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Sample records for acid catalytic activity

  1. Catalytic Ethanol Dehydration over Different Acid-activated Montmorillonite Clays.

    PubMed

    Krutpijit, Chadaporn; Jongsomjit, Bunjerd

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the catalytic dehydration of ethanol to obtain ethylene over montmorillonite clays (MMT) with mineral acid activation including H2SO4 (SA-MMT), HCl (HA-MMT) and HNO3 (NA-MMT) was investigated at temperature range of 200 to 400°C. It revealed that HA-MMT exhibited the highest catalytic activity. Ethanol conversion and ethylene selectivity were found to increase with increased reaction temperature. At 400°C, the HA-MMT yielded 82% of ethanol conversion having 78% of ethylene yield. At lower temperature (i.e. 200 to 300°C), diethyl ether (DEE) was a major product. The highest activity obtained from HA-MMT can be attributed to an increase of weak acid sites and acid density by the activation of MMT with HCl. It can be also proven by various characterization techniques that in most case, the main structure of MMT did not alter by acid activation (excepted for NA-MMT). Upon the stability test for 72 h during the reaction, the MMT and HA-MMT showed only slight deactivation due to carbon deposition. Hence, the acid activation of MMT by HCl is promising to enhance the catalytic dehydration of ethanol. PMID:27041515

  2. Anacardic acid inhibits the catalytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Nambiar, Jyotsna; Harris, Rodney M; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Varghese, Rebu K; Kumar, Geetha B; Tainer, John A; Banerji, Asoke; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nair, Bipin G

    2012-10-01

    Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide variety of pathophysiological conditions. To further define the mechanism of CNSL action, we investigated the effect of cashew nut shell extract (CNSE) on two matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-2/gelatinase A and MMP-9/gelatinase B, which are known to have critical roles in several disease states. We observed that the major constituent of CNSE, anacardic acid, markedly inhibited the gelatinase activity of 3T3-L1 cells. Our gelatin zymography studies on these two secreted gelatinases, present in the conditioned media from 3T3-L1 cells, established that anacardic acid directly inhibited the catalytic activities of both MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our docking studies suggested that anacardic acid binds into the MMP-2/9 active site, with the carboxylate group of anacardic acid chelating the catalytic zinc ion and forming a hydrogen bond to a key catalytic glutamate side chain and the C15 aliphatic group being accommodated within the relatively large S1' pocket of these gelatinases. In agreement with the docking results, our fluorescence-based studies on the recombinant MMP-2 catalytic core domain demonstrated that anacardic acid directly inhibits substrate peptide cleavage in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC₅₀ of 11.11 μM. In addition, our gelatinase zymography and fluorescence data confirmed that the cardol-cardanol mixture, salicylic acid, and aspirin, all of which lack key functional groups present in anacardic acid, are much weaker MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitors. Our results provide the first evidence for inhibition of gelatinase catalytic activity by anacardic acid, providing a novel template for drug discovery and a molecular mechanism potentially involved in CNSL therapeutic action. PMID:22745359

  3. Anacardic Acid Inhibits the Catalytic Activity of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9

    PubMed Central

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Nambiar, Jyotsna; Harris, Rodney M.; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Varghese, Rebu K.; Kumar, Geetha B.; Tainer, John A.; Banerji, Asoke; Perry, J. Jefferson P.

    2012-01-01

    Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide variety of pathophysiological conditions. To further define the mechanism of CNSL action, we investigated the effect of cashew nut shell extract (CNSE) on two matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-2/gelatinase A and MMP-9/gelatinase B, which are known to have critical roles in several disease states. We observed that the major constituent of CNSE, anacardic acid, markedly inhibited the gelatinase activity of 3T3-L1 cells. Our gelatin zymography studies on these two secreted gelatinases, present in the conditioned media from 3T3-L1 cells, established that anacardic acid directly inhibited the catalytic activities of both MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our docking studies suggested that anacardic acid binds into the MMP-2/9 active site, with the carboxylate group of anacardic acid chelating the catalytic zinc ion and forming a hydrogen bond to a key catalytic glutamate side chain and the C15 aliphatic group being accommodated within the relatively large S1′ pocket of these gelatinases. In agreement with the docking results, our fluorescence-based studies on the recombinant MMP-2 catalytic core domain demonstrated that anacardic acid directly inhibits substrate peptide cleavage in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 11.11 μM. In addition, our gelatinase zymography and fluorescence data confirmed that the cardol-cardanol mixture, salicylic acid, and aspirin, all of which lack key functional groups present in anacardic acid, are much weaker MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitors. Our results provide the first evidence for inhibition of gelatinase catalytic activity by anacardic acid, providing a novel template for drug discovery and a molecular mechanism potentially involved in CNSL therapeutic action. PMID:22745359

  4. Catalytic Activity of Supported Metal Particles for Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey N. Rashkeev; Daniel M. Ginosar; Lucia M. Petkovic; Helen H. Farrell

    2007-08-01

    Production of hydrogen by splitting water in thermochemical water-splitting cycles, such as the sulfur-based group that employs the catalytic decomposition of sulfuric acid into SO2 and O2 is of considerable interest. Most of these processes occur at high temperatures (T = 1,000 K) and exposes catalysts to the extreme conditions such as steam, oxygen, and acid vapor that severely damage these catalysts within a short time. To develop an understanding of the factors that cause catalyst deactivation, we performed density-functional-theory (DFT)-based first-principles calculations and computer simulations for transition metal (TM) particles positioned on the two types of substrate (?-alumina and TiO2-rutile). The catalytic activity of the considered systems is defined by several factors, namely: (i) The efficiency of detaching oxygen atoms from the sulfur-containing species SOn (n = 1,2,3). The breaking of the S-O bonds may occur at both the substrate and the transition metal cluster. However, the bond-breaking at the substrate is endothermic (and takes about 1.5 eV per bond) while at low-coordinated metal atom of a cluster it is exothermic (with energy gain of about 0.5 eV per bond). This explains why the presence of transition metal clusters is necessary for catalytic activity; (ii) The ability of the cluster to “clean” itself, i.e., to eliminate oxygen from its surface, in order to regain the catalytically active sites and to continue the process. We found that the clusters of Pd and Pt with the size = 2-3 nm are more efficient in this process (at T = 1,000 K) than the clusters of other TM’s considered (Rh, Ir, Ru, and Os); (iii) The ability of the cluster to keep its size to avoid sintering (that reduces the number of low-coordinated catalytically active sites at the surface of the cluster). We found that the sintering of Rh, Ir, Ru, and Os clusters is significantly suppressed in comparison with the sintering of Pd and Pt clusters of the same size (the

  5. Stable and catalytically active iron porphyrin-based porous organic polymer: Activity as both a redox and Lewis acid catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Oveisi, Ali R.; Zhang, Kainan; Khorramabadi-zad, Ahmad; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    A new porphyrin-based porous organic polymer (POP) with BET surface area ranging from 780 to 880 m2/g was synthesized in free-base form via the reaction of meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin and a rigid trigonal building block, hexahydroxytriphenylene. The material was then metallated with Fe(III) imparting activity for Lewis acid catalysis (regioselective methanolysis ring-opening of styrene oxide), oxidative cyclization catalysis (conversion of bis(2-hydroxy-1-naphthyl)methanes to the corresponding spirodienone), and a tandem catalytic processes: an in situ oxidation-cyclic aminal formation-oxidation sequence, which selectively converts benzyl alcohol to 2-phenyl-quinazolin-4(3H)-one. Notably, the catalyst is readily recoverable and reusable, with little loss in catalytic activity. PMID:26177563

  6. Preparation and Acid Catalytic Activity of TiO2 Grafted Silica MCM-41 with Sulfate Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dai-shi; Ma, Zi-feng; Yin, Chun-sheng; Jiang, Qi-zhong

    2008-02-01

    TiO2 grafted silica MCM-41 catalyst with and without sulfate treatment were prepared. The structural and acid properties of these materials were investigated by XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption, element analysis, thermal analysis, Raman and FTIR measurements. Their acid-catalytic activities were evaluated using the cyclization reaction of pseudoionone. It was found that the obtained materials possess well-ordered mesostructure, and the grafted TiO2 components were in highly dispersed amorphous form. T/MCM41 without sulfation contained only Lewis acid sites, while Brønsted and Lewis acidities were remarkably improved for the sulfated materials ST/MCM41 and d-ST/MCM41. T/MCM-41 was not active for the cyclization reaction of pseudoionone, but ST/MCM-41 and d-ST/MCM-41 possessed favorable catalytic activities. The catalytic performance of ST/MCM-41 was comparable with that of the commercial solid acid catalyst of Amberlyst-15, and better than that of d-ST/MCM-41, although the latter underwent a second TiO2 grafting process and accordingly had higher Ti and S content. The specific surface structure of Si-O-Ti-O-S=O in ST/MCM-41 and the bilateral induction effect of Si and S=O on Si-O-Ti bonds were speculated to account for its higher acid catalytic activity.

  7. Building, characterising and catalytic activity testing of Co-C-protected amino acid complexes covalently grafted onto chloropropylated silica gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, G.; Timár, Z.; Csendes, Z.; Bajnóczi, É. G.; Carlson, S.; Canton, S. E.; Bagi, L.; Sipos, P.; Pálinkó, I.

    2015-06-01

    Co-C-protected amino acid (C-protected L-histidine, L-tyrosine, L-cysteine and L-cystine) complexes were covalently grafted onto chloropropylated silica gel, and the materials thus obtained were structurally characterised by mid/far IR and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. The superoxide dismutase-like activities of the substances were determined via the Beauchamp-Fridovich test reaction. It was found that covalent grafting and the preparation of the anchored complexes were successful in most cases. The coordinating groups varied upon changing the conditions of the syntheses. All materials displayed catalytic activity, although catalytic activities differed widely.

  8. ENHANCEMENT OF SPHINGOSINE KINASE 1 CATALYTIC ACTIVITY BY DELETION OF 21 AMINO ACIDS FROM THE COOH-TERMINUS*

    PubMed Central

    Hengst, Jeremy A.; Guilford, Jacquelyn M.; Conroy, Elizabeth J.; Wang, Xujun; Yun, Jong K.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) responds to a variety of growth factor signals by increasing catalytic activity as it translocates to the plasma membrane (PM). Several studies have identified amino acids residues involved in translocation yet how SphK1 increases its catalytic activity remains to be elucidated. Herein, we report that deletion of 21 amino acids from the COOH terminus of SphK1 (1-363) results in increased catalytic activity relative to wild-type SphK1 (1-384) which is independent of the phosphorylation state of Serine 225 and PMA stimulation. Importantly, HEK293 cells stably expressing the 1-363 protein exhibit enhanced cell growth under serum-deprived cell culture conditions. Together the evidence indicates that the COOH-terminal region of SphK1 encompasses a structural element that is necessary for the increase in catalytic activity in response to PMA treatment and that its deletion renders SphK1 constitutively active with respect to PMA treatment. PMID:19914200

  9. Surface Acidity as Descriptor of Catalytic Activity for Oxygen Evolution Reaction in Li-O2 Battery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinzhen; Wang, Fan; Wang, Beizhou; Wang, Youwei; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2015-10-28

    Unraveling the descriptor of catalytic activity, which is related to physical properties of catalysts, is a major objective of catalysis research. In the present study, the first-principles calculations based on interfacial model were performed to study the oxygen evolution reaction mechanism of Li2O2 supported on active surfaces of transition-metal compounds (TMC: oxides, carbides, and nitrides). Our studies indicate that the O2 evolution and Li(+) desorption energies show linear and volcano relationships with surface acidity of catalysts, respectively. Therefore, the charging voltage and desorption energies of Li(+) and O2 over TMC could correlate with their corresponding surface acidity. It is found that certain materials with an appropriate surface acidity can achieve the high catalytic activity in reducing charging voltage and activation barrier of rate-determinant step. According to this correlation, CoO should have as active catalysis as Co3O4 in reducing charging overpotential, which is further confirmed by our comparative experimental studies. Co3O4, Mo2C, TiC, and TiN are predicted to have a relatively high catalytic activity, which is consistent with the previous experiments. The present study enables the rational design of catalysts with greater activity for charging reactions of Li-O2 battery. PMID:26436336

  10. Substantial Humic Acid Adsorption to Activated Carbon Air Cathodes Produces a Small Reduction in Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wulin; Watson, Valerie J; Logan, Bruce E

    2016-08-16

    Long-term operation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can result in substantial degradation of activated carbon (AC) air-cathode performance. To examine a possible role in fouling from organic matter in water, cathodes were exposed to high concentrations of humic acids (HA). Cathodes treated with 100 mg L(-1) HA exhibited no significant change in performance. Exposure to 1000 mg L(-1) HA decreased the maximum power density by 14% (from 1310 ± 30 mW m(-2) to 1130 ± 30 mW m(-2)). Pore blocking was the main mechanism as the total surface area of the AC decreased by 12%. Minimization of external mass transfer resistances using a rotating disk electrode exhibited only a 5% reduction in current, indicating about half the impact of HA adsorption was associated with external mass transfer resistance and the remainder was due to internal resistances. Rinsing the cathodes with deionized water did not restore cathode performance. These results demonstrated that HA could contribute to cathode fouling, but the extent of power reduction was relatively small in comparison to large mass of humics adsorbed. Other factors, such as biopolymer attachment, or salt precipitation, are therefore likely more important contributors to long-term fouling of MFC cathodes. PMID:27414751

  11. Efficient Catalytic Ozonation over Reduced Graphene Oxide for p-Hydroxylbenzoic Acid (PHBA) Destruction: Active Site and Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxian; Xie, Yongbing; Sun, Hongqi; Xiao, Jiadong; Cao, Hongbin; Wang, Shaobin

    2016-04-20

    Nanocarbons have been demonstrated as promising environmentally benign catalysts for advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) upgrading metal-based materials. In this study, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with a low level of structural defects was synthesized via a scalable method for catalytic ozonation of p-hydroxylbenzoic acid (PHBA). Metal-free rGO materials were found to exhibit a superior activity in activating ozone for catalytic oxidation of organic phenolics. The electron-rich carbonyl groups were identified as the active sites for the catalytic reaction. Electron spin resonance (ESR) and radical competition tests revealed that superoxide radical ((•)O2(-)) and singlet oxygen ((1)O2) were the reactive oxygen species (ROS) for PHBA degradation. The intermediates and the degradation pathways were illustrated from mass spectroscopy. It was interesting to observe that addition of NaCl could enhance both ozonation and catalytic ozonation efficiencies and make ·O2(-) as the dominant ROS. Stability of the catalysts was also evaluated by the successive tests. Loss of specific surface area and changes in the surface chemistry were suggested to be responsible for catalyst deactivation. PMID:27007603

  12. Reactions of hypochlorous acid with biological substrates are activated catalytically by tertiary amines.

    PubMed

    Prütz, W A

    1998-09-15

    The activation of reactions of HOCl with a variety of model substrates by tertiary amines was investigated spectroscopically by tandem-mix and stopped-flow techniques. HOCl-induced chlorination of salicylate can be sped up by several orders of magnitude by catalytic amounts of trimethylamine (TMN). The effect is obviously due to the fast generation of reactive quarternary chloramonium ions, TMN+ Cl, which act as chain carrier in a catalytic reaction cycle. Of various catalysts tested, quinine shows the highest activity; this is attributable to the quinuclidine (QN) substituent, a bicyclic tertiary amine, forming a particularly reactive chloro derivative, QN+ Cl, which does not decompose autocatalytically. The rate of catalytic salicylate chlorination as a function of pH (around pH 7) depends not at least on the basicity of the tertiary amine; the rate increases with pH in the cases of TMN and quinuclidine (high basicity), but decreases with pH in the case of MES (low basicity). Tertiary amines also catalyze the interaction between HOCl and alkenes, as shown using sorbate as model. Reaction of HOCl with the nucleotides GMP and CMP is sped up remarkably by catalytic amounts of tertiary amines. In the case of GMP the same product spectrum is produced by HOCl in absence and presence of catalyst, but a change in the product spectra is obtained when AMP and CMP are reacted with HOCl in presence of catalyst. Using poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) as DNA model, it is shown that HOCl primarily induces an absorbance increase at 263 nm, which indicates unfolding of the double strand due to fast chlorination of thymidine; a subsequent secondary absorbance decrease can be explained by slow chlorination of adenosine. Both the primary and secondary processes are activated by catalytic amounts of quinine. No evidence was found for a radical pathway in TMN-mediated oxidation of formate by HOCl. The present results suggest that low concentrations of certain tertiary amines have the potential

  13. Increased Biomass Yield of Lactococcus lactis by Reduced Overconsumption of Amino Acids and Increased Catalytic Activities of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Adamberg, Kaarel; Seiman, Andrus; Vilu, Raivo

    2012-01-01

    Steady state cultivation and multidimensional data analysis (metabolic fluxes, absolute proteome, and transcriptome) are used to identify parameters that control the increase in biomass yield of Lactococcus lactis from 0.10 to 0.12 C-mol C-mol−1 with an increase in specific growth rate by 5 times from 0.1 to 0.5 h−1. Reorganization of amino acid consumption was expressed by the inactivation of the arginine deiminase pathway at a specific growth rate of 0.35 h−1 followed by reduced over-consumption of pyruvate directed amino acids (asparagine, serine, threonine, alanine and cysteine) until almost all consumed amino acids were used only for protein synthesis at maximal specific growth rate. This balanced growth was characterized by a high glycolytic flux carrying up to 87% of the carbon flow and only amino acids that relate to nucleotide synthesis (glutamine, serine and asparagine) were consumed in higher amounts than required for cellular protein synthesis. Changes in the proteome were minor (mainly increase in the translation apparatus). Instead, the apparent catalytic activities of enzymes and ribosomes increased by 3.5 times (0.1 vs 0.5 h−1). The apparent catalytic activities of glycolytic enzymes and ribosomal proteins were seen to follow this regulation pattern while those of enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism increased more than the specific growth rate (over 5.5 times). Nucleotide synthesis formed the most abundant biomonomer synthetic pathway in the cells with an expenditure of 6% from the total ATP required for biosynthesis. Due to the increase in apparent catalytic activity, ribosome translation was more efficient at higher growth rates as evidenced by a decrease of protein to mRNA ratios. All these effects resulted in a 30% decrease of calculated ATP spilling (0.1 vs 0.5 h−1). Our results show that bioprocesses can be made more efficient (using a balanced metabolism) by varying the growth conditions. PMID:23133574

  14. A single domain of human prostatic acid phosphatase shows antibody-mediated restoration of catalytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Choe, B K; Dong, M K; Walz, D; Gleason, S; Rose, N R

    1982-01-01

    By limited proteolysis with mouse submaxillaris protease, human prostatic acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) was cleaved into three fragments, Sp1, Sp2, and Sp3, which individually had no enzymatic activity. One of the fragments, Sp3, regained enzymatic activity after interaction with rabbit antibody to prostatic acid phosphatase. The Sp3 fragment was purified and characterized as to its molecular weight, amino acid composition, and carbohydrate content. The Sp3 fragment behaved like the parent molecule in L(+)-tartrate affinity and in trapping of a phosphoryl intermediate. The same Sp3 fragment also bears the most prominent antigenic determinants. This evidence suggest that Sp3 is the enzymatically active domain of prostatic acid phosphatase. Images PMID:6193513

  15. Understanding the enhanced catalytic activity of Cu1@Pd3(111) in formic acid dissociation, a theoretical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Feng; Li, Kai; Xie, Guangyou; Wang, Ying; Jiao, Menggai; Tang, Hao; Wu, Zhijian

    2016-06-01

    The bimetallic Cu1@Pd3(111) catalyst has been synthesized recently and exhibits better catalytic activity and durability compared with pure Pd(111) as anode catalyst in direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs). In this work, we studied the reaction mechanism of formic acid dissociation on both Pd(111) and Cu1@Pd3(111) by using the density functional method. Our calculations showed that the surface adsorption of the poisoning species CO on Cu1@Pd3(111) is weakened mainly by the strain effect rather than the Cusbnd Pd ligand effect. The Cu1@Pd3(111) can effectively promote the catalytic activity for formic acid dissociation by decreasing the barrier of CO2 formation from the preferential trans-COOH intermediate and increasing the barrier of CO formation from the reduction of CO2. We found that the H atom accumulation, electron accumulation and low electrode potential could accelerate the catalyst deactivation due to the contamination of the poisoning species CO. Furthermore, under low anode potential, the Cu1@Pd3(111) has better durability than pure Pd(111), which can be attributed to the unfavorable CO formation and the favorable CO desorption.

  16. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A.; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-06-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%.

  17. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A.; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-01-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%. PMID:27292280

  18. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-01-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%. PMID:27292280

  19. Properties and catalytic activity of magnetic and acidic ionic liquids: experimental and molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cunshan; Yu, Xiaojie; Ma, Haile; Huang, Xingyi; Zhang, Henan; Jin, Jian

    2014-05-25

    The exploitation of dual functional magnetic and acidic ionic liquids (MAILs) for hydrolysis of cellulose to platform chemicals can solve some practical challenges through easy separation of products and efficient catalyst recyclability. In this work, seven Cnmim/FeCl4 MAILs were synthesized and investigated with combined experimental and molecular dynamics. The MAILs contained FeCl4(-) anions and exhibited a typical hard magnetic materials behavior with rather strong magnetic susceptibilities. These MAILs were stable up to 250-310°C, the decomposition was started up at 250/310-480-810°C in two steps with the formation of the undecomposed residue. The Gibbs energy for the reaction of glucose/xylose conversion to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural by metal chlorides in the CnmimCl ionic liquid was studied using the density functional theory calculations and the results that C3mim/WCl3 may be the most hopeful catalyst. The MAILs have the potential to open up promising new catalytic systems because of their easy product separation and efficient catalyst recyclability. PMID:24708984

  20. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of acid-base bifunctional materials through protection of amino groups

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yanqiu; Liu, Heng; Yu, Xiaofang; Guan, Jingqi; Kan, Qiubin

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acid-base bifunctional material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized through protection of amino groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} catalyst containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties. -- Abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, transmission electron micrographs (TEM), back titration, {sup 13}C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and {sup 29}Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR were employed to characterize the synthesized materials. The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation reaction between acetone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. Compared with monofunctional catalysts of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15 and SBA-15-NH{sub 2}, the bifunctional sample of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity for the aldol condensation.

  1. Heterogeneous Fenton-like catalytic removal of p-nitrophenol in water using acid-activated fly ash.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aili; Wang, Nannan; Zhou, Jiti; Jiang, Ping; Liu, Guangfei

    2012-01-30

    The use of nitric-acid-activated fly ash (AFA), as heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst for p-nitrophenol (p-NP) removal from water, was investigated. The physicochemical characteristics of AFA were better than those of raw fly ash (RFA). Under experimental conditions of pH 1.5-5.1, H(2)O(2) dosage 83.3-333 mgL(-1), AFA loaded 5.0-20 gL(-1), and temperature 298-348 K, the p-NP removal rate increased with the increase of H(2)O(2) dosage, AFA loaded and temperature. The highest removal rate (98%) was observed at pH 2.0 when H(2)O(2) dosage 166.5 mgL(-1), AFA loaded 10 gL(-1) and temperature 298 K. However, good p-NP removal efficiency (98.8%) could still be achieved under milder pH (5.1) conditions when enough reaction time (14 h) was applied. The leached iron concentration increased with decrease in pH and with increase in reaction time. The homogenous catalysis caused by leached iron was negligible. The less reaction time and higher AFA load could be selected flexibly for catalytic stability and reusability in actual application. The probable heterogeneous catalytic mechanisms were proposed. PMID:22169244

  2. Structure and catalytic activities of ferrous centers confined on the interface between carbon nanotubes and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongqi; Yin, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hanqing; Gao, Xingfa; Zhang, Jing; Ibrahim, Kurash; Chai, Zhifang; Feng, Weiyue; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-02-14

    Preparation of heterogeneous catalysts with active ferrous centers is of great significance for industrial and environmental catalytic processes. Nanostructured carbon materials (NCM), which possess free-flowing π electrons, can coordinate with transition metals, provide a confinement environment for catalysis, and act as potential supports or ligands to construct analogous complexes. However, designing such catalysts using NCM is still seldom studied to date. Herein, we synthesized a sandwich structured ternary complex via the coordination of Fe-loaded humic acid (HA) with C=C bonds in the aromatic rings of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in which the O/N-Fe-C interface configuration provides the confinement environment for the ferrous sites. The experimental and theoretical results revealed octahedrally/tetrahedrally coordinated geometry at Fe centers, and the strong hybridization between CNT C π* and Fe 3d orbitals induces discretization of the atomic charges on aromatic rings of CNTs, which facilitates O2 adsorption and electron transfer from carbon to O2, which enhances O2 activation. The O2 activation by the novel HA/Fe-CNT complex can be applied in the oxidative degradation of phenol red (PR) and bisphenol A (BPA) in aqueous media. PMID:25580558

  3. Impairment of the catalytic activity of Escherichia coli ribonucleic acid polymerase by a unique reaction of 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan.

    PubMed Central

    Bratcher, S C; Nitta, K; Kronman, M J

    1979-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNA polymerase loses 55-65% of its catalytic activity on reaction with Nbf-Cl (4-choro-7-nitrobenzofurazan). This partial inactivation was shown to be the result of specific impairment of RNA-chain elongation, since initiation of RNA chains was not altered after treatment with Nbf-Cl. The site of reaction was shown to be a unique thiol on the beta-subunit. This thiol is not accessible to reaction with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). No protection of the enzyme against reaction with Nbf-Cl could be obtained with the inhibitor rifamycin nor with calf thymus DNA, GTP or 1,10-phenanthroline, indicating that the unique thiol is probably not within the active site. The specific impairment of RNA-chain elongation thus appears to be the result of a local conformational change which leaves chain initiation unimpaired. Changes observed in the tryptophan fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme or reaction with Nbf-Cl are consistent with formation of a Meisenheimer complex of the reagent with a nucleophilic group on the enzyme near the reactive thiol. It is proposed that formation of such a complex and a subsequent conformational change renders this thiol unusually susceptible to reaction with Nbf-Cl. PMID:393251

  4. Nanoporous bimetallic Pt-Au alloy nanocomposites with superior catalytic activity towards electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Wang, Yan; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2011-04-01

    We present a facile route to fabricate novel nanoporous bimetallic Pt-Au alloy nanocomposites by dealloying a rapidly solidified Al(75)Pt(15)Au(10) precursor under free corrosion conditions. The microstructure of the precursor and the as-dealloyed sample was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The Al(75)Pt(15)Au(10) precursor is composed of a single-phase Al(2)(Au,Pt) intermetallic compound, and can be fully dealloyed in a 20 wt.% NaOH or 5 wt.% HCl aqueous solution. The dealloying leads to the formation of the nanoporous Pt(60)Au(40) nanocomposites (np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs) with an fcc structure. The morphology, size and crystal orientation of grains in the precursor can be conserved in the resultant nanoporous alloy. The np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs consist of two zones with distinct ligament/channel sizes and compositions. The formation mechanism of these np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs can be rationalized based upon surface diffusion of more noble elements and spinodal decomposition during dealloying. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs show superior catalytic activity towards the electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid in the acid media compared to the commercial JM-Pt/C catalyst. This material can find potential applications in catalysis related areas, such as direct methanol or formic acid fuel cells. Our findings demonstrate that dealloying is an effective and simple strategy to realize the alloying of immiscible systems under mild conditions, and to fabricate novel nanostructures with superior performance. PMID:21311802

  5. Structure and catalytic activities of ferrous centers confined on the interface between carbon nanotubes and humic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongqi; Yin, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hanqing; Gao, Xingfa; Zhang, Jing; Ibrahim, Kurash; Chai, Zhifang; Feng, Weiyue; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Preparation of heterogeneous catalysts with active ferrous centers is of great significance for industrial and environmental catalytic processes. Nanostructured carbon materials (NCM), which possess free-flowing π electrons, can coordinate with transition metals, provide a confinement environment for catalysis, and act as potential supports or ligands to construct analogous complexes. However, designing such catalysts using NCM is still seldom studied to date. Herein, we synthesized a sandwich structured ternary complex via the coordination of Fe-loaded humic acid (HA) with C&z.dbd;C bonds in the aromatic rings of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in which the O/N-Fe-C interface configuration provides the confinement environment for the ferrous sites. The experimental and theoretical results revealed octahedrally/tetrahedrally coordinated geometry at Fe centers, and the strong hybridization between CNT C π* and Fe 3d orbitals induces discretization of the atomic charges on aromatic rings of CNTs, which facilitates O2 adsorption and electron transfer from carbon to O2, which enhances O2 activation. The O2 activation by the novel HA/Fe-CNT complex can be applied in the oxidative degradation of phenol red (PR) and bisphenol A (BPA) in aqueous media.Preparation of heterogeneous catalysts with active ferrous centers is of great significance for industrial and environmental catalytic processes. Nanostructured carbon materials (NCM), which possess free-flowing π electrons, can coordinate with transition metals, provide a confinement environment for catalysis, and act as potential supports or ligands to construct analogous complexes. However, designing such catalysts using NCM is still seldom studied to date. Herein, we synthesized a sandwich structured ternary complex via the coordination of Fe-loaded humic acid (HA) with C&z.dbd;C bonds in the aromatic rings of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in which the O/N-Fe-C interface configuration provides the confinement environment for the

  6. Lewis base activation of Lewis acids: catalytic, enantioselective vinylogous aldol addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R

    2007-07-20

    The generality of Lewis base catalyzed, Lewis acid mediated, enantioselective vinylogous aldol addition reactions has been investigated. The combination of silicon tetrachloride and chiral phosphoramides is a competent catalyst for highly selective additions of a variety of alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone-, 1,3-diketone-, and alpha,beta-unsaturated amide-derived dienolates to aldehydes. These reactions provided high levels of gamma-site selectivity for a variety of substitution patterns on the dienyl unit. Both ketone- and morpholine amide-derived dienol ethers afforded high enantio- and diastereoselectivity in the addition to conjugated aldehydes. Although alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone-derived dienolate did not react with aliphatic aldehydes, alpha,beta-unsaturated amide-derived dienolates underwent addition at reasonable rates affording high yields of vinylogous aldol product. The enantioselectivities achieved with the morpholine derived-dienolate in the addition to aliphatic aldehydes was the highest afforded to date with the silicon tetrachloride-chiral phosphoramide system. Furthermore, the ability to cleanly convert the morpholine amide to a methyl ketone was demonstrated. PMID:17583959

  7. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 through random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Chaewon; Han, Dongfei; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 catalyzes the decarboxylation reaction of lignin monomers and phenolic compounds such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid into their corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives, that is, 4-vinylphenol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively. Among various ferulic acid decarboxylase enzymes, we chose the FADase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4, whose crystal structure is known, and produced mutants to enhance its catalytic activity by random and site-directed mutagenesis. After three rounds of sequential mutations, FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) showed approximately 34-fold higher catalytic activity than wild-type for the production of 4-vinylguaiacol from ferulic acid. Docking analyses suggested that the increased activity of FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) could be due to formation of compact active site compared with that of the wild-type FADase. Considering the amount of phenolic compounds such as lignin monomers in the biomass components, successfully bioengineered FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 could provide an ecofriendly biocatalytic tool for producing diverse styrene derivatives from biomass. PMID:26059194

  8. MCM-41 supported 12-tungstophosphoric acid mesoporous materials: Preparation, characterization, and catalytic activities for benzaldehyde oxidation with H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Chen, Xi; Dong, Bei-Bei; Zheng, Xiu-Cheng

    2013-10-01

    Mesoporous molecular sieves MCM-41 and bulk 12-tungstophosphoric acid (HPW) were synthesized and employed to prepare 5-45 wt.% HPW/MCM-41 mesoporous materials. Characterization results suggested the good dispersion of HPW within MCM-41 when the loading of HPW was less than 35 wt.% and HPW/MCM-41 retained the typical mesopore structure of the supports. The results of the catalytic oxidation of benzaldehyde to benzoic acid with 30% H2O2, in the absence of any organic solvent and co-catalysts, indicated that HPW/MCM-41 was an efficient catalyst and 30 wt.% HPW/MCM-41 sample exhibited the highest catalytic activity among these materials.

  9. Effect of surface roughening on the catalytic activity of Pt-Cr electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction in phosphoric acid fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.T.; Kim, Y.G.; Chung, J.S.

    1995-05-01

    A Pt-Cr bimetallic catalyst with an atomic ratio of 3 to 1 was prepared by the impregnation method using a Pt/C catalyst (Pt loading: 10 weight percent). The catalyst was subjected to heat-treatment from 400 to 1,200 C. Its physical properties were characterized by H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} chemisorption, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Changes in the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction in PAFC were also examined. In particular, surface roughening caused by acid pretreatment and/or potential excursion was investigated to see its effect on the activity. Acid treatment (in 1M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} for 1 day) and/or potential excursion at a mild condition (with a limited upper potential of 0.9 V vs. RHE) effectively created surface roughening without showing particle growth via sintering. The surface roughening increased the Pt surface area and consequently mass activity (catalytic activity based on mass of Pt) of the catalysts due to the selective leaching of surface-enriched chromium species. Concerning the specific activity (catalytic activity based on the Pt surface area), Pt-Cr having a smaller lattice parameter than Pt-Fe or Pt showed better performance, and this rule could be extended for other alloy systems. The mass activity, which is more important for practical applications, could be enhanced substantially when the surface roughening was brought on the catalyst surface while keeping the metal particle size small. The largest enhancement in the mass activity was observed when a partially alloyed or disordered alloy of Pt-Cr catalyst was subjected to the acid treatment or to the potential excursion.

  10. Ionizable Side Chains at Catalytic Active Sites of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1072 Å3. The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes. PMID:22484856

  11. Improvement of catalytic activity of Candida rugosa lipase in the presence of calix[4]arene bearing iminodicarboxylic/phosphonic acid complexes modified iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ozyilmaz, Elif; Bayrakci, Mevlut; Yilmaz, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, iron oxide magnetite nanoparticles, prepared through a co-precipitation method, were coated with phosphonic acid or iminodicarboxylic acid derivatives of calix[4]arene to modulate their surfaces with different acidic groups. Candida rugosa lipase was then directly immobilized onto the modified nanoparticles through sol-gel encapsulation. The catalytic activities and enantioselectivities of the two encapsulated lipases in the hydrolysis reaction of (R/S)-naproxen methyl ester and (R/S)-2-phenoxypropionic acid methyl ester were assessed. The results showed that the activity and enantioselectivity of the lipase were improved when the lipase was encapsulated in the presence of calixarene-based additives; the encapsulated lipase with the phosphonic acid derivative of calix[4]arene had an excellent rate of enantioselectivity against the (R/S)-naproxen methyl and (R/S)-2-phenoxypropionic acid methyl esters, with E=350 and 246, respectively, compared to the free enzyme. The encapsulated lipases (Fe-Calix-N(COOH)) and (Fe-Calix-P) showed good loading ability and little loss of enzyme activity, and the stability of the catalyst was very good; they only lost 6-11% of the enzyme's activity after five batches. PMID:26698535

  12. Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Sjöblom, Magnus; Matsakas, Leonidas; Christakopoulos, Paul; Rova, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation-based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here, current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium- and Platinum-based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the production of green fuels and chemicals. PMID:26994015

  13. Carboxylic acid-grafted mesoporous material and its high catalytic activity in one-pot three-component coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Ruth; Bhaumik, Asim; Dutta, Saikat

    2014-11-01

    A new carboxylic acid functionalized mesoporous organic polymer has been synthesized via in situ radical polymerization of divinylbenzene and acrylic acid using a mesoporous silica as a seed during the polymerization process under solvothermal conditions. The mesoporous material MPDVAA-1 has been thoroughly characterized employing powder XRD, solid state {sup 13}C cross polarization magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance, FT-IR spectroscopy, N{sub 2} sorption, HR-TEM, and NH{sub 3} temperature programmed desorption-thermal conductivity detector (TPD-TCD) analysis to understand its porosity, chemical environment, bonding, and surface properties. The mesoporous polymer was used as a catalyst for a three comp onent Biginelli condensation between various aldehydes, β-keto esters, and urea/thioureas to give 3,4-dihydropyrimidine-2(1H)-ones. The reactions were carried out under conventional heating as well as solvent-free microwave irradiation of solid components, and in both the cases, the mesoporous polymer MPDVAA-1 proved to be a powerful, robust, and reusable catalyst with high catalytic efficiency.

  14. Carboxylic acid-grafted mesoporous material and its high catalytic activity in one-pot three-component coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Ruth; Dutta, Saikat; Bhaumik, Asim

    2014-11-01

    A new carboxylic acid functionalized mesoporous organic polymer has been synthesized via in situ radical polymerization of divinylbenzene and acrylic acid using a mesoporous silica as a seed during the polymerization process under solvothermal conditions. The mesoporous material MPDVAA-1 has been thoroughly characterized employing powder XRD, solid state 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance, FT-IR spectroscopy, N2 sorption, HR-TEM, and NH3 temperature programmed desorption-thermal conductivity detector (TPD-TCD) analysis to understand its porosity, chemical environment, bonding, and surface properties. The mesoporous polymer was used as a catalyst for a three comp onent Biginelli condensation between various aldehydes, β-keto esters, and urea/thioureas to give 3,4-dihydropyrimidine-2(1H)-ones. The reactions were carried out under conventional heating as well as solvent-free microwave irradiation of solid components, and in both the cases, the mesoporous polymer MPDVAA-1 proved to be a powerful, robust, and reusable catalyst with high catalytic efficiency.

  15. Investigation of catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction of Pt dispersed on boron doped graphene in acid medium.

    PubMed

    Pullamsetty, Ashok; Sundara, Ramaprabhu

    2016-10-01

    Boron doped graphene was prepared by a facile method and platinum (Pt) decoration over boron doped graphene was done in various chemical reduction methods such as sodium borohydride (NaBH4), polyol and modified polyol. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the synthesized catalyst particles are present in a nanocrystalline structure and transmission and scanning electron microscopy were employed to investigate the morphology and particle distribution. The electrochemical properties were investigated with the help of the rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique and cyclic voltammetry. The results show that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) takes place by a four-electron process. The kinetics of the ORR was evaluated using K-L and Tafel plots. The electrocatalyst obtained in modified polyol reduction method has shown the better catalytic activity compared to other two electrocatalysts. PMID:27393888

  16. Identification of amino acids important for the catalytic activity of the collagen glucosyltransferase associated with the multifunctional lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunguang; Risteli, Maija; Heikkinen, Jari; Hussa, Anna-Kaisa; Uitto, Lahja; Myllyla, Raili

    2002-05-24

    Collagen glucosyltransferase (GGT) activity has recently been shown to be associated with human lysyl hydroxylase (LH) isoform 3 (LH3) (Heikkinen, J., Risteli, M., Wang, C., Latvala, J., Rossi, M., Valtavaara, M., Myllylä, R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 36158-36163). The LH and GGT activities of the multifunctional LH3 protein modify lysyl residues in collagens posttranslationally to form hydroxylysyl and glucosylgalactosyl hydroxylysyl residues respectively. We now report that in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, where only one ortholog is found for lysyl hydroxylase, the LH and GGT activities are also associated with the same gene product. The aim of the present studies is the identification of amino acids important for the catalytic activity of GGT. Our data indicate that the GGT active site is separate from the carboxyl-terminal LH active site of human LH3, the amino acids important for the GGT activity being located at the amino-terminal part of the molecule. Site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved cysteine at position 144 to isoleucine and a leucine at position 208 to isoleucine caused a marked reduction in GGT activity. These amino acids were conserved in C. elegans LH and mammalian LH3, but not in LH1 or LH2, which lack GGT activity. The data also reveal a DXD-like motif in LH3 characteristic of many glycosyltransferases and the mutagenesis of aspartates of this motif eliminated the GGT activity. Reduction in GGT activity was not accompanied by a change in the LH activity of the molecule. Thus GGT activity can be manipulated independently of LH activity in LH3. These data provide the information needed to design knock-out studies for investigation of the function of glucosylgalactosyl hydroxylysyl residues of collagens in vivo. PMID:11896059

  17. Improvement of catalytic activity of lipase in the presence of calix[4]arene valeric acid or hydrazine derivative.

    PubMed

    Akoz, Enise; Sayin, Serkan; Kaplan, Selcuk; Yilmaz, Mustafa

    2015-03-01

    Sol-gel encapsulation is a simple but powerful method to enhance the enantioselectivity of lipase-catalyzed transformations in an isooctane/aqueous buffer solution. Candida rugosa lipase was encapsulated according to a sol-gel procedure in the presence and absence of calix[4]arene hydrazine or carboxylic acid derivatives with Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles as an additive. The activity of the encapsulated lipases was evaluated for the enantioselective hydrolysis of racemic Naproxen methyl ester and the hydrolysis of p-Nitrophenylpalmitate. The results indicate that the encapsulated lipase without calix[4]arene derivative has lower conversion and enantioselectivity compared to the encapsulated lipase with calix[4]arene derivative. It was found that the calix[4]arene hydrazine and carboxylic acid-based encapsulated lipases have excellent activity and enantioselectivity (E >300) compared to encapsulated lipase without the calix[4]arene derivatives. PMID:25326059

  18. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas Jd; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia. PMID:26725083

  19. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain

    PubMed Central

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael; Beigneux, Anne P; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Fong, Loren G; Bensadouen, André; Jørgensen, Thomas JD; Young, Stephen G; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12095.001 PMID:26725083

  20. Arginine kinase in the demosponge Suberites domuncula: regulation of its expression and catalytic activity by silicic acid.

    PubMed

    Perovic-Ottstadt, Sanja; Wiens, Matthias; Schröder, Heinz-C; Batel, Renato; Giovine, Marco; Krasko, Anatoli; Müller, Isabel M; Müller, Werner E G

    2005-02-01

    In Demospongiae (phylum Porifera) the formation of the siliceous skeleton, composed of spicules, is an energetically expensive reaction. The present study demonstrates that primmorphs from the demosponge Suberites domuncula express the gene for arginine kinase after exposure to exogenous silicic acid. The deduced sponge arginine kinase sequence displays the two characteristic domains of the ATP:guanido phosphotransferases; it can be grouped to the 'usual' mono-domain 40 kDa guanidino kinases (arginine kinases). Phylogenetic studies indicate that the metazoan guanidino kinases evolved from this ancestral sponge enzyme; among them are also the 'unusual' two-domain 80 kDa guanidino kinases. The high expression level of the arginine kinase gene was already measurable 1 day after addition of silicic acid by northern blot, as well as by in situ hybridization analysis. Parallel determinations of enzyme activity confirmed that high levels of arginine kinase are present in primmorphs that had been exposed for 1-5 days to silicic acid. Finally, transmission electron-microscopical studies showed that primmorphs containing high levels of arginine kinase also produce siliceous spicules. These data highlight that silicic acid is an inorganic morphogenetic factor that induces the expression of the arginine kinase, which in turn probably catalyzes the reversible transfer of high-energy phosphoryl groups. PMID:15695756

  1. Catalytic Activities Of [GADV]-Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Takae; Fukushima, Jun; Maruyama, Masako; Iwamoto, Ryoko; Ikehara, Kenji

    2005-10-01

    We have previously postulated a novel hypothesis for the origin of life, assuming that life on the earth originated from “[GADV]-protein world”, not from the “RNA world” (see Ikehara's review, 2002). The [GADV]-protein world is constituted from peptides and proteins with random sequences of four amino acids (glycine [G], alanine [A], aspartic acid [D] and valine [V]), which accumulated by pseudo-replication of the [GADV]-proteins. To obtain evidence for the hypothesis, we produced [GADV]-peptides by repeated heat-drying of the amino acids for 30 cycles ([GADV]-P30) and examined whether the peptides have some catalytic activities or not. From the results, it was found that the [GADV]-P30 can hydrolyze several kinds of chemical bonds in molecules, such as umbelliferyl-β-D-galactoside, glycine-p-nitroanilide and bovine serum albumin. This suggests that [GADV]-P30 could play an important role in the accumulation of [GADV]-proteins through pseudo-replication, leading to the emergence of life. We further show that [GADV]-octapaptides with random sequences, but containing no cyclic compounds as diketepiperazines, have catalytic activity, hydrolyzing peptide bonds in a natural protein, bovine serum albumin. The catalytic activity of the octapeptides was much higher than the [GADV]-P30 produced through repeated heat-drying treatments. These results also support the [GADV]-protein-world hypothesis of the origin of life (see Ikehara's review, 2002). Possible steps for the emergence of life on the primitive earth are presented.

  2. Formation and catalytic activity of high molecular weight soluble polymers produced by heating amino acids in a modified sea medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okihana, Hiroyuki

    1982-06-01

    Eighteen protein amino acids with milk casein composition were heated in a modified sea medium. Marigranules were formed in the precipitates and soluble polymers were formed in the supernatant. Time course of the reaction (ultraviolet spectra, the concentration of metal ions, and the concentration of amino acids in the supernatant) were measured. The time course of the formation of the soluble polymers was also studied by Bio-Gel P-2 column. High molecular weight soluble polymers (HMWSP) were separated from low molecular weight ones by dialysis. It was shown that these polymers catalyzed the dehydrogenation of NADH. These polymers also catalyzed the coupled reaction between dehydrogenation of NADH and reduction of resazurin. This coupled reaction was accelerated by the light.

  3. Catalytic activities of zeolite compounds for decomposing aqueous ozone.

    PubMed

    Kusuda, Ai; Kitayama, Mikito; Ohta, Yoshio

    2013-12-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP), chemical oxidation using aqueous ozone in the presence of appropriate catalysts to generate highly reactive oxygen species, offers an attractive option for removing poorly biodegradable pollutants. Using the commercial zeolite powders with various Si/Al ratios and crystal structures, their catalytic activities for decomposing aqueous ozone were evaluated by continuously flowing ozone to water containing the zeolite powders. The hydrophilic zeolites (low Si/Al ratio) with alkali cations in the crystal structures were found to possess high catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. The hydrophobic zeolite compounds (high Si/Al ratio) were found to absorb ozone very well, but to have no catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Their catalytic activities were also evaluated by using the fixed bed column method. When alkali cations were removed by acid rinsing or substituted by alkali-earth cations, the catalytic activities was significantly deteriorated. These results suggest that the metal cations on the crystal surface of the hydrophilic zeolite would play a key role for catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. PMID:25078817

  4. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method. PMID:27198855

  5. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-05-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method.

  6. Reducing-Agent-Free Instant Synthesis of Carbon-Supported Pd Catalysts in a Green Leidenfrost Droplet Reactor and Catalytic Activity in Formic Acid Dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Jin, Min-Ho; Lee, Young-Joo; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Park, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The development of green synthesis methods for supported noble metal catalysts remains important challenges to improve their sustainability. Here we first synthesized carbon-supported Pd catalysts in a green Leidenfrost droplet reactor without reducing agents, high-temperature calcination and reduction procedures. When the aqueous solution containing Pd nitrate precursor, carbon support, and water is dripped on a hot plate, vapor layer is formed between a solution droplet and hot surface, which allow the solution droplet to be levitated on the hot surface (Leidenfrost phenomena). Subsequently, Pd nanoparticles can be prepared without reducing agents in a weakly basic droplet reactor created by the Leidenfrost phenomena, and then the as-prepared Pd nanoparticles are loaded on carbon supports during boiling down the droplet on hot surface. Compared to conventional incipient wetness and chemical synthetic methods, the Leidenfrost droplet reactor does not need energy-consuming, time-consuming, and environmentally unfriendly procedures, which leads to much shorter synthesis time, lower carbon dioxide emission, and more ecofriendly process in comparison with conventional synthesis methods. Moreover, the catalysts synthesized in the Leidenfrost droplet reactor provided much better catalytic activity for room-temperature formic acid decomposition than those prepared by the incipient wetness method. PMID:27198855

  7. Catalytic activity of acid and base with different concentration on sol-gel kinetics of silica by ultrasonic method.

    PubMed

    Das, R K; Das, M

    2015-09-01

    The effects of both acid (acetic acid) and base (ammonia) catalysts in varying on the sol-gel synthesis of SiO2 nanoparticles using tetra ethyl ortho silicate (TEOS) as a precursor was determined by ultrasonic method. The ultrasonic velocity was received by pulsar receiver. The ultrasonic velocity in the sol and the parameter ΔT (time difference between the original pulse and first back wall echo of the sol) was varied with time of gelation. The graphs of ln[ln1/ΔT] vs ln(t), indicate two region - nonlinear region and a linear region. The time corresponds to the point at which the non-linear region change to linear region is considered as gel time for the respective solutions. Gelation time is found to be dependent on the concentration and types of catalyst and is found from the graphs based on Avrami equation. The rate of condensation is found to be faster for base catalyst. The gelation process was also characterized by viscosity measurement. Normal sol-gel process was also carried out along with the ultrasonic one to compare the effectiveness of ultrasonic. The silica gel was calcined and the powdered sample was characterized with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectra, X-ray diffractogram, and FTIR spectroscopy. PMID:25600993

  8. Lewis base activation of Lewis acids. Catalytic enantioselective addition of silyl enol ethers of achiral methyl ketones to aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R

    2003-06-26

    A highly enantioselective addition of silyl enol ethers derived from simple methyl ketones is described. The catalyst system of silicon tetrachloride activated by a chiral bisphosphoramide (R,R)-7 effectively promotes the addition of a variety of unsubstituted silyl enol ethers to aromatic, olefinic, and heteroaromatic aldehydes in excellent yield. [reaction: see text] PMID:12816434

  9. Catalytic hydroxylation of benzoic acid by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pulippurasseril, C.R.; Filippova, T.Yu.; Dedov, A.G.

    1992-12-31

    An effective catalytic system based on Fe(III) and surfactants is proposed for the hydroxylation of benozic acid by hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous medium at a temperature of 30-80{degrees}C. 8 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Characteristics of post-impregnated SBA-15 with 12- Tungstophosphoric acid and its correlation with catalytic activity in selective esterification of glycerol to monolaurate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoo, P. Y.; Abdullah, A. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Selective esterification of glycerol and lauric acid to monolaurin was conducted using 12-tungstophosphoric acid (HPW) incorporated SBA-15 as catalyst. They were synthesized with HPW loadings of 10-40 wt. % via post impregnation and characterized in terms of surficial and structural characteristic, acidity and morphology. Relatively high lauric acid conversion (up to 95%) and monolaurin yield (53%) were observed while the activity was successfully correlated to the material behaviours, i.e. highly acidic active acid sites within highly uniformed mesopores. The effects of different reaction parameters including reactant ratio (1:1-5:1), catalyst loading (1-5 wt. %) and length of fatty acid were also elucidated. Reduced fatty acid conversion was observed when longer fatty acids were used, thus further strengthen the idea of size selectivity effect provided by the synthesized catalysts.

  11. [Preparation of Cu/ZrO2/S2O8(2-)/gamma-Al2O3 solid acid catalyst and its catalytic activity to selective reduction of NO].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xi-kun; Wang, Xiao-ming

    2008-06-01

    Cu/ZrO2/S2O8(2-)/gamma-Al2O3 solid acid catalyst was prepared by loading of (NH4)2S2O8, ZrOCl2, and Cu(NO3)2 onto gamma-Al2O3 step by step, which was obtained from calcining of pseudoboehmite. The catalytic property of Cu/ZrO2/S2O8(2-)/gamma-Al2O3 on the selective reduction of NO by C3H6 in excess oxygen was investigated. The relationship between the structure and the catalytic property of Cu/ZrO2/S2O8(2-)/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst was also explored by means of SEM, XRD, Py-IR and TPR. The experimental results of catalytic activity of the title catalyst indicated that the maximum conversion rate of NO could reach 82.9% in the absence of water and was up to 80.2% even in the presence of 10% water vapor. The results of the structural characterization toward the catalyst showed that S2O8(2-) and ZrO2 could restrain the sinteration of gamma-Al2O3 particles and the formation of CuAl2O4 spinelle, and also facilitate the formation of new acidic sites (Brönsted acid) and the enhance of the acidity on the surface of the catalyst. In addition, ZrO2 could increase the reducibility of Cu on the catalyst. Consequently, the catalytic activity and hydrothermal stability of the catalyst were improved effectively. PMID:18763532

  12. Treatment of activated carbon to enhance catalytic activity for reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, B.J.; Rhee, H.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Lee, J.K.; Park, D. )

    1994-11-01

    Catalytic activity of activated carbon treated with various techniques was examined in a fixed bed reactor for the reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia at 150 C. Activated carbon derived from coconut shell impregnated with an aqueous solution of ammonium sulfate, further treated with sulfuric acid, dried at 120 C, and then heated in an inert gas stream at 400 C, showed the highest catalytic activity within the range of experimental conditions. The enhancement of catalytic activity of modified activated carbon could be attributed to the increase in the amount of oxygen function groups which increased the adsorption site for ammonia. Catalytic activity of activated carbons depended on the surface area and the oxygen content as well.

  13. Clay Minerals as Solid Acids and Their Catalytic Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helsen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses catalytic properties of clays, attributed to acidity of the clay surface. The formation of carbonium ions on montmorillonite is used as a demonstration of the presence of surface acidity, the enhanced dissociation of water molecules when polarized by cations, and the way the surface can interact with organic substances. (Author/JN)

  14. Preparation, characterization and catalytic properties of MCM-48 supported tungstophosphoric acid mesoporous materials for green synthesis of benzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Chen, Xi; Chen, Ya; Zheng, Xiu-Cheng

    2014-03-15

    MCM-48 and tungstophosphoric acid (HPW) were prepared and applied for the synthesis of HPW/MCM-48 mesoporous materials. The characterization results showed that HPW/MCM-48 obtained retained the typical mesopore structure of MCM-48, and the textural parameters decreased with the increase loading of HPW. The catalytic oxidation results of benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde with 30% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} indicated that HPW/MCM-48 was an efficient catalyst for the green synthesis of benzoic acid. Furthermore, 35 wt% HPW/MCM-48 sample showed the highest activity under the reaction conditions. Highlights: • 5–45 wt% HPW/MCM-48 mesoporous catalysts were prepared and characterized. • Their catalytic activities for the green synthesis of benzoic acid were investigated. • HPW/MCM-48 was approved to be an efficient catalyst. • 5 wt% HPW/MCM-48 exhibited the highest catalytic activity.

  15. Pivalase catalytic antibodies: towards abzymatic activation of prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Bensel, N; Reymond, M T; Reymond, J L

    2001-11-01

    Screening of monoclonal-antibody libraries generated against the tert-butyl phosphonate hapten 2 and the chloromethyl phosphonate hapten 3 with pivaloyloxymethyl-umbelliferone 1 as a fluorogenic substrate led to the isolation of eleven catalytic antibodies with rate accelerations around kcat/ kuncat = 10(3). The antibodies are not inhibited by the product and accept different acyloxymethyl derivatives of acidic phenols as substrates. The highest activity was found for the bulky, chemically less-reactive pivaloyloxymethyl group: there is no activity with acetoxymethyl or acetyl esters. This difference might reflect the preference of the immune system for hydrophobic interactions in binding and catalysis. Pivalase catalytic antibodies might be useful for activating orally available pivaloyloxymethyl prodrugs. PMID:11757652

  16. Catalytic conversion of lactic acid and its derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Kokitkar, P.B.; Langford, R.; Miller, D.J.; Jackson, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    The catalytic upgrading of lactic acid and methyl lactate is being investigated. With the commercialization of inexpensive starch fermentation technologies, US production of lactic acid is undergoing a surge. Dropping cost and increased availability offer a major opportunity to develop lactic acid as a renewable feedstock for chemicals production. IT can be catalytically converted into several important chemical intermediates currently derived from petroleum including acrylic acid, propanoic acid, and 2,3-pentanedione. The process can expand the potential of biomass as a substitute feedstock for petroleum and can benefit both the US chemical process industry and US agriculture via increased production of high-value, non-food products from crops and crop byproducts. Reaction studies of lactic acid and its ester are conducted in fixed bed reactors at 250-380{degrees}C and 0.1-0.5 MPa (1-5 atm) using salt catalysts on low surface area supports. Highest selectivities achieved are 42% to acrylic acid and 55% to 2,3-pentanedione from lactic acid over NaNO{sub 3} catalyst on low surface area silica support. High surface area (microporous) or highly acidic supports promote fragmentation to acetaldehyde and thus reduce yields of desirable products. The support acidity gives rice to lactic acid from neat methyl lactate feed but the lactic acid yield goes down after the nitrate salt is impregnated on the support. Both lactic acid and methyl lactate form 2,3-pentanedione. Methyl lactate reactions are more complex since it forms all the products obtained from lactic acid as well as many corresponding esters of the acids obtained from lactic acid (mainly methyl acrylate, methyl propionate, methyl acetate). At high temperatures, methyl acetate and acetic acid yields become significant from methyl lactate whereas lactic acid gives significant amount of acetol at high temperatures.

  17. Catalytic kinetic spectrophotometry for the determination of trace amount of oxalic acid in biological samples with oxalic acid-rhodamine B-potassium dichromate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Qing-Zhou; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Qing-Zhou

    2006-09-01

    A new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method was proposed for determining trace oxalic acid based on the catalytic effect of oxalate on the oxidation of potassium dichromate with rhodamin B in 0.10 M of sulfuric acid. Good linearity is obtained over the concentration range 0.40-6.0 μg/mL of oxalic acid. After the reactions of the catalytic and non-catalytic systems were terminated by using 2.00 mL of 4 M sodium hydroxide solution, they can be stable for 3 h at room temperature. The apparent activation energy of the catalytic reaction is 12.44 kJ/mol. The effect of 50 coexisting substances was observed. The method was used to determine trace oxalic acid in tea, spinach and urine samples with satisfactory results.

  18. Uniquely Localized Intra-Molecular Amino Acid Concentrations at the Glycolytic Enzyme Catalytic/Active Centers of Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota are Associated with Their Proposed Temporal Appearances on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, J. Dennis; Gerard, David; Pearl, Dennis K.

    2013-04-01

    The distributions of amino acids at most-conserved sites nearest catalytic/active centers (C/AC) in 4,645 sequences of ten enzymes of the glycolytic Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota are similar to the proposed temporal order of their appearance on Earth. Glycine, isoleucine, leucine, valine, glutamic acid and possibly lysine often described as prebiotic, i.e., existing or occurring before the emergence of life, were localized in positional and conservational defined aggregations in all enzymes of all Domains. The distributions of all 20 biologic amino acids in most-conserved sites nearest their C/ACs were quite different either from distributions in sites less-conserved and further from their C/ACs or from all amino acids regardless of their position or conservation. The major concentrations of glycine, e.g., perhaps the earliest prebiotic amino acid, occupies ≈16 % of all the most-conserved sites within a volume of ≈7-8 Å radius from their C/ACs and decreases linearly towards the molecule's peripheries. Spatially localized major concentrations of isoleucine, leucine and valine are in the mid-conserved and mid-distant sites from their C/ACs in protein interiors. Lysine and glutamic acid comprise ≈25-30 % of all amino acids within an irregular volume bounded by ≈24-28 Å radii from their C/ACs at the most-distant least-conserved sites. The unreported characteristics of these amino acids: their spatially and conservationally identified concentrations in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota, suggest some common structural organization of glycolytic enzymes that may be relevant to their evolution and that of other proteins. We discuss our data in relation to enzyme evolution, their reported prebiotic putative temporal appearances on Earth, abundances, biological "cost", neighbor-sequence preferences or "ordering" and some thermodynamic parameters.

  19. Uniquely localized intra-molecular amino acid concentrations at the glycolytic enzyme catalytic/active centers of Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota are associated with their proposed temporal appearances on earth.

    PubMed

    Pollack, J Dennis; Gerard, David; Pearl, Dennis K

    2013-04-01

    The distributions of amino acids at most-conserved sites nearest catalytic/active centers (C/AC) in 4,645 sequences of ten enzymes of the glycolytic Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota are similar to the proposed temporal order of their appearance on Earth. Glycine, isoleucine, leucine, valine, glutamic acid and possibly lysine often described as prebiotic, i.e., existing or occurring before the emergence of life, were localized in positional and conservational defined aggregations in all enzymes of all Domains. The distributions of all 20 biologic amino acids in most-conserved sites nearest their C/ACs were quite different either from distributions in sites less-conserved and further from their C/ACs or from all amino acids regardless of their position or conservation. The major concentrations of glycine, e.g., perhaps the earliest prebiotic amino acid, occupies ≈ 16 % of all the most-conserved sites within a volume of ≈ 7-8 Å radius from their C/ACs and decreases linearly towards the molecule's peripheries. Spatially localized major concentrations of isoleucine, leucine and valine are in the mid-conserved and mid-distant sites from their C/ACs in protein interiors. Lysine and glutamic acid comprise ≈ 25-30 % of all amino acids within an irregular volume bounded by ≈ 24-28 Å radii from their C/ACs at the most-distant least-conserved sites. The unreported characteristics of these amino acids: their spatially and conservationally identified concentrations in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota, suggest some common structural organization of glycolytic enzymes that may be relevant to their evolution and that of other proteins. We discuss our data in relation to enzyme evolution, their reported prebiotic putative temporal appearances on Earth, abundances, biological "cost", neighbor-sequence preferences or "ordering" and some thermodynamic parameters. PMID:23715690

  20. Catalytic Activity of a Binary Informational Macromolecule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, John S.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules are thought to have played a prominent role in the early history of life on Earth based on their ability both to encode genetic information and to exhibit catalytic function. The modern genetic alphabet relies on two sets of complementary base pairs to store genetic information. However, due to the chemical instability of cytosine, which readily deaminates to uracil, a primitive genetic system composed of the bases A, U, G and C may have been difficult to establish. It has been suggested that the first genetic material instead contained only a single base-pairing unie'. Here we show that binary informational macromolecules, containing only two different nucleotide subunits, can act as catalysts. In vitro evolution was used to obtain ligase ribozymes composed of only 2,6-diaminopurine and uracil nucleotides, which catalyze the template-directed joining of two RNA molecules, one bearing a 5'-triphosphate and the other a 3'-hydroxyl. The active conformation of the fastest isolated ribozyme had a catalytic rate that was about 36,000-fold faster than the uncatalyzed rate of reaction. This ribozyme is specific for the formation of biologically relevant 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages.

  1. Concentration of Specific Amino Acids at the Catalytic/Active Centers of Highly-Conserved ``Housekeeping'' Enzymes of Central Metabolism in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota: Is There a Widely Conserved Chemical Signal of Prebiotic Assembly?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, J. Dennis; Pan, Xueliang; Pearl, Dennis K.

    2010-06-01

    In alignments of 1969 protein sequences the amino acid glycine and others were found concentrated at most-conserved sites within ˜15 Å of catalytic/active centers (C/AC) of highly conserved kinases, dehydrogenases or lyases of Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. Lysine and glutamic acid were concentrated at least-conserved sites furthest from their C/ACs. Logistic-regression analyses corroborated the “movement” of glycine towards and lysine away from their C/ACs: the odds of a glycine occupying a site were decreased by 19%, while the odds for a lysine were increased by 53%, for every 10 Å moving away from the C/AC. Average conservation of MSA consensus sites was highest surrounding the C/AC and directly decreased in transition toward model’s peripheries. Findings held with statistical confidence using sequences restricted to individual Domains or enzyme classes or to both. Our data describe variability in the rate of mutation and likelihoods for phylogenetic trees based on protein sequence data and endorse the extension of substitution models by incorporating data on conservation and distance to C/ACs rather than only using cumulative levels. The data support the view that in the most-conserved environment immediately surrounding the C/AC of taxonomically distant and highly conserved essential enzymes of central metabolism there are amino acids whose identity and degree of occupancy is similar to a proposed amino acid set and frequency associated with prebiotic evolution.

  2. MOF-Derived Tungstated Zirconia as Strong Solid Acids toward High Catalytic Performance for Acetalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Feng, Jian; Zhao, Yupei; Wang, Shaobin; Liu, Jian

    2016-09-14

    A strong solid acid, tungstated zirconia (WZ), has been prepared first using tungstate immobilized UiO-66 as precursors through a "double-solvent" impregnation method under mild calcination temperature. With moderate W contents, the as-synthesized WZ catalysts possess a high density of acid sites, and the proper heat treatment also has facilely led to a bunch of oligomeric tungsten clusters on stabilized tetragonal ZrO2. The resultant solid acids show an improved catalytic performance toward the benzaldehyde's acetalization in comparison with traditional zirconium hydroxide-prepared WZ. Notably, due to large surface area and additionally introduced strong acid sites, the MOF-derived WZ catalysts afforded conversion up to 86.0%. The facile method endows the WZ catalysts with superior catalytic activities and excellent recyclability, thus opening a new avenue for preparation of metal oxide-based solid superacids and superbases. PMID:27557351

  3. Catalytic conversion of cellulose to 5-hydroxymethyl furfural using acidic ionic liquids and co-catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhen-Dong; Shi, Jin-Cai; Xiao, Jing-Jing; Gu, Wen-Xiu; Zheng, Chang-Ge; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2012-10-01

    Efficient catalytic conversion of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) to 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF), is achieved using acidic ionic liquids (ILs) as the catalysts and metal salts as co-catalysts in the solvent of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazo-lium acetate ([emim][Ac]). A series of acidic ILs has been synthesized and tested in conversion of MCC to HMF. The effect of reaction conditions, such as reaction time, temperature, catalyst dosage, metal salts, water dosage, Cu(2+) concentration and various acidic ILs are investigated in detail. The results show that CuCl(2) in 1-(4-sulfonic acid) butyl-3-methylimidazolium methyl sulfate ([C(4)SO(3)Hmim][CH(3)SO(3)]), is found to be an efficient catalyst for catalytic conversion of MCC to HMF, and 69.7% yield of HMF is obtained. A mechanism to explain the high activity of CuCl(2) in [C(4)SO(3)Hmim][CH(3)SO(3)] is proposed. To the best of our knowledge, this report first proposes that the Cu(2+) and [C(4)SO(3)Hmim][CH(3)SO(3)] show better catalytic performance in catalytic conversion of MCC to HMF. PMID:22840003

  4. Purification and properties of catalytic subunit of branched-chain -keto acid dehydrogenase phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, L.J.; Damuni, Z.

    1987-05-01

    The catalytic subunit of the branched-chain -keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) phosphatase has been purified over 50,000-fold from extracts of bovine kidney mitochondria. The apparently homogeneous protein consists of a single polypeptide chain with an apparent M/sub r/ of about 33,000 as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. BCKDH phosphatase, with apparent M/sub r/ of 460,000 was dissociated to its catalytic subunit, with no apparent change in activity, at an early stage in the purification procedure by treatment with 6 M urea. The specific activity of the catalytic subunit was 1500-2500 units/mg. The catalytic subunit exhibited approx.10% maximal activity with TSP-labeled pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, but was inactive with phosphorylase a and with p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The catalytic subunit, like the M/sub r/ 460,000 species, was inhibited by nanomolar concentrations of BCKDH phosphatase inhibitor protein, was unaffected by protein phosphatase inhibitor 1 and inhibitor 2, and was inhibited by nucleoside tri- and diphosphates, but not by nucleoside monophosphates.

  5. Nonenzymatic catalytic signal amplification for nucleic acid hybridization assays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wenhong (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Devices, methods, and kits for amplifying the signal from hybridization reactions between nucleic acid probes and their cognate targets are presented. The devices provide partially-duplexed, immobilized probe complexes, spatially separate from and separately addressable from immobilized docking strands. Cognate target acts catalytically to transfer probe from the site of probe complex immobilization to the site of immobilized docking strand, generating a detectable signal. The methods and kits of the present invention may be used to identify the presence of cognate target in a fluid sample.

