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Sample records for acid catabolic pathways

  1. Occurrence of Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes in Arginine Catabolism by Wine Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S.; Pritchard, G. G.; Hardman, M. J.; Pilone, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    l-Arginine, an amino acid found in significant quantities in grape juice and wine, is known to be catabolized by some wine lactic acid bacteria. The correlation between the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and the ability to catabolize arginine was examined in this study. The activities of the three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes, arginine deiminase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and carbamate kinase, were measured in cell extracts of 35 strains of wine lactic acid bacteria. These enzymes were present in all heterofermentative lactobacilli and most leuconostocs but were absent in all the homofermentative lactobacilli and pediococci examined. There was a good correlation among arginine degradation, formation of ammonia and citrulline, and the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes. Urea was not detected during arginine degradation, suggesting that the catabolism of arginine did not proceed via the arginase-catalyzed reaction, as has been suggested in some earlier studies. Detection of ammonia with Nessler's reagent was shown to be a simple, rapid test to assess the ability of wine lactic acid bacteria to degrade arginine, although in media containing relatively high concentrations (>0.5%) of fructose, ammonia formation is inhibited. PMID:16534912

  2. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of a Ureidoglycine Aminotransferase in the Klebsiella pneumoniae Uric Acid Catabolic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-09-03

    Many plants, fungi, and bacteria catabolize allantoin as a mechanism for nitrogen assimilation. Recent reports have shown that in plants and some bacteria the product of hydrolysis of allantoin by allantoinase is the unstable intermediate ureidoglycine. While this molecule can spontaneously decay, genetic analysis of some bacterial genomes indicates that an aminotransferase may be present in the pathway. Here we present evidence that Klebsiella pneumoniae HpxJ is an aminotransferase that preferentially converts ureidoglycine and an {alpha}-keto acid into oxalurate and the corresponding amino acid. We determined the crystal structure of HpxJ, allowing us to present an explanation for substrate specificity.

  3. Factors Affecting the Pathways of Glucose Catabolism and the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Pseudomonas natriegens

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H. W.; Eagon, R. G.

    1967-01-01

    Less than 50% of theoretical oxygen uptake was observed when glucose was dissimilated by resting cells of Pseudomonas natriegens. Low oxygen uptakes were also observed when a variety of other substrates were dissimilated. When uniformly labeled glucose-14C was used as substrate, 56% of the label was shown to accumulate in these resting cells. This material consisted, in part, of a polysaccharide which, although it did not give typical glycogen reactions, yielded glucose after its hydrolysis. Resting cells previously cultivated on media containing glucose completely catabolized glucose and formed a large amount of pyruvate within 30 min. Resting cells cultivated in the absence of glucose catabolized glucose more slowly and produced little pyruvate. Pyruvate disappeared after further incubation. In this latter case, experimental results suggested (i) that pyruvate was converted to other acidic products (e.g., acetate and lactate) and (ii) that pyruvate was further catabolized via the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Growth on glucose repressed the level of key enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and of lactic dehydrogenase. Growth on glycerol stimulated the level of these enzymes. A low level of isocitratase, but not malate synthetase, was noted in extracts of glucose-grown cells. Isocitric dehydrogenase was shown to require nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) as cofactor. Previous experiments have shown that reduced NADP (NADPH2) cannot be readily oxidized and that pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase could not be detected in extracts. It was concluded that acetate, lactate, and pyruvate accumulate under growing conditions when P. natriegens is cultivated on glucose (i) because of a rapid initial catabolism of glucose via an aerobic glycolytic pathway and (ii) because of a sluggishly functioning tricarboxylic acid cycle due to the accumulation of NADPH2 and to repressed levels of key enzymes. PMID:4381634

  4. White-to-brite conversion in human adipocytes promotes metabolic reprogramming towards fatty acid anabolic and catabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Barquissau, V.; Beuzelin, D.; Pisani, D.F.; Beranger, G.E.; Mairal, A.; Montagner, A.; Roussel, B.; Tavernier, G.; Marques, M.-A.; Moro, C.; Guillou, H.; Amri, E.-Z.; Langin, D.

    2016-01-01

    in PPARα-null mice displaying an impaired britening response. Conclusions Conversion of human white fat cells into brite adipocytes results in a major metabolic reprogramming inducing fatty acid anabolic and catabolic pathways. PDK4 redirects glucose from oxidation towards triglyceride synthesis and favors the use of fatty acids as energy source for uncoupling mitochondria. PMID:27110487

  5. Assignment of function to a domain of unknown function: DUF1537 is a new kinase family in catabolic pathways for acid sugars.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinshuai; Carter, Michael S; Vetting, Matthew W; San Francisco, Brian; Zhao, Suwen; Al-Obaidi, Nawar F; Solbiati, Jose O; Thiaville, Jennifer J; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Jacobson, Matthew P; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2016-07-19

    Using a large-scale "genomic enzymology" approach, we (i) assigned novel ATP-dependent four-carbon acid sugar kinase functions to members of the DUF1537 protein family (domain of unknown function; Pfam families PF07005 and PF17042) and (ii) discovered novel catabolic pathways for d-threonate, l-threonate, and d-erythronate. The experimentally determined ligand specificities of several solute binding proteins (SBPs) for TRAP (tripartite ATP-independent permease) transporters for four-carbon acids, including d-erythronate and l-erythronate, were used to constrain the substrates for the catabolic pathways that degrade the SBP ligands to intermediates in central carbon metabolism. Sequence similarity networks and genome neighborhood networks were used to identify the enzyme components of the pathways. Conserved genome neighborhoods encoded SBPs as well as permease components of the TRAP transporters, members of the DUF1537 family, and a member of the 4-hydroxy-l-threonine 4-phosphate dehydrogenase (PdxA) oxidative decarboxylase, class II aldolase, or ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, large subunit (RuBisCO) superfamily. Because the characterized substrates of members of the PdxA, class II aldolase, and RuBisCO superfamilies are phosphorylated, we postulated that the members of the DUF1537 family are novel ATP-dependent kinases that participate in catabolic pathways for four-carbon acid sugars. We determined that (i) the DUF1537/PdxA pair participates in a pathway for the conversion of d-threonate to dihydroxyacetone phosphate and CO2 and (ii) the DUF1537/class II aldolase pair participates in pathways for the conversion of d-erythronate and l-threonate (epimers at carbon-3) to dihydroxyacetone phosphate and CO2 The physiological importance of these pathways was demonstrated in vivo by phenotypic and genetic analyses. PMID:27402745

  6. A previously undescribed pathway for pyrimidine catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Kevin D.; Gyaneshwar, Prasad; Markenscoff Papadimitriou, Eirene; Fong, Rebecca; Kim, Kwang-Seo; Parales, Rebecca; Zhou, Zhongrui; Inwood, William; Kustu, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    The b1012 operon of Escherichia coli K-12, which is composed of seven unidentified ORFs, is one of the most highly expressed operons under control of nitrogen regulatory protein C. Examination of strains with lesions in this operon on Biolog Phenotype MicroArray (PM3) plates and subsequent growth tests indicated that they failed to use uridine or uracil as the sole nitrogen source and that the parental strain could use them at room temperature but not at 37°C. A strain carrying an ntrB(Con) mutation, which elevates transcription of genes under nitrogen regulatory protein C control, could also grow on thymidine as the sole nitrogen source, whereas strains with lesions in the b1012 operon could not. Growth-yield experiments indicated that both nitrogens of uridine and thymidine were available. Studies with [14C]uridine indicated that a three-carbon waste product from the pyrimidine ring was excreted. After trimethylsilylation and gas chromatography, the waste product was identified by mass spectrometry as 3-hydroxypropionic acid. In agreement with this finding, 2-methyl-3-hydroxypropionic acid was released from thymidine. Both the number of available nitrogens and the waste products distinguished the pathway encoded by the b1012 operon from pyrimidine catabolic pathways described previously. We propose that the genes of this operon be named rutA–G for pyrimidine utilization. The product of the divergently transcribed gene, b1013, is a tetracycline repressor family regulator that controls transcription of the b1012 operon negatively. PMID:16540542

  7. Structural Organization of Enzymes of the Phenylacetate Catabolic Hybrid Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Grishin, Andrey M.; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are the second most abundant class of molecules on the earth and frequent environmental pollutants. They are difficult to metabolize due to an inert chemical structure, and of all living organisms, only microbes have evolved biochemical pathways that can open an aromatic ring and catabolize thus formed organic molecules. In bacterial genomes, the phenylacetate (PA) utilization pathway is abundant and represents the central route for degradation of a variety of organic compounds, whose degradation reactions converge at this pathway. The PA pathway is a hybrid pathway and combines the dual features of aerobic metabolism, i.e., usage of both oxygen to open the aromatic ring and of anaerobic metabolism—coenzyme A derivatization of PA. This allows the degradation process to be adapted to fluctuating oxygen conditions. In this review we focus on the structural and functional aspects of enzymes and their complexes involved in the PA degradation by the catabolic hybrid pathway. We discuss the ability of the central PaaABCE monooxygenase to reversibly oxygenate PA, the controlling mechanisms of epoxide concentration by the pathway enzymes, and the similarity of the PA utilization pathway to the benzoate utilization Box pathway and β-oxidation of fatty acids. PMID:26075354

  8. Hepatic long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 5 mediates fatty acid channeling between anabolic and catabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bu, So Young; Mashek, Douglas G

    2010-11-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) and fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) activate fatty acids (FAs) to acyl-CoAs prior to their downstream metabolism. Of numerous ACSL and FATP isoforms, ACSL5 is expressed predominantly in tissues with high rates of triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis, suggesting it may have an anabolic role in lipid metabolism. To characterize the role of ACSL5 in hepatic energy metabolism, we used small interference RNA (siRNA) to knock down ACSL5 in rat primary hepatocytes. Compared with cells transfected with control siRNA, suppression of ACSL5 expression significantly decreased FA-induced lipid droplet formation. These findings were further extended with metabolic labeling studies showing that ACSL5 knockdown resulted in decreased [1-(14)C]oleic acid or acetic acid incorporation into intracellular TAG, phospholipids, and cholesterol esters without altering FA uptake or lipogenic gene expression. ACSL5 knockdown also decreased hepatic TAG secretion proportionate to the observed decrease in neutral lipid synthesis. ACSL5 knockdown did not alter lipid turnover or mediate the effects of insulin on lipid metabolism. Hepatocytes treated with ACSL5 siRNA had increased rates of FA oxidation without changing PPAR-α activity and target gene expression. These results suggest that ACSL5 activates and channels FAs toward anabolic pathways and, therefore, is an important branch point in hepatic FA metabolism. PMID:20798351

  9. Ribitol Catabolic Pathway in Klebsiella aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Charnetzky, W. T.; Mortlock, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    In Klebsiella aerogenes W70, there is an inducible pathway for the catabolism of ribitol consisting of at least two enzymes, ribitol dehydrogenase (RDH) and d-ribulokinase (DRK). These two enzymes are coordinately controlled and induced in response to d-ribulose, an intermediate of the pathway. Whereas wild-type K. aerogenes W70 are unable to utilize xylitol as a carbon and energy source, mutants constitutive for the ribitol pathway are able to utilize RDH to oxidize the unusual pentitol, xylitol, to d-xylulose. These mutants are able to grow on xylitol, presumably by utilization of the d-xylulose produced. Mutants constitutive for l-fucose isomerase can utilize the isomerase to convert d-arabinose to d-ribulose. In the presence of d-ribulose, RDH and DRK are induced, and such mutants are thus able to phosphorylate the d-ribulose by using the DRK of the ribitol pathway. Derivatives of an l-fucose isomerase-constitutive mutant were plated on d-arabinose, ribitol, and xylitol to select and identify mutations in the ribitol pathway. Using the transducing phage PW52, we were able to demonstrate genetic linkage of the loci involved. Three-point crosses, using constitutive mutants as donors and RDH−, DRK− double mutants as recipients and selecting for DRK+ transductants on d-arabinose, resulted in DRK+RDH+-constitutive, DRK+RDH+-inducible, and DRK+RDH−-inducible transductants but no detectable DRK+RDH− constitutive transductants, data consistent with the order rbtC-rbtD-rbtK, where rbtC is a control site and rbtD and rbtK correspond to the sites for the sites for the enzymes RDH and DRK, respectively. PMID:4366025

  10. Hyaluronic acid fragments enhance the inflammatory and catabolic response in human intervertebral disc cells through modulation of toll-like receptor 2 signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is characterized by extracellular matrix breakdown and is considered to be a primary cause of discogenic back pain. Although increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels within degenerating discs are associated with discogenic back pain, the mechanisms leading to their overproduction have not yet been elucidated. As fragmentation of matrix components occurs during IVD degeneration, we assessed the potential involvement of hyaluronic acid fragments (fHAs) in the induction of inflammatory and catabolic mediators. Methods Human IVD cells isolated from patient biopsies were stimulated with fHAs (6 to 12 disaccharides) and their effect on cytokine and matrix degrading enzyme production was assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The involvement of specific cell surface receptors and signal transduction pathways in mediating the effects of fHAs was tested using small interfering RNA (siRNA) approaches and kinase inhibition assays. Results Treatment of IVD cells with fHAs significantly increased mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and -13. The stimulatory effects of fHAs on IL-6 protein production were significantly impaired when added to IVD cells in combination with either Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 siRNA or a TLR2 neutralizing antibody. Furthermore, the ability of fHAs to enhance IL-6 and MMP-3 protein production was found to be dependent on the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling pathway. Conclusions These findings suggest that fHAs may have the potential to mediate IVD degeneration and discogenic back pain through activation of the TLR2 signaling pathway in resident IVD cells. PMID:23968377

  11. A Novel Testosterone Catabolic Pathway in Bacteria ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Yann-Lii; Wang, Po-Hsiang; Shiao, Ming-Shi; Ismail, Wael; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2011-01-01

    Forty years ago, Coulter and Talalay (A. W. Coulter and P. Talalay, J. Biol. Chem. 243:3238–3247, 1968) established the oxygenase-dependent pathway for the degradation of testosterone by aerobes. The oxic testosterone catabolic pathway involves several oxygen-dependent reactions and is not available for anaerobes. Since then, a variety of anaerobic bacteria have been described for the ability to degrade testosterone in the absence of oxygen. Here, a novel, oxygenase-independent testosterone catabolic pathway in such organisms is described. Steroidobacter denitrificansDSMZ18526 was shown to be capable of degrading testosterone in the absence of oxygen and was selected as the model organism in this study. In a previous investigation, we identified the initial intermediates involved in an anoxic testosterone catabolic pathway, most of which are identical to those of the oxic pathway demonstrated in Comamonas testosteroni. In this study, five additional intermediates of the anoxic pathway were identified. We demonstrated that subsequent steps of the anoxic pathway greatly differ from those of the established oxic pathway, which suggests that a novel pathway for testosterone catabolism is present. In the proposed anoxic pathway, a reduction reaction occurs at C-4 and C-5 of androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione, the last common intermediate of both the oxic and anoxic pathways. After that, a novel hydration reaction occurs and a hydroxyl group is thus introduced to the C-1α position of C19steroid substrates. To our knowledge, an enzymatic hydration reaction occurring at the A ring of steroid compounds has not been reported before. PMID:21725000

  12. Amino acid catabolism: a pivotal regulator of innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    McGaha, Tracy L.; Huang, Lei; Lemos, Henrique; Metz, Richard; Mautino, Mario; Prendergast, George C.; Mellor, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Enhanced amino acid catabolism is a common response to inflammation, but the immunologic significance of altered amino acid consumption remains unclear. The finding that tryptophan catabolism helped maintain fetal tolerance during pregnancy provided novel insights into the significance of amino acid metabolism in controlling immunity. Recent advances in identifying molecular pathways that enhance amino acid catabolism and downstream mechanisms that affect immune cells in response to inflammatory cues support the notion that amino acid catabolism regulates innate and adaptive immune cells in pathologic settings. Cells expressing enzymes that degrade amino acids modulate antigen-presenting cell and lymphocyte functions and reveal critical roles for amino acid- and catabolite-sensing pathways in controlling gene expression, functions, and survival of immune cells. Basal amino acid catabolism may contribute to immune homeostasis that prevents autoimmunity, whereas elevated amino acid catalytic activity may reinforce immune suppression to promote tumorigenesis and persistence of some pathogens that cause chronic infections. For these reasons, there is considerable interest in generating novel drugs that inhibit or induce amino acid consumption and target downstream molecular pathways that control immunity. In this review, we summarize recent developments and highlight novel concepts and key outstanding questions in this active research field. PMID:22889220

  13. A highly conserved mycobacterial cholesterol catabolic pathway

    PubMed Central

    García-Fernández, Esther; Frank, Daniel J.; Galán, Beatriz; Kells, Petrea M.; Podust, Larissa M.; García, José L.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Degradation of the cholesterol side-chain in M. tuberculosis is initiated by two cytochromes P450, CYP125A1 and CYP142A1, that sequentially oxidize C26 to the alcohol, aldehyde and acid metabolites. Here we report characterization of the homologous enzymes CYP125A3 and CYP142A2 from M. smegmatis mc2 155. Heterologously expressed, purified CYP125A3 and CYP142A2 bound cholesterol, 4-cholesten-3-one, and antifungal azole drugs. CYP125A3 or CYP142A2 reconstituted with spinach ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase efficiently hydroxylated 4-cholesten-3-one to the C-26 alcohol and subsequently to the acid. The X-ray structures of both substrate-free CYP125A3 and CYP142A2 and of cholest-4-en-3-one-bound CYP142A2 reveal significant differences in the substrate binding sites compared with the homologous M. tuberculosis proteins. Deletion of cyp125A3 or cyp142A2 does not impair growth of M. smegmatis mc2 155 on cholesterol. However, deletion only of cyp125A3 causes a reduction of both the alcohol and acid metabolites and a strong induction of cyp142 at the mRNA and protein levels, indicating that CYP142A2 serves as a functionally redundant back up enzyme for CYP125A3. In contrast to M. tuberculosis, the M. smegmatis Δcyp125Δcyp142 double mutant retains its ability to grow on cholesterol albeit with a diminished capacity, indicating an additional level of redundancy within its genome. PMID:23489718

  14. Metabolic engineering of Pediococcus acidilactici BD16 for production of vanillin through ferulic acid catabolic pathway and process optimization using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baljinder; Chakraborty, Debkumar; Kumar, Balvir

    2014-10-01

    Occurrence of feruloyl-CoA synthetase (fcs) and enoyl-CoA hydratase (ech) genes responsible for the bioconversion of ferulic acid to vanillin have been reported and characterized from Amycolatopsis sp., Streptomyces sp., and Pseudomonas sp. Attempts have been made to express these genes in Escherichia coli DH5α, E. coli JM109, and Pseudomonas fluorescens. However, none of the lactic acid bacteria strain having GRAS status was previously proposed for heterologous expression of fcs and ech genes for production of vanillin through biotechnological process. Present study reports heterologous expression of vanillin synthetic gene cassette bearing fcs and ech genes in a dairy isolate Pediococcus acidilactici BD16. After metabolic engineering, statistical optimization of process parameters that influence ferulic acid to vanillin biotransformation in the recombinant strain was carried out using central composite design of response surface methodology. After scale-up of the process, 3.14 mM vanillin was recovered from 1.08 mM ferulic acid per milligram of recombinant cell biomass within 20 min of biotransformation. From LCMS-ESI spectral analysis, a metabolic pathway of phenolic biotransformations was predicted in the recombinant P. acidilactici BD16 (fcs (+)/ech (+)). PMID:25077778

  15. Branched chain amino acid catabolism fuels adipocyte differentiation and lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Green, Courtney R.; Wallace, Martina; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Phillips, Susan A.; Murphy, Anne N.; Ciaraldi, Theodore P.; Metallo, Christian M.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays important roles in regulating carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis, though less is known about the regulation of amino acid metabolism in adipocytes. Here we applied isotope tracing to pre–adipocytes and differentiated adipocytes to quantify the contributions of different substrates to tricarboxylic acid metabolism and lipogenesis. In contrast to proliferating cells that use glucose and glutamine for acetyl–coenzyme A (AcCoA) generation, differentiated adipocytes increased branched chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolic flux such that leucine and isoleucine from media and/or protein catabolism accounted for as much as 30% of lipogenic AcCoA pools. Medium cobalamin deficiency caused methylmalonic acid accumulation and odd–chain fatty acid synthesis. B12 supplementation reduced these metabolites and altered the balance of substrates entering mitochondria. Finally, inhibition of BCAA catabolism compromised adipogenesis. These results quantitatively highlight the contribution of BCAAs to adipocyte metabolism and suggest that BCAA catabolism plays a functional role in adipocyte differentiation. PMID:26571352

  16. The genomes of the South American opossum (Monodelphis domestica) and platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) encode a more complete purine catabolic pathway than placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Keebaugh, Alaine C; Thomas, James W

    2009-09-01

    The end product of purine catabolism varies amongst vertebrates and is a consequence of independent gene inactivation events that have truncated the purine catabolic pathway. Mammals have traditionally been grouped into two classes based on their end product of purine catabolism: most mammals, whose end product is allantoin due to an ancient loss of allantoinase (ALLN), and the hominoids, whose end product is uric acid due to recent inactivations of urate oxidase (UOX). However little is known about purine catabolism in marsupials and monotremes. Here we report the results of a comparative genomics study designed to characterize the purine catabolic pathway in a marsupial, the South American opossum (Monodelphis domestica), and a monotreme, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). We found that both genomes encode a more complete set of genes for purine catabolism than do eutherians and conclude that a near complete purine catabolic pathway was present in the common ancestor of all mammals, and that the loss of ALLN is specific to placental mammals. Our results therefore provide a revised history for gene loss in the purine catabolic pathway and suggest that marsupials and monotremes represent a third class of mammals with respect to their end products of purine catabolism. PMID:20161190

  17. Metabolic Signature of Sun Exposed Skin Suggests Catabolic Pathway Overweighs Anabolic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Manpreet; Sangar, Vineet; Tucker-Samaras, Samantha; Southall, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Skin chronically exposed to sun results in phenotypic changes referred as photoaging. This aspect of aging has been studied extensively through genomic and proteomic tools. Metabolites, the end product are generated as a result of biochemical reactions are often studied as a culmination of complex interplay of gene and protein expression. In this study, we focused exclusively on the metabolome to study effects from sun-exposed and sun-protected skin sites from 25 human subjects. We generated a highly accurate metabolomic signature for the skin that is exposed to sun. Biochemical pathway analysis from this data set showed that sun-exposed skin resides under high oxidative stress and the chains of reactions to produce these metabolites are inclined toward catabolism rather than anabolism. These catabolic activities persuade the skin cells to generate metabolites through the salvage pathway instead of de novo synthesis pathways. Metabolomic profile suggests catabolic pathways and reactive oxygen species operate in a feed forward fashion to alter the biology of sun exposed skin. PMID:24603693

  18. Characterization of a Unique Pathway for 4-Cresol Catabolism Initiated by Phosphorylation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Du, Lei; Ma, Li; Qi, Feifei; Zheng, Xianliang; Jiang, Chengying; Li, Ailei; Wan, Xiaobo; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Li, Shengying

    2016-03-18

    4-Cresol is not only a significant synthetic intermediate for production of many aromatic chemicals, but also a priority environmental pollutant because of its toxicity to higher organisms. In our previous studies, a gene cluster implicated to be involved in 4-cresol catabolism, creCDEFGHIR, was identified in Corynebacterium glutamicum and partially characterized in vivo. In this work, we report on the discovery of a novel 4-cresol biodegradation pathway that employs phosphorylated intermediates. This unique pathway initiates with the phosphorylation of the hydroxyl group of 4-cresol, which is catalyzed by a novel 4-methylbenzyl phosphate synthase, CreHI. Next, a unique class I P450 system, CreJEF, specifically recognizes phosphorylated intermediates and successively oxidizes the aromatic methyl group into carboxylic acid functionality via alcohol and aldehyde intermediates. Moreover, CreD (phosphohydrolase), CreC (alcohol dehydrogenase), and CreG (aldehyde dehydrogenase) were also found to be required for efficient oxidative transformations in this pathway. Steady-state kinetic parameters (Km and kcat) for each catabolic step were determined, and these results suggest that kinetic controls serve a key role in directing the metabolic flux to the most energy effective route. PMID:26817843

  19. Novel Pathway of Toluene Catabolism in the Trichloroethylene-Degrading Bacterium G4

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Malcolm S.; Montgomery, Stacy O.; Chapman, Peter J.; Cuskey, Stephen M.; Pritchard, P. H.

    1989-01-01

    o-Cresol and 3-methylcatechol were identified as successive transitory intermediates of toluene catabolism by the trichloroethylene-degrading bacterium G4. The absence of a toluene dihydrodiol intermediate or toluene dioxygenase and toluene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase activities suggested that G4 catabolizes toluene by a unique pathway. Formation of a hybrid species of 18O- and 16O-labeled 3-methylcatechol from toluene in an atmosphere of 18O2 and 16O2 established that G4 catabolizes toluene by successive monooxygenations at the ortho and meta positions. Detection of trace amounts of 4-methylcatechol from toluene catabolism suggested that the initial hydroxylation of toluene was not exclusively at the ortho position. Further catabolism of 3-methylcatechol was found to proceed via catechol-2,3-dioxygenase and hydroxymuconic semialdehyde hydrolase activities. PMID:16347956

  20. Insights into the evolution of sialic acid catabolism among bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Boyd, E Fidelma

    2009-01-01

    Background Sialic acids comprise a family of nine-carbon amino sugars that are prevalent in mucus rich environments. Sialic acids from the human host are used by a number of pathogens as an energy source. Here we explore the evolution of the genes involved in the catabolism of sialic acid. Results The cluster of genes encoding the enzymes N-acetylneuraminate lyase (NanA), epimerase (NanE), and kinase (NanK), necessary for the catabolism of sialic acid (the Nan cluster), are confined 46 bacterial species, 42 of which colonize mammals, 33 as pathogens and 9 as gut commensals. We found a putative sialic acid transporter associated with the Nan cluster in most species. We reconstructed the phylogenetic history of the NanA, NanE, and NanK proteins from the 46 species and compared them to the species tree based on 16S rRNA. Within the NanA phylogeny, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria do not form distinct clades. NanA from Yersinia and Vibrio species was most closely related to the NanA clade from eukaryotes. To examine this further, we reconstructed the phylogeny of all NanA homologues in the databases. In this analysis of 83 NanA sequences, Bacteroidetes, a human commensal group formed a distinct clade with Verrucomicrobia, and branched with the Eukaryotes and the Yersinia/Vibrio clades. We speculate that pathogens such as V. cholerae may have acquired NanA from a commensal aiding their colonization of the human gut. Both the NanE and NanK phylogenies more closely represented the species tree but numerous incidences of incongruence are noted. We confirmed the predicted function of the sialic acid catabolism cluster in members the major intestinal pathogens Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, V. vulnificus, Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. pestis. Conclusion The Nan cluster among bacteria is confined to human pathogens and commensals conferring them the ability to utilize a ubiquitous carbon source in mucus rich surfaces of the human body. The Nan region shows a

  1. Volatile sulphur compounds and pathways of L-methionine catabolism in Williopsis yeasts.

    PubMed

    Tan, Amelia W J; Lee, Pin-Rou; Seow, Yi-Xin; Ong, Peter K C; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2012-08-01

    Volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs) are important to the food industry due to their high potency and presence in many foods. This study assessed for the first time VSC production and pathways of L: -methionine catabolism in yeasts from the genus Williopsis with a view to understanding VSC formation and their potential flavour impact. Five strains of Williopsis saturnus (var. saturnus, var. subsufficiens, var. suavolens, var. sargentensis and var. mrakii) were screened for VSC production in a synthetic medium supplemented with L: -methionine. A diverse range of VSCs were produced including dimethyl disulphide, dimethyl trisulphide, 3-(methylthio)-1-propanal (methional), 3-(methylthio)-1-propanol (methionol), 3-(methylthio)-1-propene, 3-(methylthio)-1-propyl acetate, 3-(methylthio)-1-propanoic acid (methionic acid) and ethyl 3-(methylthio)-1-propanoate, though the production of these VSCs varied between yeast strains. W. saturnus var. saturnus NCYC22 was selected for further studies due to its relatively high VSC production. VSC production was characterised step-wise with yeast strain NCYC22 in coconut cream at different L: -methionine concentrations (0.00-0.20%) and under various inorganic sulphate (0.00-0.20%) and nitrogen (ammonia) supplementation (0.00-0.20%), respectively. Optimal VSC production was obtained with 0.1% of L: -methionine, while supplementation of sulphate had no significant effect. Nitrogen supplementation showed a dramatic inhibitory effect on VSC production. Based on the production of VSCs, the study suggests that the Ehrlich pathway of L: -methionine catabolism is operative in W. saturnus yeasts and can be manipulated by adjusting certain nutrient parameters to control VSC production. PMID:22370952

  2. Interaction between glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-leucine catabolic enzymes: intersecting metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Susan M; Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) catabolism follows sequential reactions and their metabolites intersect with other metabolic pathways. The initial enzymes in BCAA metabolism, the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm), which deaminates the BCAAs to branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKAs); and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), which oxidatively decarboxylates the BCKAs, are organized in a supramolecular complex termed metabolon. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1) is found in the metabolon in rat tissues. Bovine GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP)-form of human BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-BCATm in vitro. This protein interaction facilitates reamination of the α-ketoglutarate (αKG) product of the GDH1 oxidative deamination reaction. Human GDH1 appears to act like bovine GDH1 but human GDH2 does not show the same enhancement of BCKDC enzyme activities. Another metabolic enzyme is also found in the metabolon is pyruvate carboxylase (PC). Kinetic results suggest that PC binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC but does not effect BCAA catabolism. The protein interaction of BCATm and GDH1 promotes regeneration of PLP-BCATm which then binds to BCKDC resulting in channeling of the BCKA products from BCATm first half reaction to E1 and promoting BCAA oxidation and net nitrogen transfer from BCAAs. The cycling of nitrogen through glutamate via the actions of BCATm and GDH1 releases free ammonia. Formation of ammonia may be important for astrocyte glutamine synthesis in the central nervous system. In peripheral tissue association of BCATm and GDH1 would promote BCAA oxidation at physiologically relevant BCAA concentrations. PMID:21621574

  3. Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation Restrains Systemic Catabolism during Starvation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Scafidi, Susanna; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2016-06-28

    The liver is critical for maintaining systemic energy balance during starvation. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation on this process, we generated mice with a liver-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (Cpt2(L-/-)), an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. Fasting induced hepatic steatosis and serum dyslipidemia with an absence of circulating ketones, while blood glucose remained normal. Systemic energy homeostasis was largely maintained in fasting Cpt2(L-/-) mice by adaptations in hepatic and systemic oxidative gene expression mediated in part by Pparα target genes including procatabolic hepatokines Fgf21, Gdf15, and Igfbp1. Feeding a ketogenic diet to Cpt2(L-/-) mice resulted in severe hepatomegaly, liver damage, and death with a complete absence of adipose triglyceride stores. These data show that hepatic fatty acid oxidation is not required for survival during acute food deprivation but essential for constraining adipocyte lipolysis and regulating systemic catabolism when glucose is limiting. PMID:27320917

  4. d-Amino Acid Catabolism Is Common Among Soil-Dwelling Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Radkov, Atanas D; McNeill, Katlyn; Uda, Koji; Moe, Luke A

    2016-01-01

    Soil and rhizosphere environments were examined in order to determine the identity and relative abundance of bacteria that catabolize d- and l-amino acids as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. All substrates were readily catabolized by bacteria from both environments, with most d-amino acids giving similar CFU counts to their l-amino acid counterparts. CFU count ratios between l- and d-amino acids typically ranged between 2 and 1. Isolates were phylogenetically typed in order to determine the identity of d-amino acid catabolizers. Actinobacteria, specifically the Arthrobacter genus, were abundant along with members of the α- and β-Proteobacteria classes. PMID:27169790

  5. D-Amino Acid Catabolism Is Common Among Soil-Dwelling Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Radkov, Atanas D; McNeill, Katlyn; Uda, Koji; Moe, Luke A

    2016-06-25

    Soil and rhizosphere environments were examined in order to determine the identity and relative abundance of bacteria that catabolize d- and l-amino acids as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. All substrates were readily catabolized by bacteria from both environments, with most d-amino acids giving similar CFU counts to their l-amino acid counterparts. CFU count ratios between l- and d-amino acids typically ranged between 2 and 1. Isolates were phylogenetically typed in order to determine the identity of d-amino acid catabolizers. Actinobacteria, specifically the Arthrobacter genus, were abundant along with members of the α- and β-Proteobacteria classes. PMID:27169790

  6. Comparative genomics and functional analysis of rhamnose catabolic pathways and regulons in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing; Thiel, Vera; Stolyar, Sergey; Stanton, Krista; Fredrickson, James K.; Bryant, Donald A.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Best, Aaron A.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2013-01-01

    L-rhamnose (L-Rha) is a deoxy-hexose sugar commonly found in nature. L-Rha catabolic pathways were previously characterized in various bacteria including Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, homology searches failed to recognize all the genes for the complete L-Rha utilization pathways in diverse microbial species involved in biomass decomposition. Moreover, the regulatory mechanisms of L-Rha catabolism have remained unclear in most species. A comparative genomics approach was used to reconstruct the L-Rha catabolic pathways and transcriptional regulons in the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Thermotogae. The reconstructed pathways include multiple novel enzymes and transporters involved in the utilization of L-Rha and L-Rha-containing polymers. Large-scale regulon inference using bioinformatics revealed remarkable variations in transcriptional regulators for L-Rha utilization genes among bacteria. A novel bifunctional enzyme, L-rhamnulose-phosphate aldolase (RhaE) fused to L-lactaldehyde dehydrogenase (RhaW), which is not homologous to previously characterized L-Rha catabolic enzymes, was identified in diverse bacteria including Chloroflexi, Bacilli, and Alphaproteobacteria. By using in vitro biochemical assays we validated both enzymatic activities of the purified recombinant RhaEW proteins from Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Bacillus subtilis. Another novel enzyme of the L-Rha catabolism, L-lactaldehyde reductase (RhaZ), was identified in Gammaproteobacteria and experimentally validated by in vitro enzymatic assays using the recombinant protein from Salmonella typhimurium. C. aurantiacus induced transcription of the predicted L-Rha utilization genes when L-Rha was present in the growth medium and consumed L-Rha from the medium. This study provided comprehensive insights to L-Rha catabolism and its regulation in diverse Bacteria. PMID:24391637

  7. An Oxygenase-Independent Cholesterol Catabolic Pathway Operates under Oxic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Wael; Tsai, Ching-Yen; Lin, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Yu-Wen; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol is one of the most ubiquitous compounds in nature. The 9,10-seco-pathway for the aerobic degradation of cholesterol was established thirty years ago. This pathway is characterized by the extensive use of oxygen and oxygenases for substrate activation and ring fission. The classical pathway was the only catabolic pathway adopted by all studies on cholesterol-degrading bacteria. Sterolibacterium denitrificans can degrade cholesterol regardless of the presence of oxygen. Here, we aerobically grew the model organism with 13C-labeled cholesterol, and substrate consumption and intermediate production were monitored over time. Based on the detected 13C-labeled intermediates, this study proposes an alternative cholesterol catabolic pathway. This alternative pathway differs from the classical 9,10-seco-pathway in numerous important aspects. First, substrate activation proceeds through anaerobic C-25 hydroxylation and subsequent isomerization to form 26-hydroxycholest-4-en-3-one. Second, after the side chain degradation, the resulting androgen intermediate is activated by adding water to the C-1/C-2 double bond. Third, the cleavage of the core ring structure starts at the A-ring via a hydrolytic mechanism. The 18O-incorporation experiments confirmed that water is the sole oxygen donor in this catabolic pathway. PMID:23826110

  8. Dissection of the bifunctional ARGRII protein involved in the regulation of arginine anabolic and catabolic pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Qui, H F; Dubois, E; Messenguy, F

    1991-01-01

    ARGRII is a regulatory protein which regulates the arginine anabolic and catabolic pathways in combination with ARGRI and ARGRIII. We have investigated, by deletion analysis and fusion to LexA protein, the different domains of ARGRII protein. In contrast to other yeast regulatory proteins, 92% of ARGRII is necessary for its anabolic repression function and 80% is necessary for its catabolic activator function. We can define three domains in this protein: a putative DNA-binding domain containing a zinc finger motif, a region more involved in the repression activity located around the RNase-like sequence, and a large activation domain. Images PMID:2005903

  9. Prediction and Biochemical Demonstration of a Catabolic Pathway for the Osmoprotectant Proline Betaine

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ritesh; Zhao, Suwen; Vetting, Matthew W.; Wood, B. McKay; Sakai, Ayano; Cho, Kyuil; Solbiati, José; Almo, Steven C.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Gerlt, John A.; Cronan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Through the use of genetic, enzymatic, metabolomic, and structural analyses, we have discovered the catabolic pathway for proline betaine, an osmoprotectant, in Paracoccus denitrificans and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Genetic and enzymatic analyses showed that several of the key enzymes of the hydroxyproline betaine degradation pathway also function in proline betaine degradation. Metabolomic analyses detected each of the metabolic intermediates of the pathway. The proline betaine catabolic pathway was repressed by osmotic stress and cold stress, and a regulatory transcription factor was identified. We also report crystal structure complexes of the P. denitrificans HpbD hydroxyproline betaine epimerase/proline betaine racemase with l-proline betaine and cis-hydroxyproline betaine. PMID:24520058

  10. Integrated Response to Inducers by Communication between a Catabolic Pathway and Its Regulatory System▿

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pérez, Olga; López-Sánchez, Aroa; Reyes-Ramírez, Francisca; Floriano, Belén; Santero, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    Efficient gene regulation of metabolic pathways implies that the profile of molecules inducing the pathway matches that of the molecules that are metabolized. Gratuitous induction, a well-known phenomenon in catabolic pathways, is the consequence of differences in the substrate and inducer profiles. This phenomenon is particularly evident in pathways for biodegradation of organic contaminants that can be induced by a variety of molecules similar to the real substrates. Analysis of the regulation of tetralin biodegradation genes in mutant strains with mutations that affect each component of the initial dioxygenase enzymatic complex indicated that the response of the regulatory system to potential inducers is altered differently depending on the mutated component. Based on the expression phenotypes of a number of single or double mutants, we propose a model that represents an unprecedented way of communication between a catabolic pathway and its regulatory system to prevent efficient induction by a molecule that is not a real substrate. This communication allows a better fit of the substrate and inducer profiles, thus minimizing gratuitous induction, without a requirement for optimal coevolution to match the specificity of catabolic enzymes and their regulatory systems. Modulation of the regulatory system in this way not only provides a more appropriate response to potential inducers recognized by the regulatory system but also may properly adjust the levels of gene expression to the substrate availability. PMID:17351041

  11. Summer-to-Winter Phenotypic Flexibility of Fatty Acid Transport and Catabolism in Skeletal Muscle and Heart of Small Birds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufeng; King, Marisa O; Harmon, Erin; Swanson, David L

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged shivering in birds is mainly fueled by lipids. Consequently, lipid transport and catabolism are vital for thermogenic performance and could be upregulated along with thermogenic capacity as part of the winter phenotype. We investigated summer-to-winter variation in lipid transport and catabolism by measuring mRNA expression, protein levels, and enzyme activities for several key steps of lipid transport and catabolic pathways in pectoralis muscle and heart in two small temperate-zone resident birds, American goldfinches (Spinus tristis) and black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus). Cytosolic fatty acid binding protein (FABPc; a key component of intramyocyte lipid transport) mRNA and/or protein levels were generally higher in winter for pectoralis muscle and heart for both species. However, seasonal variation in plasma membrane lipid transporters, fatty acyl translocase, and plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein in pectoralis and heart differed between the two species, with winter increases for chickadees and seasonal stability or summer increases for goldfinches. Catabolic enzyme activities generally showed limited seasonal differences for both tissues and both species. These data suggest that FABPc is an important target of upregulation for the winter phenotype in pectoralis and heart of both species. Plasma membrane lipid transporters and lipid catabolic capacity were also elevated in winter for chickadees but not for goldfinches. Because the two species show differential regulation of distinct aspects of lipid transport and catabolism, these data are consistent with other recent studies documenting that different bird species or populations employ a variety of strategies to promote elevated winter thermogenic capacity. PMID:26658250

  12. The Steroid Catabolic Pathway of the Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi Is Important for Pathogenesis and a Target for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    van der Geize, R.; Grommen, A. W. F.; Hessels, G. I.; Jacobs, A. A. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes fatal pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and immunocompromised animals and humans. Despite its importance, there is currently no effective vaccine against the disease. The actinobacteria R. equi and the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis are related, and both cause pulmonary diseases. Recently, we have shown that essential steps in the cholesterol catabolic pathway are involved in the pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a similar cholesterol catabolic gene cluster in R. equi. Orthologs of predicted M. tuberculosis virulence genes located within this cluster, i.e. ipdA (rv3551), ipdB (rv3552), fadA6 and fadE30, were identified in R. equi RE1 and inactivated. The ipdA and ipdB genes of R. equi RE1 appear to constitute the α-subunit and β-subunit, respectively, of a heterodimeric coenzyme A transferase. Mutant strains RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, were impaired in growth on the steroid catabolic pathway intermediates 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD) and 3aα-H-4α(3′-propionic acid)-5α-hydroxy-7aβ-methylhexahydro-1-indanone (5α-hydroxy-methylhexahydro-1-indanone propionate; 5OH-HIP). Interestingly, RE1ΔipdAB and RE1ΔfadE30, but not RE1ΔfadA6, also displayed an attenuated phenotype in a macrophage infection assay. Gene products important for growth on 5OH-HIP, as part of the steroid catabolic pathway, thus appear to act as factors involved in the pathogenicity of R. equi. Challenge experiments showed that RE1ΔipdAB could be safely administered intratracheally to 2 to 5 week-old foals and oral immunization of foals even elicited a substantial protective immunity against a virulent R. equi strain. Our data show that genes involved in steroid catabolism are promising targets for the development of a live-attenuated vaccine against R. equi infections. PMID:21901092

  13. Activation and inactivation of Pseudomonas stutzeri methylbenzene catabolism pathways mediated by a transposable element

    SciTech Connect

    Bolognese, F.; Di Lecce, C.; Galli, E.; Barbieri, P.

    1999-05-01

    The arrangement of the genes involved in o-xylene, m-xylene, and p-xylene catabolism was investigated in three Pseudomonas stutzeri strains: the wild-type strain OX1, which is able to grow on o-xylene but not on the meta and para isomers; the mutant M1, which grows on m-xylene and p-xylene but is unable to utilize the ortho isomer; and the revertant R1, which can utilize all the three isomers of xylene. A 3-kb insertion sequence (IS) termed ISPs1, which inactivates the m-xylene and p-xylene catabolic pathway in P. stutzeri OX1 and the o-xylene catabolic genes in P. stutzeri M1, was detected. No IS was detected in the corresponding catabolic regions of the P. stutzeri R1 genome. ISPs1 is present in several copies in the genomes of the three strains. It is flanked by 24-bp imperfect inverted repeats, causes the direct duplication of 8 bp in the target DNA, and seems to be related to the ISL3 family.

  14. A functional myo-inositol catabolism pathway is essential for rhizopine utilization by Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, M P; Feng, S F; Borneman, J; Triplett, E W; de Bruijn, F J; Rossbach, S

    1998-10-01

    Rhizopine (L-3-O-methyl-scyllo-inosamine) is a symbiosis-specific compound found in alfalfa nodules induced by specific Sinorhizobium meliloti strains. It has been postulated that rhizobial strains able to synthesize and catabolize rhizopine gain a competitive advantage in the rhizosphere. The pathway of rhizopine degradation is analysed here. Since rhizopine is an inositol derivative, it was tested whether inositol catabolism is involved in rhizopine utilization. A genetic locus required for the catabolism of inositol as sole carbon source was cloned from S. meliloti. This locus was delimited by transposon Tn5 mutagenesis and its DNA sequence was determined. Based on DNA similarity studies and enzyme assays, this genetic region was shown to encode an S. meliloti myo-inositol dehydrogenase. Strains that harboured a mutation in the myo-inositol dehydrogenase gene (idhA) did not display myo-inositol dehydrogenase activity, were unable to utilize myo-inositol as sole carbon/energy source, and were unable to catabolize rhizopine. Thus, myo-inositol dehydrogenase activity is essential for rhizopine utilization in S. meliloti. PMID:9802033

  15. Pathway-Level Acceleration of Glycogen Catabolism by a Response Regulator in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis Species PCC 68031[W

    PubMed Central

    Osanai, Takashi; Oikawa, Akira; Numata, Keiji; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Doi, Yoshiharu; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2014-01-01

    Response regulators of two-component systems play pivotal roles in the transcriptional regulation of responses to environmental signals in bacteria. Rre37, an OmpR-type response regulator, is induced by nitrogen depletion in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis species PCC 6803. Microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that genes related to sugar catabolism and nitrogen metabolism were up-regulated by rre37 overexpression. Protein levels of GlgP(slr1367), one of the two glycogen phosphorylases, in the rre37-overexpressing strain were higher than those of the parental wild-type strain under both nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions. Glycogen amounts decreased to less than one-tenth by rre37 overexpression under nitrogen-replete conditions. Metabolome analysis revealed that metabolites of the sugar catabolic pathway and amino acids were altered in the rre37-overexpressing strain after nitrogen depletion. These results demonstrate that Rre37 is a pathway-level regulator that activates the metabolic flow from glycogen to polyhydroxybutyrate and the hybrid tricarboxylic acid and ornithine cycle, unraveling the mechanism of the transcriptional regulation of primary metabolism in this unicellular cyanobacterium. PMID:24521880

  16. The putrescine biosynthesis pathway in Lactococcus lactis is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression, mediated by CcpA.

    PubMed

    Linares, Daniel M; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2013-07-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterium most widely used by the dairy industry as a starter for the manufacture of fermented products such as cheese and buttermilk. However, some strains produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The proteins involved in this pathway, including those necessary for agmatine uptake and conversion into putrescine, are encoded by the aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC genes, which together form an operon. This paper reports the mechanism of regulation of putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis. It is shown that the aguBDAC operon, which contains a cre site at the promoter of aguB (the first gene of the operon), is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) mediated by the catabolite control protein CcpA. PMID:23688550

  17. N2-Succinylated intermediates in an arginine catabolic pathway of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Alfred; Stalon, Victor; Wauven, Corinne Vander; Leisinger, Thomas; Haas, Dieter

    1986-01-01

    Arginine-nonutilizing (aru) mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO converted L-arginine to N2-succinylarginine or N-succinylglutamate, which were identified by high-voltage electrophoresis and HPLC. Addition of aminooxyacetate, an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzymes, to resting cells of the wild-type PAO1 in arginine medium led to the accumulation of N2-succinylornithine. Enzyme assays with crude P. aeruginosa extracts established the following pathway: L-arginine + succinyl-CoA → N2-succinylarginine → N2-succinylornithine → N_succinylglutamate 5-semialdehyde → N-succinylglutamate → succinate + glutamate. Succinyl-CoA may be regenerated from glutamate via 2-ketoglutarate. L-Arginine induced the enzymes of the pathway, and succinate caused catabolite repression. Purified N2-acetylornithine 5-aminotransferase (N2-acetyl-L-ornithine: 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.11), an arginine biosynthetic enzyme, efficiently transaminated N2-succinylornithine; this explains the enzyme's dual role in arginine biosynthesis and catabolism. The succinylarginine pathway enables P. aeruginosa to utilize arginine efficiently as a carbon source under aerobic conditions, whereas the other three arginine catabolic pathways previously established in P. aeruginosa fulfill different functions. Images PMID:16593724

  18. An l-glucose Catabolic Pathway in Paracoccus Species 43P*

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Tetsu; Takaya, Naoki; Nakamura, Akira

    2012-01-01

    An l-glucose-utilizing bacterium, Paracoccus sp. 43P, was isolated from soil by enrichment cultivation in a minimal medium containing l-glucose as the sole carbon source. In cell-free extracts from this bacterium, NAD+-dependent l-glucose dehydrogenase was detected as having sole activity toward l-glucose. This enzyme, LgdA, was purified, and the lgdA gene was found to be located in a cluster of putative inositol catabolic genes. LgdA showed similar dehydrogenase activity toward scyllo- and myo-inositols. l-Gluconate dehydrogenase activity was also detected in cell-free extracts, which represents the reaction product of LgdA activity toward l-glucose. Enzyme purification and gene cloning revealed that the corresponding gene resides in a nine-gene cluster, the lgn cluster, which may participate in aldonate incorporation and assimilation. Kinetic and reaction product analysis of each gene product in the cluster indicated that they sequentially metabolize l-gluconate to glycolytic intermediates, d-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and pyruvate through reactions of C-5 epimerization by dehydrogenase/reductase, dehydration, phosphorylation, and aldolase reaction, using a pathway similar to l-galactonate catabolism in Escherichia coli. Gene disruption studies indicated that the identified genes are responsible for l-glucose catabolism. PMID:23038265

  19. Branched-chain amino acid catabolism fuels adipocyte differentiation and lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Green, Courtney R; Wallace, Martina; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Phillips, Susan A; Murphy, Anne N; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Metallo, Christian M

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays important roles in regulating carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis, but less is known about the regulation of amino acid metabolism in adipocytes. Here we applied isotope tracing to pre-adipocytes and differentiated adipocytes to quantify the contributions of different substrates to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolism and lipogenesis. In contrast to proliferating cells, which use glucose and glutamine for acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) generation, differentiated adipocytes showed increased branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolic flux such that leucine and isoleucine from medium and/or from protein catabolism accounted for as much as 30% of lipogenic AcCoA pools. Medium cobalamin deficiency caused methylmalonic acid accumulation and odd-chain fatty acid synthesis. Vitamin B12 supplementation reduced these metabolites and altered the balance of substrates entering mitochondria. Finally, inhibition of BCAA catabolism compromised adipogenesis. These results quantitatively highlight the contribution of BCAAs to adipocyte metabolism and suggest that BCAA catabolism has a functional role in adipocyte differentiation. PMID:26571352

  20. Acetone formation in the Vibrio family: a new pathway for bacterial leucine catabolism.

    PubMed

    Nemecek-Marshall, M; Wojciechowski, C; Wagner, W P; Fall, R

    1999-12-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of L-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed that acetone was produced after a lag in late logarithmic or stationary phase of growth, depending on the medium, and was not derived from acetoacetate by nonenzymatic decarboxylation in the medium. L-Leucine, but not D-leucine, was converted to acetone with a stoichiometry of approximately 0.61 mol of acetone per mol of L-leucine. Testing various potential leucine catabolites as precursors of acetone showed that only alpha-ketoisocaproate was efficiently converted by whole cells to acetone. Acetone production was blocked by a nitrogen atmosphere but not by electron transport inhibitors, suggesting that an oxygen-dependent reaction is required for leucine catabolism. Metabolic labeling with deuterated (isopropyl-d(7))-L-leucine revealed that the isopropyl carbons give rise to acetone with full retention of deuterium in each methyl group. These results suggest the operation of a new catabolic pathway for leucine in vibrios that is distinct from the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A pathway seen in pseudomonads. PMID:10601206

  1. Genetic Examination of Initial Amino Acid Oxidation and Glutamate Catabolism in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis

    PubMed Central

    Yokooji, Yuusuke; Sato, Takaaki; Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid catabolism in Thermococcales is presumed to proceed via three steps: oxidative deamination of amino acids by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) or aminotransferases, oxidative decarboxylation by 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (KOR), and hydrolysis of acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) by ADP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). Here, we performed a genetic examination of enzymes involved in Glu catabolism in Thermococcus kodakarensis. Examination of amino acid dehydrogenase activities in cell extracts of T. kodakarensis KUW1 (ΔpyrF ΔtrpE) revealed high NADP-dependent GDH activity, along with lower levels of NAD-dependent activity. NADP-dependent activities toward Gln/Ala/Val/Cys and an NAD-dependent threonine dehydrogenase activity were also detected. In KGDH1, a gene disruption strain of T. kodakarensis GDH (Tk-GDH), only threonine dehydrogenase activity was detected, indicating that all other activities were dependent on Tk-GDH. KGDH1 could not grow in a medium in which growth was dependent on amino acid catabolism, implying that Tk-GDH is the only enzyme that can discharge the electrons (to NADP+/NAD+) released from amino acids in their oxidation to 2-oxoacids. In a medium containing excess pyruvate, KGDH1 displayed normal growth, but higher degrees of amino acid catabolism were observed compared to those for KUW1, suggesting that Tk-GDH functions to suppress amino acid oxidation and plays an anabolic role under this condition. We further constructed disruption strains of 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and succinyl-CoA synthetase. The two strains displayed growth defects in both media compared to KUW1. Succinate generation was not observed in these strains, indicating that the two enzymes are solely responsible for Glu catabolism among the multiple KOR and ACS enzymes in T. kodakarensis. PMID:23435976

  2. Phytochemicals that modulate amino acid and peptide catabolism by caprine rumen microbes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Microbe-derived ionophores and macrolide antibiotics are often added to ruminant diets, and growth promotion and feed efficiency are among the benefits. One mechanism is inhibition of microbes that catabolize amino acids or peptides and produce ammonia. Plants also produce antimicrobial ...

  3. Plasmid-Encoded Phthalate Catabolic Pathway in Arthrobacter keyseri 12B†

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Several 2-substituted benzoates (including 2-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro-, 2-bromo-, 2-iodo-, 2-nitro-, 2-methoxy-, and 2-acetyl-benzoates) were converted by phthalate-grown Arthrobacter keyseri (formerly Micrococcus sp.) 12B to the corresponding 2-substituted 3,4-dihydroxybenzoates (protocatechuates). Because these products lack a carboxyl group at the 2 position, they were not substrates for the next enzyme of the phthalate catabolic pathway, 3,4-dihydroxyphthalate 2-decarboxylase, and accumulated. When these incubations were carried out in iron-containing minimal medium, the products formed colored chelates. This chromogenic response was subsequently used to identify recombinant Escherichia coli strains carrying genes encoding the responsible enzymes, phthalate 3,4-dioxygenase and 3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrophthalate dehydrogenase, from the 130-kbp plasmid pRE1 of strain 12B. Beginning with the initially cloned 8.14-kbp PstI fragment of pRE824 as a probe to identify recombinant plasmids carrying overlapping fragments, a DNA segment of 33.5 kbp was cloned from pRE1 on several plasmids and mapped using restriction endonucleases. From these plasmids, the sequence of 26,274 contiguous bp was determined. Sequenced DNA included several genetic units: tnpR, pcm operon, ptr genes, pehA, norA fragment, and pht operon, encoding a transposon resolvase, catabolism of protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoate), a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter, a possible phthalate ester hydrolase, a fragment of a norfloxacin resistance-like transporter, and the conversion of phthalate to protocatechuate, respectively. Activities of the eight enzymes involved in the catabolism of phthalate through protocatechuate to pyruvate and oxaloacetate were demonstrated in cells or cell extracts of recombinant E. coli strains. PMID:11371533

  4. Catabolism of Arylboronic Acids by Arthrobacter nicotinovorans Strain PBA

    PubMed Central

    Negrete-Raymond, Ana C.; Weder, Barbara; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2003-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain PBA metabolized phenylboronic acid to phenol. The oxygen atom in phenol was shown to be derived from the atmosphere using 18O2. 1-Naphthalene-, 2-naphthalene-, 3-cyanophenyl-, 2,5-fluorophenyl-, and 3-thiophene-boronic acids were also transformed to monooxygenated products. The oxygen atom in the product was bonded to the ring carbon atom originally bearing the boronic acid substituent with all the substrates tested. PMID:12839810

  5. Amino acid repletion does not decrease muscle protein catabolism during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Raj, Dominic S C; Adeniyi, Oladipo; Dominic, Elizabeth A; Boivin, Michel A; McClelland, Sandra; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H; Morgan, Nancy; Gonzales, Lawrence; Wolfe, Robert; Ferrando, Arny

    2007-06-01

    Intradialytic protein catabolism is attributed to loss of amino acids in the dialysate. We investigated the effect of amino acid infusion during hemodialysis (HD) on muscle protein turnover and amino acid transport kinetics by using stable isotopes of phenylalanine, leucine, and lysine in eight patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Subjects were studied at baseline (pre-HD), 2 h of HD without amino acid infusion (HD-O), and 2 h of HD with amino acid infusion (HD+AA). Amino acid depletion during HD-O augmented the outward transport of amino acids from muscle into the vein. Increased delivery of amino acids to the leg during HD+AA facilitated the transport of amino acids from the artery into the intracellular compartment. Increase in muscle protein breakdown was more than the increase in synthesis during HD-O (46.7 vs. 22.3%, P < 0.001). Net balance (nmol.min(-1).100 ml (-1)) was more negative during HD-O compared with pre-HD (-33.7 +/- 1.5 vs. -6.0 +/- 2.3, P < 0.001). Despite an abundant supply of amino acids, the net balance (-16.9 +/- 1.8) did not switch from net release to net uptake. HD+AA induced a proportional increase in muscle protein synthesis and catabolism. Branched chain amino acid catabolism increased significantly from baseline during HD-O and did not decrease during HD+AA. Protein synthesis efficiency, the fraction of amino acid in the intracellular pool that is utilized for muscle protein synthesis decreased from 42.1% pre-HD to 33.7 and 32.6% during HD-O and HD+AA, respectively (P < 0.01). Thus amino acid repletion during HD increased muscle protein synthesis but did not decrease muscle protein breakdown. PMID:17264222

  6. A 2-Hydroxypyridine Catabolism Pathway in Rhodococcus rhodochrous Strain PY11

    PubMed Central

    Gasparavičiūtė, Renata; Rutkienė, Rasa; Tauraitė, Daiva; Meškys, Rolandas

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11 (DSM 101666) is able to use 2-hydroxypyridine as a sole source of carbon and energy. By investigating a gene cluster (hpo) from this bacterium, we were able to reconstruct the catabolic pathway of 2-hydroxypyridine degradation. Here, we report that in Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11, the initial hydroxylation of 2-hydroxypyridine is catalyzed by a four-component dioxygenase (HpoBCDF). A product of the dioxygenase reaction (3,6-dihydroxy-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin-2-one) is further oxidized by HpoE to 2,3,6-trihydroxypyridine, which spontaneously forms a blue pigment. In addition, we show that the subsequent 2,3,6-trihydroxypyridine ring opening is catalyzed by the hypothetical cyclase HpoH. The final products of 2-hydroxypyridine degradation in Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11 are ammonium ion and α-ketoglutarate. PMID:26655765

  7. Transfer of a Catabolic Pathway for Chloromethane in Methylobacterium Strains Highlights Different Limitations for Growth with Chloromethane or with Dichloromethane

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michener, Joshua K.; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Bringel, Françoise; Marx, Christopher J.

    2016-07-19

    Chloromethane is an ozone-depleting gas, produced predominantly from natural sources, that provides an important environmental niche for microbes capable of consuming it. Chloromethane catabolism has been difficult to study owing to the challenging genetics of its native microbial hosts. Since the pathways for chloromethane catabolism show evidence of horizontal gene transfer, we reproduced this transfer process in the laboratory to generate new chloromethane-catabolizing strains in tractable hosts. Here, we demonstrate that six putative accessory genes improve chloromethane catabolism, though heterologous expression of only one of the six is strictly necessary for growth on chloromethane. In contrast to growth of Methylobacteriummore » strains with the closely-related compound dichloromethane, we find that chloride export does not limit growth on chloromethane and, in general, that the ability of a strain to grow on dichloromethane is uncorrelated with its ability to grow on chloromethane. Finally, this heterologous expression system allows us to investigate the components required for effective chloromethane catabolism and the factors that limit effective catabolism after horizontal transfer.« less

  8. Transfer of a Catabolic Pathway for Chloromethane in Methylobacterium Strains Highlights Different Limitations for Growth with Chloromethane or with Dichloromethane

    PubMed Central

    Michener, Joshua K.; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Bringel, Françoise; Marx, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Chloromethane (CM) is an ozone-depleting gas, produced predominantly from natural sources, that provides an important carbon source for microbes capable of consuming it. CM catabolism has been difficult to study owing to the challenging genetics of its native microbial hosts. Since the pathways for CM catabolism show evidence of horizontal gene transfer, we reproduced this transfer process in the laboratory to generate new CM-catabolizing strains in tractable hosts. We demonstrate that six putative accessory genes improve CM catabolism, though heterologous expression of only one of the six is strictly necessary for growth on CM. In contrast to growth of Methylobacterium strains with the closely related compound dichloromethane (DCM), we find that chloride export does not limit growth on CM and, in general that the ability of a strain to grow on DCM is uncorrelated with its ability to grow on CM. This heterologous expression system allows us to investigate the components required for effective CM catabolism and the factors that limit effective catabolism after horizontal transfer. PMID:27486448

  9. Transfer of a Catabolic Pathway for Chloromethane in Methylobacterium Strains Highlights Different Limitations for Growth with Chloromethane or with Dichloromethane.

    PubMed

    Michener, Joshua K; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Bringel, Françoise; Marx, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Chloromethane (CM) is an ozone-depleting gas, produced predominantly from natural sources, that provides an important carbon source for microbes capable of consuming it. CM catabolism has been difficult to study owing to the challenging genetics of its native microbial hosts. Since the pathways for CM catabolism show evidence of horizontal gene transfer, we reproduced this transfer process in the laboratory to generate new CM-catabolizing strains in tractable hosts. We demonstrate that six putative accessory genes improve CM catabolism, though heterologous expression of only one of the six is strictly necessary for growth on CM. In contrast to growth of Methylobacterium strains with the closely related compound dichloromethane (DCM), we find that chloride export does not limit growth on CM and, in general that the ability of a strain to grow on DCM is uncorrelated with its ability to grow on CM. This heterologous expression system allows us to investigate the components required for effective CM catabolism and the factors that limit effective catabolism after horizontal transfer. PMID:27486448

  10. Direct inhibition of retinoic acid catabolism by fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Hellmann-Regen, Julian; Uhlemann, Ria; Regen, Francesca; Heuser, Isabella; Otte, Christian; Endres, Matthias; Gertz, Karen; Kronenberg, Golo

    2015-09-01

    Recent evidence from animal and human studies suggests neuroprotective effects of the SSRI fluoxetine, e.g., in the aftermath of stroke. The underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully defined. Because of its effects on the cytochrome P450 system (CYP450), we hypothesized that neuroprotection by fluoxetine is related to altered metabolism of retinoic acid (RA), whose CYP450-mediated degradation in brain tissue constitutes an important step in the regulation of its site-specific auto- and paracrine actions. Using traditional pharmacological in vitro assays, the effects of fluoxetine on RA degradation were probed in crude synaptosomes from rat brain and human-derived SH-SY5Y cells, and in cultures of neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, retinoid-dependent effects of fluoxetine on neuronal survival following glutamate exposure were investigated in rat primary neurons cells using specific retinoid receptor antagonists. Experiments revealed dose-dependent inhibition of synaptosomal RA degradation by fluoxetine along with dose-dependent increases in RA levels in cell cultures. Furthermore, fluoxetine's neuroprotective effects against glutamate excitotoxicity in rat primary neurons were demonstrated to partially depend on RA signaling. Taken together, these findings demonstrate for the first time that the potent, pleiotropic antidepressant fluoxetine directly interacts with RA homeostasis in brain tissue, thereby exerting its neuroprotective effects. PMID:25981674

  11. Catabolic pathway of gamma-caprolactone in the biocontrol agent Rhodococcus erythropolis.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Corinne; Crépin, Alexandre; Cirou, Amélie; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Faure, Denis; Dessaux, Yves; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-caprolactone (GCL) is well-known as a food flavor and has been recently described as a biostimulant molecule promoting the growth of bacteria with biocontrol activity against soft-rot pathogens. Among these biocontrol agents, Rhodococcus erythropolis, characterized by a remarkable metabolic versatility, assimilates various γ-butyrolactone molecules with a branched-aliphatic chain, such as GCL. The assimilative pathway of GCL in R. erythropolis was investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. This analysis suggests the involvement of the lactonase QsdA in ring-opening, a feature confirmed by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. According to proteome analysis, the open-chain form of GCL was degraded by β- and ω-oxidation coupled to the Krebs cycle and β-ketoadipate pathway. Ubiquity of qsdA gene among environmental R. erythropolis isolates was verified by PCR. In addition to a previous N-acyl homoserine lactone catabolic function, QsdA may therefore be involved in an intermediate degradative step of cyclic recalcitrant molecules or in synthesis of flavoring lactones. PMID:22085026

  12. Methionine catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Perpète, Philippe; Duthoit, Olivier; De Maeyer, Simon; Imray, Louise; Lawton, Andrew I; Stavropoulos, Konstantinos E; Gitonga, Virginia W; Hewlins, Michael J E; Dickinson, J Richard

    2006-01-01

    The catabolism of methionine to methionol and methanethiol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied using (13)C NMR spectroscopy, GC-MS, enzyme assays and a number of mutants. Methionine is first transaminated to alpha-keto-gamma-(methylthio)butyrate. Methionol is formed by a decarboxylation reaction, which yields methional, followed by reduction. The decarboxylation is effected specifically by Ydr380wp. Methanethiol is formed from both methionine and alpha-keto-gamma-(methylthio)butyrate by a demethiolase activity. In all except one strain examined, demethiolase was induced by the presence of methionine in the growth medium. This pathway results in the production of alpha-ketobutyrate, a carbon skeleton, which can be re-utilized. Hence, methionine catabolism is more complex and economical than the other amino acid catabolic pathways in yeast, which use the Ehrlich pathway and result solely in the formation of a fusel alcohol. PMID:16423070

  13. Characterization of the metabolic pathway and catabolic gene expression in biphenyl degrading marine bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa JP-11.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Jaya; Das, Surajit

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic pathway of biphenyl assimilation and the catabolic gene expression in a marine bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa JP-11, isolated from the coastal sediments of Odisha, India have been studied. This strain utilized 98.86% ± 2.29% of biphenyl within 72 h when supplied as the sole source of carbon, however, preferential utilization of glucose was observed over catechol and biphenyl when grown in a complex medium. Combination of chromatographic and spectrophotometric techniques confirmed the catechol pathway and identified 2-Hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2, 4-dienoate as the intermediate metabolic product. Assimilation of biphenyl was initiated by its dioxygenation, forming cis-2, 3-dihydro-2, 3-dihydroxybiphenyl subsequently transformed to 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2, 4-dienoate. In the lower pathway, cis-1, 6-dihydroxy-2, 4-cyclohexadiene-1-carboxylic acid was detected which formed catechol before entering into the Krebs cycle. Detection of key enzyme catechol-1, 2-dioxygenase in the cell-free extract of P. aeruginosa JP-11 supported the proposed degradation pathway. The primary enzyme for biphenyl assimilation, biphenyl dioxygenase encoded by bphA gene was found in the genome of the isolate. On increasing biphenyl stress (50, 100, 150 and 200 mg L(-1)), bphA gene showed a significant (P < 0.01) up-regulation upto 43.5 folds. Production of biosurfactant was confirmed and the rhamnolipid synthesizing gene rhlAB was amplified. This gene also showed a significant (P < 0.01) up-regulation upto 258 folds on increasing biphenyl stress. PMID:26519802

  14. Characterization of a plasmid-specified pathway for catabolism of isopropylbenzene in Pseudomonas putida RE204

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, R.W.; Timmis, K.N.

    1986-10-01

    A Pseudomonas putida strain designated RE204, able to utilize isopropylbenzene as the sole carbon and energy source, was isolated. Tn5 transposon mutagenesis by means of the suicide transposon donor plasmid pLG221 yielded mutant derivatives defective in isopropylbenzene metabolism. These were characterized by the identification of the products which they accumulated when grown in the presence of isopropylbenzene and by the assay of enzyme activities in cell extracts. Based on the results obtained, the following metabolic pathway is proposed: isopropylbenzene ..-->.. 2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyisopropylbenzene ..-->.. 3-isopropylcatechol ..-->.. 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-7-methylocta-2,4-dienoate ..-->.. isobutyrate + 2-oxopent-4-enoate ..-->.. amphibolic intermediates. Plasmid DNA was isolated from strain RE204 and mutant derivatives and characterized by restriction enzyme cleavage analysis. Isopropylbenzene-negative isolates carried a Tn5 insert within a 15-kilobase region of a 105-kilobase plasmid designated pRE4. DNA fragments of pRE4 carrying genes encoding isopropylbenzene catabolic enzymes were cloned in Escherichia coli with various plasmid vectors. These clones were subsequently used to generate a transposon insertion and restriction enzyme cleavage map of the isopropylbenzene metabolic region of pRE4.

  15. Carotenoid biosynthetic and catabolic pathways: gene expression and carotenoid content in grains of maize landraces.

    PubMed

    da Silva Messias, Rafael; Galli, Vanessa; Dos Anjos E Silva, Sérgio Delmar; Rombaldi, Cesar Valmor

    2014-01-01

    Plant carotenoids have been implicated in preventing several age-related diseases, and they also provide vitamin A precursors; therefore, increasing the content of carotenoids in maize grains is of great interest. It is not well understood, however, how the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is regulated. Fortunately, the maize germplasm exhibits a high degree of genetic diversity that can be exploited for this purpose. Here, the accumulation of carotenoids and the expression of genes from carotenoid metabolic and catabolic pathways were investigated in several maize landraces. The carotenoid content in grains varied from 10.03, in the white variety MC5, to 61.50 μg·g⁻¹, in the yellow-to-orange variety MC3, and the major carotenoids detected were lutein and zeaxanthin. PSY1 (phythoene synthase) expression showed a positive correlation with the total carotenoid content. Additionally, the PSY1 and HYD3 (ferredoxin-dependent di-iron monooxygenase) expression levels were positively correlated with β-cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin, while CYP97C (cytochrome P450-type monooxygenase) expression did not correlate with any of the carotenoids. In contrast, ZmCCD1 (carotenoid dioxygenase) was more highly expressed at the beginning of grain development, as well as in the white variety, and its expression was inversely correlated with the accumulation of several carotenoids, suggesting that CCD1 is also an important enzyme to be considered when attempting to improve the carotenoid content in maize. The MC27 and MC1 varieties showed the highest HYD3/CYP97C ratios, suggesting that they are promising candidates for increasing the zeaxanthin content; in contrast, MC14 and MC7 showed low HYD3/CYP97C, suggesting that they may be useful in biofortification efforts aimed at promoting the accumulation of provitamin A. The results of this study demonstrate the use of maize germplasm to provide insight into the regulation of genes involved in the carotenoid pathway, which would thus

  16. Carotenoid Biosynthetic and Catabolic Pathways: Gene Expression and Carotenoid Content in Grains of Maize Landraces

    PubMed Central

    Messias, Rafael da Silva; Galli, Vanessa; Silva, Sérgio Delmar dos Anjos e; Rombaldi, Cesar Valmor

    2014-01-01

    Plant carotenoids have been implicated in preventing several age-related diseases, and they also provide vitamin A precursors; therefore, increasing the content of carotenoids in maize grains is of great interest. It is not well understood, however, how the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is regulated. Fortunately, the maize germplasm exhibits a high degree of genetic diversity that can be exploited for this purpose. Here, the accumulation of carotenoids and the expression of genes from carotenoid metabolic and catabolic pathways were investigated in several maize landraces. The carotenoid content in grains varied from 10.03, in the white variety MC5, to 61.50 μg·g−1, in the yellow-to-orange variety MC3, and the major carotenoids detected were lutein and zeaxanthin. PSY1 (phythoene synthase) expression showed a positive correlation with the total carotenoid content. Additionally, the PSY1 and HYD3 (ferredoxin-dependent di-iron monooxygenase) expression levels were positively correlated with β-cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin, while CYP97C (cytochrome P450-type monooxygenase) expression did not correlate with any of the carotenoids. In contrast, ZmCCD1 (carotenoid dioxygenase) was more highly expressed at the beginning of grain development, as well as in the white variety, and its expression was inversely correlated with the accumulation of several carotenoids, suggesting that CCD1 is also an important enzyme to be considered when attempting to improve the carotenoid content in maize. The MC27 and MC1 varieties showed the highest HYD3/CYP97C ratios, suggesting that they are promising candidates for increasing the zeaxanthin content; in contrast, MC14 and MC7 showed low HYD3/CYP97C, suggesting that they may be useful in biofortification efforts aimed at promoting the accumulation of provitamin A. The results of this study demonstrate the use of maize germplasm to provide insight into the regulation of genes involved in the carotenoid pathway, which would thus better

  17. Impaired adiponectin signaling contributes to disturbed catabolism of branched-chain amino acids in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lian, Kun; Du, Chaosheng; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Di; Yan, Wenjun; Zhang, Haifeng; Hong, Zhibo; Liu, Peilin; Zhang, Lijian; Pei, Haifeng; Zhang, Jinglong; Gao, Chao; Xin, Chao; Cheng, Hexiang; Xiong, Lize; Tao, Ling

    2015-01-01

    The branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) accumulated in type 2 diabetes are independent contributors to insulin resistance. The activity of branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, rate-limiting enzyme in BCAA catabolism, is reduced in diabetic states, which contributes to elevated BCAA concentrations. However, the mechanisms underlying decreased BCKD activity remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial phosphatase 2C (PP2Cm), a newly identified BCKD phosphatase that increases BCKD activity, was significantly downregulated in ob/ob and type 2 diabetic mice. Interestingly, in adiponectin (APN) knockout (APN(-/-)) mice fed with a high-fat diet (HD), PP2Cm expression and BCKD activity were significantly decreased, whereas BCKD kinase (BDK), which inhibits BCKD activity, was markedly increased. Concurrently, plasma BCAA and branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKA) were significantly elevated. APN treatment markedly reverted PP2Cm, BDK, BCKD activity, and BCAA and BCKA levels in HD-fed APN(-/-) and diabetic animals. Additionally, increased BCKD activity caused by APN administration was partially but significantly inhibited in PP2Cm knockout mice. Finally, APN-mediated upregulation of PP2Cm expression and BCKD activity were abolished when AMPK was inhibited. Collectively, we have provided the first direct evidence that APN is a novel regulator of PP2Cm and systematic BCAA levels, suggesting that targeting APN may be a pharmacological approach to ameliorating BCAA catabolism in the diabetic state. PMID:25071024

  18. Drosophila miR-277 controls branched-chain amino acid catabolism and affects lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Esslinger, Stephanie Maria; Schwalb, Björn; Helfer, Stephanie; Michalik, Katharina Maria; Witte, Heidi; Maier, Kerstin C.; Martin, Dietmar; Michalke, Bernhard; Tresch, Achim; Cramer, Patrick; Förstemann, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Development, growth and adult survival are coordinated with available metabolic resources, ascertaining that the organism responds appropriately to environmental conditions. MicroRNAs are short (21–23 nt) regulatory RNAs that confer specificity on the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) to inhibit a given set of mRNA targets. We profiled changes in miRNA expression during adult life in Drosophila melanogaster and determined that miR-277 is downregulated during adult life. Molecular analysis revealed that this miRNA controls branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism and as a result it can modulate the activity of the TOR kinase, a central growth regulator, in cultured cells. Metabolite analysis in cultured cells as well as flies suggests that the mechanistic basis may be an accumulation of branched-chain α-keto-acids (BCKA), rather than BCAAs, thus avoiding potentially detrimental consequences of increased branched chain amino acid levels on e.g., translational fidelity. Constitutive miR-277 expression shortens lifespan and is synthetically lethal with reduced insulin signaling, indicating that metabolic control underlies this phenotype. Transgenic inhibition with a miRNA sponge construct also shortens lifespan, in particular on protein-rich food. Thus, optimal metabolic adaptation appears to require tuning of cellular BCAA catabolism by miR-277. PMID:23669073

  19. Sialic acid catabolism drives intestinal inflammation and microbial dysbiosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yen-Lin; Chassard, Christophe; Hausmann, Martin; von Itzstein, Mark; Hennet, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Rapid shifts in microbial composition frequently occur during intestinal inflammation, but the mechanisms underlying such changes remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that an increased caecal sialidase activity is critical in conferring a growth advantage for some bacteria including Escherichia coli (E. coli) during intestinal inflammation in mice. This sialidase activity originates among others from Bacteroides vulgatus, whose intestinal levels expand after dextran sulphate sodium administration. Increased sialidase activity mediates the release of sialic acid from intestinal tissue, which promotes the outgrowth of E. coli during inflammation. The outburst of E. coli likely exacerbates the inflammatory response by stimulating the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by intestinal dendritic cells. Oral administration of a sialidase inhibitor and low levels of intestinal α2,3-linked sialic acid decrease E. coli outgrowth and the severity of colitis in mice. Regulation of sialic acid catabolism opens new perspectives for the treatment of intestinal inflammation as manifested by E. coli dysbiosis. PMID:26303108

  20. Amino acid efflux by asexual blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum and its utility in interrogating the kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Seema; Klemba, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The endocytosis and catabolism of large quantities of host cell hemoglobin is a hallmark of the intraerythrocytic asexual stage of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It is known that the parasite's production of amino acids from hemoglobin far exceeds its metabolic needs. Here, we show that P. falciparum effluxes large quantities of certain non-polar (Ala, Leu, Val, Pro, Phe, Gly) and polar (Ser, Thr, His) amino acids to the external medium. That these amino acids originate from hemoglobin catabolism is indicated by the strong correlation between individual amino acid efflux rates and their abundances in hemoglobin, and the ability of the food vacuole falcipain inhibitor E-64d to greatly suppress efflux rates. We then developed a rapid, sensitive and precise method for quantifying flux through the hemoglobin endocytic-catabolic pathway that is based on leucine efflux. Optimization of the method involved the generation of a novel amino acid-restricted RPMI formulation as well as the validation of D-norvaline as an internal standard. The utility of this method was demonstrated by characterizing the effects of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and dihydroartemisinin on the kinetics of Leu efflux. Both compounds rapidly inhibited Leu efflux, which is consistent with a role for phosphtidylinositol-3-phosphate production in the delivery of hemoglobin to the food vacuole; however, wortmannin inhibition was transient, which was likely due to the instability of this compound in culture medium. The simplicity, convenience and non-invasive nature of the Leu efflux assay described here makes it ideal for characterizing the in vivo kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism, for inhibitor target validation studies, and for medium-throughput screens to identify novel inhibitors of cytostomal endocytosis. PMID:26215764

  1. Amino acid efflux by asexual blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum and its utility in interrogating the kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Seema; Klemba, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The endocytosis and catabolism of large quantities of host cell hemoglobin is a hallmark of the intraerythrocytic asexual stage of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It is known that the parasite’s production of amino acids from hemoglobin far exceeds its metabolic needs. Here, we show that P. falciparum effluxes large quantities of certain non-polar (Ala, Leu, Val, Pro, Phe, Gly) and polar (Ser, Thr, His) amino acids to the external medium. That these amino acids originate from hemoglobin catabolism is indicated by the strong correlation between individual amino acid efflux rates and their abundances in hemoglobin, and the ability of the food vacuole falcipain inhibitor E-64d to greatly suppress efflux rates. We then developed a rapid, sensitive and precise method for quantifying flux through the hemoglobin endocytic-catabolic pathway that is based on leucine efflux. Optimization of the method involved the generation of a novel amino acid-restricted RPMI formulation as well as the validation of D-norvaline as an internal standard. The utility of this method was demonstrated by characterizing the effects of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and dihydroartemisinin on the kinetics of Leu efflux. Both compounds rapidly inhibited Leu efflux, which is consistent with a role for phosphtidylinositol-3-phosphate production in the delivery of hemoglobin to the food vacuole; however, wortmannin inhibition was transient, which was likely due to the instability of this compound in culture medium. The simplicity, convenience and non-invasive nature of the Leu efflux assay described here makes it ideal for characterizing the in vivo kinetics of hemoglobin endocytosis and catabolism, for inhibitor target validation studies, and for medium-throughput screens to identify novel inhibitors of cytostomal endocytosis. PMID:26215764

  2. γ-Resorcylate Catabolic-Pathway Genes in the Soil Actinomycete Rhodococcus jostii RHA1

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Daisuke; Araki, Naoto; Motoi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Shota; Iino, Toju; Imai, Shunsuke; Masai, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 gene cluster required for γ-resorcylate (GRA) catabolism was characterized. The cluster includes tsdA, tsdB, tsdC, tsdD, tsdR, tsdT, and tsdX, which encode GRA decarboxylase, resorcinol 4-hydroxylase, hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase, maleylacetate reductase, an IclR-type regulator, a major facilitator superfamily transporter, and a putative hydrolase, respectively. The tsdA gene conferred GRA decarboxylase activity on Escherichia coli. Purified TsdB oxidized NADH in the presence of resorcinol, suggesting that tsdB encodes a unique NADH-specific single-component resorcinol 4-hydroxylase. Mutations in either tsdA or tsdB resulted in growth deficiency on GRA. The tsdC and tsdD genes conferred hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase and maleylacetate reductase activities, respectively, on E. coli. Inactivation of tsdT significantly retarded the growth of RHA1 on GRA. The growth retardation was partially suppressed under acidic conditions, suggesting the involvement of tsdT in GRA uptake. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the tsd genes constitute three transcriptional units, the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons and tsdR. Transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons was induced during growth on GRA. Inactivation of tsdR derepressed transcription of the tsdBADC and tsdTX operons in the absence of GRA, suggesting that tsd gene transcription is negatively regulated by the tsdR-encoded regulator. Binding of TsdR to the tsdR-tsdB and tsdT-tsdR intergenic regions was inhibited by the addition of GRA, indicating that GRA interacts with TsdR as an effector molecule. PMID:26319878

  3. A new physiological role for Pdr12p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: export of aromatic and branched-chain organic acids produced in amino acid catabolism.

