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Sample records for acid chaperone properties

  1. Do nucleic acids moonlight as molecular chaperones?

    PubMed Central

    Docter, Brianne E.; Horowitz, Scott; Gray, Michael J.; Jakob, Ursula; Bardwell, James C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Organisms use molecular chaperones to combat the unfolding and aggregation of proteins. While protein chaperones have been widely studied, here we demonstrate that DNA and RNA exhibit potent chaperone activity in vitro. Nucleic acids suppress the aggregation of classic chaperone substrates up to 300-fold more effectively than the protein chaperone GroEL. Additionally, RNA cooperates with the DnaK chaperone system to refold purified luciferase. Our findings reveal a possible new role for nucleic acids within the cell: that nucleic acids directly participate in maintaining proteostasis by preventing protein aggregation. PMID:27105849

  2. Do nucleic acids moonlight as molecular chaperones?

    PubMed

    Docter, Brianne E; Horowitz, Scott; Gray, Michael J; Jakob, Ursula; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-06-01

    Organisms use molecular chaperones to combat the unfolding and aggregation of proteins. While protein chaperones have been widely studied, here we demonstrate that DNA and RNA exhibit potent chaperone activity in vitro Nucleic acids suppress the aggregation of classic chaperone substrates up to 300-fold more effectively than the protein chaperone GroEL. Additionally, RNA cooperates with the DnaK chaperone system to refold purified luciferase. Our findings reveal a possible new role for nucleic acids within the cell: that nucleic acids directly participate in maintaining proteostasis by preventing protein aggregation. PMID:27105849

  3. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  4. Chaperone properties of Escherichia coli thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Renée; Malki, Abderrahim; Holmgren, Arne; Richarme, Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    Thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase and NADPH form the thioredoxin system and are the major cellular protein disulphide reductase. We report here that Escherichia coli thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase interact with unfolded and denatured proteins, in a manner similar to that of molecular chaperones that are involved in protein folding and protein renaturation after stress. Thioredoxin and/or thioredoxin reductase promote the functional folding of citrate synthase and alpha-glucosidase after urea denaturation. They also promote the functional folding of the bacterial galactose receptor, a protein without any cysteines. Furthermore, redox cycling of thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase in the presence of NADPH and cystine stimulates the renaturation of the galactose receptor, suggesting that the thioredoxin system functions like a redox-powered chaperone machine. Thioredoxin reductase prevents the aggregation of citrate synthase under heat-shock conditions. It forms complexes that are more stable than those formed by thioredoxin with several unfolded proteins such as reduced carboxymethyl alpha-lactalbumin and unfolded bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. These results suggest that the thioredoxin system, in addition to its protein disulphide isomerase activity possesses chaperone-like properties, and that its thioredoxin reductase component plays a major role in this function. PMID:12549977

  5. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central “hubs”. Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates. PMID:26394388

  6. HdeB chaperone activity is coupled to its intrinsic dynamic properties

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jienv; Yang, Chengfeng; Niu, Xiaogang; Hu, Yunfei; Jin, Changwen

    2015-01-01

    Enteric bacteria encounter extreme acidity when passing through hosts’ stomach. Since the bacterial periplasmic space quickly equilibrates with outer environment, an efficient acid resistance mechanism is essential in preventing irreversible protein denaturation/aggregation and maintaining bacteria viability. HdeB, along with its homolog HdeA, was identified as a periplasmic acid-resistant chaperone. Both proteins exist as homodimers and share similar monomeric structures under neutral pH, while showing different dimeric packing interfaces. Previous investigations show that HdeA functions through an acid-induced dimer-to-monomer transition and partial unfolding at low pH (pH 2–3), resulting in exposure of hydrophobic surfaces that bind substrate proteins. In contrast, HdeB appears to have a much higher optimal activation pH (pH 4–5), under which condition the protein maintains a well-folded dimer and the mechanism for its chaperone activity remains elusive. Herein, we present an NMR study of HdeB to investigate its dynamic properties. Our results reveal that HdeB undergoes significant micro- to milli-second timescale conformational exchanges at neutral to near-neutral pH, under the later condition it exhibits optimal activity. The current study indicates that HdeB activation is coupled to its intrinsic dynamics instead of structural changes, and therefore its functional mechanism is apparently different from HdeA. PMID:26593705

  7. Dissecting the oligonucleotide binding properties of a disordered chaperone protein using surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Baltzinger, Mireille; Sharma, Kamal Kant; Mély, Yves; Altschuh, Danièle

