children aged 12-14 yr and provide here the instructions for teachers to replicate these experiments and lessons. All parts of the kit are easy to make or order. We propose to use such easy to fabricate kits in labs with no access to current microfluidic tools as well as in classroom environments to get exposure to the powerful techniques of microfluidics.

  7. Discrete Rectangles, Prisms, and Heterometallic Cages from a Conjugated Cp*Rh-Based Building Block.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xu-Yu; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Long; Lin, Yue-Jian; Jin, Guo-Xin

    2015-11-16

    By carefully selecting an existing synthetic strategy and suitable coordination subunits, constructing desired coordination geometries is no longer that difficult to accomplish. Herein, a new strategy to construct a series of unprecedented structures by using conjugated Cp*Rh-based complex BN-OTf (Cp* = η(5)-C5Me5) as the building block is proposed. DFT calculations revealed extensive delocalized π bonds in the subunit. With BN-OTf, rectangular macrocycles TN-bpy and TN-bpe were controllably synthesized. Single-crystal XRD studies confirmed one-dimensional stacking channels for the tetranuclear structure. Notably, the starting ligand imidazole-4,5-dicarboxylate was found to act not only as a tetradentate but also as a hexadentate ligand that can coordinate to further metal ions. Subsequently, [4 Rh+1 M] heterometallic complexes HMZ (M = Cu and Zn) were accessed by chelating borderline hard/soft Lewis acids. With TN-Linker or HMZ, two routes resulted in the [8 Rh+2 M] heterometallic cages HMC (M = Cu and Zn) with excellent crystallinity and stability. Surprisingly, when BN-OTf bonded to rhodium itself, triangular prisms TP-Linker were obtained with high solubility after being linked by bipyridine linkers. Both the X-ray structure and (1)H NMR spectrum confirmed the novel isomerization of the triangular structures. All of the compounds were obtained in high yields and were fully characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and in most cases single-crystal X-ray structure determination. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The Synthesis and Application of Fmoc-Lys(5-Fam) Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Tokmina-Roszyk, Michal; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Fields, Gregg B.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptide substrates are often utilized for protease activity assays. This study has examined the preparation of FRET triple-helical peptide (THP) substrates using 5-carboxyfluorescein (5-Fam) as the fluorophore and 4,4-dimethylamino-azobenzene-4′-carboxylic acid (Dabcyl) as the quencher. The Nα-(9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl)-Nε-(5-carboxy-fluorescein)-L-lysine [Fmoc-Lys(5-Fam)] building block was synthesized utilizing two distinct synthetic routes. The first involved copper complexation of Lys while the second utilized Fmoc-Lys with microwave irradiation. Both approaches allowed convenient production of a very pure final product at a reasonable cost. Fmoc-Lys(5-Fam) and Fmoc-Lys(Dabcyl) were incorporated into the sequence of a THP substrate utilizing automated solid-phase peptide synthesis protocols. A second substrate was assembled where (7-methoxycoumarin-4-yl)-acetyl (Mca) was the fluorophore and 2,4-dinitrophenyl (Dnp) was the quencher. Circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to determine the influence of the fluorophore/quencher pair on the stability of the triple-helix. The activity of the two substrates was examined with three matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-1, MMP-13, and MT1-MMP. The combination of 5-Fam as fluorophore and Dabcyl as quencher resulted in a triple-helical substrate that, compared with the fluorophore/quencher pair of Mca/Dnp, had a slightly destabilized triple-helix but was hydrolyzed more rapidly by MMP-1 and MMP-13 and had greater sensitivity. PMID:23444261

  9. Functional Perfluoroalkyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (F-POSS): Building Blocks for Low Surface Energy Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-21

    low-surface energy material for superhydrophobic and oleophobic surfaces. These F-POSS compounds consist of a silicon-oxide core with a periphery of...for the development of new superhydrophobic and oleophobic materials. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...F·I’OSS. These no\\e1 structures can he used as the initial building blocks for the development of Ilew superhydrophobic and o!cophobic materials

  10. Surface grafted polymer brushes as ideal building blocks for "smart" surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2006-09-07

    Polymer brushes are assemblies of macromolecules chemically tethered at one end to a substrate. They provide an alternative to self-assembled monolayers because of the intrinsically large size of the building blocks and the ensuing entropic contribution to the film morphology. In this article, an overview of a number of representative polymer brush systems will be presented and their potential application for surfaces with controlled wettability, smart surfaces and nanoactuators will be explored in some detail.

  11. The IMPACT Common Module - A Low Cost, Reconfigurable Building Block for Next Generation Phased Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-31

    their sub- components, have been application-tailored for a specific need set, volume- based pricing models have not been able to be leveraged to...The IMPACT Common Module – A Low Cost , Reconfigurable Building Block for Next Generation Phased Arrays Ted Hoffmann Rockwell Collins 400 Collins...Timescales (ACT) program. The goal of this program has been to develop a common technology base for Electronically Scanned Array (ESA) systems

  12. High-performance energy-storage architectures from carbon nanotubes and nanocrystal building blocks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Zhang, Dieqing; Wang, Xiaolei; Jia, Xilai; Wei, Fei; Li, Hexing; Lu, Yunfeng

    2012-04-17

    High-performance energy-storage architectures are fabricated by forming conformal coatings of active nanocrystal building blocks on preformed carbon nanotube conductive scaffolds for lithium ion electrodes. This unique structure offers effective pathways for charge transport, high active-material loading, structure robustness, and flexibility. This general approach enables the fabrication of a new family of high-performance architectures for energy storage and many other applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Single crystalline Ge(1-x)Mn(x) nanowires as building blocks for nanoelectronics.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Machteld I; Petkov, Nikolay; Morris, Michael A; Kazakova, Olga; Han, Xinhai; Wang, Kang L; Jacob, Ajey P; Holmes, Justin D

    2009-01-01

    Magnetically doped Si and Ge nanowires have potential application in future nanowire spin-based devices. Here, we report a supercritical fluid method for producing single crystalline Mn-doped Ge nanowires with a Mn-doping concentration of between 0.5-1.0 atomic % that display ferromagnetism above 300 K and a superior performance with respect to the hole mobility of around 340 cm(2)/Vs, demonstrating the potential of using these nanowires as building blocks for electronic devices.

  14. High-Performance Photovoltaic Polymers Employing Symmetry-Breaking Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Deyu; Zhu, Qianqian; Gu, Chunyang; Wang, Junyi; Qiu, Meng; Chen, Weichao; Bao, Xichang; Sun, Mingliang; Yang, Renqiang

    2016-10-01

    Two 1D-2D asymmetric benzodithiophenes (BDTs) as donor building blocks are designed and synthesized, combining the advantages of both 1D and 2D symmetric BDTs. The photovoltaic properties of the asymmetric BDT-based polymers are improved greatly in comparison with corresponding symmetric BDT-based polymers. This work provides a new approach to design prospective organic optoelectronic materials employing the symmetry-breaking strategy.

  15. A study of standard building blocks for the design of fault-tolerant distributed computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rennels, D. A.; Avizienis, A.; Ercegovac, M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study that has established a standard set of four semiconductor VLSI building-block circuits. These circuits can be assembled with off-the-shelf microprocessors and semiconductor memory modules into fault-tolerant distributed computer configurations. The resulting multi-computer architecture uses self-checking computer modules backed up by a limited number of spares. A redundant bus system is employed for communication between computer modules.

  16. PBF Reactor Building (PER620). After lowering reactor vessel onto blocks, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Reactor Building (PER-620). After lowering reactor vessel onto blocks, it is rolled on logs into PBF. Metal framework under vessel is handling device. Various penetrations in reactor bottom were for instrumentation, poison injection, drains. Large one, below center "manhole" was for primary coolant. Photographer: Larry Page. Date: February 13, 1970. INEEL negative no. 70-736 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Geospatial-enabled Data Exploration and Computation through Data Infrastructure Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, C. X.; Biehl, L. L.; Merwade, V.; Villoria, N.

    2015-12-01

    Geospatial data are present everywhere today with the proliferation of location-aware computing devices and sensors. This is especially true in the scientific community where large amounts of data are driving research and education activities in many domains. Collaboration over geospatial data, for example, in modeling, data analysis and visualization, must still overcome the barriers of specialized software and expertise among other challenges. The GABBs project aims at enabling broader access to geospatial data exploration and computation by developing spatial data infrastructure building blocks that leverage capabilities of end-to-end application service and virtualized computing framework in HUBzero. Funded by NSF Data Infrastructure Building Blocks (DIBBS) initiative, GABBs provides a geospatial data architecture that integrates spatial data management, mapping and visualization and will make it available as open source. The outcome of the project will enable users to rapidly create tools and share geospatial data and tools on the web for interactive exploration of data without requiring significant software development skills, GIS expertise or IT administrative privileges. This presentation will describe the development of geospatial data infrastructure building blocks and the scientific use cases that help drive the software development, as well as seek feedback from the user communities.

  18. Regulation mechanism of negative permittivity in percolating composites via building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Peitao; Wang, Zhongyang; Sun, Kai; Cheng, Chuanbing; Liu, Yao; Fan, Runhua

    2017-09-01

    Percolating composites with negative permittivity can be promising candidates for metamaterials; however, building blocks of negative permittivity have not yet been put forward in percolating composites. Here, the dielectric properties of a ternary composite with Fe and SiO2-coated Fe particles dispersed in a polymer matrix were investigated in the range of 10 MHz-1 GHz. By gradually controlling the Fe/coated-Fe ratio (x), a three-dimensional conductive network could be constructed when x exceeds 0.75. The Drude-type negative permittivity was achieved by the conductive network, and its Lorentz-type dispersion was mainly attributed to dielectric resonance of coated-Fe particles. Equivalent circuit analysis demonstrated that the inductive conductive network was the decisive building block to achieve negative permittivity. Moreover, the dielectric resonance caused by coated-Fe particles was LC resonance, and this indicated that the capacitive isolated metallic particles acted as another building block to control the dispersion of negative permittivity by LC resonance. Our reported work provides a highly efficient strategy to adjust negative permittivity and will facilitate applications of negative permittivity materials.

  19. Mussel-inspired nano-building block assemblies for mimicking extracellular matrix microenvironments with multiple functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenming; Jia, Zhanrong; Jiang, Yanan; Li, Pengfei; Han, Lu; Lu, Xiong; Ren, Fuzeng; Wang, Kefeng; Yuan, Huiping

    2017-08-03

    The assembly of nano-building blocks is an effective way to produce artificial extracellular matrix microenvironments with hierarchical micro/nano structures. However, it is hard to assemble different types of nano-building blocks, to form composite coatings with multiple functions, by traditional layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly methods. Inspired by the mussel adhesion mechanism, we developed polydopamine (PDA)-decorated bovine serum albumin microspheres (BSA-MS) and nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HA), and assembled them to form bioactive coatings with micro/nano structures encapsulating bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). First, PDA-decorated nano-HA (nano-pHA) was obtained by oxidative polymerization of dopamine on nano-HA. Second, BMP-2-encapsulated BSA microspheres were prepared through desolvation, and then were also decorated by PDA (pBSA-MS). Finally, the nano-pHA and pBSA-MS were assembled using the adhesive properties of PDA. Bone marrow stromal cell cultures and in vivo implantation, showed that the pHA/pBSA (BMP-2) coatings can promote cell adhesion, proliferation, and benefited for osteoinductivity. PDA decoration was also applied to assemble various functional nanoparticles, such as nano-HA, polystyrene, and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. In summary, this study provides a novel strategy for the assembly of biofunctional nano-building blocks, which surpasses traditional LbL self-assembly of polyelectrolytes, and can find broad applications in bioactive agents delivery or multi-functional coatings.

  20. The building blocks for JWST I&T to operations: from simulator to flight units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiak, Francis; Ochs, William; Johns, Alan; Seaton, Bonita; Adams, Cynthia; Fatig, Curtis; Jones, Ronald; Jackson, Wallace

    2012-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project has an extended integration and test (I&T) phase due to long procurement and development times of various components as well as recent launch delays. The JWST Ground Segment and Operations group has developed a roadmap of the various ground and flight elements and their use in the various JWST I&T test programs. The JWST Project's building block approach to the eventual operational systems, while not new, is complex and challenging; a large-scale mission like JWST involves international partners, many vendors across the United States, and competing needs for the same systems. One of the challenges is resource balancing so simulators and flight products for various elements congeal into integrated systems used for I&T and flight operations activities. This building block approach to an incremental buildup provides for early problem identification with simulators and exercises the flight operations systems, products, and interfaces during the JWST I&T test programs. The JWST Project has completed some early I&T with the simulators, engineering models and some components of the operational ground system. The JWST Project is testing the various flight units as they are delivered and will continue to do so for the entire flight and operational system. The JWST Project has already and will continue to reap the value of the building block approach on the road to launch and flight operations.

  1. Technological characteristics of compressed earth blocks for its use as a building material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Villalba, Luz Stella; Camacho-Perez, Nancy; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Becerra-Becerra, Javier; Esmeralda Corredor-Pulido, Dery; Fort, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    We present here an innovative building technique, which uses ecological, inexpensive and environmentally friendly materials. These compressed earth blocks seem to be very good for building purposes and that is why we have characterized three types of compressed earth blocks (CEB, named by their color as yellow, grey and red) mineralogically by means of X ray diffraction XRD and scanning electron microscopy SEM (both blocks and raw materials), petrographically by polarizing optical light microscopy POLM, and SEM, and, mainly, petrophysically: their hydric, physical and physico-mechanical properties by means of determining their capillary water absorption, porosity (open or accessible to water, pore size distribution and micro/macroporosity), and densities, color and ultrasound velocity (together with anisotropy). The particularities of these analyzed materials show that some varieties are more durable than others, and that all of them can be used as building materials with some restrictions related to their appropriate placing in the structures and the exposure to water. Acknowledgements: This work is supported by the GEOMATERIALES (S2009/MAT-1629) and CONSOLIDER-TCP (CSD2007-0058) programmes. Thanks also to the UCM (Complutense University of Madrid) Research Group "Alteración y conservación de los materiales pétreos del patrimonio" / Alteration and conservation of heritage stone materials (ref. 921349).

  2. Reference Architecture Test-Bed for Avionics (RASTA): A Software Building Blocks Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana Sanchez, Aitor; Taylor, Chris

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Reference Architecture System Test-bed for Avionics (RASTA) being developed within the ESA Estec Data Systems Division. This activity aims to benefit from interface standardization to provide a hardware/software reference infrastructure into which incoming R&D activities can be integrated, thus providing a generic but standardized test and development environment rather than dedicated facilities for each activity. Rasta is composed of by both HW and SW building blocks constituting the main elements of a typical Data Handling System. This includes a core processor (LEON2), Telemetry and Telecommand links, digital interfaces, and mass memory. The range of digital serial interfaces includes CAN bus, MIL-STD-1553 and SpaceWire. The paper will focus on the Software aspects of RASTA and in particular the software building blocks provided to ease development activities and allow hardware independency. To support the take-up of RASTA by European Industry, all RASTA software developed internally by ESA is provided free under license. Significant outputs are already available and include: Basic SW and SW drivers (CAN/1553/SpW, TT&C), OS abstraction layer, CFDP flight implementation, highly portable and independent file system for space, ground segment telecommand/telemetry router. In the future, additional SW building blocks are planned (e.g. ECSS CAN library). The present focus of RASTA is related to a prototype implementation of the SOIS services and protocols under development by the CCSDS (Consultative committee for Space Data Standards)

  3. Development of a building block design of modular photovoltaic concentrator array fields

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, D.C.; Alexander, G.; Noel, G.T.; Scurlock, L.D.; Huss, W.R.; Stickford, G.H.

    1983-08-01

    To reduce the balance-of-system (BOS) costs and site-specific design costs for photovoltaic concentrator array fields, a modular Building Block design has been developed for installing array fields of each of two available concentrator collectors. The array-field subsystems and requirements incorporated in the design analyses include site preparation, foundations, electrical wiring, grounding, lightning protection, electromagnetic interference provisions, and tracking and controls. The Building Block designs developed minimize these array-field BOS costs and serve as standardized units to be used in multiples to construct array fields of various sizes. The detailed drawings and construction specifications prepared for the designs require only minimal design modification and cost for adaption to a specific site and application. The two concentrator collectors for which the modular array-field designs were developed are the linear-focus Fresnel-lens array manufactured by E-Systems, Inc., and the point-focus Fresnel-lens array manufactured by Martin Marietta Aerospace Corporation. Both designs are two-axis tracking and passively cooled. The developed Building Block designs are immediately applicable and reduce the array-field BOS costs and site-specific design costs to a fraction of those experienced in previous installations. The estimated array-field BOS costs (in 1982 dollars) using these modular designs are $0.78/W for the modular field based on the E-Systems array and $1.18/W for the modular field based on the Martin-Marietta array.

  4. A new tetracyclic lactam building block for thick, broad-bandgap photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Kroon, Renee; Diaz de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia; Himmelberger, Scott; Bergqvist, Jonas; Bäcke, Olof; Faria, Gregório Couto; Gao, Feng; Obaid, Abdulmalik; Zhuang, Wenliu; Gedefaw, Desta; Olsson, Eva; Inganäs, Olle; Salleo, Alberto; Müller, Christian; Andersson, Mats R

    2014-08-20

    A new tetracyclic lactam building block for polymer semiconductors is reported that was designed to combine the many favorable properties that larger fused and/or amide-containing building blocks can induce, including improved solid-state packing, high charge carrier mobility, and improved charge separation. Copolymerization with thiophene resulted in a semicrystalline conjugated polymer, PTNT, with a broad bandgap of 2.2 eV. Grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering of PTNT thin films revealed a strong tendency for face-on π-stacking of the polymer backbone, which was retained in PTNT:fullerene blends. Corresponding solar cells featured a high open-circuit voltage of 0.9 V, a fill factor around 0.6, and a power conversion efficiency as high as 5% for >200 nm thick active layers, regardless of variations in blend stoichiometry and nanostructure. Moreover, efficiencies of >4% could be retained when thick active layers of ∼400 nm were employed. Overall, these values are the highest reported for a conjugated polymer with such a broad bandgap and are unprecedented in materials for tandem and particularly ternary blend photovoltaics. Hence, the newly developed tetracyclic lactam unit has significant potential as a conjugated building block in future organic electronic materials.

  5. {Quantification of Colloidal Blocking by Humic Acids in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Flynn, R.; von der Kammer, F.; Hofmann, T.

    2009-04-01

    colloid response in these latter experiments suggested that 1μg of SRHA could block 4.51x106 colloidal deposition sites. At molecular level, this means that 9.6 x107 SRHA molecules block one colloidal deposition site, assuming number average molecular weight of SRHA of 1390g/mol. Study results further highlight the potential of humic acids to promote the transport of natural and anthropogenic substances in groundwater.

  6. Multi-shape memory polymers achieved by the spatio-assembly of 3D printable thermoplastic building blocks.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongze; Gao, Xiang; Luo, Yingwu

    2016-04-07

    Multi-shape memory polymers were prepared by the macroscale spatio-assembly of building blocks in this work. The building blocks were methyl acrylate-co-styrene (MA-co-St) copolymers, which have the St-block-(St-random-MA)-block-St tri-block chain sequence. This design ensures that their transition temperatures can be adjusted over a wide range by varying the composition of the middle block. The two St blocks at the chain ends can generate a crosslink network in the final device to achieve strong bonding force between building blocks and the shape memory capacity. Due to their thermoplastic properties, 3D printing was employed for the spatio-assembly to build devices. This method is capable of introducing many transition phases into one device and preparing complicated shapes via 3D printing. The device can perform a complex action via a series of shape changes. Besides, this method can avoid the difficult programing of a series of temporary shapes. The control of intermediate temporary shapes was realized via programing the shapes and locations of building blocks in the final device.

  7. Synthesis, structure and luminescent properties of rare earth coordination polymers constructed from paddle-wheel building blocks.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaodan; Zhu, Guangshan; Fang, Qianrong; Xue, Ming; Tian, Ge; Sun, Jinyu; Li, Xiaotian; Qiu, Shilun

    2005-05-30

    A series of three-dimensional (3D) novel coordination polymers M(bpdc)1.5(H2O) x 0.5DMF (M = Tb (1), Ho (2), Er (3), or Y (4)) have been synthesized by reaction of the rare earth ions (M3+) with 4,4'-biphenyldicarboxylic acid (H2bpdc) in a mixed solution of DMF and C2H5OH. They possess the same 3D architectures and crystallize in monoclinic space group C2/c. Two seven-coordinated metal centers and four dimonodentate bpdc groups construct a paddle-wheel building block. These building blocks connect with two carboxyl groups to lead to a one-dimensional inorganic chain, ---M-O-C-O-M---, along the [001] direction. The inorganic chains are linked with two biphenyl groups to form 25.15 A x 17.09 A rhombic channels along the c axis without interpenetration. These complexes exhibit strong fluorescence in the visible region, and complex 3 shows Er3+ characteristic emission in the range of 1450-1650 nm at room temperature. These complexes could be anticipated as potential fluorescent probes and an IR-emitter, respectively.

  8. Supramolecular self-assembly of 1D and 3D heterometallic coordination polymers with triruthenium building blocks.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sharon Lai-Fung; Gao, Song; Chui, Stephen Sin-Yin; Shek, Lam; Huang, Jie-Sheng; Che, Chi-Ming

    2012-09-03

    Ru(3)(TSA)(6) (1; H(2)TSA=2-thiosalicylic acid), which bears six peripheral carboxylate groups and was isolated in the form [NEt(4)](1.5)[Ru(3)(HTSA)(2)(TSA)(4)](OAc)(0.5)·3.5H(2)O, serves as a building block for assembly of heterometallic coordination polymers. Treatment of 1 with [Fe(acac)(3)] (acac=acetylacetonate) in EG/H(2)O (EG=ethylene glycol) afforded 1D Ru(3)-Fe coordination polymer 2 by means of the connection of the building block 1 through iron centers. Treatment of 1 with MnCl(2) in EG resulted in the formation of 1D Ru(3)-Mn(3) coordination polymer 3, which features self-assembled polynuclear linking units Mn(3)(OCH(2)CH(2)O)(3), each of which contains a planar Mn(3)O(3) ring. By treating 1 with Gd(NO(3))(3) and NaHCO(3) in EG, a 3D Ru(3)-Gd(6) coordination polymer 4 was obtained; this 3D coordination polymer features unprecedented Gd(6)(μ(3)-CO(3))(4) units. The magnetic properties of 1-4, along with DFT calculations on the electronic structure of 1, are also described.

  9. Molecular modeling of the elastomeric properties of repeating units and building blocks of resilin, a disordered elastic protein.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Md Shahriar K; Dudek, Daniel M; Beers, Eric P; Dillard, David A; Bevan, David R

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the properties of disordered elastomeric proteins are not well known. To better understand the relationship between elastomeric behavior and amino acid sequence, we investigated resilin, a disordered rubber-like protein, found in specialized regions of the cuticle of insects. Resilin of Drosophila melanogaster contains Gly-rich repetitive motifs comprised of the amino acids, PSSSYGAPGGGNGGR, which confer elastic properties to resilin. The repetitive motifs of insect resilin can be divided into smaller partially conserved building blocks: PSS, SYGAP, GGGN and GGR. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we studied the relative roles of SYGAP, and its less common variants SYSAP and TYGAP, on the elastomeric properties of resilin. Results showed that SYGAP adopts a bent structure that is one-half to one-third the end-to-end length of the other motifs having an equal number of amino acids but containing SYSAP or TYGAP substituted for SYGAP. The bent structure of SYGAP forms due to conformational freedom of glycine, and hydrogen bonding within the motif apparently plays a role in maintaining this conformation. These structural features of SYGAP result in higher extensibility compared to other motifs, which may contribute to elastic properties at the macroscopic level. Overall, the results are consistent with a role for the SYGAP building block in the elastomeric properties of these disordered proteins. What we learned from simulating the repetitive motifs of resilin may be applicable to the biology and mechanics of other elastomeric biomaterials, and may provide us the deeper understanding of their unique properties.

  10. Niflumic acid blocks native and recombinant T-type channels.

    PubMed

    Balderas, Enrique; Ateaga-Tlecuitl, Rogelio; Rivera, Manuel; Gomora, Juan C; Darszon, Alberto

    2012-06-01

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels are widely distributed in animal cells, including spermatozoa. Calcium is fundamental in many sperm functions such as: motility, capacitation, and the acrosome reaction (AR), all essential for fertilization. Pharmacological evidence has suggested T-type calcium channels participate in the AR. Niflumic acid (NA), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug commonly used as chloride channel blocker, blocks T-currents in mouse spermatogenic cells and Cl(-) channels in testicular sperm. Here we examine the mechanism of NA blockade and explore if it can be used to separate the contribution of different Ca(V)3 members previously detected in these cells. Electrophysiological patch-clamp recordings were performed in isolated mouse spermatogenic cells and in HEK cells heterologously expressing Ca(V)3 channels. NA blocks mouse spermatogenic cell T-type currents with an IC(50) of 73.5 µM, without major voltage-dependent effects. The NA blockade is more potent in the open and in the inactivated state than in the closed state of the T-type channels. Interestingly, we found that heterologously expressed Ca(V)3.1 and Ca(V)3.3 channels were more sensitive to NA than Ca(V)3.2 channels, and this drug substantially slowed the recovery from inactivation of the three isoforms. Molecular docking modeling of drug-channel binding predicts that NA binds preferentially to the extracellular face of Ca(V)3.1 channels. The biophysical characteristics of mouse spermatogenic cell T-type currents more closely resemble those from heterologously expressed Ca(V)3.1 channels, including their sensitivity to NA. As Ca(V)3.1 null mice maintain their spermatogenic cell T-currents, it is likely that a novel Ca(V)3.2 isoform is responsible for them.

  11. NIFLUMIC ACID BLOCKS NATIVE AND RECOMBINANT T-TYPE CHANNELS

    PubMed Central

    Balderas, E; Arteaga-Tlecuitl, R; Rivera, M; Gomora, JC; Darszon, A

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels are widely distributed in animal cells, including spermatozoa. Calcium is fundamental in many sperm functions such as: motility, capacitation and the acrosome reaction, all essential for fertilization. Pharmacological evidence has suggested T-type calcium channels participate in the acrosome reaction. Niflumic acid (NA), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug commonly used as chloride channel blocker, blocks T-currents in mouse spermatogenic cells and Cl− channels in testicular sperm. Here we examine the mechanism of NA blockade and explore if it can be used to separate the contribution of different CaV3 members previously detected in these cells. Electrophysiological patch-clamp recordings were performed in isolated mouse spermatogenic cells and in HEK cells heterologously expressing CaV3 channels. NA blocks mouse spermatogenic cell T-type currents with an IC50 of 73.5 µM, without major voltage-dependent effects. The NA blockade is more potent in the open and in the inactivated state than in the closed state of the T-type channels. Interestingly, we found that heterologously expressed CaV3.1 and CaV3.3 channels were more sensitive to NA than CaV3.2 channels, and this drug substantially slowed the recovery from inactivation of the three isoforms. Molecular docking modeling of drug-channel binding predicts that NA binds preferentially to the extracellular face of CaV3.1 channels. The biophysical characteristics of mouse spermatogenic cell T-type currents more closely resemble those from heterologously expressed CaV3.1 channels, including their sensitivity to NA. As CaV3.1 null mice maintain their spermatogenic cell T-currents, it is likely that a novel CaV3.2 isoform is responsible for them. PMID:21898399

  12. Furan-oxidation-triggered inducible DNA cross-linking: acyclic versus cyclic furan-containing building blocks--on the benefit of restoring the cyclic sugar backbone.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kristof; Claeys, Diederica D; Catak, Saron; Figaroli, Sara; Hocek, Michal; Tromp, Jan M; Schürch, Stefan; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Madder, Annemieke

    2011-06-14

    Oligodeoxynucleotides incorporating a reactive functionality can cause irreversible cross-linking to the target sequence and have been widely studied for their potential in inhibition of gene expression or development of diagnostic probes for gene analysis. Reactive oligonucleotides further show potential in a supramolecular context for the construction of nanometer-sized DNA-based objects. Inspired by the cytochrome P450 catalyzed transformation of furan into a reactive enal species, we recently introduced a furan-oxidation-based methodology for cross-linking of nucleic acids. Previous experiments using a simple acyclic building block equipped with a furan moiety for incorporation into oligodeoxynucleotides have shown that cross-linking occurs in a very fast and efficient way and that substantial amounts of stable, site-selectively cross-linked species can be isolated. Given the destabilization of duplexes observed upon introduction of the initially designed furan-modified building block into DNA duplexes, we explore here the potential benefits of two new building blocks featuring an extended aromatic system and a restored cyclic backbone. Thorough experimental analysis of cross-linking reactions in a series of contexts, combined with theoretical calculations, permit structural characterization of the formed species and allow assessment of the origin of the enhanced cross-link selectivity. Our experiments clearly show that the modular nature of the furan-modified building blocks used in the current cross-linking strategy allow for fine tuning of both yield and selectivity of the interstrand cross-linking reaction.

  13. Advanced phase change materials technology: Evaluation in lightweight Solite hollow-core building blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, I.O.; Sircar, A.K.; Kumar, A.