    PubMed

    Hazelwood, Lucie A; Tai, Siew Leng; Boer, Viktor M; de Winde, Johannes H; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean Marc

    2006-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae can use a broad range of compounds as sole nitrogen source. Many amino acids, such as leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine and methionine, are utilized through the Ehrlich pathway. The fusel acids and alcohols produced from this pathway, along with their derived esters, are important contributors to beer and wine flavor. It is unknown how these compounds are exported from the cell. Analysis of nitrogen-source-dependent transcript profiles via microarray analysis of glucose-limited, aerobic chemostat cultures revealed a common upregulation of PDR12 in cultures grown with leucine, methionine or phenylalanine as sole nitrogen source. PDR12 encodes an ABC transporter involved in weak-organic-acid resistance, which has hitherto been studied in the context of resistance to exogenous organic acids. The hypothesis that PDR12 is involved in export of natural products of amino acid catabolism was evaluated by analyzing the phenotype of null mutants in PDR12 or in WAR1, its positive transcriptional regulator. The hypersensitivity of the pdr12Delta and war1Delta strains for some of these compounds indicates that Pdr12p is involved in export of the fusel acids, but not the fusel alcohols derived from leucine, isoleucine, valine, phenylalanine and tryptophan. PMID:16911515

  4. Catabolism of Naphthalenesulfonic Acids by Pseudomonas sp. A3 and Pseudomonas sp. C22

    PubMed Central

    Brilon, C.; Beckmann, W.; Knackmuss, H.-J.

    1981-01-01

    Naphthalene and two naphthalenesulfonic acids were degraded by Pseudomonas sp. A3 and Pseudomonas sp. C22 by the same enzymes. Gentisate is a major metabolite. Catabolic activities for naphthalene, 1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, and 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid are induced by growth with naphthalene, 1-naphthalenesulfonic acid, 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, methylnaphthalene, or salicylate. Gentisate is also an inducer in strain A3. Inhibition kinetics show that naphthalene and substituted naphthalenes are hydroxylated by the same naphthalene dioxygenase. Substrates with nondissociable substituents such as CH3, OCH3, Cl, or NO2 are hydroxylated in the 7,8-position, and 4-substituted salicylates are accumulated. If CO2H, CH2CO2H, or SO3H are substituents, hydroxylation occurs with high regioselectivity in the 1,2-position. Thus, 1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene-2-carboxylic acids are formed quantitatively from the corresponding naphthalenecarboxylic acids. Utilization of naphthalenesulfonic acids proceeds by the same regioselective 1,2-dioxygenation which labilizes the C—SO3− bond and eliminates sulfite. PMID:16345814

  5. CATABOLISM OF AROMATIC BIOGENIC AMINES BY 'PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA' PA01 VIA META CLEAVAGE OF HOMOPROTOCATECHUIC ACID (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas aruginosa PA01 catabolized the aromatic amines tyramine and octopamine through 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPA). Meta ring cleavage was mediated by 3-4-dihydroxyphenylacetate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPADO), producing 2-hydroxy-5-carboxymeth...

  6. Genetic analysis of phenylacetic acid catabolism in Arthrobacter oxydans CECT386.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Llorens, Juana María; Drzyzga, Oliver; Perera, Julián

    2008-07-01

    Arthrobacter oxydans CECT386 is a Gram-positive bacterium able to use either phenylacetic acid or phenylacetaldehyde as the sole carbon and energy source for aerobic growth. Genes responsible for the catabolism of these compounds have been located at two chromosomal regions and were organized in one isolated paaN gene and two putative paa operons, one consisting of the paaD, paaF, tetR and prot genes, and one consisting of the paaG, paaH, paaI, paaJ, paaK and paaB genes. The identity of the paaF and paaN genes was supported by functional complementation experiments. A comparison with the paa catabolic genes and/or gene clusters of other bacteria that degrade these aromatic compounds is presented. The results of this study broaden the knowledge regarding the range of metabolic potential of this strain and eventually make it attractive for environmental applications. PMID:18437357

  7. Periodic Nanomechanical Stimulation in a Biokinetics Model Identifying Anabolic and Catabolic Pathways Associated With Cartilage Matrix Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Asit K.

    2010-01-01

    Enhancing the available nanotechnology to describe physicochemical interactions during biokinetic regulation will strongly support cellular and molecular engineering efforts. In a recent mathematical model developed to extend the applicability of a statically loaded, single-cell biomechanical analysis, a biokinetic regulatory threshold was presented (Saha and Kohles, 2010, “A Distinct Catabolic to Anabolic Threshold Due to Single-Cell Static Nanomechanical Stimulation in a Cartilage Biokinetics Model,” J. Nanotechnol. Eng. Med., 1(3), p. 031005). Results described multiscale mechanobiology in terms of catabolic to anabolic pathways. In the present study, we expand the mathematical model to continue exploring the nanoscale biomolecular response within a controlled microenvironment. Here, we introduce a dynamic mechanical stimulus for regulating cartilage molecule synthesis. Model iterations indicate the identification of a biomathematical mechanism balancing the harmony between catabolic and anabolic states. Relative load limits were defined to distinguish between “healthy” and “injurious” biomolecule accumulations. The presented mathematical framework provides a specific algorithm from which to explore biokinetic regulation. PMID:21152382

  8. Identification of an itaconic acid degrading pathway in itaconic acid producing Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Huang, Xuenian; Zhong, Chengwei; Li, Jianjun; Lu, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    Itaconic acid, one of the most promising and flexible bio-based chemicals, is mainly produced by Aspergillus terreus. Previous studies to improve itaconic acid production in A. terreus through metabolic engineering were mainly focused on its biosynthesis pathway, while the itaconic acid-degrading pathway has largely been ignored. In this study, we used transcriptomic, proteomic, bioinformatic, and in vitro enzymatic analyses to identify three key enzymes, itaconyl-CoA transferase (IctA), itaconyl-CoA hydratase (IchA), and citramalyl-CoA lyase (CclA), that are involved in the catabolic pathway of itaconic acid in A. terreus. In the itaconic acid catabolic pathway in A. terreus, itaconic acid is first converted by IctA into itaconyl-CoA with succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor, and then itaconyl-CoA is hydrated into citramalyl-CoA by IchA. Finally, citramalyl-CoA is cleaved into acetyl-CoA and pyruvate by CclA. Moreover, IctA can also catalyze the reaction between citramalyl-CoA and succinate to generate succinyl-CoA and citramalate. These results, for the first time, identify the three key enzymes, IctA, IchA, and CclA, involved in the itaconic acid degrading pathway in itaconic acid producing A. terreus. The results will facilitate the improvement of itaconic acid production by metabolically engineering the catabolic pathway of itaconic acid in A. terreus. PMID:27102125

  9. Integration of chemotaxis, transport and catabolism in Pseudomonas putida and identification of the aromatic acid chemoreceptor PcaY.

    PubMed

    Luu, Rita A; Kootstra, Joshua D; Nesteryuk, Vasyl; Brunton, Ceanne N; Parales, Juanito V; Ditty, Jayna L; Parales, Rebecca E

    2015-04-01

    Aromatic and hydroaromatic compounds that are metabolized through the β-ketoadipate catabolic pathway serve as chemoattractants for Pseudomonas putida F1. A screen of P. putida F1 mutants, each lacking one of the genes encoding the 18 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs), revealed that pcaY encodes the MCP required for metabolism-independent chemotaxis to vanillate, vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzoate, benzoate, protocatechuate, quinate, shikimate, as well as 10 substituted benzoates that do not serve as growth substrates for P. putida F1. Chemotaxis was induced during growth on aromatic compounds, and an analysis of a pcaY-lacZ fusion revealed that pcaY is expressed in the presence of β-ketoadipate, a common intermediate in the pathway. pcaY expression also required the transcriptional activator PcaR, indicating that pcaY is a member of the pca regulon, which includes three unlinked gene clusters that encode five enzymes required for the conversion of 4-hydroxybenzoate to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates as well as the major facilitator superfamily transport protein PcaK. The 4-hydroxybenzoate permease PcaK was shown to modulate the chemotactic response by facilitating the uptake of 4-hydroxybenzoate, which leads to the accumulation of β-ketoadipate, thereby increasing pcaY expression. The results show that chemotaxis, transport and metabolism of aromatic compounds are intimately linked in P. putida. PMID:25582673

  10. Catabolism of Hexuronides, Hexuronates, Aldonates, and Aldarates.

    PubMed

    Mandrand-Berthelot, M-A; Condemine, G; Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, N

    2004-12-01

    Following elucidation of the regulation of the lactose operon in Escherichia coli, studies on the metabolism of many sugars were initiated in the early 1960s. The catabolic pathways of D-gluconate and of the two hexuronates, D-glucuronate and D-galacturonate, were investigated. The post genomic era has renewed interest in the study of these sugar acids and allowed the complete characterization of the D-gluconate pathway and the discovery of the catabolic pathways for L-idonate, D-glucarate, galactarate, and ketogluconates. Among the various sugar acids that are utilized as sole carbon and energy sources to support growth of E. coli, galacturonate, glucuronate, and gluconate were shown to play an important role in the colonization of the mammalian large intestine. In the case of sugar acid degradation, the regulators often mediate negative control and are inactivated by interaction with a specific inducer, which is either the substrate or an intermediate of the catabolism. These regulators coordinate the synthesis of all the proteins involved in the same pathway and, in some cases, exert crosspathway control between related catabolic pathways. This is particularly well illustrated in the case of hexuronide and hexuronate catabolism. The structural genes encoding the different steps of hexuronate catabolism were identified by analysis of numerous mutants affected for growth with galacturonate or glucuronate. E. coli is able to use the diacid sugars D-glucarate and galactarate (an achiral compound) as sole carbon source for growth. Pyruvate and 2-phosphoglycerate are the final products of the D-glucarate/galactarate catabolism. PMID:26443361

  11. Metabolite Profile Analysis Reveals Functional Effects of 28-Day Vitamin B-6 Restriction on One-Carbon Metabolism and Tryptophan Catabolic Pathways in Healthy Men and Women123

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Vanessa R.; Rios-Avila, Luisa; Lamers, Yvonne; Ralat, Maria A.; Midttun, Øivind; Quinlivan, Eoin P.; Garrett, Timothy J.; Coats, Bonnie; Shankar, Meena N.; Percival, Susan S.; Chi, Yueh-Yun; Muller, Keith E.; Ueland, Per Magne; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Gregory, Jesse F.

    2013-01-01

    Suboptimal vitamin B-6 status, as reflected by low plasma pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) concentration, is associated with increased risk of vascular disease. PLP plays many roles, including in one-carbon metabolism for the acquisition and transfer of carbon units and in the transsulfuration pathway. PLP also serves as a coenzyme in the catabolism of tryptophan. We hypothesize that the pattern of these metabolites can provide information reflecting the functional impact of marginal vitamin B-6 deficiency. We report here the concentration of major constituents of one-carbon metabolic processes and the tryptophan catabolic pathway in plasma from 23 healthy men and women before and after a 28-d controlled dietary vitamin B-6 restriction (<0.35 mg/d). liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the compounds relevant to one-carbon metabolism showed that vitamin B-6 restriction yielded increased cystathionine (53% pre- and 76% postprandial; P < 0.0001) and serine (12% preprandial; P < 0.05), and lower creatine (40% pre- and postprandial; P < 0.0001), creatinine (9% postprandial; P < 0.05), and dimethylglycine (16% postprandial; P < 0.05) relative to the vitamin B-6–adequate state. In the tryptophan pathway, vitamin B-6 restriction yielded lower kynurenic acid (22% pre- and 20% postprandial; P < 0.01) and higher 3-hydroxykynurenine (39% pre- and 34% postprandial; P < 0.01). Multivariate ANOVA analysis showed a significant global effect of vitamin B-6 restriction and multilevel partial least squares-discriminant analysis supported this conclusion. Thus, plasma concentrations of creatine, cystathionine, kynurenic acid, and 3-hydroxykynurenine jointly reveal effects of vitamin B-6 restriction on the profiles of one-carbon and tryptophan metabolites and serve as biomarkers of functional effects of marginal vitamin B-6 deficiency. PMID:23966327

  12. Cooperative catabolic pathways within an atrazine-degrading enrichment culture isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel; Alvey, Sam; Crowley, David E

    2005-07-01

    Atrazine degradation previously has been shown to be carried out by individual bacterial species or by relatively simple consortia that have been isolated using enrichment cultures. Here, the degradative pathway for atrazine was examined for a complex 8-membered enrichment culture. The species composition of the culture was determined by PCR-DGGE. The bacterial species included Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Caulobacter crescentus, Pseudomonas putida, Sphingomonas yaniokuyae, Nocardia sp., Rhizobium sp., Flavobacterium oryzihabitans, and Variovorax paradoxus. All of the isolates were screened for the presence of known genes that function for atrazine degradation including atzA,-B,-C,-D,-E,-F and trzD,-N. Dechlorination of atrazine, which was obligatory for complete mineralization, was carried out exclusively by Nocardia sp., which contained the trzN gene. Following dechlorination, the resulting product, hydroxyatrazine was further degraded via two separate pathways. In one pathway Nocardia converted hydroxyatrazine to N-ethylammelide via an unidentified gene product. In the second pathway, hydroxyatrazine generated by Nocardia sp. was hydrolyzed to N-isopropylammelide by Rhizobium sp., which contained the atzB gene. Each member of the enrichment culture contained atzC, which is responsible for ring cleavage, but none of the isolates carried the atzD,-E, or -F genes. Each member further contained either trzD or exhibited urease activity. The enrichment culture was destabilized by loss of Nocardia sp. when grown on ethylamine, ethylammelide, and cyanuric acid, after which the consortium was no longer able to degrade atrazine. The analysis of this enrichment culture highlights the broad level bacterial community interactions that may be involved in atrazine degradation in nature. PMID:16329946

  13. A Single Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Is Required For Catabolism Of Isoleucine, Valine And Short-Chain Fatty Acids In Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Maggio-Hall, Lori A.; Lyne, Paul; Wolff, Jon A.; Keller, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    An acyl-CoA dehydrogenase has been identified as part of the mitochondrial β-oxidation pathway in the ascomycete fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Disruption of the scdA gene prevented use of butyric acid (C4) and hexanoic acid (C6) as carbon sources and reduced cellular butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase activity by 7.5-fold. While the mutant strain exhibited wild-type levels of growth on erucic acid (C22:1) and oleic acid (C18:1), some reduction in growth was observed with myristic acid (C14). The ΔscdA mutation was found to be epistatic to a mutation downstream in the β-oxidation pathway (disruption of enoyl-CoA hydratase). The ΔscdA mutant was also unable to use isoleucine or valine as a carbon source. Transcription of scdA was observed in the presence of either fatty acids or amino acids. When the mutant was grown in medium containing either isoleucine or valine, organic acid analysis of culture supernatants showed accumulation of 2-oxo acid intermediates of branched chain amino acid catabolism, suggesting feedback inhibition of the upstream branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase. PMID:17656140

  14. The Mitochondrial Sulfur Dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 Is Required for Amino Acid Catabolism during Carbohydrate Starvation and Embryo Development in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Krüßel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D.; Browning, Luke W.; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rüdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M.

    2014-01-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine. PMID:24692429

  15. Molecular Iodine-Mediated Chemoselective Synthesis of Multisubstituted Pyridines through Catabolism and Reconstruction Behavior of Natural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jia-Chen; Wang, Miao; Cheng, Yan; Wu, An-Xin

    2016-01-01

    A new process has been developed for the selective construction of 2,6-disubstituted, 2,4,6-trisubstituted, and 3,5-disubstituted pyridines based on the catabolism and reconstruction behaviors of amino acids. Molecular iodine was used as a tandem catalyst to trigger the decarboxylation-deamination of amino acids and to promote the subsequent formation of the pyridine products. PMID:26653580

  16. Ureide catabolism of soybeans

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, R.G.; Blevins, D.G.; Polacco, J.C.; Randall, D.D.

    1987-03-01

    Allantoin catabolism studies have been extended to intact leaf tissue of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) Phenyl phosphordiamidate, one of the most potent urease inhibitors known does not inhibit /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ release from (2,7-/sup 14/C)allantoin (urea labeled), but inhibits urea dependent CO/sub 2/release greater than or equal to99.9% under similar conditions. Furthermore, /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and /sup 14/C) allantoate are the only detectable products of (2,7-/sup 14/C)allantoin catabolism. Neither urea nor any other product were detected by analysis on HPLC organic acid or organic base columns although urea and all commercially available metabolites that have been implicated in allantoin and glyoxylate metabolism can be resolved by a combination of these two columns. In contrast, when allantoin was labeled in the two central, nonureido carbons ((4,5-/sup 14/C)allantoin), its catabolism to (/sup 14/)allantoate, /sup 14/CO/sub 2/,(/sup 14/C)glyoxylate, (/sup 14/C)glycine, and (/sup 14/C)serine in leaf discs could be detected. These data are fully consistent with the metabolism of allantoate by two amidohydrolase reactions (neither of which is urease) that occur at similar rates to release glyoxylate, which in turn is metabolized via the photorespiratory pathway. This is the first evidence that allantoate is metabolized without urease action to NH/sub 4//sup +/ and CO/sub 2/ and that carbons 4 and 5 enter the photorespiratory pathway.

  17. Evidence of a plasmid-encoded oxidative xylose-catabolic pathway in Arthrobacter nicotinovorans pAO1.

    PubMed

    Mihasan, Marius; Stefan, Marius; Hritcu, Lucian; Artenie, Vlad; Brandsch, Roderich

    2013-01-01

    Due to its high abundance, the D-xylose fraction of lignocellulose provides a promising resource for production of various chemicals. Examples of efficient utilization of d-xylose are nevertheless rare, mainly due to the lack of enzymes with suitable properties for biotechnological applications. The genus Arthrobacter, which occupies an ecological niche rich in lignocellulosic materials and containing species with high resistance and tolerance to environmental factors, is a very suitable candidate for finding D-xylose-degrading enzymes with new properties. In this work, the presence of the pAO1 megaplasmid in cells of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans was directly linked to the ability of this microorganism to ferment D-xylose and to sustain longer log growth. Three pAO1 genes (orf32, orf39, orf40) putatively involved in degradation of xylose were identified and cloned, and the corresponding proteins purified and characterized. ORF40 was shown to be a homotetrameric NADP(+)/NAD(+) sugar dehydrogenase with a strong preference for d-xylose; ORF39 is a monomeric aldehyde dehydrogenase with wide substrate specificity and ORF32 is a constitutive expressed transcription factor putatively involved in control of the entire catabolic pathway. Based on analogies with other pentose degradation pathways, a putative xylose oxidative pathway similar to the Weimberg pathway is postulated. PMID:23063486

  18. Reversal of the Kynurenine Pathway of Tryptophan Catabolism May Improve Depression in ART-treated HIV-infected Ugandans

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Priscilla; Tsai, Alexander C.; Muzoora, Conrad; Kembabazi, Annet; Weiser, Sheri D.; Huang, Yong; Haberer, Jessica E.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Bangsberg, David R.; Hunt, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder is highly prevalent among HIV-infected persons, and depression symptom severity improves during the course of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART). The potential biologic pathways explaining these phenomena remain unclear. We investigated the extent to which ART-mediated suppression of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan catabolism (via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 and potentially other sources) may correlate with improvements in depression symptom severity in this setting. Method We used the first year of data from the Uganda AIDS Rural Treatment Outcomes Study, a prospective cohort of 504 HIV-infected individuals initiating their first ART regimen in rural Uganda. We fitted random-effects regression models to estimate the associations between plasma tryptophan, plasma kynurenine, dietary diversity, and self-reported depression symptom severity. Results Greater depressive symptoms were associated with both lower plasma tryptophan and higher plasma kynurenine/tryptophan (KT) ratio over 12-month follow-up. In multivariable-adjusted models, declines in KT ratio and increases in plasma tryptophan levels partially explained ART-mediated improvements in depressive symptom severity. The association between KT ratio and depression symptom severity was stronger among persons with protein-deficient diets than among those with protein-rich diets. Conclusions IDO-mediated tryptophan catabolism may contribute to depression symptom severity among HIV-infected individuals, particularly among those with poor dietary protein intake. ART-mediated improvements in depressive symptom severity may also be at least partially mediated by immunologic mechanisms. Interventions to reduce immune activation, and dietary protein supplementation, may be promising strategies to further reduce depression in this setting. PMID:24220289

  19. Elucidation of the 4-Hydroxyacetophenone Catabolic Pathway in Pseudomonas fluorescens ACB▿

    PubMed Central

    Moonen, Mariëlle J. H.; Kamerbeek, Nanne M.; Westphal, Adrie H.; Boeren, Sjef A.; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.; van Berkel, Willem J. H.

    2008-01-01

    The catabolism of 4-hydroxyacetophenone in Pseudomonas fluorescens ACB is known to proceed through the intermediate formation of hydroquinone. Here, we provide evidence that hydroquinone is further degraded through 4-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde and maleylacetate to β-ketoadipate. The P. fluorescens ACB genes involved in 4-hydroxyacetophenone utilization were cloned and characterized. Sequence analysis of a 15-kb DNA fragment showed the presence of 14 open reading frames containing a gene cluster (hapCDEFGHIBA) of which at least four encoded enzymes are involved in 4-hydroxyacetophenone degradation: 4-hydroxyacetophenone monooxygenase (hapA), 4-hydroxyphenyl acetate hydrolase (hapB), 4-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (hapE), and maleylacetate reductase (hapF). In between hapF and hapB, three genes encoding a putative intradiol dioxygenase (hapG), a protein of the Yci1 family (hapH), and a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin (hapI) were found. Downstream of the hap genes, five open reading frames are situated encoding three putative regulatory proteins (orf10, orf12, and orf13) and two proteins possibly involved in a membrane efflux pump (orf11 and orf14). Upstream of hapE, two genes (hapC and hapD) were present that showed weak similarity with several iron(II)-dependent extradiol dioxygenases. Based on these findings and additional biochemical evidence, it is proposed that the hapC and hapD gene products are involved in the ring cleavage of hydroquinone. PMID:18502868

  20. Insights into Ongoing Evolution of the Hexachlorocyclohexane Catabolic Pathway from Comparative Genomics of Ten Sphingomonadaceae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Stephen L.; Oakeshott, John G.; Pandey, Gunjan

    2015-01-01

    Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), a synthetic organochloride, was first used as a broad-acre insecticide in the 1940s, and many HCH-degrading bacterial strains have been isolated from around the globe during the last 20 years. To date, the same degradation pathway (the lin pathway) has been implicated in all strains characterized, although the pathway has only been characterized intensively in two strains and for only a single HCH isomer. To further elucidate the evolution of the lin pathway, we have biochemically and genetically characterized three HCH-degrading strains from the Czech Republic and compared the genomes of these and seven other HCH-degrading bacterial strains. The three new strains each yielded a distinct set of metabolites during their degradation of HCH isomers. Variable assembly of the pathway is a common feature across the 10 genomes, eight of which (including all three Czech strains) were either missing key lin genes or containing duplicate copies of upstream lin genes (linA-F). The analysis also confirmed the important role of horizontal transfer mediated by insertion sequence IS6100 in the acquisition of the pathway, with a stronger association of IS6100 to the lin genes in the new strains. In one strain, a linA variant was identified that likely caused a novel degradation phenotype involving a shift in isomer preference. This study identifies a number of strains that are in the early stages of lin pathway acquisition and shows that the state of the pathway can explain the degradation patterns observed. PMID:25850427

  1. Salmonid genomes have a remarkably expanded akirin family, coexpressed with genes from conserved pathways governing skeletal muscle growth and catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kristjánsson, Bjarni K.; Johnston, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Metazoan akirin genes regulate innate immunity, myogenesis, and carcinogenesis. Invertebrates typically have one family member, while most tetrapod and teleost vertebrates have one to three. We demonstrate an expanded repertoire of eight family members in genomes of four salmonid fishes, owing to paralog preservation after three tetraploidization events. Retention of paralogs secondarily lost in other teleosts may be related to functional diversification and posttranslational regulation. We hypothesized that salmonid akirins would be transcriptionally regulated in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during activation of conserved pathways governing catabolism and growth. The in vivo nutritional state of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus L.) was experimentally manipulated, and transcript levels for akirin family members and 26 other genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), allowing the establishment of a similarity network of expression profiles. In fasted muscle, a class of akirins was upregulated, with one family member showing high coexpression with catabolic genes coding the NF-κB p65 subunit, E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and IGF-I receptors. Another class of akirin was upregulated with subsequent feeding, coexpressed with 14-3-3 protein genes. There was no similarity between expression profiles of akirins with IGF hormones or binding protein genes. The level of phylogenetic relatedness of akirin family members was not a strong predictor of transcriptional responses to nutritional state, or differences in transcript abundance levels, indicating a complex pattern of regulatory evolution. The salmonid akirins epitomize the complexity linking the genome to physiological phenotypes of vertebrates with a history of tetraploidization. PMID:20388840

  2. Salmonid genomes have a remarkably expanded akirin family, coexpressed with genes from conserved pathways governing skeletal muscle growth and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Macqueen, Daniel J; Kristjánsson, Bjarni K; Johnston, Ian A

    2010-06-01

    Metazoan akirin genes regulate innate immunity, myogenesis, and carcinogenesis. Invertebrates typically have one family member, while most tetrapod and teleost vertebrates have one to three. We demonstrate an expanded repertoire of eight family members in genomes of four salmonid fishes, owing to paralog preservation after three tetraploidization events. Retention of paralogs secondarily lost in other teleosts may be related to functional diversification and posttranslational regulation. We hypothesized that salmonid akirins would be transcriptionally regulated in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during activation of conserved pathways governing catabolism and growth. The in vivo nutritional state of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus L.) was experimentally manipulated, and transcript levels for akirin family members and 26 other genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), allowing the establishment of a similarity network of expression profiles. In fasted muscle, a class of akirins was upregulated, with one family member showing high coexpression with catabolic genes coding the NF-kappaB p65 subunit, E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and IGF-I receptors. Another class of akirin was upregulated with subsequent feeding, coexpressed with 14-3-3 protein genes. There was no similarity between expression profiles of akirins with IGF hormones or binding protein genes. The level of phylogenetic relatedness of akirin family members was not a strong predictor of transcriptional responses to nutritional state, or differences in transcript abundance levels, indicating a complex pattern of regulatory evolution. The salmonid akirins epitomize the complexity linking the genome to physiological phenotypes of vertebrates with a history of tetraploidization. PMID:20388840

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the d-Amino Acid Catabolism Bacterium Phaeobacter sp. Strain JL2886, Isolated from Deep Seawater of the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yingnan; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zilian; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2016-01-01

    Phaeobacter sp. strain JL2886, isolated from deep seawater of the South China Sea, can catabolize d-amino acids. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Phaeobacter sp. JL2886. It comprises ~4.06 Mbp, with a G+C content of 61.52%. A total of 3,913 protein-coding genes and 10 genes related to d-amino acid catabolism were obtained. PMID:27587825

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the d-Amino Acid Catabolism Bacterium Phaeobacter sp. Strain JL2886, Isolated from Deep Seawater of the South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yingnan; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Phaeobacter sp. strain JL2886, isolated from deep seawater of the South China Sea, can catabolize d-amino acids. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Phaeobacter sp. JL2886. It comprises ~4.06 Mbp, with a G+C content of 61.52%. A total of 3,913 protein-coding genes and 10 genes related to d-amino acid catabolism were obtained. PMID:27587825

  5. Pyridine metabolism in tea plants: salvage, conjugate formation and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Deng, Wei-Wei

    2012-11-01

    Pyridine compounds, including nicotinic acid and nicotinamide, are key metabolites of both the salvage pathway for NAD and the biosynthesis of related secondary compounds. We examined the in situ metabolic fate of [carbonyl-(14)C]nicotinamide, [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid and [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid riboside in tissue segments of tea (Camellia sinensis) plants, and determined the activity of enzymes involved in pyridine metabolism in protein extracts from young tea leaves. Exogenously supplied (14)C-labelled nicotinamide was readily converted to nicotinic acid, and some nicotinic acid was salvaged to nicotinic acid mononucleotide and then utilized for the synthesis of NAD and NADP. The nicotinic acid riboside salvage pathway discovered recently in mungbean cotyledons is also operative in tea leaves. Nicotinic acid was converted to nicotinic acid N-glucoside, but not to trigonelline (N-methylnicotinic acid), in any part of tea seedlings. Active catabolism of nicotinic acid was observed in tea leaves. The fate of [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid indicates that glutaric acid is a major catabolite of nicotinic acid; it was further metabolised, and carbon atoms were finally released as CO(2). The catabolic pathway observed in tea leaves appears to start with the nicotinic acid N-glucoside formation; this pathway differs from catabolic pathways observed in microorganisms. Profiles of pyridine metabolism in tea plants are discussed. PMID:22527843

  6. In Planta Biocontrol of Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Rhodococcus erythropolis Involves Silencing of Pathogen Communication by the Rhodococcal Gamma-Lactone Catabolic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Barbey, Corinne; Crépin, Alexandre; Bergeau, Dorian; Ouchiha, Asma; Mijouin, Lily; Taupin, Laure; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Dufour, Alain; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The virulence of numerous Gram-negative bacteria is under the control of a quorum sensing process based on synthesis and perception of N-acyl homoserine lactones. Rhodococcus erythropolis, a Gram-positive bacterium, has recently been proposed as a biocontrol agent for plant protection against soft-rot bacteria, including Pectobacterium. Here, we show that the γ-lactone catabolic pathway of R. erythropolis disrupts Pectobacterium communication and prevents plant soft-rot. We report the first characterization and demonstration of N-acyl homoserine lactone quenching in planta. In particular, we describe the transcription of the R. erythropolis lactonase gene, encoding the key enzyme of this pathway, and the subsequent lactone breakdown. The role of this catabolic pathway in biocontrol activity was confirmed by deletion of the lactonase gene from R. erythropolis and also its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The γ-lactone catabolic pathway is induced by pathogen communication rather than by pathogen invasion. This is thus a novel and unusual biocontrol pathway, differing from those previously described as protecting plants from phytopathogens. These findings also suggest the existence of an additional pathway contributing to plant protection. PMID:23805254

  7. In Planta Biocontrol of Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Rhodococcus erythropolis Involves Silencing of Pathogen Communication by the Rhodococcal Gamma-Lactone Catabolic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Corinne; Crépin, Alexandre; Bergeau, Dorian; Ouchiha, Asma; Mijouin, Lily; Taupin, Laure; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Dufour, Alain; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The virulence of numerous Gram-negative bacteria is under the control of a quorum sensing process based on synthesis and perception of N-acyl homoserine lactones. Rhodococcus erythropolis, a Gram-positive bacterium, has recently been proposed as a biocontrol agent for plant protection against soft-rot bacteria, including Pectobacterium. Here, we show that the γ-lactone catabolic pathway of R. erythropolis disrupts Pectobacterium communication and prevents plant soft-rot. We report the first characterization and demonstration of N-acyl homoserine lactone quenching in planta. In particular, we describe the transcription of the R. erythropolis lactonase gene, encoding the key enzyme of this pathway, and the subsequent lactone breakdown. The role of this catabolic pathway in biocontrol activity was confirmed by deletion of the lactonase gene from R. erythropolis and also its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The γ-lactone catabolic pathway is induced by pathogen communication rather than by pathogen invasion. This is thus a novel and unusual biocontrol pathway, differing from those previously described as protecting plants from phytopathogens. These findings also suggest the existence of an additional pathway contributing to plant protection. PMID:23805254

  8. Fish oil and krill oil supplementations differentially regulate lipid catabolic and synthetic pathways in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Marine derived oils are rich in long-chain polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids, in particular eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which have long been associated with health promoting effects such as reduced plasma lipid levels and anti-inflammatory effects. Krill oil (KO) is a novel marine oil on the market and is also rich in EPA and DHA, but the fatty acids are incorporated mainly into phospholipids (PLs) rather than triacylglycerols (TAG). This study compares the effects of fish oil (FO) and KO on gene regulation that influences plasma and liver lipids in a high fat diet mouse model. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a high-fat diet (HF) containing 24% (wt/wt) fat (21.3% lard and 2.3% soy oil), or the HF diet supplemented with FO (15.7% lard, 2.3% soy oil and 5.8% FO) or KO (15.6% lard, 2.3% soy oil and 5.7% KO) for 6 weeks. Total levels of cholesterol, TAG, PLs, and fatty acid composition were measured in plasma and liver. Gene regulation was investigated using quantitative PCR in liver and intestinal epithelium. Results Plasma cholesterol (esterified and unesterified), TAG and PLs were significantly decreased with FO. Analysis of the plasma lipoprotein particles indicated that the lipid lowering effect by FO is at least in part due to decreased very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) content in plasma with subsequent liver lipid accumulation. KO lowered plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) with a minor effect on fatty acid accumulation in the liver. In spite of a lower omega-3 fatty acid content in the KO supplemented diet, plasma and liver PLs omega-3 levels were similar in the two groups, indicating a higher bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids from KO. KO more efficiently decreased arachidonic acid and its elongation/desaturation products in plasma and liver. FO mainly increased the expression of several genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, while KO specifically decreased the expression of genes involved in

  9. Catabolism of (+/-)-abscisic acid by excised leaves of Hordeum vulgare L. cv Dyan and its modification by chemical and environmental factors

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, A.K.; Railton, I.D.

    1987-05-01

    Excised light-grown leaves and etiolated leaves of Hordeum vulgare L. cv Dyan catabolized applied (+/-)-(2-/sup 14/C)abscisic acid ((+/-)-(2-/sup 14/C)ABA) to phaseic acid (PA), dihydrophaseic acid (DPA), and 2'-hydroxymethyl ABA (2'-HMABA). Identification of these catabolites was made by microchemical methods and by combined capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) following high dose feeds of nonlabeled substrate to leaves. Circular dichroism analysis revealed that 2'-HMABA was derived from the (-) enantiomer of ABA. Refeeding studies were used to confirm the catabolic route. The methyl ester of (+/-)-(2/sup 14/C)-ABA was hydrolyzed efficiently by light-grown leaves of H. vulgare. Leaf age played a significant role in (+/-)-ABA catabolism, with younger leaves being less able than their older counterparts to catabolize this compound. The catabolism of (+/-)-ABA was inhibited markedly in water-stressed Hordeum leaves which was characterized by a decreased incorporation of label into 2'-HMABA, DPA, and conjugates. The specific, mixed function oxidase inhibitor, ancymidol, did not inhibit, dramatically (+/-)-ABA catabolism in light-grown leaves of Hordeum whereas the 80s ribosome, translational inhibitor, cycloheximide, inhibited this process markedly. The 70s ribosome translational inhibitors, lincomycin and chloramphenicol, were less effective than cycloheximide in inhibiting (+/-)-ABA catabolism, implying that cytoplasmic protein synthesis is necessary for the catabolism of (+/-)-ABA in Hordeum leaves whereas chloroplast protein synthesis plays only a minor role. This further suggests that the enzymes involved in (+/-)-ABA catabolism in this plant are cytoplasmically synthesized and are turned-over rapidly, although the enzyme responsible for glycosylating (+/-)-ABA itself appeared to be stable.

  10. A novel pathway for fungal D-glucuronate catabolism contains an L-idonate forming 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Kuivanen, Joosu; Sugai-Guérios, Maura H.; Arvas, Mikko; Richard, Peter

    2016-01-01

    For the catabolism of D-glucuronate, different pathways are used by different life forms. The pathways in bacteria and animals are established, however, a fungal pathway has not been described. In this communication, we describe an enzyme that is essential for D-glucuronate catabolism in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. The enzyme has an NADH dependent 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase activity forming L-idonate. The deletion of the corresponding gene, the gluC, results in a phenotype of no growth on D-glucuronate. The open reading frame of the A. niger 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase was expressed as an active protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A histidine tagged protein was purified and it was demonstrated that the enzyme converts 2-keto-L-gulonate to L-idonate and, in the reverse direction, L-idonate to 2-keto-L-gulonate using the NAD(H) as cofactors. Such an L-idonate forming 2-keto-L-gulonate dehydrogenase has not been described previously. In addition, the finding indicates that the catabolic D-glucuronate pathway in A. niger differs fundamentally from the other known D-glucuronate pathways. PMID:27189775

  11. A novel pathway for fungal D-glucuronate catabolism contains an L-idonate forming 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase.

    PubMed

    Kuivanen, Joosu; Sugai-Guérios, Maura H; Arvas, Mikko; Richard, Peter

    2016-01-01

    For the catabolism of D-glucuronate, different pathways are used by different life forms. The pathways in bacteria and animals are established, however, a fungal pathway has not been described. In this communication, we describe an enzyme that is essential for D-glucuronate catabolism in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. The enzyme has an NADH dependent 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase activity forming L-idonate. The deletion of the corresponding gene, the gluC, results in a phenotype of no growth on D-glucuronate. The open reading frame of the A. niger 2-keto-L-gulonate reductase was expressed as an active protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A histidine tagged protein was purified and it was demonstrated that the enzyme converts 2-keto-L-gulonate to L-idonate and, in the reverse direction, L-idonate to 2-keto-L-gulonate using the NAD(H) as cofactors. Such an L-idonate forming 2-keto-L-gulonate dehydrogenase has not been described previously. In addition, the finding indicates that the catabolic D-glucuronate pathway in A. niger differs fundamentally from the other known D-glucuronate pathways. PMID:27189775

  12. Expression of the retinoic acid catabolic enzyme CYP26B1 in the human brain to maintain signaling homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Stoney, Patrick N; Fragoso, Yara D; Saeed, Reem Bu; Ashton, Anna; Goodman, Timothy; Simons, Claire; Gomaa, Mohamed S; Sementilli, Angelo; Sementilli, Leonardo; Ross, Alexander W; Morgan, Peter J; McCaffery, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a potent regulator of gene transcription via its activation of a set of nuclear receptors controlling transcriptional activation. Precise maintenance of where and when RA is generated is essential and achieved by local expression of synthetic and catabolic enzymes. The catabolic enzymes Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1 have been studied in detail in the embryo, where they limit gradients of RA that form patterns of gene expression, crucial for morphogenesis. This paracrine role of RA has been assumed to occur in most tissues and that the RA synthetic enzymes release RA at a site distant from the catabolic enzymes. In contrast to the embryonic CNS, relatively little is known about RA metabolism in the adult brain. This study investigated the distribution of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1 transcripts in the rat brain, identifying several novel regions of expression, including the cerebral cortex for both enzymes and striatum for Cyp26b1. In vivo use of a new and potent inhibitor of the Cyp26 enzymes, ser 2-7, demonstrated a function for endogenous Cyp26 in the brain and that hippocampal RA levels can be raised by ser 2-7, altering the effect of RA on differential patterning of cell proliferation in the hippocampal region of neurogenesis, the subgranular zone. The expression of CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 was also investigated in the adult human brain and colocalization of CYP26A1 and the RA synthetic enzyme RALDH2 indicated a different, autocrine role for RA in human hippocampal neurons. Studies with the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line implied that the co-expression of RA synthetic and catabolic enzymes maintains retinoid homeostasis within neurons. This presents a novel view of RA in human neurons as part of an autocrine, intracellular signaling system. PMID:26374207

  13. Expression and transfer of engineered catabolic pathways harbored by Pseudomonas spp. introuduced into activated sludge microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Nublein, K.; Maris, D.; Timmis, K.; Dwyer, D.F. )

    1992-10-01

    Two genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs), Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 FR1(pFRC20P) (FR120) and Pseudomonas putida KT2440(pWWO-EB62) (EB62), were introduced into activated sludge microcosms that had the level of aeration, nutrient makeup, and microbial community structure of activated sludge reactors. FR120 contains an experimentally assembled ortho cleavage route for simultaneous degradation of 3-chlorobenzoate (3CB) and 4-methyl benzoate (4MB); EB62 contains a derivative TOL plasmid-encoded degradative pathway for toluene experimentally evolved so that it additionally processes 4-ethyl benzoate (4EB). Experiments assessed survival of the GEMs, their ability to degrade target substrates, and lateral transfer of plasmid-encoded recombinant DNA.

  14. Ethylene-enhanced catabolism of ( sup 14 C)indole-3-acetic acid to indole-3-carboxylic acid in citrus leaf tissues. [Citrus sinensis

    SciTech Connect

    Sagee, O.; Riov, J.; Goren, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Exogenous ({sup 14}C)indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is conjugated in citrus (Citrus sinensis) leaf tissues to one major substance which has been identified as indole-3-acetylaspartic acid (IAAsp). Ethylene pretreatment enhanced the catabolism of ({sup 14}C)IAA to indole-3-carboxylic acid (ICA), which accumulated as glucose esters (ICGlu). Increased formation of ICGlu by ethylene was accompanied by a concomitant decrease in IAAsp formation. IAAsp and ICGlu were identified by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Formation of ICGlu was dependent on the concentration of ethylene and the duration of the ethylene pretreatment. It is suggested that the catabolism of IAA to ICA may be one of the mechanisms by which ethylene endogenous IAA levels.

  15. Combined fluxomics and transcriptomics analysis of glucose catabolism via a partially cyclic pentose phosphate pathway in Gluconobacter oxydans 621H.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Tanja; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan; Polen, Tino; Bringer, Stephanie; Sahm, Hermann; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Bott, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the distribution and regulation of periplasmic and cytoplasmic carbon fluxes in Gluconobacter oxydans 621H with glucose were studied by (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) in combination with transcriptomics and enzyme assays. For (13)C-MFA, cells were cultivated with specifically (13)C-labeled glucose, and intracellular metabolites were analyzed for their labeling pattern by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In growth phase I, 90% of the glucose was oxidized periplasmically to gluconate and partially further oxidized to 2-ketogluconate. Of the glucose taken up by the cells, 9% was phosphorylated to glucose 6-phosphate, whereas 91% was oxidized by cytoplasmic glucose dehydrogenase to gluconate. Additional gluconate was taken up into the cells by transport. Of the cytoplasmic gluconate, 70% was oxidized to 5-ketogluconate and 30% was phosphorylated to 6-phosphogluconate. In growth phase II, 87% of gluconate was oxidized to 2-ketogluconate in the periplasm and 13% was taken up by the cells and almost completely converted to 6-phosphogluconate. Since G. oxydans lacks phosphofructokinase, glucose 6-phosphate can be metabolized only via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) or the Entner-Doudoroff pathway (EDP). (13)C-MFA showed that 6-phosphogluconate is catabolized primarily via the oxidative PPP in both phases I and II (62% and 93%) and demonstrated a cyclic carbon flux through the oxidative PPP. The transcriptome comparison revealed an increased expression of PPP genes in growth phase II, which was supported by enzyme activity measurements and correlated with the increased PPP flux in phase II. Moreover, genes possibly related to a general stress response displayed increased expression in growth phase II. PMID:23377928

  16. Establishment of an alternative phosphoketolase-dependent pathway for fructose catabolism in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Fleige, Christian; Kroll, Jens; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2011-08-01

    The β-proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 utilizes fructose and gluconate as carbon sources for heterotrophic growth exclusively via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway with its key enzyme 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (KDPG) aldolase. By deletion of the responsible gene eda, we constructed a KDPG aldolase-negative strain, which is disabled to supply pyruvate for energy metabolism from fructose or gluconate as sole carbon sources. To restore growth on fructose, an alternative pathway, similar to the fructose-6-phosphate shunt of heterofermentative bifidobacteria, was established. For this, the xfp gene from Bifidobacterium animalis, coding for a bifunctional xylulose-5-phosphate/fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase (Xfp; Meile et al. in J Bacteriol 183:2929-2936, 2001), was expressed in R. eutropha H16 PHB(-)4 Δeda. This Xfp catalyzes the phosphorolytic cleavage of fructose 6-phosphate to erythrose 4-phosphate and acetylphosphate as well as of xylulose 5-phosphate to glyceralaldehyde 3-phosphate and acetylphosphate. The recombinant strain showed phosphoketolase (PKT) activity on either substrate, and was able to use fructose as sole carbon source for growth, because PKT is the only enzyme that is missing in R. eutropha H16 to establish the artificial fructose-6-phosphate shunt. The Xfp-expressing strain R. eutropha H16 PHB(-)4 Δeda (pBBR1MCS-3::xfp) should be applicable for a novel variant of a plasmid addiction system to stably maintain episomally encoded genetic information during fermentative production processes. Plasmid addiction systems are often used to ensure plasmid stability in many biotechnology relevant microorganisms and processes without the need to apply external selection pressure, like the addition of antibiotics. By episomal expression of xfp in a R. eutropha H16 mutant lacking KDPG aldolase activity and cultivation in mineral salt medium with fructose as sole carbon source, the growth of this bacterium was addicted to the constructed xfp

  17. Engineering a catabolic pathway in plants for the degradation of 1,2-dichloroethane.

    PubMed

    Mena-Benitez, Gilda L; Gandia-Herrero, Fernando; Graham, Stuart; Larson, Tony R; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; French, Christopher E; Rylott, Elizabeth L; Bruce, Neil C

    2008-07-01

    Plants are increasingly being employed to clean up environmental pollutants such as heavy metals; however, a major limitation of phytoremediation is the inability of plants to mineralize most organic pollutants. A key component of organic pollutants is halogenated aliphatic compounds that include 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA). Although plants lack the enzymatic activity required to metabolize this compound, two bacterial enzymes, haloalkane dehalogenase (DhlA) and haloacid dehalogenase (DhlB) from the bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10, have the ability to dehalogenate a range of halogenated aliphatics, including 1,2-DCA. We have engineered the dhlA and dhlB genes into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum 'Xanthi') plants and used 1,2-DCA as a model substrate to demonstrate the ability of the transgenic tobacco to remediate a range of halogenated, aliphatic hydrocarbons. DhlA converts 1,2-DCA to 2-chloroethanol, which is then metabolized to the phytotoxic 2-chloroacetaldehyde, then chloroacetic acid, by endogenous plant alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities, respectively. Chloroacetic acid is dehalogenated by DhlB to produce the glyoxylate cycle intermediate glycolate. Plants expressing only DhlA produced phytotoxic levels of chlorinated intermediates and died, while plants expressing DhlA together with DhlB thrived at levels of 1,2-DCA that were toxic to DhlA-expressing plants. This represents a significant advance in the development of a low-cost phytoremediation approach toward the clean-up of halogenated organic pollutants from contaminated soil and groundwater. PMID:18467461

  18. Phenylbutyrate improves nitrogen disposal via an alternative pathway without eliciting an increase in protein breakdown and catabolism in control and ornithine transcarbamylase–deficient patients123

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Juan C; Lanpher, Brendan C; Scaglia, Fernando; O'Brien, William E; Sun, Qin; Garlick, Peter J; Jahoor, Farook

    2011-01-01

    Background: Phenylbutyrate is a drug used in patients with urea cycle disorder to elicit alternative pathways for nitrogen disposal. However, phenylbutyrate administration decreases plasma branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) concentrations, and previous research suggests that phenylbutyrate administration may increase leucine oxidation, which would indicate increased protein degradation and net protein loss. Objective: We investigated the effects of phenylbutyrate administration on whole-body protein metabolism, glutamine, leucine, and urea kinetics in healthy and ornithine transcarbamylase–deficient (OTCD) subjects and the possible benefits of BCAA supplementation during phenylbutyrate therapy. Design: Seven healthy control and 7 partial-OTCD subjects received either phenylbutyrate or no treatment in a crossover design. In addition, the partial-OTCD and 3 null-OTCD subjects received phenylbutyrate and phenylbutyrate plus BCAA supplementation. A multitracer protocol was used to determine the whole-body fluxes of urea and amino acids of interest. Results: Phenylbutyrate administration reduced ureagenesis by ≈15% without affecting the fluxes of leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, or glutamine and the oxidation of leucine or phenylalanine. The transfer of 15N from glutamine to urea was reduced by 35%. However, a reduction in plasma concentrations of BCAAs due to phenylbutyrate treatment was observed. BCAA supplementation did not alter the respective baseline fluxes. Conclusions: Prolonged phenylbutyrate administration reduced ureagenesis and the transfer of 15N from glutamine to urea without parallel reductions in glutamine flux and concentration. There were no changes in total-body protein breakdown and amino acid catabolism, which suggests that phenylbutyrate can be used to dispose of nitrogen effectively without adverse effects on body protein economy. PMID:21490144

  19. Lysine catabolism in Rhizoctonia leguminicola and related fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Guengerich, F P; Broquist, H P

    1976-01-01

    The catabolism of lysine was studied in several yeasts and fungi. Results with cell-free extracts of Rhizoctonia leguminicola support a proposed pathway involving (D- and L-) EPSILON-N-acetyllysine, alpha-keto-epsilon-acetamidohexanoic acid, delta-acetamidovaleric acid, and delta-aminovaleric acid in the conversion of L-lysine to shortchain organic acids. Label from radioactive L-lysine was found to accumulate in D- and L-epsilon-N-acetyllysine, delta-acetamidovaleric acid, delta-aminovaleric acid, and glutaric acid in cultures of R. leguminicola, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Hansenula saturnus, suggesting that the proposed omega-acetyl pathway of lysine catabolism is generalized among yeasts and fungi. In N. crassa, as is the case in R. leguminicola, the major precursor of L-pipecolic acid was the L-isomer of lysine; 15N experiments were consistent with delta1-piperideine-2-carboxylic acid as an intermediate in the transformation. PMID:131119

  20. Regulation and characterization of the dadRAX locus for D-amino acid catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    He, Weiqing; Li, Congran; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2011-05-01

    D-amino acids are essential components for bacterial peptidoglycan, and these natural compounds are also involved in cell wall remodeling and biofilm disassembling. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the dadAX operon, encoding the D-amino acid dehydrogenase DadA and the amino acid racemase DadX, is essential for D- and L-Ala catabolism, and its expression requires a transcriptional regulator, DadR. In this study, purified recombinant DadA alone was sufficient to demonstrate the proposed enzymatic activity with very broad substrate specificity; it utilizes all D-amino acids tested as substrates except D-Glu and D-Gln. DadA also showed comparable k(cat) and K(m) values on D-Ala and several D-amino acids. dadRAX knockout mutants were constructed and subjected to analysis of their growth phenotypes on amino acids. The results revealed that utilization of L-Ala, L-Trp, D-Ala, and a specific set of D-amino acids as sole nitrogen sources was abolished in the dadA mutant and/or severely hampered in the dadR mutant while growth yield on D-amino acids was surprisingly improved in the dadX mutant. The dadA promoter was induced by several L-amino acids, most strongly by Ala, and only by D-Ala among all tested D-amino acids. Enhanced growth of the dadX mutant on D-amino acids is consistent with the finding that the dadA promoter was constitutively induced in the dadX mutant, where exogenous D-Ala but not L-Ala reduced the expression. Binding of DadR to the dadA regulatory region was demonstrated by electromobility shift assays, and the presence of L-Ala but not D-Ala increased affinity by 3-fold. The presence of multiple DadR-DNA complexes in the dadA regulatory region was demonstrated in vitro, and the formation of these nucleoprotein complexes exerted a complicated impact on promoter activation in vivo. In summary, the results from this study clearly demonstrate DadA to be the enzyme solely responsible for the proposed D-amino acid dehydrogenase activity of broad substrate

  1. Anabolic and Catabolic Signaling Pathways in mouse Longissimus Dorsi after 30-day BION-M1 Spaceflight and Subsequent Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoev, Timur; Blottner, Dieter; Shenkman, Boris; Lomonosova, Yulia; Vilchinskaya, Natalia; Nemirovskaya, Tatiana; Salanova, Michele

    The aim of the study was to analyze some of the key markers regulating anabolic and catabolic processes in mouse m. longissimus dorsi, an important back muscle system for trunk stabilization, following 30-day spaceflight and 8-day recovery period. C57/black mice were divided into 3 groups: 1) Vivarium Control (n=7), 2) Flight (n=5), 3) Recovery (n=5). The experiment was carried out in accordance with the rules of biomedical ethics certified by the Russian Academy of Sciences Committee on Bioethics. Using Western-blotting analysis we determined the content of IRS-1, p-AMPK, MURF-1 and eEF2 in m. longissimus dorsi. The content of IRS-1 in mice m. longissimus dorsi after the 30-day flight did not differ from the control group, however, in the Recovery group IRS-1 level was 80% higher (p<0.05) as compared to Control. Phospho-AMPK content remained unchanged. In the Recovery group there was an increase of eEF2 by 75% compared to the Control (p<0.05). After spaceflight MuRF-1 content was increased more than 2 times compared to the control animals. Thus, our findings showed that the work of the IRS-1 - dependent signaling pathway is only active in the recovery period. The content of the ubiquitin-ligase MURF-1 that takes parts in degrading myosin heavy chain was increased after the spaceflight, however, after 8-day recovery period MURF-1 level did not exceed the control indicating normalization of protein degradation in m. longissimus dorsi. The work was supported by the program of basic research of RAS and Federal Space Program of Russia for the period of 2006-2015.

  2. Catabolic cytokines disrupt the circadian clock and the expression of clock-controlled genes in cartilage via an NFкB-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guo, B.; Yang, N.; Borysiewicz, E.; Dudek, M.; Williams, J.L.; Li, J.; Maywood, E.S.; Adamson, A.; Hastings, M.H.; Bateman, J.F.; White, M.R.H.; Boot-Handford, R.P.; Meng, Q.J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To define how the catabolic cytokines (Interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)) affect the circadian clock mechanism and the expression of clock-controlled catabolic genes within cartilage, and to identify the downstream pathways linking the cytokines to the molecular clock within chondrocytes. Methods Ex vivo cartilage explants were isolated from the Cry1-luc or PER2::LUC clock reporter mice. Clock gene dynamics were monitored in real-time by bioluminescence photon counting. Gene expression changes were studied by qRT-PCR. Functional luc assays were used to study the function of the core Clock/BMAL1 complex in SW-1353 cells. NFкB pathway inhibitor and fluorescence live-imaging of cartilage were performed to study the underlying mechanisms. Results Exposure to IL-1β severely disrupted circadian gene expression rhythms in cartilage. This effect was reversed by an anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone, but not by other clock synchronizing agents. Circadian disruption mediated by IL-1β was accompanied by disregulated expression of endogenous clock genes and clock-controlled catabolic pathways. Mechanistically, NFкB signalling was involved in the effect of IL-1β on the cartilage clock in part through functional interference with the core Clock/BMAL1 complex. In contrast, TNFα had little impact on the circadian rhythm and clock gene expression in cartilage. Conclusion In our experimental system (young healthy mouse cartilage), we demonstrate that IL-1β (but not TNFα) abolishes circadian rhythms in Cry1-luc and PER2::LUC gene expression. These data implicate disruption of the chondrocyte clock as a novel aspect of the catabolic responses of cartilage to pro-inflammatory cytokines, and provide an additional mechanism for how chronic joint inflammation may contribute to osteoarthritis (OA). PMID:26521744

  3. A fusion promoter created by a new insertion sequence, IS1490, activates transcription of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid catabolic genes in Burkholderia cepacia AC1100.

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, A; Hendrickson, W

    1997-01-01

    Transposition and transcriptional activation by insertion sequences in Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 were investigated. Two closely related new elements, IS1413 and IS1490, were identified and characterized. These elements are not highly related to other insertion sequences identified in AC1100 or other B. cepacia isolates. Based on their structures and the sequences of the inverted terminal repeats and the putative transposase protein, the insertion elements (IS elements) are similar to IST2 of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and several related elements. All the IS elements that have been identified in this strain are found in multiple copies (10 to 40), and they have high-level promoter activity capable of stimulating transcription from a distance up to 500 bp from a target gene. Strain AC1100 was originally isolated after prolonged selection for the ability to utilize the herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) as a sole carbon source. Three IS elements are located near the first gene of the 2,4,5-T catabolic pathway, tftA. IS1490 inserted 110 bp upstream of tftA and created a fusion promoter responsible for constitutive transcription of the gene. Our results confirm the hypothesis that IS elements play a central role in transcription of 2,4,5-T genes and likely have stimulated rapid evolution of the metabolic pathway. PMID:9098071

  4. Lactating Porcine Mammary Tissue Catabolizes Branched-Chain Amino Acids for Glutamine and Aspartate Synthesis1–3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Knabe, Darrell A.; Kim, Sung Woo; Lynch, Christopher J.; Hutson, Susan M.; Wu, Guoyao

    2009-01-01

    The uptake of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) from plasma by lactating porcine mammary gland substantially exceeds their output in milk, whereas glutamine output is 125% greater than its uptake from plasma. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that BCAA are catabolized for glutamine synthesis in mammary tissue. Mammary tissue slices from sows on d 28 of lactation were incubated at 37°C for 1 h in Krebs buffer containing 0.5 or 2 mmol/L l-[1-14C]– or l-[U-14C]–labeled leucine, isoleucine, or valine. Rates of BCAA transport and degradation in mammary tissue were high, with ∼60% of transaminated BCAA undergoing oxidative decarboxylation and the remainder being released as branched-chain α-ketoacids (BCKA). Most (∼70%) of the decarboxylated BCAA were oxidized to CO2. Rates of net BCAA transamination were similar to rates of glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, asparagine, and alanine synthesis. Consistent with the metabolic data, mammary tissue expressed BCAA aminotransferase (BCAT), BCKA decarboxylase, glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate-oxaloacetate aminotransferase, glutamate-pyruvate aminotransferase, and asparagine synthetase, but no phosphate-activated glutaminase, activity. Western blot analysis indicated relatively high levels of mitochondrial and cytosolic isoforms of BCAT, as well as BCKA dehydrogenase and GS proteins in mammary tissue. Our results demonstrate that glutamine and aspartate (abundant amino acids in milk protein) were the major nitrogenous products of BCAA catabolism in lactating porcine mammary tissue and provide a biochemical basis to explain an enrichment of glutamine and aspartate in sow milk. PMID:19549750

  5. Microbial catabolism of vanillate: decarboxylation to guaiacol.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, R L; Olson, P P

    1978-01-01

    A novel catabolic transformation of vanillic acid (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid) by microorganisms is reported. Several strains of Bacillus megaterium and a strain of Streptomyces are shown to convert vanillate to guaiacol (o-methoxyphenol) and CO2 by nonoxidative decarboxylation. Use of a modified most-probable-number procedure shows that numerous soils contain countable numbers (10(1) to 10(2) organisms per g of dry soil) of aerobic sporeformers able to convert vanillate to guaiacol. Conversion of vanillate to guaiacol by the microfloras of most-probable-number replicates was used as the criterion for scoring replicates positive or negative. Guaiacol was detected by thin-layer chromatography. These results indicate that the classic separations of catabolic pathways leading to specific ring-fashion substrates such as protocatechuate and catechol are often interconnectable by single enzymatic transformations, usually a decarboxylation. PMID:101140

  6. Characterization of the Mycobacterial Acyl-CoA Carboxylase Holo Complexes Reveals Their Functional Expansion into Amino Acid Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ehebauer, Matthias T.; Zimmermann, Michael; Jakobi, Arjen J.; Noens, Elke E.; Laubitz, Daniel; Cichocki, Bogdan; Marrakchi, Hedia; Lanéelle, Marie-Antoinette; Daffé, Mamadou; Sachse, Carsten; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Sauer, Uwe; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Biotin-mediated carboxylation of short-chain fatty acid coenzyme A esters is a key step in lipid biosynthesis that is carried out by multienzyme complexes to extend fatty acids by one methylene group. Pathogenic mycobacteria have an unusually high redundancy of carboxyltransferase genes and biotin carboxylase genes, creating multiple combinations of protein/protein complexes of unknown overall composition and functional readout. By combining pull-down assays with mass spectrometry, we identified nine binary protein/protein interactions and four validated holo acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase complexes. We investigated one of these - the AccD1-AccA1 complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with hitherto unknown physiological function. Using genetics, metabolomics and biochemistry we found that this complex is involved in branched amino-acid catabolism with methylcrotonyl coenzyme A as the substrate. We then determined its overall architecture by electron microscopy and found it to be a four-layered dodecameric arrangement that matches the overall dimensions of a distantly related methylcrotonyl coenzyme A holo complex. Our data argue in favor of distinct structural requirements for biotin-mediated γ-carboxylation of α−β unsaturated acid esters and will advance the categorization of acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase complexes. Knowledge about the underlying structural/functional relationships will be crucial to make the target category amenable for future biomedical applications. PMID:25695631

  7. A Two-Component para-Nitrophenol Monooxygenase Initiates a Novel 2-Chloro-4-Nitrophenol Catabolism Pathway in Rhodococcus imtechensis RKJ300

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jun; Zhang, Jun-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus imtechensis RKJ300 (DSM 45091) grows on 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol (2C4NP) and para-nitrophenol (PNP) as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. In this study, by genetic and biochemical analyses, a novel 2C4NP catabolic pathway different from those of all other 2C4NP utilizers was identified with hydroxyquinol (hydroxy-1,4-hydroquinone or 1,2,4-benzenetriol [BT]) as the ring cleavage substrate. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the pnp cluster located in three operons is likely involved in the catabolism of both 2C4NP and PNP. The oxygenase component (PnpA1) and reductase component (PnpA2) of the two-component PNP monooxygenase were expressed and purified to homogeneity, respectively. The identification of chlorohydroquinone (CHQ) and BT during 2C4NP degradation catalyzed by PnpA1A2 indicated that PnpA1A2 catalyzes the sequential denitration and dechlorination of 2C4NP to BT and catalyzes the conversion of PNP to BT. Genetic analyses revealed that pnpA1 plays an essential role in both 2C4NP and PNP degradations by gene knockout and complementation. In addition to catalyzing the oxidation of CHQ to BT, PnpA1A2 was also found to be able to catalyze the hydroxylation of hydroquinone (HQ) to BT, revealing the probable fate of HQ that remains unclear in PNP catabolism by Gram-positive bacteria. This study fills a gap in our knowledge of the 2C4NP degradation mechanism in Gram-positive bacteria and also enhances our understanding of the genetic and biochemical diversity of 2C4NP catabolism. PMID:26567304

  8. Branched-chain and aromatic amino acid catabolism into aroma volatiles in Cucumis melo L. fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The unique aroma of melons (Cucumis melo L., Cucurbitaceae) is composed of many volatile compounds biosynthetically derived from fatty-acids, carotenoids, amino-acids as well as terpenes. Incubation of melon fruit cubes with amino- and a-keto acids led to the enhanced formation of aroma compounds be...

  9. A Fox2-dependent fatty acid ß-oxidation pathway coexists both in peroxisomes and mitochondria of the ascomycete yeast Candida lusitaniae.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Frédéric; Accoceberry, Isabelle; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques; Salin, Bénédicte; Lucas-Guérin, Marine; Manon, Stephen; Dementhon, Karine; Noël, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    It is generally admitted that the ascomycete yeasts of the subphylum Saccharomycotina possess a single fatty acid ß-oxidation pathway located exclusively in peroxisomes, and that they lost mitochondrial ß-oxidation early during evolution. In this work, we showed that mutants of the opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida lusitaniae which lack the multifunctional enzyme Fox2p, a key enzyme of the ß-oxidation pathway, were still able to grow on fatty acids as the sole carbon source, suggesting that C. lusitaniae harbored an alternative pathway for fatty acid catabolism. By assaying 14Cα-palmitoyl-CoA consumption, we demonstrated that fatty acid catabolism takes place in both peroxisomal and mitochondrial subcellular fractions. We then observed that a fox2Δ null mutant was unable to catabolize fatty acids in the mitochondrial fraction, thus indicating that the mitochondrial pathway was Fox2p-dependent. This finding was confirmed by the immunodetection of Fox2p in protein extracts obtained from purified peroxisomal and mitochondrial fractions. Finally, immunoelectron microscopy provided evidence that Fox2p was localized in both peroxisomes and mitochondria. This work constitutes the first demonstration of the existence of a Fox2p-dependent mitochondrial β-oxidation pathway in an ascomycetous yeast, C. lusitaniae. It also points to the existence of an alternative fatty acid catabolism pathway, probably located in peroxisomes, and functioning in a Fox2p-independent manner. PMID:25486052

  10. Initial hydrogenation during catabolism of picric acid by Rhodococcus erythropolis HL 24-2.

    PubMed Central

    Lenke, H; Knackmuss, H J

    1992-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis HL 24-2, which was originally isolated as a 2,4-dinitrophenol-degrading bacterium, could also utilize picric acid as a nitrogen source after spontaneous mutation. During growth, the mutant HL PM-1 transiently accumulated an orange-red metabolite, which was identified as a hydride-Meisenheimer complex of picric acid. This complex was formed as the initial metabolite and further converted with concomitant liberation of nitrite. 2,4,6-Trinitrocyclohexanone was identified as a dead-end metabolite of the degradation of picric acid, indicating the addition of two hydride ions to picric acid. PMID:1444408

  11. Effect of dietary fat, carbohydrate, and protein on branched-chain amino acid catabolism during caloric restriction.

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, J A; Morse, E L; Adibi, S A

    1985-01-01

    To assess the effect of each dietary caloric source on the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids, we investigated the rate of leucine oxidation before and after obese volunteers consumed one of the following diets for one week: (a) starvation, (b) 300 or 500 cal of fat/d, (c) 300 or 500 cal of carbohydrate/d, (d) 300 or 500 cal of protein/d, (e) a mixture of carbohydrate (300 cal/d) and fat (200 cal/d), or (f) a mixture of carbohydrate (300 cal/d) and protein (200 cal/d). Starvation significantly increased the rate of leucine oxidation (1.4 +/- 0.11 vs. 1.8 +/- 0.16 mmol/h, P less than 0.01). The same occurred with the fat and protein diets. In sharp contrast, the 500-cal carbohydrate diet significantly decreased the rate of leucine oxidation (1.3 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.6 +/- 0.09 mmol/h, P less than 0.01). The same occurred when a portion of the carbohydrate diet was isocalorically replaced with either fat or protein. The cumulative nitrogen excretion during the fat diet and starvation was not significantly different. As compared with the fat diets, the carbohydrate diets on the average reduced the urinary nitrogen excretion by 12 g/wk. Nitrogen balance was positive during the consumption of the 500-cal protein diet, but negative during the consumption of carbohydrate-protein diet. The fat diets, like the protein diets and starvation, greatly increased plasma leucine (119 +/- 13 vs. 222 +/- 15 microM, P less than 0.01) and beta-hydroxybutyrate (0.12 +/- 0.02 vs. 4.08 +/- 0.43 mM, P less than 0.01) concentrations, and significantly decreased plasma glucose (96 +/- 4 vs. 66 +/- 3 mg/dl, P less than 0.01) and insulin (18 +/- 4 vs. 9 +/- 1 microU/ml, P less than 0.05) concentrations. These changes did not occur, or were greatly attenuated, when subjects consumed carbohydrate alone or in combination with fat or protein. We conclude that during brief caloric restriction, dietary lipid and protein, unlike carbohydrate, do not diminish the catabolism of branched-chain amino

  12. Contribution of Amino Acid Catabolism to the Tissue Specific Persistence of Campylobacter jejuni in a Murine Colonization Model

    PubMed Central

    Hofreuter, Dirk; Mohr, Juliane; Wensel, Olga; Rademacher, Sebastian; Schreiber, Kerstin; Schomburg, Dietmar; Gao, Beile; Galán, Jorge E.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of food-borne disease in industrialized countries. Carbohydrate utilization by C. jejuni is severely restricted, and knowledge about which substrates fuel C. jejuni infection and growth is limited. Some amino acids have been shown to serve as carbon sources both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study we investigated the contribution of serine and proline catabolism to the in vitro and in vivo growth of C. jejuni 81-176. We confirmed that the serine transporter SdaC and the serine ammonia-lyase SdaA are required for serine utilization, and demonstrated that a predicted proline permease PutP and a bifunctional proline/delta-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase PutA are required for proline utilization by C. jejuni 81-176. C. jejuni 81-176 mutants unable to utilize serine were shown to be severely defective for colonization of the intestine and systemic tissues in a mouse model of infection. In contrast, C. jejuni 81-176 mutants unable to utilize proline were only defective for intestinal colonization. These results further emphasize the importance of amino acid utilization in C. jejuni colonization of various tissues. PMID:23226358

  13. BCAT1 promotes cell proliferation through amino acid catabolism in gliomas carrying wild-type IDH1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon Jung; Wang, Wei; Schlotter, Magdalena; Lindroth, Anders M; Pleier, Sabrina V; Bai, Alfa H C; Karra, Daniela; Piro, Rosario M; Felsberg, Jörg; Addington, Adele; Lemke, Dieter; Weibrecht, Irene; Hovestadt, Volker; Rolli, Claudio G; Campos, Benito; Turcan, Sevin; Sturm, Dominik; Witt, Hendrik; Chan, Timothy A; Herold-Mende, Christel; Kemkemer, Ralf; König, Rainer; Schmidt, Kathrin; Hull, William-Edmund; Pfister, Stefan M; Jugold, Manfred; Hutson, Susan M; Plass, Christoph; Okun, Jürgen G; Reifenberger, Guido; Lichter, Peter; Radlwimmer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Here we show that glioblastoma express high levels of branched-chain amino acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1), the enzyme that initiates the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). Expression of BCAT1 was exclusive to tumors carrying wild-type isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 genes and was highly correlated with methylation patterns in the BCAT1 promoter region. BCAT1 expression was dependent on the concentration of α-ketoglutarate substrate in glioma cell lines and could be suppressed by ectopic overexpression of mutant IDH1 in immortalized human astrocytes, providing a link between IDH1 function and BCAT1 expression. Suppression of BCAT1 in glioma cell lines blocked the excretion of glutamate and led to reduced proliferation and invasiveness in vitro, as well as significant decreases in tumor growth in a glioblastoma xenograft model. These findings suggest a central role for BCAT1 in glioma pathogenesis, making BCAT1 and BCAA metabolism attractive targets for the development of targeted therapeutic approaches to treat patients with glioblastoma. PMID:23793099

  14. Interplay of Aro80 and GATA activators in regulation of genes for catabolism of aromatic amino acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyusung; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2013-06-01

    Aro80, a member of the Zn(2)Cys(6) family proteins, activates expression of the ARO9 and ARO10 genes involved in catabolism of aromatic amino acids in response to aromatic amino acids that act as inducers. ARO9 and ARO10 are also under the control of nitrogen catabolite repression, but the direct roles for GATA factors, Gat1 and Gln3, in this regulation have not yet been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that Aro80 is constitutively bound to its target promoters and activated by inducers at the level of transactivation. Although Aro80 also binds to its own promoter, ARO80 expression is induced only by rapamycin, but not by tryptophan. We show that Aro80 is absolutely required for Gat1 binding to the ARO9, ARO10 and ARO80 promoters upon rapamycin treatment. Gln3 binding to these promoters shows a partial requirement for Aro80. Rapamycin-dependent Gat1 and Gln3 binding to the Aro80 target promoters is not affected by tryptophan availability, suggesting that transactivation activity of Aro80 is not necessary for the recruitment of GATA factors. Rapamycin-dependent induction of Aro80 target genes also requires PP2A phosphatase complex, but not Sit4 phosphatase, acting downstream of TORC1. PMID:23651256

  15. Catabolism and detoxification of 1-aminoalkylphosphonic acids: N-acetylation by the phnO gene product.

    PubMed

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; McSorley, Fern R; Zechel, David L

    2012-01-01

    In Escherichia coli uptake and catabolism of organophosphonates are governed by the phnCDEFGHIJKLMNOP operon. The phnO cistron is shown to encode aminoalkylphosphonate N-acetyltransferase, which utilizes acetylcoenzyme A as acetyl donor and aminomethylphosphonate, (S)- and (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonate, 2-aminoethyl- and 3-aminopropylphosphonate as acetyl acceptors. Aminomethylphosphonate, (S)-1-aminoethylphosphonate, 2-aminoethyl- and 3-aminopropylphosphonate are used as phosphate source by E. coli phn(+) strains. 2-Aminoethyl- or 3-aminopropylphosphonate but not aminomethylphosphonate or (S)-1-aminoethylphosphonate is used as phosphate source by phnO strains. Neither phn(+) nor phnO strains can use (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonate as phosphate source. Utilization of aminomethylphosphonate or (S)-1-aminoethylphosphonate requires the expression of phnO. In the absence of phnO-expression (S)-1-aminoethylphosphonate is bacteriocidal and rescue of phnO strains requires the simultaneous addition of d-alanine and phosphate. An intermediate of the carbon-phosphorus lyase pathway, 5'-phospho-α-d-ribosyl 1'-(2-N-acetamidoethylphosphonate), a substrate for carbon-phosphorus lyase, was found to accumulate in cultures of a phnP mutant strain. The data show that the physiological role of N-acetylation by phnO-specified aminoalkylphosphonate N-acetyltransferase is to detoxify (S)-1-aminoethylphosphonate, an analog of d-alanine, and to prepare (S)-1-aminoethylphosphonate and aminomethylphosphonate for utilization of the phosphorus-containing moiety. PMID:23056305

  16. The Effects of Monensin on Amino Acid Catabolizing Bacteria Isolated from the Boer Goat Rumen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When ruminants consume feed, as much as half of the amino acid nitrogen can be lost due to microbial degradation in the rumen. Hyper ammonia-producing bacteria (HAB) are primarily responsible for nitrogen loss in sheep and cattle, and these organisms have been well characterized. However, little is ...