    2013-01-01

    We have used surface plasmon resonance to investigate the nucleic acid binding properties of the core protein of hepatitis C virus, a disordered protein believed to chaperone the genomic RNA. It was previously shown that a peptide (peptide E) corresponding to the association of two basic clusters of core enhances the annealing and the dimerization of nucleic acid fragments derived from a stem loop (SL2) in the 3′ untranslated region of the hepatitis C virus genome. However, strong aggregation of nucleic acids by core or peptide E in the excess of the latter precluded the characterization of their binding parameters up to now. By careful design of surface plasmon resonance experiments, we obtained accurate binding parameters for the interaction of peptide E with SL2-derived oligonucleotides of different lengths and sequences, in form of stem-loop, duplex or strand. Peptide E was found to bind in a salt dependent manner to all oligonucleotides assayed. Affinity data identify at least two binding modes, of which one is independent of sequence/structure, and the other is specific to the SL2 stem-loop fold. Stoichiometry data support a multi-motif binding model allowing formation of higher-order complexes. We propose that the modular binding mode demonstrated for structured RNA-binding proteins also applies to this disordered chaperone and is relevant to its activity. PMID:24030713

  8. Chaperone gelator for the chiral self-assembly of all proteinogenic amino acids and their enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Tianyu; Liu, Minghua

    2016-05-01

    A concept of a chaperone gelator that can assist non-gelator molecules to form gels is proposed. Such a new gelator was developed and found to tune all the proteinogenic l-amino acids, as well as their enantiomers into supramolecular gels. PMID:27071330

  9. Characterization of the 105-kDa molecular chaperone. Identification, biochemical properties, and localization.

    PubMed

    Matsumori, Mika; Itoh, Hideaki; Toyoshima, Itaru; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Sawada, Ken-Ichi; Fukuda, Jun; Tanaka, Toshinobu; Okubo, Atsuya; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki; Mizoi, Kazuo; Hama, Tokiko; Suzuki, Akira; Hamada, Fumio; Otaka, Michiro; Shoji, Yutaka; Takada, Goro

    2002-11-01

    We have characterized the biochemical properties of the testis and brain-specific 105-kDa protein which is cross-reacted with an anti-bovine HSP90 antibody. The protein was induced in germ cells by heat stress, resulting in a protein which is one of the heat shock proteins [Kumagai, J., Fukuda, J., Kodama, H., Murata, M., Kawamura, K., Itoh, H. & Tanaka, T. (2000) Eur. J. Biochem.267, 3073-3078]. In the present study, we characterized the biochemical properties of the protein. The 105-kDa protein inhibited the aggregation of citrate synthase as a molecular chaperone in vitro. ATP/MgCl2 has a slight influence of the suppression of the citrate synthase aggregation by the 105-kDa protein. The protein possessed chaperone activity. The protein was able to bind to ATP-Sepharose like the other molecular chaperone HSP70. A partial amino-acid sequence (24 amino-acid residues) of the protein was determined and coincided with those of the mouse testis- and brain-specific APG-1 and osmotic stress protein 94 (OSP94). The 105-kDa protein was detected only in the medulla of the rat kidney sections similar to OSP94 upon immunoblotting. The purified 105-kDa protein was cross-reacted with an antibody against APG-1. These results suggested that APG-1 and OSP94 are both identical to the 105-kDa protein. There were highly homologous regions between the 105-kDa protein/APG-1/OSP94 and HSP90. The region of HSP90 was also an immunoreactive site. An anti-bovine HSP90 antibody may cross-react with the 105-kDa protein similar to HSP90 in the rat testis and brain. We have investigated the localization and developmental induction of the protein in the rat brain. In the immunohistochemical analysis, the protein was mainly detected in the cytoplasm of the nerve and glial cells of the rat brain. Although the 105-kDa protein was localized in all rat brain segments, the expression pattern was fast in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus and slow in the cerebellum. PMID:12423363

  10. Investigating the Chaperone Properties of a Novel Heat Shock Protein, Hsp70.c, from Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Burger, Adélle; Ludewig, Michael H; Boshoff, Aileen

    2014-01-01

    The neglected tropical disease, African Trypanosomiasis, is fatal and has a crippling impact on economic development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is an important molecular chaperone that is expressed in response to stress and Hsp40 acts as its co-chaperone. These proteins play a wide range of roles in the cell and they are required to assist the parasite as it moves from a cold blooded insect vector to a warm blooded mammalian host. A novel cytosolic Hsp70, from Trypanosoma brucei, TbHsp70.c, contains an acidic substrate binding domain and lacks the C-terminal EEVD motif. The ability of a cytosolic Hsp40 from Trypanosoma brucei J protein 2, Tbj2, to function as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c was investigated. The main objective was to functionally characterize TbHsp70.c to further expand our knowledge of parasite biology. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 were heterologously expressed and purified and both proteins displayed the ability to suppress aggregation of thermolabile MDH and chemically denatured rhodanese. ATPase assays revealed a 2.8-fold stimulation of the ATPase activity of TbHsp70.c by Tbj2. TbHsp70.c and Tbj2 both demonstrated chaperone activity and Tbj2 functions as a co-chaperone of TbHsp70.c. In vivo heat stress experiments indicated upregulation of the expression levels of TbHsp70.c. PMID:24707395

  11. Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity of HIV-1 NC Proteins Investigated by Single Molecule DNA Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark C.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Bloomfield, Victor A.