    1995-12-31

    Methods for containment of PCM, developed during research in the last 15 years at the University of Dayton, have been applied to Solite hollow-core building blocks. Two important new developments arise from this study: First, the invention of K-18/HDPE/EVA/ABS [High Density PolyEthylenes/Ethylene Vinyl Acetate copolymer/hydrophilic silica] melt-mix composition, which can be mechanically mixed to form pellets that contain the PCM in the form of non-oozable dry pellets. Second is the determination that the PCM in the form of PCM/HDPE pellets, PCM/silica dry powder, or the PCM melt-mix, when inserted into the hollow core space of concrete blocks, can accommodate large quantities of PCM and, correspondingly, very large amounts of thermal storage. Thermal storage in excess of 1,000,000 BTU can potentially be obtained in the hollow-core blocks of a modest-sized building having a 30 feet x 40 feet x 10 feet outer wall.

  14. Computational strategies for the automated design of RNA nanoscale structures from building blocks using NanoTiler☆

    PubMed Central

    Bindewald, Eckart; Grunewald, Calvin; Boyle, Brett; O’Connor, Mary; Shapiro, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    One approach to designing RNA nanoscale structures is to use known RNA structural motifs such as junctions, kissing loops or bulges and to construct a molecular model by connecting these building blocks with helical struts. We previously developed an algorithm for detecting internal loops, junctions and kissing loops in RNA structures. Here we present algorithms for automating or assisting many of the steps that are involved in creating RNA structures from building blocks: (1) assembling building blocks into nanostructures using either a combinatorial search or constraint satisfaction; (2) optimizing RNA 3D ring structures to improve ring closure; (3) sequence optimisation; (4) creating a unique non-degenerate RNA topology descriptor. This effectively creates a computational pipeline for generating molecular models of RNA nanostructures and more specifically RNA ring structures with optimized sequences from RNA building blocks. We show several examples of how the algorithms can be utilized to generate RNA tecto-shapes. PMID:18838281

  15. Sunlight induced cycloaddition and host-guest property of self-assembled organometallic macrocycles based on a versatile building block.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong; Weng, Lin-Hong; Jin, Guo-Xin

    2012-05-11

    Organometallic rectangle 1 which undergoes [2+2] cycloaddition upon irradiation with sunlight and organometallic prism 3 which displayed interesting host-guest property were self-assembled based on a versatile building block.

  16. Building biologically active nucleic acid nanocomplexes.

    PubMed

    Smith, C I Edvard; Lundin, Karin E; Simonson, Oscar E; Moreno, Pedro M D; Svahn, Mathias G; Wenska, Malgorzata; Strömberg, Roger

    2008-01-01

    The Bioplex technology allows the hybridization of functional entities to various forms of nucleic acids by the use of synthetic nucleic acid analogs. Such supramolecular assemblies can be made in a predetermined fashion and can confer new properties. The Zorro technology is based on a novel construct generated to simultaneously bind to both DNA strands. Such compounds may have gene silencing activity.

  17. Designed, Helical Protein Nanotubes with Variable Diameters from a Single Building Block.

    PubMed

    Brodin, Jeffrey D; Smith, Sarah J; Carr, Jessica R; Tezcan, F Akif

    2015-08-26

    Due to their structural and mechanical properties, 1D helical protein assemblies represent highly attractive design targets for biomolecular engineering and protein design. Here we present a designed, tetrameric protein building block, Zn8R4, which assembles via Zn coordination interactions into a series of crystalline, helical nanotubes whose widths can be controlled by solution conditions. X-ray crystallography and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements indicate that all classes of protein nanotubes are constructed through the same 2D arrangement of Zn8R4 tetramers held together by Zn coordination. The mechanical properties of these nanotubes are correlated with their widths. All Zn8R4 nanotubes are found to be highly flexible despite possessing crystalline order, owing to their minimal interbuilding-block interactions mediated solely by metal coordination.

  18. A Customizable Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata Building Block for the Synthesis of Classical and Reversible Circuits.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed; Younes, Ahmed; Hassan, Yasser F

    2015-01-01

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) are nanoscale digital logic constructs that use electrons in arrays of quantum dots to carry out binary operations. In this paper, a basic building block for QCA will be proposed. The proposed basic building block can be customized to implement classical gates, such as XOR and XNOR gates, and reversible gates, such as CNOT and Toffoli gates, with less cell count and/or better latency than other proposed designs.

  19. A Customizable Quantum-Dot Cellular Automata Building Block for the Synthesis of Classical and Reversible Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ahmed; Younes, Ahmed; Hassan, Yasser F.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) are nanoscale digital logic constructs that use electrons in arrays of quantum dots to carry out binary operations. In this paper, a basic building block for QCA will be proposed. The proposed basic building block can be customized to implement classical gates, such as XOR and XNOR gates, and reversible gates, such as CNOT and Toffoli gates, with less cell count and/or better latency than other proposed designs. PMID:26345412

  20. Automated electrochemical assembly of the protected potential TMG-chitotriomycin precursor based on rational optimization of the carbohydrate building block.

    PubMed

    Nokami, Toshiki; Isoda, Yuta; Sasaki, Norihiko; Takaiso, Aki; Hayase, Shuichi; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Hayashi, Ryutaro; Shimizu, Akihiro; Yoshida, Jun-ichi

    2015-03-20

    The anomeric arylthio group and the hydroxyl-protecting groups of thioglycosides were optimized to construct carbohydrate building blocks for automated electrochemical solution-phase synthesis of oligoglucosamines having 1,4-β-glycosidic linkages. The optimization study included density functional theory calculations, measurements of the oxidation potentials, and the trial synthesis of the chitotriose trisaccharide. The automated synthesis of the protected potential N,N,N-trimethyl-d-glucosaminylchitotriomycin precursor was accomplished by using the optimized building block.

  1. Utilization of the Building-Block Approach in Structural Mechanics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, Marshall; Jegley, Dawn C.; McGowan, David M.; Bush, Harold G.; Waters, W. Allen

    2005-01-01

    In the last 20 years NASA has worked in collaboration with industry to develop enabling technologies needed to make aircraft safer and more affordable, extend their lifetime, improve their reliability, better understand their behavior, and reduce their weight. To support these efforts, research programs starting with ideas and culminating in full-scale structural testing were conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. Each program contained development efforts that (a) started with selecting the material system and manufacturing approach; (b) moved on to experimentation and analysis of small samples to characterize the system and quantify behavior in the presence of defects like damage and imperfections; (c) progressed on to examining larger structures to examine buckling behavior, combined loadings, and built-up structures; and (d) finally moved to complicated subcomponents and full-scale components. Each step along the way was supported by detailed analysis, including tool development, to prove that the behavior of these structures was well-understood and predictable. This approach for developing technology became known as the "building-block" approach. In the Advanced Composites Technology Program and the High Speed Research Program the building-block approach was used to develop a true understanding of the response of the structures involved through experimentation and analysis. The philosophy that if the structural response couldn't be accurately predicted, it wasn't really understood, was critical to the progression of these programs. To this end, analytical techniques including closed-form and finite elements were employed and experimentation used to verify assumptions at each step along the way. This paper presents a discussion of the utilization of the building-block approach described previously in structural mechanics research and development programs at NASA Langley Research Center. Specific examples that illustrate the use of this approach are

  2. Building blocks for social accountability: a conceptual framework to guide medical schools.

    PubMed

    Preston, Robyn; Larkins, Sarah; Taylor, Judy; Judd, Jenni

    2016-08-26

    This paper presents a conceptual framework developed from empirical evidence, to guide medical schools aspiring towards greater social accountability. Using a multiple case study approach, seventy-five staff, students, health sector representatives and community members, associated with four medical schools, participated in semi-structured interviews. Two schools were in Australia and two were in the Philippines. These schools were selected because they were aspiring to be socially accountable. Data was collected through on-site visits, field notes and a documentary review. Abductive analysis involved both deductive and inductive iterative theming of the data both within and across cases. The conceptual framework for socially accountable medical education was built from analyzing the internal and external factors influencing the selected medical schools. These factors became the building blocks that might be necessary to assist movement to social accountability. The strongest factor was the demands of the local workforce situation leading to innovative educational programs established with or without government support. The values and professional experiences of leaders, staff and health sector representatives, influenced whether the organizational culture of a school was conducive to social accountability. The wider institutional environment and policies of their universities affected this culture and the resourcing of programs. Membership of a coalition of socially accountable medical schools created a community of learning and legitimized local practice. Communities may not have recognized their own importance but they were fundamental for socially accountable practices. The bedrock of social accountability, that is, the foundation for all building blocks, is shared values and aspirations congruent with social accountability. These values and aspirations are both a philosophical understanding for innovation and a practical application at the health systems and

  3. On the building blocks of the M31 and Milky Way halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monelli, Matteo

    2017-09-01

    We discuss the formation of the halo of M31 and the Milky Way as traced by the population of RR Lyrae stars, in comparison with the population of such stars preent in satellite dwarf galaxies. We find that both halos and the massive dwarf host a population of high amplitude short period RRab stars, absent in low-mass dwarfs. These stars are explained as the metal-rich tail of the RR Lyrae distribution ([Fe/H] ˜ - 1.5), and thus their existence imply fast chemical enrichment in the host system. Their presence in both halos implies that massive building blocks had an important role in their formation.

  4. Stand-off building block systems for roof-mounted photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, M. C.; Kern, E. C., Jr.

    1986-06-01

    A low-cost building-block array for roof-mounted, grid-connected photovoltaic installations has been developed and prototype-tested. The focus of this work was on standardizing the array mounting hardware and installation methods to reduce installed system costs. The targeted consumer price for the balance-of-system - all hardware and assembly/installation labor, excluding the purchase price of modules and power conditioner was $50 per square meter of photovoltaic array (or $0.50/Wp for a nominal 10% efficient array). A cost of $40.78 per square meter of photovoltaic array (or $0.41 Wp) was achieved for the prototype installation.

  5. Impact: a low cost, reconfigurable, digital beamforming common module building block for next generation phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Lee; Hoffmann, Ted; Fulton, Caleb; Yeary, Mark; Saunders, Austin; Thompson, Dan; Chen, Bill; Guo, Alex; Murmann, Boris

    2015-05-01

    Phased array systems offer numerous advantages to the modern warfighter in multiple application spaces, including Radar, Electronic Warfare, Signals Intelligence, and Communications. However, a lack of commonality in the underlying technology base for DoD Phased Arrays has led to static systems with long development cycles, slow technology refreshes in response to emerging threats, and expensive, application-specific sub-components. The IMPACT module (Integrated Multi-use Phased Array Common Tile) is a multi-channel, reconfigurable, cost-effective beamformer that provides a common building block for multiple, disparate array applications.

  6. Control over Catenation in Metal−Organic Frameworks via Rational Design of the Organic Building Block

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Omar K.; Malliakas, Christos D.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2010-02-19

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a hybrid class of materials comprising inorganic nodes and organic struts, have potential application in many areas due to their high surface areas and uniform pores and channels. One of the key challenges to be overcome in MOF synthesis is the strong propensity for catenation (growth of multiple independent networks within a given crystal), as catenation reduces cavity sizes and diminishes porosity. Here we demonstrate that rational design of organic building blocks, which act as strut-impervious scaffolds, can be exploited to generate highly desired noncatenated materials in a controlled fashion.

  7. Clinical postconference pedagogy: exploring evidence-based practice with millennial-inspired "Building Blocks".

    PubMed

    Schams, Kristin A; Kuennen, Jackie K

    2012-01-01

    This article reports an innovative teaching strategy consisting of learning units whereby students come to postconference sessions prepared to share evidence-based practice (EBP) information associated with upcoming laboratory concepts, discover relationships among laboratory concepts and current nursing practice, and associate personal clinical experiences with the practice environment. This strategy, named "Building Blocks," represents one method to transform nursing education into a more active process, and also has the potential to prepare graduates who can function in a dynamic health care environment incorporating EBP.

  8. Molecular building blocks and their architecture in biologically/environmentally compatible soft matter chemical machinery.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Taro; Banno, Taisuke; Nitta, Sachiko; Takinoue, Masahiro; Nomoto, Tomonori; Natsume, Yuno; Matsumura, Shuichi; Fujinami, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    This review briefly summarizes recent developments in the construction of biologically/environmentally compatible chemical machinery composed of soft matter. Since environmental and living systems are open systems, chemical machinery must continuously fulfill its functions not only through the influx and generation of molecules but also via the degradation and dissipation of molecules. If the degradation or dissipation of soft matter molecular building blocks and biomaterial molecules/polymers can be achieved, soft matter particles composed of them can be used to realize chemical machinery such as selfpropelled droplets, drug delivery carriers, tissue regeneration scaffolds, protocell models, cell-/tissuemarkers, and molecular computing systems.

  9. Microwave assisted regioselective synthesis of novel pyrazoles and pyrazolopyridazines via fluorine containing building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althagafi, Ismail I.; Shaaban, Mohamed R.

    2017-08-01

    A facile regioselective synthesis of novel pyrazole derivatives containing a fluorophenyl moiety via the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of nitrileimines and enamines using conventional as well as microwave irradiation conditions have been achieved. Fluorine-containing building blocks methodology was used in order to access the targeted fluorinated compounds. The structures of the synthesized products were confirmed by 1H NMR, FT-IR, mass spectrometry, and elemental analyses. Furthermore, the synthesized pyrazoles have been used in the synthesis of some new pyrazolo pyidazines containing pendent to fluorophenyl moiety. An unambiguous structural assignment of the obtained pyrazole regioisomers was determined using the 1H NMR analysis as a valuable tool.

  10. Metal-oxide based nanoobjects: reactivity, building blocks for polymeric structures and structural variety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Achim; Roy, Soumyajit

    2002-12-01

    From the unique 'library' of molybdenum-oxide based building blocks/fragments under reducing conditions in aqueous solution a huge variety of nanoobjects, allowing specific reactions at well-defined positions, can be generated. This enables us to perform a new type of nanochemistry. Examples include the well-known molecular big-wheel of the type {Mo176} and big-ball of the type {Mo132} including their derivatives which are considered here. In addition, the by far largest structurally well-characterised cluster having 368 molybdenum atoms with the shape of a lemon is outlined and discussed. The bibliography includes 71 references.

  11. Search for water and life's building blocks in the Universe: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Sun

    Water and organics are commonly believed to be the essential ingredients for life on Earth. The development of infrared and submillimeter observational techniques has resulted in the detection of water in circumstellar envelopes, interstellar clouds, comets, asteroids, planetary satellites and the Sun. Complex organics have also been found in stellar ejecta, diffuse and molecular clouds, meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, comets and planetary satellites. In this Focus Meeting, we will discuss the origin, distribution, and detection of water and other life's building blocks both inside and outside of the Solar System. The possibility of extraterrestrial organics and water on the origin of life on Earth will also be discussed.

  12. Enzymatic Ligation Creates Discrete Multi-Nanoparticle Building Blocks for Self-Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Claridge, Shelley A.; Mastroianni, Alexander J.; Au, Yeung B.; Liang, Huiyang W.; Micheel, Christine M.; Frechet, Jean M.J.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-05-27

    Enzymatic ligation of discrete nanoparticle?DNA conjugates creates nanoparticle dimer and trimer structures in which the nanoparticles are linked by single-stranded DNA, rather than double-stranded DNA as in previous experiments. Ligation is verified by agarose gel and small-angle X-ray scattering. This capability is utilized in two ways: first to create a new class of multiparticle building blocks for nanoscale self-assembly; second to develop a system which can amplify a population of discrete nanoparticle assemblies.

  13. Dialkoxybithiazole: a new building block for head-to-head polymer semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xugang; Quinn, Jordan; Chen, Zhihua; Usta, Hakan; Zheng, Yan; Xia, Yu; Hennek, Jonathan W; Ortiz, Rocío Ponce; Marks, Tobin J; Facchetti, Antonio

    2013-02-06

    Polymer semiconductors have received great attention for organic electronics due to the low fabrication cost offered by solution-based printing techniques. To enable the desired solubility/processability and carrier mobility, polymers are functionalized with hydrocarbon chains by strategically manipulating the alkylation patterns. Note that head-to-head (HH) linkages have traditionally been avoided because the induced backbone torsion leads to poor π-π overlap and amorphous film microstructures, and hence to low carrier mobilities. We report here the synthesis of a new building block for HH linkages, 4,4'-dialkoxy-5,5'-bithiazole (BTzOR), and its incorporation into polymers for high performance organic thin-film transistors. The small oxygen van der Waals radius and intramolecular S(thiazolyl)···O(alkoxy) attraction promote HH macromolecular architectures with extensive π-conjugation, low bandgaps (1.40-1.63 eV), and high crystallinity. In comparison to previously reported 3,3'-dialkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene (BTOR), BTzOR is a promising building block in view of thiazole geometric and electronic properties: (a) replacing (thiophene)C-H with (thiazole)N reduces steric encumbrance in -BTzOR-Ar- dyads by eliminating repulsive C-H···H-C interactions with neighboring arene units, thereby enhancing π-π overlap and film crystallinity; and (b) thiazole electron-deficiency compensates alkoxy electron-donating characteristics, thereby lowering the BTzOR polymer HOMO versus that of the BTOR analogues. Thus, the new BTzOR polymers show substantial hole mobilities (0.06-0.25 cm(2)/(V s)) in organic thin-film transistors, as well as enhanced I(on):I(off) ratios and greater ambient stability than the BTOR analogues. These geometric and electronic properties make BTzOR a promising building block for new classes of polymer semiconductors, and the synthetic route to BTzOR reported here should be adaptable to many other bithiazole-based building blocks.

  14. 324 and 325 Building Hot Cell Cleanout Program: Air lock cover block refurbishment

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Y.B.; Holton, L.K. Jr.; Gale, R.M.

    1989-05-01

    The high-density concrete cover blocks shielding the pipe trench in the hot-cell air lock of the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells had accumulated fixed radioactivity ranging from 1100 to 22, 000 mrad/hr. A corresponding increase in the radiation exposure to personnel entering the air lock, together with ALARA concerns, led to the removal of the contaminated concrete surface with a hydraulic spaller and the emplacement of a stainless steel covering over a layer of grout. The resultant saving in radiation exposure is estimated to be 7200 mrad for personnel completing burial box runs for the 324 and 325 Building Hot Cell Cleanout Program. Radiation exposure to all staff members entering the air lock is now at least 50% lower. 3 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Overproduction of a Functional Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Enzyme Blocks Fatty Acid Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Subrahmanyam, Satyanarayana; Cronan, John E.

    1998-01-01

    β-Ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthetase II (KAS II) is one of three Escherichia coli isozymes that catalyze the elongation of growing fatty acid chains by condensation of acyl-ACP with malonyl-ACP. Overexpression of this enzyme has been found to be extremely toxic to E. coli, much more so than overproduction of either of the other KAS isozymes, KAS I or KAS III. The immediate effect of KAS II overproduction is the cessation of phospholipid synthesis, and this inhibition is specifically due to the blockage of fatty acid synthesis. To determine the cause of this inhibition, we examined the intracellular pools of ACP, coenzyme A (CoA), and their acyl thioesters. Although no significant changes were detected in the acyl-ACP pools, the CoA pools were dramatically altered by KAS II overproduction. Malonyl-CoA increased to about 40% of the total cellular CoA pool upon KAS II overproduction from a steady-state level of around 0.5% in the absence of KAS II overproduction. This finding indicated that the conversion of malonyl-CoA to fatty acids had been blocked and could be explained if either the conversion of malonyl-CoA to malonyl-ACP and/or the elongation reactions of fatty acid synthesis had been blocked. Overproduction of malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, the enzyme catalyzing the conversion of malonyl-CoA to malonyl-ACP, partially relieved the toxicity of KAS II overproduction, consistent with a model in which high levels of KAS II blocks access of the other KAS isozymes to malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase. PMID:9721301

  16. Supramolecular assemblies with tunable morphologies from homopolymeric and small organic molecular building blocks.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huisheng; Lu, Yunfeng

    2006-06-20

    This work demonstrates the formation of micrometer-sized supramolecular assemblies with tunable morphologies using a homopolymer, poly(4-vinylpyridine), and a small organic acid, 5,7-dodecadiynedioic acid, as the building molecules. Three different morphologies (hollow spheres, solid spheres, and rods) were obtained, depending on the molar ratio of the building molecules. It is proposed that hydrogen bonding between P4VP and DCDA and the pi-pi stacking of the diacetylenic moieties are responsible for the formation of these assemblies. Interestingly, ordered hexagonal and lamellar mesostructures were also formed within the microstructure during the co-assembly process. As a result, UV irradiation of the supramolecular assemblies polymerized the diacetylenic moieties, resulting in cross-linked and responsive blue polydiacetylenic assemblies that can change color to red upon external stimuli (e.g., thermal stimuli). This work provides a novel concept of the synthesis of responsive supramolecular assemblies from a homopolymer and small organic molecules.

  17. Oligosilsesquioxanes as versatile building blocks for the preparation of self-assembled thin films.

    PubMed

    Cassagneau, Thierry; Caruso, Frank

    2002-07-10

    A self-assembly approach to the preparation of nanocomposite siliceous thin films by using oligosilsesquioxanes as building blocks is presented. Poly(styrene-4-sulfonate), PSS, and octa(3-aminopropyl)silsesquioxane, NSi8, were layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled onto planar substrates and polystyrene (PS) particles, thus forming composite multilayers. We have clarified the binding properties of NSi8 to PSS by examining the pH influence on film buildup by microelectrophoresis (zeta-potential) and quartz crystal microgravimetry (QCM). The regular growth of PSS/NSi8 multilayers on planar supports was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and QCM. By applying the LbL coating procedure to spherical templates, we prepared compact, microporous hollow silica spheres by calcining PS spheres coated with (poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH)/PSS)(2)/(NSi8/PSS)(n) (n varying from 3 to 12), at 750 degrees C, because of sintering of the octameric clusters (NSi8). Hollow spheres derived from coatings with n = 3 drastically altered in size (relative to the template core), depending on the size of the PS particles used. The novelty of this method for the nanofabrication of siliceous films stems from the use of well-defined and discrete building blocks, such as NSi8, leading to homogeneous organic-silica composite films as well as individual siliceous particles of variable size and shape.

  18. Assessing the Potential of Folded Globular Polyproteins As Hydrogel Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The native states of proteins generally have stable well-defined folded structures endowing these biomolecules with specific functionality and molecular recognition abilities. Here we explore the potential of using folded globular polyproteins as building blocks for hydrogels. Photochemically cross-linked hydrogels were produced from polyproteins containing either five domains of I27 ((I27)5), protein L ((pL)5), or a 1:1 blend of these proteins. SAXS analysis showed that (I27)5 exists as a single rod-like structure, while (pL)5 shows signatures of self-aggregation in solution. SANS measurements showed that both polyprotein hydrogels have a similar nanoscopic structure, with protein L hydrogels being formed from smaller and more compact clusters. The polyprotein hydrogels showed small energy dissipation in a load/unload cycle, which significantly increased when the hydrogels were formed in the unfolded state. This study demonstrates the use of folded proteins as building blocks in hydrogels, and highlights the potential versatility that can be offered in tuning the mechanical, structural, and functional properties of polyproteins. PMID:28006103

  19. Mesoscopic packing of disk-like building blocks in calcium silicate hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zechuan; Zhou, Ao; Lau, Denvid

    2016-01-01

    At 100-nanometer length scale, the mesoscopic structure of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) plays a critical role in determining the macroscopic material properties, such as porosity. In order to explore the mesoscopic structure of C-S-H, we employ two effective techniques, nanoindentation test and molecular dynamics simulation. Grid nanoindentation tests find different porosity of C-S-H in cement paste specimens prepared at varied water-to-cement (w/c) ratios. The w/c-ratio-induced porosity difference can be ascribed to the aspect ratio (diameter-to-thickness ratio) of disk-like C-S-H building blocks. The molecular dynamics simulation, with a mesoscopic C-S-H model, reveals 3 typical packing patterns and relates the packing density to the aspect ratio. Illustrated with disk-like C-S-H building blocks, this study provides a description of C-S-H structures in complement to spherical-particle C-S-H models at the sub-micron scale. PMID:27845376

  20. Equivalence of the EMD- and NEMD-based decomposition of thermal conductivity into microscopic building blocks.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Hiroki; Kikugawa, Gota; Ishikiriyama, Mamoru; Yamashita, Seiji; Ohara, Taku

    2017-09-21

    Thermal conductivity of a material can be comprehended as being composed of microscopic building blocks relevant to the energy transfer due to a specific microscopic process or structure. The building block is called the partial thermal conductivity (PTC). The concept of PTC is essential to evaluate the contributions of various molecular mechanisms to heat conduction and has been providing detailed knowledge of the contribution. The PTC can be evaluated by equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) in different manners: the EMD evaluation utilizes the autocorrelation of spontaneous heat fluxes in an equilibrium state whereas the NEMD one is based on stationary heat fluxes in a non-equilibrium state. However, it has not been fully discussed whether the two methods give the same PTC or not. In the present study, we formulate a Green-Kubo relation, which is necessary for EMD to calculate the PTCs equivalent to those by NEMD. Unlike the existing theories, our formulation is based on the local equilibrium hypothesis to describe a clear connection between EMD and NEMD simulations. The equivalence of the two derivations of PTCs is confirmed by the numerical results for liquid methane and butane. The present establishment of the EMD-NEMD correspondence makes the MD analysis of PTCs a robust way to clarify the microscopic origins of thermal conductivity.

  1. Accelerated wound healing by injectable microporous gel scaffolds assembled from annealed building blocks

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Donald R.; Weaver, Westbrook M.; Scumpia, Philip; Di Carlo, Dino; Segura, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Summary Injectable hydrogels can provide a scaffold for in situ tissue regrowth and regeneration, however these injected materials require gel degradation prior to tissue reformation limiting their ability to provide physical support. We have created a new class of injectable biomaterial that circumvents this challenge by providing an interconnected microporous network for simultaneous tissue reformation and material degradation. We assemble monodisperse micro-gel building blocks into an interconnected microporous annealed particle (MAP) scaffold. Through microfluidic formation, we tailor the chemical and physical properties of the building blocks, providing downstream control of the physical and chemical properties of the assembled MAP scaffold. In vitro, cells incorporated during MAP scaffold formation proliferated and formed extensive 3D networks within 48 hours. In vivo, the injectable MAP scaffold facilitated cell migration resulting in rapid cutaneous tissue regeneration and tissue structure formation within 5 days. The combination of microporosity and injectability achieved with MAP scaffolds will enable novel routes to tissue regeneration in vivo and tissue creation de novo. PMID:26030305

  2. Concept analysis and the building blocks of theory: misconceptions regarding theory development.

    PubMed

    Bergdahl, Elisabeth; Berterö, Carina M

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the attempts to justify concepts analysis as a way to construct theory - a notion often advocated in nursing. The notion that concepts are the building blocks or threads from which theory is constructed is often repeated. It can be found in many articles and well-known textbooks. However, this notion is seldom explained or defended. The notion of concepts as building blocks has also been questioned by several authors. However, most of these authors seem to agree to some degree that concepts are essential components from which theory is built. Discussion paper. Literature was reviewed to synthesize and debate current knowledge. Our point is that theory is not built by concepts analysis or clarification and we will show that this notion has its basis in some serious misunderstandings. We argue that concept analysis is not a part of sound scientific method and should be abandoned. The current methods of concept analysis in nursing have no foundation in philosophy of science or in language philosophy. The type of concept analysis performed in nursing is not a way to 'construct' theory. Rather, theories are formed by creative endeavour to propose a solution to a scientific and/or practical problem. The bottom line is that the current style and form of concept analysis in nursing should be abandoned in favour of methods in line with modern theory of science. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Social motivation and conflict resolution tactics as potential building blocks of sociality in cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Balshine, Sigal; Wong, Marian Y L; Reddon, Adam R

    2017-01-03

    Even closely related and ecologically similar cichlid species of Lake Tanganyika exhibit an impressive diversity of social systems, and therefore these fishes offer an excellent opportunity to examine the evolution of social behaviour. Sophisticated social relationships are thought to have evolved via a building block design where more fundamental social behaviours and cognitive processes have been combined, incrementally modified, and elaborated over time. Here, we studied two of these putative social building blocks in two closely related species of cichlids: Neolamprologus pulcher, a group-living species, and Telmatochromis temporalis, a non-grouping species. Otherwise well matched in ecology, this pair of species provide an excellent comparison point to understand how behavioural processes may have been modified in relation to the evolution of sociality. Using social assays in both the laboratory and in the field, we explored each species' motivation to interact with conspecifics, and each species' conflict resolution tactics. We found that individuals of the group living species, N. pulcher, displayed higher social motivation and were more likely to produce submission displays than were individuals of the non-grouping species, T. temporalis. We argue that the motivation to interact with conspecifics is a necessary prerequisite for the emergence of group living, and that the use of submission reduces the costs of conflict and facilitates the maintenance of close social proximity. These results suggest that social motivation and conflict resolution tactics are associated with social complexity, and that these behavioural traits may be functionally significant in the evolution and maintenance of sociality.

  4. Catalytic allylic oxidation of internal alkenes to a multifunctional chiral building block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayeh, Liela; Le, Phong Q.; Tambar, Uttam K.