  6. Interface dynamics explain assembly dependency of influenza neuraminidase catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    von Grafenstein, Susanne; Wallnoefer, Hannes G.; Kirchmair, Johannes; Fuchs, Julian E.; Huber, Roland G.; Schmidtke, Michaela; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Rollinger, Judith M.; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus neuraminidase (iNA) is a homotetrameric surface protein of the influenza virus and an established target for antiviral drugs. In contrast to neuraminidases (NAs) of other biological systems (non-iNAs), enzymatic activity of iNA is only observed in a quaternary assembly and iNA needs the tetramerization to mediate enzymatic activity. Obviously, differences on a molecular level between iNA and non-iNAs are responsible for this intriguing observation. Comparison between protein structures and multiple sequence alignment allow the identification of differences in amino acid composition in crucial regions of the enzyme, such as next to the conserved D151 and the 150-loop. These differences in amino acid sequence and protein tetramerization are likely to alter the dynamics of the system. Therefore, we performed molecular dynamics simulations to investigate differences in the molecular flexibility of monomers, dimers, and tetramers of iNAs of subtype N1 (avian 2004, pandemic 1918 and pandemic 2009 iNA) and as comparison the non-iNA monomer from Clostridium perfringens. We show that conformational transitions of iNA are crucially influenced by its assembly state. The protein–protein interface induces a complex hydrogen-bonding network between the 110-helix and the 150-loop, which consequently stabilizes the structural arrangement of the binding site. Therefore, we claim that these altered dynamics are responsible for the dependence of iNA’s catalytic activity on the tetrameric assembly. Only the tetramerization-induced balance between stabilization and altered local flexibility in the binding site provides the appropriate arrangement of key residues for iNA’s catalytic activity. PMID:24279589

  7. Identification of Catalytic Amino Acid Residues by Chemical Modification in Dextranase.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jin-A; Nam, Seung-Hee; Kim, Doman; Lee, Jun-Ho; Kim, Young-Min

    2016-05-28

    A novel endodextranase isolated from Paenibacillus sp. was found to produce isomaltotetraose and small amounts of cycloisomaltooligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization of 7-14 from dextran. To determine the active site, the enzyme was modified with 1-ethyl-3-[3- (dimethylamino)-propyl]-carbodiimide (EDC) and α-epoxyalkyl α-glucosides (EAGs), an affinity labeling reagent. The inactivation followed pseudo first-order kinetics. Kinetic analysis and chemical modification using EDC and EAGs indicated that carboxyl groups are essential for the enzymatic activity. Three Asp and one Glu residues were identified as candidate catalytic amino acids, since these residues are completely conserved across the GH family of 66 enzymes. Replacement of Asp189, Asp340, or Glu412 completely abolished the enzyme activity, indicating that these residues are essential for catalytic activity. PMID:26907761

  8. Synthesis and catalytic activity of polysaccharide templated nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Sherly, K. B.; Rakesh, K.

    2014-01-28

    Nanoscaled materials are of great interest due to their unique enhanced optical, electrical and magnetic properties. Sulfate-promoted zirconia has been shown to exhibit super acidic behavior and high activity for acid catalyzed reactions. Nanocrystalline zirconia was prepared in the presence of polysaccharide template by interaction between ZrOCl{sub 2}⋅8H{sub 2}O and chitosan template. The interaction was carried out in aqueous phase, followed by the removal of templates by calcination at optimum temperature and sulfation. The structural and textural features were characterized by powder XRD, TG, SEM and TEM. XRD patterns showed the peaks of the diffractogram were in agreement with the theoretical data of zirconia with the catalytically active tetragonal phase and average crystalline size of the particles was found to be 9 nm, which was confirmed by TEM. TPD using ammonia as probe, FTIR and BET surface area analysis were used for analyzing surface features like acidity and porosity. The BET surface area analysis showed the sample had moderately high surface area. FTIR was used to find the type species attached to the surface of zirconia. UV-DRS found the band gap of the zirconia was found to be 2.8 eV. The benzylation of o-xylene was carried out batchwise in atmospheric pressure and 433K temperature using sulfated zirconia as catalyst.

  9. Synthesis and catalytic activity of polysaccharide templated nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherly, K. B.; Rakesh, K.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscaled materials are of great interest due to their unique enhanced optical, electrical and magnetic properties. Sulfate-promoted zirconia has been shown to exhibit super acidic behavior and high activity for acid catalyzed reactions. Nanocrystalline zirconia was prepared in the presence of polysaccharide template by interaction between ZrOCl2ṡ8H2O and chitosan template. The interaction was carried out in aqueous phase, followed by the removal of templates by calcination at optimum temperature and sulfation. The structural and textural features were characterized by powder XRD, TG, SEM and TEM. XRD patterns showed the peaks of the diffractogram were in agreement with the theoretical data of zirconia with the catalytically active tetragonal phase and average crystalline size of the particles was found to be 9 nm, which was confirmed by TEM. TPD using ammonia as probe, FTIR and BET surface area analysis were used for analyzing surface features like acidity and porosity. The BET surface area analysis showed the sample had moderately high surface area. FTIR was used to find the type species attached to the surface of zirconia. UV-DRS found the band gap of the zirconia was found to be 2.8 eV. The benzylation of o-xylene was carried out batchwise in atmospheric pressure and 433K temperature using sulfated zirconia as catalyst.

  10. ECUT: Energy Conversion and utilization Technologies program biocatalysis research activity. Generation of chemical intermediates by catalytic oxidative decarboxylation of dilute organic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Distefano, S.; Gupta, A.; Ingham, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A rhodium-based catalyst was prepared and preliminary experiments were completed where the catalyst appeared to decarboxylate dilute acids at concentrations of 1 to 10 vol%. Electron spin resonance spectroscoy was used to characterize the catalyst as a first step leading toward modeling and optimization of rhodium catalysts. Also, a hybrid chemical/biological process for the production of hydrocarbons has been assessed. These types of catalysts could greatly increase energy efficiency of this process.

  11. Catalytic Asymmetric Cycloaddition of In Situ-Generated ortho-Quinone Methides and Azlactones by a Triple Brønsted Acid Activation Strategy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Ye; Chen, Jia-Rong; Wei, Qiang; Cheng, Hong-Gang; Liu, Zhi-Cheng; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-05-10

    A convergent and highly stereoselective [4+2] cycloaddition of in situ-generated ortho-Quinone methides (o-QMs) and azlactone enols has been successfully developed through a triple Brønsted acid catalysis strategy. This protocol provides an efficient and mild access to various densely functionalized dihydrocoumarins bearing adjacent quaternary and tertiary stereogenic centers in high yields with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity. PMID:26990670

  12. Central-metal exchange, improved catalytic activity, photoluminescence properties of a new family of d(10) coordination polymers based on the 5,5'-(1H-2,3,5-triazole-1,4-diyl)diisophthalic acid ligand.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huarui; Huang, Chao; Han, Yanbing; Shao, Zhichao; Hou, Hongwei; Fan, Yaoting

    2016-05-01

    The rigid and planar tetracarboxylic acid 5,5'-(1H-2,3,5-triazole-1,4-diyl)diisophthalic acid (H4L), incorporating a triazole group, has been used with no or different pyridine-based linkers to construct a family of d(10) coordination polymers, namely, {[H2N(CH3)2]3[Cd3(L)2(HCOO)]}n (), {[Cd2(L)(py)6]·H2O}n (), {[H2N(CH3)2] [Cd2(L)(HCOO)(H2O)4]}n (), {[Zn(H2L)]·H2O}n (), and {[Zn(H2L)(4,4'-bipy)0.5]·C2H5OH·H2O}n () (py = pyridine, 4,4'-bipy = 4,4'-bipyridine). constructs a 3D porous network containing two kinds of channels: one is filled with coordinated HCOO(-) anions, and the other with [H2N(CH3)2](+) cations. The framework of can be described as a rare (5,6,7)-connected net with the Schläfli symbol of (4(12)·5·6(2))(4(5)·5(3)·6(2))2(4(8)·5(3)·6(8)·8(2))2. The Cd(ii) ions in are connected through the carboxylate ligands to form a 2D layer, with aperture dimensions of ∼15.1 Å × 16.2 Å. The network of features a 3D (3,4)-connected (6·8·10)2(6·8(3)·10(2)) topology. A 3D network with the (4(2)·6·8(3)) topology of possesses an open 1D channel with the free volume of 29.2%. is a 2D layer structure with the (4(2)·6(3)·8)(4(2)·6) topology. The fluorescence lifetime τ values of are on the nanosecond timescale at room temperature. In particular, central-metal exchange in leads to a series of isostructural M(ii)-Cd frameworks [M = Cu (), Co (), Ni ()] showing improved catalytic activity for the synthesis of 1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine derivatives. Based on this, a plausible mechanism for the catalytic reaction has been proposed and the reactivity-structure relationship has been further clarified. PMID:27063339

  13. Catalytic conversion of inulin and fructose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural by lignosulfonic acid in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haibo; Zhao, Zongbao K; Wang, Qian

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we found that lignosulfonic acid (LS), which is a waste byproduct from the paper industry, in ionic liquids (ILs) can catalyze the dehydration of fructose and inulin into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) efficiently, which is a promising potential substitute for petroleum-based building blocks. The effects of reaction time, temperature, catalyst loading, and reusability of the catalytic system were studied. It was found that a 94.3% yield of HMF could be achieved in only 10 min at 100 °C under mild conditions. The reusability study of the LS-IL catalytic system after removal of HMF by ethyl acetate extraction demonstrated that the catalytic activity decreased from 77.4 to 62.9% after five cycles and the catalytic activity could be recovered after simply removing the accumulated humins by filtration after adding ethanol to the LS-ILs. The integrated utilization of a biorenewable feedstock, catalyst, and ILs is an example of an ideal green chemical process. PMID:22517537

  14. Voltage-dependent motion of the catalytic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase monitored by a fluorescent amino acid.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Souhei; Jinno, Yuka; Kawanabe, Akira; Okamura, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    The cytoplasmic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) derives the voltage dependence of its catalytic activity from coupling to a voltage sensor homologous to that of voltage-gated ion channels. To assess the conformational changes in the cytoplasmic region upon activation of the voltage sensor, we genetically incorporated a fluorescent unnatural amino acid, 3-(6-acetylnaphthalen-2-ylamino)-2-aminopropanoic acid (Anap), into the catalytic region of Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP). Measurements of Anap fluorescence under voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes revealed that the catalytic region assumes distinct conformations dependent on the degree of voltage-sensor activation. FRET analysis showed that the catalytic region remains situated beneath the plasma membrane, irrespective of the voltage level. Moreover, Anap fluorescence from a membrane-facing loop in the C2 domain showed a pattern reflecting substrate turnover. These results indicate that the voltage sensor regulates Ci-VSP catalytic activity by causing conformational changes in the entire catalytic region, without changing their distance from the plasma membrane. PMID:27330112

  15. Voltage-dependent motion of the catalytic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase monitored by a fluorescent amino acid

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Souhei; Jinno, Yuka; Kawanabe, Akira; Okamura, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) derives the voltage dependence of its catalytic activity from coupling to a voltage sensor homologous to that of voltage-gated ion channels. To assess the conformational changes in the cytoplasmic region upon activation of the voltage sensor, we genetically incorporated a fluorescent unnatural amino acid, 3-(6-acetylnaphthalen-2-ylamino)-2-aminopropanoic acid (Anap), into the catalytic region of Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP). Measurements of Anap fluorescence under voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes revealed that the catalytic region assumes distinct conformations dependent on the degree of voltage-sensor activation. FRET analysis showed that the catalytic region remains situated beneath the plasma membrane, irrespective of the voltage level. Moreover, Anap fluorescence from a membrane-facing loop in the C2 domain showed a pattern reflecting substrate turnover. These results indicate that the voltage sensor regulates Ci-VSP catalytic activity by causing conformational changes in the entire catalytic region, without changing their distance from the plasma membrane. PMID:27330112

  16. Tannic acid functionalized graphene hydrogel for entrapping gold nanoparticles with high catalytic performance toward dye reduction.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Zhang, Nan; Lai, Jianping; Liu, Ren; Liu, Xiaoya

    2015-12-30

    In this work, a simple, cost-effective, and environmental-friendly strategy was developed to synthesize gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) decorated graphene hydrogel with the use of tannic acid. This facile route involved the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) in the presence of tannic acid to form tannic acid functionalized graphene hydrogel, followed by loading and in situ reduction of AuCl4(-) ions in the graphene hydrogel network benefiting from the abundant phenol groups of tannic acid. Tannic acid (TA), a typical plant polyphenol widely present in woods, not only reduced GO and induced the self-assembly of reduced graphene oxide into graphene hydrogel, but also served as the reducing agent and stabilizer for the synthesis and immobilization of Au NPs, avoiding extra chemical reagent and any stabilizer. The obtained Au NPs decorated graphene hydrogel (Au@TA-GH) was fully characterized and exhibited much higher catalytic activities than the unsupported and other polymer-supported Au NPs toward the reduction of methylene blue (MB). In addition, the high catalytic activity of Au@TA-GH could withhold in different pH solution conditions. Another distinct advantage of Au@TA-GH as catalysts is that it can be easily recovered and reused for five cycles. PMID:26275351

  17. Improved catalytic activity of laser generated bimetallic and trimetallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rina; Soni, R K

    2014-09-01

    We report synthesis of silver nanoparticles, bimetallic (Al2O3@Ag) nanoparticles and trimetallic (Al2O3@AgAu) nanoparticles by nanosecond pulse laser ablation (PLA) in deionized water. Two-step laser ablation methodologies were adopted for the synthesis of bi- and tri-metallic nanoparticles. In this method a silver or gold target was ablated in colloidal solution of γ-alumina nanoparticles prepared by PLA. The TEM image analysis of bimetallic and trimetallic particles reveals deposition of fine silver particles and Ag-Au alloy particles, respectively, on large alumina particles. The laser generated nanoparticles were tested for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol and showed excellent catalytic behaviour. The catalytic rate was greatly improved by incorporation of additional metal in silver nanoparticles. The catalytic efficiency of trimetallic Al2O3@AgAu for reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol was remarkably enhanced and the catalytic reaction was completed in just 5 sec. Even at very low concentration, both Al2O3@Ag nanoparticles and Al2O3@AgAu nanoparticles showed improved rate of catalytic reduction than monometallic silver nanoparticles. Our results demonstrate that alumina particles in the solution not only provide the active sites for particle dispersion but also improve the catalytic activity. PMID:25924343

  18. Catalytic Growth of Macroscopic Carbon Nanofibers Bodies with Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, N.; Muhammad, I. S.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.; Rinaldi, A.; Su, D. S.; Schlogl, R.

    2009-06-01

    Carbon-carbon composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofibers have been synthesized by growing Carbon nanofiber (CNF) on Palm shell-based Activated carbon (AC) with Ni catalyst. The composites are in an agglomerated shape due to the entanglement of the defective CNF between the AC particles forming a macroscopic body. The macroscopic size will allow the composite to be used as a stabile catalyst support and liquid adsorbent. The preparation of CNT/AC nanocarbon was initiated by pre-treating the activated carbon with nitric acid, followed by impregnation of 1 wt% loading of nickel (II) nitrate solutions in acetone. The catalyst precursor was calcined and reduced at 300 deg. C for an hour in each step. The catalytic growth of nanocarbon in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} was carried out at temperature of 550 deg. C for 2 hrs with different rotating angle in the fluidization system. SEM and N{sub 2} isotherms show the level of agglomeration which is a function of growth density and fluidization of the system. The effect of fluidization by rotating the reactor during growth with different speed give a significant impact on the agglomeration of the final CNF/AC composite and thus the amount of CNFs produced. The macrostructure body produced in this work of CNF/AC composite will have advantages in the adsorbent and catalyst support application, due to the mechanical and chemical properties of the material.

  19. Human airway epithelia express catalytically active NEU3 sialidase

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Sang Won; Feng, Chiguang; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Anguo; Guang, Wei; Nguyen, Chinh; Sun, Wenji; Luzina, Irina G.; Webb, Tonya J.; Atamas, Sergei P.; Passaniti, Antonino; Twaddell, William S.; Puché, Adam C.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Cross, Alan S.; Goldblum, Simeon E.

    2014-01-01

    Sialic acids on glycoconjugates play a pivotal role in many biological processes. In the airways, sialylated glycoproteins and glycolipids are strategically positioned on the plasma membranes of epithelia to regulate receptor-ligand, cell-cell, and host-pathogen interactions at the molecular level. We now demonstrate, for the first time, sialidase activity for ganglioside substrates in human airway epithelia. Of the four known mammalian sialidases, NEU3 has a substrate preference for gangliosides and is expressed at mRNA and protein levels at comparable abundance in epithelia derived from human trachea, bronchi, small airways, and alveoli. In small airway and alveolar epithelia, NEU3 protein was immunolocalized to the plasma membrane, cytosolic, and nuclear subcellular fractions. Small interfering RNA-induced silencing of NEU3 expression diminished sialidase activity for a ganglioside substrate by >70%. NEU3 immunostaining of intact human lung tissue could be localized to the superficial epithelia, including the ciliated brush border, as well as to nuclei. However, NEU3 was reduced in subepithelial tissues. These results indicate that human airway epithelia express catalytically active NEU3 sialidase. PMID:24658138

  20. Size-dependent catalytic activity of supported metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Xiao, F.-S.; Purnell, S. K.; Alexeev, O.; Kawi, S.; Deutsch, S. E.; Gates, B. C.

    1994-11-01

    BECAUSE catalysis by metals is a surface phenomenon, many technological catalysts contain small (typically nanometre-sized) supported metal particles with a large fraction of the atoms exposed1. Many reactions, such as hydrocarbon hydrogenations, are structure-insensitive, proceeding at approximately the same rate on metal particles of various sizes provided that they are larger than about 1 nm and show bulk-like metallic behaviour1. But it is not known whether the catalytic properties of metal particles become size-dependent as the particles become so small that they are no longer metallic in character. Here we investigate the catalytic behaviour of precisely defined clusters of just four and six iridium atoms on solid supports. We find that the Ir4 and Ir6 clusters differ in catalytic activity both from each other and from metallic Ir particles. This raises the possibility of tailoring the catalytic behaviour of metal clusters by controlling the cluster size.

  1. Catalytic ozonation of sulfosalicylic acid over manganese oxide supported on mesoporous ceria.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shengtao; Lu, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Lin; Ma, Zichuan; Wu, Yinsu

    2016-02-01

    Manganese oxide supported on mesoporous ceria was prepared and used as catalyst for catalytic ozonation of sulfosalicylic acid (SA). Characterization results indicated that the manganese oxide was mostly incorporated into the pores of ceria. The synthesized catalyst exhibited high activity and stability for the mineralization of SA in aqueous solution by ozone, and more than 95% of total organic carbon was removed in 30 min under various conditions. Mechanism studies indicated that SA was mainly degraded by ozone molecules, and hydroxyl radical reaction played an important role for the degradation of its ozonation products (small molecular organic acids). The manganese oxide in the pores of CeO2 improved the adsorption of small molecular organic acids and the generation of hydroxyl radicals from ozone decomposition, resulting in high TOC removal efficiency. PMID:26344143

  2. Acidity studies of fluid catalytic cracking catalysts by microcalorimetry and infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.; Sharma, S.; Dumesic, J.A. ); Martinez, N. Cardona; Bell, V.A.; Hodge, G.D.; Madon, R.J. )

    1992-08-01

    The acidic properties of a USY-based fluid catalytic cracking catalyst steamed at various severities and amorphous silica-alumina were investigated by microcalorimetry and infrared spectroscopy using pyridine adsorption at 473 K. Microcalorimetric measurements of the differential heat of pyridine adsorption versus adsorbate coverage revealed a heterogeneous acid site distribution for the catalysts. Besides showing the expected progressive decrease in the number of acid sites for pyridine adsorption, measurements showed that the strength of Broensted acid sites decreased with increasing severity of steam treatment. Infrared spectra of adsorbed pyridine revealed a significant decrease in the ratio of Broensted to Lewis acid sites upon steaming. Amorphous silica-alumina had a relatively large number of acid sites of which a large proportion were Broensted acid sites. However, the strength of these Broensted sites was lower than that of the mildly steamed USY catalysts. This lower Broensted acid strength, the authors believe, is related to lower activity for gas-oil cracking over silica-alumina.

  3. Tunable plasmonic nanoparticles with catalytically active high-index facets.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hao; Zhang, Qingfeng; Large, Nicolas; Yu, Chunmei; Blom, Douglas A; Nordlander, Peter; Wang, Hui

    2014-06-11

    Noble metal nanoparticles have been of tremendous interest due to their intriguing size- and shape-dependent plasmonic and catalytic properties. Combining tunable plasmon resonances with superior catalytic activities on the same metallic nanoparticle, however, has long been challenging because nanoplasmonics and nanocatalysis typically require nanoparticles in two drastically different size regimes. Here, we demonstrate that creation of high-index facets on subwavelength metallic nanoparticles provides a unique approach to the integration of desired plasmonic and catalytic properties on the same nanoparticle. Through site-selective surface etching of metallic nanocuboids whose surfaces are dominated by low-index facets, we have controllably fabricated nanorice and nanodumbbell particles, which exhibit drastically enhanced catalytic activities arising from the catalytically active high-index facets abundant on the particle surfaces. The nanorice and nanodumbbell particles also possess appealing tunable plasmonic properties that allow us to gain quantitative insights into nanoparticle-catalyzed reactions with unprecedented sensitivity and detail through time-resolved plasmon-enhanced spectroscopic measurements. PMID:24842375

  4. Tunable Plasmonic Nanoparticles with Catalytically Active High-Index Facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Hao; Large, Nicolas; Zhang, Qinfeng; Nordlander, Peter; Wang, Hui

    2015-03-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have been of tremendous interest due to their intriguing size- and shape-dependent plasmonic and catalytic properties. Combining tunable plasmon resonances with superior catalytic activities on the same metallic nanoparticle, however, has long been challenging because nanoplasmonics and nanocatalysis typically require nanoparticles in two drastically different size regimes. Here, we demonstrate that creation of high-index facets on subwavelength metallic nanoparticles provides a unique approach to the integration of desired plasmonic and catalytic properties on the same nanoparticle. Through site-selective surface etching of metallic nanocuboids whose surfaces are dominated by low-index facets, we have controllably fabricated nanorice and nanodumbbell shaped particles, which exhibit drastically enhanced catalytic activities arising from the catalytically active high-index facets abundant on the particle surfaces. The nanorice and nanodumbbell particles also possess appealing tunable plasmonic properties that allow us to gain quantitative insights into nanoparticle-catalyzed reactions with unprecedented sensitivity and detail through time-resolved plasmon-enhanced spectroscopic measurements. Past affiliation: Rice University.

  5. HIPK2 catalytic activity and subcellular localization are regulated by activation-loop Y354 autophosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Siepi, Francesca; Gatti, Veronica; Camerini, Serena; Crescenzi, Marco; Soddu, Silvia

    2013-06-01

    HIPK2 (homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2) binds to and phosphorylates, at Ser and Thr residues, a large number of targets involved in cell division and cell fate decision in response to different physiological or stress stimuli. Inactivation of HIPK2 has been observed in human and mouse cancers supporting its role as a tumor suppressor. Despite the biological relevance of this kinase, very little is known on how HIPK2 becomes catalytically active. Based on sequence homologies, HIPK2 has been taxonomically classified as a subfamily member of the dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinases (DYRKs) and the activation-loop Y354 of HIPK2 has been found phosphorylated in different cells; however, the relevance of this Y phosphorylation is presently unknown. Here, we show that HIPK2, which is extensively phosphorylated at S/T sites throughout its functional domains, becomes catalytically active by autophosphorylation at the activation-loop Y354. In particular, we found that, in analogy to DYRKs, HIPK2-Y354 phosphorylation is an autocatalytic event and its prevention, through Y354 substitution with non-phosphorylatable amino acids or by using the kinase inhibitor purvalanol A, induces a strong reduction of the HIPK2 S/T-kinase activity on different substrates. Interestingly, at variance from DYRKs, inhibition of HIPK2-Y354 phosphorylation induces a strong out-of-target Y-kinase activity in cis and a strong cytoplasmic relocalization of the kinase. Together, these results demonstrate that the catalytic activity, substrate specificity, and subcellular localization of HIPK2 are regulated by autophosphorylation of its activation-loop Y354. PMID:23485397

  6. HIPK2 catalytic activity and subcellular localization are regulated by activation-loop Y354 autophosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Siepi, Francesca; Gatti, Veronica; Camerini, Serena; Crescenzi, Marco; Soddu, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    HIPK2 (homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2) binds to and phosphorylates, at Ser and Thr residues, a large number of targets involved in cell division and cell fate decision in response to different physiological or stress stimuli. Inactivation of HIPK2 has been observed in human and mouse cancers supporting its role as a tumor suppressor. Despite the biological relevance of this kinase, very little is known on how HIPK2 becomes catalytically active. Based on sequence homologies, HIPK2 has been taxonomically classified as a subfamily member of the dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinases (DYRKs) and the activation-loop Y354 of HIPK2 has been found phosphorylated in different cells; however, the relevance of this Y phosphorylation is presently unknown. Here, we show that HIPK2, which is extensively phosphorylated at S/T sites throughout its functional domains, becomes catalytically active by autophosphorylation at the activation-loop Y354. In particular, we found that, in analogy to DYRKs, HIPK2-Y354 phosphorylation is an autocatalytic event and its prevention, through Y354 substitution with non-phosphorylatable amino acids or by using the kinase inhibitor purvalanol A, induces a strong reduction of the HIPK2 S/T-kinase activity on different substrates. Interestingly, at variance from DYRKs, inhibition of HIPK2-Y354 phosphorylation induces a strong out-of-target Y-kinase activity in cis and a strong cytoplasmic relocalization of the kinase. Together, these results demonstrate that the catalytic activity, substrate specificity, and subcellular localization of HIPK2 are regulated by autophosphorylation of its activation-loop Y354. PMID:23485397

  7. Structural stability and catalytic activity of lanthanum-based perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Sergey N. Rashkeev; Lucia M. Petkovic

    2011-05-01

    Perovskite-type oxide materials with a general formula La(1-x)A(x)Fe(1-y)Co(y)O(3-delta), where A is an alkaline earth metal Sr or Ba have been studied as cathode materials for catalytic reduction of oxygen in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), as well as combustion catalysts. In this study, we use a combination of temperature programmed reduction measurements, X-ray diffraction, carbon black catalytic oxidation measurements, and first-principles, density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations to elucidate the main processes that contribute into the structural stability and catalytic activity for soot oxidation of these materials. In particular, we investigate the dynamics of the structure reconstruction with oxygen loss during the regulated increase of the temperature. The calculations are in good qualitative agreement with catalytic experiments and allow identify special combinations of the perovskite chemical composition and local surface structures for which one could expect the highest catalytic activity for the soot oxidation process.

  8. Correlations between surface structure and catalytic activity/selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.W.

    1992-10-01

    Objective is to address the keys to understanding the relation between surface structure and catalytic activity/selectivity. Of concern are questions related to enhanced catalytic properties of mixed-metal catalysts and critical active site requirements for molecular synthesis and rearrangement. The experimental approach utilizes a microcatalytic reactor contiguous to a surface analysis system, an arrangement which allows in vacuo transfer of the catalyst from one chamber to the other. Surface techniques being used include Auger (AES), UV and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (UPS and XPS), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). Our research program builds upon our previous experience relating the results of single crystal kinetic measurements with the results obtained with supported analogs. As well we are exploiting our recent work on the preparation, the characterization, and the determination of the catalytic properties of ultra-thin metal and metal oxide films. The program is proceeding toward the study of the unique catalytic properties of ultrathin metal films; the investigation of the critical ensemble size requirements for principal catalytic reaction types; and the modelling of supported catalysts using ultra-thin planar oxide surfaces.

  9. Catalytic activity of allamanda mediated phytosynthesized anisotropic gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, Rajesh K.; Dhumale, Vinayak A.; Gosavi, S. W.; Sharma, Rishi B.; Datar, Suwarna S.

    2013-12-01

    A simple and eco-friendly method has been developed for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using allamanda flower extract. In this green synthesis method, chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) solution was reduced with the help of allamanda flower extract. The synthesized gold nanoparticles were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction technique for their morphological and structural analysis. The size of the spherical and triangular gold nanoparticles was found to be in the range of 5-40 and 20-70 nm, respectively. The x-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the crystallite size of face-centered cubic (FCC) gold nanoparticles was ˜ 11 nm. These synthesized gold nanoparticles exhibit good catalytic activity towards the reduction of H2O2. The fabricated sensor exhibits good sensitivity of 21.33 μA mM-1 cm-2 with linear relationship (R2 = 0.996) in the range from 2 to 10 mM of H2O2 concentration. This work can be extended further for potential applications such as antimicrobial studies, bio-imaging and drug-delivery owing to the known properties of the allamanda flower extract.

  10. Crystal structures of a purple acid phosphatase, representing different steps of this enzyme's catalytic cycle

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Gerhard; Elliott, Tristan W; Leung, Eleanor; Carrington, Lyle E; Mitić, Nataša; Gahan, Lawrence R; Guddat, Luke W

    2008-01-01

    Background Purple acid phosphatases belong to the family of binuclear metallohydrolases and are involved in a multitude of biological functions, ranging from bacterial killing and bone metabolism in animals to phosphate uptake in plants. Due to its role in bone resorption purple acid phosphatase has evolved into a promising target for the development of anti-osteoporotic chemotherapeutics. The design of specific and potent inhibitors for this enzyme is aided by detailed knowledge of its reaction mechanism. However, despite considerable effort in the last 10 years various aspects of the basic molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Results Red kidney bean purple acid phosphatase is a heterovalent enzyme with an Fe(III)Zn(II) center in the active site. Two new structures with bound sulfate (2.4 Å) and fluoride (2.2 Å) provide insight into the pre-catalytic phase of its reaction cycle and phosphorolysis. The sulfate-bound structure illustrates the significance of an extensive hydrogen bonding network in the second coordination sphere in initial substrate binding and orientation prior to hydrolysis. Importantly, both metal ions are five-coordinate in this structure, with only one nucleophilic μ-hydroxide present in the metal-bridging position. The fluoride-bound structure provides visual support for an activation mechanism for this μ-hydroxide whereby substrate binding induces a shift of this bridging ligand towards the divalent metal ion, thus increasing its nucleophilicity. Conclusion In combination with kinetic, crystallographic and spectroscopic data these structures of red kidney bean purple acid phosphatase facilitate the proposal of a comprehensive eight-step model for the catalytic mechanism of purple acid phosphatases in general. PMID:18234116

  11. Structural Insights into the Catalytic Active Site and Activity of Human Nit2/ω-Amidase

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Chin-Hsiang; Gao, Quan-Ze; Cooper, Arthur J. L.; Lyu, Jyun-Hong; Sheu, Sheh-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Human nitrilase-like protein 2 (hNit2) is a putative tumor suppressor, recently identified as ω-amidase. hNit2/ω-amidase plays a crucial metabolic role by catalyzing the hydrolysis of α-ketoglutaramate (the α-keto analog of glutamine) and α-ketosuccinamate (the α-keto analog of asparagine), yielding α-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate, respectively. Transamination between glutamine and α-keto-γ-methiolbutyrate closes the methionine salvage pathway. Thus, hNit2/ω-amidase links sulfur metabolism to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. To elucidate the catalytic specificity of hNit2/ω-amidase, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on the wild type enzyme and its mutants to investigate enzyme-substrate interactions. Binding free energies were computed to characterize factors contributing to the substrate specificity. The predictions resulting from these computations were verified by kinetic analyses and mutational studies. The activity of hNit2/ω-amidase was determined with α-ketoglutaramate and succinamate as substrates. We constructed three catalytic triad mutants (E43A, K112A, and C153A) and a mutant with a loop 116–128 deletion to validate the role of key residues and the 116–128 loop region in substrate binding and turnover. The molecular dynamics simulations successfully verified the experimental trends in the binding specificity of hNit2/ω-amidase toward various substrates. Our findings have revealed novel structural insights into the binding of substrates to hNit2/ω-amidase. A catalytic triad and the loop residues 116–128 of hNit2 play an essential role in supporting the stability of the enzyme-substrate complex, resulting in the generation of the catalytic products. These observations are predicted to be of benefit in the design of new inhibitors or activators for research involving cancer and hyperammonemic diseases. PMID:22674578

  12. Structure and catalytic properties of magnesia-supported copper salts of molybdovanadophosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangdong; Yang, Xiaomei; Liu, Jie; Zhen, Kaiji; Wang, Haishui; Cheng, Tiexin

    2006-05-25

    The structure and stability of magnesia-supported copper salts of molybdovanadophosphoric acid (Cu(2)PMo(11)VO(40)) were characterized by different techniques. The catalyst was prepared in ethanol by impregnation because this solvent does not hurt texture of the water-sensitive MgO and Cu(2)PMo(11)VO(40). The Keggin-type structure compound may be degraded partially to form oligomerized polyoxometalate when supported on MgO. However, the oligomers can rebuild as the Keggin structure again after thermal treatment in air or during the reaction. Meanwhile, the V atoms migrate out of the Keggin structure to form a lacunary structure, as observed by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. Moreover, the presence of Cu(2+) as a countercation showed an affirmative influence on the migration of V atoms, and the active sites derived from the lacunary species generated after release of V from the Keggin anion. The electron paramagnetic resonance data imply that V(5+) autoreduces to V(4+) in the fresh catalyst, and during the catalytic reaction a large number of V(4+) ions are produced, which enhance the formation of O(2-) vacancies around the metal atoms. These oxygen vacancies may also improve the reoxidation function of the catalyst. This behavior is correlated to higher catalytic properties of this catalyst. The oxidative dehydrogenation of hexanol to hexanal was studied over this catalyst. After reaction at 553.2 K for 50 h, catalytic properties did not decrease and exhibited higher selectivity (>96.0%) toward hexanal. PMID:16706435

  13. Sulphate-activated phosphorylase b: the pH-dependence of catalytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Zographos, S E; Oikonomakos, N G; Dixon, H B; Griffin, W G; Johnson, L N; Leonidas, D D

    1995-01-01

    The pH-dependence of sulphate-activated phosphorylase b has been studied in the direction of glycogen synthesis. The bell-shaped curve of the pH-dependence of the catalytic constant for the AMP-activated enzyme showed pK values of 6.1 and 7.3, but the curve for the enzyme activated by 0.9 M ammonium sulphate showed a drop of activity on the acid side at much higher pH values. Its bell was centred at pH 7.8 but it was too narrow to be characterized by only two pK values. The narrowness of the curve could be explained by positive co-operativity, but not its unusually steep acid side. We suggest that the fall on the acid side is due to more than one hydronation (addition of H+). The points can be fitted by a curve with two de-activating hydronations and a de-activating dehydronation having identical titration pK values of 7.5, and hence molecular values of 7.0, 7.5 and 8.0. If both 0.9 M ammonium sulphate and 5 mM AMP are added, the bell is as broad as with AMP alone, but is somewhat raised in pH optimum. The results are discussed in the light of new structural data from crystallographic studies on binary complexes of the enzyme. PMID:7654195

  14. Sulphate-activated phosphorylase b: the pH-dependence of catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zographos, S E; Oikonomakos, N G; Dixon, H B; Griffin, W G; Johnson, L N; Leonidas, D D

    1995-09-01

    The pH-dependence of sulphate-activated phosphorylase b has been studied in the direction of glycogen synthesis. The bell-shaped curve of the pH-dependence of the catalytic constant for the AMP-activated enzyme showed pK values of 6.1 and 7.3, but the curve for the enzyme activated by 0.9 M ammonium sulphate showed a drop of activity on the acid side at much higher pH values. Its bell was centred at pH 7.8 but it was too narrow to be characterized by only two pK values. The narrowness of the curve could be explained by positive co-operativity, but not its unusually steep acid side. We suggest that the fall on the acid side is due to more than one hydronation (addition of H+). The points can be fitted by a curve with two de-activating hydronations and a de-activating dehydronation having identical titration pK values of 7.5, and hence molecular values of 7.0, 7.5 and 8.0. If both 0.9 M ammonium sulphate and 5 mM AMP are added, the bell is as broad as with AMP alone, but is somewhat raised in pH optimum. The results are discussed in the light of new structural data from crystallographic studies on binary complexes of the enzyme. PMID:7654195

  15. Pair interaction of catalytically active colloids: from assembly to escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Mozaffari, Ali; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo M.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics and pair trajectory of two self-propelled colloids are reported. The autonomous motions of the colloids are due to a catalytic chemical reaction taking place asymmetrically on their surfaces that generates a concentration gradient of interactive solutes around the particles and actuate particle propulsion. We consider two spherical particles with symmetric catalytic caps extending over the local polar angles $\\theta^1_{cap}$ and $\\theta^2_{cap}$ from the centers of active sectors in an otherwise quiescent fluid. A combined analytical-numerical technique was developed to solve the coupled mass transfer equation and the hydrodynamics in the Stokes flow regime. The ensuing pair trajectory of the colloids is controlled by the reacting coverages $\\theta^j_{cap}$ and their initial relative orientation with respect to each other. Our analysis indicates two possible scenarios for pair trajectories of catalytic self-propelled particles: either the particles approach, come into contact and assemble or they interact and move away from each other (escape). For arbitrary motions of the colloids, it is found that the direction of particle rotations is the key factor in determining the escape or assembly scenario. Based on the analysis, a phase diagram is sketched for the pair trajectory of the catalytically active particles as a function of active coverages and their initial relative orientations. We believe this study has important implications in elucidation of collective behaviors of auotophoretically self-propelled colloids.

  16. Studies of the effect of Broensted acids and the form of the second transition metal on a Ziegler-type catalytic system for olefin dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrev, D.; Kurtev, K.

    1988-02-01

    Studies have been carried out concerning the effect of Broensted acids on the catalytic activity of Ni(C/sub 5/H/sub 7/O/sub 2/)/sub 2/-(C/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/AlCl-(C/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 3/P with respect to dimerization of lower olefins. Strong acids have been found to improve, and weak acids to diminish, the catalytic activity of this system. The direction of insertion of propylene into the Ni-H-bond can also vary, depending on the acidity. The use of transition metal additives can significantly enhance the catalytic activity of the system, by acting as an oxidant in the activation process.

  17. Atomistic details of the Catalytic Mechanism of Fe(III)-Zn(II) Purple Acid Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Alberto, Marta E; Marino, Tiziana; Ramos, Maria J; Russo, Nino

    2010-08-10

    In the present work, we performed a theoretical investigation of the reaction mechanism of the Fe(III)-Zn(II) purple acid phosphatase from red kidney beans (rkbPAP), using the hybrid density functional theory and employing different exchange-correlation potentials. Characterization of the transition states and intermediates involved and the potential energy profiles for the reaction in different environments (gas phase, protein environment, and water) are reported. Our results show that the Fe(III)-Zn(II)PAP catalyzes the hydrolysis of methylphosphate via direct attack by a bridging metals-coordinated hydroxide leading to the cleavage of the ester bond. From our study emerges that the rate-limiting step of the reaction is the nucleophilic attack followed by the less energetically demanding release of the leaving group. Furthermore, we provide insights into some important points of contention concerning the precatalytic complex and the substrate coordination mode into the active site prior to hydrolysis. In particular: (i) Two models of enzyme-substrate with different orientations of the substrate into the active site were tested to evaluate the possible roles played by the conserved histidine residues (His 202 and His 296); (ii) Different protonation states of the substrate were taken into account in order to reproduce different pH values and to verify its influence on the catalytic efficiency and on the substrate binding mode; (iii) The metals role in each step of the catalytic mechanism was elucidated. We were also able to ascertain that the activation of the leaving group by the protonated His 296 is decisive to reach an optimal catalytic efficiency, while the bond scission without activation requires higher energy to occur. PMID:26613496

  18. Acid-catalytic decomposition of peracetic acid in the liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Kharchuk, V.G.; Kolenko, I.P.; Petrov, L.A.

    1985-12-01

    This paper elucidates the kinetic relationships of peracetic acid (PAA) decomposition in the presence of mineral acids and their heterogeneous analogs, polystyrene-di-vinylbenzene cation-exchangers, differing in physicochemical and morphological parameters. It is shown that the thermal decomposition of PAA in acetic acid is an acid-catalyzed reaction. The controlling step of the reaction is protonation of the substrate with formation of an active intermediate form. Sulfonated cation-exchangers are twice as effective as sulfuric acid in this process. Polystyrene-divinylbenzene sulfonated cation-exchangers can be used with success as acid catalysts in oxidation processes involving PAA, because of their high effectiveness, stability, and availability.

  19. Simultaneous detection of ascorbate and uric acid using a selectively catalytic surface.

    PubMed

    Nassef, Hossam M; Radi, Abd-Elgawad; O'Sullivan, Ciara

    2007-01-30

    The direct and selective detection of ascorbate at conventional carbon or metal electrodes is difficult due to its large overpotential and fouling by oxidation products. Electrode modification by electrochemical reduction of diazonium salts of different aryl derivatives is useful for catalytic, analytical and biotechnological applications. A monolayer of o-aminophenol (o-AP) was grafted on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) via the electrochemical reduction of its in situ prepared diazonium salts in aqueous solution. The o-aminophenol confined surface was characterized by cyclic voltammetry. The grafted film demonstrated an excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of ascorbate in phosphate buffer of pH 7.0 shifting the overpotential from +462 to +263 mV versus Ag/AgCl. Cyclic voltammetry and d.c. amperometric measurements were carried out for the quantitative determination of ascorbate and uric acid. The catalytic oxidation peak current was linearly dependent on the ascorbate concentration and a linear calibration curve was obtained using d.c. amperometry in the range of 2-20 microM of ascorbate with a correlation coefficient 0.9998, and limit of detection 0.3 microM. The effect of H2O2 on the electrocatalytic oxidation of ascorbate at o-aminophenol modified GC electrode has been studied, the half-life time and rate constant was estimated as 270 s, and 2.57x10(-3) s(-1), respectively. The catalytically selective electrode was applied to the simultaneous detection of ascorbate and uric acid, and used for their determination in real urine samples. This o-AP/GCE showed high stability with time, and was used as a simple and precise amperometric sensor for the selective determination of ascorbate. PMID:17386544

  20. Facile route to hierarchical silver microstructures with high catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Sasa; Wang, Wei Tan, Fatang; Gu, Jian; Qiao, Xueliang; Chen, Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A facile route was developed to prepare hierarchical silver microstructures. • The shape and size of secondary units can be tailed by varying reaction conditions. • Hierarchical silver microstructures have excellent catalytic activity. • The morphology and crystallinity of silver particles affect the catalytic activity. - Abstract: A facile, cost-effective and environmentally friendly route was developed to synthesize hierarchical silver microstructures consisting of different shaped secondary units through reducing concentrated silver nitrate with ascorbic acid in the absence of any surfactant. The as-obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The investigation on the morphology evolution revealed that the molar ratio of ascorbic acid to silver nitrate was critical to control the shape of secondary structures. The length of plate-like secondary structures which composed hierarchical silver particles could be controlled by changing the reactant concentrations, and it had a key relationship with the catalytic activity for the reduction of p-nitrophenol by NaBH{sub 4}. The catalytic activity of these surfactant-free silver microstructures was about ten times higher than that of silver nanoparticles, and even comparable to that of gold nanoplates, which indicates that the as-obtained silver microstructures are very promising candidates for the catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol due to the simple synthesis route and high catalytic activity.

  1. State and catalytic activity of iridium compounds in the reaction of mercury(I) oxidation by cerium(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Khomutova, E.G.; Rysev, A.P.; Romanovskaya, L.E.; Malysheva, N.M.

    1995-12-01

    Kinetic methods of determining Ir are insufficiently selective and sensitive as compared to the methods of determining Os and Ru. These characteristics may be improved by increasing the catalytic activity of iridium. All other factors being equal, catalytic activity depends on the state and form of iridium that enters the catalytic process. This is why one of the ways of improving the performance characteristics of a method of determining iridium involves searching for forms of the catalyst with higher catalytic activity. The aim of this work was to study the state and catalytic activity of iridium compounds. The method based on the iridium-catalyzed reaction of mercury(I) oxidation by cerium(IV) was chosen for the investigation. This method is most commonly used for analyzing complex samples. It was found previously that both the catalytic activity and selectivity of iridium determination increase when the reaction is conducted in the medium of perchloric acid or the sample is pretreated with nitric acid.

  2. Phosphorylation Modulates Catalytic Activity of Mycobacterial Sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ghanshyam S.; Ravala, Sandeep K.; Malhotra, Neha; Chakraborti, Pradip K.

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD+-dependent deacetylases involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes and are conserved throughout phylogeny. Here we report about in vitro transphosphorylation of the only NAD+-dependent deacetylase (mDAC) present in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases, particularly PknA. The phosphorylated mDAC displayed decreased deacetylase activity compared to its unphosphorylated counterpart. Mass-spectrometric study identified seven phosphosites in mDAC; however, mutational analysis highlighted major contribution of Thr-214 for phosphorylation of the protein. In concordance to this observation, variants of mDAC substituting Thr-214 with either Ala (phospho-ablated) or Glu (phosphomimic) exhibited significantly reduced deacetylase activity suggesting phosphorylation mediated control of enzymatic activity. To assess the role of phosphorylation towards functionality of mDAC, we opted for a sirtuin knock-out strain of Escherichia coli (Δdac), where interference of endogenous mycobacterial kinases could be excluded. The Δdac strain in nutrient deprived acetate medium exhibited compromised growth and complementation with mDAC reversed this phenotype. The phospho-ablated or phosphomimic variant, on the other hand, was unable to restore the functionality of mDAC indicating the role of phosphorylation per se in the process. We further over-expressed mDAC or mDAC-T214A as His-tagged protein in M. smegmatis, where endogenous eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases are present. Anti-phosphothreonine antibody recognized both mDAC and mDAC-T214A proteins in western blotting. However, the extent of phosphorylation as adjudged by scanning the band intensity, was significantly low in the mutant protein (mDAC-T214A) compared to that of the wild-type (mDAC). Furthermore, expression of PknA in the mDAC complemented Δdac strain was able to phosphorylate M. tuberculosis sirtuin. The growth profile of this culture in acetate medium was

  3. Decomposition of 1,2-dichloroethane over CeO2 modified USY zeolite catalysts: effect of acidity and redox property on the catalytic behavior.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinqin; Xue, Xiaomin; Zhou, Renxian

    2010-11-15

    CeO(2) modified ultrastable Y zeolite (CeO(2)-USY) catalysts were prepared and were used as the catalysts for the decomposition of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE). The catalytic behavior of these catalysts was evaluated by micro-reaction and temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) technique. The results reveal that CeO(2)-USY catalysts exhibit good catalytic activity for DCE decomposition and high selectivity to the formation of CO(2) and HCl. Both acidity and redox property play important roles in the DCE decomposition, and the synergy between CeO(2) species and USY zeolite shows an enhancement in the catalytic activity for DCE decomposition. CeO(2)-USY (1:8) with high dispersion of CeO(2) species and a much more suitable combination of acidity and redox property exhibits the best catalytic activity. PMID:20709452

  4. Catalytic activities enhanced by abundant structural defects and balanced N distribution of N-doped graphene in oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaogong; Shi, Yantao; Guo, Jiahao; Gao, Liguo; Wang, Kai; Du, Yi; Ma, Tingli

    2016-02-01

    N-doped graphene (NG) is a promising candidate for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the cathode of fuel cells. However, the catalytic activity of NG is lower than that of commercial Pt/C in alkaline and acidic media. In this study, NG samples were obtained using urea as N source. The structural defects and N distribution in the samples were adjusted by regulating the pyrolysis temperature. The new NG type exhibited remarkable catalytic activities for ORR in both alkaline and acidic media.

  5. SWI/SNF-mutant cancers depend on catalytic and non-catalytic activity of EZH2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kimberly H; Kim, Woojin; Howard, Thomas P; Vazquez, Francisca; Tsherniak, Aviad; Wu, Jennifer N; Wang, Weishan; Haswell, Jeffrey R; Walensky, Loren D; Hahn, William C; Orkin, Stuart H; Roberts, Charles W M

    2015-12-01

    Human cancer genome sequencing has recently revealed that genes that encode subunits of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes are frequently mutated across a wide variety of cancers, and several subunits of the complex have been shown to have bona fide tumor suppressor activity. However, whether mutations in SWI/SNF subunits result in shared dependencies is unknown. Here we show that EZH2, a catalytic subunit of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), is essential in all tested cancer cell lines and xenografts harboring mutations of the SWI/SNF subunits ARID1A, PBRM1, and SMARCA4, which are several of the most frequently mutated SWI/SNF subunits in human cancer, but that co-occurrence of a Ras pathway mutation is correlated with abrogation of this dependence. Notably, we demonstrate that SWI/SNF-mutant cancer cells are primarily dependent on a non-catalytic role of EZH2 in the stabilization of the PRC2 complex, and that they are only partially dependent on EZH2 histone methyltransferase activity. These results not only reveal a shared dependency of cancers with genetic alterations in SWI/SNF subunits, but also suggest that EZH2 enzymatic inhibitors now in clinical development may not fully suppress the oncogenic activity of EZH2. PMID:26552009

  6. SWI/SNF mutant cancers depend upon catalytic and non–catalytic activity of EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kimberly H.; Kim, Woojin; Howard, Thomas P.; Vazquez, Francisca; Tsherniak, Aviad; Wu, Jennifer N.; Wang, Weishan; Haswell, Jeffrey R.; Walensky, Loren D.; Hahn, William C.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Roberts, Charles W. M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cancer genome sequencing has recently revealed that genes encoding subunits of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes are frequently mutated across a wide variety of cancers, and several subunits of the complex have been shown to have bona fide tumor suppressor activity1. However, whether mutations in SWI/SNF subunits result in shared dependencies is unknown. Here we show that EZH2, a catalytic subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), is essential in all tested cancer cell lines and xenografts harboring mutations of the SWI/SNF subunits ARID1A, PBRM1, and SMARCA4, which are several of the most frequently mutated SWI/SNF subunits in human cancer but that co–occurrence of a Ras pathway mutation correlates with abrogation of this dependence. Surprisingly, we demonstrate that SWI/SNF mutant cancer cells are primarily dependent upon a non–catalytic role of EZH2 in stabilization of the PRC2 complex, and only partially dependent on EZH2 histone methyltransferase activity. These results not only reveal a shared dependency of cancers with genetic alterations in SWI/SNF subunits, but also suggest that EZH2 enzymatic inhibitors now in clinical development may not fully suppress the oncogenic activity of EZH2. PMID:26552009

  7. Thrombomodulin Binding Selects the Catalytically Active Form of Thrombin.

    PubMed

    Handley, Lindsey D; Treuheit, Nicholas A; Venkatesh, Varun J; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-01

    Human α-thrombin is a serine protease with dual functions. Thrombin acts as a procoagulant, cleaving fibrinogen to make the fibrin clot, but when bound to thrombomodulin (TM), it acts as an anticoagulant, cleaving protein C. A minimal TM fragment consisting of the fourth, fifth, and most of the sixth EGF-like domain (TM456m) that has been prepared has much improved solubility, thrombin binding capacity, and anticoagulant activity versus those of previous TM456 constructs. In this work, we compare backbone amide exchange of human α-thrombin in three states: apo, D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethylketone (PPACK)-bound, and TM456m-bound. Beyond causing a decreased level of amide exchange at their binding sites, TM and PPACK both cause a decreased level of amide exchange in other regions including the γ-loop and the adjacent N-terminus of the heavy chain. The decreased level of amide exchange in the N-terminus of the heavy chain is consistent with the historic model of activation of serine proteases, which involves insertion of this region into the β-barrel promoting the correct conformation of the catalytic residues. Contrary to crystal structures of thrombin, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results suggest that the conformation of apo-thrombin does not yet have the N-terminus of the heavy chain properly inserted for optimal catalytic activity, and that binding of TM allosterically promotes the catalytically active conformation. PMID:26468766

  8. Ultrafine Nanoparticle-Supported Ru Nanoclusters with Ultrahigh Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lihua; Jiang, Yingying; Zheng, Jinbao; Zhang, Nuowei; Yu, Changlin; Li, Yunhua; Pao, Chih-Wen; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Jin, Chuanhong; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Chen, Bing H

    2015-09-01

    The design of an ideal heterogeneous catalyst for hydrogenation reaction is to impart the catalyst with synergetic surface sites active cooperatively toward different reaction species. Herein a new strategy is presented for the creation of such a catalyst with dual active sites by decorating metal and metal oxide nanoparticles with ultrafine nanoclusters at atomic level. This strategy is exemplified by the design and synthesis of Ru nanoclusters supported on Ni/NiO nanoparticles. This Ru-nanocluster/Ni/NiO-nanoparticle catalyst is shown to exhibit ultrahigh catalytic activity for benzene hydrogenation reaction, which is 55 times higher than Ru-Ni alloy or Ru on Ni catalysts. The nanoclusters-on-nanoparticles are characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscope, Cs-corrected high angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscopy, elemental mapping, high-sensitivity low-energy ion scattering, and X-ray absorption spectra. The atomic-scale nanocluster-nanoparticle structural characteristics constitute the basis for creating the catalytic synergy of the surface sites, where Ru provides hydrogen adsorption and dissociation site, Ni acts as a "bridge" for transferring H species to benzene adsorbed and activated at NiO site, which has significant implications to multifunctional nanocatalysts design for wide ranges of catalytic reactions. PMID:26081741

  9. Enhanced catalytic performance of Pd catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation in ionic liquid aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yuan-Yuan; Yin, Qian-Ying; Lu, Guo-Ping; Yang, Hai-Fang; Zhu, Xiao; Kong, De-Sheng; You, Jin-Mao

    2014-12-01

    A protic ionic liquid (IL), n-butylammonium nitrate (N4NO3), is prepared and employed as the electrolyte for formic acid electrooxidation reaction (FAOR) on Pd catalysts. The oxidation peak potential of FAOR in the IL solution shows about a 200 mV negative shift as compared with those in traditional H2SO4/HClO4 electrolytes, suggesting that FAOR can be more easily carried out on Pd catalysts in IL media. The catalytic properties of Pd toward FAOR are not only dependent on the concentration of IL, as a consequence of the varied electronic conductivity of the IL solution, but also on the high potential limit of the cyclic voltammograms. When the Pd catalyst is cycled up to 1.0 V (vs. SCE), which induces a significant oxidation of Pd, it shows ca. 4.0 times higher activity than that not subjected to the Pd oxidation (up to 0.6 V). The Pd oxides, which are more easily formed in IL solution than in traditional H2SO4/HClO4 electrolytes, may play a crucial role in increasing the catalytic activities of Pd toward FAOR. Our work would shed new light on the mechanism of FAOR and highlight the potential applications of IL as green and environment-friendly electrolytes in fuel cells and other technologies.

  10. Cu(II) Catalytic Reduction of Cr(VI) by Tartaric Acid Under the Irradiation of Simulated Solar Light

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Qin, Chao; Zhang, Jing; Lan, Yeqing; Zhou, Lixiang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cu(II) catalytic reduction of Cr(VI) by tartaric acid under the irradiation of simulated solar light was investigated through batch experiments at pHs from 3 to 6 and at temperatures from 15°C to 35°C. Results demonstrated that introduction of Cu(II) could markedly improve reduction of Cr(VI) in comparison with tartaric acid alone. Optimal removal of Cr(VI) was achieved at pH 4. Reduction of Cr(VI) increased with increasing temperatures and initial concentrations of Cu(II) and tartaric acid. The catalytic role of Cu(II) in the reduction of Cr(VI) was ascribed to the formation of Cu(II)-tartaric acid complex, which generated active reductive intermediates, including Cu(I) and tartaric acid radicals through a pathway of metal–ligand–electron transfer with light. Cu(II) photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) by tartaric acid followed pseudo zero-order kinetics with regard to Cr(VI), and the activation energy was calculated to be 21.48 kJ/mol. To date, such a role of Cu(II) has not been reported. The results from the present study are helpful in fully understanding the photochemical reductive behavior of Cr(VI) in the presence of both tartaric acid and Cu(II) in soil and aquatic environments. PMID:25125941

  11. Commercial Activated Carbon for the Catalytic Production of Hydrogen via the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar; Lucia M. Petkovic; Kyle C. Burch

    2011-07-01

    Eight activated carbon catalysts were examined for their catalytic activity to decompose hydroiodic acid (HI) to produce hydrogen; a key reaction in the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Activity was examined under a temperature ramp from 473 to 773 K. No statistically significant correlation was found between catalyst sample properties and catalytic activity. Four of the eight samples were examined for one week of continuous operation at 723 K. All samples appeared to be stable over the period of examination.

  12. Iridium complexes containing mesoionic C donors: selective C(sp3)-H versus C(sp2)-H bond activation, reactivity towards acids and bases, and catalytic oxidation of silanes and water.

    PubMed

    Petronilho, Ana; Woods, James A; Mueller-Bunz, Helge; Bernhard, Stefan; Albrecht, Martin

    2014-11-24

    Metalation of a C2-methylated pyridylimidazolium salt with [IrCp*Cl2]2 affords either an ylidic complex, resulting from C(sp(3))-H bond activation of the C2-bound CH3 group if the metalation is performed in the presence of a base, such as AgO2 or Na2CO3, or a mesoionic complex via cyclometalation and thermally induced heterocyclic C(sp(2))-H bond activation, if the reaction is performed in the absence of a base. Similar cyclometalation and complex formation via C(sp(2))-H bond activation is observed when the heterocyclic ligand precursor consists of the analogous pyridyltriazolium salt, that is, when the metal bonding at the C2 position is blocked by a nitrogen rather than a methyl substituent. Despite the strongly mesoionic character of both the imidazolylidene and the triazolylidene, the former reacts rapidly with D(+) and undergoes isotope exchange at the heterocyclic C5 position, whereas the triazolylidene ligand is stable and only undergoes H/D exchange under basic conditions, where the imidazolylidene is essentially unreactive. The high stability of the Ir-C bond in aqueous solution over a broad pH range was exploited in catalytic water oxidation and silane oxidation. The catalytic hydrosilylation of ketones proceeds with turnover frequencies as high as 6,000 h(-1) with both the imidazolylidene and the triazolylidene system, whereas water oxidation is enhanced by the stronger donor properties of the imidazol-4-ylidene ligands and is more than three times faster than with the triazolylidene analogue. PMID:25302630

  13. Domain function dissection and catalytic properties of Listeria monocytogenes p60 protein with bacteriolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Minfeng; Zuo, Jinrong; Gu, Hao; Guo, Minliang; Yin, Yuelan

    2015-12-01

    The major extracellular protein p60 of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm-p60) is an autolysin that can hydrolyze the peptidoglycan of bacterial cell wall and has been shown to be required for L. monocytogenes virulence. The predicted three-dimensional structure of Lm-p60 showed that Lm-p60 could be split into two independent structural domains at the amino acid residue 270. Conserved motif analysis showed that V30, D207, S395, and H444 are the key amino acid residues of the corresponding motifs. However, not only the actual functions of these two domains but also the catalytic properties of Lm-p60 are unclear. We try to express recombinant Lm-p60 and identify the functions of two domains by residue substitution (V30A, D207A, S395A, and H444A) and peptide truncation. The C-terminal domain was identified as catalytic element and N-terminal domain as substrate recognition and binding element. Either N-terminal domain truncation or C-terminal domain truncation presents corresponding biological activity. The catalytic activity of Lm-p60 with a malfunctioned substrate-binding domain was decreased, while the substrate binding was not affected by a mulfunctioned catalytic domain. With turbidimetric method, we determined the optimal conditions for the bacteriolytic activity of Lm-p60 against Micrococcus lysodeikficus. The assay for the effect of Lm-p60 on the bacteriolytic activity of lysozyme revealed that the combined use of Lm-p60 protein with lysozyme showed a strong synergistic effect on the bacteriolytic activity. PMID:26363556

  14. Interaction of Ku protein and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit with nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Dynan, W S; Yoo, S

    1998-01-01

    The Ku protein-DNA-dependent protein kinase system is one of the major pathways by which cells of higher eukaryotes respond to double-strand DNA breaks. The components of the system are evolutionarily conserved and homologs are known from a number of organisms. The Ku protein component binds directly to DNA ends and may help align them for ligation. Binding of Ku protein to DNA also nucleates formation of an active enzyme complex containing the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). The interaction between Ku protein, DNA-PKcs and nucleic acids has been extensively investigated. This review summarizes the results of these biochemical investigations and relates them to recent molecular genetic studies that reveal highly characteristic repair and recombination defects in mutant cells lacking Ku protein or DNA-PKcs. PMID:9512523

  15. Guiding Catalytically Active Particles with Chemically Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspal, W. E.; Popescu, M. N.; Dietrich, S.; Tasinkevych, M.

    2016-07-01

    Catalytically active Janus particles suspended in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemiosmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemiosmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate "point-particle" approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemiosmotic flows can cause particles to either "dock" at the chemical step between the two materials or follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governing this behavior.

  16. Acid-base and catalytic properties of the products of oxidative thermolysis of double complex compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenyuk, S. I.; Semushina, Yu. P.; Kuz'mich, L. F.; Ivanov, Yu. V.

    2016-01-01

    Acid-base properties of the products of thermal decomposition of [M(A)6] x; [M1(L)6] y (where M is Co, Cr, Cu, Ni; M1 is Fe, Cr, Co; A is NH3, 1/2 en, 1/2 pn, CO(NH2)2; and L is CN, 1/2C2O4) binary complexes in air and their catalytic properties in the oxidation reaction of ethanol with atmospheric oxygen are studied. It is found that these thermolysis products are mixed oxides of the central atoms of complexes characterized by pH values of the zero charge point in the region of 4-9, OH-group sorption limits from 1 × 10-4 to 4.5 × 10-4 g-eq/g, OH-group surface concentrations of 10-50 nm-2 in 0.1 M NaCl solutions, and S sp from 3 to 95 m2/g. Their catalytic activity is estimated from the apparent rate constant of the conversion of ethanol in CO2. The values of constants are (1-6.5) × 10-5 s-1, depending on the gas flow rate and the S sp value.

  17. Acidic 1,3-propanediaminetetraacetato lanthanides with luminescent and catalytic ester hydrolysis properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mao-Long; Shi, Yan-Ru; Yang, Yu-Chen; Zhou, Zhao-Hui

    2014-11-15

    In acidic solution, a serials of water-soluble coordination polymers (CPs) were isolated as zonal 1D-CPs 1,3-propanediaminetetraacetato lanthanides [Ln(1,3-H{sub 3}pdta)(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}]{sub n}·2Cl{sub n}·3nH{sub 2}O [Ln=La, 1; Ce, 2; Pr, 3; Nd, 4; Sm, 5] (1,3-H{sub 4}pdta=1,3-propanediaminetetraacetic acid, C{sub 11}H{sub 18}N{sub 2}O{sub 8}) in high yields. When 1 eq. mol potassium hydroxide was added to the solutions of 1D-CPs, respectively, two 1D-CPs [Ln(1,3-H{sub 2}pdta)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{sub n}·Cl{sub n}·2nH{sub 2}O [Ln=Sm, 6; Gd, 7] were isolated at room temperature and seven 2D-CPs [Ln(1,3-H{sub 2}pdta)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}·Cl{sub n}·2nH{sub 2}O [Ln=La, 8; Ce, 9; Pr, 10; Nd, 11; Sm, 12; Eu, 13; Gd, 14] were isolated at 70 °C. When the crystals of 1–4 were hydrothermally heated at 180 °C with 1–2 eq. mol potassium hydroxide, four 3D-CPs [Ln(1,3-Hpdta)]{sub n}·nH{sub 2}O [Ln=La, 15; Ce, 16; Pr, 17; Nd, 18] were obtained. The two 2D-CPs [Ln(1,3-Hpdta)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n}·4nH{sub 2}O (Sm, 19; Eu, 20) were isolated in similar reaction conditions. With the increments of pH value in the solution and reaction temperature, the structure becomes more complicated. 1–5 are soluble in water and 1 was traced by solution {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) NMR technique, the water-soluble lanthanides 1 and 5 show catalytic activity to ester hydrolysis reaction respectively, which indicate their important roles in the hydrolytic reaction. The europium complexes 13 and 20 show visible fluorescence at an excitation of 394 nm. The structure diversity is mainly caused by the variation of coordinated ligand in different pH values and lanthanide contraction effect. Acidic conditions are favorable for the isolations of lanthanide complexes in different structures and this may helpful to separate different lanthanides. The thermal stability investigations reveal that acidic condition is favorable to obtain the oxides at a lower temperature. - Graphical abstract: A series

  18. Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres and their acid catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hui; Zhang, Jianming; Zhang, Yuxiao; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang

    2013-10-01

    Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres bearing sulfonic acid groups (MPCS-SO3H) were prepared by incomplete carbonization of glucose in silica crystal bead template, followed by sulfonation and removal of the template. The composition and porous structure of the obtained carbon spheres were investigated by physical adsorption of nitrogen, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. While the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of carbon spheres. The catalytic properties of the MPCS-SO3H were evaluated by esterification of ethanol with acetic acid, indicating that MPCS-SO3H possess remarkable catalytic performance (high stability and acid catalytic ability) for the esterification.