    2002-03-01

    HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein (NC) is a nucleic acid chaperone protein that is responsible for facilitating numerous nucleic acid rearrangements throughout the reverse transcription cycle of HIV-1. To understand the mechanism of NC’s chaperone function, we carried out single molecule DNA stretching studies in the presence of NC and mutant forms of NC. Using an optical tweezers instrument, we stretch single DNA molecules from the double-stranded helical state to the single-stranded (coil) state. Based on the observed cooperativity of DNA force-induced melting, we find that the fraction of melted base pairs at room temperature is increased dramatically in the presence of NC. Thus, upon NC binding, increased thermal fluctuations cause continuous melting and reannealing of base pairs so that DNA strands are able to rapidly sample configurations in order to find the lowest energy state. While NC destabilizes the double-stranded form of DNA, a mutant form of NC that lacks the zinc finger structures does not. DNA stretching experiments carried out in the presence of NC variants containing more subtle changes in the zinc finger structures were conducted to elucidate the contribution of each individual finger to NC’s chaperone activity, and these results will be reported.

  12. Evolutionary silence of the acid chaperone protein HdeB in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Periplasmic chaperones HdeA and HdeB are known to be important for cell survival at low pH (pH<3) in E. coli and Shigella spp. Here we investigated the roles of these two acid chaperones in survival of various enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) following exposure to pH 2.0. Similar to K-12 strains, th...

  13. The Assembly and Intermolecular Properties of the Hsp70-Tomm34-Hsp90 Molecular Chaperone Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Trcka, Filip; Durech, Michal; Man, Petr; Hernychova, Lenka; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borivoj

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of protein homeostasis by molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 requires their spatial and functional coordination. The cooperation of Hsp70 and Hsp90 is influenced by their interaction with the network of co-chaperone proteins, some of which contain tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains. Critical to these interactions are TPR domains that target co-chaperone binding to the EEVD-COOH motif that terminates Hsp70/Hsp90. Recently, the two-TPR domain-containing protein, Tomm34, was reported to bind both Hsp70 and Hsp90. Here we characterize the structural basis of Tomm34-Hsp70/Hsp90 interactions. Using multiple methods, including pull-down assays, fluorescence polarization, hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and site-directed mutagenesis, we defined the binding activities and specificities of Tomm34 TPR domains toward Hsp70 and Hsp90. We found that Tomm34 TPR1 domain specifically binds Hsp70. This interaction is partly mediated by a non-canonical TPR1 two-carboxylate clamp and is strengthened by so far unidentified additional intermolecular contacts. The two-carboxylate clamp of the isolated TPR2 domain has affinity for both chaperones, but as part of the full-length Tomm34 protein, the TPR2 domain binds specifically Hsp90. These binding properties of Tomm34 TPR domains thus enable simultaneous binding of Hsp70 and Hsp90. Importantly, we provide evidence for the existence of an Hsp70-Tomm34-Hsp90 tripartite complex. In addition, we defined the basic conformational demands of the Tomm34-Hsp90 interaction. These results suggest that Tomm34 represents a novel scaffolding co-chaperone of Hsp70 and Hsp90, which may facilitate Hsp70/Hsp90 cooperation during protein folding. PMID:24567332

  14. Mechanism of Nucleic Acid Chaperone Function of Retroviral Nuceleocapsid (NC) Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouzina, Ioulia; Vo, My-Nuong; Stewart, Kristen; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Cruceanu, Margareta; Williams, Mark

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted two main activities of HIV-1 NC protein contributing to its function as a universal nucleic acid chaperone. Firstly, it is the ability of NC to weakly destabilize all nucleic acid,(NA), secondary structures, thus resolving the kinetic traps for NA refolding, while leaving the annealed state stable. Secondly, it is the ability of NC to aggregate NA, facilitating the nucleation step of bi-molecular annealing by increasing the local NA concentration. In this work we use single molecule DNA stretching and gel-based annealing assays to characterize these two chaperone activities of NC by using various HIV-1 NC mutants and several other retroviral NC proteins. Our results suggest that two NC functions are associated with its zinc fingers and cationic residues, respectively. NC proteins from other retroviruses have similar activities, although expressed to a different degree. Thus, NA aggregating ability improves, and NA duplex destabilizing activity decreases in the sequence: MLV NC, HIV NC, RSV NC. In contrast, HTLV NC protein works very differently from other NC proteins, and similarly to typical single stranded NA binding proteins. These features of retroviral NCs co-evolved with the structure of their genomes.