    2017-07-01

    The stereoselective oxidation of hydrocarbons is one of the most notable advances in synthetic chemistry over the past fifty years. Inspired by nature, enantioselective dihydroxylations, epoxidations and other oxidations of unsaturated hydrocarbons have been developed. More recently, the catalytic enantioselective allylic carbon-hydrogen oxidation of alkenes has streamlined the production of pharmaceuticals, natural products, fine chemicals and other functional materials. Allylic functionalization provides a direct path to chiral building blocks with a newly formed stereocentre from petrochemical feedstocks while preserving the olefin functionality as a handle for further chemical elaboration. Various metal-based catalysts have been discovered for the enantioselective allylic carbon-hydrogen oxidation of simple alkenes with cyclic or terminal double bonds. However, a general and selective allylic oxidation using the more common internal alkenes remains elusive. Here we report the enantioselective, regioselective and E/Z-selective allylic oxidation of unactivated internal alkenes via a catalytic hetero-ene reaction with a chalcogen-based oxidant. Our method enables non-symmetric internal alkenes to be selectively converted into allylic functionalized products with high stereoselectivity and regioselectivity. Stereospecific transformations of the resulting multifunctional chiral building blocks highlight the potential for rapidly converting internal alkenes into a broad range of enantioenriched structures that can be used in the synthesis of complex target molecules.

  5. Self-assembling SAS-6 multimer is a core centriole building block.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Jayachandran; Guichard, Paul; Smith, Andrew H; Schwarz, Heinz; Agard, David A; Marco, Sergio; Avidor-Reiss, Tomer

    2010-03-19

    Centrioles are conserved microtubule-based organelles with 9-fold symmetry that are essential for cilia and mitotic spindle formation. A conserved structure at the onset of centriole assembly is a "cartwheel" with 9-fold radial symmetry and a central tubule in its core. It remains unclear how the cartwheel is formed. The conserved centriole protein, SAS-6, is a cartwheel component that functions early in centriole formation. Here, combining biochemistry and electron microscopy, we characterize SAS-6 and show that it self-assembles into stable tetramers, which serve as building blocks for the central tubule. These results suggest that SAS-6 self-assembly may be an initial step in the formation of the cartwheel that provides the 9-fold symmetry. Electron microscopy of centrosomes identified 25-nm central tubules with repeating subunits and show that SAS-6 concentrates at the core of the cartwheel. Recombinant and native SAS-6 self-oligomerizes into tetramers with approximately 6-nm subunits, and these tetramers are components of the centrosome, suggesting that tetramers are the building blocks of the central tubule. This is further supported by the observation that elevated levels of SAS-6 in Drosophila cells resulted in higher order structures resembling central tubule morphology. Finally, in the presence of embryonic extract, SAS-6 tetramers assembled into high density complexes, providing a starting point for the eventual in vitro reconstruction of centrioles.

  6. Multifunctional Nanoparticles Self-Assembled from Small Organic Building Blocks for Biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Xing, Pengyao; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-09-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly shows significant potential to construct responsive materials. By tailoring the structural parameters of organic building blocks, nanosystems can be fabricated, whose performance in catalysis, energy storage and conversion, and biomedicine has been explored. Since small organic building blocks are structurally simple, easily modified, and reproducible, they are frequently employed in supramolecular self-assembly and materials science. The dynamic and adaptive nature of self-assembled nanoarchitectures affords an enhanced sensitivity to the changes in environmental conditions, favoring their applications in controllable drug release and bioimaging. Here, recent significant research advancements of small-organic-molecule self-assembled nanoarchitectures toward biomedical applications are highlighted. Functionalized assemblies, mainly including vesicles, nanoparticles, and micelles are categorized according to their topological morphologies and functions. These nanoarchitectures with different topologies possess distinguishing advantages in biological applications, well incarnating the structure-property relationship. By presenting some important discoveries, three domains of these nanoarchitectures in biomedical research are covered, including biosensors, bioimaging, and controlled release/therapy. The strategies regarding how to design and characterize organic assemblies to exhibit biomedical applications are also discussed. Up-to-date research developments in the field are provided and research challenges to be overcome in future studies are revealed.

  7. Equivalence of the EMD- and NEMD-based decomposition of thermal conductivity into microscopic building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Hiroki; Kikugawa, Gota; Ishikiriyama, Mamoru; Yamashita, Seiji; Ohara, Taku

    2017-09-01

    Thermal conductivity of a material can be comprehended as being composed of microscopic building blocks relevant to the energy transfer due to a specific microscopic process or structure. The building block is called the partial thermal conductivity (PTC). The concept of PTC is essential to evaluate the contributions of various molecular mechanisms to heat conduction and has been providing detailed knowledge of the contribution. The PTC can be evaluated by equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) in different manners: the EMD evaluation utilizes the autocorrelation of spontaneous heat fluxes in an equilibrium state whereas the NEMD one is based on stationary heat fluxes in a non-equilibrium state. However, it has not been fully discussed whether the two methods give the same PTC or not. In the present study, we formulate a Green-Kubo relation, which is necessary for EMD to calculate the PTCs equivalent to those by NEMD. Unlike the existing theories, our formulation is based on the local equilibrium hypothesis to describe a clear connection between EMD and NEMD simulations. The equivalence of the two derivations of PTCs is confirmed by the numerical results for liquid methane and butane. The present establishment of the EMD-NEMD correspondence makes the MD analysis of PTCs a robust way to clarify the microscopic origins of thermal conductivity.

  8. Engineering cell factories for producing building block chemicals for bio-polymer synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Yota; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Sasaki, Kengo; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-21

    Synthetic polymers are widely used in daily life. Due to increasing environmental concerns related to global warming and the depletion of oil reserves, the development of microbial-based fermentation processes for the production of polymer building block chemicals from renewable resources is desirable to replace current petroleum-based methods. To this end, strains that efficiently produce the target chemicals at high yields and productivity are needed. Recent advances in metabolic engineering have enabled the biosynthesis of polymer compounds at high yield and productivities by governing the carbon flux towards the target chemicals. Using these methods, microbial strains have been engineered to produce monomer chemicals for replacing traditional petroleum-derived aliphatic polymers. These developments also raise the possibility of microbial production of aromatic chemicals for synthesizing high-performance polymers with desirable properties, such as ultraviolet absorbance, high thermal resistance, and mechanical strength. In the present review, we summarize recent progress in metabolic engineering approaches to optimize microbial strains for producing building blocks to synthesize aliphatic and high-performance aromatic polymers.

  9. Surfactant-free CZTS nanoparticles as building blocks for low-cost solar cell absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaberca, O.; Oftinger, F.; Chane-Ching, J. Y.; Datas, L.; Lafond, A.; Puech, P.; Balocchi, A.; Lagarde, D.; Marie, X.

    2012-05-01

    A process route for the fabrication of solvent-redispersible, surfactant-free Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanoparticles has been designed with the objective to have the benefit of a simple sulfide source which advantageously acts as (i) a complexing agent inhibiting crystallite growth, (ii) a surface additive providing redispersion in low ionic strength polar solvents and (iii) a transient ligand easily replaced by an carbon-free surface additive. This multifunctional use of the sulfide source has been achieved through a fine tuning of ((Cu2+)a(Zn2+)b(Sn4+)c(Tu)d(OH-)e)t+, Tu = thiourea) oligomers, leading after temperature polycondensation and S2- exchange to highly concentrated (c > 100 g l-1), stable, ethanolic CZTS dispersions. The good electronic properties and low-defect concentration of the sintered, crack-free CZTSe films resulting from these building blocks was shown by photoluminescence investigation, making these building blocks interesting for low-cost, high-performance CZTSe solar cells.

  10. U.S. national categorical mapping of building heights by block group from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falcone, James

    2016-01-01

    This dataset is a categorical mapping of estimated mean building heights, by Census block group, in shapefile format for the conterminous United States. The data were derived from the NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which collected “first return” (top of canopy and buildings) radar data at 30-m resolution in February, 2000 aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor. These data were processed here to estimate building heights nationally, and then aggregated to block group boundaries. The block groups were then categorized into six classes, ranging from “Low” to “Very High”, based on the mean and standard deviation breakpoints of the data. The data were evaluated in several ways, to include comparing them to a reference dataset of 85,000 buildings for the city of San Francisco for accuracy assessment and to provide contextual definitions for the categories.

  11. Measuring the health systems impact of disease control programmes: a critical reflection on the WHO building blocks framework

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The WHO health systems Building Blocks framework has become ubiquitous in health systems research. However, it was not developed as a research instrument, but rather to facilitate investments of resources in health systems. In this paper, we reflect on the advantages and limitations of using the framework in applied research, as experienced in three empirical vaccine studies we have undertaken. Discussion We argue that while the Building Blocks framework is valuable because of its simplicity and ability to provide a common language for researchers, it is not suitable for analysing dynamic, complex and inter-linked systems impacts. In our three studies, we found that the mechanical segmentation of effects by the WHO building blocks, without recognition of their interactions, hindered the understanding of impacts on systems as a whole. Other important limitations were the artificial equal weight given to each building block and the challenge in capturing longer term effects and opportunity costs. Another criticism is not of the framework per se, but rather how it is typically used, with a focus on the six building blocks to the neglect of the dynamic process and outcome aspects of health systems. We believe the framework would be improved by making three amendments: integrating the missing “demand” component; incorporating an overarching, holistic health systems viewpoint and including scope for interactions between components. If researchers choose to use the Building Blocks framework, we recommend that it be adapted to the specific study question and context, with formative research and piloting conducted in order to inform this adaptation. Summary As with frameworks in general, the WHO Building Blocks framework is valuable because it creates a common language and shared understanding. However, for applied research, it falls short of what is needed to holistically evaluate the impact of specific interventions on health systems. We propose that if

  12. Measuring the health systems impact of disease control programmes: a critical reflection on the WHO building blocks framework.

    PubMed

    Mounier-Jack, Sandra; Griffiths, Ulla K; Closser, Svea; Burchett, Helen; Marchal, Bruno

    2014-03-25

    The WHO health systems Building Blocks framework has become ubiquitous in health systems research. However, it was not developed as a research instrument, but rather to facilitate investments of resources in health systems. In this paper, we reflect on the advantages and limitations of using the framework in applied research, as experienced in three empirical vaccine studies we have undertaken. We argue that while the Building Blocks framework is valuable because of its simplicity and ability to provide a common language for researchers, it is not suitable for analysing dynamic, complex and inter-linked systems impacts. In our three studies, we found that the mechanical segmentation of effects by the WHO building blocks, without recognition of their interactions, hindered the understanding of impacts on systems as a whole. Other important limitations were the artificial equal weight given to each building block and the challenge in capturing longer term effects and opportunity costs. Another criticism is not of the framework per se, but rather how it is typically used, with a focus on the six building blocks to the neglect of the dynamic process and outcome aspects of health systems.We believe the framework would be improved by making three amendments: integrating the missing "demand" component; incorporating an overarching, holistic health systems viewpoint and including scope for interactions between components. If researchers choose to use the Building Blocks framework, we recommend that it be adapted to the specific study question and context, with formative research and piloting conducted in order to inform this adaptation. As with frameworks in general, the WHO Building Blocks framework is valuable because it creates a common language and shared understanding. However, for applied research, it falls short of what is needed to holistically evaluate the impact of specific interventions on health systems. We propose that if researchers use the framework, it

  13. RNA and RNP as Building Blocks for Nanotechnology and Synthetic Biology.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hirohisa; Saito, Hirohide

    2016-01-01

    Recent technologies that aimed to elucidate cellular function have revealed essential roles for RNA molecules in living systems. Our knowledge concerning functional and structural information of naturally occurring RNA and RNA-protein (RNP) complexes is increasing rapidly. RNA and RNP interaction motifs are structural units that function as building blocks to constitute variety of complex structures. RNA-central synthetic biology and nanotechnology are constructive approaches that employ the accumulated information and build synthetic RNA (RNP)-based circuits and nanostructures. Here, we describe how to design and construct synthetic RNA (RNP)-based devices and structures at the nanometer-scale for biological and future therapeutic applications. RNA/RNP nanostructures can also be utilized as the molecular scaffold to control the localization or interactions of target molecule(s). Moreover, RNA motifs recognized by RNA-binding proteins can be applied to make protein-responsive translational "switches" that can turn gene expression "on" or "off" depending on the intracellular environment. This "synthetic RNA and RNP world" will expand tools for nanotechnology and synthetic biology. In addition, these reconstructive approaches would lead to a greater understanding of building principle in naturally occurring RNA/RNP molecules and systems.

  14. Culture's building blocks: investigating cultural evolution in a LEGO construction task.

    PubMed

    McGraw, John J; Wallot, Sebastian; Mitkidis, Panagiotis; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    ONE OF THE MOST ESSENTIAL BUT THEORETICALLY VEXING ISSUES REGARDING THE NOTION OF CULTURE IS THAT OF CULTURAL EVOLUTION AND TRANSMISSION: how a group's accumulated solutions to invariant challenges develop and persevere over time. But at the moment, the notion of applying evolutionary theory to culture remains little more than a suggestive trope. Whereas the modern synthesis of evolutionary theory has provided an encompassing scientific framework for the selection and transmission of biological adaptations, a convincing theory of cultural evolution has yet to emerge. One of the greatest challenges for theorists is identifying the appropriate time scales and units of analysis in order to reduce the intractably large and complex phenomenon of "culture" into its component "building blocks." In this paper, we present a model for scientifically investigating cultural processes by analyzing the ways people develop conventions in a series of LEGO construction tasks. The data revealed a surprising pattern in the selection of building bricks as well as features of car design across consecutive building sessions. Our findings support a novel methodology for studying the development and transmission of culture through the microcosm of interactive LEGO design and assembly.

  15. Culture’s building blocks: investigating cultural evolution in a LEGO construction task

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, John J.; Wallot, Sebastian; Mitkidis, Panagiotis; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    One of the most essential but theoretically vexing issues regarding the notion of culture is that of cultural evolution and transmission: how a group’s accumulated solutions to invariant challenges develop and persevere over time. But at the moment, the notion of applying evolutionary theory to culture remains little more than a suggestive trope. Whereas the modern synthesis of evolutionary theory has provided an encompassing scientific framework for the selection and transmission of biological adaptations, a convincing theory of cultural evolution has yet to emerge. One of the greatest challenges for theorists is identifying the appropriate time scales and units of analysis in order to reduce the intractably large and complex phenomenon of “culture” into its component “building blocks.” In this paper, we present a model for scientifically investigating cultural processes by analyzing the ways people develop conventions in a series of LEGO construction tasks. The data revealed a surprising pattern in the selection of building bricks as well as features of car design across consecutive building sessions. Our findings support a novel methodology for studying the development and transmission of culture through the microcosm of interactive LEGO design and assembly. PMID:25309482

  16. A synthetic strategy to xylose-containing thioglycoside tri- and tetrasaccharide building blocks corresponding to Cryptococcus neoformans capsular polysaccharide structures.

    PubMed

    Guazzelli, Lorenzo; Ulc, Rebecca; Rydner, Lina; Oscarson, Stefan

    2015-06-21

    As part of an ongoing project aimed at developing vaccine candidates against Cryptococcus neoformans the preparation of tri- and tetrasaccharide thioglycoside building blocks, to be used in construction of structurally defined part structures of C. neoformans GXM capsular polysaccharide, was investigated. Using a naphthalenylmethyl (NAP) ether as a temporary protecting group and trichloroacetimidate donors in optimized glycosylations the target building blocks, ethyl 6-O-acetyl-2,4-di-O-benzyl-3-O-(2-naphthalenylmethyl)-α-D-mannopyranosyl-(1→3)-[2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)]-4,6-di-O-benzyl-1-thio-α-D-mannopyranoside (16) and ethyl 2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)-4,6-di-O-benzyl-3-O-(2-naphthalenylmethyl)-α-D-mannopyranosyl-(1→3)-[2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-β-D-xylopyra-nosyl-(1→2)]-6-O-acetyl-4-O-benzyl-1-thio-α-D-mannopyranoside (21), were efficiently prepared. These synthesized thiosaccharide building blocks were then used as donors in high-yielding (~90%) DMTST promoted glycosylations to a spacer-containing acceptor to, after deprotection, afford GXM polysaccharide part structures ready for protein conjugation to give vaccine candidates. Also, the NAP groups in the building blocks were removed to obtain tri- and tetrasaccharide acceptors suitable for further elongation towards larger thiosaccharide building blocks.

  17. Digital NMR profiles as building blocks: assembling ¹H fingerprints of steviol glycosides.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, José G; Simmler, Charlotte; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2015-04-24

    This report describes a fragment-based approach to the examination of congeneric organic compounds by NMR spectroscopy. The method combines the classic interpretation of 1D- and 2D-NMR data sets with contemporary computer-assisted NMR analysis. Characteristic NMR profiles of key structural motifs were generated by (1)H iterative full spin analysis and then joined together as building blocks to recreate the (1)H NMR spectra of increasingly complex molecules. To illustrate the methodology described, a comprehensive analysis of steviol (1), seven steviol glycosides (2-8) and two structurally related isosteviol compounds (9, 10) was carried out. The study also assessed the potential impact of this method on relevant aspects of natural product research including structural verification, chemical dereplication, and mixture analysis.

  18. The assembly of supramolecular boxes and coordination polymers based on bis-zinc-salphen building blocks.

    PubMed

    Kuil, Mark; Puijk, Iris M; Kleij, Arjan W; Tooke, Duncan M; Spek, Anthony L; Reek, Joost N H

    2009-01-05

    We report the assembly of supramolecular boxes and coordination polymers based on a rigid bis-zinc(II)-salphen complex and various ditopic nitrogen ligands. The use of the bis-zinc(II)-salphen building block in combination with small ditopic nitrogen ligands gave organic coordination polymers both in solution as well as in the solid state. Molecular modeling shows that supramolecular boxes with small internal cavities can be formed. However, the inability to accommodate solvent molecules (such as toluene) in these cavities explains why coordination polymers are prevailing over well-defined boxes, as it would lead to an energetically unfavorable vacuum. In contrast, for relatively longer ditopic nitrogen ligands, we observed the selective formation of supramolecular box assemblies in all cases studied. The approach can be easily extended to chiral analogues by using chiral ditopic nitrogen ligands.

  19. 2-Alkynylbenzaldoxime: a versatile building block for the generation of N-heterocycles.

    PubMed

    He, Linman; Nie, Hongming; Qiu, Guanyinsheng; Gao, Yueqiu; Wu, Jie

    2014-12-07

    2-Alkynylbenzaldoxime as a versatile building block has been applied widely for the construction of N-heterocycles in organic synthesis. Since it could be easily transferred to isoquinoline N-oxide via intramolecular 6-endo cyclization in the presence of metal catalysts or electrophiles, the subsequent [3 + 2] cycloaddition/nucleophilic addition and rearrangement could be expected. On the other hand, a Beckmann rearrangement could occur first since an oxime moiety is present in the molecule, which would then undergo an intramolecular cyclization to furnish nitrogen-containing heterocycles. This review reports the recent advancement in the generation of N-heterocycles starting from 2-alkynylbenzaldoximes via tandem reactions based on different reaction types.

  20. Remote Stabilization of Copper Paddlewheel Based Molecular Building Blocks in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Wen-Yang; Cai, Rong; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A.; Hogan, Adam; Nugent, Patrick; Williams, Kia; Wojtas, Lukasz; Luebke, Ryan; Weseliinski, Lukasz J.; Zaworotko, Michael J.; Space, Brian; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Shi, Xiaodong; Ma, Shengqian

    2015-08-21

    Copper paddlewheel based molecular building blocks (MBBs) are ubiquitous and have been widely employed for the construction of highly porous metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). However, most copper paddlewheel based MOFs fail to retain their structural integrity in the presence of water. This instability is directly correlated to the plausible displacement of coordinating carboxylates in the copper paddlewheel MBB, [Cu₂(O₂C-)₄], by the strongly coordinating water molecules. In this comprehensive study, we illustrate the chemical stability control in the rht-MOF platform via strengthening the coordinating bonds within the triangular inorganic MBB, [Cu₃O(N4–x(CH)xC-)₃] (x = 0, 1, or 2). Remotely, the chemical stabilization propagated into the paddlewheel MBB to afford isoreticular rht-MOFs with remarkably enhanced water/chemical stabilities compared to the prototypal rht-MOF-1.

  1. Digital NMR Profiles as Building Blocks: Assembling 1H Fingerprints of Steviol Glycosides

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, José G.; Simmler, Charlotte; McAlpine, James B.; Lankin, David C.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a fragment-based approach to the examination of congeneric organic compounds by NMR spectroscopy. The method combines the classic interpretation of 1D- and 2D-NMR data sets with contemporary computer-assisted NMR analysis. Characteristic NMR profiles of key structural motifs were generated by 1H iterative full spin analysis and then joined together as building blocks to recreate the 1H NMR spectra of increasingly complex molecules. To illustrate the methodology described, a comprehensive analysis of steviol (1), seven steviol glycosides (2–8) and two structurally related isosteviol compounds (9, 10) was carried out. The study also assessed the potential impact of this method on relevant aspects of natural product research including structural verification, chemical dereplication, and mixture analysis. PMID:25714117

  2. A generalized analog implementation of piecewise linear neuron models using CCII building blocks.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Hamid; Ahmadi, Arash; Bavandpour, Mohammad; Sharifipoor, Ozra

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a set of reconfigurable analog implementations of piecewise linear spiking neuron models using second generation current conveyor (CCII) building blocks. With the same topology and circuit elements, without W/L modification which is impossible after circuit fabrication, these circuits can produce different behaviors, similar to the biological neurons, both for a single neuron as well as a network of neurons just by tuning reference current and voltage sources. The models are investigated, in terms of analog implementation feasibility and costs, targeting large scale hardware implementations. Results show that, in order to gain the best performance, area and accuracy; these models can be compromised. Simulation results are presented for different neuron behaviors with CMOS 350 nm technology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Three distinct ribosome assemblies modulated by translation are the building blocks of polysomes

    PubMed Central

    Lunelli, Lorenzo; Passerini, Andrea; Bianchini, Paolo; Gilbert, Robert J.; Bernabò, Paola; Tebaldi, Toma; Diaspro, Alberto; Pederzolli, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Translation is increasingly recognized as a central control layer of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The overall organization of mRNA and ribosomes within polysomes, as well as the possible role of this organization in translation are poorly understood. Here we show that polysomes are primarily formed by three distinct classes of ribosome assemblies. We observe that these assemblies can be connected by naked RNA regions of the transcript. We show that the relative proportions of the three classes of ribosome assemblies reflect, and probably dictate, the level of translational activity. These results reveal the existence of recurrent supra-ribosomal building blocks forming polysomes and suggest the presence of unexplored translational controls embedded in the polysome structure. PMID:25713412

  4. Spectroscopic investigation of some building blocks of organic conductors: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, V.; Yadav, T.

    2017-04-01

    Theoretical molecular structures and IR and Raman spectra of di and tetra methyl substituted tetrathiafulvalene and tetraselenafulvalene molecules have been studied. These molecules belong to the organic conductor family and are immensely used as building blocks of several organic conducting devices. The Hartree-Fock and density functional theory with exchange functional B3LYP have been employed for computational purpose. We have also performed normal coordinate analysis to scale the theoretical frequencies and to calculate potential energy distributions for the conspicuous assignments. The exciting frequency and temperature dependent Raman spectra have also presented. Optimization results reveal that the sulphur derivatives possess boat shape while selenium derivatives possess planner structures. Natural bond orbitals analysis has also been performed to study second order interaction between donors and acceptors and to compute molecular orbital occupancy and energy.

  5. The Local Dwarf GALAXIES:BUILDING Blocks of Massive Ones? I.THE Fornax Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykytyuk, T. V.

    A chemical evolution of the Local Group dwarf galaxy Fornax is considered in the framework of the merger scenario. We suppose a galactic stellar halo to be formed as separate fragments which then merge; thus, we can calculate the set of such the fragments to reproduce the observed metallicity distribution function of a galaxy. Accordingly, if dwarf galaxies were such the systems, which, once merged, have formed massive galaxies, we need to obtain only one fragment to reproduce the observed metallicity distribution function of a dwarf galaxy. To test this assumption, the stellar metallicity distribution functions of Fornax was calculated in the framework of the merger scenario. The more than one fragment was obtained for galaxy under consideration; thus, it is unlikely the systems similar to Fornax to be building blocks of massive galaxies.

  6. Repeat protein engineering: creating functional nanostructures/biomaterials from modular building blocks.

    PubMed

    Main, Ewan R G; Phillips, Jonathan J; Millership, Charlotte

    2013-10-01

    There is enormous interest in molecular self-assembly and the development of biological systems to form smart nanostructures for biotechnology (so-called 'bottom-up fabrications'). Repeat proteins are ideal choices for development of such systems as they: (i) possess a relatively simple relationship between sequence, structure and function; (ii) are modular and non-globular in structure; (iii) act as diverse scaffolds for the mediation of a diverse range of protein-protein interactions; and (iv) have been extensively studied and successfully engineered and designed. In the present review, we summarize recent advances in the use of engineered repeat proteins in the self-assembly of novel materials, nanostructures and biosensors. In particular, we show that repeat proteins are excellent monomeric programmable building blocks that can be triggered to associate into a range of morphologies and can readily be engineered as stimuli-responsive biofunctional materials.

  7. Learning and optimization with cascaded VLSI neural network building-block chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, T.; Eberhardt, S. P.; Tran, M.; Daud, T.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    To demonstrate the versatility of the building-block approach, two neural network applications were implemented on cascaded analog VLSI chips. Weights were implemented using 7-b multiplying digital-to-analog converter (MDAC) synapse circuits, with 31 x 32 and 32 x 32 synapses per chip. A novel learning algorithm compatible with analog VLSI was applied to the two-input parity problem. The algorithm combines dynamically evolving architecture with limited gradient-descent backpropagation for efficient and versatile supervised learning. To implement the learning algorithm in hardware, synapse circuits were paralleled for additional quantization levels. The hardware-in-the-loop learning system allocated 2-5 hidden neurons for parity problems. Also, a 7 x 7 assignment problem was mapped onto a cascaded 64-neuron fully connected feedback network. In 100 randomly selected problems, the network found optimal or good solutions in most cases, with settling times in the range of 7-100 microseconds.

  8. β-Diketo Building Blocks for MCRs-Based Syntheses of Heterocycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Duque, Maria Mar Sanchez; Allais, Christophe; Isambert, Nicolas; Constantieux, Thierry; Rodriguez, Jean

    In the context of sustainable chemistry, because of economic and ecological increasing pressure, domino multicomponent reactions (MCRs) constitute a central academic and industrial investigation domain in diversity-oriented synthesis of functionalized heterocycles. Although isocyanide-based MCRs generally predominate nowadays, the use of 1,3-dicarbonyls as substrates, proposed as early as 1882 by Hantzsch, proved to be highly efficient, but have been relatively unexplored until recently. In the last few years, such transformations received a growing attention as new useful methodologies valuable for the selective direct access to highly functionalized small organic molecules of primary synthetic and biological value. This review focuses on the more significant recent developments on the use of β-diketo building blocks for MCRs published in the last 5 years.

  9. Learning and optimization with cascaded VLSI neural network building-block chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, T.; Eberhardt, S. P.; Tran, M.; Daud, T.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    To demonstrate the versatility of the building-block approach, two neural network applications were implemented on cascaded analog VLSI chips. Weights were implemented using 7-b multiplying digital-to-analog converter (MDAC) synapse circuits, with 31 x 32 and 32 x 32 synapses per chip. A novel learning algorithm compatible with analog VLSI was applied to the two-input parity problem. The algorithm combines dynamically evolving architecture with limited gradient-descent backpropagation for efficient and versatile supervised learning. To implement the learning algorithm in hardware, synapse circuits were paralleled for additional quantization levels. The hardware-in-the-loop learning system allocated 2-5 hidden neurons for parity problems. Also, a 7 x 7 assignment problem was mapped onto a cascaded 64-neuron fully connected feedback network. In 100 randomly selected problems, the network found optimal or good solutions in most cases, with settling times in the range of 7-100 microseconds.

  10. Turning passive into active: a building block of ego and fundamental mechanism of defense.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Richard B

    2007-01-01

    Turning passive into active is an ego function that plays an important role in managing anxiety associated with passive feelings of helplessness and powerlessness. Its use in childhood aids the ego in constructing a basic sense of mastery, a secure sense of being in control, both of oneself and of one's circumstances. Functioning first as a building block of ego, it subsequently becomes a versatile mechanism of defense with utility throughout the life cycle. This article discusses both the developmental and defensive uses of the passive into active mechanism of defense and illustrates them with clinical examples. Often regarded only as a byproduct of defense, its importance in mastering core developmental anxieties and their adult revivals warrants its inclusion in the glossary of discrete defenses.