  19. Catalytic air oxidation of biomass-derived carbohydrates to formic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Ding, Dao-Jun; Deng, Li; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2012-07-01

    An efficient catalytic system for biomass oxidation to form formic acid was developed. The conversion of glucose to formic acid can reach up to 52% yield within 3 h when catalyzed by 5 mol% of H(5)PV(2)Mo(10)O(40) at only 373 K using air as the oxidant. Furthermore, the heteropolyacid can be used as a bifunctional catalyst in the conversion of cellulose to formic acid (yield=35%) with air as the oxidant. PMID:22499553

  20. A Structure-Based Approach for Detection of Thiol Oxidoreductases and Their Catalytic Redox-Active Cysteine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Stefano M.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine (Cys) residues often play critical roles in proteins, for example, in the formation of structural disulfide bonds, metal binding, targeting proteins to the membranes, and various catalytic functions. However, the structural determinants for various Cys functions are not clear. Thiol oxidoreductases, which are enzymes containing catalytic redox-active Cys residues, have been extensively studied, but even for these proteins there is little understanding of what distinguishes their catalytic redox Cys from other Cys functions. Herein, we characterized thiol oxidoreductases at a structural level and developed an algorithm that can recognize these enzymes by (i) analyzing amino acid and secondary structure composition of the active site and its similarity to known active sites containing redox Cys and (ii) calculating accessibility, active site location, and reactivity of Cys. For proteins with known or modeled structures, this method can identify proteins with catalytic Cys residues and distinguish thiol oxidoreductases from the enzymes containing other catalytic Cys types. Furthermore, by applying this procedure to Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins containing conserved Cys, we could identify the majority of known yeast thiol oxidoreductases. This study provides insights into the structural properties of catalytic redox-active Cys and should further help to recognize thiol oxidoreductases in protein sequence and structure databases. PMID:19424433

  1. Experimental study of humic acid degradation and theoretical modelling of catalytic ozonation.

    PubMed

    Turkay, Ozge; Inan, Hatice; Dimoglo, Anatoli

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of TiO2 as a catalyst in the ozonation of humic acid (HA) was evaluated in a comprehensive manner. Ozonation, catalytic ozonation and adsorption experiments were conducted using both synthetic HA solution and natural water. HA degradation was evaluated in terms of DOC, VIS400 and UV254. It was shown that the addition of catalyst positively affects the mechanism of ozonation. An increase in HA degradation was observed for all these parameters. The impact of catalyst dose and initial pH value of HA on the efficacy of catalytic ozonation was investigated. The highest removal efficiencies were achieved with the dose of 1 g l(-1) of TiO2 (Degussa P-25) and in the acidic pH region. The catalytic ozonation process was efficient also on natural water component although not at the same level as it was on synthetic water. The adsorptive feature of P-25 was considered to have a clear evidence of the catalytic ozonation mechanism. The mechanism of catalysis on the surface of metal oxides was elucidated with the help of quantum-chemical calculations. In the framework of Density Function Theory (DFT), the O3 decomposition was calculated in the catalytic and non-catalytic processes. Donor-acceptor properties of the frontier (highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, HOMO/LUMO) orbitals are discussed. Electron density distribution and reaction mechanism of superoxide particles formation, which participate in the process of HA ozonation are analyzed. PMID:25056748

  2. Catalytically active lead(ii)-imidazolium coordination assemblies with diversified lead(ii) coordination geometries.

    PubMed

    Naga Babu, Chatla; Suresh, Paladugu; Srinivas, Katam; Sathyanarayana, Arruri; Sampath, Natarajan; Prabusankar, Ganesan

    2016-05-10

    Five Pb(ii)-imidazolium carboxylate coordination assemblies with novel structural motifs were derived from the reaction between the corresponding flexible, semi flexible or rigid imidazolium carboxylic acid ligands and lead nitrate. The imidazolium linker present in these molecules likely plays a triple role such as the counter ion to balance the metal charge, the ligand being an integral part of the final product and the catalyst facilitating carbon-carbon bond formation reaction. These lead-imidazolium coordination assemblies exhibit, variable chemical and thermal stabilities, as well as catalytic activity. These newly prepared catalysts are highly active towards benzoin condensation reactions with good functional group tolerance. PMID:27093629

  3. Kinetics of Non-Catalytic Esterification of Free Fatty Acids Present in Jatropha Oil.

    PubMed

    Prasanna Rani, Karna Narayana; Ramana Neeharika, Tulasi Sri Venkata; Kumar, Thella Prathap; Satyavathi, Bankupalli; Sailu, Chintha

    2016-05-01

    Non-catalytic esterfication of free fatty acids (FFA) present in vegetable oils is an alternative pretreatment process for the biodiesel production. Biodiesel, consists of long-chain fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) and is obtained from renewable sources such as vegetable oils or animal fat. This study presents kinetics of thermal esterification of free fatty acids present in jatropha oil with methanol. The effect of process parameters like reaction time (1-5 h), temperature (170-190°C) and oil to methanol ratio (1:3-1:5) at constant pressure was investigated. The optimal conditions were found to be oil to methanol ratio of 1:4, 190°C, at 27.1 bar and 5 h which gave a maximum conversion of 95.1%. A second order kinetic model for both forward and backward reactions was proposed to study the reaction system. A good agreement was observed between the experimental data and the model values. The activation energy for forward reaction and the heat of reaction were found to be 36.364 Kcal/mol and 1.74 Kcal/mol respectively. PMID:27086997

  4. A Supramolecularly Activated Radical Cation for Accelerated Catalytic Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Li, Wan-Lu; Xu, Jiang-Fei; Wang, Guangtong; Li, Jun; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xi

    2016-07-25

    Tuning the activity of radicals is crucial for radical reactions and radical-based materials. Herein, we report a supramolecular strategy to accelerate the Fenton reaction through the construction of supramolecularly activated radical cations. As a proof of the concept, cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) was introduced, through host-guest interactions, onto each side of a derivative of 1,4-diketopyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (DPP), a model dye for Fenton oxidation. The DPP radical cation, the key intermediate in the oxidation process, was activated by the electrostatically negative carbonyl groups of CB[7]. The activation induced a drastic decrease in the apparent activation energy and greatly increased the reaction rate. This facile supramolecular strategy is a promising method for promoting radical reactions. It may also open up a new route for the catalytic oxidation of organic pollutants for water purification and widen the realm of supramolecular catalysis. PMID:27273046

  5. Highly Selective Synthesis of Catalytically Active Monodisperse Rhodium Nanocubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Grass, M.E.; Kuhn, J.N.; Tao, F.; Habas, S.E.; Huang, W.; Yang, P.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-02-21

    Synthesis of monodisperse and shape-controlled colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) is of increasing scientific interest and technological significance. Recently, shape control of Pt, Pd, Ag, Au, and Rh NCs has been obtained by tuning growth kinetics in various solution-phase approaches, including modified polyol methods, seeded growth by polyol reduction, thermolysis of organometallics, and micelle techniques. Control of reduction kinetics of the noble metal precursors and regulation of the relative growth rates of low-index planes (i.e. {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace}) via selective adsorption of selected chemical species are two keys for achieving shape modification of noble metal NCs. One application for noble metal NCs of well-defined shape is in understanding how NC faceting (determines which crystallographic planes are exposed) affects catalytic performance. Rh NCs are used in many catalytic reactions, including hydrogenation, hydroformylation, hydrocarbonylation, and combustion reactions. Shape manipulation of Rh NCs may be important in understanding how faceting on the nanoscale affects catalytic properties, but such control is challenging and there are fewer reports on the shape control of Rh NCs compared to other noble metals. Xia and coworkers obtained Rh multipods exhibiting interesting surface plasmonic properties by a polyol approach. The Somorjai and Tilley groups synthesized crystalline Rh multipods, cubes, horns and cuboctahedra, via polyol seeded growth. Son and colleagues prepared catalytically active monodisperse oleylamine-capped tetrahedral Rh NCs for the hydrogenation of arenes via an organometallic route. More recently, the Somorjai group synthesized sizetunable monodisperse Rh NCs using a one-step polyol technique. In this Communication, we report the highly selective synthesis of catalytically active, monodisperse Rh nanocubes of < 10 nm by a seedless polyol method. In this approach, Br{sup -} ions from trimethyl

  6. Catalytically and biologically active silver nanoparticles synthesized using essential oil.

    PubMed

    Vilas, Vidya; Philip, Daizy; Mathew, Joseph

    2014-11-11

    There are numerous reports on phytosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and various phytochemicals are involved in the reduction and stabilization. Pure explicit phytosynthetic protocol for catalytically and biologically active silver nanoparticles is of importance as it is an environmentally benign green method. This paper reports the use of essential oil of Myristica fragrans enriched in terpenes and phenyl propenes in the reduction and stabilization. FTIR spectra of the essential oil and the synthesized biogenic silver nanoparticles are in accordance with the GC-MS spectral analysis reports. Nanosilver is initially characterized by an intense SPR band around 420 nm, followed by XRD and TEM analysis revealing the formation of 12-26 nm sized, highly pure, crystalline silver nanoparticles. Excellent catalytic and bioactive potential of the silver nanoparticles is due to the surface modification. The chemocatalytic potential of nanosilver is exhibited by the rapid reduction of the organic pollutant, para nitro phenol and by the degradation of the thiazine dye, methylene blue. Significant antibacterial activity of the silver colloid against Gram positive, Staphylococcus aureus (inhibition zone--12 mm) and Gram negative, Escherichia coli (inhibition zone--14 mm) is demonstrated by Agar-well diffusion method. Strong antioxidant activity of the biogenic silver nanoparticles is depicted through NO scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, reducing power, DPPH and total antioxidant activity assays. PMID:24956490

  7. Catalytically active single-atom niobium in graphitic layers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Guo, Junjie; Guan, Pengfei; Liu, Chunjing; Huang, Hao; Xue, Fanghong; Dong, Xinglong; Pennycook, Stephen J; Chisholm, Matthew F

    2013-01-01

    Carbides of groups IV through VI (Ti, V and Cr groups) have long been proposed as substitutes for noble metal-based electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. However, their catalytic activity has been extremely limited because of the low density and stability of catalytically active sites. Here we report the excellent performance of a niobium-carbon structure for catalysing the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. A large number of single niobium atoms and ultra small clusters trapped in graphitic layers are directly identified using state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. This structure not only enhances the overall conductivity for accelerating the exchange of ions and electrons, but it suppresses the chemical/thermal coarsening of the active particles. Experimental results coupled with theory calculations reveal that the single niobium atoms incorporated within the graphitic layers produce a redistribution of d-band electrons and become surprisingly active for O2 adsorption and dissociation, and also exhibit high stability. PMID:23715283

  8. Catalytically and biologically active silver nanoparticles synthesized using essential oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, Vidya; Philip, Daizy; Mathew, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    There are numerous reports on phytosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and various phytochemicals are involved in the reduction and stabilization. Pure explicit phytosynthetic protocol for catalytically and biologically active silver nanoparticles is of importance as it is an environmentally benign green method. This paper reports the use of essential oil of Myristica fragrans enriched in terpenes and phenyl propenes in the reduction and stabilization. FTIR spectra of the essential oil and the synthesized biogenic silver nanoparticles are in accordance with the GC-MS spectral analysis reports. Nanosilver is initially characterized by an intense SPR band around 420 nm, followed by XRD and TEM analysis revealing the formation of 12-26 nm sized, highly pure, crystalline silver nanoparticles. Excellent catalytic and bioactive potential of the silver nanoparticles is due to the surface modification. The chemocatalytic potential of nanosilver is exhibited by the rapid reduction of the organic pollutant, para nitro phenol and by the degradation of the thiazine dye, methylene blue. Significant antibacterial activity of the silver colloid against Gram positive, Staphylococcus aureus (inhibition zone - 12 mm) and Gram negative, Escherichia coli (inhibition zone - 14 mm) is demonstrated by Agar-well diffusion method. Strong antioxidant activity of the biogenic silver nanoparticles is depicted through NO scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, reducing power, DPPH and total antioxidant activity assays.

  9. Catalytic Intramolecular Ketone Alkylation with Olefins by Dual Activation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hee Nam; Dong, Guangbin

    2015-12-01

    Two complementary methods for catalytic intramolecular ketone alkylation reactions with unactivated olefins, resulting in Conia-ene-type reactions, are reported. The transformations are enabled by dual activation of both the ketone and the olefin and are atom-economical as stoichiometric oxidants or reductants are not required. Assisted by Kool's aniline catalyst, the reaction conditions can be both pH- and redox-neutral. A broad range of functional groups are thus tolerated. Whereas the rhodium catalysts are effective for the formation of five-membered rings, a ruthenium-based system that affords the six-membered ring products was also developed. PMID:26486569

  10. Nickel-doped ceria nanoparticles for promoting catalytic activity of Pt/C for ethanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qiang; Du, Chunyu; Sun, Yongrong; Du, Lei; Yin, Geping; Gao, Yunzhi

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports the facile synthesis of monodispersed nickel-doped ceria nanoparticles by a thermal decomposition method, which is used to promote catalytic properties of Pt/C. The Pt/Ni-doped CeO2/C catalyst obtained exhibits remarkably high activity and stability towards the ethanol electrooxidation in acidic media. This is attributed to higher oxygen releasing capacity and stronger interaction of Ni-doped CeO2 with Pt than pure CeO2 nanoparticles that contribute positively to the removal of poisoning intermediates. We believe that the design concept and synthetic strategy of metal doped oxides used for fuel cell catalysts can be potentially extended to other catalytic fields.

  11. Activity of catalytic silver nanoparticles modulated by capping agent hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Janani, Seralathan; Stevenson, Priscilla; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a facile in situ method is reported for the preparation of catalytic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using N-acyl tyramine (NATA) with variable hydrophobic acyl length. Scanning electron microscopic analysis shows that NATA exists initially as larger aggregates in alkaline aqueous solution. The addition of AgNO3 dissociates these larger aggregate and subsequently promotes the formation of self-assembled NATA and AgNPs. Characterization of AgNPs using UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope revealed that the hydrophobic acyl chain length of NATA does not influence the particle size, shape and morphology. All NATA-AgNPs yielded relatively identical values in full width at half-maximum (FWHM) analysis, indicating that the AgNPs prepared with NATA are relatively polydispersed at all tested acyl chain lengths. These nanoparticles are able to efficiently catalyze the reduction of 4-nitro phenol to 4-amino phenol, 2-nitro aniline to 1,2-diamino benzene, 2,4,6-trinitro phenol to 2,4,6-triamino phenol by NaBH4 in an aqueous environment. The reduction reaction rate is determined to be pseudo-first order and the apparent rate constant is linearly dependent on the hydrophobic acyl chain length of the NATA. All reaction kinetics presented an induction period, which is dependent on the N-acyl chain length, indicating that the hydrophobic effects play a critical role in bringing the substrate to the metal nanoparticle surface to induce the catalytic reaction. In this study, however, the five catalytic systems have similar size and polydispersity, differing only in terms of capping agent hydrophobicity, and shows different catalytic activity with respect to the alkyl chain length of the capping agent. As discussed, the ability to modulate the metal nanoparticles catalytic property, by modifying the capping agent hydrophobicity represents a promising future for developing an efficient nanocatalyst without altering the size

  12. Ultra-high electrochemical catalytic activity of MXenes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Cheap and abundant electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reactions (HER) have been widely pursued for their practical application in hydrogen-energy technologies. In this work, I present systematical study of the hydrogen evolution reactions on MXenes (Mo2X and W2X, X = C and N) based on density-functional-theory calculations. I find that their HER performances strongly depend on the composition, hydrogen adsorption configurations, and surface functionalization. I show that W2C monolayer has the best HER activity with near-zero overpotential at high hydrogen density among all of considered pure MXenes, and hydrogenation can efficiently enhance its catalytic performance in a wide range of hydrogen density further, while oxidization makes its activity reduced significantly. I further show that near-zero overpotential for HER on Mo2X monolayers can be achieved by oxygen functionalization. My calculations predict that surface treatment, such as hydrogenation and oxidization, is critical to enhance the catalytic performance of MXenes. I expect that MXenes with HER activity comparable to Pt in a wide range of hydrogen density can be realized by tuning composition and functionalizing, and promotes their applications into hydrogen-energy technologies. PMID:27604848

  13. Ultra-high electrochemical catalytic activity of MXenes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Cheap and abundant electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reactions (HER) have been widely pursued for their practical application in hydrogen-energy technologies. In this work, I present systematical study of the hydrogen evolution reactions on MXenes (Mo2X and W2X, X = C and N) based on density-functional-theory calculations. I find that their HER performances strongly depend on the composition, hydrogen adsorption configurations, and surface functionalization. I show that W2C monolayer has the best HER activity with near-zero overpotential at high hydrogen density among all of considered pure MXenes, and hydrogenation can efficiently enhance its catalytic performance in a wide range of hydrogen density further, while oxidization makes its activity reduced significantly. I further show that near-zero overpotential for HER on Mo2X monolayers can be achieved by oxygen functionalization. My calculations predict that surface treatment, such as hydrogenation and oxidization, is critical to enhance the catalytic performance of MXenes. I expect that MXenes with HER activity comparable to Pt in a wide range of hydrogen density can be realized by tuning composition and functionalizing, and promotes their applications into hydrogen-energy technologies. PMID:27604848

  14. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  15. Mutations in the Catalytic Loop HRD Motif Alter the Activity and Function of Drosophila Src64

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Taylor C.; Kaur, Gurvinder; Thomas, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic loop HRD motif is found in most protein kinases and these amino acids are predicted to perform functions in catalysis, transition to, and stabilization of the active conformation of the kinase domain. We have identified mutations in a Drosophila src gene, src64, that alter the three HRD amino acids. We have analyzed the mutants for both biochemical activity and biological function during development. Mutation of the aspartate to asparagine eliminates biological function in cytoskeletal processes and severely reduces fertility, supporting the amino acid's critical role in enzymatic activity. The arginine to cysteine mutation has little to no effect on kinase activity or cytoskeletal reorganization, suggesting that the HRD arginine may not be critical for coordinating phosphotyrosine in the active conformation. The histidine to leucine mutant retains some kinase activity and biological function, suggesting that this amino acid may have a biochemical function in the active kinase that is independent of its side chain hydrogen bonding interactions in the active site. We also describe the phenotypic effects of other mutations in the SH2 and tyrosine kinase domains of src64, and we compare them to the phenotypic effects of the src64 null allele. PMID:22132220

  16. Balancing the stability and the catalytic specificities of OP hydrolases with enhanced V-agent activities.

    PubMed

    Reeves, T E; Wales, M E; Grimsley, J K; Li, P; Cerasoli, D M; Wild, J R

    2008-06-01

    Rational site-directed mutagenesis and biophysical analyses have been used to explore the thermodynamic stability and catalytic capabilities of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and its genetically modified variants. There are clear trade-offs in the stability of modifications that enhance catalytic activities. For example, the H254R/H257L variant has higher turnover numbers for the chemical warfare agents VX (144 versus 14 s(-1) for the native enzyme (wild type) and VR (Russian VX, 465 versus 12 s(-1) for wild type). These increases are accompanied by a loss in stability in which the total Gibb's free energy for unfolding is 19.6 kcal/mol, which is 5.7 kcal/mol less than that of the wild-type enzyme. X-ray crystallographic studies support biophysical data that suggest amino acid residues near the active site contribute to the chemical and thermal stability through hydrophobic and cation-pi interactions. The cation-pi interactions appear to contribute an additional 7 kcal/mol to the overall global stability of the enzyme. Using rational design, it has been possible to make amino acid changes in this region that restored the stability, yet maintained effective V-agent activities, with turnover numbers of 68 and 36 s(-1) for VX and VR, respectively. This study describes the first rationally designed, stability/activity balance for an OPH enzyme with a legitimate V-agent activity, and its crystal structure. PMID:18434422

  17. Origin of the catalytic activity of bovine seminal ribonuclease against double-stranded RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opitz, J. G.; Ciglic, M. I.; Haugg, M.; Trautwein-Fritz, K.; Raillard, S. A.; Jermann, T. M.; Benner, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    Bovine seminal ribonuclease (RNase) binds, melts, and (in the case of RNA) catalyzes the hydrolysis of double-stranded nucleic acid 30-fold better under physiological conditions than its pancreatic homologue, the well-known RNase A. Reported here are site-directed mutagenesis experiments that identify the sequence determinants of this enhanced catalytic activity. These experiments have been guided in part by experimental reconstructions of ancestral RNases from extinct organisms that were intermediates in the evolution of the RNase superfamily. It is shown that the enhanced interactions between bovine seminal RNase and double-stranded nucleic acid do not arise from the increased number of basic residues carried by the seminal enzyme. Rather, a combination of a dimeric structure and the introduction of two glycine residues at positions 38 and 111 on the periphery of the active site confers the full catalytic activity of bovine seminal RNase against duplex RNA. A structural model is presented to explain these data, the use of evolutionary reconstructions to guide protein engineering experiments is discussed, and a new variant of RNase A, A(Q28L K31C S32C D38G E111G), which contains all of the elements identified in these experiments as being important for duplex activity, is prepared. This is the most powerful catalyst within this subfamily yet observed, some 46-fold more active against duplex RNA than RNase A.

  18. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Oxygen Electroreduction Activities of Carbon-Supported PtW Nanoparticle Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Liufeng; More, Karren Leslie; He, Ting

    2010-01-01

    Carbon-supported PtW (PtW/C) alloy nanoparticle catalysts with well-controlled particle size, dispersion, and composition uniformity, have been synthesized by wet chemical methods of decomposition of carbonyl cluster complexes, hydrolysis of metal salts, and chemical reactions within a reverse microemulsion. The synthesized PtW/C catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The catalytic oxygen electroreduction activities were measured by the hydrodynamic rotating disk electrode technique in an acidic electrolyte. The influence of the synthesis method on PtW particle size, size distribution, composition uniformity, and catalytic oxygen electroreduction activity, have been investigated. Among the synthesis methods studied, PtW/C catalysts prepared by the decomposition of carbonyl cluster complexes displayed the best platinum mass activity for oxygen reduction reaction under the current small scale production; a 3.4-fold catalytic enhancement was achieved in comparison to a benchmark Pt/C standard.

  19. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Maleic Acid at Moderate Pressures: A Laboratory Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amoa, Kwesi

    2007-01-01

    Moderate-pressure catalytic hydrogenation is often overlooked as a classroom demonstration because of the awkwardness of the equipment and the time constraints required for the conversion of reactants to products. This article demonstrates the reduction of maleic acid in about 90 minutes. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

  20. Determinants of ligand binding and catalytic activity in the myelin enzyme 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Raasakka, Arne; Myllykoski, Matti; Laulumaa, Saara; Lehtimäki, Mari; Härtlein, Michael; Moulin, Martine; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri

    2015-01-01

    2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) is an enzyme highly abundant in the central nervous system myelin of terrestrial vertebrates. The catalytic domain of CNPase belongs to the 2H phosphoesterase superfamily and catalyzes the hydrolysis of nucleoside 2',3'-cyclic monophosphates to nucleoside 2'-monophosphates. The detailed reaction mechanism and the essential catalytic amino acids involved have been described earlier, but the roles of many amino acids in the vicinity of the active site have remained unknown. Here, several CNPase catalytic domain mutants were studied using enzyme kinetics assays, thermal stability experiments, and X-ray crystallography. Additionally, the crystal structure of a perdeuterated CNPase catalytic domain was refined at atomic resolution to obtain a detailed view of the active site and the catalytic mechanism. The results specify determinants of ligand binding and novel essential residues required for CNPase catalysis. For example, the aromatic side chains of Phe235 and Tyr168 are crucial for substrate binding, and Arg307 may affect active site electrostatics and regulate loop dynamics. The β5-α7 loop, unique for CNPase in the 2H phosphoesterase family, appears to have various functions in the CNPase reaction mechanism, from coordinating the nucleophilic water molecule to providing a binding pocket for the product and being involved in product release. PMID:26563764

  1. Catalytic Mesoporous Janus Nanomotors for Active Cargo Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report on the synergy between catalytic propulsion and mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) for the design of Janus nanomotors as active cargo delivery systems with sizes <100 nm (40, 65, and 90 nm). The Janus asymmetry of the nanomotors is given by electron beam (e-beam) deposition of a very thin platinum (2 nm) layer on MSNPs. The chemically powered Janus nanomotors present active diffusion at low H2O2 fuel concentration (i.e., <3 wt %). Their apparent diffusion coefficient is enhanced up to 100% compared to their Brownian motion. Due to their mesoporous architecture and small dimensions, they can load cargo molecules in large quantity and serve as active nanocarriers for directed cargo delivery on a chip. PMID:25844893

  2. Triggering activity of catalytic rod-like supramolecular polymers.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Elisa; van Genabeek, Bas; Lamers, Brigitte A G; Koenigs, Marcel M E; Meijer, E W; Palmans, Anja R A

    2015-02-23

    Supramolecular polymers based on benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamides (BTAs) functionalized with an L- or D-proline moiety display high catalytic activity towards aldol reactions in water. High turnover frequencies (TOF) of up to 27×10(-4) s(-1) and excellent stereoselectivities (up to 96% de, up to 99% ee) were observed. In addition, the catalyst could be reused and remained active at catalyst loadings and substrate concentrations as low as 0.1 mol % and 50 mM, respectively. A temperature-induced conformational change in the supramolecular polymer triggers the high activity of the catalyst. The supramolecular polymer's helical sense in combination with the configuration of the proline (L- or D-) is responsible for the observed selectivity. PMID:25614098

  3. Catalytic mesoporous Janus nanomotors for active cargo delivery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xing; Hahn, Kersten; Sanchez, Samuel

    2015-04-22

    We report on the synergy between catalytic propulsion and mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) for the design of Janus nanomotors as active cargo delivery systems with sizes <100 nm (40, 65, and 90 nm). The Janus asymmetry of the nanomotors is given by electron beam (e-beam) deposition of a very thin platinum (2 nm) layer on MSNPs. The chemically powered Janus nanomotors present active diffusion at low H2O2 fuel concentration (i.e., <3 wt %). Their apparent diffusion coefficient is enhanced up to 100% compared to their Brownian motion. Due to their mesoporous architecture and small dimensions, they can load cargo molecules in large quantity and serve as active nanocarriers for directed cargo delivery on a chip. PMID:25844893

  4. A classical enzyme active center motif lacks catalytic competence until modulated electrostatically.

    PubMed

    Pinitglang, S; Watts, A B; Patel, M; Reid, J D; Noble, M A; Gul, S; Bokth, A; Naeem, A; Patel, H; Thomas, E W; Sreedharan, S K; Verma, C; Brocklehurst, K

    1997-08-19

    The cysteine proteinase superfamily is a source of natural structural variants of value in the investigation of mechanism. It has long been considered axiomatic that catalytic competence of these enzymes mirrors the generation of the ubiquitous catalytic site imidazolium-thiolate ion pair. We here report definitive evidence from kinetic studies supported by electrostatic potential calculations, however, that at least for some of these enzymes the ion pair state which provides the nucleophilic and acid-base chemistry is essentially fully developed at low pH where the enzymes are inactive. Catalytic competence requires an additional protonic dissociation with a common pKa value close to 4 possibly from the Glu50 cluster to control ion pair geometry. The pH dependence of the second-order rate constant (k) for the reactions of the catalytic site thiol groups with 4,4'-dipyrimidyl disulfide is shown to provide the pKa values for the formation and deprotonation of the (Cys)-S-/(His)-Im+H ion pair state. Analogous study of the reactions with 2,2'-dipyridyl disulfide reveals other kinetically influential ionizations, and all of these pKa values are compared with those observed in the pH dependence of kcat/Km for the catalyzed hydrolysis of N-acetylphenylalanylglycine 4-nitroanilide. The discrepancy between the pKa value for ion pair formation and the common pKa value close to 4 related to generation of catalytic activity is particularly marked for ficin (pKa 2.49 +/- 0.02) and caricain (pKa 2.88 +/- 0.02) but exists also for papain (pKa 3.32 +/- 0.01). PMID:9254592

  5. Polyvinylpyrrolidone adsorption effects on the morphologies of synthesized platinum particles and its catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, Mahayatun Dayana Johan; Aziz, Azlan Abdul

    2015-04-01

    Flower-like Platinum micro-structures were synthesized from different concentration of the PVP using solvothermal method. At 5.0×10-3 mmol of PVP, well-defined flower-like pattern consists of triangular petals radiating from the centre were produced whereas larger flower network developed at higher PVP concentration. High degree of crystallinity was obtained upon each increment of PVP. The well defined flower like pattern synthesized using 5.0×10-3 mmol PVP exhibit the highest catalytic activity and stability towards electro-oxidation of formic acid.

  6. Structure of the catalytic domain of Plasmodium falciparum ARF GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, William J.; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2012-03-26

    The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the ADP ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP) from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined and refined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) data were collected utilizing the Zn{sup 2+} ion bound at the zinc-finger domain and were used to solve the structure. The overall structure of the domain is similar to those of mammalian ARFGAPs. However, several amino-acid residues in the area where GAP interacts with ARF1 differ in P. falciparum ARFGAP. Moreover, a number of residues that form the dimer interface in the crystal structure are unique in P. falciparum ARFGAP.

  7. Polyvinylpyrrolidone adsorption effects on the morphologies of synthesized platinum particles and its catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ooi, Mahayatun Dayana Johan; Aziz, Azlan Abdul

    2015-04-24

    Flower-like Platinum micro-structures were synthesized from different concentration of the PVP using solvothermal method. At 5.0×10{sup −3} mmol of PVP, well-defined flower-like pattern consists of triangular petals radiating from the centre were produced whereas larger flower network developed at higher PVP concentration. High degree of crystallinity was obtained upon each increment of PVP. The well defined flower like pattern synthesized using 5.0×10{sup −3} mmol PVP exhibit the highest catalytic activity and stability towards electro-oxidation of formic acid.

  8. Synthesis and catalytic activity of heteroatom doped metal-free single-wall carbon nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaohui; Cui, Longbin; Tang, Pei; Hu, Ziqi; Ma, Ding; Shi, Zujin

    2016-04-01

    Boron-, phosphorus-, nitrogen-doped and co-doped single-wall carbon nanohorns were produced using an arc-vaporization method. These as-prepared doped materials consist of uniform isolated nanohorns and exhibit greatly enhanced catalytic capabilities in the reduction reaction of nitrobenzene and a volcano-shape trend between their activities with a B dopant content is found. Moreover, the B-C3 and P-C3 species in doped nanohorns might act as the acidic and basic sites to promote this reaction. PMID:27006980

  9. Direct Catalytic Chemoselective α-Amination of Acylpyrazoles: A Concise Route to Unnatural α-Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tokumasu, Keisuke; Yazaki, Ryo; Ohshima, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    A direct copper-catalyzed highly chemoselective α-amination is described. Acylpyrazole proved to be a highly efficient enolate precursor of a carboxylic acid oxidation state substrate, while preactivation by a stoichiometric amount of strong base has been used in catalytic α-aminations. The simultaneous activation of both coupling partners, enolization and metal nitrenoid formation, was crucial for obtaining the product, and wide functional group compatibility highlighted the mildness of the present catalysis. The bidentate coordination mode was amenable to highly chemoselective activation over ketone and much more acidic nitroalkyl functionality. Deuterium exchange experiments clearly demonstrated that exclusive enolization of acylpyrazole was achieved without the formation of a nitronate. The present catalysis was applied to late-stage α-amination, allowing for concise access to highly versatile α-amino acid derivatives. The product could be transformed into variety of useful building blocks. PMID:26859788

  10. Catalytic activity of noble metals for metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yae, Shinji; Morii, Yuma; Fukumuro, Naoki; Matsuda, Hitoshi

    2012-06-01

    Metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon is an electroless method that can produce porous silicon by immersing metal-modified silicon in a hydrofluoric acid solution without electrical bias. We have been studying the metal-assisted hydrofluoric acid etching of silicon using dissolved oxygen as an oxidizing agent. Three major factors control the etching reaction and the porous silicon structure: photoillumination during etching, oxidizing agents, and metal particles. In this study, the influence of noble metal particles, silver, gold, platinum, and rhodium, on this etching is investigated under dark conditions: the absence of photogenerated charges in the silicon. The silicon dissolution is localized under the particles, and nanopores are formed whose diameters resemble the size of the metal nanoparticles. The etching rate of the silicon and the catalytic activity of the metals for the cathodic reduction of oxygen in the hydrofluoric acid solution increase in the order of silver, gold, platinum, and rhodium.

  11. Catalytic activity of noble metals for metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon is an electroless method that can produce porous silicon by immersing metal-modified silicon in a hydrofluoric acid solution without electrical bias. We have been studying the metal-assisted hydrofluoric acid etching of silicon using dissolved oxygen as an oxidizing agent. Three major factors control the etching reaction and the porous silicon structure: photoillumination during etching, oxidizing agents, and metal particles. In this study, the influence of noble metal particles, silver, gold, platinum, and rhodium, on this etching is investigated under dark conditions: the absence of photogenerated charges in the silicon. The silicon dissolution is localized under the particles, and nanopores are formed whose diameters resemble the size of the metal nanoparticles. The etching rate of the silicon and the catalytic activity of the metals for the cathodic reduction of oxygen in the hydrofluoric acid solution increase in the order of silver, gold, platinum, and rhodium. PMID:22738277

  12. Catalytic Reduction of 4-Nitrophenol Using Silver Nanoparticles with Adjustable Activity.

    PubMed

    Kästner, Claudia; Thünemann, Andreas F

    2016-07-26

    We report on the development of ultrasmall core-shell silver nanoparticles synthesized by an upscaled modification of the polyol process. It is foreseen to use these thoroughly characterized particles as reference material to compare the catalytic and biological properties of functionalized silver nanoparticles. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis reveals a narrow size distribution of the silver cores with a mean radius of Rc = 3.0 nm and a distribution width of 0.6 nm. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) provides a hydrodynamic radius of RH = 10.0 nm and a PDI of 0.09. The particles' surface is covered with poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) forming a shell with a thickness of 7.0 nm, which provides colloidal stability lasting for more than 6 months at ambient conditions. The PAA can be easily exchanged by biomolecules to modify the surface functionality. Replacements of PAA with glutathione (GSH) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been performed as examples. We demonstrate that the silver particles effectively catalyze the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol with sodium borohydride. With PAA as stabilizer, the catalytic activity of 436 ± 24 L g(-1) s(-1) is the highest reported in the literature for silver nanoparticles. GSH and BSA passivate the surface substantially, resulting in a catalytic activity of 77.6 ± 0.9 and 3.47 ± 0.50 L g(-1) s(-1), respectively. PMID:27380382

  13. Catalytic activity of nuclease P1: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Falcone, J.M.; Shibata, M.; Box, H.C.

    1994-10-01

    Nuclease P1 from Penicillium citrinum is a zinc dependent glyco-enzyme that recognizes single stranded DNA and RNA as substrates and hydrolyzes the phosphate ester bond. Nuclease Pl seems to recognize particular conformations of the phosphodiester backbone and shows significant variation in the rate of hydrolytic activity depending upon which nucleosides are coupled by the phosphodiester bond. The efficiency of nuclease Pl in hydrolyzing the phosphodiester bonds of a substrate can be altered by modifications to one of the substrate bases induced by ionizing radiation or oxidative stress. Measurements have been made of the effect of several radiation induced lesions on the catalytic rate of nuclease Pl. A model of the structure of the enzyme has been constructed in order to better understand the binding and activity of this enzyme on various ssDNA substrates.

  14. Dual Catalytic Activity of Hydroxycinnamoyl-Coenzyme A Quinate Transferase from Tomato Allows It to Moonlight in the Synthesis of Both Mono- and Dicaffeoylquinic Acids1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Moglia, Andrea; Lanteri, Sergio; Comino, Cinzia; Hill, Lionel; Knevitt, Daniel; Cagliero, Cecilia; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Bornemann, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), like other Solanaceous species, accumulates high levels of antioxidant caffeoylquinic acids, which are strong bioactive molecules and protect plants against biotic and abiotic stresses. Among these compounds, the monocaffeoylquinic acids (e.g. chlorogenic acid [CGA]) and the dicaffeoylquinic acids (diCQAs) have been found to possess marked antioxidative properties. Thus, they are of therapeutic interest both as phytonutrients in foods and as pharmaceuticals. Strategies to increase diCQA content in plants have been hampered by the modest understanding of their biosynthesis and whether the same pathway exists in different plant species. Incubation of CGA with crude extracts of tomato fruits led to the formation of two new products, which were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as diCQAs. This chlorogenate:chlorogenate transferase activity was partially purified from ripe fruit. The final protein fraction resulted in 388-fold enrichment of activity and was subjected to trypsin digestion and mass spectrometric sequencing: a hydroxycinnamoyl-Coenzyme A:quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) was selected as a candidate protein. Assay of recombinant HQT protein expressed in Escherichia coli confirmed its ability to synthesize diCQAs in vitro. This second activity (chlorogenate:chlorogenate transferase) of HQT had a low pH optimum and a high Km for its substrate, CGA. High concentrations of CGA and relatively low pH occur in the vacuoles of plant cells. Transient assays demonstrated that tomato HQT localizes to the vacuole as well as to the cytoplasm of plant cells, supporting the idea that in this species, the enzyme catalyzes different reactions in two subcellular compartments. PMID:25301886

  15. Acidic Properties and Structure-Activity Correlations of Solid Acid Catalysts Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Li, Shenhui; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2016-04-19

    Solid acid materials with tunable structural and acidic properties are promising heterogeneous catalysts for manipulating and/or emulating the activity and selectivity of industrially important catalytic reactions. On the other hand, the performances of acid-catalyzed reactions are mostly dictated by the acidic features, namely, type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount, strength, and local environment of acid sites. The latter is relevant to their location (intra- vs extracrystalline), and possible confinement and Brønsted-Lewis acid synergy effects that may strongly affect the host-guest interactions, reaction mechanism, and shape selectivity of the catalytic system. This account aims to highlight some important applications of state-of-the-art solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for exploring the structural and acidic properties of solid acid catalysts as well as their catalytic performances and relevant reaction pathway invoked. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations may be exploited in conjunction with experimental SSNMR studies to verify the structure-activity correlations of the catalytic system at a microscopic scale. We describe in this Account the developments and applications of advanced ex situ and/or in situ SSNMR techniques, such as two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum magic-angle spinning (DQ MAS) homonuclear correlation spectroscopy for structural investigation of solid acids as well as study of their acidic properties. Moreover, the energies and electronic structures of the catalysts and detailed catalytic reaction processes, including the identification of reaction species, elucidation of reaction mechanism, and verification of structure-activity correlations, made available by DFT theoretical calculations were also discussed. Relevant discussions will focus primarily on results obtained from our laboratories in the past decade, including (i) quantitative and qualitative acidity characterization utilizing assorted probe molecules

  16. TET2 Regulates Mast Cell Differentiation and Proliferation through Catalytic and Non-catalytic Activities.

    PubMed

    Montagner, Sara; Leoni, Cristina; Emming, Stefan; Della Chiara, Giulia; Balestrieri, Chiara; Barozzi, Iros; Piccolo, Viviana; Togher, Susan; Ko, Myunggon; Rao, Anjana; Natoli, Gioacchino; Monticelli, Silvia

    2016-05-17

    Dioxygenases of the TET family impact genome functions by converting 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in DNA to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). Here, we identified TET2 as a crucial regulator of mast cell differentiation and proliferation. In the absence of TET2, mast cells showed disrupted gene expression and altered genome-wide 5hmC deposition, especially at enhancers and in the proximity of downregulated genes. Impaired differentiation of Tet2-ablated cells could be relieved or further exacerbated by modulating the activity of other TET family members, and mechanistically it could be linked to the dysregulated expression of C/EBP family transcription factors. Conversely, the marked increase in proliferation induced by the loss of TET2 could be rescued exclusively by re-expression of wild-type or catalytically inactive TET2. Our data indicate that, in the absence of TET2, mast cell differentiation is under the control of compensatory mechanisms mediated by other TET family members, while proliferation is strictly dependent on TET2 expression. PMID:27160912

  17. Guiding catalytically active particles with chemically patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspal, William; Popescu, Mihail; Dietrich, Siegfried; Tasinkevych, Mykola

    Catalytically active Janus particles in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemi-osmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemi-osmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate ``point-particle'' approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate (e.g., by adsorbing two different materials) one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemi-osmotic flows can cause particles to either ``dock'' at a chemical step between the two materials, or to follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe-following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governing this behavior.

  18. Studies Relevent to Catalytic Activation Co & other small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Peter C

    2005-02-22

    Detailed annual and triannual reports describing the progress accomplished during the tenure of this grant were filed with the Program Manager for Catalysis at the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. To avoid unnecessary duplication, the present report will provide a brief overview of the research areas that were sponsored by this grant and list the resulting publications and theses based on this DOE supported research. The scientific personnel participating in (and trained by) this grant's research are also listed. Research carried out under this DOE grant was largely concerned with the mechanisms of the homogeneous catalytic and photocatalytic activation of small molecules such as carbon monoxide, dihydrogen and various hydrocarbons. Much of the more recent effort has focused on the dynamics and mechanisms of reactions relevant to substrate carbonylations by homogeneous organometallic catalysts. A wide range of modern investigative techniques were employed, including quantitative fast reaction methodologies such as time-resolved optical (TRO) and time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy and stopped flow kinetics. Although somewhat diverse, this research falls within the scope of the long-term objective of applying quantitative techniques to elucidate the dynamics and understand the principles of mechanisms relevant to the selective and efficient catalytic conversions of fundamental feedstocks to higher value materials.

  19. Catalytic combustion of dry carbon monoxide by external power activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treviño, C.; Prince, J. C.

    2000-03-01

    The catalytic combustion of dry carbon monoxide and air in a planar stagnation-point flow over a platinum foil with external power is studied in this paper. The reduced heterogeneous kinetics are modelled with the dissociative adsorption of the molecular oxygen and the non-dissociative adsorption of CO, together with a surface reaction of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood type and the desorption reaction of the adsorbed product, CO 2(s). The resulting governing equations have been numerically integrated and the whole S-shaped response curve has been obtained as a function of the mixture initial concentration. The critical conditions for the catalytic ignition and extinction are deduced using high activation energy asymptotics of the desorption kinetics of the most efficient adsorbed reactant, CO(s). We obtained a very good agreement between the numerical and asymptotic results for the ignition and extinction conditions. In general, the ignition process can be well modelled without reactant consumption, while extinction occurs in the partial diffusion-controlled regime, with a finite non-zero concentration of carbon monoxide close to the plate.

  20. Copper metal-organic framework nanocrystal for plane effect nonenzymatic electro-catalytic activity of glucose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanying; Zhang, Youjuan; Chen, Jing; Pang, Huan

    2014-10-01

    This work describes the first demonstration of nanocrystal plane dependent nonenzymatic electro-catalytic glucose activity of [Cu3(btc)2] nanocrystals with different shapes (nanocube, truncated cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron). From electrochemical results, the obtained [Cu3(btc)2] nanocube modified electrode shows the best nonenzymatic electro-catalytic glucose activity. Interestingly, decreasing the {100} crystal planes from cubes to octahedra, changes the nonenzymatic electro-catalytic activity from highly sensitive to general. PMID:25123202

  1. Study of Single Catalytic Events at Copper-in-Charcoal: Localization of Click Activity Through Subdiffraction Observation of Single Catalytic Events.

    PubMed

    Decan, Matthew R; Scaiano, Juan C

    2015-10-15

    Single molecule fluorescence microscopy reveals that copper-in-charcoal--a high performance click catalyst- has remarkably few catalytic sites, with 90% of the charcoal particles being inactive, and for the catalytic ones the active sites represent a minute fraction (∼0.003%) of the surface. The intermittent nature of the catalytic events enables subdiffraction resolution and mapping of the catalytic sites. PMID:26722775

  2. Antibacterial and catalytic activities of green synthesized silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindhu, M. R.; Umadevi, M.

    2015-01-01

    The aqueous beetroot extract was used as reducing agent for silver nanoparticles synthesis. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The surface plasmon resonance peak of synthesized nanoparticles was observed at 438 nm. As the concentration of beetroot extract increases, absorption spectra shows blue shift with decreasing particle size. The prepared silver nanoparticles were well dispersed, spherical in shape with the average particle size of 15 nm. The prepared silver nanoparticles are effective in inhibiting the growth of both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. The prepared silver nanoparticles reveal faster catalytic activity. This natural method for synthesis of silver nanoparticles offers a valuable contribution in the area of green synthesis and nanotechnology avoiding the presence of hazardous and toxic solvents and waste.

  3. Support nanostructure boosts oxygen transfer to catalytically active platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vayssilov, Georgi N; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Migani, Annapaola; Staudt, Thorsten; Petrova, Galina P; Tsud, Nataliya; Skála, Tomáš; Bruix, Albert; Illas, Francesc; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír; Neyman, Konstantin M; Libuda, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Interactions of metal particles with oxide supports can radically enhance the performance of supported catalysts. At the microscopic level, the details of such metal-oxide interactions usually remain obscure. This study identifies two types of oxidative metal-oxide interaction on well-defined models of technologically important Pt-ceria catalysts: (1) electron transfer from the Pt nanoparticle to the support, and (2) oxygen transfer from ceria to Pt. The electron transfer is favourable on ceria supports, irrespective of their morphology. Remarkably, the oxygen transfer is shown to require the presence of nanostructured ceria in close contact with Pt and, thus, is inherently a nanoscale effect. Our findings enable us to detail the formation mechanism of the catalytically indispensable Pt-O species on ceria and to elucidate the extraordinary structure-activity dependence of ceria-based catalysts in general. PMID:21423188

  4. Support nanostructure boosts oxygen transfer to catalytically active platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayssilov, Georgi N.; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Migani, Annapaola; Staudt, Thorsten; Petrova, Galina P.; Tsud, Nataliya; Skála, Tomáš; Bruix, Albert; Illas, Francesc; Prince, Kevin C.; MatolíN, VladimíR.; Neyman, Konstantin M.; Libuda, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Interactions of metal particles with oxide supports can radically enhance the performance of supported catalysts. At the microscopic level, the details of such metal-oxide interactions usually remain obscure. This study identifies two types of oxidative metal-oxide interaction on well-defined models of technologically important Pt-ceria catalysts: (1) electron transfer from the Pt nanoparticle to the support, and (2) oxygen transfer from ceria to Pt. The electron transfer is favourable on ceria supports, irrespective of their morphology. Remarkably, the oxygen transfer is shown to require the presence of nanostructured ceria in close contact with Pt and, thus, is inherently a nanoscale effect. Our findings enable us to detail the formation mechanism of the catalytically indispensable Pt-O species on ceria and to elucidate the extraordinary structure-activity dependence of ceria-based catalysts in general.

  5. [Effect Of Polyelectrolytes on Catalytic Activity of Alcohol Dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Dubrovsky, A V; Musina, E V; Kim, A L; Tikhonenko, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent and optical spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with negatively charged polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) and dextran sulfate (DS), as well as positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium) (PDADMA). As found, DS and PDADMA did not affect the structural and catalytic enzyme properties. In contrast, PSS slightly decreased the protein self-fluorescence over 1 h of incubation, which is associated with partial destruction of its quaternary (globular) structure. Investigation of the ADH activity with and without PSS showed its dependency on the incubation time and the PSS presence. Sodium chloride (2.0 M and 0.2 M) or ammonium sulfate (0.1 M) added to the reaction mixture did not completely protect the enzyme quaternary structure from the PSS action. However ammonium sulfate or 0.2 M sodium chloride stabilized the enzyme and partially inhibited the negative PSS effect. PMID:27266256

  6. Acceleration of catalytic activity of calcium oxide for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Ayato; Matsubara, Koh; Honda, Katsuhisa

    2009-01-01

    This research was aimed at studying the acceleration of the catalytic activity of calcium oxide (CaO) for developing an effective heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production by the transesterification of plant oil with methanol. CaO was activated by pretreatment with methanol and was used for the transesterification reaction. The activation and transesterification reaction conditions were examined. The obtained optimal reaction conditions were 0.1-g CaO, 3.9-g methanol, 15-g rapeseed oil, and 1.5-h activation time at room temperature that provided methyl ester in approximately 90% yield within a reaction time of 3h at 60 degrees C. The activation mechanism was also investigated, and the proposed mechanism is as follows. By pretreatment with methanol, a small amount of CaO gets converted into Ca(OCH(3))(2) that acts as an initiating reagent for the transesterification reaction and produces glycerin as a by-product. Subsequently, a calcium-glycerin complex, formed due to the reaction of CaO with glycerin, functions as the main catalyst and accelerates the transesterification reaction. PMID:18684617

  7. Catalytic activity of silicon nanowires decorated with silver and copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amdouni, Sonia; Coffinier, Yannick; Szunerits, Sabine; Zaïbi, Mohammed Ali; Oueslati, Meherzi; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports on the elaboration of silicon nanowires decorated with silver (SiNWs-Ag NPs) or copper (SiNWs-Cu NPs) nanoparticles and the investigation of their catalytic properties for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol. The SiNW arrays were produced through chemical etching of crystalline silicon in HF/AgNO3 aqueous solution. The metal nanoparticles were deposited on the SiNW substrates through chemical bath immersion in a metal salt/hydrofluoric acid aqueous solution. The SiNWs decorated with Ag NPs and Cu NPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The catalytic activity of the SiNWs loaded with metal nanoparticles was evaluated for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride (NaBH4). The substrates exhibited good catalytic performance toward nitrophenol with a full reduction in less than 30 s for the SiNWs-Cu NPs.

  8. Catalytic conversion of carbohydrates to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural from the waste liquid of acid hydrolysis NCC.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yonghui; Liu, Pengtao; Liu, Zhong

    2016-05-20

    The principal goal of this work was to reuse the carbohydrates and recycle sulfuric acid in the waste liquid of acid hydrolysis nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC). Therefore, in this work, the optimizations of further hydrolysis of waste liquid of acid hydrolysis NCC and catalytic conversion of L4 to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) were studied. Sulfuric acid was separated by spiral wound diffusion dialysis (SWDD). The results revealed that cellulose can be hydrolyze to glucose absolutely under the condition of temperature 35 °C, 3 h, and sulfuric acid's concentration 62 wt%. And 78.3% sulfuric acid was recovered by SWDD. The yield of 5-HMF was highest in aqueous solution under the optimal condition was as follows, temperature 160 °C, 3 h, and sulfuric acid's concentration 12 wt%. Then the effect of biphasic solvent systems catalytic conversion and inorganic salt as additives were still examined. The results showed that both of them contributed to prepare 5-HMF. The yield and selectivity of 5-HMF was up to 21.0% and 31.4%, respectively. PMID:26917388

  9. Requirement of catalytic-triad and related amino acids for the acyltransferase activity of Tanacetum cinerariifolium GDSL lipase/esterase TcGLIP for ester-bond formation in pyrethrin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kikuta, Yukio; Yamada, Gen; Mitsumori, Tomonori; Takeuchi, Takayuki; Nakayama, Koji; Katsuda, Yoshio; Hatanaka, Akikazu; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    We have recently discovered that a GDSL lipase/esterase (TcGLIP) in Tanacetum cinerariifolium catalyzed acyltransferase activity to form an ester bond in the natural insecticide, pyrethrin. TcGLIP contained Ser40 in Block I, Gly64 in Block II, Asn168 in Block III and Asp318 and His321 in Block V, suggesting underlying hydrolase activity, although little is known about their role in acyltransferase activity. We expressed TcGLIP here in Esherichia coli as a fusion with maltose-binding protein (MBP), part of the fusion being cleaved with a protease to obtain MBP-free TcGLIP. A kinetic analysis revealed that the MBP moiety scarcely influenced the kinetic parameters. The effects on acyltransferase activity of mutations of Gly64, Asn168, Asp318 and His321 were investigated by using MBP-fused TcGLIP. Mutations of these amino acids markedly reduced the acyltransferase activity, suggesting their critical role in the production of pyrethrins. PMID:24018659

  10. Development of novel catalytically active polymer-metal-nanocomposites based on activated foams and textile fibers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report the intermatrix synthesis of Ag nanoparticles in different polymeric matrices such as polyurethane foams and polyacrylonitrile or polyamide fibers. To apply this technique, the polymer must bear functional groups able to bind and retain the nanoparticle ion precursors while ions should diffuse through the matrix. Taking into account the nature of some of the chosen matrices, it was essential to try to activate the support material to obtain an acceptable value of ion exchange capacity. To evaluate the catalytic activity of the developed nanocomposites, a model catalytic reaction was carried out in batch experiments: the reduction of p-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride. PMID:23680063

  11. Development of novel catalytically active polymer-metal-nanocomposites based on activated foams and textile fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domènech, Berta; Ziegler, Kharla K.; Carrillo, Fernando; Muñoz, Maria; Muraviev, Dimitri N.; Macanás, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we report the intermatrix synthesis of Ag nanoparticles in different polymeric matrices such as polyurethane foams and polyacrylonitrile or polyamide fibers. To apply this technique, the polymer must bear functional groups able to bind and retain the nanoparticle ion precursors while ions should diffuse through the matrix. Taking into account the nature of some of the chosen matrices, it was essential to try to activate the support material to obtain an acceptable value of ion exchange capacity. To evaluate the catalytic activity of the developed nanocomposites, a model catalytic reaction was carried out in batch experiments: the reduction of p-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride.

  12. Structural Basis for Catalytic Activation of a Serine Recombinase

    SciTech Connect

    Keenholtz, Ross A.; Rowland, Sally-J.; Boocock, Martin R.; Stark, W. Marshall; Rice, Phoebe A.

    2014-10-02

    Sin resolvase is a site-specific serine recombinase that is normally controlled by a complex regulatory mechanism. A single mutation, Q115R, allows the enzyme to bypass the entire regulatory apparatus, such that no accessory proteins or DNA sites are required. Here, we present a 1.86 {angstrom} crystal structure of the Sin Q115R catalytic domain, in a tetrameric arrangement stabilized by an interaction between Arg115 residues on neighboring subunits. The subunits have undergone significant conformational changes from the inactive dimeric state previously reported. The structure provides a new high-resolution view of a serine recombinase active site that is apparently fully assembled, suggesting roles for the conserved active site residues. The structure also suggests how the dimer-tetramer transition is coupled to assembly of the active site. The tetramer is captured in a different rotational substate than that seen in previous hyperactive serine recombinase structures, and unbroken crossover site DNA can be readily modeled into its active sites.

  13. Identification of three critical acidic residues of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase involved in catalysis: determining the PARG catalytic domain

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Chandra N.; Koh, David W.; Jacobson, Myron K.; Oliveira, Marcos A.

    2005-01-01

    PARG [poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase] catalyses the hydrolysis of α(1″→2′) or α(1‴→2″) O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers to produce free ADP-ribose. We investigated possible mechanistic similarities between PARG and glycosidases, which also cleave O-glycosidic linkages. Glycosidases typically utilize two acidic residues for catalysis, thus we targeted acidic residues within a conserved region of bovine PARG that has been shown to contain an inhibitor-binding site. The targeted glutamate and aspartate residues were changed to asparagine in order to minimize structural alterations. Mutants were purified and assayed for catalytic activity, as well as binding, to an immobilized PARG inhibitor to determine ability to recognize substrate. Our investigation revealed residues essential for PARG catalytic activity. Two adjacent glutamic acid residues are found in the conserved sequence Gln755-Glu-Glu757, and a third residue found in the conserved sequence Val737-Asp-Phe-Ala-Asn741. Our functional characterization of PARG residues, along with recent identification of an inhibitor-binding residue Tyr796 and a glycine-rich region Gly745-Gly-Gly747 important for PARG function, allowed us to define a PARG ‘signature sequence’ [vDFA-X3-GGg-X6–8-vQEEIRF-X3-PE-X14-E-X12-YTGYa], which we used to identify putative PARG sequences across a range of organisms. Sequence alignments, along with our mapping of PARG functional residues, suggest the presence of a conserved catalytic domain of approx. 185 residues which spans residues 610–795 in bovine PARG. PMID:15658938

  14. Characterization of a soluble, catalytically active form of Escherichia coli leader peptidase: requirement of detergent or phospholipid for optimal activity.

    PubMed

    Tschantz, W R; Paetzel, M; Cao, G; Suciu, D; Inouye, M; Dalbey, R E

    1995-03-28

    Leader peptidase is a novel serine protease in Escherichia coli, which functions to cleave leader sequences from exported proteins. Its catalytic domain extends into the periplasmic space and is anchored to the membrane by two transmembrane segments located at the N-terminal end of the protein. At present, there is no information on the structure of the catalytic domain. Here, we report on the properties of a soluble form of leader peptidase (delta 2-75), and we compare its properties to those of the wild-type enzyme. We find that the truncated leader peptidase has a kcat of 3.0 S-1 and a Km of 32 microM with a pro-OmpA nuclease A substrate. In contrast to the wild-type enzyme (pI of 6.8), delta 2-75 is water-soluble and has an acidic isoelectric point of 5.6. We also show with delta 2-75 that the replacement of serine 90 and lysine 145 with alanine residues results in a 500-fold reduction in activity, providing further evidence that leader peptidase employs a catalytic serine/lysine dyad. Finally, we find that the catalysis of delta 2-75 is accelerated by the presence of the detergent Triton X-100, regardless if the substrate is pro-OmpA nuclease A or a peptide substrate. Triton X-100 is required for optimal activity of delta 2-75 at a level far below the critical micelle concentration. Moreover, we find that E. coli phospholipids stimulate the activity of delta 2-75, suggesting that phospholipids may play an important physiological role in the catalytic mechanism of leader peptidase. PMID:7696258

  15. Formic Acid Free Flowsheet Development To Eliminate Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In The Defense Waste Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Dan P.; Stone, Michael E.; Newell, J. David; Fellinger, Terri L.; Bricker, Jonathan M.

    2012-09-14

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during production of plutonium and tritium demanded by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass canisters is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. Testing was initiated to determine whether the elimination of formic acid from the DWPF's chemical processing flowsheet would eliminate catalytic hydrogen generation. Historically, hydrogen is generated in chemical processing of alkaline High Level Waste sludge in DWPF. In current processing, sludge is combined with nitric and formic acid to neutralize the waste, reduce mercury and manganese, destroy nitrite, and modify (thin) the slurry rheology. The noble metal catalyzed formic acid decomposition produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Elimination of formic acid by replacement with glycolic acid has the potential to eliminate the production of catalytic hydrogen. Flowsheet testing was performed to develop the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet as an alternative to the nitric-formic flowsheet currently being processed at the DWPF. This new flowsheet has shown that mercury can be reduced and removed by steam stripping in DWPF with no catalytic hydrogen generation. All processing objectives were also met, including greatly reducing the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product yield stress as compared to the baseline nitric/formic flowsheet. Ten DWPF tests were performed with nonradioactive simulants designed to cover a broad compositional range. No hydrogen was generated in testing without formic acid.

  16. Simultaneous pore enlargement and introduction of highly dispersed Fe active sites in MSNs for enhanced catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Jinlou; Dong Xu; Elangovan, S.P.; Li Yongsheng; Zhao Wenru; Iijima, Toshio; Yamazaki, Yasuo; Shi Jianlin

    2012-02-15

    An effective post-hydrothermal treatment strategy has been developed to dope highly dispersed iron catalytical centers into the framework of mesoporous silica, to keep the particle size in nanometric scale, and in the meanwhile, to expand the pore size of the synthesized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). Characterization techniques such as XRD, BET, SEM and TEM support that the synthesized samples are long period ordered with particles size about 100 nm and a relatively large pore size of ca. 3.5 nm. UV-vis, XPS and EPR measurements demonstrate that the introduced iron active centers are highly dispersed in a coordinatively unsaturated status. NH{sub 3}-TPD verifies that the acid amount of iron-doped MSNs is quite high. The synthesized nanocatalysts show an excellent catalytic performance for benzylation of benzene by benzyl chloride, and they present relatively higher yield and selectivity to diphenylmethane with a lower iron content and much shorter reaction time. - Graphical abstract: Uniform MSNs with iron active centers and large pore size have been prepared by a newly developed strategy, which demonstrates enhanced catalytic performance for benzylation of benzene by benzyl chloride. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron species were introduced into the framework of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with uniform dispersion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The pore sizes of the synthesized nanocatalysts were expanded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acidic site quantities were quite high and the acidic centers were accessible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanocatalysts presented higher yield and selectivity to diphenylmethane with significantly lower Fe content.

  17. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles using renewable Punica granatum juice and study of its catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Shib Shankar; Bag, Braja Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Punica granatum juice, a delicious multivitamin drink of great medicinal significance, is rich in different types of phytochemicals, such as terpenoids, alkaloids, sterols, polyphenols, sugars, fatty acids, aromatic compounds, amino acids, tocopherols, etc. We have demonstrated the use of the juice for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at room temperature under very mild conditions. The synthesis of the AuNPs was complete in few minutes and no extra stabilizing or capping agents were necessary. The size of the nanoparticles could be controlled by varying the concentration of the fruit extract. The AuNPs were characterized by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. Catalytic activity of the synthesized colloidal AuNPs has also been demonstrated.

  18. Characterization of 12-molybdophosphoric acid supported on mesoporous silica MCM-41 and its catalytic performance in the synthesis of hydroquinone diacetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Awad I.; Samra, S. E.; El-Hakam, S. A.; Khder, A. S.; El-Shenawy, H. Z.; El-Yazeed, W. S. Abo

    2013-10-01

    12-molybdophosphoric acid (PMA) was supported on mesoporous molecular sieves MCM-41 by impregnation of 12-molybdophosphoric acid followed by calcination. The nanochannels of MCM-41 provide a large surface area for the solid state dispersion of 12-molybdophosphoric acid. The samples have been characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption at -196 °C, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and FT-IR measurements. The acidity and catalytic activity have been, respectively, examined by nonaqueous titration of n-butylamine in acetonitrile and synthesis of hydroquinone diacetate. The results showed that ordered hexagonal pore structure was observed in the synthesized MCM-41. Also the results indicate that PMA are highly dispersed on mesoporous silica MCM-41 spherical nanoparticles while PMA retains its Keggin structure. On the other hand, with increasing the introduced PMA amount, the specific surface area decreases, and the mesoporous ordering of the samples become poor. Both the surface acidity and the catalytic activity sharply increase with the modification of MCM-41 by PMA but decrease by increasing the calcination temperature. The sample with 55 wt% PMA/MCM-41 calcined at 350 °C shows the highest acidity and catalytic activity.

  19. Prediction of hammerhead ribozyme intracellular activity with the catalytic core fingerprint.

    PubMed

    Gabryelska, Marta Magdalena; Wyszko, Eliza; Szymański, Maciej; Popenda, Mariusz; Barciszewski, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Hammerhead ribozyme is a versatile tool for down-regulation of gene expression in vivo. Owing to its small size and high activity, it is used as a model for RNA structure-function relationship studies. In the present paper we describe a new extended hammerhead ribozyme HH-2 with a tertiary stabilizing motif constructed on the basis of the tetraloop receptor sequence. This ribozyme is very active in living cells, but shows low activity in vitro. To understand it, we analysed tertiary structure models of substrate-ribozyme complexes. We calculated six unique catalytic core geometry parameters as distances and angles between particular atoms that we call the ribozyme fingerprint. A flanking sequence and tertiary motif change the geometry of the general base, general acid, nucleophile and leaving group. We found almost complete correlation between these parameters and the decrease of target gene expression in the cells. The tertiary structure model calculations allow us to predict ribozyme intracellular activity. Our approach could be widely adapted to characterize catalytic properties of other RNAs. PMID:23418809

  20. Bacillus pumilus Cyanide Dihydratase Mutants with Higher Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Crum, Mary A; Sewell, B Trevor; Benedik, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide degrading nitrilases are noted for their potential to detoxify industrial wastewater contaminated with cyanide. However, such application would benefit from an improvement to characteristics such as their catalytic activity and stability. Following error-prone PCR for random mutagenesis, several cyanide dihydratase mutants from Bacillus pumilus were isolated based on improved catalysis. Four point mutations, K93R, D172N, A202T, and E327K were characterized and their effects on kinetics, thermostability and pH tolerance were studied. K93R and D172N increased the enzyme's thermostability whereas E327K mutation had a less pronounced effect on stability. The D172N mutation also increased the affinity of the enzyme for its substrate at pH 7.7 but lowered its k cat. However, the A202T mutation, located in the dimerization or the A surface, destabilized the protein and abolished its activity. No significant effect on activity at alkaline pH was observed for any of the purified mutants. These mutations help confirm the model of CynD and are discussed in the context of the protein-protein interfaces leading to the protein quaternary structure. PMID:27570524

  1. Bacillus pumilus Cyanide Dihydratase Mutants with Higher Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Crum, Mary A.; Sewell, B. Trevor; Benedik, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide degrading nitrilases are noted for their potential to detoxify industrial wastewater contaminated with cyanide. However, such application would benefit from an improvement to characteristics such as their catalytic activity and stability. Following error-prone PCR for random mutagenesis, several cyanide dihydratase mutants from Bacillus pumilus were isolated based on improved catalysis. Four point mutations, K93R, D172N, A202T, and E327K were characterized and their effects on kinetics, thermostability and pH tolerance were studied. K93R and D172N increased the enzyme’s thermostability whereas E327K mutation had a less pronounced effect on stability. The D172N mutation also increased the affinity of the enzyme for its substrate at pH 7.7 but lowered its kcat. However, the A202T mutation, located in the dimerization or the A surface, destabilized the protein and abolished its activity. No significant effect on activity at alkaline pH was observed for any of the purified mutants. These mutations help confirm the model of CynD and are discussed in the context of the protein–protein interfaces leading to the protein quaternary structure. PMID:27570524

  2. DGKθ Catalytic Activity is Required for Efficient Recycling of Presynaptic Vesicles at Excitatory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Hana L.; Tu-Sekine, Becky; Volk, Lenora; Anggono, Victor; Huganir, Richard L.; Raben, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Synaptic transmission relies on coordinated coupling of synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis and endocytosis. While much attention has focused on characterizing proteins involved in SV recycling, the roles of membrane lipids and their metabolism remain poorly understood. Diacylglycerol, a major signaling lipid produced at synapses during synaptic transmission, is regulated by diacylglycerol kinase (DGK). Here we report a role for DGKθ in the mammalian central nervous system in facilitating recycling of presynaptic vesicles at excitatory synapses. Using synaptophysin- and vGlut1-pHluorin optical reporters, we found that acute and chronic deletion of DGKθ attenuated the recovery of SVs following neuronal stimulation. Rescue of recycling kinetics required DGKθ kinase activity. Our data establish a role for DGK catalytic activity and its byproduct, phosphatidic acid, at the presynaptic nerve terminal in SV recycling. Together these data suggest DGKθ supports synaptic transmission during periods of elevated neuronal activity. PMID:26748701

  3. Crystal Structure of Tryptophanyl-tRNA Synthetase Complexed with Adenosine-5′ Tetraphosphate: Evidence for Distributed Use of Catalytic Binding Energy in Amino Acid Activation by Class I Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Retailleau, Pascal; Weinreb, Violetta; Hu, Mei; Carter, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    Tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) is a functionally dimeric ligase, which specifically couples hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate to the formation of an ester bond between tryptophan and the cognate tRNA. TrpRS from Bacillus stearothermophilus binds the ATP analogue, adenosine-5′ tetraphosphate, AQP, competitively with ATP during pyrophosphate exchange. Estimates of binding affinity from this competitive inhibition and from isothermal titration calorimetry show that AQP binds 200 times more tightly than ATP both under conditions of induced-fit, where binding is coupled to an unfavourable conformational change, and under exchange conditions, where there is no conformational change. These binding data provide an indirect experimental measurement of +3.0 kcal/mole for the conformational free energy change associated with induced-fit assembly of the active site. Thermodynamic parameters derived from the calorimetry reveal very modest enthalpic changes, consistent with binding driven largely by a favorable entropy change. The 2.5 Å structure of the TrpRS:AQP complex, determined de novo by X-ray crystallography, resembles that of the previously described, pre-transition state TrpRS:ATP complexes. The anticodon-binding domain untwists relative to the Rossmann-fold domain by 20% of the way toward the orientation observed for the Products complex. An unexpected tetraphosphate conformation allows the γ̃ and δ̃ phosphate groups to occupy positions equivalent to those occupied by the β̃ and γ̃ phosphates of ATP. The β-phosphate effects a 1.11 Å extension that relocates the α-phosphate toward the tryptophan carboxylate while the PPi mimic moves deeper into the KMSKS loop. This configuration improves interactions between enzyme and nucleotide significantly and uniformly in the adenosine and PPi binding subsites. A new hydrogen bond forms between S194 from the class I KMSKS signature sequence and the PPi mimic. These complementary thermodynamic and

  4. Simple and rapid hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol with aqueous formic acid in catalytic flow reactors

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Shin-ichiro; Suzuki, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Summary The inner surface of a metallic tube (i.d. 0.5 mm) was coated with a palladium (Pd)-based thin metallic layer by flow electroless plating. Simultaneous plating of Pd and silver (Ag) from their electroless-plating solution produced a mixed distributed bimetallic layer. Preferential acid leaching of Ag from the Pd–Ag layer produced a porous Pd surface. Hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol was examined in the presence of formic acid simply by passing the reaction solution through the catalytic tubular reactors. p-Aminophenol was the sole product of hydrogenation. No side reaction occurred. Reaction conversion with respect to p-nitrophenol was dependent on the catalyst layer type, the temperature, pH, amount of formic acid, and the residence time. A porous and oxidized Pd (PdO) surface gave the best reaction conversion among the catalytic reactors examined. p-Nitrophenol was converted quantitatively to p-aminophenol within 15 s of residence time in the porous PdO reactor at 40 °C. Evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2) was observed during the reaction, although hydrogen (H2) was not found in the gas phase. Dehydrogenation of formic acid did not occur to any practical degree in the absence of p-nitrophenol. Consequently, the nitro group was reduced via hydrogen transfer from formic acid to p-nitrophenol and not by hydrogen generated by dehydrogenation of formic acid. PMID:23843908

  5. Simple and rapid hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol with aqueous formic acid in catalytic flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Javaid, Rahat; Kawasaki, Shin-Ichiro; Suzuki, Akira; Suzuki, Toshishige M

    2013-01-01

    The inner surface of a metallic tube (i.d. 0.5 mm) was coated with a palladium (Pd)-based thin metallic layer by flow electroless plating. Simultaneous plating of Pd and silver (Ag) from their electroless-plating solution produced a mixed distributed bimetallic layer. Preferential acid leaching of Ag from the Pd-Ag layer produced a porous Pd surface. Hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol was examined in the presence of formic acid simply by passing the reaction solution through the catalytic tubular reactors. p-Aminophenol was the sole product of hydrogenation. No side reaction occurred. Reaction conversion with respect to p-nitrophenol was dependent on the catalyst layer type, the temperature, pH, amount of formic acid, and the residence time. A porous and oxidized Pd (PdO) surface gave the best reaction conversion among the catalytic reactors examined. p-Nitrophenol was converted quantitatively to p-aminophenol within 15 s of residence time in the porous PdO reactor at 40 °C. Evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2) was observed during the reaction, although hydrogen (H2) was not found in the gas phase. Dehydrogenation of formic acid did not occur to any practical degree in the absence of p-nitrophenol. Consequently, the nitro group was reduced via hydrogen transfer from formic acid to p-nitrophenol and not by hydrogen generated by dehydrogenation of formic acid. PMID:23843908

  6. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of carbon-silica hybrid catalyst from rice straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaun, J.; Safie, N. N.; Siambun, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    The hybrid-carbon catalyst has been studied because of its promising potential to have high porosity and surface area to be used in biodiesel production. Silica has been used as the support to produce hybrid carbon catalyst due to its mesoporous structure and high surface area properties. The chemical synthesis of silica-carbon hybrid is expensive and involves more complicated preparation steps. The presence of natural silica in rice plants especially rice husk has received much attention in research because of the potential as a source for solid acid catalyst synthesis. But study on rice straw, which is available abundantly as agricultural waste is limited. In this study, rice straw undergone pyrolysis and functionalized using fuming sulphuric acid to anchor -SO3H groups. The presence of silica and the physiochemical properties of the catalyst produced were studied before and after sulphonation. The catalytic activity of hybrid carbon silica acid catalyst, (H-CSAC) in esterification of oleic acid with methanol was also studied. The results showed the presence of silica-carbon which had amorphous structure and highly porous. The carbon surface consisted of higher silica composition, had lower S element detected as compared to the surface that had high carbon content but lower silica composition. This was likely due to the fact that Si element which was bonded to oxygen was highly stable and unlikely to break the bond and react with -SO3H ions. H-CSAC conversions were 23.04 %, 35.52 % and 34.2 7% at 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. From this research, rice straw can be used as carbon precursor to produce hybrid carbon-silica catalyst and has shown catalytic activity in biodiesel production. Rate equation obtained is also presented.