  15. Effect of a chemical chaperone, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, on HDM-induced allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Siddesha, Jalahalli M; Nakada, Emily M; Mihavics, Bethany R; Hoffman, Sidra M; Rattu, Gurkiranjit K; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Cahoon, Jonathon M; Lahue, Karolyn G; Daphtary, Nirav; Aliyeva, Minara; Chapman, David G; Desai, Dhimant H; Poynter, Matthew E; Anathy, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced unfolded protein response plays a critical role in inflammatory diseases, including allergic airway disease. However, the benefits of inhibiting ER stress in the treatment of allergic airway disease are not well known. Herein, we tested the therapeutic potential of a chemical chaperone, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), in combating allergic asthma, using a mouse model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airway disease. TUDCA was administered during the HDM-challenge phase (preventive regimen), after the HDM-challenge phase (therapeutic regimen), or therapeutically during a subsequent HDM rechallenge (rechallenge regimen). In the preventive regimen, TUDCA significantly decreased HDM-induced inflammation, markers of ER stress, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and fibrosis. Similarly, in the therapeutic regimen, TUDCA administration efficiently decreased HDM-induced airway inflammation, mucus metaplasia, ER stress markers, and AHR, but not airway remodeling. Interestingly, TUDCA administered therapeutically in the HDM rechallenge regimen markedly attenuated HDM-induced airway inflammation, mucus metaplasia, ER stress markers, methacholine-induced AHR, and airway fibrotic remodeling. These results indicate that the inhibition of ER stress in the lungs through the administration of chemical chaperones could be a valuable strategy in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:27154200

  16. RNA-binding properties and RNA chaperone activity of human peroxiredoxin 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Lee, Hae Na; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Ha, Bin; Ahn, Sung-Min; Jang, Ho Hee; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hPrx1 has RNA-binding properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hPrx1 exhibits helix-destabilizing activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cold stress increases hPrx1 level in the nuclear fraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hPrx1 enhances the viability of cells exposed to cold stress. -- Abstract: Human peroxiredoxin 1 (hPrx1), a member of the peroxiredoxin family, detoxifies peroxide substrates and has been implicated in numerous biological processes, including cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and redox signaling. To date, Prx1 has not been implicated in RNA metabolism. Here, we investigated the ability of hPrx1 to bind RNA and act as an RNA chaperone. In vitro, hPrx1 bound to RNA and DNA, and unwound nucleic acid duplexes. hPrx1 also acted as a transcription anti-terminator in an assay using an Escherichia coli strain containing a stem-loop structure upstream of the chloramphenicol resistance gene. The overall cellular level of hPrx1 expression was not increased at low temperatures, but the nuclear level of hPrx1 was increased. In addition, hPrx1 overexpression enhanced the survival of cells exposed to cold stress, whereas hPrx1 knockdown significantly reduced cell survival under the same conditions. These findings suggest that hPrx1 may perform biological functions as a RNA-binding protein, which are distinctive from known functions of hPrx1 as a reactive oxygen species scavenger.

  17. Nucleic acid chaperons: a theory of an RNA-assisted protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Biro, Jan C

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteins are assumed to contain all the information necessary for unambiguous folding (Anfinsen's principle). However, ab initio structure prediction is often not successful because the amino acid sequence itself is not sufficient to guide between endless folding possibilities. It seems to be a logical to try to find the "missing" information in nucleic acids, in the redundant codon base. Results mRNA energy dot plots and protein residue contact maps were found to be rather similar. The structure of mRNA is also conserved if the protein structure is conserved, even if the sequence similarity is low. These observations led me to suppose that some similarity might exist between nucleic acid and protein folding. I found that amino acid pairs, which are co-located in the protein structure, are preferentially coded by complementary codons. This codon complementarity is not perfect; it is suboptimal where the 1st and 3rd codon residues are complementary to each other in reverse orientation, while the 2nd codon letters may be, but are not necessarily, complementary. Conclusion Partial complementary coding of co-locating amino acids in protein structures suggests that mRNA assists in protein folding and functions not only as a template but even as a chaperon during translation. This function explains the role of wobble bases and answers the mystery of why we have a redundant codon base. PMID:16137324

  18. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Qualley, Dominic F. Sokolove, Victoria L.; Ross, James L.

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC.

  19. Identification by mutational analysis of amino acid residues essential in the chaperone function of calreticulin.

    PubMed

    Martin, Virginie; Groenendyk, Jody; Steiner, Simone S; Guo, Lei; Dabrowska, Monika; Parker, J M Robert; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Opas, Michal; Michalak, Marek