  17. Uricase Inhibits Nitrogen Dioxide-Promoted Allergic Sensitization to Inhaled Ovalbumin Independent of Uric Acid Catabolism.

    PubMed

    Ather, Jennifer L; Burgess, Edward J; Hoyt, Laura R; Randall, Matthew J; Mandal, Mridul K; Matthews, Dwight E; Boyson, Jonathan E; Poynter, Matthew E

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an environmental air pollutant and endogenously generated oxidant that contributes to the exacerbation of respiratory disease and can function as an adjuvant to allergically sensitize to an innocuous inhaled Ag. Because uric acid has been implicated as a mediator of adjuvant activity, we sought to determine whether uric acid was elevated and participated in a mouse model of NO2-promoted allergic sensitization. We found that uric acid was increased in the airways of mice exposed to NO2 and that administration of uricase inhibited the development of OVA-driven allergic airway disease subsequent to OVA challenge, as well as the generation of OVA-specific Abs. However, uricase was itself immunogenic, inducing a uricase-specific adaptive immune response that occurred even when the enzymatic activity of uricase had been inactivated. Inhibition of the OVA-specific response was not due to the capacity of uricase to inhibit the early steps of OVA uptake or processing and presentation by dendritic cells, but occurred at a later step that blocked OVA-specific CD4(+) T cell proliferation and cytokine production. Although blocking uric acid formation by allopurinol did not affect outcomes, administration of ultra-clean human serum albumin at protein concentrations equivalent to that of uricase inhibited NO2-promoted allergic airway disease. These results indicate that, although uric acid levels are elevated in the airways of NO2-exposed mice, the powerful inhibitory effect of uricase administration on allergic sensitization is mediated more through Ag-specific immune deviation than via suppression of allergic sensitization, a mechanism to be considered in the interpretation of results from other experimental systems. PMID:27465529

  18. Transcriptome analysis of bitter acid biosynthesis and precursor pathways in hop (Humulus lupulus)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bitter acids (e.g. humulone) are prenylated polyketides synthesized in lupulin glands of the hop plant (Humulus lupulus) which are important contributors to the bitter flavour and stability of beer. Bitter acids are formed from acyl-CoA precursors derived from branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) degradation and C5 prenyl diphosphates from the methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. We used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to obtain the transcriptomes of isolated lupulin glands, cones with glands removed and leaves from high α-acid hop cultivars, and analyzed these datasets for genes involved in bitter acid biosynthesis including the supply of major precursors. We also measured the levels of BCAAs, acyl-CoA intermediates, and bitter acids in glands, cones and leaves. Results Transcripts encoding all the enzymes of BCAA metabolism were significantly more abundant in lupulin glands, indicating that BCAA biosynthesis and subsequent degradation occurs in these specialized cells. Branched-chain acyl-CoAs and bitter acids were present at higher levels in glands compared with leaves and cones. RNA-seq analysis showed the gland-specific expression of the MEP pathway, enzymes of sucrose degradation and several transcription factors that may regulate bitter acid biosynthesis in glands. Two branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT) enzymes, HlBCAT1 and HlBCAT2, were abundant, with gene expression quantification by RNA-seq and qRT-PCR indicating that HlBCAT1 was specific to glands while HlBCAT2 was present in glands, cones and leaves. Recombinant HlBCAT1 and HlBCAT2 catalyzed forward (biosynthetic) and reverse (catabolic) reactions with similar kinetic parameters. HlBCAT1 is targeted to mitochondria where it likely plays a role in BCAA catabolism. HlBCAT2 is a plastidial enzyme likely involved in BCAA biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis of the hop BCATs and those from other plants showed that they group into distinct biosynthetic (plastidial) and catabolic (mitochondrial

  19. Catabolism of Branched Chain Amino Acids Contributes Significantly to Synthesis of Odd-Chain and Even-Chain Fatty Acids in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Crown, Scott B.; Marze, Nicholas; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.

    2015-01-01

    The branched chain amino acids (BCAA) valine, leucine and isoleucine have been implicated in a number of diseases including obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, although the mechanisms are still poorly understood. Adipose tissue plays an important role in BCAA homeostasis by actively metabolizing circulating BCAA. In this work, we have investigated the link between BCAA catabolism and fatty acid synthesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes using parallel 13C-labeling experiments, mass spectrometry and model-based isotopomer data analysis. Specifically, we performed parallel labeling experiments with four fully 13C-labeled tracers, [U-13C]valine, [U-13C]leucine, [U-13C]isoleucine and [U-13C]glutamine. We measured mass isotopomer distributions of fatty acids and intracellular metabolites by GC-MS and analyzed the data using the isotopomer spectral analysis (ISA) framework. We demonstrate that 3T3-L1 adipocytes accumulate significant amounts of even chain length (C14:0, C16:0 and C18:0) and odd chain length (C15:0 and C17:0) fatty acids under standard cell culture conditions. Using a novel GC-MS method, we demonstrate that propionyl-CoA acts as the primer on fatty acid synthase for the production of odd chain fatty acids. BCAA contributed significantly to the production of all fatty acids. Leucine and isoleucine contributed at least 25% to lipogenic acetyl-CoA pool, and valine and isoleucine contributed 100% to lipogenic propionyl-CoA pool. Our results further suggest that low activity of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and mass action kinetics of propionyl-CoA on fatty acid synthase result in high rates of odd chain fatty acid synthesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Overall, this work provides important new insights into the connection between BCAA catabolism and fatty acid synthesis in adipocytes and underscores the high capacity of adipocytes for metabolizing BCAA. PMID:26710334

  20. NAH plasmid-mediated catabolism of anthracene and phenanthrene to naphthoic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Menn, F M; Applegate, B M; Sayler, G S

    1993-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens 5R contains an NAH7-like plasmid (pKA1), and P. fluorescens 5R mutant 5RL contains a bioluminescent reporter plasmid (pUTK21) which was constructed by transposon mutagenesis. Polymerase chain reaction mapping confirmed the localization of lux transposon Tn4431 300 bp downstream from the start of the nahG gene. Two degradation products, 2-hydroxy-3-naphthoic acid and 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, were recovered and identified from P. fluorescens 5RL as biochemical metabolites from the biotransformation of anthracene and phenanthrene, respectively. This is the first report which provides direct biochemical evidence that the naphthalene plasmid degradative enzyme system is involved in the degradation of higher-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons other than naphthalene. Images PMID:8328810

  1. Crystal Structure of N-succinylarginine Dihydrolase AstB, Bound to Substrate and Product, an Enzyme from the Arginine Catabolic Pathway of Escherichia Coli

    SciTech Connect

    Tocilj,A.; Schrag, J.; Li, Y.; Schneider, B.; Reitzer, L.; Matte, A.; Cygler, M.

    2005-01-01

    The ammonia-producing arginine succinyltransferase pathway is the major pathway in Escherichia coli and related bacteria for arginine catabolism as a sole nitrogen source. This pathway consists of five steps, each catalyzed by a distinct enzyme. Here we report the crystal structure of N-succinylarginine dihydrolase AstB, the second enzyme of the arginine succinyltransferase pathway, providing the first structural insight into enzymes from this pathway. The enzyme exhibits a pseudo 5-fold symmetric {alpha}/{beta} propeller fold of circularly arranged {beta}{beta}{alpha}{beta} modules enclosing the active site. The crystal structure indicates clearly that this enzyme belongs to the amidinotransferase (AT) superfamily and that the active site contains a Cys-His-Glu triad characteristic of the AT superfamily. Structures of the complexes of AstB with the reaction product and a C365S mutant with bound the N-succinylarginine substrate suggest a catalytic mechanism that consists of two cycles of hydrolysis and ammonia release, with each cycle utilizing a mechanism similar to that proposed for arginine deiminases. Like other members of the AT superfamily of enzymes, AstB possesses a flexible loop that is disordered in the absence of substrate and assumes an ordered conformation upon substrate binding, shielding the ligand from the bulk solvent, thereby controlling substrate access and product release.

  2. Tryptophan catabolism in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed Central

    Bouknight, R R; Sadoff, H L

    1975-01-01

    Bacillus megaterium grows in a medium containing L-tryptophan as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. Kynurenine, anthranilic acid, and catechol are metabolic intermediates, suggesting that this organism used the anthranilic acid pathway for tryptophan degradation. Cells that grow on L-tryptophan oxidize kynurenine, alanine, and anthranilic acid and the presence of tryptophan oxygenase (EC 1.13.1.12), kynureninase (EC 3.7.1.3), and catechol oxygenase (EC 1.13.1.1) in cell extracts provide additional evidence for the degradative pathway in B. megaterium. Tryptophan oxygenase is inhibited by sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and hydroxylamine, indicating that the enzyme has a functional heme group. D-Tryptophan is not a substrate for tryptophan oxygenase, and the D-isomer does not inhibit this enzyme. Formamidase (EC 3.5.1.9) and anthranilate hydroxylase are not detectable in extracts. Tryptophan catabolism is inducible in B megaterium and is subject to catabolite repression by glucose and glutamate. Arginine does not cause repression, and kynurenine induces both tryptophan oxygenase and kynureninase. PMID:803956

  3. A second pathway to degrade pyrimidine nucleic acid precursors in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Gorm; Björnberg, Olof; Polakova, Silvia; Pynyaha, Yuriy; Rasmussen, Anna; Møller, Kasper; Hofer, Anders; Moritz, Thomas; Sandrini, Michael Paolo Bastner; Merico, Anna-Maria; Compagno, Concetta; Akerlund, Hans-Erik; Gojković, Zoran; Piskur, Jure

    2008-07-18

    Pyrimidine bases are the central precursors for RNA and DNA, and their intracellular pools are determined by de novo, salvage and catabolic pathways. In eukaryotes, degradation of uracil has been believed to proceed only via the reduction to dihydrouracil. Using a yeast model, Saccharomyces kluyveri, we show that during degradation, uracil is not reduced to dihydrouracil. Six loci, named URC1-6 (for uracil catabolism), are involved in the novel catabolic pathway. Four of them, URC3,5, URC6, and URC2 encode urea amidolyase, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, and a putative transcription factor, respectively. The gene products of URC1 and URC4 are highly conserved proteins with so far unknown functions and they are present in a variety of prokaryotes and fungi. In bacteria and in some fungi, URC1 and URC4 are linked on the genome together with the gene for uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (URC6). Urc1p and Urc4p are therefore likely the core components of this novel biochemical pathway. A combination of genetic and analytical chemistry methods demonstrates that uridine monophosphate and urea are intermediates, and 3-hydroxypropionic acid, ammonia and carbon dioxide the final products of degradation. The URC pathway does not require the presence of an active respiratory chain and is therefore different from the oxidative and rut pathways described in prokaryotes, although the latter also gives 3-hydroxypropionic acid as the end product. The genes of the URC pathway are not homologous to any of the eukaryotic or prokaryotic genes involved in pyrimidine degradation described to date. PMID:18550080

  4. Xlr1 is involved in the transcriptional control of the pentose catabolic pathway, but not hemi-cellulolytic enzymes in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Evy; Klaubauf, Sylvia; Vallet, Julie; Ribot, Cecile; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; de Vries, Ronald P

    2013-08-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a fungal plant pathogen of many grasses including rice. Since arabinoxylan is one of the major components of the plant cell wall of grasses, M. oryzae is likely to degrade this polysaccharide for supporting its growth in infected leaves. D-Xylose is released from arabinoxylan by fungal depolymerising enzymes and catabolized through the pentose pathway. The expression of genes involved in these pathways is under control of the transcriptional activator XlnR/Xlr1, conserved among filamentous ascomycetes. In this study, we identified M. oryzae genes involved in the pentose catabolic pathway (PCP) and their function during infection, including the XlnR homolog, XLR1, through the phenotypic analysis of targeted null mutants. Growth of the Δxlr1 strain was reduced on D-xylose and xylan, but unaffected on L-arabinose and arabinan. A strong reduction of PCP gene expression was observed in the Δxlr1 strain on D-xylose and L-arabinose. However, there was no significant difference in xylanolytic and cellulolytic enzyme activities between the Δxlr1 mutant and the reference strain. These data demonstrate that XLR1 encodes the transcriptional activator of the PCP in M. oryzae, but does not appear to play a role in the regulation of the (hemi-) cellulolytic system in this fungus. This indicates only partial similarity in function between Xlr1 and A. niger XlnR. The deletion mutant of D-xylulose kinase encoding gene (XKI1) is clearly unable to grow on either D-xylose or L-arabinose and showed reduced growth on xylitol, L-arabitol and xylan. Δxki1 displayed an interesting molecular phenotype as it over-expressed other PCP genes as well as genes encoding (hemi-) cellulolytic enzymes. However, neither Δxlr1 nor Δxki1 showed significant differences in their pathogeny on rice and barley compared to the wild type, suggesting that D-xylose catabolism is not required for fungal growth in infected leaves. PMID:23810898

  5. Branched-chain amino acid catabolism is a conserved regulator of physiological ageing.

    PubMed

    Mansfeld, Johannes; Urban, Nadine; Priebe, Steffen; Groth, Marco; Frahm, Christiane; Hartmann, Nils; Gebauer, Juliane; Ravichandran, Meenakshi; Dommaschk, Anne; Schmeisser, Sebastian; Kuhlow, Doreen; Monajembashi, Shamci; Bremer-Streck, Sibylle; Hemmerich, Peter; Kiehntopf, Michael; Zamboni, Nicola; Englert, Christoph; Guthke, Reinhard; Kaleta, Christoph; Platzer, Matthias; Sühnel, Jürgen; Witte, Otto W; Zarse, Kim; Ristow, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ageing has been defined as a global decline in physiological function depending on both environmental and genetic factors. Here we identify gene transcripts that are similarly regulated during physiological ageing in nematodes, zebrafish and mice. We observe the strongest extension of lifespan when impairing expression of the branched-chain amino acid transferase-1 (bcat-1) gene in C. elegans, which leads to excessive levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). We further show that BCAAs reduce a LET-363/mTOR-dependent neuro-endocrine signal, which we identify as DAF-7/TGFβ, and that impacts lifespan depending on its related receptors, DAF-1 and DAF-4, as well as ultimately on DAF-16/FoxO and HSF-1 in a cell-non-autonomous manner. The transcription factor HLH-15 controls and epistatically synergizes with BCAT-1 to modulate physiological ageing. Lastly and consistent with previous findings in rodents, nutritional supplementation of BCAAs extends nematodal lifespan. Taken together, BCAAs act as periphery-derived metabokines that induce a central neuro-endocrine response, culminating in extended healthspan. PMID:26620638

  6. Branched-chain amino acid catabolism is a conserved regulator of physiological ageing

    PubMed Central

    Mansfeld, Johannes; Urban, Nadine; Priebe, Steffen; Groth, Marco; Frahm, Christiane; Hartmann, Nils; Gebauer, Juliane; Ravichandran, Meenakshi; Dommaschk, Anne; Schmeisser, Sebastian; Kuhlow, Doreen; Monajembashi, Shamci; Bremer-Streck, Sibylle; Hemmerich, Peter; Kiehntopf, Michael; Zamboni, Nicola; Englert, Christoph; Guthke, Reinhard; Kaleta, Christoph; Platzer, Matthias; Sühnel, Jürgen; Witte, Otto W.; Zarse, Kim; Ristow, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ageing has been defined as a global decline in physiological function depending on both environmental and genetic factors. Here we identify gene transcripts that are similarly regulated during physiological ageing in nematodes, zebrafish and mice. We observe the strongest extension of lifespan when impairing expression of the branched-chain amino acid transferase-1 (bcat-1) gene in C. elegans, which leads to excessive levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). We further show that BCAAs reduce a LET-363/mTOR-dependent neuro-endocrine signal, which we identify as DAF-7/TGFβ, and that impacts lifespan depending on its related receptors, DAF-1 and DAF-4, as well as ultimately on DAF-16/FoxO and HSF-1 in a cell-non-autonomous manner. The transcription factor HLH-15 controls and epistatically synergizes with BCAT-1 to modulate physiological ageing. Lastly and consistent with previous findings in rodents, nutritional supplementation of BCAAs extends nematodal lifespan. Taken together, BCAAs act as periphery-derived metabokines that induce a central neuro-endocrine response, culminating in extended healthspan. PMID:26620638

  7. Somatic hypermutation of human mitochondrial and nuclear DNA by APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases, a pathway for DNA catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Suspène, Rodolphe; Aynaud, Marie-Ming; Guétard, Denise; Henry, Michel; Eckhoff, Grace; Marchio, Agnès; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 (A3A–A3H) locus encodes six cytidine deaminases that edit single-stranded DNA, the result being DNA peppered with uridine. Although several cytidine deaminases are clearly restriction factors for retroviruses and hepadnaviruses, it is not known if APOBEC3 enzymes have roles outside of these settings. It is shown here that both human mitochondrial and nuclear DNA are vulnerable to somatic hypermutation by A3 deaminases, with APOBEC3A standing out among them. The degree of editing is much greater in patients lacking the uracil DNA-glycolyase gene, indicating that the observed levels of editing reflect a dynamic composed of A3 editing and DNA catabolism involving uracil DNA-glycolyase. Nonetheless, hyper- and lightly mutated sequences went hand in hand, raising the hypothesis that recurrent low-level mutation by APOBEC3A could catalyze the transition from a healthy to a cancer genome. PMID:21368204

  8. Inhibition of retinoic acid catabolism by minocycline: evidence for a novel mode of action?

    PubMed

    Regen, Francesca; Hildebrand, Martin; Le Bret, Nathalie; Herzog, Irmelin; Heuser, Isabella; Hellmann-Regen, Julian

    2015-06-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) represents an essential and highly potent endogenous retinoid with pronounced anti-inflammatory properties and potent anti-acne activity, and has recently been suggested to share a common anti-inflammatory mode of action with tetracycline antibiotics. We hypothesized that tetracyclines may directly interfere with RA homeostasis via inhibition of its local cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated degradation, an essential component of tightly regulated skin RA homeostasis. To test this hypothesis, we performed controlled in vitro RA metabolism assays using rat skin microsomes and measured RA levels in a RA-synthesizing human keratinocyte cell line, both in the presence and in the absence of minocycline, a tetracycline popular in acne treatment. Interestingly, minocycline potently blocked RA degradation in rat skin microsomes, and strikingly enhanced RA levels in RA-synthesizing cell cultures, in a dose-dependent manner. These findings indicate a potential role for CYP-450-mediated RA metabolism in minocycline's pleiotropic mode of action and anti-acne efficacy and could account for the overlap between minocycline and RA-induced effects at the level of their molecular mode of action, but also clinically at the level of the rare side effect of pseudotumor cerebri, which is observed for both, RA and minocycline treatment. PMID:25810318

  9. ORGANIZATION AND EVOLUTION OF NAPHTHALENE CATABOLIC PATHWAYS: SEQUENCE OF THE DNA ENCODING 2-HYDROXYCHROMEME-2-CARBOXYLATE ISOMERASE AND TRANS-O-HYDROXYBENZYLIDENEPYRUVATE HYDRATASE-ALDOLASE FROM THE NAH7 PLASMID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sequence of a 2,437-bp DNA segment from the naphthalene upper catabolic pathway operon of plasmid NAH7 was determined. This segment contains three large open reading frames designated nahQ, nahE, and nahD. The first of these is the 3 end of an open reading frame that has no k...

  10. Methotrexate catabolism to 7-hydroxy methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis alters drug efficacy and retention and is reduced by folic acid supplements

    PubMed Central

    Baggott, Joseph E.; Morgan, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Urinary excretion of methotrexate (MTX) and its catabolite 7-hydroxy-MTX (7-OH-MTX) were measured in two 24-hour collections after MTX therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The effect of folic and folinic acid supplements on this catabolism was determined in patients and in vitro. The effect of this catabolism on MTX efficacy and in vivo retention was determined. Methods Urines were collected after 6 and 7 weeks of therapy. MTX and 7-OH-MTX concentrations were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy. Swelling (SW) and pain/tenderness (P/T) indices were measured before and at 6 and 7 weeks of therapy. Patients received either folic or folinic acid supplements (1mg/day) from week 6 to 7. Results Folic acid not folinic acid inhibited aldehyde oxidase (AO), the 7-OH-MTX producing enzyme. Excretion of 7-OH-MTX as % of dose or mg 7-OH-MTX / g creatinine was not normally distributed (n = 39). Patients with marked improvement in SW and P/T indices had lower mean 7-OH-MTX excretion (p <0.05). Folic acid supplementation lowered 7-OH-MTX excretion (p = 0.03). Relatively high 7-OH-MTX excretion was correlated (p<0.05) with relatively high MTX excretion and with relatively low in vivo MTX retention (n = 35). Conclusion Non-normal distribution of 7-OH-MTX excretion suggests at least two phenotypes for this catabolism. Lower 7-OH-MTX formation suggests folic acid inhibition of AO and a better clinical response. Higher 7-OH-MTX formation may interfere with MTX polyglutamylation and binding to enzymes and therefore increase MTX excretion, decrease in vivo MTX retention and efficacy. PMID:19644884

  11. Control of Abscisic Acid Catabolism and Abscisic Acid Homeostasis Is Important for Reproductive Stage Stress Tolerance in Cereals1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xuemei; Dong, Baodi; Shiran, Behrouz; Talbot, Mark J.; Edlington, Jane E.; Hughes, Trijntje; White, Rosemary G.; Gubler, Frank; Dolferus, Rudy

    2011-01-01

    Drought stress at the reproductive stage causes pollen sterility and grain loss in wheat (Triticum aestivum). Drought stress induces abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis genes in anthers and ABA accumulation in spikes of drought-sensitive wheat varieties. In contrast, drought-tolerant wheat accumulates lower ABA levels, which correlates with lower ABA biosynthesis and higher ABA catabolic gene expression (ABA 8′-hydroxylase). Wheat TaABA8′OH1 deletion lines accumulate higher spike ABA levels and are more drought sensitive. ABA treatment of the spike mimics the effect of drought, causing high levels of sterility. ABA treatment represses the anther cell wall invertase gene TaIVR1, and drought-tolerant lines appeared to be more sensitive to the effect of ABA. Drought-induced sterility shows similarity to cold-induced sterility in rice (Oryza sativa). In cold-stressed rice, the rate of ABA accumulation was similar in cold-sensitive and cold-tolerant lines during the first 8 h of cold treatment, but in the tolerant line, ABA catabolism reduced ABA levels between 8 and 16 h of cold treatment. The ABA biosynthesis gene encoding 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase in anthers is mainly expressed in parenchyma cells surrounding the vascular bundle of the anther. Transgenic rice lines expressing the wheat TaABA8′OH1 gene under the control of the OsG6B tapetum-specific promoter resulted in reduced anther ABA levels under cold conditions. The transgenic lines showed that anther sink strength (OsINV4) was maintained under cold conditions and that this correlated with improved cold stress tolerance. Our data indicate that ABA and ABA 8′-hydroxylase play an important role in controlling anther ABA homeostasis and reproductive stage abiotic stress tolerance in cereals. PMID:21502188

  12. Regulation of adipose branched-chain amino acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lackey, Denise E.; Lynch, Christopher J.; Olson, Kristine C.; Mostaedi, Rouzbeh; Ali, Mohamed; Smith, William H.; Karpe, Fredrik; Humphreys, Sandy; Bedinger, Daniel H.; Dunn, Tamara N.; Thomas, Anthony P.; Oort, Pieter J.; Kieffer, Dorothy A.; Amin, Rajesh; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Haj, Fawaz G.; Permana, Paska; Anthony, Tracy G.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated blood branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are often associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, which might result from a reduced cellular utilization and/or incomplete BCAA oxidation. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a potential player in whole body BCAA metabolism. We tested if expression of the mitochondrial BCAA oxidation checkpoint, branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, is reduced in obese WAT and regulated by metabolic signals. WAT BCKD protein (E1α subunit) was significantly reduced by 35–50% in various obesity models (fa/fa rats, db/db mice, diet-induced obese mice), and BCKD component transcripts significantly lower in subcutaneous (SC) adipocytes from obese vs. lean Pima Indians. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes or mice with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists increased WAT BCAA catabolism enzyme mRNAs, whereas the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-d-glucose had the opposite effect. The results support the hypothesis that suboptimal insulin action and/or perturbed metabolic signals in WAT, as would be seen with insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, could impair WAT BCAA utilization. However, cross-tissue flux studies comparing lean vs. insulin-sensitive or insulin-resistant obese subjects revealed an unexpected negligible uptake of BCAA from human abdominal SC WAT. This suggests that SC WAT may not be an important contributor to blood BCAA phenotypes associated with insulin resistance in the overnight-fasted state. mRNA abundances for BCAA catabolic enzymes were markedly reduced in omental (but not SC) WAT of obese persons with metabolic syndrome compared with weight-matched healthy obese subjects, raising the possibility that visceral WAT contributes to the BCAA metabolic phenotype of metabolically compromised individuals. PMID:23512805

  13. Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase from the thermophilic bacterium Rhodothermus marinus JCM9785: characteristics and role in trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline catabolism.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Ishikura, Masaru; Koyanagi, Takashi; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Suye, Shin-ichiro

    2015-05-01

    A gene from the thermophilic Gram-negative bacterium Rhodothermus marinus JCM9785, encoding a dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase homologue, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product was purified and characterized. The expressed enzyme was a highly thermostable dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase that retained more than 80% of its activity after incubation for 10 min at up to 70 °C. When enzyme-catalyzed dehydrogenation of several D-amino acids was carried out using 2,6-dichloroindophenol as the electron acceptor, D-phenylalanine was the most preferable substrate among the D-amino acids tested. Immediately upstream of the dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase gene (dadh) was a gene encoding a 4-hydroxyproline 2-epimerase homologue (hypE). That gene was successfully expressed in E. coli, and the gene product exhibited strong 4-hydroxyproline 2-epimerase activity. Reverse transcription PCR and quantitative real-time PCR showed that the six genes containing the dadh and hypE genes were arranged in an operon and were required for catabolism of trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline in R. marinus. This is the first description of a dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenase (Dye-DADH) with broad substrate specificity involved in trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline catabolism. PMID:25472442

  14. Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase and other meta-cleavage catabolic pathway genes in the 'anaerobic' termite gut spirochete Treponema primitia.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Kaitlyn S; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2014-03-01

    Microorganisms have evolved a spectacular diversity of metabolisms, some of which allow them to overcome environmental constraints, utilize abundant but inaccessible resources and drive nutrient cycling in various ecosystems. The termite hindgut microbial community is optimized to metabolize wood, and in recent years, the in situ physiological and ecological functions of community members have been researched. Spirochetes are abundant in the termite gut, and herein, putative aromatic meta-cleavage pathway genes typical of aerobic pseudomonads were located in genomes of homoacetogenic termite hindgut 'anaerobes', Treponema primitia str. ZAS-1 and ZAS-2. Phylogenetic analyses suggest the T. primitia catechol 2,3-dioxygenase and several other essential meta-pathway genes were acquired from an α-proteobacterium in the distant past to augment several genes T. primitia acquired from anaerobic firmicutes that do not directly catabolize aromatics but can contribute to the final pathway steps. Further, transcripts for each meta-pathway gene were expressed in strictly anaerobic cultures of T. primitia str. ZAS-2 indicative of constitutive pathway expression. Also, the addition of catechol + O(2) to T. primitia liquid cultures resulted in the transient accumulation of trace amounts of the yellow ring cleavage product, hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. This is the first evidence of aromatic ring cleavage in the phylum (division) Spirochetes. Results also support a possible role for T. primitia in termite hindgut O(2) /lignin aromatic monomer metabolism. Potential O(2) -dependent yet nonrespiratory microbial metabolisms have heretofore been overlooked and warrant further investigation. These metabolisms could describe the degradation of plant-derived and other aromatics in microoxic environments and contribute significantly to carbon turnover. PMID:24261591

  15. Serine Biosynthesis with One Carbon Catabolism and the Glycine Cleavage System Represents a Novel Pathway for ATP Generation

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Alexei; Markert, Elke K.; Oltvai, Zoltán N.

    2011-01-01

    Previous experimental evidence indicates that some cancer cells have an alternative glycolysis pathway with net zero ATP production, implying that upregulation of glycolysis in these cells may not be related to the generation of ATP. Here we use a genome-scale model of human cell metabolism to investigate the potential metabolic alterations in cells using net zero ATP glycolysis. We uncover a novel pathway for ATP generation that involves reactions from serine biosynthesis, one-carbon metabolism and the glycine cleavage system, and show that the pathway is transcriptionally upregulated in an inducible murine model of Myc-driven liver tumorigenesis. This pathway has a predicted two-fold higher flux rate in cells using net zero ATP glycolysis than those using standard glycolysis and generates twice as much ATP with significantly lower rate of lactate - but higher rate of alanine secretion. Thus, in cells using the standard - or the net zero ATP glycolysis pathways a significant portion of the glycolysis flux is always associated with ATP generation, and the ratio between the flux rates of the two pathways determines the rate of ATP generation and lactate and alanine secretion during glycolysis. PMID:22073143

  16. Regulation of carbon and electron flow in Propionispira arboris: Relationship of catabolic enzyme levels to carbon substrates fermented during propionate formation via the methylmalony coenzyme a pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.E. ); Zeikus, J.G. )

    1988-09-01

    A detailed study of the glucose fermentation pathway and the modulation of catabolic oxidoreductase activities by energy sources (i.e., glucose versus lactate of fumarate) in Propionispira arboris was performed. {sup 14}C radiotracer data show the CO{sub 2} produced from pyruvate oxidation comes exclusively from the C-3 and C-4 positions of glucose. Significant specific activities of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase were detected, which substantiates the utilization of the Embden-Meyerhoff-Parnas path for glucose metabolism. The methylmalonyl coenzyme A pathway for pyruvate reduction to propionate was established by detection of significant activities of methylmalonyl coenzyme A transcarboxylase, malate dehydrogenase, and fumarate reductase in cell-free extracts and by {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscpic demonstation of randomization of label from (2-{sup 13}C)pyruvate into positions 2 and 3 of propionate. The specific activity of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase, malate dehydrogenase, fumarate reductase, and transcarboxylase varied significantly in cells grown on different energy sources. D-Lactate dehydrogenase (non-NADH linked) was present in cells of P. arboris grown on lactate but not in cells grown on glucose or fumarate. These results indicate that growth substrates regulate synthesis of enzymes specific for the methylmalonyl coenzyme A path initial substrate transformation.

  17. Seasonal upregulation of catabolic enzymes and fatty acid transporters in the flight muscle of migrating hoary bats, Lasiurus cinereus.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Liam P; Fenton, M Brock; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2013-06-01

    The high energy density of fat, and limited capacity for carbohydrate storage suggest that migrating bats should fuel endurance flights with fat, as observed in migrating birds. Yet, cursorial mammals are unable to support high intensity exercise with fat stores. We hypothesized that migratory bats and birds have converged on similar physiological mechanisms to fuel endurance flight with fat. We predicted bats would seasonally upregulate fatty acid transport and oxidation pathways when migration demands were high. We studied seasonal variation in mitochondrial oxidative enzyme activities and fatty acid transport protein expression in the flight muscle of hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus). Carnitine palmitoyl transferase, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and citrate synthase activity increased during migration. There were no changes in expression of fatty acid translocase or plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein. Heart-type fatty acid binding protein expression increased 5-fold in migrating females, but did not vary seasonally in males. An aerial insectivore lifestyle, and the coincidence of migration and pregnancy may explain differences in transporter expression compared to previously studied birds. Overall, our results are consistent with seasonal upregulation of lipid metabolism and aerobic capacity, and confirm that migration poses distinct physiological challenges for bats. PMID:23545469

  18. Linking genome content to biofuel production yields: a meta-analysis of major catabolic pathways among select H2 and ethanol-producing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    to have little impact on H2 production in organisms that do not encode ethanol producing pathways, they do influence reduced end-product yields in those that do. Conclusions Here we show that composition of genes encoding pathways involved in pyruvate catabolism and end-product synthesis pathways can be used to approximate potential end-product distribution patterns. We have identified a number of genetic biomarkers for streamlining ethanol and H2 producing capabilities. By linking genome content, reaction thermodynamics, and end-product yields, we offer potential targets for optimization of either ethanol or H2 yields through metabolic engineering. PMID:23249097

  19. Catabolic Signaling Pathways, Atrogenes, and Ubiquitinated Proteins Are Regulated by the Nutritional Status in the Muscle of the Fine Flounder

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo N.; Ruiz, Pamela; Valdes, Juan Antonio; Molina, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    A description of the intracellular mechanisms that modulate skeletal muscle atrophy in early vertebrates is still lacking. In this context, we used the fine flounder, a unique and intriguing fish model, which exhibits remarkably slow growth due to low production of muscle-derived IGF-I, a key growth factor that has been widely acknowledged to prevent and revert muscle atrophy. Key components of the atrophy system were examined in this species using a detailed time-course of sampling points, including two contrasting nutritional periods. Under basal conditions high amounts of the atrogenes MuRF-1 and Atrogin-1 were observed. During fasting, the activation of the P38/MAPK and Akt/FoxO signaling pathways decreased; whereas, the activation of the IκBα/NFκB pathway increased. These changes in signal transduction activation were concomitant with a strong increase in MuRF-1, Atrogin-1, and protein ubiquitination. During short-term refeeding, the P38/MAPK and Akt/FoxO signaling pathways were strongly activated, whereas the activation of the IκBα/NFκB pathway decreased significantly. The expression of both atrogenes, as well as the ubiquitination of proteins, dropped significantly during the first hour of refeeding, indicating a strong anti-atrophic condition during the onset of refeeding. During long-term refeeding, Akt remained activated at higher than basal levels until the end of refeeding, and Atrogin-1 expression remained significantly lower during this period. This study shows that the components of the atrophy system in skeletal muscle appeared early in the evolution of vertebrates and some mechanisms have been conserved, whereas others have not. These results represent an important achievement for the area of fish muscle physiology, showing an integrative view of the atrophy system in a non-mammalian species and contributing to novel insights on the molecular basis of muscle growth regulation in earlier vertebrates. PMID:23024748

  20. Retinoic acid triggers meiosis initiation via stra8-dependent pathway in Southern catfish, Silurus meridionalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Feng, Ruijuan; Ma, He; Dong, Ranran; Liu, Zhilong; Jiang, Wentao; Tao, Wenjing; Wang, Deshou

    2016-06-01

    Existing studies demonstrated that retinoic acid (RA) regulates meiotic initiation via stra8-independent pathway in teleosts which lack stra8 in their genomes. However, stra8 was recently identified from several fish species including Southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis). To explore the existence of stra8-dependent pathway in RA mediated meiotic initiation in fishes, in the present study, the genes encoding RA synthase aldh1a2 and catabolic enzyme cyp26a1 and cyp26b1 were cloned from the Southern catfish. By immunohistochemistry, Aldh1a2 signal was observed in gonads of both sexes during the meiotic initiation period. By real-time PCR, differentially expressed gene was observed for cyp26a1, but not for cyp26b1, in gonads during the meiotic initiation. Administration of exogenous RA or inhibition of endogenous RA degradation by either KET (RA catabolic enzyme inhibitor) or cyp26a1 knockdown using CRISPR/Cas9 induced advanced meiotic initiation in the ovaries as demonstrated by increased Stra8/stra8 expression and appearance of oocytes. In contrast, treatment with RA synthase inhibitor DEAB resulted in delayed meiotic initiation and Stra8/stra8 expression in the ovaries, which was rescued by exogenous RA administration. These results indicated that (1) RA triggers the onset of meiosis via stra8-dependent pathway in stra8 existing teleosts, as it does in tetrapods; (2) exogenous RA can rescue the endogenous RA deficiency; (3) Cyp26a1, instead of Cyp26b1, is the key catabolic enzyme involved in meiosis initiation in teleosts. Taken together, RA might trigger meiotic initiation via stra8-dependent and -independent pathway in different teleosts. PMID:26764212

  1. 13C-tryptophan breath test detects increased catabolic turnover of tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway in patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Teraishi, Toshiya; Hori, Hiroaki; Sasayama, Daimei; Matsuo, Junko; Ogawa, Shintaro; Ota, Miho; Hattori, Kotaro; Kajiwara, Masahiro; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Altered tryptophan–kynurenine (KYN) metabolism has been implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD). The l-[1-13C]tryptophan breath test (13C-TBT) is a noninvasive, stable-isotope tracer method in which exhaled 13CO2 is attributable to tryptophan catabolism via the KYN pathway. We included 18 patients with MDD (DSM-IV) and 24 age- and sex-matched controls. 13C-tryptophan (150 mg) was orally administered and the 13CO2/12CO2 ratio in the breath was monitored for 180 min. The cumulative recovery rate during the 180-min test (CRR0–180; %), area under the Δ13CO2-time curve (AUC; %*min), and the maximal Δ13CO2 (Cmax; %) were significantly higher in patients with MDD than in the controls (p = 0.004, p = 0.008, and p = 0.002, respectively). Plasma tryptophan concentrations correlated negatively with Cmax in both the patients and controls (p = 0.020 and p = 0.034, respectively). Our results suggest that the 13C-TBT could be a novel biomarker for detecting a subgroup of MDD with increased tryptophan–KYN metabolism. PMID:26524975

  2. Identification and Characterization of an Archaeal Kojibiose Catabolic Pathway in the Hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus sp. Strain ST04

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Dong-Ho; Holden, James F.

    2014-01-01

    A unique gene cluster responsible for kojibiose utilization was identified in the genome of Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04. The proteins it encodes hydrolyze kojibiose, a disaccharide product of glucose caramelization, and form glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) in two steps. Heterologous expression of the kojibiose-related enzymes in Escherichia coli revealed that two genes, Py04_1502 and Py04_1503, encode kojibiose phosphorylase (designated PsKP, for Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 kojibiose phosphorylase) and β-phosphoglucomutase (PsPGM), respectively. Enzymatic assays show that PsKP hydrolyzes kojibiose to glucose and β-glucose-1-phosphate (β-G1P). The Km values for kojibiose and phosphate were determined to be 2.53 ± 0.21 mM and 1.34 ± 0.04 mM, respectively. PsPGM then converts β-G1P into G6P in the presence of 6 mM MgCl2. Conversion activity from β-G1P to G6P was 46.81 ± 3.66 U/mg, and reverse conversion activity from G6P to β-G1P was 3.51 ± 0.13 U/mg. The proteins are highly thermostable, with optimal temperatures of 90°C for PsKP and 95°C for PsPGM. These results indicate that Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 converts kojibiose into G6P, a substrate of the glycolytic pathway. This is the first report of a disaccharide utilization pathway via phosphorolysis in hyperthermophilic archaea. PMID:24391053

  3. Identification and characterization of an archaeal kojibiose catabolic pathway in the hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Dong-Ho; Holden, James F; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2014-03-01

    A unique gene cluster responsible for kojibiose utilization was identified in the genome of Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04. The proteins it encodes hydrolyze kojibiose, a disaccharide product of glucose caramelization, and form glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) in two steps. Heterologous expression of the kojibiose-related enzymes in Escherichia coli revealed that two genes, Py04_1502 and Py04_1503, encode kojibiose phosphorylase (designated PsKP, for Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 kojibiose phosphorylase) and β-phosphoglucomutase (PsPGM), respectively. Enzymatic assays show that PsKP hydrolyzes kojibiose to glucose and β-glucose-1-phosphate (β-G1P). The Km values for kojibiose and phosphate were determined to be 2.53 ± 0.21 mM and 1.34 ± 0.04 mM, respectively. PsPGM then converts β-G1P into G6P in the presence of 6 mM MgCl2. Conversion activity from β-G1P to G6P was 46.81 ± 3.66 U/mg, and reverse conversion activity from G6P to β-G1P was 3.51 ± 0.13 U/mg. The proteins are highly thermostable, with optimal temperatures of 90°C for PsKP and 95°C for PsPGM. These results indicate that Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 converts kojibiose into G6P, a substrate of the glycolytic pathway. This is the first report of a disaccharide utilization pathway via phosphorolysis in hyperthermophilic archaea. PMID:24391053

  4. Citrulline Protects Streptococcus pyogenes from Acid Stress Using the Arginine Deiminase Pathway and the F1Fo-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Cusumano, Zachary T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A common stress encountered by both pathogenic and environmental bacteria is exposure to a low-pH environment, which can inhibit cell growth and lead to cell death. One major defense mechanism against this stress is the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway, which catabolizes arginine to generate two ammonia molecules and one molecule of ATP. While this pathway typically relies on the utilization of arginine, citrulline has also been shown to enter into the pathway and contribute to protection against acid stress. In the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes, the utilization of citrulline has been demonstrated to contribute to pathogenesis in a murine model of soft tissue infection, although the mechanism underlying its role in infection is unknown. To gain insight into this question, we analyzed a panel of mutants defective in different steps in the ADI pathway to dissect how arginine and citrulline protect S. pyogenes in a low-pH environment. While protection provided by arginine utilization occurred through the buffering of the extracellular environment, citrulline catabolism protection was pH independent, requiring the generation of ATP via the ADI pathway and a functional F1Fo-ATP synthase. This work demonstrates that arginine and citrulline catabolism protect against acid stress through distinct mechanisms and have unique contributions to virulence during an infection. IMPORTANCE An important aspect of bacterial pathogenesis is the utilization of host-derived nutrients during an infection for growth and virulence. Previously published work from our lab identified a unique role for citrulline catabolism in Streptococcus pyogenes during a soft tissue infection. The present article probes the role of citrulline utilization during this infection and its contribution to protection against acid stress. This work reveals a unique and concerted action between the catabolism of citrulline and the F1Fo-ATPase that function together to provide protection for

  5. Enzymes involved in a novel anaerobic cyclohexane carboxylic acid degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Kung, Johannes W; Meier, Anne-Katrin; Mergelsberg, Mario; Boll, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    The anaerobic degradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHC) has so far been studied only in Rhodopseudomonas palustris, in which CHC is activated to cyclohexanoyl coenzyme A (cyclohexanoyl-CoA [CHCoA]) and then dehydrogenated to cyclohex-1-ene-1-carboxyl-CoA (CHeneCoA). This intermediate is further degraded by reactions of the R. palustris-specific benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway of aromatic compounds. However, CHeneCoA is not an intermediate in the degradation of aromatic compounds in all other known anaerobic bacteria; consequently, degradation of CHC was mostly unknown in anaerobic bacteria. We identified a previously unknown CHC degradation pathway in the Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter metallireducens by determining the following CHC-induced in vitro activities: (i) the activation of CHC to CHCoA by a succinyl-CoA:CHC CoA transferase, (ii) the 1,2-dehydrogenation of CHCoA to CHeneCoA by CHCoA dehydrogenase, and (iii) the unusual 1,4-dehydrogenation of CHeneCoA to cyclohex-1,5-diene-1-carboxyl-CoA. This last represents a previously unknown joint intermediate of the CHC and aromatic compound degradation pathway in bacteria other than R. palustris. The enzymes catalyzing the three reactions were purified and characterized as specific enzymes after heterologous expression of the encoding genes. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed that expression of these genes was highly induced during growth with CHC but not with benzoate. The newly identified CHC degradation pathway is suggested to be present in nearly all CHC-degrading anaerobic bacteria, including denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and fermenting bacteria. Remarkably, all three CHC degradation pathways always link CHC catabolism to the catabolic pathways of aromatic compounds. We propose that the capacity to use CHC as a carbon source evolved from already-existing aromatic compound degradation pathways. PMID:25112478

  6. Chlorophyll catabolism in senescing plant tissues: In vivo breakdown intermediates suggest different degradative pathways for Citrus fruit and parsley leaves.

    PubMed

    Amir-Shapira, D; Goldschmidt, E E; Altman, A

    1987-04-01

    High-pressure liquid chromatography was used to separate chlorophyll derivatives in acetone extracts from senescing Citrus fruit peel, autumnal Melia azedarach L. leaves, and dark-held detached parsley (Petroselinum sativum L.) leaves. Chlorophyllide a and another polar, dephytylated derivative accumulated in large amounts in senescing Citrus peel, particularly in fruit treated with ethylene. Ethylene also induced a 4-fold increase in the specific activity of Citrus chlorophyllase (chlorophyll chlorophyllidohydrolase, EC 3.1.1.14). Detailed kinetics based on a hexane/acetone solvent partition system showed that the in vivo increase in dephytylated derivatives coincided with the decrease in total chlorophyll. Polar, dephytylated derivatives accumulated also in senescing Melia leaves. Senescing parsley leaves revealed a very different picture. The gradual disappearance of chlorophyll a was accompanied by an increase in pheophytin a and by the transient appearance of several phytylated derivatives. Only pheophytin a and an adjacent peak were left when all the chlorophyll a had disappeared. The pathways for breakdown of chlorophyll in the Citrus and parsley senescence systems are discussed. PMID:16593821

  7. Fatty acid elongase-5 (Elovl5) regulates hepatic triglyceride catabolism in obese C57BL/6J mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Sasmita; Lytle, Kelli A.; Stevens, Robert D.; Bain, James R.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Greenberg, Andrew S.; Huang, Li-Shin; Jump, Donald B.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a major public health concern in the obese and type 2 diabetic populations. The high-fat lard diet induces obesity and fatty liver in C57BL/6J mice and suppresses expression of the PPAR-target gene, FA elongase 5 (Elovl5). Elovl5 plays a key role in MUFA and PUFA synthesis. Increasing hepatic Elovl5 activity in obese mice lowered hepatic TGs and endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (X-box binding protein 1 and cAMP-dependent transcription factor 6α) and increased TG catabolism and fatty acyl carnitines. Increased hepatic Elovl5 activity did not increase hepatic capacity for β-oxidation. Elovl5 effects on hepatic TG catabolism were linked to increased protein levels of adipocyte TG lipase (ATGL) and comparative gene identification 58 (CGI58). Elevated hepatic Elovl5 activity also induced the expression of some (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 and fibroblast growth factor 21), but not other cytochrome P450 4A10 (CYP4A10), PPAR-target genes. FA products of Elovl5 activity increased ATGL, but not CGI58, mRNA through PPARβ-dependent mechanisms in human HepG2 cells. Treatment of mouse AML12 hepatocytes with the PPARβ agonist (GW0742) decreased 14C-18:2,n-6 in TGs but did not affect β-oxidation. These studies establish that Elovl5 activity regulates hepatic levels of FAs controlling PPARβ activity, ATGL expression, and TG catabolism, but not FA oxidation. PMID:24814977

  8. Fatty acid elongase-5 (Elovl5) regulates hepatic triglyceride catabolism in obese C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Sasmita; Lytle, Kelli A; Stevens, Robert D; Bain, James R; Newgard, Christopher B; Greenberg, Andrew S; Huang, Li-Shin; Jump, Donald B

    2014-07-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a major public health concern in the obese and type 2 diabetic populations. The high-fat lard diet induces obesity and fatty liver in C57BL/6J mice and suppresses expression of the PPAR-target gene, FA elongase 5 (Elovl5). Elovl5 plays a key role in MUFA and PUFA synthesis. Increasing hepatic Elovl5 activity in obese mice lowered hepatic TGs and endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (X-box binding protein 1 and cAMP-dependent transcription factor 6α) and increased TG catabolism and fatty acyl carnitines. Increased hepatic Elovl5 activity did not increase hepatic capacity for β-oxidation. Elovl5 effects on hepatic TG catabolism were linked to increased protein levels of adipocyte TG lipase (ATGL) and comparative gene identification 58 (CGI58). Elevated hepatic Elovl5 activity also induced the expression of some (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 and fibroblast growth factor 21), but not other cytochrome P450 4A10 (CYP4A10), PPAR-target genes. FA products of Elovl5 activity increased ATGL, but not CGI58, mRNA through PPARβ-dependent mechanisms in human HepG2 cells. Treatment of mouse AML12 hepatocytes with the PPARβ agonist (GW0742) decreased (14)C-18:2,n-6 in TGs but did not affect β-oxidation. These studies establish that Elovl5 activity regulates hepatic levels of FAs controlling PPARβ activity, ATGL expression, and TG catabolism, but not FA oxidation. PMID:24814977

  9. Modified branched-chain amino acid pathways give rise to acyl acids of sucrose esters exuded from tobacco leaf trichomes.

    PubMed

    Kandra, G; Severson, R; Wagner, G J

    1990-03-10

    A major diversion of carbon from branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis/catabolism to form acyl moieties of sucrose esters (6-O-acetyl-2,3,4-tri-O-acyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-beta-D- fructofuranosides) was observed to be associated with specialized trichome head cells which secrete large amounts of sucrose esters. Surface chemistry and acetyl and acyl substituent groups of tobacco (T.I. 1068) sucrose esters were identified and quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Sucrose esters were prominent surface constituents and 3-methylvaleric acid, 2- and 3-methylbutyric acid, and methylpropionic acid accounted for 60%, 25% and 9%, respectively, of total C3--C7 acyl substituents. Radiolabeled Thr, Ile, Val, Leu, pyruvate and Asp, metabolites of branched-chain amino acid pathways, were compared with radioactively labeled acetate and sucrose as donors of carbon to sucrose, acetyl and acyl components of sucrose esters using epidermal peels with undisturbed trichomes. Preparations of biosynthetically competent trichome heads (site of sucrose ester formation) were also examined. Results indicate that 3-methylvaleryl and 2-methylbutyryl groups are derived from the Thr pathway of branched-chain amino acid metabolism, 3-methylbutyryl and methylpropionyl groups are formed via the pyruvate pathway, and that acetyl groups are principally formed directly via acetyl-CoA. Arguments are presented which rule out participation of fatty acid synthase in the formation of prominent acyl acids. Results suggest that the shunting of carbon away from the biosynthesis of Val, Leu and Ile may be due to a low level of amino acid utilization in protein synthesis in specialized glandular head cells of trichomes. This would result in the availability of corresponding oxo acids for CoA activation and esterification to form sucrose esters. Preliminary evidence was found for the involvement of cycling reactions in oxo-acid-chain lengthening and for utilization of pyruvate-derived 2

  10. Characterization of p-Hydroxycinnamate Catabolism in a Soil Actinobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Hiroshi; Lee, Young-Eun; Casabon, Israël

    2014-01-01

    p-Hydroxycinnamates, such as ferulate and p-coumarate, are components of plant cell walls and have a number of commercial applications. Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 (RHA1) catabolizes ferulate via vanillate and the β-ketoadipate pathway. Here, we used transcriptomics to identify genes in RHA1 that are upregulated during growth on ferulate versus benzoate. The upregulated genes included three transcriptional units predicted to encode the uptake and β-oxidative deacetylation of p-hydroxycinnamates: couHTL, couNOM, and couR. Neither ΔcouL mutants nor ΔcouO mutants grew on p-hydroxycinnamates, but they did grow on vanillate. Among several p-hydroxycinnamates, CouL catalyzed the thioesterification of p-coumarate and caffeate most efficiently (kcat/Km = ∼400 mM−1 s−1). p-Coumarate was also RHA1's preferred growth substrate, suggesting that CouL is a determinant of the pathway's specificity. CouL did not catalyze the activation of sinapate, in similarity to two p-coumaric acid:coenzyme A (CoA) ligases from plants, and contains the same bulged loop that helps determine substrate specificity in the plant homologues. The couO mutant accumulated 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionate in the culture supernatant when incubated with ferulate, supporting β-oxidative deacetylation. This phenotype was not complemented with a D257N variant of CouO, consistent with the predicted role of Asp257 as a metal ligand in this amidohydrolase superfamily member. These data suggest that CouO functionally replaces the β-ketothiolase and acyl-CoA thioesterase that occur in canonical β-oxidative pathways. Finally, the transcriptomics data suggest the involvement of two distinct formaldehyde detoxification pathways in vanillate catabolism and identify a eugenol catabolic pathway. The results of this study augment our understanding of the bacterial catabolism of aromatics from renewable feedstocks. PMID:25266382

  11. Phenylbutyrate improves nitrogen disposal via alternative pathway without eliciting an increase in protein breakdown and catabolism in control and ornithine transcarbamylace-deficient patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenylbutyrate (PB) is a drug used in urea cycle disorder patients to elicit alternative pathways for nitrogen disposal. However, PB decreases plasma branched chain amino acid (BCAA) concentrations and prior research suggests that PB may increase leucine oxidation, indicating increased protein degra...

  12. Arginine catabolism in Aphanocapsa 6308.

    PubMed

    Weathers, P J; Chee, H L; Allen, M M

    1978-07-01

    The catabolic products of arginine metabolism were observed in Aphanocapsa 6308, a unicellular cyanobacterium, by thin layer chromatography of growth media, by limiting growth conditions, and by enzymatic analysis. Of the organic, nitrogenous compounds examined, only arginine supported growth in CO2-free media. The excretion of ornithine at a concentration level greater than citrulline suggested the existence in Aphanocapsa 6308 of the arginine dihydrolase pathway which produced ornithine, CO2,NH4,+ adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Its existence was confirmed by enzymatic analysis. Although cells could not grow on urea as a sole carbon source a very active urease and subsequently an arginase were also demonstrated, indicating that Aphanocapsa can metabolize arginine via the arginase pathway. The level of enzymes for both pathways indicates a lack of genetic control. It is suggested that the arginase pathway provides only nitrogen for the cells wheras the arginine dihydrolase pathway provides not only nitrogen, but also CO2 and adenosine 5'-triphosphate. PMID:100070

  13. Plasma First Resuscitation Reduces Lactate Acidosis, Enhances Redox Homeostasis, Amino Acid and Purine Catabolism in a Rat Model of Profound Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; Moore, Hunter B; Moore, Ernest E; Wither, Matthew J; Nemkov, Travis; Morton, Alexander P; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Chapman, Michael P; Fragoso, Miguel; Slaughter, Anne; Sauaia, Angela; Silliman, Christopher C; Hansen, Kirk C; Banerjee, Anirban

    2016-08-01

    The use of aggressive crystalloid resuscitation to treat hypoxemia, hypovolemia, and nutrient deprivation promoted by massive blood loss may lead to the development of the blood vicious cycle of acidosis, hypothermia, and coagulopathy and, utterly, death. Metabolic acidosis is one of the many metabolic derangements triggered by severe trauma/hemorrhagic shock, also including enhanced proteolysis, lipid mobilization, as well as traumatic diabetes. Appreciation of the metabolic benefit of plasma first resuscitation is an important concept. Plasma resuscitation has been shown to correct hyperfibrinolysis secondary to severe hemorrhage better than normal saline. Here, we hypothesize that plasma first resuscitation corrects metabolic derangements promoted by severe hemorrhage better than resuscitation with normal saline. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics analyses were performed to screen plasma metabolic profiles upon shock and resuscitation with either platelet-free plasma or normal saline in a rat model of severe hemorrhage. Of the 251 metabolites that were monitored, 101 were significantly different in plasma versus normal saline resuscitated rats. Plasma resuscitation corrected lactate acidosis by promoting glutamine/amino acid catabolism and purine salvage reactions. Plasma first resuscitation may benefit critically injured trauma patients by relieving the lactate burden and promoting other non-clinically measured metabolic changes. In the light of our results, we propose that plasma resuscitation may promote fueling of mitochondrial metabolism, through the enhancement of glutaminolysis/amino acid catabolism and purine salvage reactions. The treatment of trauma patients in hemorrhagic shock with plasma first resuscitation is likely not only to improve coagulation, but also to promote substrate-specific metabolic corrections. PMID:26863033

  14. Substrate Uptake and Subcellular Compartmentation of Anoxic Cholesterol Catabolism in Sterolibacterium denitrificans*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Wen; Wang, Po-Hsiang; Ismail, Wael; Tsai, Yu-Wen; El Nayal, Ashraf; Yang, Chia-Ying; Yang, Fu-Chun; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol catabolism by actinobacteria has been extensively studied. In contrast, the uptake and catabolism of cholesterol by Gram-negative species are poorly understood. Here, we investigated microbial cholesterol catabolism at the subcellular level. 13C metabolomic analysis revealed that anaerobically grown Sterolibacterium denitrificans, a β-proteobacterium, adopts an oxygenase-independent pathway to degrade cholesterol. S. denitrificans cells did not produce biosurfactants upon growth on cholesterol and exhibited high cell surface hydrophobicity. Moreover, S. denitrificans did not produce extracellular catabolic enzymes to transform cholesterol. Accordingly, S. denitrificans accessed cholesterol by direction adhesion. Cholesterol is imported through the outer membrane via a putative FadL-like transport system, which is induced by neutral sterols. The outer membrane steroid transporter is able to selectively import various C27 sterols into the periplasm. S. denitrificans spheroplasts exhibited a significantly higher efficiency in cholest-4-en-3-one-26-oic acid uptake than in cholesterol uptake. We separated S. denitrificans proteins into four fractions, namely the outer membrane, periplasm, inner membrane, and cytoplasm, and we observed the individual catabolic reactions within them. Our data indicated that, in the periplasm, various periplasmic and peripheral membrane enzymes transform cholesterol into cholest-4-en-3-one-26-oic acid. The C27 acidic steroid is then transported into the cytoplasm, in which side-chain degradation and the subsequent sterane cleavage occur. This study sheds light into microbial cholesterol metabolism under anoxic conditions. PMID:25418128

  15. Novel Pathway for the Degradation of 2-Chloro-4-Nitrobenzoic Acid by Acinetobacter sp. Strain RKJ12▿†

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Dhan; Kumar, Ravi; Jain, R. K.; Tiwary, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    The organism Acinetobacter sp. RKJ12 is capable of utilizing 2-chloro-4-nitrobenzoic acid (2C4NBA) as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. In the degradation of 2C4NBA by strain RKJ12, various metabolites were isolated and identified by a combination of chromatographic, spectroscopic, and enzymatic activities, revealing a novel assimilation pathway involving both oxidative and reductive catabolic mechanisms. The metabolism of 2C4NBA was initiated by oxidative ortho dehalogenation, leading to the formation of 2-hydroxy-4-nitrobenzoic acid (2H4NBA), which subsequently was metabolized into 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,4-DHBA) by a mono-oxygenase with the concomitant release of chloride and nitrite ions. Stoichiometric analysis indicated the consumption of 1 mol O2 per conversion of 2C4NBA to 2,4-DHBA, ruling out the possibility of two oxidative reactions. Experiments with labeled H218O and 18O2 indicated the involvement of mono-oxygenase-catalyzed initial hydrolytic dechlorination and oxidative denitration mechanisms. The further degradation of 2,4-DHBA then proceeds via reductive dehydroxylation involving the formation of salicylic acid. In the lower pathway, the organism transformed salicylic acid into catechol, which was mineralized by the ortho ring cleavage catechol-1,2-dioxygenase to cis, cis-muconic acid, ultimately forming tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Furthermore, the studies carried out on a 2C4NBA− derivative and a 2C4NBA+ transconjugant demonstrated that the catabolic genes for the 2C4NBA degradation pathway possibly reside on the ∼55-kb transmissible plasmid present in RKJ12. PMID:21803909

  16. Transcriptional induction kinetics from the promoters of the catabolic pathways of TOL plasmid pWW0 of Pseudomonas putida for metabolism of aromatics.

    PubMed Central

    Marqués, S; Holtel, A; Timmis, K N; Ramos, J L

    1994-01-01

    We determined, under several growth conditions, the kinetics of mRNA synthesis from the four Pseudomonas putida pWW0 plasmid promoters involved in degradation of xylenes and methylbenzyl alcohols via toluates. Transcription by XylS of the meta-cleavage pathway operon promoter (Pm) for the metabolism of alkylbenzoates was stimulated immediately after the addition of an effector, both in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium and in minimal medium. Activation of the sigma 54-dependent upper-pathway operon promoter (Pu) and the xylS gene promoter (Ps) by effector-activated XylR was dependent on the growth medium used: on minimal medium, activation of transcription from Pu and Ps occurred immediately after the addition of a XylR effector; in contrast, activation appeared only after several hours when cells were growing on LB medium. When Pm was induced through the physiological overexpression of XylS, mediated by XylR when this regulator was activated by upper-pathway effectors, the kinetics of transcription from Pm was similar to that of Pu and Ps: maximum values were reached after delays of several hours in rich medium and after several minutes in minimal medium. The delay in the induction of transcription of sigma 54-dependent promoters reflects catabolite inhibition exerted by LB components, since the addition of yeast extracts, Casamino Acids, or several combinations of amino acids dramatically inhibited the synthesis of XylR-controlled sigma 54-dependent promoters. Expression from xylR gene tandem promoters occurred independently of the growth medium used. Images PMID:8169200

  17. Resistant starch induces catabolic but suppresses immune and cell division pathways and changes the microbiome in the proximal colon of male pigs.

    PubMed

    Haenen, Daniëlle; Souza da Silva, Carol; Zhang, Jing; Koopmans, Sietse Jan; Bosch, Guido; Vervoort, Jacques; Gerrits, Walter J J; Kemp, Bas; Smidt, Hauke; Müller, Michael; Hooiveld, Guido J E J

    2013-12-01

    Consumption of resistant starch (RS) has been associated with various intestinal health benefits, but knowledge of its effects on global gene expression in the colon is limited. The main objective of the current study was to identify genes affected by RS in the proximal colon to infer which biologic pathways were modulated. Ten 17-wk-old male pigs, fitted with a cannula in the proximal colon for repeated collection of tissue biopsy samples and luminal content, were fed a digestible starch (DS) diet or a diet high in RS (34%) for 2 consecutive periods of 14 d in a crossover design. Analysis of the colonic transcriptome profiles revealed that, upon RS feeding, oxidative metabolic pathways, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle and β-oxidation, were induced, whereas many immune response pathways, including adaptive and innate immune system, as well as cell division were suppressed. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ was identified as a potential key upstream regulator. RS significantly (P < 0.05) increased the relative abundance of several butyrate-producing microbial groups, including the butyrate producers Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Megasphaera elsdenii, and reduced the abundance of potentially pathogenic members of the genus Leptospira and the phylum Proteobacteria. Concentrations in carotid plasma of the 3 main short-chain fatty acids acetate, propionate, and butyrate were significantly higher with RS consumption compared with DS consumption. Overall, this study provides novel insights on effects of RS in proximal colon and contributes to our understanding of a healthy diet. PMID:24132577

  18. Genes involved in lactose catabolism and organic acid production during growth of Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20 in skimmed milk.

    PubMed

    Do Carmo, A P; De Oliveira, M N V; Da Silva, D F; Castro, S B; Borges, A C; De Carvalho, A F; De Moraes, C A

    2012-03-01

    There are three main reasons for using lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as starter cultures in industrial food fermentation processes: food preservation due to lactic acid production; flavour formation due to a range of organic molecules derived from sugar, lipid and protein catabolism; and probiotic properties attributed to some strains of LAB, mainly of lactobacilli. The aim of this study was to identify some genes involved in lactose metabolism of the probiotic Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV H2b20, and analyse its organic acid production during growth in skimmed milk. The following genes were identified, encoding the respective enzymes: ldh - lactate dehydrogenase, adhE - Ldb1707 acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, and ccpA-pepR1 - catabolite control protein A. It was observed that L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 cultivated in different media has the unexpected ability to catabolyse galactose, and to produce high amounts of succinic acid, which was absent in the beginning, raising doubts about the subspecies in question. The phylogenetic analyses showed that this strain can be compared physiologically to L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis, which are able to degrade lactose and can grow in milk. L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 sequences have grouped with L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ATCC 11842 and L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus ATCC BAA-365, strengthening the classification of this probiotic strain in the NCFM group proposed by a previous study. Additionally, L. delbrueckii UFV H2b20 presented an evolutionary pattern closer to that of probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, corroborating the suggestion that this strain might be considered as a new and unusual subspecies among L. delbrueckii subspecies, the first one identified as a probiotic. In addition, its unusual ability to metabolise galactose, which was significantly consumed in the fermentation medium, might be exploited to produce low-browning probiotic Mozzarella cheeses, a desirable property

  19. Aerobic catabolism of phenylacetic acid in Pseudomonas putida U: biochemical characterization of a specific phenylacetic acid transport system and formal demonstration that phenylacetyl-coenzyme A is a catabolic intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Schleissner, C; Olivera, E R; Fernández-Valverde, M; Luengo, J M

    1994-01-01

    The phenylacetic acid transport system (PATS) of Pseudomonas putida U was studied after this bacterium was cultured in a chemically defined medium containing phenylacetic acid (PA) as the sole carbon source. Kinetic measurement was carried out, in vivo, at 30 degrees C in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). Under these conditions, the uptake rate was linear for at least 3 min and the value of Km was 13 microM. The PATS is an active transport system that is strongly inhibited by 2,4-dinitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol (100%), KCN (97%), 2-nitrophenol (90%), or NaN3 (80%) added at a 1 mM final concentration (each). Glucose or D-lactate (10 mM each) increases the PATS in starved cells (140%), whereas arsenate (20 mM), NaF, or N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (1 mM) did not cause any effect. Furthermore, the PATS is insensitive to osmotic shock. These data strongly suggest that the energy for the PATS is derived only from an electron transport system which causes an energy-rich membrane state. The thiol-containing compounds mercaptoethanol, glutathione, and dithiothreitol have no significant effect on the PATS, whereas thiol-modifying reagents such as N-ethylmaleimide and iodoacetate strongly inhibit uptake (100 and 93%, respectively). Molecular analogs of PA with a substitution (i) on the ring or (ii) on the acetyl moiety or those containing (iii) a different ring but keeping the acetyl moiety constant inhibit uptake to different extents. None of the compounds tested significantly increase the PA uptake rate except adipic acid, which greatly stimulates it (163%). The PATS is induced by PA and also, gratuitously, by some phenyl derivatives containing an even number of carbon atoms on the aliphatic moiety (4-phenyl-butyric, 6-phenylhexanoic, and 8-phenyloctanoic acids). However, similar compounds with an odd number of carbon atoms (benzoic, 3-phenylpropionic, 5-phenylvaleric, 7-phenylheptanoic, and 9-phenylnonanoic acids) as well as many other PA derivatives do not induce the system

  20. Piperazic acid derivatives inhibit Gli1 in Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Khatra, Harleen; Kundu, Jayanta; Khan, Pragya Paramita; Duttagupta, Indranil; Pattanayak, Sankha; Sinha, Surajit

    2016-09-15

    Piperazic acid, a non-proteinogenic amino acid, found in complex secondary metabolites and peptide natural substances, has shown down regulation of Gli1 expression in Hedgehog signaling pathway in cell based assays. Further structure activity relationship study indicated that amide derivatives of piperazic acid are more potent than piperazic acid itself, with little to no toxicity. However, other cellular components involved in the pathway were not affected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the inhibitory property of piperazic acid in this pathway. Hence, this molecule could serve as a useful tool for studying Hedgehog signaling. PMID:27528433

  1. Catabolism of (2E)-4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal via ω- and ω-1-Oxidation Stimulated by Ketogenic Diet*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhicheng; Berthiaume, Jessica M.; Li, Qingling; Henry, Fabrice; Huang, Zhong; Sadhukhan, Sushabhan; Gao, Peng; Tochtrop, Gregory P.; Puchowicz, Michelle A.; Zhang, Guo-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress triggers the peroxidation of ω-6-polyunsaturated fatty acids to reactive lipid fragments, including (2E)-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE). We previously reported two parallel catabolic pathways of HNE. In this study, we report a novel metabolite that accumulates in rat liver perfused with HNE or 4-hydroxynonanoic acid (HNA), identified as 3-(5-oxotetrahydro-2-furanyl)propanoyl-CoA. In experiments using a combination of isotopic analysis and metabolomics studies, three catabolic pathways of HNE were delineated following HNE conversion to HNA. (i) HNA is ω-hydroxylated to 4,9-dihydroxynonanoic acid, which is subsequently oxidized to 4-hydroxynonanedioic acid. This is followed by the degradation of 4-hydroxynonanedioic acid via β-oxidation originating from C-9 of HNA breaking down to 4-hydroxynonanedioyl-CoA, 4-hydroxyheptanedioyl-CoA, or its lactone, 2-hydroxyglutaryl-CoA, and 2-ketoglutaric acid entering the citric acid cycle. (ii) ω-1-hydroxylation of HNA leads to 4,8-dihydroxynonanoic acid (4,8-DHNA), which is subsequently catabolized via two parallel pathways we previously reported. In catabolic pathway A, 4,8-DHNA is catabolized to 4-phospho-8-hydroxynonanoyl-CoA, 3,8-dihydroxynonanoyl-CoA, 6-hydroxyheptanoyl-CoA, 4-hydroxypentanoyl-CoA, propionyl-CoA, and acetyl-CoA. (iii) The catabolic pathway B of 4,8-DHNA leads to 2,6-dihydroxyheptanoyl-CoA, 5-hydroxyhexanoyl-CoA, 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA, and acetyl-CoA. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments showed that HNE can be catabolically disposed via ω- and ω-1-oxidation in rat liver and kidney, with little activity in brain and heart. Dietary experiments showed that ω- and ω-1-hydroxylation of HNA in rat liver were dramatically up-regulated by a ketogenic diet, which lowered HNE basal level. HET0016 inhibition and mRNA expression level suggested that the cytochrome P450 4A are main enzymes responsible for the NADPH-dependent ω- and ω-1-hydroxylation of HNA/HNE. PMID:25274632

  2. The Ferredoxin ThnA3 Negatively Regulates Tetralin Biodegradation Gene Expression via ThnY, a Ferredoxin Reductase That Functions as a Regulator of the Catabolic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ledesma-García, Laura; Reyes-Ramírez, Francisca; Santero, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The genes for tetralin (thn) utilization in Sphingomonasmacrogolitabida strain TFA are regulated at the transcriptional level by ThnR, ThnY and ThnA3. ThnR, a LysR-type transcriptional activator activates transcription specifically in response to tetralin, and ThnY is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein that may activate ThnR by protein-protein interaction. ThnA3, a Rieske-type ferredoxin that transfers electrons to the tetralin dioxygenase, prevents transcription of thn genes when the inducer molecule of the pathway is a poor substrate for the dioxygenase. The mechanism by which ThnA3 transduces this signal to the regulatory system is a major question concerning thn gene regulation. Here, we have confirmed the discriminatory function of ThnA3 and the negative role of its reduced form. We have generated ThnY variants with amino acid exchanges in the [2Fe-2S], FAD and NAD(P) H binding domains and their regulatory properties have been analyzed. Two variants, ThnY-C40S and ThnY-N201G,S206P have completely lost the discriminatory function of the regulatory system because they induced thn gene expression with different molecules such us cis-decalin, cyclohexane, trans-decalin, or benzene, which are not real inducers of the pathway. These results support a model in which ThnA3 exerts its negative modulation via the regulator ThnY. PMID:24069247

  3. Bacterial Catabolism of Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP)

    PubMed Central

    Reisch, Chris R.; Moran, Mary Ann; Whitman, William B.