  11. Access to a new class of synthetic building blocks via trifluoromethoxylation of pyridines and pyrimidines†

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Pengju; Lee, Katarzyna N.; Lee, Johnny W.; Zhan, Chengbo

    2016-01-01

    Since the first synthesis of trifluoromethyl ethers in 1935, the trifluoromethoxy (OCF3) group has made a remarkable impact in medicinal, agrochemical, and materials science research. However, our inability to facilely incorporate the OCF3 group into molecules, especially heteroaromatics, has limited its potential across a broad spectrum of technological applications. Herein, we report a scalable and operationally simple protocol for regioselective trifluoromethoxylation of a wide range of functionalized pyridines and pyrimidines under mild reaction conditions. The trifluoromethoxylated products are useful scaffolds that can be further elaborated by amidation and palladium-catalysed cross coupling reactions. Mechanistic studies suggest that a radical O-trifluoromethylation followed by the OCF3-migration reaction pathway is operable. Given the unique properties of the OCF3 group and the ubiquity of pyridine and pyrimidine in biologically active molecules and functional materials, trifluoromethoxylated pyridines and pyrimidines could serve as valuable building blocks for the discovery and development of new drugs, agrochemicals, and materials. PMID:27857834

  12. Preparation of thioamide building blocks via microwave-promoted three-component kindler reactions.

    PubMed

    Zbruyev, Oleksandr I; Stiasni, Nikola; Kappe, C Oliver

    2003-01-01

    A microwave-enhanced variation of the Kindler thioamide synthesis is introduced. Taking advantage of the sealed vessel capabilities of a dedicated single-mode microwave reacto,r a diverse selection of 13 aldehyde and 12 amine precursors was utilized in the construction of a representative 34-member library of substituted thioamides. The three-component condensations of aldehydes, amines, and elemental sulfur were carried out using 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as solvent employing microwave flash heating at 110-180 degrees C for 2-20 min. A simple workup protocol allows the isolation of synthetically valuable primary, secondary, and tertiary thioamide building blocks in 83% average yield and >90% purity.

  13. Extended structure design with simple molybdenum oxide building blocks and urea as a directing agent.

    PubMed

    Veen, Sandra J; Roy, Soumyajit; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Petukhov, Andrei V; Versluijs-Helder, Marjan; Broersma, Alfred; Soulimani, Fouad; Visser, Tom; Kegel, Willem K

    2008-08-04

    We report here a simple one-pot directed synthesis of an oxomolybdate urea composite in which elementary molybdenum oxide building blocks are linked together with the aid of urea. This type of directed material design resulted in large rod-like crystals of an inorganic-organic hybrid extended structure of {MoO 3(NH 2-CO-NH 2)} infinity consisting of right- and left-handed helical units. In the crystal structure urea acts both as a glue that links the inorganic molybdenum units into a helix and as a supramolecular linker for the stabilization of the crystal structure as a whole. This type of molecular topology resulted in an unexpectedly high thermal stability.

  14. Biophysics and Thermodynamics: The Scientific Building Blocks of Bio-inspired Drug Delivery Nano Systems.

    PubMed

    Demetzos, Costas

    2015-06-01

    Biophysics and thermodynamics are considered as the scientific milestones for investigating the properties of materials. The relationship between the changes of temperature with the biophysical variables of biomaterials is important in the process of the development of drug delivery systems. Biophysics is a challenge sector of physics and should be used complementary with the biochemistry in order to discover new and promising technological platforms (i.e., drug delivery systems) and to disclose the 'silence functionality' of bio-inspired biological and artificial membranes. Thermal analysis and biophysical approaches in pharmaceuticals present reliable and versatile tools for their characterization and for the successful development of pharmaceutical products. The metastable phases of self-assembled nanostructures such as liposomes should be taken into consideration because they represent the thermal events can affect the functionality of advanced drug delivery nano systems. In conclusion, biophysics and thermodynamics are characterized as the building blocks for design and development of bio-inspired drug delivery systems.

  15. Aldo-X Bifunctional Building Blocks for the Synthesis of Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Ravichandiran, Palanisamy; Lai, Bingbing; Gu, Yanlong

    2017-02-01

    Compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen, or sulfur atoms inside the rings are attracting much attention and interest due to their biological importance. In recent years, several methods for the synthesis of such molecules have been reported by using aldo-X bifunctional building blocks (AXB3 s) as substrates; these are a wide class of organic molecules that contain at least two reactive sites, among them, one aldehyde, acetal, or semiacetal group was involved. Because of the multiple reactivities, AXB3 s are widely used in the one-pot synthesis of biologically important heterocycles. This review summarizes the synthesis of important heterocycles by using AXB3 s as pivotal components in establishing multicomponent reactions, tandem reactions, and so forth. In many cases, the established reaction systems with AXB3 s were characterized by some green properties, such as easy access to the substrate, mild and environmentally benign conditions, and wide scope of the substrate.

  16. Low-voltage FGMOS squarer/divider-based analog building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Richa; Gupta, Maneesha; Singh, Urvashi

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a new low-voltage floating gate MOS (FGMOS)-based current-mode squarer/divider circuit. The low-voltage operation is obtained by replacing the PMOS transistor used to bias the conventional circuit with two-input FGMOS. The proposed circuit offers advantage of two-quadrant operation, low supply voltage (0.85 V) requirement, low circuit complexity and low noise as compared to the conventional one. The proposed circuit is then used as basic building block to develop full Gaussian function generator and RMS-to-DC converter. The simulations are performed in TSMC 0.18 µm CMOS, BSIM3 and Level 49 technology by using Spectre simulator of Cadence.

  17. In vitro self-assembly of tailorable nanotubes from a simple protein building block

    PubMed Central

    Ballister, Edward R.; Lai, Angela H.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Cheng, Yifan; Mougous, Joseph D.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for generating discretely structured protein nanotubes from the simple ring-shaped building block, homohexameric Hcp1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our design exploited the observation that the crystal lattice of Hcp1 contains rings stacked in a repeating head-to-tail pattern. High-resolution detail of the ring–ring interface allowed the selection of sites for specific cysteine mutations capable of engaging in disulfide bond formation across rings, thereby generating stable Hcp1 nanotubes. Protein nanotubes containing up to 25 subunits (≈100 nm in length) were self-assembled under simple conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the tube ends and interior can be independently and specifically functionalized to generate nanocapsules. PMID:18310321

  18. Synthetic polycations with controlled charge density and molecular weight as building blocks for biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kleinberger, Rachelle M; Burke, Nicholas A D; Zhou, Christal; Stöver, Harald D H

    2016-01-01

    A series of polycations prepared by RAFT copolymerization of N-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide hydrochloride (APM) and N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide, with molecular weights of 15 and 40 kDa, and APM content of 10-75 mol%, were tested as building blocks for electrostatically assembled hydrogels such as those used for cell encapsulation. Complexation and distribution of these copolymers within anionic calcium alginate gels, as well as cytotoxicity, cell attachment, and cell proliferation on surfaces grafted with the copolymers were found to depend on composition and molecular weight. Copolymers with lower cationic charge density and lower molecular weight showed less cytotoxicity and cell adhesion, and were more mobile within alginate gels. These findings aid in designing improved polyelectrolyte complexes for use as biomaterials.

  19. Spectroscopic investigation of some building blocks of organic conductors: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, V; Yadav, T

    2017-04-05

    Theoretical molecular structures and IR and Raman spectra of di and tetra methyl substituted tetrathiafulvalene and tetraselenafulvalene molecules have been studied. These molecules belong to the organic conductor family and are immensely used as building blocks of several organic conducting devices. The Hartree-Fock and density functional theory with exchange functional B3LYP have been employed for computational purpose. We have also performed normal coordinate analysis to scale the theoretical frequencies and to calculate potential energy distributions for the conspicuous assignments. The exciting frequency and temperature dependent Raman spectra have also presented. Optimization results reveal that the sulphur derivatives possess boat shape while selenium derivatives possess planner structures. Natural bond orbitals analysis has also been performed to study second order interaction between donors and acceptors and to compute molecular orbital occupancy and energy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A functional metasurface platform with unique building blocks: light manipulation and beam shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forouzmand, Ali; Mosallaei, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an engineered metasurface which can serve functionalities such as anomalous bending, focusing, and beam shaping over the circularly polarized (CP) incident beam. The building block is a bilayer double split-loop resonators (DSLRs) where it can fully transmit the impinging light and control phase only by rotation of unit-cell and not by changing the structural parameters which can greatly facilitate the fabrication process. The mechanism behind this fascinating feature can be described as the conversion of an impinging CP incident beam into the opposite handedness and obtaining a geometrical phase shift equal to twice the rotating angle of DSLRs. It is illustrated that full transmission with 2π phase shift can be achieved with the proposed metasurface. Unique designs with helicity dependency to realize anomalous bending, bifunctional convergence/divergence, and flat-top beam creation with applying lossless beam shaping approach are presented.

  1. Tracing the Archaeal Origins of Eukaryotic Membrane-Trafficking System Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Christen M; Spang, Anja; Dacks, Joel B; Ettema, Thijs J G

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to prokaryotes, eukaryotic cells are characterized by a complex set of internal membrane-bound compartments. A subset of these, and the protein machineries that move material between them, define the membrane-trafficking system (MTS), the emergence of which represents a landmark in eukaryotic evolution. Unlike mitochondria and plastids, MTS organelles have autogenous origins. Much of the MTS machinery is composed of building blocks, including small GTPase, coiled-coil, beta-propeller + alpha-solenoid, and longin domains. Despite the identification of prokaryotic proteins containing these domains, only few represent direct orthologues, leaving the origins and early evolution of the MTS poorly understood. Here, we present an in-depth analysis of MTS building block homologues in the composite genome of Lokiarchaeum, the recently discovered archaeal sister clade of eukaryotes, yielding several key insights. We identify two previously unreported Eukaryotic Signature Proteins; orthologues of the Gtr/Rag family GTPases, involved in target of rapamycin complex signaling, and of the RLC7 dynein component. We could not identify golgin or SNARE (coiled-coil) or beta-propeller + alpha-solenoid orthologues, nor typical MTS domain fusions, suggesting that these either were lost from Lokiarchaeum or emerged later in eukaryotic evolution. Furthermore, our phylogenetic analyses of lokiarchaeal GTPases support a split into Ras-like and Arf-like superfamilies, with different prokaryotic antecedents, before the advent of eukaryotes. While no GTPase activating proteins or exchange factors were identified, we show that Lokiarchaeum encodes numerous roadblock domain proteins and putative longin domain proteins, confirming the latter's origin from Archaea. Altogether, our study provides new insights into the emergence and early evolution of the eukaryotic membrane-trafficking system. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  2. POMzites: A Family of Zeolitic Polyoxometalate Frameworks from a Minimal Building Block Library.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Thomas; Mitchell, Scott G; Gabb, David; Long, De-Liang; Song, Yu-Fei; Cronin, Leroy

    2017-04-26

    We describe why the cyclic heteropolyanion [P8W48O184](40-) (abbreviated as {P8W48}) is an ideal building block for the construction of intrinsically porous framework materials by classifying and analyzing >30 coordination polymers incorporating this polyoxometalate (POM) ligand. This analysis shows that the exocyclic coordination of first-row transition metals (TMs) to {P8W48} typically yields frameworks which extend through {W-O-TM-O-W} bridges in one, two, or three dimensions. However, despite the rich structural diversity of such compounds, the coordination of TMs to the {P8W48} ring is poorly understood, and therefore largely unpredictable, and had not until now been present with any structural classification that could allow rational design. Herein, not only do we present a new approach to understand and classify this new class of materials, we also present three {P8W48}-based frameworks which complement those frameworks which have previously been described. These new compounds help us postulate a new taxonomy of these materials. This is possible because the TM coordination sites of the {P8W48} ring are found, once fully mapped, to lead to well-defined classes of connectivity. Together, analysis provides insight into the nature of the building block connectivity within each framework, to facilitate comparisons between related structures, and to fundamentally unite this family of compounds. Hence we have tentatively named these compounds as "POMzites" to reflect the POM-based composition and zeolitic nature of each family member, although crucially, POMzites differ from zeolites in the modular manner of their preparation. As the synthesis of further POMzites is anticipated, the classification system and terminology introduced here will allow new compounds to be categorized and understood in the context of the established materials. A better understanding of TM coordination to the {P8W48} ring may allow the targeted synthesis of new frameworks rather than the

  3. Multifunctional hybrids by combining ordered mesoporous materials and macromolecular building blocks.

    PubMed

    Soler-Illia, Galo J A A; Azzaroni, Omar

    2011-02-01

    This critical review presents and discusses the recent advances in complex hybrid materials that result from the combination of polymers and mesoporous matrices. Ordered mesoporous materials derived from supramolecular templating present high surface area and tailored pore sizes; pore surfaces can be further modified by organic, organometallic or even biologically active functional groups. This permits the creation of hybrid systems with distinct physical properties or chemical functions located in the framework walls, the pore surface, and the pore interior. Bringing polymeric building blocks into the game opens a new dimension: the possibility to create phase separated regions (functional domains) within the pores that can behave as "reactive pockets" of nanoscale size, with highly controlled chemistry and interactions within restricted volumes. The possibilities of combining "hard" and "soft" building blocks to yield these novel nanocomposite materials with tuneable functional domains ordered in space are potentially infinite. New properties are bound to arise from the synergy of both kinds of components, and their spatial location. The main object of this review is to report on new approaches towards functional polymer-inorganic mesostructured hybrids, as well as to discuss the present challenges in this flourishing research field. Indeed, the powerful concepts resulting from the synergy of sol-gel processing, supramolecular templating and polymer chemistry open new opportunities in the design of advanced functional materials: the tailored production of complex matter displaying spatially-addressed chemistry based on the control of chemical topology. Breakthrough applications are expected in the fields of sustainable energy, environment sensing and remediation, biomaterials, pharmaceutical industry and catalysis, among others (221 references).

  4. Preparation of oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing the pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct by using a dinucleotide building block.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Shigenori

    2013-06-01

    This unit describes procedures for the synthesis of a dinucleotide-type building block of the pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct [(6-4) photoproduct], which is one of the major DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet (UV) light, and its incorporation into oligodeoxyribonucleotides. Although this type of lesion is frequently found at thymine-cytosine sites, the building block of the (6-4) photoproduct formed at thymine-thymine sites can be synthesized much more easily. The problem in the oligonucleotide synthesis is that the (6-4) photoproduct is labile under alkaline conditions. Therefore, building blocks with an amino-protecting group that can be removed by a brief treatment with ammonia water at room temperature must be used for the incorporation of the normal bases. Byproduct formation by the coupling of phosphoramidites with the N3 of the 5' component should also be considered. This side reaction can be avoided by using benzimidazolium triflate as an activator.

  5. Intrinsic Folding Proclivities in Cyclic β-Peptide Building Blocks: Configuration and Heteroatom Effects Analyzed by Conformer-Selective Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alauddin, Mohammad; Gloaguen, Eric; Brenner, Valérie; Tardivel, Benjamin; Mons, Michel; Zehnacker-Rentien, Anne; Declerck, Valérie; Aitken, David J

    2015-11-09

    This work describes the use of conformer-selective laser spectroscopy following supersonic expansion to probe the local folding proclivities of four-membered ring cyclic β-amino acid building blocks. Emphasis is placed on stereochemical effects as well as on the structural changes induced by the replacement of a carbon atom of the cycle by a nitrogen atom. The amide A IR spectra are obtained and interpreted with the help of quantum chemistry structure calculations. Results provide evidence that the building block with a trans-substituted cyclobutane ring has a predilection to form strong C8 hydrogen bonds. Nitrogen-atom substitution in the ring induces the formation of the hydrazino turn, with a related but distinct hydrogen-bonding network: the structure is best viewed as a bifurcated C8/C5 bond with the N heteroatom lone electron pair playing a significant acceptor role, which supports recent observations on the hydrazino turn structure in solution. Surprisingly, this study shows that the cis-substituted cyclobutane ring derivative also gives rise predominantly to a C8 hydrogen bond, although weaker than in the two former cases, a feature that is not often encountered for this building block. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A rare cationic building block that generates a new type of polyhedral network with "cross-linked" pto topology.

    PubMed

    Lusi, Matteo; Fechine, Pierre B A; Chen, Kai-Jie; Perry, John J; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2016-03-18

    A rare 8-connected cationic building block, [Cu2L8(μ-MF6)](2+) (L = pyridyl ligand, M = Si, Ti, Ge, Zr or Sn), enables the formation of a small cubicuboctahedral supramolecular building block, SBB, when complexed by 2,4,6-tris(4-pyridyl)pyridine. The coordination network resulting from fusing the square faces of the SBBs can be described as a pto topology in which half of the square faces are cross-linked by MF6(2-) moieties, and represents the first example of a new 3,5-c topology.

  7. A Library of Rad Hard Mixed-Voltage/Mixed-Signal Building Blocks for Integration of Avionics Systems for Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, M. M.; Blaes, B.; Kolawa, E. A.; Blalock, B. J.; Li, H. W.; Buck, K.; Houge, D.

    2001-01-01

    To build the sensor intensive system-on-a-chip for the next generation spacecrafts for deep space, Center for Integration of Space Microsystems at JPL (CISM) takes advantage of the lower power rating and inherent radiation resistance of Silicon on Insulator technology (SOI). We are developing a suite of mixed-voltage and mixed-signal building blocks in Honeywell's SOI process that can enable the rapid integration of the next generation avionics systems with lower power rating, higher reliability, longer life, and enhanced radiation tolerance for spacecrafts such as the Europa Orbiter and Europa Lander. The mixed-voltage building blocks are predominantly for design of adaptive power management systems. Their design centers around an LDMOS structure that is being developed by Honeywell, Boeing Corp, and the University of Idaho. The mixed-signal building blocks are designed to meet the low power, extreme radiation requirement of deep space applications. These building blocks are predominantly used to interface analog sensors to the digital CPU of the next generation avionics system on a chip. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. A Library of Rad Hard Mixed-Voltage/Mixed-Signal Building Blocks for Integration of Avionics Systems for Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, M. M.; Blaes, B.; Kolawa, E. A.; Blalock, B. J.; Li, H. W.; Buck, K.; Houge, D.

    2001-01-01

    To build the sensor intensive system-on-a-chip for the next generation spacecrafts for deep space, Center for Integration of Space Microsystems at JPL (CISM) takes advantage of the lower power rating and inherent radiation resistance of Silicon on Insulator technology (SOI). We are developing a suite of mixed-voltage and mixed-signal building blocks in Honeywell's SOI process that can enable the rapid integration of the next generation avionics systems with lower power rating, higher reliability, longer life, and enhanced radiation tolerance for spacecrafts such as the Europa Orbiter and Europa Lander. The mixed-voltage building blocks are predominantly for design of adaptive power management systems. Their design centers around an LDMOS structure that is being developed by Honeywell, Boeing Corp, and the University of Idaho. The mixed-signal building blocks are designed to meet the low power, extreme radiation requirement of deep space applications. These building blocks are predominantly used to interface analog sensors to the digital CPU of the next generation avionics system on a chip. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Development of a system of innovative insulated building blocks under energy related inventions grant. Quarterly progress report, ThermaLock Products, Inc., October 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-04-05

    Progress is reported on research pertaining to insulated building blocks. Areas covered include coursing, the development of a stuffing machine, block fabrication, designs for earthquake testing, and sound tests.

  10. Building Quality Report Cards for Geriatric Care in The Netherlands: Using Concept Mapping to Identify the Appropriate "Building Blocks" from the Consumer's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groenewoud, A. Stef; van Exel, N. Job A.; Berg, Marc; Huijsman, Robbert

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on a study to identify "building blocks" for quality report cards for geriatric care. Its aim is to present (a) the results of the study and (b) the innovative step-by-step approach that was developed to arrive at these results. Design and Methods: We used Concept Mapping/Structured Conceptualization to…

  11. Syntheses and physical characterization of new aliphatic triblock poly(L-lactide-b-butylene succinate-b-L-lactide)s bearing soft and hard biodegradable building blocks.

    PubMed

    Ba, Chaoyi; Yang, Jing; Hao, Qinghui; Liu, Xiaoyun; Cao, Amin

    2003-01-01

    This study presents chemical syntheses and physical characterization of a new aliphatic poly(L-lactide-b-butylene succinate-b-L-lactide) triblock copolyester with soft and hard biodegradable building blocks. First, poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) prepolymers terminated with hydroxyl functional groups were synthesized through melt polycondensation from succinic acid and 1,4-butanediol. Further, a series of new PLLA-b-PBS-b-PLLA triblock copolyesters bearing various average PLLA block lengths were prepared via ring opening polymerization of L-lactide with the synthesized hydroxyl capped PBS prepolymer (Mn = 4.9 KDa) and stannous octanoate as the macroinitiator and catalyst, respectively. By means of GPC, NMR, FTIR, DSC, TGA, and wide-angle X-ray diffractometer (WAXD), the macromolecular structures and physical properties were intensively studied for these synthesized PBS prepolymer and PLLA-b-PBS-b-PLLA triblock copolyesters. 13C NMR and GPC experimental results confirmed the formation of sequential block structures without any detectable transesterification under the present experimental conditions, and the molecular weights of triblock copolyesters could be readily regulated by adjusting the feeding molar ratio of L-lactide monomer to the PBS macroinitiator. DSC measurements showed all single glass transitions, and their glass transition temperatures were found to be between those of PLLA and PBS, depending on the lengths of PLLA blocks. It was noteworthy that the segmental flexibilities of the hard PLLA blocks were found to be remarkably enhanced by the more flexible PBS block partner, and the PBS and PLLA building blocks were well mixed in the amorphous regions. Results of TGA analyses indicated that thermal degradation and stabilities of the PLLA blocks strongly depended on the average PLLA block lengths of triblock copolyesters. In addition, FTIR and WAXD results showed the coexistence of the assembled PLLA and PBS crystal structures when the average PLLA block

  12. Antimicrobial activity of poly(acrylic acid) block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Gratzl, Günther; Paulik, Christian; Hild, Sabine; Guggenbichler, Josef P; Lackner, Maximilian

    2014-05-01

    The increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains has developed into a major health problem. In particular, biofilms are the main reason for hospital-acquired infections and diseases. Once formed, biofilms are difficult to remove as they have specific defense mechanisms against antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial surfaces must therefore kill or repel bacteria before they can settle to form a biofilm. In this study, we describe that poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) containing diblock copolymers can kill bacteria and prevent from biofilm formation. The PAA diblock copolymers with poly(styrene) and poly(methyl methacrylate) were synthesized via anionic polymerization of tert-butyl acrylate with styrene or methyl methacrylate and subsequent acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of the tert-butyl ester. The copolymers were characterized via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis, and acid-base titrations. Copolymer films with a variety of acrylic acid contents were produced by solvent casting, characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and tested for their antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antimicrobial activity of the acidic diblock copolymers increased with increasing acrylic acid content, independent of the copolymer-partner, the chain length and the nanostructure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Polyelectrolyte Stars and Cylindrical Brushes Made by ATRP: New Building Blocks in Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plamper, Felix; Xu, Youyong; Yuan, Jiayin; Ballauff, Matthias; Müller, Axel H. E.

    Star polymers and cylindrical polymer brushes (CPBs), i.e. polymers possessing side groups densely grafted from a linear main chain, have attracted considerable experimental and theoretical interest over the past decade, owing to their peculiar solution and bulk properties. We have used the grafting-from approach via ATRP to synthesize well-defined star polymers and core—shell CPBs with homopolymer and block copolymer side chains. The diblock copolymer side chains may include combinations of soft-hard, hydrophilic-hydrophobic and crystalline-amorphous block segments. In particular, we have been interested in polyelectrolyte blocks; then the polymers resemble intramolecular spherical and cylindrical micelles, respectively. Star polymers of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (DMAEMA) were made using sugar- or silsesquioxane-based ATRP initiators. Their LCST and UCST phase behaviour depends on pH, counterion charge, temperature, and light. PDMAEMA CPBs react in a similar way, and on addition of trivalent counterions they even form helical structures. We have also synthesized hybrid nanowires of semiconducting CdS and CdSe or nanomagnets of γ-Fe2O3 inside the PAA core of CPBs. Here, we present novel water-soluble and biocompatible silica nanowires based on CPBs. They have a core consisting of a silsesquioxane network of crosslinked poly(3-acryloylpropyl trimethoxysilane) (PAPTS) and a shell of poly(oligoe-thyleneglycol methacrylate) (POEGMA). Sequential ATRP of APTS and OEGMA initiated by a polyinitiator backbone (DP = 3,200) was carried out in benzene. Due to the cylindrical shape of the brushes the functional TMS moieties were arranged into a 1D manner and then crosslinked via alkaline condensation, rendering the rigid core—shell hybrid CPBs. Finally, uniform silica nanowires were achieved by the simultaneous removal of the hybrid CPB template via pyrolysis. The length as well as the diameter of silica nanowires are well-defined.

  14. Three-dimensional {Co(3+)-Zn2+} and {Co(3+)-Cd2+} networks originated from carboxylate-rich building blocks: syntheses, structures, and heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Girijesh; Gupta, Rajeev

    2013-10-07

    The present work shows the utilization of Co(3+) complexes appended with either para- or meta-arylcarboxylic acid groups as the molecular building blocks for the construction of three-dimensional {Co(3+)-Zn(2+)} and {Co(3+)-Cd(2+)} heterobimetallic networks. The structural characterizations of these networks show several interesting features including well-defined pores and channels. These networks function as heterogeneous and reusable catalysts for the regio- and stereoselective ring-opening reactions of various epoxides and size-selective cyanation reactions of assorted aldehydes.

  15. Bidirectional cross metathesis and ring-closing metathesis/ring opening of a C 2-symmetric building block: a strategy for the synthesis of decanolide natural products

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Summary Starting from the conveniently available ex-chiral pool building block (R,R)-hexa-1,5-diene-3,4-diol, the ten-membered ring lactones stagonolide E and curvulide A were synthesized using a bidirectional olefin-metathesis functionalization of the terminal double bonds. Key steps are (i) a site-selective cross metathesis, (ii) a highly diastereoselective extended tethered RCM to furnish a (Z,E)-configured dienyl carboxylic acid and (iii) a Ru–lipase-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution to establish the desired configuration at C9. Ring closure was accomplished by macrolactonization. Curvulide A was synthesized from stagonolide E through Sharpless epoxidation. PMID:24367418

  16. Serum from patients with pernicious anaemia blocks gastrin stimulation of acid secretion by parietal cells.

    PubMed Central

    de Aizpurua, H J; Ungar, B; Toh, B H

    1985-01-01

    We examined 51 sera from patients with pernicious anaemia for their capacity to block maximal gastrin stimulation of acid secretion by isolated rodent gastric parietal cells. 14C-aminopyrine accumulation was used as the index of acid secretion in vitro. Sera from patients with pernicious anaemia gave significantly (P less than 0.005) more block of maximal gastrin stimulation of acid secretion (61.7 +/- 37.8%) than sera from 10 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (19.6 +/- 17.7%), 10 with scleroderma (34.2 +/- 22.3%), five with rheumatoid arthritis (22.4 +/- 15.6%) or 30 from healthy persons (27.4 +/- 12.8%). Maximal histamine stimulation of acid secretion was not inhibited. The blocking factor was present in serum IgG fractions, and serum and IgG fractions gave parallel dose-response and dilution curves. The serum block was abolished by absorption with gastric mucosal cells and correlated with the presence of parietal cell surface autoantibody. We conclude that serum immunoglobulin in pernicious anaemia can block gastrin stimulation of acid secretion and suggest that this block may be mediated by competition with gastrin for surface receptors on parietal cells. PMID:4042425

  17. hERG blocking potential of acids and zwitterions characterized by three thresholds for acidity, size and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Nikolov, Nikolai G; Dybdahl, Marianne; Jónsdóttir, Svava Ó; Wedebye, Eva B

    2014-11-01

    Ionization is a key factor in hERG K(+) channel blocking, and acids and zwitterions are known to be less probable hERG blockers than bases and neutral compounds. However, a considerable number of acidic compounds block hERG, and the physico-chemical attributes which discriminate acidic blockers from acidic non-blockers have not been fully elucidated. We propose a rule for prediction of hERG blocking by acids and zwitterionic ampholytes based on thresholds for only three descriptors related to acidity, size and reactivity. The training set of 153 acids and zwitterionic ampholytes was predicted with a concordance of 91% by a decision tree based on the rule. Two external validations were performed with sets of 35 and 48 observations, respectively, both showing concordances of 91%. In addition, a global QSAR model of hERG blocking was constructed based on a large diverse training set of 1374 chemicals covering all ionization classes, externally validated showing high predictivity and compared to the decision tree. The decision tree was found to be superior for the acids and zwitterionic ampholytes classes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. SiC Multi-Chip Power Modules as Power-System Building Blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lostetter, Alexander; Franks, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The term "SiC MCPMs" (wherein "MCPM" signifies "multi-chip power module") denotes electronic power-supply modules containing multiple silicon carbide power devices and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) control integrated-circuit chips. SiC MCPMs are being developed as building blocks of advanced expandable, reconfigurable, fault-tolerant power-supply systems. Exploiting the ability of SiC semiconductor devices to operate at temperatures, breakdown voltages, and current densities significantly greater than those of conventional Si devices, the designs of SiC MCPMs and of systems comprising multiple SiC MCPMs are expected to afford a greater degree of miniaturization through stacking of modules with reduced requirements for heat sinking. Moreover, the higher-temperature capabilities of SiC MCPMs could enable operation in environments hotter than Si-based power systems can withstand. The stacked SiC MCPMs in a given system can be electrically connected in series, parallel, or a series/parallel combination to increase the overall power-handling capability of the system. In addition to power connections, the modules have communication connections. The SOI controllers in the modules communicate with each other as nodes of a decentralized control network, in which no single controller exerts overall command of the system. Control functions effected via the network include synchronization of switching of power devices and rapid reconfiguration of power connections to enable the power system to continue to supply power to a load in the event of failure of one of the modules. In addition to serving as building blocks of reliable power-supply systems, SiC MCPMs could be augmented with external control circuitry to make them perform additional power-handling functions as needed for specific applications: typical functions could include regulating voltages, storing energy, and driving motors. Because identical SiC MCPM building blocks could be utilized in a variety of ways, the cost