    2006-01-27

    Calreticulin is a Ca2+ -binding chaperone that resides in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and is involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and in the folding of newly synthesized glycoproteins. In this study, we have used site-specific mutagenesis to map amino acid residues that are critical in calreticulin function. We have focused on two cysteine residues (Cys(88) and Cys(120)), which form a disulfide bridge in the N-terminal domain of calreticulin, on a tryptophan residue located in the carbohydrate binding site (Trp(302)), and on certain residues located at the tip of the "hairpin-like" P-domain of the protein (Glu(238), Glu(239), Asp(241), Glu(243), and Trp(244)). Calreticulin mutants were expressed in crt(-/-) fibroblasts, and bradykinin-dependent Ca2+ release was measured as a marker of calreticulin function. Bradykinin-dependent Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum was rescued by wild-type calreticulin and by the Glu(238), Glu(239), Asp(241), and Glu(243) mutants. The Cys(88) and Cys(120) mutants rescued the calreticulin-deficient phenotype only partially ( approximately 40%), and the Trp(244) and Trp(302) mutants did not rescue it at all. We identified four amino acid residues (Glu(239), Asp(241), Glu(243), and Trp(244)) at the hairpin tip of the P-domain that are critical in the formation of a complex between ERp57 and calreticulin. Although the Glu(239), Asp(241), and Glu(243) mutants did not bind ERp57 efficiently, they fully restored bradykinin-dependent Ca2+ release in crt(-/-) cells. This indicates that binding of ERp57 to calreticulin may not be critical for the chaperone function of calreticulin with respect to the bradykinin receptor. PMID:16291754

  20. Mass spectrometric study of gas-phase ions of acid β-glucosidase (Cerezyme) and iminosugar pharmacological chaperones.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2014-10-01

    The effect on the conformations and stability of gas-phase ions of Cerezyme, a glycoprotein, when bound to three small-molecule chaperones has been studied using intact ESI MS, collision cross section and MS/MS measurements. To distinguish between the peaks from apo and small-molecule complex ions, Cerezyme is deglycosylated (dg-Cer). ESI MS of dg-Cer reveals that glycosylation accounts for 8.5% of the molecular weight. When excess chaperone, either covalent (2FGF) or noncovalent (A and B iminosugars), is added to solutions of dg-Cer, mass spectra show peaks from 1:1 chaperone-enzyme complexes as well as free enzyme. On average, ions of the apoenzyme have 1.6 times higher cross sections when activated in the source region of the mass spectrometer. For a given charge state, ions of complexes of 2FGF and B have about 30% and 8.4% lower cross sections, respectively, compared to the apoenzyme. Thus, binding the chaperones causes the gas-phase protein to adopt more compact conformations. The noncovalent complex ions dissociate by the loss of charged chaperones. In the gas phase, the relative stability of dg-Cer with B is higher than that with the A, whereas in solution A binds enzyme more strongly than B. Nevertheless, the disagreement is explained based on the greater number of contacts between the B and dg-Cer than the A and dg-Cer (13 vs. 8), indicating the importance of noncovalent interactions within the protein-chaperone complex in the absence of solvent. Findings in this work suggest a hypothesis towards predicting a consistent correlation between gas-phase properties to solution binding properties. PMID:25303390

  1. Matrix Domain Modulates HIV-1 Gag's Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity via Inositol Phosphate Binding ▿

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher P.; Datta, Siddhartha A. K.; Rein, Alan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Retroviruses replicate by reverse transcribing their single-stranded RNA genomes into double-stranded DNA using specific cellular tRNAs to prime cDNA synthesis. In HIV-1, human tRNA3Lys serves as the primer and is packaged into virions during assembly. The viral Gag protein is believed to chaperone tRNA3Lys placement onto the genomic RNA primer binding site; however, the timing and possible regulation of this event are currently unknown. Composed of the matrix (MA), capsid (CA), nucleocapsid (NC), and p6 domains, the multifunctional HIV-1 Gag polyprotein orchestrates the highly coordinated process of virion assembly, but the contribution of these domains to tRNA3Lys annealing is unclear. Here, we show that NC is absolutely essential for annealing and that the MA domain inhibits Gag's tRNA annealing capability. During assembly, MA specifically interacts with inositol phosphate (IP)-containing lipids in the plasma membrane (PM). Surprisingly, we find that IPs stimulate Gag-facilitated tRNA annealing but do not stimulate annealing in Gag variants lacking the MA domain or containing point mutations involved in PM binding. Moreover, we find that IPs prevent MA from binding to nucleic acids but have little effect on NC or Gag. We propose that Gag binds to RNA either with both NC and MA domains or with NC alone and that MA-IP interactions alter Gag's binding mode. We propose that MA's interactions with the PM trigger the switch between these two binding modes and stimulate Gag's chaperone function, which may be important for the regulation of events such as tRNA primer annealing. PMID:21123373

  2. Acidic Residues in the Hfq Chaperone Increase the Selectivity of sRNA Binding and Annealing.

    PubMed

    Panja, Subrata; Santiago-Frangos, Andrew; Schu, Daniel J; Gottesman, Susan; Woodson, Sarah A