  7. Catalytic activities of platinum nanotubes: a density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Prajna; Gupta, Bikash C.; Jena, Puru

    2015-10-01

    In this work we investigate the catalytic properties of platinum nanotubes using density functional theory based calculations. In particular, we study the dissociation of hydrogen and oxygen molecules as well as oxidation of CO molecules. The results indicate that platinum nanotubes have good catalytic properties and can be effectively used in converting CO molecule to CO2.

  8. Isolation of an Active Catalytic Core of Streptococcus downei MFe28 GTF-I Glucosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Monchois, Vincent; Arguello-Morales, Martha; Russell, Roy R. B.

    1999-01-01

    Truncated variants of GTF-I from Streptococcus downei MFe28 were purified by means of a histidine tag. Sequential deletions showed that the C-terminal domain was not directly involved in the catalytic process but was required for primer activation. A fully active catalytic core of only 100 kDa was isolated. PMID:10094712

  9. Effects of biomineralization peptide topology on the structure and catalytic activity of Pd nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Janairo, Jose Isagani B; Sakaguchi, Tatsuya; Hara, Kenji; Fukuoka, Atsushi; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2014-08-25

    Highly branched, coral-like Pd nanostructures were formed using a biomineralization peptide conjugated to an oligomeric peptide that simultaneously controls the spatial orientation, arrangement and valency. The Pd nanocoral showed very high catalytic activity in the reduction of nitrophenol. The results highlight the importance of topological arrangement in nanostructure formation and catalytic activity. PMID:24963622

  10. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Lignin over High-Surface-Area Mesoporous Aluminosilicates: Effect of Porosity and Acidity.

    PubMed

    Custodis, Victoria B F; Karakoulia, Stamatia A; Triantafyllidis, Kostas S; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2016-05-23

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) of lignin with amorphous mesoporous aluminosilicates catalysts yields a high fraction of aromatics and a relatively low amount of char/coke. The relationship between the acidity and porosity of Al-MCM-41, Al-SBA-15, and Al-MSU-J with product selectivity during lignin CFP is determined. The acid sites (mild Brønsted and stronger Lewis) are able to catalyze pyrolysis intermediates towards fewer oxygenated phenols and aromatic hydrocarbons. A generalized correlation of the product selectivity and yield with the aluminum content and acidity of the mesoporous aluminosilicates is hard to establish. Zeolitic strong acid sites are not required to achieve high conversion and selectivity to aromatic hydrocarbon because nanosized MCM-41 produces a high liquid yield and selectivity. The two most essential parameters are diffusion, which is influenced by pore and grain size, and the active site, which may be mildly acidic, but is dominated by Lewis acid sites. Nanosized grains and mild acidity are essential ingredients for a good lignin CFP catalyst. PMID:27079742

  11. Inhibiting caspase-6 activation and catalytic activity for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Flygare, John A; Arkin, Michelle R

    2014-01-01

    Partnerships between industry and academia are becoming increasingly complex and relevant in the drive to discover innovative new medicines. We describe the structure of the collaboration between the University of California - San Francisco - Small Molecule Discovery Center (UCSF-SMDC) and Genentech to develop chemical matter that inhibits the activity of caspase-6. We focus on the scientific basis for the partnership and how the orientation- and transaction-related barriers were overcome. We describe the division of labor that allowed two groups to operate as a unified team to generate multiple chemical series with distinct mechanisms of action. The successful structure of the agreement serves as a model for future collaborations at both institutions. PMID:24283214

  12. Disruption of the aldolase A tetramer into catalytically active monomers.

    PubMed

    Beernink, P T; Tolan, D R

    1996-05-28

    The fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (EC 4.1.2.13) homotetramer has been destabilized by site-directed mutagenesis at the two different subunit interfaces. A double mutant aldolase, Q125D/E224A, sediments as two distinct species, characteristic of a slow equilibrium, with velocities expected for the monomer and tetramer. The aldolase monomer is shown to be catalytically active following isolation from sucrose density gradients. The isolated aldolase monomer had 72% of the specific activity of the wild-type enzyme and a slightly lower Michaelis constant, clearly indicating that the quaternary structure is not required for catalysis. Cross-linking of the isolated monomer confirmed that it does not rapidly reequilibrate with the tetramer following isolation. There was a substantial difference between the tetramer and monomer in their inactivation by urea. The stability toward both urea and thermal inactivation of these oligomeric variants suggests a role for the quaternary structure in maintaining the stability of aldolase, which may be an important role of quaternary structure in many proteins. PMID:8643582

  13. The alpha subunit of nitrile hydratase is sufficient for catalytic activity and post-translational modification.

    PubMed

    Nelp, Micah T; Astashkin, Andrei V; Breci, Linda A; McCarty, Reid M; Bandarian, Vahe

    2014-06-24

    Nitrile hydratases (NHases) possess a mononuclear iron or cobalt cofactor whose coordination environment includes rare post-translationally oxidized cysteine sulfenic and sulfinic acid ligands. This cofactor is located in the α-subunit at the interfacial active site of the heterodimeric enzyme. Unlike canonical NHases, toyocamycin nitrile hydratase (TNHase) from Streptomyces rimosus is a unique three-subunit member of this family involved in the biosynthesis of pyrrolopyrimidine antibiotics. The subunits of TNHase are homologous to the α- and β-subunits of prototypical NHases. Herein we report the expression, purification, and characterization of the α-subunit of TNHase. The UV-visible, EPR, and mass spectra of the α-subunit TNHase provide evidence that this subunit alone is capable of synthesizing the active site complex with full post-translational modifications. Remarkably, the isolated post-translationally modified α-subunit is also catalytically active with the natural substrate, toyocamycin, as well as the niacin precursor 3-cyanopyridine. Comparisons of the steady state kinetic parameters of the single subunit variant to the heterotrimeric protein clearly show that the additional subunits impart substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency. We conclude that the α-subunit is the minimal sequence needed for nitrile hydration providing a simplified scaffold to study the mechanism and post-translational modification of this important class of catalysts. PMID:24914472

  14. Acidic 1,3-propanediaminetetraacetato lanthanides with luminescent and catalytic ester hydrolysis properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mao-Long; Shi, Yan-Ru; Yang, Yu-Chen; Zhou, Zhao-Hui

    2014-11-01

    In acidic solution, a serials of water-soluble coordination polymers (CPs) were isolated as zonal 1D-CPs 1,3-propanediaminetetraacetato lanthanides [Ln(1,3-H3pdta)(H2O)5]n·2Cln·3nH2O [Ln=La, 1; Ce, 2; Pr, 3; Nd, 4; Sm, 5] (1,3-H4pdta=1,3-propanediaminetetraacetic acid, C11H18N2O8) in high yields. When 1 eq. mol potassium hydroxide was added to the solutions of 1D-CPs, respectively, two 1D-CPs [Ln(1,3-H2pdta)(H2O)3]n·Cln·2nH2O [Ln=Sm, 6; Gd, 7] were isolated at room temperature and seven 2D-CPs [Ln(1,3-H2pdta)(H2O)2]n·Cln·2nH2O [Ln=La, 8; Ce, 9; Pr, 10; Nd, 11; Sm, 12; Eu, 13; Gd, 14] were isolated at 70 °C. When the crystals of 1-4 were hydrothermally heated at 180 °C with 1-2 eq. mol potassium hydroxide, four 3D-CPs [Ln(1,3-Hpdta)]n·nH2O [Ln=La, 15; Ce, 16; Pr, 17; Nd, 18] were obtained. The two 2D-CPs [Ln(1,3-Hpdta)(H2O)]n·4nH2O (Sm, 19; Eu, 20) were isolated in similar reaction conditions. With the increments of pH value in the solution and reaction temperature, the structure becomes more complicated. 1-5 are soluble in water and 1 was traced by solution 13C{1H} NMR technique, the water-soluble lanthanides 1 and 5 show catalytic activity to ester hydrolysis reaction respectively, which indicate their important roles in the hydrolytic reaction. The europium complexes 13 and 20 show visible fluorescence at an excitation of 394 nm. The structure diversity is mainly caused by the variation of coordinated ligand in different pH values and lanthanide contraction effect. Acidic conditions are favorable for the isolations of lanthanide complexes in different structures and this may helpful to separate different lanthanides. The thermal stability investigations reveal that acidic condition is favorable to obtain the oxides at a lower temperature.

  15. Non-cell autonomous and non-catalytic activities of ATX in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Greenman, Raanan; Gorelik, Anna; Sapir, Tamar; Baumgart, Jan; Zamor, Vanessa; Segal-Salto, Michal; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Aidinis, Vassilis; Aoki, Junken; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Reiner, Orly

    2015-01-01

    The intricate formation of the cerebral cortex requires a well-coordinated series of events, which are regulated at the level of cell-autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms. Whereas cell-autonomous mechanisms that regulate cortical development are well-studied, the non-cell autonomous mechanisms remain poorly understood. A non-biased screen allowed us to identify Autotaxin (ATX) as a non-cell autonomous regulator of neural stem cells. ATX (also known as ENPP2) is best known to catalyze lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) production. Our results demonstrate that ATX affects the localization and adhesion of neuronal progenitors in a cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous manner, and strikingly, this activity is independent from its catalytic activity in producing LPA. PMID:25788872

  16. Non-cell autonomous and non-catalytic activities of ATX in the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Greenman, Raanan; Gorelik, Anna; Sapir, Tamar; Baumgart, Jan; Zamor, Vanessa; Segal-Salto, Michal; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Aidinis, Vassilis; Aoki, Junken; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Reiner, Orly

    2015-01-01

    The intricate formation of the cerebral cortex requires a well-coordinated series of events, which are regulated at the level of cell-autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms. Whereas cell-autonomous mechanisms that regulate cortical development are well-studied, the non-cell autonomous mechanisms remain poorly understood. A non-biased screen allowed us to identify Autotaxin (ATX) as a non-cell autonomous regulator of neural stem cells. ATX (also known as ENPP2) is best known to catalyze lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) production. Our results demonstrate that ATX affects the localization and adhesion of neuronal progenitors in a cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous manner, and strikingly, this activity is independent from its catalytic activity in producing LPA. PMID:25788872

  17. Pt3Co concave nanocubes: synthesis, formation understanding, and enhanced catalytic activity toward hydrogenation of styrene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenyu; Lin, Cuikun; Zhang, Lihua; Quan, Zewei; Sun, Kai; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Feng; Porter, Nathan; Wang, Yuxuan; Fang, Jiye

    2014-02-01

    We report a facile synthesis route to prepare high-quality Pt3Co nanocubes with a concave structure, and further demonstrate that these concave Pt3Co nanocubes are terminated with high-index crystal facets. The success of this preparation is highly dependent on an appropriate nucleation process with a successively anisotropic overgrowth and a preservation of the resultant high-index planes by control binding of oleyl-amine/oleic acid with a fine-tuned composition. Using a hydrogenation of styrene as a model reaction, these Pt3Co concave nanocubes as a new class of nanocatalysts with more open structure and active atomic sites located on their high-index crystallographic planes exhibit an enhanced catalytic activity in comparison with low-indexed surface terminated Pt3Co nanocubes in similar size. PMID:24382713

  18. Controlling the Growth and Catalytic Activity of Platinum Nanoparticles Using Peptide and Polymer Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Lauren Marie

    Heterogeneous catalysts have widespread industrial applications. Platinum nanomaterials in particular, due to their particularly high electrocatalytic activity and durability, are used to catalyze a wide variety of reactions, including oxygen reduction, which is frequently used as the cathode reaction in fuel cells. As platinum is a very expensive material, a high priority in fuel cell research is the exploration of less expensive, more efficient catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). We demonstrate here the use of phage display to identify peptides that bind to Pt (100) which were then used to synthesize platinum cubes in solution. However, while the peptides were able to control particle growth, the bio-synthesized Pt particles showed extremely poor activity when tested for ORR. This could be attributed to peptide coverage on the surface or strong interactions between particular amino acids and the metal that are detrimental for catalysis. To investigate this further, we decided to investigate the role of individual amino acids on Pt nanocrystal synthesis and catalysis. For this, we conjugated the R-groups of single amino acids to polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains. Through this work we have determined that the identity of the amino acid R-group is important in both the synthesis and the catalytic activity of the particles. For Pt nanoparticle synthesis, we found that the hydrophobicity of the functional groups affected their ability to interact well with the particles during nucleation and growth, and thus only the hydrophilic functional groups were capable of mediating the synthesis to produce well-defined faceted particles. With respect to ORR, we found distinct trends that showed that the inclusion of certain amino acids could significantly enhance catalysis---even at high polymer loadings. This work presents evidence that counters the common conception that organic capping ligands decrease catalytic activity; in fact activity may actually be

  19. Acidic proteases from Monterey sardine (Sardinops sagax caerulea) immobilized on shrimp waste chitin and chitosan supports: searching for a by-product catalytic system.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Leyva, Jesus Aaron; Lizardi-Mendoza, Jaime; Ramirez-Suarez, Juan Carlos; Valenzuela-Soto, Elisa Miriam; Ezquerra-Brauer, Josafat Marina; Castillo-Yañez, Francisco Javier; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramon

    2013-10-01

    Solid wastes generated from the seafood industry represent an important environmental pollutant; therefore, utilization of those wastes for the development of processing biochemical tools could be an attractive and clean solution for the seafood industry. This study reports the immobilization of semi-purified acidic proteases from Monterey sardine stomachs onto chitin and chitosan materials extracted from shrimp head waste. Several supports (chitosan beads, chitosan flakes, and partially deacetylated flakes) were activated either with genipin or Na-tripolyphosphate and evaluated as a mean to immobilize acidic proteases. The protein load varied within the 67-91% range on different supports. The immobilization systems based on chitosan beads achieved the highest protein loads but showed the lowest retained catalytic activities. The best catalytic behavior was obtained using partially deacetylated chitin flakes activated either with genipin or Na-tripolyphosphate. According to results, the immobilization matrix structure, as well as acetylation degree of chitin-chitosan used, has considerable influence on the catalytic behavior of immobilized proteases. Partially deacetylated chitin flakes represent a suitable option as support for enzyme immobilization because its preparation requires fewer steps than other supports. Two abundant seafood by-products were used to obtain a catalytic system with enough proteolytic activity to be considered for biotechnological applications in diverse fields. PMID:23897542

  20. High viscosity to highly dispersed PtPd bimetallic nanocrystals for enhanced catalytic activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jie; Hu, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Xiao-Yu; Wei, Hao; Xiao, Yu-Xuan; Janiak, Christoph; Mu, Shi-Chun; Tian, Ge; Pan, Mu; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Su, Bao-Lian

    2016-07-01

    A facile high-viscosity-solvent method is presented to synthesize PtPd bimetallic nanocrystals highly dispersed in different mesostructures (2D and 3D structures), porosities (large and small pore sizes), and compositions (silica and carbon). Further, highly catalytic activity, stability and durability of the nanometals have been proven in different catalytic reactions. PMID:27222099

  1. A Lamellar Coordination Polymer with Remarkable Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Ricardo F; Antunes, Margarida M; Silva, Patrícia; Barbosa, Paula; Figueiredo, Filipe; Linden, Anthony; Rocha, João; Valente, Anabela A; Almeida Paz, Filipe A

    2016-09-01

    A positively charged lamellar coordination polymer based on a flexible triphosphonic acid linker is reported. [Gd(H4 nmp)(H2 O)2 ]Cl⋅2 H2 O (1) [H6 nmp=nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid)] was obtained by a one-pot approach by using water as a green solvent and by forcing the inclusion of additional acid sites by employing HCl in the synthesis. Compound 1 acts as a versatile heterogeneous acid catalyst with outstanding activity in organic reactions such as alcoholysis of styrene oxide, acetalization of benzaldehyde and cyclohexanaldehyde and ketalization of cyclohexanone. For all reaction systems, very high conversions were reached (92-97 %) in only 15-30 min under mild conditions (35 °C, atmospheric pressure). The coordination polymer exhibits a protonic conductivity of 1.23×10(-5)  S cm(-1) at 98 % relative humidity and 40 °C. PMID:27505712

  2. Effect of citrate on Aspergillus niger phytase adsorption and catalytic activity in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezeli, Malika; Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Zhang, Hao; Giles, Courtney; George, Timothy; Shand, Charlie; Lumsdon, David; Cooper, Patricia; Wendler, Renate; Brown, Lawrie; Stutter, Marc; Blackwell, Martin; Darch, Tegan; Wearing, Catherine; Haygarth, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Current developments in cropping systems that promote mobilisation of phytate in agricultural soils, by exploiting plant-root exudation of phytase and organic acids, offer potential for developments in sustainable phosphorus use. However, phytase adsorption to soil particles and phytate complexion has been shown to inhibit phytate dephosphorylation, thereby inhibiting plant P uptake, increasing the risk of this pool contributing to diffuse pollution and reducing the potential benefits of biotechnologies and management strategies aimed to utilise this abundant reserve of 'legacy' phosphorus. Citrate has been seen to increase phytase catalytic efficiency towards complexed forms of phytate, but the mechanisms by which citrate promotes phytase remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated phytase (from Aspergillus niger) inactivation, and change in catalytic properties upon addition to soil and the effect citrate had on adsorption of phytase and hydrolysis towards free, precipitated and adsorbed phytate. A Langmuir model was fitted to phytase adsorption isotherms showing a maximum adsorption of 0.23 nKat g-1 (19 mg protein g-1) and affinity constant of 435 nKat gˉ1 (8.5 mg protein g-1 ), demonstrating that phytase from A.niger showed a relatively low affinity for our test soil (Tayport). Phytases were partially inhibited upon adsorption and the specific activity was of 40.44 nKat mgˉ1 protein for the free enzyme and 25.35 nKat mgˉ1 protein when immobilised. The kinetics of adsorption detailed that most of the adsorption occurred within the first 20 min upon addition to soil. Citrate had no effect on the rate or total amount of phytase adsorption or loss of activity, within the studied citrate concentrations (0-4mM). Free phytases in soil solution and phytase immobilised on soil particles showed optimum activity (>80%) at pH 4.5-5.5. Immobilised phytase showed greater loss of activity at pH levels over 5.5 and lower activities at the secondary peak at pH 2

  3. Effects of surface activation on the structural and catalytic properties of ruthenium nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xianfeng; Lin, Rui; Beuerle, Christopher; Jackson, James E; Obare, Sherine O; Ofoli, Robert Y

    2014-01-31

    Using colloid-based methods to prepare supported catalytic metallic nanoparticles (NPs) often faces the challenge of removing the stabilizer used during synthesis and activating the catalyst without modifying the particles or the support. We explored three surface activation protocols (thermal oxidation at 150 °C, thermal reduction at 350 °C, and argon-protected calcination at 650 °C) to activate ruthenium NPs supported on mesoporous silica (MSU-F), and assessed their effects on the structural and catalytic properties of the catalysts, and their activity by the aqueous phase hydrogenation of pyruvic acid. The NPs were synthesized by polyol reduction using poly-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer, and supported on MSU-F by sonication-assisted deposition. The NPs maintained their original morphology on the support during activation. Ar-protected calcination was the most efficient of the three for completely removing PVP from particle surfaces, and provided the highest degree of particle crystallinity and a metal dispersion comparable to commercial Ru/SiO2. Its catalytic performance was significantly higher than the other two protocols, although all three thermally activated catalysts achieved higher activity than the commercial catalyst at the same Ru loading. Post-reaction analysis also showed that the supported catalyst activated at 650 °C retained its morphology during the reaction, which is an important requirement for recyclability. PMID:24394435

  4. Effects of surface activation on the structural and catalytic properties of ruthenium nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xianfeng; Lin, Rui; Beuerle, Christopher; Jackson, James E.; Obare, Sherine O.; Ofoli, Robert Y.

    2014-01-01

    Using colloid-based methods to prepare supported catalytic metallic nanoparticles (NPs) often faces the challenge of removing the stabilizer used during synthesis and activating the catalyst without modifying the particles or the support. We explored three surface activation protocols (thermal oxidation at 150 ° C, thermal reduction at 350 ° C, and argon-protected calcination at 650 ° C) to activate ruthenium NPs supported on mesoporous silica (MSU-F), and assessed their effects on the structural and catalytic properties of the catalysts, and their activity by the aqueous phase hydrogenation of pyruvic acid. The NPs were synthesized by polyol reduction using poly-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer, and supported on MSU-F by sonication-assisted deposition. The NPs maintained their original morphology on the support during activation. Ar-protected calcination was the most efficient of the three for completely removing PVP from particle surfaces, and provided the highest degree of particle crystallinity and a metal dispersion comparable to commercial Ru/SiO2. Its catalytic performance was significantly higher than the other two protocols, although all three thermally activated catalysts achieved higher activity than the commercial catalyst at the same Ru loading. Post-reaction analysis also showed that the supported catalyst activated at 650 ° C retained its morphology during the reaction, which is an important requirement for recyclability.

  5. Catalytic dehydrogenation of isobutane in the presence of hydrogen over Cs-modified Ni2P supported on active carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanli; Sang, Huanxin; Wang, Kang; Wang, Xitao

    2014-10-01

    In this article, an environmentally friendly non-noble-metal class of Cs-Ni2P/active carbon (AC) catalyst was prepared and demonstrated to exhibit enhanced catalytic performance in isobutane dehydrogenation. The results of activity tests reveal that Ni/AC catalyst was highly active for isobutane cracking, which led to the formation of abundant methane and coke. After the introduction of phosphorus through impregnation with ammonium di-hydrogen phosphate and H2-temperature programmed reduction, undesired cracking reactions were effectively inhibited, and the selectivity to isobutene and stability of catalyst increased remarkably. The characterization results indicate that, after the addition of phosphorous, the improvement of dehydrogenation selectivity is ascribed to the partial positive charges carried on Ni surface in Ni2P particles, which decreases the strength of Nisbnd C bond between Ni and carbonium-ion intermediates and the possibility of excessive dehydrogenation. In addition, Cs-modified Ni2P/AC catalysts display much higher catalytic performance as compared to Ni2P/AC catalyst. Cs-Ni2P-6.5 catalyst has the highest catalytic performance, and the selectivity to isobutene higher than 93% can be obtained even after 4 h reaction. The enhancement in catalytic performance of the Cs-modified catalysts is mainly attributed to the function of Cs to improve the dispersion of Ni2P particles, transfer electron from Cs to Ni, and decrease acid site number and strength.

  6. Production of aviation fuel via catalytic hydrothermal decarboxylation of fatty acids in microalgae oil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cuiyue; Nie, Renfeng; Fu, Jie; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2013-10-01

    A series of fatty acids in microalgae oil, such as stearic acid, palmitic acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, arachidic acid and behenic acid, were selected as the raw materials to produce aviation fuel via hydrothermal decarboxylation over a multi-wall carbon nanotube supported Pt catalyst (Pt/MWCNTs). It was found that Pt/MWCNTs catalysts exhibited higher activity for the hydrothermal decarboxylation of stearic acid with a 97% selectivity toward heptadecane compared to Pt/C and Ru/C under the same conditions. And Pt/MWCNTs is also capable for the decarboxylation of different fatty acids in microalgae oil. The reaction conditions, such as Pt/MWCNTs loading amount, reaction temperature and time were optimized. The activation energy of stearic acid decarboxylation over Pt/MWCNTs was calculated (114 kJ/mol). PMID:23973977

  7. High performing and stable supported nano-alloys for the catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid to γ-valerolactone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wenhao; Sankar, Meenakshisundaram; Beale, Andrew M.; He, Qian; Kiely, Christopher J.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-03-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid, a key platform molecule in many biorefinery schemes, into γ-valerolactone is considered as one of the pivotal reactions to convert lignocellulose-based biomass into renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we report on the development of highly active, selective and stable supported metal catalysts for this reaction and on the beneficial effects of metal nano-alloying. Bimetallic random alloys of gold-palladium and ruthenium-palladium supported on titanium dioxide are prepared with a modified metal impregnation method. Gold-palladium/titanium dioxide shows a marked,~27-fold increase in activity (that is, turnover frequency of 0.1 s-1) compared with its monometallic counterparts. Although ruthenium-palladium/titanium dioxide is not only exceptionally active (that is, turnover frequency of 0.6 s-1), it shows excellent, sustained selectivity to γ-valerolactone (99%). The dilution and isolation of ruthenium by palladium is thought to be responsible for this superior catalytic performance. Alloying, furthermore, greatly improves the stability of both supported nano-alloy catalysts.

  8. High performing and stable supported nano-alloys for the catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid to γ-valerolactone

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenhao; Sankar, Meenakshisundaram; Beale, Andrew M.; He, Qian; Kiely, Christopher J.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid, a key platform molecule in many biorefinery schemes, into γ-valerolactone is considered as one of the pivotal reactions to convert lignocellulose-based biomass into renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we report on the development of highly active, selective and stable supported metal catalysts for this reaction and on the beneficial effects of metal nano-alloying. Bimetallic random alloys of gold-palladium and ruthenium-palladium supported on titanium dioxide are prepared with a modified metal impregnation method. Gold-palladium/titanium dioxide shows a marked,~27-fold increase in activity (that is, turnover frequency of 0.1 s−1) compared with its monometallic counterparts. Although ruthenium-palladium/titanium dioxide is not only exceptionally active (that is, turnover frequency of 0.6 s−1), it shows excellent, sustained selectivity to γ-valerolactone (99%). The dilution and isolation of ruthenium by palladium is thought to be responsible for this superior catalytic performance. Alloying, furthermore, greatly improves the stability of both supported nano-alloy catalysts. PMID:25779385

  9. High performing and stable supported nano-alloys for the catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid to γ-valerolactone.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenhao; Sankar, Meenakshisundaram; Beale, Andrew M; He, Qian; Kiely, Christopher J; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid, a key platform molecule in many biorefinery schemes, into γ-valerolactone is considered as one of the pivotal reactions to convert lignocellulose-based biomass into renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we report on the development of highly active, selective and stable supported metal catalysts for this reaction and on the beneficial effects of metal nano-alloying. Bimetallic random alloys of gold-palladium and ruthenium-palladium supported on titanium dioxide are prepared with a modified metal impregnation method. Gold-palladium/titanium dioxide shows a marked,~27-fold increase in activity (that is, turnover frequency of 0.1 s(-1)) compared with its monometallic counterparts. Although ruthenium-palladium/titanium dioxide is not only exceptionally active (that is, turnover frequency of 0.6 s(-1)), it shows excellent, sustained selectivity to γ-valerolactone (99%). The dilution and isolation of ruthenium by palladium is thought to be responsible for this superior catalytic performance. Alloying, furthermore, greatly improves the stability of both supported nano-alloy catalysts. PMID:25779385

  10. Nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopy of the catalytic-triad histidine of a serine protease in peptide boronic acid inhibitor complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Wong, W.Y.L.; Farr-Jones, S. ); Shenvi, A.B.; Kettner, C.A. )

    1988-10-04

    {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy was used to examine the active-site histidyl residue of {alpha}-lytic protease in peptide boronic acid inhibitor complexes. Two distinct types of complexes were observed: (1) Boronic acids that are analogues of substrates form complexes in which the active-site imidazole ring is protonated and both imidazole N-H protons are strongly hydrogen bonded. (2) Boronic acids that are not substrate analogues form complexes in which N{sup {epsilon}2} of the active-site histidine is covalently bonded to the boron atom of the inhibitor. The proton bound to N{sup {delta}1} of the histidine in these histidine-boronate adducts remains strongly hydrogen bonded, presumably to the active-site aspartate. In both types of complexes the N-H protons of His-57 exchange unusually slowly as evidenced by the room temperature visibility of the low-field {sup 1}H resonances and the {sup 15}N-H spin couplings. These results indicate that occupancy of the specificity subsites may be required to fully form the transition-state binding site. The significance of these findings for understanding inhibitor binding and the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases is discussed.

  11. Optical activity of catalytic elements of hetero-metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Apell, S. Peter; Wadell, Carl; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Interaction of light with metals in the form of surface plasmons is used in a wide range of applications in which the scattering decay channel is important. The absorption channel is usually thought of as unwanted and detrimental to the efficiency of the device. This is true in many applications, however, recent studies have shown that maximization of the decay channel of surface plasmons has potentially significant uses. One of these is the creation of electron-hole pairs or hot electrons which can be used for e.g. catalysis. Here, we study the optical properties of hetero-metallic nanostructures that enhance light interaction with the catalytic elements of the nanostructures. A hybridized LSPR that matches the spectral characteristic of the light source is excited. This LSPR through coupling between the plasmonic elements maximizes light absorption in the catalytic part of the nanostructure. Numerically calculated visible light absorption in the catalytic nanoparticles is enhanced 12-fold for large catalytic disks and by more 30 for small nanoparticles on the order of 5 nm. In experiments we measure a sizable increase in the absorption cross section when small palladium nanoparticles are coupled to a large silver resonator. These observations suggest that heterometallic nanostructures can enhance catalytic reaction rates.

  12. PHARMACOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES OF PROTOCATECHUIC ACID.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abida Kalsoom; Rashid, Rehana; Fatima, Nighat; Mahmood, Sadaf; Mir, Sadullah; Khan, Sara; Jabeen, Nyla; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, PCA) is a simple phenolic acid. It is found in a large variety of edible plants and possesses various pharmacological activities. This article aims to review the modern trends in phytochemical isolation and extraction of PCA from plants and other natural resources. Moreover, this article also encompasses pharmacological and biological activities of PCA. It is well known to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-hyperglycemia, antibacterial, anticancer, anti-ageing, anti-athro- genic, anti-tumoral, anti-asthma, antiulcer, antispasmodic and neurological properties. PMID:26647619

  13. Nanosheet-enhanced asymmetric induction of chiral α-amino acids in catalytic aldol reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Wei; Shi, Hui-Min; Wang, Jiu-Zhao; He, Jing

    2012-11-26

    An efficient ligand design strategy towards boosting asymmetric induction was proposed, which simply employed inorganic nanosheets to modify α-amino acids and has been demonstrated to be effective in vanadium-catalyzed epoxidation of allylic alcohols. Here, the strategy was first extended to zinc-catalyzed asymmetric aldol reaction, a versatile bottom-up route to make complex functional compounds. Zinc, the second-most abundant transition metal in humans, is an environment-friendly catalytic center. The strategy was then further proved valid for organocatalyzed metal-free asymmetric catalysis, that is, α-amino acid catalyzed asymmetric aldol reaction. Visible improvement of enantioselectivity was experimentally achieved irrespective of whether the nanosheet-attached α-amino acids were applied as chiral ligands together with catalytic Zn(II) centers or as chiral catalysts alone. The layered double hydroxide nanosheet was clearly found by theoretical calculations to boost ee through both steric and H-bonding effects; this resembles the role of a huge and rigid substituent. PMID:23074138

  14. Surface engineering on CeO2 nanorods by chemical redox etching and their enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Zhang, Zhiyun; Li, Jing; Ma, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yongquan

    2015-07-01

    Controllable surface properties of nanocerias are desired for various catalytic processes. There is a lack of efficient approaches to adjust the surface properties of ceria to date. Herein, a redox chemical etching method was developed to controllably engineer the surface properties of ceria nanorods. Ascorbic acid and hydrogen peroxide were used to perform the redox chemical etching process, resulting in a rough surface and/or pores on the surface of ceria nanorods. Increasing the etching cycles induced a steady increase of the specific surface area, oxygen vacancies and surface Ce3+ fractions. As a result, the etched nanorods delivered enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation, compared to the non-etched ceria nanorods. Our method provides a novel and facile approach to continuously adjust the surface properties of ceria for practical applications.Controllable surface properties of nanocerias are desired for various catalytic processes. There is a lack of efficient approaches to adjust the surface properties of ceria to date. Herein, a redox chemical etching method was developed to controllably engineer the surface properties of ceria nanorods. Ascorbic acid and hydrogen peroxide were used to perform the redox chemical etching process, resulting in a rough surface and/or pores on the surface of ceria nanorods. Increasing the etching cycles induced a steady increase of the specific surface area, oxygen vacancies and surface Ce3+ fractions. As a result, the etched nanorods delivered enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation, compared to the non-etched ceria nanorods. Our method provides a novel and facile approach to continuously adjust the surface properties of ceria for practical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Diameter distributions of as-prepared and etched samples, optical images, specific catalytic data of CO oxidation and comparison of CO oxidation. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01846c

  15. Synthesis of Water Dispersible and Catalytically Active Gold-Decorated Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Alessandro; Mondini, Sara; Marelli, Marcello; Pifferi, Valentina; Falciola, Luigi; Ponti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Anna Maria; Polito, Laura

    2016-07-19

    Hetero-nanoparticles represent an important family of composite nanomaterials that in the past years are attracting ever-growing interest. Here, we report a new strategy for the synthesis of water dispersible cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CoxFe3-xO4 NPs) decorated with ultrasmall (2-3 nm) gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The synthetic procedure is based on the use of 2,3-meso-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), which plays a double role. First, it transfers cobalt ferrite NPs from the organic phase to aqueous media. Second, the DMSA reductive power promotes the in situ nucleation of gold NPs in proximity of the magnetic NP surface. Following this procedure, we achieved a water dispersible nanosystem (CoxFe3-xO4-DMSA-Au NPs) which combines the cobalt ferrite magnetic properties with the catalytic features of ultrasmall Au NPs. We showed that CoxFe3-xO4-DMSA-Au NPs act as an efficient nanocatalyst to reduce 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol and that they can be magnetically recovered and recycled. It is noteworthy that such nanosystem is more catalytically active than Au NPs with equal size. Finally, a complete structural and chemical characterization of the hetero-NPs is provided. PMID:27328722

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-12-01

    This project was directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction on carbonaceous supports at low temperatures. The experimental work was conducted primarily in a packed bed reactor/gas flow system that was constructed for this work. The analytical techniques employed were mass spectrometry, NO{sub x} chemiluminescence, and gas chromatography. The experimental plan was focused on steady-state reactivity experiments, followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of surface intermediates, and also selected temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) experiments. Both uncatalyzed and catalyzed (potassium-promoted) phenolic resin char, were investigated as well as the catalytic effect of additional CO in the gas phase.

  17. Characterization of AlFe-pillared Unye bentonite: A study of the surface acidity and catalytic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglar, Bulent; Cubuk, Osman; Demir, Ersin; Coldur, Fatih; Catir, Mustafa; Topcu, Cihan; Tabak, Ahmet

    2015-06-01

    Aluminium-iron-pillared bentonite has been prepared by incorporation of the iron mixed aluminium-polyoxocation into bentonite layers and characterized by the powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, thermal analysis and surface area measurement techniques. The characteristic d001 basal spacing of raw bentonite increased with the pillaring process and reached to 18.05 Å. The siloxane layers of bentonite were perturbed and the positions of Si-O stretching vibrations were altered by pillaring process. However, these pillars in the interlayer gallery spacing enhanced the thermal stability of bentonite. The new micropores were formed by the pillaring process and the specific surface area of raw bentonite increased by ca. 2-fold for aluminium-iron-pillared bentonite. FTIR spectra and thermal analysis curves of pyridine adsorbed samples clearly show that the surface Lewis acidity of aluminium-iron-pillared bentonite is greater than that of raw bentonite. Raw and aluminium-iron-pillared bentonites have been utilized as solid catalysts for benzoylation of benzene with benzoyl chloride. The aluminium-iron-pillared bentonite catalyst showed promising catalytic activity whereas raw bentonite showed no catalytic activity in benzoylation of benzene with benzoyl chloride.

  18. Correction: Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Araya, Jorge Ignacio; Grand, André; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2016-01-28

    Correction for 'Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges' by Jorge Ignacio Martínez-Araya et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5cp03822g. PMID:26524565

  19. Catalytic activity for nitrate electroreduction of nano-structured polypyrrole films electrochemically synthesized onto a copper electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong Thoa Nguyen, Thi; Thinh Nguyen, Viet; Hai Le, Viet

    2010-03-01

    Polypyrrole film was synthesized electrochemically onto a copper electrode in oxalate, oxalic acid and salicylic acid solutions. The electrochemical oxidation of pyrrole to form polypyrrole film and the electroreduction of nitrate and nitrite ions at synthesized Ppy modified copper electrodes (Ppy/Cu) in potassium chloride aqueous solutions were studied by cyclic voltammetry. Polypyrrole nano-porous film formation and the activity of the modified Ppy/Cu electrode for nitrate reduction were found to be dependent on the synthesis medium and conditions: pH; content and concentrations of the electrolytes; pyrrole concentration; electrode potential; electrolysis duration; drying time and temperature for finishing the Ppy/Cu electrode and immersion time in water for storing the Ppy/Cu electrode before use. High catalytic activity for nitrate reduction was found for composite electrodes with nano-porous structured Ppy films. The Ppy/Cu electrodes prepared in oxalate buffer and salicylic acid solutions perform more stable catalytic activity for nitrate reduction; their service life is about ten times longer than for an electrode prepared in oxalic acid solution.

  20. Simultaneous realization of high catalytic activity and stability for catalytic cracking of n-heptane on highly exposed (010) crystal planes of nanosheet ZSM-5 zeolite.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xia; Zhang, Yaoyuan; Jiang, Guiyuan; Liu, Jia; Han, Shanlei; Zhao, Zhen; Wang, Ruipu; Li, Cong; Xu, Chunming; Duan, Aijun; Wang, Yajun; Liu, Jian; Wei, Yuechang

    2016-08-01

    Nanosheet ZSM-5 zeolite with highly exposed (010) crystal planes demonstrates high reactivity and good anti-coking stability for the catalytic cracking of n-heptane, which is attributed to the synergy of high external surface area and acid sites, fully accessible channel intersection acid sites, and hierarchical porosity caused by the unique morphology. PMID:27458616

  1. Physicochemical properties and catalytic activity of metal tetraphenyl porphins in the oxidation of alkylaromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobotaeva, N. S.; Skorokhodova, T. S.; Kokova, D. A.

    2013-06-01

    We consider the effect of complexing metal in a tetraphenylporphin molecule on its catalytic activity in oxidizing alkylaromatic hydrocarbons by molecular oxygen. The catalytic activity of metal porphyrins (Co, Cu, Zn, Mn, and In TPP) is found to depend on their oxidation potentials and the distribution of electron density in the molecule. The electron-donating compound imidazole is shown to affect the oxidation rate.

  2. Nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopy of the catalytic-triad histidine of a serine protease in peptide boronic acid inhibitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, W W; Wong, W Y; Farr-Jones, S; Shenvi, A B; Kettner, C A

    1988-10-01

    15N NMR spectroscopy was used to examine the active-site histidyl residue of alpha-lytic protease in peptide boronic acid inhibitor complexes. Two distinct types of complexes were observed: (1) Boronic acids that are analogues of substrates form complexes in which the active-site imidazole ring is protonated and both imidazole N-H protons are strongly hydrogen bonded. With the better inhibitors of the class this arrangement is stable over the pH range 4.0-10.5. The results are consistent with a putative tetrahedral intermediate like complex involving a negatively charged, tetrahedral boron atom covalently bonded to O gamma of the active-site serine. (2) Boronic acids that are not substrate analogues form complexes in which N epsilon 2 of the active-site histidine is covalently bonded to the boron atom of the inhibitor. The proton bound to N delta 1 of the histidine in these histidine-boronate adducts remains strongly hydrogen bonded, presumably to the active-site aspartate. Benzeneboronic acid, which falls in this category, forms an adduct with histidine. In both types of complexes the N-H protons of His-57 exchange unusually slowly as evidenced by the room temperature visibility of the low-field 1H resonances and the 15N-H spin couplings. These results, coupled with the kinetic data of the preceding paper [Kettner, C. A., Bone, R., Agard, D. A., & Bachovchin, W. W. (1988) Biochemistry (preceding paper in this issue)], indicate that occupancy of the specificity subsites may be required to fully form the transition-state binding site. The significance of these findings for understanding inhibitor binding and the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases is discussed. PMID:3207700

  3. pH dependent catalytic activities of platinum nanoparticles with respect to the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and scavenging of superoxide and singlet oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Wu, Haohao; Li, Meng; Yin, Jun-Jie; Nie, Zhihong

    2014-09-01

    Recently, platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs) have received increasing attention in the field of catalysis and medicine due to their excellent catalytic activity. To rationally design Pt NPs for these applications, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms underlying their catalytic and biological activities. This article describes a systematic study on the Pt NP-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and scavenging of superoxide (O2&z.rad;-) and singlet oxygen (1O2) over a physiologically relevant pH range of 1.12-10.96. We demonstrated that the catalytic activities of Pt NPs can be modulated by the pH value of the environment. Our results suggest that Pt NPs possess peroxidase-like activity of decomposing H2O2 into &z.rad;OH under acidic conditions, but catalase-like activity of producing H2O and O2 under neutral and alkaline conditions. In addition, Pt NPs exhibit significant superoxide dismutase-like activity of scavenging O2&z.rad;- under neutral conditions, but not under acidic conditions. The 1O2 scavenging ability of Pt NPs increases with the increase in the pH of the environment. The study will provide useful guidance for designing Pt NPs with desired catalytic and biological properties.Recently, platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs) have received increasing attention in the field of catalysis and medicine due to their excellent catalytic activity. To rationally design Pt NPs for these applications, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms underlying their catalytic and biological activities. This article describes a systematic study on the Pt NP-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and scavenging of superoxide (O2&z.rad;-) and singlet oxygen (1O2) over a physiologically relevant pH range of 1.12-10.96. We demonstrated that the catalytic activities of Pt NPs can be modulated by the pH value of the environment. Our results suggest that Pt NPs possess peroxidase-like activity of decomposing H2O2 into &z.rad;OH under acidic conditions

  4. Biodiesel production from algae oil high in free fatty acids by two-step catalytic conversion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Tianzhong; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaolin; Wang, Junfeng

    2012-05-01

    The effect of storage temperature and time on lipid composition of Scenedesmus sp. was studied. When stored at 4°C or higher, the free fatty acid content in the wet biomass increased from a trace to 62.0% by day 4. Using two-step catalytic conversion, algae oil with a high free fatty acid content was converted to biodiesel by pre-esterification and transesterification. The conversion rate of triacylglycerols reached 100% under the methanol to oil molar ratio of 12:1 during catalysis with 2% potassium hydroxide at 65°C for 30 min. This process was scaled up to produce biodiesel from Scenedesmus sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. oil. The crude biodiesel was purified using bleaching earth. Except for moisture content, the biodiesel conformed to Chinese National Standards. PMID:22401712

  5. Copper metal-organic framework nanocrystal for plane effect nonenzymatic electro-catalytic activity of glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanying; Zhang, Youjuan; Chen, Jing; Pang, Huan

    2014-09-01

    This work describes the first demonstration of nanocrystal plane dependent nonenzymatic electro-catalytic glucose activity of [Cu3(btc)2] nanocrystals with different shapes (nanocube, truncated cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron). From electrochemical results, the obtained [Cu3(btc)2] nanocube modified electrode shows the best nonenzymatic electro-catalytic glucose activity. Interestingly, decreasing the {100} crystal planes from cubes to octahedra, changes the nonenzymatic electro-catalytic activity from highly sensitive to general.This work describes the first demonstration of nanocrystal plane dependent nonenzymatic electro-catalytic glucose activity of [Cu3(btc)2] nanocrystals with different shapes (nanocube, truncated cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron). From electrochemical results, the obtained [Cu3(btc)2] nanocube modified electrode shows the best nonenzymatic electro-catalytic glucose activity. Interestingly, decreasing the {100} crystal planes from cubes to octahedra, changes the nonenzymatic electro-catalytic activity from highly sensitive to general. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03396e

  6. Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Nanocarbon: Intrinsic Catalytic Activity and Structure-Function Relationships.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei; Liu, Wei; Guo, Xiaoling; Schlögl, Robert; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-11-01

    Physical and chemical insights into the nature and quantity of the active sites and the intrinsic catalytic activity of nanocarbon materials in alkane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reactions are reported using a novel in situ chemical titration process. A study on the structure-function relationship reveals that the active sites are identical both in nature and function on various nanocarbon catalysts. Additionally, the quantity of the active sites could be used as a metric to normalize the reaction rates, and thus to evaluate the intrinsic activity of nanocarbon catalysts. The morphology of the nanocarbon catalysts at the microscopic scale exhibits a minor influence on their intrinsic ODH catalytic activity. The number of active sites calculated from the titration process indicates the number of catalytic centers that are active (that is, working) under the reaction conditions. PMID:26388451

  7. Nanoporous PtRu Alloys with Unique Catalytic Activity toward Hydrolytic Dehydrogenation of Ammonia Borane.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiuxia; Xu, Caixia

    2016-03-01

    Nanoporous (NP) PtRu alloys with three different bimetallic components were straightforwardly fabricated by dealloying PtRuAl ternary alloys in hydrochloric acid. Selective etching of aluminum from source alloys generates bicontinuous network nanostructures with uniform size and structure. The as-made NP-PtRu alloys exhibit superior catalytic activity toward the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB) than pure NP-Pt and NP-Ru owing to alloying platinum with ruthenium. The NP-Pt70 Ru30 alloy exhibits much higher specific activity toward hydrolytic dehydrogenation of AB than NP-Pt30 Ru70 and NP-Pt50 Ru50 . The hydrolysis activation energy of NP-Pt70 Ru30 was estimated to be about 38.9 kJ mol(-1) , which was lower than most of the reported activation energy values in the literature. In addition, recycling tests show that the NP-Pt70 Ru30 is still highly active in the hydrolysis of AB even after five runs, which indicates that NP-PtRu alloy accompanied by the network nanoarchitecture is beneficial to improve structural stability toward the dehydrogenation of AB. PMID:26573746

  8. Enhanced performance of the catalytic conversion of allyl alcohol to 3-hydroxypropionic acid using bimetallic gold catalysts.

    PubMed

    Falletta, Ermelinda; Della Pina, Cristina; Rossi, Michele; He, Qian; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2011-01-01

    One of the strategic building blocks in organic synthesis is 3-hydroxypropionic acid, which is particularly important for the manufacture of high performance polymers. However, to date, despite many attempts using both biological and chemical routes, no large scale effective process for manufacturing 3-hydroxypropionic acid has been developed. One potentially useful starting point is from allyl alcohol, as this can be obtained in principle from the dehydration of glycerol, thereby presenting a bio-renewable green pathway to this important building block. The catalytic transformation of allyl alcohol to 3-hydroxypropionic acid presents interesting challenges in catalyst design, particularly with respect to the control of selectivity among the products that can be expected, as acrylic acid, acrolein and glyceric acid can also be formed. In this paper, we present a novel eco-sustainable catalytic pathway leading to 3-hydroxypropionic acid, which highlights the outstanding potential of gold-based and bimetallic catalysts in the aerobic oxidation of allyl alcohol. PMID:22455056

  9. Substrate Orientation and Catalytic Specificity in the Action of Xanthine Oxidase: The Sequential Hydroxylation of Hypoxanthine to Uric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Hongnan; Pauff, James M.; Hille, Russ

    2010-11-29

    Xanthine oxidase is a molybdenum-containing enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of a sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon in a broad range of aromatic heterocycles and aldehydes. Crystal structures of the bovine enzyme in complex with the physiological substrate hypoxanthine at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution and the chemotherapeutic agent 6-mercaptopurine at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution have been determined, showing in each case two alternate orientations of substrate in the two active sites of the crystallographic asymmetric unit. One orientation is such that it is expected to yield hydroxylation at C-2 of substrate, yielding xanthine. The other suggests hydroxylation at C-8 to give 6,8-dihydroxypurine, a putative product not previously thought to be generated by the enzyme. Kinetic experiments demonstrate that >98% of hypoxanthine is hydroxylated at C-2 rather than C-8, indicating that the second crystallographically observed orientation is significantly less catalytically effective than the former. Theoretical calculations suggest that enzyme selectivity for the C-2 over C-8 of hypoxanthine is largely due to differences in the intrinsic reactivity of the two sites. For the orientation of hypoxanthine with C-2 proximal to the molybdenum center, the disposition of substrate in the active site is such that Arg880 and Glu802, previous shown to be catalytically important for the conversion of xanthine to uric acid, play similar roles in hydroxylation at C-2 as at C-8. Contrary to the literature, we find that 6,8-dihydroxypurine is effectively converted to uric acid by xanthine oxidase.

  10. Development of catalytically active and highly stable catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekeun; Xie, Tianyuan; Jung, Wonsuk; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Ganesan, Prabhu; Popov, Branko N.

    2015-01-01

    Novel procedures are developed for the synthesis of highly stable carbon composite catalyst supports (CCCS-800 °C and CCCS-1100 °C) and an activated carbon composite catalyst support (A-CCCS). These supports are synthesized through: (i) surface modification with acids and inclusion of oxygen groups, (ii) metal-catalyzed pyrolysis, and (iii) chemical leaching to remove excess metal used to dope the support. The procedure results in increasing carbon graphitization and inclusion of non-metallic active sites on the support surface. Catalytic activity of CCCS indicates an onset potential of 0.86 V for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with well-defined kinetic and mass-transfer regions and ∼2.5% H2O2 production in rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) studies. Support stability studies at 1.2 V constant potential holding for 400 h indicate high stability for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS catalyst with a cell potential loss of 27 mV at 800 mA cm-2 under H2-air, 32% mass activity loss, and 30% ECSA loss. Performance evaluation in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell shows power densities (rated) of 0.18 and 0.23 gPt kW-1 for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS and 30% Pt/CCCS-800 °C catalysts, respectively. The stabilities of various supports developed in this study are compared with those of a commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  11. Temporal separation of catalytic activities allows anti-Markovnikov reductive functionalization of terminal alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Le; Herzon, Seth B.

    2014-01-01

    There is currently great interest in the development of multistep catalytic processes in which one or several catalysts act sequentially to rapidly build complex molecular structures. Many enzymes—often the inspiration for new synthetic transformations—are capable of processing a single substrate through a chain of discrete, mechanistically distinct catalytic steps. Here, we describe an approach to emulate the efficiency of these natural reaction cascades within a synthetic catalyst by the temporal separation of catalytic activities. In this approach, a single catalyst exhibits multiple catalytic activities sequentially, allowing for the efficient processing of a substrate through a cascade pathway. Application of this design strategy has led to the development of a method to effect the anti-Markovnikov (linear-selective) reductive functionalization of terminal alkynes. The strategy of temporal separation may facilitate the development of other efficient synthetic reaction cascades.

  12. Catalytic and stoichiometric bromination of aromatic compounds in aqueous trifluoroacetic acid in the presence of nitrogen-containing oxidizing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Cheprakov, A.V.; Makhon'kov, D.I.; Rodkin, M.A.; Beletskaya, I.P.

    1988-07-10

    The mono- and polybromination of benzene, halogenobenzenes, toluene, p-xylene, anisole, biphenyl, benzotrifluoride, benzoic acid, p-nitro- and p-carboxytoluene, p-methoxybenzonitrile, tetralin, and naphthalene were studied in trifluoroacetic acid and its aqueous solutions in systems containing stoichiometric amounts of bromine or alkali-metal bromide and stoichiometric or catalytic (in the presence of oxygen or air) amounts of nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent (nitrogen(IV) oxide, alkali-metal nitrate or nitrite). It is suggested that the brominating agent under the investigated conditions is nitryl bromide NO/sub 2/Br. Under the conditions of catalytic bromination anthracene is oxidized to anthraquinone with a preparative yield.

  13. Thermal activation of catalytic microjets in blood samples using microfluidic chips†

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Lluís; Martínez-Cisneros, Cynthia; Swiersy, Anka; Sánchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that catalytic microjet engines can out-swim high complex media composed of red blood cells and serum. Despite the challenge presented by the high viscosity of the solution at room temperature, the catalytic microjets can be activated at physiological temperature and, consequently, self-propel in diluted solutions of blood samples. We prove that these microjets self-propel in 10× diluted blood samples using microfluidic chips. PMID:24089195

  14. Asymmetric Intramolecular Alkylation of Chiral Aromatic Imines via Catalytic C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Watzke, Anja; Wilson, Rebecca; O'Malley, Steven; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2007-04-16

    The asymmetric intramolecular alkylation of chiral aromatic aldimines, in which differentially substituted alkenes are tethered meta to the imine, was investigated. High enantioselectivities were obtained for imines prepared from aminoindane derivatives, which function as directing groups for the rhodium-catalyzed C-H bond activation. Initial demonstration of catalytic asymmetric intramolecular alkylation also was achieved by employing a sterically hindered achiral imine substrate and catalytic amounts of a chiral amine.

  15. Marine Rhodobacteraceae L-haloacid dehalogenase contains a novel His/Glu dyad that could activate the catalytic water.

    PubMed

    Novak, Halina R; Sayer, Christopher; Isupov, Michail N; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Gotz, Dorothee; Spragg, Andrew Mearns; Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2013-04-01

    The putative L-haloacid dehalogenase gene (DehRhb) from a marine Rhodobacteraceae family was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The DehRhb protein was shown to be an L-haloacid dehalogenase with highest activity towards brominated substrates with short carbon chains (≤ C3). The optimal temperature for enzyme activity was 55 °C, and the Vmax and Km were 1.75 μm·min(-1) ·mg(-1) of protein and 6.72 mm, respectively, when using monobromoacetic acid as a substrate. DehRhb showed moderate thermal stability, with a melting temperature of 67 °C. The enzyme demonstrated high tolerance to solvents, as shown by thermal shift experiments and solvent incubation assays. The DehRhb protein was crystallized and structures of the native, reaction intermediate and substrate-bound forms were determined. The active site of DehRhb had significant differences from previously studied L-haloacid dehalogenases. The asparagine and arginine residues shown to be essential for catalytic activity in other L-haloacid dehalogenases are not present in DehRhb. The histidine residue which replaces the asparagine residue in DehRhb was coordinated by a conformationally strained glutamate residue that replaces a conserved glycine. The His/Glu dyad is positioned for deprotonation of the catalytic water which attacks the ester bond in the reaction intermediate. The catalytic water in DehRhb is shifted by ~ 1.5 Å from its position in other L-haloacid dehalogenases. A similar His/Glu or Asp dyad is known to activate the catalytic water in haloalkane dehalogenases. The DehRhb enzyme represents a novel member within the L-haloacid dehalogenase family and it has potential to be used as a commercial biocatalyst. PMID:23384397

  16. Cold catalytic recovery of loaded activated carbon using iron oxide-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bach, Altai; Zelmanov, Grigory; Semiat, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach for the recovery of spent activated carbon by an advanced oxidation process using iron oxide-based nanocatalysts was proposed and investigated. Model organic contaminants, such as ethylene glycol and phenol, were chosen for this study as water pollutants. It was shown that there are several advantages in using catalytic oxidation recovery of activated carbon with iron oxide-based nanocatalysts: low temperature reactivity of catalytic recovery without heating; and a relatively large number of adsorption-recovery cycles, without a reduction in the adsorptive properties of the virgin activated carbon or without a performance decrease from the first adsorption-recovery cycle of the new modified adsorptive properties of the activated carbon. The catalytic recovery takes place without ultraviolet light or any visible radiation sources. Results show a high efficiency of catalytic recovery of spent activated carbon using iron oxide-based nanocatalysts. A 97-99% efficiency of spent activated carbon catalytic regeneration was achieved under chosen conditions after 15-20 min of reaction. The process may be also considered as cold in situ recovery of active carbon. PMID:17826818

  17. Pseudo catalytic transformation of volatile fatty acids into fatty acid methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong-Min; Cho, Jinwoo; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kwon, Eilhann E

    2016-03-01

    Instead of anaerobic digestion of biodegradable wastes for producing methane, this work introduced the transformation of acidogenesis products (VFAs) into fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) to validate the feasible production of short-chained fatty alcohols via hydrogenation of FAMEs. In particular, among VFAs, this work mainly described the mechanistic explanations for transforming butyric acid into butyric acid methyl ester as a case study. Unlike the conventional esterification process (conversion efficiency of ∼94%), the newly introduced esterification under the presence of porous materials via the thermo-chemical process reached up to ∼99.5%. Furthermore, the newly introduced esterification via the thermo-chemical pathway in this work showed extremely high tolerance of impurities: the conversion efficiency under the presence of impurities reached up to ∼99±0.3%; thus, the inhibition behaviors attributed from the impurities used for the experimental work were negligible. PMID:26720136

  18. Reactivity and Catalytic Activity of Hydrogen Atom Chemisorbed Silver Clusters.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Dar; Pal, Sourav

    2015-06-18

    Metal clusters of silver have attracted recent interest of researchers as a result of their potential in different catalytic applications and low cost. However, due to the completely filled d orbital and very high first ionization potential of the silver atom, the silver-based catalysts interact very weakly with the reacting molecules. In the current work, density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrogen atom chemisorption on the reactivity and catalytic properties of inert silver clusters. Our results affirm that the hydrogen atom chemisorption leads to enhancement in the binding energy of the adsorbed O2 molecule on the inert silver clusters. The increase in the binding energy is also characterized by the decrease in the Ag-O and increase in the O-O bond lengths in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Pertinent to the increase in the O-O bond length, a significant red shift in the O-O stretching frequency is also noted in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Moreover, the hydrogen atom chemisorbed silver clusters show low reaction barriers and high heat of formation of the final products for the environmentally important CO oxidation reaction as compared to the parent catalytically inactive clusters. The obtained results were compared with those of the corresponding gold and hydrogen atom chemisorbed gold clusters obtained at the same level of theory. It is expected the current computational study will provide key insights for future advances in the design of efficient nanosilver-based catalysts through the adsorption of a small atom or a ligand. PMID:25988294

  19. Determinants of ligand binding and catalytic activity in the myelin enzyme 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase

    PubMed Central

    Raasakka, Arne; Myllykoski, Matti; Laulumaa, Saara; Lehtimäki, Mari; Härtlein, Michael; Moulin, Martine; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri

    2015-01-01

    2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) is an enzyme highly abundant in the central nervous system myelin of terrestrial vertebrates. The catalytic domain of CNPase belongs to the 2H phosphoesterase superfamily and catalyzes the hydrolysis of nucleoside 2′,3′-cyclic monophosphates to nucleoside 2′-monophosphates. The detailed reaction mechanism and the essential catalytic amino acids involved have been described earlier, but the roles of many amino acids in the vicinity of the active site have remained unknown. Here, several CNPase catalytic domain mutants were studied using enzyme kinetics assays, thermal stability experiments, and X-ray crystallography. Additionally, the crystal structure of a perdeuterated CNPase catalytic domain was refined at atomic resolution to obtain a detailed view of the active site and the catalytic mechanism. The results specify determinants of ligand binding and novel essential residues required for CNPase catalysis. For example, the aromatic side chains of Phe235 and Tyr168 are crucial for substrate binding, and Arg307 may affect active site electrostatics and regulate loop dynamics. The β5-α7 loop, unique for CNPase in the 2H phosphoesterase family, appears to have various functions in the CNPase reaction mechanism, from coordinating the nucleophilic water molecule to providing a binding pocket for the product and being involved in product release. PMID:26563764

  20. The Influence of Elastic Strain on Catalytic Activity in the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kai; Maark, Tuhina Adit; Khorshidi, Alireza; Sethuraman, Vijay A; Peterson, Andrew A; Guduru, Pradeep R

    2016-05-17

    Understanding the role of elastic strain in modifying catalytic reaction rates is crucial for catalyst design, but experimentally, this effect is often coupled with a ligand effect. To isolate the strain effect, we have investigated the influence of externally applied elastic strain on the catalytic activity of metal films in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We show that elastic strain tunes the catalytic activity in a controlled and predictable way. Both theory and experiment show strain controls reactivity in a controlled manner consistent with the qualitative predictions of the HER volcano plot and the d-band theory: Ni and Pt's activities were accelerated by compression, while Cu's activity was accelerated by tension. By isolating the elastic strain effect from the ligand effect, this study provides a greater insight into the role of elastic strain in controlling electrocatalytic activity. PMID:27079940

  1. 3-Nitropropionic Acid is a Suicide Inhibitor of MitochondrialRespiration that, Upon Oxidation by Complex II, Forms a Covalent AdductWith a Catalytic Base Arginine in the Active Site of the Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Sun, Gang; Cobessi, David; Wang, Andy C.; Shen,John T.; Tung, Eric Y.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-12-01

    We report three new structures of mitochondrial respiratory Complex II (succinate ubiquinone oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.3.5.1) at up to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, with various inhibitors. The structures define the conformation of the bound inhibitors and suggest the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the dicarboxylate site. In particular they support the role of Arg297 as a general base catalyst accepting a proton in the dehydrogenation of succinate. The dicarboxylate ligand in oxaloacetate-containing crystals appears to be the same as that reported for Shewanella flavocytochrome c treated with fumarate. The plant and fungal toxin 3-nitropropionic acid, an irreversible inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase, forms a covalent adduct with the side chain of Arg297. The modification eliminates a trypsin cleavage site in the flavoprotein, and tandem mass spectroscopic analysis of the new fragment shows the mass of Arg 297 to be increased by 83 Da and to have potential of losing 44 Da, consistent with decarboxylation, during fragmentation.

  2. Synthesis, structural characterization and catalytic activity of a multifunctional enzyme mimetic oxoperoxovanadium(V) complex.

    PubMed

    Si, Tapan K; Paul, Shiv S; Drew, Michael G B; Mukherjea, Kalyan K

    2012-05-21

    The synthesis and structural characterization of a novel oxoperoxovanadium(V) complex [VO(O(2))(PAH)(phen)] containing the ligands 2-phenylacetohydroxamic acid (PAHH) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) has been accomplished. The oxoperoxovanadium(V) complex was found to mimic both vanadate-dependent haloperoxidase (VHPO) activity as well as nuclease activity through effective interaction with DNA. The complex is the first example of a structurally characterized stable oxoperoxovanadium(V) complex with a coordinated bi-dentate hydroximate moiety (-CONHO(-)) from 2-phenylacetohydroximate (PAH). The oxoperoxovanadium(V) complex has been used as catalyst for the peroxidative bromination reaction of some unsaturated alcohols (e.g. 4-pentene-1-ol, 1-octene-3-ol and 9-decene-1-ol) in the presence of H(2)O(2) and KBr. The catalytic products have been characterized by GC-MS analysis and spectrophotometric methods. The DNA binding of this complex has been established with CT DNA whereas the DNA cleavage was demonstrated with plasmid DNA. The interactions of the complex with DNA have been monitored by electronic absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopy. Viscometric measurements suggest that the compound is a DNA intercalator. The nuclease activity of this complex was confirmed by gel electrophoresis studies. PMID:22441646

  3. Preparation of acid-base bifunctional mesoporous KIT-6 (KIT: Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) and its catalytic performance in Knoevenagel reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ling; Wang, Chunhua; Guan, Jingqi

    2014-05-01

    Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous catalysts Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} containing different aluminum content have been synthesized through post synthetic grafting method. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), transmission electron micrographs (TEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), IR spectra of pyridine adsorption, NH{sub 3}-TPD and TG analysis. The characterization results indicated that the pore structure of KIT-6 was well kept after the addition of aluminum and grafting of aminopropyl groups. The acid amount of Al-KIT-6 increased with enhancing aluminum content. Catalytic results showed that weak acid and weak base favor the Knoevenagel reaction, while catalysts with strong acid and weak base exhibited worse catalytic behavior. - Graphical abstract: The postulated steps of mechanism for the acid-base catalyzed process are as follows: (1) the aldehyde gets activated by the surface acidic sites which allow the amine undergoes nucleophilic to attack the carbonyl carbon of benzaldehyde. (2) Water is released in the formation of imine intermediate. (3) The ethyl cyanoacetate reacts with the intermediate. (4) The benzylidene ethyl cyanoacetate is formed and the amine is regenerated. - Highlights: • KIT-6 and Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} with different Si/Al ratios has been successfully prepared. • 79.4% Yield was obtained over 46-Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} within 20 min in Knoevenagel reaction. • Low Al-content Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} shows better catalytic stability than high Al-content catalysts. • There is acid-base synergistic effect in Knoevenagel reaction.

  4. Examination of an active-site electrostatic node in the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, B. D.; Tsigelny, I.; Adams, J. A.; Taylor, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    The active site of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit harbors a cluster of acidic residues-Asp 127, Glu 170, Glu 203, Glu 230, and Asp 241-that are not conserved throughout the protein kinase family. Based on crystal structures of the catalytic subunit, these amino acids are removed from the site of phosphoryl transfer and are implicated in substrate recognition. Glu 230, the most buried of these acidic residues, was mutated to Ala (rC[E230A]) and Gln (rC[E230Q]) and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In contrast to the mostly insoluble and destabilized rC[E230A], rC[E230Q] is largely soluble, purifies like wild-type enzyme, and displays wild-type-like thermal stability. The mutation in rC[E230Q] causes an order of magnitude decrease in the affinity for a heptapeptide substrate, Kemptide. In addition, two independent kinetic techniques were used to dissect phosphoryl transfer and product release steps in the reaction pathway. Viscosometric and pre-steady-state quench-flow analyses revealed that the phosphoryl transfer rate constant decreases by an order of magnitude, whereas the product release rate constant remains unperturbed. Electrostatic alterations in the rC[E230Q] active site were assessed using modeling techniques that provide molecular interpretations for the substrate affinity and phosphoryl transfer rate decreases observed experimentally. These observations indicate that subsite recognition elements in the catalytic subunit make electrostatic contributions that are important not only for peptide affinity, but also for catalysis. Protein kinases may, therefore, discriminate substrates by not only binding them tightly, but also by only turning over ones that complement the electrostatic character of the active site. PMID:8819164

  5. Inhibition of miR-21 in glioma cells using catalytic nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Belter, Agnieszka; Rolle, Katarzyna; Piwecka, Monika; Fedoruk-Wyszomirska, Agnieszka; Naskręt-Barciszewska, Mirosława Z.; Barciszewski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Despite tremendous efforts worldwide, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains a deadly disease for which no cure is available and prognosis is very bad. Recently, miR-21 has emerged as a key omnipotent player in carcinogenesis, including brain tumors. It is recognized as an indicator of glioma prognosis and a prosperous target for anti-tumor therapy. Here we show that rationally designed hammerhead ribozymes and DNAzymes can target miR-21 and/or its precursors. They decrease miR-21 level, and thus silence this oncomiR functions. We demonstrated that anti-miRNA catalytic nucleic acids show a novel terrific arsenal for specific and effective combat against diseases with elevated cellular miR-21 content, such as brain tumors. PMID:27079911

  6. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides

    PubMed Central

    Gagne, Steve J.; Stout, Jake M.; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M.; Page, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2–C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity. PMID:22802619

  7. Three-phase catalytic system of H2O, ionic liquid, and VOPO4-SiO2 solid acid for conversion of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chengcheng; Zhu, Xiang; Chai, Song-Hai; Wu, Zili; Binder, Andrew; Brown, Suree; Li, Lin; Luo, Huimin; Guo, Yanglong; Dai, Sheng

    2014-06-01

    Efficient transformation of biomass-derived feedstocks to chemicals and fuels remains a daunting challenge in utilizing biomass as alternatives to fossil resources. A three-phase catalytic system, consisting of an aqueous phase, a hydrophobic ionic-liquid phase, and a solid-acid catalyst phase of nanostructured vanadium phosphate and mesostructured cellular foam (VPO-MCF), is developed for efficient conversion of biomass-derived fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). HMF is a promising, versatile building block for production of value-added chemicals and transportation fuels. The essence of this three-phase system lies in enabling the isolation of the solid-acid catalyst from the aqueous phase and regulation of its local environment by using a hydrophobic ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([BMIM][Tf2N]). This system significantly inhibits the side reactions of HMF with H2O and leads to 91 mol % selectivity to HMF at 89 % of fructose conversion. The unique three-phase catalytic system opens up an alternative avenue for making solid-acid catalyst systems with controlled and locally regulated microenvironment near catalytically active sites by using a hydrophobic ionic liquid. PMID:24729382

  8. Comparison of Two Preparation Methods on Catalytic Activity and Selectivity of Ru-Mo/HZSM5 for Methane Dehydroaromatization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic performance of Mo/HZSM5 and Ru-Mo/HZSM5 catalysts prepared by vaporization-deposition of molybdenum trioxide and impregnation with ammonium heptamolybdate was analyzed in terms of catalyst activity and selectivity, nitrogen physisorption analyses, temperature-programmed oxidation of carbonaceous residues, and temperature-programmed reduction. Vaporization-deposition rendered the catalyst more selective to ethylene and coke than the catalyst prepared by impregnation. This result was assigned to lower interaction of molybdenum carbide with the zeolite acidic sites.