    2011-01-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is a metabolite produced primarily by marine phytoplankton and is the main precursor to the climatically important gas dimethylsulfide (DMS). DMS is released upon bacterial catabolism of DMSP, but it is not the only possible fate of DMSP sulfur. An alternative demethylation/demethiolation pathway results in the eventual release of methanethiol, a highly reactive volatile sulfur compound that contributes little to the atmospheric sulfur flux. The activity of these pathways control the natural flux of sulfur released to the atmosphere. Although these biochemical pathways and the factors that regulate them are of great interest, they are poorly understood. Only recently have some of the genes and pathways responsible for DMSP catabolism been elucidated. Thus far, six different enzymes have been identified that catalyze the cleavage of DMSP, resulting in the release of DMS. In addition, five of these enzymes appear to produce acrylate, while one produces 3-hydroxypropionate. In contrast, only one enzyme, designated DmdA, has been identified that catalyzes the demethylation reaction producing methylmercaptopropionate (MMPA). The metabolism of MMPA is performed by a series of three coenzyme-A mediated reactions catalyzed by DmdB, DmdC, and DmdD. Interestingly, Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique, a member of the SAR11 clade of Alphaproteobacteria that is highly abundant in marine surface waters, possessed functional DmdA, DmdB, and DmdC enzymes. Microbially mediated transformations of both DMS and methanethiol are also possible, although many of the biochemical and molecular genetic details are still unknown. This review will focus on the recent discoveries in the biochemical pathways that mineralize and assimilate DMSP carbon and sulfur, as well as the areas for which a comprehensive understanding is still lacking. PMID:21886640

  4. Jasmonic acid promotes degreening via MYC2/3/4- and ANAC019/055/072-mediated regulation of major chlorophyll catabolic genes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Junyi; Xie, Zuokun; Gao, Jiong; Ren, Guodong; Gao, Shan; Zhou, Xin; Kuai, Benke

    2015-11-01

    Degreening caused by rapid chlorophyll (Chl) degradation is a characteristic event during green organ senescence or maturation. Pheophorbide a oxygenase gene (PAO) encodes a key enzyme of Chl degradation, yet its transcriptional regulation remains largely unknown. Using yeast one-hybrid screening, coupled with in vitro and in vivo assays, we revealed that Arabidopsis MYC2/3/4 basic helix-loop-helix proteins directly bind to PAO promoter. Overexpression of the MYCs significantly enhanced the transcriptional activity of PAO promoter in Arabidopsis protoplasts, and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment greatly induced PAO expression in wild-type Arabidopsis plants, but the induction was abolished in myc2 myc3 myc4. In addition, MYC2/3/4 proteins could promote the expression of another Chl catabolic enzyme gene, NYC1, as well as a key regulatory gene of Chl degradation, NYE1/SGR1, by directly binding to their promoters. More importantly, the myc2 myc3 myc4 triple mutant showed a severe stay-green phenotype, whereas the lines overexpressing the MYCs showed accelerated leaf yellowing upon MeJA treatment. These results suggest that MYC2/3/4 proteins may mediate jasmonic acid (JA)-induced Chl degradation by directly activating these Chl catabolic genes (CCGs). Three NAC family proteins, ANAC019/055/072, downstream from MYC2/3/4 proteins, could also directly promote the expression of a similar set of CCGs (NYE1/SGR1, NYE2/SGR2 and NYC1) during Chl degradation. In particular, anac019 anac055 anac072 triple mutant displayed a severe stay-green phenotype after MeJA treatment. Finally, we revealed that MYC2 and ANAC019 may interact with each other and synergistically enhance NYE1 expression. Together, our study reveals a hierarchical and coordinated regulatory network of JA-induced Chl degradation. PMID:26407000

  5. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid improves metabolic dysregulation and aberrant hepatic lipid metabolism in mice by both PPARα-dependent and -independent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyan; Shen, Wen-Jun; Cortez, Yuan; Kraemer, Fredric B.

    2013-01-01

    Creosote bush-derived nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a lipoxygenase inhibitor, possesses antioxidant properties and functions as a potent antihyperlipidemic agent in rodent models. Here, we examined the effect of chronic NDGA treatment of ob/ob mice on plasma dyslipidemia, hepatic steatosis, and changes in hepatic gene expression. Feeding ob/ob mice a chow diet supplemented with either low (0.83 g/kg diet) or high-dose (2.5 g/kg diet) NDGA for 16 wk significantly improved plasma triglyceride (TG), inflammatory chemokine levels, hyperinsulinemia, insulin sensitivity, and glucose intolerance. NDGA treatment caused a marked reduction in liver weight and TG content, while enhancing rates of fatty acid oxidation. Microarray analysis of hepatic gene expression demonstrated that NDGA treatment altered genes for lipid metabolism, with genes involved in fatty acid catabolism most significantly increased. NDGA upregulated the mRNA and nuclear protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), and the activated (phosphorylated) form of AMP-activated kinase. NDGA increased PPARα promoter activity in AML12 hepatocytes and also prevented the fatty acid suppression of PPARα expression. In contrast, PPARα siRNA abrogated the stimulatory effect of NDGA on fatty acid catabolism. Likewise, no stimulatory effect of NDGA on hepatic fatty acid oxidation was observed in the livers of PPARα-deficient mice, but the ability of NDGA to reverse fatty liver conditions was unaffected. In conclusion, the beneficial actions of NDGA on dyslipidemia and hepatic steatosis in ob/ob mice are exerted primarily through enhanced fatty acid oxidation via PPARα-dependent pathways. However, PPARα-independent pathways also contribute to NDGA's action to ameliorate hepatic steatosis. PMID:23104557

  6. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Terreic Acid Pathway in Aspergillus terreus

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Sun, Wei-wen; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2014-09-29

    Terreic acid is a natural product derived from 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA). A compact gene cluster for its biosynthesis was characterized. Isolation of the intermediates and shunt products from the mutant strains, in combined with bioinformatic analyses, allowed us to propose a biosynthetic pathway for terreic acid. Defining the pathway and the genes involved will facilitate the engineering of this molecule with interesting antimicrobial and antitumor bioactivities.

  7. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Terreic Acid Pathway in Aspergillus terreus

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Sun, Wei-wen; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2014-09-29

    Terreic acid is a natural product derived from 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA). A compact gene cluster for its biosynthesis was characterized. Isolation of the intermediates and shunt products from the mutant strains, in combined with bioinformatic analyses, allowed us to propose a biosynthetic pathway for terreic acid. Lastly, defining the pathway and the genes involved will facilitate the engineering of this molecule with interesting antimicrobial and antitumor bioactivities.

  8. Potent and Selective α-Ketoheterocycle-Based Inhibitors of the Anandamide and Oleamide Catabolizing Enzyme, Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Romero, F. Anthony; Du, Wu; Hwang, Inkyu; Rayl, Thomas J.; Kimball, F. Scott; Leung, Donmienne; Hoover, Heather S.; Apodaca, Richard L.; Breitenbucher, J. Guy; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Boger, Dale L.

    2008-01-01

    A study of the structure–activity relationships (SAR) of 2f (OL-135), a potent inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), is detailed targeting the 5-position of the oxazole. Examination of a series of substituted benzene derivatives (12–14) revealed that the optimal position for substitution was the meta-position with selected members approaching or exceeding the potency of 2f. Concurrent with these studies, the effect of substitution on the pyridine ring of 2f was also examined. A series of small, non-aromatic C5-substituents was also explored and revealed that the Ki follows a well-defined correlation with the Hammett σp constant (ρ = 3.01, R2 = 0.91) in which electron-withdrawing substituents enhance potency leading to inhibitors with Ki’s as low as 400 pM (20n). Proteomic-wide screening of the inhibitors revealed that most are exquisitely selective for FAAH over all other mammalian proteases reversing the 100-fold preference of 20a (C5 substituent = H) for the enzyme TGH. PMID:17279740

  9. CDK inhibitors induce mitochondria-mediated apoptosis through the activation of polyamine catabolic pathway in LNCaP, DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Arisan, Elif Damla; Obakan, Pinar; Coker-Gurkan, Ajda; Calcabrini, Annarica; Agostinelli, Enzo; Unsal, Narcin Palavan

    2014-01-01

    Androgen signaling is critical in prostate cancer development and progression. The co-existence of hormone responsive and irresponsive cells due to functional androgen receptor (AR) in prostate gland is the major obstacle in prostate cancer therapy models. Targeting aberrant cell cycle by novel cell cycle blocking agents is a promising strategy to treat various types of malignancies. Purvalanol and roscovitine are cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors able to activate apoptotic cell death by inducing cell cycle arrest at G1/S and G2/M phases in cancer cells. Polyamines are unique cationic amine derivatives involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. Although the elevated intracellular level of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) is typical for prostate gland, abnormal regulation of polyamine metabolism might result in rapid cell proliferation and, thus in prostate cancer progression. Therefore, treatment with drug-induced depletion of intracellular polyamine levels through the activated polyamine catabolism is critical to achieve successful strategies for prostate cancer. In this study we aimed to investigate the apoptotic efficiency of CDK inhibitors in three prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, DU145 and PC3), showing different AR expression profile. We found that both purvalanol and roscovitine were able to induce apoptosis at moderate cytotoxic concentrations by decreasing mitochondria membrane potential. The apoptotic effect of both CDK inhibitors was due to activation of caspases by modulating Bcl-2 family members. The efficiency of drugs was quite similar on the three prostate cell lines used in this study. However, DU145 cells were found the least sensitive against CDK inhibitors while purvalanol was more potent than roscovitine. Similarly to classical chemotherapeutic agents, both drugs could up-regulate polyamine catabolic enzymes (SSAT, SMO and PAO) in cell type dependent manner. Transient silencing of SSAT and/or inhibition of PAO

  10. Catabolism of hyaluronan: involvement of transition metals

    PubMed Central

    Šoltés, Ladislav; Kogan, Grigorij

    2009-01-01

    One of the very complex structures in the vertebrates is the joint. The main component of the joint is the synovial fluid with its high-molar-mass glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, which turnover is approximately twelve hours. Since the synovial fluid does not contain any hyaluronidases, the fast hyaluronan catabolism is caused primarily by reductive-oxidative processes. Eight transition metals – V23, Mn25, Fe26, Co27, Ni28, Cu29, Zn30, and Mo42 – naturally occurring in living organism are essential for the control of various metabolic and signaling pathways. They are also the key elements in catabolism of hyaluronan in the joint. In this overview, the role of these metals in physiological and pathophysiological catabolism of hyaluronan is described. The participation of these metals in the initiation and propagation of the radical degradation hyaluronan is critically reviewed. PMID:21217859

  11. Fibroblast Growth Factor–2 Promotes Catabolism Via FGFR1–Ras–Raf–MEK1/2–ERK1/2 Axis That Coordinates With the PKCδ Pathway in Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongyao; Chen, Di; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) has been found to play an anti-anabolic and/or a catabolic role in adult human articular cartilage via regulation of multiple signaling pathways. Upon FGF-2 stimulation, a molecular crosstalk between the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase C δ (PKCδ) pathways are initiated, where PKCδ positively regulates downstream MAPK signaling. In this study, we explored the relationship between fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), Ras, and PKCδ in FGF-2 signaling in human articular chondrocytes. Pathway-specific inhibition using both chemical inhibitors and siRNA targeting FGFR1 demonstrated that, upon FGF-2 stimulation, FGFR1 controlled both Ras and PKCδ activation, which converged on the Raf-MEK1/2-ERK1/2 axis. No crosstalk was observed between Ras and PKCδ. Quantitative PCR analyses revealed that both Ras and PKCδ contributed to FGF-2-mediated upregulation of MMP-13, ADAMTS5, and repression of aggrecan gene. Correspondingly, FGF-2-mediated proteoglycan loss was effectively reversed by individual pathway-specific inhibitor of Ras, PKCδ, and ERK1/2 in both 3-dimensional alginate bead culture and cartilage organ culture systems. Our findings suggest that FGFR1 interacts with FGF-2 and then activates Ras and PKCδ, which concertedly drive MAPK signaling to mediate biological effects of FGF-2. Such an integration of dual inputs constitutes a novel mechanism of FGF-2 signaling cascade in human articular chondrocytes. PMID:22488450

  12. Exploring De Novo metabolic pathways from pyruvate to propionic acid.

    PubMed

    Stine, Andrew; Zhang, Miaomin; Ro, Soo; Clendennen, Stephanie; Shelton, Michael C; Tyo, Keith E J; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Industrial biotechnology provides an efficient, sustainable solution for chemical production. However, designing biochemical pathways based solely on known reactions does not exploit its full potential. Enzymes are known to accept non-native substrates, which may allow novel, advantageous reactions. We have previously developed a computational program named Biological Network Integrated Computational Explorer (BNICE) to predict promiscuous enzyme activities and design synthetic pathways, using generalized reaction rules curated from biochemical reaction databases. Here, we use BNICE to design pathways synthesizing propionic acid from pyruvate. The currently known natural pathways produce undesirable by-products lactic acid and succinic acid, reducing their economic viability. BNICE predicted seven pathways containing four reaction steps or less, five of which avoid these by-products. Among the 16 biochemical reactions comprising these pathways, 44% were validated by literature references. More than 28% of these known reactions were not in the BNICE training dataset, showing that BNICE was able to predict novel enzyme substrates. Most of the pathways included the intermediate acrylic acid. As acrylic acid bioproduction has been well advanced, we focused on the critical step of reducing acrylic acid to propionic acid. We experimentally validated that Oye2p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae can catalyze this reaction at a slow turnover rate (10(-3) s(-1) ), which was unknown to occur with this enzyme, and is an important finding for further propionic acid metabolic engineering. These results validate BNICE as a pathway-searching tool that can predict previously unknown promiscuous enzyme activities and show that computational methods can elucidate novel biochemical pathways for industrial applications. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:303-311, 2016. PMID:26821575

  13. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenase pathway of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Arthur A.; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are oxidized by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases to PUFA epoxides which function as potent lipid mediators. The major metabolic pathways of PUFA epoxides are incorporation into phospholipids and hydrolysis to the corresponding PUFA diols by soluble epoxide hydrolase. Inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase stabilize PUFA epoxides and potentiate their functional effects. The epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) synthesized from arachidonic acid produce vasodilation, stimulate angiogenesis, have anti-inflammatory actions, and protect the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury. EETs produce these functional effects by activating receptor-mediated signaling pathways and ion channels. The epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids synthesized from eicosapentaenoic acid and epoxydocosapentaenoic acids synthesized from docosahexaenoic acid are potent inhibitors of cardiac arrhythmias. Epoxydocosapentaenoic acids also inhibit angiogenesis, decrease inflammatory and neuropathic pain, and reduce tumor metastasis. These findings indicate that a number of the beneficial functions of PUFA may be due to their conversion to PUFA epoxides. PMID:25093613

  14. Purvalanol A is a strong apoptotic inducer via activating polyamine catabolic pathway in MCF-7 estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Obakan, Pınar; Arısan, Elif Damla; Özfiliz, Pelin; Çoker-Gürkan, Ajda; Palavan-Ünsal, Narçin

    2014-01-01

    Purvalanol A is a specific CDK inhibitor which triggers apoptosis by causing cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. Although it has strong apoptotic potential, the mechanistic action of Purvalanol A on significant cell signaling targets has not been clarified yet. Polyamines are crucial metabolic regulators affected by CDK inhibition because of their role in cell cycle progress as well. In addition, malignant cells possess impaired polyamine homeostasis with high level of intracellular polyamines. Especially induction of polyamine catabolic enzymes spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT), polyamine oxidase (PAO) and spermine oxidase (SMO) induced toxic by-products in correlation with the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. In this study, we showed that Purvalanol A induced apoptosis in caspase- dependent manner in MCF-7 ER(+) cells, while MDA-MB-231 (ER-) cells were less sensitive against drug. In addition Bcl-2 is a critical target for Purvalanol A, since Bcl-2 overexpressed cells are more resistant to Purvalanol A-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, exposure of MCF-7 cells to Purvalanol A triggered SSAT and PAO upregulation and the presence of PAO/SMO inhibitor, MDL 72,527 prevented Purvalanol A-induced apoptosis. PMID:24190492

  15. Arginine transport in catabolic disease states.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ming; Choudry, Haroon A; Epler, Mark J; Meng, Qinghe; Karinch, Anne; Lin, Chengmao; Souba, Wiley

    2004-10-01

    Arginine appears to be a semiessential amino acid in humans during critical illness. Catabolic disease states such as sepsis, injury, and cancer cause an increase in arginine utilization, which exceeds body production, leading to arginine depletion. This is aggravated by the reduced nutrient intake that is associated with critical illness. Arginine depletion may have negative consequences on tissue function under these circumstances. Nutritional regimens containing arginine have been shown to improve nitrogen balance and lymphocyte function, and stimulate arginine transport in the liver. We have studied the effects of stress mediators on arginine transport in vascular endothelium, liver, and gut epithelium. In vascular endothelium, endotoxin stimulates arginine uptake, an effect that is mediated by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and by the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. This TNF-alpha stimulation involves the activation of intracellular protein kinase C (PKC). A significant increase in hepatic arginine transport activity also occurs following burn injury and in rats with progressive malignant disease. Surgical removal of the growing tumor results in a normalization of the accelerated hepatic arginine transport within days. Chronic metabolic acidosis and sepsis individually augment intestinal arginine transport in rats and Caco-2 cell culture. PKC and mitogen-activated protein kinases are involved in mediating the sepsis/acidosis stimulation of arginine transport. Understanding the regulation of plasma membrane arginine transport will enhance our knowledge of nutrition and metabolism in seriously ill patients and may lead to the design of improved nutritional support formulas. PMID:15465794

  16. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  17. Dibenzothiophene Catabolism Proceeds via a Flavin-N5-oxide Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Adak, Sanjoy; Begley, Tadhg P

    2016-05-25

    The dibenzothiophene catabolic pathway converts dibenzothiophene to 2-hydroxybiphenyl and sulfite. The third step of the pathway, involving the conversion of dibenzothiophene sulfone to 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-benzenesulfinic acid, is catalyzed by a unique flavoenzyme DszA. Mechanistic studies on this reaction suggest that the C2 hydroperoxide of dibenzothiophene sulfone reacts with flavin to form a flavin-N5-oxide. The intermediacy of the flavin-N5-oxide was confirmed by LC-MS analysis, a co-elution experiment with chemically synthesized FMN-N5-oxide and (18)O2 labeling studies. PMID:27120486

  18. Leptin modulates the expression of catabolic genes in rat nucleus pulposus cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathways

    PubMed Central

    MIAO, DAOYI; ZHANG, LINGZHOU

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been demonstrated to be involved in the progress of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). However, the associated mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The purpose the present study was to examine the effect of leptin on the expression of degeneration-associated genes in rat nucleus pulposus (NP) cells, and determine the possible mechanism. Normal NP cells, obtained from Sprague Dawley rats, were identified using immunocytochemistry for the expression of collagen II and CA125, and treated with leptin and/or interleukin (IL)-β. Subsequently, the mRNA expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-13, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)-4, ADAMTS-5, aggrecan and COL2A1 were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-q-PCR). Alcian staining and immunocytochemistry were used to examine the expression levels of proteoglycan and collagen II. The pathway activation was investigated using western blotting, and inhibitors of the pathways were used to reveal the effect of these pathways on the NP cells. The results of the RT-qPCR demonstrated that leptin alone upregulated the mRNA expression levels of MMP-1, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, ADAMTS-5 and COL2A1. Synergy of leptin and IL-β was found in the increased expression levels of MMP-1, MMP-3 and ADAMTS-5. The leptin-treated NP cells exhibited decreased expression of collagen II. The mitrogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (c-Jun-N-terminal kinase, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway and Janus kinase (JAK)2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway were all activated by leptin, however, inhibitors of all the pathways, with the exception of the PI3K/Akt pathway, reversed the expression levels of MMP-1 and MMP-13. These results suggested that leptin promoted catabolic metabolism in the rat NP cells via the MAPK and JAK2/STAT3

  19. Leptin modulates the expression of catabolic genes in rat nucleus pulposus cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathways.

    PubMed

    Miao, Daoyi; Zhang, Lingzhou

    2015-08-01

    Obesity has been demonstrated to be involved in the progress of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). However, the associated mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The purpose the present study was to examine the effect of leptin on the expression of degeneration-associated genes in rat nucleus pulposus (NP) cells, and determine the possible mechanism. Normal NP cells, obtained from Sprague Dawley rats, were identified using immunocytochemistry for the expression of collagen II and CA125, and treated with leptin and/or interleukin (IL)-β. Subsequently, the mRNA expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-13, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)-4, ADAMTS-5, aggrecan and COL2A1 were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-q-PCR). Alcian staining and immunocytochemistry were used to examine the expression levels of proteoglycan and collagen II. The pathway activation was investigated using western blotting, and inhibitors of the pathways were used to reveal the effect of these pathways on the NP cells. The results of the RT-qPCR demonstrated that leptin alone upregulated the mRNA expression levels of MMP-1, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, ADAMTS-5 and COL2A1. Synergy of leptin and IL-β was found in the increased expression levels of MMP-1, MMP-3 and ADAMTS-5. The leptin-treated NP cells exhibited decreased expression of collagen II. The mitrogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (c-Jun-N-terminal kinase, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway and Janus kinase (JAK)2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway were all activated by leptin, however, inhibitors of all the pathways, with the exception of the PI3K/Akt pathway, reversed the expression levels of MMP-1 and MMP-13. These results suggested that leptin promoted catabolic metabolism in the rat NP cells via the MAPK and JAK2/STAT3

  20. Ornithine-δ-aminotransferase is essential for Arginine Catabolism but not for Proline Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Funck, Dietmar; Stadelhofer, Bettina; Koch, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Background Like many other plant species, Arabidopsis uses arginine (Arg) as a storage and transport form of nitrogen, and proline (Pro) as a compatible solute in the defence against abiotic stresses causing water deprivation. Arg catabolism produces ornithine (Orn) inside mitochondria, which was discussed controversially as a precursor for Pro biosynthesis, alternative to glutamate (Glu). Results We show here that ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (δOAT, At5g46180), the enzyme converting Orn to pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), is localised in mitochondria and is essential for Arg catabolism. Wildtype plants could readily catabolise supplied Arg and Orn and were able to use these amino acids as the only nitrogen source. Deletion mutants of δOAT, however, accumulated urea cycle intermediates when fed with Arg or Orn and were not able to utilize nitrogen provided as Arg or Orn. Utilisation of urea and stress induced Pro accumulation were not affected in T-DNA insertion mutants with a complete loss of δOAT expression. Conclusion Our findings indicate that δOAT feeds P5C exclusively into the catabolic branch of Pro metabolism, which yields Glu as an end product. Conversion of Orn to Glu is an essential route for recovery of nitrogen stored or transported as Arg. Pro biosynthesis occurs predominantly or exclusively via the Glu pathway in Arabidopsis and does not depend on Glu produced by Arg and Orn catabolism. PMID:18419821

  1. Dietary Lipid Levels Influence Lipid Deposition in the Liver of Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea) by Regulating Lipoprotein Receptors, Fatty Acid Uptake and Triacylglycerol Synthesis and Catabolism at the Transcriptional Level

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing; Liao, Kai; Wang, Tianjiao; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic lipid accumulation has been observed in fish fed a high-lipid diet. However, no information is available on the mechanism by which dietary lipid levels comprehensively regulate lipid transport, uptake, synthesis and catabolism in fish. Therefore, the present study aimed to gain further insight into how dietary lipids affect lipid deposition in the liver of large yellow croaker(Larimichthys crocea). Fish (150.00±4.95 g) were fed a diet with a low (6%), moderate (12%, the control diet) or high (18%) crude lipid content for 10 weeks. Growth performance, plasma biochemical indexes, lipid contents and gene expression related to lipid deposition, including lipoprotein assembly and clearance, fatty acid uptake and triacylglycerol synthesis and catabolism, were assessed. Growth performance was not significantly affected. However, the hepato-somatic and viscera-somatic indexes as well as plasma triacylglycerol, non-esterified fatty acids and LDL-cholesterol levels were significantly increased in fish fed the high-lipid diet. In the livers of fish fed the high-lipid diet, the expression of genes related to lipoprotein clearance (LDLR) and fatty acid uptake (FABP11) was significantly up-regulated, whereas the expression of genes involved in lipoprotein assembly (apoB100), triacylglycerol synthesis and catabolism (DGAT2, CPT I) was significantly down-regulated compared with fish fed the control diet, and hepatic lipid deposition increased. In fish fed the low-lipid diet, the expression of genes associated with lipoprotein assembly and clearance (apoB100, LDLR, LRP-1), fatty acid uptake (CD36, FATP1, FABP3) and triacylglycerol synthesis (FAS) was significantly increased, whereas the expression of triacylglycerol catabolism related genes (ATGL, CPT I) was reduced compared with fish fed the control diet. However, hepatic lipid content in fish fed the low-lipid diet decreased mainly due to low dietary lipid intake. In summary, findings of this study provide molecular

  2. [The pathways of glucose catabolism in Tenebrio molitor: the effects of fasting and the injection of the corpus cardiacum-corpus allatum complex].

    PubMed

    Gourdoux, L

    1975-01-01

    In the adult of Tenebrio molitor (Coleopterous) the pentose cycle is greatly used for the glucose degradation: starvation or injection of corpus cardiacum-corpus allatum complex alter this metabolic orientation : the pentose pathway is decreased and the glucose itself is less utilized. PMID:129268

  3. Increase of betulinic acid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by balancing fatty acids and betulinic acid forming pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Yansheng

    2014-04-01

    Betulinic acid is a plant-based triterpenoid that has been recognized for its antitumor and anti-HIV activities. The level of betulinic acid in its natural hosts is extremely low. In the present study, we constructed betulinic acid biosynthetic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by metabolic engineering. Given the betulinic acid forming pathways sharing the common substrate acetyl-CoA with fatty acid synthesis, the metabolic fluxes between the two pathways were varied by changing gene expressions, and their effects on betulinic acid production were investigated. We constructed nine S. cerevisiae strains representing nine combinations of the flux distributions between betulinic acid and fatty acid pathways. Our results demonstrated that it was possible to improve the betulinic acid production in S. cerevisiae while keeping a desirable growth phenotype by optimally balancing the carbon fluxes of the two pathways. Through modulating the expressions of the key genes on betulinic acid and fatty acid pathways, the difference in betulinic acid yield varied largely in the range of 0.01-1.92 mg L(-1) OD(-1). The metabolic engineering approach used in this study could be extended for synthesizing other triterpenoids in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24389702

  4. Expanding the docosahexaenoic acid food web for sustainable production: engineering lower plant pathways into higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, James R.; Singh, Surinder P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Algae are becoming an increasingly important component of land plant metabolic engineering projects. Land plants and algae have similar enough genetics to allow relatively straightforward gene transfer and they also share enough metabolic similarities that algal enzymes often function in a plant cell environment. Understanding metabolic systems in algae can provide insights into homologous systems in land plants. As examples, algal models are currently being used by several groups to better understand starch and lipid metabolism and catabolism, fields which have relevance in land plants. Importantly, land plants and algae also have enough metabolic divergence that algal genes can often provide new metabolic traits to plants. Furthermore, many algal genomes have now been sequenced, with many more in progress, and this easy access to genome-wide information has revealed that algal genomes are often relatively simple when compared with plants. Scope One example of the importance of algal, and in particular microalgal, resources to land plant research is the metabolic engineering of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids into oilseed crops which typically uses microalgal genes to extend existing natural plant biosynthetic pathways. This review describes both recent progress and remaining challenges in this field. PMID:22476481

  5. Role of the fatty acid breakdown pathway in the leaf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Components of the lipid breakdown pathway including beta-oxidation enzymes and fatty acid transport mechanisms are essential for mobilizing storage lipid in germinating seeds of many plants. Comparatively little is known about their role during the rest of the plant’s life-time, however. We are cur...

  6. Studies of the catabolic pathway of degradation of nitrobenzene by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes JS45: removal of the amino group from 2-aminomuconic semialdehyde.

    PubMed Central

    He, Z; Spain, J C

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes JS45 utilizes nitrobenzene as the sole source of nitrogen, carbon, and energy. Previous studies have shown that degradation of nitrobenzene involves the reduction of nitrobenzene to nitrosobenzene and hydroxylaminobenzene, followed by rearrangement to 2-aminophenol, which then undergoes meta ring cleavage to 2-aminomuconic semialdehyde. In the present paper, we report the enzymatic reactions responsible for the release of ammonia after ring cleavage. 2-Aminomuconic semialdehyde was oxidized to 2-aminomuconate in the presence of NAD by enzymes in crude extracts. 2-Aminomuconate was subsequently deaminated stoichiometrically to 4-oxalocrotonic acid. No cofactors are required for the deamination. Two enzymes, 2-aminomuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase and a novel 2-aminomuconate deaminase, distinguished by partial purification of the crude extracts, catalyzed the two reactions. 4-Oxalocrotonic acid was further degraded to pyruvate and acetaldehyde. The key enzyme, 2-aminomuconate deaminase, catalyzed the hydrolytic deamination that released ammonia, which served as the nitrogen source for growth of the organism. PMID:9471964

  7. Synthesis and Physicochemical Characterization of D-Tagatose-1-phosphate: The Substrate of the Tagatose-1-Phosphate Kinase TagK in the PTS-mediated D-Tagatose Catabolic Pathway of Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Delmarcelle, Michaël; Simon, Patricia; Counson, Melody; Galleni, Moreno; Freedberg, Darón I.; Thompson, John; Joris, Bernard; Battistel, Marcos D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first enzymatic synthesis of D-tagatose-1-phosphate (Tag-1P) by the multi-component PEP-dependent:tag-PTS present in tagatose-grown cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Physicochemical characterization by 31P and 1H NMR spectroscopy reveals that, in solution, this derivative is primarily in the pyranose form. Tag-1P was used to characterize the putative tagatose-1-phosphate kinase (TagK) of the Bacillus licheniformis PTS-mediated D-Tagatose catabolic Pathway (Bli-TagP). For this purpose, a soluble protein fusion was obtained with the 6 His-tagged trigger factor (TFHis6) of Escherichia coli. The active fusion enzyme was named TagK-TFHis6. Tag-1P and D-fructose-1-phosphate (Fru-1P) are substrates for the TagK-TFHis6 enzyme, whereas the isomeric derivatives D-tagatose-6-phosphate (Tag-6P) and D-fructose-6-phosphate (Fru-6P) are inhibitors. Studies of catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) reveal that the enzyme specificity is markedly in favor of Tag-1P as substrate. Importantly, we show in vivo that the transfer of the phosphate moiety from PEP to the B. licheniformis tagatose-specific enzyme II (EIITag) in E.coli is inefficient. The capability of the PTS general cytoplasmic components of B. subtilis, HPr and EI, to restore the phosphate transfer is demonstrated. PMID:26159072

  8. Microbial degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid: Insight into the enzymes and catabolic genes involved, their regulation and biotechnological implications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Trefault, Nicole; Olaniran, Ademola Olufolahan

    2016-01-01

    A considerable progress has been made to understand the mechanisms of biodegradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). 2,4-D biodegradation pathway has been elucidated in many microorganisms including Cupriavidus necator JMP134 (previously known as Wautersia eutropha, Ralstonia eutropha and Alcaligenes eutrophus) and Pseudomonas strains. It generally involves the side chain removal of 2,4-D by α-ketoglutarate-dependent 2,4-D dioxygenase (tfdA) to form 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP); hydroxylation of 2,4-DCP by 2,4-DCP hydroxylase (tfdB) to form dichlorocatechol; ortho or meta cleavage of dichlorocatechol by chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase (tfdC) to form 2,4-dichloro-cis,cis-muconate; conversion of 2,4-dichloro-cis,cis-muconate to 2-chlorodienelactone by chloromuconate cycloisomerase (tfdD); conversion of 2-chlorodienelactone to 2-chloromaleylacetate by chlorodienelactone hydrolase (tfdE) and, finally, conversion of 2-chloromaleylacetate to 3-oxoadepate via maleylacetate by chloromaleylacetate reductase and maleylacetate reductase (tfdF), respectively, which is funnelled to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The latest review on microbial breakdown of 2,4-D, other halogenated aromatic pesticides, and related compounds was compiled by Haggblom, however, a considerable progress has been made in this area of research since then. Thus, this review focuses on the recent advancement on 2,4-D biodegradation, the enzymes, and genes involved and their biotechlogical implications. PMID:25058513

  9. A β-Alanine Catabolism Pathway Containing a Highly Promiscuous ω-Transaminase in the 12-Aminododecanate-Degrading Pseudomonas sp. Strain AAC

    PubMed Central

    Wilding, Matthew; Peat, Thomas S.; Newman, Janet

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously isolated the transaminase KES23458 from Pseudomonas sp. strain AAC as a promising biocatalyst for the production of 12-aminododecanoic acid, a constituent building block of nylon-12. Here, we report the subsequent characterization of this transaminase. It exhibits activity with a broad substrate range which includes α-, β-, and ω-amino acids, as well as α,ω-diamines and a number of other industrially relevant compounds. It is therefore a prospective candidate for the biosynthesis of a range of polyamide monomers. The crystal structure of KES23458 revealed that the protein forms a dimer containing a large active site pocket and unusual phosphorylated histidine residues. To infer the physiological role of the transaminase, we expressed, purified, and characterized a dehydrogenase from the same operon, KES23460. Unlike the transaminase, the dehydrogenase was shown to be quite selective, catalyzing the oxidation of malonic acid semialdehyde, formed from β-alanine transamination via KES23458. In keeping with previous reports, the dehydrogenase was shown to catalyze both a coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent reaction to form acetyl-CoA and a significantly slower CoA-independent reaction to form acetate. These findings support the original functional assignment of KES23458 as a β-alanine transaminase. However, a seemingly well-adapted active site and promiscuity toward unnatural compounds, such as 12-aminododecanoic acid, suggest that this enzyme could perform multiple functions for Pseudomonas sp. strain AAC. IMPORTANCE We describe the characterization of an industrially relevant transaminase able to metabolize 12-aminododecanoic acid, a constituent building block of the widely used polymer nylon-12, and we report the biochemical and structural characterization of the transaminase protein. A physiological role for this highly promiscuous enzyme is proposed based on the characterization of a related gene from the host organism. Molecular dynamics

  10. The cockroach Blattella germanica obtains nitrogen from uric acid through a metabolic pathway shared with its bacterial endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Patiño-Navarrete, Rafael; Piulachs, Maria-Dolors; Belles, Xavier; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo; Peretó, Juli

    2014-07-01

    Uric acid stored in the fat body of cockroaches is a nitrogen reservoir mobilized in times of scarcity. The discovery of urease in Blattabacterium cuenoti, the primary endosymbiont of cockroaches, suggests that the endosymbiont may participate in cockroach nitrogen economy. However, bacterial urease may only be one piece in the entire nitrogen recycling process from insect uric acid. Thus, in addition to the uricolytic pathway to urea, there must be glutamine synthetase assimilating the released ammonia by the urease reaction to enable the stored nitrogen to be metabolically usable. None of the Blattabacterium genomes sequenced to date possess genes encoding for those enzymes. To test the host's contribution to the process, we have sequenced and analysed Blattella germanica transcriptomes from the fat body. We identified transcripts corresponding to all genes necessary for the synthesis of uric acid and its catabolism to urea, as well as for the synthesis of glutamine, asparagine, proline and glycine, i.e. the amino acids required by the endosymbiont. We also explored the changes in gene expression with different dietary protein levels. It appears that the ability to use uric acid as a nitrogen reservoir emerged in cockroaches after its age-old symbiotic association with bacteria. PMID:25079497

  11. The bzd Gene Cluster, Coding for Anaerobic Benzoate Catabolism, in Azoarcus sp. Strain CIB

    PubMed Central

    Barragán, María J. López; Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María T.; Thiele, Bärbel; Boll, Matthias; Fuchs, Georg; García, José L.; Díaz, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    We report here that the bzd genes for anaerobic benzoate degradation in Azoarcus sp. strain CIB are organized as two transcriptional units, i.e., a benzoate-inducible catabolic operon, bzdNOPQMSTUVWXYZA, and a gene, bzdR, encoding a putative transcriptional regulator. The last gene of the catabolic operon, bzdA, has been expressed in Escherichia coli and encodes the benzoate-coenzyme A (CoA) ligase that catalyzes the first step in the benzoate degradation pathway. The BzdA enzyme is able to activate a wider range of aromatic compounds than that reported for other previously characterized benzoate-CoA ligases. The reduction of benzoyl-CoA to a nonaromatic cyclic intermediate is carried out by a benzoyl-CoA reductase (bzdNOPQ gene products) detected in Azoarcus sp. strain CIB extracts. The bzdW, bzdX, and bzdY gene products show significant similarity to the hydratase, dehydrogenase, and ring-cleavage hydrolase that act sequentially on the product of the benzoyl-CoA reductase in the benzoate catabolic pathway of Thauera aromatica. Benzoate-CoA ligase assays and transcriptional analyses based on lacZ-reporter fusions revealed that benzoate degradation in Azoarcus sp. strain CIB is subject to carbon catabolite repression by some organic acids, indicating the existence of a physiological control that connects the expression of the bzd genes to the metabolic status of the cell. PMID:15317781

  12. PATHWAY FOR THE DISSIMILATION OF ITACONIC AND MESACONIC ACIDS.

    PubMed

    Brightman, V; Martin, W R

    1961-09-01

    Brightman, Vernon (The University of Chicago, Chicago), and William R. Martin. Pathway for the dissimilation of itaconic and mesaconic acids. J. Bacteriol. 82:376-382. 1961.-Studies on the oxidation of itaconic and mesaconic acids by a Pseudomonas sp., adapted to utilize either of these acids as a sole carbon source, have provided evidence for a pathway converting both itaconate and mesaconate to succinate. A metabolic interconversion of itaconate, mesaconate, and citramalate has also been demonstrated by whole cell and cell-free enzyme studies. Succinate derived from methylene-labeled itaconate was found to be labeled in the inside carbon atoms, a fact which indicates that the branched chain compound was converted into a straight chain molecule by a shift of the methylene carbon (C-5) from the side chain of itaconate to a position between C-2 and C-3 in an, as yet, unknown straight chain intermediate prior to its conversion to succinate. PMID:16561921

  13. Catabolism of low density lipoproteins by perfused rabbit livers: cholestyramine promotes receptor-dependent hepatic catabolism of low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chao, Y S; Yamin, T T; Alberts, A W

    1982-07-01

    Rabbits fed a wheat starch/casein diet develop a marked hypercholesterolemia accompanied by a decrease in the number of EDTA-sensitive binding sites on plasma membrane fractions of the liver for low density lipoproteins (LDL) and beta-migrating very low density lipoproteins [Chao, Y.-S., Yamin, T.-T. & Alberts, A. W. (1982) J. Biol. Chem., in press]. Inclusion of 1% cholestyramine resin in this diet prevents the increase in plasma cholesterol, increases the removal of LDL from plasma, and increases the number of hepatic plasma membrane LDL-binding sites. To determine the functional role of hepatic LDL-binding sites in the catabolism of LDL, we studied the catabolism of (125)I-labeled LDL ((125)I-LDL) by in situ perfused rabbit livers in a recirculating system. The rate of catabolism was measured from the increment of nonprotein-bound radioiodine in the perfusate. The receptor-dependent catabolism of LDL by the liver was calculated from the difference of hepatic catabolism of (125)I-LDL and catabolism of (125)I-labeled cyclohexanedione-modified LDL, which does not bind to LDL receptors. The data show that about 74% of LDL catabolized by perfused livers from chow-fed rabbits is through the receptor-dependent pathway and 26% is through the receptor-independent pathway. In rabbits fed a cholesterol diet, the hepatic catabolism of (125)I-LDL is reduced, and the receptor-dependent catabolism of (125)I-LDL is abolished. In rabbits fed the wheat starch/casein diet, the receptor-dependent catabolism of (125)I-LDL is reduced by 40% when compared with hepatic catabolism in chow-fed rabbits. Perfused livers from rabbits fed the wheat starch/casein diet supplemented with 1% cholestyramine show a 5,4-fold increase of receptor-dependent catabolism of (125)I-LDL when compared with that of livers from rabbits fed the wheat starch/casein diet alone. Thus, these studies demonstrate that the change in the number of rabbit hepatic membrane LDL receptors induced by dietary manipulation

  14. Regiospecificity of Dioxygenation of Di- to Pentachlorobiphenyls and Their Degradation to Chlorobenzoates by the bph-Encoded Catabolic Pathway of Burkholderia sp. Strain LB400

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Michael; Zielinski, Marco; Timmis, Kenneth N.; Hofer, Bernd

    1999-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain LB400 is one of the most potent aerobic polychlorobiphenyl (PCB)-degrading microorganisms that have been characterized. Its PCB-dioxygenating activity originates predominantly or exclusively from the biphenyl dioxygenase encoded by its bph gene cluster. Analysis of the dioxygenation products of several di- to pentachlorinated biphenyls formed by this enzyme revealed a complex dependence of the regiospecificity and the yield of dioxygenation on the substitution patterns of both the oxidized and the nonoxidized rings. No dioxygenolytic attack involving chlorinated meta or para carbons was observed. Therefore, the ability of the enzyme to hydroxylate chlorinated carbons appears to be limited to the ortho position. However, it is not limited to monochlorinated rings, as evidenced by dioxygenation of the 2,4-disubstituted ring at carbons 2 and 3. This site of attack is strikingly different from that of the 2,5-dichlorinated ring, which has been shown to be dihydroxylated at positions 3 and 4 (J. D. Haddock, J. R. Horton, and D. T. Gibson, J. Bacteriol. 177:20–26, 1995). These results demonstrate that a second substituent of ortho-chlorinated rings crucially influences the site of dioxygenation at this ring and thereby determines whether or not the initial chlorobiphenyl oxidation product is further metabolized through the bph-encoded pathway. The 2,4-dichlorinated ring can alternatively be attacked at carbons 5 and 6. The preferred site crucially depends on the substitution pattern of the other ring. The formation of more than a single dioxygenation product was found predominantly with congeners that contain two chlorinated rings, both of which are similarly prone to dioxygenation or one is substituted only at carbon 3. PMID:10427057

  15. Metabolic Engineering of a Novel Muconic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway via 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sudeshna; Goonewardena, Lakshani; Juturu, Veeresh

    2015-01-01

    cis,cis-Muconic acid (MA) is a commercially important raw material used in pharmaceuticals, functional resins, and agrochemicals. MA is also a potential platform chemical for the production of adipic acid (AA), terephthalic acid, caprolactam, and 1,6-hexanediol. A strain of Escherichia coli K-12, BW25113, was genetically modified, and a novel nonnative metabolic pathway was introduced for the synthesis of MA from glucose. The proposed pathway converted chorismate from the aromatic amino acid pathway to MA via 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHB). Three nonnative genes, pobA, aroY, and catA, coding for 4-hydroxybenzoate hydrolyase, protocatechuate decarboxylase, and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, respectively, were functionally expressed in E. coli to establish the MA biosynthetic pathway. E. coli native genes ubiC, aroFFBR, aroE, and aroL were overexpressed and the genes ptsH, ptsI, crr, and pykF were deleted from the E. coli genome in order to increase the precursors of the proposed MA pathway. The final engineered E. coli strain produced nearly 170 mg/liter of MA from simple carbon sources in shake flask experiments. The proposed pathway was proved to be functionally active, and the strategy can be used for future metabolic engineering efforts for production of MA from renewable sugars. PMID:26362984

  16. Metabolic engineering of a novel muconic acid biosynthesis pathway via 4-hydroxybenzoic acid in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sudeshna; Jonnalagadda, Sudhakar; Goonewardena, Lakshani; Juturu, Veeresh

    2015-12-01

    cis,cis-Muconic acid (MA) is a commercially important raw material used in pharmaceuticals, functional resins, and agrochemicals. MA is also a potential platform chemical for the production of adipic acid (AA), terephthalic acid, caprolactam, and 1,6-hexanediol. A strain of Escherichia coli K-12, BW25113, was genetically modified, and a novel nonnative metabolic pathway was introduced for the synthesis of MA from glucose. The proposed pathway converted chorismate from the aromatic amino acid pathway to MA via 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHB). Three nonnative genes, pobA, aroY, and catA, coding for 4-hydroxybenzoate hydrolyase, protocatechuate decarboxylase, and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, respectively, were functionally expressed in E. coli to establish the MA biosynthetic pathway. E. coli native genes ubiC, aroF(FBR), aroE, and aroL were overexpressed and the genes ptsH, ptsI, crr, and pykF were deleted from the E. coli genome in order to increase the precursors of the proposed MA pathway. The final engineered E. coli strain produced nearly 170 mg/liter of MA from simple carbon sources in shake flask experiments. The proposed pathway was proved to be functionally active, and the strategy can be used for future metabolic engineering efforts for production of MA from renewable sugars. PMID:26362984

  17. Hepatic SRC-1 Activity Orchestrates Transcriptional Circuitries of Amino Acid Pathways with Potential Relevance for Human Metabolic Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tannour-Louet, Mounia; York, Brian; Tang, Ke; Stashi, Erin; Bouguerra, Hichem; Zhou, Suoling; Yu, Hui; Wong, Lee-Jun C.; Stevens, Robert D.; Xu, Jianming; Newgard, Christopher B.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances in amino acid metabolism are increasingly recognized as being associated with, and serving as prognostic markers for chronic human diseases, such as cancer or type 2 diabetes. In the current study, a quantitative metabolomics profiling strategy revealed global impairment in amino acid metabolism in mice deleted for the transcriptional coactivator steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1. Aberrations were hepatic in origin, because selective reexpression of SRC-1 in the liver of SRC-1 null mice largely restored amino acids concentrations to normal levels. Cistromic analysis of SRC-1 binding sites in hepatic tissues confirmed a prominent influence of this coregulator on transcriptional programs regulating amino acid metabolism. More specifically, SRC-1 markedly impacted tyrosine levels and was found to regulate the transcriptional activity of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme of tyrosine catabolism. Consequently, SRC-1 null mice displayed low TAT expression and presented with hypertyrosinemia and corneal alterations, 2 clinical features observed in the human syndrome of TAT deficiency. A heterozygous missense variant of SRC-1 (p.P1272S) that is known to alter its coactivation potential, was found in patients harboring idiopathic tyrosinemia-like disorders and may therefore represent one risk factor for their clinical symptoms. Hence, we reinforce the concept that SRC-1 is a central factor in the fine orchestration of multiple pathways of intermediary metabolism, suggesting it as a potential therapeutic target that may be exploitable in human metabolic diseases and cancer. PMID:25148457

  18. Carbohydrate Catabolism in Phaeobacter inhibens DSM 17395, a Member of the Marine Roseobacter Clade

    PubMed Central

    Wiegmann, Katharina; Hensler, Michael; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Ulbrich, Marcus; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Since genome analysis did not allow unambiguous reconstruction of transport, catabolism, and substrate-specific regulation for several important carbohydrates in Phaeobacter inhibens DSM 17395, proteomic and metabolomic analyses of N-acetylglucosamine-, mannitol-, sucrose-, glucose-, and xylose-grown cells were carried out to close this knowledge gap. These carbohydrates can pass through the outer membrane via porins identified in the outer membrane fraction. For transport across the cytoplasmic membrane, carbohydrate-specific ABC transport systems were identified. Their coding genes mostly colocalize with the respective “catabolic” and “regulatory” genes. The degradation of N-acetylglucosamine proceeds via N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate and glucosamine-6-phosphate directly to fructose-6-phosphate; two of the three enzymes involved were newly predicted and identified. Mannitol is catabolized via fructose, sucrose via fructose and glucose, glucose via glucose-6-phosphate, and xylose via xylulose-5-phosphate. Of the 30 proteins predicted to be involved in uptake, regulation, and degradation, 28 were identified by proteomics and 19 were assigned to their respective functions for the first time. The peripheral degradation pathways feed into the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway, which is connected to the lower branch of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway. The enzyme constituents of these pathways displayed higher abundances in P. inhibens DSM 17395 cells grown with any of the five carbohydrates tested than in succinate-grown cells. Conversely, gluconeogenesis is turned on during succinate utilization. While tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle proteins remained mainly unchanged, the abundance profiles of their metabolites reflected the differing growth rates achieved with the different substrates tested. Homologs of the 74 genes involved in the reconstructed catabolic pathways and central metabolism are present in various Roseobacter clade members. PMID:24858085

  19. Auxin Biosynthesis: Are the Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Phenylacetic Acid Biosynthesis Pathways Mirror Images?

    PubMed

    Cook, Sam D; Nichols, David S; Smith, Jason; Chourey, Prem S; McAdam, Erin L; Quittenden, Laura; Ross, John J

    2016-06-01

    The biosynthesis of the main auxin in plants (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) has been elucidated recently and is thought to involve the sequential conversion of Trp to indole-3-pyruvic acid to IAA However, the pathway leading to a less well studied auxin, phenylacetic acid (PAA), remains unclear. Here, we present evidence from metabolism experiments that PAA is synthesized from the amino acid Phe, via phenylpyruvate. In pea (Pisum sativum), the reverse reaction, phenylpyruvate to Phe, is also demonstrated. However, despite similarities between the pathways leading to IAA and PAA, evidence from mutants in pea and maize (Zea mays) indicate that IAA biosynthetic enzymes are not the main enzymes for PAA biosynthesis. Instead, we identified a putative aromatic aminotransferase (PsArAT) from pea that may function in the PAA synthesis pathway. PMID:27208245

  20. Oleic acid-enhanced transdermal delivery pathways of fluorescent nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wen; Ghazaryan, Ara; Tso, Chien-Hsin; Hu, Po-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Liang; Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Shean-Jen; Chen, Chia-Chun; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2012-05-01

    Transdermal delivery of nanocarriers provides an alternative pathway to transport therapeutic agents, alleviating pain, improving compliance of patients, and increasing overall effectiveness of delivery. In this work, enhancement of transdermal delivery of fluorescent nanoparticles and sulforhodamine B with assistance of oleic acid was visualized utilizing multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and analyzed quantitatively using multi-photon excitation-induced fluorescent signals. Results of MPM imaging and MPM intensity-based spatial depth-dependent analysis showed that oleic acid is effective in facilitating transdermal delivery of nanoparticles.

  1. Functional role of the Ti plasmid-encoded catabolic mannopine cyclase in mannityl opine catabolism by Agrobacterium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S B; Farrand, S K

    1994-01-01

    Catabolic mannopine (MOP) cyclase encoded by Ti or Ri plasmids lactonizes MOP to agropine (AGR). The gene of the octopine-type Ti plasmid pTi15955 encoding the catabolic MOP cyclase enzyme previously was localized to a 1.6-kb segment within a cosmid clone, pYDH208. A subclone containing only this region complemented the AGR catabolism-negative phenotype conferred by a derivative of the octopine-type plasmid pTiB6S3 containing a Tn7 insertion in the region encoding the MOP cyclase enzyme. Uptake assays of strains harboring pRiA4 or pArA4a, along with complementation analyses, indicate that MOP cyclase is not sufficient for catabolism of AGR but that the strains must also express an AGR transport system. To determine the requirement for MOP cyclase in opine catabolism unequivocally, a site-specific, nonpolar deletion mutation abolishing only MOP cyclase activity was introduced into pYDH208, a cosmid clone that confers utilization of MOP, AGR, and mannopinic acid (MOA). Strains harboring this MOP cyclase-negative mutant clone, pYDPH208, did not utilize AGR but continued to utilize MOP. Growth on AGR was restored in this strain upon introduction of clones encoding the pTi15955-derived catabolic or anabolic MOP cyclase genes. The induction pattern of MOA catabolism shown by strain NT1 harboring the MOP cyclase-deficient pYDPH208 suggests that AGR is converted into MOP by MOP cyclase and that MOP, but not AGR, induces catabolism of MOA. Genetic and biochemical analyses of MOP and AGR metabolism suggest that only the conversion of AGR to MOP is directly involved in catabolism of AGR, even though the reaction catalyzed by MOP cyclase predominantly lies in the lactonization of MOP to AGR. Images PMID:8206835

  2. Dissecting Abscisic Acid Signaling Pathways Involved in Cuticle Formation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fuqiang; Brosché, Mikael; Lehtonen, Mikko T; Amiryousefi, Ali; Xu, Enjun; Punkkinen, Matleena; Valkonen, Jari P T; Fujii, Hiroaki; Overmyer, Kirk

    2016-06-01

    The cuticle is the outer physical barrier of aerial plant surfaces and an important interaction point between plants and the environment. Many environmental stresses affect cuticle formation, yet the regulatory pathways involved remain undefined. We used a genetics and gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana to define an abscisic acid (ABA) signaling loop that positively regulates cuticle formation via the core ABA signaling pathway, including the PYR/PYL receptors, PP2C phosphatase, and SNF1-Related Protein Kinase (SnRK) 2.2/SnRK2.3/SnRK2.6. Downstream of the SnRK2 kinases, cuticle formation was not regulated by the ABA-responsive element-binding transcription factors but rather by DEWAX, MYB16, MYB94, and MYB96. Additionally, low air humidity increased cuticle formation independent of the core ABA pathway and cell death/reactive oxygen species signaling attenuated expression of cuticle-biosynthesis genes. In Physcomitrella patens, exogenous ABA suppressed expression of cuticle-related genes, whose Arabidopsis orthologs were ABA-induced. Hence, the mechanisms regulating cuticle formation are conserved but sophisticated in land plants. Signaling specifically related to cuticle deficiency was identified to play a major role in the adaptation of ABA signaling pathway mutants to increased humidity and in modulating their immunity to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis. These results define a cuticle-specific downstream branch in the ABA signaling pathway that regulates responses to the external environment. PMID:27060495

  3. Orthogonal Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Pathway Improves Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Dawn T; HamediRad, Mohammad; Yuan, Yongbo; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-07-17

    Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) are a form of biodiesel that can be microbially produced via a transesterification reaction of fatty acids with ethanol. The titer of microbially produced FAEEs can be greatly reduced by unbalanced metabolism and an insufficient supply of fatty acids, resulting in a commercially inviable process. Here, we report on a pathway engineering strategy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhancing the titer of microbially produced FAEEs by providing the cells with an orthogonal route for fatty acid synthesis. The fatty acids generated from this heterologous pathway would supply the FAEE production, safeguarding endogenous fatty acids for cellular metabolism and growth. We investigated the heterologous expression of a Type-I fatty acid synthase (FAS) from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes coupled with WS/DGAT, the wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme that catalyzes the transesterification reaction with ethanol. Strains harboring the orthologous fatty acid synthesis yielded a 6.3-fold increase in FAEE titer compared to strains without the heterologous FAS. Variations in fatty acid chain length and degree of saturation can affect the quality of the biodiesel; therefore, we also investigated the diversity of the fatty acid production profile of FAS enzymes from other Actinomyces organisms. PMID:25594225

  4. The RpiR-Like Repressor IolR Regulates Inositol Catabolism in Sinorhizobium meliloti▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Petra R. A.; Choong, Ee-Leng; Rossbach, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nitrogen-fixing symbiont of alfalfa, has the ability to catabolize myo-, scyllo-, and d-chiro-inositol. Functional inositol catabolism (iol) genes are required for growth on these inositol isomers, and they play a role during plant-bacterium interactions. The inositol catabolism genes comprise the chromosomally encoded iolA (mmsA) and the iolY(smc01163)RCDEB genes, as well as the idhA gene located on the pSymB plasmid. Reverse transcriptase assays showed that the iolYRCDEB genes are transcribed as one operon. The iol genes were weakly expressed without induction, but their expression was strongly induced by myo-inositol. The putative transcriptional regulator of the iol genes, IolR, belongs to the RpiR-like repressor family. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that IolR recognized a conserved palindromic sequence (5′-GGAA-N6-TTCC-3′) in the upstream regions of the idhA, iolY, iolR, and iolC genes. Complementation assays found IolR to be required for the repression of its own gene and for the downregulation of the idhA-encoded myo-inositol dehydrogenase activity in the presence and absence of inositol. Further expression studies indicated that the late pathway intermediate 2-keto-5-deoxy-d-gluconic acid 6-phosphate (KDGP) functions as the true inducer of the iol genes. The iolA (mmsA) gene encoding methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase was not regulated by IolR. The S. meliloti iolA (mmsA) gene product seems to be involved in more than only the inositol catabolic pathway, since it was also found to be essential for valine catabolism, supporting its more recent annotation as mmsA. PMID:21784930

  5. Virus-induced gene silencing reveals control of reactive oxygen species accumulation and salt tolerance in tomato by γ-aminobutyric acid metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hexigeduleng; Chen, Xianyang; Lv, Sulian; Jiang, Ping; Feng, Juanjuan; Fan, Pengxiang; Nie, Lingling; Li, Yinxin

    2015-03-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulates in many plant species in response to environmental stress. However, the physiological function of GABA or its metabolic pathway (GABA shunt) in plants remains largely unclear. Here, the genes, including glutamate decarboxylases (SlGADs), GABA transaminases (SlGABA-Ts) and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SlSSADH), controlling three steps of the metabolic pathway of GABA, were studied through virus-induced gene silencing approach in tomato. Silencing of SlGADs (GABA biosynthetic genes) and SlGABA-Ts (GABA catabolic genes) led to increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as salt sensitivity under 200 mm NaCl treatment. Targeted quantitative analysis of metabolites revealed that GABA decreased and increased in the SlGADs- and SlGABA-Ts-silenced plants, respectively, whereas succinate (the final product of GABA metabolism) decreased in both silenced plants. Contrarily, SlSSADH-silenced plants, also defective in GABA degradation process, showed dwarf phenotype, curled leaves and enhanced accumulation of ROS in normal conditions, suggesting the involvement of a bypath for succinic semialdehyde catabolism to γ-hydroxybutyrate as reported previously in Arabidopsis, were less sensitive to salt stress. These results suggest that GABA shunt is involved in salt tolerance of tomato, probably by affecting the homeostasis of metabolites such as succinate and γ-hydroxybutyrate and subsequent ROS accumulation under salt stress. PMID:25074245

  6. Polymorphism of Kynurenine Pathway-Related Genes, Kynurenic Acid, and Psychopathological Symptoms in HIV.

    PubMed

    Douet, Vanessa; Tanizaki, Naomi; Franke, Adrian; Li, Xingnan; Chang, Linda

    2016-09-01

    HIV-infection is associated with neuroinflammation and greater psychopathological symptoms, which may be mediated by imbalances in the kynurenic pathway (KP). Two key KP enzymes that catabolize kynurenine include kynurenine-aminotransferase II (KATII), which yields antioxidative kynurenine acid [KYNA] in astrocytes, and kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO), which produces neurotoxic metabolites in microglia. The relationships between polymorphisms in KMO and KATII, psychopathological symptoms, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) [KYNA] were evaluated in subjects with and without HIV-infection. Seventy-two HIV-positive and 72-seronegative (SN) participants were genotyped for KATII-rs1480544 and KMO-rs1053230. Although our participants were not currently diagnosed with depression or anxiety, they were assessed for psychopathological distress with Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. CSF-[KYNA] was also measured in 100 subjects (49 HIV/51 SN). HIV-participants had more psychopathological distress than SN, especially for anxiety. KATII-by-HIV interactions were found on anxiety, interpersonal sensitivity and obsessive compulsivity; KATII-C-carriers had lower scores than TT-carriers in SN but not in HIV. In contrast, the KMO-polymorphism had no influence on psychopathological symptoms in both groups. Overall, CSF-[KYNA] increased with age independently of HIV-serostatus, except KATII-TT-carriers tended to show no age-dependent variations. Therefore, the C-allele in KATII-rs1480544 appears to be protective against psychopathological distress in SN but not in HIV individuals, who had more psychopathological symptoms and likely greater neuroinflammation. The age-dependent increase in CSF-[KYNA] may reflect a compensatory response to age-related inflammation, which may be deficient in KATII-TT-carriers. Targeted treatments that decrease neuroinflammation and increase KYNA in at risk KATII-TT-carriers may reduce psychopathological symptoms

  7. Catabolism of (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin by rat intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, Akiko; Nanjo, Fumio

    2013-05-22

    Catabolism of (+)-catechin (+C) and (-)-epicatechin (EC) by rat intestinal microbiota was examined in vitro. +C and EC metabolites isolated were identified by LC-MS and NMR analyses. As a result, 4-hydroxy-5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)valeric acid (C-5 and EC-5), 4-oxo-5-(3,4-dihydorxyphenyl)valeric acid (EC-7), 4-oxo-5-(3-hydorxyphenyl)valeric acid (EC-8), and 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-3-(2,4,6-trihydroxyphenyl)propan-2-ol (EC-13) were identified as new metabolites of +C or EC. From the measurement of optical rotation, each of the +C and EC metabolites possessing the same chemical structure and chiral carbon was inferred to have an enantiomeric relationship to each other and to maintain the configurations at the 3-position of the original catechins. On the basis of these findings together with previous information, the proposed metabolic pathway of +C and EC by rat intestinal microbiota was updated. PMID:23621128

  8. Life in hot acid: pathway analyses in extremely thermoacidophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Auernik, Kathryne S; Cooper, Charlotte R; Kelly, Robert M

    2008-10-01

    The extremely thermoacidophilic archaea are a particularly intriguing group of microorganisms that must simultaneously cope with biologically extreme pHs (< or = 4) and temperatures (Topt > or = 60 degrees C) in their natural environments. Their expanding biotechnological significance relates to their role in biomining of base and precious metals and their unique mechanisms of survival in hot acid, at both the cellular and biomolecular levels. Recent developments, such as advances in understanding of heavy metal tolerance mechanisms, implementation of a genetic system, and discovery of a new carbon fixation pathway, have been facilitated by the availability of genome sequence data and molecular genetic systems. As a result, new insights into the metabolic pathways and physiological features that define extreme thermoacidophily have been obtained, in some cases suggesting prospects for biotechnological opportunities. PMID:18760359

  9. Hepatic alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid. A revised pathway.

    PubMed

    Van Veldhoven, P P; Mannaerts, G P; Casteels, M; Croes, K

    1999-01-01

    Synthetic 3-methyl-branched chain fatty acids were used to decipher the breakdown of phytanic acid. Based on results obtained in intact or permeabilized rat hepatocytes, rat liver homogenates or subcellular fractions, a revised alpha-oxidation pathway is proposed which appears to be functioning in man as well. In a first step, the 3-methyl-branched chain fatty acid is activated by an acyl-CoA synthetase. This reaction requires CoA, ATP and Mg2+. Subsequently, the acyl-CoA ester is hydroxylated at position 2 by a peroxisomal dioxygenase. This step is dependent on alpha-oxoglutarate, ascorbate (or glutathione), Fe2+ and O2. The 2-hydroxy-3-methylacyl-CoA intermediate is cleaved by a peroxisomal lyase to formyl-CoA and a 2-methyl-branched fatty aldehyde. Formyl-CoA is (partly enzymically) hydrolyzed to formate, which is then converted, most likely in the cytosol, to CO2. In the presence of NAD+, the aldehyde is dehydrogenated to a 2-methyl-branched fatty acid, presumably by a peroxisomal aldehyde dehydrogenase. This acid can--after activation--be degraded via a D-specific peroxisomal beta-oxidation system. PMID:10709654

  10. Structural Biology of Proline Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Summary The proline catabolic enzymes proline dehydrogenase and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase catalyze the 4-electron oxidation of proline to glutamate. These enzymes play important roles in cellular redox control, superoxide generation, apoptosis and cancer. In some bacteria, the two enzymes are fused into the bifunctional enzyme, proline utilization A. Here we review the three-dimensional structural information that is currently available for proline catabolic enzymes. Crystal structures have been determined for bacterial monofunctional proline dehydrogenase and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, as well as the proline dehydrogenase and DNA-binding domains of proline utilization A. Some of the functional insights provided by analyses of these structures are discussed, including substrate recognition, catalytic mechanism, biochemical basis of inherited proline catabolic disorders and DNA recognition by proline utilization A. PMID:18369526

  11. Bacterial Fatty Acid Synthesis and its Relationships with Polyketide Synthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cronan, John E.; Thomas, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    This review presents the most thoroughly studied bacterial fatty acid synthetic pathway, that of Escherichia coli and then discusses the exceptions to the E. coli pathway present in other bacteria. The known interrelationships between the fatty acid and polyketide synthetic pathways are also assessed, mainly in the Streptomyces group of bacteria. Finally, we present a compendium of methods for analysis of bacterial fatty acid synthetic pathways. PMID:19362649

  12. Catabolism and Deactivation of the Lipid-Derived Hormone Jasmonoyl-Isoleucine

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J. K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2012-01-01

    The oxylipin hormone jasmonate controls myriad processes involved in plant growth, development, and immune function. The discovery of jasmonoyl-l-isoleucine (JA-Ile) as the major bioactive form of the hormone highlights the need to understand biochemical and cell biological processes underlying JA-Ile homeostasis. Among the major metabolic control points governing the accumulation of JA-Ile in plant tissues are the availability of jasmonic acid, the immediate precursor of JA-Ile, and oxidative enzymes involved in catabolism and deactivation of the hormone. Recent studies indicate that JA-Ile turnover is mediated by a ω-oxidation pathway involving members of the CYP94 family of cytochromes P450. This discovery opens new opportunities to genetically manipulate JA-Ile levels for enhanced resistance to environmental stress, and further highlights ω-oxidation as a conserved pathway for catabolism of lipid-derived signals in plants and animals. Functional characterization of the full complement of CYP94 P450s promises to reveal new pathways for jasmonate metabolism and provide insight into the evolution of oxylipin signaling in land plants. PMID:22639640

  13. Mutants of Pseudomonas cepacia G4 defective in catabolism of aromatic compounds and trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, M S; Montgomery, S O; Cuskey, S M; Chapman, P J; Pritchard, P H

    1991-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia G4 possesses a novel pathway of toluene catabolism that is shown to be responsible for the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE). This pathway involves conversion of toluene via o-cresol to 3-methylcatechol. In order to determine the enzyme of toluene degradation that is responsible for TCE degradation, chemically induced mutants, blocked in the toluene ortho-monooxygenase (TOM) pathway of G4, were examined. Mutants of the phenotypic class designated TOM A- were all defective in their ability to oxidize toluene, o-cresol, m-cresol, and phenol, suggesting that a single enzyme is responsible for conversion of these compounds to their hydroxylated products (3-methylcatechol from toluene, o-cresol, and m-cresol and catechol from phenol) in the wild type. Mutants of this class did not degrade TCE. Two other mutant classes which were blocked in toluene catabolism, TOM B-, which lacked catechol-2,3-dioxygenase, and TOM C-, which lacked 2-hydroxy-6-oxoheptadienoic acid hydrolase activity, were fully capable of TCE degradation. Therefore, TCE degradation is directly associated with the monooxygenation capability responsible for toluene, cresol, and phenol hydroxylation. PMID:1892384

  14. Inhibition of growth by erythritol catabolism in Brucella abortus.

    PubMed Central

    Sperry, J F; Robertson, D C

    1975-01-01

    The growth of Brucella abortus (US-19) in a complex tryptose-yeast extract medium containing D-glucose is inhibited by 10 mM erythritol. The enzymes of the erythritol pathway, except for D-erythrulose 1-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glycero-2-tetrulose 1-phosphate:nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) 4-oxidoreductase) were detected in the soluble and membrane fractions of cell extracts. Glucose catabolism by cell extracts was inhibited by erythritol, whereas, phosphorylated intermediates of the hexose monophosphate pathway were converted to pyruvic acid with oxygen consumption. Erythritol kinase (EC 2.7.1.27; adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP): erythritol 1-phosphotransferase) was found to be eightfold higher in activity than the hexokinase in cell extracts. In vivo, ATP is apparently consumed with the accumulation of D-erythrulose 1-phosphate (D-glycero-2-tetrulose 1-phosphate) and no substrate level phosphorylation. ATP levels dropped 10-fold in 30 min after addition of erythritol to log phase cells in tryptose-yeast extract medium with D-glucose as the carbon source. These data suggest bacteriostasis in the presence of erythritol results from the ATP drain caused by erythritol kinase. PMID:170249

  15. Long-Term Administration of Dehydroepiandrosterone Accelerates Glucose Catabolism via Activation of PI3K/Akt-PFK-2 Signaling Pathway in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jian; Ge, Chongyang; Yu, Lei; Li, Longlong; Ma, Haitian

    2016-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has a fat-reducing effect, while little information is available on whether DHEA regulates glucose metabolism, which would in turn affect fat deposition. To investigate the effects of DHEA on glucose metabolism, rats were administered a high-fat diet containing either 0 (HCG), 25 (HLG), 50 (HMG), or 100 (HHG) mg·kg-1 DHEA per day via gavage for 8 weeks. Results showed that long-term administration of DHEA inhibited body weight gain in rats on a high-fat diet. No statistical differences in serum glucose levels were observed, whereas hepatic glycogen content in HMG and HHG groups and muscle glycogen content in HLG and HMG groups were higher than those in HCG group. Glucokinase, malate dehydrogenase and phosphofructokinase-2 activities in HMG and HHG groups, pyruvate kinase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in HMG group, and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in all DHEA treatment groups were increased compared with those in HCG group. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glycogen phosphorylase mRNA levels were decreased in HMG and HHG groups, whereas glycogen synthase-2 mRNA level was increased in HMG group compared with those in HCG. The abundance of Glut2 mRNA in HMG and HHG groups and Glut4 mRNA in HMG group was higher than that in HCG group. DHEA treatment increased serum leptin content in HMG and HHG groups compared with that in HCG group. Serum insulin content and insulin receptor mRNA level in HMG group and insulin receptor substrate-2 mRNA level in HMG and HHG group were increased compared with those in HCG group. Furthermore, Pi3k mRNA level in HMG and Akt mRNA level in HMG and HHG groups were significantly increased than those in HCG group. These data showed that DHEA treatment could enhance glycogen storage and accelerate glucose catabolism in rats fed a high-fat diet, and this effect may be associated with the activation of PI3K/Akt-PFK-2 signaling pathway. PMID:27410429

  16. Long-Term Administration of Dehydroepiandrosterone Accelerates Glucose Catabolism via Activation of PI3K/Akt-PFK-2 Signaling Pathway in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jian; Ge, Chongyang; Yu, Lei; Li, Longlong; Ma, Haitian

    2016-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has a fat-reducing effect, while little information is available on whether DHEA regulates glucose metabolism, which would in turn affect fat deposition. To investigate the effects of DHEA on glucose metabolism, rats were administered a high-fat diet containing either 0 (HCG), 25 (HLG), 50 (HMG), or 100 (HHG) mg·kg-1 DHEA per day via gavage for 8 weeks. Results showed that long-term administration of DHEA inhibited body weight gain in rats on a high-fat diet. No statistical differences in serum glucose levels were observed, whereas hepatic glycogen content in HMG and HHG groups and muscle glycogen content in HLG and HMG groups were higher than those in HCG group. Glucokinase, malate dehydrogenase and phosphofructokinase-2 activities in HMG and HHG groups, pyruvate kinase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in HMG group, and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in all DHEA treatment groups were increased compared with those in HCG group. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glycogen phosphorylase mRNA levels were decreased in HMG and HHG groups, whereas glycogen synthase-2 mRNA level was increased in HMG group compared with those in HCG. The abundance of Glut2 mRNA in HMG and HHG groups and Glut4 mRNA in HMG group was higher than that in HCG group. DHEA treatment increased serum leptin content in HMG and HHG groups compared with that in HCG group. Serum insulin content and insulin receptor mRNA level in HMG group and insulin receptor substrate-2 mRNA level in HMG and HHG group were increased compared with those in HCG group. Furthermore, Pi3k mRNA level in HMG and Akt mRNA level in HMG and HHG groups were significantly increased than those in HCG group. These data showed that DHEA treatment could enhance glycogen storage and accelerate glucose catabolism in rats fed a high-fat diet, and this effect may be associated with the activation of PI3K/Akt-PFK-2 signaling pathway. PMID:27410429

  17. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the positive regulator (DmpR) of the phenol catabolic pathway encoded by pVI150 and identification of DmpR as a member of the NtrC family of transcriptional activators.

    PubMed Central

    Shingler, V; Bartilson, M; Moore, T

    1993-01-01

    The catabolic plasmid pVI150 of Pseudomonas sp. strain CF600 encodes all the genetic information required for the regulated metabolism of phenol and some of its methyl-substituted derivatives. The structural dmp genes of the pathway are clustered in a single operon that lies just downstream of a -24 TGGC, -12 TTGC nif/ntr-like promoter sequence. Promoters of this class are recognized by a minor form of RNA polymerase utilizing sigma 54 (NtrA, RpoN). Primer extension analysis demonstrated that the dmp operon transcript initiates downstream of the -24, -12 promoter. Transposon insertion mutants, specifically defective in the regulation of the dmp operon, were isolated, and complementation of a phenol-utilization regulatory mutant was used to identify the regulatory locus, dmpR. The 67-kDa dmpR gene product alone was shown to be sufficient for activation of transcription from the dmp operon promoter. Nucleotide sequence determination revealed that DmpR belongs to the NtrC family of transcriptional activators that regulate transcription from -24, -12 promoters. The deduced amino acid sequence of DmpR has high homology (40 to 67% identity) with the central and carboxy-terminal regions of these activators, which are believed to be involved in the interaction with the sigma 54 RNA polymerase and in DNA binding, respectively. The amino-terminal region of DmpR was found to share 64% identity with the amino-terminal region of XylR, which is also a member of this family of activators. This region has been implicated in effector recognition of aromatic compounds that is required for the regulatory activity of XylR. Images PMID:8449869

  18. Oxalate catabolism in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxalic acid is found in most plant species and can serve beneficial roles that protect the plant from a variety of environmental stresses. Excessive amounts of oxalate, however, can be detrimental to plant health. Thus, careful coordination of oxalate metabolism is needed. Despite the important impa...

  19. Substrate specificity of the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Christina L.; Goon, Scarlett; Yarema, Kevin J.; Hinderlich, Stephan; Hang, Howard C.; Chai, Diana H.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2001-07-18

    Unnatural analogs of sialic acid can be delivered to mammalian cell surfaces through the metabolic transformation of unnatural N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) derivatives. In previous studies, mannosamine analogs bearing simple N-acyl groups up to five carbon atoms in length were recognized as substrates by the biosynthetic machinery and transformed into cell-surface sialoglycoconjugates [Keppler, O. T., et al. (2001) Glycobiology 11, 11R-18R]. Such structural alterations to cell surface glycans can be used to probe carbohydrate-dependent phenomena. This report describes our investigation into the extent of tolerance of the pathway toward additional structural alterations of the N-acyl substituent of ManNAc. A panel of analogs with ketone-containing N-acyl groups that varied in the lengthor steric bulk was chemically synthesized and tested for metabolic conversion to cell-surface glycans. We found that extension of the N-acyl chain to six, seven, or eight carbon atoms dramatically reduced utilization by the biosynthetic machinery. Likewise, branching from the linear chain reduced metabolic conversion. Quantitation of metabolic intermediates suggested that cellular metabolism is limited by the phosphorylation of the N-acylmannosamines by ManNAc 6-kinase in the first step of the pathway. This was confirmed by enzymatic assay of the partially purified enzyme with unnatural substrates. Identification of ManNAc 6-kinase as a bottleneck for unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis provides a target for expanding the metabolic promiscuity of mammalian cells.

  20. Proteolytic Pathways Induced by Herbicides That Inhibit Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Villamor, Joji Grace; Zabalza, Ana; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Royuela, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicides glyphosate (Gly) and imazamox (Imx) inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling. Results Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined. PMID:24040092

  1. Metabolomic profiling of permethrin-treated Drosophila melanogaster identifies a role for tryptophan catabolism in insecticide survival.