  19. Synthesis and NMR studies of malonyl-linked glycoconjugates of N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine. Building blocks for the construction of combinatorial glycopeptide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Nörrlinger, Markus; Hafner, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Summary Four glycoconjugate building blocks for the construction of combinatorial PNA like glycopeptide libraries were prepared in 75–79% yield by condensing tert-butyl N-[2-(N-9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonylamino)ethyl]glycinate (AEG) 5 with 3-oxo-3-(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranosylamino)- (6a), 3-oxo-3-(β-D-galactopyranosylamino)- (6b), 3-oxo-3-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranosylamino)- (6c) and 3-oxo-3-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-D-galactopyranosylamino)propanoic acid (6d), respectively. The resulting AEG glycoconjugates 1a–d were converted into the corresponding free acids 2a–d in 97–98% yield by treatment with aqueous formic acid. The Fmoc group of compound 1c was removed and the intermediate amine 9 was condensed with 2a to afford the corresponding glycosylated AEG dipeptide 4 in 58% yield. All glycoconjugate building blocks showed the presence of cis and trans rotamers. Compounds 1a, 1b and 4 were subjected to temperature dependent 1H NMR spectroscopy in order to determine the coalescence temperature which resulted in calculated rotation barriers of 17.9–18.3 kcal/mol for the rotamers. PMID:27829900

  20. POMzites: A Family of Zeolitic Polyoxometalate Frameworks from a Minimal Building Block Library

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We describe why the cyclic heteropolyanion [P8W48O184]40– (abbreviated as {P8W48}) is an ideal building block for the construction of intrinsically porous framework materials by classifying and analyzing >30 coordination polymers incorporating this polyoxometalate (POM) ligand. This analysis shows that the exocyclic coordination of first-row transition metals (TMs) to {P8W48} typically yields frameworks which extend through {W–O–TM–O–W} bridges in one, two, or three dimensions. However, despite the rich structural diversity of such compounds, the coordination of TMs to the {P8W48} ring is poorly understood, and therefore largely unpredictable, and had not until now been present with any structural classification that could allow rational design. Herein, not only do we present a new approach to understand and classify this new class of materials, we also present three {P8W48}-based frameworks which complement those frameworks which have previously been described. These new compounds help us postulate a new taxonomy of these materials. This is possible because the TM coordination sites of the {P8W48} ring are found, once fully mapped, to lead to well-defined classes of connectivity. Together, analysis provides insight into the nature of the building block connectivity within each framework, to facilitate comparisons between related structures, and to fundamentally unite this family of compounds. Hence we have tentatively named these compounds as “POMzites” to reflect the POM-based composition and zeolitic nature of each family member, although crucially, POMzites differ from zeolites in the modular manner of their preparation. As the synthesis of further POMzites is anticipated, the classification system and terminology introduced here will allow new compounds to be categorized and understood in the context of the established materials. A better understanding of TM coordination to the {P8W48} ring may allow the targeted synthesis of new frameworks

  1. Properties of non-IPR fullerene films versus size of the building blocks.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Daniel; Ulas, Seyithan; Jester, Stefan-Sven; Weis, Patrick; Böttcher, Artur; Kappes, Manfred M

    2010-09-28

    This perspective focuses on the cage size dependent properties of novel solid fullerene nanofilms grown by soft-landing of mass-selected C(n)(+) (48, 50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 62, 64, 66 and 68) onto room temperature graphite surfaces under ultra-high vacuum conditions. Such non-isolated-pentagon-ring (non-IPR) fullerene materials are not accessible to standard fullerene preparation methods. The component molecular building blocks of non-IPR films were generated by electron impact induced ionization/fragmentation of sublimed IPR-C(70)(D(5h)) (-->C(n) (n = 68, 66, 64, 62)) or IPR-C(60)(I(h)) (-->C(n) (n = 58, 56, 54, 52, 50)). Non-IPR fullerene films on graphite grow via formation of dendritic C(n) aggregates, whereas deposition of IPR fullerenes under analogous conditions (via deposition of unfragmented C(60)(+) and C(70)(+)) leads to compact islands. The latter are governed by weak van der Waals cage-cage interactions. In contrast, the former are stabilized by covalent intercage bonds as mediated by the non-IPR sites (primarily adjacent pentagon pairs, AP). A significant fraction of the deposited non-IPR C(n) cages can be intactly (re)sublimed by heating. The corresponding mean desorption activation energies, E(des), increase from 2.1 eV for C(68) up to 2.6 eV for C(50). The densities of states in the valence band regions (DOS), surface ionization potentials (sIP) and HOMO-LUMO gaps (Delta) of semiconducting non-IPR films were measured and found to vary strongly with cage size. Overall, the n-dependencies of these properties can be interpreted in terms of covalently interconnected oligomeric structures comprising the most stable (neutral) C(n) isomers-as determined from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Non-IPR fullerene films are the first known examples of elemental cluster materials in which the cluster building blocks are covalently but reversibly interconnected.

  2. Quantum Simulation with Circuit-QED Lattices: from Elementary Building Blocks to Many-Body Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guanyu

    Recent experimental and theoretical progress in superconducting circuits and circuit QED (quantum electrodynamics) has helped to develop high-precision techniques to control, manipulate, and detect individual mesoscopic quantum systems. A promising direction is hence to scale up from individual building blocks to form larger-scale quantum many-body systems. Although realizing a scalable fault-tolerant quantum computer still faces major barriers of decoherence and quantum error correction, it is feasible to realize scalable quantum simulators with state-of-the-art technology. From the technological point of view, this could serve as an intermediate stage towards the final goal of a large-scale quantum computer, and could help accumulating experience with the control of quantum systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. From the physical point of view, this opens up a new regime where condensed matter systems can be simulated and studied, here in the context of strongly correlated photons and two-level systems. In this thesis, we mainly focus on two aspects of circuit-QED based quantum simulation. First, we discuss the elementary building blocks of the quantum simulator, in particular a fluxonium circuit coupled to a superconducting resonator. We show the interesting properties of the fluxonium circuit as a qubit, including the unusual structure of its charge matrix elements. We also employ perturbation theory to derive the effective Hamiltonian of the coupled system in the dispersive regime, where qubit and the photon frequencies are detuned. The observables predicted with our theory, including dispersive shifts and Kerr nonlinearity, are compared with data from experiments, such as homodyne transmission and two-tone spectroscopy. These studies also relate to the problem of detection in a circuit-QED quantum simulator. Second, we study many-body physics of circuit-QED lattices, serving as quantum simulators. In particular, we focus on two different

  3. Photoelectron spectroscopy of cluster anions: In search of building blocks for cluster-assembled materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubisic, Andrej

    A combination of mass spectrometry, anion photoelectron spectroscopy and theory were employed to study the electronic, geometric and reactive properties of a number of different cluster systems. A special emphasis was placed on scouting for those particular cluster compositions that show signs of enhanced stability. Those clusters could potentially be used as building blocks of cluster-assembled materials. The studied systems include aluminum hydrides, lanthanide-silicon mixed cluster, platinum-lead clusters and Al13 -. Among aluminum hydrides an entire family of previously unknown closo-alanes with a general formula AlnHn+2 (4 ≤ n ≤ 8) had been discovered. They exhibit signs of substantial stability and are shown to follow the Wade's rule for closo-alanes (Chapter 3). In the studies of lanthanide-silicon, LnSin- (3 ≤ n ≤ 13) clusters, lanthanide atoms were observed to adopt low oxidation numbers even in the presence of a strongly interacting silicon environment. The implied limited participation of lanthanide atoms' f-electrons in bonding with the silicon stands in stark contrast to the d-electrons of the transition metal atoms. The result raises prospects for magnetic, silicon-based clusters (Chapter 4). A series of reactive studies of Al13- a well-known magic cluster, and Aln- cluster anions in general were conducted to better understand their size-specific behavior. Size-selective etching of Al11- and Al12- by NH3 has been attributed to a diminished barrier for conversion of a physisorbed precursor into the chemisorbed adduct in case of these two clusters. Al13- shows few signs of reactivity. The well-documented inertness of Al13- towards O 2 has been traced back to the triplet state of oxygen. Due to the need to conserve spin along the reaction coordinate, the number of viable reaction channels that have a low barrier is greatly reduced (Chapter 5). Lastly, a building block of a recently synthesized cluster-assembled material, (Pt Pb 12)2-, was studied

  4. "Science SQL" as a Building Block for Flexible, Standards-based Data Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We have learnt to live with the pain of separating data and metadata into non-interoperable silos. For metadata, we enjoy the flexibility of databases, be they relational, graph, or some other NoSQL. Contrasting this, users still "drown in files" as an unstructured, low-level archiving paradigm. It is time to bridge this chasm which once was technologically induced, but today can be overcome. One building block towards a common re-integrated information space is to support massive multi-dimensional spatio-temporal arrays. These "datacubes" appear as sensor, image, simulation, and statistics data in all science and engineering domains, and beyond. For example, 2-D satellilte imagery, 2-D x/y/t image timeseries and x/y/z geophysical voxel data, and 4-D x/y/z/t climate data contribute to today's data deluge in the Earth sciences. Virtual observatories in the Space sciences routinely generate Petabytes of such data. Life sciences deal with microarray data, confocal microscopy, human brain data, which all fall into the same category. The ISO SQL/MDA (Multi-Dimensional Arrays) candidate standard is extending SQL with modelling and query support for n-D arrays ("datacubes") in a flexible, domain-neutral way. This heralds a new generation of services with new quality parameters, such as flexibility, ease of access, embedding into well-known user tools, and scalability mechanisms that remain completely transparent to users. Technology like the EU rasdaman ("raster data manager") Array Database system can support all of the above examples simultaneously, with one technology. This is practically proven: As of today, rasdaman is in operational use on hundreds of Terabytes of satellite image timeseries datacubes, with transparent query distribution across more than 1,000 nodes. Therefore, Array Databases offering SQL/MDA constitute a natural common building block for next-generation data infrastructures. Being initiator and editor of the standard we present principles

  5. Partial Least Squares Method in the Analysis of the Intensity of Damage in Prefabricated Large-Block Building Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firek, Karol; Rusek, Janusz

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents the research methodology aimed at determining the building damage intensity index as a linear combination of indices describing the damage to its individual components. The research base comprised 129 building structures erected in the large-block technology. The study compared the results of a standardized approach to data mining - PCA (Principal Components Analysis) with the procedure of the PLSR method (Partial Least Squares Regression). As a result of the analysis, a generalized form of the building damage index was obtained, as a linear combination of the damage to its components.

  6. Creating functional sophistication from simple protein building blocks, exemplified by factor H and the regulators of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Makou, Elisavet; Herbert, Andrew P; Barlow, Paul N

    2015-10-01

    Complement control protein modules (CCPs) occur in numerous functionally diverse extracellular proteins. Also known as short consensus repeats (SCRs) or sushi domains each CCP contains approximately 60 amino acid residues, including four consensus cysteines participating in two disulfide bonds. Varying in length and sequence, CCPs adopt a β-sandwich type fold and have an overall prolate spheroidal shape with N- and C-termini lying close to opposite poles of the long axis. CCP-containing proteins are important as cytokine receptors and in neurotransmission, cell adhesion, blood clotting, extracellular matrix formation, haemoglobin metabolism and development, but CCPs are particularly well represented in the vertebrate complement system. For example, factor H (FH), a key soluble regulator of the alternative pathway of complement activation, is made up entirely from a chain of 20 CCPs joined by short linkers. Collectively, therefore, the 20 CCPs of FH must mediate all its functional capabilities. This is achieved via collaboration and division of labour among these modules. Structural studies have illuminated the dynamic architectures that allow FH and other CCP-rich proteins to perform their biological functions. These are largely the products of a highly varied set of intramolecular interactions between CCPs. The CCP can act as building block, spacer, highly versatile recognition site or dimerization mediator. Tandem CCPs may form composite binding sites or contribute to flexible, rigid or conformationally 'switchable' segments of the parent proteins.

  7. Production of carbohydrate building blocks from red seaweed polysaccharides. Efficient conversion of galactans into C-glycosyl aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Ducatti, Diogo R B; Massi, Alessandro; Noseda, Miguel D; Duarte, Maria Eugênia R; Dondoni, Alessandro

    2009-02-07

    Agarans and carrageenans are abundant natural polysaccharides which are obtained on a large scale by water extraction from a variety of red seaweeds. These galactans, in addition to being valuable products for the pharmaceutical and food industries, are low cost starting materials for the preparation of useful and rare carbohydrate-based building blocks whose access by total synthesis is difficult and expensive. The semisynthesis of two sets of C-glycosyl aldehydes with l- and d-configuration from agarose and kappa-carrageenan respectively is described. Succinctly, the partial acid-catalyzed mercaptolysis of the two galactans under mild conditions afforded agarobiose and carrabiose (beta-d-Galp-(1-->4)-3,6-anhydro-aldehydo-l- and d-galactose, respectively) derivatives. Complete depolymerization of agarose and kappa-carrageenan under harsher conditions produced 3,6-anhydro l- and d-galactose aldehyde derivatives. Chain shortening of these products via alditol formation and oxidative carbon-carbon bond cleavage furnished C-formyl alpha-l- and alpha-d-threofuranosides. The above C-glycosyl aldehydes were all prepared on a meaningful preparative scale starting from gram quantities of galactans. Finally, a new procedure for the preparation of the 2,3-O-benzyl l-threofuranose was established by Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of the benzylated C-formyl alpha-l-threofuranoside here prepared from agarose.

  8. Construction of polyoxometalate-based inorganic-organic compounds using silver(I) double helicates as secondary building blocks.

    PubMed

    Dang, Dongbin; Zheng, Guangshui; Bai, Yan; Yang, Fan; Gao, Hui; Ma, Pengtao; Niu, Jingyang

    2011-09-05

    Two polyoxometalate-based silver(I) compounds including a three-dimensional porous crystalline array and a double-helicate bisupporting cluster were achieved using metal-organic helicates and Keggin [PMo(12)O(40)](3-) as secondary building blocks.

  9. Programming the assembly of two- and three-dimensional architectures with DNA and nanoscale inorganic building blocks.

    PubMed

    Mirkin, C A

    2000-05-29

    The use of biochemical molecular recognition principles for the assembly of nanoscale inorganic building blocks into macroscopic functional materials constitutes a new frontier in science. This article details efforts pertaining to the use of sequence-specific DNA hybridization events and novel inorganic surface coordination chemistry to control the formation of both two- and three-dimensional functional architectures.

  10. The Building Blocks of Digital Media Literacy: Socio-Material Participation and the Production of Media Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dezuanni, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the knowledge and skills students develop when they engage in digital media production and analysis in school settings. The metaphor of "digital building blocks" is used to describe the material practices, conceptual understandings and production of knowledge that lead to the development of digital media literacy.…

  11. The Development of Logico-Mathematical Knowledge in a Block-Building Activity at Ages 1-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamii, Constance; Miyakawa, Yoko; Kato, Yasuhiko

    2004-01-01

    To study the developmental interrelationships among various aspects of logico-mathematical knowledge, 80 one- to 4-year-olds were individually asked to build "something tall" with 20 blocks. Percentages of new and significant behaviors increased with age and were analyzed in terms of the development of logico-mathematical relationships. It was…

  12. The Development of Logico-Mathematical Knowledge in a Block-Building Activity at Ages 1-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamii, Constance; Miyakawa, Yoko; Kato, Yasuhiko

    2004-01-01

    To study the developmental interrelationships among various aspects of logico-mathematical knowledge, 80 one- to 4-year-olds were individually asked to build "something tall" with 20 blocks. Percentages of new and significant behaviors increased with age and were analyzed in terms of the development of logico-mathematical relationships. It was…

  13. The Building Blocks of Digital Media Literacy: Socio-Material Participation and the Production of Media Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dezuanni, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the knowledge and skills students develop when they engage in digital media production and analysis in school settings. The metaphor of "digital building blocks" is used to describe the material practices, conceptual understandings and production of knowledge that lead to the development of digital media literacy.…

  14. Playing with structures at the nanoscale: designing catalysts by manipulation of clusters and nanocrystals as building blocks.

    PubMed

    Cargnello, Matteo; Fornasiero, Paolo; Gorte, Raymond J

    2013-12-02

    The purpose of this Concept is to highlight some of the most recent and promising methods for the preparation of tailored catalysts by designing and preparing the component building blocks and by assembling them in a controlled fashion. We want to emphasize how rational design and synthesis of catalysts must be coupled to precise catalytic and structural characterization of the systems in an ideal feedback loop. New catalyst design and preparation techniques, dictated by information about the active sites that the specific application requires, are frequently available. The building blocks for developing these novel catalysts include colloidal methods for the preparation of uniform nanostructures, physical methods for rational assembly of the building blocks (Langmuir-Blodgett, liquid-air self-assembly), and development of rational interactions between the building blocks for enhanced activity of the assemblies. These methods, which apply techniques normally used in other fields of nanotechnology to catalysis, offer exciting opportunities to help improve currently available catalytic systems in terms of activity, stability and selectivity.

  15. Use of shock block transmitters in the structural rehabilitation of historical buildings in Calabria and Sicily

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, Alessia; Candela, Michele; Fonti, Roberta

    2008-07-08

    Many old and historical masonry buildings, located in the Calabrian and Sicilian areas near the strait of Messina, are affected by typical pattern of cracks, which are not produced by previous earthquakes. These cracks in the masonry walls are characterized by a quasi-vertical trend with constant width. The careful examination of the crack distribution allows to clearly identify the diagnosis: the damage is caused by the sinking due to a horizontal movement of translation of the ground, which is an evident effect of creep phenomena in the soil, so-called 'solifluxion'. This paper, after showing this geological pathology, proposes an innovative strategy of intervention, which consists of the use of 'oleo-dynamic' devices, so-called shock block transmitters, providing different degrees of restraint, according to the loading conditions. In addition, in case of earthquake, an important part of the in-put seismic energy can be dissipated. The strategy of application of this system to the building consists of the subdivision of each masonry wall in two different parts, which are physically separated by the cracks. Each wall portion must be consolidated separately and the different parts of walls behave as statically independent each other, so that they can move independently during the serviceability conditions. The connection among the walls composing the whole structural organism is given by metal tie-rods equipped with 'oleo dynamic' devices, which allows, in a given range, the horizontal sliding in case of slow movement due to the phenomenon of 'solifluxion'. Contrary, in case of dynamic and fast movements, such as the ones produced by an earthquake, each 'oleo dynamic' device provides a fully restraint effect and, as a consequence, the tie-rods behave in the classical way.

  16. Three-dimensional tissues using human pluripotent stem cell spheroids as biofabrication building blocks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haishuang; Li, Qiang; Lei, Yuguo

    2017-03-13

    A recently emerged approach for tissue engineering is to biofabricate tissues using cellular spheroids as building blocks. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), can be cultured to generate large numbers of cells and presumably be differentiated into all the cell types of human body in vitro, thus are ideal cell source for biofabrication. We previously developed a hydrogel-based cell culture system that can economically produce large numbers of hPSC spheroids. With hPSCs and this culture system, there are two potential methods to biofabricate a desired tissue. In Method 1, hPSC spheroids are first utilized to biofabricate a hPSC tissue that is subsequently differentiated into the desired tissue. In Method 2, hPSC spheroids are first converted into tissue spheroids in the hydrogel-based culture system and the tissue spheroids are then utilized to biofabricate the desired tissue. In this paper, we systematically measured the fusion rates of hPSC spheroids without and with differentiation toward cortical and midbrain dopaminergic neurons and found spheroids' fusion rates dropped sharply as differentiation progressed. We found Method 1 was appropriated for biofabricating neural tissues.

  17. The building blocks of planets within the 'terrestrial' region of protoplanetary disks.

    PubMed

    van Boekel, R; Min, M; Leinert, Ch; Waters, L B F M; Richichi, A; Chesneau, O; Dominik, C; Jaffe, W; Dutrey, A; Graser, U; Henning, Th; de Jong, J; Köhler, R; de Koter, A; Lopez, B; Malbet, F; Morel, S; Paresce, F; Perrin, G; Preibisch, Th; Przygodda, F; Schöller, M; Wittkowski, M

    2004-11-25

    Our Solar System was formed from a cloud of gas and dust. Most of the dust mass is contained in amorphous silicates, yet crystalline silicates are abundant throughout the Solar System, reflecting the thermal and chemical alteration of solids during planet formation. (Even primitive bodies such as comets contain crystalline silicates.) Little is known about the evolution of the dust that forms Earth-like planets. Here we report spatially resolved detections and compositional analyses of these building blocks in the innermost two astronomical units of three proto-planetary disks. We find the dust in these regions to be highly crystallized, more so than any other dust observed in young stars until now. In addition, the outer region of one star has equal amounts of pyroxene and olivine, whereas the inner regions are dominated by olivine. The spectral shape of the inner-disk spectra shows surprising similarity with Solar System comets. Radial-mixing models naturally explain this resemblance as well as the gradient in chemical composition. Our observations imply that silicates crystallize before any terrestrial planets are formed, consistent with the composition of meteorites in the Solar System.

  18. α-Fluorovinyl Weinreb Amides and α- Fluoroenones from a Common Fluorinated Building Block

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Banerjee, Shaibal; Sinha, Saikat; Kang, Soon Bang; Zajc, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis and reactivity of N-methoxy-N-methyl-(1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylsulfonyl)fluoroacetamide, a building block for Julia olefination, is reported. This reagent undergoes condensation reactions with aldehydes and cyclic ketones, to give α-fluorovinyl Weinreb amides. Olefination reactions proceed under mild, DBU-mediated conditions, or in the presence of NaH. DBU-mediated condensations proceed with either E or Z-selectivity, depending upon reaction conditions, whereas NaH-mediated reactions are ≥98% Z-stereoselective. Conversion of the Weinreb amide moiety in N-methoxy-N-methyl-(1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylsulfanyl)fluoroacetamide to ketones, followed by oxidation, resulted in another set of olefination reagents, namely (1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylsulfonyl)fluoromethyl phenyl and propyl ketones. In the presence of DBU, these compounds react with aldehydes tested to give α-fluoroenones with high Z-selectivity. The use of N-methoxy-N-methyl-(1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylsulfanyl)fluoroacetamide as a common fluorinated intermediate in the synthesis of α-fluorovinyl Weinreb amides and α-fluoroenones has been demonstrated. Application of the Weinreb amide to α-fluoro allyl amine synthesis is also shown. PMID:19361189

  19. Dual-Functional Hydrazide-Reactive and Anhydride-Containing Oligomeric Hydrogel Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Kascholke, Christian; Loth, Tina; Kohn-Polster, Caroline; Möller, Stephanie; Bellstedt, Peter; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Hacker, Michael C

    2017-03-13

    Biomimetic hydrogels are advanced biomaterials that have been developed following different synthetic routes. Covalent postfabrication functionalization is a promising strategy to achieve efficient matrix modification decoupled of general material properties. To this end, dual-functional macromers were synthesized by free radical polymerization of maleic anhydride with diacetone acrylamide (N-(1,1-dimethyl-3-oxobutyl)acrylamide) and pentaerythritol diacrylate monostearate. Amphiphilic oligomers (Mn < 7.5 kDa) with anhydride contents of 7-20% offered cross-linking reactivity to yield rigid hydrogels with gelatinous peptides (E = 4-13 kPa) and good cell adhesion properties. Mildly reactive methyl ketones as second functionality remained intact during hydrogel formation and potential of covalent matrix modification was shown using hydrazide and hydrazine model compounds. Successful secondary dihydrazide cross-linking was demonstrated by an increase of hydrogel stiffness (>40%). Efficient hydrazide/hydrazine immobilization depending on solution pH, hydrogel ketone content as well as ligand concentration for bioconjugation was shown and reversibility of hydrazone formation was indicated by physiologically relevant hydrazide release over 7 days. Proof-of-concept experiments with hydrazido-functionalized hyaluronan demonstrated potential for covalent aECM immobilization. The presented dual-functional macromers have perspective as reactive hydrogel building blocks for various biomedical applications.

  20. Cation mediated self-assembly of inorganic cluster anion building blocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifeng; Weinstock, Ira A

    2010-07-21

    Polyoxometalate (POM) cluster anions form highly organized monolayers on planar surfaces, stabilize metal nanoparticles in solution, and serve as structural components of hollow, single-walled vesicles. Until recently, each of these classes of superstructures was viewed as fundamentally distinct. Now, however, new data show that metal nanoparticles serve as templates for the assembly of spherical, "metal-core"-supported POM monolayers. As such, POM-protected metal nanoparticles are pivotal members of a continuum that ranges from planar arrays to hollow-spheres. Moreover, it is now apparent that, in all three classes of superstructures, similar electrostatic forces between POMs and their counter-cations are intimately involved in self-assembly, structure and stability. This common role for counter-cations is the theme of this Perspective article. In it, we highlight the role of cation-anion interactions in the formation and structure of newly documented POM monolayers on metal nanoparticles, and establish a unifying principle for better understanding the self-assembly of diverse supramolecular structures from highly charged molecular-ion building blocks.

  1. Ultrahigh-speed rotating nanoelectromechanical system devices assembled from nanoscale building blocks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanoh; Xu, Xiaobin; Guo, Jianhe; Fan, D L

    2014-04-07

    The development of rotary nanomotors is crucial for advancing nanoelectromechanical system technology. In this work, we report design, assembly and rotation of ordered arrays of nanomotors. The nanomotors are bottom-up assembled from nanoscale building blocks with nanowires as rotors, patterned nanomagnets as bearings and quadrupole microelectrodes as stators. Arrays of nanomotors rotate with controlled angle, speed (over 18,000 r.p.m.), and chirality by electric fields. Using analytical modelling, we reveal the fundamental nanoscale electrical, mechanical and magnetic interactions in the nanomotor system, which excellently agrees with experimental results and provides critical understanding for designing metallic nanoelectromechanical systems. The nanomotors can be continuously rotated for 15 h over 240,000 cycles. They are applied for controlled biochemical release and demonstrate releasing rate of biochemicals on nanoparticles that can be precisely tuned by mechanical rotations. The innovations reported in this research, from concept, design and actuation to application, are relevant to nanoelectromechanical system, nanomedicine, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip architectures.

  2. Building blocks for automated elucidation of metabolites: Machine learning methods for NMR prediction

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Stefan; Egert, Björn; Neumann, Steffen; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Background Current efforts in Metabolomics, such as the Human Metabolome Project, collect structures of biological metabolites as well as data for their characterisation, such as spectra for identification of substances and measurements of their concentration. Still, only a fraction of existing metabolites and their spectral fingerprints are known. Computer-Assisted Structure Elucidation (CASE) of biological metabolites will be an important tool to leverage this lack of knowledge. Indispensable for CASE are modules to predict spectra for hypothetical structures. This paper evaluates different statistical and machine learning methods to perform predictions of proton NMR spectra based on data from our open database NMRShiftDB. Results A mean absolute error of 0.18 ppm was achieved for the prediction of proton NMR shifts ranging from 0 to 11 ppm. Random forest, J48 decision tree and support vector machines achieved similar overall errors. HOSE codes being a notably simple method achieved a comparatively good result of 0.17 ppm mean absolute error. Conclusion NMR prediction methods applied in the course of this work delivered precise predictions which can serve as a building block for Computer-Assisted Structure Elucidation for biological metabolites. PMID:18817546

  3. Alfvén wave collisions, the fundamental building block of plasma turbulence. I. Asymptotic solution

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, G. G.; Nielson, K. D.

    2013-07-15

    The nonlinear interaction between counterpropagating Alfvén waves is the physical mechanism underlying the cascade of energy to small scales in astrophysical plasma turbulence. Beginning with the equations for incompressible MHD, an asymptotic analytical solution for the nonlinear evolution of these Alfvén wave collisions is derived in the weakly nonlinear limit. The resulting qualitative picture of nonlinear energy transfer due to this mechanism involves two steps: first, the primary counterpropagating Alfvén waves interact to generate an inherently nonlinear, purely magnetic secondary fluctuation with no parallel variation; second, the two primary waves each interact with this secondary fluctuation to transfer energy secularly to two tertiary Alfvén waves. These tertiary modes are linear Alfvén waves with the same parallel wavenumber as the primary waves, indicating the lack of a parallel cascade. The amplitude of these tertiary modes increases linearly with time due to the coherent nature of the resonant four-wave interaction responsible for the nonlinear energy transfer. The implications of this analytical solution for turbulence in astrophysical plasmas are discussed. The solution presented here provides valuable intuition about the nonlinear interactions underlying magnetized plasma turbulence, in support of an experimental program to verify in the laboratory the nature of this fundamental building block of astrophysical plasma turbulence.

  4. Ultrahigh-speed rotating nanoelectromechanical system devices assembled from nanoscale building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwanoh; Xu, Xiaobin; Guo, Jianhe; Fan, D. L.

    2014-04-01

    The development of rotary nanomotors is crucial for advancing nanoelectromechanical system technology. In this work, we report design, assembly and rotation of ordered arrays of nanomotors. The nanomotors are bottom-up assembled from nanoscale building blocks with nanowires as rotors, patterned nanomagnets as bearings and quadrupole microelectrodes as stators. Arrays of nanomotors rotate with controlled angle, speed (over 18,000 r.p.m.), and chirality by electric fields. Using analytical modelling, we reveal the fundamental nanoscale electrical, mechanical and magnetic interactions in the nanomotor system, which excellently agrees with experimental results and provides critical understanding for designing metallic nanoelectromechanical systems. The nanomotors can be continuously rotated for 15 h over 240,000 cycles. They are applied for controlled biochemical release and demonstrate releasing rate of biochemicals on nanoparticles that can be precisely tuned by mechanical rotations. The innovations reported in this research, from concept, design and actuation to application, are relevant to nanoelectromechanical system, nanomedicine, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip architectures.