  9. Reduced graphene oxide: firm support for catalytically active palladium nanoparticles and game changer in selective hydrogenation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Manuela; Benito, Ana M.; Urriolabeitia, Esteban P.; Arenal, Raul; Maser, Wolfgang K.

    2013-10-01

    Simultaneous decomposition and reduction of a Pd2+ complex in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) lead to the formation of Pd0-nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) with average sizes of 4 nm firmly anchored on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The Pd-NP/RGO hybrids exhibited remarkable catalytic activity and selectivity in mild hydrogenation reactions where the acidic properties of RGO play an active role and may act as an important game-changer.Simultaneous decomposition and reduction of a Pd2+ complex in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) lead to the formation of Pd0-nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) with average sizes of 4 nm firmly anchored on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The Pd-NP/RGO hybrids exhibited remarkable catalytic activity and selectivity in mild hydrogenation reactions where the acidic properties of RGO play an active role and may act as an important game-changer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis and results. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02822d

  10. Polysugar-stabilized Pd nanoparticles exhibiting high catalytic activities for hydrodechlorination of environmentally deleterious trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juncheng; He, Feng; Durham, Ed; Zhao, Dongye; Roberts, Christopher B

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a straightforward and environmentally friendly aqueous-phase synthesis of small Pd nanoparticles (approximately 2.4 nm under the best stabilization) by employing a "green", inexpensive, and biodegradable/biocompatible polysugar, sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), as a capping agent. The Pd nanoparticles exhibited rather high catalytic activity (observed pseudo-first-order reaction kinetic rate constant, k(obs), is up to 828 L g(-1) min(-1)) for the hydrodechlorination of environmentally deleterious trichloroethene (TCE) in water. Fourier transform IR (FT-IR) spectra indicate that CMC molecules interact with the Pd nanoparticles via both carboxyl (-COO-) and hydroxyl (-OH) groups, thereby functioning to passivate the surface and suppress the growth of the Pd nanoparticles. Hydrodechlorination of TCE using differently sized CMC-capped Pd nanoparticles as catalyst was systematically investigated in this work. Both the catalytic activity (k(obs)) and the surface catalytic activity (turnover frequency, TOF) of these CMC-capped Pd nanoparticles for TCE degradation are highly size-dependent. This point was further verified by a comparison of the catalytic activities and surface catalytic activities of CMC-capped Pd nanoparticles with those of beta-D-glucose-capped Pd and neat Pd nanoparticles for TCE degradation. PMID:18044944

  11. Structural and adsorption characteristics and catalytic activity of titania and titania-containing nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Gun'ko, V M; Blitz, J P; Zarko, V I; Turov, V V; Pakhlov, E M; Oranska, O I; Goncharuk, E V; Gornikov, Y I; Sergeev, V S; Kulik, T V; Palyanytsya, B B; Samala, R K

    2009-02-01

    Morphological, structural, adsorption, and catalytic properties of highly disperse titania prepared using sulfate and pyrogenic methods, and fumed titania-containing mixed oxides, were studied using XRD, TG/DTA, nitrogen adsorption, (1)H NMR, FTIR, microcalorimetry on immersion of oxides in water and decane, thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) and catalytic photodecomposition of methylene blue (MB). Phase composition and aggregation characteristics of nanoparticles (pore size distribution) of sulfate and pyrogenically prepared titania are very different; temperature dependent structural properties are thus very different. Catalytic activity for the photodecomposition of MB is greatest (per gram of TiO(2) for the pure oxide materials) for non-treated ultrafine titania PC-500, which has the largest S(BET) value and smallest particle size of the materials studied. However, this activity calculated per m(2) is higher for PC-105, possessing a much smaller S(BET) value than PC-500. The activity per unit surface area of titania is greatest for the fumed silica-titania mixed oxide ST20. Calcination of PC-500 at 650 degrees C leads to enhancement of anatase content and catalytic activity, but heating at 800 and 900 degrees C lowers the anatase content (since rutile appears) and diminishes catalytic activity, as well as the specific surface area because of nanoparticle sintering. PMID:18996539

  12. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide on Activated Carbons Impregnated with Sodium Hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Viviane; Baskova, Svetlana; Armstrong, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    Two activated carbons of different origin were impregnated with the solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) of various concentrations up to 10 wt %, and the effect of impregnation on the catalytic performance of the carbons was evaluated. The catalytic activity was analyzed in terms of the capacity of carbons for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) conversion and removal from hydrogen-rich fuel streams and the emission times of H2S and the products of its oxidation [e.g., sulfur dioxide (SO2) and carbonyl sulfide (COS)]. The results of impregnation showed a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of both carbons proportional to the amount of NaOH introduced. NaOH introduces hydroxyl groups (OH-) on the surface of the activated carbon that increase its surface reactivity and its interaction with sulfur-containing compounds.

  13. Catalytic Conversion of Biomass for the Production of Hydrogen; Decomposition of Formic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi Manzour, Faraz

    Highly active bimetallic catalysts were synthesized and used for the decomposition of formic acid for the production of hydrogen. Ruthenium alloys were prepared and resulted in a maximum formic acid conversion of 68% (after one hour at 180 °C) and a turnover frequency of 0.7/s (at 5 wt% formic acid). The most promising catalysts were characterized by the means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Kinetic studies were also carried out over these catalysts for the determination of reaction rate and turnover frequency. Promotion of Ru/C with tin, barium and cesium increased the formic acid conversion by 55%, 18% and 11% respectively.

  14. Importance of the Protein Framework for Catalytic Activity of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Knörzer, Philipp; Silakov, Alexey; Foster, Carina E.; Armstrong, Fraser A.; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Happe, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The active center (H-cluster) of [FeFe]-hydrogenases is embedded into a hydrophobic pocket within the protein. We analyzed several amino acids, located in the vicinity of this niche, by site-directed mutagenesis of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases from Clostridium pasteurianum (CpI) and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrHydA1). These amino acids are highly conserved and predicted to be involved in H-cluster coordination. Characterization of two hydrogenase variants confirmed this hypothesis. The exchange of residues CrHydA1Met415 and CrHydA1Lys228 resulted in inactive proteins, which, according to EPR and FTIR analyses, contain no intact H-cluster. However, [FeFe]-hydrogenases in which CpIMet353 (CrHydA1Met223) and CpICys299 (CrHydA1Cys169) were exchanged to leucine and serine, respectively, showed a structurally intact H-cluster with catalytic activity either absent (CpIC299S) or strongly diminished (CpIM353L). In the case of CrHydA1C169S, the H-cluster was trapped in an inactive state exhibiting g values and vibrational frequencies that resembled the Htrans state of DdH from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. This cysteine residue, interacting with the bridge head nitrogen of the di(methyl)amine ligand, seems therefore to represent an essential contribution of the immediate protein environment to the reaction mechanism. Exchanging methionine CpIM353 (CrHydA1M223) to leucine led to a strong decrease in turnover without affecting the Km value of the electron donor. We suggest that this methionine constitutes a “fine-tuning” element of hydrogenase activity. PMID:22110126

  15. Effects of Particle Size on the Gas Sensitivity and Catalytic Activity of In2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoshui; Gu, Ruiqin; Zhao, Jinling; Jin, Guixin; Zhao, Mengke; Xue, Yongliang

    2015-10-01

    Nanosized In2O3 powders with different particle sizes were prepared by the microemulsion synthetic method. The effects of particle size on the gas-sensing and catalytic properties of the as-prepared In2O3 were investigated. Reductions in particle size to nanometer levels improved the sensitivity and catalytic activity of In2O3 to i-C4H10 and C2H5OH. The sensitivity of nanosized In2O3 (<42 nm) sensors to i-C4H10, H2 and C2H5OH was 2-4 times higher than that of chemically precipitated In2O3 (130 nm) sensor. A nearly linear relationship was observed between the catalytic activity and specific surface area of In2O3 for the oxidation of i-C4H10 and C2H5OH at 275 °C. The relationship between gas sensitivity and catalytic activity was further discussed. The results of this work reveal that catalytic activity plays a key role in enhancing the sensitivity of gas-sensing materials.

  16. Greatly Enhancing Catalytic Activity of Graphene by Doping the Underlying Metal Substrate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Na; Xi, Yongjie; Liu, Shuanglong; Zhang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Graphene-based solid-state catalysis represents a new direction in applications of graphene and has attracted a lot of interests recently. However, the difficulty in fine control and large-scale production of previously proposed graphene catalysts greatly limits their industrial applications. Here we present a novel way to enhance the catalytic activity of graphene, which is highly efficient yet easy to fabricate and control. By first-principles calculations, we show that when the underlying metal substrate is doped with impurities, the catalytic activity of the supported graphene can be drastically enhanced. Graphene supported on a Fe/Ni(111) surface is chosen as a model catalyst, and the chemical reaction of CO oxidation is used to probe the catalytic activity of graphene. When the underlying Fe/Ni(111) substrate is impurity free, the graphene is catalytically inactive. When a Zn atom is doped into the substrate, the catalytic activity of the supported graphene is greatly enhanced, and the reaction barrier of the catalyzed CO oxidation is reduced to less than 0.5 eV. Intriguing reaction mechanism of catalyzed CO oxidation is revealed. These studies suggest a new class of graphene-based catalysts and pave the way for future applications of graphene in solid-state catalysis. PMID:26156332

  17. Catalytic activities of Werner protein are affected by adduction with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal

    PubMed Central

    Czerwińska, Jolanta; Poznański, Jarosław; Dębski, Janusz; Bukowy, Zuzanna; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Tudek, Barbara; Speina, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde generated during oxidative stress and subsequent peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Here, Werner protein (WRN) was identified as a novel target for modification by HNE. Werner syndrome arises through mutations in the WRN gene that encodes the RecQ DNA helicase which is critical for maintaining genomic stability. This hereditary disease is associated with chromosomal instability, premature aging and cancer predisposition. WRN appears to participate in the cellular response to oxidative stress and cells devoid of WRN display elevated levels of oxidative DNA damage. We demonstrated that helicase/ATPase and exonuclease activities of HNE-modified WRN protein were inhibited both in vitro and in immunocomplexes purified from the cell extracts. Sites of HNE adduction in human WRN were identified at Lys577, Cys727, His1290, Cys1367, Lys1371 and Lys1389. We applied in silico modeling of the helicase and RQC domains of WRN protein with HNE adducted to Lys577 and Cys727 and provided a potential mechanism of the observed deregulation of the protein catalytic activities. In light of the obtained results, we postulate that HNE adduction to WRN is a post-translational modification, which may affect WRN conformational stability and function, contributing to features and diseases associated with premature senescence. PMID:25170083

  18. Acid Strength and Bifunctional Catalytic Behavior of Alloys Comprised of Noble Metals and Oxophilic Metal Promoters

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbitts, David D.; Tan, Qiaohua; Neurock, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    The promotion of metal catalysts with partially oxidized oxophilic MOx species, such as ReOx-promoted Rh, has been demonstrated to produce Brønsted acid sites that can promote hydrogenolysis of oxygenate intermediates such as those found in biomass-derived species. A wide variety of alloy compositions and structures are examined in this work to investigate strongly acidic promoters by using DFT-calculated deprotonation energies (DPE) as a measure of acid strength. Sites with the highest acid strength had DPE less than 1100 kJ mol-1, similar to DPE values of heteropolyacids or acid-containing zeolites, and were found on alloys composed of an oxophilic metal (such as Re or W) with a noble metal (such as Rh or Pt). NH3 adsorbs more strongly to sites with increasing acid strength and the activation barriers for acid-catalyzed ring opening of a furan ring decrease with increasing acid strength, which was also shown to be stronger for OH acid sites bound to multiple oxophilic metal atoms in a three-fold configuration rather than OH sites adsorbed in an atop configuration on one oxophilic metal, indicating that small MOx clusters may yield sites with the highest acid strength.

  19. Copper on responsive polymer microgels: a recyclable catalyst exhibiting tunable catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingshi; Cheng, Han; Chang, Aiping; Bai, Xue; Lu, Fan; Wu, Weitai

    2014-11-25

    Copper has been immobilized on a chitosan-based responsive polymer microgel by simply stirring the microgel dispersion with copper sulfate. The ensuing catalyst is highly active for a model azide-alkyne [3+2]-cycloaddition reaction, and can be recycled at least 5 times; the catalytic activity can be tuned via swelling-deswelling transitions of the polymer gels. PMID:25283806

  20. The importance of hinge sequence for loop function and catalytic activity in the reaction catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Xiang, J; Sun, J; Sampson, N S

    2001-04-01

    We have determined the sequence requirements for the N-terminal protein hinge of the active-site lid of triosephosphate isomerase. The codons for the hinge (PVW) were replaced with a genetic library of all possible 8000 amino acid combinations. The most active of these 8000 mutants were selected using in vivo complementation of a triosephosphate isomerase-deficient strain of Escherichia coli, DF502. Approximately 0.3 % of the mutants complement DF502 with an activity that is between 10 and 70 % of wild-type activity. They all contain Pro at the first position. Furthermore, the sequences of these hinge mutants reveal that hydrophobic packing is very important for efficient formation of the enediol intermediate. However, the reduced catalytic activities observed are not due to increased rates of loop opening. To explore the relationship between the N-terminal and C-terminal hinges, three semi-active mutants from the N-terminal hinge selection experiment (PLH, PHS and PTF), and six active C-terminal hinge mutants from previous work (NSS, LWA, YSL, KTK, NPN, KVA) were combined to form 18 "double-hinge" mutants. The activities of these mutants suggest that the N-terminal and C-terminal hinge structures affect one another. It appears that specific side-chain interactions are important for forming a catalytically active enzyme, but not for preventing release of the unstable enediol intermediate from the active site of the enzyme. The independence of intermediate release on amino acid sequence is consistent with the absence of a "universal" hinge sequence in structurally related enzymes. PMID:11286559

  1. Conformational Disorganization within the Active Site of a Recently Evolved Organophosphate Hydrolase Limits Its Catalytic Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Mabbitt, Peter D; Correy, Galen J; Meirelles, Tamara; Fraser, Nicholas J; Coote, Michelle L; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of new enzymatic activity is rarely observed outside of the laboratory. In the agricultural pest Lucilia cuprina, a naturally occurring mutation (Gly137Asp) in α-esterase 7 (LcαE7) results in acquisition of organophosphate hydrolase activity and confers resistance to organophosphate insecticides. Here, we present an X-ray crystal structure of LcαE7:Gly137Asp that, along with kinetic data, suggests that Asp137 acts as a general base in the new catalytic mechanism. Unexpectedly, the conformation of Asp137 observed in the crystal structure obstructs the active site and is not catalytically productive. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that alternative, catalytically competent conformers of Asp137 are sampled on the nanosecond time scale, although these states are less populated. Thus, although the mutation introduces the new reactive group responsible for organophosphate detoxification, the catalytic efficiency appears to be limited by conformational disorganization: the frequent sampling of low-energy nonproductive states. This result is consistent with a model of molecular evolution in which initial function-changing mutations can result in enzymes that display only a fraction of their catalytic potential due to conformational disorganization. PMID:26881849

  2. The Role of Organic Capping Layers of Platinum Nanoparticles in Catalytic Activity of CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong Y.; Aliaga, Cesar; Renzas, J. Russell; Lee, Hyunjoo; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-12-17

    We report the catalytic activity of colloid platinum nanoparticles synthesized with different organic capping layers. On the molecular scale, the porous organic layers have open spaces that permit the reactant and product molecules to reach the metal surface. We carried out CO oxidation on several platinum nanoparticle systems capped with various organic molecules to investigate the role of the capping agent on catalytic activity. Platinum colloid nanoparticles with four types of capping layer have been used: TTAB (Tetradecyltrimethylammonium Bromide), HDA (hexadecylamine), HDT (hexadecylthiol), and PVP (poly(vinylpyrrolidone)). The reactivity of the Pt nanoparticles varied by 30%, with higher activity on TTAB coated nanoparticles and lower activity on HDT, while the activation energy remained between 27-28 kcal/mol. In separate experiments, the organic capping layers were partially removed using ultraviolet light-ozone generation techniques, which resulted in increased catalytic activity due to the removal of some of the organic layers. These results indicate that the nature of chemical bonding between organic capping layers and nanoparticle surfaces plays a role in determining the catalytic activity of platinum colloid nanoparticles for carbon monoxide oxidation.

  3. Catalytic activity of lime for N{sub 2}O decomposition under coal combustion conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaoka, Eiji; Sada, Norimasa; Hara, Kenichi; Uddin, M.A.; Sakata, Yusaku

    1999-04-01

    To understand the contribution of lime to the abatement of N{sub 2}O emission from fluidized coal combustor, the catalytic activity of the lime for the decomposition of N{sub 2}O under coal combustion conditions was studied. Lime was active for the catalytic decomposition of N{sub 2}O, and its activity was stable in the simulated coal combustion flue gas in the absence of SO{sub 2} at 800 C. The catalytic activity of lime was depressed by the presence of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and SO{sub 2}. The affect of the presence of SO{sub 2} seemed to be most important: the catalytic activity of the lime gradually decreased as the degree of sulfation increased, and the specific surface area decreased with the progression of sulfation. From N{sub 2}O pretreatment and temperature-programmed desorption studies on the used lime, it was found that two oxygen species and one species of No desorbed. A surface character change due to sulfation is expected from these gas desorptions. From the relation of the activity to the surface area or the desorption of the gases or both, it was concluded that a decrease in the surface area contributed to the decay of the activity more effectively than the surface character change caused by the sulfation.

  4. Catalytic Hydrotreatment of Humins in Mixtures of Formic Acid/2-Propanol with Supported Ruthenium Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuehu; Agarwal, Shilpa; Kloekhorst, Arjan; Heeres, Hero Jan

    2016-05-10

    The catalytic hydrotreatment of humins, which are the solid byproducts from the conversion of C6 sugars (glucose, fructose) into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and levulinic acid (LA), by using supported ruthenium catalysts has been investigated. Reactions were carried out in a batch setup at elevated temperatures (400 °C) by using a hydrogen donor (formic acid (FA) in isopropanol (IPA) or hydrogen gas), with humins obtained from d-glucose. Humin conversions of up to 69 % were achieved with Ru/C and FA, whereas the performance for Ru on alumina was slightly poorer (59 % humin conversion). Humin oils were characterized by using a range of analytical techniques (GC, GC-MS, GCxGC, gel permeation chromatography) and were shown to consist of monomers, mainly alkyl phenolics (>45 % based on compounds detectable by GC) and higher oligomers. A reaction network for the reaction is proposed based on structural proposals for humins and the main reaction products. PMID:26836970

  5. Catalytic degradation of Acid Orange 7 by manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves with peroxymonosulfate under visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lian; Sun, Binzhe; Wei, Mingyu; Luo, Shilu; Pan, Fei; Xu, Aihua; Li, Xiaoxia

    2015-03-21

    In this paper, the photodegradation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) in aqueous solutions with peroxymonosulfate (PMS) was studied with manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves (OMS-2) as the catalyst. The activities of different systems including OMS-2 under visible light irradiation (OMS-2/Vis), OMS-2/PMS and OMS-2/PMS/Vis were evaluated. It was found that the efficiency of OMS-2/PMS was much higher than that of OMS-2/Vis and could be further enhanced by visible light irradiation. The catalyst also exhibited stable performance for multiple runs. Results from ESR and XPS analyses suggested that the highly catalytic activity of the OMS-2/PMS/Vis system possible involved the activation of PMS to sulfate radicals meditated by the redox pair of Mn(IV)/Mn(III) and Mn(III)/Mn(II), while in the OMS-2/PMS system, only the redox reaction between Mn(IV)/Mn(III) occurred. Several operational parameters, such as dye concentration, catalyst load, PMS concentration and solution pH, affected the degradation of AO7. PMID:25528234

  6. Ag–Fe2O3 nanocomposites with enhanced catalytic activity for reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shiben; Chen, Yingjie; Dong, Lifeng

    2016-07-01

    Hybrid nanostructures can be multifunctional and even possess enhanced properties. Ag–Fe2O3 nanocomposites and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were fabricated and applied to catalyze the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. Compared with Ag NPs, Ag–Fe2O3 nanocomposites demonstrated enhanced catalytic activities. Furthermore, due to their magnetic properties, Ag–Fe2O3 nanocomposites could be easily separated from the reaction mixture and recycled through an external magnetic field. These findings will help us design hybrid nanostructures with catalytic activity and explore other potential applications of magnetic nanocomposites.

  7. Hematite concave nanocubes and their superior catalytic activity for low temperature CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hanfeng; Jiang, Xinde; Qi, Zhengbing; Chen, Wei; Wu, Zhengtao; Xu, Binbin; Wang, Zhoucheng; Mi, Jinxiao; Li, Qingbiao

    2014-06-01

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) concave nanocubes bound by high-index {134&cmb.macr;4} and {123&cmb.macr;8} facets were synthesized and their catalytic activity for CO oxidation were also investigated.Hematite (α-Fe2O3) concave nanocubes bound by high-index {134&cmb.macr;4} and {123&cmb.macr;8} facets were synthesized and their catalytic activity for CO oxidation were also investigated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00552j

  8. Dimer-dimer interaction of the bacterial selenocysteine synthase SelA promotes functional active site formation and catalytic specificity

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Bröcker, Markus J.; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Söll, Dieter; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    The 21st amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec), is incorporated translationally into proteins, and is synthesized on its specific tRNA (tRNASec). In Bacteria, the selenocysteine synthase SelA converts Ser-tRNASec, formed by seryl-tRNA synthetase, to Sec-tRNASec. SelA, a member of the fold-type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme superfamily, has an exceptional homodecameric quaternary structure with a molecular mass of about 500 kDa. Our previously determined crystal structures of Aquifex aeolicus SelA complexed with tRNASec revealed that the ring-shaped decamer is composed of pentamerized SelA dimers, with two SelA dimers arranged to collaboratively interact with one Ser-tRNASec. The SelA catalytic site is close to the dimer-dimer interface, but the significance of the dimer-pentamerization in the catalytic site formation remained elusive. In the present study, we examined the quaternary interactions, and demonstrated their importance for SelA activity by systematic mutagenesis. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of “depentamerized” SelA variants with mutations at the dimer-dimer interface that prevent pentamerization. These dimeric SelA variants formed a distorted and inactivated catalytic site, and confirmed that the pentamer interactions are essential for productive catalytic site formation. Intriguingly, the conformation of the non-functional active site of dimeric SelA shares structural features with other fold-type-I PLP-dependent enzymes with native dimer or tetramer (dimer-of-dimers) quaternary structures. PMID:24456689

  9. Novel Dextranase Catalyzing Cycloisomaltooligosaccharide Formation and Identification of Catalytic Amino Acids and Their Functions Using Chemical Rescue Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Min; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Muraki, Tomoe; Kang, Min-Sun; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Saburi, Wataru; Lang, Weeranuch; Kang, Hee-Kwon; Okuyama, Masayuki; Mori, Haruhide; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Funane, Kazumi; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Momma, Mitsuru; Fujimoto, Zui; Oguma, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Mikihiko; Kim, Doman; Kimura, Atsuo

    2012-01-01

    A novel endodextranase from Paenibacillus sp. (Paenibacillus sp. dextranase; PsDex) was found to mainly produce isomaltotetraose and small amounts of cycloisomaltooligosaccharides (CIs) with a degree of polymerization of 7–14 from dextran. The 1,696-amino acid sequence belonging to the glycosyl hydrolase family 66 (GH-66) has a long insertion (632 residues; Thr451–Val1082), a portion of which shares identity (35% at Ala39–Ser1304 of PsDex) with Pro32–Ala755 of CI glucanotransferase (CITase), a GH-66 enzyme that catalyzes the formation of CIs from dextran. This homologous sequence (Val837–Met932 for PsDex and Tyr404–Tyr492 for CITase), similar to carbohydrate-binding module 35, was not found in other endodextranases (Dexs) devoid of CITase activity. These results support the classification of GH-66 enzymes into three types: (i) Dex showing only dextranolytic activity, (ii) Dex catalyzing hydrolysis with low cyclization activity, and (iii) CITase showing CI-forming activity with low dextranolytic activity. The fact that a C-terminal truncated enzyme (having Ala39–Ser1304) has 50% wild-type PsDex activity indicates that the C-terminal 392 residues are not involved in hydrolysis. GH-66 enzymes possess four conserved acidic residues (Asp189, Asp340, Glu412, and Asp1254 of PsDex) of catalytic candidates. Their amide mutants decreased activity (11,500 to 140,000 times), and D1254N had 36% activity. A chemical rescue approach was applied to D189A, D340G, and E412Q using α-isomaltotetraosyl fluoride with NaN3. D340G or E412Q formed a β- or α-isomaltotetraosyl azide, respectively, strongly indicating Asp340 and Glu412 as a nucleophile and acid/base catalyst, respectively. Interestingly, D189A synthesized small sized dextran from α-isomaltotetraosyl fluoride in the presence of NaN3. PMID:22461618

  10. Catalytic Reduction of Noble Metal Salts by Sodium Hypophosphite Promoted by the Film Poly-(p-Allyl Ether Benzenesulfonic Acid).

    PubMed

    Costa, M I C F; Steter, J R; Purgato, F L S; Romero, J R

    2011-01-01

    Glassy carbon electrodes were coated with the film poly-(p-allyl ether benzenesulfonic acid) by an anodic procedure. Nickel, platinum, and palladium ions were introduced into the film by ion exchange of H(+) with the corresponding salts. These ions were catalytically reduced to their corresponding metals using the known electroless reducing agent sodium hypophosphite. Scanning electron microcopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were carried out to demonstrate the occurrence of the catalytic process. To compare this method with another one carried out in our laboratory, the electrocatalytic reduction of H(+) was studied using the same modified electrodes. A suggested mechanism for the catalysis is proposed. PMID:24052832

  11. Catalytic Reduction of Noble Metal Salts by Sodium Hypophosphite Promoted by the Film Poly-(p-Allyl Ether Benzenesulfonic Acid)

    PubMed Central

    Costa, M. I. C. F.; Steter, J. R.; Purgato, F. L. S.; Romero, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    Glassy carbon electrodes were coated with the film poly-(p-allyl ether benzenesulfonic acid) by an anodic procedure. Nickel, platinum, and palladium ions were introduced into the film by ion exchange of H+ with the corresponding salts. These ions were catalytically reduced to their corresponding metals using the known electroless reducing agent sodium hypophosphite. Scanning electron microcopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were carried out to demonstrate the occurrence of the catalytic process. To compare this method with another one carried out in our laboratory, the electrocatalytic reduction of H+ was studied using the same modified electrodes. A suggested mechanism for the catalysis is proposed. PMID:24052832

  12. Structural and mechanistic analysis of trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pegan, Scott D.; Serrano, Hector; Whitman, Christian P.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2008-12-01

    The X-ray structure of a noncovalently modified trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase with a substrate-homolog acetate bound in the active site has been determined to 1.7 Å resolution. Elucidation of catalytically important water is reported and multiple conformations of the catalytic residue αGlu52 are observed. Trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD) is a critical enzyme in the trans-1, 3-dichloropropene (DCP) degradation pathway in Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170. This enzyme allows bacteria to use trans-DCP, a common component in commercially produced fumigants, as a carbon source. CaaD specifically catalyzes the fourth step of the pathway by cofactor-independent dehalogenation of a vinyl carbon–halogen bond. Previous studies have reported an X-ray structure of CaaD under acidic conditions with a covalent modification of the catalytic βPro1 residue. Here, the 1.7 Å resolution X-ray structure of CaaD under neutral (pH 6.5) conditions is reported without the presence of the covalent adduct. In this new structure, a substrate-like acetate molecule is bound within the active site in a position analogous to the putative substrate-binding site. Additionally, a catalytically important water molecule was identified, consistent with previously proposed reaction schemes. Finally, flexibility of the catalytically relevant side chain αGlu52 is observed in the structure, supporting its role in the catalytic mechanism.

  13. Preparation of zeolite supported TiO2, ZnO and ZrO2 and the study on their catalytic activity in NOx reduction and 1-pentanol dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatimah, Is

    2016-03-01

    Preparation of zeolite supported TiO2, ZnO and ZrO2 and their catalytic activity was studied. Activated natural zeolite from Indonesia was utilized for the preparation and catalytic activity test on NOx reduction by NH3 and also 1-pentanol dehydration were examined. Physicochemical characterization of materials was studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement, scanning electron microscope, solid acidity determination and also gas sorption analysis. The results confirmed that the preparation gives some improvements on physicochemical characters suitable for catalysis mechanism in those reactions. Solid acidity and specific surface area contributed significantly to the activity.

  14. Highly versatile catalytic hydrogenation of carboxylic and carbonic acid derivatives using a Ru-triphos complex: molecular control over selectivity and substrate scope.

    PubMed

    vom Stein, Thorsten; Meuresch, Markus; Limper, Dominik; Schmitz, Marc; Hölscher, Markus; Coetzee, Jacorien; Cole-Hamilton, David J; Klankermayer, Jürgen; Leitner, Walter

    2014-09-24

    The complex [Ru(Triphos)(TMM)] (Triphos = 1,1,1-tris(diphenylphosphinomethyl)ethane, TMM = trimethylene methane) provides an efficient catalytic system for the hydrogenation of a broad range of challenging functionalities encompassing carboxylic esters, amides, carboxylic acids, carbonates, and urea derivatives. The key control factor for this unique substrate scope results from selective activation to generate either the neutral species [Ru(Triphos)(Solvent)H2] or the cationic intermediate [Ru(Triphos)(Solvent)(H)(H2)](+) in the presence of an acid additive. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopic studies demonstrated together with DFT investigations that the neutral species generally provides lower energy pathways for the multistep reduction cascades comprising hydrogen transfer to C═O groups and C-O bond cleavage. Carboxylic esters, lactones, anhydrides, secondary amides, and carboxylic acids were hydrogenated in good to excellent yields under these conditions. The formation of the catalytically inactive complexes [Ru(Triphos)(CO)H2] and [Ru(Triphos)(μ-H)]2 was identified as major deactivation pathways. The former complex results from substrate-dependent decarbonylation and constitutes a major limitation for the substrate scope under the neutral conditions. The deactivation via the carbonyl complex can be suppressed by addition of catalytic amounts of acids comprising non-coordinating anions such as HNTf2 (bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide). Although the corresponding cationic cycle shows higher overall barriers of activation, it provides a powerful hydrogenation pathway at elevated temperatures, enabling the selective reduction of primary amides, carbonates, and ureas in high yields. Thus, the complex [Ru(Triphos)(TMM)] provides a unique platform for the rational selection of reaction conditions for the selective hydrogenation of challenging functional groups and opens novel synthetic pathways for the utilization of renewable carbon sources. PMID:25208046

  15. pH control of the structure, composition, and catalytic activity of sulfated zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Vladimir K.; Baranchikov, Alexander Ye.; Kopitsa, Gennady P.; Lermontov, Sergey A.; Yurkova, Lyudmila L.; Gubanova, Nadezhda N.; Ivanova, Olga S.; Lermontov, Anatoly S.; Rumyantseva, Marina N.; Vasilyeva, Larisa P.; Sharp, Melissa; Pranzas, P. Klaus; Tretyakov, Yuri D.

    2013-02-15

    We report a detailed study of structural and chemical transformations of amorphous hydrous zirconia into sulfated zirconia-based superacid catalysts. Precipitation pH is shown to be the key factor governing structure, composition and properties of amorphous sulfated zirconia gels and nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia. Increase in precipitation pH leads to substantial increase of surface fractal dimension (up to {approx}2.7) of amorphous sulfated zirconia gels, and consequently to increase in specific surface area (up to {approx}80 m{sup 2}/g) and simultaneously to decrease in sulfate content and total acidity of zirconia catalysts. Complete conversion of hexene-1 over as synthesized sulfated zirconia catalysts was observed even under ambient conditions. - Graphical abstract: Surface fractal dimension of amorphous sulfated zirconia and specific surface area and catalytic activity of crystalline sulfated zirconia as a function of precipitation pH. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural transformation of amorphous hydrous zirconia into sulfated zirconia is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation pH controls surface fractal dimension of amorphous zirconia gels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation pH is the key factor governing properties of sulfated zirconia.

  16. A Catalytic DNA Activated by a Specific Strain of Bacterial Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhifa; Wu, Zaisheng; Chang, Dingran; Zhang, Wenqing; Tram, Kha; Lee, Christine; Kim, Peter; Salena, Bruno J; Li, Yingfu

    2016-02-01

    Pathogenic strains of bacteria are known to cause various infectious diseases and there is a growing demand for molecular probes that can selectively recognize them. Here we report a special DNAzyme (catalytic DNA), RFD-CD1, that shows exquisite specificity for a pathogenic strain of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). RFD-CD1 was derived by an in vitro selection approach where a random-sequence DNA library was allowed to react with an unpurified molecular mixture derived from this strain of C. difficle, coupled with a subtractive selection strategy to eliminate cross-reactivities to unintended C. difficile strains and other bacteria species. RFD-CD1 is activated by a truncated version of TcdC, a transcription factor, that is unique to the targeted strain of C. difficle. Our study demonstrates for the first time that in vitro selection offers an effective approach for deriving functional nucleic acid probes that are capable of achieving strain-specific recognition of bacterial pathogens. PMID:26676768

  17. A supramolecular ruthenium macrocycle with high catalytic activity for water oxidation that mechanistically mimics photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Marcus; Kunz, Valentin; Frischmann, Peter D.; Würthner, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the ingenuity of nature and exploiting the billions of years over which natural selection has developed numerous effective biochemical conversions is one of the most successful strategies in a chemist's toolbox. However, an inability to replicate the elegance and efficiency of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II (OEC-PSII) in its oxidation of water into O2 is a significant bottleneck in the development of a closed-loop sustainable energy cycle. Here, we present an artificial metallosupramolecular macrocycle that gathers three Ru(bda) centres (bda = 2,2‧-bipyridine-6,6‧-dicarboxylic acid) that catalyses water oxidation. The macrocyclic architecture accelerates the rate of water oxidation via a water nucleophilic attack mechanism, similar to the mechanism exhibited by OEC-PSII, and reaches remarkable catalytic turnover frequencies >100 s–1. Photo-driven water oxidation yields outstanding activity, even in the nM concentration regime, with a turnover number of >1,255 and turnover frequency of >13.1 s–1.

  18. Nickel-cobalt nanoparticles supported on single-walled carbon nanotubes and their catalytic hydrogenation activity.

    PubMed

    Lekgoathi, Mpho D S; Augustyn, Willem G; Heveling, Josef

    2011-08-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized from graphite using the arc discharge technique. A nickel/yttrium/graphite mixture was used as the catalyst. After purification by sonication in a Triton X-100 solution, nickel-cobalt metal nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. The resulting material and/or the nanotubes themselves were characterized by physisorption, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution transition electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the nanotubes, prepared by the arc discharge technique, are semi-conducting with a diameter centering at 1.4 nm. The average nickel-cobalt particle size is estimated to be in the region of 8 nm. The catalytic activity of the material was examined for the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters obtained from avocado oil. The carbon nanotube supported nickel-cobalt particles effectively hydrogenate polyunsaturated methyl linoleate to monounsaturated methyl oleate. In contrast to a conventional nickel on kieselghur catalyst, further hydrogenation of methyl oleate to undesired methyl stearate was not observed. PMID:22103112

  19. A supramolecular ruthenium macrocycle with high catalytic activity for water oxidation that mechanistically mimics photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Marcus; Kunz, Valentin; Frischmann, Peter D; Würthner, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the ingenuity of nature and exploiting the billions of years over which natural selection has developed numerous effective biochemical conversions is one of the most successful strategies in a chemist's toolbox. However, an inability to replicate the elegance and efficiency of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II (OEC-PSII) in its oxidation of water into O2 is a significant bottleneck in the development of a closed-loop sustainable energy cycle. Here, we present an artificial metallosupramolecular macrocycle that gathers three Ru(bda) centres (bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid) that catalyses water oxidation. The macrocyclic architecture accelerates the rate of water oxidation via a water nucleophilic attack mechanism, similar to the mechanism exhibited by OEC-PSII, and reaches remarkable catalytic turnover frequencies >100 s(-1). Photo-driven water oxidation yields outstanding activity, even in the nM concentration regime, with a turnover number of >1,255 and turnover frequency of >13.1 s(-1). PMID:27219702

  20. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of BthTX-II, a myotoxic Asp49-phospholipase A{sub 2} with low catalytic activity from Bothrops jararacussu venom

    SciTech Connect

    Corrêa, L. C.; Marchi-Salvador, D. P.; Cintra, A. C. O.; Soares, A. M.

    2006-08-01

    A myotoxic Asp49-PLA{sub 2} with low catalytic activity from B. jararacussu (BthTX-II) was crystallized in the monoclinic crystal system; a complete X-ray diffraction data set was collected and a molecular-replacement solution was obtained. The oligomeric structure of BthTX-II resembles those of the Asp49-PLA{sub 2} PrTX-III and all bothropic Lys49-PLA{sub 2}s. For the first time, a complete X-ray diffraction data set has been collected from a myotoxic Asp49-phospholipase A{sub 2} (Asp49-PLA{sub 2}) with low catalytic activity (BthTX-II from Bothrops jararacussu venom) and a molecular-replacement solution has been obtained with a dimer in the asymmetric unit. The quaternary structure of BthTX-II resembles the myotoxin Asp49-PLA{sub 2} PrTX-III (piratoxin III from B. pirajai venom) and all non-catalytic and myotoxic dimeric Lys49-PLA{sub 2}s. In contrast, the oligomeric structure of BthTX-II is different from the highly catalytic and non-myotoxic BthA-I (acidic PLA{sub 2} from B. jararacussu). Thus, comparison between these structures should add insight into the catalytic and myotoxic activities of bothropic PLA{sub 2}s.

  1. Catalytic deactivation of methane steam reforming catalysts. I. Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Agnelli, M.E.; Demicheli, M.C.; Ponzi, E.N.

    1987-08-01

    An alumina-supported catalyst was studied both in its original state and after activation and sintering. Chemical composition and textural properties were determined, and crystalline compounds were identified. Active-phase and support transformations occurring during activation were determined by differential thermoanalysis (DTA), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and X-ray diffraction. The catalyst activated by means of various procedures was characterized by measuring crystallite size.

  2. A novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha/gamma agonist, BPR1H0101, inhibits topoisomerase II catalytic activity in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Hsun; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Chitlimalla, Santhosh Kumar; Pan, Wen-Yu; Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Tsai, Yuan-Chin; Lin, Wen-Hsing; Chuang, Shuang-En; Chang, Jang-Yang

    2008-02-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists are used clinically for treating diabetes mellitus and cancer. 2-Methyl-2[(1-{3-phenyl-7-propylbenzol[d]isoxazol-6-yl}oxy)propyl]-1H-4-indolyl) oxy]propanoic acid (BPR1H0101) is a novel synthetic indole-based compound, discovered through research to identify new PPARgamma agonists, and it acts as a dual agonist for PPARgamma and PPARalpha. Isobologram analysis demonstrated that BPR1H0101 is capable of antagonistic interaction with the topoisomerase (topo) II poison, VP16. A study of its mechanism showed that BPR1H0101 could inhibit the catalytic activity of topo II in vitro, but did not produce detectable topo II-mediated DNA strand breaks in human oral cancer KB cells. Furthermore, BPR1H0101 could inhibit VP16-induced topo II-mediated DNA cleavage and ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated phosphorylation in KB cells. The results suggest that BPR1H0101 can interfere with the topo II reaction by inhibiting catalytic activity before the formation of the intermediate cleavable complex; consequently, it can impede VP16-induced topo II-mediated DNA cleavage and cell death. This is the first identified PPARalpha/gamma agonist that can serve as a topo II catalytic inhibitor, to interfere with VP16-induced cell death. The result might have relevance to the clinical use of the PPARalpha/gamma agonist in combination chemotherapy. PMID:18176111

  3. Identification of essential residues for the catalytic function of 85-kDa cytosolic phospholipase A2. Probing the role of histidine, aspartic acid, cysteine, and arginine.

    PubMed

    Pickard, R T; Chiou, X G; Strifler, B A; DeFelippis, M R; Hyslop, P A; Tebbe, A L; Yee, Y K; Reynolds, L J; Dennis, E A; Kramer, R M; Sharp, J D

    1996-08-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) hydrolyzes the sn-2-acyl ester bond of phospholipids and shows a preference for arachidonic acid-containing substrates. We found previously that Ser-228 is essential for enzyme activity and is likely to function as a nucleophile in the catalytic center of the enzyme (Sharp, J. D., White, D. L., Chiou, X. G., Goodson, T., Gamboa, G. C., McClure, D., Burgett, S., Hoskins, J., Skatrud, P. L., Sportsman, J. R., Becker, G. W., Kang, L. H., Roberts, E. F., and Kramer, R. M.(1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 14850-14853). cPLA2 contains a catalytic aspartic acid motif common to the subtilisin family of serine proteases. Substitution within this motif of Ala for Asp-549 completely inactivated the enzyme, and substitutions with either glutamic acid or asparagine reduced activity 2000- and 300-fold, respectively. Additionally, using mutants with cysteine replaced by alanine, we found that Cys-331 is responsible for the enzyme's sensitivity to N-ethylmaleimide. Surprisingly, substituting alanine for any of the 19 histidines did not produce inactive enzyme, demonstrating that a classical serine-histidine-aspartate mechanism does not operate in this hydrolase. We found that substituting alanine or histidine for Arg-200 did produce inactive enzyme, while substituting lysine reduced activity 200-fold. Results obtained with the lysine mutant (R200K) and a coumarin ester substrate suggest no specific interaction between Arg-200 and the phosphoryl group of the phospholipid substrate. Arg-200, Ser-228, and Asp-549 are conserved in cPLA2 from six species and also in four nonmammalian phospholipase B enzymes. Our results, supported by circular dichroism, provide evidence that Asp-549 and Arg-200 are critical to the enzyme's function and suggest that the cPLA2 catalytic center is novel. PMID:8702602

  4. IFCC primary reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes at 37 degrees C. Part 1. The concept of reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Siekmann, Lothar; Bonora, Roberto; Burtis, Carl A; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Clerc-Renaud, Pascale; Férard, Georges; Ferrero, Carlo A; Forest, Jean-Claude; Franck, Paul F H; Gella, F Javier; Hoelzel, Wieland; Jørgensen, Poul Jørgen; Kanno, Takashi; Kessner, Art; Klauke, Rainer; Kristiansen, Nina; Lessinger, Jean-Marc; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Misaki, Hideo; Mueller, Mathias M; Panteghini, Mauro; Pauwels, Jean; Schiele, Françoise; Schimmel, Heinz G; Vialle, Arlette; Weidemann, Gerhard; Schumann, Gerhard

    2002-06-01

    This paper is the first in a series dealing with reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes at 37 degrees C and with the certification of reference preparations. Other parts deal with: Part 2. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Creatine Kinase; Part 3. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Lactate Dehydrogenase; Part 4. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Alanine Aminotransferase; Part 5. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Aspartate Aminotransferase; Part 6. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic fication of Four Reference Materials for the Determination of Enzymatic Activity of y-Glutamyltransferase, Lactate Dehydrogenase, Alanine Aminotransferase and Creatine Kinase at 37 degrees C. A document describing the determination of preliminary reference values is also in preparation. PMID:12211661

  5. Studies relevant to the catalytic activation of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, P.C.

    1992-06-04

    Research activity during the 1991--1992 funding period has been concerned with the following topics relevant to carbon monoxide activation. (1) Exploratory studies of water gas shift catalysts heterogenized on polystyrene based polymers. (2) Mechanistic investigation of the nucleophilic activation of CO in metal carbonyl clusters. (3) Application of fast reaction techniques to prepare and to investigate reactive organometallic intermediates relevant to the activation of hydrocarbons toward carbonylation and to the formation of carbon-carbon bonds via the migratory insertion of CO into metal alkyl bonds.

  6. Synthesis of concave gold nanocuboids with high-index facets and their enhanced catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Lidong; Peng, Yi; Yue, Yonghai; Hu, Ye; Liang, Xiu; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin

    2015-07-25

    Novel concave gold nanocuboids bounded by 24 high-index {611} facets are synthesized using the seed-mediated growth method via an overgrowth mechanism. The as-synthesized products demonstrated greatly enhanced catalytic activity for the electro-oxidation of glucose and the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol (4-NTP) under a laser. PMID:26097908

  7. A reconstruction strategy to synthesize mesoporous SAPO molecular sieve single crystals with high MTO catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chan; Yang, Miao; Li, Mingrun; Xu, Shutao; Yang, Yue; Tian, Peng; Liu, Zhongmin

    2016-05-11

    Mesoporous SAPO-34 single crystals with tunable porosity and Si content have been fast synthesized within 4 hours by a reconstruction strategy, which show excellent hydrothermal stability and MTO catalytic activity. This new strategy is further proven to be applicable to prepare other mesoporous SAPO molecular sieve single crystals. PMID:27101359

  8. Enantioselective Synthesis of a PKC Inhibitor via Catalytic C-HBond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Rebecca M.; Thalji, Reema K.; Bergman, Robert G.; Ellman,Jonathan A.

    2006-02-26

    The syntheses of two biologically active molecules possessing dihydropyrroloindole cores (1 and 2) were completed using rhodium-catalyzed imine-directed C-H bond functionalization, with the second of these molecules containing a stereocenter that can be set with 90% ee during cyclization using chiral nonracemic phosphoramidite ligands. Catalytic decarbonylation and direct indole/maleimide coupling provide efficient access to 2.

  9. A highly sensitive technique for detecting catalytically active nanoparticles against a background of general workplace aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, N.; Weis, F.; Binder, A.; Seipenbusch, M.; Kasper, G.

    2011-07-01

    A new measurement technique was studied using catalysis to specifically detect airborne nanoparticles in presence of background particles in the workplace air. Catalytically active nanoparticles produced by spark discharge were used as aerosol catalysts. According to these particles suitable catalytic test reactions were chosen and investigated by two different approaches: catalysis on airborne nanoparticles and catalysis on deposited nanoparticles. The results indicate that catalysis is applicable for the specific measurement of nanoparticles in the workplace air. Catalysis on airborne particles is suitable for the specific detection of very active nanoparticles, e.g. platinum or nickel, at high concentrations of about 107 #/cm3. The approach of catalysis on deposited particles is better suited for nanoparticle aerosols at low concentrations, for slow catalytic reactions or less active nanoparticles like iron oxide (Fe2O3). On the basis of the experimental results detection limits in the range of μg or even ng were calculated which assure the good potential of catalysis for the specific detection of nanoparticles in the workplace air based on their catalytic activity.

  10. Reversible amorphization and the catalytically active state of crystalline Co3O4 during oxygen evolution.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Arno; Martinez-Moreno, Elias; Teschner, Detre; Chernev, Petko; Gliech, Manuel; de Araújo, Jorge Ferreira; Reier, Tobias; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water splitting catalysed by earth-abundant materials is pivotal for global-scale production of non-fossil fuels, yet our understanding of the active catalyst structure and reactivity is still insufficient. Here we report on the structurally reversible evolution of crystalline Co3O4 electrocatalysts during oxygen evolution reaction identified using advanced in situ X-ray techniques. At electrode potentials facilitating oxygen evolution, a sub-nanometre shell of the Co3O4 is transformed into an X-ray amorphous CoOx(OH)y which comprises di-μ-oxo-bridged Co(3+/4+) ions. Unlike irreversible amorphizations, here, the formation of the catalytically-active layer is reversed by re-crystallization upon return to non-catalytic electrode conditions. The Co3O4 material thus combines the stability advantages of a controlled, stable crystalline material with high catalytic activity, thanks to the structural flexibility of its active amorphous oxides. We propose that crystalline oxides may be tailored for generating reactive amorphous surface layers at catalytic potentials, just to return to their stable crystalline state under rest conditions. PMID:26456525

  11. Open-mouthed hybrid microcapsules with elevated enzyme loading and enhanced catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiafu; Zhang, Shaohua; Wang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2014-10-25

    Open-mouthed hybrid microcapsules (HMCs) are synthesized through a hard-templating method. When utilized for enzyme immobilization and enzymatic catalysis, the open-mouthed HMCs show high enzyme loading capability, enhanced catalytic activity and desirable recycling stability, due to their fully exposed outer and inner surfaces. PMID:25189769

  12. Reversible amorphization and the catalytically active state of crystalline Co3O4 during oxygen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Arno; Martinez-Moreno, Elias; Teschner, Detre; Chernev, Petko; Gliech, Manuel; de Araújo, Jorge Ferreira; Reier, Tobias; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Water splitting catalysed by earth-abundant materials is pivotal for global-scale production of non-fossil fuels, yet our understanding of the active catalyst structure and reactivity is still insufficient. Here we report on the structurally reversible evolution of crystalline Co3O4 electrocatalysts during oxygen evolution reaction identified using advanced in situ X-ray techniques. At electrode potentials facilitating oxygen evolution, a sub-nanometre shell of the Co3O4 is transformed into an X-ray amorphous CoOx(OH)y which comprises di-μ-oxo-bridged Co3+/4+ ions. Unlike irreversible amorphizations, here, the formation of the catalytically-active layer is reversed by re-crystallization upon return to non-catalytic electrode conditions. The Co3O4 material thus combines the stability advantages of a controlled, stable crystalline material with high catalytic activity, thanks to the structural flexibility of its active amorphous oxides. We propose that crystalline oxides may be tailored for generating reactive amorphous surface layers at catalytic potentials, just to return to their stable crystalline state under rest conditions.

  13. Reversible amorphization and the catalytically active state of crystalline Co3O4 during oxygen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Arno; Martinez-Moreno, Elias; Teschner, Detre; Chernev, Petko; Gliech, Manuel; de Araújo, Jorge Ferreira; Reier, Tobias; Dau, Holger; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water splitting catalysed by earth-abundant materials is pivotal for global-scale production of non-fossil fuels, yet our understanding of the active catalyst structure and reactivity is still insufficient. Here we report on the structurally reversible evolution of crystalline Co3O4 electrocatalysts during oxygen evolution reaction identified using advanced in situ X-ray techniques. At electrode potentials facilitating oxygen evolution, a sub-nanometre shell of the Co3O4 is transformed into an X-ray amorphous CoOx(OH)y which comprises di-μ-oxo-bridged Co3+/4+ ions. Unlike irreversible amorphizations, here, the formation of the catalytically-active layer is reversed by re-crystallization upon return to non-catalytic electrode conditions. The Co3O4 material thus combines the stability advantages of a controlled, stable crystalline material with high catalytic activity, thanks to the structural flexibility of its active amorphous oxides. We propose that crystalline oxides may be tailored for generating reactive amorphous surface layers at catalytic potentials, just to return to their stable crystalline state under rest conditions. PMID:26456525

  14. Confined iron nanowires enhance the catalytic activity of carbon nanotubes in the aerobic oxidation of cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xixian; Yu, Hao; Peng, Feng; Wang, Hongjuan

    2012-07-01

    Inside job: New applications of carbon materials pave the way towards greener chemical syntheses. The encapsulation of metallic Fe within CNTs improves electron transfer between the metal and the CNTs. The resulting material offers a high catalytic activity and easy magnetic separation of catalyst in the heterogeneous selective oxidation of cyclohexane. PMID:22488987

  15. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  16. HIGH-THROUGHPUT IDENTIFICATION OF CATALYTIC REDOX-ACTIVE CYSTEINE RESIDUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cysteine (Cys) residues often play critical roles in proteins; however, identification of their specific functions has been limited to case-by-case experimental approaches. We developed a procedure for high-throughput identification of catalytic redox-active Cys in proteins by se...

  17. Switchable catalytic activity: selenium-containing peptides with redox-controllable self-assembly properties.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiaoming; Cao, Wei; Zheng, Wenting; Wang, Jingyu; Zhang, Xiaoli; Gao, Jie; Yang, Chengbiao; Kong, Deling; Xu, Huaping; Wang, Ling; Yang, Zhimou

    2013-07-22

    Mimicking nature: The reversible formation of self-assembled nanostructures of selenium-containing peptides can be controlled by redox triggers (see scheme, VC = vitamin C). As a consequence, the catalytic activity of these peptides is switchable. These results should lead to the development of nature-mimicking smart materials with promising properties. PMID:23784972

  18. Self-propulsion and interactions of catalytic particles in a chemically active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward J.; Marko, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic "machines," such as catalytic rods or colloids, can self-propel and interact by generating gradients of their substrates. We theoretically investigate the behaviors of such machines in a chemically active environment where their catalytic substrates are continuously synthesized and destroyed, as occurs in living cells. We show how the kinetic properties of the medium modulate self-propulsion and pairwise interactions between machines, with the latter controlled by a tunable characteristic interaction range analogous to the Debye screening length in an electrolytic solution. Finally, we discuss the effective force arising between interacting machines and possible biological applications, such as partitioning of bacterial plasmids.

  19. The nature of catalytically active complexes of Ziegler-type systems based on iron subgroup elements

    SciTech Connect

    Brodskii, A.R.; Noskova, N.F.

    1995-02-01

    Complexation processes that occur in Ziegler-type systems on the basis of the carboxylate compounds of elements belonging mainly to the Iron Subgroup are investigated. The influence of genesis on the composition and structure of the complexes forming in the catalytic systems is demonstrated. A general scheme to describe the interaction of the catalyst components depending on their formation conditions is proposed. It is established that, along with other complexes, polynuclear associated species are present in the catalysts and play a decisive role in the catalytic activity of the investigated systems.

  20. Modeling the heterogeneous catalytic activity of a single nanoparticle using a first passage time distribution formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anusheela; Chaudhury, Srabanti

    2015-11-01

    Metal nanoparticles are heterogeneous catalysts and have a multitude of non-equivalent, catalytic sites on the nanoparticle surface. The product dissociation step in such reaction schemes can follow multiple pathways. Proposed here for the first time is a completely analytical theoretical framework, based on the first passage time distribution, that incorporates the effect of heterogeneity in nanoparticle catalysis explicitly by considering multiple, non-equivalent catalytic sites on the nanoparticle surface. Our results show that in nanoparticle catalysis, the effect of dynamic disorder is manifested even at limiting substrate concentrations in contrast to an enzyme that has only one well-defined active site.

  1. Relative Catalytic Efficiency of ldhL- and ldhD-Encoded Products Is Crucial for Optical Purity of Lactic Acid Produced by Lactobacillus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhaojuan; Sheng, Binbin; Zhang, Haiwei; Gao, Chao; Su, Fei

    2012-01-01

    NAD-dependent l- and d-lactate dehydrogenases coexist in Lactobacillus genomes and may convert pyruvic acid into l-lactic acid and d-lactic acid, respectively. Our findings suggest that the relative catalytic efficiencies of ldhL- and ldhD-encoded products are crucial for the optical purity of lactic acid produced by Lactobacillus strains. PMID:22344644

  2. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human SER/THR Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E.

    2004-01-01

    Serinekhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth. Here we report the 1.6 Angstrom resolution crystal structure of PP5 catalytic domain with metal and phosphate ions in the active site. The structure reveals a mechanism for PPS-mediated catalysis that requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1),-M(sub 2)-His(sup 427)-W(sup 2)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif, and provides a structural basis for the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases placing them among the most powerful catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of PP5 should aid development of specific inhibitors.

  3. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang-Gang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Catalysis by gold supported on reducible oxides has been extensively studied, yet issues such as the nature of the catalytic site and the role of the reducible support remain fiercely debated topics. Here we present ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of an unprecedented dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism for the oxidation of carbon monoxide by ceria-supported gold clusters. The reported dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism results from the ability of the gold cation to strongly couple with the redox properties of the ceria in a synergistic manner, thereby lowering the energy of redox reactions. The gold cation can break away from the gold nanoparticle to catalyse carbon monoxide oxidation, adjacent to the metal/oxide interface and subsequently reintegrate back into the nanoparticle after the reaction is completed. Our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in catalysis. PMID:25735407

  4. Enhancement of biomass conversion in catalytic fast pyrolysis by microwave-assisted formic acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu; Li, Guangyu; Li, Xiangyu; Zhu, Ning; Xiao, Bo; Li, Jian; Wang, Yujue

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated microwave-assisted formic acid (MW-FA) pretreatment as a possible way to improve aromatic production from catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) of lignocellulosic biomass. Results showed that short duration of MW-FA pretreatment (5-10min) could effectively disrupt the recalcitrant structure of beech wood and selectively remove its hemicellulose and lignin components. This increased the accessibility of cellulose component of biomass to subsequent thermal conversion in CFP. Consequently, the MW-FA pretreated beech wood produced 14.0-28.3% higher yields (26.4-29.8C%) for valuable aromatic products in CFP than the untreated control (23.2C%). In addition, the yields of undesired solid residue (char/coke) decreased from 33.1C% for the untreated control to 28.6-29.8C% for the MW-FA pretreated samples. These results demonstrate that MW-FA pretreatment can provide an effective way to improve the product distribution from CFP of lignocellulose. PMID:27176672

  5. Fibrillar networks of glycyrrhizic acid for hybrid nanomaterials with catalytic features.

    PubMed

    Saha, Abhijit; Adamcik, Jozef; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Handschin, Stephan; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-04-27

    Self-assembly of the naturally occurring sweetening agent, glycyrrhizic acid (GA) in water is studied by small-angle X-ray scattering and microscopic techniques. Statistical analysis on atomic force microscopy images reveals the formation of ultralong GA fibrils with uniform thickness of 2.5 nm and right-handed twist with a pitch of 9 nm, independently of GA concentration. Transparent nematic GA hydrogels are exploited to create functional hybrid materials. Two-fold and three-fold hybrids are developed by introducing graphene oxide (GO) and in situ-synthesized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in the hydrogel matrix for catalysis applications. In the presence of GO, the catalytic efficiency of Au NPs in the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol is enhanced by 2.5 times. Gold microplate single crystals are further synthesized in the GA hydrogel, expanding the scope of these hybrids and demonstrating their versatility in materials design. PMID:25759108

  6. A ternary composite based on graphene, hemin, and gold nanorods with high catalytic activity for the detection of cell-surface glycan expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Xin, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Shusheng

    2015-01-26

    A novel graphene-family ternary composite with high catalytic activity has been developed by using simple synthetic methods. The graphene-based ternary composite has abundant positively charged Au NRs, which greatly improved the catalytic properties of the graphene-family of peroxidase mimetics, because of the high electron-transfer rate of graphene and the synergistic interaction of three components. Sensitive detection of glycan expression on K562 cell surface can be achieved with a low detection limit of 10 cells. This finding constitutes a novel graphene-family hybrid nanomaterials-based peroxidase mimetic that is expected to be applied widely in the construction of simple, sensitive, and selective biosensors for nucleic acids and proteins both inside and outside of cells through catalytic reaction of H2 O2 . PMID:25418152

  7. Analyzing the catalytic role of active site residues in the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Salette; Wu, Rui; Krzywda, Karoline; Opalka, Veronika; Chan, Hei; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    A strictly conserved active site arginine residue (αR157) and two histidine residues (αH80 and αH81) located near the active site of the Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1 (CtNHase), were mutated. These mutant enzymes were examined for their ability to bind iron and hydrate acrylonitrile. For the αR157A mutant, the residual activity (k cat = 10 ± 2 s(-1)) accounts for less than 1% of the wild-type activity (k cat = 1100 ± 30 s(-1)) while the K m value is nearly unchanged at 205 ± 10 mM. On the other hand, mutation of the active site pocket αH80 and αH81 residues to alanine resulted in enzymes with k cat values of 220 ± 40 and 77 ± 13 s(-1), respectively, and K m values of 187 ± 11 and 179 ± 18 mM. The double mutant (αH80A/αH81A) was also prepared and provided an enzyme with a k cat value of 132 ± 3 s(-1) and a K m value of 213 ± 61 mM. These data indicate that all three residues are catalytically important, but not essential. X-ray crystal structures of the αH80A/αH81A, αH80W/αH81W, and αR157A mutant CtNHase enzymes were solved to 2.0, 2.8, and 2.5 Å resolutions, respectively. In each mutant enzyme, hydrogen-bonding interactions crucial for the catalytic function of the αCys(104)-SOH ligand are disrupted. Disruption of these hydrogen bonding interactions likely alters the nucleophilicity of the sulfenic acid oxygen and the Lewis acidity of the active site Fe(III) ion. PMID:26077812

  8. Mycobacteriophage Endolysins: Diverse and Modular Enzymes with Multiple Catalytic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Kimberly M.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2012-01-01

    The mycobacterial cell wall presents significant challenges to mycobacteriophages – viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts – because of its unusual structure containing a mycolic acid-rich mycobacterial outer membrane attached to an arabinogalactan layer that is in turn linked to the peptidoglycan. Although little is known about how mycobacteriophages circumvent these barriers during the process of infection, destroying it for lysis at the end of their lytic cycles requires an unusual set of functions. These include Lysin B proteins that cleave the linkage of mycolic acids to the arabinogalactan layer, chaperones required for endolysin delivery to peptidoglycan, holins that regulate lysis timing, and the endolysins (Lysin As) that hydrolyze peptidoglycan. Because mycobacterial peptidoglycan contains atypical features including 3→3 interpeptide linkages, it is not surprising that the mycobacteriophage endolysins also have non-canonical features. We present here a bioinformatic dissection of these lysins and show that they are highly diverse and extensively modular, with an impressive number of domain organizations. Most contain three domains with a novel N-terminal predicted peptidase, a centrally located amidase, muramidase, or transglycosylase, and a C-terminal putative cell wall binding domain. PMID:22470512

  9. Converting Transaldolase into Aldolase through Swapping of the Multifunctional Acid-Base Catalyst: Common and Divergent Catalytic Principles in F6P Aldolase and Transaldolase.

    PubMed

    Sautner, Viktor; Friedrich, Mascha Miriam; Lehwess-Litzmann, Anja; Tittmann, Kai

    2015-07-28

    Transaldolase (TAL) and fructose-6-phosphate aldolase (FSA) both belong to the class I aldolase family and share a high degree of structural similarity and sequence identity. The molecular basis of the different reaction specificities (transferase vs aldolase) has remained enigmatic. A notable difference between the active sites is the presence of either a TAL-specific Glu (Gln in FSA) or a FSA-specific Tyr (Phe in TAL). Both residues seem to have analoguous multifunctional catalytic roles but are positioned at different faces of the substrate locale. We have engineered a TAL double variant (Glu to Gln and Phe to Tyr) with an active site resembling that of FSA. This variant indeed exhibits aldolase activity as its main activity with a catalytic efficiency even larger than that of authentic FSA, while TAL activity is greatly impaired. Structural analysis of this variant in complex with the dihydroxyacetone Schiff base formed upon substrate cleavage identifies the introduced Tyr (genuine in FSA) to catalyze protonation of the central carbanion-enamine intermediate as a key determinant of the aldolase reaction. Our studies pinpoint that the Glu in TAL and the Tyr in FSA, although located at different positions at the active site, similarly act as bona fide acid-base catalysts in numerous catalytic steps, including substrate binding, dehydration of the carbinolamine, and substrate cleavage. We propose that the different spatial positions of the multifunctional Glu in TAL and of the corresponding multifunctional Tyr in FSA relative to the substrate locale are critically controlling reaction specificity through either unfavorable (TAL) or favorable (FSA) geometry of proton transfer onto the common carbanion-enamine intermediate. The presence of both potential acid-base residues, Glu and Tyr, in the active site of TAL has deleterious effects on substrate binding and cleavage, most likely resulting from a differently organized H-bonding network. Large-scale motions of the

  10. Role of conserved Met112 residue in the catalytic activity and stability of ketosteroid isomerase.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyung Jin; Jang, Do Soo; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Hong, Bee Hak; Yun, Young Sung; Shin, Eun Ju; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2016-10-01

    Ketosteroid isomerase (3-oxosteroid Δ(5)-Δ(4)-isomerase, KSI) from Pseudomonas putida catalyzes allylic rearrangement of the 5,6-double bond of Δ(5)-3-ketosteroid to 4,5-position by stereospecific intramolecular transfer of a proton. The active site of KSI is formed by several hydrophobic residues and three catalytic residues (Tyr14, Asp38, and Asp99). In this study, we investigated the role of a hydrophobic Met112 residue near the active site in the catalysis, steroid binding, and stability of KSI. Replacing Met112 with alanine (yields M112A) or leucine (M112L) decreased the kcat by 20- and 4-fold, respectively. Compared with the wild type (WT), M112A and M112L KSIs showed increased KD values for equilenin, an intermediate analogue; these changes suggest that loss of packing at position 112 might lead to unfavorable steroid binding, thereby resulting in decreased catalytic activity. Furthermore, M112A and M112L mutations reduced melting temperature (Tm) by 6.4°C and 2.5°C, respectively. These changes suggest that favorable packing in the core is important for the maintenance of stability in KSI. The M112K mutation decreased kcat by 2000-fold, compared with the WT. In M112K KSI structure, a new salt bridge was formed between Asp38 and Lys112. This bridge could change the electrostatic potential of Asp38, and thereby contribute to the decreased catalytic activity. The M112K mutation also decreased the stability by reducing Tm by 4.1°C. Our data suggest that the Met112 residue may contribute to the catalytic activity and stability of KSI by providing favorable hydrophobic environments and compact packing in the catalytic core. PMID:27375051

  11. Comparison of three microbial hosts for the expression of an active catalytic scFv.

    PubMed

    Robin, Sylvain; Petrov, Kliment; Dintinger, Thierry; Kujumdzieva, Anna; Tellier, Charles; Dion, Michel

    2003-01-01

    Antibodies represent an interesting protein framework on which catalytic functions can be grafted. In previous studies, we have reported the characterization of the catalytic antibody 4B2 obtained on the basis of the "bait and switch" strategy which catalyzes two different chemical reactions: the allylic isomerization of beta,gamma-unsaturated ketones and the Kemp elimination. We have cloned the antibody 4B2 and expressed it as a single-chain Fv (scFv) fragment in different expression systems, Escherichia coli and two yeasts species, in order to elicit the most suitable system to study its catalytic activity. The scFv4B2 was secreted as an active form in the culture medium of Pichia pastoris and Kluyveromyces lactis, which led respectively to 4 and 1.3mg/l after purification. In E. coli, different strategies were investigated to increase the cytoplasmic soluble fraction, which resulted, in all cases, in the expression of a low amount of functional antibodies. By contrast, substantial amount of scFv4B2 could be purified when it was expressed as inclusion bodies (12mg/l) and submitted to an in vitro refolding process. Its catalytic activity was measured and proved to be comparable to that of the whole IgG. However, the instability of the scFv4B2 in solution prevented from an exhaustive characterization of its activity and stabilization of this protein appears to be essential before designing strategies to improve its catalytic activity. PMID:12531284

  12. Green diesel production via catalytic hydrogenation/decarboxylation of triglycerides and fatty acids of vegetable oil and brown grease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, Elvan

    than activated carbon itself for both decarboxylation of oleic acid and hydrogenation of alkenes. In an additional effort to reduce Pd amount in the catalyst, Pd2Co/C catalysts with various Pd content were prepared and the catalytic activity study showed that 0.5 wt% Pd2Co/C catalyst performs even better than a 5 wt% Pd/C catalyst. Pd and Co alloys were very well dispersed and formed fine clusters, which led to a higher active metal surface area and hence favored the decarboxylation of oleic acid. This study showed that an alloy of Pd on carbon with a significantly low Pd content is much more active and selective to diesel hydrocarbons production from an unsaturated fatty acid in super-critical water and may be regarded as a prospective feasible decarboxylation catalyst for the removal of oxygen from vegetable oil/animal fat without the need of additional hydrogen.