    2015-11-01

    Hfq facilitates gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), thereby affecting bacterial attributes such as biofilm formation and virulence. Escherichia coli Hfq recognizes specific U-rich and AAN motifs in sRNAs and target mRNAs, after which an arginine patch on the rim promotes base pairing between their complementary sequences. In the cell, Hfq must discriminate between many similar RNAs. Here, we report that acidic amino acids lining the sRNA binding channel between the inner pore and rim of the Hfq hexamer contribute to the selectivity of Hfq's chaperone activity. RNase footprinting, in vitro binding and stopped-flow fluorescence annealing assays showed that alanine substitution of D9, E18 or E37 strengthened RNA interactions with the rim of Hfq and increased annealing of non-specific or U-tailed RNA oligomers. Although the mutants were less able than wild-type Hfq to anneal sRNAs with wild-type rpoS mRNA, the D9A mutation bypassed recruitment of Hfq to an (AAN)4 motif in rpoS, both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that acidic residues normally modulate access of RNAs to the arginine patch. We propose that this selectivity limits indiscriminate target selection by E. coli Hfq and enforces binding modes that favor genuine sRNA and mRNA pairs. PMID:26196441

  3. Attenuation of endoplasmic reticulum stress using the chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid prevents cardiac fibrosis induced by isoproterenol.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Pedro; Montenegro, José; Vivar, Raúl; Letelier, Alan; Urroz, Pablo Aránguiz; Copaja, Miguel; Pivet, Deisy; Humeres, Claudio; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Lavandero, Sergio; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2012-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in various diseases. In the human heart, ischemia/reperfusion has been correlated to ER stress, and several markers of the unfolded protein response (UPR) participate during cardiac remodeling and fibrosis. Here, we used isoproterenol (ISO) injection as a model for in vivo cardiac fibrosis. ISO induced significant cardiomyocyte loss and collagen deposition in the damaged areas of the endocardium. These responses were accompanied by an increase in the protein levels of the luminal ER chaperones BIP and PDI, as well as an increase in the UPR effector CHOP. The use of the chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) prevented the activation of the UPR, the increase in luminal chaperones and also, leads to decreased collagen deposition, cardiomyocyte loss into the damaged zones. Our results suggest that cardiac damage and fibrosis induced in vivo by the beta-adrenergic agonist ISO are tightly related to ER stress signaling pathways, and that increasing the ER luminal folding capacity with exogenously administrated 4-PBA is a powerful strategy for preventing the development of cardiac fibrosis. Additionally, 4-PBA might prevent the loss of cardiomyocytes. Our data suggests that the attenuation of ER stress pathways with pharmacological compounds such as the chemical chaperone 4-PBA can prevent the development of cardiac fibrosis and adverse remodeling. PMID:22101259

  4. Evidence that Chemical Chaperone 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Binds to Human Serum Albumin at Fatty Acid Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    James, Joel; Shihabudeen, Mohamed Sham; Kulshrestha, Shweta; Goel, Varun; Thirumurugan, Kavitha

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress elicits unfolded protein response to counteract the accumulating unfolded protein load inside a cell. The chemical chaperone, 4-Phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) is a FDA approved drug that alleviates endoplasmic reticulum stress by assisting protein folding. It is found efficacious to augment pathological conditions like type 2 diabetes, obesity and neurodegeneration. This study explores the binding nature of 4-PBA with human serum albumin (HSA) through spectroscopic and molecular dynamics approaches, and the results show that 4-PBA has high binding specificity to Sudlow Site II (Fatty acid binding site 3, subdomain IIIA). Ligand displacement studies, RMSD stabilization profiles and MM-PBSA binding free energy calculation confirm the same. The binding constant as calculated from fluorescence spectroscopic studies was found to be kPBA = 2.69 x 105 M-1. Like long chain fatty acids, 4-PBA induces conformational changes on HSA as shown by circular dichroism, and it elicits stable binding at Sudlow Site II (fatty acid binding site 3) by forming strong hydrogen bonding and a salt bridge between domain II and III of HSA. This minimizes the fluctuation of HSA backbone as shown by limited conformational space occupancy in the principal component analysis. The overall hydrophobicity of W214 pocket (located at subdomain IIA), increases upon occupancy of 4-PBA at any FA site. Descriptors of this pocket formed by residues from other subdomains largely play a role in compensating the dynamic movement of W214. PMID:26181488