  5. van der Waals Solids from Self-Assembled Nanoscale Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bonnie; Yu, Jaeeun; Paley, Daniel W; Trinh, M Tuan; Paley, Maria V; Karch, Jessica M; Crowther, Andrew C; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lalancette, Roger A; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Kim, Philip; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Roy, Xavier

    2016-02-10

    Traditional atomic van der Waals materials such as graphene, hexagonal boron-nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides have received widespread attention due to the wealth of unusual physical and chemical behaviors that arise when charges, spins, and vibrations are confined to a plane. Though not as widespread as their atomic counterparts, molecule-based two-dimensional (2D) layered solids offer significant benefits; their structural flexibility will enable the development of materials with tunable properties. Here we describe a layered van der Waals solid self-assembled from a structure-directing building block and C60 fullerene. The resulting crystalline solid contains a corrugated monolayer of neutral fullerenes and can be mechanically exfoliated. The absorption spectrum of the bulk solid shows an optical gap of 390 ± 40 meV that is consistent with thermal activation energy obtained from electrical transport measurement. We find that the dimensional confinement of fullerenes significantly modulates the optical and electronic properties compared to the bulk solid.

  6. Targeting the Early Step of Building Block Organization in Viral Capsid Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lampel, Ayala; Bram, Yaron; Ezer, Anat; Shaltiel-Kario, Ronit; Saad, Jamil S; Bacharach, Eran; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-08-21

    Viral assembly, similar to other self-organizing protein systems, relies upon early building blocks, which associate into the late supramolecular structures. An initial and crucial event during HIV-1 core assembly is the dimerization of the capsid protein C-terminal domain, which stabilizes the viral capsid lattice. Thus, monitoring and manipulating this stage is desirable both from mechanistic as well as clinical perspectives. Here, we developed a fluorescent-based method for the detection and visualization of these early capsid interactions. We detected strong dimeric interactions, which were influenced by mutations in the capsid protein. We utilized this assay for potential assembly inhibitors screening, which resulted in the identification of a leading compound that hinders the assembly of capsid protein in vitro. Moreover, a derivative of the compound impaired virus production and infectivity in cell cultures. These findings demonstrate that the described assay efficiently detects the very first association events in HIV-1 capsid formation and emphasize the significance of targeting early intermolecular interactions.

  7. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Terrestrial Planets: Building Blocks and Differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Terrestrial Planets: Building Blocks and Differentiation: included the following topics:Magnesium Isotopes in the Earth, Moon, Mars, and Pallasite Parent Body: High-Precision Analysis of Olivine by Laser-Ablation Multi-Collector ICPMS; Meteoritic Constraints on Collision Rates in the Primordial Asteroid Belt and Its Origin; New Constraints on the Origin of the Highly Siderophile Elements in the Earth's Upper Mantle; Further Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd Isotopic Data on Planetary Materials and Consequences for Planetary Differentiation; A Deep Lunar Magma Ocean Based on Neodymium, Strontium and Hafnium Isotope Mass Balance Partial Resetting on Hf-W System by Giant Impacts; On the Problem of Metal-Silicate Equilibration During Planet Formation: Significance for Hf-W Chronometry ; Solid Metal-Liquid Metal Partitioning of Pt, Re, and Os: The Effect of Carbon; Siderophile Element Abundances in Fe-S-Ni-O Melts Segregated from Partially Molten Ordinary Chondrite Under Dynamic Conditions; Activity Coefficients of Silicon in Iron-Nickel Alloys: Experimental Determination and Relevance for Planetary Differentiation; Reinvestigation of the Ni and Co Metal-Silicate Partitioning; Metal/Silicate Paritioning of P, Ga, and W at High Pressures and Temperatures: Dependence on Silicate Melt Composition; and Closure of the Fe-S-Si Liquid Miscibility Gap at High Pressure and Its Implications for Planetary Core Formation.

  8. A computerized tutor prototype for prostate cryotherapy: key building blocks and system evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Yoed; Shimada, Kenji; Joshi, Purva; Sehrawat, Anjali; Keelan, Robert; Wilfong, Dona M.; McCormick, James T.

    2017-02-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of a prototype for a computer-based tutoring system for prostate cryosurgery, while reviewing its key building blocks and their benchmark performance. The tutoring system lists geometrical constraints of cryoprobe placement, displays a rendered shape of the prostate, simulates cryoprobe insertion, enables distance measurements, simulates the corresponding thermal history, and evaluates the mismatch between the target region shape and a pre-selected planning isotherm. The quality of trainee planning is measured in comparison with a computergenerated plan, created for each case study by a previously developed planning algorithm, known as bubble-packing. While the tutoring level in this study aims only at geometrical constraints on cryoprobe placement and the resulting thermal history, it creates a unique opportunity to gain insight into the process outside of the operation room. System validation of the tutor has been performed by collecting training data from surgical residents, having no prior experience or advanced knowledge of cryotherapy. Furthermore, the system has been evaluated by graduate engineering students having no formal education in medicine. In terms of match between a planning isotherm and the target region shape, results demonstrate medical residents' performance improved from 4.4% in a pretest to 37.8% in a posttest over a course of 50 minutes of training (within 10% margins from a computer-optimized plan). Comparing those results with the performance of engineering students indicates similar results, suggesting that planning of the cryoprobe layout essentially revolves around geometric considerations.

  9. Inductive linkage identification on building blocks of different sizes and types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-ping; Chuang, Chung-Yao; Huang, Yuan-Wei

    2012-12-01

    The goal of linkage identification is to obtain the dependencies among decision variables. Such information or knowledge can be applied to design crossover operators and/or the encoding schemes in genetic and evolutionary methods. Thus, promising sub-solutions to the problem will be disrupted less likely, and successful convergence may be achieved more likely. To obtain linkage information, a linkage identification technique, called Inductive Linkage Identification (ILI), was proposed recently. ILI was established upon the mechanism of perturbation and the idea of decision tree learning. By constructing a decision tree according to decision variables and fitness difference values, the interdependent variables will be determined by the adopted decision tree learning algorithm. In this article, we aim to acquire a better understanding on the characteristics of ILI, especially its behaviour under problems composed of different-sized and different-type building blocks (BBs) which are not overlapped. Experiments showed that ILI can efficiently handle BBs of different sizes and is insensitive to BB types. Our experimental observations indicate the flexibility and the applicability of ILI on various elementary BB types that are commonly adopted in related experiments.

  10. Probing the Conformational Landscape of Polyether Building Blocks in Supersonic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocklitz, Sebastian; Hewett, Daniel M.; Zwier, Timothy S.; Suhm, Martin A.

    2016-06-01

    Polyethylene oxides (Polyethylene glycoles) and their phenoxy-capped analogs represent a prominent class of important polymers that are highly used as precursor molecules in supramolecular reactions. After a detailed study on the simplest representative (1,2-dimethoxyethane) [1], we present results on oligoethylene oxides with increasing chain lengths obtained by spontaneous Raman scattering in a supersonic jet. Through variation of stagnation pressure, carrier gas, nozzle distance and temperature we gain information on the conformational landscape as well as the mutual interconversion of low energy conformers. The obtained results are compared to state-of-the-art quantum chemical calculations. Additionally, we present UV as well as IR-UV and UV-UV double resonance studies on 1-methoxy-2-phenoxyethane in a supersonic jet. These complementary techniques allow for conformationally selective electronic and vibrational spectra in a closely related conformational landscape. [1] S. Bocklitz, M. A. Suhm, Constraining the Conformational Landscape of a Polyether Building Block by Raman Jet Spectroscopy, Z. Phys. Chem. 2015, 229, 1625-1648.

  11. A new building block for DNA network formation by self-assembly and polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Robotta, Marta; Drescher, Malte

    2014-01-01

    Summary The predictability of DNA self-assembly is exploited in many nanotechnological approaches. Inspired by naturally existing self-assembled DNA architectures, branched DNA has been developed that allows self-assembly to predesigned architectures with dimensions on the nanometer scale. DNA is an attractive material for generation of nanostructures due to a plethora of enzymes which modify DNA with high accuracy, providing a toolbox for many different manipulations to construct nanometer scaled objects. We present a straightforward synthesis of a rigid DNA branching building block successfully used for the generation of DNA networks by self-assembly and network formation by enzymatic DNA synthesis. The Y-shaped 3-armed DNA construct, bearing 3 primer strands is accepted by Taq DNA polymerase. The enzyme uses each arm as primer strand and incorporates the branched construct into large assemblies during PCR. The networks were investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The findings indicate that rather rigid DNA networks were formed. This presents a new bottom-up approach for DNA material formation and might find applications like in the generation of functional hydrogels. PMID:24991255

  12. A LEON2&3 Emulation Board Qualified for Space Programs Based on Reusable Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleno, Mauro; Quere, Gregory; Chenu, Xavier

    2014-08-01

    ESA/ESTEC has granted Airbus Defense and Space a study for the development of a versatile LEON2 and LEON3 emulation board hosted on a COTS FPGA board.The LEON Emulation Board (LEB) is a component for System Simulators used as Software Validation Facilities and Operational Simulators. It is an alternative to the full software simulation of the LEON processor; additionally, because it embeds the actual VHDL of the LEON processor, it is fully representative and delivers a performance higher than the instruction-set software simulators.The LEB enables simulating in software the functions of Systems on Chip not already embedded in the LEB. It is available in 3 configurations for the LEON2 FT and the LEON3. Moreover, as it is built around a set of reusable simulation building blocks (VHDL + software driver), it can easily be reassembled to emulate more accurately different Systems on Chips (SoC).This paper presents the key functions of the LEB, its performance, applications and potential future developments.

  13. Building blocks of self-control: increased tolerance for delay with bundled rewards.

    PubMed Central

    Ainslie, George; Monterosso, John R

    2003-01-01

    Impulsive choice can be defined as temporary preference for a smaller-sooner reward (SS) over a larger-later reward (LL). Hyperbolic discounting implies that impulsive choices will occur less when organisms choose between a series of SSs versus LLs all at once than when they choose between single SS versus LL pairs. Eight rats were exposed to two conditions of an intertemporal choice paradigm using sucrose solution as reward. In both conditions, the LL was 150 microl delayed by 3 s, while the SS was an immediate reward that ranged from 25-150 microl across sessions. Preference for the LL was greater when the chosen reward was automatically delivered three times in succession (bundled) than when it was chosen singly and delivered after each choice. For each of the 8 rats, the estimated SS amount that produced indifference was higher in the bundled condition than in the single condition. Because bundling in humans may be based on the perception that one's current choice is predictive of future choices, the data presented here may demonstrate an important building block of self-control. PMID:12696740

  14. Assembly of Robust Bacterial Microcompartment Shells Using Building Blocks from an Organelle of Unknown Function

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, JK; Bernstein, SL; Kinney, JN; Axen, SD; Kerfeld, CA

    2014-05-29

    Bacterial microconnpartnnents (BMCs) sequester enzymes from the cytoplasmic environment by encapsulation inside a selectively permeable protein shell. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that many bacteria encode BMC clusters of unknown function and with diverse combinations of shell proteins. The genome of the halophilic myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum encodes one of the most atypical sets of shell proteins in terms of composition and primary structure. We found that microconnpartnnent shells could be purified in high yield when all seven H. ochraceum BMC shell genes were expressed from a synthetic operon in Escherichia coll. These shells differ substantially from previously isolated shell systems in that they are considerably smaller and more homogeneous, with measured diameters of 39 2 nm. The size and nearly uniform geometry allowed the development of a structural model for the shells composed of 260 hexagonal units and 13 hexagons per icosahedral face. We found that new proteins could be recruited to the shells by fusion to a predicted targeting peptide sequence, setting the stage for the use of these remarkably homogeneous shells for applications such as three-dimensional scaffolding and the construction of synthetic BMCs. Our results demonstrate the value of selecting from the diversity of BMC shell building blocks found in genomic sequence data for the construction of novel compartments. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Probing the bioactivity-relevant chemical space of robust reactions and common molecular building blocks.

    PubMed

    Hartenfeller, Markus; Eberle, Martin; Meier, Peter; Nieto-Oberhuber, Cristina; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Schneider, Gisbert; Jacoby, Edgar; Renner, Steffen

    2012-05-25

    In the search for new bioactive compounds, there is a trend toward increasingly complex compound libraries aiming to target the demanding targets of the future. In contrast, medicinal chemistry and traditional library design rely mainly on a small set of highly established and robust reactions. Here, we probe a set of 58 such reactions for their ability to sample the chemical space of known bioactive molecules, and the potential to create new scaffolds. Combined with ~26,000 common available building blocks, the reactions retrieve around 9% of a scaffold-diverse set of compounds active on human target proteins covering all major pharmaceutical target classes. Almost 80% of generated scaffolds from virtual one-step synthesis products are not present in a large set of known bioactive molecules for human targets, indicating potential for new discoveries. The results suggest that established synthesis resources are well suited to cover the known bioactivity-relevant chemical space and that there are plenty of unexplored regions accessible by these reactions, possibly providing valuable "low-hanging fruit" for hit discovery.

  16. The cluster Terzan 5 as a remnant of a primordial building block of the Galactic bulge.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, F R; Dalessandro, E; Mucciarelli, A; Beccari, G; Rich, R M; Origlia, L; Lanzoni, B; Rood, R T; Valenti, E; Bellazzini, M; Ransom, S M; Cocozza, G

    2009-11-26

    Globular star clusters are compact and massive stellar systems old enough to have witnessed the entire history of our Galaxy, the Milky Way. Although recent results suggest that their formation may have been more complex than previously thought, they still are the best approximation to a stellar population formed over a relatively short timescale (less than 1 Gyr) and with virtually no dispersion in the iron content. Indeed, only one cluster-like system (omega Centauri) in the Galactic halo is known to have multiple stellar populations with a significant spread in iron abundance and age. Similar findings in the Galactic bulge have been hampered by the obscuration arising from thick and varying layers of interstellar dust. Here we report that Terzan 5, a globular-cluster-like system in the Galactic bulge, has two stellar populations with different iron contents and ages. Terzan 5 could be the surviving remnant of one of the primordial building blocks that are thought to merge and form galaxy bulges.

  17. Nanocluster building blocks of artificial square spin ice: Stray-field studies of thermal dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlit, Merlin Porrati, Fabrizio; Huth, Michael; Müller, Jens

    2015-05-07

    We present measurements of the thermal dynamics of a Co-based single building block of an artificial square spin ice fabricated by focused electron-beam-induced deposition. We employ micro-Hall magnetometry, an ultra-sensitive tool to study the stray field emanating from magnetic nanostructures, as a new technique to access the dynamical properties during the magnetization reversal of the spin-ice nanocluster. The obtained hysteresis loop exhibits distinct steps, displaying a reduction of their “coercive field” with increasing temperature. Therefore, thermally unstable states could be repetitively prepared by relatively simple temperature and field protocols allowing one to investigate the statistics of their switching behavior within experimentally accessible timescales. For a selected switching event, we find a strong reduction of the so-prepared states' “survival time” with increasing temperature and magnetic field. Besides the possibility to control the lifetime of selected switching events at will, we find evidence for a more complex behavior caused by the special spin ice arrangement of the macrospins, i.e., that the magnetic reversal statistically follows distinct “paths” most likely driven by thermal perturbation.

  18. Search for water and life's building blocks in the universe: A summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Kwok, Sun; Bergin, Edwin

    2015-08-01

    Water and organic compounds are essential ingredients for life on Earth and possibly elsewhere. In gaseous form water acts as a coolant that allows interstellar gas clouds to collapse to form stars, whereas water ice covers small dust particles that agglomerate to form planetesimals and planets. The variety of organic compounds identified in interstellar and circumstellar regions reflects complex reaction schemes in the gaseous and icy/solid state. Interstellar volatiles and refractory materials were processed and radially mixed within the protostellar disk from which our solar system formed. But the dynamic solar nebula was also a source for new materials and the search for water and life’s building blocks on terrestrial planets, most of the outer-solar-system satellites as well as small solar system bodies reveals exciting new findings. The analysis of small bodies and their fragments, meteorites and interplanetary dust particles, sheds lights onto the extraterrestrial delivery process of prebiotic molecules to young planets and the pathways to life’s origin on Earth and possibly elsewhere. We summarize the results of invited and contributed papers of this Focus Meeting which will allow us to better assess the habitability of objects in our solar system and provide constraints for exoplanets.

  19. From isolated molecules through clusters and condensates to the building blocks of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bald, Ilko; Langer, Judith; Tegeder, Petra; Ingólfsson, Oddur

    2008-11-01

    Electron attachment processes in isolated molecules in the gas phase, in clusters and in molecules condensed on surfaces are reviewed, and a special section is dedicated to electron attachment to biologically relevant molecules. For isolated molecules in the gas phase the emphasis is on the comparison between direct dissociation from strongly repulsive [sigma]* states and the more indirect predissociation processes associated with the initial occupation of a [pi]* MO. These processes are discussed with regard to the temperature dependence of the dissociative electron attachment processes and with regard to its high bond selectivity. Specific examples of high bond and site selectivity at particular electron incident energies are discussed in terms of thermo-chemically controlled and state controlled selectivity of the dissociative electron attachment process. Different processes that are specific for electron attachment to molecules in clusters or condensed on surfaces are discussed for prototypical cases. These include suppression and enhancement of DEA channels, negative ion formation through "electron/exciton-complexes", scavenging processes, and low energy electron induced synthesis in thin molecular films and in clusters. Finally we discuss gas phase electron attachment to the DNA and RNA building blocks, i.e., the nucleobases, the sugar unit and the phosphate group. The relevance of these gas phase experiments to actual DNA damage such as single strand breaks is discussed and first gas phase electron attachment experiments on larger DNA units are discussed.

  20. Linking dwarf galaxies to halo building blocks with the most metal-poor star in Sculptor.

    PubMed

    Frebel, Anna; Kirby, Evan N; Simon, Joshua D

    2010-03-04

    Current cosmological models indicate that the Milky Way's stellar halo was assembled from many smaller systems. On the basis of the apparent absence of the most metal-poor stars in present-day dwarf galaxies, recent studies claimed that the true Galactic building blocks must have been vastly different from the surviving dwarfs. The discovery of an extremely iron-poor star (S1020549) in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy based on a medium-resolution spectrum cast some doubt on this conclusion. Verification of the iron-deficiency, however, and measurements of additional elements, such as the alpha-element Mg, are necessary to demonstrate that the same type of stars produced the metals found in dwarf galaxies and the Galactic halo. Only then can dwarf galaxy stars be conclusively linked to early stellar halo assembly. Here we report high-resolution spectroscopic abundances for 11 elements in S1020549, confirming its iron abundance of less than 1/4,000th that of the Sun, and showing that the overall abundance pattern follows that seen in low-metallicity halo stars, including the alpha-elements. Such chemical similarity indicates that the systems destroyed to form the halo billions of years ago were not fundamentally different from the progenitors of present-day dwarfs, and suggests that the early chemical enrichment of all galaxies may be nearly identical.

  1. Structural Influence on Superatomic Orbitals of Typical Gold Nanostructure Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wanrun; Gao, Yang; Xu, Dexuan; Liu, Fang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-10-01

    We compared superatomic orbitals mainly contributed by 6s atomic orbitals among spherical core-shell cluster Au13, hexagonal plane Au7 and a (5,5) nanotube segment Au35 through first-principles density functional theory calculations. The compatibility between geometry and orbital morphology influences both the presence and the energy level order of particular superatomic orbitals. Taking Au13 as a reference, which possesses a regular configuration of 1S 21P 61D 5, the hexagonal Au7 in 1S 21P 41D 1 lacks the 1P occupied superatomic orbital which is distributed out of the structural plane. Different from the nearly degenerated five occupied 1D orbitals in Au13, Au35 in 1S 21P 61D 101F 101G 61H 1 shows energy separations over 4.0 eV between split 1D regions and 1F regions according to the preference of tubular geometry to different orbital morphologies. The structural reliance of the electronic structure revealed by these typical building blocks might be informative for bottom-up design and fabrication of nanoscale devices based on a gold nanostructure and contributes to the variety and operability of nanoscale materials.

  2. Intrinsic Optical Activity and Environmental Perturbations: Solvation Effects in Chiral Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemler, Paul M.; Vaccaro, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    The non-resonant interaction of electromagnetic radiation with an isotropic ensemble of chiral molecules, which causes the incident state of linear polarization to undergo a signed rotation, long has served as a metric for gauging the enantiomeric purity of asymmetric syntheses. While the underlying phenomenon of circular birefringence (CB) typically is probed in the condensed phase, recent advances in ultrasensitive circular-differential detection schemes, as exemplified by the techniques of Cavity Ring-Down Polarimetry (CRDP), have permitted the first quantitative analyses of such processes to be performed in rarefied media. Efforts to extend vapor-phase investigations of CB to new families of chiral substrates will be discussed, with particular emphasis directed towards the elucidation of intrinsic (e.g., solvent-free) properties and their mediation by environmental perturbations (e.g., solvation). Specific species targeted by this work will include the stereoselective building blocks phenylpropylene oxide and α-methylbenzyl amine, both of which exhibit pronounced solvent-dependent changes in measured optical activity. The nature of chiroptical response in different environments will be highlighted, with quantum-chemical calculations serving to unravel the structural and electronic provenance of observed behavior.

  3. Crystal engineering on superpolyhedral building blocks in metal–organic frameworks applied in gas adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying-Pin; Liu, Tian-Fu; Fordham, Stephen; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-11-07

    Two metal–organic frameworks [PCN-426(Ni) and PCN-427(Cu)] have been designed and synthesized to investigate the structure predictability using a SBB (supermolecular building blocks) approach. Tetratopic ligands featuring 120° angular carboxylate moieties were coordinated with a [Ni33-O)] cluster and a [Cu2O2] unit, respectively. As topologically predicted, 4-connected networks with square coordination adopted thenbonet for the Ni-MOF andssbnet for the Cu-MOF. PCN-426(Ni) was augmented with 12-connected octahedral SBBs, while PCN-427(Cu) was constructed with tetragonal open channels. After a CO2supercritical drying procedure, the PCN-426(Ni) possessed a Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area as high as 3935 m2 g-1and impressively high N2uptake of 1500 cm3 g-1. This work demonstrates the generalization of the SBB strategy, finding an alternative to inconvenient synthetic processes to achieve the desired structural features.

  4. Cellularized microcarriers as adhesive building blocks for fabrication of tubular tissue constructs

    PubMed Central

    Twal, Waleed O.; Klatt, Sandra C.; Harikrishnan, Keerthi; Gerges, Ebtesam; Cooley, Marion A.; Trusk, Thomas C.; Zhou, Boran; Gabr, Mohamed G.; Shazly, Tarek; Lessner, Susan M.; Markwald, Roger R.; Argraves, W. Scott

    2013-01-01

    To meet demands of vascular reconstruction, there is a need for prosthetic alternatives to natural blood vessels. Here we explored a new conduit fabrication approach. Macroporous, gelatin microcarriers laden with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and aortic smooth muscle cells were dispensed into tubular agarose molds and found to adhere to form living tubular tissues. The ability of cellularized microcarriers to adhere to one another involved cellular and extracellular matrix bridging that included the formation of epithelium-like cell layers lining the lumenal and ablumenal surfaces of the constructs and the deposition of collagen and elastin fibers. The tubular tissues behaved as elastic solids, with a uniaxial mechanical response that is qualitatively similar to that of native vascular tissues and consistent with their elastin and collagen composition. Linearized measures of the mechanical response of the fabricated tubular tissues at both low and high strains was observed to increase with duration of static culture, with no significant loss of stiffness following decellularization. The findings highlight the utility of cellularized macroporous gelatin microcarriers as self-adhering building blocks for the fabrication of living tubular structures. PMID:23943070

  5. Can Fluorinated Molecular Cages Be Utilized as Building Blocks of Hyperhalogens?

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei-Ming; Li, Xiang-Hui; Li, Ying; Wu, Di; Li, Chun-Yan; Chen, Jing-Hua; Li, Zhi-Ru

    2016-05-18

    Based on the density functional theory for exchange-correlation potential, fluorocarbon molecular cages are investigated as building blocks of hyperhalogens. By utilizing C8 F7 as a ligand, a series of hyperhalogen anions, that is, M(C8 F7 )2 (-) (M=Li, Na, and K) and M(C8 F7 )3 (-) (M=Be, Mg, and Ca), are modeled. Calculations show that all the C8 F7 moieties preserve their geometric and electronic integrity in these anions. These anionic molecules possess larger vertical electron detachment energies (5.11-6.45 eV) than that of C8 F7 (-) , verifying their hyperhalogen nature. Moreover, it is also revealed that using larger fluorinated cage C10 F9 as ligands can bring about hyperhalogen anions with larger vertical electron detachment energies. The stability of these studied anions is determined by their large HOMO-LUMO gaps and positive dissociation energies of predetermined possible fragmentation pathways. It is hoped this study will provide an approach for the construction of new types of hyperhalogens and stimulate more research in superatom chemistry. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Ultraflat Au nanoplates as a new building block for molecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Wooseok; Lee, Miyeon; Lee, Hyunsoo; Lee, Hyoban; Kim, Bongsoo; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the charge transport properties of a self-assembled organic monolayer on Au nanoplates with conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). Atomically flat Au nanoplates, a few hundred micrometers on each side, that have only (111) surfaces, were synthesized using the chemical vapor transport method; these nanoplates were employed as the substrates for hexadecanethiol (HDT) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Atomic-scale high-resolution images show (\\sqrt{3}× \\sqrt{3}){{R}}30^\\circ molecular periodicity, indicating a well-ordered structure of the HDT on the Au nanoplates. We observed reduced friction and adhesion forces on the HDT SAMs on Au nanoplates, compared with Si substrates, which is consistent with the lubricating nature of HDT SAMs. The electrical properties, such as I-V characteristics and current as a function of load, were measured using CP-AFM. We obtained a tunneling decay constant (β) of 0.57 Å-1, including through-bond ({β }{tb} = 0.99 Å-1) and through-space ({β }{{ts}} = 1.36 Å-1) decay constants for the two-pathway model. This indicates that the charge transport properties of HDT SAMs on Au nanoplates are consistent with those on a Au (111) film, suggesting that SAMs on nanoplates can provide a new building block for molecular electronics.

  7. Flexible Fabrication of Shape-Controlled Collagen Building Blocks for Self-Assembly of 3D Microtissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Meng, Zhaoxu; Ma, Jingyun; Shi, Yang; Xu, Hui; Lykkemark, Simon; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-08-12

    Creating artificial tissue-like structures that possess the functionality, specificity, and architecture of native tissues remains a big challenge. A new and straightforward strategy for generating shape-controlled collagen building blocks with a well-defined architecture is presented, which can be used for self-assembly of complex 3D microtissues. Collagen blocks with tunable geometries are controllably produced and released via a membrane-templated microdevice. The formation of functional microtissues by embedding tissue-specific cells into collagen blocks with expression of specific proteins is described. The spontaneous self-assembly of cell-laden collagen blocks into organized tissue constructs with predetermined configurations is demonstrated, which are largely driven by the synergistic effects of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. This new strategy would open up new avenues for the study of tissue/organ morphogenesis, and tissue engineering applications.

  8. Acetohydroxamic Acid Complexes with Trivalent f-Block Metal Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Sinkov, Serguei I.; Choppin, Gregory

    2003-11-01

    Acetohydroxamic acid has been studied by optical absorbance spectroscopy as a complex forming reagent for the lighter trivalent lanthanides and actinides (Pu(III) and Am(III)) in aqueous solution at 2.0 M (NaClO4) ionic strength. The highest stoichiometry in all the cases studied has been found to be a 1:4 metal-to-ligand ratio; formation of tetrahydroxamato species requires a high excess of the ligand and alkaline pH, Spectrophotometric monitoring confirmed the presence of Pu(III) by electrochemical reduction of Pu(IV) in the course of the pH titration experiment. The formation constants can be used for optimization of processing flowsheets in the advanced PUREX process.

  9. Thermodynamics and phase behavior of acid-tethered block copolymers with ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ha Young; Park, Moon Jeong

    2016-12-21

    We investigate the phase behavior of acid-tethered block copolymers with and without ionic liquids. Two phosphonated block copolymers and their sulfonated analogs were synthesized by fine-tuning the degree of polymerization and the acid content. The block copolymers carrying acid groups with ionic liquids exhibited rich phase sequences, i.e., disorder-lamellae (LAM), gyroid-LAM, gyroid-hexagonal cylinder (HEX), and gyroid-A15 lattice, and the cation/anion ratio in the ionic liquid exerted profound effects on the segregation strength and topology of the self-assembled structures. Additionally, using ionic liquids with excessive cation content was found to enhance the effective Flory-Huggins interaction parameter, χeff, of the samples. However, as the anion content of the ionic liquids increased the segregation strength decreased. This is attributed to the packing frustration accompanied by the prevailing repulsive electrostatic interactions of the anions in the ionic liquid and the polymer matrix. As the hydrophobicity of the ionic liquids increased, well-defined ordered phases emerged in the phosphonated block copolymers with increased anion content, contrary to the disordered phases of the sulfonated samples. Thus, the balance between solvation energy of the anions and the electrostatic interactions is a key determinant of the thermodynamics of acid-tethered block copolymers containing ionic liquids.