  13. Support Effects on the Catalytic Activity of Graphene-Supported Pt13 Nanoclusters for CO Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fampiou, Ioanna; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin

    2015-03-01

    Sub-nanometer Pt nanoparticles supported on graphene are shown to exhibit increased stability, uniform dispersion and increased tolerance to CO poisoning, making them attractive candidates as electrocatalysts for fuel-cell electrodes. A fundamental understanding of support effects on the catalytic activity of the nanoparticles is important for effective catalyst design. In this study, we use density functional theory to investigate support effects on the catalytic activity for CO oxidation on Pt13 nanoclusters supported at point defects (vacancies, divacancies) in graphene in the high CO-coverage regime. Our results suggest that support defects are crucial in stabilizing the clusters on the support at high CO cluster coverage, preventing sintering and catalyst loss. By sampling the CO oxidation reaction at various surface sites on graphene-supported and free Pt13 nanoclusters, we show that strong cluster-support interactions can substantially reduce the barrier for CO oxidation on supported versus free nanoclusters, by more than 0.5 eV. Our results suggest that defect engineering of graphene supports could serve to enhance the catalytic activity of sub-nanometer Pt nanoclusters, allowing for tuning of catalytic properties through cluster-support interactions. We acknowledge support by U.S. DOE under Award Number DE-SC0010610 and computational resources by NERSC, supported by the Office of Science, U.S DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  14. Two-dimensional structure Au nanosheets are super active for the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Cui, Zhimin; Li, Lidong; Guo, Lin; Yang, Shihe

    2015-06-14

    Two-dimensional structure Au nanosheets with a polygon morphology and controlled thicknesses of ∼15 nm, ∼35 nm, and ∼50 nm were successfully synthesized by a one-step solution reduction method. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SEAD) analyses, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to thoroughly study the structure and the formation mechanism of the nanosheets. The catalytic activity of the Au nanosheets was investigated for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. Against all expectation, the Au nanosheets with such a big lateral (more than 1 μm) size exhibited superior catalytic activity on the selective reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) in the presence of NaBH4. On the other hand, the catalytic activity does closely depend on the thickness of the nanosheets; that is, it decreases with increasing thickness. The reaction can be completed in less than 1 min when catalyzed by Au nanosheets about 15 nm thick. The 100% conversion efficiency was further demonstrated after two catalytic cycles with the thinnest Au nanosheets. PMID:25971868

  15. mTOR Ser-2481 autophosphorylation monitors mTORC-specific catalytic activity and clarifies rapamycin mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ghada A; Acosta-Jaquez, Hugo A; Dunlop, Elaine A; Ekim, Bilgen; Maj, Nicole E; Tee, Andrew R; Fingar, Diane C

    2010-03-12

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) Ser/Thr kinase signals in at least two multiprotein complexes distinguished by their different partners and sensitivities to rapamycin. Acute rapamycin inhibits signaling by mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) but not mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), which both promote cell growth, proliferation, and survival. Although mTORC2 regulation remains poorly defined, diverse cellular mitogens activate mTORC1 signaling in a manner that requires sufficient levels of amino acids and cellular energy. Before the identification of distinct mTOR complexes, mTOR was reported to autophosphorylate on Ser-2481 in vivo in a rapamycin- and amino acid-insensitive manner. These results suggested that modulation of mTOR intrinsic catalytic activity does not universally underlie mTOR regulation. Here we re-examine the regulation of mTOR Ser-2481 autophosphorylation (Ser(P)-2481) in vivo by studying mTORC-specific Ser(P)-2481 in mTORC1 and mTORC2, with a primary focus on mTORC1. In contrast to previous work, we find that acute rapamycin and amino acid withdrawal markedly attenuate mTORC1-associated mTOR Ser(P)-2481 in cycling cells. Although insulin stimulates both mTORC1- and mTORC2-associated mTOR Ser(P)-2481 in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent manner, rapamycin acutely inhibits insulin-stimulated mTOR Ser(P)-2481 in mTORC1 but not mTORC2. By interrogating diverse mTORC1 regulatory input, we find that without exception mTORC1-activating signals promote, whereas mTORC1-inhibitory signals decrease mTORC1-associated mTOR Ser(P)-2481. These data suggest that mTORC1- and likely mTORC2-associated mTOR Ser-2481 autophosphorylation directly monitors intrinsic mTORC-specific catalytic activity and reveal that rapamycin inhibits mTORC1 signaling in vivo by reducing mTORC1 catalytic activity. PMID:20022946

  16. Probing the correlations between the defects in metal-organic frameworks and their catalytic activity by an epoxide ring-opening reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyang; Klet, Rachel C; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar

    2016-06-14

    Seven Zr/Hf-based MOFs with different degrees of defects were obtained by modulating the synthetic conditions. The number of missing linkers in these MOFs was calculated based on potentiometric acid-base titration. The number of defects was found to correlate quantitatively with the catalytic activity of UiO-type MOFs for an acid-catalyzed epoxide ring-opening reaction. More importantly, we were able to identify a MOF with inherent defective Zr6 nodes, which showed great activity and regio-selectivity for the epoxide ring-opening reaction. PMID:27229848

  17. Size-dependent catalytic activity and dynamics of gold nanoparticles at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaochun; Xu, Weilin; Liu, Guokun; Panda, Debashis; Chen, Peng

    2010-01-13

    Nanoparticles are important catalysts for petroleum processing, energy conversion, and pollutant removal. As compared to their bulk counterparts, their often superior or new catalytic properties result from their nanometer size, which gives them increased surface-to-volume ratios and chemical potentials. The size of nanoparticles is thus pivotal for their catalytic properties. Here, we use single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to study the size-dependent catalytic activity and dynamics of spherical Au-nanoparticles under ambient solution conditions. By monitoring the catalysis of individual Au-nanoparticles of three different sizes in real time with single-turnover resolution, we observe clear size-dependent activities in both the catalytic product formation reaction and the product dissociation reaction. Within a model of classical thermodynamics, these size-dependent activities of Au-nanoparticles can be accounted for by the changes in the adsorption free energies of the substrate resazurin and the product resorufin because of the nanosize effect. We also observe size-dependent differential selectivity of the Au-nanoparticles between two parallel product dissociation pathways, with larger nanoparticles less selective between the two pathways. The particle size also strongly influences the surface-restructuring-coupled catalytic dynamics; both the catalysis-induced and the spontaneous dynamic surface restructuring occur more readily for smaller Au-nanoparticles due to their higher surface energies. Using a simple thermodynamic model, we analyze the catalysis- and size-dependent dynamic surface restructuring quantitatively; the results provide estimates on the activation energies and time scales of spontaneous dynamic surface restructuring that are fundamental to heterogeneous catalysis in both the nano- and the macro-scale. This study further exemplifies the power of the single-molecule approach in probing the intricate workings of nanoscale catalysts. PMID

  18. Engineering a hyper-catalytic enzyme by photo-activated conformation modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Pratul K

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme engineering for improved catalysis has wide implications. We describe a novel chemical modification of Candida antarctica lipase B that allows modulation of the enzyme conformation to promote catalysis. Computational modeling was used to identify dynamical enzyme regions that impact the catalytic mechanism. Surface loop regions located distal to active site but showing dynamical coupling to the reaction were connected by a chemical bridge between Lys136 and Pro192, containing a derivative of azobenzene. The conformational modulation of the enzyme was achieved using two sources of light that alternated the azobenzene moiety in cis and trans conformations. Computational model predicted that mechanical energy from the conformational fluctuations facilitate the reaction in the active-site. The results were consistent with predictions as the activity of the engineered enzyme was found to be enhanced with photoactivation. Preliminary estimations indicate that the engineered enzyme achieved 8-52 fold better catalytic activity than the unmodulated enzyme.

  19. Enhanced catalytic activity of gold nanoparticle-carbon nanotube hybrids for influenza virus detection.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syed Rahin; Kim, Jeonghyo; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Lee, Jaebeom; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-11-15

    Multifunctional nanohybrids have created new and valuable opportunities for a wide range of catalysis and biotechnology applications. Here, we present a relatively simple method for producing nanohybrids composed of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that does not require an acidic pre-treatment of the CNTs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra revealed that Au NPs bonded to the CNT surface. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) revealed a stronger signal from Au-CNT nanohybrids than from pristine CNTs. The Au-CNT nanohybrids showed catalytic activity in the oxidation of 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB) by H2O2 and developed a unique blue colour in aqueous solution. Because of the enhanced peroxidase-like activity of these Au-CNT nanohybrids, they were selected for use as part of a highly sensitive colorimetric test for influenza virus A (H3N2). In the presence of influenza A virus (H3N2) in the test system (specific antibody-conjugated Au CNT nanohybrids-TMB-H2O2), a deep blue colour developed, the optical density of which was dependent on the virus concentration (10-50,000 PFU/ml). The limit of detection of this proposed method was 3.4 PFU/ml, a limit 385 times lower than that of conventional ELISA (1312 PFU/ml). The sensitivity of this test was also 500 times greater than that of commercial immunochromatography kits. The nanohybrid preparation and colorimetric detection methods reported herein may be easily adapted to other nanohybrid structures with enzyme mimetic properties for broader applications in catalysis and nanobiotechnology. PMID:27209577

  20. Unprecedented Catalytic Wet Oxidation of Glucose to Succinic Acid Induced by the Addition of n-Butylamine to a Ru(III) Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Podolean, Iunia; Rizescu, Cristina; Bala, Camelia; Rotariu, Lucian; Parvulescu, Vasile I; Coman, Simona M; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2016-09-01

    A new pathway for the catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of glucose is described. Employing a cationic Ru@MNP catalyst, succinic acid is obtained in unprecedently high yield (87.5 %) for a >99.9 % conversion of glucose, most probably through a free radical mechanism combined with catalytic didehydroxylation of vicinal diols and hydrogenation of the resulted unsaturated intermediate. PMID:27511900

  1. Gold Sulfinyl Mesoionic Carbenes: Synthesis, Structure, and Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Frutos, María; Avello, Marta G; Viso, Alma; Fernández de la Pradilla, Roberto; de la Torre, María C; Sierra, Miguel A; Gornitzka, Heinz; Hemmert, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Gold mesoionic carbenes having a chiral sulfoxide group attached to the C4 position of the five membered ring have been prepared and tested as catalysts in the cycloisomerization of enynes. These new catalysts are very efficient, with the sulfoxide moiety playing a key role in their activity and the N1-substituent in control of the regioselectivity of these processes. PMID:27403763

  2. Flexible macrocycles as versatile supports for catalytically active metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jason D; Gagnon, Kevin J; Teat, Simon J; McIntosh, Ruaraidh D

    2016-07-12

    Here we present three structurally diverse clusters stabilised by the same macrocyclic polyphenol; t-butylcalix[8]arene. This work demonstrates the range of conformations the flexible ligand is capable of adopting, highlighting its versatility in metal coordination. In addition, a Ti complex displays activity for the ring-opening polymerisation of lactide. PMID:26892948

  3. Catalytic conversion of furfural into a 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid-based polyester with total carbon utilization.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tao; Deng, Jin; Xu, Qing; Zuo, Yong; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2013-01-01

    One divided into two combined into one: The catalytic conversion of furfural into a 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid-based polyester, linked by the disproportionation of furoate to furan and 2,5-furandicarboxylate, is reported. In this manner, all carbons are utilized, demonstrating the success of combining a platform molecule from C(5) sugars (furfural) to one from C(6) sugars (2,5-FDCA). PMID:23239596

  4. Catalytic activity of baker's yeast in a mediatorless microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Enas Taha; Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Nakagawa, Nobuyoshi

    2012-08-01

    The catalytic activity of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a biocatalyst was investigated in a mediatorless microbial fuel cell. The yeast cells that adhered on the anode surface were the active biocatalyst for glucose oxidation in a mediatorless biofuel cell, suggesting that the electron transfer took place through the surface confined species. The species in the anolyte solution including the dispersed yeast cells did not take a part in the electron transfer and thus in the power generation. PMID:22357359

  5. Development of High Activity, Coal-Derived, Promoted Catalytic Systems for NOx Reduction at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Calo

    1998-05-01

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics.

  6. Esterification and Transesterification of greases to fatty acid methyl esters with highly active diphenylamine salts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diphenylamine sulfate (DPAS) and diphenylamine hydrochloride (DPACl) salts were found to be highly active catalysts for esterification and transesterification of inexpensive greases to fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). In the presence of catalytic amounts of DPAS or DPACl and excess methanol, the fr...

  7. Chemoselective Boron-Catalyzed Nucleophilic Activation of Carboxylic Acids for Mannich-Type Reactions.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuya; Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Nagai, Hideoki; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-06-10

    The carboxyl group (COOH) is an omnipresent functional group in organic molecules, and its direct catalytic activation represents an attractive synthetic method. Herein, we describe the first example of a direct catalytic nucleophilic activation of carboxylic acids with BH3·SMe2, after which the acids are able to act as carbon nucleophiles, i.e. enolates, in Mannich-type reactions. This reaction proceeds with a mild organic base (DBU) and exhibits high levels of functional group tolerance. The boron catalyst is highly chemoselective toward the COOH group, even in the presence of other carbonyl moieties, such as amides, esters, or ketones. Furthermore, this catalytic method can be extended to highly enantioselective Mannich-type reactions by using a (R)-3,3'-I2-BINOL-substituted boron catalyst. PMID:26011419

  8. Essential Nonredundant Function of the Catalytic Activity of Histone Deacetylase 2 in Mouse Development

    PubMed Central

    Hagelkruys, Astrid; Mattes, Katharina; Moos, Verena; Rennmayr, Magdalena; Ringbauer, Manuela; Sawicka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) HDAC1 and HDAC2 play partially redundant roles in the regulation of gene expression and mouse development. As part of multisubunit corepressor complexes, these two deacetylases exhibit both enzymatic and nonenzymatic functions. To examine the impact of the catalytic activities of HDAC1 and HDAC2, we generated knock-in mice expressing catalytically inactive isoforms, which are still incorporated into the HDAC1/HDAC2 corepressor complexes. Surprisingly, heterozygous mice expressing catalytically inactive HDAC2 die within a few hours after birth, while heterozygous HDAC1 mutant mice are indistinguishable from wild-type littermates. Heterozygous HDAC2 mutant mice show an unaltered composition but reduced associated deacetylase activity of corepressor complexes and exhibit a more severe phenotype than HDAC2-null mice. They display changes in brain architecture accompanied by premature expression of the key regulator protein kinase C delta. Our study reveals a dominant negative effect of catalytically inactive HDAC2 on specific corepressor complexes resulting in histone hyperacetylation, transcriptional derepression, and, ultimately, perinatal lethality. PMID:26598605

  9. Spectroscopic properties and the catalytic activity of new organo-lead supramolecular coordination polymer containing quinoxaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etaiw, Safaa El-din H.; Abdou, Safaa N.

    2015-01-01

    The 3D-supramolecular coordination polymer (SCP) 3∞[ Cu2(CN)3(Me3Pb)(qox)], 1, as the first example of the CuCN SCP containing the (Me3Pb) fragment, was explored to investigate its catalytic and photo-catalytic activities. The structure of 1 contains two chemically identical but crystallographically different [Cu2(CN)3ṡMe3Pbṡqox]2 units with four Cu(I) sites assuming distorted TP-3 geometry. Two non-linear chains of equal abundance are formed producing corrugated parallel chains which are connected laterally by quinoxaline creating 2D-layers which are arranged parallel in an (AB⋯AB⋯AB)n fashion forming 3D-network. IR, mass, electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra are also investigated. The SCP 1 is diamagnetic and exhibits good catalytic and photo-catalytic activities for the degradation of methylene blue (MB). The reaction is first order with respect to MB dye. The irradiation of the reaction with UV-light enhanced the rate of MB mineralization. The efficiency of recycled the 1 and the mechanism of degradation of MB dye were investigated.

  10. Spectroscopic properties and the catalytic activity of new organo-lead supramolecular coordination polymer containing quinoxaline.

    PubMed

    Etaiw, Safaa El-din H; Abdou, Safaa N

    2015-01-25

    The 3D-supramolecular coordination polymer (SCP) (3)∞[ Cu2(CN)3(Me3Pb)(qox)], 1, as the first example of the CuCN SCP containing the (Me3Pb) fragment, was explored to investigate its catalytic and photo-catalytic activities. The structure of 1 contains two chemically identical but crystallographically different [Cu2(CN)3⋅Me3Pb⋅qox]2 units with four Cu(I) sites assuming distorted TP-3 geometry. Two non-linear chains of equal abundance are formed producing corrugated parallel chains which are connected laterally by quinoxaline creating 2D-layers which are arranged parallel in an (AB⋯AB⋯AB)n fashion forming 3D-network. IR, mass, electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra are also investigated. The SCP 1 is diamagnetic and exhibits good catalytic and photo-catalytic activities for the degradation of methylene blue (MB). The reaction is first order with respect to MB dye. The irradiation of the reaction with UV-light enhanced the rate of MB mineralization. The efficiency of recycled the 1 and the mechanism of degradation of MB dye were investigated. PMID:25124847

  11. Role of hydroxyl groups on the stability and catalytic activity of Au clusters on rutile surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxyls are present as surface terminations of transition metal oxides under ambient conditions and may modify the properties of supported catalysts. We perform first-principles density functional theory calculations to investigate the role of hydroxyls on the catalytic activity of supported gold clusters on TiO{sub 2} (rutile). We find that they have a long-range effect increasing the adhesion of gold clusters on rutile. While hydroxyls make one gold atom more electronegative, a more complex charge-transfer scenario is observed on larger clusters which are important for catalytic applications. This enhances the molecular adsorption and coadsorption energies of CO and O{sub 2}, thereby increasing the catalytic activity of gold clusters for CO oxidation, consistent with reported experiments. Hydroxyls at the interface between gold and rutile surface are most important to this process, even when not directly bound to gold. As such, accurate models of catalytic processes on gold and other catalysts should include the effect of surface hydroxyls.

  12. An ultra-low Pd loading nanocatalyst with efficient catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yunxia; Xi, Jiangbo; Zhang, Zheye; Xiao, Junwu; Xiao, Fei; Qian, Lihua; Wang, Shuai

    2015-03-01

    An ultra-low Pd loading nanocatalyst is synthesized by a convenient solution route of photochemical reduction and aqueous chemical growth. The modification of nanocatalyst structures is investigated through changing morphologies of Pd nanoclusters on the surface of ZnO nanorods. A significant enhancement in photocatalytic properties has been achieved by decorating a trace amount of Pd clusters (0.05 at%) on the surface of ZnO nanorods. The reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) is applied to demonstrate multiple catalytic activities in the Pd-ZnO hybrid nanocatalyst, which also provides a better understanding of the relationship between the unique nanoconfigured structure and catalytic performance.An ultra-low Pd loading nanocatalyst is synthesized by a convenient solution route of photochemical reduction and aqueous chemical growth. The modification of nanocatalyst structures is investigated through changing morphologies of Pd nanoclusters on the surface of ZnO nanorods. A significant enhancement in photocatalytic properties has been achieved by decorating a trace amount of Pd clusters (0.05 at%) on the surface of ZnO nanorods. The reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) is applied to demonstrate multiple catalytic activities in the Pd-ZnO hybrid nanocatalyst, which also provides a better understanding of the relationship between the unique nanoconfigured structure and catalytic performance. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00599j

  13. TRAIL-induced caspase/p38 activation is responsible for the increased catalytic and invasive activities of Akt

    PubMed Central

    SUN, BO K.; KIM, JOO-HANG; NGUYEN, HOAN N.; KIM, SO Y.; OH, SEEUN; LEE, YONG J.; SONG, JAE J.

    2010-01-01

    We previously observed that TRAIL induces acquired TRAIL resistance coinciding with increased Akt phosphorylation brought about by the Src-PI3K-Akt signaling pathways and mediated by c-Cbl. c-Cbl, a ubiquitously expressed cytoplasmic adaptor protein, is simultaneously involved in the rapid degradation of TRAIL receptors and Akt phosphorylation during TRAIL treatment. Here, we show that Akt phosphorylation is not exclusively responsible for acquired TRAIL resistance. Akt catalytic activation is known to increase during metabolic oxidative stress, but we show that TRAIL also dramatically induces the catalytic activation of Akt in TRAIL-sensitive cells, but not in TRAIL-resistant cells. This suggests that Akt catalytic activation during TRAIL-induced apoptosis is likely to play a compensatory role in the maintenance of cell homeostasis. In addition, activated p38 and phosphorylated HSP27 were found to act as downstream effector molecules of p38 during TRAIL treatment and were shown to be responsible for increased Akt catalytic and invasive activities. PMID:21109947

  14. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  15. Single Amino Acid Substitution in the Pullulanase of Klebsiella variicola for Enhancing Thermostability and Catalytic Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Mu, Guo Cui; Nie, Yao; Mu, Xiao Qing; Xu, Yan; Xiao, Rong

    2015-07-01

    Based on conserved sites and homology modeling analysis, the residue Phe581 in the Klebsiella variicola SHN-1 pullulanase was selected as the potential thermostability-related site and its role on thermostability and activity was investigated by site-saturated mutagenesis. Compared with the wild-type pullulanase, the optimum temperature of the mutants including F581L, F581Q, F581R, F581T, F581V, and F581Y was increased from 53 to 56 °C, and correspondingly the half lives of these mutants at 55 °C were increased by 4.20, 3.70, 1.90, 7.16, 3.01, and 1.75 min, respectively. By modeling the structure of the pullulanase, formation of more hydrogen bonds by single-site substitution was supposed to be responsible for the improvement of thermostability. Of these mutants, furthermore, F581L and F581V exhibited higher values of V max and k cat/K m, compared with the wild-type enzyme. Therefore, the residue Phe581 was identified as an important site relevant to the activity and thermostability of the pullulanase of K. variicola, and by mutation at this single site, the mutated enzymes with enhanced thermostability and catalytic efficiency were achieved consequently. PMID:26018345

  16. Novel Cage-Like Hexanuclear Nickel(II) Silsesquioxane. Synthesis, Structure, and Catalytic Activity in Oxidations with Peroxides.

    PubMed

    Bilyachenko, Alexey N; Yalymov, Alexey I; Shul'pina, Lidia S; Mandelli, Dalmo; Korlyukov, Alexander A; Vologzhanina, Anna V; Es'kova, Marina A; Shubina, Elena S; Levitsky, Mikhail M; Shul'pin, Georgiy B

    2016-01-01

    New hexanuclear nickel(II) silsesquioxane [(PhSiO1.5)12(NiO)₆(NaCl)] (1) was synthesized as its dioxane-benzonitrile-water complex (PhSiO1,5)12(NiO)₆(NaCl)(C₄H₈O₂)13(PhCN)₂(H₂O)₂ and studied by X-ray and topological analysis. The compound exhibits cylinder-like type of molecular architecture and represents very rare case of polyhedral complexation of metallasilsesquioxane with benzonitrile. Complex 1 exhibited catalytic activity in activation of such small molecules as light alkanes and alcohols. Namely, oxidation of alcohols with tert-butylhydroperoxide and alkanes with meta-chloroperoxybenzoic acid. The oxidation of methylcyclohexane gave rise to the isomeric ketones and unusual distribution of alcohol isomers. PMID:27213319

  17. Enhancement of catalytic activity of platinum-based nanoparticles towards electrooxidation of ethanol through interfacial modification with heteropolymolybdates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barczuk, Piotr J.; Lewera, Adam; Miecznikowski, Krzysztof; Zurowski, Artur; Kulesza, Pawel J.

    As evidenced from the increase of electrocatalytic currents measured under voltammetric and chronoamperometric conditions, the activity of bimetallic Pt-Ru and Pt-Sn nanoparticles towards oxidation of ethanol is increased by modification of their surfaces with ultra-thin films of phosphododecamolybdic acid (H 3PMo 12O 40). The enhancement effect has been most pronounced in a case of heteropolymolybdate-modified carbon-supported Pt-Sn catalysts. Independent high-resolution XPS measurements indicate the ability of heteropolymolybdates to stabilize tin (in bimetallic Pt-Sn particles) at higher oxidation states (presumably as tin oxo species). The overall activation effect may also be ascribed to changes in the morphology of catalytic films following modification with heteropolymolybdates. Presence of the polyoxometallate is also likely to increase of the interfacial population of reactive oxo groups in the vicinity of platinum centers.

  18. [A structure-activity study of a catalytic antiidiotypic antibody to the human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, E S; Koralevski, F; Titov, M I; Demin, A V; Kozyr', A V; Kolesnikov, A V; Tramontano, A; Paul, S; Thomas, D; Gabibov, A G; Gnuchev, N V; Friboulet, A

    2002-01-01

    The catalytic monoclonal antibody 9A8 (MA 9A8), antiidiotypic to the antibody AE-2 (MA AE2) produced to the active site of acetyl cholinesterase from human erythrocytes, was subjected to a structure-function study. The specific binding of MA 9A8 to MA AE2 (K 2.26 x 10(9) M-1) was shown by the method of surface plasmon resonance, and the functional activity of MA 9A8 was demonstrated. Unlike acetyl cholinesterase, this antibody specifically reacted with the irreversible phosphonate inhibitors of esterases. A peptide map of MA 9A8 was analyzed by MALDI mass spectrometry. The Ser99 residue of its heavy chain was shown to be within the active site of the catalytic antibody. A computer modeling of the MA 9A8 active site suggested the existence of a catalytic dyad formed by Ser99 and His35. A comparison of the tertiary structures of the MA 9A8 and the 17E8 monoclonal antibody, which also exhibited an esterase activity and was produced to the stable analogue of the reaction transition state, indicated a practically complete coincidence of the structures of their presumed active sites. PMID:11962233

  19. Plant lipases: biocatalyst aqueous environment in relation to optimal catalytic activity in lipase-catalyzed synthesis reactions.

    PubMed

    Caro, Yanis; Pina, Michel; Turon, Fabrice; Guilbert, Stephane; Mougeot, Estelle; Fetsch, David V; Attwool, Philip; Graille, Jean

    2002-03-20

    Adsorption and desorption isotherms of two commercial enzyme preparations of papain and bromelain were determined with a Dynamic Vapor System. The Guggenheim-Anderson-deBoer (GAB) modeling of the obtained sorption isotherms allowed the definition of different levels of hydration of those samples. Afterward, these enzyme preparations were used as biocatalysts in water and solvent-free esterification and alcoholysis reactions. The evolution of the obtained fatty acid ester level as a function of the initial hydration level of the biocatalyst, i.e., thermodynamic water activity (a(w)) and water content, was studied. The results show an important correlation between the initial hydration level of the biocatalyst and its catalytic activity during the lipase-catalyzed synthesis reactions. Thus, the Carica papaya lipase (crude papain preparation) catalytic activity is highly dependent on the biocatalyst hydration state. The optimized synthesis reaction yield is obtained when the a(w) value of the enzyme preparation is stabilized at 0.22, which corresponds to 2% water content. This optimal level of hydration occurs on the linear part of the biocatalyst's sorption isotherm, where the water molecules can form a mono- or multiple layer with the protein network. The synthesis reaction yield decreases when the a(w) of the preparation is higher than 0.22, because the excess water molecules modify the system equilibrium leading to the reverse and competitive reaction, i.e., hydrolysis. These results show also that an optimal storage condition for the highly hydrophilic crude papain preparation is a relative humidity strictly lower than 70% to avoid an irreversible structural transition leading to a useless biocatalyst. Concerning the bromelain preparation, no effect of the hydration level on the catalytic activity during esterification reactions was observed. This biocatalyst has too weak a catalytic activity which makes it difficult to observe any differences. Furthermore, the

  20. Effects of hydrogen bonds in association with flavin and substrate in flavoenzyme d-amino acid oxidase. The catalytic and structural roles of Gly313 and Thr317.

    PubMed

    Setoyama, Chiaki; Nishina, Yasuzo; Tamaoki, Haruhiko; Mizutani, Hisashi; Miyahara, Ikuko; Hirotsu, Ken; Shiga, Kiyoshi; Miura, Retsu

    2002-01-01

    According to the three-dimensional structure of a porcine kidney D-amino acid oxidase-substrate (D-leucine) complex model, the G313 backbone carbonyl recognizes the substrate amino group by hydrogen bonding and the side-chain hydroxyl of T317 forms a hydrogen bond with C(2)=O of the flavin moiety of FAD [Miura et al. (1997) J. Biochem. 122, 825-833]. We have designed and expressed the G313A and T317A mutants and compared their enzymatic and spectroscopic properties with those of the wild type. The G313A mutant shows decreased activities to various D-amino acids, but the pattern of substrate specificity is different from that of the wild type. The results imply that the hydrogen bond between the G313 backbone carbonyl and the substrate amino group plays important roles in substrate recognition and in defining the substrate specificity of D-amino acid oxidase. The T317A mutant shows a decreased affinity for FAD. The steady-state kinetic measurements indicate diminished activities of T317A to substrate D-amino acids. The transient kinetic parameters measured by stopped-flow spectroscopy revealed that T317 plays key roles in stabilizing the purple intermediate, a requisite intermediate in the oxidative half-reaction, and in enhancing the release of the product from the active site, thereby optimizing the overall catalytic process of D-amino acid oxidase. PMID:11754736

  1. Comparative catalytic activity of PET track-etched membranes with embedded silver and gold nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashentseva, Anastassiya; Borgekov, Daryn; Kislitsin, Sergey; Zdorovets, Maxim; Migunova, Anastassiya

    2015-12-01

    Irradiated by heavy ions nanoporous polyethylene terephthalate track-etched membranes (PET TeMs) after +15Kr84 ions bombardment (1.75 MeV/nucl with the ion fluency of 1 × 109 cm-2) and sequential etching was applied in this research as a template for development of composites with catalytically enriched properties. A highly ordered silver and gold nanotubes arrays were embedded in 100 nm pores of PET TeMs via electroless deposition technique at 4 °C during 1 h. All "as-prepared" composites were examined for catalytic activity using reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) by sodium borohydride as a common reaction to test metallic nanostructures catalysts. The effect of temperature on the catalytic activity was investigated in range of 292-313 K and activation energy were calculated. Kapp of Ag/PET composites linearly increase with an increase of the temperature thus normal Arrhenius behavior have been seen and the activation energy was calculated to be 42.13 kJ/mol. Au/PET composites exhibit not only more powerful catalytic activity but also non-linear dependence of rate constant from temperature. Kapp increased with increasing temperature throughout the 292-308 K temperature range; the reaction had an activation energy 65.32 kJ/mol. In range 311-313 K rate constant dramatically decreased and the apparent activation energy at this temperature rang was -91.44 kJ/mol due some structural changes, i.e. agglomeration of Au nanoparticles on the surface of composite.

  2. Highly stable and re-dispersible nano Cu hydrosols with sensitively size-dependent catalytic and antibacterial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Pengli; Li, Gang; Wang, Wenzhao; Chen, Liang; Lu, Daoqiang Daniel; Sun, Rong; Zhou, Feng; Wong, Chingping

    2015-08-01

    Highly stable monodispersed nano Cu hydrosols were facilely prepared by an aqueous chemical reduction method through selecting copper hydroxide (Cu(OH)2) as the copper precursor, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and ethanol amine (EA) as the complexing agents, and hydrazine hydrate as the reducing agent. The size of the obtained Cu colloidal nanoparticles was controlled from 0.96 to 26.26 nm by adjusting the dosage of the copper precursor. Moreover, the highly stable nano Cu hydrosols could be easily concentrated and re-dispersed in water meanwhile maintaining good dispersibility. A model catalytic reaction of reducing p-nitrophenol with NaBH4 in the presence of nano Cu hydrosols with different sizes was performed to set up the relationship between the apparent kinetic rate constant (kapp) and the particle size of Cu catalysts. The experimental results indicate that the corresponding kapp showed an obvious size-dependency. Calculations revealed that kapp was directly proportional to the surface area of Cu catalyst nanoparticles, and also proportional to the reciprocal of the particle size based on the same mass of Cu catalysts. This relationship might be a universal principle for predicting and assessing the catalytic efficiency of Cu nanoparticles. The activation energy (Ea) of this catalytic reaction when using 0.96 nm Cu hydrosol as a catalyst was calculated to be 9.37 kJ mol-1, which is considered an extremely low potential barrier. In addition, the synthesized nano Cu hydrosols showed size-dependent antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and the minimal inhibitory concentration of the optimal sample was lower than 5.82 μg L-1.Highly stable monodispersed nano Cu hydrosols were facilely prepared by an aqueous chemical reduction method through selecting copper hydroxide (Cu(OH)2) as the copper precursor, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and ethanol amine (EA) as the complexing agents, and hydrazine hydrate as the reducing agent. The size of the

  3. The Catalytic Scaffold fo the Haloalkanoic Acid Dehalogenase Enzyme Superfamily Acts as a Mold for the Trigonal Bipyramidal Transition State

    SciTech Connect

    Lu,Z.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Allen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of new catalytic activities and specificities within an enzyme superfamily requires the exploration of sequence space for adaptation to a new substrate with retention of those elements required to stabilize key intermediates/transition states. Here, we propose that core residues in the large enzyme family, the haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase enzyme superfamily (HADSF) form a 'mold' in which the trigonal bipyramidal transition states formed during phosphoryl transfer are stabilized by electrostatic forces. The vanadate complex of the hexose phosphate phosphatase BT4131 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 (HPP) determined at 1.00 Angstroms resolution via X-ray crystallography assumes a trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry with the nucleophilic Asp-8 and one oxygen ligand at the apical position. Remarkably, the tungstate in the complex determined to 1.03 Angstroms resolution assumes the same coordination geometry. The contribution of the general acid/base residue Asp-10 in the stabilization of the trigonal bipyramidal species via hydrogen-bond formation with the apical oxygen atom is evidenced by the 1.52 Angstroms structure of the D10A mutant bound to vanadate. This structure shows a collapse of the trigonal bipyramidal geometry with displacement of the water molecule formerly occupying the apical position. Furthermore, the 1.07 Angstroms resolution structure of the D10A mutant complexed with tungstate shows the tungstate to be in a typical 'phosphate-like' tetrahedral configuration. The analysis of 12 liganded HADSF structures deposited in the protein data bank (PDB) identified stringently conserved elements that stabilize the trigonal bipyramidal transition states by engaging in favorable electrostatic interactions with the axial and equatorial atoms of the transferring phosphoryl group.

  4. Fabrication of Pt-loaded NiCo nanochains with superior catalytic dehydrogenation activity.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming; Wu, Qingnan; Peng, Jin; Wu, Qingsheng; Wang, Chenxiang

    2014-02-15

    A new magnetic Pt-loaded NiCo nanochain, with the diameter from 80 nm to 120 nm, has been prepared through microwave-induced assembly process followed by the galvanic displacement performance. Pt nanoparticles are distributed on the surface of NiCo nanochains. The products are investigated as hydrolytic dehydrogenation catalyst for potential hydrogen energy applications. Compared with NiCo nanochains, the Pt-loaded NiCo nanochains present exceedingly high catalytic activity toward the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane aqueous under ambient atmosphere at room temperature, where the Ni16Co80/Pt4 nanochains exhibit high catalytic activity with a lower activation energy of 45.72 kJ mol(-1) and a superior dehydrogenation rate of 1.17 × 10(4) mL min(-1) g(-1), suggesting the potential application in hydrogen fuel and chemical industry. PMID:24370425

  5. Extra carbohydrate binding module contributes to the processivity and catalytic activity of a non-modular hydrolase family 5 endoglucanase from Fomitiporia mediterranea MF3/22.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ronghua; Hu, Yimei; Long, Liangkun; Wang, Jing; Ding, Shaojun

    2016-09-01

    FmEG from Fomitiporia mediterranea is a non-modular endoglucanase composed of a 24-amino acids extension and 13-amino acids linker-like peptide at the N-terminus and a 312-amino acids GH5 catalytic domain (CD) at the C-terminus. In this study, six FmEG derivatives with deletion of N-terminal fragments or fusion with an extra family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM1) was constructed in order to evaluate the contribution of CBM1 to FmEG processivity and catalytic activity. FmEG showed a weak processivity and released cellobiose (G2) and cellotriose (G3) as main end products, and cellotriose (G4) as minor end product from filter paper (FP), but more amount of G4 was released from regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC). All derivatives had similar activity on carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) with the same optimal pH (7.0) and temperature (50°C). However, fusing an extra CBM1 to FmEG△24 or FmEG△37 with flexible peptide significantly improved its processivity and catalytic activity to FP and RAC. Overall, 1.79- and 1.84-fold increases in the soluble/insoluble product ratio on FP, and 1.38- and 1.39-fold increases on RAC, compared to FmEG△24, were recorded for CBM1-FmEG△24 and CBM1-linker-FmEG△24, respectively. Meanwhile, they displayed 2.64- and 2.67-fold more activity on RAC, and 1.68- and 1.77-fold on FP, respectively. Similar improvement was also obtained for CBM1-linker-FmEG△37 as compared with FmEG△37. Interestingly, fusion of an extra CBM1 with FmEG also caused an alteration of cleavage pattern on insoluble celluloses. Our results suggest that such improvements in processivity and catalytic activity may arise from CBM1 binding affinity. The N-terminal 24- or 37-amino acids may serve as linker for sufficient spatial separation of the two domains required for processivity and catalytic activity. In addition, deletion of the N-terminal 24- or 37-amino acids led to significant reduction in thermostability but not the enzymatic activity. PMID:27444328

  6. Enhanced thermostability of mesophilic endoglucanase Z with a high catalytic activity at active temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jung; Joo, Ji Eun; Jeon, Sang Duck; Hyeon, Jeong Eun; Kim, Seung Wook; Um, Young Soon; Han, Sung Ok

    2016-05-01

    This is the first study for therrmostable mutants of mesophilic endoglucanase EngZ from Clostridium cellulovorans using by site-directed mutagenesis. K94R, S365P and their double mutant K94R/S365P had a wide range of active temperatures (30-60°C). In addition, the optimal temperature of K94R/S365P was increased by 7.5°C. K94R/S365P retained 78.3% relative activity at 70°C, while the wild type retained only 5.8%. Especially, K94R/S365P remained 45.1-fold higher activity than the wild type at 70°C. In addition, K94R/S365P was 3.1-fold higher activity than the wild type at 42.5°C, which is the optimal temperature of the wild type. K94R/S365P showed also stimulated in 2.5-fold lower concentration of CaCl2 and delayed aggregation temperature in the presence of CaCl2 compared to the wild type. In pH stability, K94R/S365P was not influenced, but the optimum pH was transferred from pH 7 to pH 6. In long-term hydrolysis, K94R/S365P reduced the newly released reducing sugar yields after 12h reaction; however, the yields consistently increased until 72h. Finally, the total reducing sugar of K94R/S365P was 5.0-fold higher than the wild type at 50°C, pH6. EngZ (K94R/S365P) can support information to develop thermostability of GH9 endoglucanase with a high catalytic efficiency as the potential industrial bioprocess candidate. PMID:26808019

  7. Reversible Regulation of Catalytic Activity of Gold Nanoparticles with DNA Nanomachines

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peipei; Jia, Sisi; Pan, Dun; Wang, Lihua; Gao, Jimin; Lu, Jianxin; Shi, Jiye; Tang, Zisheng; Liu, Huajie

    2015-01-01

    Reversible catalysis regulation has gained much attention and traditional strategies utilized reversible ligand coordination for switching catalyst’s conformations. However, it remains challenging to regulate the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticle-based catalysts. Herein, we report a new DNA nanomachine-driven reversible nano-shield strategy for circumventing this problem. The basic idea is based on the fact that the conformational change of surface-attached DNA nanomachines will cause the variation of the exposed surface active area on metal nanoparticles. As a proof-of-concept study, we immobilized G-rich DNA strands on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) which have glucose oxidase (GOx) like activity. Through the reversible conformational change of the G-rich DNA between a flexible single-stranded form and a compact G-quadruplex form, the catalytic activity of AuNPs has been regulated reversibly for several cycles. This strategy is reliable and robust, which demonstrated the possibility of reversibly adjusting catalytic activity with external surface coverage switching, rather than coordination interactions. PMID:26395968

  8. Phosphorylation of Leukotriene C4 Synthase at Serine 36 Impairs Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shabbir; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Thulasingam, Madhuranayaki; Tholander, Fredrik; Bergman, Tomas; Zubarev, Roman; Wetterholm, Anders; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes; Haeggström, Jesper Z

    2016-08-26

    Leukotriene C4 synthase (LTC4S) catalyzes the formation of the proinflammatory lipid mediator leukotriene C4 (LTC4). LTC4 is the parent molecule of the cysteinyl leukotrienes, which are recognized for their pathogenic role in asthma and allergic diseases. Cellular LTC4S activity is suppressed by PKC-mediated phosphorylation, and recently a downstream p70S6k was shown to play an important role in this process. Here, we identified Ser(36) as the major p70S6k phosphorylation site, along with a low frequency site at Thr(40), using an in vitro phosphorylation assay combined with mass spectrometry. The functional consequences of p70S6k phosphorylation were tested with the phosphomimetic mutant S36E, which displayed only about 20% (20 μmol/min/mg) of the activity of WT enzyme (95 μmol/min/mg), whereas the enzyme activity of T40E was not significantly affected. The enzyme activity of S36E increased linearly with increasing LTA4 concentrations during the steady-state kinetics analysis, indicating poor lipid substrate binding. The Ser(36) is located in a loop region close to the entrance of the proposed substrate binding pocket. Comparative molecular dynamics indicated that Ser(36) upon phosphorylation will pull the first luminal loop of LTC4S toward the neighboring subunit of the functional homotrimer, thereby forming hydrogen bonds with Arg(104) in the adjacent subunit. Because Arg(104) is a key catalytic residue responsible for stabilization of the glutathione thiolate anion, this phosphorylation-induced interaction leads to a reduction of the catalytic activity. In addition, the positional shift of the loop and its interaction with the neighboring subunit affect active site access. Thus, our mutational and kinetic data, together with molecular simulations, suggest that phosphorylation of Ser(36) inhibits the catalytic function of LTC4S by interference with the catalytic machinery. PMID:27365393

  9. When ruthenia met titania: Achieving extraordinary catalytic activity at low temperature by nanostructuring of oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Graciani, J.; Stacchiola, D.; Yang, F.; Evans, J.; Vidal, A. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Sanz, J. F.

    2015-09-09

    Nanostructured RuOx/TiO2(110) catalysts have a remarkable catalytic activity for CO oxidation at temperatures in the range of 350–375 K. Furthermore, the RuO2(110) surface has no activity. The state-of-the-art DFT calculations indicate that the main reasons for such an impressive improvement in the catalytic activity are: (i) a decrease of the diffusion barrier of adsorbed O atoms by around 40%, from 1.07 eV in RuO2(110) to 0.66 eV in RuOx/TiO2(110), which explains the shift of the activity to lower temperatures and (ii) a lowering of the barrier by 20% for the association of adsorbed CO and O species to give CO2 (the main barrier for the CO oxidation reaction) passing from around 0.7 eV in RuO2(110) to 0.55 eV in RuOx/TiO2(110). We show that the catalytic properties of ruthenia are strongly modified when supported as nanostructures on titania, attaining higher activity at temperatures 100 K lower than that needed for pure ruthenia. As in other systems consisting of ceria nanostructures supported on titania, nanostructured ruthenia shows strongly modified properties compared to the pure oxide, consolidating the fact that the nanostructuring of oxides is a main way to attain higher catalytic activity at lower temperatures.

  10. When ruthenia met titania: Achieving extraordinary catalytic activity at low temperature by nanostructuring of oxides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Graciani, J.; Stacchiola, D.; Yang, F.; Evans, J.; Vidal, A. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Sanz, J. F.

    2015-09-09

    Nanostructured RuOx/TiO2(110) catalysts have a remarkable catalytic activity for CO oxidation at temperatures in the range of 350–375 K. Furthermore, the RuO2(110) surface has no activity. The state-of-the-art DFT calculations indicate that the main reasons for such an impressive improvement in the catalytic activity are: (i) a decrease of the diffusion barrier of adsorbed O atoms by around 40%, from 1.07 eV in RuO2(110) to 0.66 eV in RuOx/TiO2(110), which explains the shift of the activity to lower temperatures and (ii) a lowering of the barrier by 20% for the association of adsorbed CO and O species to give CO2more » (the main barrier for the CO oxidation reaction) passing from around 0.7 eV in RuO2(110) to 0.55 eV in RuOx/TiO2(110). We show that the catalytic properties of ruthenia are strongly modified when supported as nanostructures on titania, attaining higher activity at temperatures 100 K lower than that needed for pure ruthenia. As in other systems consisting of ceria nanostructures supported on titania, nanostructured ruthenia shows strongly modified properties compared to the pure oxide, consolidating the fact that the nanostructuring of oxides is a main way to attain higher catalytic activity at lower temperatures.« less

  11. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ had noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems.

  12. Highly stable and re-dispersible nano Cu hydrosols with sensitively size-dependent catalytic and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Pengli; Li, Gang; Wang, Wenzhao; Chen, Liang; Lu, Daoqiang Daniel; Sun, Rong; Zhou, Feng; Wong, Chingping

    2015-08-28

    Highly stable monodispersed nano Cu hydrosols were facilely prepared by an aqueous chemical reduction method through selecting copper hydroxide (Cu(OH)2) as the copper precursor, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and ethanol amine (EA) as the complexing agents, and hydrazine hydrate as the reducing agent. The size of the obtained Cu colloidal nanoparticles was controlled from 0.96 to 26.26 nm by adjusting the dosage of the copper precursor. Moreover, the highly stable nano Cu hydrosols could be easily concentrated and re-dispersed in water meanwhile maintaining good dispersibility. A model catalytic reaction of reducing p-nitrophenol with NaBH4 in the presence of nano Cu hydrosols with different sizes was performed to set up the relationship between the apparent kinetic rate constant (kapp) and the particle size of Cu catalysts. The experimental results indicate that the corresponding kapp showed an obvious size-dependency. Calculations revealed that kapp was directly proportional to the surface area of Cu catalyst nanoparticles, and also proportional to the reciprocal of the particle size based on the same mass of Cu catalysts. This relationship might be a universal principle for predicting and assessing the catalytic efficiency of Cu nanoparticles. The activation energy (Ea) of this catalytic reaction when using 0.96 nm Cu hydrosol as a catalyst was calculated to be 9.37 kJ mol(-1), which is considered an extremely low potential barrier. In addition, the synthesized nano Cu hydrosols showed size-dependent antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and the minimal inhibitory concentration of the optimal sample was lower than 5.82 μg L(-1). PMID:26219381

  13. Hydrodechlorination catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles supported on TiO 2 modified SBA-15 investigated by IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannus, I.; Búza, M.; Beck, A.; Guczi, L.; Sáfrán, G.

    2009-04-01

    The hydrodechlorination catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles on SBA-15 silica modified by TiO 2 promoters has been investigated. Comparing the hydrodechlorination catalytic activity platinum nanoparticles supported on TiO 2 catalyst was used in the hydrodechlorination of CCl 4 as model compound. The IR spectroscopic experimental results showed that the gold nanoparticles have higher catalytic activity, than platinum ones. The two samples were tested also in CO oxidation, in which Au/TiO 2/SBA-15 possess also somewhat higher activity than Pt/TiO 2.

  14. Small-Pore Molecular Sieves SAPO-34 with Chabazite Structure: Theoretical Study of Silicon Incorporation and Interrelated Catalytic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Lewis, James; Liu, Zhongmin

    2011-03-01

    The catalytic conversion of methonal to olefin (MTO) has attracted attention both in industrial and academic fields. Strong evidence shows that small-pore molecular sieves with certain amount silicon incorporated (SAPO) present promising high catalytic activity in MTO conversion. Using DFT, we study the structural and electronic properties of chabazite SAPO-34. Although there are extensively experimental results show that silicon incorporation does not change the overall structure as the original AlPO structure, local structural changes are still created by silicon substitution, which probably accounted for the high catalytic activity. It is noted that the catalytic activity of SAPO-34 presents increasing trend along with the silicon incorporation amount increasing and maintain a flat peak even with more silicon incorporated. Hence, there is an optimal silicon incorporation amount which possibly yields the highest catalytic MTO conversion.

  15. Structural and catalytic characterization of a thermally stable and acid-stable variant of human carbonic anhydrase II containing an engineered disulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Boone, Christopher D; Habibzadegan, Andrew; Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N; McKenna, Robert

    2013-08-01

    The carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a family of mostly zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate and a proton. Recently, there has been industrial interest in utilizing CAs as biocatalysts for carbon sequestration and biofuel production. The conditions used in these processes, however, result in high temperatures and acidic pH. This unfavorable environment results in rapid destabilization and loss of catalytic activity in CAs, ultimately resulting in cost-inefficient high-maintenance operation of the system. In order to negate these detrimental industrial conditions, cysteines at residues 23 (Ala23Cys) and 203 (Leu203Cys) were engineered into a wild-type variant of human CA II (HCAII) containing the mutation Cys206Ser. The X-ray crystallographic structure of the disulfide-containing HCAII (dsHCAII) was solved to 1.77 Å resolution and revealed that successful oxidation of the cysteine bond was achieved while also retaining desirable active-site geometry. Kinetic studies utilizing the measurement of (18)O-labeled CO2 by mass spectrometry revealed that dsHCAII retained high catalytic efficiency, and differential scanning calorimetry showed acid stability and thermal stability that was enhanced by up to 14 K compared with native HCAII. Together, these studies have shown that dsHCAII has properties that could be used in an industrial setting to help to lower costs and improve the overall reaction efficiency. PMID:23897465

  16. Positional effects of hydroxy groups on catalytic activity of proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Iridium(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Suna, Yuki; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Wang, Wan-Hui; Kambayashi, Hide; Manaka, Yuichi; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2014-11-12

    Proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Ir(III) complexes possessing a bipyridine ligand with two hydroxy groups at the 3,3'-, 4,4'-, 5,5'- or 6,6'-positions (3DHBP, 4DHBP, 5DHBP, or 6DHBP) were systematically investigated. UV-vis titration data provided average pK a values of the hydroxy groups on the ligands. Both hydroxy groups were found to deprotonate in the pH 4.6–5.6 range for the 4–6DHBP complexes. One of the hydroxy groups of the 3DHBP complex exhibited the low pKa value of < 0.4 because the deprotonation is facilitated by the strong intramolecular hydrogen bond formed between the generated oxyanion and the remaining hydroxy group, which in turn leads to an elevated pKa value of ~13.6 for the second deprotonation step. The crystal structures of the 4– and 6DHBP complexes obtained from basic aqueous solutions revealed their deprotonated forms. The intramolecular hydrogen bond in the 3DHBP complex was also observed in the crystal structures. The catalytic activities of these complexes in aqueous phase reactions, at appropriate pH, for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide (pH 8.5), dehydrogenation of formic acid (pH 1.8), transfer hydrogenation reactions using formic acid/formate as a hydrogen source (pH 7.2 and 2.6) were investigated to compare the positional effects of the hydroxy groups. The 4– and 6DHBP complexes exhibited remarkably enhanced catalytic activities under basic conditions because of the resonance effect of the strong electrondonating oxyanions, whereas the 5DHBP complex exhibited negligible activity despite the presence of electron-donating groups. The 3DHBP complex exhibited relatively high catalytic activity at low pH owing to the one strong electron-donating oxyanion group stabilized by the intramolecular hydrogen bond. DFT calculations were employed to study the mechanism of CO₂ hydrogenation by the 4DHBP and 6DHBP complexes, and comparison of the activation free energies of the H₂ heterolysis and CO

  17. Positional effects of hydroxy groups on catalytic activity of proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Iridium(III) complexes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Suna, Yuki; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Wang, Wan-Hui; Kambayashi, Hide; Manaka, Yuichi; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2014-11-12

    Proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Ir(III) complexes possessing a bipyridine ligand with two hydroxy groups at the 3,3'-, 4,4'-, 5,5'- or 6,6'-positions (3DHBP, 4DHBP, 5DHBP, or 6DHBP) were systematically investigated. UV-vis titration data provided average pK a values of the hydroxy groups on the ligands. Both hydroxy groups were found to deprotonate in the pH 4.6–5.6 range for the 4–6DHBP complexes. One of the hydroxy groups of the 3DHBP complex exhibited the low pKa value of < 0.4 because the deprotonation is facilitated by the strong intramolecular hydrogen bond formed between the generated oxyanion and the remaining hydroxy group, which in turn leadsmore » to an elevated pKa value of ~13.6 for the second deprotonation step. The crystal structures of the 4– and 6DHBP complexes obtained from basic aqueous solutions revealed their deprotonated forms. The intramolecular hydrogen bond in the 3DHBP complex was also observed in the crystal structures. The catalytic activities of these complexes in aqueous phase reactions, at appropriate pH, for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide (pH 8.5), dehydrogenation of formic acid (pH 1.8), transfer hydrogenation reactions using formic acid/formate as a hydrogen source (pH 7.2 and 2.6) were investigated to compare the positional effects of the hydroxy groups. The 4– and 6DHBP complexes exhibited remarkably enhanced catalytic activities under basic conditions because of the resonance effect of the strong electrondonating oxyanions, whereas the 5DHBP complex exhibited negligible activity despite the presence of electron-donating groups. The 3DHBP complex exhibited relatively high catalytic activity at low pH owing to the one strong electron-donating oxyanion group stabilized by the intramolecular hydrogen bond. DFT calculations were employed to study the mechanism of CO₂ hydrogenation by the 4DHBP and 6DHBP complexes, and comparison of the activation free energies of the H₂ heterolysis and CO₂ insertion steps

  18. Catalytic activity and thermal stability of horseradish peroxidase encapsulated in self-assembled organic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qin; Kim, Youngchan; Bassim, Nabil; Raman, Nisha; Collins, Greg E

    2016-03-21

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was encapsulated in self-assembled lithocholic acid (LCA) based organic nanotubes and its catalytic activity before and after thermal treatment was measured for comparison with free HRP. The apparent kcat (kcat/Km) for nanotube encapsulated HRP remained almost the same before and after thermal treatment, reporting an average value of 3.7 ± 0.4 μM(-1) s(-1). The apparent kcat value for free HRP decreased from 14.8 ± 1.3 μM(-1) s(-1) for samples stored at 4 °C to 2.4 ± 0.1 μM(-1) s(-1) after thermal treatment for 8 h at 55 °C. The Michaelis-Menten constants, Km, determined for encapsulated HRP and free HRP were relatively unperturbed by storage conditions at 4 °C or thermally treated at 55 °C for varying time periods from 2-8 h, with encapsulated HRP having a slightly higher Km than free HRP (13.4 ± 0.9 μM versus 11.7 ± 0.4 μM). The amount of HRP encapsulated in LCA nanotubes increased dramatically when the mixture of HRP and LCA nanotubes was brought to an elevated temperature. Within 4 h of thermal treatment at 55 °C, the amount of HRP encapsulated by the LCA nanotubes was more than 4 times the amount of HRP encapsulated when equilibrated at 4 °C for 7 days. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that the higher degree of exposure of hydrophobic residues in HRP at elevated temperatures enhances the hydrophobic interaction between HRP and the nanotube wall, resulting in the increased amount of HRP surface adsorption and, hence, the overall amount of encapsulation inside the nanotubes. PMID:26953357

  19. Acid Rain: Activities for Science Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Seven complete secondary/college level acid rain activities are provided. Activities include overview; background information and societal implications; major concepts; student objectives; vocabulary/material lists; procedures; instructional strategies; and questions/discussion and extension suggestions. Activities consider effects of acid rain on…

  20. Catalytic diamination of olefins via N-N bond activation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingguang; Cornwall, Richard G; Du, Haifeng; Zhao, Baoguo; Shi, Yian

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Vicinal diamines are important structural motifs present in various biologically and chemically significant molecules. Direct diamination of olefins provides an effective approach to this class of compounds. Unlike well-established oxidation processes such as epoxidation, dihydroxylation, and aminohydroxylation, direct diamination of olefins had remained a long-standing challenge and had been less well developed. In this Account, we summarize our recent studies on Pd(0)- and Cu(I)-catalyzed diaminations of olefins using di-tert-butyldiaziridinone and its related analogues as nitrogen sources via N-N bond activation. A wide variety of imidazolidinones, cyclic sulfamides, indolines, imidazolinones, and cyclic guanidines can be obtained from conjugated dienes and terminal olefins. For conjugated dienes, the diamination proceeds regioselectively at the internal double bond with the Pd(0) catalyst. Mechanistic studies show that the diamination likely involves a four-membered Pd(II) species resulting from the insertion of Pd(0) into the N-N bond of di-tert-butyldiaziridinone. Interestingly, the Cu(I)-catalyzed process occurs regioselectively at either the terminal or internal double bond depending on the reaction conditions via two mechanistically distinct pathways. The Cu(I) catalyst cleaves the N-N bond of di-tert-butyldiaziridinone to form a Cu(II) nitrogen radical and a four-membered Cu(III) species, which are likely in rapid equilibrium. The Cu(II) nitrogen radical and the four-membered Cu(III) species lead to the terminal and internal diamination, respectively. Terminal olefins are effectively C-H diaminated at the allylic and homoallylic carbons with Pd(0) as catalyst and di-tert-butyldiaziridinone as nitrogen source, likely involving a diene intermediate generated in situ from the terminal olefin via formation of a π-allyl Pd complex and subsequent β-hydride elimination. When di-tert-butylthiadiaziridine 1,1-dioxide is used as nitrogen source

  1. Catalytic Diamination of Olefins via N–N Bond Activation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Vicinal diamines are important structural motifs present in various biologically and chemically significant molecules. Direct diamination of olefins provides an effective approach to this class of compounds. Unlike well-established oxidation processes such as epoxidation, dihydroxylation, and aminohydroxylation, direct diamination of olefins had remained a long-standing challenge and had been less well developed. In this Account, we summarize our recent studies on Pd(0)- and Cu(I)-catalyzed diaminations of olefins using di-tert-butyldiaziridinone and its related analogues as nitrogen sources via N–N bond activation. A wide variety of imidazolidinones, cyclic sulfamides, indolines, imidazolinones, and cyclic guanidines can be obtained from conjugated dienes and terminal olefins. For conjugated dienes, the diamination proceeds regioselectively at the internal double bond with the Pd(0) catalyst. Mechanistic studies show that the diamination likely involves a four-membered Pd(II) species resulting from the insertion of Pd(0) into the N–N bond of di-tert-butyldiaziridinone. Interestingly, the Cu(I)-catalyzed process occurs regioselectively at either the terminal or internal double bond depending on the reaction conditions via two mechanistically distinct pathways. The Cu(I) catalyst cleaves the N–N bond of di-tert-butyldiaziridinone to form a Cu(II) nitrogen radical and a four-membered Cu(III) species, which are likely in rapid equilibrium. The Cu(II) nitrogen radical and the four-membered Cu(III) species lead to the terminal and internal diamination, respectively. Terminal olefins are effectively C–H diaminated at the allylic and homoallylic carbons with Pd(0) as catalyst and di-tert-butyldiaziridinone as nitrogen source, likely involving a diene intermediate generated in situ from the terminal olefin via formation of a π-allyl Pd complex and subsequent β-hydride elimination. When di-tert-butylthiadiaziridine 1,1-dioxide is used as nitrogen source

  2. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; Maruyama, B.

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only in the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.

  3. Engineering catalytic activity via ion beam bombardment of catalyst supports for vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Islam, A. E.; Zakharov, D.; Stach, E. A.; Nikoleav, P.; Amama, P. B.; Sargent, G.; Saber, S.; Huffman, D.; Erford, M.; Semiatin, S. L.; et al

    2015-09-16

    Carbon nanotube growth depends on the catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles on alumina or silica supports. The control on catalytic activity is generally achieved by variations in water concentration, carbon feed, and sample placement on a few types of alumina or silica catalyst supports obtained via thin film deposition. We have recently expanded the choice of catalyst supports by engineering inactive substrates like c-cut sapphire via ion beam bombardment. The deterministic control on the structure and chemistry of catalyst supports obtained by tuning the degree of beam-induced damage have enabled better regulation of the activity of Fe catalysts only inmore » the ion beam bombarded areas and hence enabled controllable super growth of carbon nanotubes. A wide range of surface characterization techniques were used to monitor the catalytically active surface engineered via ion beam bombardment. The proposed method offers a versatile way to control carbon nanotube growth in patterned areas and also enhances the current understanding of the growth process. As a result, with the right choice of water concentration, carbon feed and sample placement, engineered catalyst supports may extend the carbon nanotube growth yield to a level that is even higher than the ones reported here, and thus offers promising applications of carbon nanotubes in electronics, heat exchanger, and energy storage.« less

  4. Structural and kinetic contributions of the oxyanion binding site to the catalytic activity of acylaminoacyl peptidase.

    PubMed

    Kiss, András L; Palló, Anna; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Harmat, Veronika; Polgár, László

    2008-05-01

    It is widely accepted that the catalytic activity of serine proteases depends primarily on the Asp-His-Ser catalytic triad and other residues within the vicinity of this motif. Some of these residues form the oxyanion binding site that stabilizes the tetrahedral intermediate by hydrogen bonding to the negatively charged oxyanion. In acylaminoacyl peptidase from the thermophile Aeropyrum pernix, the main chain NH group of Gly369 is one of the hydrogen bond donors forming the oxyanion binding site. The side chain of His367, a conserved residue in acylaminoacyl peptidases across all species, fastens the loop holding Gly369. Determination of the crystal structure of the H367A mutant revealed that this loop, including Gly369, moves away considerably, accounting for the observed three orders of magnitude decrease in the specificity rate constant. For the wild-type enzyme ln(k(cat)/K(m)) vs. 1/T deviates from linearity indicating greater rate enhancement with increasing temperature for the dissociation of the enzyme-substrate complex compared with its decomposition to product. In contrast, the H367A variant provided a linear Arrhenius plot, and its reaction was associated with unfavourable entropy of activation. These results show that a residue relatively distant from the active site can significantly affect the catalytic activity of acylaminoacyl peptidase without changing the overall structure of the enzyme. PMID:18325786

  5. Catalytic actions of alkaline salts in reactions between 1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid and cellulose: II. Esterification.

    PubMed

    Ji, Bolin; Tang, Peixin; Yan, Kelu; Sun, Gang

    2015-11-01

    1,2,3,4-Butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) reacts with cellulose in two steps with catalysis of alkaline salts such as sodium hypophosphite: anhydride formation and esterification of anhydride with cellulose. The alkali metal ions were found effective in catalyzing formation of BTCA anhydride in a previous report. In this work, catalytic functions of the alkaline salts in the esterification reaction between BTCA anhydride and cellulose were investigated. Results revealed that acid anions play an important role in the esterification reaction by assisting removal of protons on intermediates and completion of the esterification between cellulose and BTCA. Besides, alkaline salts with lower pKa1 values of the corresponding acids are more effective ones for the reaction since addition of these salts could lead to lower pH values and higher acid anion concentrations in finishing baths. The mechanism explains the results of FTIR and wrinkle recovery angles of the fabrics cured under different temperatures and times. PMID:26256345

  6. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human bile salt activated lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Terzyan, S.; Wang, C. S.; Downs, D.; Hunter, B.; Zhang, X. C.

    2000-01-01

    Bile-salt activated lipase (BAL) is a pancreatic enzyme that digests a variety of lipids in the small intestine. A distinct property of BAL is its dependency on bile salts in hydrolyzing substrates of long acyl chains or bulky alcoholic motifs. A crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human BAL (residues 1-538) with two surface mutations (N186D and A298D), which were introduced in attempting to facilitate crystallization, has been determined at 2.3 A resolution. The crystal form belongs to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with one monomer per asymmetric unit, and the protein shows an alpha/beta hydrolase fold. In the absence of bound bile salt molecules, the protein possesses a preformed catalytic triad and a functional oxyanion hole. Several surface loops around the active site are mobile, including two loops potentially involved in substrate binding (residues 115-125 and 270-285). PMID:11045623

  7. Aqueous synthesis of hierarchical bismuth nanobundles with high catalytic activity to organic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Dechong; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Jingzhe; Li, Yawen; Lu, Yan; Zhao, Duijia

    2015-07-01

    Bundle-like bismuth (Bi) nanoarchitectures were successfully prepared on a large scale by an aqueous reducing strategy with polyethylene glycol (PEG) as directing agent at 90 °C for 55 min. The bundle-like Bi nanoarchitectures have a length of 4-5 μm and diameter of 0.5-1 μm with fairly uniform construction. Catalytic activities of the as-prepared hierarchical Bi nanobundles were investigated for degrading Rhodamine B (RhB) dye solution under visible-light irradiation. The Bi nanostructures extended excellent catalytic activity and good cycling performance toward photodegradation of RhB. Possible mechanism was proposed for Bi-assisted photocatalytic degradation of RhB under visible-light.

  8. Gold Incorporated Mesoporous Silica Thin Film Model Surface as a Robust SERS and Catalytically Active Substrate.

    PubMed

    Sunil Sekhar, Anandakumari Chandrasekharan; Vinod, Chathakudath Prabhakaran

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-small gold nanoparticles incorporated in mesoporous silica thin films with accessible pore channels perpendicular to the substrate are prepared by a modified sol-gel method. The simple and easy spin coating technique is applied here to make homogeneous thin films. The surface characterization using FESEM shows crack-free films with a perpendicular pore arrangement. The applicability of these thin films as catalysts as well as a robust SERS active substrate for model catalysis study is tested. Compared to bare silica film our gold incorporated silica, GSM-23F gave an enhancement factor of 10³ for RhB with a laser source 633 nm. The reduction reaction of p-nitrophenol with sodium borohydride from our thin films shows a decrease in peak intensity corresponding to -NO₂ group as time proceeds, confirming the catalytic activity. Such model surfaces can potentially bridge the material gap between a real catalytic system and surface science studies. PMID:27213321

  9. Catalytic activity of platinum on ruthenium electrodes with modified (electro)chemical states.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Won; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2005-07-21

    Using Pt on Ru thin-film electrodes with various (electro)chemical states designed by the sputtering method, the effect of Ru states on the catalytic activity of Pt was investigated. The chemical and electrochemical properties of Pt/Ru thin-film samples were confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, Pt nanoparticles on Ru metal or oxide for an actual fuel cell system showed an effect of Ru states on the catalytic activity of Pt in methanol electrooxidation. Finally, it was concluded that such an enhancement of methanol electrooxidation on the Pt is responsible for Ru metallic and/or oxidation sites compared to pure Pt without any Ru state. PMID:16852701

  10. Improving the catalytic activity of isopentenyl phosphate kinase through protein coevolution analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Yan, Zhihui; Lu, Xiaoyun; Xiao, Dongguang; Jiang, Huifeng

    2016-01-01

    Protein rational design has become more and more popular for protein engineering with the advantage of biological big-data. In this study, we described a method of rational design that is able to identify desired mutants by analyzing the coevolution of protein sequence. We employed this approach to evolve an archaeal isopentenyl phosphate kinase that can convert dimethylallyl alcohol (DMA) into precursor of isoprenoids. By designing 9 point mutations, we improved the catalytic activities of IPK about 8-fold in vitro. After introducing the optimal mutant of IPK into engineered E. coli strain for β-carotenoids production, we found that β-carotenoids production exhibited 97% increase over the starting strain. The process of enzyme optimization presented here could be used to improve the catalytic activities of other enzymes. PMID:27052337

  11. Twinning in fcc lattice creates low-coordinated catalytically active sites in porous gold.

    PubMed

    Krajčí, Marian; Kameoka, Satoshi; Tsai, An-Pang

    2016-08-28

    We describe a new mechanism for creation of catalytically active sites in porous gold. Samples of porous gold prepared by de-alloying Al2Au exhibit a clear correlation between the catalytic reactivity towards CO oxidation and structural defects in the fcc lattice of Au. We have found that on the stepped {211} surfaces quite common twin boundary defects in the bulk structure of porous gold can form long close-packed rows of atoms with the coordination number CN = 6. DFT calculations confirm that on these low-coordinated Au sites dioxygen chemisorbs and CO oxidation can proceed via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the activation energy of 37 kJ/mol or via the CO-OO intermediate with the energy barrier of 19 kJ/mol. The existence of the twins in porous gold is stabilized by the surface energy. PMID:27586937

  12. Selective nitrogen doping in graphene: Enhanced catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianlong; Hou, Zhufeng; Ikeda, Takashi; Huang, Sheng-Feng; Terakura, Kiyoyuki; Boero, Mauro; Oshima, Masaharu; Kakimoto, Masa-Aki; Miyata, Seizo

    2011-12-01

    The structural and electronic properties of N-doped zigzag graphene ribbons with various ratios of dihydrogenated to monohydrogenated edge carbons are investigated within the density functional theory framework. We find that the stability of graphitic N next to the edge, which is claimed to play important roles in the catalytic activity in our previous work, will be enhanced with increasing the concentration of dihydrogenated carbons. Furthermore, the dihydrogenated edge carbons turn out to be easily converted into monohydrogenated ones in the presence of oxygen molecules at room temperature. Based on our results, we propose a possible way to enhance the oxygen reduction catalytic activity of N-doped graphene by controlling the degrees of hydrogenation of edge carbons. The characteristic features in the x-ray absorption and emission spectra for each specific N site considered here will also be given.