    PubMed

    Brinzer, Robert A; Henderson, Louise; Marchiondo, Alan A; Woods, Debra J; Davies, Shireen A; Dow, Julian A T

    2015-12-01

    Insecticides and associated synergists are rapidly losing efficacy in target insect pest populations making the discovery of alternatives a priority. To discover novel targets for permethrin synergists, metabolomics was performed on permethrin-treated Drosophila melanogaster. Changes were observed in several metabolic pathways including those for amino acids, glycogen, glycolysis, energy, nitrogen, NAD(+), purine, pyrimidine, lipids and carnitine. Markers for acidosis, ammonia stress, oxidative stress and detoxification responses were also observed. Many of these changes had not been previously characterized after permethrin exposure. From the altered pathways, tryptophan catabolism was selected for further investigation. The knockdown of some tryptophan catabolism genes (vermilion, cinnabar and CG6950) in the whole fly and in specific tissues including fat body, midgut and Malpighian tubules using targeted RNAi resulted in altered survival phenotypes against acute topical permethrin exposure. The knockdown of vermilion, cinnabar and CG6950 in the whole fly also altered survival phenotypes against chronic oral permethrin, fenvalerate, DDT, chlorpyriphos and hydramethylnon exposure. Thus tryptophan catabolism has a previously uncharacterized role in defence against insecticides, and shows that metabolomics is a powerful tool for target identification in pesticide research. PMID:26474926

  2. Central Role of Pyruvate Kinase in Carbon Co-catabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Noy, Tahel; Vergnolle, Olivia; Hartman, Travis E; Rhee, Kyu Y; Jacobs, William R; Berney, Michael; Blanchard, John S

    2016-03-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) displays a high degree of metabolic plasticity to adapt to challenging host environments. Genetic evidence suggests thatMtbrelies mainly on fatty acid catabolism in the host. However,Mtbalso maintains a functional glycolytic pathway and its role in the cellular metabolism ofMtbhas yet to be understood. Pyruvate kinase catalyzes the last and rate-limiting step in glycolysis and theMtbgenome harbors one putative pyruvate kinase (pykA, Rv1617). Here we show thatpykAencodes an active pyruvate kinase that is allosterically activated by glucose 6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Deletion ofpykApreventsMtbgrowth in the presence of fermentable carbon sources and has a cidal effect in the presence of glucose that correlates with elevated levels of the toxic catabolite methylglyoxal. Growth attenuation was also observed in media containing a combination of short chain fatty acids and glucose and surprisingly, in media containing odd and even chain fatty acids alone. Untargeted high sensitivity metabolomics revealed that inactivation of pyruvate kinase leads to accumulation of phosphoenolpyruvate (P-enolpyruvate), citrate, and aconitate, which was consistent with allosteric inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase by P-enolpyruvate. This metabolic block could be relieved by addition of the α-ketoglutarate precursor glutamate. Taken together, our study identifies an essential role of pyruvate kinase in preventing metabolic block during carbon co-catabolism inMtb. PMID:26858255

  3. Integrated Interactive Chart as a Tool for Teaching Metabolic Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalogiannis, Stavros; Pagkalos, Ioannis; Koufoudakis, Panagiotis; Dashi, Ino; Pontikeri, Kyriaki; Christodoulou, Constantina

    2014-01-01

    An interactive chart of energy metabolism with didactic function, complementary to the already existing metabolic maps, located at the URL www.metpath.teithe.gr is being presented. The chart illustrates the major catabolic and biosynthetic pathways of glucose, fatty acids, and aminoacids, individually as well as in an integrated view. For every…

  4. Engineered Production of Short Chain Fatty Acid in Escherichia coli Using Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Kamran; Mattam, Anu Jose; Fatma, Zia; Wajid, Saima; Abdin, Malik Z.; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyric acid, have a broad range of applications in chemical and fuel industries. Worldwide demand of sustainable fuels and chemicals has encouraged researchers for microbial synthesis of SCFAs. In this study we compared three thioesterases, i.e., TesAT from Anaerococcus tetradius, TesBF from Bryantella formatexigens and TesBT from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, for production of SCFAs in Escherichia coli utilizing native fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway and modulated the genetic and bioprocess parameters to improve its yield and productivity. E. coli strain expressing tesBT gene yielded maximum butyric acid titer at 1.46 g L-1, followed by tesBF at 0.85 g L-1 and tesAT at 0.12 g L-1. The titer of butyric acid varied significantly depending upon the plasmid copy number and strain genotype. The modulation of genetic factors that are known to influence long chain fatty acid production, such as deletion of the fadD and fadE that initiates the fatty acid degradation cycle and overexpression of fadR that is a global transcriptional activator of fatty acid biosynthesis and repressor of degradation cycle, did not improve the butyric acid titer significantly. Use of chemical inhibitor cerulenin, which restricts the fatty acid elongation cycle, increased the butyric acid titer by 1.7-fold in case of TesBF, while it had adverse impact in case of TesBT. In vitro enzyme assay indicated that cerulenin also inhibited short chain specific thioesterase, though inhibitory concentration varied according to the type of thioesterase used. Further process optimization followed by fed-batch cultivation under phosphorous limited condition led to production of 14.3 g L-1 butyric acid and 17.5 g L-1 total free fatty acid at 28% of theoretical yield. This study expands our understanding of SCFAs production in E. coli through FASII pathway and highlights role of genetic and process optimization to enhance the desired product. PMID:27466817

  5. Engineered Production of Short Chain Fatty Acid in Escherichia coli Using Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Kamran; Mattam, Anu Jose; Fatma, Zia; Wajid, Saima; Abdin, Malik Z; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyric acid, have a broad range of applications in chemical and fuel industries. Worldwide demand of sustainable fuels and chemicals has encouraged researchers for microbial synthesis of SCFAs. In this study we compared three thioesterases, i.e., TesAT from Anaerococcus tetradius, TesBF from Bryantella formatexigens and TesBT from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, for production of SCFAs in Escherichia coli utilizing native fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway and modulated the genetic and bioprocess parameters to improve its yield and productivity. E. coli strain expressing tesBT gene yielded maximum butyric acid titer at 1.46 g L-1, followed by tesBF at 0.85 g L-1 and tesAT at 0.12 g L-1. The titer of butyric acid varied significantly depending upon the plasmid copy number and strain genotype. The modulation of genetic factors that are known to influence long chain fatty acid production, such as deletion of the fadD and fadE that initiates the fatty acid degradation cycle and overexpression of fadR that is a global transcriptional activator of fatty acid biosynthesis and repressor of degradation cycle, did not improve the butyric acid titer significantly. Use of chemical inhibitor cerulenin, which restricts the fatty acid elongation cycle, increased the butyric acid titer by 1.7-fold in case of TesBF, while it had adverse impact in case of TesBT. In vitro enzyme assay indicated that cerulenin also inhibited short chain specific thioesterase, though inhibitory concentration varied according to the type of thioesterase used. Further process optimization followed by fed-batch cultivation under phosphorous limited condition led to production of 14.3 g L-1 butyric acid and 17.5 g L-1 total free fatty acid at 28% of theoretical yield. This study expands our understanding of SCFAs production in E. coli through FASII pathway and highlights role of genetic and process optimization to enhance the desired product. PMID:27466817

  6. Reconstruction of cytosolic fumaric acid biosynthetic pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fumaric acid is a commercially important component of foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals and industrial materials, yet the current methods of production are unsustainable and ecologically destructive. Results In this study, the fumarate biosynthetic pathway involving reductive reactions of the tricarboxylic acid cycle was exogenously introduced in S. cerevisiae by a series of simple genetic modifications. First, the Rhizopus oryzae genes for malate dehydrogenase (RoMDH) and fumarase (RoFUM1) were heterologously expressed. Then, expression of the endogenous pyruvate carboxylase (PYC2) was up-regulated. The resultant yeast strain, FMME-001 ↑PYC2 + ↑RoMDH, was capable of producing significantly higher yields of fumarate in the glucose medium (3.18 ± 0.15 g liter-1) than the control strain FMME-001 empty vector. Conclusions The results presented here provide a novel strategy for fumarate biosynthesis, which represents an important advancement in producing high yields of fumarate in a sustainable and ecologically-friendly manner. PMID:22335940

  7. Abscisic-acid-induced cellular apoptosis and differentiation in glioma via the retinoid acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Yao, Yu; Ye, Hongxing; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying

    2016-04-15

    Retinoid acid (RA) plays critical roles in regulating differentiation and apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells. Abscisic acid (ABA) and RA are direct derivatives of carotenoids and share structural similarities. Here we proposed that ABA may also play a role in cellular differentiation and apoptosis by sharing a similar signaling pathway with RA that may be involved in glioma pathogenesis. We reported for the first time that the ABA levels were twofold higher in low-grade gliomas compared with high-grade gliomas. In glioma tissues, there was a positive correlation between the ABA levels and the transcription of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 (CRABP2) and a negative correlation between the ABA levels and transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5). ABA treatment induced a significant increase in the expression of CRABP2 and a decrease in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) in glioblastoma cells. Remarkably, both cellular apoptosis and differentiation were increased in the glioblastoma cells after ABA treatment. ABA-induced cellular apoptosis and differentiation were significantly reduced by selectively silencing RAR-α, while RAR-α overexpression exaggerated the ABA-induced effects. These results suggest that ABA may play a role in the pathogenesis of glioma by promoting cellular apoptosis and differentiation through the RA signaling pathway. PMID:26594836

  8. Transport and Catabolism of Carbohydrates by Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Derkaoui, Meriem; Antunes, Ana; Nait Abdallah, Jamila; Poncet, Sandrine; Mazé, Alain; Ma Pham, Que Mai; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Joyet, Philippe; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Deutscher, Josef

    2016-01-01

    We identified the genes encoding the proteins for the transport of glucose and maltose in Neisseria meningitidis strain 2C4-3. A mutant deleted for NMV_1892(glcP) no longer grew on glucose and deletion of NMV_0424(malY) prevented the utilization of maltose. We also purified and characterized glucokinase and α-phosphoglucomutase, which catalyze early catabolic steps of the two carbohydrates. N. meningitidis catabolizes the two carbohydrates either via the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway or the pentose phosphate pathway, thereby forming glyceraldehyde-3-P and either pyruvate or fructose-6-P, respectively. We purified and characterized several key enzymes of the two pathways. The genes required for the transformation of glucose into gluconate-6-P and its further catabolism via the ED pathway are organized in two adjacent operons. N. meningitidis also contains genes encoding proteins which exhibit similarity to the gluconate transporter (NMV_2230) and gluconate kinase (NMV_2231) of Enterobacteriaceae and Firmicutes. However, gluconate might not be the real substrate of NMV_2230 because N. meningitidis was not able to grow on gluconate as the sole carbon source. Surprisingly, deletion of NMV_2230 stimulated growth in minimal medium in the presence and absence of glucose and drastically slowed the clearance of N. meningitidis cells from transgenic mice after intraperitoneal challenge. PMID:27454890

  9. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Madiraju, Anila K; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-06-14

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27247419

  10. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Madiraju, Anila K.; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W.; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27247419

  11. 15-oxoeicosatetraenoic acid is a 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase-derived electrophilic mediator of inflammatory signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Nathaniel W.; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Gao, Yang; Blair, Ian A.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive lipids govern cellular homeostasis and pathogenic inflammatory processes. Current dogma holds that bioactive lipids, such as prostaglandins and lipoxins, are inactivated by 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15PGDH). In contrast, the present results reveal that catabolic “inactivation” of hydroxylated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) yields electrophilic α,β-unsaturated ketone derivatives. These endogenously produced species are chemically reactive signaling mediators that induce tissue protective events. Electrophilic fatty acids diversify the proteome through post-translational alkylation of nucleophilic cysteines in key transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes that govern cellular metabolic and inflammatory homeostasis. 15PGDH regulates these processes as it is responsible for the formation of numerous electrophilic fatty acids including the arachidonic acid metabolite, 15-oxoeicosatetraenoic acid (15-oxoETE). Herein, the role of 15-oxoETE in regulating signaling responses is reported. In cell cultures, 15-oxoETE activates Nrf2-regulated antioxidant responses (AR) and inhibits NF-κB-mediated pro-inflammatory responses via IKKβ inhibition. Inhibition of glutathione S-transferases using ethacrynic acid incrementally increased the signaling capacity of 15-oxoETE by decreasing 15-oxoETE-GSH adduct formation. This work demonstrates that 15PGDH plays a role in the regulation of cell and tissue homeostasis via the production of electrophilic fatty acid signaling mediators. PMID:25450232

  12. An Oxalyl-CoA Dependent Pathway of Oxalate Catabolism Plays a Role in Regulating Calcium Oxalate Crystal Accumulation and Defending against Oxalate-Secreting Phytopathogens in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Justin; Luo, Bin; Nakata, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Considering the widespread occurrence of oxalate in nature and its broad impact on a host of organisms, it is surprising that so little is known about the turnover of this important acid. In plants, oxalate oxidase is the most well studied enzyme capable of degrading oxalate, but not all plants possess this activity. Recently, an Acyl Activating Enzyme 3 (AAE3), encoding an oxalyl-CoA synthetase, was identified in Arabidopsis. AAE3 has been proposed to catalyze the first step in an alternative pathway of oxalate degradation. Whether this enzyme and proposed pathway is important to other plants is unknown. Here, we identify the Medicago truncatula AAE3 (MtAAE3) and show that it encodes an oxalyl-CoA synthetase activity exhibiting high activity against oxalate with a Km = 81 ± 9 μM and Vmax = 19 ± 0.9 μmoles min-1mg protein-1. GFP-MtAAE3 localization suggested that this enzyme functions within the cytosol of the cell. Mtaae3 knock-down line showed a reduction in its ability to degrade oxalate into CO2. This reduction in the capacity to degrade oxalate resulted in the accumulation of druse crystals of calcium oxalate in the Mtaae3 knock-down line and an increased susceptibility to oxalate-secreting phytopathogens such as Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Taken together, these results suggest that AAE3 dependent turnover of oxalate is important to different plants and functions in the regulation of tissue calcium oxalate crystal accumulation and in defense against oxalate-secreting phytopathogens. PMID:26900946

  13. Glyphosate catabolism by Pseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Shinabarger, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The pathway for the degradation of glyphosate (N-phosphonomethylglycine) by Pseudomonas sp. PG2982 has been determined using metabolic radiolabeling experiments. Radiorespirometry experiments utilizing (3-/sup 14/C) glyphosate revealed that approximately 50-59% of the C3 carbon was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Fractionation of stationary phase cells labeled with (3-/sup 14/C)glyphosate revealed that from 45-47% of the assimilated C3 carbon is distributed to proteins and that amino acids methionine and serine are highly labeled. The nucleic acid bases adenine and guanine received 90% of the C3 label that was incorporated into nucleic acids, and the only pyrimidine base labeled was thymine. Pulse labeling of PG2982 cells with (3-/sup 14/C)glyphosate revealed that (3-/sup 14/C)sarcosine is an intermediate in glyphosate degradation. Examination of crude extracts prepared from PG2982 cells revealed the presence of an enzyme that oxidizes sarcosine to glycine and formaldehyde. These results indicate that the first step in glyphosate degradation by PG2982 is cleavage of the carbon-phosphorus bond, resulting in the release of sarcosine and a phosphate group. The phosphate group is utilized as a source of phosphorus, and the sarcosine is degraded to glycine and formaldehyde. Phosphonate utilization by Pseudomonas sp. PG2982 was investigated. Each of the ten phosphonates tested were utilized as a sole source of phosphorus by PG2982. Representative compounds tested included alkylphosphonates, 1-amino-substituted alkylphosphonates, amino-terminal phosphonates, and an arylphosphonate. PG2982 cultures degraded phenylphosphonate to benzene and produced methane from methylphosphonate. The data indicate that PG2982 is capable of cleaving the carbon-phosphorus bond of several structurally different phosphonates.

  14. HDL biogenesis, remodeling, and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Zannis, Vassilis I; Fotakis, Panagiotis; Koukos, Georgios; Kardassis, Dimitris; Ehnholm, Christian; Jauhiainen, Matti; Chroni, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we review how HDL is generated, remodeled, and catabolized in plasma. We describe key features of the proteins that participate in these processes, emphasizing how mutations in apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and the other proteins affect HDL metabolism. The biogenesis of HDL initially requires functional interaction of apoA-I with the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and subsequently interactions of the lipidated apoA-I forms with lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Mutations in these proteins either prevent or impair the formation and possibly the functionality of HDL. Remodeling and catabolism of HDL is the result of interactions of HDL with cell receptors and other membrane and plasma proteins including hepatic lipase (HL), endothelial lipase (EL), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), apolipoprotein M (apoM), scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1), the F1 subunit of ATPase (Ecto F1-ATPase), and the cubulin/megalin receptor. Similarly to apoA-I, apolipoprotein E and apolipoprotein A-IV were shown to form discrete HDL particles containing these apolipoproteins which may have important but still unexplored functions. Furthermore, several plasma proteins were found associated with HDL and may modulate its biological functions. The effect of these proteins on the functionality of HDL is the topic of ongoing research. PMID:25522986

  15. Amino acid biosynthesis in the spirochete Leptospira: evidence for a novel pathway of isoleucine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Charon, N W; Johnson, R C; Peterson, D

    1974-01-01

    Radioactive carbon dioxide was incubated with growing cells of Leptospira interrogans serotypes semaranga and tarassovi, and the specific activities and distribution of the label within the cellular amino acids were determined. The origins of the carbon skeletons of all the acid-stable amino acids except isoleucine were found to be consistent with known biosynthetic pathways for these amino acids. Experiments using radioactive carbon dioxide and other tracers indicated that most of the isoleucine was synthesized by a pathway not involving threonine. The origin of the carbon skeleton of isoleucine consisted of two residues of pyruvate (carbons 2 and 3) and acetate of acetyl-coenzyme A by this pathway. Isotope competition studies indicated that the pathway was regulated by isoleucine. The results are discussed in relation to two proposed pathways of isoleucine biosynthesis involving citramalate as an intermediate. PMID:4808901

  16. Anaerobic Catabolism of Aromatic Compounds: a Genetic and Genomic View

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F.; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Barragán, María J. L.; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach. PMID:19258534

  17. Characterization of an Arginine:Pyruvate Transaminase in Arginine Catabolism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhe; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2007-01-01

    The arginine transaminase (ATA) pathway represents one of the multiple pathways for l-arginine catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The AruH protein was proposed to catalyze the first step in the ATA pathway, converting the substrates l-arginine and pyruvate into 2-ketoarginine and l-alanine. Here we report the initial biochemical characterization of this enzyme. The aruH gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product was purified to homogeneity. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (MS) analyses were employed to detect the presence of the transamination products 2-ketoarginine and l-alanine, thus demonstrating the proposed biochemical reaction catalyzed by AruH. The enzymatic properties and kinetic parameters of dimeric recombinant AruH were determined by a coupled reaction with NAD+ and l-alanine dehydrogenase. The optimal activity of AruH was found at pH 9.0, and it has a novel substrate specificity with an order of preference of Arg > Lys > Met > Leu > Orn > Gln. With l-arginine and pyruvate as the substrates, Lineweaver-Burk plots of the data revealed a series of parallel lines characteristic of a ping-pong kinetic mechanism with calculated Vmax and kcat values of 54.6 ± 2.5 μmol/min/mg and 38.6 ± 1.8 s−1. The apparent Km and catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) were 1.6 ± 0.1 mM and 24.1 mM−1 s−1 for pyruvate and 13.9 ± 0.8 mM and 2.8 mM−1 s−1 for l-arginine. When l-lysine was used as the substrate, MS analysis suggested Δ1-piperideine-2-carboxylate as its transamination product. These results implied that AruH may have a broader physiological function in amino acid catabolism. PMID:17416668

  18. Changes in expression of proteolytic genes in response to anabolic and catabolic signals in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rates of protein accrual are largely affected by rates of protein degradation. Determining how proteolytic pathways are affected by catabolic and anabolic signals will contribute to the understanding of the impact and regulation these pathways have on protein turnover. Real time RT-PCR was used to...

  19. Neanderthal ancestry drives evolution of lipid catabolism in contemporary Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Khrameeva, Ekaterina E.; Bozek, Katarzyna; He, Liu; Yan, Zheng; Jiang, Xi; Wei, Yuning; Tang, Kun; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Prufer, Kay; Kelso, Janet; Paabo, Svante; Giavalisco, Patrick; Lachmann, Michael; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Although Neanderthals are extinct, fragments of their genomes persist in contemporary humans. Here we show that while the genome-wide frequency of Neanderthal-like sites is approximately constant across all contemporary out-of-Africa populations, genes involved in lipid catabolism contain more than threefold excess of such sites in contemporary humans of European descent. Evolutionally, these genes show significant association with signatures of recent positive selection in the contemporary European, but not Asian or African populations. Functionally, the excess of Neanderthal-like sites in lipid catabolism genes can be linked with a greater divergence of lipid concentrations and enzyme expression levels within this pathway, seen in contemporary Europeans, but not in the other populations. We conclude that sequence variants that evolved in Neanderthals may have given a selective advantage to anatomically modern humans that settled in the same geographical areas. PMID:24690587

  20. Pathways of Amino Acid Degradation in Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) with Special Reference to Lysine-Ketoglutarate Reductase/Saccharopine Dehydrogenase (LKR/SDH)

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Pin-Jun; Yuan, San-Yue; Tang, Yao-Hua; Li, Kai-Long; Yang, Lu; Fu, Qiang; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Nilaparvata lugens harbors yeast-like symbionts (YLSs). In present paper, a genome-wide analysis found 115 genes from Ni. lugens and 90 genes from YLSs that were involved in the metabolic degradation of 20 proteinogenic amino acids. These 205 genes encoded for 77 enzymes. Accordingly, the degradation pathways for the 20 amino acids were manually constructed. It is postulated that Ni. lugens can independently degrade fourteen amino acids (threonine, alanine, glycine, serine, aspartate, asparagine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, glutamate, glutamine, proline, histidine, leucine and lysine). Ni. lugens and YLSs enzymes may work collaboratively to break down tryptophan, cysteine, arginine, isoleucine, methionine and valine. We cloned a lysine-ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase gene (Nllkr/sdh) that encoded a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the first two steps of lysine catabolism. Nllkr/sdh is widely expressed in the first through fifth instar nymphs and adults, and is highly expressed in the fat body, ovary and gut in adults. Ingestion of dsNllkr/sdh by nymphs successfully knocked down the target gene, and caused nymphal/adult mortality, shortened nymphal development stage and reduced adult fresh weight. Moreover, Nllkr/sdh knockdown resulted in three defects: wings were shortened and thickened; cuticles were stretched and thinned; and old nymphal cuticles remained on the tips of legs and abdomen and were not completely shed. These data indicate that impaired lysine degradation negatively affects the survival and development of Ni. lugens. PMID:26000452

  1. Enhancement of arachidonic acid signaling pathway by nicotinic acid receptor HM74A

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuting . E-mail: ytang@prdus.jnj.com; Zhou, Lubing; Gunnet, Joseph W.; Wines, Pamela G.; Cryan, Ellen V.; Demarest, Keith T.

    2006-06-23

    HM74A is a G protein-coupled receptor for nicotinic acid (niacin), which has been used clinically to treat dyslipidemia for decades. The molecular mechanisms whereby niacin exerts its pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In addition, the most common side effect in niacin therapy is skin flushing that is caused by prostaglandin release, suggesting that the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2})/arachidonic acid (AA) pathway is involved. Various eicosanoids have been shown to activate peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) that play a diverse array of roles in lipid metabolism. To further elucidate the potential roles of HM74A in mediating the therapeutic effects and/or side effects of niacin, we sought to explore the signaling events upon HM74A activation. Here we demonstrated that HM74A synergistically enhanced UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner in A431 cells. Activation of HM74A also led to Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization and enhanced bradykinin-promoted Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization through Gi protein. While HM74A increased ERK1/2 activation by the bradykinin receptor, it had no effects on UTP-promoted ERK1/2 activation.Furthermore, UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release was significantly decreased in the presence of both MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 098059 and PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. However, the synergistic effects of HM74A were not dramatically affected by co-treatment with both inhibitors, indicating the cross-talk occurred at the receptor level. Finally, stimulation of A431 cells transiently transfected with PPRE-luciferase with AA significantly induced luciferase activity, mimicking the effects of PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that alteration of AA signaling pathway can regulate gene expression via endogenous PPARs.

  2. Auxin Biosynthesis: Are the Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Phenylacetic Acid Biosynthesis Pathways Mirror Images?1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, David S.; Smith, Jason; Chourey, Prem S.; McAdam, Erin L.; Quittenden, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the main auxin in plants (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) has been elucidated recently and is thought to involve the sequential conversion of Trp to indole-3-pyruvic acid to IAA. However, the pathway leading to a less well studied auxin, phenylacetic acid (PAA), remains unclear. Here, we present evidence from metabolism experiments that PAA is synthesized from the amino acid Phe, via phenylpyruvate. In pea (Pisum sativum), the reverse reaction, phenylpyruvate to Phe, is also demonstrated. However, despite similarities between the pathways leading to IAA and PAA, evidence from mutants in pea and maize (Zea mays) indicate that IAA biosynthetic enzymes are not the main enzymes for PAA biosynthesis. Instead, we identified a putative aromatic aminotransferase (PsArAT) from pea that may function in the PAA synthesis pathway. PMID:27208245

  3. Novel Insights into the Diversity of Catabolic Metabolism from Ten Haloarchaeal Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Scheuner, Carmen; Goker, Markus; Mavromatis, Kostas; Hooper, Sean D.; Porat, Iris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2011-05-03

    The extremely halophilic archaea are present worldwide in saline environments and have important biotechnological applications. Ten complete genomes of haloarchaea are now available, providing an opportunity for comparative analysis. We report here the comparative analysis of five newly sequenced haloarchaeal genomes with five previously published ones. Whole genome trees based on protein sequences provide strong support for deep relationships between the ten organisms. Using a soft clustering approach, we identified 887 protein clusters present in all halophiles. Of these core clusters, 112 are not found in any other archaea and therefore constitute the haloarchaeal signature. Four of the halophiles were isolated from water, and four were isolated from soil or sediment. Although there are few habitat-specific clusters, the soil/sediment halophiles tend to have greater capacity for polysaccharide degradation, siderophore synthesis, and cell wall modification. Halorhabdus utahensis and Haloterrigena turkmenica encode over forty glycosyl hydrolases each, and may be capable of breaking down naturally occurring complex carbohydrates. H. utahensis is specialized for growth on carbohydrates and has few amino acid degradation pathways. It uses the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway instead of the oxidative pathway, giving it more flexibility in the metabolism of pentoses. These new genomes expand our understanding of haloarchaeal catabolic pathways, providing a basis for further experimental analysis, especially with regard to carbohydrate metabolism. Halophilic glycosyl hydrolases for use in biofuel production are more likely to be found in halophiles isolated from soil or sediment.

  4. Novel Insights into the Diversity of Catabolic Metabolism from Ten Haloarchaeal Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Iain; Scheuner, Carmen; Göker, Markus; Mavromatis, Kostas; Hooper, Sean D.; Porat, Iris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    Background The extremely halophilic archaea are present worldwide in saline environments and have important biotechnological applications. Ten complete genomes of haloarchaea are now available, providing an opportunity for comparative analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings We report here the comparative analysis of five newly sequenced haloarchaeal genomes with five previously published ones. Whole genome trees based on protein sequences provide strong support for deep relationships between the ten organisms. Using a soft clustering approach, we identified 887 protein clusters present in all halophiles. Of these core clusters, 112 are not found in any other archaea and therefore constitute the haloarchaeal signature. Four of the halophiles were isolated from water, and four were isolated from soil or sediment. Although there are few habitat-specific clusters, the soil/sediment halophiles tend to have greater capacity for polysaccharide degradation, siderophore synthesis, and cell wall modification. Halorhabdus utahensis and Haloterrigena turkmenica encode over forty glycosyl hydrolases each, and may be capable of breaking down naturally occurring complex carbohydrates. H. utahensis is specialized for growth on carbohydrates and has few amino acid degradation pathways. It uses the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway instead of the oxidative pathway, giving it more flexibility in the metabolism of pentoses. Conclusions These new genomes expand our understanding of haloarchaeal catabolic pathways, providing a basis for further experimental analysis, especially with regard to carbohydrate metabolism. Halophilic glycosyl hydrolases for use in biofuel production are more likely to be found in halophiles isolated from soil or sediment. PMID:21633497

  5. Aerobic bacterial catabolism of persistent organic pollutants - potential impact of biotic and abiotic interaction.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Baldrian, Petr; Schmidt, Stefan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2016-04-01

    Several aerobic bacteria possess unique catabolic pathways enabling them to degrade persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The catabolic activity of aerobic bacteria employed for removal of POPs in the environment may be modulated by several biotic (i.e. fungi, plants, algae, earthworms, and other bacteria) and abiotic (i.e. zero-valent iron, advanced oxidation, and electricity) agents. This review describes the basic biochemistry of the aerobic bacterial catabolism of selected POPs and discusses how biotic and abiotic agents enhance or inhibit the process. Solutions allowing biotic and abiotic agents to exert physical and chemical assistance to aerobic bacterial catabolism of POPs are also discussed. PMID:26851837

  6. Intersection of RNA Processing and the Type II Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway in Yeast Mitochondria▿

    PubMed Central

    Schonauer, Melissa S.; Kastaniotis, Alexander J.; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo; Dieckmann, Carol L.

    2008-01-01

    Distinct metabolic pathways can intersect in ways that allow hierarchical or reciprocal regulation. In a screen of respiration-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene deletion strains for defects in mitochondrial RNA processing, we found that lack of any enzyme in the mitochondrial fatty acid type II biosynthetic pathway (FAS II) led to inefficient 5′ processing of mitochondrial precursor tRNAs by RNase P. In particular, the precursor containing both RNase P RNA (RPM1) and tRNAPro accumulated dramatically. Subsequent Pet127-driven 5′ processing of RPM1 was blocked. The FAS II pathway defects resulted in the loss of lipoic acid attachment to subunits of three key mitochondrial enzymes, which suggests that the octanoic acid produced by the pathway is the sole precursor for lipoic acid synthesis and attachment. The protein component of yeast mitochondrial RNase P, Rpm2, is not modified by lipoic acid in the wild-type strain, and it is imported in FAS II mutant strains. Thus, a product of the FAS II pathway is required for RNase P RNA maturation, which positively affects RNase P activity. In addition, a product is required for lipoic acid production, which is needed for the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which feeds acetyl-coenzyme A into the FAS II pathway. These two positive feedback cycles may provide switch-like control of mitochondrial gene expression in response to the metabolic state of the cell. PMID:18779316

  7. Biosynthetic Pathway Analysis for Improving the Cordycepin and Cordycepic Acid Production in Hirsutella sinensis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Xue, Ya-Ping; Baker, Peter James; Wu, Hui; Xu, Feng; Teng, Yi; Brathwaite, Mgavi Elombe; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-06-01

    Hirsutella sinensis is considered as the only correct anamorph of Ophiocordyceps sinensis. To improve cordycepin and cordycepic acid production in H. sinensis, the biosynthetic pathways of cordycepin and cordycepic acid were predicted, and verified by cloning and expressing genes involved in these pathways, respectively. Then, 5'-nucleotidase participating in biosynthetic pathway of cordycepin, hexokinase, and glucose phosphate isomerase involved in biosynthetic pathway of cordycepic acid, were demonstrated playing important roles in the corresponding biosynthetic pathway by real-time PCR, accompanying with significantly up-regulated 15.03-, 5.27-, and 3.94-fold, respectively. Moreover, the metabolic regulation of H. sinensis was performed. As expected, cordycepin production reached 1.09 mg/g when additional substrate of 5'-nucleotidase was 4 mg/mL, resulting in an increase of 201.1 % compared with the control. In the same way, cordycepic acid production reached 26.6 and 23.4 % by adding substrate of hexokinase or glucose phosphate isomerase, leading to a rise of 77.3 and 55.1 %, respectively. To date, this is the first time to improve cordycepin and cordycepic acid production through metabolic regulation based on biosynthetic pathway analysis, and metabolic regulation is proved as a simple and effective way to enhance the output of cordycepin and cordycepic acid in submerged cultivation of H. sinensis. PMID:26922724

  8. Arginine-dependent acid-resistance pathway in Shigella boydii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ability to survive the low pH of the human stomach is considered be an important virulent determinant. Acid tolerance of Shigella boydii 18 CDPH, the strain implicated in an outbreak may have played an important role in surviving the acidic food (bean salad). The strain was capable of inducing arg...

  9. A biosynthetic pathway for a prominent class of microbiota-derived bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, A. Sloan; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The gut bile acid pool is millimolar in concentration, varies widely in composition among individuals, and is linked to metabolic disease and cancer. Although these molecules derive almost exclusively from the microbiota, remarkably little is known about which bacterial species and genes are responsible for their biosynthesis. Here, we report a biosynthetic pathway for the second most abundant class in the gut, iso (3β-hydroxy) bile acids, whose levels exceed 300 µM in some humans and are absent in others. We show, for the first time, that iso bile acids are produced by Ruminococcus gnavus, a far more abundant commensal than previously known producers; and that the iso bile acid pathway detoxifies deoxycholic acid, favoring the growth of the keystone genus Bacteroides. By revealing the biosynthetic genes for an abundant class of bile acids, our work sets the stage for predicting and rationally altering the composition of the bile acid pool. PMID:26192599

  10. Indole-3-acetic acid biosynthetic pathways in the basidiomycetous yeast Rhodosporidium paludigenum.

    PubMed

    Nutaratat, Pumin; Srisuk, Nantana; Arunrattiyakorn, Panarat; Limtong, Savitree

    2016-07-01

    Microorganisms produce plant growth regulators, such as auxins, cytokinins and gibberellins, to promote plant growth. Auxins are a group of compounds with an indole ring that have a positive effect on plant growth. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is a plant growth hormone classified as an indole derivative of the auxin family. IAA biosynthesis pathways have been reported and widely studied in several groups of bacteria. Only a few studies on IAA biosynthesis pathways have been conducted in yeast. This study aimed to investigate IAA biosynthesis pathways in a basidiomycetous yeast (Rhodosporidium paludigenum DMKU-RP301). Investigations were performed both with and without a tryptophan supplement. Indole compound intermediates were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Indole-3-lactic acid and indole-3-ethanol were found as a result of the enzymatic reduction of indole-3-pyruvic acid and indole-3-acetaldehyde, in IAA biosynthesis via an indole-3-pyruvic acid pathway. In addition, we also found indole-3-pyruvic acid in culture supernatants determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Identification of tryptophan aminotransferase activity supports indole-3-pyruvic acid-routed IAA biosynthesis in R. paludigenum DMKU-RP301. We hence concluded that R. paludigenum DMKU-RP301 produces IAA through an indole-3-pyruvic acid pathway. PMID:26899734

  11. Opposing effects of bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid on signal transduction pathways in oesophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Reynolds, John V

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was reported to reduce bile acid toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying its cytoprotective effects are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of UDCA on the modulation of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced signal transduction in oesophageal cancer cells. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was assessed using a gel shift assay. NF-κB activation and translocation was performed using an ELISA-based assay and immunofluorescence analysis. COX-2 expression was analysed by western blotting and COX-2 promoter activity was assessed by luciferase assay. DCA induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in SKGT-4 and OE33 cells. UDCA pretreatment inhibited DCA-induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and NF-κB translocation. This inhibitory effect was coupled with a blockade of IκB-α degradation and inhibition of phosphorylation of IKK-α/β and ERK1/2. Moreover, UDCA pretreatment inhibited COX-2 upregulation. Using transient transfection of the COX-2 promoter, UDCA pretreatment abrogated DCA-induced COX-2 promoter activation. In addition, UDCA protected oesophageal cells from the apoptotic effects of deoxycholate. Our findings indicate that UDCA inhibits DCA-induced signalling pathways in oesophageal cancer cells. These data indicate a possible mechanistic role for the chemopreventive actions of UDCA in oesophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:26378497

  12. Pinolenic Acid Downregulates Lipid Anabolic Pathway in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ah Ron; Han, Sung Nim

    2016-07-01

    Pine nut oil (PNO) was reported to reduce lipid accumulation in the liver. However, the specific effect of pinolenic acid (18:3, all-cis-Δ5,9,12), a unique component of PNO, on lipid metabolism has not been studied. We hypothesized that pinolenic acid downregulates the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells. HepG2 cells were incubated in serum-free medium supplemented with 50 μM bovine serum albumin (BSA), palmitic acid, oleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, pinolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or α-linolenic acid for 24 h. Lipid accumulation was determined by Oil Red O (ORO) staining. The mRNA levels of genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis (SREBP1c, FAS, SCD1, and ACC1), fatty acid oxidation (ACC2, PPARα, CPT1A, and ACADL), cholesterol synthesis (SREBP2 and HMGCR), and lipoprotein uptake (LDLr) and of genes that may be involved in the downregulation of the lipogenic pathway (ACSL3, ACSL4, and ACSL5) were determined by qPCR. LDLR protein levels were measured by Western blot analysis. The mRNA levels of SREBP1c, FAS, and SCD1 were significantly downregulated by pinolenic acid treatment compared to BSA control (53, 54, and 38 % lower, respectively). In addition, the mRNA levels of HMGCR, ACSL3, and LDLr were significantly lower (30, 30, and 43 % lower, respectively), and ACSL4 tended to be lower in the pinolenic acid group (20 % lower, P = 0.082) relative to the control group. In conclusion, pinolenic acid downregulated the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells by reducing expression of genes related to lipid synthesis, lipoprotein uptake, and the regulation of the lipogenic pathway. PMID:27084371

  13. Hybrubins: Bipyrrole Tetramic Acids Obtained by Crosstalk between a Truncated Undecylprodigiosin Pathway and Heterologous Tetramic Acid Biosynthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhilong; Shi, Ting; Xu, Min; Brock, Nelson L; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Wang, Yemin; Deng, Zixin; Pang, Xiuhua; Tao, Meifeng

    2016-02-01

    Heterologous expression of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the genomic library of Streptomyces variabilis Snt24 in Streptomyces lividans SBT5 which carried a truncated undecylprodigiosin biosynthetic gene cluster led to the identification of hybrubins A-C. The hybrubins represent a new carbon skeleton in which a tetramic acid moiety is fused to a 2,2'-dipyrrole building block. Gene knockout experiments confirmed that hybrubins are derived from two convergent biosynthetic pathways including the remaining genomic red genes of S. lividans SBT5 as well as the BAC encoded hbn genes for the production of 5-ethylidenetetramic acid. A possible biosynthetic pathway was also proposed. PMID:26800378

  14. Preparation of 7-hydroxy-2-oxoindolin-3-ylacetic acid and its [13C2], [5-n-3H], and [5-n-3H]-7-O-glucosyl analogues for use in the study of indol-3-ylacetic acid catabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewer, P.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    An improved synthesis of 7-hydroxy-2-oxoindolin-3-ylacetic acid via the base-induced condensation reaction between oxalate esters and 7-benzyloxyindolin-2-one is described. 7-Benzyloxyindolin-2-one was prepared in four steps and 50% overall yield from 3-hydroxy-2-nitrotoluene. The yield of the title compound from 7-benzyloxyindolin-2-one was 56%. This route was used to prepare 7-hydroxy-2-oxoindolin-3-yl[13C2]acetic acid in 30% yield from [13C2]oxalic acid dihydrate. The method could not be extended to the preparation of the corresponding [14C2]-compound. However, an enzyme preparation from Zea mays roots catalysed the conversion of carrier-free [5-n-3H]indol-3-ylacetic acid with a specific activity of 16.7 Ci mmol-1 to a mixture of 7-hydroxy-2-oxo[5-n-3H]indolin-3-ylacetic acid and its [5-n-3H]-7-O-glucoside in ca. 3 and 40% radiochemical yield respectively. The glucoside was converted into the 7-hydroxy compound in 80% yield by means of beta-glucosidase.

  15. Regulation of phenolic catabolism in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, D. ); Rynne, F.; Glenn, A. )

    1991-09-01

    In members of the family Rhizobiaceae, many phenolic compounds are degraded by the protocatechuate branch of the {beta}-ketoadipate pathway, In this paper the authors describe a novel pattern of induction of protocatechuate (pca) genes in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii. Isolation of pca mutant strains revealed that 4-hydroxybenzoate, quinate, and 4-coumarate are degraded via the protocatechuate pathway. At least three inducers govern catabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoate to succinyl coenzyme A and acetyl coenzyme A. The enzyme that catalyzes the initial step is induced by its substrate, whereas the catabolite {beta}-carboxy-cis, cis-muconate induces enzymes for the upper protocatechuate pathway, and {beta}-ketoadipate elicits expression of the enzyme for a subsequent step, {beta}-ketoadipate succinyl-coenzyme A transferase. Elucidation of the induction pattern relied in part on complementation of mutant Rhizobium strains by known subclones of Acinetobacter genes expressed off the lac promoter in a broad-host-range vector.

  16. Protein catabolism and requirements in severe illness.

    PubMed

    Genton, L; Pichard, C

    2011-03-01

    Reduced total body protein mass is a marker of protein-energy malnutrition and has been associated with numerous complications. Severe illness is characterized by a loss of total body protein mass, mainly from the skeletal muscle. Studies on protein turnover describe an increased protein breakdown and, to a lesser extent, an increased whole-body protein synthesis, as well as an increased flux of amino acids from the periphery to the liver. Appropriate nutrition could limit protein catabolism. Nutritional support limits but does not stop the loss of total body protein mass occurring in acute severe illness. Its impact on protein kinetics is so far controversial, probably due to the various methodologies and characteristics of nutritional support used in the studies. Maintaining calorie balance alone the days after an insult does not clearly lead to an improved clinical outcome. In contrast, protein intakes between 1.2 and 1.5 g/kg body weight/day with neutral energy balance minimize total body protein mass loss. Glutamine and possibly leucine may improve clinical outcome, but it is unclear whether these benefits occur through an impact on total body protein mass and its turnover, or through other mechanisms. Present recommendations suggest providing 20 - 25 kcal/kg/day over the first 72 - 96 hours and increasing energy intake to target thereafter. Simultaneously, protein intake should be between 1.2 and 1.5 g/kg/day. Enteral immunonutrition enriched with arginine, nucleotides, and omega-3 fatty acids is indicated in patients with trauma, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and mild sepsis. Glutamine (0.2 - 0.4 g/kg/day of L-glutamine) should be added to enteral nutrition in burn and trauma patients (ESPEN guidelines 2006) and to parenteral nutrition, in the form of dipeptides, in intensive care unit (ICU) patients in general (ESPEN guidelines 2009). PMID:22139565

  17. Metabolic Pathway Confirmation and Discovery Through 13C-labeling of Proteinogenic Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    You, Le; Page, Lawrence; Feng, Xueyang; Berla, Bert; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Tang, Yinjie J.

    2012-01-01

    Microbes have complex metabolic pathways that can be investigated using biochemistry and functional genomics methods. One important technique to examine cell central metabolism and discover new enzymes is 13C-assisted metabolism analysis 1. This technique is based on isotopic labeling, whereby microbes are fed with a 13C labeled substrates. By tracing the atom transition paths between metabolites in the biochemical network, we can determine functional pathways and discover new enzymes. As a complementary method to transcriptomics and proteomics, approaches for isotopomer-assisted analysis of metabolic pathways contain three major steps 2. First, we grow cells with 13C labeled substrates. In this step, the composition of the medium and the selection of labeled substrates are two key factors. To avoid measurement noises from non-labeled carbon in nutrient supplements, a minimal medium with a sole carbon source is required. Further, the choice of a labeled substrate is based on how effectively it will elucidate the pathway being analyzed. Because novel enzymes often involve different reaction stereochemistry or intermediate products, in general, singly labeled carbon substrates are more informative for detection of novel pathways than uniformly labeled ones for detection of novel pathways3, 4. Second, we analyze amino acid labeling patterns using GC-MS. Amino acids are abundant in protein and thus can be obtained from biomass hydrolysis. Amino acids can be derivatized by N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (TBDMS) before GC separation. TBDMS derivatized amino acids can be fragmented by MS and result in different arrays of fragments. Based on the mass to charge (m/z) ratio of fragmented and unfragmented amino acids, we can deduce the possible labeled patterns of the central metabolites that are precursors of the amino acids. Third, we trace 13C carbon transitions in the proposed pathways and, based on the isotopomer data, confirm whether these

  18. Origin of fatty acid synthesis - Thermodynamics and kinetics of reaction pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1991-01-01

    The primitiveness of contemporary fatty acid biosynthesis was evaluated by using the thermodynamics and kinetics of its component reactions to estimate the extent of its dependence on powerful and selective catalysis by enzymes. Since this analysis indicated that the modern pathway is not primitive because it requires sophisticated enzymatic catalysis, an alternative pathway of primitive fatty acid synthesis is proposed that uses glycolaldehyde as a substrate. In contrast to the modern pathway, this primitive pathway is not dependent on an exogenous source of phosphoanhydride energy. Furthermore, the chemical spontaneity of its reactions suggests that it could have been readily catalyzed by the rudimentary biocatalysts available at an early stage in the origin of life.

  19. Biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor in glandular gastric mucosa. Evidence for the involvement of the 'de novo' pathway and modulation by fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gallardo, S; Gijon, M A; Garcia, M C; Cano, E; Sanchez Crespo, M

    1988-09-15

    The biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF), a phospholipid autocoid with potent ulcerogenic properties that is produced in secretory exocrine glands by physiological secretagogues, was assessed in microsomal preparations of glandular gastric mucosa. For this purpose, 1-O-alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (lyso-PAF):acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.67); the enzymes of the 'de novo' pathway: 1-O-alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (alkyl-lyso-GP):acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase and 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (alkylacetyl-G):CDP-choline cholinephosphotransferase (EC 2.7.8.16); and some enzymes involved in the catabolism of PAF and lyso-PAF were assayed. Only the enzymes of the 'de novo' pathway and small amounts of PAF acetylhydrolase, phospholipase A2 and a lysophospholipase D acting on either lipids could be detected in the gastric preparations, whereas lyso-PAF:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase activity was undetectable. The specific activity of alkyl-lyso-GP:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase in the gastric mucosa was about one-tenth of that found in spleen microsomes and its apparent Km for acetyl-CoA was 454 microM compared with 277 microM in spleen microsomes. Glandular mucosa homogenates contained preformed PAF at a concentration of 2.7 +/- 0.7 ng equivalents of PAF (hexadecyl)/mg of protein. When gastric microsomes were incubated with micromolar concentrations of fatty acids (arachidonic, palmitic and oleic) prior to the assay of dithiothreitol (DTT)-insensitive cholinephosphotransferase, a dose-dependent reduction in the formation of PAF was observed, arachidonic acid being the most potent inhibitor, followed by linoleic acid (only tested on spleen microsomes) and oleic acid. By contrast, 1,2-diolein and phosphatidylcholine (dipalmitoyl) showed no or little effect. These results indicate that glandular gastric mucosa can produce PAF through the 'de novo' pathway, and that fatty acids, especially unsaturated, can reduce that synthesis by

  20. Assembly of Lipoic Acid on Its Cognate Enzymes: an Extraordinary and Essential Biosynthetic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cronan, John E

    2016-06-01

    Although the structure of lipoic acid and its role in bacterial metabolism were clear over 50 years ago, it is only in the past decade that the pathways of biosynthesis of this universally conserved cofactor have become understood. Unlike most cofactors, lipoic acid must be covalently bound to its cognate enzyme proteins (the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases and the glycine cleavage system) in order to function in central metabolism. Indeed, the cofactor is assembled on its cognate proteins rather than being assembled and subsequently attached as in the typical pathway, like that of biotin attachment. The first lipoate biosynthetic pathway determined was that of Escherichia coli, which utilizes two enzymes to form the active lipoylated protein from a fatty acid biosynthetic intermediate. Recently, a more complex pathway requiring four proteins was discovered in Bacillus subtilis, which is probably an evolutionary relic. This pathway requires the H protein of the glycine cleavage system of single-carbon metabolism to form active (lipoyl) 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases. The bacterial pathways inform the lipoate pathways of eukaryotic organisms. Plants use the E. coli pathway, whereas mammals and fungi probably use the B. subtilis pathway. The lipoate metabolism enzymes (except those of sulfur insertion) are members of PFAM family PF03099 (the cofactor transferase family). Although these enzymes share some sequence similarity, they catalyze three markedly distinct enzyme reactions, making the usual assignment of function based on alignments prone to frequent mistaken annotations. This state of affairs has possibly clouded the interpretation of one of the disorders of human lipoate metabolism. PMID:27074917

  1. New approaches to target the mycolic acid biosynthesis pathway for the development of tuberculosis therapeutics.

    PubMed

    North, E Jeffrey; Jackson, Mary; Lee, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Mycolic acids are the major lipid components of the unique mycobacterial cell wall responsible for the protection of the tuberculosis bacilli from many outside threats. Mycolic acids are synthesized in the cytoplasm and transported to the outer membrane as trehalose- containing glycolipids before being esterified to the arabinogalactan portion of the cell wall and outer membrane glycolipids. The large size of these unique fatty acids is a result of a huge metabolic investment that has been evolutionarily conserved, indicating the importance of these lipids to the mycobacterial cellular survival. There are many key enzymes involved in the mycolic acid biosynthetic pathway, including fatty acid synthesis (KasA, KasB, MabA, InhA, HadABC), mycolic acid modifying enzymes (SAM-dependent methyltransferases, aNAT), fatty acid activating and condensing enzymes (FadD32, Acc, Pks13), transporters (MmpL3) and tranferases (Antigen 85A-C) all of which are excellent potential drug targets. Not surprisingly, in recent years many new compounds have been reported to inhibit specific portions of this pathway, discovered through both phenotypic screening and target enzyme screening. In this review, we analyze the new and emerging inhibitors of this pathway discovered in the post-genomic era of tuberculosis drug discovery, several of which show great promise as selective tuberculosis therapeutics. PMID:24245756

  2. New Approaches to Target the Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway for the Development of Tuberculosis Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    North, E. Jeffrey; Jackson, Mary; Lee, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Mycolic acids are the major lipid component of the unique mycobacterial cell wall responsible for the protection of the tuberculosis bacilli from many outside threats. Mycolic acids are synthesized in the cytoplasm and transported to the outer membrane as trehalose-containing glycolipids before being esterified to the arabinogalactan portion of the cell wall and outer membrane glycolipids. The large size of these unique fatty acids is a result of a huge metabolic investment that has been evolutionarily conserved, indicating the importance of these lipids to the mycobacterial cellular survival. There are many key enzymes involved in the mycolic acid biosynthetic pathway, including fatty acid synthesis (KasA, KasB, MabA, InhA, HadABC), mycolic acid modifying enzymes (SAM-dependent methyltransferases, aNAT), fatty acid activating and condensing enzymes (FadD32, Acc, Pks13), transporters (MmpL3) and tranferases (Antigen 85A-C) all of which are excellent potential drug targets. Not surprisingly, in recent years many new compounds have been reported to inhibit specific portions of this pathway, discovered through both phenotypic screening and target enzyme screening. In this review, we analyze the new and emerging inhibitors of this pathway discovered in the post-genomic era of tuberculosis drug discovery, several of which show great promise as selective tuberculosis therapeutics. PMID:24245756

  3. Role of bile acids in the regulation of the metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taoka, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Yoko; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Kitamura, Naho; Tanigaki, Tatsuya; Takashina, Yoko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that bile acids (BAs) are not only facilitators of dietary lipid absorption but also important signaling molecules exerting multiple physiological functions. Some major signaling pathways involving the nuclear BAs receptor farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled BAs receptor TGR5/M-BAR have been identified to be the targets of BAs. BAs regulate their own homeostasis via signaling pathways. BAs also affect diverse metabolic pathways including glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and energy expenditure. This paper suggests the mechanism of controlling metabolism via BA signaling and demonstrates that BA signaling is an attractive therapeutic target of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27433295

  4. Role of bile acids in the regulation of the metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Taoka, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Yoko; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Kitamura, Naho; Tanigaki, Tatsuya; Takashina, Yoko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-10

    Recent studies have revealed that bile acids (BAs) are not only facilitators of dietary lipid absorption but also important signaling molecules exerting multiple physiological functions. Some major signaling pathways involving the nuclear BAs receptor farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled BAs receptor TGR5/M-BAR have been identified to be the targets of BAs. BAs regulate their own homeostasis via signaling pathways. BAs also affect diverse metabolic pathways including glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and energy expenditure. This paper suggests the mechanism of controlling metabolism via BA signaling and demonstrates that BA signaling is an attractive therapeutic target of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27433295

  5. Molecular Basis of a Bacterial Consortium: Interspecies Catabolism of Atrazine

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Mervyn L.; Newcombe, David; Alvey, Sam; Crowley, David E.; Hay, Anthony; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    1998-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP contains the genes, atzA, -B, and -C, that encode three enzymes which metabolize atrazine to cyanuric acid. Atrazine-catabolizing pure cultures isolated from around the world contain genes homologous to atzA, -B, and -C. The present study was conducted to determine whether the same genes are present in an atrazine-catabolizing bacterial consortium and how the genes and metabolism are subdivided among member species. The consortium contained four or more bacterial species, but two members, Clavibacter michiganese ATZ1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain CN1, collectively mineralized atrazine. C. michiganese ATZ1 released chloride from atrazine, produced hydroxyatrazine, and contained a homolog to the atzA gene that encoded atrazine chlorohydrolase. C. michiganese ATZ1 stoichiometrically metabolized hydroxyatrazine to N-ethylammelide and contained genes homologous to atzB and atzC, suggesting that either a functional AtzB or -C catalyzed N-isopropylamine release from hydroxyatrazine. C. michiganese ATZ1 grew on isopropylamine as its sole carbon and nitrogen source, explaining the ability of the consortium to use atrazine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. A second consortium member, Pseudomonas sp. strain CN1, metabolized the N-ethylammelide produced by C. michiganese ATZ1 to transiently form cyanuric acid, a reaction catalyzed by AtzC. A gene homologous to the atzC gene of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP was present, as demonstrated by Southern hybridization and PCR. Pseudomonas sp. strain CN1, but not C. michiganese, metabolized cyanuric acid. The consortium metabolized atrazine faster than did C. michiganese individually. Additionally, the consortium metabolized a much broader set of triazine ring compounds than did previously described pure cultures in which the atzABC genes had been identified. These data begin to elucidate the genetic and metabolic bases of catabolism by multimember consortia. PMID:16349478

  6. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Khalid, Syed; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Morup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2015-10-03

    In this study, iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV–vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the othermore » two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.« less

  7. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Khalid, Syed; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Zhang, Hengzhong; Morup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2015-10-03

    In this study, iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV–vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the other two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.

  8. Precipitation pathways for ferrihydrite formation in acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Frandsen, Cathrine; Wallace, Adam F.; Legg, Benjamin; Khalid, Syed; Zhang, Hengzhong; Mørup, Steen; Banfield, Jillian F.; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxides and oxyhydroxides form via Fe3+ hydrolysis and polymerization in many aqueous environments, but the pathway from Fe3+ monomers to oligomers and then to solid phase nuclei is unknown. In this work, using combined X-ray, UV-vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopic approaches, we were able to identify and quantify the long-time sought ferric speciation over time during ferric oxyhydroxide formation in partially-neutralized ferric nitrate solutions ([Fe3+] = 0.2 M, 1.8 < pH < 3). Results demonstrate that Fe exists mainly as Fe(H2O)63+, μ-oxo aquo dimers and ferrihydrite, and that with time, the μ-oxo dimer decreases while the other two species increase in their concentrations. No larger Fe oligomers were detected. Given that the structure of the μ-oxo dimer is incompatible with those of all Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides, our results suggest that reconfiguration of the μ-oxo dimer structure occurs prior to further condensation leading up to the nucleation of ferrihydrite. The structural reconfiguration is likely the rate-limiting step involved in the nucleation process.

  9. Phosphonate biosynthesis and catabolism: a treasure trove of unusual enzymology.

    PubMed

    Peck, Spencer C; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2013-08-01

    Natural product biosynthesis has proven a fertile ground for the discovery of novel chemistry. Herein we review the progress made in elucidating the biosynthetic pathways of phosphonate and phosphinate natural products such as the antibacterial compounds dehydrophos and fosfomycin, the herbicidal phosphinothricin-containing peptides, and the antimalarial compound FR-900098. In each case, investigation of the pathway has yielded unusual, and often unprecedented, biochemistry. Likewise, recent investigations have uncovered novel ways to cleave the CP bond to yield phosphate under phosphorus starvation conditions. These include the discovery of novel oxidative cleavage of the CP bond catalyzed by PhnY and PhnZ as well as phosphonohydrolases that liberate phosphate from phosphonoacetate. Perhaps the crown jewel of phosphonate catabolism has been the recent resolution of the longstanding problem of the C-P lyase responsible for reductively cleaving the CP bond of a number of different phosphonates to release phosphate. Taken together, the strides made on both metabolic and catabolic fronts illustrate an array of fascinating biochemistry. PMID:23870698

  10. Extending shikimate pathway for the production of muconic acid and its precursor salicylic acid in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuheng; Sun, Xinxiao; Yuan, Qipeng; Yan, Yajun

    2014-05-01

    cis,cis-Muconic acid (MA) and salicylic acid (SA) are naturally-occurring organic acids having great commercial value. MA is a potential platform chemical for the manufacture of several widely-used consumer plastics; while SA is mainly used for producing pharmaceuticals (for example, aspirin and lamivudine) and skincare and haircare products. At present, MA and SA are commercially produced by organic chemical synthesis using petro-derived aromatic chemicals, such as benzene, as starting materials, which is not environmentally friendly. Here, we report a novel approach for efficient microbial production of MA via extending shikimate pathway by introducing the hybrid of an SA biosynthetic pathway with its partial degradation pathway. First, we engineered a well-developed phenylalanine producing Escherichia coli strain into an SA overproducer by introducing isochorismate synthase and isochorismate pyruvate lyase. The engineered strain is able to produce 1.2g/L of SA from simple carbon sources, which is the highest titer reported so far. Further, the partial SA degradation pathway involving salicylate 1-monoxygenase and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase is established to achieve the conversion of SA to MA. Finally, a de novo MA biosynthetic pathway is assembled by integrating the established SA biosynthesis and degradation modules. Modular optimization enables the production of up to 1.5g/L MA within 48h in shake flasks. This study not only establishes an efficient microbial platform for the production of SA and MA, but also demonstrates a generalizable pathway design strategy for the de novo biosynthesis of valuable degradation metabolites. PMID:24583236

  11. EIMS Fragmentation Pathways and MRM Quantification of 7α/β-Hydroxy-Dehydroabietic Acid TMS Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rontani, Jean-François; Aubert, Claude; Belt, Simon T

    2015-09-01

    EI mass fragmentation pathways of TMS derivatives οf 7α/β-hydroxy-dehydroabietic acids resulting from NaBH(4)-reduction of oxidation products of dehydroabietic acid (a component of conifers) were investigated and deduced by a combination of (1) low energy CID-GC-MS/MS, (2) deuterium labeling, (3) different derivatization methods, and (4) GC-QTOF accurate mass measurements. Having identified the main fragmentation pathways, the TMS-derivatized 7α/β-hydroxy-dehydroabietic acids could be quantified in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode in sea ice and sediment samples collected from the Arctic. These newly characterized transformation products of dehydroabietic acid constitute potential tracers of biotic and abiotic degradation of terrestrial higher plants in the environment. PMID:26138887

  12. EIMS Fragmentation Pathways and MRM Quantification of 7α/β-Hydroxy-Dehydroabietic Acid TMS Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Jean-François; Aubert, Claude; Belt, Simon T.

    2015-09-01

    EI mass fragmentation pathways of TMS derivatives οf 7α/β-hydroxy-dehydroabietic acids resulting from NaBH4-reduction of oxidation products of dehydroabietic acid (a component of conifers) were investigated and deduced by a combination of (1) low energy CID-GC-MS/MS, (2) deuterium labeling, (3) different derivatization methods, and (4) GC-QTOF accurate mass measurements. Having identified the main fragmentation pathways, the TMS-derivatized 7α/β-hydroxy-dehydroabietic acids could be quantified in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode in sea ice and sediment samples collected from the Arctic. These newly characterized transformation products of dehydroabietic acid constitute potential tracers of biotic and abiotic degradation of terrestrial higher plants in the environment.

  13. An oxalyl-CoA dependent pathway of oxalate catabolism plays a role in regulating calcium oxalate crystal accumulation and defending against oxalate-secreting phytopathogens in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Considering the widespread occurrence of oxalate in nature and its broad impact on a host of organisms, it is surprising that so little is known about the turnover of this important acid. In plants, oxalate oxidase is the most well studied enzyme capable of degrading oxalate, but not all plants pos...

  14. Stable isotope studies reveal pathways for the incorporation of non-essential amino acids in Acyrthosiphon pisum (pea aphids).

    PubMed

    Haribal, Meena; Jander, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Plant roots incorporate inorganic nitrogen into the amino acids glutamine, glutamic acid, asparagine and aspartic acid, which together serve as the primary metabolites of nitrogen transport to other tissues. Given the preponderance of these four amino acids, phloem sap is a nutritionally unbalanced diet for phloem-feeding insects. Therefore, aphids and other phloem feeders typically rely on microbial symbionts for the synthesis of essential amino acids. To investigate the metabolism of the four main transport amino acids by the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum), and its Buchnera aphidicola endosymbionts, aphids were fed defined diets with stable isotope-labeled glutamine, glutamic acid, asparagine or aspartic acid (U-(13)C, U-(15)N; U-(15)N; α-(15)N; or γ-(15)N). The metabolic fate of the dietary (15)N and (13)C was traced using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Nitrogen was the major contributor to the observed amino acid isotopomers with one additional unit mass (M+1). However, there was differential incorporation, with the amine nitrogen of asparagine being incorporated into other amino acids more efficiently than the amide nitrogen. Higher isotopomers (M+2, M+3 and M+4) indicated the incorporation of varying numbers of (13)C atoms into essential amino acids. GC-MS assays also showed that, even with an excess of dietary labeled glutamine, glutamic acid, asparagine or aspartic acid, the overall content of these amino acids in aphid bodies was mostly the product of catabolism of dietary amino acids and subsequent re-synthesis within the aphids. Thus, these predominant dietary amino acids are not passed directly to Buchnera endosymbionts for synthesis of essential amino acids, but are rather are produced de novo, most likely by endogenous aphid enzymes. PMID:26632455

  15. From thiol to sulfonic acid: modeling the oxidation pathway of protein thiols by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, Laura A H; Roos, Goedele; De Proft, Frank

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a natural oxidant that can oxidize protein thiols (RSH) via sulfenic acid (RSOH) and sulfinic acid (RSO2H) to sulfonic acid (RSO3H). In this paper, we study the complete anionic and neutral oxidation pathway from thiol to sulfonic acid. Reaction barriers and reaction free energies for all three oxidation steps are computed, both for the isolated substrates and for the substrates in the presence of different model ligands (CH4, H2O, NH3) mimicking the enzymatic environment. We found for all three barriers that the anionic thiolate is more reactive than the neutral thiol. However, the assistance of the environment in the neutral pathway in a solvent-assisted proton-exchange (SAPE) mechanism can lower the reaction barrier noticeably. Polar ligands can decrease the reaction barriers, whereas apolar ligands do not influence the barrier heights. The same holds for the reaction energies: they decrease (become more negative) in the presence of polar ligands whereas apolar ligands do not have an influence. The consistently negative consecutive reaction energies for the oxidation in the anionic pathway when going from thiolate over sulfenic and sulfinic acid to sulfonic acid are in agreement with biological reversibility. PMID:25036614

  16. Regulation and Evolution of Malonate and Propionate Catabolism in Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Suvorova, I. A.; Ravcheev, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria catabolize malonate via two pathways, encoded by the mdc and mat genes. In various bacteria, transcription of these genes is controlled by the GntR family transcription factors (TFs) MatR/MdcY and/or the LysR family transcription factor MdcR. Propionate is metabolized via the methylcitrate pathway, comprising enzymes encoded by the prp and acn genes. PrpR, the Fis family sigma 54-dependent transcription factor, is known to be a transcriptional activator of the prp genes. Here, we report a detailed comparative genomic analysis of malonate and propionate metabolism and its regulation in proteobacteria. We characterize genomic loci and gene regulation and identify binding motifs for four new TFs and also new regulon members, in particular, tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporters. We describe restructuring of the genomic loci and regulatory interactions during the evolution of proteobacteria. PMID:22505679

  17. A transferable plasticity region in Campylobacter coli allows isolates of an otherwise non-glycolytic food-borne pathogen to catabolize glucose.

    PubMed

    Vorwerk, Hanne; Huber, Claudia; Mohr, Juliane; Bunk, Boyke; Bhuju, Sabin; Wensel, Olga; Spröer, Cathrin; Fruth, Angelika; Flieger, Antje; Schmidt-Hohagen, Kerstin; Schomburg, Dietmar; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Hofreuter, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Thermophilic Campylobacter species colonize the intestine of agricultural and domestic animals commensally but cause severe gastroenteritis in humans. In contrast to other enteropathogenic bacteria, Campylobacter has been considered to be non-glycolytic, a metabolic property originally used for their taxonomic classification. Contrary to this dogma, we demonstrate that several Campylobacter coli strains are able to utilize glucose as a growth substrate. Isotopologue profiling experiments with (13) C-labeled glucose suggested that these strains catabolize glucose via the pentose phosphate and Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathways and use glucose efficiently for de novo synthesis of amino acids and cell surface carbohydrates. Whole genome sequencing of glycolytic C. coli isolates identified a genomic island located within a ribosomal RNA gene cluster that encodes for all ED pathway enzymes and a glucose permease. We could show in vitro that a non-glycolytic C. coli strain could acquire glycolytic activity through natural transformation with chromosomal DNA of C. coli and C. jejuni subsp. doylei strains possessing the ED pathway encoding plasticity region. These results reveal for the first time the ability of a Campylobacter species to catabolize glucose and provide new insights into how genetic macrodiversity through intra- and interspecies gene transfer expand the metabolic capacity of this food-borne pathogen. PMID:26259566

  18. The rabbit pulmonary cytochrome P450 arachidonic acid metabolic pathway: characterization and significance.

    PubMed Central

    Zeldin, D C; Plitman, J D; Kobayashi, J; Miller, R F; Snapper, J R; Falck, J R; Szarek, J L; Philpot, R M; Capdevila, J H

    1995-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 metabolizes arachidonic acid to several unique and biologically active compounds in rabbit liver and kidney. Microsomal fractions prepared from rabbit lung homogenates metabolized arachidonic acid through cytochrome P450 pathways, yielding cis-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and their hydration products, vic-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids, mid-chain cis-trans conjugated dienols, and 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. Inhibition studies using polyclonal antibodies prepared against purified CYP2B4 demonstrated 100% inhibition of arachidonic acid epoxide formation. Purified CYP2B4, reconstituted in the presence of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and cytochrome b5, metabolized arachidonic acid, producing primarily EETs. EETs were detected in lung homogenate using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy, providing evidence for the in vivo pulmonary cytochrome P450 epoxidation of arachidonic acid. Chiral analysis of these lung EETs demonstrated a preference for the 14(R),15(S)-, 11(S),12(R)-, and 8(S),9(R)-EET enantiomers. Both EETs and vic-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids were detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. At micromolar concentrations, methylated 5,6-EET and 8,9-EET significantly relaxed histamine-contracted guinea pig hilar bronchi in vitro. In contrast, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid caused contraction to near maximal tension. We conclude that CYP2B4, an abundant rabbit lung cytochrome P450 enzyme, is the primary constitutive pulmonary arachidonic acid epoxygenase and that these locally produced, biologically active eicosanoids may be involved in maintaining homeostasis within the lung. Images PMID:7738183

  19. Microalgae Synthesize Hydrocarbons from Long-Chain Fatty Acids via a Light-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sorigué, Damien; Légeret, Bertrand; Cuiné, Stéphan; Morales, Pablo; Mirabella, Boris; Guédeney, Geneviève; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Jetter, Reinhard; Peltier, Gilles; Beisson, Fred

    2016-08-01

    Microalgae are considered a promising platform for the production of lipid-based biofuels. While oil accumulation pathways are intensively researched, the possible existence of a microalgal pathways converting fatty acids into alka(e)nes has received little attention. Here, we provide evidence that such a pathway occurs in several microalgal species from the green and the red lineages. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlorophyceae), a C17 alkene, n-heptadecene, was detected in the cell pellet and the headspace of liquid cultures. The Chlamydomonas alkene was identified as 7-heptadecene, an isomer likely formed by decarboxylation of cis-vaccenic acid. Accordingly, incubation of intact Chlamydomonas cells with per-deuterated D31-16:0 (palmitic) acid yielded D31-18:0 (stearic) acid, D29-18:1 (oleic and cis-vaccenic) acids, and D29-heptadecene. These findings showed that loss of the carboxyl group of a C18 monounsaturated fatty acid lead to heptadecene formation. Amount of 7-heptadecene varied with growth phase and temperature and was strictly dependent on light but was not affected by an inhibitor of photosystem II. Cell fractionation showed that approximately 80% of the alkene is localized in the chloroplast. Heptadecane, pentadecane, as well as 7- and 8-heptadecene were detected in Chlorella variabilis NC64A (Trebouxiophyceae) and several Nannochloropsis species (Eustigmatophyceae). In contrast, Ostreococcus tauri (Mamiellophyceae) and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum produced C21 hexaene, without detectable C15-C19 hydrocarbons. Interestingly, no homologs of known hydrocarbon biosynthesis genes were found in the Nannochloropsis, Chlorella, or Chlamydomonas genomes. This work thus demonstrates that microalgae have the ability to convert C16 and C18 fatty acids into alka(e)nes by a new, light-dependent pathway. PMID:27288359

  20. Evidence for the importance of 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine catabolism in humans from 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Malet-Martino, M C; Armand, J P; Lopez, A; Bernadou, J; Béteille, J P; Bon, M; Martino, R

    1986-04-01

    The use of a new methodology, 19F nuclear magnetic resonance, has allowed detection of all the fluorinated metabolites in the biofluids of patients treated with 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-dFUrd) injected i.v. at a dose of 10 g/m2 over 6 h. This technique, which requires no labeled drug, allows a direct study of the biological sample with no need for extraction or derivatization and a simultaneous identification and quantitation of all the different fluorinated metabolites. As well as the already known metabolites, unmetabolized 5'-dFUrd, 5-fluorouracil, and 5,6-dihydro-5-fluorouracil, the presence of alpha-fluoro-beta-ureidopropionic acid, alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine (FBAL), N-carboxy-alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine, and the fluoride anion F- is reported. The catabolic pathway proposed for 5'-dFUrd is analogous to that of 5-fluorouracil, completed with FBAL----F- step, and the plasmatic equilibrium of FBAL with N-carboxy-alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine, its N-carboxy derivative. The quantitative analysis of the different metabolites found in plasma and urine emphasizes the significance of the catabolic pathway. High concentrations of alpha-fluoro-beta ureidopropionic acid and FBAL are recovered in plasma from 3 h after the beginning of the perfusion to 1 h after its end. The global urinary excretion results show that there is a high excretion of 5'-dFUrd and metabolites. Unchanged 5'-dFUrd and FBAL are by far the major excretory products and are at nearly equal rates. The protocol followed in this study produces relatively low but persistent plasmatic concentrations of 5-fluorouracil throughout the perfusion. PMID:2936452

  1. Bile acid promotes liver regeneration via farnesoid X receptor signaling pathways in rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Long; Yang, Yu; Qu, Yikun; Yang, Ting; Wang, Kaifeng; Liu, Weixin; Xia, Weibin

    2015-06-01

    Bile acids, which are synthesized from cholesterol in the hepatocytes of the liver, are amphipathic molecules with a steroid backbone. Studies have shown that bile acid exhibits important effects on liver regeneration. However, the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of bile acid and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) on hepatic regeneration and lipid metabolism. Rats were fed with 0.2% bile acid or glucose for 7 days and then subjected to a 50 or 70% hepatectomy. Hepatic regeneration rate, serum and liver levels of bile acid, and expression of FXR and Caveolin‑1, were detected at 24, 48 or 72 h following hepatectomy. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the liver was measured using immunohistochemistry at the end of the study. Hepatocytes isolated from rats were treated with bile acid, glucose, FXR agonist and FXR antagonist, separately or in combination. Lipid metabolism, the expression of members of the FXR signaling pathway and energy metabolism‑related factors were measured using ELISA kits or western blotting. Bile acid significantly increased the hepatic regeneration rate and the expression of FXR, Caveolin‑1 and PCNA. Levels of total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein were increased in bile acid‑ or FXR agonist‑treated hepatocytes in vitro. Levels of triglyceride, low density lipoprotein and free fatty acid were decreased. In addition, bile acid and FXR agonists increased the expression of bile salt export pump and small heterodimer partner, and downregulated the expression of apical sodium‑dependent bile acid transporter, Na+/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and cholesterol 7α‑hydroxylase. These results suggested that physiological concentrations of bile acid may promote liver regeneration via FXR signaling pathways, and may be associated with energy metabolism. PMID:25634785

  2. Metabolism of sinapic acid and related compounds in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, L. A.

    1969-01-01

    1. Administration of sinapic acid to the rat results in the excretion of 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenylpropionic acid, dihydrosinapic acid, 3-hydroxy-5-methoxycinnamic acid and unchanged sinapic acid in the urine. The sinapic acid conjugate sinalbin is also catabolized to free sinapic acid and 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenylpropionic acid in the rat. 2. 3,4,5-Trimethoxycinnamic acid is metabolized in part to sinapic acid and 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenylpropionic acid. 3. 3,5-Dimethoxycinnamic acid is metabolized to 3-hydroxy-5-methoxycinnamic acid and 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenylpropionic acid. 4. The metabolic interrelationships of these compounds were studied by the administration of intermediates and a metabolic pathway is proposed. 5. The metabolism of the corresponding benzoic acids was studied, but these compounds and their metabolites were shown not to be intermediates or products of the metabolism of the related cinnamic acids. PMID:5386182

  3. Metabolism of sinapic acid and related compounds in the rat.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, L A

    1969-07-01

    1. Administration of sinapic acid to the rat results in the excretion of 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenylpropionic acid, dihydrosinapic acid, 3-hydroxy-5-methoxycinnamic acid and unchanged sinapic acid in the urine. The sinapic acid conjugate sinalbin is also catabolized to free sinapic acid and 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenylpropionic acid in the rat. 2. 3,4,5-Trimethoxycinnamic acid is metabolized in part to sinapic acid and 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenylpropionic acid. 3. 3,5-Dimethoxycinnamic acid is metabolized to 3-hydroxy-5-methoxycinnamic acid and 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenylpropionic acid. 4. The metabolic interrelationships of these compounds were studied by the administration of intermediates and a metabolic pathway is proposed. 5. The metabolism of the corresponding benzoic acids was studied, but these compounds and their metabolites were shown not to be intermediates or products of the metabolism of the related cinnamic acids. PMID:5386182

  4. Distribution of. delta. -aminolevulinic acid biosynthetic pathways among phototrophic and related bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Avissar, Y.J.; Beale, S.I. ); Ormerod, J.G. )

    1989-04-01

    Two biosynthetic pathways are known for the universal tetrapyrrole precursor, {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA): condensation of glycine and succinyl-CoA to form ALA with the loss of C-1 of glycine as CO{sub 2}, and conversion of the intact carbon skeleton of glutamate to ALA in a process requiring tRNA{sup Glu}, ATP, Mg{sup 2+}, NADPH, and pyridoxal phosphate. The distribution of the two ALA biosynthetic pathways among various bacterial genera was determined, using cell-free extracts obtained from representative organisms. Evidence for the operation of the glutamate pathway was obtained by the measurement of RNase-sensitive label incorporation from glutamate into ALA using 3,4-({sup 3}H)glutamate and 1-({sup 14}C)glutamate as substrate. The glycine pathway was indicated by RNase-insensitive incorporation of level from 2-({sup 14}C)glycine into ALA. The distribution of the two pathways among the bacteria tested was in general agreement with their previously phylogenetic relationships and clearly indicates that the glutamate pathway is the more ancient process, whereas the glycine pathway probably evolved much later. The glutamate pathway is the more widely utilized one among bacteria, while the glycine pathway is apparently limited to the {alpha} subgroup of purple bacteria (including Rhodobacter, Rhodospirillum, and Rhizobium). E. coli was found ALA via the glutamate pathway. The ALA-requiring hemA mutant of E. coli was determined to lack the dehydrogenase activity that utilizes glutamyl-tRNA as a substrate.