  5. The Cell Wall Polymer Lipoteichoic Acid Becomes Nonessential in Staphylococcus aureus Cells Lacking the ClpX Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Lisa; Millership, Charlotte; Dupont Søgaard, Mia; Kaever, Volkhard; Siljamäki, Pia; Savijoki, Kirsi; Varmanen, Pekka; Nyman, Tuula A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important cell wall component of Gram-positive bacteria and a promising target for the development of vaccines and antimicrobial compounds against Staphylococcus aureus. Here we demonstrate that mutations in the conditionally essential ltaS (LTA synthase) gene arise spontaneously in an S. aureus mutant lacking the ClpX chaperone. A wide variety of ltaS mutations were selected, and among these, a substantial portion resulted in premature stop codons and other changes predicted to abolish LtaS synthesis. Consistent with this assumption, the clpX ltaS double mutants did not produce LTA, and genetic analyses confirmed that LTA becomes nonessential in the absence of the ClpX chaperone. In fact, inactivation of ltaS alleviated the severe growth defect conferred by the clpX deletion. Microscopic analyses showed that the absence of ClpX partly alleviates the septum placement defects of an LTA-depleted strain, while other phenotypes typical of LTA-negative S. aureus mutants, including increased cell size and decreased autolytic activity, are retained. In conclusion, our results indicate that LTA has an essential role in septum placement that can be bypassed by inactivating the ClpX chaperone. PMID:27507828

  6. Cellular nucleic acid binding protein binds G-rich single-stranded nucleic acids and may function as a nucleic acid chaperone.

    PubMed

    Armas, Pablo; Nasif, Sofía; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2008-02-15

    Cellular nucleic acid binding protein (CNBP) is a small single-stranded nucleic acid binding protein made of seven Zn knuckles and an Arg-Gly rich box. CNBP is strikingly conserved among vertebrates and was reported to play broad-spectrum functions in eukaryotic cells biology. Neither its biological function nor its mechanisms of action were elucidated yet. The main goal of this work was to gain further insights into the CNBP biochemical and molecular features. We studied Bufo arenarum CNBP (bCNBP) binding to single-stranded nucleic acid probes representing the main reported CNBP putative targets. We report that, although bCNBP is able to bind RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes in vitro, it binds RNA as a preformed dimer whereas both monomer and dimer are able to bind to ssDNA. A systematic analysis of variant probes shows that the preferred bCNBP targets contain unpaired guanosine-rich stretches. These data expand the knowledge about CNBP binding stoichiometry and begins to dissect the main features of CNBP nucleic acid targets. Besides, we show that bCNBP presents a highly disordered predicted structure and promotes the annealing and melting of nucleic acids in vitro. These features are typical of proteins that function as nucleic acid chaperones. Based on these data, we propose that CNBP may function as a nucleic acid chaperone through binding, remodeling, and stabilizing nucleic acids secondary structures. This novel CNBP biochemical activity broadens the field of study about its biological function and may be the basis to understand the diverse ways in which CNBP controls gene expression. PMID:17661353

  7. Hydration properties of the molecular chaperone alpha-crystallin in the bovine lens.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, M A; Nikolayev, G M; Goryachev, S N; Bours, J; Martin, R

    2003-10-01

    Topographic studies of crystalline fractions from different morphological layers of the young adult bovine lens were conducted. Crystallin profiles were obtained for each lens layer, using thin-layer isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel (IEF). Water soluble (WS) crystallins from the lens equator revealed a separation into HM (high molecular weight) alpha(L)-, beta(H)-, beta(L)-, beta(S)-, and gamma-crystallins. The nature of the water insoluble (WI) protein fraction in the separated lens layers reflected the aggregated state of alpha(L)-, beta(L)-, beta(S)-, and gamma-crystallins in different regions of the lens, concealed in the central cavity of the alpha-crystallin chaperone model. The IEF data demonstrate a possible chaperone-like function for alpha-crystallin in the nucleus and inner cortex of the lens, but not in the outer cortex. The water binding properties of bovine lens alpha-crystallin, calf skin collagen, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated with various techniques. The water adsorptive capacity was obtained in high vacuum desorption experiments volumetrically, and also gravimetrically in controlled atmosphere experiments. The NMR spin-echo technique was used to study the hydration of protein samples and to determine the spin-spin relaxation times (T(2)) from the protons of water adsorbed on the proteins. Isolated bovine lenses were sectioned into 11-12 morphological layers (from anterior cortex through nucleus to posterior cortex). The water content in relation to dry weight of proteins was measured in individual morphological lens layers. During water vapor uptake at relative humidity P/P(0) = 0.75, alpha-crystallin did not adsorb water suggesting that hydrophobic regions of the protein are exposed to the aqueous solvent. At relative humidity P/P(0) = 1.0, the adsorption of water by alpha-crystallin was 17% with a single component decay character of spin echo (T(2) = 3 msec). Addition of water to alpha-crystallin to about 50% of its

  8. GroEL1: a dedicated chaperone involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis during biofilm formation in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Anil; Anand, Mridula; Bhatt, Apoorva; Kremer, Laurent; Jacobs, William R; Hatfull, Graham F