  13. Improving the catalytic activity of isopentenyl phosphate kinase through protein coevolution analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Yan, Zhihui; Lu, Xiaoyun; Xiao, Dongguang; Jiang, Huifeng

    2016-01-01

    Protein rational design has become more and more popular for protein engineering with the advantage of biological big-data. In this study, we described a method of rational design that is able to identify desired mutants by analyzing the coevolution of protein sequence. We employed this approach to evolve an archaeal isopentenyl phosphate kinase that can convert dimethylallyl alcohol (DMA) into precursor of isoprenoids. By designing 9 point mutations, we improved the catalytic activities of IPK about 8-fold in vitro. After introducing the optimal mutant of IPK into engineered E. coli strain for β-carotenoids production, we found that β-carotenoids production exhibited 97% increase over the starting strain. The process of enzyme optimization presented here could be used to improve the catalytic activities of other enzymes. PMID:27052337

  14. ALD Functionalized Nanoporous Gold: Thermal Stability, Mechanical Properties, and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Wichmann, A; Wittstock, A; Baumann, T F; Baeumer, M; Hamza, A V

    2011-03-24

    Nanoporous metals have many technologically promising applications but their tendency to coarsen limits their long-term stability and excludes high temperature applications. Here, we demonstrate that atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to stabilize and functionalize nanoporous metals. Specifically, we studied the effect of nanometer-thick alumina and titania ALD films on thermal stability, mechanical properties, and catalytic activity of nanoporous gold (np-Au). Our results demonstrate that even only one-nm-thick oxide films can stabilize the nanoscale morphology of np-Au up to 1000 C, while simultaneously making the material stronger and stiffer. The catalytic activity of np-Au can be drastically increased by TiO{sub 2} ALD coatings. Our results open the door to high temperature sensor, actuator, and catalysis applications and functionalized electrodes for energy storage and harvesting applications.

  15. Characterization and catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles synthesized using ayurvedic arishtams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswathy Aromal, S.; Dinesh Babu, K. V.; Philip, Daizy

    2012-10-01

    The development of new synthesis methods for monodispersed nanocrystals using cheap and nontoxic chemicals, environmentally benign solvents and renewable materials remains a challenge to the scientific community. The present work reports a new green method for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. Four different ayurvedic arishtams are used for the reduction of Au3+ to Au nanoparticles. This method is simple, efficient, economic and nontoxic. Gold nanoparticles having different sizes in the range from 15 to 23 nm could be obtained. The nanoparticles have been characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR analysis. The high crystallinity of nanoparticles is evident from bright circular spots in the SAED pattern and peaks in the XRD pattern. The synthesized gold nanoparticles show good catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by excess NaBH4. The synthesized nanoparticles are found to exhibit size dependent catalytic property, the smaller nanoparticles showing faster activity.

  16. Hydrogenation under high pressure enhancing catalytic activity of Cu-Zr amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szummer, A.; Janik-Czachor, M.; Molnár, Á.; Marchuk, I.; Varga, M.; Filipek, S. M.

    2002-11-01

    High pressures of hydrogen up to 3.0 GPa and temperatures up to 373 K were used as a pretreatment to introduce structural changes in the bulk and on the surface of Cu-Zr amorphous alloys which then were examined by means of x-ray diffraction and microscopy. The hydrogenative pretreatment of high hydrogen fugacity followed by annealing at 623 K, aimed at causing desorption of hydrogen, and an eventual exposure of the samples to air at room temperature to oxidize Zr, resulted in a distinct increase of catalytic activity in the dehydrogenation of 2-propanol. A tentative mechanism to account for the enhancement of the catalytic activity induced by the above combined pretreatment is discussed.

  17. Effect of size of catalytically active phases in the dehydrogenation of alcohols and the challenging selective oxidation of hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghong; Deng, Weiping; Wang, Ye

    2011-09-01

    The size of the active phase is one of the most important factors in determining the catalytic behaviour of a heterogeneous catalyst. This Feature Article focuses on the size effects in two types of reactions, i.e., the metal nanoparticle-catalysed dehydrogenation of alcohols and the metal oxide nanocluster-catalysed selective oxidation of hydrocarbons (including the selective oxidation of methane and ethane and the epoxidation of propylene). For Pd or Au nanoparticle-catalysed oxidative or non-oxidative dehydrogenation of alcohols, the size of metal nanoparticles mainly controls the catalytic activity by affecting the activation of reactants (either alcohol or O(2)). The size of oxidic molybdenum species loaded on SBA-15 determines not only the activity but also the selectivity of oxygenates in the selective oxidation of ethane; highly dispersed molybdenum species are suitable for acetaldehyde formation, while molybdenum oxide nanoparticles exhibit higher formaldehyde selectivity. Cu(II) and Fe(III) isolated on mesoporous silica are highly efficient for the selective oxidation of methane to formaldehyde, while the corresponding oxide clusters mainly catalyse the complete oxidation of methane. The lattice oxygen in iron or copper oxide clusters is responsible for the complete oxidation, while the isolated Cu(I) or Fe(II) generated during the reaction can activate molecular oxygen forming active oxygen species for the selective oxidation of methane. Highly dispersed Cu(I) and Fe(II) species also function for the epoxidation of propylene by O(2) and N(2)O, respectively. Alkali metal ions work as promoters for the epoxidation of propylene by enhancing the dispersion of copper or iron species and weakening the acidity. PMID:21629889

  18. Influence of physicochemical treatments on iron-based spent catalyst for catalytic oxidation of toluene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Chai; Shim, Wang Geun

    2008-06-15

    The catalytic oxidation of toluene was studied over an iron-based spent and regenerated catalysts. Air, hydrogen, or four different acid solutions (oxalic acid (C2H2O4), citric acid (C6H8O7), acetic acid (CH3COOH), and nitric acid (HNO3)) were employed to regenerate the spent catalyst. The properties of pretreated spent catalyst were characterized by the Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The air pretreatment significantly enhanced the catalytic activity of the spent catalyst in the pretreatment temperature range of 200-400 degrees C, but its catalytic activity diminished at the pretreatment temperature of 600 degrees C. The catalytic activity sequence with respect to the air pretreatment temperatures was 400 degrees C>200 degrees C>parent>600 degrees C. The TPR results indicated that the catalytic activity was correlated with both the oxygen mobility and the amount of available oxygen on the catalyst. In contrast, the hydrogen pretreatment had a negative effect on the catalytic activity, and toluene conversion decreased with increasing pretreatment temperatures (200-600 degrees C). The XRD and TPR results confirmed the formation of metallic iron which had a negative effect on the catalytic activity with increasing pretreatment temperature. The acid pretreatment improved the catalytic activity of the spent catalyst. The catalytic activity sequence with respect to different acids pretreatment was found to be oxalic acid>citric acid>acetic acid>or=nitric acid>parent. The TPR results of acid pretreated samples showed an increased amount of available oxygen which gave a positive effect on the catalytic activity. Accordingly, air or acid pretreatments were more promising methods of regenerating the iron-based spent catalyst. In particular, the oxalic acid pretreatment was found to be most effective in the formation of FeC2O4 species which contributed highly to the

  19. Methods and apparatuses for preparing a surface to have catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Robert G.; Peng, Wen-Ping; Ouyang, Zheng; Goodwin, Michael P.

    2011-03-22

    The invention provides methods and apparatuses that utilize mass spectrometry for preparation of a surface to have catalytic activity through molecular soft-landing of mass selected ions. Mass spectrometry is used to generate combinations of atoms in a particular geometrical arrangement, and ion soft-landing selects this molecular entity or combination of entities and gently deposits the entity or combination intact onto a surface.

  20. The Catalytic Activity of Proline Racemase: a QM/MM Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenta, Marco; Calvaresi, Matteo; Altoè, Piero; Spinelli, Domenico; Garavelli, Marco; Bottoni, Andrea

    2007-12-01

    The catalytic activity of an interesting enzyme (involved in the life cycle of the Trypanosoma Cruzi eucariotic parasite) has been elucidated by mean of a QM/MM study. The reaction mechanism of the stereo-inversion of the substrate has been studied by characterizing the associated PES. The nature of the found critical point has been checked by means of numerical frequencies calculations. The role of the various residues in the catalysis has been pointed out.

  1. Synthesis of Pt-Mo-N Thin Film and Catalytic Activity for Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Akira; Tague, Michele E.; Gregoire, John M.; Wen, Xiao-Dong; van Dover, R. Bruce; Abruña, Héctor D.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2010-05-13

    Pt-Mo-N composition gradient film was synthesized by combining thin-film deposition techniques and subsequent thermal nitridation. A ternary platinum-based nitride, Pt2Mo3N, showed catalytic activities for fuel cell applications and higher electrochemical stability when it was compared with a PtMo alloy with the same Pt:Mo ratio.

  2. Nanorods of cryptomelane via soft chemistry method and their catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorieva, Anastasia V.; Melnik, Denis M.; Goodilin, Eugene A.; Anufrieva, Tatyana A.; Derlyukova, Lyudmila E.; Tretyakov, Yuri D.

    2012-07-01

    α-MnO2 nanorods were obtained by a fast redox transformation of aqueous solution of potassium permanganate. The formation mechanism of 1D nanocrystals proceeds via a first pH- and temperature sensitive stage followed by cation/anion control of the nanorod growth. A high surface area and nanostructuring allowed to achieve superb catalytic activity in a CO oxidation process compared to a conventionally prepared manganese dioxide.

  3. Isolated metal active site concentration and stability control catalytic CO2 reduction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Matsubu, John C; Yang, Vanessa N; Christopher, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    CO2 reduction by H2 on heterogeneous catalysts is an important class of reactions that has been studied for decades. However, atomic scale details of structure-function relationships are still poorly understood. Particularly, it has been suggested that metal particle size plays a unique role in controlling the stability of CO2 hydrogenation catalysts and the distribution of active sites, which dictates reactivity and selectivity. These studies often have not considered the possible role of isolated metal active sites in the observed dependences. Here, we utilize probe molecule diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) with known site-specific extinction coefficients to quantify the fraction of Rh sites residing as atomically dispersed isolated sites (Rhiso), as well as Rh sites on the surface of Rh nanoparticles (RhNP) for a series of TiO2 supported Rh catalysts. Strong correlations were observed between the catalytic reverse water gas shift turn over frequency (TOF) and the fraction of Rhiso sites and between catalytic methanation TOF and the fraction of RhNP sites. Furthermore, it was observed that reaction condition-induced disintegration of Rh nanoparticles, forming Rhiso active sites, controls the changing reactivity with time on stream. This work demonstrates that isolated atoms and nanoparticles of the same metal on the same support can exhibit uniquely different catalytic selectivity in competing parallel reaction pathways and that disintegration of nanoparticles under reaction conditions can play a significant role in controlling stability. PMID:25671686

  4. Direct Visualization of Catalytically Active Sites at the FeO-Pt(111) Interface.

    PubMed

    Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Peng, Guowen; Zeuthen, Helene; Bai, Yunhai; Merte, Lindsay R; Lammich, Lutz; Besenbacher, Flemming; Mavrikakis, Manos; Wendt, Stefan

    2015-08-25

    Within the area of surface science, one of the "holy grails" is to directly visualize a chemical reaction at the atomic scale. Whereas this goal has been reached by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in a number of cases for reactions occurring at flat surfaces, such a direct view is often inhibited for reaction occurring at steps and interfaces. Here we have studied the CO oxidation reaction at the interface between ultrathin FeO islands and a Pt(111) support by in situ STM and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Time-lapsed STM imaging on this inverse model catalyst in O2 and CO environments revealed catalytic activity occurring at the FeO-Pt(111) interface and directly showed that the Fe-edges host the catalytically most active sites for the CO oxidation reaction. This is an important result since previous evidence for the catalytic activity of the FeO-Pt(111) interface is essentially based on averaging techniques in conjunction with DFT calculations. The presented STM results are in accord with DFT+U calculations, in which we compare possible CO oxidation pathways on oxidized Fe-edges and O-edges. We found that the CO oxidation reaction is more favorable on the oxidized Fe-edges, both thermodynamically and kinetically. PMID:26027877

  5. A microreactor array for spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity for high-throughput catalysis science

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratyuk, Petro; Gumuslu, Gamze; Shukla, Shantanu; Miller, James B; Morreale, Bryan D; Gellman, Andrew J

    2013-04-01

    We describe a 100 channel microreactor array capable of spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity across the surface of a flat substrate. When used in conjunction with a composition spread alloy film (CSAF, e.g. Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y}) across which component concentrations vary smoothly, such measurements permit high-throughput analysis of catalytic activity and selectivity as a function of catalyst composition. In the reported implementation, the system achieves spatial resolution of 1 mm{sup 2} over a 10×10 mm{sup 2} area. During operation, the reactant gases are delivered at constant flow rate to 100 points of differing composition on the CSAF surface by means of a 100-channel microfluidic device. After coming into contact with the CSAF catalyst surface, the product gas mixture from each of the 100 points is withdrawn separately through a set of 100 isolated channels for analysis using a mass spectrometer. We demonstrate the operation of the device on a Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} CSAF catalyzing the H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange reaction at 333 K. In essentially a single experiment, we measured the catalytic activity over a broad swathe of concentrations from the ternary composition space of the Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} alloy.

  6. Direct Visualization of Catalytically Active Sites at the FeO-Pt(111) Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Peng, Guowen; Zeuthen, Helene; Bai, Yunhai; Merte, L. R.; Lammich, Lutz; Besenbacher, Fleming; Mavrikakis, Manos; Wendt, Stefen

    2015-08-25

    Within the area of surface science, one of the “holy grails” is to directly visualize a chemical reaction at the atomic scale. Whereas this goal has been reached by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in a number of cases for reactions occurring at flat surfaces, such a direct view is often inhibited for reaction occurring at steps and interfaces. Here we have studied the CO oxidation reaction at the interface between ultrathin FeO islands and a Pt(111) support by in situ STM and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Time-lapsed STM imaging on this inverse model catalyst in O2 and CO environments revealed catalytic activity occurring at the FeO-Pt(111) interface and directly showed that the Fe-edges host the catalytically most active sites for the CO oxidation reaction. This is an important result since previous evidence for the catalytic activity of the FeO-Pt(111) interface is essentially based on averaging techniques in conjunction with DFT calculations. The presented STM results are in accord with DFTþU calculations, in which we compare possible CO oxidation pathways on oxidized Fe-edges and O-edges. We found that the CO oxidation reaction is more favorable on the oxidized Fe-edges, both thermodynamically and kinetically.

  7. Effect of the synthetic method on the catalytic activity of alumina: Epoxidation of cyclohexene

    SciTech Connect

    Valderruten, N.E.; Peña, W.F.; Ramírez, A.E.; Rodríguez-Páez, J.E.

    2015-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Temperature influence on percent conversion and selectivity in the epoxidation of cyclohexene using commercial alumina as a catalyst. - Highlights: • Aluminum oxide was synthesized using Pechini method. • The alumina obtained showed a mix of boehmite and γ-alumina phases. • We research an economically feasible method to obtain alumina for use as a catalyst. • Alumina obtained by Pechini showed high percent conversion and/or selectivity. • The best results were 78% conversion and 78% selectivity to epoxidation reactions. - Abstract: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was prepared from different inorganic precursors via the Pechini method and compared with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} prepared by the sol–gel method. Structural characterization of these materials was carried out by FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption at −196 °C and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The solids were tested in the epoxidation of cyclohexene and a difference in their catalytic activities was observed. The characterization results indicate that the samples prepared by Pechini have a mixture of γ-alumina and boehmite, a condition favoring catalytic activity, whereas the sol–gel sample is less crystalline due to higher boehmite content. These results indicate that both the nature of the precursor and the method of synthesis strongly affect the catalytic activity of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  8. Supercritical CO{sub 2} mediated synthesis and catalytic activity of graphene/Pd nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lulu; Nguyen, Van Hoa; Shim, Jae-Jin

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • RGO/Pd composite was efficiently prepared via a facile method in supercritical CO{sub 2}. • Graphene sheets were coated uniformly with Pd nanoparticles with a size of ∼8 nm. • Composites exhibited excellent catalytic activity in the Suzuki reaction even after 10 cycles. - Abstract: Graphene sheets were decorated with palladium nanoparticles using a facile and efficient method in supercritical CO{sub 2}. The nanoparticles were formed on the graphene sheets by the simple hydrogen reduction of palladium(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate precursor in supercritical CO{sub 2}. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Highly dispersed nanoparticles with various sizes and shapes adhered well to the graphene sheets. The composites showed high catalytic activities for the Suzuki reaction under aqueous and aerobic conditions within 5 min. The effects of the different Pd precursor loadings on the catalytic activities of the composites were also examined.

  9. Catalytic activity of cobalt on nanotextured polymer films for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvadkar, Niranjan A.; Sekeroglu, Koray; Dressick, Walter J.; Demirel, Melik C.

    2011-10-01

    We describe the mechanism of cobalt and ligand binding on nanotextured poly(chloro-p-xylylene) (PPX) films as supports for catalytic release of H2 from alkaline aqueous solutions of sodium borohydride. Cobalt catalysts are prepared on nanotextured PPX substrates via electroless plating using a Sn-free Pd(II) colloid with adsorbed pyridine ligand as an adhesion promoter. Gas physisorption studies on PPX, using N2 and CO2 as probe gases, indicate the presence of micropores (∼1 to 2 nm width) responsible for the adsorption and non-covalent stabilization of pyridine molecules on the nanotextured surface. The strongly adsorbed pyridine molecules promote Co adhesion onto the PPX surface during subsequent electroless deposition, thereby retaining the metal's catalytic activity for H2 evolution even after multiple reaction cycles. In contrast, conventionally deposited PPX is devoid of any nanotexture and contains fewer micropores capable of stabilizing pyridine adsorption, resulting in poor metallization and catalytic activity for H2 evolution. We also demonstrate the effect of patterning the PPX substrate as a means to further improve the activity of the Co catalyst to achieve H2 evolution rates comparable to those obtained using precious metal catalysts.

  10. Catalytic activity of human carbonic anhydrase isoform IX is displayed both extra- and intracellularly.

    PubMed

    Klier, Michael; Jamali, Somayeh; Ames, Samantha; Schneider, Hans-Peter; Becker, Holger M; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-01-01

    Most carbonic anhydrases catalyse the reversible conversion of carbon dioxide to protons and bicarbonate, either as soluble cytosolic enzymes, in or at intracellular organelles, or at the extracellular face of the cell membrane as membrane-anchored proteins. Carbonic anhydrase isoform IX (CA IX), a membrane-bound enzyme with catalytic activity at the extracellular membrane surface, has come to prominence in recent years because of its association with hypoxic tissue, particularly tumours, often indicating poor prognosis. We have evaluated the catalytic activity of CA IX heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by measuring the amplitude and rate of cytosolic pH changes as well as pH changes at the outer membrane surface (pHs ) during addition and removal of 5% CO2 /25 mm HCO3-, and by mass spectrometry. Our results indicate both extracellular and intracellular catalytic activity of CA IX. Reduced rates of CO2 -dependent intracellular pH changes after knockdown of CA IX confirmed these findings in two breast cancer cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Our results demonstrate a new function of CA IX that may be important in the search for therapeutic cancer drugs targeting CA IX. PMID:26470855

  11. Insight into the Mechanism of Intramolecular Inhibition of the Catalytic Activity of Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinyu; Flick, Franziska; Verheugd, Patricia; Carloni, Paolo; Lüscher, Bernhard; Rossetti, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) is a NAD+-dependent deacetylase that has been associated with neurodegeneration and cancer. SIRT2 is composed of a central catalytic domain, the structure of which has been solved, and N- and C-terminal extensions that are thought to control SIRT2 function. However structural information of these N- and C-terminal regions is missing. Here, we provide the first full-length molecular models of SIRT2 in the absence and presence of NAD+. We also predict the structural alterations associated with phosphorylation of SIRT2 at S331, a modification that inhibits catalytic activity. Bioinformatics tools and molecular dynamics simulations, complemented by in vitro deacetylation assays, provide a consistent picture based on which the C-terminal region of SIRT2 is suggested to function as an autoinhibitory region. This has the capacity to partially occlude the NAD+ binding pocket or stabilize the NAD+ in a non-productive state. Furthermore, our simulations suggest that the phosphorylation at S331 causes large conformational changes in the C-terminal region that enhance the autoinhibitory activity, consistent with our previous findings that phosphorylation of S331 by cyclin-dependent kinases inhibits SIRT2 catalytic activity. The molecular insight into the role of the C-terminal region in controlling SIRT2 function described in this study may be useful for future design of selective inhibitors targeting SIRT2 for therapeutic applications. PMID:26407304

  12. Optimizing anti-coking abilities of zeolites by ethylene diamine tetraacetie acid modification on catalytic fast pyrolysis of corn stalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhong, Zhaoping; Song, Zuwei; Ding, Kuan; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2015-12-01

    In order to minimize coke yield during biomass catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) process, ethylene diamine tetraacetie acid (EDTA) chemical modification method is carried out to selectively remove the external framework aluminum of HZSM-5 catalyst. X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen (N2)-adsorption and ammonia-temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) techniques are employed to investigate the porosity and acidity characteristics of original and modified HZSM-5 samples. Py-GC/MS and thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA) experiments are further conducted to explore the catalytic effect of modified HZSM-5 samples on biomass CFP and to verify the positive effect on coke reduction. Results show that EDTA treatment does not damage the crystal structure of HZSM-5 zeolites, but leads to a slight increase of pore volume and pore size. Meanwhile, the elimination of the strong acid peak indicates the dealumination of outer surface of HZSM-5 zeolites. Treatment time of 2 h (labeled EDTA-2H) is optimal for acid removal and hydrocarbon formation. Among all modified catalysts, EDTA-2H performs the best for deacidification and can obviously increase the yields of positive chemical compositions in pyrolysis products. Besides, EDTA modification can improve the anti-coking properties of HZSM-5 zeolites, and EDTA-2H gives rise to the lowest coke yield.

  13. Improved Catalytic Activity and Stability of a Palladium Pincer Complex by Incorporation into a Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Samantha A; Kassie, Abebu; Baranowski, Sarah A; Fritzsching, Keith J; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Brown, Craig M; Wade, Casey R

    2016-02-17

    A porous metal-organic framework Zr6O4(OH)4(L-PdX)3 (1-X) has been constructed from Pd diphosphinite pincer complexes ([L-PdX](4-) = [(2,6-(OPAr2)2C6H3)PdX](4-), Ar = p-C6H4CO2(-), X = Cl, I). Reaction of 1-X with PhI(O2CCF3)2 facilitates I(-)/CF3CO2(-) ligand exchange to generate 1-TFA and I2 as a soluble byproduct. 1-TFA is an active and recyclable catalyst for transfer hydrogenation of benzaldehydes using formic acid as a hydrogen source. In contrast, the homogeneous analogue (t)Bu(L-PdTFA) is an ineffective catalyst owing to decomposition under the catalytic conditions, highlighting the beneficial effects of immobilization. PMID:26813149

  14. Catalytic supports on the base of activated anthracites and synthetic carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubchik, S. B.; Tikhonova, L. P.; Tarasenko, Yu. A.; Galushko, O. L.; Galushko, L. Ya.; Fonseca, I. M.

    2006-06-01

    Selective adsorption of platinum group metals (PMG) on activated carbons from a multi-component model and technological solutions was proposed for the preparation of heterogeneous-supported catalysts. Activated natural anthracites and a nitrogen-containing synthetic carbon are considered as carriers for Pd-supported catalysts. Their catalytic activity was studied in the Pd-catalyzed reactions of hydrogen peroxide decomposition and chloride ions oxidation by manganese(III). On the base of the obtained results, novel high sensitive analytical methods both for direct determination of supported-metal quantity and palladium oxidation states on the surface of spent adsorbents are suggested.

  15. Molecular Basis of Reduced Pyridoxine 5′-Phosphate Oxidase Catalytic Activity in Neonatal Epileptic Encephalopathy Disorder*

    PubMed Central

    Musayev, Faik N.; Di Salvo, Martino L.; Saavedra, Mario A.; Contestabile, Roberto; Ghatge, Mohini S.; Haynes, Alexina; Schirch, Verne; Safo, Martin K.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in pyridoxine 5′-phosphate oxidase are known to cause neonatal epileptic encephalopathy. This disorder has no cure or effective treatment and is often fatal. Pyridoxine 5′-phosphate oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of pyridoxine 5′-phosphate to pyridoxal 5′-phosphate, the active cofactor form of vitamin B6 required by more than 140 different catalytic activities, including enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism and biosynthesis of neurotransmitters. Our aim is to elucidate the mechanism by which a homozygous missense mutation (R229W) in the oxidase, linked to neonatal epileptic encephalopathy, leads to reduced oxidase activity. The R229W variant is ∼850-fold less efficient than the wild-type enzyme due to an ∼192-fold decrease in pyridoxine 5′-phosphate affinity and an ∼4.5-fold decrease in catalytic activity. There is also an ∼50-fold reduction in the affinity of the R229W variant for the FMN cofactor. A 2.5 Å crystal structure of the R229W variant shows that the substitution of Arg-229 at the FMN binding site has led to a loss of hydrogen-bond and/or salt-bridge interactions between FMN and Arg-229 and Ser-175. Additionally, the mutation has led to an alteration of the configuration of a β-strand-loop-β-strand structure at the active site, resulting in loss of two critical hydrogen-bond interactions involving residues His-227 and Arg-225, which are important for substrate binding and orientation for catalysis. These results provide a molecular basis for the phenotype associated with the R229W mutation, as well as providing a foundation for understanding the pathophysiological consequences of pyridoxine 5′-phosphate oxidase mutations. PMID:19759001

  16. ZSM-5 zeolite nanosheets with improved catalytic activity synthesized using a new class of structure-directing agents.

    PubMed

    Kore, Rajkumar; Srivastava, Rajendra; Satpati, Biswarup

    2014-09-01

    A new series of multiquaternary ammonium structure-directing agents, based on 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane, was prepared. ZSM-5 zeolites with nanosheet morphology (10 nm crystal thickness) were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions using multiquaternary ammonium surfactants as the zeolite structure-generating agents. Both wide-angle and small-angle diffraction patterns were obtained using only a suitable structure-directing agent under a specific zeolite synthesis composition. A mechanism of zeolite formation is proposed based on the results obtained from various physicochemical characterizations. ZSM-5 materials were investigated in catalytic reactions requiring medium to strong acidity, which are important for the synthesis of a wide range of industrially important fine and specialty chemicals. The catalytic activity of ZSM-5 materials was compared with that of the conventional ZSM-5 and amorphous mesoporous aluminosilicate Al-MCM-41. The synthesis strategy of the present investigation using the new series of structure-directing agents could be extended for the synthesis of other related zeolites or other porous materials in the future. Zeolite with a structural feature as small as the size of a unit cell (5-10 nm) with hierarchically ordered porous structure would be very promising for catalysis. PMID:25056112

  17. Nanorods, nanospheres, nanocubes: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of nanoferrites of Mn, Co, Ni, Part-89

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Supriya; Srivastava, Pratibha; Singh, Gurdip

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Prepared nanoferrites were characterized by FE-SEM and bright field TEM micrographs. The catalytic effect of these nanoferrites was evaluated on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate using TG and TG–DSC techniques. The kinetics of thermal decomposition of AP was evaluated using isothermal TG data by model fitting as well as isoconversional method. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Synthesis of ferrite nanostructures (∼20.0 nm) by wet-chemical method under different synthetic conditions. ► Characterization using XRD, FE-SEM, EDS, TEM, HRTEM and SAED pattern. ► Catalytic activity of ferrite nanostructures on AP thermal decomposition by thermal techniques. ► Burning rate measurements of CSPs with ferrite nanostructures. ► Kinetics of thermal decomposition of AP + nanoferrites. -- Abstract: In this paper, the nanoferrites of Mn, Co and Ni were synthesized by wet chemical method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive, X-ray spectra (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). It is catalytic activity were investigated on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and composite solid propellants (CSPs) using thermogravimetry (TG), TG coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (TG–DSC) and ignition delay measurements. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of AP + nanoferrites have also been investigated using isoconversional and model fitting approaches which have been applied to data for isothermal TG decomposition. The burning rate of CSPs was considerably enhanced by these nanoferrites. Addition of nanoferrites to AP led to shifting of the high temperature decomposition peak toward lower temperature. All these studies reveal that ferrite nanorods show the best catalytic activity superior to that of nanospheres and nanocubes.

  18. Probing the Electrostatics of Active Site Microenvironments along the Catalytic Cycle for Escherichia coli Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions play an important role in enzyme catalysis by guiding ligand binding and facilitating chemical reactions. These electrostatic interactions are modulated by conformational changes occurring over the catalytic cycle. Herein, the changes in active site electrostatic microenvironments are examined for all enzyme complexes along the catalytic cycle of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) by incorporation of thiocyanate probes at two site-specific locations in the active site. The electrostatics and degree of hydration of the microenvironments surrounding the probes are investigated with spectroscopic techniques and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. Changes in the electrostatic microenvironments along the catalytic environment lead to different nitrile (CN) vibrational stretching frequencies and 13C NMR chemical shifts. These environmental changes arise from protein conformational rearrangements during catalysis. The QM/MM calculations reproduce the experimentally measured vibrational frequency shifts of the thiocyanate probes across the catalyzed hydride transfer step, which spans the closed and occluded conformations of the enzyme. Analysis of the molecular dynamics trajectories provides insight into the conformational changes occurring between these two states and the resulting changes in classical electrostatics and specific hydrogen-bonding interactions. The electric fields along the CN axes of the probes are decomposed into contributions from specific residues, ligands, and solvent molecules that make up the microenvironments around the probes. Moreover, calculation of the electric field along the hydride donor–acceptor axis, along with decomposition of this field into specific contributions, indicates that the cofactor and substrate, as well as the enzyme, impose a substantial electric field that facilitates hydride transfer. Overall, experimental and theoretical data provide evidence for

  19. The support effect on the size and catalytic activity of thiolated Au25 nanoclusters as precatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jun; Li, Jingguo; Zhang, Bin; Yuan, Xun; Asakura, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Tsunehiro; Teramura, Kentaro; Xie, Jianping; Yan, Ning

    2015-03-01

    In this study, 6-mercaptohexanoic (MHA) protected Au25(MHA)18 nanoclusters (or thiolated Au NCs) deposited on various inorganic supports, including hydroxyapatite (HAP), TiO2 (Degussa P25), activated carbon (AC), pyrolyzed graphene oxide (PGO), and fumed SiO2 were prepared via a conventional impregnation method. Following that, calcination under a N2 stream was conducted to produce surface ligand free, highly dispersed Au NCs catalysts. The effects of supports on the size and catalytic activity of Au NCs were systematically investigated. No obvious size growth was observed for Au NCs on HAP and P25 after thermally induced ligand removal, due to the strong interaction between the metal and the supports. However, severe aggregations of Au NCs were seen after thermal treatment on three other supports, including AC, PGO, and SiO2. The removal of surface thiol ligands from the Au NCs is crucial to catalyze nitrobenzene hydrogenation, where only calcined Au/HAP and Au/P25 exhibited good catalytic activity. On the other hand, all the supported Au NCs were active for the styrene oxidation, where Au/HAP exhibited the best catalytic performance. Altogether, both the size effect and metal-support interaction are crucial for the design of supported Au NCs as efficient catalysts for targeted reactions.In this study, 6-mercaptohexanoic (MHA) protected Au25(MHA)18 nanoclusters (or thiolated Au NCs) deposited on various inorganic supports, including hydroxyapatite (HAP), TiO2 (Degussa P25), activated carbon (AC), pyrolyzed graphene oxide (PGO), and fumed SiO2 were prepared via a conventional impregnation method. Following that, calcination under a N2 stream was conducted to produce surface ligand free, highly dispersed Au NCs catalysts. The effects of supports on the size and catalytic activity of Au NCs were systematically investigated. No obvious size growth was observed for Au NCs on HAP and P25 after thermally induced ligand removal, due to the strong interaction between the

  20. Reconciling Ligase Ribozyme Activity with Fatty Acid Vesicle Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anella, Fabrizio; Danelon, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The “RNA world” and the “Lipid world” theories for the origin of cellular life are often considered incompatible due to the differences in the environmental conditions at which they can emerge. One obstacle resides in the conflicting requirements for divalent metal ions, in particular Mg2+, with respect to optimal ribozyme activity, fatty acid vesicle stability and protection against RNA strand cleavage. Here, we report on the activity of a short L1 ligase ribozyme in the presence of myristoleic acid (MA) vesicles at varying concentrations of Mg2+. The ligation rate is significantly lower at low-Mg2+ conditions. However, the loss of activity is overcompensated by the increased stability of RNA leading to a larger amount of intact ligated substrate after long reaction periods. Combining RNA ligation assays with fatty acid vesicles we found that MA vesicles made of 5 mM amphiphile are stable and do not impair ligase ribozyme activity in the presence of approximately 2 mM Mg2+. These results provide a scenario in which catalytic RNA and primordial membrane assembly can coexist in the same environment. PMID:25513761

  1. Tough and catalytically active hybrid biofibers wet-spun from nanochitin hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Das, Paramita; Heuser, Thomas; Wolf, Andrea; Zhu, Baolei; Demco, Dan Eugen; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Walther, Andreas

    2012-12-10

    Sustainable alternatives for high-performance and functional materials based on renewable resources are intensely needed as future alternatives for present-day, fossil-based materials. Nanochitin represents an emerging class of highly crystalline bionanoparticles with high intrinsic mechanical properties and the ability for conjugation into functional materials owing to reactive amine and hydroxyl groups. Herein we demonstrate that hydrogels containing surface-deacetylated chitin nanofibrils of micrometer length and average diameters of 9 nm, as imaged by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, can be wet-spun into macrofibers via extrusion in a coagulation bath, a simple low energy and large-scale processing route. The resulting biofibers display attractive mechanical properties with a large plastic region of about 12% in strain, in which frictional sliding of nanofibrils allows dissipation of fracture energy and enables a high work-of-fracture of near 10 MJ/m3. We further show how to add functionality to these macrofibers by exploiting the amine functions of the surface chitosan groups to host catalytically active noble metal nanoparticles, furnishing biobased, renewable catalytic hybrids. These inorganic/organic macrofibers can be used repeatedly for fast catalytic reductions of model compounds without loss of activity, rendering the concept of hybridized chitin materials interesting as novel bioderived supports for nanoparticle catalysts. PMID:23102411

  2. Facile and green synthesis of cellulose nanocrystal-supported gold nanoparticles with superior catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Chen, Chang; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dan; Li, Ai-Jun; Yao, Zheng; Shi, Li-Yi

    2016-04-20

    The emphasis of science and technology shifts toward environmentally friendly and sustainable resources and processes. Herein, we report a facile, one-pot and green synthesis of biomaterial-supported gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with superior catalytic activity. Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC)-supported AuNPs were prepared by heating the aqueous mixture of HAuCl4, CNCs and polyethylene glycol, avoiding toxic chemicals, extreme condition and complicated procedure. The resultant CNC-supported AuNPs exhibited catalytic activities for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride. The maximum apparent rate constant reached 1.47×10(-2)s(-1), and the turnover frequency reached 641h(-1). The superior catalytic performance can be ascribed to the large amount of highly dispersed AuNPs with few nanometers in size which are loaded on CNCs. About 90% of the AuNPs are smaller than 10nm, and nearly 60% of the AuNPs are smaller than 5nm. The synthesis is eco-friendly, facile and low-cost, thus has great potential for industrial and medical applications. PMID:26876829

  3. Expression and purification of correctly processed, active human TACE catalytic domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Clarke, H R; Wolfson, M F; Rauch, C T; Castner, B J; Huang, C P; Gerhart, M J; Johnson, R S; Cerretti, D P; Paxton, R J; Price, V L; Black, R A

    1998-06-01

    Human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) converting enzyme (TACE) releases soluble TNF alpha from cells. It is a member of the adamalysin family of metalloproteases. A truncated form of TACE cDNA was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified to homogeneity in order to study TACE structure and function. Recombinant TACE was expressed as a preproprotein including the pro- and catalytic (PROCAT) domains fused to the yeast alpha-factor leader. A C-terminal immunoreactive FLAG peptide was added for Western blot detection and anti-FLAG antibody column purification. We constructed two glycosylation mutant PROCAT TACE isoforms to facilitate purification. A PROCAT isoform, mutated to eliminate two N-linked glycosylation sites, was buffer exchanged and purified to homogeneity by ion exchange chromatography and an anti-FLAG antibody affinity step. N-terminal sequence analysis showed that the mutant preproprotein was processed in yeast at the furin protease cleavage site and yielded an active catalytic domain which has TNF alpha peptide-specific protease activity. Mass spectrometry of the purified catalytic domain showed that removal of both N-linked sites results in a homogeneous sized polypeptide lacking further posttranslational modifications. PMID:9631522

  4. The Non-Catalytic Domains of Drosophila Katanin Regulate Its Abundance and Microtubule-Disassembly Activity

    PubMed Central

    Grode, Kyle D.; Rogers, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule severing is a biochemical reaction that generates an internal break in a microtubule and regulation of microtubule severing is critical for cellular processes such as ciliogenesis, morphogenesis, and meiosis and mitosis. Katanin is a conserved heterodimeric ATPase that severs and disassembles microtubules, but the molecular determinants for regulation of microtubule severing by katanin remain poorly defined. Here we show that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and activity in living cells. Our data indicate that the microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT) domain and adjacent linker region of the Drosophila katanin catalytic subunit Kat60 cooperate to regulate microtubule severing in two distinct ways. First, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 decrease its abundance by enhancing its proteasome-dependent degradation. The Drosophila katanin regulatory subunit Kat80, which is required to stabilize Kat60 in cells, conversely reduces the proteasome-dependent degradation of Kat60. Second, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 augment its microtubule-disassembly activity by enhancing its association with microtubules. On the basis of our data, we propose that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin serve as the principal sites of integration of regulatory inputs, thereby controlling its ability to sever and disassemble microtubules. PMID:25886649

  5. A Novel miRNA Processing Pathway Independent of Dicer Requires Argonaute2 Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes, Daniel; Xue, Huiling; Taylor, David W.; Patnode, Heather; Mishima, Yuichiro; Cheloufi, Sihem; Ma, Enbo; Mane, Shrikant; Hannon, Gregory J.; Lawson, Nathan D.; Wolfe, Scot A.; Giraldez, Antonio J.

    2011-01-01

    Dicer is a central enzyme in microRNA (miRNA) processing. We identified a Dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis pathway that uses Argonaute2 (Ago2) slicer catalytic activity. In contrast to other miRNAs, miR-451 levels were refractory to dicer loss of function but were reduced in MZago2 (maternal-zygotic) mutants. We found that pre-miR-451 processing requires Ago2 catalytic activity in vivo. MZago2 mutants showed delayed erythropoiesis that could be rescued by wild-type Ago2 or miR-451-duplex but not by catalytically dead Ago2. Changing the secondary structure of Dicer-dependent miRNAs to mimic that of pre-miR-451 restored miRNA function and rescued developmental defects in MZdicer mutants, indicating that the pre-miRNA secondary structure determines the processing pathway in vivo. We propose that Ago2-mediated cleavage of pre-miRNAs, followed by uridylation and trimming, generates functional miRNAs independently of Dicer. PMID:20448148

  6. A novel miRNA processing pathway independent of Dicer requires Argonaute2 catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Daniel; Xue, Huiling; Taylor, David W; Patnode, Heather; Mishima, Yuichiro; Cheloufi, Sihem; Ma, Enbo; Mane, Shrikant; Hannon, Gregory J; Lawson, Nathan D; Wolfe, Scot A; Giraldez, Antonio J

    2010-06-25

    Dicer is a central enzyme in microRNA (miRNA) processing. We identified a Dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis pathway that uses Argonaute2 (Ago2) slicer catalytic activity. In contrast to other miRNAs, miR-451 levels were refractory to dicer loss of function but were reduced in MZago2 (maternal-zygotic) mutants. We found that pre-miR-451 processing requires Ago2 catalytic activity in vivo. MZago2 mutants showed delayed erythropoiesis that could be rescued by wild-type Ago2 or miR-451-duplex but not by catalytically dead Ago2. Changing the secondary structure of Dicer-dependent miRNAs to mimic that of pre-miR-451 restored miRNA function and rescued developmental defects in MZdicer mutants, indicating that the pre-miRNA secondary structure determines the processing pathway in vivo. We propose that Ago2-mediated cleavage of pre-miRNAs, followed by uridylation and trimming, generates functional miRNAs independently of Dicer. PMID:20448148

  7. Co-Cu Nanoparticles: Synthesis by Galvanic Replacement and Phase Rearrangement during Catalytic Activation.

    PubMed

    Nafria, Raquel; Genç, Aziz; Ibáñez, Maria; Arbiol, Jordi; de la Piscina, Pilar Ramírez; Homs, Narcís; Cabot, Andreu

    2016-03-01

    The control of the phase distribution in multicomponent nanomaterials is critical to optimize their catalytic performance. In this direction, while impressive advances have been achieved in the past decade in the synthesis of multicomponent nanoparticles and nanocomposites, element rearrangement during catalyst activation has been frequently overseen. Here, we present a facile galvanic replacement-based procedure to synthesize Co@Cu nanoparticles with narrow size and composition distributions. We further characterize their phase arrangement before and after catalytic activation. When oxidized at 350 °C in air to remove organics, Co@Cu core-shell nanostructures oxidize to polycrystalline CuO-Co3O4 nanoparticles with randomly distributed CuO and Co3O4 crystallites. During a posterior reduction treatment in H2 atmosphere, Cu precipitates in a metallic core and Co migrates to the nanoparticle surface to form Cu@Co core-shell nanostructures. The catalytic behavior of such Cu@Co nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica was further analyzed toward CO2 hydrogenation in real working conditions. PMID:26878153

  8. First insight into catalytic activity of anionic iron porphyrins immobilized on exfoliated layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Nakagaki, Shirley; Halma, Matilte; Bail, Alesandro; Arízaga, Gregório Guadalupe Carbajal; Wypych, Fernando

    2005-01-15

    Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) intercalated with glycinate anions was synthesized through co-precipitation and exfoliated in formamide and the single-layer suspension was reacted with aqueous iron porphyrin solutions (Fe(TDFSPP) and Fe(TCFSPP)). The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, UV-vis, and electron paramagnetic resonance and investigated in the oxidation reaction of cyclooctene and cyclohexane using iodosylbenzene as oxidant. The iron porphyrin seems to be immobilized at the surface of the glycinate intercalated LDH. The catalytic activities obtained in heterogeneous media for iron porphyrin, Fe(TDFSPP), was superior to the results obtained under homogeneous conditions, but the opposite effect was observed on the Fe(TCFSPP), indicating that, instead of the structural similarity of both iron porphyrins (second-generation porphyrins), the immobilization of each one produced different catalysts. The best catalytic activity of the Fe(TDFSPP)/Gly-LDH, compared to Fe(TCFSPP)/Gly-LDH, can be explained by the easy access of the oxidant and the substrate to the catalytic sites in the former, probably located at the surface of the layered double hydroxide pillared with glycinate anions. A model for the immobilization and a mechanism for the oxidation reaction will be discussed. PMID:15571697

  9. Graphdiyne oxides as excellent substrate for electroless deposition of Pd clusters with high catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hetong; Yu, Ping; Wang, Yuexiang; Han, Guangchao; Liu, Huibiao; Yi, Yuanping; Li, Yuliang; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-04-29

    Graphdiyne (GDY), a novel kind of two-dimensional carbon allotrope consisting of sp- and sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms, is found to be able to serve as the reducing agent and stabilizer for electroless deposition of highly dispersed Pd nanoparticles owing to its low reduction potential and highly conjugated electronic structure. Furthermore, we observe that graphdiyne oxide (GDYO), the oxidation form of GDY, can be used as an even excellent substrate for electroless deposition of ultrafine Pd clusters to form Pd/GDYO nanocomposite that exhibits a high catalytic performance toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. The high catalytic performance is considered to benefit from the rational design and electroless deposition of active metal catalysts with GDYO as the support. PMID:25871853

  10. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles, decorated on graphene oxide nanosheets and their catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekanth, T. V. M.; Jung, Min-Ji; Eom, In-Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we develop an inexpensive and green route for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using Picrasma quassioides bark aqueous extract as reducing and capping agent and also eco-friendly decorate graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets with AgNPs (GO-AgNPs). Green synthesized AgNPs and GO-AgNPs composites were characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, SEM-EDX, and TEM-SAED techniques. The resulting GO-AgNPs contained about 41.35% of Ag and the AgNPs size ranges 17.5-66.5 nm, and GO-AgNPs size ranges 10-49.5 nm. Moreover, the GO-AgNPs exhibited excellent catalytic activity towards the methylene blue (MB) in the presence of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) at room temperature. This catalytic reaction completed within 15 min.

  11. Green synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of palladium nanoparticles by xanthan gum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoshi kumari, Amrutham; Venkatesham, Maragoni; Ayodhya, Dasari; Veerabhadram, Guttena

    2015-03-01

    Here, we report the synthesis, characterization and catalytic evaluation of palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) using xanthan gum, acting as both reducing and stabilizing agent without using any synthetic reagent. The uniqueness of our method lies in its fast synthesis rates using hydrothermal method in autoclave at a pressure of 15 psi and at 120 °C temperature by 10 min time. The formation and size of the PdNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The catalytic activity of PdNPs was evaluated on the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by sodium borohydride using spectrophotometry.

  12. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoclusters: Aqueous, Concentrated, Stable, and Catalytically Active Colloids toward Green Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tarutani, Naoki; Vaz, Pedro D; Nunes, Carla D; Prevot, Vanessa; Stenning, Gavin B G; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-05-24

    Increasing attention has been dedicated to the development of nanomaterials rendering green and sustainable processes, which occur in benign aqueous reaction media. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of another family of green nanomaterials, layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoclusters, which are concentrated (98.7 g/L in aqueous solvent), stably dispersed (transparent sol for >2 weeks), and catalytically active colloids of nano LDHs (isotropic shape with the size of 7.8 nm as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering). LDH nanoclusters are available as colloidal building blocks to give access to meso- and macroporous LDH materials. Proof-of-concept applications revealed that the LDH nanocluster works as a solid basic catalyst and is separable from solvents of catalytic reactions, confirming the nature of nanocatalysts. The present work closely investigates the unique physical and chemical features of this colloid, the formation mechanism, and the ability to act as basic nanocatalysts in benign aqueous reaction systems. PMID:27124717

  13. An ultra-low Pd loading nanocatalyst with efficient catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yunxia; Xi, Jiangbo; Zhang, Zheye; Xiao, Junwu; Xiao, Fei; Qian, Lihua; Wang, Shuai

    2015-03-12

    An ultra-low Pd loading nanocatalyst is synthesized by a convenient solution route of photochemical reduction and aqueous chemical growth. The modification of nanocatalyst structures is investigated through changing morphologies of Pd nanoclusters on the surface of ZnO nanorods. A significant enhancement in photocatalytic properties has been achieved by decorating a trace amount of Pd clusters (0.05 at%) on the surface of ZnO nanorods. The reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) is applied to demonstrate multiple catalytic activities in the Pd-ZnO hybrid nanocatalyst, which also provides a better understanding of the relationship between the unique nanoconfigured structure and catalytic performance. PMID:25735825

  14. Influence of support hydroxides on the catalytic activity of oxidized gold clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Gabriel M; Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J; Dudney, Nancy J

    2010-01-01

    Gold oxide nanoparticles were prepared on the native surface and a hydroxylated surface of a non-porous TiO2 support (Degussa P25). Scanning transmission electron microscopy results show the formation of similarly sized clusters on both support materials (1.86 and 1.61 nm clusters on the native oxide and the hydroxylated oxide respectively). X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy clearly indicate the formation of Au3+ rich oxide nanoparticles. Despite the similar cluster sizes and oxidation states the gold oxide clusters grown on the hydroxylated surface were at least 180 times more catalytically active for the oxidation of carbon monoxide then those grown on the native oxide surface. These hydroxides are conveniently introduced during the solution phase synthesis of gold catalysts and play a dominate, but previously unrecognized, role in the catalytic properties of both oxidized and metallic gold particles.

  15. Tailoring the assembly, interfaces, and porosity of nanostructures toward enhanced catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh-Dinh; Dinh, Cao-Thang; Do, Trong-On

    2015-01-14

    The evolution of nanotechnology has inspired materials scientists to invent nanostructures with achievements in numerous practical applications, particularly in catalysis. The great advancements typically involve flexible control over the unique properties of the nanomaterial through tuning their structural geometries and components. In this Feature Article, we present the recent progress of our recent research and that of other groups in tailoring the assembly, interfaces, and porosity of diverse inorganic nanostructures. The enhanced catalytic properties of the engineered nanostructures are discussed in relation to photocatalysis, with special emphasis on solar energy conversion, including water splitting, CO2 reduction, and organic photodecomposition. Considering their attributes of superior catalytic performance and long-term durability, the development of economical, active nanocatalysts opens up practical opportunities for endeavours in sustainable energy conversion and other applied fields. This review is expected to introduce readers to the general principles of engineering the nanostructured features of the inorganic nanomaterials capable of improving solar photocatalytic efficiency. PMID:25302344

  16. pH-susceptibility of HLA-DO tunes DO/DM ratios to regulate HLA-DM catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Strohman, Michael J.; Somasundaram, Sriram; Ayyangar, Sashi; Hou, Tieying; Wang, Nan; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2015-01-01

    The peptide-exchange catalyst, HLA-DM, and its inhibitor, HLA-DO control endosomal generation of peptide/class II major histocompatibility protein (MHC-II) complexes; these complexes traffic to the cell surface for inspection by CD4+ T cells. Some evidence suggests that pH influences DO regulation of DM function, but pH also affects the stability of polymorphic MHC-II proteins, spontaneous peptide loading, DM/MHC-II interactions and DM catalytic activity, imposing challenges on approaches to determine pH effects on DM-DO function and their mechanistic basis. Using optimized biochemical methods, we dissected pH-dependence of spontaneous and DM-DO-mediated class II peptide exchange and identified an MHC-II allele-independent relationship between pH, DO/DM ratio and efficient peptide exchange. We demonstrate that active, free DM is generated from DM-DO complexes at late endosomal/lysosomal pH due to irreversible, acid-promoted DO destruction rather than DO/DM molecular dissociation. Any soluble DM that remains in complex with DO stays inert. pH-exposure of DM-DO in cell lysates corroborates such a pH-regulated mechanism, suggesting acid-activated generation of functional DM in DO-expressing cells. PMID:26610428

  17. The substrate specificity and the catalytic mechanism of N-carbamyl- D-amino acid amidohydrolase: A theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei-Wei; Zhan, Dong Ling; Luo, Quan; Zhou, Yi-Han; Yao, Yuan; Li, Ze-Sheng; Feng, Yan

    2009-04-01

    N-carbamyl- D-amino acid amidohydrolasecatalyzes the hydrolysis of N-carbamyl- D-amino acids to D-amino acids, ammonia and the carbon dioxide. The docking studies validate that D-NCAase possesses of preference for D-enantiomers, predict that Gly194 and Arg174 may take part in the catalytic mechanism, and Glu136 is essential to maintain the stable conformation for catalysis. The initial step of the acylation reaction catalyzed by D-NCAase has been studied by density functional calculations. It was furthermore demonstrated that Lys126, His143, and Asn196 decrease the reaction barrier, while Asn172 raise the barrier. The structural and mechanistic insights obtained from computational study should be valuable for the mechanisms of cysteine proteases.

  18. Structure of Human Acid Sphingomyelinase Reveals the Role of the Saposin Domain in Activating Substrate Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zi-Jian; Huang, Jingjing; Poda, Gennady; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G

    2016-07-31

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal phosphodiesterase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide and phosphocholine. While other lysosomal sphingolipid hydrolases require a saposin activator protein for full activity, the ASM polypeptide incorporates a built-in N-terminal saposin domain and does not require an external activator protein. Here, we report the crystal structure of human ASM and describe the organization of the three main regions of the enzyme: the N-terminal saposin domain, the proline-rich connector, and the catalytic domain. The saposin domain is tightly associated along an edge of the large, bowl-shaped catalytic domain and adopts an open form that exposes a hydrophobic concave surface approximately 30Å from the catalytic center. The calculated electrostatic potential of the enzyme is electropositive at the acidic pH of the lysosome, consistent with the strict requirement for the presence of acidic lipids in target membranes. Docking studies indicate that sphingomyelin binds with the ceramide-phosphate group positioned at the binuclear zinc center and molecular dynamic simulations indicate that the intrinsic flexibility of the saposin domain is important for monomer-dimer exchange and for membrane interactions. Overall, ASM uses a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions to cause local disruptions of target bilayers in order to bring the lipid headgroup to the catalytic center in a membrane-bound reaction. PMID:27349982

  19. Electrophilic Activation of α,β-Unsaturated Amides: Catalytic Asymmetric Vinylogous Conjugate Addition of Unsaturated γ-Butyrolactones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2016-04-11

    Although catalytic asymmetric conjugate addition reactions have remarkably advanced over the last two decades, the application of less electrophilic α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acid derivatives in this useful reaction manifold remains challenging. Herein, we report that α,β-unsaturated 7-azaindoline amides act as reactive electrophiles to participate in catalytic diastereo- and enantioselective vinylogous conjugate addition of γ-butyrolactones in the presence of a cooperative catalyst comprising of a soft Lewis acid and a Brønsted base. Reactions mostly reached completion with as little as 1 mol % of catalyst loading to give the desired conjugate adducts in a highly stereoselective manner. PMID:26970428

  20. Lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of anacardic acids.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae Joung; Kubo, Isao

    2005-06-01

    6[8'(Z)-pentadecenyl]salicylic acid, otherwise known as anacardic acid (C15:1), inhibited the linoleic acid peroxidation catalyzed by soybean lipoxygenase-1 (EC 1.13.11.12, type 1) with an IC50 of 6.8 microM. The inhibition of the enzyme by anacardic acid (C15:1) is a slow and reversible reaction without residual activity. The inhibition kinetics analyzed by Dixon plots indicates that anacardic acid (C15:1) is a competitive inhibitor and the inhibition constant, KI, was obtained as 2.8 microM. Although anacardic acid (C15:1) inhibited the linoleic acid peroxidation without being oxidized, 6[8'(Z),11'(Z)-pentadecadienyl]salicylic acid, otherwise known as anacardic acid (C15:2), was dioxygenated at low concentrations as a substrate. In addition, anacardic acid (C15:2) was also found to exhibit time-dependent inhibition of lipoxygenase-1. The alk(en)yl side chain of anacardic acids is essential to elicit the inhibitory activity. However, the hydrophobic interaction alone is not enough because cardanol (C15:1), which possesses the same side chain as anacardic acid (C15:1), acted neither as a substrate nor as an inhibitor. PMID:15913294

  1. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Binbin Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng

    2015-01-15

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2} using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl{sub 2} at 400 °C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of –SO{sub 3}H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and –SO{sub 3}H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles. - Graphical abstract: Sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres with high surface area and superior catalytic performance were prepared by a facile chemical activation route. - Highlights: • Porous carbon spheres solid acid prepared by a facile chemical activation. • It owns high surface area, superior porosity and uniform spherical morphology. • It possesses

  2. The role of acidic sites and the catalytic reaction pathways on the Rh/ZrO2 catalysts for ethanol steam reforming.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ziyi; Ang, Hanwee; Choong, Catherine; Chen, Luwei; Huang, Lin; Lin, Jianyi

    2009-02-01

    Rh catalysts supported on ZrO(2)-based oxides were studied for ethanol steam reforming (SR) reaction. Pure ZrO(2) as the support resulted in higher H(2) production yield compared to the ZrO(2) oxide decorated with CeO(2), Al(2)O(3), La(2)O(3) or Li(2)O at the reaction temperature of 300 degrees C. Above 450 degrees C, all the catalysts exhibited similar catalytic activity. However, at low reaction temperatures (below 400 degrees C), a significant enhancement in the catalytic activity, selectivity and stability was achieved by replacing the ZrO(2) support prepared by a precipitation method (ZrO(2)-CP) with that prepared by a hydrothermal method (ZrO(2)-HT). A deactivation was observed during the EtOH SR reaction at 300 degrees C on the two catalysts of Rh/ZrO(2)-CP and Rh/ZrO(2)-HT. NH(3)-TPD experiments confirmed that the ZrO(2)-HT support had two types of acidic sites while the ZrO(2)-CP support had only one type of weak acidic sites. DRIFTS studies showed that the absorption of EtOH molecules was strong on the Rh/ZrO(2)-HT catalyst and a number of C(2) oxygenates were accumulated on the catalyst surface. Meanwhile, the EtOH absorption on the Rh/ZrO(2)-CP catalyst was weak and the accumulation of CO, carbonate and CH(x) was observed. It is concluded that the relatively strong Lewis acidic sites in the Rh/ZrO(2)-HT catalyst is responsible for the strong absorption of EtOH molecules, and the subsequent C-H breakage step (formation of acetaldehyde or called as dehydrogenation reaction) is a fast reaction on it; on the Rh/ZrO(2)-CP catalyst, the EtOH adsorption was weak and the C-C breakage was the dominating reaction which led to the accumulation of surface CO, CH(x) and CO(2) species. Therefore, it is believed that, in order to promote the absorption of EtOH molecules and to reduce the formation of metastable carbonaceous species (C(2) oxygenates) during the reaction, the catalyst should be enhanced both with Lewis acidity and with C-C bond breakage function. Also

  3. Metal Ions Play an Essential Catalytic Role in the Mechanism of Ketol-Acid Reductoisomerase.

    PubMed

    Tadrowski, Sonya; Pedroso, Marcelo M; Sieber, Volker; Larrabee, James A; Guddat, Luke W; Schenk, Gerhard

    2016-05-23

    Ketol-acid reductoisomerase (KARI) is a Mg(2+) -dependent enzyme in the branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis pathway. It catalyses a complex two-part reaction: an alkyl migration followed by a NADPH-dependent reduction. Both reactions occur within the one active site, but in particular, the mechanism of the isomerisation step is poorly understood. Here, using a combination of kinetic, thermodynamic and spectroscopic techniques, the reaction mechanisms of both Escherichia coli and rice KARI have been investigated. We propose a conserved mechanism of catalysis, whereby a hydroxide, bridging the two Mg(2+) ions in the active site, initiates the reaction by abstracting a proton from the C2 alcohol group of the substrate. While the μ-hydroxide-bridged dimetallic centre is pre-assembled in the bacterial enzyme, in plant KARI substrate binding leads to a reduction of the metal-metal distance with the concomitant formation of a hydroxide bridge. Only Mg(2+) is capable of promoting the isomerisation reaction, likely to be due to non-competent substrate binding in the presence of other metal ions. PMID:27136273

  4. The Contribution of Non-catalytic Carbohydrate Binding Modules to the Activity of Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases*

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Lucy I.; Labourel, Aurore; Walton, Paul H.; Davies, Gideon J.; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable industrial substrate. Copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) contribute to the degradation of lignocellulose and increase the efficiency of biofuel production. LPMOs can contain non-catalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), but their role in the activity of these enzymes is poorly understood. Here we explored the importance of CBMs in LPMO function. The family 2a CBMs of two monooxygenases, CfLPMO10 and TbLPMO10 from Cellulomonas fimi and Thermobispora bispora, respectively, were deleted and/or replaced with CBMs from other proteins. The data showed that the CBMs could potentiate and, surprisingly, inhibit LPMO activity, and that these effects were both enzyme-specific and substrate-specific. Removing the natural CBM or introducing CtCBM3a, from the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome scaffoldin CipA, almost abolished the catalytic activity of the LPMOs against the cellulosic substrates. The deleterious effect of CBM removal likely reflects the importance of prolonged presentation of the enzyme on the surface of the substrate for efficient catalytic activity, as only LPMOs appended to CBMs bound tightly to cellulose. The negative impact of CtCBM3a is in sharp contrast with the capacity of this binding module to potentiate the activity of a range of glycoside hydrolases including cellulases. The deletion of the endogenous CBM from CfLPMO10 or the introduction of a family 10 CBM from Cellvibrio japonicus LPMO10B into TbLPMO10 influenced the quantity of non-oxidized products generated, demonstrating that CBMs can modulate the mode of action of LPMOs. This study demonstrates that engineered LPMO-CBM hybrids can display enhanced industrially relevant oxygenations. PMID:26801613

  5. Screening acidic zeolites for catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass and its components

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zeolites have been shown to effectively promote cracking reactions during pyrolysis resulting in highly deoxygenated and hydrocarbon-rich compounds and stable pyrolysis oil product. Py/GC-MS was employed to study the catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass samples comprising oak, corn...

  6. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger J.

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interface with themore » metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.« less

  7. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger J.

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interface with the metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.

  8. Catalytic oxidation of pulping effluent by activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Bholu Ram; Garg, Anurag

    2016-01-01

    The present study deals with the non-catalytic and catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) for the removal of persistent organic compounds from the pulping effluent. Two activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts (Cu/Ce/AC and Cu/Mn/AC) were used for CWO after characterization by the following techniques: temperature-programmed reduction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. The oxidation reaction was performed in a batch high-pressure reactor (capacity = 0.7  L) at moderate oxidation conditions (temperature = 190°C and oxygen pressure = 0.9 MPa). With Cu/Ce/AC catalyst, the maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and lignin removals of 79%, 77% and 88% were achieved compared to only 50% removal during the non-catalytic process. The 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) to COD ratio (a measure for biodegradability) of the pulping effluent was improved to 0.52 from an initial value of 0.16. The mass balance calculations for solid recovered after CWO reaction showed 8% and 10% deduction in catalyst mass primarily attributed to the loss of carbon and metal leaching. After the CWO process, carbon deposition was also observed on the recovered catalyst which was responsible for around 3-4% TOC reduction. PMID:26508075

  9. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger J.

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interface with the metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.

  10. Facile synthesis of magnetically separable reduced graphene oxide/magnetite/silver nanocomposites with enhanced catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhenyuan; Shen, Xiaoping; Yue, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Hu; Yang, Juan; Wang, Yuqin; Ma, Lianbo; Chen, Kangmin

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the combination of magnetite (Fe3O4) with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) generates a new hybrid substrate for the dispersion of noble metal nanoparticles. Well-dispersed silver (Ag) nanoparticles loaded on the surface of Fe3O4 modified RGO are achieved by an efficient two-step approach. Through reducing Ag(+) ions, highly dispersed Ag nanoparticles are in-situ formed on the RGO/Fe3O4 substrate. It is found that the existence of Fe3O4 nanocrystals can significantly improve the dispersity and decrease the particle size of the in-situ formed Ag nanoparticles. Magnetic study reveals that the as-prepared RGO/Fe3O4/Ag ternary nanocomposites display room-temperature superparamagnetic behavior. The catalytic properties of the RGO/Fe3O4/Ag ternary nanocomposites were evaluated with the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol as a model reaction. The as-synthesized RGO/Fe3O4/Ag ternary catalysts exhibit excellent catalytic stability and much higher catalytic activity than the corresponding RGO/Ag catalyst. Moreover, the RGO/Fe3O4/Ag catalysts can be easily magnetically separated for reuse. This study further demonstrates that nanoparticles modified graphene can act as an effective hybrid substrate for the synthesis of multi-component and multifunctional graphene-based composites. PMID:26263498

  11. Residues Distal to the Active Site Contribute to Enhanced Catalytic Activity of Variant and Hybrid β-Lactamases Derived from CTX-M-14 and CTX-M-15

    PubMed Central

    He, Dandan; Chiou, Jiachi; Zeng, Zhenling; Liu, Lanping; Chen, Xiaojie; Zeng, Li; Chan, Edward Wai Chi

    2015-01-01

    A variety of CTX-M-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), including hybrid ones, have been reported in China that are uncommon elsewhere. To better characterize the substrate profiles and enzymatic mechanisms of these enzymes, we performed comparative kinetic analyses of both parental and hybrid CTX-M enzymes, including CTX-M-15, -132, -123, -64, -14 and -55, that are known to confer variable levels of β-lactam resistance in the host strains. All tested enzymes were susceptible to serine β-lactamase inhibitors, with sulbactam exhibiting the weakest inhibitory effects. CTX-M-55, which differs from CTX-M-15 by one substitution, A77V, displayed enhanced catalytic activity (kcat/Km) against expanded-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs). CTX-M-55 exhibits higher structure stability, most likely by forming hydrophobic interactions between A77V and various key residues in different helices, thereby stabilizing the core architecture of the helix cluster, and indirectly contributes to a more stable active site conformation, which in turn shows higher catalytic efficiency and is more tolerant to temperature change. Analyses of the hybrids and their parental prototypes showed that evolution from CTX-M-15 to CTX-M-132, CTX-M-123, and CTX-M-64, characterized by gradual enhancement of catalytic activity to ESCs, was attributed to introduction of different substitutions to amino acids distal to the active site of CTX-M-15. Similarly, the increased hydrolytic activities against cephalosporins and sensitivity to β-lactamase inhibitors, clavulanic acid and sulbactam, of CTX-M-64 were partly due to the amino acids that were different from CTX-M-14 and located at both the C and N termini of CTX-M-64. These data indicate that residues distal to the active site of CTX-Ms contributed to their enhanced catalytic activities to ESCs. PMID:26169409

  12. Biosynthesised palladium nanoparticles using Eucommia ulmoides bark aqueous extract and their catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liansheng; Li, Ming; Liu, Huihong

    2015-12-01

    Palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) are of great importance as catalytic materials. Their synthesis has been widely studied and interest in their properties is growing. Bio-based methods might be a greener option for designing the PdNPs with reduced environmental impacts. This study reports the synthesis of PdNPs by utilising the aqueous extract of medicinally important Eucommia ulmoides (E. Ulmoides) bark which functions as both reducing and capping agent in moderate reaction conditions. Reduction potential of E. Ulmoides bark aqueous extract was about -0.08 V vs. saturated calomel electrode by open-circuit voltage method and the rich polyphenolics was confirmed by cyclic voltammetry, which helps to reduce palladium ions to PdNPs. The characterisation through high-resolution transmission electron microscopic, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction infer that the as-synthesised PdNPs were spherical in shape with a face cubic crystal structure. The results from dynamic light scattering suggest the PdNPs have the narrow size distribution with an average size of 12.6 nm. The lower zeta potential (-25.3 mV) and the Fourier transform infrared spectra indicate that the as-synthesised PdNPs keep remarkably stable for a long period due to the capped biomolecules on the nanoparticle surface. This method for synthesis of PdNPs is simple, economic, non-toxic and efficient. The PdNPs show excellent catalytic activity for the electro-catalytic oxidation of hydrazine and the catalytic reducing degradation of p-aminoazobenzene, a model compound of azo-dyes. PMID:26647810

  13. TERATOGENIC ACTIVITY OF TRICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA)is a by-product of the chlorine disinfection of water containing natural organic material. It is detectable finished drinking water at levels comparable to the trihalomethanes (30-60). TCA is also formed in vivo after ingestion of hypochlorite and has be...