  5. Stromal uptake and transmission of acid is a pathway for venting cancer cell-generated acid.

    PubMed

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Black, Nicholas; Hsia, Lin-Ting; Wilding, Jennifer; Bodmer, Walter F; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-09-01

    Proliferation and invasion of cancer cells require favorable pH, yet potentially toxic quantities of acid are produced metabolically. Membrane-bound transporters extrude acid from cancer cells, but little is known about the mechanisms that handle acid once it is released into the poorly perfused extracellular space. Here, we studied acid handling by myofibroblasts (colon cancer-derived Hs675.T, intestinal InMyoFib, embryonic colon-derived CCD-112-CoN), skin fibroblasts (NHDF-Ad), and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells (HCT116, HT29) grown in monoculture or coculture. Expression of the acid-loading transporter anion exchanger 2 (AE2) (SLC4A2 product) was detected in myofibroblasts and fibroblasts, but not in CRC cells. Compared with CRC cells, Hs675.T and InMyoFib myofibroblasts had very high capacity to absorb extracellular acid. Acid uptake into CCD-112-CoN and NHDF-Ad cells was slower and comparable to levels in CRC cells, but increased alongside SLC4A2 expression under stimulation with transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), a cytokine involved in cancer-stroma interplay. Myofibroblasts and fibroblasts are connected by gap junctions formed by proteins such as connexin-43, which allows the absorbed acid load to be transmitted across the stromal syncytium. To match the stimulatory effect on acid uptake, cell-to-cell coupling in NHDF-Ad and CCD-112-CoN cells was strengthened with TGFβ1. In contrast, acid transmission was absent between CRC cells, even after treatment with TGFβ1. Thus, stromal cells have the necessary molecular apparatus for assembling an acid-venting route that can improve the flow of metabolic acid through tumors. Importantly, the activities of stromal AE2 and connexin-43 do not place an energetic burden on cancer cells, allowing resources to be diverted for other activities. PMID:27543333

  6. Ulvan, a sulfated polysaccharide from green algae, activates plant immunity through the jasmonic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jaulneau, Valérie; Lafitte, Claude; Jacquet, Christophe; Fournier, Sylvie; Salamagne, Sylvie; Briand, Xavier; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Dumas, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The industrial use of elicitors as alternative tools for disease control needs the identification of abundant sources of them. We report on an elicitor obtained from the green algae Ulva spp. A fraction containing most exclusively the sulfated polysaccharide known as ulvan-induced expression of a GUS gene placed under the control of a lipoxygenase gene promoter. Gene expression profiling was performed upon ulvan treatments on Medicago truncatula and compared to phytohormone effects. Ulvan induced a gene expression signature similar to that observed upon methyl jasmonate treatment (MeJA). Involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in ulvan response was confirmed by detecting induction of protease inhibitory activity and by hormonal profiling of JA, salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Ulvan activity on the hormonal pathway was further consolidated by using Arabidopsis hormonal mutants. Altogether, our results demonstrate that green algae are a potential reservoir of ulvan elicitor which acts through the JA pathway. PMID:20445752

  7. Biosynthetic pathway for acrylic acid from glycerol in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wenhua; Xu, Ying; Xian, Mo; Niu, Wei; Guo, Jiantao; Liu, Huizhou; Zhao, Guang

    2016-06-01

    Acrylic acid is an important industrial feedstock. In this study, a de novo acrylate biosynthetic pathway from inexpensive carbon source glycerol was constructed in Escherichia coli. The acrylic acid was produced from glycerol via 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde, 3-hydroxypropionyl-CoA, and acrylyl-CoA. The acrylate production was improved by screening and site-directed mutagenesis of key enzyme enoyl-CoA hydratase and chromosomal integration of some exogenous genes. Finally, our recombinant strain produced 37.7 mg/L acrylic acid under shaking flask conditions. Although the acrylate production is low, our study shows feasibility of engineering an acrylate biosynthetic pathway from inexpensive carbon source. Furthermore, the reasons for limited acrylate production and further strain optimization that should be performed in the future were also discussed. PMID:26782744

  8. Ulvan, a Sulfated Polysaccharide from Green Algae, Activates Plant Immunity through the Jasmonic Acid Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jaulneau, Valérie; Lafitte, Claude; Jacquet, Christophe; Fournier, Sylvie; Salamagne, Sylvie; Briand, Xavier; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Dumas, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The industrial use of elicitors as alternative tools for disease control needs the identification of abundant sources of them. We report on an elicitor obtained from the green algae Ulva spp. A fraction containing most exclusively the sulfated polysaccharide known as ulvan-induced expression of a GUS gene placed under the control of a lipoxygenase gene promoter. Gene expression profiling was performed upon ulvan treatments on Medicago truncatula and compared to phytohormone effects. Ulvan induced a gene expression signature similar to that observed upon methyl jasmonate treatment (MeJA). Involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in ulvan response was confirmed by detecting induction of protease inhibitory activity and by hormonal profiling of JA, salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Ulvan activity on the hormonal pathway was further consolidated by using Arabidopsis hormonal mutants. Altogether, our results demonstrate that green algae are a potential reservoir of ulvan elicitor which acts through the JA pathway. PMID:20445752

  9. Comparing how land use change impacts soil microbial catabolic respiration in Southwestern Amazon.

    PubMed

    Mazzetto, Andre Mancebo; Feigl, Brigitte Josefine; Cerri, Carlos Eduardo Pellegrino; Cerri, Carlos Clemente

    2016-01-01

    Land use changes strongly impact soil functions, particularly microbial biomass diversity and activity. We hypothesized that the catabolic respiration response of the microbial biomass would differ depending on land use and that these differences would be consistent at the landscape scale. In the present study, we analyzed the catabolic response profile of the soil microbial biomass through substrate-induced respiration in different land uses over a wide geographical range in Mato Grosso and Rondônia state (Southwest Amazon region). We analyzed the differences among native areas, pastures and crop areas and within each land use and examined only native areas (Forest, Dense Cerrado and Cerrado), pastures (Nominal, Degraded and Improved) and crop areas (Perennial, No-Tillage, Conventional Tillage). The metabolic profile of the microbial biomass was accessed using substrate-induced respiration. Pasture soils showed significant responses to amino acids and carboxylic acids, whereas native areas showed higher responses to malonic acid, malic acid and succinic acid. Within each land use category, the catabolic responses showed similar patterns in both large general comparisons (native area, pasture and crop areas) and more specific comparisons (biomes, pastures and crop types). The results showed that the catabolic responses of the microbial biomass are highly correlated with land use, independent of soil type or climate. The substrate induced respiration approach is useful to discriminate microbial communities, even on a large scale. PMID:26887228

  10. Comparing how land use change impacts soil microbial catabolic respiration in Southwestern Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Mazzetto, Andre Mancebo; Feigl, Brigitte Josefine; Cerri, Carlos Eduardo Pellegrino; Cerri, Carlos Clemente

    2016-01-01

    Land use changes strongly impact soil functions, particularly microbial biomass diversity and activity. We hypothesized that the catabolic respiration response of the microbial biomass would differ depending on land use and that these differences would be consistent at the landscape scale. In the present study, we analyzed the catabolic response profile of the soil microbial biomass through substrate-induced respiration in different land uses over a wide geographical range in Mato Grosso and Rondônia state (Southwest Amazon region). We analyzed the differences among native areas, pastures and crop areas and within each land use and examined only native areas (Forest, Dense Cerrado and Cerrado), pastures (Nominal, Degraded and Improved) and crop areas (Perennial, No-Tillage, Conventional Tillage). The metabolic profile of the microbial biomass was accessed using substrate-induced respiration. Pasture soils showed significant responses to amino acids and carboxylic acids, whereas native areas showed higher responses to malonic acid, malic acid and succinic acid. Within each land use category, the catabolic responses showed similar patterns in both large general comparisons (native area, pasture and crop areas) and more specific comparisons (biomes, pastures and crop types). The results showed that the catabolic responses of the microbial biomass are highly correlated with land use, independent of soil type or climate. The substrate induced respiration approach is useful to discriminate microbial communities, even on a large scale. PMID:26887228

  11. Protein Analysis of Sapienic Acid-Treated Porphyromonas gingivalis Suggests Differential Regulation of Multiple Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Deborah V.; Blanchette, Derek R.; Drake, David R.; Wertz, Philip W.; Brogden, Kim A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipids endogenous to skin and mucosal surfaces exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Our previous work demonstrated the antimicrobial activity of the fatty acid sapienic acid (C16:1Δ6) against P. gingivalis and found that sapienic acid treatment alters both protein and lipid composition from those in controls. In this study, we further examined whole-cell protein differences between sapienic acid-treated bacteria and untreated controls, and we utilized open-source functional association and annotation programs to explore potential mechanisms for the antimicrobial activity of sapienic acid. Our analyses indicated that sapienic acid treatment induces a unique stress response in P. gingivalis resulting in differential expression of proteins involved in a variety of metabolic pathways. This network of differentially regulated proteins was enriched in protein-protein interactions (P = 2.98 × 10−8), including six KEGG pathways (P value ranges, 2.30 × 10−5 to 0.05) and four Gene Ontology (GO) molecular functions (P value ranges, 0.02 to 0.04), with multiple suggestive enriched relationships in KEGG pathways and GO molecular functions. Upregulated metabolic pathways suggest increases in energy production, lipid metabolism, iron acquisition and processing, and respiration. Combined with a suggested preferential metabolism of serine, which is necessary for fatty acid biosynthesis, these data support our previous findings that the site of sapienic acid antimicrobial activity is likely at the bacterial membrane. IMPORTANCE P. gingivalis is an important opportunistic pathogen implicated in periodontitis. Affecting nearly 50% of the population, periodontitis is treatable, but the resulting damage is irreversible and eventually progresses to tooth loss. There is a great need for natural products that can be used to treat and/or prevent the overgrowth of

  12. Acid Stress-Mediated Metabolic Shift in Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis LSCE1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Serrazanetti, Diana I.; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Sado-Kamdem, Sylvain L.; Corsetti, Aldo; Vogel, Rudi F.; Ehrmann, Matthias; Guerzoni, M. Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis LSCE1 was selected as a target organism originating from recurrently refreshed sourdough to study the metabolic rerouting associated with the acid stress exposure during sourdough fermentation. In particular, the acid stress induced a metabolic shift toward overproduction of 3-methylbutanoic and 2-methylbutanoic acids accompanied by reduced sugar consumption and primary carbohydrate metabolite production. The fate of labeled leucine, the role of different nutrients and precursors, and the expression of the genes involved in branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism were evaluated at pH 3.6 and 5.8. The novel application of the program XCMS to the solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) data allowed accurate separation and quantification of 2-methylbutanoic and 3-methylbutanoic acids, generally reported as a cumulative datum. The metabolites coming from BCAA catabolism increased up to seven times under acid stress. The gene expression analysis confirmed that some genes associated with BCAA catabolism were overexpressed under acid conditions. The experiment with labeled leucine showed that 2-methylbutanoic acid originated also from leucine. While the overproduction of 3-methylbutanoic acid under acid stress can be attributed to the need to maintain redox balance, the rationale for the production of 2-methylbutanoic acid from leucine can be found in a newly proposed biosynthesis pathway leading to 2-methylbutanoic acid and 3 mol of ATP per mol of leucine. Leucine catabolism to 3-methylbutanoic and 2-methylbutanoic acids suggests that the switch from sugar to amino acid catabolism supports growth in L. sanfranciscensis in restricted environments such as sourdough characterized by acid stress and recurrent carbon starvation. PMID:21335381

  13. Body Weight Independently Affects Articular Cartilage Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Denning, W. Matt; Winward, Jason G.; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J. Ty; Seeley, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key points Walking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration. Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  14. Catabolism and safety of supplemental L-arginine in animals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenlong; Hou, Yongqing; Hu, Shengdi; Bazer, Fuller W; Meininger, Cynthia J; McNeal, Catherine J; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-07-01

    L-arginine (Arg) is utilized via multiple pathways to synthesize protein and low-molecular-weight bioactive substances (e.g., nitric oxide, creatine, and polyamines) with enormous physiological importance. Furthermore, Arg regulates cell signaling pathways and gene expression to improve cardiovascular function, augment insulin sensitivity, enhance lean tissue mass, and reduce obesity in humans. Despite its versatile roles, the use of Arg as a dietary supplement is limited due to the lack of data to address concerns over its safety in humans. Data from animal studies are reviewed to assess arginine catabolism and the safety of long-term Arg supplementation. The arginase pathway was responsible for catabolism of 76-85 and 81-96 % Arg in extraintestinal tissues of pigs and rats, respectively. Dietary supplementation with Arg-HCl or the Arg base [315- and 630-mg Arg/(kg BW d) for 91 d] had no adverse effects on male or female pigs. Similarly, no safety issues were observed for male or female rats receiving supplementation with 1.8- and 3.6-g Arg/(kg BW d) for at least 91 d. Intravenous administration of Arg-HCl to gestating sheep at 81 and 180 mg Arg/(kg BW d) is safe for at least 82 and 40 d, respectively. Animals fed conventional diets can well tolerate large amounts of supplemental Arg [up to 630-mg Arg/(kg BW d) in pigs or 3.6-g Arg/(kg BW d) in rats] for 91 d, which are equivalent to 573-mg Arg/(kg BW d) for humans. Collectively, these results can help guide studies to determine the safety of long-term oral administration of Arg in humans. PMID:27156062

  15. Flux Balance Analysis of Mycolic Acid Pathway: Targets for Anti-Tubercular Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Karthik; Rajagopalan, Preethi; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the focus of several investigations for design of newer drugs, as tuberculosis remains a major epidemic despite the availability of several drugs and a vaccine. Mycobacteria owe many of their unique qualities to mycolic acids, which are known to be important for their growth, survival, and pathogenicity. Mycolic acid biosynthesis has therefore been the focus of a number of biochemical and genetic studies. It also turns out to be the pathway inhibited by front-line anti-tubercular drugs such as isoniazid and ethionamide. Recent years have seen the emergence of systems-based methodologies that can be used to study microbial metabolism. Here, we seek to apply insights from flux balance analyses of the mycolic acid pathway (MAP) for the identification of anti-tubercular drug targets. We present a comprehensive model of mycolic acid synthesis in the pathogen M. tuberculosis involving 197 metabolites participating in 219 reactions catalysed by 28 proteins. Flux balance analysis (FBA) has been performed on the MAP model, which has provided insights into the metabolic capabilities of the pathway. In silico systematic gene deletions and inhibition of InhA by isoniazid, studied here, provide clues about proteins essential for the pathway and hence lead to a rational identification of possible drug targets. Feasibility studies using sequence analysis of the M. tuberculosis H37Rv and human proteomes indicate that, apart from the known InhA, potential targets for anti-tubercular drug design are AccD3, Fas, FabH, Pks13, DesA1/2, and DesA3. Proteins identified as essential by FBA correlate well with those previously identified experimentally through transposon site hybridisation mutagenesis. This study demonstrates the application of FBA for rational identification of potential anti-tubercular drug targets, which can indeed be a general strategy in drug design. The targets, chosen based on the critical points in the pathway, form a ready shortlist

  16. Genetic organization of the catabolic plasmid pJP4 from Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 (pJP4) reveals mechanisms of adaptation to chloroaromatic pollutants and evolution of specialized chloroaromatic degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Trefault, N; De la Iglesia, R; Molina, A M; Manzano, M; Ledger, T; Pérez-Pantoja, D; Sánchez, M A; Stuardo, M; González, B

    2004-07-01

    Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 (pJP4) is a useful model for the study of bacterial degradation of substituted aromatic pollutants. Several key degrading capabilities, encoded by tfd genes, are located in the 88 kb, self-transmissible, IncP-1 beta plasmid pJP4. The complete sequence of the 87,688 nucleotides of pJP4, encoding 83 open reading frames (ORFs), is reported. Most of the coding sequence corresponds to a well-conserved IncP-1 beta backbone and the previously reported tfd genes. In addition, we found hypothetical proteins putatively involved in the transport of aromatic compounds and short-chain fatty acid oxidation. ORFs related to mobile elements, including the Tn501-encoded mercury resistance determinants, an IS1071-based composite transposon and a cryptic class II transposon, are also present in pJP4. These mobile elements are inefficient in transposition and are located in two regions of pJP4 that are rich in remnants of lateral gene transfer events. pJP4 plasmid was able to capture chromosomal genes and form hybrid plasmids with the IncP-1 alpha plasmid RP4. These observations are integrated into a model for the evolution of pJP4, which reveals mechanisms of bacterial adaptation to degrade pollutants. PMID:15186344

  17. Catabolism of aggrecan, decorin and biglycan in tendon.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, S G; Flannery, C R; Little, C B; Hughes, C E; Caterson, B; Dent, C M

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the catabolism of the proteoglycans aggrecan, decorin and biglycan in fresh tendon samples and in explant cultures of tissue from the tensional and compressed regions of young and mature bovine tendons. A panel of well-characterized antibodies that recognize glycosaminoglycan or protein (linear or neoepitope) sequences was used to detect proteoglycans and proteoglycan degradation products that were both retained within the tissue and released into the culture medium. In addition, a reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR analysis was used to examine the mRNA expression patterns of tendon proteoglycans and aggrecanases. The results of this study indicate a major role for aggrecanase(s) in the catabolism of aggrecan in bovine tendon. The study also provides a characterization of glycosaminoglycan epitopes associated with the proteoglycans of tendon, illustrating age-related changes in the isomers of chondroitin sulphate disaccharides that remain attached to the core protein glycosaminoglycan linkage region after digestion with chondroitinase ABC. Evidence for a rapid turnover of the small proteoglycans decorin and biglycan was also observed, indicating additional molecular pathways that might compromise the integrity of the collagen matrix and potentially contribute to tendon dysfunction after injury and during disease. PMID:10926842

  18. Tryptophan-Catabolizing Enzymes – Party of Three

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Helen J.; Jusof, Felicita F.; Bakmiwewa, Supun M.; Hunt, Nicholas H.; Yuasa, Hajime J.

    2014-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) are tryptophan-degrading enzymes that have independently evolved to catalyze the first step in tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway (KP). The depletion of tryptophan and formation of KP metabolites modulates the activity of the mammalian immune, reproductive, and central nervous systems. IDO and TDO enzymes can have overlapping or distinct functions depending on their expression patterns. The expression of TDO and IDO enzymes in mammals differs not only by tissue/cellular localization but also by their induction by distinct stimuli. To add to the complexity, these genes also have undergone duplications in some organisms leading to multiple isoforms of IDO or TDO. For example, many vertebrates, including all mammals, have acquired two IDO genes via gene duplication, although the IDO1-like gene has been lost in some lower vertebrate lineages. Gene duplications can allow the homologs to diverge and acquire different properties to the original gene. There is evidence for IDO enzymes having differing enzymatic characteristics, signaling properties, and biological functions. This review analyzes the evolutionary convergence of IDO and TDO enzymes as tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes and the divergent evolution of IDO homologs to generate an enzyme family with diverse characteristics not possessed by TDO enzymes, with an emphasis on the immune system. PMID:25346733

  19. Distinct amino acid-sensing mTOR pathways regulate skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Chen, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to amino acid availability controls many cellular and developmental processes. mTOR is a master regulator of myogenic differentiation, but the pathways mediating amino acid signals in this process are not known. Here we examine the Rag GTPases and the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, two mediators of amino acid signals upstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in cell growth regulation, for their potential involvement in myogenesis. We find that, although both Rag and Vps34 mediate amino acid activation of mTORC1 in C2C12 myoblasts, they have opposing functions in myogenic differentiation. Knockdown of RagA/B enhances, whereas overexpression of active RagB/C mutants impairs, differentiation, and this inhibitory function of Rag is mediated by mTORC1 suppression of the IRS1-PI3K-Akt pathway. On the other hand, Vps34 is required for myogenic differentiation. Amino acids activate a Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1) pathway that controls the production of insulin-like growth factor II, an autocrine inducer of differentiation, through the Igf2 muscle enhancer. The product of PLD, phosphatidic acid, activates the enhancer in a rapamycin-sensitive but mTOR kinase-independent manner. Our results uncover amino acid-sensing mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of myogenesis and underline the versatility and context dependence of mTOR signaling. PMID:24068326

  20. Hexanoic acid is a resistance inducer that protects tomato plants against Pseudomonas syringae by priming the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid pathways.

    PubMed

    Scalschi, Loredana; Vicedo, Begonya; Camañes, Gemma; Fernandez-Crespo, Emma; Lapeña, Leonor; González-Bosch, Carmen; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2013-05-01

    Hexanoic acid-induced resistance (Hx-IR) is effective against several pathogens in tomato plants. Our study of the mechanisms implicated in Hx-IR against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 suggests that hexanoic acid (Hx) treatment counteracts the negative effect of coronatine (COR) and jasmonyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) on the salicylic acid (SA) pathway. In Hx-treated plants, an increase in the expression of jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (JMT) and the SA marker genes PR1 and PR5 indicates a boost in this signalling pathway at the expense of a decrease in JA-Ile. Moreover, Hx treatment potentiates 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid accumulation, which suggests that this molecule might play a role per se in Hx-IR. These results support a positive relationship between the SA and JA pathways in Hx-primed plants. Furthermore, one of the mechanisms of virulence mediated by COR is stomatal re-opening on infection with P. syringae. In this work, we observed that Hx seems to inhibit stomatal opening in planta in the presence of COR, which suggests that, on infection in tomato, this treatment suppresses effector action to prevent bacterial entry into the mesophyll. PMID:23279078

  1. The abundant marine bacterium Pelagibacter simultaneously catabolizes dimethylsulfoniopropionate to the gases dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Todd, Jonathan D; Thrash, J Cameron; Qian, Yanping; Qian, Michael C; Temperton, Ben; Guo, Jiazhen; Fowler, Emily K; Aldrich, Joshua T; Nicora, Carrie D; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D; De Leenheer, Patrick; Payne, Samuel H; Johnston, Andrew W B; Davie-Martin, Cleo L; Halsey, Kimberly H; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton produce ∼10(9) tonnes of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) per year(1,2), an estimated 10% of which is catabolized by bacteria through the DMSP cleavage pathway to the climatically active gas dimethyl sulfide(3,4). SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria (order Pelagibacterales), the most abundant chemo-organotrophic bacteria in the oceans, have been shown to assimilate DMSP into biomass, thereby supplying this cell's unusual requirement for reduced sulfur(5,6). Here, we report that Pelagibacter HTCC1062 produces the gas methanethiol, and that a second DMSP catabolic pathway, mediated by a cupin-like DMSP lyase, DddK, simultaneously shunts as much as 59% of DMSP uptake to dimethyl sulfide production. We propose a model in which the allocation of DMSP between these pathways is kinetically controlled to release increasing amounts of dimethyl sulfide as the supply of DMSP exceeds cellular sulfur demands for biosynthesis. PMID:27573103

  2. Stimulation of the Salicylic Acid Pathway Aboveground Recruits Entomopathogenic Nematodes Belowground.

    PubMed

    Filgueiras, Camila Cramer; Willett, Denis S; Junior, Alcides Moino; Pareja, Martin; Borai, Fahiem El; Dickson, Donald W; Stelinski, Lukasz L; Duncan, Larry W

    2016-01-01

    Plant defense pathways play a critical role in mediating tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores, and natural enemies. While the impact of plant defense pathway stimulation on natural enemies has been extensively explored aboveground, belowground ramifications of plant defense pathway stimulation are equally important in regulating subterranean pests and still require more attention. Here we investigate the effect of aboveground stimulation of the salicylic acid pathway through foliar application of the elicitor methyl salicylate on belowground recruitment of the entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema diaprepesi. Also, we implicate a specific root-derived volatile that attracts S. diaprepesi belowground following aboveground plant stimulation by an elicitor. In four-choice olfactometer assays, citrus plants treated with foliar applications of methyl salicylate recruited S. diaprepesi in the absence of weevil feeding as compared with negative controls. Additionally, analysis of root volatile profiles of citrus plants receiving foliar application of methyl salicylate revealed production of d-limonene, which was absent in negative controls. The entomopathogenic nematode S. diaprepesi was recruited to d-limonene in two-choice olfactometer trials. These results reinforce the critical role of plant defense pathways in mediating tritrophic interactions, suggest a broad role for plant defense pathway signaling belowground, and hint at sophisticated plant responses to pest complexes. PMID:27136916

  3. Stimulation of the Salicylic Acid Pathway Aboveground Recruits Entomopathogenic Nematodes Belowground

    PubMed Central

    Filgueiras, Camila Cramer; Willett, Denis S.; Junior, Alcides Moino; Pareja, Martin; Borai, Fahiem El; Dickson, Donald W.; Stelinski, Lukasz L.; Duncan, Larry W.

    2016-01-01

    Plant defense pathways play a critical role in mediating tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores, and natural enemies. While the impact of plant defense pathway stimulation on natural enemies has been extensively explored aboveground, belowground ramifications of plant defense pathway stimulation are equally important in regulating subterranean pests and still require more attention. Here we investigate the effect of aboveground stimulation of the salicylic acid pathway through foliar application of the elicitor methyl salicylate on belowground recruitment of the entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema diaprepesi. Also, we implicate a specific root-derived volatile that attracts S. diaprepesi belowground following aboveground plant stimulation by an elicitor. In four-choice olfactometer assays, citrus plants treated with foliar applications of methyl salicylate recruited S. diaprepesi in the absence of weevil feeding as compared with negative controls. Additionally, analysis of root volatile profiles of citrus plants receiving foliar application of methyl salicylate revealed production of d-limonene, which was absent in negative controls. The entomopathogenic nematode S. diaprepesi was recruited to d-limonene in two-choice olfactometer trials. These results reinforce the critical role of plant defense pathways in mediating tritrophic interactions, suggest a broad role for plant defense pathway signaling belowground, and hint at sophisticated plant responses to pest complexes. PMID:27136916

  4. Exogenous fatty acids affect CDP-choline pathway to increase phosphatidylcholine synthesis in granular pneumocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, A.; Gullo, J.; Reicherter, J.; Fisher, A.

    1987-05-01

    Regulation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis in rat granular pneumocytes isolated by tryptic digestion of lungs and maintained in primary culture for 24 h was investigated by following effects of exogenous fatty acids on (/sup 3/H-methyl)choline incorporation into PC and disaturated PC (DSPC). At 0.1 mM choline, the rate of choline incorporation into PC and DSPC was 440 +/- and 380 +/- 50 pmol/h/ug Pi (mean +/- SE, n=3-5), respectively, and was linear for up to 3 h. PC synthesis was significantly increased by 0.1 mM each of palmitic, oleic, linoleic, or linolenic acid. However, synthesis of DSPC was increased only by palmitic acid and this increase was prevented by addition of oleic acid suggesting lack of effect on the remodeling pathway. Pulse-chase experiments with choline in absence or presence of palmitic or oleic acid showed that the label declined in choline phosphate and increased in PC more rapidly in presence of either of the fatty acids, suggesting rapid conversion of choline phosphate to PC. Microsomal choline phosphate cytidyltransferase activity in cells preincubated without or with palmitic acid for 3 h was 0.81 +/- 0.07 and 1.81 +/- 0.09 nmol choline phosphate converted/min/mg protein (n=4). These results suggest that in granular pneumocytes, exogenous fatty acids modulate PC synthesis by increasing choline phosphate cytidyltransferase activity.

  5. Amino acids and autophagy: cross-talk and co-operation to control cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Bernadette; Korolchuk, Viktor I; Sarkar, Sovan

    2015-10-01

    Maintenance of amino acid homeostasis is important for healthy cellular function, metabolism and growth. Intracellular amino acid concentrations are dynamic; the high demand for protein synthesis must be met with constant dietary intake, followed by cellular influx, utilization and recycling of nutrients. Autophagy is a catabolic process via which superfluous or damaged proteins and organelles are delivered to the lysosome and degraded to release free amino acids into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, autophagy is specifically activated in response to amino acid starvation via two key signaling cascades: the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) and the general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) pathways. These pathways are key regulators of the integration between anabolic (amino acid depleting) and catabolic (such as autophagy which is amino acid replenishing) processes to ensure intracellular amino acid homeostasis. Here, we discuss the key roles that amino acids, along with energy (ATP, glucose) and oxygen, are playing in cellular growth and proliferation. We further explore how sophisticated methods are employed by cells to sense intracellular amino acid concentrations, how amino acids can act as a switch to dictate the temporal and spatial activation of anabolic and catabolic processes and how autophagy contributes to the replenishment of free amino acids, all to ensure cell survival. Relevance of these molecular processes to cellular and organismal physiology and pathology is also discussed. PMID:24965527

  6. Nucleic Acid-Targeting Pathways Promote Inflammation in Obesity-Related Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Revelo, Xavier S; Ghazarian, Magar; Chng, Melissa Hui Yen; Luck, Helen; Kim, Justin H; Zeng, Kejing; Shi, Sally Y; Tsai, Sue; Lei, Helena; Kenkel, Justin; Liu, Chih Long; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Tsui, Hubert; Sima, Corneliu; Xiao, Changting; Shen, Lei; Li, Xiaoying; Jin, Tianru; Lewis, Gary F; Woo, Minna; Utz, Paul J; Glogauer, Michael; Engleman, Edgar; Winer, Shawn; Winer, Daniel A

    2016-07-19

    Obesity-related inflammation of metabolic tissues, including visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and liver, are key factors in the development of insulin resistance (IR), though many of the contributing mechanisms remain unclear. We show that nucleic-acid-targeting pathways downstream of extracellular trap (ET) formation, unmethylated CpG DNA, or ribonucleic acids drive inflammation in IR. High-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice show increased release of ETs in VAT, decreased systemic clearance of ETs, and increased autoantibodies against conserved nuclear antigens. In HFD-fed mice, this excess of nucleic acids and related protein antigens worsens metabolic parameters through a number of mechanisms, including activation of VAT macrophages and expansion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in the liver. Consistently, HFD-fed mice lacking critical responders of nucleic acid pathways, Toll-like receptors (TLR)7 and TLR9, show reduced metabolic inflammation and improved glucose homeostasis. Treatment of HFD-fed mice with inhibitors of ET formation or a TLR7/9 antagonist improves metabolic disease. These findings reveal a pathogenic role for nucleic acid targeting as a driver of metabolic inflammation in IR. PMID:27373163

  7. An okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase negatively controls the cyclin degradation pathway in amphibian eggs.

    PubMed Central

    Lorca, T; Fesquet, D; Zindy, F; Le Bouffant, F; Cerruti, M; Brechot, C; Devauchelle, G; Dorée, M

    1991-01-01

    Inhibition of okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatases released the cyclin degradation pathway from its inhibited state in extracts prepared from unfertilized Xenopus eggs arrested at the second meiotic metaphase. It also switched on cyclin protease activity in a permanent fashion in interphase extracts prepared from activated eggs. Even after cdc2 kinase inactivation, microinjection of okadaic acid-treated interphase extracts pushed G2-arrested recipient oocytes into the M phase, suggesting that the phosphatase inhibitor stabilizes the activity of an unidentified factor which shares in common with cdc2 kinase the maturation-promoting factor activity. Images PMID:1846666

  8. Enhanced fatty acid accumulation in Isochrysis galbana by inhibition of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase pathway under nitrogen deprivation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Litao; Liu, Jianguo

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the interrelation between the mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway and fatty acid accumulation in marine microalga Isochrysis galbana. Under normal conditions, the activity of the AOX pathway was maintained at a low level in I. galbana. Compared with the normal condition, nitrogen deprivation significantly increased the AOX pathway activity and fatty acid accumulation. Under nitrogen deprivation, the inhibition of the AOX pathway by salicylhydroxamic acid caused the accumulation of reducing equivalents and the over-reduction of chloroplasts in I. galbana cells, leading to a decrease in the photosynthetic O2 evolution rate. The over-production of reducing equivalents due to the inhibition of the AOX pathway under nitrogen deprivation further enhanced the accumulation of fatty acids in I. galbana cells. PMID:27068057

  9. 11,12-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid activates the L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Like; Cui, Yuying; Geng, Bing; Zeng, Xiangjun; Tang, Chaoshu

    2008-01-01

    The present study was to test the hypothesis that 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (11,12-EET), a metabolic product of arachidonic acid by cytochrome P450 epoxygenase, regulates nitric oxide (NO) generation of the L-arginine/NO synthase (NOS) pathway in human platelets. Human platelets were incubated in the presence or absence of different concentrations of 11,12-EET for 2 h at 37 degrees C, followed by measurements of activities of the L-arginine/NOS pathway. Incubation with 11,12-EET increased the platelet NOS activity, nitrite production, cGMP content, and the platelet uptake of L-[(3)H]arginine in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, 11,12-EET attenuated intracellular free Ca(2+) accumulation stimulated by collagen, which was at least partly mediated by EET-activated L-arginine/NOS pathway. It is suggested that 11,12-EET regulates platelet function through up-regulating the activity of the L-arginine/NOS/NO pathway. PMID:17932624

  10. Single amino acid substitutions influencing the folding pathway of the phage P22 tail spike endorhamnosidase.

    PubMed

    Yu, M H; King, J

    1984-11-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutations in the gene for the thermostable tail spike of phage P22 interyFere with the folding and subunit association pathway at the restrictive temperature but not with the activity or stability of the protein once matured. The local sites of these mutations and the mutant amino acid substitutions have been determined by DNA sequencing. Of 11 temperature-sensitive folding mutations, 3 were replacements of glycine residues by polar residues, and three were replacements of threonine residues by residues unable to form a side-chain H-bond. There were no proline replacements. Two of the temperature-sensitive sites in which threonine residues were replaced by isoleucine residues were homologous. These sequences probably maintain the correct local folding pathway at higher temperatures. The temperature-sensitive amino acid substitutions appear to destabilize a thermolabile intermediate in the wild-type folding pathway or to increase the rate of a competing off-pathway reaction. PMID:6387707

  11. Bioluminescent reporters for catabolic gene expression and pollutant bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzer, A.; DiGrazia, P.M.; Sayler, G.S. . Center for Environmental Biotechnology); Burlage, R.S. )

    1991-01-01

    The application of visualized catabolic nah-gene expression using a luxCDABE gene fusion provides a valuable method to measure quantitatively and specifically naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability. It has been demonstrated that the physiological state of the test culture together with the intrinsic regulation mechanisms of the naphthalene degradation pathway as well as the physiological aspects of the lux gene fusion have to be taken into account. The method presented provides a high potential for in situ bioprocess monitoring. In addition, the results obtained with immobilized cells provide a basis for the development of biosensors for environmental applications in specific pollutant monitoring in waste streams and soil slurry systems but, as a general method, also for more conventional biotechnological process control. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Phospholipase D Signaling Pathways and Phosphatidic Acid as Therapeutic Targets in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bruntz, Ronald C.; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipase D is a ubiquitous class of enzymes that generates phosphatidic acid as an intracellular signaling species. The phospholipase D superfamily plays a central role in a variety of functions in prokaryotes, viruses, yeast, fungi, plants, and eukaryotic species. In mammalian cells, the pathways modulating catalytic activity involve a variety of cellular signaling components, including G protein–coupled receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, polyphosphatidylinositol lipids, Ras/Rho/ADP-ribosylation factor GTPases, and conventional isoforms of protein kinase C, among others. Recent findings have shown that phosphatidic acid generated by phospholipase D plays roles in numerous essential cellular functions, such as vesicular trafficking, exocytosis, autophagy, regulation of cellular metabolism, and tumorigenesis. Many of these cellular events are modulated by the actions of phosphatidic acid, and identification of two targets (mammalian target of rapamycin and Akt kinase) has especially highlighted a role for phospholipase D in the regulation of cellular metabolism. Phospholipase D is a regulator of intercellular signaling and metabolic pathways, particularly in cells that are under stress conditions. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the regulation of phospholipase D activity and its modulation of cellular signaling pathways and functions. PMID:25244928

  13. Early hormonal changes affect the catabolic response to trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Bessey, P Q; Lowe, K A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors sought to determine how temporary insulin suppression might alter the catabolic effects of cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrine. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The metabolic responses to injury include hypermetabolism, accelerated net skeletal muscle protein breakdown, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. These alterations are associated with increased stress hormone concentrations. Insulin elaboration is usually suppressed immediately after an injury but is abundant later during convalescence. An infusion of hydrocortisone, glucagon, and epinephrine increases both stress hormone concentrations and insulin levels. It induces many of the metabolic alterations seen in critically ill patients, but it does not affect net muscle breakdown. METHODS: Seven healthy adults received a stress hormone infusion for 3 days in two separate studies. During one study they, also received an infusion of the somatostatin analogue, octreotide (0.005 micrograms/kg/min), to suppress insulin elaboration for the first 24 hours. During the other study (control), insulin was permitted to rise unchecked. RESULTS: Stress hormone concentrations, hypermetabolism (+/- 20% above basal), and leukocytosis were similar during both study periods. When insulin elaboration was temporarily suppressed, whole-body nitrogen loss was increased during the first 48 hours, and the efflux of amino acids from the forearm after 72 hours of infusion was 60% greater than the control level. CONCLUSIONS: Temporary insulin suppression during physiologic increases in stress hormone concentrations amplified whole-body nitrogen loss and led to the development of accelerated net skeletal muscle protein breakdown. Early hormonal changes after an injury may affect the development of later catabolic responses. PMID:8215639

  14. Rewiring of the Ppr1 Zinc Cluster Transcription Factor from Purine Catabolism to Pyrimidine Biogenesis in the Saccharomycetaceae.

    PubMed

    Tebung, Walters Aji; Choudhury, Baharul I; Tebbji, Faiza; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2016-07-11

    Metabolic pathways are largely conserved in eukaryotes, but the transcriptional regulation of these pathways can sometimes vary between species; this has been termed "rewiring." Recently, it has been established that in the Saccharomyces lineage starting from Naumovozyma castellii, genes involved in allantoin breakdown have been genomically relocated to form the DAL cluster. The formation of the DAL cluster occurred along with the loss of urate permease (UAP) and urate oxidase (UOX), reducing the requirement for oxygen and bypassing the candidate Ppr1 inducer, uric acid. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this allantoin catabolism cluster is regulated by the transcription factor Dal82, which is not present in many of the pre-rearrangement fungal species. We have used ChIP-chip analysis, transcriptional profiling of an activated Ppr1 protein, bioinformatics, and nitrogen utilization studies to establish that in Candida albicans the zinc cluster transcription factor Ppr1 controls this allantoin catabolism regulon. Intriguingly, in S. cerevisiae, the Ppr1 ortholog binds the same DNA motif (CGG(N6)CCG) as in C. albicans but serves as a regulator of pyrimidine biosynthesis. This transcription factor rewiring appears to have taken place at the same phylogenetic step as the formation of the rearranged DAL cluster. This transfer of the control of allantoin degradation from Ppr1 to Dal82, together with the repositioning of Ppr1 to the regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis, may have resulted from a switch to a metabolism that could exploit hypoxic conditions in the lineage leading to N. castellii and S. cerevisiae. PMID:27321996

  15. Functional genomics by NMR spectroscopy. Phenylacetate catabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Wael; El-Said Mohamed, Magdy; Wanner, Barry L; Datsenko, Kirill A; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Rohdich, Felix; Bacher, Adelbert; Fuchs, Georg

    2003-07-01

    Aerobic metabolism of phenylalanine in most bacteria proceeds via oxidation to phenylacetate. Surprisingly, the further metabolism of phenylacetate has not been elucidated, even in well studied bacteria such as Escherichia coli. The only committed step is the conversion of phenylacetate into phenylacetyl-CoA. The paa operon of E. coli encodes 14 polypeptides involved in the catabolism of phenylacetate. We have found that E. coli K12 mutants with a deletion of the paaF, paaG, paaH, paaJ or paaZ gene are unable to grow with phenylacetate as carbon source. Incubation of a paaG mutant with [U-13C8]phenylacetate yielded ring-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrophenylacetyl lactone as shown by NMR spectroscopy. Incubation of the paaF and paaH mutants with phenylacetate yielded delta3-dehydroadipate and 3-hydroxyadipate, respectively. The origin of the carbon atoms of these C6 compounds from the aromatic ring was shown using [ring-13C6]phenylacetate. The paaG and paaZ mutants also converted phenylacetate into ortho-hydroxyphenylacetate, which was previously identified as a dead end product of phenylacetate catabolism. These data, in conjunction with protein sequence data, suggest a novel catabolic pathway via CoA thioesters. According to this, phenylacetyl-CoA is attacked by a ring-oxygenase/reductase (PaaABCDE proteins), generating a hydroxylated and reduced derivative of phenylacetyl-CoA, which is not re-oxidized to a dihydroxylated aromatic intermediate, as in other known aromatic pathways. Rather, it is proposed that this nonaromatic intermediate CoA ester is further metabolized in a complex reaction sequence comprising enoyl-CoA isomerization/hydration, nonoxygenolytic ring opening, and dehydrogenation catalyzed by the PaaG and PaaZ proteins. The subsequent beta-oxidation-type degradation of the resulting CoA dicarboxylate via beta-ketoadipyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA appears to be catalyzed by the PaaJ, PaaF and PaaH proteins. PMID:12846838

  16. Docosahexaenoic Acid Modulates Invasion and Metastasis of Human Ovarian Cancer via Multiple Molecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Chun; Wu, Yi-Nan; Wang, Su-Li; Lin, Qing-Hua; He, Ming-Fang; Liu, Qiao-lin; Wang, Jin-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objective We investigated the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the invasion and metastasis of ovarian cancer cells (A2780, HO8910, and SKOV-3). Methods Cytotoxicity assay was performed to determine the optimal doses of DHA in this experiment. The effects of DHA on invasion ability were assessed by invasion assay. The expressions of messenger RNA and/or proteins associated with invasion or metastasis were detected by quantitative Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction or Western blot. The effect of DHA on cell metastasis was assessed in xenograft model of zebrafish. Results Docosahexaenoic acid and α-linolenic acid could reduce the cell vitalities in dose-dependent manner. However, DHA inhibited the invasion and metastasis of ovarian cancer cells, but α-linolenic acid did not (**P < 0.01). Docosahexaenoic acid could downregulate the expressions of WAVE3, vascular endothelial cell growth factor, and MMP-9, and upregulate KISS-1, TIMP-1, and PPAR-γ, which negatively correlated with cell invasion and metastasis (*P < 0.05). Docosahexaenoic acid restrained the development of subintestinal vessels and cancer cell metastasis in xenograft model of zebrafish (**P < 0.01). Conclusions Docosahexaenoic acid inhibited the invasion and metastasis of ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo through the modulation of NF-κB signaling pathway, suggesting that DHA is a promising candidate for ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:27258728

  17. Glycosidases: inborn errors of glycosphingolipid catabolism.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Hisashi; Li, Yu-Teh

    2014-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are information-rich glycoconjugates that occur in nature mainly as constituents of biomembranes. Each GSL contains a complex carbohydrate chain linked to a ceramide moiety that anchors the molecule to biomembranes. In higher animals, catabolism of GSLs takes place in lysosomes where sugar chains in GSLs are hydrolyzed by exo-glycosidases to cleave a sugar residue from the non-reducing end of a sugar chain. Inborn errors of GSL-catabolism, collectively called sphingolipidoses or GSL-storage diseases, are caused by the deficiency of exo-glycosidases responsible for the degradation of the specific sugar residues at the non-reducing termini in GSLs. This chapter briefly discusses glycone, anomeric, linkage, and aglycone specificities of exo-glycosidases and some of the historical landmarks on their associations with the chemical pathology of the five best known sphingolipidoses: GM1 gangliosidosis, GM2 gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs disease), Fabry disease, Gaucher disease, and Krabbe disease. PMID:25151392

  18. Functional characterization and expression analysis of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase provide new insight into the regulation of proline and arginine catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    While intracellular proline accumulation in response to various stress conditions has been investigated in great detail, the biochemistry and physiological relevance of proline degradation in plants is much less understood. Moreover, the second and last step in proline catabolism, the oxidation of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid (P5C) to glutamate, is shared with arginine catabolism. Little information is available to date concerning the regulatory mechanisms coordinating these two pathways. Expression of the gene coding for P5C dehydrogenase was analyzed in rice by real-time PCR either following the exogenous supply of amino acids of the glutamate family, or under hyperosmotic stress conditions. The rice enzyme was heterologously expressed in E. coli, and the affinity-purified protein was thoroughly characterized with respect to structural and functional properties. A tetrameric oligomerization state was observed in size exclusion chromatography, which suggests a structure of the plant enzyme different from that shown for the bacterial P5C dehydrogenases structurally characterized to date. Kinetic analysis accounted for a preferential use of NAD+ as the electron acceptor. Cations were found to modulate enzyme activity, whereas anion effects were negligible. Several metal ions were inhibitory in the micromolar range. Interestingly, arginine also inhibited the enzyme at higher concentrations, with a mechanism of uncompetitive type with respect to P5C. This implies that millimolar levels of arginine would increase the affinity of P5C dehydrogenase toward its specific substrate. Results are discussed in view of the involvement of the enzyme in either proline or arginine catabolism. PMID:26300893

  19. Functional characterization and expression analysis of rice δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase provide new insight into the regulation of proline and arginine catabolism.

    PubMed

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    While intracellular proline accumulation in response to various stress conditions has been investigated in great detail, the biochemistry and physiological relevance of proline degradation in plants is much less understood. Moreover, the second and last step in proline catabolism, the oxidation of δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid (P5C) to glutamate, is shared with arginine catabolism. Little information is available to date concerning the regulatory mechanisms coordinating these two pathways. Expression of the gene coding for P5C dehydrogenase was analyzed in rice by real-time PCR either following the exogenous supply of amino acids of the glutamate family, or under hyperosmotic stress conditions. The rice enzyme was heterologously expressed in E. coli, and the affinity-purified protein was thoroughly characterized with respect to structural and functional properties. A tetrameric oligomerization state was observed in size exclusion chromatography, which suggests a structure of the plant enzyme different from that shown for the bacterial P5C dehydrogenases structurally characterized to date. Kinetic analysis accounted for a preferential use of NAD(+) as the electron acceptor. Cations were found to modulate enzyme activity, whereas anion effects were negligible. Several metal ions were inhibitory in the micromolar range. Interestingly, arginine also inhibited the enzyme at higher concentrations, with a mechanism of uncompetitive type with respect to P5C. This implies that millimolar levels of arginine would increase the affinity of P5C dehydrogenase toward its specific substrate. Results are discussed in view of the involvement of the enzyme in either proline or arginine catabolism. PMID:26300893

  20. Indole-3-acetic acid biosynthetic pathway and aromatic amino acid aminotransferase activities in Pantoea dispersa strain GPK.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, G B; Nayak, A S; Sajjan, S S; Oblesha, A; Karegoudar, T B

    2013-05-01

    This investigation deals with the production of IAA by a bacterial isolate Pantoea dispersa strain GPK (PDG) identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. HPLC and Mass spectral analysis of metabolites from bacterial spent medium revealed that, IAA production by PDG is Trp-dependent and follows indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPyA) pathway. Substrate specificity study of aromatic amino acid aminotransferase (AAT) showed high activities, only when tryptophan (Trp) and α-ketoglutarate (α-kg) were used as substrates. AAT is highly specific for Trp and α-kg as amino group donor and acceptor, respectively. The effect of exogenous IAA on bacterial growth was established. Low concentration of exogenous IAA induced the growth, whereas high concentration decreased the growth of bacterium. PDG treatment significantly increased the root length, shoot length and dry mass of the chickpea and pigeon pea plants. PMID:23448265

  1. c9,t11-Conjugated linoleic acid ameliorates steatosis by modulating mitochondrial uncoupling and Nrf2 pathway[S

    PubMed Central

    Mollica, Maria Pina; Trinchese, Giovanna; Cavaliere, Gina; De Filippo, Chiara; Cocca, Ennio; Gaita, Marcello; Della-Gatta, Antonio; Marano, Angela; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Bergamo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, hepatic steatosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction are key pathophysiological features of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. A conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) mixture of cis9,trans11 (9,11-CLA) and trans10,cis12 (10,12-CLA) isomers enhanced the antioxidant/detoxifying mechanism via the activation of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and improved mitochondrial function, but less is known about the actions of specific isomers. The differential ability of individual CLA isomers to modulate these pathways was explored in Wistar rats fed for 4 weeks with a lard-based high-fat diet (L) or with control diet (CD), and, within each dietary treatment, two subgroups were daily administered with 9,11-CLA or 10,12-CLA (30 mg/day). The 9,11-CLA, but not 10,12-CLA, supplementation to CD rats improves the GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver, mitochondrial functions, and Nrf2 activity. Histological examination reveals a reduction of steatosis in L-fed rats supplemented with both CLA isomers, but 9,11-CLA downregulated plasma concentrations of proinflammatory markers, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress markers in liver more efficiently than in 10,12-CLA treatment. The present study demonstrates the higher protective effect of 9,11-CLA against diet-induced pro-oxidant and proinflammatory signs and suggests that these effects are determined, at least in part, by its ability to activate the Nrf2 pathway and to improve the mitochondrial functioning and biogenesis. PMID:24634500

  2. Actinobacterial Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetases Involved in Steroid Side-Chain Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Casabon, Israël; Swain, Kendra; Crowe, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial steroid catabolism is an important component of the global carbon cycle and has applications in drug synthesis. Pathways for this catabolism involve multiple acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases, which activate alkanoate substituents for β-oxidation. The functions of these synthetases are poorly understood. We enzymatically characterized four distinct acyl-CoA synthetases from the cholate catabolic pathway of Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and the cholesterol catabolic pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Phylogenetic analysis of 70 acyl-CoA synthetases predicted to be involved in steroid metabolism revealed that the characterized synthetases each represent an orthologous class with a distinct function in steroid side-chain degradation. The synthetases were specific for the length of alkanoate substituent. FadD19 from M. tuberculosis H37Rv (FadD19Mtb) transformed 3-oxo-4-cholesten-26-oate (kcat/Km = 0.33 × 105 ± 0.03 × 105 M−1 s−1) and represents orthologs that activate the C8 side chain of cholesterol. Both CasGRHA1 and FadD17Mtb are steroid-24-oyl-CoA synthetases. CasG and its orthologs activate the C5 side chain of cholate, while FadD17 and its orthologs appear to activate the C5 side chain of one or more cholesterol metabolites. CasIRHA1 is a steroid-22-oyl-CoA synthetase, representing orthologs that activate metabolites with a C3 side chain, which accumulate during cholate catabolism. CasI had similar apparent specificities for substrates with intact or extensively degraded steroid nuclei, exemplified by 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oate and 1β(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α(3″-propanoate)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone (kcat/Km = 2.4 × 105 ± 0.1 × 105 M−1 s−1 and 3.2 × 105 ± 0.3 × 105 M−1 s−1, respectively). Acyl-CoA synthetase classes involved in cholate catabolism were found in both Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Overall, this study provides insight into the physiological roles of acyl-CoA synthetases in steroid catabolism and

  3. Genetic analysis of pathway regulation for enhancing branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Saksa, Kristen; Zhao, Feiyi; Qiu, Joyce; Xiong, Liming

    2010-08-01

    The branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) valine, leucine and isoleucine are essential amino acids that play critical roles in animal growth and development. Animals cannot synthesize these amino acids and must obtain them from their diet. Plants are the ultimate source of these essential nutrients, and they synthesize BCAAs through a conserved pathway that is inhibited by its end products. This feedback inhibition has prevented scientists from engineering plants that accumulate high levels of BCAAs by simply over-expressing the respective biosynthetic genes. To identify components critical for this feedback regulation, we performed a genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants that exhibit enhanced resistance to BCAAs. Multiple dominant allelic mutations in the VALINE-TOLERANT 1 (VAT1) gene were identified that conferred plant resistance to valine inhibition. Map-based cloning revealed that VAT1 encodes a regulatory subunit of acetohydroxy acid synthase (AHAS), the first committed enzyme in the BCAA biosynthesis pathway. The VAT1 gene is highly expressed in young, rapidly growing tissues. When reconstituted with the catalytic subunit in vitro, the vat1 mutant-containing AHAS holoenzyme exhibits increased resistance to valine. Importantly, transgenic plants expressing the mutated vat1 gene exhibit valine tolerance and accumulate higher levels of BCAAs. Our studies not only uncovered regulatory characteristics of plant AHAS, but also identified a method to enhance BCAA accumulation in crop plants that will significantly enhance the nutritional value of food and feed. PMID:20497381

  4. Identification of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway leading to odd-numbered fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuki; Ohno, Yusuke; Yamagata, Maki; Obara, Takashi; Seki, Naoya; Kitamura, Takuya; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Kihara, Akio

    2014-01-01

    The long-chain base phytosphingosine is a component of sphingolipids and exists in yeast, plants and some mammalian tissues. Phytosphingosine is unique in that it possesses an additional hydroxyl group compared with other long-chain bases. However, its metabolism is unknown. Here we show that phytosphingosine is metabolized to odd-numbered fatty acids and is incorporated into glycerophospholipids both in yeast and mammalian cells. Disruption of the yeast gene encoding long-chain base 1-phosphate lyase, which catalyzes the committed step in the metabolism of phytosphingosine to glycerophospholipids, causes an ~40% reduction in the level of phosphatidylcholines that contain a C15 fatty acid. We also find that 2-hydroxypalmitic acid is an intermediate of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, we show that the yeast MPO1 gene, whose product belongs to a large, conserved protein family of unknown function, is involved in phytosphingosine metabolism. Our findings provide insights into fatty acid diversity and identify a pathway by which hydroxyl group-containing lipids are metabolized. PMID:25345524

  5. An Abscisic Acid-Independent Oxylipin Pathway Controls Stomatal Closure and Immune Defense in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mondy, Samuel; Tranchimand, Sylvain; Rumeau, Dominique; Boudsocq, Marie; Garcia, Ana Victoria; Douki, Thierry; Bigeard, Jean; Laurière, Christiane; Chevalier, Anne; Castresana, Carmen; Hirt, Heribert

    2013-01-01

    Plant stomata function in innate immunity against bacterial invasion and abscisic acid (ABA) has been suggested to regulate this process. Using genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that (i) the Arabidopsis thaliana nine-specific-lipoxygenase encoding gene, LOX1, which is expressed in guard cells, is required to trigger stomatal closure in response to both bacteria and the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide flg22; (ii) LOX1 participates in stomatal defense; (iii) polyunsaturated fatty acids, the LOX substrates, trigger stomatal closure; (iv) the LOX products, fatty acid hydroperoxides, or reactive electrophile oxylipins induce stomatal closure; and (v) the flg22-mediated stomatal closure is conveyed by both LOX1 and the mitogen-activated protein kinases MPK3 and MPK6 and involves salicylic acid whereas the ABA-induced process depends on the protein kinases OST1, MPK9, or MPK12. Finally, we show that the oxylipin and the ABA pathways converge at the level of the anion channel SLAC1 to regulate stomatal closure. Collectively, our results demonstrate that early biotic signaling in guard cells is an ABA-independent process revealing a novel function of LOX1-dependent stomatal pathway in plant immunity. PMID:23526882

  6. Catabolism of tritiated thymidine by aquatic microbial communities and incorporation of tritium into RNA and protein

    SciTech Connect

    Brittain, A.M.; Karl, D.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The incorporation of tritiated thymidine by five microbial ecosystems and the distribution of tritium into DNA, RNA, and protein were determined. Nonspecific labeling was greatest in sediment samples, for which {>=}95% of the tritium was recovered with the RNA and protein fractions. The percentage of tritium recovered in the DNA fraction ranged from 15 to 38% of the total labeled macromolecules recovered. Nonspecific labeling was independent of both incubation time and thymidine concentration over very wide ranges. We also evaluated the specificity of (2-{sup 3}H) adenine incorporation into adenylate residues in both RNA and DNA in parallel with the ({sup 3}H) thymidine experiments and compared the degree of nonspecific labeling by ({sup 3}H) adenine with that derived from ({sup 3}H)thymidine. Rapid catabolism of tritiated thymidine was evaluated by determining the disappearance of tritiated thymidine from the incubation medium and the appearance of degradation products. Degradation product formation, including that of both volatile and nonvolatile compounds, was much greater than the rate of incorporation of tritium into stable macromolecules. The standard degradation pathway for thymidine coupled with utilization of Krebs cycle intermediates for the biosynthesis of amino acids, purines, and pyrimidines readily accounts for the observed nonspecific labeling in environmental samples.

  7. MYC-induced reprogramming of glutamine catabolism supports optimal virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Minh; Thaker, Shivani K.; Feng, Jun; Du, Yushen; Hu, Hailiang; Ting Wu, Ting; Graeber, Thomas G.; Braas, Daniel; Christofk, Heather R.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses rewire host cell glucose and glutamine metabolism to meet the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of viral propagation. However, the mechanism by which viruses reprogram glutamine metabolism and the metabolic fate of glutamine during adenovirus infection have remained elusive. Here, we show MYC activation is necessary for adenovirus-induced upregulation of host cell glutamine utilization and increased expression of glutamine transporters and glutamine catabolism enzymes. Adenovirus-induced MYC activation promotes increased glutamine uptake, increased use of glutamine in reductive carboxylation and increased use of glutamine in generating hexosamine pathway intermediates and specific amino acids. We identify glutaminase (GLS) as a critical enzyme for optimal adenovirus replication and demonstrate that GLS inhibition decreases replication of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus 1 and influenza A in cultured primary cells. Our findings show that adenovirus-induced reprogramming of glutamine metabolism through MYC activation promotes optimal progeny virion generation, and suggest that GLS inhibitors may be useful therapeutically to reduce replication of diverse viruses. PMID:26561297

  8. Identification of genes and pathways involved in the synthesis of Mead acid (20:3n-9), an indicator of essential fatty acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ichi, Ikuyo; Kono, Nozomu; Arita, Yuka; Haga, Shizuka; Arisawa, Kotoko; Yamano, Misato; Nagase, Mana; Fujiwara, Yoko; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, 5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid (Mead acid, 20:3n-9) is synthesized from oleic acid during a state of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD). Mead acid is thought to be produced by the same enzymes that synthesize arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, but the genes and the pathways involved in the conversion of oleic acid to Mead acid have not been fully elucidated. The levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in cultured cells are generally very low compared to those in mammalian tissues. In this study, we found that cultured cells, such as NIH3T3 and Hepa1-6 cells, have significant levels of Mead acid, indicating that cells in culture are in an EFAD state under normal culture conditions. We then examined the effect of siRNA-mediated knockdown of fatty acid desaturases and elongases on the level of Mead acid, and found that knockdown of Elovl5, Fads1, or Fads2 decreased the level of Mead acid. This and the measured levels of possible intermediate products for the synthesis of Mead acid such as 18:2n-9, 20:1n-9 and 20:2n-9 in the knocked down cells indicate two pathways for the synthesis of Mead acid: pathway 1) 18:1n-9→(Fads2)→18:2n-9→(Elovl5)→20:2n-9→(Fads1)→20:3n-9 and pathway 2) 18:1n-9→(Elovl5)→20:1n-9→(Fads2)→20:2n-9→(Fads1)→20:3n-9. PMID:24184513

  9. The general amino acid control pathway regulates mTOR and autophagy during serum/glutamine starvation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Zou, Yilong; Mao, Dongxue; Sun, Daxiao; Gao, Guanguang; Shi, Jingwen; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Chen; Yang, Mingyu; Ye, Wanlu; Hao, Qianqian

    2014-01-01

    Organisms have evolved elaborate mechanisms to adjust intracellular nutrient levels in response to fluctuating availability of exogenous nutrients. During starvation, cells can enhance amino acid uptake and synthesis through the general amino acid control (GAAC) pathway, whereas nonessential cellular contents are recycled by autophagy. How these two pathways are coordinated in response to starvation is currently unknown. Here we show that the GAAC pathway couples exogenous amino acid availability with autophagy. Starvation caused deactivation of mTOR, which then activated autophagy. In parallel, serum/glutamine starvation activated the GAAC pathway, which up-regulated amino acid transporters, leading to increased amino acid uptake. This elevated the intracellular amino acid level, which in turn reactivated mTOR and suppressed autophagy. Knockdown of activating transcription factor 4, the major transcription factor in the GAAC pathway, or of SLC7A5, a leucine transporter, caused impaired mTOR reactivation and much higher levels of autophagy. Thus, the GAAC pathway modulates autophagy by regulating amino acid uptake and mTOR reactivation during serum/glutamine starvation. PMID:25049270

  10. The orphan GPCR, Gpr161, regulates the retinoic acid and canonical Wnt pathways during neurulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo I; Matteson, Paul G; Ababon, Myka F; Nato, Alejandro Q; Lin, Yong; Nanda, Vikas; Matise, Tara C; Millonig, James H

    2015-06-01

    The vacuolated lens (vl) mouse mutation arose on the C3H/HeSnJ background and results in lethality, neural tube defects (NTDs) and cataracts. The vl phenotypes are due to a deletion/frameshift mutation in the orphan GPCR, Gpr161. A recent study using a null allele demonstrated that Gpr161 functions in primary cilia and represses the Shh pathway. We show the hypomorphic Gpr161(vl) allele does not severely affect the Shh pathway. To identify additional pathways regulated by Gpr161 during neurulation, we took advantage of naturally occurring genetic variation in the mouse. Previously Gpr161(vl-C3H) was crossed to different inbred backgrounds including MOLF/EiJ and the Gpr161(vl) mutant phenotypes were rescued. Five modifiers were mapped (Modvl: Modifier of vl) including Modvl5(MOLF). In this study we demonstrate the Modvl5(MOLF) congenic rescues the Gpr161(vl)-associated lethality and NTDs but not cataracts. Bioinformatics determined the transcription factor, Cdx1, is the only annotated gene within the Modvl5 95% CI co-expressed with Gpr161 during neurulation and not expressed in the eye. Using Cdx1 as an entry point, we identified the retinoid acid (RA) and canonical Wnt pathways as downstream targets of Gpr161. QRT-PCR, ISH and IHC determined that expression of RA and Wnt genes are down-regulated in Gpr161(vl/vl) but rescued by the Modvl5(MOLF) congenic during neurulation. Intraperitoneal RA injection restores expression of canonical Wnt markers and rescues Gpr161(vl/vl) NTDs. These results establish the RA and canonical Wnt as pathways downstream of Gpr161 during neurulation, and suggest that Modvl5(MOLF) bypasses the Gpr161(vl) mutation by restoring the activity of these pathways. PMID:25753732

  11. Induction of Arabidopsis tryptophan pathway enzymes and camalexin by amino acid starvation, oxidative stress, and an abiotic elicitor.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J; Williams, C C; Last, R L

    1998-01-01

    The tryptophan (Trp) biosynthetic pathway leads to the production of many secondary metabolites with diverse functions, and its regulation is predicted to respond to the needs for both protein synthesis and secondary metabolism. We have tested the response of the Trp pathway enzymes and three other amino acid biosynthetic enzymes to starvation for aromatic amino acids, branched-chain amino acids, or methionine. The Trp pathway enzymes and cytosolic glutamine synthetase were induced under all of the amino acid starvation test conditions, whereas methionine synthase and acetolactate synthase were not. The mRNAs for two stress-inducible enzymes unrelated to amino acid biosynthesis and accumulation of the indolic phytoalexin camalexin were also induced by amino acid starvation. These results suggest that regulation of the Trp pathway enzymes under amino acid deprivation conditions is largely a stress response to allow for increased biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Consistent with this hypothesis, treatments with the oxidative stress-inducing herbicide acifluorfen and the abiotic elicitor alpha-amino butyric acid induced responses similar to those induced by the amino acid starvation treatments. The role of salicylic acid in herbicide-mediated Trp and camalexin induction was investigated. PMID:9501110

  12. Putrescine production via the ornithine decarboxylation pathway improves the acid stress survival of Lactobacillus brevis and is part of a horizontally transferred acid resistance locus.

    PubMed

    Romano, Andrea; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A; Lucas, Patrick M

    2014-04-01

    Decarboxylation pathways are widespread among lactic acid bacteria; their physiological role is related to acid resistance through the regulation of the intracellular pH and to the production of metabolic energy via the generation of a proton motive force and its conversion into ATP. These pathways include, among others, biogenic amine (BA) production pathways. BA accumulation in foodstuffs is a health risk; thus, the study of the factors involved in their production is of major concern. The analysis of several lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from different environments, including fermented foods and beverages, revealed that the genes encoding these pathways are clustered on the chromosome, which suggests that these genes are part of a genetic hotspot related to acid stress resistance. Further attention was devoted to the ornithine decarboxylase pathway, which affords putrescine from ornithine. Studies were performed on three lactic acid bacteria belonging to different species. The ODC pathway was always shown to be involved in cytosolic pH alkalinisation and acid shock survival, which were observed to occur with a concomitant increase in putrescine production. PMID:24495587

  13. Unity in organisation and regulation of catabolic operons in Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus lactis and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Ulrika; Molenaar, Douwe; Rådström, Peter; de Vos, Willem M

    2005-04-01

    Global regulatory circuits together with more specific local regulators play a notable role when cells are adapting to environmental changes. Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium abundant in nature fermenting most mono- and disaccharides. Comparative genomics analysis of the operons encoding the proteins and enzymes crucial for catabolism of lactose, maltose and threhalose revealed an obvious unity in operon organisation . The local regulator of each operon was located in a divergent transcriptional direction to the rest of the operon including the transport protein-encoding genes. Furthermore, in all three operons a catabolite responsive element (CRE) site was detected inbetween the gene encoding the local regulator and one of the genes encoding a sugar transport protein. It is evident that regardless of type of transport system and catabolic enzymes acting upon lactose, maltose and trehalose, respectively, Lc. lactis shows unity in both operon organisation and regulation of these catabolic operons. This knowledge was further extended to other catabolic operons in Lc. lactis and the two related bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Listeria monocytogenes. Thirty-nine catabolic operons responsible for degradation of sugars and sugar alcohols in Lc. lactis, Lb. plantarum and L. monocytogenes were investigated and the majority of those possessed the same organisation as the lactose, maltose and trehalose operons of Lc. lactis. Though, the frequency of CRE sites and their location varied among the bacteria. Both Lc. lactis and Lb. plantarum showed CRE sites in direct proximity to genes coding for proteins responsible for sugar uptake. However, in L. monocytogenes CRE sites were not frequently found and not in the vicinity of genes encoding transport proteins, suggesting a more local mode of regulation of the catabolic operons found and/or the use of inducer control in this bacterium. PMID:15900965

  14. Induction of DREB2A pathway with repression of E2F, jasmonic acid biosynthetic and photosynthesis pathways in cold acclimation-specific freeze-resistant wheat crown.

    PubMed

    Karki, Amrit; Horvath, David P; Sutton, Fedora

    2013-03-01

    Winter wheat lines can achieve cold acclimation (development of tolerance to freezing temperatures) and vernalization (delay in transition from vegetative to reproductive phase) in response to low non-freezing temperatures. To describe cold-acclimation-specific processes and pathways, we utilized cold acclimation transcriptomic data from two lines varying in freeze survival but not vernalization. These lines, designated freeze-resistant (FR) and freeze-susceptible (FS), were the source of crown tissue RNA. Well-annotated differentially expressed genes (p ≤ 0.005 and fold change ≥ 2 in response to 4 weeks cold acclimation) were used for gene ontology and pathway analysis. "Abiotic stimuli" was identified as the most enriched and unique for FR. Unique to FS was "cytoplasmic components." Pathway analysis revealed the "triacylglycerol degradation" pathway as significantly downregulated and common to both FR and FS. The most enriched of FR pathways was "neighbors of DREB2A," with the highest positive median fold change. The "13-LOX and 13-HPL" and the "E2F" pathways were enriched in FR only with a negative median fold change. The "jasmonic acid biosynthesis" pathway and four "photosynthetic-associated" pathways were enriched in both FR and FS but with a more negative median fold change in FR than in FS. A pathway unique to FS was "binding partners of LHCA1," which was enriched only in FS with a significant negative median fold change. We propose that the DREB2A, E2F, jasmonic acid biosynthesis, and photosynthetic pathways are critical for discrimination between cold-acclimated lines varying in freeze survival. PMID:23262780

  15. Expression of Vibrio harveyi Acyl-ACP Synthetase Allows Efficient Entry of Exogenous Fatty Acids into the Escherichia coli Fatty Acid and Lipid A Synthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanfang; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M.; Campbell, John W.; Chan, Chi Ho; Cronan, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Although the Escherichia coli fatty acid synthesis (FAS) pathway is the best studied type II fatty acid synthesis system, a major experimental limitation has been the inability to feed intermediates into the pathway in vivo because exogenously-supplied free fatty acids are not efficiently converted to the acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesters required by the pathway. We report that expression of Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase (AasS), a soluble cytosolic enzyme that ligates free fatty acids to ACP to form acyl-ACPs, allows exogenous fatty acids to enter the E. coli fatty acid synthesis pathway. The free fatty acids are incorporated intact and can be elongated or directly incorporated into complex lipids by acyltransferases specific for acyl-ACPs. Moreover, expression of AasS strains and supplementation with the appropriate fatty acid restored growth to E. coli mutant strains that lack essential fatty acid synthesis enzymes. Thus, this strategy provides a new tool for circumventing the loss of enzymes essential for FAS function. PMID:20028080

  16. Investigation of follicular and non-follicular pathways for polyarginine and oleic acid modified nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Patrick; Singh, Mandip

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the current study was to investigate the percutaneous permeation pathways of cell penetrating peptide modified lipid nanoparticles and oleic acid modified polymeric nanoparticles. Methods Confocal microscopy was performed on skin cultures (EpiDermFT™) for modified and un-modified nanoparticles. Differential stripping was performed following in vitro skin permeation of Ibuprofen (Ibu) encapsulated nanoparticles to estimate Ibu levels in different skin layers and receiver compartment. The hair follicles (HF) were blocked and in vitro skin permeation of nanoparticles was then compared with unblocked HF. The surface modified nanoparticles were investigated for response on allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Results Surface modified nanoparticles showed a significant higher (p < 0.05) in fluorescence in EpiDermFT™ cultures compared to controls. The HF play less than 5% role in total nanoparticle permeation into the skin. The Ibu levels were significantly high (p<0.05) for surface modified nanoparticles compared to controls. The Ibu levels in skin and receiver compartment were not significantly different when HF were open or closed. Modified nanoparticles showed significant improvement in treatment of ACD compared to solution. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate that increased skin permeation of surface modified nanoparticles is not only dependent on a follicular pathway but also occur through non-follicular pathway(s). PMID:23187866

  17. Improving fatty acids production by engineering dynamic pathway regulation and metabolic control

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng; Li, Lingyun; Zhang, Fuming; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Koffas, Mattheos

    2014-01-01

    Global energy demand and environmental concerns have stimulated increasing efforts to produce carbon-neutral fuels directly from renewable resources. Microbially derived aliphatic hydrocarbons, the petroleum-replica fuels, have emerged as promising alternatives to meet this goal. However, engineering metabolic pathways with high productivity and yield requires dynamic redistribution of cellular resources and optimal control of pathway expression. Here we report a genetically encoded metabolic switch that enables dynamic regulation of fatty acids (FA) biosynthesis in Escherichia coli. The engineered strains were able to dynamically compensate the critical enzymes involved in the supply and consumption of malonyl-CoA and efficiently redirect carbon flux toward FA biosynthesis. Implementation of this metabolic control resulted in an oscillatory malonyl-CoA pattern and a balanced metabolism between cell growth and product formation, yielding 15.7- and 2.1-fold improvement in FA titer compared with the wild-type strain and the strain carrying the uncontrolled metabolic pathway. This study provides a new paradigm in metabolic engineering to control and optimize metabolic pathways facilitating the high-yield production of other malonyl-CoA–derived compounds. PMID:25049420

  18. Quantitative importance of the 25-hydroxylation pathway for bile acid biosynthesis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Duane, W.C.; Bjoerkhem, I.H.; Hamilton, J.N.; Mueller, S.M.

    1988-05-01

    During biosynthesis of bile acid, carbons 25-26-27 are removed from the cholesterol side chain. Side-chain oxidation begins either with hydroxylation at the 26-position, in which case the three-carbon fragment is released as propionic acid, or with hydroxylation at the 25-position, in which case the three-carbon fragment is released as acetone. In the present study, we have quantitated the relative importance of these two pathways in vivo by measuring production of (14C) acetone from (14C)-26-cholesterol. Four days after intraperitoneal injection of 20 to 40 muCi (14C)-26-cholesterol and 1 day after beginning a constant intravenous infusion of unlabeled acetone at 25 mumoles per kg per min, 6 male and 2 female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent breath collections. Expired acetone was trapped and purified as the 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivative. 14CO2 was trapped quantitatively using phenethylamine. Specific activity of breath acetone was multiplied times the acetone infusion rate to calculate production of (14C)acetone. (14C) Acetone production averaged 1.7% of total release of 14C from (14C)-26-cholesterol, estimated by 14CO2 output. The method was validated by showing that (14C) acetone production from (14C)isopropanol averaged 111% of the (14C)isopropanol infusion rate. We conclude that, in the normal rat, the 25-hydroxylation pathway accounts for less than 2% of bile acid synthesis.