  10. [Fe(bpym)(CN)4]-: a new building block for designing single-chain magnets.

    PubMed

    Toma, Luminita Marilena; Lescouëzec, Rodrigue; Pasan, Jorge; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina; Vaissermann, Jacqueline; Cano, Joan; Carrasco, Rosa; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2006-04-12

    We herein present the preparation, crystal structure, magnetic properties, and theoretical study of new heterobimetallic chains of formula {[Fe(III)(bpym)(CN4)]2M(II)(H2O)2}.6H2O [bpym = 2,2'-bipyrimidine; M = Zn (2), Co (3), Cu (4), and Mn (5)] which are obtained by using the building block PPh4[Fe(bpym)(CN)4].H2O (1) (PPh4+= tetraphenylphosphonium) as a ligand toward the fully solvated MII ions. The structure of complex 1 contains mononuclear [Fe(bpym)(CN)4]- anions. Compounds 2-5 are isostructural 4,2-ribbonlike bimetallic chains where the [Fe(bpym)(CN)4]- unit acts as a bis-monodenate ligand through two of its four cyanide ligands toward the M atom. Water hexamer clusters (4) and regular alternating fused six- and four-membered water rings with two dangling water molecules (2, 3, and 5) are trapped between the cyanide-bridged 4,2-ribbonlike chains. 1 and 2 behave as magnetically isolated low-spin iron(III) centers. 3 behaves as a single-chain magnet (SCM) with intrachain ferromagnetic coupling, slow magnetic relaxation, hysteresis effects, and frequency-dependent ac signals at T < 7 K). As expected for a thermally activated process, the nucleation field (Hn) in 3 increases with decreasing T and increasing v. Below 1.0 K, Hn becomes temperature independent but remains strongly sweep rate dependent. In this temperature range, the reversal of the magnetization may be induced by a quantum nucleation of a domain wall that then propagates due to the applied field. 4 and 5 are ferro- and ferrimagnetic chains respectively, with metamagnetic-like behavior (4). DFT-type calculations and QMC methodology provided a good understanding of the magnetic properties of 3-5.

  11. High-surface Thermally Stable Mesoporous Gallium Phosphates Constituted by Nanoparticles as Primary Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    V Parvulescu; V Parvulescu; D Ciuparu; C Hardacre; H Garcia

    2011-12-31

    In constant, search for micro/mesoporous materials, gallium phosphates, have attracted continued interest due to the large pore size reported for some of these solids in comparison with analogous aluminum phosphates. However up to now, the porosity of gallium phosphates collapsed upon template removal or exposure to the ambient moisture. In the present work, we describe high-surface thermally stable mesoporous gallium phosphates synthesized from gallium propoxide and PCl{sub 3} and different templating agents such as amines (dipropylamine, piperidine and aminopiperidine) and quaternary ammonium salts (C{sub 16}H{sub 33}(CH{sub 3})3NBr and C{sub 16}PyCl). These highly reactive precursors have so far not been used as gallium and phosphate sources for the synthesis of gallophosphates. Conceptually, our present synthetic procedure is based on the fast formation of gallium phosphate nanoparticles via the reaction of gallium propoxide with PCl{sub 3} and subsequent construction of the porous material with nanoparticles as building blocks. The organization of the gallophosphate nanoparticles in stable porous structures is effected by the templates. Different experimental procedures varying the molar composition of the sol-gel, pH and the pretreatment of gallium precursor were assayed, most of them leading to satisfactory materials in terms of thermal stability and porosity. In this way, a series of gallium phosphates with surface are above 200 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, and narrow pore size from 3 to 6 nm and remarkable thermal stability (up to 550 C) have been prepared. In some cases, the structure tends to show some periodicity and regularity as determined by XRD. The remarkable stability has allowed us to test the catalytic activity of gallophosphates for the aerobic oxidation of alkylaromatics with notable good results. Our report reopens the interest for gallophosphates in heterogeneous catalysis.

  12. The emergence of a shared action ontology: building blocks for a theory.

    PubMed

    Metzinger, Thomas; Gallese, Vittorio

    2003-12-01

    To have an ontology is to interpret a world. In this paper we argue that the brain, viewed as a representational system aimed at interpreting our world, possesses an ontology too. It creates primitives and makes existence assumptions. It decomposes target space in a way that exhibits a certain invariance, which in turn is functionally significant. We will investigate which are the functional regularities guiding this decomposition process, by answering to the following questions: What are the explicit and implicit assumptions about the structure of reality, which at the same time shape the causal profile of the brain's motor output and its representational deep structure, in particular of the conscious mind arising from it (its "phenomenal output")? How do they constrain high-level phenomena like conscious experience, the emergence of a first-person perspective, or social cognition? By reviewing a series of neuroscientific results and integrating them with a wider philosophical perspective, we will emphasize the contribution the motor system makes to this process. As it will be shown, the motor system constructs goals, actions, and intending selves as basic constituents of the world it interprets. It does so by assigning a single, unified causal role to them. Empirical evidence demonstrates that the brain models movements and action goals in terms of multimodal representations of organism-object-relations. Under a representationalist analysis, this process can be conceived of as an internal, dynamic representation of the intentionality-relation itself. We will show how such a complex form of representational content, once it is in place, can later function as a functional building block for social cognition and for a more complex, consciously experienced representation of the first-person perspective as well.

  13. Leveraging "raw materials" as building blocks and bioactive signals in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Renth, Amanda N; Detamore, Michael S

    2012-10-01

    Components found within the extracellular matrix (ECM) have emerged as an essential subset of biomaterials for tissue engineering scaffolds. Collagen, glycosaminoglycans, bioceramics, and ECM-based matrices are the main categories of "raw materials" used in a wide variety of tissue engineering strategies. The advantages of raw materials include their inherent ability to create a microenvironment that contains physical, chemical, and mechanical cues similar to native tissue, which prove unmatched by synthetic biomaterials alone. Moreover, these raw materials provide a head start in the regeneration of tissues by providing building blocks to be bioresorbed and incorporated into the tissue as opposed to being biodegraded into waste products and removed. This article reviews the strategies and applications of employing raw materials as components of tissue engineering constructs. Utilizing raw materials holds the potential to provide both a scaffold and a signal, perhaps even without the addition of exogenous growth factors or cytokines. Raw materials contain endogenous proteins that may also help to improve the translational success of tissue engineering solutions to progress from laboratory bench to clinical therapies. Traditionally, the tissue engineering triad has included cells, signals, and materials. Whether raw materials represent their own new paradigm or are categorized as a bridge between signals and materials, it is clear that they have emerged as a leading strategy in regenerative medicine. The common use of raw materials in commercial products as well as their growing presence in the research community speak to their potential. However, there has heretofore not been a coordinated or organized effort to classify these approaches, and as such we recommend that the use of raw materials be introduced into the collective consciousness of our field as a recognized classification of regenerative medicine strategies.

  14. Are ancient dwarf satellites the building blocks of the Galactic halo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitoni, E.; Vincenzo, F.; Matteucci, F.; Romano, D.

    2016-05-01

    According to the current cosmological cold dark matter paradigm, the Galactic halo could have been the result of the assemblage of smaller structures. Here we explore the hypothesis that the classical and ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way have been the building blocks of the Galactic halo by comparing their [α/Fe] and [Ba/Fe] versus [Fe/H] patterns with the ones observed in Galactic halo stars. The α elements deviate substantially from the observed abundances in the Galactic halo stars for [Fe/H] values larger than -2 dex, while they overlap for lower metallicities. On the other hand, for the [Ba/Fe] ratio, the discrepancy is extended at all [Fe/H] values, suggesting that the majority of stars in the halo are likely to have been formed in situ. Therefore, we suggest that [Ba/Fe] ratios are a better diagnostic than [α/Fe] ratios. Moreover, for the first time we consider the effects of an enriched infall of gas with the same chemical abundances as the matter ejected and/or stripped from dwarf satellites of the Milky Way on the chemical evolution of the Galactic halo. We find that the resulting chemical abundances of the halo stars depend on the assumed infall time-scale, and the presence of a threshold in the gas for star formation. In particular, in models with an infall time-scale for the halo around 0.8 Gyr coupled with a threshold in the surface gas density for the star formation (4 M⊙ pc-2), and the enriched infall from dwarf spheroidal satellites, the first halo stars formed show [Fe/H]>-2.4 dex. In this case, to explain [α/Fe] data for stars with [Fe/H]<-2.4 dex, we need stars formed in dSph systems.

  15. The pherophorins: common, versatile building blocks in the evolution of extracellular matrix architecture in Volvocales.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, Armin

    2006-01-01

    Green algae of the order Volvocales provide an unrivalled opportunity for exploring the transition from unicellularity to multicellularity. They range from unicells, like Chlamydomonas, through homocytic colonial forms with increasing cooperation of individual cells, like Gonium or Pandorina, to heterocytic multicellular forms with different cell types and a complete division of labour, like Volvox. A fundamental requirement for the evolution of multicellularity is the development of a complex, multifunctional extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM has many functions, which can change under developmental control or as a result of environmental factors. Here molecular data from 15 novel proteins are presented. These proteins have been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Gonium pectorale, Pandorina morum and Volvox carteri, and all belong to a single protein family, the pherophorins. Pherophorin-V1 is shown to be a glycoprotein localized to the 'cellular zone' of the V. carteri ECM. Pherophorin-V1 and -V2 mRNAs are strongly induced not only by the sex inducer, which triggers sexual development at extremely low concentrations, but also by mechanical wounding. Like the extensins of higher plants, which are also developmentally controlled or sometimes inducible by wounding, the pherophorins contain a (hydroxy-)proline-rich (HR) rod-like domain and are abundant within the extracellular compartment. In contrast to most extensins, pherophorins have additional globular A and B domains on both ends of the HR domains. Therefore pherophorins most closely resemble a particular class of higher plant extensin, the solanaceous lectins (e.g. potato lectin), suggesting multivalent carbohydrate-binding functions are present within the A and B domains and are responsible for cross-linking. Our results suggest that pherophorins are used as the building blocks for the extracellular scaffold throughout the Volvocales, with the characteristic mesh sizes in different ECM structures being

  16. Leveraging “Raw Materials” as Building Blocks and Bioactive Signals in Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Renth, Amanda N.

    2012-01-01

    Components found within the extracellular matrix (ECM) have emerged as an essential subset of biomaterials for tissue engineering scaffolds. Collagen, glycosaminoglycans, bioceramics, and ECM-based matrices are the main categories of “raw materials” used in a wide variety of tissue engineering strategies. The advantages of raw materials include their inherent ability to create a microenvironment that contains physical, chemical, and mechanical cues similar to native tissue, which prove unmatched by synthetic biomaterials alone. Moreover, these raw materials provide a head start in the regeneration of tissues by providing building blocks to be bioresorbed and incorporated into the tissue as opposed to being biodegraded into waste products and removed. This article reviews the strategies and applications of employing raw materials as components of tissue engineering constructs. Utilizing raw materials holds the potential to provide both a scaffold and a signal, perhaps even without the addition of exogenous growth factors or cytokines. Raw materials contain endogenous proteins that may also help to improve the translational success of tissue engineering solutions to progress from laboratory bench to clinical therapies. Traditionally, the tissue engineering triad has included cells, signals, and materials. Whether raw materials represent their own new paradigm or are categorized as a bridge between signals and materials, it is clear that they have emerged as a leading strategy in regenerative medicine. The common use of raw materials in commercial products as well as their growing presence in the research community speak to their potential. However, there has heretofore not been a coordinated or organized effort to classify these approaches, and as such we recommend that the use of raw materials be introduced into the collective consciousness of our field as a recognized classification of regenerative medicine strategies. PMID:22462759

  17. Modelling of Shaded and Unshaded Shallow-Ground Heat Pump System for a Residential Building Block in a Mediterranean Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottarelli, M.; Yousif, C.

    2017-01-01

    Heat pumps may be coupled to shallow-ground geothermal fields and used for the purpose of space heating and cooling of buildings. However, quite often it is not possible to locate the geothermal field in cleared grounds, especially in cities where building density is high and land has a high premium. This leads to the possibility of burying the geothermal field under the basement of new building blocks, before construction of the building. In the present work, the shaded-unshaded arrangement is numerically studied by coupling the software DesignBuilder-EnergyPlus to assess the building’s energy requirement with the software FEFLOW to solve the heat transfer equation in porous media. Assuming a standard residential building block, the coupling between the two software is performed by assigning the thermal energy requirement for air conditioning, as calculated by EnergyPlus, to a flat-panel typology of ground heat exchanger simplified in a 2D FEFLOW’s domain. The results show that it is necessary to opt for a dual-source heat pump (air/geothermal) system to ensure that the ground is not frozen or over-heated at peak times and to improve the overall performance of the system.

  18. A crown-like heterometallic unit as the building block for a 3D In-Ge-S framework.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaohui; Wang, Zhenqing; Xu, Jin; Liu, Dan; Wang, Cheng

    2015-12-14

    Supertetrahedral clusters are the most common building blocks in constructing Group 13/14/16 microporous metal chalcogenide materials while other types of clusters are yet scarcely explored. Herein, a new crown-like building unit [In3Ge3S16] has been obtained. The units assemble into a 3D framework [C6H14NO]4[In6Ge3S17]·1.5H2O (1) via a dual-connection mode and a SrSi2 (srs)-type topology could be achieved by treating each unit as a tri-connected node.

  19. Controlling Growth of Novel Solid-State Materials via Discrete Molybdenum-Oxide-Based Building Blocks as Synthons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Leroy; Kögerler, Paul; Müller, Achim

    2000-06-01

    The understanding of the fundamental principles behind the growth of materials from discrete molecules to new solid-state materials is presently a great challenge. Herein novel nanoscale polyoxometalate clusters with circular and spherical topologies are described and examples that have application in the study of molecular growth processes are highlighted. This is because it is now possible to control the formation of solid-state structures from certain types of polyoxometalate fragments that can be described as synthon-based building blocks. This ability, combined with the enormous number of ways that these building blocks can be linked together, is opening completely new and fascinating avenues for the synthesis of solid-state structures with predesigned properties.

  20. Use of mixed micelles for presentation of building blocks in a new combinatorial discovery methodology: proof-of-concept studies.

    PubMed

    New, Roger; Bansal, Gurpal S; Bogus, Michael; Zajkowska, Kasia; Rickelt, Steffen; Toth, Istvan

    2013-03-14

    We describe a new method of combinatorial screening in which building blocks, instead of being linked together chemically, are placed on the surface of nanoparticles. Two- or three-dimensional structures form on the surface of these particles through the close approach of different building blocks, with sufficient flexibility to be able to adapt and interact with putative binding sites in biological systems. The particles assemble without the need for formation of chemical bonds, so libraries comprised of many structures can be prepared rapidly, with large quantities of material available for testing. Screening methods can include solid and solution-phase binding assays, or tissue culture models, for example looking for structures which can change the behaviour of cells in a disease-modifying manner.

  1. On the use of a hierarchical multi-level building block basis function scheme in periodic plasmonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, X.; Valev, V. K.; Volskiy, V.; Vandenbosch, Guy A. E.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2014-05-01

    A Volumetric Method of Moments algorithm is applied to predict the plasmonic responses of chiral metamaterials. This algorithm is based on the use of a multi-level building block basis function scheme, in combination with a dedicated Kummer transformation in the calculation of periodic Green's functions. The validity of the algorithm is demonstrated by analyzing a Ninja Star periodic structure. A good agreement can be found between simulation and experiment.

  2. Design and construction of self-assembling supramolecular protein complexes using artificial and fusion proteins as nanoscale building blocks.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Arai, Ryoichi

    2017-02-01

    The central goal of nanobiotechnology is to design and construct novel biomaterials of nanometer sizes. In this short review, we describe recent progress of several approaches for designing and creating artificial self-assembling protein complexes and primarily focus on the following biotechnological strategies for using artificial and fusion proteins as nanoscale building blocks: fusion proteins designed for symmetrical self-assembly; three-dimensional domain-swapped oligomers; self-assembling designed coiled-coil peptide modules; metal-directed self-assembling engineered proteins; computationally designed self-assembling de novo proteins; and self-assembling protein nanobuilding blocks (PN-Blocks) using an intermolecularly folded dimeric de novo protein. These state-of-the-art nanobiotechnologies for designing supramolecular protein complexes will facilitate the development of novel functional nanobiomaterials.

  3. The Building Blocks for JWST I and T (Integrations and Test) to Operations - From Simulator to Flight Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatig, Curtis; Ochs, William; Johns, Alan; Seaton, Bonita; Adams, Cynthia; Wasiak, Francis; Jones, Ronald; Jackson, Wallace

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Project has an extended integration and test (I&T) phase due to long procurement and development times of various components as well as recent launch delays. The JWST Ground Segment and Operations group has developed a roadmap of the various ground and flight elements and their use in the various JWST I&T test programs. The JWST Project s building block approach to the eventual operational systems, while not new, is complex and challenging; a large-scale mission like JWST involves international partners, many vendors across the United States, and competing needs for the same systems. One of the challenges is resource balancing so simulators and flight products for various elements congeal into integrated systems used for I&T and flight operations activities. This building block approach to an incremental buildup provides for early problem identification with simulators and exercises the flight operations systems, products, and interfaces during the JWST I&T test programs. The JWST Project has completed some early I&T with the simulators, engineering models and some components of the operational ground system. The JWST Project is testing the various flight units as they are delivered and will continue to do so for the entire flight and operational system. The JWST Project has already and will continue to reap the value of the building block approach on the road to launch and flight operations.

  4. Hierarchy of Supramolecular Arrangements and Building Blocks: Inverted Paradigm of Crystal Engineering in the Unprecedented Metal Coordination of Methylene Blue.

    PubMed

    Canossa, Stefano; Bacchi, Alessia; Graiff, Claudia; Pelagatti, Paolo; Predieri, Giovanni; Ienco, Andrea; Manca, Gabriele; Mealli, Carlo

    2017-03-20

    The aromatic methylene blue cation (MB(+)) shows unprecedented ligand behavior in the X-ray structures of the trigonal-planar (TP) complexes MBMCl2 (M = Cu(I), Ag(I)). The two isostructural compounds were exclusively synthesized by grinding together methylene blue chloride and MCl solids. Only in the case of AuCl did the technique lead to a different, yet isoformular, Au(I) derivative with separated MB(+) and AuCl2(-) counterions and no direct N-Au linkage. While the density functional theory (DFT) molecular modeling failed in reproducing the isolated Cu and Ag complexes, the solid-state program CRYSTAL satisfactorily provided for Cu the correct TP building block associated with a highly compact π stacking of the MB(+) ligands. In this respect, the dispersion interactions, evaluated with the DFT functional, provide to the system an extra energy, which likely supports the unprecedented metal coordination of the MB(+) cation. The feature seems governed by subtle chemical factors, such as, for instance, the selected metal ion of the coinage triad. Thus, the electronically consistent Au(I) ion does not form the analogous TP building block because of a looser supramolecular arrangement. In conclusion, while a given crystalline design is generally fixed by the nature of the building block, a peculiarly efficient supramolecular packing may stabilize an otherwise unattainable metal complex.

  5. FT-IR spectra of alginic acid block fractions in three species of brown seaweeds.

    PubMed

    Leal, David; Matsuhiro, Betty; Rossi, Miriam; Caruso, Francesco

    2008-02-04

    Sodium alginates obtained by alkaline extraction of Lessonia flavicans, Desmarestia ligulata and Desmarestia distans (Phaeophyta) from southern Chile were partially hydrolyzed with HCl. Each alginate gave three fractions that were characterized using FT-IR spectroscopy. The fractions soluble in 0.3M HCl presented in the fingerprint region four vibrations at around 960, 911, 890 and 815 cm(-1) that were assigned to heteropolymeric blocks. The fractions soluble at pH 2.85 showed bands at around 948, 888 and 820 cm(-1) attributed to homopolymannuronic acid blocks, the first band is resolved in the second-derivative spectra into two bands at 951 and 936 cm(-1). The fractions insoluble at pH 2.85 presented four bands at around 947, 903, 812 and 781 cm(-1), which were assigned to homopolyguluronic acid blocks. For some samples, the second derivative FT-IR spectra showed new bands indicating the presence of other structures, in low proportions. Structures deduced by FT-IR spectroscopy were corroborated by solution (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Two-dimensional spectra were collected to confirm the fine structure of the hetero- and homopolymeric fractions. A geometrically optimized model for the disaccharide alpha-l-gulopyranuronosyl-(1-->4)-alpha-l-gulopyranuronic acid was calculated using density functional theory; good agreement was obtained between its corresponding calculated vibrations and the experimental bands assigned to homopolyguluronic acid blocks.

  6. Using Blocks to Build Art Concepts: A New Look at an Old Friend.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelfer, Jeffrey I.; Perkins, Peggy G.

    From the 1950s through the 1970s, children's play with blocks was seen as facilitating many developmental and educational outcomes, including art and creativity. In the 1980s there is less interest in the use of blocks to help children acquire art concepts and sensitivities as the pressure for back to the basics increases. This paper aims to…

  7. [Fe(III)(dmbpy)(CN)4]-: a new building block for designing single-chain magnets.

    PubMed

    Toma, Luminita Marilena; Pasán, Jorge; Ruiz-Pérez, Catalina; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel

    2012-11-28

    We herein present the synthesis and magneto-structural study of a new family of heterobimetallic chains of general formula {[Fe(III)(dmbpy)(CN)(4)](2)M(II)(H(2)O)(2)}(n)·pnH(2)O [dmbpy = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine; M = Mn (2), Cu (3), Ni (4) and Co (5) with p = 4 (2), 3 (3), 9 (4) and 3.5 (5)] which were prepared by using the mononuclear PPh(4)[Fe(III)(dmbpy)(CN)(4)]·3H(2)O (1) building block (PPh(4)(+) = tetraphenylphosphonium) as a ligand toward fully solvated M(II) ions. The structure of 1 consists of discrete [Fe(III)(dmbpy)(CN)(4)](-) anions, tetraphenylphosphonium cations and noncoordinated water molecules. Complexes 2-5 are isostructural compounds whose structure consists of neutral 4,2-wave like heterobimetallic chains of formula {[Fe(III)(dmbpy)(CN)(4)](2)M(II)(H(2)O)(2)}(n) where the [Fe(III)(dmbpy)(CN)(4)](-) entity adopts a bis-monodentate coordination mode toward trans-[M(II)(H(2)O)(2)] units through two of its four cyanide groups in cis positions. 1 exhibits the magnetic behaviour of magnetically isolated six-coordinate low-spin Fe(III) complexes with an important orbital contribution. 2 behaves as ferrimagnetic Fe(III)(2)Mn(II) chains, whereas 3-5 exhibit intrachain ferromagnetic couplings between the low-spin Fe(III) and either Cu(II) (3), Ni (4) or Co(II) (5) as well as frequency-dependence of the out-of-phase ac susceptibility signals below 3.0 (3), 5.5 (4) and 5.0 K (5). The relaxation time and the energy to reverse the magnetization of 3-5 are related to the anisotropy of the M(II) center and to the intra- and interchain magnetic interactions. Unprecedentedly in the world of cyanide-bearing complexes, 5 exhibits a double slow relaxation of the magnetization.

  8. Heteroscorpionate aluminium complexes as chiral building blocks to engineer helical architectures.

    PubMed

    Castro-Osma, Jose A; Alonso-Moreno, Carlos; Gómez, M Victoria; Márquez-Segovia, Isabel; Otero, Antonio; Lara-Sánchez, Agustín; Fernández-Baeza, Juan; Sánchez-Barba, Luis F; Rodríguez, Ana M

    2013-10-21

    Treatment of heteroscorpionate ligand precursors pbptamH, pbpamH, sbpamH and (S)-mbpamH with 2 equivalents of AlR3 (R = Et, Me) yielded the corresponding binuclear organoaluminium complexes [Al2R4(μ-pbptam)] (R = Me 1, Et 2), [Al2R4(μ-pbpam)] (R = Me 3, Et 4), [Al2R4(μ-sbpam)] (R = Me 5, Et 6) and [Al2R4{μ-(S)-mbpam}] (R = Me 7, Et 8). These complexes have helical chirality due to the demands of the fixed pyrazole rings. The stereoisomerism and the self-assembly processes of these helicates have been studied in some detail in solution by NMR and in the solid state by X-ray diffraction. Mixtures of M- and P-handed enantiomers and mixtures of M- and P-handed diastereoisomers were obtained when achiral (1–4) and chiral (5–8) heteroscorpionate ligands were used as scaffolds, respectively. Re-crystallization from hexane allowed us to obtain M-homochiral architectures in the solid state for the helical complexes [Al2Et4(μ-sbpam)] (6) and [Al2Et4{μ-(S)-mbpam}] (8). The reaction of heteroscorpionate ligands with 3 equivalents of AlR3 (R = Me, Et) led to the corresponding trinuclear organoaluminium complexes [Al3R7(μ3-pbptam)] (R = Me 9, Et 10), [Al3R7(μ3-pbpam)] (R = Me 11, Et 12), [Al3R7(μ3-sbpam)] (R = Me 13, Et 14) and [Al3R7{μ3-(S)-mbpam}] (R = Me 15, Et 16). The extra AlR3 molecule contributes to the formation of a diastereomeric excess of the PS helicate for complexes 15 and 16. X-ray determination of some of the helical complexes allowed us to witness a versatile and efficient self-assembly process of the building blocks (heteroscorpionate aluminium complexes) directed by noncovalent intermolecular CH–π interactions. The structures of these complexes have been determined by spectroscopic methods and the X-ray crystal structures of 2, 6, 8, and 16 have also been established. Concentration-dependent 1H pulsed field-gradient spin echo (PFGSE) NMR experiments provided evidence for the self-assembly of the single molecular species of complex 2 in

  9. Symmetric functionalization of polyhedral phenylsilsesquioxanes as a route to nano-building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roll, Mark Francis

    The design and synthesis of nanometer scale structures is of intense current interest. Herein we report on the ability to use symmetric, robust, mutable silsesquioxane ([RSiO3/2]n) nano-building blocks to produce well-defined 3-D structures for electronic or adsorption applications. We are able to show the systematic effects of supermolecular coordination to modulate the density of the molecular packing. This dissertation first describes the synthesis of the elusive decaphenylsilsesquioxane, and the exploration of the substitutionally specific para iodination of the octa-, deca- and dodeca-(p-iodophenyl)-silsesquioxanes, whose single-crystal X-ray diffraction structures are reported. Octa( p-iodophenyl)-silsesquioxane shows supermolecular coordination via Desiraju's halogen-halogen short-contact synthon, forming an open structure with a solvent accessible cavity comprising 40% of the unit cell. The application of palladium, nickel and copper catalyzed cross-coupling techniques using the carbon-iodine bond is explored in order to divergently synthesize crystalline derivatives. These derivatives include the octa(diphenylacetylene)-silsesquioxane and the octa(hexaphenylbenzene)silsesquioxane (56 Aryl), whose single-crystal X-ray diffraction structures are reported. We show that 56 Aryl, which contains more carbon atoms than any other discrete molecule in the Cambridge Structural Database, crystallizes into an extremely open structure with a solvent accessible cavity comprising 55% of the total volume. The supermolecular ordering driven by the bulky hexaphenylbenzene moieties gives nanometer-scale channels along the ab plane. Substitutional specificity is explored in the bromination of octaphenylsilsesquioxane (OPS), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction structures are reported for the octa-, hexadeca- and tetraicosa-brominated derivatives. Precise synthetic control is demonstrated by the unique catalyst-free bromination of OPS, providing the octa

  10. An Electronic Structure Approach to Charge Transfer and Transport in Molecular Building Blocks for Organic Optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Heidi Phillips

    A fundamental understanding of charge separation in organic materials is necessary for the rational design of optoelectronic devices suited for renewable energy applications and requires a combination of theoretical, computational, and experimental methods. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD)DFT are cost effective ab-initio approaches for calculating fundamental properties of large molecular systems, however conventional DFT methods have been known to fail in accurately characterizing frontier orbital gaps and charge transfer states in molecular systems. In this dissertation, these shortcomings are addressed by implementing an optimally-tuned range-separated hybrid (OT-RSH) functional approach within DFT and TDDFT. The first part of this thesis presents the way in which RSH-DFT addresses the shortcomings in conventional DFT. Environmentally-corrected RSH-DFT frontier orbital energies are shown to correspond to thin film measurements for a set of organic semiconducting molecules. Likewise, the improved RSH-TDDFT description of charge transfer excitations is benchmarked using a model ethene dimer and silsesquioxane molecules. In the second part of this thesis, RSH-DFT is applied to chromophore-functionalized silsesquioxanes, which are currently investigated as candidates for building blocks in optoelectronic applications. RSH-DFT provides insight into the nature of absorptive and emissive states in silsesquioxanes. While absorption primarily involves transitions localized on one chromophore, charge transfer between chromophores and between chromophore and silsesquioxane cage have been identified. The RSH-DFT approach, including a protocol accounting for complex environmental effects on charge transfer energies, was tested and validated against experimental measurements. The third part of this thesis addresses quantum transport through nano-scale junctions. The ability to quantify a molecular junction via spectroscopic methods is crucial to their

  11. Direct block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel by niflumic acid.

    PubMed

    Scott-Ward, T S; Li, H; Schmidt, A; Cai, Z; Sheppard, D N

    2004-01-01

    Niflumic acid is widely used to inhibit Ca(2+) -activated Cl(-) channels. However, the chemical structure of niflumic acid resembles that of diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, a drug that inhibits the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel. To investigate how niflumic acid inhibits CFTR Cl(-) channel, we studied recombinant wild-type human CFTR in excised inside-out membrane patches. When added to the intracellular solution, niflumic acid caused a concentration- and voltage-dependent decrease of CFTR Cl(-) current with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (K(i)) of 253 microM and Hill co-efficient of approximately 1, at -50 mV. Niflumic acid inhibition of single CFTR Cl(-) channels was characterized by a very fast, flickery block that decreased dramatically current amplitude without altering open-probability. Consistent with these data, spectral analysis of CFTR Cl(-) currents suggested that channel block by niflumic acid was described by the closed <--> open <--> blocked kinetic scheme with blocker on rate (k(on)) = 13.9 x 10(6) M(-1)s(-1), off rate (k(off))=3348 s(-1) and dissociation constant (K(d)) = 241 microM, at -50 mV. Based on these data, we tested the effects of niflumic acid on transepithelial Cl(-) secretion and cyst growth using type I MDCK epithelial cells. Niflumic acid (200 microM) inhibited cAMP-stimulated, bumetanide-sensitive short-circuit current by 55%. Moreover, the drug potently retarded cyst growth. We conclude that niflumic acid is an open-channel blocker of CFTR that inhibits Cl(-) permeation by plugging the channel pore. It or related agents might be of value in the development of new therapies for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

  12. Catalytic enantioselective construction of quaternary stereocenters: assembly of key building blocks for the synthesis of biologically active molecules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiyang; Han, Seo-Jung; Liu, Wen-Bo; Stoltz, Brian M

    2015-03-17

    compatible with a wide range of arylboronic acids, β-substituents, and ring sizes. Aside from benzylic quaternary stereocenters, a more challenging motif is a quaternary stereocenter not adjacent to an aromatic group. Such centers represent more general structures in chemical space but are more difficult to form by asymmetric catalysis. To address this greater challenge, and motivated by the greater reward, we entered the field of palladium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation of prochiral enolate nucleophiles about a decade ago. On the basis of Tsuji's work, which solved the issue of positional selectivity for unsymmetrical ketones, we discovered that the phosphinooxazoline ligand effectively rendered this reaction enantioselective. Extensive investigations since then have revealed that the reaction exhibits broad scope and accepts a range of substrate classes, each with its unique advantage in synthetic applications. A diverse array of carbonyl compounds bearing α-quaternary stereocenters are obtained in excellent yields and enantioselectivities, and more possibilities have yet to be explored. As an alternative to palladium catalysis, we also studied iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylations that generate vicinal quaternary and tertiary stereocenters in a single transformation. Overall, these methods provide access to small molecule building blocks with a single quaternary stereocenter, can be applied to various molecular scaffolds, and tolerate a wide range of functional groups. We envision that the chemistry reported in this Account will be increasingly useful in drug discovery and design.