  14. Fatty acid activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR).

    PubMed

    Bocos, C; Göttlicher, M; Gearing, K; Banner, C; Enmark, E; Teboul, M; Crickmore, A; Gustafsson, J A

    1995-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferators such as clofibric acid, nafenopin, and WY-14,643 have been shown to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), a member of the steroid nuclear receptor superfamily. We have cloned the cDNA from rat that is homologous to that from mouse, which encodes a 97% similar protein. To search for physiologically occurring activators, we established a transcriptional transactivation assay by stably expressing in CHO cells a chimera of rat PPAR and the human glucocorticoid receptor that activates expression of the placental alkaline phosphatase reporter gene under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. 150 microM concentrations of arachidonic or linoleic acid but not of dehydroepiandrosterone, cholesterol, or 25-hydroxy-cholesterol, activated the receptor chimera. In addition, saturated fatty acids induced the reporter gene. Shortening the chain length to n = 6 or introduction of an omega-terminal carboxylic group abolished the activation potential of the fatty acid. To test whether a common PPAR binding metabolite might be formed from free fatty acids we tested the effects of differentially beta-oxidizable fatty acids and inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism. The peroxisomal proliferation-inducing, non-beta-oxidizable, tetradecylthioacetic acid activated PPAR to the same extent as the strong peroxisomal proliferator WY-14,643, whereas the homologous beta-oxidizable tetradecylthiopropionic acid was only as potent as a non-substituted fatty acid. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors, radical scavengers or cytochrome P450 inhibitors did not affect activation of PPAR. In conclusion, beta-oxidation is apparently not required for the formation of the PPAR-activating molecule and this moiety might be a fatty acid, its ester with CoA, or a further derivative of the activated fatty acid prior to beta-oxidation of the acyl-CoA ester. PMID:7626496

  15. Influence of the preparation procedure on the catalytic activity of gold supported on diamond nanoparticles for phenol peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Roberto; Navalon, Sergio; Delgado, Juan Jose; Calvino, Jose J; Alvaro, Mercedes; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2011-08-16

    The catalytic activity of diamond-supported gold nanoparticle (Au/D) samples prepared by the deposition/precipitation method have been correlated as a function of the pH and the reduction treatment. It was found that the most active material is the one prepared at pH 5 followed by subsequent thermal treatment at 300 °C under hydrogen. TEM images show that Au/D prepared under optimal conditions contain very small gold nanoparticles with sizes below 2 nm that are proposed to be responsible for the catalytic activity. Tests of productivity using large phenol (50 g L(-1)) and H(2)O(2) excesses (100 g L(-1)) and reuse gives a minimum TON of 458,759 moles of phenol degraded per gold atom. Analysis of the organic compounds extracted from the deactivated solid catalyst indicates that the poisons are mostly hydroxylated dicarboxylic acids arising from the degradative oxidation of the phenyl ring. By determining the efficiency for phenol degradation and the amount of O(2) evolved two different reactions of H(2)O(2) decomposition (the Fenton reaction at acidic pH values and spurious O(2) evolution at basic pH values) are proposed for Au/D catalysis. The activation energy of the two processes is very similar (ranging between 30 and 35 kJ mol(-1)). By using dimethylsulfoxide as a radical scavenger and N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone as a spin trap under aerated conditions, the EPR spectrum of the expected PBN-OCH(3) adduct was detected, supporting the generation of HO(.), characteristic of Fenton chemistry in the process. Phenol degradation, on the other hand, exhibits the same activation energy as H(2)O(2) decomposition at pH 4 (due to the barrierless attack of HO(.) to phenol), but increases the activation energy gradually up to about 90 kJ mol(-1) at pH 7 and then undergoes a subsequent reduction as the pH increases reaching another minimum at pH 8.5 (49 kJ mol(-1)). PMID:21766362

  16. A Mesoporous Indium Metal-Organic Framework: Remarkable Advances in Catalytic Activity for Strecker Reaction of Ketones.

    PubMed

    Reinares-Fisac, Daniel; Aguirre-Díaz, Lina María; Iglesias, Marta; Snejko, Natalia; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles; Gándara, Felipe

    2016-07-27

    With the aim of developing new highly porous, heterogeneous Lewis acid catalysts for multicomponent reactions, a new mesoporous metal-organic framework, InPF-110 ([In3O(btb)2(HCOO)(L)], (H3btb = 1,3,5-tris(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene acid, L = methanol, water, or ethanol), has been prepared with indium as the metal center. It exhibits a Langmuir surface area of 1470 m(2) g(-1), and its structure consists of hexagonal pores with a 2.8 nm aperture, which allows the diffusion of multiple substrates. This material presents a large density of active metal sites resulting in outstanding catalytic activity in the formation of substituted α-aminonitriles through the one-pot Strecker reaction of ketones. In this respect, InPF-110 stands out compared to other catalysts for this reaction due to the small catalyst loadings required, and without the need for heat or solvents. Furthermore, X-ray single crystal diffraction studies clearly show the framework-substrate interaction through coordination to the accessible indium sites. PMID:27420904

  17. Dielectric characterization and catalytic activity studies of nickel chloride doped carboxymethyl cellulose films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bahy, Zeinhom M.; Mahmoud, Khaled H.

    Cast technique was used to prepare films of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) doped with different ratios of NiCl2·6H2O in the range of 0-40 Ni2+ wt.%. Thermal analysis (DTA) in the range of 25-600 °C and dielectric properties in the temperature range of 30-150 °C and frequency range of 0.1-100 kHz were measured for the prepared samples. DTA analysis showed new exothermic peaks which were attributed to structural phase transitions. Different molecular motions are separated via dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. In the high temperature range (higher than 100 °C), the σ-relaxation, which is associated with the hopping motion of ions through polymer material, was detected. The detailed analysis of the results showed that the dielectric dispersion consists of both dipolar and interfacial polarization. Measurements of ac conductivity as a function of frequency at different temperatures indicated that the correlated barrier hopping model (CBH) is the most suitable mechanism for the ac conduction behavior. The catalytic activity of CMC doped with Ni2+ was tested in the reduction of the hazardous pollutant 4-nitrophenol to the functional 4-aminophenol with an excess amount of NaBH4. Ni-free CMC did not exhibit any catalytic activity for the studied reaction. However, Ni2+-doped CMC showed a significant catalytic activity that is proportional to the ratio of Ni2+ included in CMC. The activation energy (Ea) was estimated in the temperature range of 25-40 °C. The estimated value of Ea decreased with increasing the ratio of Ni2+. Finally, the optimum catalyst mass was found to be ≈0.6 g/l.

  18. Effect of Manganese Additive on the Improvement of Low-Temperature Catalytic Activity of VO(x)-WO(x)/TiO2 Nanoparticles for Chlorobenzene Combustion.

    PubMed

    He, Fei; Chen, Chunxiao; Liu, Shantang

    2016-06-01

    In this study, V-W/TiO2, Mn-V-W/TiO2 and Mn-W/TiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by homogeneous precipitation method and investigated for the catalytic combustion of chlorobenzene (CB), which was used as a model compound of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and hydrogen temperature-programed reduction (H2-TPR). The average size of the nanoparticles was -20 nm. Manganese species were evenly distributed on the surface of the V-W/TiO2 catalyst, and a small amount of manganese addition did not affect the crystal form, crystallinity and morphology of the V-W/TiO2 catalyst. In addition, low-temperature catalytic activity of V-W/TiO2 catalysts could be effectively improved. When the molar ratio of Mn/(Mn + V) was 0.25 or 0.4, the catalyst displayed the highest low-temperature activity. This was possibly due to Mn (VO3)x formed by the reaction of manganese and vanadium species. Meanwhile, we also found that the addition of oxalic acid was benefit to the improvement of the catalytic activities. When manganese content was high, such as Mn (0.75) VW/Ti, the catalyst activity declined seriously, and the reason was also discussed. PMID:27427700

  19. Functional role of TRIM E3 ligase oligomerization and regulation of catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Koliopoulos, Marios G; Esposito, Diego; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Taylor, Ian A; Rittinger, Katrin

    2016-06-01

    TRIM E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate a wide variety of cellular processes and are particularly important during innate immune signalling events. They are characterized by a conserved tripartite motif in their N-terminal portion which comprises a canonical RING domain, one or two B-box domains and a coiled-coil region that mediates ligase dimerization. Self-association via the coiled-coil has been suggested to be crucial for catalytic activity of TRIMs; however, the precise molecular mechanism underlying this observation remains elusive. Here, we provide a detailed characterization of the TRIM ligases TRIM25 and TRIM32 and show how their oligomeric state is linked to catalytic activity. The crystal structure of a complex between the TRIM25 RING domain and an ubiquitin-loaded E2 identifies the structural and mechanistic features that promote a closed E2~Ub conformation to activate the thioester for ubiquitin transfer allowing us to propose a model for the regulation of activity in the full-length protein. Our data reveal an unexpected diversity in the self-association mechanism of TRIMs that might be crucial for their biological function. PMID:27154206

  20. A redox 2-Cys mechanism regulates the catalytic activity of divergent cyclophilins.

    PubMed

    Campos, Bruna Medéia; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli; Domingues, Mariane Noronha; Brasil de Souza, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalvez; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Perez, Carlos Alberto; Whittaker, Sara Britt-Marie; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Matos; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2013-07-01

    The citrus (Citrus sinensis) cyclophilin CsCyp is a target of the Xanthomonas citri transcription activator-like effector PthA, required to elicit cankers on citrus. CsCyp binds the citrus thioredoxin CsTdx and the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II and is a divergent cyclophilin that carries the additional loop KSGKPLH, invariable cysteine (Cys) residues Cys-40 and Cys-168, and the conserved glutamate (Glu) Glu-83. Despite the suggested roles in ATP and metal binding, the functions of these unique structural elements remain unknown. Here, we show that the conserved Cys residues form a disulfide bond that inactivates the enzyme, whereas Glu-83, which belongs to the catalytic loop and is also critical for enzyme activity, is anchored to the divergent loop to maintain the active site open. In addition, we demonstrate that Cys-40 and Cys-168 are required for the interaction with CsTdx and that CsCyp binds the citrus carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II YSPSAP repeat. Our data support a model where formation of the Cys-40-Cys-168 disulfide bond induces a conformational change that disrupts the interaction of the divergent and catalytic loops, via Glu-83, causing the active site to close. This suggests a new type of allosteric regulation in divergent cyclophilins, involving disulfide bond formation and a loop-displacement mechanism. PMID:23709667

  1. Facile synthesis of pristine graphene-palladium nanocomposites with extraordinary catalytic activities using swollen liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Vats, T; Dutt, S; Kumar, R; Siril, P F

    2016-01-01

    Amazing conductivity, perfect honeycomb sp(2) arrangement and the high theoretical surface area make pristine graphene as one of the best materials suited for application as catalyst supports. Unfortunately, the low reactivity of the material makes the formation of nanocomposite with inorganic materials difficult. Here we report an easy approach to synthesize nanocomposites of pristine graphene with palladium (Pd-G) using swollen liquid crystals (SLCs) as a soft template. The SLC template gives the control to deposit very small Pd particles of uniform size on G as well as RGO. The synthesized nanocomposite (Pd-G) exhibited exceptionally better catalytic activity compared with Pd-RGO nanocomposite in the hydrogenation of nitrophenols and microwave assisted C-C coupling reactions. The catalytic activity of Pd-G nanocomposite during nitrophenol reduction reaction was sixteen times higher than Pd nanoparticles and more than double than Pd-RGO nanocomposite. The exceptionally high activity of pristine graphene supported catalysts in the organic reactions is explained on the basis of its better pi interacting property compared to partially reduced RGO. The Pd-G nanocomposite showed exceptional stability under the reaction conditions as it could be recycled upto a minimum of 15 cycles for the C-C coupling reactions without any loss in activity. PMID:27619321

  2. Design of activated serine-containing catalytic triads with atomic level accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Sridharan; Wang, Chu; Yu, Kai; Kuzin, Alexandre P.; Richter, Florian; Lew, Scott; Miklos, Aleksandr E.; Matthews, Megan L.; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Su, Min; Hunt, John. F.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    A challenge in the computational design of enzymes is that multiple properties must be simultaneously optimized -- substrate-binding, transition state stabilization, and product release -- and this has limited the absolute activity of successful designs. Here, we focus on a single critical property of many enzymes: the nucleophilicity of an active site residue that initiates catalysis. We design proteins with idealized serine-containing catalytic triads, and assess their nucleophilicity directly in native biological systems using activity-based organophosphate probes. Crystal structures of the most successful designs show unprecedented agreement with computational models, including extensive hydrogen bonding networks between the catalytic triad (or quartet) residues, and mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that these networks are critical for serine activation and organophosphate-reactivity. Following optimization by yeast-display, the designs react with organophosphate probes at rates comparable to natural serine hydrolases. Co-crystal structures with diisopropyl fluorophosphate bound to the serine nucleophile suggest the designs could provide the basis for a new class of organophosphate captures agents. PMID:24705591

  3. Site-dependent catalytic activity of graphene oxides towards oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaobin; Cao, Zexing

    2012-12-28

    Graphene oxides (GOs) may offer extraordinary potential in the design of novel catalytic systems due to the presence of various oxygen functional groups and their unique electronic and structural properties. Using first-principles calculations, we explore the plausible mechanisms for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane to propene by GOs and the diffusion of the surface oxygen-containing groups under an external electric field. The present results show that GOs with modified oxygen-containing groups may afford high catalytic activity for the ODH of propane to propene. The presence of hydroxyl groups around the active sites provided by epoxides can remarkably enhance the C-H bond activation of propane and the activity enhancement exhibits strong site dependence. The sites of oxygen functional groups on the GO surface can be easily tuned by the diffusion of these groups under an external electric field, which increases the reactivity of GOs towards ODH of propane. The chemically modified GOs are thus quite promising in the design of metal-free catalysis. PMID:22801590

  4. Creation of catalytically active particles from enzymes crosslinked with a natural bifunctional agent--homocysteine thiolactone.

    PubMed

    Stroylova, Yulia Y; Semenyuk, Pavel I; Asriyantz, Regina A; Gaillard, Cedric; Haertlé, Thomas; Muronetz, Vladimir I

    2014-09-01

    The current study describes an approach to creation of catalytically active particles with increased stability from enzymes by N-homocysteinylation, a naturally presented protein modification. Enzymatic activities and properties of two globular tetrameric enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were studied before and after N-homocysteinylation. Modification of these proteins concerns the accessible lysine residues and introduces an average of 2-2,5 homocysteine residues per protein monomer. Formation of a range of aggregates was observed for both enzymes, which assemble via formation of intermolecular noncovalent bonds and by disulfide bonds. It was demonstrated that both studied enzymes retain their catalytic activities on modification and the subsequent formation of oligomeric forms. At low concentrations of homocysteine thiolactone, modification of GAPDH leads not only to prevention of spontaneous inactivation but also increases thermal stability of this enzyme on heating to 80°C. A moderate reduction of the activity of GAPDH observed in case of its crosslinking with 50-fold excess of homocysteine thiolactone per lysine is probably caused by hindered substrate diffusion. Spherical particles of 100 nm and larger diameters were observed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscope techniques after modification of GAPDH with different homocysteine thiolactone concentrations. In case of LDH, branched fibril-like aggregates were observed under the same conditions. Interestingly, crosslinked samples of both proteins were found to have reversible thermal denaturation profiles, indicating that modification with homocysteine thiolactone stabilizes the spatial structure of these enzymes. PMID:24912753

  5. Activity, Expression and Function of a Second Drosophila Protein Kinase a Catalytic Subunit Gene

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-01-01

    The DC2 gene was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DCO, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 did not affect the viability or phenotype of imaginal disc cells lacking DC0 activity or embryonic hatching of animals with reduced DC0 activity. Furthermore, transgenes expressing DC2 from a DC0 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. PMID:8601490

  6. Structural and catalytic characterization of a thermally stable and acid-stable variant of human carbonic anhydrase II containing an engineered disulfide bond

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Christopher D.; Habibzadegan, Andrew; Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N.; McKenna, Robert

    2013-08-01

    The X-ray crystallographic structure of the disulfide-containing HCAII (dsHCAII) has been solved to 1.77 Å resolution and revealed that successful oxidation of the cysteine bond was achieved while also retaining desirable active-site geometry. The carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a family of mostly zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of CO{sub 2} to bicarbonate and a proton. Recently, there has been industrial interest in utilizing CAs as biocatalysts for carbon sequestration and biofuel production. The conditions used in these processes, however, result in high temperatures and acidic pH. This unfavorable environment results in rapid destabilization and loss of catalytic activity in CAs, ultimately resulting in cost-inefficient high-maintenance operation of the system. In order to negate these detrimental industrial conditions, cysteines at residues 23 (Ala23Cys) and 203 (Leu203Cys) were engineered into a wild-type variant of human CA II (HCAII) containing the mutation Cys206Ser. The X-ray crystallographic structure of the disulfide-containing HCAII (dsHCAII) was solved to 1.77 Å resolution and revealed that successful oxidation of the cysteine bond was achieved while also retaining desirable active-site geometry. Kinetic studies utilizing the measurement of {sup 18}O-labeled CO{sub 2} by mass spectrometry revealed that dsHCAII retained high catalytic efficiency, and differential scanning calorimetry showed acid stability and thermal stability that was enhanced by up to 14 K compared with native HCAII. Together, these studies have shown that dsHCAII has properties that could be used in an industrial setting to help to lower costs and improve the overall reaction efficiency.

  7. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Hua; Li, Zhihu; Xu, Yanhui

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm{sup −2} for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm{sup −2} (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −6} cm s{sup −1}. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER.

  8. Cwc2 and its human homologue RBM22 promote an active conformation of the spliceosome catalytic centre

    PubMed Central

    Rasche, Nicolas; Dybkov, Olexandr; Schmitzová, Jana; Akyildiz, Berktan; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    RNA-structural elements play key roles in pre-mRNA splicing catalysis; yet, the formation of catalytically competent RNA structures requires the assistance of spliceosomal proteins. We show that the S. cerevisiae Cwc2 protein functions prior to step 1 of splicing, and it is not required for the Prp2-mediated spliceosome remodelling that generates the catalytically active B* complex, suggesting that Cwc2 plays a more sophisticated role in the generation of a functional catalytic centre. In active spliceosomes, Cwc2 contacts catalytically important RNA elements, including the U6 internal stem-loop (ISL), and regions of U6 and the pre-mRNA intron near the 5′ splice site, placing Cwc2 at/near the spliceosome's catalytic centre. These interactions are evolutionarily conserved, as shown by studies with Cwc2's human counterpart RBM22, indicating that Cwc2/RBM22–RNA contacts are functionally important. We propose that Cwc2 induces an active conformation of the spliceosome's catalytic RNA elements. Thus, the function of RNA–RNA tertiary interactions within group II introns, namely to induce an active conformation of domain V, may be fulfilled by proteins that contact the functionally analogous U6-ISL, within the spliceosome. PMID:22246180

  9. Structural and mechanistic analysis of engineered trichodiene synthase enzymes from Trichoderma harzianum: towards higher catalytic activities empowering sustainable agriculture.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Indu; Chaudhary, Nitika; Sandhu, Padmani; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-06-01

    Trichoderma spp. are well-known bioagents for the plant growth promotion and pathogen suppression. The beneficial activities of the fungus Trichoderma spp. are attributed to their ability to produce and secrete certain secondary metabolites such as trichodermin that belongs to trichothecene family of molecules. The initial steps of trichodermin biosynthetic pathway in Trichoderma are similar to the trichothecenes from Fusarium sporotrichioides. Trichodiene synthase (TS) encoded by tri5 gene in Trichoderma catalyses the conversion of farnesyl pyrophosphate to trichodiene as reported earlier. In this study, we have carried out a comprehensive comparative sequence and structural analysis of the TS, which revealed the conserved residues involved in catalytic activity of the protein. In silico, modelled tertiary structure of TS protein showed stable structural behaviour during simulations. Two single-substitution mutants, i.e. D109E, D248Y and one double-substitution mutant (D109E and D248Y) of TS with potentially higher activities are screened out. The mutant proteins showed more stability than the wild type, an increased number of electrostatic interactions and better binding energies with the ligand, which further elucidates the amino acid residues involved in the reaction mechanism. These results will lead to devise strategies for higher TS activity to ultimately enhance the trichodermin production by Trichoderma spp. for its better exploitation in the sustainable agricultural practices. PMID:26207800

  10. Factor IX Amagasaki: A new mutation in the catalytic domain resulting in the loss of both coagulant and esterase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Toshiyuki; Iwanaga, Sadaaki ); Sakai, Toshiyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Naka, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazukuni; Yoshioka, Akira; Fukui, Hiromu ); Mitsui, Kotoko; Kamiya, Kensyu; Umeyama, Hideaki )

    1991-11-26

    Factor IX Amagasaki (AMG) is a naturally occurring mutant of factor IX having essentially no coagulant activity, even though normal levels of antigen are detected in plasma. Factor IX AMG was purified from the patient's plasma by immunoaffinity chromatography with an anti-factor IX monoclonal antibody column. Factor IX AMG was cleaved normally by factor VIIa-tissue factor complex, yielding a two-chain factor IXa. Amino acid composition and sequence analysis of one of the tryptic peptides isolated from factor IX AMG revealed that Gly-311 had been replaced by Glu. The authors identified a one-base substitution of guanine to adenine in exon VIII by amplifying exon VIII using the polymerase chain reaction method and sequencing the product. This base mutation also supported the replacement of Gly-311 by Glu. In the purified system, factor IXa AMG did not activate for factor X in the presence of factor VIII, phospholipids, and Ca{sup 2+}, and no esterase activity toward Z-Arg-p-nitrobenzyl ester was observed. The model building of the serine protease domain of factor IXa suggests that the Gly-311 {yields} Glu exchange would disrupt the specific conformational state in the active site environment, resulting in the substrate binding site not forming properly. This is the first report to show the experimental evidence for importance of a highly conserved Gly-142 (chymotrypsinogen numbering) located in the catalytic site of mammalian serine proteases so far known.

  11. Advances in catalytic production of bio-based polyester monomer 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junhua; Li, Junke; Tang, Yanjun; Lin, Lu; Long, Minnan

    2015-10-01

    Recently, the production and utilization of 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) have become a hot research topic in catalyst field and polyester industry for its special chemical structure and a wide range of raw material source. FDCA is a potential replacement for the terephthalic acid monomer used in the production of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT), which opens up a new pathway for obtaining biomass-based polyester to replace or partially replace petroleum based polyester. Here, we mainly reviewed the catalytic pathway for the synthesis of FDCA derived from lignocellulosic biomass or from the related downstream products, such as glucose, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). Moreover, the utilization of oxidation catalysts, the reaction mechanism, the existing limitations and unsolved challenges were also elaborated in detail. Therefore, we hope this mini review provides a helpful overview and insight to readers in this exciting research area. PMID:26076643

  12. A new experimental setup for high-pressure catalytic activity measurements on surface deposited mass-selected Pt clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Yoshihide; Isomura, Noritake

    2009-09-15

    A new experimental setup to study catalytic and electronic properties of size-selected clusters on metal oxide substrates from the viewpoint of cluster-support interaction and to formulate a method for the development of heterogeneous catalysts such as automotive exhaust catalysts has been developed. The apparatus consists of a size-selected cluster source, a photoemission spectrometer, a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), and a high-pressure reaction cell. The high-pressure reaction cell measurements provided information on catalytic properties in conditions close to practical use. The authors investigated size-selected platinum clusters deposited on a TiO{sub 2}(110) surface using a reaction cell and STM. Catalytic activity measurements showed that the catalytic activities have a cluster-size dependency.

  13. Catalytic Ester–Amide Exchange Using Group (IV) Metal Alkoxide–Activator Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chong; Lee, Jonathan P.; Lobkovsky, Emil; Porco, John A.

    2005-01-01

    A process for preparation of amides from unactivated esters and amines has been developed using a catalytic system comprised of group (IV) metal alkoxides in conjunction with additives including 1-hydroxy-7-azabenzotriazole (HOAt). In general, ester–amide exchange proceeds using a variety of structurally diverse esters and amines without azeotropic reflux to remove the alcohol byproduct. Initial mechanistic studies on the Zr(Ot-Bu)4–HOAt system revealed that the active catalyst is a novel, dimeric zirconium complex as determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:16011366

  14. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of novel large network polystyrene-immobilized organic bases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tassi, Marco; Bartollini, Elena; Adriaensens, Peter; Bianchi, Luca; Barkakaty, Balaka; Carleer, Robert; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.; Marrocchi, Assunta; Vaccaro, Luigi

    2015-12-07

    In view of searching for efficient polymeric supports for organic bases to be used in environmentally friendly reaction conditions, novel gel-type cross-linked polystyrenes functionalized with diethylamine and 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene, have been prepared. Moreover, the structural properties and morphology of these catalysts have been determined by extensive solid state NMR experiments, FTIR spectroscopy and SEM/TEM microscopy. SPACeR-supported bases were found to exhibit high catalytic activity in the epoxide ring opening by phenols. Finally, a range of β-substituted alcohols have been readily and regioselectively synthesized.

  15. Outer-sphere residues influence the catalytic activity of a chalcone synthase from Polygonum cuspidatum.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yalin; Li, Xing; Chai, Tuanyao; Wang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    We have previously cloned a chalcone synthase (PcCHS1) from Polygonum cuspidatum and biochemically identified its enzymatic dynamic properties. Here, we found that the outer sphere residues, Q82 and R105, could affect the catalytic activity and product profile of PcCHS1. Both Q82P and R105Q mutations of PcCHS1 could also change the pH dependence activity as well as the product profile of PcCHS1. Moreover, the Q82P/C198F double mutant could rescue the complete loss of enzyme activity caused by the C198F single mutation. Our study demonstrated that these outer-sphere residues of PcCHS1 play important roles both in structural maintenance and enzyme activity. PMID:27419064

  16. Catalytic activity of bimetal-containing Co,Pd systems in the oxidation of carbon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleksenko, L. P.; Lutsenko, L. V.

    2013-02-01

    The catalytic activity of low-percentage Co,Pd systems on ZSM-5, ERI, SiO2, and Al2O3 supports in the oxidation of CO was studied. The activity of bimetal-containing catalysts was shown to depend on the nature of the catalyst and the amount and ratio of their active components. According to the results of thermoprogrammed reduction with H2 (H2 TPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data, the metals are distributed as isolated cations or Coδ+-O-Pdδ+ clusters with cobalt and palladium cations surrounded by off-lattice oxygen in Co,Pd systems. The 0.8% Co,0.5% Pd-ZSM-5 bimetal catalysts were found to be more active due to the presence of clusters.

  17. Upgrading of coal-derived liquids. 1. Catalytic activities of zeolite catalysts and commercial HDS catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, R.; Hara, S.; Yoshida, T.; Yokoyama, S.; Nakata, Y.; Goto, Y.; Maekawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The applicability of various zeolite catalysts and commercial hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts to the secondary hydrotreatment of coal-derived liquids was examined in relation to the chemical structure of upgraded liquids. The catalytic activities of zeolite catalysts for HI conversion is lower than are the activities of Ni-Mo, Ni-Co-Mo, Co-Mo and Ni-W catalysts. However, as regards hydrogenation and the removal of nitrogen, zeolite catalysts such as natural clinoptilolite and mordenite have almost the same activity as do Co-Mo and Ni-W catalysts. As to the removal of oxygen, it was proved that zeolite catalysts had a functionality to remove oxygen as CO/sub x/ gas, and HDS catalysts had a high activity for hydrodeoxygenation. 10 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  18. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  19. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology. PMID:26861509

  20. Reduction of nitrogen oxides with catalytic acid resistant aluminosilicate molecular sieves and ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Pence, Dallas T.; Thomas, Thomas R.

    1980-01-01

    Noxious nitrogen oxides in a waste gas stream such as the stack gas from a fossil-fuel-fired power generation plant or other industrial plant off-gas stream is catalytically reduced to elemental nitrogen and/or innocuous nitrogen oxides employing ammonia as reductant in the presence of a zeolite catalyst in the hydrogen or sodium form having pore openings of about 3 to 10 A.

  1. Enhanced catalytic activity over MIL-100(Fe) loaded ceria catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH₃ at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Sun, Hong; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo

    2016-01-15

    The development of catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactions that are highly active at low temperatures and show good resistance to SO2 and H2O is still a challenge. In this study, we have designed and developed a high-performance SCR catalyst based on nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside the pores of MIL-100(Fe) that combines excellent catalytic power with a metal organic framework architecture synthesized by the impregnation method (IM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the encapsulation of ceria in the cavities of MIL-100(Fe). The prepared IM-CeO2/MIL-100(Fe) catalyst shows improved catalytic activity both at low temperatures and throughout a wide temperature window. The temperature window for 90% NOx conversion ranges from 196 to 300°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) analysis indicated that the nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside MIL-100(Fe) promotes the production of chemisorbed oxygen on the catalyst surface, which greatly enhances the formation of the NO2 species responsible for fast SCR reactions. PMID:26414927

  2. Hot-electron-mediated surface chemistry: toward electronic control of catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Young; Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Hyosun; Nedrygailov, Ievgen I

    2015-08-18

    nanoparticles on oxide supports and Pt-CdSe-Pt nanodumbbells. We show that the accumulation or depletion of hot electrons on metal nanoparticles, in turn, can also influence catalytic reactions. Mechanisms suggested for hot-electron-induced chemical reactions on a photoexcited plasmonic metal are discussed. We propose that the manipulation of the flow of hot electrons by changing the electrical characteristics of metal-oxide and metal-semiconductor interfaces can give rise to the intriguing capability of tuning the catalytic activity of hybrid nanocatalysts. PMID:26181684

  3. Enhanced Activity of Nanocrystalline Zeolites for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah C. Larson; Vicki H. Grassian

    2006-12-31

    Nanocrystalline zeolites with discrete crystal sizes of less than 100 nm have different properties relative to zeolites with larger crystal sizes. Nanocrystalline zeolites have improved mass transfer properties and very large internal and external surface areas that can be exploited for many different applications. The additional external surface active sites and the improved mass transfer properties of nanocrystalline zeolites offer significant advantages for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysis with ammonia as a reductant in coal-fired power plants relative to current zeolite based SCR catalysts. Nanocrystalline NaY was synthesized with a crystal size of 15-20 nm and was thoroughly characterized using x-ray diffraction, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Copper ions were exchanged into nanocrystalline NaY to increase the catalytic activity. The reactions of nitrogen dioxides (NO{sub x}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) on nanocrystalline NaY and CuY were investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy. Significant conversion of NO{sub 2} was observed at room temperature in the presence of NH{sub 3} as monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy. Copper-exchanged nanocrystalline NaY was more active for NO{sub 2} reduction with NH{sub 3} relative to nanocrystalline NaY.

  4. CO oxidation over ruthenium: identification of the catalytically active phases at near-atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Goodman, Wayne D.

    2012-05-21

    CO oxidation was carried out over Ru(0001) and RuO2(110) thin film grown on Ru(0001) at various O2/CO ratios near atmospheric pressures. Reaction kinetics, coupled with in situ polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) and post-reaction Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) measurements were used to identify the catalytically relevant phases at different reaction conditions. Under stoichiometric and reducing conditions at all reaction temperatures, as well as net-oxidizing reaction conditions below {approx}475 K, a reduced metallic phase with chemisorbed oxygen is the thermodynamically stable and catalytically active phase. On this surface CO oxidation occurs at surface defect sites, for example step edges. Only at net-oxidizing reaction conditions and above {approx}475 K is the RuO2 thin film grown on metallic Ru stable and active. However, RuO2 is not active itself without the existence of the metal substrate, suggesting the importance of a strong metal-substrate interaction (SMSI).

  5. HMGB1 interacts with human topoisomerase IIα and stimulates its catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Štros, Michal; Bačíková, Alena; Polanská, Eva; Štokrová, Jitka

    2007-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα) is an essential nuclear enzyme and its unique decatenation activity has been implicated in many aspects of chromosome dynamics such as chromosome replication and segregation during mitosis. Here we show that chromatin-associated protein HMGB1 (a member of the large family of HMG-box proteins with possible functions in DNA replication, transcription, recombination and DNA repair) promotes topo IIα-mediated catenation of circular DNA, relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA and decatenation of kinetoplast DNA. HMGB1 interacts with topo IIα and this interaction, like the stimulation of the catalytic activity of the enzyme, requires both HMG-box domains of HMGB1. A mutant of HMGB1, which cannot change DNA topology stimulates DNA decatenation by topo IIα indistinguishably from the wild-type protein. Although HMGB1 stimulates ATP hydrolysis by topo IIα, the DNA cleavage is much more enhanced. The observed abilities of HMGB1 to interact with topo IIα and promote topo IIα binding to DNA suggest a mechanism by which HMGB1 stimulates the catalytic activity of the enzyme via enhancement of DNA cleavage. PMID:17636313

  6. Nitrated graphene oxide and its catalytic activity in thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenwen; Luo, Qingping; Duan, Xiaohui; Zhou, Yong; Pei, Chonghua

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • The NGO was synthesized by nitrifying homemade GO. • The N content of resulted NGO is up to 1.45 wt.%. • The NGO can facilitate the decomposition of AP and release much heat. - Abstract: Nitrated graphene oxide (NGO) was synthesized by nitrifying homemade GO with nitro-sulfuric acid. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), laser Raman spectroscopy, CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the structure of NGO. The thickness and the compositions of GO and NGO were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and elemental analysis (EA), respectively. The catalytic effect of the NGO for the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Adding 10% of NGO to AP decreases the decomposition temperature by 106 °C and increases the apparent decomposition heat from 875 to 3236 J/g.

  7. Control of product selectivity using solid acids for the catalytic addition of phenol to hydroxy fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The acid catalyzed reactions of hydroxy fatty acids, such as ricinoleic and lesquerolic, in the presence of phenolics can lead to four products or product groups. These include simple dehydration to dienoic acids, cyclization to epoxides, Friedel-Crafts alkylations of the double bonds, or ether for...

  8. Catalytic hydrodechlorination of monochloroacetic acid in wastewater using Ni-Fe bimetal prepared by ball milling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong; Xu, Fuyuan; Zhao, Jianzhuang; Jia, Linfang; Wu, Kunming

    2015-09-01

    Monochloroacetic acid (MCA) is a chemically stable and biologically toxic pollutant. It is often generated during the production of the pesticide dimethoate. Conventional wastewater treatment processes have difficulty degrading it. In this work, the dechlorination effects of Ni-Fe bimetal prepared using ball milling (BM) technology for the high concentrations of MCA in wastewater were examined. The MCA in aqueous solution was found to be degraded efficiently by the Ni-Fe bimetal. However, S-(methoxycarbonyl) methyl O, O-dimethyl phosphorodithioate (SMOPD) in wastewater, a by-product of the dimethoate production process, significantly inhibited the reductive dechlorination activity of Ni-Fe bimetal. Increasing the reaction temperature in the MCA wastewater enhanced the reduction activity of the Ni-Fe bimetal effectively. Oxygen was found to be unfavorable to dechlorination. Sealing the reaction to prevent oxidation was found to render the degradation process more efficient. The process retained over 88% efficiency after 10 treatment cycles with 50 g/L of Ni-Fe bimetal under field conditions. PMID:25976331

  9. Insertion of Endocellulase Catalytic Domains into Thermostable Consensus Ankyrin Scaffolds: Effects on Stability and Cellulolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Eva S.; Hatem, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of cellulose for biofuels production holds promise in solving important environmental and economic problems. However, the low activities (and thus high enzyme-to-substrate ratios needed) of hydrolytic cellulase enzymes, which convert cellulose into simple sugars, remain a major barrier. As a potential strategy to stabilize cellulases and enhance their activities, we have embedded cellulases of extremophiles into hyperstable α-helical consensus ankyrin domain scaffolds. We found the catalytic domains CelA (CA, GH8; Clostridium thermocellum) and Cel12A (C12A, GH12; Thermotoga maritima) to be stable in the context of the ankyrin scaffold and to be active against both soluble and insoluble substrates. The ankyrin repeats in each fusion are folded, although it appears that for the C12A catalytic domain (CD; where the N and C termini are distant in the crystal structure), the two flanking ankyrin domains are independent, whereas for CA (where termini are close), the flanking ankyrin domains stabilize each other. Although the activity of CA is unchanged in the context of the ankyrin scaffold, the activity of C12A is increased between 2- and 6-fold (for regenerated amorphous cellulose and carboxymethyl cellulose substrates) at high temperatures. For C12A, activity increases with the number of flanking ankyrin repeats. These results showed ankyrin arrays to be a promising scaffold for constructing designer cellulosomes, preserving or enhancing enzymatic activity and retaining thermostability. This modular architecture will make it possible to arrange multiple cellulase domains at a precise spacing within a single polypeptide, allowing us to search for spacings that may optimize reactivity toward the repetitive cellulose lattice. PMID:23974146

  10. First acidic macro-mesocellular aluminosilicate monolithic foams "SiAl(HIPE)" and their catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Debecker, Damien P; Boissière, Cédric; Laurent, Guillaume; Huet, Stéphanie; Eliaers, Philippe; Sanchez, Clément; Backov, Rénal

    2015-09-25

    A new type of acidic macrocellular and mesoporous silica-alumina foam is obtained via a one pot alkaline sol-gel route coupled with a concentrated emulsion-based templating technique. The mixed oxide monolith exhibits high surface acidity, translating into excellent performance in the acid-catalyzed dehydration of bioethanol to ethene. PMID:26266884

  11. alpha-lytic protease can exist in two separately stable conformations with different His57 mobilities and catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Kristin Coffman; Sudmeier, James L; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Bachovchin, William W

    2005-01-25

    alpha-Lytic protease is a bacterial serine protease widely studied as a model system of enzyme catalysis. Here we report that lyophilization induces a structural change in the enzyme that is not reversed by redissolution in water. The structural change reduces the mobility of the active-site histidine residue and the catalytic activity of the enzyme. The application of mild pressure to solutions of the altered enzyme reverses the lyophilization-induced structural change and restores the mobility of the histidine residue and the enzyme's catalytic activity. This effect of lyophilization permits a unique opportunity for investigating the relationship between histidine ring dynamics and catalytic activity. The results demonstrate that His57 in resting enzymes is more mobile than previously thought, especially when protonated. The histidine motion and its correlation to enzyme activity lend support to the reaction-driven ring flip hypothesis. PMID:15657134

  12. α-Lytic protease can exist in two separately stable conformations with different His57 mobilities and catalytic activities

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Kristin Coffman; Sudmeier, James L.; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    2005-01-01

    α-Lytic protease is a bacterial serine protease widely studied as a model system of enzyme catalysis. Here we report that lyophilization induces a structural change in the enzyme that is not reversed by redissolution in water. The structural change reduces the mobility of the active-site histidine residue and the catalytic activity of the enzyme. The application of mild pressure to solutions of the altered enzyme reverses the lyophilization-induced structural change and restores the mobility of the histidine residue and the enzyme's catalytic activity. This effect of lyophilization permits a unique opportunity for investigating the relationship between histidine ring dynamics and catalytic activity. The results demonstrate that His57 in resting enzymes is more mobile than previously thought, especially when protonated. The histidine motion and its correlation to enzyme activity lend support to the reaction-driven ring flip hypothesis. PMID:15657134

  13. Catalytic activity of metal oxides in hydrogen sulfide oxidation by oxygen and sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Marshneva, V.I.; Mokrinskii, V.V.

    1989-02-01

    Separate investigations have been made of the catalytic activities of a wide range of oxides by groups I-VIII metals in the Claus reaction and oxidation of H/sub 2/S by oxygen. Only 9 of 21 oxides used in the Claus reaction exhibit stable activity. The remaining oxides are deactivated, mainly by absorbing H/sub 2/S and being converted into sulfides. There are similar tendencies in the changes of sulfur formation specific velocities in both processes in the series of stable oxides V/sub 2/O/sub 5/, TiO/sub 2/, Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MgO, Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Vanadium pentoxide is the most active catalyst in the total and partial oxidations of H/sub 2/S and the Claus reaction.

  14. Catalytic activity of unsaturated coordinated Cu-MOF to the hydroxylation of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Lijuan; Chen, Chao; Lan, Fan; Deng, Shengjun; Xiao, Weiming; Zhang, Ning

    2011-05-01

    A 2D metal-organic framework [Cu 2 (BPTC) (Im) 4(H 2O) (DMF)] n ( 1) with unsaturated coordinated Cu(II) sites has been prepared under solvothermal condition, and applied to the hydroxylation of phenol after activating. The catalytic results indicate that 1a (the activated 1) exhibits an obvious activity for phenol hydroxylation at 40 °C for 4 h. Compared to the control experiments where the free Cu(II) (from Cu(OAc) 2 salt) has been utilized as the catalysts, 1a shows the higher selectivity to diphenols. This suggests that the coordinated environment of unsaturated coordinated Cu(II) sites in the 2D layer play the key role in the phenol hydroxylation.

  15. Promoting effect of vanadium on catalytic activity of Pt/Ce-Zr-O diesel oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haifeng; Jiang, Bo; Gu, Lei; Qi, Zhonghua; Lu, Hanfeng

    2015-07-01

    A series of Pt-V/Ce-Zr-O diesel oxidation catalysts was prepared using the impregnation method. The catalytic activity and sulfur resistance of Pt-V/Ce-Zr-O were investigated in the presence of simulated diesel exhaust. The effect of vanadium on the structure and redox properties of the catalysts was also investigated using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method, X-ray diffraction, H2 temperature-programmed reduction, CO temperature-programmed desorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. Results showed that the Pt particles were well dispersed on the Ce-Zr-O carrier through the vanadium isolation effect, which significantly improved the oxidation activity toward CO and hydrocarbons. An electron-withdrawing phenomenon occurred from V to Pt, resulting in an increase in the metallic nature of platinum, which was beneficial to hydrocarbon molecular activation. PMID:26141886

  16. Preparation of gold nanoparticles using Salicornia brachiata plant extract and evaluation of catalytic and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Subramanian, Swetha; Sivasubramanian, Aravind; Veerappan, Ganapathy; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2014-09-15

    The current study deals with the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using Salicornia brachiata (Sb) and evaluation of their antibacterial and catalytic activity. The SbAuNPs showed purple color with a characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak at 532 nm. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed polydispersed AuNPs with the size range from 22 to 35 nm. Energy dispersive X-ray and thin layer X-ray diffraction analysis clearly shows that SbAuNPs was pure and crystalline in nature. As prepared gold nanoparticles was used as a catalyst for the sodium borohydride reduction of 4-nitro phenol to 4-amino phenol and methylene blue to leucomethylene blue. The green synthesized nanoparticles exhibited potent antibacterial activity against the pathogenic bacteria, as evidenced by their zone of inhibition. In addition, we showed that the SbAuNPs in combination with the regular antibiotic, ofloxacin, exhibit superior antibacterial activity than the individual. PMID:24762573

  17. DGKθ Catalytic Activity Is Required for Efficient Recycling of Presynaptic Vesicles at Excitatory Synapses.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Hana L; Tu-Sekine, Becky; Volk, Lenora; Anggono, Victor; Huganir, Richard L; Raben, Daniel M

    2016-01-12

    Synaptic transmission relies on coordinated coupling of synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis and endocytosis. While much attention has focused on characterizing proteins involved in SV recycling, the roles of membrane lipids and their metabolism remain poorly understood. Diacylglycerol, a major signaling lipid produced at synapses during synaptic transmission, is regulated by diacylglycerol kinase (DGK). Here, we report a role for DGKθ in the mammalian CNS in facilitating recycling of presynaptic vesicles at excitatory synapses. Using synaptophysin- and vGlut1-pHluorin optical reporters, we found that acute and chronic deletion of DGKθ attenuated the recovery of SVs following neuronal stimulation. Rescue of recycling kinetics required DGKθ kinase activity. Our data establish a role for DGK catalytic activity at the presynaptic nerve terminal in SV recycling. Altogether, these data suggest that DGKθ supports synaptic transmission during periods of elevated neuronal activity. PMID:26748701

  18. Preparation of gold nanoparticles using Salicornia brachiata plant extract and evaluation of catalytic and antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Subramanian, Swetha; Sivasubramanian, Aravind; Veerappan, Ganapathy; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2014-09-01

    The current study deals with the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using Salicornia brachiata (Sb) and evaluation of their antibacterial and catalytic activity. The SbAuNPs showed purple color with a characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak at 532 nm. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed polydispersed AuNPs with the size range from 22 to 35 nm. Energy dispersive X-ray and thin layer X-ray diffraction analysis clearly shows that SbAuNPs was pure and crystalline in nature. As prepared gold nanoparticles was used as a catalyst for the sodium borohydride reduction of 4-nitro phenol to 4-amino phenol and methylene blue to leucomethylene blue. The green synthesized nanoparticles exhibited potent antibacterial activity against the pathogenic bacteria, as evidenced by their zone of inhibition. In addition, we showed that the SbAuNPs in combination with the regular antibiotic, ofloxacin, exhibit superior antibacterial activity than the individual.

  19. Phase- and morphology-controlled synthesis of cobalt sulfide nanocrystals and comparison of their catalytic activities for hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuan; Liu, Yunqi; Liu, Chenguang

    2015-12-01

    Colalt sulfide nanocrystals (NCs), including dandelion-like Co9S8 and sphere-like Co3S4, have been synthesized via a thermal decomposition approach using cobalt acetylacetonate as the cobalt source, 1-dodecanethiol as the sulfur source and oleic acid or oleylamine as the high boiling organic solvent. It is found that the molar ratio of the Co:S precursor and the species of solvent play an important role in the control of phase and morphology of cobalt sulfide nanostructures. The phase structure and morphology of the as-synthesized nickel sulfide NCs are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) mapping, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N2 adsorption-desorption. Then we further compare the electrocatalytic activity and stability of as-synthesized cobalt sulfide NCs for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The results show that sphere-like Co3S4 exhibits better electrocatalytic activity than the dandelion-like Co9S8 NCs for HER, which can be attributed to the difference of phase structure and morphology. The sphere-like Co3S4 NCs have large surface area and high electrical conductivity, both are beneficial to enhance the catalytic activity. This study indicates that the crystalline phase structure and morphology of cobalt sulfide NCs are important for designing HER electrocatalysts with high efficiency and good stability.

  20. Photo-catalytic Activities of Plant Hormones on Semiconductor Nanoparticles by Laser-Activated Electron Tunneling and Emitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-01

    Understanding of the dynamic process of laser-induced ultrafast electron tunneling is still very limited. It has been thought that the photo-catalytic reaction of adsorbents on the surface is either dependent on the number of resultant electron-hole pairs where excess energy is lost to the lattice through coupling with phonon modes, or dependent on irradiation photon wavelength. We used UV (355 nm) laser pulses to excite electrons from the valence band to the conduction band of titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO) and bismuth cobalt zinc oxide (Bi2O3)0.07(CoO)0.03(ZnO)0.9 semiconductor nanoparticles with different photo catalytic properties. Photoelectrons are extracted, accelerated in a static electric field and eventually captured by charge deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used to detect negative molecules and fragment ions generated by un-paired electron directed bond cleavages. We show that the probability of electron tunneling is determined by the strength of the static electric field and intrinsic electron mobility of semiconductors. Photo-catalytic dissociation or polymerization reactions of adsorbents are highly dependent on the kinetic energy of tunneling electrons as well as the strength of laser influx. By using this approach, photo-activities of phytohormones have been investigated.

  1. Photo-catalytic Activities of Plant Hormones on Semiconductor Nanoparticles by Laser-Activated Electron Tunneling and Emitting

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the dynamic process of laser-induced ultrafast electron tunneling is still very limited. It has been thought that the photo-catalytic reaction of adsorbents on the surface is either dependent on the number of resultant electron-hole pairs where excess energy is lost to the lattice through coupling with phonon modes, or dependent on irradiation photon wavelength. We used UV (355 nm) laser pulses to excite electrons from the valence band to the conduction band of titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO) and bismuth cobalt zinc oxide (Bi2O3)0.07(CoO)0.03(ZnO)0.9 semiconductor nanoparticles with different photo catalytic properties. Photoelectrons are extracted, accelerated in a static electric field and eventually captured by charge deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used to detect negative molecules and fragment ions generated by un-paired electron directed bond cleavages. We show that the probability of electron tunneling is determined by the strength of the static electric field and intrinsic electron mobility of semiconductors. Photo-catalytic dissociation or polymerization reactions of adsorbents are highly dependent on the kinetic energy of tunneling electrons as well as the strength of laser influx. By using this approach, photo-activities of phytohormones have been investigated. PMID:25749635

  2. Activities of human RRP6 and structure of the human RRP6 catalytic domain

    SciTech Connect

    Januszyk, Kurt; Liu, Quansheng; Lima, Christopher D.

    2011-08-29

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome is a highly conserved multi-subunit complex that catalyzes degradation and processing of coding and noncoding RNA. A noncatalytic nine-subunit exosome core interacts with Rrp44 and Rrp6, two subunits that possess processive and distributive 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity, respectively. While both Rrp6 and Rrp44 are responsible for RNA processing in budding yeast, Rrp6 may play a more prominent role in processing, as it has been demonstrated to be inhibited by stable RNA secondary structure in vitro and because the null allele in budding yeast leads to the buildup of specific structured RNA substrates. Human RRP6, otherwise known as PM/SCL-100 or EXOSC10, shares sequence similarity to budding yeast Rrp6 and is proposed to catalyze 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity on a variety of nuclear transcripts including ribosomal RNA subunits, RNA that has been poly-adenylated by TRAMP, as well as other nuclear RNA transcripts destined for processing and/or destruction. To characterize human RRP6, we expressed the full-length enzyme as well as truncation mutants that retain catalytic activity, compared their activities to analogous constructs for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rrp6, and determined the X-ray structure of a human construct containing the exoribonuclease and HRDC domains that retains catalytic activity. Structural data show that the human active site is more exposed when compared to the yeast structure, and biochemical data suggest that this feature may play a role in the ability of human RRP6 to productively engage and degrade structured RNA substrates more effectively than the analogous budding yeast enzyme.

  3. Support Morphology-Dependent Catalytic Activity of Pd/CeO₂ for Formaldehyde Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hongyi; Wang, Jin; Yu, Shuzhen; Zhou, Kebin

    2015-07-21

    To eliminate indoor formaldehyde (HCHO) pollution, Pd/CeO2 catalysts with different morphologies of ceria support were employed. The palladium nanoparticles loaded on {100}-faceted CeO2 nanocubes exhibited much higher activity than those loaded on {111}-faceted ceria nanooctahedrons and nanorods (enclosed by {100} and {111} facets). The HCHO could be fully converted into CO2 over the Pd/CeO2 nanocubes at a GHSV of 10,000 h(-1) and a HCHO inlet concentration of 600 ppm at ambient temperature. The prepared catalysts were characterized by a series of techniques. The HRTEM, ICP-MS and XRD results confirmed the exposed facets of the ceria and the sizes (1-2 nm) of the palladium nanoparticles with loading amounts close to 1%. According to the Pd 3d XPS and H2-TPR results, the status of the Pd-species was dependent on the morphologies of the supports. The {100} facets of ceria could maintain the metallic Pd species rather than the {111} facets, which promoted HCHO catalytic combustion. The Raman and O 1s XPS results revealed that the nanorods with more defect sites and oxygen vacancies were responsible for the easy oxidation of the Pd-species and low catalytic activity. PMID:26120873

  4. Activity, expression and function of a second Drosophila protein kinase a catalytic subunit gene

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-12-01

    The DC2 was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DC0, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. 62 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Structural basis for catalytic activation by the human ZNF451 SUMO E3 ligase

    PubMed Central

    Cappadocia, Laurent; Pichler, Andrea; Lima, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    E3 protein ligases enhance transfer of ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins from E2 conjugating enzymes to substrates by stabilizing the thioester-charged E2~Ubl in a closed configuration optimally aligned for nucleophilic attack. Here, we report biochemical and structural data that define the N-terminal domain of the Homo sapiens ZNF451 as the catalytic module for SUMO E3 ligase activity. ZNF451 catalytic module contains tandem SUMO interaction motifs (SIMs) bridged by a Proline-Leucine-Arginine-Proline (PLRP) motif. The first SIM and PLRP motif engage thioester charged E2~SUMO while the next SIM binds a second molecule of SUMO bound to the backside of E2. We show that ZNF451 is SUMO2 specific and that SUMO-modification of ZNF451 may contribute to activity by providing a second molecule of SUMO that interacts with E2. Our results are consistent with ZNF451 functioning as a bona fide SUMO E3 ligase. PMID:26524494

  6. Platinum-coated porous gold nanorods in methanol electrooxidation: dependence of catalytic activity on ligament size.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang-Hoon; Liu, Lichun; Cho, Sang Hyun; Park, Sungho

    2012-12-01

    Here we demonstrate that, in the dealloying process of Au-Ag nanorods, temperature is the key parameter for producing porous Au nanorods with tunable ligament sizes. The vertically aligned Au-Ag alloy nanorods were first synthesized by the electrochemical co-deposition of Au and Ag onto anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane templates. Porous Au nanorods were then obtained by selectively etching Ag away from the precursor Au-Ag alloy nanorods. Control of the ligament size was achieved by controlling the dealloying temperature. Pt deposited on the porous Au nanorods with smaller ligaments exhibited a higher catalytic activity during methanol electrooxidation than those deposited on nanorods with larger ligaments produced by dealloying at higher temperatures. The strong dependence of the catalytic activity on the ligament size of porous Au is principally due to different amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) generated during methanol electrooxidation. Less CO was generated as the ligament size decreased. This finding is of importance for developing highly efficient cathode materials for carrying out methanol electrooxidation in practical applications in which porous Au with a large surface area is used as a supporting substrate. PMID:23023934

  7. Process for forming a homogeneous oxide solid phase of catalytically active material

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Dale L.; Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei

    1995-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a homogeneous oxide solid phase reaction product of catalytically active material comprising one or more alkali metals, one or more alkaline earth metals, and one or more Group VIII transition metals. The process comprises reacting together one or more alkali metal oxides and/or salts, one or more alkaline earth metal oxides and/or salts, one or more Group VIII transition metal oxides and/or salts, capable of forming a catalytically active reaction product, in the optional presence of an additional source of oxygen, using a laser beam to ablate from a target such metal compound reactants in the form of a vapor in a deposition chamber, resulting in the deposition, on a heated substrate in the chamber, of the desired oxide phase reaction product. The resulting product may be formed in variable, but reproducible, stoichiometric ratios. The homogeneous oxide solid phase product is useful as a catalyst, and can be produced in many physical forms, including thin films, particulate forms, coatings on catalyst support structures, and coatings on structures used in reaction apparatus in which the reaction product of the invention will serve as a catalyst.

  8. Direct observation of enhanced plasmon-driven catalytic reaction activity of Au nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxides by SERS.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiu; You, Tingting; Liu, Dapeng; Lang, Xiufeng; Tan, Enzhong; Shi, Jihua; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin

    2015-04-21

    Graphene-based nanocomposites have recently attracted tremendous research interest in the field of catalysis due to their unique optical and electronic properties. However, direct observation of enhanced plasmon-driven catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles (NPs) supported on reduced graphene oxides (Au/rGO) has rarely been reported. Herein, based on the reduction from 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4-NBT) to p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB), the catalytic property of Au/rGO nanocomposites was investigated and compared with corresponding Au NP samples with similar size distribution. Our results show that Au/rGO nanocomposites could serve as a good catalytic and analytic platform for plasmon-driven chemical reactions. In addition, systematic comparisons were conducted during power- and time-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) experiments, which exhibited a lower power threshold and higher catalytic efficiency for Au/rGO as compared to Au NPs toward the reaction. PMID:25793752

  9. The photo-catalytic activities of MP (M = Ba, Ca, Cu, Sr, Ag; P = PO43-, HPO42-) microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Shi, Yuanji; Zhao, Zongshan; Song, Weijie; Cheng, Yang

    2014-02-01

    For the good performance of apatite-based materials in the removal of dyes and their environment-friendly advantage, five kinds of apatite microparticles of MP (M = Ba, Ca, Cu, Sr, Ag; P = PO43-, HPO42-) were synthesized by a simple precipitation method and their photo-catalytic properties were invested. Better performance in the decolorization of methyl orange (MO) under the assistance of H2O2 than that of TiO2 were obtained for all the MPs. The photo-catalytic activity was mainly affected by surface area, energy band, impurity, crystallinity and crystal structure. The DFT calculation results demonstrated that the 2p of O and 3p of P in PO43- played the main role in the photo-catalytic process. This work would be helpful to design and synthesize low cost apatite materials with good photo-catalytic performance.

  10. Deletion of a non-catalytic region increases the enzymatic activity of a β-agarase from Flammeovirga sp. MY04

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wenjun; Gu, Jingyan; Liu, Huihui; Li, Fuchuan; Wu, Zhihong; Li, Yuezhong

    2015-10-01

    A Glycoside hydrolase (GH) typically contains one catalytic module and varied non-catalytic regions (NCRs). However, effects of the NCRs to the catalytic modules remain mostly unclear except the carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). AgaG4 is a GH16 endo- β-agarase of the agarolytic marine bacterium Flammeovirga sp. MY04. The enzyme consists of an extra sugar-binding peptide within the catalytic module, with no predictable CBMs but function-unknown sequences in the NCR, which is a new characteristic of agarase sequences. In this study, we deleted the NCR sequence, a 140-amino acid peptide at the C-terminus and expressed the truncated gene, agaG4-T140, in Escherichia coli. After purification and refolding, the truncated agarase rAgaG4-T140 retained the same catalytic temperature and pH value as rAgaG4. Using combined fluorescent labeling, HPLC and MS/MS techniques, we identified the end-products of agarose degradation by rAgaG4-T140 as neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose, with a final molar ratio of 1.53:1 and a conversion ratio of approximately 70%, which were similar to those of rAgaG4. However, the truncated agarase rAgaG4-T140 markedly decreased in protein solubility by 15 times and increased in enzymatic activities by 35 times. The oligosaccharide production of rAgaG4-T140 was approximately 25 times the weight of that produced by equimolar rAgaG4. This study provides some insights into the influences of NCR on the biochemical characteristics of agarase AgaG4 and implies some new strategies to improve the properties of a GH enzyme.

  11. Inhibition of protein kinase C catalytic activity by additional regions within the human protein kinase Calpha-regulatory domain lying outside of the pseudosubstrate sequence.

    PubMed

    Kirwan, Angie F; Bibby, Ashley C; Mvilongo, Thierry; Riedel, Heimo; Burke, Thomas; Millis, Sherri Z; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2003-07-15

    The N-terminal pseudosubstrate site within the protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha)-regulatory domain has long been regarded as the major determinant for autoinhibition of catalytic domain activity. Previously, we observed that the PKC-inhibitory capacity of the human PKCalpha-regulatory domain was only reduced partially on removal of the pseudosubstrate sequence [Parissenti, Kirwan, Kim, Colantonio and Schimmer (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 8940-8945]. This finding suggested that one or more additional region(s) contributes to the inhibition of catalytic domain activity. To assess this hypothesis, we first examined the PKC-inhibitory capacity of a smaller fragment of the PKCalpha-regulatory domain consisting of the C1a, C1b and V2 regions [GST-Ralpha(39-177): this protein contained the full regulatory domain of human PKCalpha fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), but lacked amino acids 1-38 (including the pseudosubstrate sequence) and amino acids 178-270 (including the C2 region)]. GST-Ralpha(39-177) significantly inhibited PKC in a phorbol-independent manner and could not bind the peptide substrate used in our assays. These results suggested that a region within C1/V2 directly inhibits catalytic domain activity. Providing further in vivo support for this hypothesis, we found that expression of N-terminally truncated pseudosubstrate-less bovine PKCalpha holoenzymes in yeast was capable of inhibiting cell growth in a phorbol-dependent manner. This suggested that additional autoinhibitory force(s) remained within the truncated holoenzymes that could be relieved by phorbol ester. Using tandem PCR-mediated mutagenesis, we observed that mutation of amino acids 33-86 within GST-Ralpha(39-177) dramatically reduced its PKC-inhibitory capacity when protamine was used as substrate. Mutagenesis of a broad range of sequences within C2 (amino acids 159-242) also significantly reduced PKC-inhibitory capacity. Taken together, these observations support strongly the existence of

  12. Catalytic activity of trypsin entrapped in electrospun poly(ϵ-caprolactone) nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Susana C; Rodrigues, Ana R; Saraiva, Jorge A; Lopes-da-Silva, José A

    2015-11-01

    Trypsin was successfully entrapped in situ into nanofibers of poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) prepared by electrospinning. The spinning dope was an emulsion consisting of an aqueous phase with the solubilized enzyme in a pH buffer plus an oil phase of the polymer solubilized in chloroform (CF)/dimethylformamide (DMF). The optimized materials were composed by random arrays of bead-free fibers with outer diameters in the range 110-180 nm without showing core-shell structure. The fiber size and morphology, membrane porosity and surface properties were shown to be influenced by the polymer concentration and the composition ratio of the solvent mixture, and also by the presence of the enzyme. The activity of the immobilized trypsin was studied toward both a low-molecular weight synthetic substrate (BAPNA) and a protein (casein). Fluorescence microscopy, the increasing hydrophilicity of the fibrous membrane and the observed catalytic activity confirmed the entrapment of the enzyme into the PCL nanofibers. The best activity retention (∼66% toward BAPNA) was achieved using 0.20 g/mL PCL in CF/DMF [75:25], with trypsin in an aqueous buffer at pH 7.1 in the presence of benzamidine and Span80. The immobilized enzyme showed satisfactory operational stability retaining ∼59% of its initial activity after five reaction cycles. Compared with the free enzyme, the storage (at 4 °C) and thermal stability of the immobilized enzyme were highly improved. The retained catalytic activity and the observed reusability can be explained by a heterogeneous distribution of the enzyme within the polymer fiber influenced by the electrostatic field during the electrospinning process, enabling a preferential location near the fiber surface but simultaneously assuring minimal leaching out during operations. Results suggest that trypsin-PCL fibrous membranes may be useful for concomitant proteolytic and separation commercial applications. PMID:26320709

  13. Catalytic pyrolysis of oilsand bitumen over nanoporous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lee, See-Hoon; Heo, Hyeon Su; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Yim, Jin-Heong; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Jung, Kyeong Youl; Ko, Young Soo; Kim, Seung-Soo; Park, Young-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic cracking of oilsand bitumen was performed over nanoporous materials at atmospheric conditions. The yield of gas increased with application of nanoporous catalysts, with the catalytic conversion to gas highest for Meso-MFI. The cracking activity seemed to correlate with pore size rather than weak acidity or surface area. PMID:21446540

  14. Enantioselective CuH-Catalyzed Reductive Coupling of Aryl Alkenes and Activated Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Bandar, Jeffrey S; Ascic, Erhad; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2016-05-11

    A new method for the enantioselective reductive coupling of aryl alkenes with activated carboxylic acid derivatives via copper hydride catalysis is described. Dual catalytic cycles are proposed, with a relatively fast enantioselective hydroacylation cycle followed by a slower diastereoselective ketone reduction cycle. Symmetrical aryl carboxyclic anhydrides provide access to enantioenriched α-substituted ketones or alcohols with excellent stereoselectivity and functional group tolerance. PMID:27121395

  15. Catalytic performance of hybrid nanocatalyst for levulinic acid production from glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya'aini, Nazlina; Amin, Nor Aishah Saidina

    2012-11-01

    Levulinic acid is one of the potential and versatile biomass-derived chemicals. Product analysis via HPLC revealed that the heterogeneous dehydration of glucose over hybrid nanocatalyst exhibited better performance compared to single catalyst. Hybrid nanocatalyst containing H-Y zeolite and CrCl3 could substitute homogenous acid catalyst for attaining high levulinic acid yield. Different CrC3 and H-Y zeolite weight ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 were prepared according to the wetness impregnation method. The hybrid catalyst with a 1:1 weight ratio performed better compared to others with the highest levulinic acid yield reported (93.5%) at 140 °C, 180 min reaction time, 0.1 g catalyst loading and 0.1 g glucose feed. Characterization results revealed that properties such as surface area, mesoporosity and acidic strength of the catalyst have significant effects on glucose dehydration for levulinic acid production.

  16. E2 superfamily of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes: constitutively active or activated through phosphorylation in the catalytic cleft

    PubMed Central

    Valimberti, Ilaria; Tiberti, Matteo; Lambrughi, Matteo; Sarcevic, Boris; Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a modification that offers a dynamic and reversible mechanism to regulate the majority of cellular processes. Numerous diseases are associated with aberrant regulation of phosphorylation-induced switches. Phosphorylation is emerging as a mechanism to modulate ubiquitination by regulating key enzymes in this pathway. The molecular mechanisms underpinning how phosphorylation regulates ubiquitinating enzymes, however, are elusive. Here, we show the high conservation of a functional site in E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. In catalytically active E2s, this site contains aspartate or a phosphorylatable serine and we refer to it as the conserved E2 serine/aspartate (CES/D) site. Molecular simulations of substrate-bound and -unbound forms of wild type, mutant and phosphorylated E2s, provide atomistic insight into the role of the CES/D residue for optimal E2 activity. Both the size and charge of the side group at the site play a central role in aligning the substrate lysine toward E2 catalytic cysteine to control ubiquitination efficiency. The CES/D site contributes to the fingerprint of the E2 superfamily. We propose that E2 enzymes can be divided into constitutively active or regulated families. E2s characterized by an aspartate at the CES/D site signify constitutively active E2s, whereas those containing a serine can be regulated by phosphorylation. PMID:26463729

  17. Inhibition effect of graphene oxide on the catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Gu, Yao; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2015-11-01

    Variations in the enzyme activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the presence of the nano-material, graphene oxide (GO), were investigated with the use of molecular spectroscopy UV-visible and fluorescence methods. From these studies, important kinetic parameters of the enzyme were extracted; these were the maximum reaction rate, Vm , and the Michaelis constant, Km . A comparison of these parameters indicated that GO inhibited the catalytic activity of the AChE because of the presence of the AChE-GO complex. The formation of this complex was confirmed with the use of fluorescence data, which was resolved with the use of the MCR-ALS chemometrics method. Furthermore, it was found that the resonance light-scattering (RLS) intensity of AChE changed in the presence of GO. On this basis, it was demonstrated that the relationship between AChE and GO was linear and such models were used for quantitative analyses of GO. PMID:25620714

  18. The Origin of the Catalytic Activity of a Metal Hydride in CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Matam, Santhosh Kumar; Kerger, Philipp; Bernard, Laetitia; Battaglia, Corsin; Vogel, Dirk; Rohwerder, Michael; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-05-10

    Atomic hydrogen on the surface of a metal with high hydrogen solubility is of particular interest for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. In a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, methane was markedly formed on the metal hydride ZrCoHx in the course of the hydrogen desorption and not on the pristine intermetallic. The surface analysis was performed by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy and near-ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, for the in situ analysis. The aim was to elucidate the origin of the catalytic activity of the metal hydride. Since at the initial stage the dissociation of impinging hydrogen molecules is hindered by a high activation barrier of the oxidised surface, the atomic hydrogen flux from the metal hydride is crucial for the reduction of carbon dioxide and surface oxides at interfacial sites. PMID:27061237

  19. Stellated Ag-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles: An effective platform for catalytic activity tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yao, Qiaofeng; Cao, Hongbin; Xie, Jianping; Lee, Jim Yang; Yang, Jun

    2014-02-01

    The usefulness of Pt-based nanomaterials for catalysis can be greatly enhanced by coupling morphology engineering to the strategic presence of a second or even third metal. Here we demonstrate the design and preparation of stellated Ag-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles where significant activity difference between the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) may be realized by relegating Ag to the core or by hollowing out the core. In particular the stellated Pt surface, with an abundance of steps, edges, corner atoms, and {111} facets, is highly effective for the ORR but is ineffective for MOR. MOR activity is only observed in the presence of a Ag core through electronic coupling to the stellated Pt shell. The bimetallic Ag-Pt stellates therefore demonstrate the feasibility of tuning a Pt surface for two very different structure sensitive catalytic reactions. Stellated bimetallics may therefore be an effective platform for highly tunable catalyst designs.

  20. Stellated Ag-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles: An effective platform for catalytic activity tuning

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yao, Qiaofeng; Cao, Hongbin; Xie, Jianping; Lee, Jim Yang; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The usefulness of Pt-based nanomaterials for catalysis can be greatly enhanced by coupling morphology engineering to the strategic presence of a second or even third metal. Here we demonstrate the design and preparation of stellated Ag-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles where significant activity difference between the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) may be realized by relegating Ag to the core or by hollowing out the core. In particular the stellated Pt surface, with an abundance of steps, edges, corner atoms, and {111} facets, is highly effective for the ORR but is ineffective for MOR. MOR activity is only observed in the presence of a Ag core through electronic coupling to the stellated Pt shell. The bimetallic Ag-Pt stellates therefore demonstrate the feasibility of tuning a Pt surface for two very different structure sensitive catalytic reactions. Stellated bimetallics may therefore be an effective platform for highly tunable catalyst designs. PMID:24495979