  19. Functional convergence of oxylipin and abscisic acid pathways controls stomatal closure in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Tatyana; Kolla, Venkat A; Wang, Chang-Quan; Nasafi, Zainab; Hicks, Derrick R; Phadungchob, Bpantamars; Chehab, Wassim E; Brandizzi, Federica; Froehlich, John; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2014-03-01

    Membranes are primary sites of perception of environmental stimuli. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are major structural constituents of membranes that also function as modulators of a multitude of signal transduction pathways evoked by environmental stimuli. Different stresses induce production of a distinct blend of oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids, "oxylipins." We employed three Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotypes to examine the oxylipin signature in response to specific stresses and determined that wounding and drought differentially alter oxylipin profiles, particularly the allene oxide synthase branch of the oxylipin pathway, responsible for production of jasmonic acid (JA) and its precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (12-OPDA). Specifically, wounding induced both 12-OPDA and JA levels, whereas drought induced only the precursor 12-OPDA. Levels of the classical stress phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) were also mainly enhanced by drought and little by wounding. To explore the role of 12-OPDA in plant drought responses, we generated a range of transgenic lines and exploited the existing mutant plants that differ in their levels of stress-inducible 12-OPDA but display similar ABA levels. The plants producing higher 12-OPDA levels exhibited enhanced drought tolerance and reduced stomatal aperture. Furthermore, exogenously applied ABA and 12-OPDA, individually or combined, promote stomatal closure of ABA and allene oxide synthase biosynthetic mutants, albeit most effectively when combined. Using tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Brassica napus verified the potency of this combination in inducing stomatal closure in plants other than Arabidopsis. These data have identified drought as a stress signal that uncouples the conversion of 12-OPDA to JA and have revealed 12-OPDA as a drought-responsive regulator of stomatal closure functioning most effectively together with ABA. PMID:24429214

  20. Characterization of the Kynurenine Pathway and Quinolinic Acid Production in Macaque Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chai K.; Yap, Margaret M.C.; Kent, Stephen J.; Gras, Gabriel; Samah, Boubekeur; Batten, Jane C.; De Rose, Robert; Heng, Benjamin; Brew, Bruce J.; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2013-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway (KP) and one of its end-products, the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QUIN), are involved in the pathogenesis of several major neuroinflammatory brain diseases. A relevant animal model to study KP metabolism is now needed to assess whether intervention in this pathway may improve the outcome of such diseases. Humans and macaques share a very similar genetic makeup. In this study, we characterized the KP metabolism in macaque primary macrophages of three different species in comparison to human cells. We found that the KP profiles in simian macrophages were very similar to those in humans when challenged with inflammatory cytokines. Further, we found that macaque macrophages are capable of producing a pathophysiological concentration of QUIN. Our data validate the simian model as a relevant model to study the human cellular KP metabolism in the context of inflammation. PMID:23761975

  1. The autotaxin-lysophosphatidic acid pathway in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Orosa, Beatriz; García, Samuel; Conde, Carmen

    2015-10-15

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a phospholipid that is mainly produced by the hydrolysis of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) by lysophospholipase D, which is also called autotaxin (ATX). LPA interacts with specific G-protein coupled receptors and is involved in the regulation of cellular survival, proliferation, differentiation and motility. LPA also has roles in several pathological disorders, such as cancer and pulmonary, dermal and renal fibrosis. The involvement of the ATX-LPA pathway has recently been demonstrated in inflammatory responses and apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and during the development of experimental arthritis. This review summarises the current literature of the ATX-LPA pathway in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26297977

  2. Changes in actin dynamics are involved in salicylic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Matoušková, Jindřiška; Janda, Martin; Fišer, Radovan; Sašek, Vladimír; Kocourková, Daniela; Burketová, Lenka; Dušková, Jiřina; Martinec, Jan; Valentová, Olga

    2014-06-01

    Changes in actin cytoskeleton dynamics are one of the crucial players in many physiological as well as non-physiological processes in plant cells. Positioning of actin filament arrays is necessary for successful establishment of primary lines of defense toward pathogen attack, depolymerization leads very often to the enhanced susceptibility to the invading pathogen. On the other hand it was also shown that the disruption of actin cytoskeleton leads to the induction of defense response leading to the expression of PATHOGENESIS RELATED proteins (PR). In this study we show that pharmacological actin depolymerization leads to the specific induction of genes in salicylic acid pathway but not that involved in jasmonic acid signaling. Life imaging of leafs of Arabidopsis thaliana with GFP-tagged fimbrin (GFP-fABD2) treated with 1 mM salicylic acid revealed rapid disruption of actin filaments resembling the pattern viewed after treatment with 200 nM latrunculin B. The effect of salicylic acid on actin filament fragmentation was prevented by exogenous addition of phosphatidic acid, which binds to the capping protein and thus promotes actin polymerization. The quantitative evaluation of actin filament dynamics is also presented. PMID:24767113

  3. Lipoxygenase Pathway in Islet Endocrine Cells. OXIDATIVE METABOLISM OF ARACHIDONIC ACID PROMOTES INSULIN RELEASE

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Stewart; VanRollins, Michael; Strife, Robert; Fujimoto, Wilfred; Robertson, R. Paul

    1983-01-01

    Metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) via the cyclooxygenase pathway reduces glucose-stimulated insulin release. However, metabolism of AA by the lipoxygenase pathway and the consequent effects on insulin secretion have not been simultaneously assessed in the endocrine islet. Both dispersed endocrine cell-enriched pancreatic cells of the neonatal rat, as well as intact islets of the adult rat, metabolized [3H]AA not only to cyclooxygenase products (prostaglandins E2, F2α, and prostacyclin) but also to the lipoxygenase product 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE). 12-HETE was identified by coelution with authentic tritiated or unlabeled 12-HETE using four high performance liquid chromatographic systems under eight mobile-phase conditions and its identity was confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using selected ion monitoring. The predominant effect of exogenous AA (5 μg/ml) was to stimulate insulin release from pancreatic cells grown in monolayer. This effect was concentration- and time-dependent, and reversible. The effect of AA upon insulin release was potentiated by a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin) and was prevented by either of two lipoxygenase inhibitors (5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid [ETYA] and BW755c). In addition, glucose, as well as two structurally dissimilar agents (the calcium ionophore A23187 and bradykinin), which activate phospholipase(s) and thereby release endogenous AA in several cell systems, also stimulated insulin secretion. The effects of glucose, glucagon, bradykinin and high concentrations of A23187 (5 μg/ml) to augment insulin release were blocked or considerably reduced by lipoxygenase inhibitors. However, a lower concentration of the ionophore (0.25 μg/ml), which did not appear to activate phospholipase, was resistant to blockade. Exogenous 12-HETE (up to 2,000 ng/ml) did not alter glucose-induced insulin release. However, the labile intermediate 12-hydroperoxy-ETE increased insulin release. Furthermore

  4. CAR and PXR agonists stimulate hepatic bile acid and bilirubin detoxification and elimination pathways in mice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Martin; Halilbasic, Emina; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Zollner, Gernot; Fickert, Peter; Langner, Cord; Zatloukal, Kurt; Denk, Helmut; Trauner, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Induction of hepatic phase I/II detoxification enzymes and alternative excretory pumps may limit hepatocellular accumulation of toxic biliary compounds in cholestasis. Because the nuclear xenobiotic receptors constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulate involved enzymes and transporters, we aimed to induce adaptive alternative pathways with different CAR and PXR agonists in vivo. Mice were treated with the CAR agonists phenobarbital and 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichlorpyridyloxy)]benzene, as well as the PXR agonists atorvastatin and pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile. Hepatic bile acid and bilirubin-metabolizing/detoxifying enzymes (Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Sult2a1), their regulatory nuclear receptors (CAR, PXR, farnesoid X receptor), and bile acid/organic anion and lipid transporters (Ntcp, Oatp1,2,4, Bsep, Mrp2-4, Mdr2, Abcg5/8, Asbt) in the liver and kidney were analyzed via reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Potential functional relevance was tested in common bile duct ligation (CBDL). CAR agonists induced Mrp2-4 and Oatp2; PXR agonists induced only Mrp3 and Oatp2. Both PXR and CAR agonists profoundly stimulated bile acid-hydroxylating/detoxifying enzymes Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10. In addition, CAR agonists upregulated bile acid-sulfating Sult2a1 and bilirubin-glucuronidating Ugt1a1. These changes were accompanied by reduced serum levels of bilirubin and bile acids in healthy and CBDL mice and by increased levels of polyhydroxylated bile acids in serum and urine of cholestatic mice. Atorvastatin significantly increased Oatp2, Mdr2, and Asbt, while other transporters and enzymes were moderately affected. In conclusion, administration of specific CAR or PXR ligands results in coordinated stimulation of major hepatic bile acid/bilirubin metabolizing and detoxifying enzymes and hepatic key alternative efflux systems, effects that are predicted to counteract cholestasis. PMID:15986414

  5. Host Glycan Sugar-Specific Pathways in Streptococcus pneumonia: Galactose as a Key Sugar in Colonisation and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Paixão, Laura; Oliveira, Joana; Veríssimo, André; Vinga, Susana; Lourenço, Eva C.; Ventura, M. Rita; Kjos, Morten; Veening, Jan-Willem; Fernandes, Vitor E.; Andrew, Peter W.; Yesilkaya, Hasan; Neves, Ana Rute

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is a strictly fermentative organism that relies on glycolytic metabolism to obtain energy. In the human nasopharynx S. pneumoniae encounters glycoconjugates composed of a variety of monosaccharides, which can potentially be used as nutrients once depolymerized by glycosidases. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesise that the pneumococcus would rely on these glycan-derived sugars to grow. Here, we identified the sugar-specific catabolic pathways used by S. pneumoniae during growth on mucin. Transcriptome analysis of cells grown on mucin showed specific upregulation of genes likely to be involved in deglycosylation, transport and catabolism of galactose, mannose and N acetylglucosamine. In contrast to growth on mannose and N-acetylglucosamine, S. pneumoniae grown on galactose re-route their metabolic pathway from homolactic fermentation to a truly mixed acid fermentation regime. By measuring intracellular metabolites, enzymatic activities and mutant analysis, we provide an accurate map of the biochemical pathways for galactose, mannose and N-acetylglucosamine catabolism in S. pneumoniae. Intranasal mouse infection models of pneumococcal colonisation and disease showed that only mutants in galactose catabolic genes were attenuated. Our data pinpoint galactose as a key nutrient for growth in the respiratory tract and highlights the importance of central carbon metabolism for pneumococcal pathogenesis. PMID:25826206

  6. Defining and Modeling Known Adverse Outcome Pathways: Domoic Acid and Neuronal Signaling as a Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Karen H.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Basu, Nil; Carvan, Michael J.; Crofton, Kevin M.; King, Kerensa A.; Sunol, Cristina; Tiffany-Castiglioni, Evelyn; Schultz, Irvin R.

    2011-01-01

    An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a sequence of key events from a molecular-level initiating event and an ensuing cascade of steps to an adverse outcome with population level significance. To implement a predictive strategy for ecotoxicology, the multiscale nature of an AOP requires computational models to link salient processes (e.g., in chemical uptake, toxicokinetics, toxicodynamics, and population dynamics). A case study with domoic acid was used to demonstrate strategies and enable generic recommendations for developing computational models in an effort to move toward a toxicity testing paradigm focused on toxicity pathway perturbations applicable to ecological risk assessment. Domoic acid, an algal toxin with adverse effects on both wildlife and humans, is a potent agonist for kainate receptors (ionotropic glutamate receptors whose activation leads to the influx of Na+ and Ca2+). Increased Ca2+ concentrations result in neuronal excitotoxicity and cell death primarily in the hippocampus, which produces seizures, impairs learning and memory, and alters behavior in some species. Altered neuronal Ca2+ is a key process in domoic acid toxicity which can be evaluated in vitro. Further, results of these assays would be amenable to mechanistic modeling for identifying domoic acid concentrations and Ca2+ perturbations that are normal, adaptive, or clearly toxic. In vitro assays with outputs amenable to measurement in exposed populations can link in vitro to in vivo conditions, and toxicokinetic information will aid in linking in vitro results to the individual organism. Development of an AOP required an iterative process with three important outcomes: (1) a critically reviewed, stressor-specific AOP; (2) identification of key processes suitable for evaluation with in vitro assays; and (3) strategies for model development.

  7. FOXP2 drives neuronal differentiation by interacting with retinoic acid signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Devanna, Paolo; Middelbeek, Jeroen; Vernes, Sonja C.

    2014-01-01

    FOXP2 was the first gene shown to cause a Mendelian form of speech and language disorder. Although developmentally expressed in many organs, loss of a single copy of FOXP2 leads to a phenotype that is largely restricted to orofacial impairment during articulation and linguistic processing deficits. Why perturbed FOXP2 function affects specific aspects of the developing brain remains elusive. We investigated the role of FOXP2 in neuronal differentiation and found that FOXP2 drives molecular changes consistent with neuronal differentiation in a human model system. We identified a network of FOXP2 regulated genes related to retinoic acid signaling and neuronal differentiation. FOXP2 also produced phenotypic changes associated with neuronal differentiation including increased neurite outgrowth and reduced migration. Crucially, cells expressing FOXP2 displayed increased sensitivity to retinoic acid exposure. This suggests a mechanism by which FOXP2 may be able to increase the cellular differentiation response to environmental retinoic acid cues for specific subsets of neurons in the brain. These data demonstrate that FOXP2 promotes neuronal differentiation by interacting with the retinoic acid signaling pathway and regulates key processes required for normal circuit formation such as neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth. In this way, FOXP2, which is found only in specific subpopulations of neurons in the brain, may drive precise neuronal differentiation patterns and/or control localization and connectivity of these FOXP2 positive cells. PMID:25309332

  8. Microbial catabolic activities are naturally selected by metabolic energy harvest rate.

    PubMed

    González-Cabaleiro, Rebeca; Ofiţeru, Irina D; Lema, Juan M; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    The fundamental trade-off between yield and rate of energy harvest per unit of substrate has been largely discussed as a main characteristic for microbial established cooperation or competition. In this study, this point is addressed by developing a generalized model that simulates competition between existing and not experimentally reported microbial catabolic activities defined only based on well-known biochemical pathways. No specific microbial physiological adaptations are considered, growth yield is calculated coupled to catabolism energetics and a common maximum biomass-specific catabolism rate (expressed as electron transfer rate) is assumed for all microbial groups. Under this approach, successful microbial metabolisms are predicted in line with experimental observations under the hypothesis of maximum energy harvest rate. Two microbial ecosystems, typically found in wastewater treatment plants, are simulated, namely: (i) the anaerobic fermentation of glucose and (ii) the oxidation and reduction of nitrogen under aerobic autotrophic (nitrification) and anoxic heterotrophic and autotrophic (denitrification) conditions. The experimentally observed cross feeding in glucose fermentation, through multiple intermediate fermentation pathways, towards ultimately methane and carbon dioxide is predicted. Analogously, two-stage nitrification (by ammonium and nitrite oxidizers) is predicted as prevailing over nitrification in one stage. Conversely, denitrification is predicted in one stage (by denitrifiers) as well as anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation). The model results suggest that these observations are a direct consequence of the different energy yields per electron transferred at the different steps of the pathways. Overall, our results theoretically support the hypothesis that successful microbial catabolic activities are selected by an overall maximum energy harvest rate. PMID:26161636

  9. Once and again: retinoic acid signaling in the developing and regenerating olfactory pathway.

    PubMed

    Rawson, N E; LaMantia, A-S

    2006-06-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), a member of the steroid/thyroid superfamily of signaling molecules, is an essential regulator of morphogenesis, differentiation, and regeneration in the mammalian olfactory pathway. RA-mediated teratogenesis dramatically alters olfactory pathway development, presumably by disrupting retinoid-mediated inductive signaling that influences initial olfactory epithelium (OE) and bulb (OB) morphogenesis. Subsequently, RA modulates the genesis, growth, or stability of subsets of OE cells and OB interneurons. RA receptors, cofactors, and synthetic enzymes are expressed in the OE, OB, and anterior subventricular zone (SVZ), the site of neural precursors that generate new OB interneurons throughout adulthood. Their expression apparently accommodates RA signaling in OE cells, OB interneurons, and slowly dividing SVZ neural precursors. Deficiency of vitamin A, the dietary metabolic RA precursor, leads to cytological changes in the OE, as well as olfactory sensory deficits. Vitamin A therapy in animals with olfactory system damage can accelerate functional recovery. RA-related pathology as well as its potential therapeutic activity may reflect endogenous retinoid regulation of neuronal differentiation, stability, or regeneration in the olfactory pathway from embryogenesis through adulthood. These influences may be in register with retinoid effects on immune responses, metabolism, and modulation of food intake. PMID:16688760

  10. Indole-3-acetic acid in Fusarium graminearum: Identification of biosynthetic pathways and characterization of physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kun; Rocheleau, Hélène; Qi, Peng-Fei; Zheng, You-Liang; Zhao, Hui-Yan; Ouellet, Thérèse

    2016-09-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a devastating pathogenic fungus causing fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat. This fungus can produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and a very large amount of IAA accumulates in wheat head tissues during the first few days of infection by F. graminearum. Using liquid culture conditions, we have determined that F. graminearum can use tryptamine (TAM) and indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN) as biosynthetic intermediates to produce IAA. It is the first time that F. graminearum is shown to use the l-tryptophan-dependent TAM and IAN pathways rather than the indole-3-acetamide or indole-3-pyruvic acid pathways to produce IAA. Our experiments also showed that exogenous IAA was metabolized by F. graminearum. Exogenous IAA, TAM, and IAN inhibited mycelial growth; IAA and IAN also affected the hyphae branching pattern and delayed macroconidium germination. IAA and TAM had a small positive effect on the production of the mycotoxin 15-ADON while IAN inhibited its production. Our results showed that IAA and biosynthetic intermediates had a significant effect on F. graminearum physiology and suggested a new area of exploration for fungicidal compounds. PMID:27567719

  11. Catabolic ornithine transcarbamylase of Halobacterium halobium (salinarium): purification, characterization, sequence determination, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Ruepp, A; Müller, H N; Lottspeich, F; Soppa, J

    1995-03-01

    Halobacterium halobium (salinarium) is able to grow fermentatively via the arginine deiminase pathway, which is mediated by three enzymes and one membrane-bound arginine-ornithine antiporter. One of the enzymes, catabolic ornithine transcarbamylase (cOTCase), was purified from fermentatively grown cultures by gel filtration and ammonium sulfate-mediated hydrophobic chromatography. It consists of a single type of subunit with an apparent molecular mass of 41 kDa. As is common for proteins of halophilic Archaea, the cOTCase is unstable below 1 M salt. In contrast to the cOTCase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the halophilic enzyme exhibits Michaelis-Menten kinetics with both carbamylphosphate and ornithine as substrates with Km values of 0.4 and 8 mM, respectively. The N-terminal sequences of the protein and four peptides were determined, comprising about 30% of the polypeptide. The sequence information was used to clone and sequence the corresponding gene, argB. It codes for a polypeptide of 295 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 32 kDa and an amino acid composition which is typical of halophilic proteins. The native molecular mass was determined to be 200 kDa, and therefore the cOTCase is a hexamer of identical subunits. The deduced protein sequence was compared to the cOTCase of P. aeruginosa and 14 anabolic OTCases, and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. The halobacterial cOTCase is more distantly related to the cOTCase than to the anabolic OTCase of P. aeruginosa. It is found in a group with the anabolic OTCases of Bacillus subtilis, P. aeruginosa, and Mycobacterium bovis. PMID:7868583

  12. N{sub 2}O production pathways in the subtropical acid forest soils in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jinbo; Cai Zucong; Zhu Tongbin

    2011-07-15

    To date, N{sub 2}O production pathways are poorly understood in the humid subtropical and tropical forest soils. A {sup 15}N-tracing experiment was carried out under controlled laboratory conditions to investigate the processes responsible for N{sub 2}O production in four subtropical acid forest soils (pH<4.5) in China. The results showed that denitrification was the main source of N{sub 2}O emission in the subtropical acid forest soils, being responsible for 56.1%, 53.5%, 54.4%, and 55.2% of N{sub 2}O production, in the GC, GS, GB, and TC soils, respectively, under aerobic conditions (40%-52%WFPS). The heterotrophic nitrification (recalcitrant organic N oxidation) accounted for 27.3%-41.8% of N{sub 2}O production, while the contribution of autotrophic nitrification was little in the studied subtropical acid forest soils. The ratios of N{sub 2}O-N emission from total nitrification (heterotrophic+autotrophic nitrification) were higher than those in most previous references. The soil with the lowest pH and highest organic-C content (GB) had the highest ratio (1.63%), suggesting that soil pH-organic matter interactions may exist and affect N{sub 2}O product ratios from nitrification. The ratio of N{sub 2}O-N emission from heterotrophic nitrification varied from 0.02% to 25.4% due to soil pH and organic matter. Results are valuable in the accurate modeling of N2O production in the subtropical acid forest soils and global budget. - Highlights: {yields} We studied N{sub 2}O production pathways in subtropical acid forest soil under aerobic conditions. {yields} Denitrification was the main source of N{sub 2}O production in subtropical acid forest soils. {yields} Heterotrophic nitrification accounted for 27.3%-41.8% of N{sub 2}O production. {yields} While, contribution of autotrophic nitrification to N{sub 2}O production was little. {yields} Ratios of N{sub 2}O-N emission from nitrification were higher than those in most previous references.

  13. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency disrupts endocytosis, neuritogenesis, and mitochondrial protein pathways in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    English, Jane A.; Harauma, Akiko; Föcking, Melanie; Wynne, Kieran; Scaife, Caitriona; Cagney, Gerard; Moriguchi, Toru; Cotter, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid (n-3 FA) deficiency is an environmental risk factor for schizophrenia, yet characterization of the consequences of deficiency at the protein level in the brain is limited. We aimed to identify the protein pathways disrupted as a consequence of chronic n-3 deficiency in the hippocampus of mice. Fatty acid analysis of the hippocampus following chronic dietary deficiency revealed a 3-fold decrease (p < 0.001) in n-3 FA levels. Label free LC-MS/MS analysis identified and profiled 1008 proteins, of which 114 were observed to be differentially expressed between n-3 deficient and control groups (n = 8 per group). The cellular processes that were most implicated were neuritogenesis, endocytosis, and exocytosis, while specific protein pathways that were most significantly dysregulated were mitochondrial dysfunction and clathrin mediated endocytosis (CME). In order to characterize whether these processes and pathways are ones influenced by antipsychotic medication, we used LC-MS/MS to test the differential expression of these 114 proteins in the hippocampus of mice chronically treated with the antipsychotic agent haloperidol. We observed 23 of the 114 proteins to be differentially expressed, 17 of which were altered in the opposite direction to that observed following n-3 deficiency. Overall, our findings point to disturbed synaptic function, neuritogenesis, and mitochondrial function as a consequence of dietary deficiency in n-3 FA. This study greatly aids our understanding of the molecular mechanism by which n-3 deficiency impairs normal brain function, and provides clues as to how n-3 FA exert their therapeutic effect in early psychosis. PMID:24194745

  14. Pathway engineering of Propionibacterium jensenii for improved production of propionic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Guan, Ningzi; Zhu, Gexin; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Propionic acid (PA) is an important chemical building block widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. In our previous study, a shuttle vector was developed as a useful tool for engineering Propionibacterium jensenii, and two key enzymes-glycerol dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase-were overexpressed to improve PA titer. Here, we aimed to improve PA production further via the pathway engineering of P. jensenii. First, the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene (ppc) from Klebsiella pneumoniae was overexpressed to access the one-step synthesis of oxaloacetate directly from phosphoenolpyruvate without pyruvate as intermediate. Next, genes encoding lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) and pyruvate oxidase (poxB) were deleted to block the synthesis of the by-products lactic acid and acetic acid, respectively. Overexpression of ppc and deleting ldh improved PA titer from 26.95 ± 1.21 g·L(-1) to 33.21 ± 1.92 g·L(-1) and 30.50 ± 1.63 g·L(-1), whereas poxB deletion decreased it. The influence of this pathway engineering on gene transcription, enzyme expression, NADH/NAD(+) ratio, and metabolite concentration was also investigated. Finally, PA production in P. jensenii with ppc overexpression as well as ldh deletion was investigated, which resulted in further increases in PA titer to 34.93 ± 2.99 g·L(-1) in a fed-batch culture. PMID:26814976

  15. Pathway engineering of Propionibacterium jensenii for improved production of propionic acid

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Guan, Ningzi; Zhu, Gexin; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Propionic acid (PA) is an important chemical building block widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. In our previous study, a shuttle vector was developed as a useful tool for engineering Propionibacterium jensenii, and two key enzymes—glycerol dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase—were overexpressed to improve PA titer. Here, we aimed to improve PA production further via the pathway engineering of P. jensenii. First, the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene (ppc) from Klebsiella pneumoniae was overexpressed to access the one-step synthesis of oxaloacetate directly from phosphoenolpyruvate without pyruvate as intermediate. Next, genes encoding lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) and pyruvate oxidase (poxB) were deleted to block the synthesis of the by-products lactic acid and acetic acid, respectively. Overexpression of ppc and deleting ldh improved PA titer from 26.95 ± 1.21 g·L−1 to 33.21 ± 1.92 g·L−1 and 30.50 ± 1.63 g·L−1, whereas poxB deletion decreased it. The influence of this pathway engineering on gene transcription, enzyme expression, NADH/NAD+ ratio, and metabolite concentration was also investigated. Finally, PA production in P. jensenii with ppc overexpression as well as ldh deletion was investigated, which resulted in further increases in PA titer to 34.93 ± 2.99 g·L−1 in a fed-batch culture. PMID:26814976

  16. Glucose Fermentation Pathway of Thermoanaerobium brockii

    PubMed Central

    Lamed, R.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Thermoanaerobium brockii was shown to catabolize glucose via the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway into ethanol, acetic acid, H2-CO2, and lactic acid. Radioactive tracer studies, employing specifically labeled [14C]glucose, demonstrated significant fermentation of 14CO2 from C-3 and C-4 of the substrate exclusively. All extracts contained sufficient levels of activity (expressed in micromoles per minute per milligram of protein at 40°C) to assign a catabolic role for the following enzymes: glucokinase, 0.40; fructose-1,6-diphosphate aldolase, 0.23; glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, 1.73; pyruvate kinase, 0.36; lactate dehydrogenase (fructose-1,6-diphosphate activated), 0.55; pyruvate dehydrogenase (coenzyme A acetylating), 0.53; hydrogenase, 3.3; phosphotransacetylase, 0.55; acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (coenzyme A acetylating), 0.15; ethanol dehydrogenase, 1.57; and acetate kinase, 1.50. All pyridine nucleotide-linked oxidoreductases examined were specific for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, except ethanol dehydrogenase which displayed both nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide- and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-linked activities. Fermentation product balances and cell growth yields supported the glucose catabolic pathway described. Representative balanced end product yields (in moles per mole of glucose fermented) were: ethanol, 0.94; l-lactate, 0.84; acetate, 0.20; CO2, 1.31; and H2, 0.50. Growth yields of 16.4 g of cells per mole of glucose were demonstrated. Both growth and end product yields varied significantly in accordance with the specific medium composition and incubation time. PMID:6767705

  17. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes through LKB1/AMPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    He, Yonghan; Li, Ying; Zhao, Tiantian; Wang, Yanwen; Sun, Changhao

    2013-01-01

    Background Ursolic acid (UA) is a triterpenoid compound with multiple biological functions. This compound has recently been reported to possess an anti-obesity effect; however, the mechanisms are less understood. Objective As adipogenesis plays a critical role in obesity, the present study was conducted to investigate the effect of UA on adipogenesis and mechanisms of action in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Methods and Results The 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were induced to differentiate in the presence or absence of UA for 6 days. The cells were determined for proliferation, differentiation, fat accumulation as well as the protein expressions of molecular targets that regulate or are involved in fatty acid synthesis and oxidation. The results demonstrated that ursolic acid at concentrations ranging from 2.5 µM to 10 µM dose-dependently attenuated adipogenesis, accompanied by reduced protein expression of CCAAT element binding protein β (C/EBPβ), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT element binding protein α (C/EBPα) and sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), respectively. Ursolic acid increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and protein expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), but decreased protein expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4). Ursolic acid increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein expression of (silent mating type information regulation 2, homolog) 1 (Sirt1). Further studies demonstrated that the anti-adipogenic effect of UA was reversed by the AMPK siRNA, but not by the Sirt1 inhibitor nicotinamide. Liver kinase B1 (LKB1), the upstream kinase of AMPK, was upregulated by UA. When LKB1 was silenced with siRNA or the inhibitor radicicol, the effect of UA on AMPK activation was diminished. Conclusions Ursolic acid inhibited 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis through the LKB1/AMPK pathway

  18. Metabolic engineering of the omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic pathway into transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-López, Noemi; Sayanova, Olga; Napier, Johnathan A; Haslam, Richard P

    2012-04-01

    Omega-3 (ω-3) very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFAs) such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5 Δ5,8,11,14,17) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 Δ4,7,10,13,16,19) have been shown to have significant roles in human health. Currently the primary dietary source of these fatty acids are marine fish; however, the increasing demand for fish and fish oil (in particular the expansion of the aquaculture industry) is placing enormous pressure on diminishing marine stocks. Such overfishing and concerns related to pollution in the marine environment have directed research towards the development of a viable alternative sustainable source of VLC-PUFAs. As a result, the last decade has seen many genes encoding the primary VLC-PUFA biosynthetic activities identified and characterized. This has allowed the reconstitution of the VLC-PUFA biosynthetic pathway in oilseed crops, producing transgenic plants engineered to accumulate ω-3 VLC-PUFAs at levels approaching those found in native marine organisms. Moreover, as a result of these engineering activities, knowledge of the fundamental processes surrounding acyl exchange and lipid remodelling has progressed. The application of new technologies, for example lipidomics and next-generation sequencing, is providing a better understanding of seed oil biosynthesis and opportunities for increasing the production of unusual fatty acids. Certainly, it is now possible to modify the composition of plant oils successfully, and, in this review, the most recent developments in this field and the challenges of producing VLC-PUFAs in the seed oil of higher plants will be described. PMID:22291131

  19. Drosophila Fatty Acid Taste Signals through the PLC Pathway in Sugar-Sensing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Masek, Pavel; Keene, Alex C.

    2013-01-01

    Taste is the primary sensory system for detecting food quality and palatability. Drosophila detects five distinct taste modalities that include sweet, bitter, salt, water, and the taste of carbonation. Of these, sweet-sensing neurons appear to have utility for the detection of nutritionally rich food while bitter-sensing neurons signal toxicity and confer repulsion. Growing evidence in mammals suggests that taste for fatty acids (FAs) signals the presence of dietary lipids and promotes feeding. While flies appear to be attracted to fatty acids, the neural basis for fatty acid detection and attraction are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a range of FAs are detected by the fly gustatory system and elicit a robust feeding response. Flies lacking olfactory organs respond robustly to FAs, confirming that FA attraction is mediated through the gustatory system. Furthermore, flies detect FAs independent of pH, suggesting the molecular basis for FA taste is not due to acidity. We show that low and medium concentrations of FAs serve as an appetitive signal and they are detected exclusively through the same subset of neurons that sense appetitive sweet substances, including most sugars. In mammals, taste perception of sweet and bitter substances is dependent on phospholipase C (PLC) signaling in specialized taste buds. We find that flies mutant for norpA, a Drosophila ortholog of PLC, fail to respond to FAs. Intriguingly, norpA mutants respond normally to other tastants, including sucrose and yeast. The defect of norpA mutants can be rescued by selectively restoring norpA expression in sweet-sensing neurons, corroborating that FAs signal through sweet-sensing neurons, and suggesting PLC signaling in the gustatory system is specifically involved in FA taste. Taken together, these findings reveal that PLC function in Drosophila sweet-sensing neurons is a conserved molecular signaling pathway that confers attraction to fatty acids. PMID:24068941

  20. The control of chlorophyll catabolism and the status of yellowing as a biomarker of leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Ougham, H; Hörtensteiner, S; Armstead, I; Donnison, I; King, I; Thomas, H; Mur, L

    2008-09-01

    The pathway of chlorophyll catabolism during leaf senescence is known in a fair amount of biochemical and cell biological detail. In the last few years, genes encoding a number of the catabolic enzymes have been characterized, including the key ring-opening activities, phaeophorbide a oxygenase (PaO) and red chlorophyll catabolite reductase (RCCR). Recently, a gene that modulates disassembly of chlorophyll-protein complexes and activation of pigment ring-opening has been isolated by comparative mapping in monocot species, positional cloning exploiting rice genomics resources and functional testing in Arabidopsis. The corresponding gene in pea has been identified as Mendel's I locus (green/yellow cotyledons). Mutations in this and other chlorophyll catabolic genes have significant consequences, both for the course of leaf senescence and senescence-like stress responses, notably hypersensitivity to pathogen challenge. Loss of chlorophyll can occur via routes other than the PaO/RCCR pathway, resulting in changes that superficially resemble senescence. Such 'pseudosenescence' responses tend to be pathological rather than physiological and may differ from senescence in fundamental aspects of biochemistry and regulation. PMID:18721307

  1. Knockout of the murine cysteine dioxygenase gene results in severe impairment in ability to synthesize taurine and an increased catabolism of cysteine to hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Iori; Roman, Heather B.; Valli, Alessandro; Fieselmann, Krista; Lam, Jimmy; Peters, Rachel; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine homeostasis is dependent on the regulation of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) in response to changes in sulfur amino acid intake. CDO oxidizes cysteine to cysteinesulfinate, which is further metabolized to either taurine or to pyruvate plus sulfate. To gain insight into the physiological function of CDO and the consequence of a loss of CDO activity, mice carrying a null CDO allele (CDO+/− mice) were crossed to generate CDO−/−, CDO+/−, and CDO+/+ mice. CDO−/− mice exhibited postnatal mortality, growth deficit, and connective tissue pathology. CDO−/− mice had extremely low taurine levels and somewhat elevated cysteine levels, consistent with the lack of flux through CDO-dependent catabolic pathways. However, plasma sulfate levels were slightly higher in CDO−/− mice than in CDO+/− or CDO+/+ mice, and tissue levels of acid-labile sulfide were elevated, indicating an increase in cysteine catabolism by cysteine desulfhydration pathways. Null mice had lower hepatic cytochrome c oxidase levels, suggesting impaired electron transport capacity. Supplementation of mice with taurine improved survival of male pups but otherwise had little effect on the phenotype of the CDO−/− mice. H2S has been identified as an important gaseous signaling molecule as well as a toxicant, and pathology may be due to dysregulation of H2S production. Control of cysteine levels by regulation of CDO may be necessary to maintain low H2S/sulfane sulfur levels and facilitate the use of H2S as a signaling molecule. PMID:21693692

  2. Chitosan oligosaccharide induces resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus in Arabidopsis via the salicylic acid-mediated signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaochen; Meng, Qingshan; Zeng, Haihong; Wang, Wenxia; Yin, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan is one of the most abundant carbohydrate biopolymers in the world, and chitosan oligosaccharide (COS), which is prepared from chitosan, is a plant immunity regulator. The present study aimed to validate the effect of COS on inducing resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Arabidopsis and to investigate the potential defence-related signalling pathways involved. Optimal conditions for the induction of TMV resistance in Arabidopsis were COS pretreatment at 50 mg/L for 1 day prior to inoculation with TMV. Multilevel indices, including phenotype data, and TMV coat protein expression, revealed that COS induced TMV resistance in wild-type and jasmonic acid pathway- deficient (jar1) Arabidopsis plants, but not in salicylic acid pathway deficient (NahG) Arabidopsis plants. Quantitative-PCR and analysis of phytohormone levels confirmed that COS pretreatment enhanced the expression of the defence-related gene PR1, which is a marker of salicylic acid signalling pathway, and increased the amount of salicylic acid in WT and jar1, but not in NahG plants. Taken together, these results confirm that COS induces TMV resistance in Arabidopsis via activation of the salicylic acid signalling pathway. PMID:27189192

  3. Chitosan oligosaccharide induces resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus in Arabidopsis via the salicylic acid-mediated signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaochen; Meng, Qingshan; Zeng, Haihong; Wang, Wenxia; Yin, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan is one of the most abundant carbohydrate biopolymers in the world, and chitosan oligosaccharide (COS), which is prepared from chitosan, is a plant immunity regulator. The present study aimed to validate the effect of COS on inducing resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Arabidopsis and to investigate the potential defence-related signalling pathways involved. Optimal conditions for the induction of TMV resistance in Arabidopsis were COS pretreatment at 50 mg/L for 1 day prior to inoculation with TMV. Multilevel indices, including phenotype data, and TMV coat protein expression, revealed that COS induced TMV resistance in wild-type and jasmonic acid pathway- deficient (jar1) Arabidopsis plants, but not in salicylic acid pathway deficient (NahG) Arabidopsis plants. Quantitative-PCR and analysis of phytohormone levels confirmed that COS pretreatment enhanced the expression of the defence-related gene PR1, which is a marker of salicylic acid signalling pathway, and increased the amount of salicylic acid in WT and jar1, but not in NahG plants. Taken together, these results confirm that COS induces TMV resistance in Arabidopsis via activation of the salicylic acid signalling pathway. PMID:27189192

  4. Myogenic and metabolic feedback in cerebral autoregulation: Putative involvement of arachidonic acid-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ronan M G

    2016-07-01

    The present paper presents a mechanistic model of cerebral autoregulation, in which the dual effects of the arachidonic acid metabolites 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) on vascular smooth muscle mediate the cerebrovascular adjustments to a change in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). 20-HETE signalling in vascular smooth muscle mediates myogenic feedback to changes in vessel wall stretch, which may be modulated by metabolic feedback through EETs released from astrocytes and endothelial cells in response to changes in brain tissue oxygen tension. The metabolic feedback pathway is much faster than 20-HETE-dependent myogenic feedback, and the former thus initiates the cerebral autoregulatory response, while myogenic feedback comprises a relatively slower mechanism that functions to set the basal cerebrovascular tone. Therefore, assessments of dynamic cerebral autoregulation, which may provide information on the response time of the cerebrovasculature, may specifically be used to yield information on metabolic feedback mechanisms, while data based on assessments of static cerebral autoregulation represent the integrated functionality of myogenic and metabolic feedback. PMID:27241246

  5. Foreign gene recruitment to the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway in diatoms.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Baglivi, Francesca L; Jenkins, Christina E; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2013-09-01

    Diatoms are highly successful marine and freshwater algae that contribute up to 20% of global carbon fixation. These species are leading candidates for biofuel production owing to ease of culturing and high fatty acid content. To assist in strain improvement and downstream applications for potential use as a biofuel, it is important to understand the evolution of lipid biosynthesis in diatoms. The evolutionary history of diatoms is however complicated by likely multiple endosymbioses involving the capture of foreign cells and horizontal gene transfer into the host genome. Using a phylogenomic approach, we assessed the evolutionary history of 12 diatom genes putatively encoding functions related to lipid biosynthesis. We found evidence of gene transfer likely from a green algal source for seven of these genes, with the remaining showing either vertical inheritance or evolutionary histories too complicated to interpret given current genome data. The functions of horizontally transferred genes encompass all aspects of lipid biosynthesis (initiation, biosynthesis, and desaturation of fatty acids) as well as fatty acid elongation, and are not restricted to plastid-targeted proteins. Our findings demonstrate that the transfer, duplication, and subfunctionalization of genes were key steps in the evolution of lipid biosynthesis in diatoms and other photosynthetic eukaryotes. This target pathway for biofuel research is highly chimeric and surprisingly, our results suggest that research done on related genes in green algae may have application to diatom models. PMID:24404416

  6. Clay minerals on Mars: Riotinto mining district (Huelva, Spain) as Earth analogue for acidic alteration pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavris, C.; Cuadros, J.; Bishop, J. L.; Nieto, J. M.; Michalski, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Combined satellite and in-situ measurements of Mars surface have detected mineral assemblages indicating processes for which Earth analogues exist. Among them, aluminous clay-sulfate assemblages have been observed, which suggest alteration by acidic fluids. The Riotinto mining district (SW Spain) provides an Earth analogue site for such Martian processes. The parent rocks belong to an Upper Palaeozoic (Late Famennian-Tournaisian) volcano-sedimentary complex including siliciclastic sediments and mafic and felsic volcanics, all of which underwent hydrothermal alteration. The oxidation of an extensive pyrite-rich orebody provided mild to extreme acidic fluxes that leached the surrounding rocks for over 20 million years. The mineral assemblages are strongly dependent on their acidic alteration intensity. The observed mineralogical parageneses and leaching conditions for our sites at Riotinto are consistent with three alteration sequences: i) Mild: containing a range of clay minerals from vermiculite to kaolinite, with a wide variety of crystal order and mixed-layering; ii) Intermediate: containing smectite to kaolinite with jarosite-group phases; iii) Advanced: containing kaolinite, jarosite-group phases, and iron oxides. Our findings suggest that, even within this general scheme, the specific alteration pathways can be different.

  7. Isolation of a mutation resulting in constitutive synthesis of L-fucose catabolic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Bartkus, J M; Mortlock, R P

    1986-01-01

    A ribitol-positive transductant of Escherichia coli K-12, JM2112, was used to facilitate the isolation and identification of mutations affecting the L-fucose catabolic pathway. Analysis of L-fucose-negative mutants of JM2112 enabled us to confirm that L-fucose-1-phosphate is the apparent inducer of the fucose catabolic enzymes. Plating of an L-fuculokinase-negative mutant of JM2112 on D-arabinose yielded an isolate containing a second fucose mutation which resulted in the constitutive synthesis of L-fucose permease, isomerase, and kinase. This constitutive mutation differs from the constitutive mutation described by Chen et al. (J. Bacteriol. 159:725-729, 1984) in that it is tightly linked to the fucose genes and appears to be located in the gene believed to code for the positive activator of the L-fucose genes. PMID:3005235

  8. Metabolomic and Proteomic Insights into Carbaryl Catabolism by Burkholderia sp. C3 and Degradation of Ten N-Methylcarbamates

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jong-Su; Keum, Young-Soo; Li, Qing X.

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. C3, an efficient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degrader, can utilize 9 of the 10 N-methylcarbamate insecticides including carbaryl as a sole source of carbon. Rapid hydrolysis of carbaryl in C3 is followed by slow catabolism of the resulting 1-naphthol. This study focused on metabolomes and proteomes in C3 cells utilizing carbaryl in comparison to those using glucose or nutrient broth. Sixty of the 867 detected proteins were involved in primary metabolism, adaptive sensing and regulation, transport, stress response, and detoxification. Among the 41 proteins expressed in response to carbaryl were formate dehydrogenase, aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase and ethanolamine utilization protein involved in one carbon metabolism. Acetate kinase and phasin were 2 of the 19 proteins that were not detected in carbaryl-supported C3 cells, but detected in glucose-supported C3 cells. Down-production of phasin and polyhydroxyalkanoates in carbaryl-supported C3 cells suggests insufficient carbon sources and lower levels of primary metabolites to maintain an ordinary level of metabolism. Differential metabolomes (approximately 196 identified polar metabolites) showed up-production of metabolites in pentose phosphate pathways and metabolisms of cysteine, cystine and some other amino acids, disaccharides and nicotinate, in contract to down-production of most of the other amino acids and hexoses. The proteomic and metabolomic analyses showed that carbaryl-supported C3 cells experienced strong toxic effects, oxidative stresses, DNA/RNA damages and carbon nutrient deficiency. PMID:23463356

  9. Determinants of Skeletal Muscle Catabolism After Severe Burn

    PubMed Central

    Hart, David W.; Wolf, Steven E.; Chinkes, David L.; Gore, Dennis C.; Mlcak, Ronald P.; Beauford, Robert B.; Obeng, Michael K.; Lal, Sophia; Gold, Warren F.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Herndon, David N.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine which patient factors affect the degree of catabolism after severe burn. Summary Background Data Catabolism is associated with severe burn and leads to erosion of lean mass, impaired wound healing, and delayed rehabilitation. Methods From 1996 to 1999, 151 stable-isotope protein kinetic studies were performed in 102 pediatric and 21 adult subjects burned over 20–99.5% of their total body surface area (TBSA). Patient demographics, burn characteristics, and hospital course variables were correlated with the net balance of skeletal muscle protein synthesis and breakdown across the leg. Data were analyzed sequentially and cumulatively through univariate and cross-sectional multiple regression. Results Increasing age, weight, and delay in definitive surgical treatment predict increased catabolism (P < .05). Body surface area burned increased catabolism until 40% TBSA was reached; catabolism did not consistently increase thereafter. Resting energy expenditure and sepsis were also strong predictors of net protein catabolism. Among factors that did not significantly correlate were burn type, pneumonia, wound contamination, and time after burn. From these results, the authors also infer that gross muscle mass correlates independently with protein wasting after burn. Conclusions Heavier, more muscular subjects, and subjects whose definitive surgical treatment is delayed are at the greatest risk for excess catabolism after burn. Sepsis and excessive hypermetabolism are also associated with protein catabolism. PMID:10998644

  10. Palmitic acid interferes with energy metabolism balance by adversely switching the SIRT1-CD36-fatty acid pathway to the PKC zeta-GLUT4-glucose pathway in cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yeh-Peng; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Shen, Chia-Yao; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Chen, Ray-Jade; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Padma, V Vijaya; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic regulation is inextricably linked with cardiac function. Fatty acid metabolism is a significant mechanism for creating energy for the heart. However, cardiomyocytes are able to switch the fatty acids or glucose, depending on different situations, such as ischemia or anoxia. Lipotoxicity in obesity causes impairments in energy metabolism and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. We utilized the treatment of H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells palmitic acid (PA) as a model for hyperlipidemia to investigate the signaling mechanisms involved in these processes. Our results show PA induces time- and dose-dependent lipotoxicity in H9c2 cells. Moreover, PA enhances cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) and reduces glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) pathway protein levels following a short period of treatment, but cells switch from CD36 back to the GLUT4 pathway after during long-term exposure to PA. As sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ) play important roles in CD36 and GLUT4 translocation, we used the SIRT1 activator resveratrol and si-PKCζ to identify the switches in metabolism. Although PA reduced CD36 and increased GLUT4 metabolic pathway proteins, when we pretreated cells with resveratrol to activate SIRT1 or transfected si-PKCζ, both were able to significantly increase CD36 metabolic pathway proteins and reduce GLUT4 pathway proteins. High-fat diets affect energy metabolism pathways in both normal and aging rats and involve switching the energy source from the CD36 pathway to GLUT4. In conclusion, PA and high-fat diets cause lipotoxicity in vivo and in vitro and adversely switch the energy source from the CD36 pathway to the GLUT4 pathway. PMID:27133433

  11. Activation of lipid catabolism by the water-soluble fraction of petroleum in the crustacean Macrobrachium borellii.

    PubMed

    Lavarías, S; Pollero, R J; Heras, H

    2006-05-01

    Little is known about the effect of the water-soluble fraction of crude oil (WSF) on lipid metabolism in invertebrates. The effect of the WSF on the triacylglycerol (TAG) mobilization, fatty acid activation and degradation was evaluated in the decapod Macrobrachium borellii, exposing adult and eggs at different stages of development for 7 days to a sublethal concentration of WSF. Using radioactive tracers, mitochondrial palmitoyl-CoA synthetase (ACS), triacylglycerol lipase (TAG-lipase) and fatty acid beta-oxidation system activities were assayed. Before studying the effect of WSF, the kinetic parameters of ACS were determined in purified mitochondria. Its optimal temperature and pH were 32 degrees C and 8.0, respectively, the apparent K(m) 2.48 micromol l(-1), and its V(max) of 1.93 nmol min(-1) mg protein(-1). These kinetic parameters differed significantly from this shrimp's microsomal isoform. After 7 days exposure to a sublethal concentration of WSF (0.6 mg/l), changes were observed in the enzymatic activity of all enzymes or enzymatic system assayed in adult midgut gland as well as in stage 5 eggs, a period of active organogenesis. An increase in the mobilization of energy stores was detected as early as stage 4, where TAG-lipase activity increased by 27% in exposed eggs. The increase was even more marked in exposed eggs at stage 5 where a three-fold rise (154%) was determined. Exposed adult shrimp also showed an augmented lipase activity by 38%. Fatty acid beta-oxidation increased by 51.0 and 35.5% in midgut gland and eggs at stage 5, respectively, but no changes were observed at less-developed stages. Mitochondrial fatty acid activation by ACS also increased in adults and stage 5 eggs by 7.4 and 52.0%, respectively. A similar response of the lipid catabolic pathways to WSF contamination in both adult and eggs, suggests that the exposure to this pollutant causes an increase in the energy needs of this shrimp. When validated by field studies, these catabolic

  12. Major contribution of the Ehrlich pathway for 2-phenylethanol/rose flavor production in Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Ravasio, Davide; Wendland, Jürgen; Walther, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Aroma alcohols of fermented food and beverages are derived from fungal amino acids catabolism via the Ehrlich pathway. This linear pathway consists of three enzymatic reactions to form fusel alcohols. Regulation of some of the enzymes occurs on the transcriptional level via Aro80. The riboflavin overproducer Ashbya gossypii produces strong fruity flavours in contrast to its much less aromatic relative Eremothecium cymbalariae. Genome comparisons indicated that A. gossypii harbors genes for aromatic amino acid catabolism (ARO8a, ARO8b, ARO10, and ARO80) while E. cymbalariae only encodes ARO8a and thus lacks major components of aromatic amino acid catabolism. Volatile compound (VOC) analysis showed that both Eremothecium species produce large amounts of isoamyl alcohol while A. gossypii also produces high levels of 2-phenylethanol. Deletion of the A. gossypii ARO-genes did not confer any growth deficiencies. However, A. gossypii ARO-mutants (except Agaro8a) were strongly impaired in aroma production, particularly in the production of the rose flavour 2-phenylethanol. Conversely, overexpression of ARO80 via the AgTEF1 promoter resulted in 50% increase in VOC production. Together these data indicate that A. gossypii is a very potent flavour producer and that amongst the non-Saccharomyces biodiversity strains can be identified that could provide positive sensory properties to fermented beverages. PMID:24920045

  13. Intracellular Growth Is Dependent on Tyrosine Catabolism in the Dimorphic Fungal Pathogen Penicillium marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Kylie J.; McLauchlan, Alisha; Schreider, Lena; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2015-01-01

    During infection, pathogens must utilise the available nutrient sources in order to grow while simultaneously evading or tolerating the host’s defence systems. Amino acids are an important nutritional source for pathogenic fungi and can be assimilated from host proteins to provide both carbon and nitrogen. The hpdA gene of the dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei, which encodes an enzyme which catalyses the second step of tyrosine catabolism, was identified as up-regulated in pathogenic yeast cells. As well as enabling the fungus to acquire carbon and nitrogen, tyrosine is also a precursor in the formation of two types of protective melanin; DOPA melanin and pyomelanin. Chemical inhibition of HpdA in P. marneffei inhibits ex vivo yeast cell production suggesting that tyrosine is a key nutrient source during infectious growth. The genes required for tyrosine catabolism, including hpdA, are located in a gene cluster and the expression of these genes is induced in the presence of tyrosine. A gene (hmgR) encoding a Zn(II)2-Cys6 binuclear cluster transcription factor is present within the cluster and is required for tyrosine induced expression and repression in the presence of a preferred nitrogen source. AreA, the GATA-type transcription factor which regulates the global response to limiting nitrogen conditions negatively regulates expression of cluster genes in the absence of tyrosine and is required for nitrogen metabolite repression. Deletion of the tyrosine catabolic genes in the cluster affects growth on tyrosine as either a nitrogen or carbon source and affects pyomelanin, but not DOPA melanin, production. In contrast to other genes of the tyrosine catabolic cluster, deletion of hpdA results in no growth within macrophages. This suggests that the ability to catabolise tyrosine is not required for macrophage infection and that HpdA has an additional novel role to that of tyrosine catabolism and pyomelanin production during growth in host cells. PMID:25812137

  14. Introduction of a bacterial acetyl-CoA synthesis pathway improves lactic acid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Song, Ji-Yoon; Park, Joon-Song; Kang, Chang Duk; Cho, Hwa-Young; Yang, Dongsik; Lee, Seunghyun; Cho, Kwang Myung

    2016-05-01

    Acid-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to produce lactic acid by expressing heterologous lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) genes, while attenuating several key pathway genes, including glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase1 (GPD1) and cytochrome-c oxidoreductase2 (CYB2). In order to increase the yield of lactic acid further, the ethanol production pathway was attenuated by disrupting the pyruvate decarboxylase1 (PDC1) and alcohol dehydrogenase1 (ADH1) genes. Despite an increase in lactic acid yield, severe reduction of the growth rate and glucose consumption rate owing to the absence of ADH1 caused a considerable decrease in the overall productivity. In Δadh1 cells, the levels of acetyl-CoA, a key precursor for biologically applicable components, could be insufficient for normal cell growth. To increase the cellular supply of acetyl-CoA, we introduced bacterial acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (A-ALD) enzyme (EC 1.2.1.10) genes into the lactic acid-producing S. cerevisiae. Escherichia coli-derived A-ALD genes, mhpF and eutE, were expressed and effectively complemented the attenuated acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD)/acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) pathway in the yeast. The engineered strain, possessing a heterologous acetyl-CoA synthetic pathway, showed an increased glucose consumption rate and higher productivity of lactic acid fermentation. The production of lactic acid was reached at 142g/L with production yield of 0.89g/g and productivity of 3.55gL(-1)h(-1) under fed-batch fermentation in bioreactor. This study demonstrates a novel approach that improves productivity of lactic acid by metabolic engineering of the acetyl-CoA biosynthetic pathway in yeast. PMID:26384570

  15. Comparison of Four Comamonas Catabolic Plasmids Reveals the Evolution of pBHB To Catabolize Haloaromatics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Xu, Xihui; Zhang, Long; Gou, Zhenjiu; Li, Shunpeng

    2015-01-01

    Comamonas plasmids play important roles in shaping the phenotypes of their hosts and the adaptation of these hosts to changing environments, and understanding the evolutionary strategy of these plasmids is thus of great concern. In this study, the sequence of the 119-kb 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzonitrile-catabolizing plasmid pBHB from Comamonas sp. strain 7D-2 was studied and compared with those of three other Comamonas haloaromatic catabolic plasmids. Incompatibility group determination based on a phylogenetic analysis of 24 backbone gene proteins, as well as TrfA, revealed that these four plasmids all belong to the IncP-1β subgroup. Comparison of the four plasmids revealed a conserved backbone region and diverse genetic-load regions. The four plasmids share a core genome consisting of 40 genes (>50% similarities) and contain 12 to 50 unique genes each, most of which are xenobiotic-catabolic genes. Two functional reductive dehalogenase gene clusters are specifically located on pBHB, showing distinctive evolution of pBHB for haloaromatics. The higher catabolic ability of the bhbA2B2 cluster than the bhbAB cluster may be due to the transcription levels and the character of the dehalogenase gene itself rather than that of its extracytoplasmic binding receptor gene. The plasmid pBHB is riddled with transposons and insertion sequence (IS) elements, and ISs play important roles in the evolution of pBHB. The analysis of the origin of the bhb genes on pBHB suggested that these accessory genes evolved independently. Our work provides insights into the evolutionary strategies of Comamonas plasmids, especially into the adaptation mechanism employed by pBHB for haloaromatics. PMID:26682859

  16. Folic acid promotes the myogenic differentiation of C2C12 murine myoblasts through the Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seong Yeon; Kang, Yong Jung; Sung, Bokyung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Yujin; Yoo, Mi-Ae; Kim, Cheol Min; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-10-01

    Folic acid is a water-soluble vitamin in the B-complex group, and an exogenous intake is required for health, growth and development. As a precursor to co-factors, folic acid is required for one-carbon donors in the synthesis of DNA bases and other essential biomolecules. A lack of dietary folic acid can lead to folic acid deficiency and can therefore result in several health problems, including macrocytic anemia, elevated plasma homocysteine levels, cardiovascular disease, birth defects, carcinogenesis, muscle weakness and difficulty in walking. Previous studies have indicated that folic acid exerts a positive effect on skeletal muscle functions. However, the precise role of folic acid in skeletal muscle cell differentiation remains poorly understood. Thus, in the present study, we examined the effects of folic acid on neo-myotube maturation and differentiation using C2C12 murine myoblasts. We found that folic acid promoted the formation of multinucleated myotubes, and increased the fusion index and creatine kinase (CK) activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that the expression levels of the muscle-specific marker, myosin heavy chain (MyHC), as well as those of the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs), MyoD and myogenin, were increased in the folic acid-treated myotubes during myogenic differentiation. Folic acid also promoted the activation of the Akt pathway, and this effect was inhibited by treatment of the C2C12 cells with LY294002 (Akt inhibitor). Blocking of the Akt pathway with a specific inhibitor revealed that it was necessary for mediating the stimulatory effects of folic acid on muscle cell differentiation and fusion. Taken together, our data suggest that folic acid promotes the differentiation of C2C12 cells through the activation of the Akt pathway. PMID:26310574

  17. The heparan and heparin metabolism pathway is involved in regulation of fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhihua; Michal, Jennifer J; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Pan, Zengxiang; MacNeil, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    Six genes involved in the heparan sulfate and heparin metabolism pathway, DSEL (dermatan sulfate epimerase-like), EXTL1 (exostoses (multiple)-like 1), HS6ST1 (heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase 1), HS6ST3 (heparan sulfate 6-O-sulfotransferase 3), NDST3 (N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase (heparan glucosaminyl) 3), and SULT1A1 (sulfotransferase family, cytosolic, 1A, phenol-preferring, member 1), were investigated for their associations with muscle lipid composition using cattle as a model organism. Nineteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)/multiple nucleotide length polymorphisms (MNLPs) were identified in five of these six genes. Six of these mutations were then genotyped on 246 Wagyu x Limousin F(2) animals, which were measured for 5 carcass, 6 eating quality and 8 fatty acid composition traits. Association analysis revealed that DSEL, EXTL1 and HS6ST1 significantly affected two stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity indices, the amount of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), and the relative amount of saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in skeletal muscle (P<0.05). In particular, HS6ST1 joined our previously reported SCD1 and UQCRC1 genes to form a three gene network for one of the stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity indices. These results provide evidence that genes involved in heparan sulfate and heparin metabolism are also involved in regulation of lipid metabolism in bovine muscle. Whether the SNPs affected heparan sulfate proteoglycan structure is unknown and warrants further investigation. PMID:21647334

  18. Identification of Thiotetronic Acid Antibiotic Biosynthetic Pathways by Target-directed Genome Mining.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Li, Jie; Millán-Aguiñaga, Natalie; Zhang, Jia Jia; O'Neill, Ellis C; Ugalde, Juan A; Jensen, Paul R; Mantovani, Simone M; Moore, Bradley S

    2015-12-18

    Recent genome sequencing efforts have led to the rapid accumulation of uncharacterized or "orphaned" secondary metabolic biosynthesis gene clusters (BGCs) in public databases. This increase in DNA-sequenced big data has given rise to significant challenges in the applied field of natural product genome mining, including (i) how to prioritize the characterization of orphan BGCs and (ii) how to rapidly connect genes to biosynthesized small molecules. Here, we show that by correlating putative antibiotic resistance genes that encode target-modified proteins with orphan BGCs, we predict the biological function of pathway specific small molecules before they have been revealed in a process we call target-directed genome mining. By querying the pan-genome of 86 Salinispora bacterial genomes for duplicated house-keeping genes colocalized with natural product BGCs, we prioritized an orphan polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrid BGC (tlm) with a putative fatty acid synthase resistance gene. We employed a new synthetic double-stranded DNA-mediated cloning strategy based on transformation-associated recombination to efficiently capture tlm and the related ttm BGCs directly from genomic DNA and to heterologously express them in Streptomyces hosts. We show the production of a group of unusual thiotetronic acid natural products, including the well-known fatty acid synthase inhibitor thiolactomycin that was first described over 30 years ago, yet never at the genetic level in regards to biosynthesis and autoresistance. This finding not only validates the target-directed genome mining strategy for the discovery of antibiotic producing gene clusters without a priori knowledge of the molecule synthesized but also paves the way for the investigation of novel enzymology involved in thiotetronic acid natural product biosynthesis. PMID:26458099

  19. From carrot to clinic: an overview of the retinoic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Theodosiou, Maria; Laudet, Vincent; Schubert, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Vitamin A is essential for the formation and maintenance of many body tissues. It is also important for embryonic growth and development and can act as a teratogen at critical periods of development. Retinoic acid (RA) is the biologically active form of vitamin A and its signaling is mediated by the RA and retinoid X receptors. In addition to its role as an important molecule during development, RA has also been implicated in clinical applications, both as a potential anti-tumor agent as well as for the treatment of skin diseases. This review presents an overview of how dietary retinoids are converted to RA, hence presenting the major players in RA metabolism and signaling, and highlights examples of treatment applications of retinoids. Moreover, we discuss the origin and diversification of the retinoid pathway, which are important factors for understanding the evolution of ligand-specificity among retinoid receptors. PMID:20140749

  20. Biochemical and structural characterization of Klebsiella pneumoniae oxamate amidohydrolase in the uric acid degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Katherine A; Ealick, Steven E

    2016-06-01

    HpxW from the ubiquitous pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae is involved in a novel uric acid degradation pathway downstream from the formation of oxalurate. Specifically, HpxW is an oxamate amidohydrolase which catalyzes the conversion of oxamate to oxalate and is a member of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily. HpxW is autoprocessed from an inactive precursor to form a heterodimer, resulting in a 35.5 kDa α subunit and a 20 kDa β subunit. Here, the structure of HpxW is presented and the substrate complex is modeled. In addition, the steady-state kinetics of this enzyme and two active-site variants were characterized. These structural and biochemical studies provide further insight into this class of enzymes and allow a mechanism for catalysis consistent with other members of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily to be proposed. PMID:27303801

  1. Pathways Involved in the Synergistic Activation of Macrophages by Lipoteichoic Acid and Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Kathleen H.; Cox, Michelle E.; Woo-Rasberry, Virginia; Hasty, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is a Gram-positive cell surface molecule that is found in both a cell-bound form and cell-free form in the host during an infection. Hemoglobin (Hb) can synergize with LTA, a TLR2 ligand, to potently activate macrophage innate immune responses in a TLR2- and TLR4-dependent way. At low levels of LTA, the presence of Hb can result in a 200-fold increase in the secretion of IL-6 following macrophage activation. Six hours after activation, the macrophage genes that are most highly up-regulated by LTA plus Hb activation compared to LTA alone are cytokines, chemokines, receptors and interferon-regulated genes. Several of these genes exhibit a unique TLR4-dependent increase in mRNA levels that continued to rise more than eight hours after stimulation. This prolonged increase in mRNA levels could be the result of an extended period of NF-κB nuclear localization and the concurrent absence of the NF-κB inhibitor, IκBα, after stimulation with LTA plus Hb. Dynasore inhibition experiments indicate that an endocytosis-dependent pathway is required for the TLR4-dependent up-regulation of IL-6 secretion following activation with LTA plus Hb. In addition, interferon-β mRNA is present after activation with LTA plus Hb, suggesting that the TRIF/TRAM-dependent pathway may be involved. Hb alone can elicit the TLR4-dependent secretion of TNF-α from macrophages, so it may be the TLR4 ligand. Hb also led to secretion of high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), which synergized with LTA to increase secretion of IL-6. The activation of both the TLR2 and TLR4 pathways by LTA plus Hb leads to an enhanced innate immune response. PMID:23071790

  2. Organochlorines inhibit acetaminophen glucuronidation by redirecting UDP-glucuronic acid towards the D-glucuronate pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Tom S. Wilson, John X.; Selliah, Subajini; Bilodeau, Marc; Zwingmann, Claudia; Poon, Raymond; O'Brien, Peter J.

    2008-11-01

    Industry-derived organochlorines are persistent environmental pollutants that are a continuing health concern. The effects of these compounds on drug metabolism are not well understood. In the current study we present evidence that the inhibition of acetaminophen (APAP) glucuronidation by minute concentrations of organochlorines correlates well with their ability to stimulate the D-glucuronate pathway leading to ascorbate synthesis. A set of 6 arylated organochlorines, including 5 PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) congeners, were assessed for their effects on APAP glucuronidation in isolated hepatocytes from male Sprague-Dawley rats. The capacity of each organochlorine to inhibit APAP glucuronidation was found to be directly proportional to its capacity to stimulate ascorbate synthesis. PCB153, PCB28 and bis-(4-chlorophenyl sulfone) (BCPS) in increasing order were the most effective organochlorines for inhibiting APAP glucuronidation and stimulating the D-glucuronate pathway. None of the 3 inhibitors of APAP glucuronidation were able to alter the expression of UGT1A6, UGT1A7 and UGT1A8 (the major isoforms responsible for APAP glucuronidation in the rat), however, their efficacy at inhibiting APAP glucuronidation was proportional to their capacity to deplete UDP-glucuronic acid (UDPGA). BCPS-mediated inhibition of APAP glucuronidation in isolated hepatocytes had non-competitive characteristics and was insensitive to the inactivation of cytochrome P450. The effective organochlorines were also able to selectively stimulate the hydrolysis of UDPGA to UDP and glucuronate in isolated microsomes, but could not inhibit APAP glucuronidation in microsomes when UDPGA was in excess. We conclude that organochlorines are able to inhibit APAP glucuronidation in hepatocytes by depleting UDPGA via redirecting UDPGA towards the D-glucuronate pathway. Because the inhibition is non-competitive, low concentrations of these compounds could have long term inhibitory effects on the

  3. Investigating sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in aquifers in Tokyo using multiple tracers.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Keisuke; Murakami, Michio; Oguma, Kumiko; Takada, Hideshige; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    We employed a multi-tracer approach to investigate sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in urban groundwater, based on 53 groundwater samples taken from confined aquifers and unconfined aquifers in Tokyo. While the median concentrations of groundwater PFAAs were several ng/L, the maximum concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, 990 ng/L), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA, 1800 ng/L) and perfluorononanoate (PFNA, 620 ng/L) in groundwater were several times higher than those of wastewater and street runoff reported in the literature. PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage tracers (carbamazepine and crotamiton), presumably owing to the higher persistence of PFAAs, the multiple sources of PFAAs beyond sewage (e.g., surface runoff, point sources) and the formation of PFAAs from their precursors. Use of multiple methods of source apportionment including principal component analysis-multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid ratio analysis highlighted sewage and point sources as the primary sources of PFAAs in the most severely polluted groundwater samples, with street runoff being a minor source (44.6% sewage, 45.7% point sources and 9.7% street runoff, by PCA-MLR). Tritium analysis indicated that, while young groundwater (recharged during or after the 1970s, when PFAAs were already in commercial use) in shallow aquifers (<50 m depth) was naturally highly vulnerable to PFAA pollution, PFAAs were also found in old groundwater (recharged before the 1950s, when PFAAs were not in use) in deep aquifers (50-500 m depth). This study demonstrated the utility of multiple uses of tracers (pharmaceuticals and personal care products; PPCPs, tritium) and source apportionment methods in investigating sources and pathways of PFAAs in multiple aquifer systems. PMID:24814036

  4. The Transmembrane Domain of Acid Trehalase Mediates Ubiquitin-independent Multivesicular Body Pathway Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ju; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2007-01-01

    Trehalose serves as a storage source of carbon and plays important roles under various stress conditions. For example, in many organisms trehalose has a critical function in preserving membrane structure and fluidity during dehydration/rehydration. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, trehalose accumulates in the cell when the nutrient supply is limited but is rapidly degraded when the supply of nutrients is renewed. Hydrolysis of trehalose in yeast depends on neutral trehalase and acid trehalase (Ath1). Ath1 resides and functions in the vacuole; however, it appears to catalyze the hydrolysis of extracellular trehalose. Little is known about the transport route of Ath1 to the vacuole or how it encounters its substrate. Here, through the use of various trafficking mutants we showed that this hydrolase reaches its final destination through the multivesicular body (MVB) pathway. In contrast to the vast majority of proteins sorted into this pathway, Ath1 does not require ubiquitination for proper localization. Mutagenesis analyses aimed at identifying the unknown targeting signal revealed that the transmembrane domain of Ath1 contains the information sufficient for its selective sequestration into MVB internal vesicles. PMID:17475771

  5. Achievements and perspectives in yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Antonacci, Lucia; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    The use of non-mammalian model organisms, including yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, can provide new insights into eukaryotic PCD (programmed cell death) pathways. In the present paper, we report recent achievements in the elucidation of the events leading to PCD that occur as a response to yeast treatment with AA (acetic acid). In particular, ROS (reactive oxygen species) generation, cyt c (cytochrome c) release and mitochondrial function and proteolytic activity will be dealt with as they vary along the AA-PCD time course by using both wild-type and mutant yeast cells. Two AA-PCD pathways are described sharing common features, but distinct from one another with respect to the role of ROS and mitochondria, the former in which YCA1 acts upstream of cyt c release and caspase-like activation in a ROS-dependent manner and the latter in which cyt c release does not occur, but caspase-like activity increases, in a ROS-independent manner. PMID:21936848

  6. Salvianolic Acid B Attenuates Experimental Pulmonary Fibrosis through Inhibition of the TGF-β Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingmei; Chu, Haiyan; Ma, Yanyun; Wu, Ting; Qian, Feng; Ren, Xian; Tu, Wenzhen; Zhou, Xiaodong; Jin, Li; Wu, Wenyu; Wang, Jiucun

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and fatal disorder. In our previous study, we found that the Yiqihuoxue formula (YQHX), a prescription of Traditional Chinese Medicine, had a curative effect on scleroderma, a typical fibrotic disease. The aim of this study was to determine the key ingredient mediating the therapeutic effects of YQHX and to examine its effect on pulmonary fibrosis, including its mechanism. Luciferase reporter assays showed that the most important anti-fibrotic component of the YQHX was Salviae miltiorrhiza (SM). Experiments performed using a bleomycin-instilled mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis showed that Salvianolic acid B (SAB), the major ingredient of SM, had strong anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects through its inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar structure disruption, and collagen deposition. Furthermore, SAB suppressed TGF-β-induced myofibroblastic differentiation of MRC-5 fibroblasts and TGF-β-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of A549 cells by inhibiting both Smad-dependent signaling and the Smad-independent MAPK pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that SM is the key anti-fibrotic component of the YQHX and that SAB, the major ingredient of SM, alleviates experimental pulmonary fibrosis both in vivo and in vitro by inhibiting the TGF-β signaling pathway. Together, these results suggest that SAB potently inhibits pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27278104

  7. Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor Promotes Endothelial Progenitor Cells Function via Akt/FOXO3a Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuqiang; Cao, Qing; Sang, Tiantian; Liu, Fang; Chen, Shuyan

    2015-01-01

    Acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF1) has been suggested to enhance the functional activities of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The Forkhead homeobox type O transcription factors (FOXOs), a key substrate of the survival kinase Akt, play important roles in regulation of various cellular processes. We previously have shown that FOXO3a is the main subtype of FOXOs expressed in EPCs. Here, we aim to determine whether FGF1 promotes EPC function through Akt/FOXO3a pathway. Human peripheral blood derived EPCs were transduced with adenoviral vectors either expressing a non-phosphorylable, constitutively active triple mutant of FOXO3a (Ad-TM-FOXO3a) or a GFP control (Ad-GFP). FGF1 treatment improved functional activities of Ad-GFP transduced EPCs, including cell viability, proliferation, antiapoptosis, migration and tube formation, whereas these beneficial effects disappeared by Akt inhibitor pretreatment. Moreover, EPC function was declined by Ad-TM-FOXO3a transduction and failed to be attenuated even with FGF1 treatment. FGF1 upregulated phosphorylation levels of Akt and FOXO3a in Ad-GFP transduced EPCs, which were repressed by Akt inhibitor pretreatment. However, FGF1 failed to recover Ad-TM-FOXO3a transduced EPCs from dysfunction. These data indicate that FGF1 promoting EPC function is at least in part mediated through Akt/FOXO3a pathway. Our study may provide novel ideas for enhancing EPC angiogenic ability and optimizing EPC transplantation therapy in the future. PMID:26061278

  8. Streptozotocin induced activation of oxidative stress responsive splenic cell signaling pathways: Protective role of arjunolic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, Prasenjit; Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Das, Joydeep

    2010-04-15

    Present study investigates the beneficial role of arjunolic acid (AA) against the alteration in the cytokine levels and simultaneous activation of oxidative stress responsive signaling pathways in spleen under hyperglycemic condition. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (at a dose of 70 mg/kg body weight, injected in the tail vain). STZ administration elevated the levels of IL-2 as well as IFN-gamma and attenuated the level of TNF-alpha in the sera of diabetic animals. In addition, hyperglycemia is also associated with the increased production of intracellular reactive intermediates resulting with the elevation in lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and reduction in intracellular antioxidant defense. Investigating the oxidative stress responsive cell signaling pathways, increased expressions (immunoreactive concentrations) of phosphorylated p65 as well as its inhibitor protein phospho IkappaBalpha and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been observed in diabetic spleen tissue. Studies on isolated splenocytes revealed that hyperglycemia caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation in the concentration of cytosolic cytochrome c as well as activation of caspase 3 leading to apoptotic cell death. Histological examination revealed that diabetic induction depleted the white pulp scoring which is in agreement with the reduced immunological response. Treatment with AA prevented the hyperglycemia and its associated pathogenesis in spleen tissue. Results suggest that AA might act as an anti-diabetic and immunomodulatory agent against hyperglycemia.