  13. Surprising Image Revises Understanding Of Dwarf Galaxies -- Building Blocks of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Hertz. However, cold molecular Hydrogen cannot be observed with current telescopes. Instead, astronomers look for CO, which emits at several radio frequencies, and then estimate the amount of molecular Hydrogen based on how much CO they see. Based on the new observations of CO, the astronomers concluded that IC 10 has much less molecular gas than previously thought and apparently has a much smaller percentage of molecular gas than our Milky Way. The astronomers add that dwarf galaxies in general are found to have less of the heavy elements than larger, spiral galaxies. They are thus probably more similar to galaxies in the early Universe when there had been less time for stars to produce the heavy elements and then return them to their surroundings through supernova explosions. Studies of a dwarf irregular galaxy like IC 10 therefore give astronomers new insights about how stars formed in the distant past. In addition, many astronomers believe dwarf galaxies are the "building blocks of the Universe," from which larger galaxies were assembled through mergers. "The beauty of this is that dwarf irregulars are the most numerous type of galaxy, and many, like IC 10, are relatively nearby. That means we can learn about star formation in such extreme environments by studying nearby dwarf galaxies. That's fortunate, because we cannot observe extremely distant galaxies with sufficient detail," Walter said. Studies of molecules in galaxies also will benefit from the completion of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), an international millimeter-wave telescope project to be located in the high plains of northern Chile. With ALMA, astronomers will be able to study galaxies with greater detail and sensitivity to learn more about the nature of the building blocks of the Universe. Research with the Owens Valley Radio Telescope, operated by the California Institute of Technology, is supported by NSF grant AST96-13717. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National

  14. Exciton-blocking phosphonic acid-treated anode buffer layers for organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Jeramy D.; Song, Byeongseop; Griffith, Olga; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate significant improvements in power conversion efficiency of bilayer organic photovoltaics by replacing the exciton-quenching MoO3 anode buffer layer with an exciton-blocking benzylphosphonic acid (BPA)-treated MoO3 or NiO layer. We show that the phosphonic acid treatment creates buffers that block up to 70% of excitons without sacrificing the hole extraction efficiency. Compared to untreated MoO3 anode buffers, BPA-treated NiO buffers exhibit a ˜ 25% increase in the near-infrared spectral response in diphenylanilo functionalized squaraine (DPSQ)/C60-based bilayer devices, increasing the power conversion efficiency under 1 sun AM1.5G simulated solar illumination from 4.8 ± 0.2% to 5.4 ± 0.3%. The efficiency can be further increased to 5.9 ± 0.3% by incorporating a highly conductive exciton blocking bathophenanthroline (BPhen):C60 cathode buffer. We find similar increases in efficiency in two other small-molecule photovoltaic systems, indicating the generality of the phosphonic acid-treated buffer approach to enhance exciton blocking.

  15. Mutation of L-2,3-diaminopropionic acid synthase genes blocks staphyloferrin B synthesis in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus synthesizes two siderophores, staphyloferrin A and staphyloferrin B, that promote iron-restricted growth. Previous work on the biosynthesis of staphyloferrin B has focused on the role of the synthetase enzymes, encoded from within the sbnA-I operon, which build the siderophore from the precursor molecules citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate and L-2,3-diaminopropionic acid. However, no information yet exists on several other enzymes, expressed from the biosynthetic cluster, that are thought to be involved in the synthesis of the precursors (or synthetase substrates) themselves. Results Using mutants carrying insertions in sbnA and sbnB, we show that these two genes are essential for the synthesis of staphyloferrin B, and that supplementation of the growth medium with L-2,3-diaminopropionic acid can bypass the block in staphyloferrin B synthesis displayed by the mutants. Several mechanisms are proposed for how the enzymes SbnA, with similarity to cysteine synthase enzymes, and SbnB, with similarity to amino acid dehydrogenases and ornithine cyclodeaminases, function together in the synthesis of this unusual nonproteinogenic amino acid L-2,3-diaminopropionic acid. Conclusions Mutation of either sbnA or sbnB result in abrogation of synthesis of staphyloferrin B, a siderophore that contributes to iron-restricted growth of S. aureus. The loss of staphyloferrin B synthesis is due to an inability to synthesize the unusual amino acid L-2,3-diaminopropionic acid which is an important, iron-liganding component of the siderophore structure. It is proposed that SbnA and SbnB function together as an L-Dap synthase in the S. aureus cell. PMID:21906287

  16. Controls and rates of acid production in commercial-scale sulfur blocks.

    PubMed

    Birkham, T K; Hendry, M J; Barbour, S L; Lawrence, J R

    2010-01-01

    Acidic drainage (pH 0.4-1.0) from oxidizing elemental sulfur (S(0)) blocks is an environmental concern in regions where S(0) is stockpiled. In this study, the locations, controls, and rates of H(2)SO(4) production in commercial-scale S(0) blocks ( approximately 1-2 x 10(6) m(3)) in northern Alberta, Canada, were estimated. In situ modeling of O(2) concentrations ([O(2)]) suggest that 70 to >97% of the annual H(2)SO(4) production occurs in the upper 1 m of the blocks where temperatures increase to >15 degrees C during the summer. Laboratory experiments show that S(0) oxidation rates are sensitive to temperature (Q(10) = 4.3) and dependent on the activity of autotrophic S(0)-oxidizing microbes. The annual efflux of SO(4) in drainage water from a S(0) block (5.5 x 10(5) kg) was within the estimated range of SO(4) production within the block (2.7 x 10(5) to 1.2 x 10(6) kg), suggesting that H(2)SO(4) production and removal rates were approximately equal during the study period. The low mean relative humidity within the block (68%; SD = 17%; n = 21) was attributed to osmotic suction from elevated H(2)SO(4) concentrations and suggests a mean in situ pH of approximately -2.1. The low pH of drainage waters was attributed to the mixing of fresh infiltrating water and low-pH in situ water. Heat generation during S(0) oxidation was an important factor in maintaining elevated temperatures (mean, 11.1 degrees C) within the block. The implications of this research are relevant globally because construction methods and the physical properties of S(0) blocks are similar worldwide.

  17. Engineering responsive polymer building blocks with host-guest molecular recognition for functional applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinming; Liu, Shiyong

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: All living organisms and soft matter are intrinsically responsive and adaptive to external stimuli. Inspired by this fact, tremendous effort aiming to emulate subtle responsive features exhibited by nature has spurred the invention of a diverse range of responsive polymeric materials. Conventional stimuli-responsive polymers are constructed via covalent bonds and can undergo reversible or irreversible changes in chemical structures, physicochemical properties, or both in response to a variety of external stimuli. They have been imparted with a variety of emerging applications including drug and gene delivery, optical sensing and imaging, diagnostics and therapies, smart coatings and textiles, and tissue engineering. On the other hand, in comparison with molecular chemistry held by covalent bonds, supramolecular chemistry built on weak and reversible noncovalent interactions has emerged as a powerful and versatile strategy for materials fabrication due to its facile accessibility, extraordinary reversibility and adaptivity, and potent applications in diverse fields. Typically involving more than one type of noncovalent interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding, metal coordination, hydrophobic association, electrostatic interactions, van der Waals forces, and π-π stacking), host-guest recognition refers to the formation of supramolecular inclusion complexes between two or more entities connected together in a highly controlled and cooperative manner. The inherently reversible and adaptive nature of host-guest molecular recognition chemistry, stemming from multiple noncovalent interactions, has opened up a new platform to construct novel types of stimuli-responsive materials. The introduction of host-guest chemistry not only enriches the realm of responsive materials but also confers them with promising new applications. Most intriguingly, the integration of responsive polymer building blocks with host-guest recognition motifs will endow the former with

  18. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SUBSTITUTED POLY(STYRENE)-b-POLY(ACRYLIC ACID) BLOCK COPOLYMER MICELLES

    SciTech Connect

    Pickel, Deanna L; Pickel, Joseph M; Devenyi, Jozsef; Britt, Phillip F

    2009-01-01

    Block copolymer micelle synthesis and characterization has been extensively studied. In particular, most studies have focused on the properties of the hydrophilic corona due to the micelle corona structure s impact on the biodistribution and biocompatibility. Unfortunately, less attention has been given to the effect of the core block on the micelle stability, morphology, and the rate of diffusion of small molecules from the core. This investigation is focused on the synthesis of block copolymers composed of meta-substituted styrenes and acrylic acid by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization. Micelles with cores composed of substituted styrenes having Tgs ranging from -30 to 100 oC have been prepared and the size and shape of these micelles were characterized by Static and Dynamic Light Scattering and TEM. In addition, the critical micelle concentration and rate of diffusion of small molecules from the core were determined by fluorimetry using pyrene as the probe.

  19. Combination of ionic self-assembly and hydrogen bonding as a tool for the synthesis of liquid-crystalline materials and organogelators from a simple building block.

    PubMed

    Camerel, Franck; Faul, Charl F J

    2003-08-07

    In this communication we report on the facile combination of hydrogen bonding and the ionic self-assembly (ISA) process to produce organized materials and fiber-containing organogel superstructures from functionalised oligoelectrolytic building blocks.

  20. Electron Transfer within Self-Assembling Cyclic Tetramers Using Chlorophyll-Based Donor-Acceptor Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, Victoria L; Smeigh, Amanda L; Kim, Chul Hoon; Co, Dick T; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2012-05-09

    The synthesis and photoinduced charge transfer properties of a series of Chl-based donor-acceptor triad building blocks that self-assemble into cyclic tetramers are reported. Chlorophyll a was converted into zinc methyl 3-ethylpyrochlorophyllide a (Chl) and then further modified at its 20-position to covalently attach a pyromellitimide (PI) acceptor bearing a pyridine ligand and one or two naphthalene-1,8:4,5-bis(dicarboximide) (NDI) secondary electron acceptors to give Chl-PI-NDI and Chl-PI-NDI2. The pyridine ligand within each ambident triad enables intermolecular Chl metal-ligand coordination in dry toluene, which results in the formation of cyclic tetramers in solution, as determined using small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering at a synchrotron source. Femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy of the monomers in toluene-1% pyridine and the cyclic tetramers in toluene shows that the selective photoexcitation of Chl results in intramolecular electron transfer from 1*Chl to PI to form Chl+.-PI-.-NDI and Chl+.-PI-.-NDI2. This initial charge separation is followed by a rapid charge shift from PI-. to NDI and subsequent charge recombination of Chl+.-PI-NDI-. and Chl+.-PI-(NDI)NDI-. on a 5-30 ns time scale. Charge recombination in the Chl-PI-NDI2 cyclic tetramer (τCR = 30 ± 1 ns in toluene) is slower by a factor of 3 relative to the monomeric building blocks (τCR = 10 ± 1 ns in toluene-1% pyridine). This indicates that the self-assembly of these building blocks into the cyclic tetramers alters their structures in a way that lengthens their charge separation lifetimes, which is an advantageous strategy for artificial photosynthetic systems.

  1. Synergetic Evolution of Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Based Polymeric Semiconductor for High Reproducibility and Performance: Random Copolymerization of Similarly Shaped Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jangwhan; Park, Seong Jong; Lee, Sung Min; Ha, Jae Un; Ahn, Eun Soo; Chang, Suk Tai; Kwon, Soon-Ki; Chung, Dae Sung; Kim, Yun-Hi

    2016-12-01

    A new random copolymer consisting of similarly shaped donor-acceptor building blocks of diketopyrrolopyrrole-selenophene-vinylene-selenophene (DPP-SVS) and DPP-thiophene-vinylene-thiophene (DPP-TVT) is designed and synthesized. The resulting P-DPP-SVS(5)-TVT(5) with an equal molecular ratio of the two building blocks produced significantly enhanced solubility when compared to that of the two homopolymers, PDPP-SVS and PDPP-TVT. More importantly, despite the maximum segmental randomness of the PDPP-SVS(5)-TVT(5) copolymer, its crystalline perfectness and preferential orientation are outstanding, even similar to those of the homopolymers thanks to the similarity of the two building blocks. This unique property produces a high charge carrier mobility of 1.23 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) of PDPP-SVS(5)-TVT(5), as determined from polymer field-effect transistor (PFET) measurements. The high solubility of PDPP-SVS(5)-TVT(5) promotes formulation of high-viscosity solutions which could be successfully processed to fabricate large-areal PFETs onto hydrophobically treated 4 in. wafers. A total of 269 individual PFETs are fabricated. These devices exhibit extremely narrow device-to-device deviations without a single failure and demonstrate an average charge carrier mobility of 0.66 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with a standard deviation of 0.064. This is the first study to report on successfully realizing large-areal reproducibility of high-mobility polymeric semiconductors. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Azaborabutadienes: Synthesis by Metal-Free Carboboration of Nitriles and Utility as Building Blocks for B,N-Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingbing; Lu, Wei; Li, Yongxin; Ganguly, Rakesh; Kinjo, Rei

    2016-11-14

    Metal-free regioselective carboboration of arylnitriles with L2 PhB: (1: L=oxazol-2-ylidene) catalyzed by Et3 B afforded the unprecedented acyclic 2-aza-4-borabutadienes 2, thus demonstrating a new strategy to construct a B,C,N-mixed π-system involving B=C and C=N bonds. Thermal isomerization of 2 gave C-borylimines (3), and diverse reactivity of 2 a towards several substrates, such as H(+) , F(+) , O2 , S, Se, and isonitriles, allowed construction of boron-containing heterocycles with various ring sizes, thus illustrating the utility of 2 as a synthetic building block.

  3. T-shaped molecular building blocks by combined bridgehead and bridge substitution on bicyclo[1.1.1]pentanes.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Jirí; Michl, Josef; Mazal, Ctibor

    2010-04-02

    Derivatives of bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane differentially substituted in bridgehead (1,3) and bridge (2,4) positions have been synthesized. They represent a new T-shaped structural module consisting of a rigid rod with a nearly freely rotating side arm, possibly useful as a molecular building block in syntheses of more complex covalent or supramolecular scaffolds useful in bottom-up construction of molecular level devices or materials. For good chemical connectivity in the axial direction, carboxylates, ethynyls, and acetylsulfanyl groups were installed at the bridgeheads. Quinoxalines were attached in the transverse direction through a highly reactive alpha-diketone system located at the bridges.

  4. The Primary Care for the Underserved Conference as a building block to social capital: impact on practice, research, and education.

    PubMed

    Farnum, Karen; McCarthy, Mary Lou; Beauchesne, Michelle A; Lawrence, Patricia R

    2005-01-01

    A previous article traced the evolution of the Primary Care for the Underserved Conference into a new professional culture (Beauchesne & Patsdaughter, 2005). This article focuses on the relevance of the conference series as a building block of social capital. The authors critically examine the impact of the conference on health care practice, research, and education. The authors analyze two sources of data (conference evaluation and email surveys) using a descriptive, qualitative approach. Findings support the conference as a significant source of social capital for health professionals. The article includes an exemplar describing the impact of this conference on individual practitioners.

  5. Characterization of low loss microstrip resonators as a building block for circuit QED in a 3D waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoepfl, D.; Muppalla, P. R.; Schneider, C. M. F.; Kasemann, S.; Partel, S.; Kirchmair, G.

    2017-08-01

    Here we present the microwave characterization of microstrip resonators, made from aluminum and niobium, inside a 3D microwave waveguide. In the low temperature, low power limit internal quality factors of up to one million were reached. We found a good agreement to models predicting conductive losses and losses to two level systems for increasing temperature. The setup presented here is appealing for testing materials and structures, as it is free of wire bonds and offers a well controlled microwave environment. In combination with transmon qubits, these resonators serve as a building block for a novel circuit QED architecture inside a rectangular waveguide.

  6. A versatile building block: the structures and functions of negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus nucleocapsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuna; Guo, Yu; Lou, Zhiyong

    2012-12-01

    Nucleocapsid protein (NPs) of negative-sense single-stranded RNA (-ssRNA) viruses function in different stages of viral replication, transcription, and maturation. Structural investigations show that -ssRNA viruses that encode NPs preliminarily serve as structural building blocks that encapsidate and protect the viral genomic RNA and mediate the interaction between genomic RNA and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. However, recent structural results have revealed other biological functions of -ssRNA viruses that extend our understanding of the versatile roles of virally encoded NPs.

  7. Building block extraction and classification by means of Markov random fields using aerial imagery and LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratsolis, E.; Sigelle, M.; Charou, E.

    2016-10-01

    Building detection has been a prominent area in the area of image classification. Most of the research effort is adapted to the specific application requirements and available datasets. Our dataset includes aerial orthophotos (with spatial resolution 20cm), a DSM generated from LiDAR (with spatial resolution 1m and elevation resolution 20 cm) and DTM (spatial resolution 2m) from an area of Athens, Greece. Our aim is to classify these data by means of Markov Random Fields (MRFs) in a Bayesian framework for building block extraction and perform a comparative analysis with other supervised classification techniques namely Feed Forward Neural Net (FFNN), Cascade-Correlation Neural Network (CCNN), Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). We evaluated the performance of each method using a subset of the test area. We present the classified images, and statistical measures (confusion matrix, kappa coefficient and overall accuracy). Our results demonstrate that the MRFs and FFNN perform better than the other methods.

  8. Self-Assembled Nanogels of Cholesterol-Bearing Hydroxypropyl Cellulose: A Thermoresponsive Building Block for Nanogel Tectonic Materials.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Yoshiro; Sakiyama, Mizuki; Takeda, Shigeo; Nishimura, Tomoki; Mukai, Sada-Atsu; Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2016-11-29

    Hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) is a fascinating polysaccharide to use in developing a nanogel to be a thermoresponsive building unit for nanogel tectonic materials. Cholesterol-bearing HPC (Ch-HPC) self-assembled to form nanogels through hydrophobic interactions of the cholesteryl groups in water. Ch-HPC nanogels had a lower critical solution temperature in line with that of native HPC. The particle size of Ch-HPC nanogels was reversibly controlled by the temperature and salting-out effect. The thermoresponsive property was also observed in Ch-HPC nanogel-cross-linked macrogels. These results suggest that a Ch-HPC nanogel is an attractive building block for thermoresponsive nanogel tectonic materials.

  9. Power Block Geometry Applied to the Building of Power Electronics Converters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dos Santos, E. C., Jr.; da Silva, E. R. C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a new methodology, Power Block Geometry (PBG), for the presentation of power electronics topologies that process ac voltage. PBG's strategy uses formal methods based on a geometrical representation with particular rules and defines a universe with axioms and conjectures to establish a formation law. It allows power…

  10. Power Block Geometry Applied to the Building of Power Electronics Converters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dos Santos, E. C., Jr.; da Silva, E. R. C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a new methodology, Power Block Geometry (PBG), for the presentation of power electronics topologies that process ac voltage. PBG's strategy uses formal methods based on a geometrical representation with particular rules and defines a universe with axioms and conjectures to establish a formation law. It allows power…

  11. Deconstructing Building Blocks: Preschoolers' Spatial Assembly Performance Relates to Early Mathematical Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdine, Brian N.; Golinkoff, Roberta M.; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathryn; Newcombe, Nora S.; Filipowicz, Andrew T.; Chang, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on three main goals: First, 3-year-olds' spatial assembly skills are probed using interlocking block constructions (N = 102). A detailed scoring scheme provides insight into early spatial processing and offers information beyond a basic accuracy score. Second, the relation of spatial assembly to early mathematical skills…

  12. Deconstructing Building Blocks: Preschoolers' Spatial Assembly Performance Relates to Early Mathematical Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdine, Brian N.; Golinkoff, Roberta M.; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathryn; Newcombe, Nora S.; Filipowicz, Andrew T.; Chang, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on three main goals: First, 3-year-olds' spatial assembly skills are probed using interlocking block constructions (N = 102). A detailed scoring scheme provides insight into early spatial processing and offers information beyond a basic accuracy score. Second, the relation of spatial assembly to early mathematical skills…

  13. Cathepsin D-mediated yolk protein degradation is blocked by acid phosphatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fialho, Eliane; Nakamura, Angelica; Juliano, Luiz; Masuda, Hatisaburo; Silva-Neto, Mário A C

    2005-04-15

    Vitellin (VT) is a lipoglycophosphoprotein stored inside the eggs of every oviparous organism during oogenesis. In the blood-sucking bug Rhodnius prolixus, VT is deposited inside growing oocytes together with two acid hydrolases: acid phosphatase (AP) and cathepsin D (CD). Egg fertilization triggers AP activity and VT proteolysis in vivo [Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 2002 (32) 847]. Here, we show that CD is the main protease targeting VT proteolysis during egg development. CD activity in total egg homogenates is blocked by the classical aspartyl protease inhibitor, pepstatin A. Surprisingly, AP inhibitors such as NaF, Na+/K+ tartrate, and inorganic phosphate also block VT proteolysis, whereas this effect is not observed when tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors such as vanadate and phenylarsine oxide or an inhibitor of alkaline phosphatases such as levamisole are used in a VT proteolysis assay. NaF concentrations that block isolated AP activity do not affect the activity of partially purified CD. Therefore, a specific repressor of VT proteolysis must be dephosphorylated by AP in vivo. In conclusion, these results demonstrate for the first time that acid hydrolases act cooperatively to promote yolk degradation during egg development in arthropods.

  14. Amino acid infusion blocks renal tubular uptake of an indium-labelled somatostatin analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, P. J.; Wade, A. F.; Gwilliam, M. E.; Peters, A. M.; Myers, M. J.; Gilbey, S. G.; Bloom, S. R.; Calam, J.

    1993-01-01

    The Indium-labelled somatostatin analogue pentetreotide has been successfully developed for imaging of somatostatin receptor positive tumours. However there is significant renal tubular uptake of the radiolabelled peptide, which can obscure upper abdominal tumours and would preclude its use for targeted radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to determine whether amino acid infusion, which has been shown to block renal tubular peptide reabsorption, diminishes renal parenchymal uptake of this radiolabelled analogue. Eight patients being scanned with the 111In-labelled somatostatin analogue, pentetreotide, for localisation of gastroenteropancreatic tumours received an infusion of synthetic amino acids. The ratio of isotope uptake in kidney to that in spleen was assessed, and compared to the ratio for matched control patients, to determine if amino acid infusion reduced renal parenchymal uptake of the radiopharmaceutical. The amount of isotope in the urine was determined to ensure that any effect of the amino acid infusion was unrelated to changes in clearance. Infusion of amino acids significantly reduced renal parenchymal uptake of isotope at 4 h. There was a non-significant increase in urinary clearance of isotope over the 4 h, consistent with reduced reuptake and a lack of effect on glomerular filtration rate. This technique, by preventing renal damage, may allow the use of this somatostatin analogue for local radiotherapy, and could be of wider value in blocking tubular re-uptake of potentially nephrotoxic agents, such as radiolabelled Fab fragments. Images Figure 1 PMID:8099808

  15. Tartaric Acid-Assisted Self-Assembly of Hybrid Block Copolymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Li; Lin, Ying; Watkins, James

    2014-03-01

    Enantiopure tartaric acid was used as an additive to increase the segregation strength of poly(ethylene oxide-block-tert-butyl acrylate) (PEO-b-PtBA) copolymers through strong, selective interactions with one of the polymer chain segments. Addition of tartaric acid to PEO-b-PtBA exhibiting cylindrical morphologies resulted in the formation of helical superstructures as observed by transmission electron microscopy. It was also found that this small acid additive can also enable phase-selective ultra-high loading of nanoparticles (NPs) into target domains of the block copolymer composites. The loading of tartaric acid can increase enthalpically favorable interactions between the nanoparticle ligands and the host domain and mitigate entropic penalties associated with NP incorporation into the target domain. A metal content of over 40 weight percent by mass of the resulting well ordered composites was achieved as measured by thermal gravimetric analysis in PEO-b-PtBA/tartaric acid/4-hydroxythiophenol functionalized Au NP hybrid system. Funding from Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing (CHM); Facility support from Materials Research Science and Engineering Center at UMass Amherst.

  16. Deconstructing Building Blocks: Preschoolers' Spatial Assembly Performance Relates to Early Mathematics Skills

    PubMed Central

    Verdine, Brian N.; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathryn; Newcombe, Nora S.; Filipowicz, Andrew T.; Chang, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on three main goals: First, 3-year-olds' spatial assembly skills are probed using interlocking block constructions (N = 102). A detailed scoring scheme provides insight into early spatial processing and offers information beyond a basic accuracy score. Second, the relation of spatial assembly to early mathematics skills was evaluated. Spatial skill independently predicted a significant amount of the variability in concurrent mathematics performance. Finally, the relationship between spatial assembly skill and socioeconomic status, gender, and parent-reported spatial language was examined. While children's performance did not differ by gender, lower-SES children were already lagging behind higher-SES children in block assembly. Furthermore, lower-SES parents reported using significantly fewer spatial words with their children. PMID:24112041

  17. Deconstructing building blocks: preschoolers' spatial assembly performance relates to early mathematical skills.

    PubMed

    Verdine, Brian N; Golinkoff, Roberta M; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathryn; Newcombe, Nora S; Filipowicz, Andrew T; Chang, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on three main goals: First, 3-year-olds' spatial assembly skills are probed using interlocking block constructions (N = 102). A detailed scoring scheme provides insight into early spatial processing and offers information beyond a basic accuracy score. Second, the relation of spatial assembly to early mathematical skills was evaluated. Spatial skill independently predicted a significant amount of the variability in concurrent mathematical performance. Finally, the relation between spatial assembly skill and socioeconomic status (SES), gender, and parent-reported spatial language was examined. While children's performance did not differ by gender, lower SES children were already lagging behind higher SES children in block assembly. Furthermore, lower SES parents reported using significantly fewer spatial words with their children. © 2013 The Authors. Child Development © 2013 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  18. Report of the Task Force - Space for Health Sciences. Building Blocks. Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    The Task Force on Space for Health Sciences is one of four task forces established by the Committee on Capital Financing of the Council of Ontario Universities to work toward the development of a capital formula that would define space needs and building costs for Ontario universities. Each task force has a particular assignment related to the…

  19. Getting "What Works" Working: Building Blocks for the Integration of Experimental and Improvement Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    As a systemic approach to improving educational practice through research, "What Works" has come under repeated challenge from alternative approaches, most recently that of improvement science. While "What Works" remains a dominant paradigm for centralized knowledge-building efforts, there is need to understand why this…

  20. Getting "What Works" Working: Building Blocks for the Integration of Experimental and Improvement Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    As a systemic approach to improving educational practice through research, "What Works" has come under repeated challenge from alternative approaches, most recently that of improvement science. While "What Works" remains a dominant paradigm for centralized knowledge-building efforts, there is need to understand why this…