  9. Salvianolic Acid B Attenuates Experimental Pulmonary Fibrosis through Inhibition of the TGF-β Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingmei; Chu, Haiyan; Ma, Yanyun; Wu, Ting; Qian, Feng; Ren, Xian; Tu, Wenzhen; Zhou, Xiaodong; Jin, Li; Wu, Wenyu; Wang, Jiucun

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and fatal disorder. In our previous study, we found that the Yiqihuoxue formula (YQHX), a prescription of Traditional Chinese Medicine, had a curative effect on scleroderma, a typical fibrotic disease. The aim of this study was to determine the key ingredient mediating the therapeutic effects of YQHX and to examine its effect on pulmonary fibrosis, including its mechanism. Luciferase reporter assays showed that the most important anti-fibrotic component of the YQHX was Salviae miltiorrhiza (SM). Experiments performed using a bleomycin-instilled mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis showed that Salvianolic acid B (SAB), the major ingredient of SM, had strong anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects through its inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar structure disruption, and collagen deposition. Furthermore, SAB suppressed TGF-β-induced myofibroblastic differentiation of MRC-5 fibroblasts and TGF-β-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of A549 cells by inhibiting both Smad-dependent signaling and the Smad-independent MAPK pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that SM is the key anti-fibrotic component of the YQHX and that SAB, the major ingredient of SM, alleviates experimental pulmonary fibrosis both in vivo and in vitro by inhibiting the TGF-β signaling pathway. Together, these results suggest that SAB potently inhibits pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27278104

  10. Cloning and Characterization of Benzoate Catabolic Genes in the Gram-Positive Polychlorinated Biphenyl Degrader Rhodococcus sp. Strain RHA1

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Wataru; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Masai, Eiji; Fukuda, Masao

    2001-01-01

    Benzoate catabolism is thought to play a key role in aerobic bacterial degradation of biphenyl and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Benzoate catabolic genes were cloned from a PCB degrader, Rhodococcus sp. strain RHA1, by using PCR amplification and temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis separation. A nucleotide sequence determination revealed that the deduced amino acid sequences encoded by the RHA1 benzoate catabolic genes, benABCDK, exhibit 33 to 65% identity with those of Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1. The gene organization of the RHA1 benABCDK genes differs from that of ADP1. The RHA1 benABCDK region was localized on the chromosome, in contrast to the biphenyl catabolic genes, which are located on linear plasmids. Escherichia coli cells containing RHA1 benABCD transformed benzoate to catechol via 2-hydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzoate. They transformed neither 2- nor 4-chlorobenzoates but did transform 3-chlorobenzoate. The RHA1 benA gene was inactivated by insertion of a thiostrepton resistance gene. The resultant mutant strain, RBD169, neither grew on benzoate nor transformed benzoate, and it did not transform 3-chlorobenzoate. It did, however, exhibit diminished growth on biphenyl and growth repression in the presence of a high concentration of biphenyl (13 mM). These results indicate that the cloned benABCD genes could play an essential role not only in benzoate catabolism but also in biphenyl catabolism in RHA1. Six rhodococcal benzoate degraders were found to have homologs of RHA1 benABC. In contrast, two rhodococcal strains that cannot transform benzoate were found not to have RHA1 benABC homologs, suggesting that many Rhodococcus strains contain benzoate catabolic genes similar to RHA1 benABC. PMID:11673430

  11. Regulation of Primary Metabolic Pathways in Oyster Mushroom Mycelia Induced by Blue Light Stimulation: Accumulation of Shikimic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Masanobu; Kimura, Ninako; Miura, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    Shikimic acid is a key intermediate in the aromatic amino acid pathway as well as an important starting material for the synthesis of Tamiflu, a potent and selective inhibitor of the neuraminidase enzyme of influenza viruses A and B. Here we report that in oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) mycelia cultivated in the dark, stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes induces the accumulation of shikimic acid. An integrated analysis of primary metabolites, gene expression and protein expression suggests that the accumulation of shikimic acid caused by blue light stimulation is due to an increase in 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAHPS, EC2.5.1.54), the rate-determining enzyme in the shikimic acid pathway, as well as phosphofructokinase (PFK, EC2.7.1.11) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC1.1.1.49), the rate-determining enzymes in the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. This stimulation results in increased levels of phosphoenolpyruvic acid (PEP) and erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P), the starting materials of shikimic acid biosynthesis. PMID:25721093

  12. Regulation of primary metabolic pathways in oyster mushroom mycelia induced by blue light stimulation: accumulation of shikimic acid.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masanobu; Kimura, Ninako; Miura, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    Shikimic acid is a key intermediate in the aromatic amino acid pathway as well as an important starting material for the synthesis of Tamiflu, a potent and selective inhibitor of the neuraminidase enzyme of influenza viruses A and B. Here we report that in oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) mycelia cultivated in the dark, stimulation with blue light-emitting diodes induces the accumulation of shikimic acid. An integrated analysis of primary metabolites, gene expression and protein expression suggests that the accumulation of shikimic acid caused by blue light stimulation is due to an increase in 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAHPS, EC2.5.1.54), the rate-determining enzyme in the shikimic acid pathway, as well as phosphofructokinase (PFK, EC2.7.1.11) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC1.1.1.49), the rate-determining enzymes in the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. This stimulation results in increased levels of phosphoenolpyruvic acid (PEP) and erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P), the starting materials of shikimic acid biosynthesis. PMID:25721093

  13. Reconstruction of the Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Pathway of Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7 Based on Genomic and Bibliomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Regiane; Carepo, Marta S. P.; Oliveira, Rui; Marques, Rodolfo; Ramos, Rommel T. J.; Schneider, Maria P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7 is extremophile Gram-positive bacteria able to survive in cold environments. A key factor to understanding cold adaptation processes is related to the modification of fatty acids composing the cell membranes of psychrotrophic bacteria. In our study we show the in silico reconstruction of the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of E. antarcticum B7. To build the stoichiometric model, a semiautomatic procedure was applied, which integrates genome information using KEGG and RAST/SEED. Constraint-based methods, namely, Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and elementary modes (EM), were applied. FBA was implemented in the sense of hexadecenoic acid production maximization. To evaluate the influence of the gene expression in the fluxome analysis, FBA was also calculated using the log2⁡FC values obtained in the transcriptome analysis at 0°C and 37°C. The fatty acid biosynthesis pathway showed a total of 13 elementary flux modes, four of which showed routes for the production of hexadecenoic acid. The reconstructed pathway demonstrated the capacity of E. antarcticum B7 to de novo produce fatty acid molecules. Under the influence of the transcriptome, the fluxome was altered, promoting the production of short-chain fatty acids. The calculated models contribute to better understanding of the bacterial adaptation at cold environments. PMID:27595107

  14. Reconstruction of the Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Pathway of Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7 Based on Genomic and Bibliomic Data.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Regiane; Baraúna, Rafael A; Silva, Artur; Carepo, Marta S P; Oliveira, Rui; Marques, Rodolfo; Ramos, Rommel T J; Schneider, Maria P C

    2016-01-01

    Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7 is extremophile Gram-positive bacteria able to survive in cold environments. A key factor to understanding cold adaptation processes is related to the modification of fatty acids composing the cell membranes of psychrotrophic bacteria. In our study we show the in silico reconstruction of the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of E. antarcticum B7. To build the stoichiometric model, a semiautomatic procedure was applied, which integrates genome information using KEGG and RAST/SEED. Constraint-based methods, namely, Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and elementary modes (EM), were applied. FBA was implemented in the sense of hexadecenoic acid production maximization. To evaluate the influence of the gene expression in the fluxome analysis, FBA was also calculated using the log2⁡FC values obtained in the transcriptome analysis at 0°C and 37°C. The fatty acid biosynthesis pathway showed a total of 13 elementary flux modes, four of which showed routes for the production of hexadecenoic acid. The reconstructed pathway demonstrated the capacity of E. antarcticum B7 to de novo produce fatty acid molecules. Under the influence of the transcriptome, the fluxome was altered, promoting the production of short-chain fatty acids. The calculated models contribute to better understanding of the bacterial adaptation at cold environments. PMID:27595107

  15. Oxidation of cis-5-unsaturated fatty acids in intact rat liver mitochondria: the operation of reduction pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Tserng, K Y; Jin, S J

    1995-01-01

    The metabolism of cis-5 unsaturated fatty acids was studied in intact rat liver mitochondria to assess the operation of a reduction pathway. By using direct quantification of metabolites with a capillary-column gas chromatography, 3-hydroxydodecanoate was identified among other metabolites when cis-5-dodecenoate was metabolized in intact rat liver mitochondria. The formation of 3-hydroxydodecanoate supports the existence of a reduction pathway in the metabolism of cis-5-unsaturated fatty acids. This metabolite cannot be produced from the conventional isomerase-mediated pathway. However, the data also indicated the possible operation of the conventional isomerase-mediated pathway in intact rat liver mitochondria. The reduction pathway appears to account for at least 61% of the pathway for cis-5-dodecenoate. This reduction pathway was likely to proceed from the dehydrogenation to trans-2,cis-5-dodecadienoyl-CoA, which was isomerized to delta 3, delta 5-dodecadienoyl-CoA, then to trans-2,trans-4-dodecadienoate. The reduction was mediated by 2,4-dienoyl-CoA reductase by the conversion of trans-2,trans-4-dodecadienoyl-CoA into trans-3-dodecenoyl-CoA. However, direct reduction of the cis-5 double bond was also shown to be operating, although to a lesser extent. PMID:7755586

  16. Metabolic pathways for the degradation of phosphatidic acid in isolated nuclei from cerebellar cells.

    PubMed

    Gaveglio, Virginia L; Pasquaré, Susana J; Giusto, Norma M

    2011-03-15

    The aim of the present research was to analyse the pathways for phosphatidic acid metabolism in purified nuclei from cerebellar cells. Lipid phosphate phosphatase and diacylglyceride lipase activities were detected in nuclei from cerebellar cells. It was observed that DAGL activity makes up 50% of LPP activity and that PtdOH can also be metabolised to lysophosphatidic acid. With a nuclear protein content of approximately 40 μg, the production of diacylglycerol and monoacylglycerol was linear for 30 min and 5 min, respectively, whereas it increased with PtdOH concentrations of up to 250 μM. LysoPtdOH, sphingosine 1-phosphate and ceramide 1-phosphate, which are alternative substrates for LPP, significantly reduced DAG production from PA. DAG and MAG production increased in the presence of Triton X-100 (1 mM) whereas no modifications were observed in the presence of ionic detergent sodium deoxycholate. Ca²+ and Mg²+ stimulated MAG production without affecting DAG formation whereas fluoride and vanadate inhibited the generation of both products. Specific PtdOH-phospholipase A1 and PtdOH-phospholipase A2 were also detected in nuclei. Our findings constitute the first reported evidence of active PtdOH metabolism involving LPP, DAGL and PtdOH-selective PLA activities in purified nuclei prepared from cerebellar cells. PMID:21216221

  17. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato hijacks the Arabidopsis abscisic acid signalling pathway to cause disease

    PubMed Central

    de Torres-Zabala, Marta; Truman, William; Bennett, Mark H; Lafforgue, Guillaume; Mansfield, John W; Rodriguez Egea, Pedro; Bögre, Laszlo; Grant, Murray

    2007-01-01

    We have found that a major target for effectors secreted by Pseudomonas syringae is the abscisic acid (ABA) signalling pathway. Microarray data identified a prominent group of effector-induced genes that were associated with ABA biosynthesis and also responses to this plant hormone. Genes upregulated by effector delivery share a 42% overlap with ABA-responsive genes and are also components of networks induced by osmotic stress and drought. Strongly induced were NCED3, encoding a key enzyme of ABA biosynthesis, and the abscisic acid insensitive 1 (ABI1) clade of genes encoding protein phosphatases type 2C (PP2Cs) involved in the regulation of ABA signalling. Modification of PP2C expression resulting in ABA insensitivity or hypersensitivity led to restriction or enhanced multiplication of bacteria, respectively. Levels of ABA increased rapidly during bacterial colonisation. Exogenous ABA application enhanced susceptibility, whereas colonisation was reduced in an ABA biosynthetic mutant. Expression of the bacterial effector AvrPtoB in planta modified host ABA signalling. Our data suggest that a major virulence strategy is effector-mediated manipulation of plant hormone homeostasis, which leads to the suppression of defence responses. PMID:17304219

  18. Ginkgolic acid suppresses the development of pancreatic cancer by inhibiting pathways driving lipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiguang; Duan, Wanxing; Han, Suxia; Lei, Jianjun; Xu, Qinhong; Chen, Xin; Jiang, Zhengdong; Nan, Ligang; Li, Jiahui; Chen, Ke; Han, Liang; Wang, Zheng; Li, Xuqi; Wu, Erxi; Huo, Xiongwei

    2015-08-28

    Ginkgolic acid (GA) is a botanical drug extracted from the seed coat of Ginkgo biloba L. with a wide range of bioactive properties, including anti-tumor effect. However, whether GA has antitumor effect on pancreatic cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms have yet to be investigated. In this study, we show that GA suppressed the viability of cancer cells but has little toxicity on normal cells, e.g, HUVEC cells. Furthermore, treatment of GA resulted in impaired colony formation, migration, and invasion ability and increased apoptosis of cancer cells. In addition, GA inhibited the de novo lipogenesis of cancer cells through inducing activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and downregulated the expression of key enzymes (e.g. acetyl-CoA carboxylase [ACC], fatty acid synthase [FASN]) involved in lipogenesis. Moreover, the in vivo experiment showed that GA reduced the expression of the key enzymes involved in lipogenesis and restrained the tumor growth. Taken together, our results suggest that GA may serve as a new candidate against tumor growth of pancreatic cancer partially through targeting pathway driving lipogenesis. PMID:25895130

  19. The phn Island: A New Genomic Island Encoding Catabolism of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, William J.; Chen, Shicheng; Zhao, Jiangchao

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria are key in the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which are widespread environmental pollutants. At least six genotypes of PAH degraders are distinguishable via phylogenies of the ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase (RHD) that initiates bacterial PAH metabolism. A given RHD genotype can be possessed by a variety of bacterial genera, suggesting horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is an important process for dissemination of PAH-degrading genes. But, mechanisms of HGT for most RHD genotypes are unknown. Here, we report in silico and functional analyses of the phenanthrene-degrading bacterium Delftia sp. Cs1-4, a representative of the phnAFK2 RHD group. The phnAFK2 genotype predominates PAH degrader communities in some soils and sediments, but, until now, their genomic biology has not been explored. In the present study, genes for the entire phenanthrene catabolic pathway were discovered on a novel ca. 232 kb genomic island (GEI), now termed the phn island. This GEI had characteristics of an integrative and conjugative element with a mobilization/stabilization system similar to that of SXT/R391-type GEI. But, it could not be grouped with any known GEI, and was the first member of a new GEI class. The island also carried genes predicted to encode: synthesis of quorum sensing signal molecules, fatty acid/polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis, a type IV secretory system, a PRTRC system, DNA mobilization functions and >50 hypothetical proteins. The 50% G + C content of the phn gene cluster differed significantly from the 66.7% G + C level of the island as a whole and the strain Cs1-4 chromosome, indicating a divergent phylogenetic origin for the phn genes. Collectively, these studies added new insights into the genetic elements affecting the PAH biodegradation capacity of microbial communities specifically, and the potential vehicles of HGT in general. PMID:22493593

  20. Implications of interferon-induced tryptophan catabolism in cancer, auto-immune diseases and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Brown, R R; Ozaki, Y; Datta, S P; Borden, E C; Sondel, P M; Malone, D G

    1991-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) is an indispensable amino acid required for biosynthesis of proteins, serotonin and niacin. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is induced by infections, viruses, lipopolysaccharides, or interferons (IFNs) and this results in significant catabolism of Trp along the kynurenine (Kyn) pathway. Intracellular growth of Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydia psittaci in human fibroblasts in vitro is inhibited by IFN-gamma and this inhibition is negated by extra Trp in the medium. Similarly, growth of a number of human cell lines in vitro is inhibited by IFN-gamma and addition of extra Trp restores growth. Thus, in some in vitro systems, antiproliferative effects of IFN-gamma are mediated by induced depletion of Trp. We find that cancer patients given Type I or Type II IFNs can induce IDO which results in decreased serum Trp levels (20-50% of pretreatment) and increased urinary metabolites of the Kyn pathway (5 to 500 fold of pretreatment). We speculate that in vivo antineoplastic effects of IFNs and clinical side effects are mediated, at least in part, by a general or localized depletion of Trp. In view of reported increases of IFNs in autoimmune diseases and our earlier findings of elevated urinary Trp metabolites in autoimmune diseases, it seems likely that systemic or local depletion of Trp occurs in autoimmune diseases and may relate to degeneration, wasting and other symptoms in such diseases. We find high levels of IDO in cells isolated from synovia of arthritic joints. IFNs are also elevated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients and increasing IFN levels are associated with a worsening prognosis. We propose that IDO is induced chronically by HIV infection, is further increased by opportunistic infections, and that this chronic loss of Trp initiates mechanisms responsible for the cachexia, dementia, diarrhea and possibly immunosuppression of AIDS patients. In these symptoms, AIDS resembles classical pellagra due to dietary deficiency of Trp and

  1. Increased glutamine catabolism mediates bone anabolism in response to WNT signaling.

    PubMed

    Karner, Courtney M; Esen, Emel; Okunade, Adewole L; Patterson, Bruce W; Long, Fanxin

    2015-02-01

    WNT signaling stimulates bone formation by increasing both the number of osteoblasts and their protein-synthesis activity. It is not clear how WNT augments the capacity of osteoblast progenitors to meet the increased energetic and synthetic needs associated with mature osteoblasts. Here, in cultured osteoblast progenitors, we determined that WNT stimulates glutamine catabolism through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and consequently lowers intracellular glutamine levels. The WNT-induced reduction of glutamine concentration triggered a general control nonderepressible 2-mediated (GCN2-mediated) integrated stress response (ISR) that stimulated expression of genes responsible for amino acid supply, transfer RNA (tRNA) aminoacylation, and protein folding. WNT-induced glutamine catabolism and ISR were β-catenin independent, but required mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation. In a hyperactive WNT signaling mouse model of human osteosclerosis, inhibition of glutamine catabolism or Gcn2 deletion suppressed excessive bone formation. Together, our data indicate that glutamine is both an energy source and a protein-translation rheostat that is responsive to WNT and suggest that manipulation of the glutamine/GCN2 signaling axis may provide a valuable approach for normalizing deranged protein anabolism associated with human diseases. PMID:25562323

  2. Increased glutamine catabolism mediates bone anabolism in response to WNT signaling

    PubMed Central

    Karner, Courtney M.; Esen, Emel; Okunade, Adewole L.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Long, Fanxin

    2014-01-01

    WNT signaling stimulates bone formation by increasing both the number of osteoblasts and their protein-synthesis activity. It is not clear how WNT augments the capacity of osteoblast progenitors to meet the increased energetic and synthetic needs associated with mature osteoblasts. Here, in cultured osteoblast progenitors, we determined that WNT stimulates glutamine catabolism through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and consequently lowers intracellular glutamine levels. The WNT-induced reduction of glutamine concentration triggered a general control nonderepressible 2–mediated (GCN2-mediated) integrated stress response (ISR) that stimulated expression of genes responsible for amino acid supply, transfer RNA (tRNA) aminoacylation, and protein folding. WNT-induced glutamine catabolism and ISR were β-catenin independent, but required mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation. In a hyperactive WNT signaling mouse model of human osteosclerosis, inhibition of glutamine catabolism or Gcn2 deletion suppressed excessive bone formation. Together, our data indicate that glutamine is both an energy source and a protein-translation rheostat that is responsive to WNT and suggest that manipulation of the glutamine/GCN2 signaling axis may provide a valuable approach for normalizing deranged protein anabolism associated with human diseases. PMID:25562323

  3. Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid on Cell Cycle Pathways in Breast Cell Lines With Different Transformation Degree.

    PubMed

    Rescigno, Tania; Capasso, Anna; Tecce, Mario Felice

    2016-06-01

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), abundant in fish, have been shown to affect development and progression of some types of cancer, including breast cancer. The aim of our study was to further analyze and clarify the effects of these nutrients on the molecular mechanisms underlying breast cancer. Following treatments with DHA we examined cell viability, death, cell cycle, and some molecular effects in breast cell lines with different transformation, phenotypic, and biochemical characteristics (MCF-10A, MCF-7, SK-BR-3, ZR-75-1). These investigations showed that DHA is able to affect cell viability, proliferation, and cell cycle progression in a different way in each assayed breast cell line. The activation of ERK1/2 and STAT3 pathways and the expression and/or activation of molecules involved in cell cycle regulation such as p21(Waf1/Cip1) and p53, are very differently regulated by DHA treatments in each cell model. DHA selectively: (i) arrests non tumoral MCF-10A breast cells in G0 /G1 cycle phase, activating p21(Waf1/Cip1) , and p53, (ii) induces to death highly transformed breast cells SK-BR-3, reducing ERK1/2 and STAT3 phosphorylation and (iii) only slightly affects each analyzed process in MCF-7 breast cell line with transformation degree lower than SK-BR-3 cells. These findings suggest a more relevant inhibitory role of DHA within early development and late progression of breast cancer cell transformation and a variable effect in the other phases, depending on individual molecular properties and degree of malignancy of each clinical case. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1226-1236, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26480024

  4. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27455877

  5. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27455877

  6. Effects of lipopolysaccharide on the catabolic activity of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cluff, C.; Ziegler, H.K.

    1986-03-05

    The ability of macrophages to degrade and catabolize antigens is of relevance both as a means to process complex antigens prior to presentation to T cells, as well as a way to down regulate immune responses by destroying the antigenicity of polypeptides. With these considerations, the authors have investigated the regulation of macrophage catabolic activity by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Catabolic activity was quantitated by following the distribution and molecular form of /sup 125/-I labelled surface components of heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes (HKLM) subsequent to their uptake by macrophages. They have compared the catabolic activity of macrophages from peritoneal exudates of mice injected i.p. with saline or LPS and have found that LPS-elicited macrophages display a greatly enhanced (3 fold) rate of catabolism. This increase in catabolic activity peaks 3 days after LPS injection and steadily declines thereafter, approaching a baseline level after 3 weeks. The enhancement of catabolic activity is under LPS gene control. LPS-elicited macrophages rapidly destroy the antigenicity of bacterial antigens and function poorly as antigen presenting cells in vitro. These results suggest that LPS elicits a macrophage population specialized for antigen degradation functions with negative regulatory effects on the induction of specific immune responses.

  7. Erythrocyte-binding antigen 175 mediates invasion in Plasmodium falciparum utilizing sialic acid-dependent and -independent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Duraisingh, Manoj T.; Maier, Alexander G.; Triglia, Tony; Cowman, Alan F.

    2003-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte-binding antigen 175 (EBA-175) is a ligand for merozoite invasion into human erythrocytes that binds to glycophorin A in a sialic acid-dependent manner. P. falciparum strain W2mef depends on sialic acid for invasion of erythrocytes, whereas 3D7 is sialic acid-independent. We generated parasites that lack expression or express truncated forms of EBA-175 in W2mef and 3D7. Lack of EBA-175 expression in W2mef parasites was associated with a switch to sialic acid-independent invasion. 3D7 parasites lacking expression of EBA-175 showed no alteration in their ability to utilize sialic acid-independent pathways. Strikingly, both W2mef and 3D7 parasites lacking EBA-175 expression invaded chymotrypsin-treated erythrocytes inefficiently compared with the parental lines. This loss of function suggests that the EBA-175/glycophorin A ligand–receptor interaction is the major chymotrypsin-resistant invasion pathway. Parasite lines with truncated EBA-175 had invasion phenotypes equivalent to parasites lacking expression of EBA-175. The EBA-175 ligand is functional in erythrocyte invasion by merozoites that utilize either sialic acid-dependent or -independent invasion pathways. This finding suggests a model where a minimal affinity supplied by multiple ligand–receptor interactions is required for successful invasion and has implications for EBA-175 as a malaria vaccine candidate. PMID:12672957

  8. Up-regulation of abscisic acid signaling pathway facilitates aphid xylem absorption and osmoregulation under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Peng, Xinhong; Wang, Qinyang; Harris, Marvin; Ge, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The activation of the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway reduces water loss from plants challenged by drought stress. The effect of drought-induced ABA signaling on the defense and nutrition allocation of plants is largely unknown. We postulated that these changes can affect herbivorous insects. We studied the effects of drought on different feeding stages of pea aphids in the wild-type A17 of Medicago truncatula and ABA signaling pathway mutant sta-1. We examined the impact of drought on plant water status, induced plant defense signaling via the abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) pathways, and on the host nutritional quality in terms of leaf free amino acid content. During the penetration phase of aphid feeding, drought decreased epidermis/mesophyll resistance but increased mesophyll/phloem resistance of A17 but not sta-1 plants. Quantification of transcripts associated with ABA, JA and SA signaling indicated that the drought-induced up-regulation of ABA signaling decreased the SA-dependent defense but increased the JA-dependent defense in A17 plants. During the phloem-feeding phase, drought had little effect on the amino acid concentrations and the associated aphid phloem-feeding parameters in both plant genotypes. In the xylem absorption stage, drought decreased xylem absorption time of aphids in both genotypes because of decreased water potential. Nevertheless, the activation of the ABA signaling pathway increased water-use efficiency of A17 plants by decreasing the stomatal aperture and transpiration rate. In contrast, the water potential of sta-1 plants (unable to close stomata) was too low to support xylem absorption activity of aphids; the aphids on sta-1 plants had the highest hemolymph osmolarity and lowest abundance under drought conditions. Taken together this study illustrates the significance of cross-talk between biotic-abiotic signaling pathways in plant-aphid interaction, and reveals the mechanisms leading to alter

  9. Up-regulation of abscisic acid signaling pathway facilitates aphid xylem absorption and osmoregulation under drought stress

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huijuan; Sun, Yucheng; Peng, Xinhong; Wang, Qinyang; Harris, Marvin; Ge, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The activation of the abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathway reduces water loss from plants challenged by drought stress. The effect of drought-induced ABA signaling on the defense and nutrition allocation of plants is largely unknown. We postulated that these changes can affect herbivorous insects. We studied the effects of drought on different feeding stages of pea aphids in the wild-type A17 of Medicago truncatula and ABA signaling pathway mutant sta-1. We examined the impact of drought on plant water status, induced plant defense signaling via the abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) pathways, and on the host nutritional quality in terms of leaf free amino acid content. During the penetration phase of aphid feeding, drought decreased epidermis/mesophyll resistance but increased mesophyll/phloem resistance of A17 but not sta-1 plants. Quantification of transcripts associated with ABA, JA and SA signaling indicated that the drought-induced up-regulation of ABA signaling decreased the SA-dependent defense but increased the JA-dependent defense in A17 plants. During the phloem-feeding phase, drought had little effect on the amino acid concentrations and the associated aphid phloem-feeding parameters in both plant genotypes. In the xylem absorption stage, drought decreased xylem absorption time of aphids in both genotypes because of decreased water potential. Nevertheless, the activation of the ABA signaling pathway increased water-use efficiency of A17 plants by decreasing the stomatal aperture and transpiration rate. In contrast, the water potential of sta-1 plants (unable to close stomata) was too low to support xylem absorption activity of aphids; the aphids on sta-1 plants had the highest hemolymph osmolarity and lowest abundance under drought conditions. Taken together this study illustrates the significance of cross-talk between biotic-abiotic signaling pathways in plant-aphid interaction, and reveals the mechanisms leading to alter

  10. Polyamine catabolism: target for antiproliferative therapies in animals and stress tolerance strategies in plants.

    PubMed

    Tavladoraki, Paraskevi; Cona, Alessandra; Federico, Rodolfo; Tempera, Giampiero; Viceconte, Nikenza; Saccoccio, Stefania; Battaglia, Valentina; Toninello, Antonio; Agostinelli, Enzo

    2012-02-01

    Metabolism of polyamines spermidine and spermine, and their diamine precursor, putrescine, has been a target for antineoplastic therapy since these naturally occurring alkyl amines were found essential for normal mammalian cell growth. Intracellular polyamine concentrations are maintained at a cell type-specific set point through the coordinated and highly regulated interplay between biosynthesis, transport, and catabolism. A correlation between regulation of cell proliferation and polyamine metabolism is described. In particular, polyamine catabolism involves copper-containing amine oxidases and FAD-dependent polyamine oxidases. Several studies showed an important role of these enzymes in several developmental and disease-related processes in both animals and plants through a control on polyamine homeostasis in response to normal cellular signals, drug treatment, environmental and/or cellular stressors. The production of toxic aldehydes and reactive oxygen species, H(2)O(2) in particular, by these oxidases using extracellular and intracellular polyamines as substrates, suggests a mechanism by which the oxidases can be exploited as antineoplastic drug targets. This minireview summarizes recent advances on the physiological roles of polyamine catabolism in animals and plants in an attempt to highlight differences and similarities that may contribute to determine in detail the underlined mechanisms involved. This information could be useful in evaluating the possibility of this metabolic pathway as a target for new antiproliferative therapies in animals and stress tolerance strategies in plants. PMID:21874532

  11. Novel Route for Agmatine Catabolism in Aspergillus niger Involves 4-Guanidinobutyrase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Saragadam, Tejaswani; Punekar, Narayan S

    2015-08-15

    Agmatine, a significant polyamine in bacteria and plants, mostly arises from the decarboxylation of arginine. The functional importance of agmatine in fungi is poorly understood. The metabolism of agmatine and related guanidinium group-containing compounds in Aspergillus niger was explored through growth, metabolite, and enzyme studies. The fungus was able to metabolize and grow on l-arginine, agmatine, or 4-guanidinobutyrate as the sole nitrogen source. Whereas arginase defined the only route for arginine catabolism, biochemical and bioinformatics approaches suggested the absence of arginine decarboxylase in A. niger. Efficient utilization by the parent strain and also by its arginase knockout implied an arginase-independent catabolic route for agmatine. Urea and 4-guanidinobutyrate were detected in the spent medium during growth on agmatine. The agmatine-grown A. niger mycelia contained significant levels of amine oxidase, 4-guanidinobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase, 4-guanidinobutyrase (GBase), and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, but no agmatinase activity was detected. Taken together, the results support a novel route for agmatine utilization in A. niger. The catabolism of agmatine by way of 4-guanidinobutyrate to 4-aminobutyrate into the Krebs cycle is the first report of such a pathway in any organism. A. niger GBase peptide fragments were identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The corresponding open reading frame from the A. niger NCIM 565 genome was located and cloned. Subsequent expression of GBase in both Escherichia coli and A. niger along with its disruption in A. niger functionally defined the GBase locus (gbu) in the A. niger genome. PMID:26048930

  12. Novel Route for Agmatine Catabolism in Aspergillus niger Involves 4-Guanidinobutyrase

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Saragadam, Tejaswani

    2015-01-01

    Agmatine, a significant polyamine in bacteria and plants, mostly arises from the decarboxylation of arginine. The functional importance of agmatine in fungi is poorly understood. The metabolism of agmatine and related guanidinium group-containing compounds in Aspergillus niger was explored through growth, metabolite, and enzyme studies. The fungus was able to metabolize and grow on l-arginine, agmatine, or 4-guanidinobutyrate as the sole nitrogen source. Whereas arginase defined the only route for arginine catabolism, biochemical and bioinformatics approaches suggested the absence of arginine decarboxylase in A. niger. Efficient utilization by the parent strain and also by its arginase knockout implied an arginase-independent catabolic route for agmatine. Urea and 4-guanidinobutyrate were detected in the spent medium during growth on agmatine. The agmatine-grown A. niger mycelia contained significant levels of amine oxidase, 4-guanidinobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase, 4-guanidinobutyrase (GBase), and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, but no agmatinase activity was detected. Taken together, the results support a novel route for agmatine utilization in A. niger. The catabolism of agmatine by way of 4-guanidinobutyrate to 4-aminobutyrate into the Krebs cycle is the first report of such a pathway in any organism. A. niger GBase peptide fragments were identified by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The corresponding open reading frame from the A. niger NCIM 565 genome was located and cloned. Subsequent expression of GBase in both Escherichia coli and A. niger along with its disruption in A. niger functionally defined the GBase locus (gbu) in the A. niger genome. PMID:26048930

  13. The influence of alternative pathways of respiration that utilize branched-chain amino acids following water shortage in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pires, Marcel V; Pereira Júnior, Adilson A; Medeiros, David B; Daloso, Danilo M; Pham, Phuong Anh; Barros, Kallyne A; Engqvist, Martin K M; Florian, Alexandra; Krahnert, Ina; Maurino, Veronica G; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2016-06-01

    During dark-induced senescence isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVDH) and D-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (D-2HGDH) act as alternate electron donors to the ubiquinol pool via the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF/ETFQO) pathway. However, the role of this pathway in response to other stresses still remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that this alternative pathway is associated with tolerance to drought in Arabidopsis. In comparison with wild type (WT) and lines overexpressing D-2GHDH, loss-of-function etfqo-1, d2hgdh-2 and ivdh-1 mutants displayed compromised respiration rates and were more sensitive to drought. Our results demonstrated that an operational ETF/ETFQO pathway is associated with plants' ability to withstand drought and to recover growth once water becomes replete. Drought-induced metabolic reprogramming resulted in an increase in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates and total amino acid levels, as well as decreases in protein, starch and nitrate contents. The enhanced levels of the branched-chain amino acids in loss-of-function mutants appear to be related to their increased utilization as substrates for the TCA cycle under water stress. Our results thus show that mitochondrial metabolism is highly active during drought stress responses and provide support for a role of alternative respiratory pathways within this response. PMID:26616144

  14. The mucopolysaccharidoses: inborn errors of glycosaminoglycan catabolism.

    PubMed

    Cantz, M; Gehler, J

    1976-06-29

    The mucopolysaccharidoses are genetic disorders of glycosaminoglycan metabolism. Patients with these diseases accumulate within the lysosomes of most tissues excessive amounts of dermatan and/or heparan sulfates, or of keratan sulfate. The clinical consequences of such glycosaminoglycan storage range from skeletal abnormalities to cardiovascular problems, and to motor and mental retardation. In all mucopolysaccharidoses, except Morquio disease, an excessive accumulation of sulfate-labeled glycosaminoglycans has been demonstrated in fibroblasts cultured from the patient's skin. It was subsequently shown that this was due to the deficiency of specific proteins which were named "corrective factors", because their addition to the culture medium effected a normalization of the impaired glycosaminoglycan catabolism in the respective mucopolysaccharidosis fibroblasts. The investigation of the function of the corrective factors, and other studies, led to the identification of the enzymatic defect in each of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Seven lysosomal enzyme deficiencies are now recognized among this group of disorders. A classification of the diseases, according to the mutant gene products, reveals that there is considerable phenotypic variation not only between diseases, but also within several disease types. With the availability of the appropriate enzyme assays, the previous difficulties in diagnosing these disorders have now been overcome. Methods are also available for the prenatal diagnosis, and the detection of heterozygous individuals, in most of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Although correction of the metabolic defect through enzyme replacement has been achieved in tissue culture, many problems remain to be solved before such therapy may become applicable in the patients themselves. PMID:820626

  15. Catabolic flexibility of mammalian-associated lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic flexibility may be generally defined as “the capacity for the organism to adapt fuel oxidation to fuel availability”. The metabolic diversification strategies used by individual bacteria vary greatly from the use of novel or acquired enzymes to the use of plasmid-localised genes and transporters. In this review, we describe the ability of lactobacilli to utilise a variety of carbon sources from their current or new environments in order to grow and survive. The genus Lactobacillus now includes more than 150 species, many with adaptive capabilities, broad metabolic capacity and species/strain variance. They are therefore, an informative example of a cell factory capable of adapting to new niches with differing nutritional landscapes. Indeed, lactobacilli naturally colonise and grow in a wide variety of environmental niches which include the roots and foliage of plants, silage, various fermented foods and beverages, the human vagina and the mammalian gastrointestinal tract (GIT; including the mouth, stomach, small intestine and large intestine). Here we primarily describe the metabolic flexibility of some lactobacilli isolated from the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, and we also describe some of the food-associated species with a proven ability to adapt to the GIT. As examples this review concentrates on the following species - Lb. plantarum, Lb. acidophilus, Lb. ruminis, Lb. salivarius, Lb. reuteri and Lb. sakei, to highlight the diversity and inter-relationships between the catabolic nature of species within the genus. PMID:23680304

  16. Catabolic flexibility of mammalian-associated lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Michelle M; O'Toole, Paul W; Ross, Reynolds Paul

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic flexibility may be generally defined as "the capacity for the organism to adapt fuel oxidation to fuel availability". The metabolic diversification strategies used by individual bacteria vary greatly from the use of novel or acquired enzymes to the use of plasmid-localised genes and transporters. In this review, we describe the ability of lactobacilli to utilise a variety of carbon sources from their current or new environments in order to grow and survive. The genus Lactobacillus now includes more than 150 species, many with adaptive capabilities, broad metabolic capacity and species/strain variance. They are therefore, an informative example of a cell factory capable of adapting to new niches with differing nutritional landscapes. Indeed, lactobacilli naturally colonise and grow in a wide variety of environmental niches which include the roots and foliage of plants, silage, various fermented foods and beverages, the human vagina and the mammalian gastrointestinal tract (GIT; including the mouth, stomach, small intestine and large intestine). Here we primarily describe the metabolic flexibility of some lactobacilli isolated from the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, and we also describe some of the food-associated species with a proven ability to adapt to the GIT. As examples this review concentrates on the following species - Lb. plantarum, Lb. acidophilus, Lb. ruminis, Lb. salivarius, Lb. reuteri and Lb. sakei, to highlight the diversity and inter-relationships between the catabolic nature of species within the genus. PMID:23680304

  17. Ferulic acid inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis via blockage of PI3K/Akt pathway in osteosarcoma cell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Gong, Xia; Jiang, Rong; Li, Hongzhong; Du, Weimin; Kuang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid, a ubiquitous phenolic acid abundant in corn, wheat and flax, has potent anti-tumor effect in various cancer cell lines. However, the anti-tumor effect of ferulic acid on osteosarcoma remains unclear. Therefore, we conduct current study to examine the effect of ferulic acid on osteosarcoma cells and explore the underlying mechanisms. In present study, ferulic acid inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in both 143B and MG63 osteosarcoma cells dose-dependently, indicated by MTT assay and Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection. Additionally, ferulic acid induced G0/G1 phase arrest and down-regulated the expression of cell cycle-related protein, CDK 2, CDK 4, CDK 6, confirmed by flow cytometry assay and western blotting. Moreover, ferulic acid upregulated Bax, downregulated Bcl-2, and subsequently enhanced caspase-3 activity. More importantly, ferulic acid dose-dependently inhibited PI3K/Akt activation. Using adenoviruses expressing active Akt, the anti-proliferation and pro-apoptosis of ferulic acid were reverted. Our results demonstrated that ferulic acid might inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis via inhibiting PI3K/Akt pathway in osteosarcoma cells. Ferulic acid is a novel therapeutic agent for osteosarcoma. PMID:27158383

  18. Ferulic acid inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis via blockage of PI3K/Akt pathway in osteosarcoma cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Gong, Xia; Jiang, Rong; Li, Hongzhong; Du, Weimin; Kuang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid, a ubiquitous phenolic acid abundant in corn, wheat and flax, has potent anti-tumor effect in various cancer cell lines. However, the anti-tumor effect of ferulic acid on osteosarcoma remains unclear. Therefore, we conduct current study to examine the effect of ferulic acid on osteosarcoma cells and explore the underlying mechanisms. In present study, ferulic acid inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in both 143B and MG63 osteosarcoma cells dose-dependently, indicated by MTT assay and Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection. Additionally, ferulic acid induced G0/G1 phase arrest and down-regulated the expression of cell cycle-related protein, CDK 2, CDK 4, CDK 6, confirmed by flow cytometry assay and western blotting. Moreover, ferulic acid upregulated Bax, downregulated Bcl-2, and subsequently enhanced caspase-3 activity. More importantly, ferulic acid dose-dependently inhibited PI3K/Akt activation. Using adenoviruses expressing active Akt, the anti-proliferation and pro-apoptosis of ferulic acid were reverted. Our results demonstrated that ferulic acid might inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis via inhibiting PI3K/Akt pathway in osteosarcoma cells. Ferulic acid is a novel therapeutic agent for osteosarcoma. PMID:27158383

  19. Excretion pathways and ruminal disappearance of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    von Soosten, D; Meyer, U; Hüther, L; Dänicke, S; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, M; Schafft, H; Spolders, M; Breves, G

    2016-07-01

    From 6 balance experiments with total collection of feces and urine, samples were obtained to investigate the excretion pathways of glyphosate (GLY) in lactating dairy cows. Each experiment lasted for 26d. The first 21d served for adaptation to the diet, and during the remaining 5d collection of total feces and urine was conducted. Dry matter intake and milk yield were recorded daily and milk and feed samples were taken during the sampling periods. In 2 of the 6 experiments, at the sampling period for feces and urine, duodenal contents were collected for 5d. Cows were equipped with cannulas at the dorsal sac of the rumen and the proximal duodenum. Duodenal contents were collected every 2h over 5 consecutive days. The daily duodenal dry matter flow was measured by using chromium oxide as a volume marker. All samples (feed, feces, urine, milk and duodenal contents were analyzed for GLY and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA). Overall, across the 6 experiments (n=32) the range of GLY intake was 0.08 to 6.67mg/d. The main proportion (61±11%; ±SD) of consumed GLY was excreted with feces; whereas excretion by urine was 8±3% of GLY intake. Elimination via milk was negligible. The GLY concentrations above the limit of quantification were not detected in any of the milk samples. A potential ruminal degradation of GLY to AMPA was derived from daily duodenal GLY flow. The apparent ruminal disappearance of GLY intake was 36 and 6%. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that the gastrointestinal absorption of GLY is of minor importance and fecal excretion represents the major excretion pathway. A degradation of GLY to AMPA by rumen microbes or a possible retention in the body has to be taken into account. PMID:27108173

  20. The metabolism of aromatic acids by micro-organisms. Metabolic pathways in the fungi

    PubMed Central

    Cain, R. B.; Bilton, R. F.; Darrah, Josephine A.

    1968-01-01

    1. The metabolic pathways of aromatic-ring fission were examined in a range of fungal genera that utilize several compounds related to lignin. 2. Most of the genera, after growth on p-hydroxybenzoate, protocatechuate or compounds that are degraded to the latter (e.g. caffeate, ferulate or vanillate), rapidly oxidized these compounds, but not catechol. 3. Such genera possessed a protocatechuate 3,4-oxygenase and accumulated β-carboxymuconate as the product of protocatechuate oxidation. This enzyme had a high pH optimum in most organisms; the Rhodotorula enzyme was competitively inhibited by catechol. 4. β-Carboxymuconate was converted by all competent fungi into β-carboxymuconolactone, which was isolated and characterized. None of the fungi produced or utilized at significant rates the corresponding bacterial intermediate γ-carboxymuconolactone. 5. The lactonizing enzymes of Rhodotorula and Neurospora crassa had a pH optimum near 5·5 and approximate molecular weights of 19000 and 190000 respectively. 6. The fungi did not degrade the isomeric (+)-muconolactone, γ-carboxymethylenebutanolide or β-oxoadipate enol lactone at significant rates, and thus differ radically from bacteria, where β-oxoadipate enol lactone is the precursor of β-oxoadipate in all strains examined. 7. The end product of β-carboxymuconolactone metabolism by extracts was β-oxoadipate. 8. Evidence for a coenzyme A derivative of β-oxoadipate was found during further metabolism of this keto acid. 9. A few anomalous fungi, after growth on p-hydroxybenzoate, had no protocatechuate 3,4-oxygenase, but possessed all the enzymes of the catechol pathway. Catechol was detected in the growth medium in one instance. 10. A strain of Penicillium sp. formed pyruvate but no β-oxoadipate from protocatechuate, suggesting the existence also of a `meta' type of ring cleavage among fungi. PMID:5691754

  1. Microalgae Synthesize Hydrocarbons from Long-Chain Fatty Acids via a Light-Dependent Pathway1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Légeret, Bertrand; Mirabella, Boris; Guédeney, Geneviève; Jetter, Reinhard; Peltier, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are considered a promising platform for the production of lipid-based biofuels. While oil accumulation pathways are intensively researched, the possible existence of a microalgal pathways converting fatty acids into alka(e)nes has received little attention. Here, we provide evidence that such a pathway occurs in several microalgal species from the green and the red lineages. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlorophyceae), a C17 alkene, n-heptadecene, was detected in the cell pellet and the headspace of liquid cultures. The Chlamydomonas alkene was identified as 7-heptadecene, an isomer likely formed by decarboxylation of cis-vaccenic acid. Accordingly, incubation of intact Chlamydomonas cells with per-deuterated D31-16:0 (palmitic) acid yielded D31-18:0 (stearic) acid, D29-18:1 (oleic and cis-vaccenic) acids, and D29-heptadecene. These findings showed that loss of the carboxyl group of a C18 monounsaturated fatty acid lead to heptadecene formation. Amount of 7-heptadecene varied with growth phase and temperature and was strictly dependent on light but was not affected by an inhibitor of photosystem II. Cell fractionation showed that approximately 80% of the alkene is localized in the chloroplast. Heptadecane, pentadecane, as well as 7- and 8-heptadecene were detected in Chlorella variabilis NC64A (Trebouxiophyceae) and several Nannochloropsis species (Eustigmatophyceae). In contrast, Ostreococcus tauri (Mamiellophyceae) and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum produced C21 hexaene, without detectable C15-C19 hydrocarbons. Interestingly, no homologs of known hydrocarbon biosynthesis genes were found in the Nannochloropsis, Chlorella, or Chlamydomonas genomes. This work thus demonstrates that microalgae have the ability to convert C16 and C18 fatty acids into alka(e)nes by a new, light-dependent pathway. PMID:27288359

  2. Adipocyte amino acid sensing controls adult germline stem cell number via the amino acid response pathway and independently of Target of Rapamycin signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Alissa R; Laws, Kaitlin M; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    How adipocytes contribute to the physiological control of stem cells is a critical question towards understanding the link between obesity and multiple diseases, including cancers. Previous studies have revealed that adult stem cells are influenced by whole-body physiology through multiple diet-dependent factors. For example, nutrient-dependent pathways acting within the Drosophila ovary control the number and proliferation of germline stem cells (GSCs). The potential role of nutrient sensing by adipocytes in modulating stem cells in other organs, however, remains largely unexplored. Here, we report that amino acid sensing by adult adipocytes specifically modulates the maintenance of GSCs through a Target of Rapamycin-independent mechanism. Instead, reduced amino acid levels and the consequent increase in uncoupled tRNAs trigger activation of the GCN2-dependent amino acid response pathway within adipocytes, causing increased rates of GSC loss. These studies reveal a new step in adipocyte-stem cell crosstalk. PMID:25359724

  3. Adipocyte amino acid sensing controls adult germline stem cell number via the amino acid response pathway and independently of Target of Rapamycin signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Alissa R.; Laws, Kaitlin M.; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    How adipocytes contribute to the physiological control of stem cells is a critical question towards understanding the link between obesity and multiple diseases, including cancers. Previous studies have revealed that adult stem cells are influenced by whole-body physiology through multiple diet-dependent factors. For example, nutrient-dependent pathways acting within the Drosophila ovary control the number and proliferation of germline stem cells (GSCs). The potential role of nutrient sensing by adipocytes in modulating stem cells in other organs, however, remains largely unexplored. Here, we report that amino acid sensing by adult adipocytes specifically modulates the maintenance of GSCs through a Target of Rapamycin-independent mechanism. Instead, reduced amino acid levels and the consequent increase in uncoupled tRNAs trigger activation of the GCN2-dependent amino acid response pathway within adipocytes, causing increased rates of GSC loss. These studies reveal a new step in adipocyte-stem cell crosstalk. PMID:25359724

  4. The Role of Amino Acid Permeases and Tryptophan Biosynthesis in Cryptococcus neoformans Survival

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, João Daniel Santos; Martho, Kevin; Tofik, Veridiana; Vallim, Marcelo A.; Pascon, Renata C.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic diversity is an important factor during microbial adaptation to different environments. Among metabolic processes, amino acid biosynthesis has been demonstrated to be relevant for survival for many microbial pathogens, whereas the association between pathogenesis and amino acid uptake and recycling are less well-established. Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen with many habitats. As a result, it faces frequent metabolic shifts and challenges during its life cycle. Here we studied the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and found that the pathway is essential. RNAi indicated that interruptions in the biosynthetic pathway render strains inviable. However, auxotroph complementation can be partially achieved by tryptophan uptake when a non preferred nitrogen source and lower growth temperature are applied, suggesting that amino acid permeases may be the target of nitrogen catabolism repression (NCR). We used bioinformatics to search for amino acid permeases in the C. neoformans and found eight potential global permeases (AAP1 to AAP8). The transcriptional profile of them revealed that they are subjected to regulatory mechanisms which are known to respond to nutritional status in other fungi, such as (i) quality of nitrogen (Nitrogen Catabolism Repression, NCR) and carbon sources (Carbon Catabolism Repression, CCR), (ii) amino acid availability in the extracellular environment (SPS-sensing) and (iii) nutritional deprivation (Global Amino Acid Control, GAAC). This study shows that C. neoformans has fewer amino acid permeases than other model yeasts, and that these proteins may be subjected to complex regulatory mechanisms. Our data suggest that the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway is an excellent pharmacological target. Furthermore, inhibitors of this pathway cause Cryptococcus growth arrest in vitro. PMID:26162077

  5. Inactivity amplifies the catabolic response of skeletal muscle to cortisol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Stuart, C. A.; Sheffield-Moore, M.; Wolfe, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    Severe injury or trauma is accompanied by both hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity or bed rest (BR). Trauma and BR alone each result in a loss of muscle nitrogen, albeit through different metabolic alterations. Although BR alone can result in a 2-3% loss of lean body mass, the effects of severe trauma can be 2- to 3-fold greater. We investigated the combined effects of hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity on muscle protein metabolism in healthy volunteers. Six males were studied before and after 14 days of strict BR using a model based on arteriovenous sampling and muscle biopsy. Fractional synthesis and breakdown rates of skeletal muscle protein were also directly calculated. Each assessment of protein metabolism was conducted during a 12-h infusion of hydrocortisone sodium succinate (120 microg/kg x h), resulting in blood cortisol concentrations that mimic severe injury (approximately 31 microg/dL). After 14 days of strict BR, hypercortisolemia increased phenylalanine efflux from muscle by 3-fold (P < 0.05). The augmented negative amino acid balance was the result of an increased muscle protein breakdown (P < 0.05) without a concomitant change in muscle protein synthesis. Muscle efflux of glutamine and alanine increased significantly after bed rest due to a significant increase in de novo synthesis (P < 0.05). Thus, inactivity sensitizes skeletal muscle to the catabolic effects of hypercortisolemia. Furthermore, these effects on healthy volunteers are analogous to those seen after severe injury.

  6. Theoretical studies of fundamental pathways for alkaline hydrolysis of carboxylic acid esters in gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, C.G.; Landry, D.W.; Ornstein, R.L.

    2000-02-23

    Fundamental reaction pathways for the alkaline hydrolysis of carboxylic acid esters, RCOOR{prime}, were examined through a series of first-principle calculations. The reactions of six representative esters with hydroxide ion were studied in the gas phase. A total of three competing reaction pathways were found and theoretically confirmed for each of the esters examined: bimolecular base-catalyzed acyl-oxygen cleavage (B{sub AC}2), bimolecular base-catalyzed alkyl-oxygen cleavage (B{sub AL}2), and carbonyl oxygen exchange with hydroxide. For the two-step B{sub AC}2 process, this is the first theoretical study to consider the individual sub-steps of the reaction process and to consider substituent effects. For the carbonyl oxygen exchange with hydroxide and for the one-step B{sub AL}2 process, the authors report here the first quantitative theoretical results for the reaction pathways and for the energy barriers. The energy barrier calculated for the second step of the B{sub AC}2 process, that is, the decomposition of the tetrahedral intermediate, is larger in the gas phase than that of the first step, that is, the formation of the tetrahedral intermediate, for all but one of the esters examined. The exception, CH{sub 3}COOC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}, does not have an {alpha} hydrogen in the leaving group. The highest energy barrier calculated for the B{sub AC}2 process is always lower than the barriers for the oxygen exchange and for the B{sub AL}2 process. The difference between the barrier for the B{sub AL}2 process and the highest barrier for the B{sub AC}2 process is only {approximately}1--3 kcal/mol for the methyl esters, but becomes much larger for the others. Substitution of an {alpha} hydrogen in R{prime} with a methyl group considerably increases the energy barrier for the B{sub AL}2 process, and significantly decreases the energy barrier for the second step of the B{sub AC}2 process. The calculated substituent shifts of the energy barrier for the first step of the

  7. Novel 14,21-dihydroxy-docosahexaenoic acids: structures, formation pathways, and enhancement of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Tian, Haibin; Hong, Song

    2010-01-01

    Chronic wounds remain a medical challenge, where well-coordinated cellular and molecular processes required by optimal healing are impaired by diabetes, aging, or other diseases. In determining mechanisms that regulate wound healing, we found that wounding induced formation of novel endogenous 14S,21S-dihydroxy-docosa-4Z,7Z,10Z,12E,16Z,19Z-hexaenoic acids (14S,21S-diHDHA);14R,21R-diHDHA; 14S,21R-diHDHA; and/or 14R,21S-diHDHA. 12-lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 catalysis in tandem converted docosahexaenoic acid to 14S,21R-diHDHA and 14S,21S-diHDHA through the intermediacy of 14S-HDHA; P450 also converted 14R-HDHA to novel 14R,21R-diHDHA and 14R,21S-diHDHA. Macrophages function as the combination of 12-lipoxgenase and P450 to generate these 14,21-diHDHA stereoisomers, as well as their intermediates 14S-HDHA, 14R-HDHA, and 21-HDHA. The structure and formation pathways of 14,21-diHDHA stereoisomers were further confirmed by macrophage biosynthesis of 14,21-diHDHA-21,22,22,22-d4 stereoisomers, 14S-HDHA-d5, 14R-HDHA-d5, and 21-HDHA-d4 from DHA-21,21,22,22,22-d5. We found that 14S,21-diHDHA and 14R,21-diHDHA enhanced wound closure, reepithelialization, granulation tissue growth, and capillary vasculature formation of murine wounds. 14S,21-diHDHA and 14R,21-diHDHA produced by macrophages may partially represent the molecular mechanisms for macrophage pro-healing function. Taken together, 14,21-dihydroxy-DHA stereoisomers and their formation pathways may represent a novel mechanism in the orchestration of wound healing processes, which may provide new insight for developing novel therapeutic modalities that counteract impairments to wound healing. PMID:19965612

  8. Novel 14,21-dihydroxy-docosahexaenoic acids: structures, formation pathways, and enhancement of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Tian, Haibin; Hong, Song

    2010-05-01

    Chronic wounds remain a medical challenge, where well-coordinated cellular and molecular processes required by optimal healing are impaired by diabetes, aging, or other diseases. In determining mechanisms that regulate wound healing, we found that wounding induced formation of novel endogenous 14S,21S-dihydroxy-docosa-4Z,7Z,10Z,12E,16Z,19Z-hexaenoic acids (14S,21S-diHDHA);14R,21R-diHDHA; 14S,21R-diHDHA; and/or 14R,21S-diHDHA. 12-lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 catalysis in tandem converted docosahexaenoic acid to 14S,21R-diHDHA and 14S,21S-diHDHA through the intermediacy of 14S-HDHA; P450 also converted 14R-HDHA to novel 14R,21R-diHDHA and 14R,21S-diHDHA. Macrophages function as the combination of 12-lipoxgenase and P450 to generate these 14,21-diHDHA stereoisomers, as well as their intermediates 14S-HDHA, 14R-HDHA, and 21-HDHA. The structure and formation pathways of 14,21-diHDHA stereoisomers were further confirmed by macrophage biosynthesis of 14,21-diHDHA-21,22,22,22-d(4) stereoisomers, 14S-HDHA-d(5), 14R-HDHA-d(5), and 21-HDHA-d(4) from DHA-21,21,22,22,22-d(5). We found that 14S,21-diHDHA and 14R,21-diHDHA enhanced wound closure, reepithelialization, granulation tissue growth, and capillary vasculature formation of murine wounds. 14S,21-diHDHA and 14R,21-diHDHA produced by macrophages may partially represent the molecular mechanisms for macrophage pro-healing function. Taken together, 14,21-dihydroxy-DHA stereoisomers and their formation pathways may represent a novel mechanism in the orchestration of wound healing processes, which may provide new insight for developing novel therapeutic modalities that counteract impairments to wound healing. PMID:19965612

  9. Improved Acid Stress Survival of Lactococcus lactis Expressing the Histidine Decarboxylation Pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524*

    PubMed Central

    Trip, Hein; Mulder, Niels L.; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2012-01-01

    Degradative amino acid decarboxylation pathways in bacteria generate secondary metabolic energy and provide resistance against acid stress. The histidine decarboxylation pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524 was functionally expressed in the heterologous host Lactococcus lactis NZ9000, and the benefits of the newly acquired pathway for the host were analyzed. During growth in M17 medium in the pH range of 5–6.5, a small positive effect was observed on the biomass yield in batch culture, whereas no growth rate enhancement was evident. In contrast, a strong benefit for the engineered L. lactis strain was observed in acid stress survival. In the presence of histidine, the pathway enabled cells to survive at pH values as low as 3 for at least 2 h, conditions under which the host cells were rapidly dying. The flux through the histidine decarboxylation pathway in cells grown at physiological pH was under strict control of the electrochemical proton gradient (pmf) across the membrane. Ionophores that dissipated the membrane potential (ΔΨ) and/or the pH gradient (ΔpH) strongly increased the flux, whereas the presence of glucose almost completely inhibited the flux. Control of the pmf over the flux was exerted by both ΔΨ and ΔpH and was distributed over the transporter HdcP and the decarboxylase HdcA. The control allowed for a synergistic effect between the histidine decarboxylation and glycolytic pathways in acid stress survival. In a narrow pH range around 2.5 the synergism resulted in a 10-fold higher survival rate. PMID:22351775

  10. Improved acid stress survival of Lactococcus lactis expressing the histidine decarboxylation pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524.

    PubMed

    Trip, Hein; Mulder, Niels L; Lolkema, Juke S

    2012-03-30

    Degradative amino acid decarboxylation pathways in bacteria generate secondary metabolic energy and provide resistance against acid stress. The histidine decarboxylation pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524 was functionally expressed in the heterologous host Lactococcus lactis NZ9000, and the benefits of the newly acquired pathway for the host were analyzed. During growth in M17 medium in the pH range of 5-6.5, a small positive effect was observed on the biomass yield in batch culture, whereas no growth rate enhancement was evident. In contrast, a strong benefit for the engineered L. lactis strain was observed in acid stress survival. In the presence of histidine, the pathway enabled cells to survive at pH values as low as 3 for at least 2 h, conditions under which the host cells were rapidly dying. The flux through the histidine decarboxylation pathway in cells grown at physiological pH was under strict control of the electrochemical proton gradient (pmf) across the membrane. Ionophores that dissipated the membrane potential (ΔΨ) and/or the pH gradient (ΔpH) strongly increased the flux, whereas the presence of glucose almost completely inhibited the flux. Control of the pmf over the flux was exerted by both ΔΨ and ΔpH and was distributed over the transporter HdcP and the decarboxylase HdcA. The control allowed for a synergistic effect between the histidine decarboxylation and glycolytic pathways in acid stress survival. In a narrow pH range around 2.5 the synergism resulted in a 10-fold higher survival rate. PMID:22351775

  11. Elucidation of the biochemical pathway of 2-phenylethanol from shikimic acid using isolated protoplasts of rose flowers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ziyin; Sakai, Miwa; Sayama, Hironori; Shimeno, Taku; Yamaguchi, Koji; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2009-05-15

    The isolated protoplasts of rose flowers were used to investigate the metabolic pathway in rose flower leading from shikimic acid or L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) to 2-phenylethanol (2PE), a dominant volatile compound in hybrid roses such as Rosa damascena Mill., R. 'Hoh-Jun', and R. 'Yves Piaget'. Deuterium-labeled L-Phe ([2H8]L-Phe) was supplied to the protoplasts isolated from R. 'Yves Piaget' petals. The volatile end products ([2Hn]-2PE, n=6-8) and their related intermediates ([2Hn]phenylacetaldehyde, n=6-8) were detected in the protoplasts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, we chemically synthesized [2,3,4,5,6-13C5]shikimic acid, a new stable isotopomer, to investigate the formation of 2PE from shikimic acid by GC-MS and nuclear magnetic resonance. We proposed the hypothetical biochemical pathway of 2PE from shikimic acid via chorismic acid, L-Phe, and phenylacetaldehyde. This protoplast system facilitates findings of metabolic intermediates and simplifies the complex branching biosynthetic pathways of floral scents to distinct individual events. PMID:19097671

  12. E-2-hexenal promotes susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae by activating jasmonic acid pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Alessandra; Mirabella, Rossana; Mugo, Cynthia; Matsui, Kenji; Haring, Michel A.; Schuurink, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are C6-molecules – alcohols, aldehydes, and esters – produced by plants upon herbivory or during pathogen infection. Exposure to this blend of volatiles induces defense-related responses in neighboring undamaged plants, thus assigning a role to GLVs in regulating plant defenses. Here we compared Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Landsberg erecta (Ler) with a hydroperoxide lyase line, hpl1, unable to synthesize GLVs, for susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (DC3000). We found that the growth of DC3000 was significantly reduced in the hpl1 mutant. This phenomenon correlated with lower jasmonic acid (JA) levels and higher salicylic acid levels in the hpl1 mutant. Furthermore, upon infection, the JA-responsive genes VSP2 and LEC were only slightly or not induced, respectively, in hpl1. This suggests that the reduced growth of DC3000 in hpl1 plants is due to the constraint of JA-dependent responses. Treatment of hpl1 plants with E-2-hexenal, one of the more reactive GLVs, prior to infection with DC3000, resulted in increased growth of DC3000 in hpl1, thus complementing this mutant. Interestingly, the growth of DC3000 also increased in Ler plants treated with E-2-hexenal. This stronger growth was not dependent on the JA-signaling component MYC2, but on ORA59, an integrator of JA and ethylene signaling pathways, and on the production of coronatine by DC3000. GLVs may have multiple effects on plant–pathogen interactions, in this case reducing resistance to Pseudomonas syringae via JA and ORA59. PMID:23630530

  13. 2-Hydroxy Acids in Plant Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Maurino, Veronica G.; Engqvist, Martin K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Glycolate, malate, lactate, and 2-hydroxyglutarate are important 2-hydroxy acids (2HA) in plant metabolism. Most of them can be found as D- and L-stereoisomers. These 2HA play an integral role in plant primary metabolism, where they are involved in fundamental pathways such as photorespiration, tricarboxylic acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, methylglyoxal pathway, and lysine catabolism. Recent molecular studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have helped elucidate the participation of these 2HA in in plant metabolism and physiology. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge about the metabolic pathways and cellular processes in which they are involved, focusing on the proteins that participate in their metabolism and cellular/intracellular transport in Arabidopsis. PMID:26380567

  14. Betulinic Acid Suppresses STAT3 Activation Pathway Through Induction of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SHP-1 in Human Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj K.; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2009-01-01

    STAT3 activation has been associated with survival, proliferation and invasion of various human cancers. Whether betulinic acid, a pentacyclic triterpene, can modulates the STAT3 pathway, was investigated in human multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We found that betulinic acid inhibited constitutive activation of STAT3, Src kinase, JAK1 and JAK2. Pervanadate reversed the betulinic acid -induced down regulation of STAT3 activation, suggesting the involvement of a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). Furthermore, betulinic acid induced the expression of the PTP SHP-1 and silencing of the SHP-1 gene abolished the ability of betulinic acid to inhibit STAT3 activation and rescues betulinic acid-induced cell death. Betulinic acid also downregulated the expression of STAT3-regulated gene products such as bcl-xL, bcl-2, cyclin D1, and survivin. This correlated with an increase in apoptosis as indicated by an increase in the sub-G1 cell population and an increase in caspase-3–induced PARP cleavage. Consistent with these results, over expression of constitutive active STAT3 significantly reduced the betulinic acid-induced apoptosis. Betulinic acid also enhanced the apoptosis induced by thalidomide (from 10% to 55%) and bortezomib (from 5% to 70%) in MM cells. Overall, our results suggest that betulinic acid down regulates STAT3 activation through upregulation of SHP-1 and this may have potential in sensitization of STAT3 over expressing tumors to chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:19937797

  15. IL-36α: a novel cytokine involved in the catabolic and inflammatory response in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Javier; Scotece, Morena; Abella, Vanessa; Lois, Ana; López, Verónica; García-Caballero, Tomás; Pino, Jesús; Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús; Gómez, Rodolfo; Lago, Francisca; Gualillo, Oreste

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies confer to IL-36α pro-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about the expression and function of IL-36α in cartilage. This study sought to analyze the expression of IL-36α in healthy and OA cartilage. Next, we determined the effects of recombinant IL-36α on catabolism and inflammation in chondrocytes. For completeness, part of the signaling pathway elicited by IL-36α was also explored. IL-36α expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR. Expression of MMP-13, NOS2 and COX-2 was also determined in OA articular chondrocytes treated with recombinant IL-36α. IκB-α and P-p38 was explored by western blot. We observed a low constitutive expression of IL-36α in healthy human chondrocytes. However, OA chondrocytes likely expressed more IL-36α than healthy chondrocytes. In addition, immune cells infiltrated into the joint and PBMCs express higher levels of IL-36α in comparison to chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes, treated with IL-36α, showed significant increase in the expression of MMP-13, NOS2 and COX-2. Finally, IL-36α stimulated cells showed NFκB and p38 MAPK activated pathways. IL-36α acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine at cartilage level, by increasing the expression of markers of inflammation and cartilage catabolism. Like other members of IL-1 family, IL-36α acts through the activation of NFκB and p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:26560022

  16. Fatty acid metabolism pathway play an important role in carcinogenesis of human colorectal cancers by Microarray-Bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Juan, Chin-Hung; Wu, Chan-Han; Lin, Shiu-Ru

    2006-02-28

    The present study systematically explored metabolic pathways and altered expressions of genes speculatively participating in colorectal carcinogenesis by using a Microarray-Bioinformatic analysis methods. The results revealed that 157 genes were up-regulated and 281 genes were down-regulated in colorectal cancer (CRC). Gene Ontology (GO) and relevant bioinformatics tools indicated that the functional category to which 438 genes (12%; 438/3800) of the most frequent alteration belonged was metabolism. The analysis of 10 colorectal cancer tissue specimens demonstrated that genes involved in fatty acid metabolic pathways had high rates of overexpression. In addition, we stimulated CRL-1790 cell line with linoleic acid (a polyunsaturated fatty acid) for 12, 24, 48 and 72 h. Cell proliferation was elevated by 5, 25, 28 and 31% (P<0.05), respectively. Further analyses revealed that the genes increasingly expressed in the cell line included enoyl-Coenzyme A, hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl Coenzyme A dehydrogenase (EHHADH), enoyl Coenzyme A hydratase, short chain, 1, mitochondrial (ECHS1); glutaryl-Coenzyme A dehydrogenase (GCDH), acyl-Coenzyme A oxidase 2, branched chain (ACOX2); acyl-Coenzyme A dehydrogenase, C-2 to C-3 short chain precursor (ACADS); carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B (CPT1B), acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 5 (ACSL5), and cytochrome P450, family 4, subfamily A, and polypeptide 11 (CYP4A11) genes. This indicated that the stimulating effect of linoleic acid on cell proliferation was due to interference with the metabolic pathway of fatty acid metabolism. In conclusion, genes with altered expression levels in CRC were mainly associated with fatty acid metabolic pathways speculated to have an important role linked to carcinogenesis. PMID:15885896

  17. Evolution of a Genome-Encoded Bias in Amino Acid Biosynthetic Pathways Is a Potential Indicator of Amino Acid Dynamics in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Fasani, Rick A.; Savageau, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Overcoming the stress of starvation is one of an organism’s most challenging phenotypic responses. Those organisms that frequently survive the challenge, by virtue of their fitness, will have evolved genomes that are shaped by their specific environments. Understanding this genotype–environment–phenotype relationship at a deep level will require quantitative predictive models of the complex molecular systems that link these aspects of an organism’s existence. Here, we treat one of the most fundamental molecular systems, protein synthesis, and the amino acid biosynthetic pathways involved in the stringent response to starvation. These systems face an inherent logical dilemma: Building an amino acid biosynthetic pathway to synthesize its product—the cognate amino acid of the pathway—may require that very amino acid when it is no longer available. To study this potential “catch-22,” we have created a generic model of amino acid biosynthesis in response to sudden starvation. Our mathematical analysis and computational results indicate that there are two distinctly different outcomes: Partial recovery to a new steady state, or full system failure. Moreover, the cell’s fate is dictated by the cognate bias, the number of cognate amino acids in the corresponding biosynthetic pathway relative to the average number of that amino acid in the proteome. We test these implications by analyzing the proteomes of over 1,800 sequenced microbes, which reveals statistically significant evidence of low cognate bias, a genetic trait that would avoid the biosynthetic quandary. Furthermore, these results suggest that the pattern of cognate bias, which is readily derived by genome sequencing, may provide evolutionary clues to an organism’s natural environment. PMID:25118252

  18. Antitumor activity of gambogic acid on NCI-H1993 xenografts via MET signaling pathway downregulation

    PubMed Central

    LI, DONGLEI; YANG, HUIWEI; LI, RUNPU; WANG, YANLI; WANG, WEIJUN; LI, DONGJIE; MA, SHAOLIN; ZHANG, XUYU

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the anti-tumor mechanisms of gambogic acid (GA) on NCI-H1993 xenografts in vivo. Non-small cell lung carcinoma NCI-H1993 cells, which harbor a MET gene amplification, were subcutaneously injected into athymic nude mice. The mice were randomly assigned to treatment with 10, 20 or 30 mg/kg GA for 3 weeks. At the end of the efficacy study, all the mice were sacrificed and the tumor tissues were subjected to western blot analysis and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. GA inhibited NCI-H1993 xenograft tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis demonstrated that expression of phosphorylated (p)-MET and its downstream signaling molecules p-AKT and p-ERK1/2 were significantly inhibited by GA. IHC analysis of Ki-67 expression demonstrated that GA treatment resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. GA exerted antitumor effects on NCI-H1993 xenografts in vivo by direct regulation of the MET signaling pathway. Theses antitumor effects were primarily a result of its anti-proliferation function. PMID:26722245

  19. Acid sphingomyelinase-ceramide system in steatohepatitis: a novel target regulating multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen; Mato, Jose M; Vance, Dennis; Kaplowitz, Neil; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2015-01-01

    Steatohepatitis (SH) is an intermediate stage of fatty liver disease and is one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease worldwide that may progress to cirrhosis and liver cancer. SH encompasses alcoholic and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, the latter being of particular concern as it is associated with obesity and insulin resistance and has become a major cause of liver transplantation. The molecular mechanisms governing the transition from steatosis to SH are not fully understood. Here we discuss emerging data indicating that the acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), a specific mechanism of ceramide generation, is required for the activation of key pathways that regulate steatosis, fibrosis and lipotoxicity, including endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy and lysosomal membrane permeabilization. Moreover, ASMase modulates alterations of the methionine cycle and phosphatidylcholine homeostasis, two crucial events involved in SH that regulate methylation reactions, antioxidant defence and membrane integrity. These new findings suggest that targeting ASMase in combination with restoring methionine metabolism and phosphatidylcholine levels may be of utility in the treatment of SH. PMID:25281863

  20. From ether to acid: A plausible degradation pathway of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Lei; Birgel, Daniel; Elling, Felix J.; Sutton, Paul A.; Lipp, Julius S.; Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chuanlun; Könneke, Martin; Peckmann, Jörn; Rowland, Steven J.; Summons, Roger E.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are ubiquitous microbial lipids with extensive demonstrated and potential roles as paleoenvironmental proxies. Despite the great attention they receive, comparatively little is known regarding their diagenetic fate. Putative degradation products of GDGTs, identified as hydroxyl and carboxyl derivatives, were detected in lipid extracts of marine sediment, seep carbonate, hot spring sediment and cells of the marine thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The distribution of GDGT degradation products in environmental samples suggests that both biotic and abiotic processes act as sinks for GDGTs. More than a hundred newly recognized degradation products afford a view of the stepwise degradation of GDGT via (1) ether bond hydrolysis yielding hydroxyl isoprenoids, namely, GDGTol (glycerol dialkyl glycerol triether alcohol), GMGD (glycerol monobiphytanyl glycerol diether), GDD (glycerol dibiphytanol diether), GMM (glycerol monobiphytanol monoether) and bpdiol (biphytanic diol); (2) oxidation of isoprenoidal alcohols into corresponding carboxyl derivatives and (3) chain shortening to yield C39 and smaller isoprenoids. This plausible GDGT degradation pathway from glycerol ethers to isoprenoidal fatty acids provides the link to commonly detected head-to-head linked long chain isoprenoidal hydrocarbons in petroleum and sediment samples. The problematic C80 to C82 tetraacids that cause naphthenate deposits in some oil production facilities can be generated from H-shaped glycerol monoalkyl glycerol tetraethers (GMGTs) following the same process, as indicated by the distribution of related derivatives in hydrothermally influenced sediments.

  1. Tributyltin and triphenyltin inhibit osteoclast differentiation through a retinoic acid receptor-dependent signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Shin-ichi; Ahn, Jae-Yong; Cha, Byung-Yoon; Teruya, Toshiaki; Hagiwara, Hiromi; Nagai, Kazuo; Woo, Je-Tae; E-mail: jwoo@isc.chubu.ac.jp

    2007-03-30

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT), have been widely used in agriculture and industry. Although these compounds are known to have many toxic effects, including endocrine-disrupting effects, their effects on bone resorption are unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of organotin compounds, such as monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), TBT, and TPT, on osteoclast differentiation using mouse monocytic RAW264.7 cells. MBT and DBT had no effects, whereas TBT and TPT dose-dependently inhibited osteoclast differentiation at concentrations of 3-30 nM. Treatment with a retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-specific antagonist, Ro41-5253, restored the inhibition of osteoclastogenesis by TBT and TPT. TBT and TPT reduced receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) induced nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 expression, and the reduction in NFATc1 expression was recovered by Ro41-5253. Our results suggest that TBT and TPT suppress osteoclastogenesis by inhibiting RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression via an RAR-dependent signaling pathway.

  2. Mycophenolic Acid Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Gastric Cancer Cells via Multiple Molecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Boying; Sharma, Ashok; Teng, Yong; Liu, Haitao; Purohit, Sharad; Xu, Heng; Zeng, Lingwen; She, Jin-Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is the metabolized product and active element of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) that has been widely used for the prevention of acute graft rejection. MPA potently inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) that is up-regulated in many tumors and MPA is known to inhibit cancer cell proliferation as well as fibroblast and endothelial cell migration. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time MPA’s antimigratory and anti-invasion abilities of MPA-sensitive AGS (gastric cancer) cells. Genome-wide expression analyses using Illumina whole genome microarrays identified 50 genes with ≥2 fold changes and 15 genes with > 4 fold alterations and multiple molecular pathways implicated in cell migration. Real-time RT-PCR analyses of selected genes also confirmed the expression differences. Furthermore, targeted proteomic analyses identified several proteins altered by MPA treatment. Our results indicate that MPA modulates gastric cancer cell migration through down-regulation of a large number of genes (PRKCA, DOCK1, INF2, HSPA5, LRP8 and PDGFRA) and proteins (PRKCA, AKT, SRC, CD147 and MMP1) with promigratory functions as well as up-regulation of a number of genes with antimigratory functions (ATF3, SMAD3, CITED2 and CEAMCAM1). However, a few genes that may promote migration (CYR61 and NOS3) were up-regulated. Therefore, MPA’s overall antimigratory role on cancer cells reflects a balance between promigratory and antimigratory signals influenced by MPA treatment. PMID:24260584

  3. Wnt signaling pathway participates in valproic acid-induced neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Liu, Yuan; Li, Sen; Long, Zai-Yun; Wu, Ya-Min

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent cells that have the capacity for differentiation into the major cell types of the nervous system, i.e. neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely prescribed drug for seizures and bipolar disorder in clinic. Previously, a number of researches have been shown that VPA has differential effects on growth, proliferation and differentiation in many types of cells. However, whether VPA can induce NSCs from embryonic cerebral cortex differentiate into neurons and its possible molecular mechanism is also not clear. Wnt signaling is implicated in the control of cell growth and differentiation during CNS development in animal model, but its action at the cellular level has been poorly understood. In this experiment, we examined neuronal differentiation of NSCs induced by VPA culture media using vitro immunochemistry assay. The neuronal differentiation of NSCs was examined after treated with 0.75 mM VPA for three, seven and ten days. RT-PCR assay was employed to examine the level of Wnt-3α and β-catenin. The results indicated that there were more β-tublin III positive cells in NSCs treated with VPA medium compared to the control group. The expression of Wnt-3α and β-catenin in NSCs treated with VPA medium was significantly greater compared to that of control media. In conclusion, these findings indicated that VPA could induce neuronal differentiation of NSCs by activating Wnt signal pathway. PMID:25755748

  4. EGCG Attenuates Uric Acid-Induced Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses by Medicating the NOTCH Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hua; Sun, Jianqin; Chen, Yanqiu; Zong, Min; Li, Shijie; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate whether (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can prevent the UA-induced inflammatory effect of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and the involved mechanisms in vitro. Methods. HUVEC were subjected to uric acid (UA) with or without EGCG treatment. RT-PCR and western blots were performed to determine the level of inflammation marker. The antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring scavenged reactive oxygen species (ROS). Functional studies of the role of Notch-1 in HUVEC lines were performed using RNA interference analyses. Results. UA significantly increased the expressions of IL-6, ICAM-1, TNF-α, and MCP-1 and the production of ROS in HUVEC. Meanwhile, the expression of Notch-1 and its downstream effects significantly increased. Using siRNA, inhibition of Notch-1 signaling significantly impeded the expressions of inflammatory cytokines under UA treatment. Interestingly, EGCG suppressed the expressions of inflammatory cytokines and the generation of ROS. Western blot analysis of Notch-1 showed that EGCG significantly decreased the expressions of inflammatory cytokines through Notch-1 signaling pathways. Conclusions. In summary, our findings indicated that Notch-1 plays an important role in the UA-induced inflammatory response, and the downregulation of Notch-1 by EGCG could be an effective approach to decrease inflammation and oxidative stress induced by UA. PMID:26539255

  5. Inverse Temperature-Dependent Pathway of Cellulose Decrystallization in Trifluoroacetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haibo; Holladay, John E.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2007-05-17

    Abstract An unusual inverse temperature-dependent pathway was observed during cellulose decrystallization in trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Decreasing the TFA treatment temperature accelerated the cellulose decrystallization process. It took only 100 minutes to completely decrystallize cellulose at 0 °C in TFA, a result not achieved in 48 hours at 25°C in the same medium. There was neither cellulose esterification nor a change of cellulose macrofibril morphology by TFA treatment at 0 °C. Our IR data suggest that TFA molecules are present as cyclic dimers when they penetrate into crystalline cellulose regions, transforming crystalline cellulose to amorphous cellulose. The TFA cyclic dimer does not form strong hydrogen bonds with cellulose since the IR vibration frequency of the carbonyl group of the dimer molecule remained unchanged after the dimer diffused into the cellulose matrix. On the other hand, the rate of TFA penetration into the cellulose matrix was greatly retarded at higher temperatures where monomeric TFA esterification took place on the external surface of crystalline cellulose. At elevated temperatures esterification of TFA monomers with cellulose, as well as water released from the esterification reaction, inhibit the diffusion rate of TFA into the cellulose crystalline region and decreases the TFA swelling capability. Based on experimental observations, our study indicates that cellulose decrystallization does not require that solvent molecules form strong hydrogen bonds with cellulose.

  6. Retinoic Acid-Dependent Signaling Pathways and Lineage Events in the Developing Mouse Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Rebecca Lee Yean; Finnell, Richard H.; Dollé, Pascal; Niederreither, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Studies in avian models have demonstrated an involvement of retinoid signaling in early neural tube patterning. The roles of this signaling pathway at later stages of spinal cord development are only partly characterized. Here we use Raldh2-null mouse mutants res