    2005-12-01

    Mycobacteria are unusual in encoding two GroEL paralogs, GroEL1 and GroEL2. GroEL2 is essential--presumably providing the housekeeping chaperone functions--while groEL1 is nonessential, contains the attB site for phage Bxb1 integration, and encodes a putative chaperone with unusual structural features. Inactivation of the Mycobacterium smegmatis groEL1 gene by phage Bxb1 integration allows normal planktonic growth but prevents the formation of mature biofilms. GroEL1 modulates synthesis of mycolates--long-chain fatty acid components of the mycobacterial cell wall--specifically during biofilm formation and physically associates with KasA, a key component of the type II Fatty Acid Synthase involved in mycolic acid synthesis. Biofilm formation is associated with elevated synthesis of short-chain (C56-C68) fatty acids, and strains with altered mycolate profiles--including an InhA mutant resistant to the antituberculosis drug isoniazid and a strain overexpressing KasA--are defective in biofilm formation. PMID:16325580

  9. Structure and Histone Binding Properties of the Vps75-Rtt109 Chaperone-Lysine Acetyltransferase Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dan; Hu, Qi; Zhou, Hui; Thompson, James R.; Xu, Rui-Ming; Zhang, Zhiguo; Mer, Georges

    2011-11-02

    The histone chaperone Vps75 presents the remarkable property of stimulating the Rtt109-dependent acetylation of several histone H3 lysine residues within (H3-H4){sub 2} tetramers. To investigate this activation mechanism, we determined x-ray structures of full-length Vps75 in complex with full-length Rtt109 in two crystal forms. Both structures show similar asymmetric assemblies of a Vps75 dimer bound to an Rtt109 monomer. In the Vps75-Rtt109 complexes, the catalytic site of Rtt109 is confined to an enclosed space that can accommodate the N-terminal tail of histone H3 in (H3-H4){sub 2}. Investigation of Vps75-Rtt109-(H3-H4)2 and Vps75-(H3-H4)2 complexes by NMR spectroscopy-probed hydrogen/deuterium exchange suggests that Vps75 guides histone H3 in the catalytic enclosure. These findings clarify the basis for the enhanced acetylation of histone H3 tail residues by Vps75-Rtt109.

  10. Differential contribution of basic residues to HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein’s nucleic acid chaperone function and retroviral replication

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Mitra, Mithun; Naufer, M. Nabuan; McCauley, Micah J.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Williams, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid (NC) protein contains 15 basic residues located throughout its 55-amino acid sequence, as well as one aromatic residue in each of its two CCHC-type zinc finger motifs. NC facilitates nucleic acid (NA) rearrangements via its chaperone activity, but the structural basis for this activity and its consequences in vivo are not completely understood. Here, we investigate the role played by basic residues in the N-terminal domain, the N-terminal zinc finger and the linker region between the two zinc fingers. We use in vitro ensemble and single-molecule DNA stretching experiments to measure the characteristics of wild-type and mutant HIV-1 NC proteins, and correlate these results with cell-based HIV-1 replication assays. All of the cationic residue mutations lead to NA interaction defects, as well as reduced HIV-1 infectivity, and these effects are most pronounced on neutralizing all five N-terminal cationic residues. HIV-1 infectivity in cells is correlated most strongly with NC’s NA annealing capabilities as well as its ability to intercalate the DNA duplex. Although NC’s aromatic residues participate directly in DNA intercalation, our findings suggest that specific basic residues enhance these interactions, resulting in optimal NA chaperone activity. PMID:24293648

  11. Structural insights into chaperone-activity enhancement by a K354E mutation in tomato acidic leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    DuPrez, Kevin T; Scranton, Melissa A; Walling, Linda L; Fan, Li

    2016-05-01

    Tomato plants express acidic leucine aminopeptidase (LAP-A) in response to various environmental stressors. LAP-A not only functions as a peptidase for diverse peptide substrates, but also displays chaperone activity. A K354E mutation has been shown to abolish the peptidase activity but to enhance the chaperone activity of LAP-A. To better understand this moonlighting function of LAP-A, the crystal structure of the K354E mutant was determined at 2.15 Å resolution. The structure reveals that the K354E mutation destabilizes an active-site loop and causes significant rearrangement of active-site residues, leading to loss of the catalytic metal-ion coordination required for the peptidase activity. Although the mutant was crystallized in the same hexameric form as wild-type LAP-A, gel-filtration chromatography revealed an apparent shift from the hexamer to lower-order oligomers for the K354E mutant, showing a mixture of monomers to trimers in solution. In addition, surface-probing assays indicated that the K354E mutant has more accessible hydrophobic areas than wild-type LAP-A. Consistently, computational thermodynamic estimations of the interfaces between LAP-A monomers suggest that increased exposure of hydrophobic surfaces occurs upon hexamer breakdown. These results suggest that the K354E mutation disrupts the active-site loop, which also contributes to the hexameric assembly, and destabilizes the hexamers, resulting in much greater hydrophobic areas accessible for efficient chaperone activity than in the wild-type LAP-A. PMID:27139632

  12. Single Amino Acid Deletion in Kindlin-1 Results in Partial Protein Degradation Which Can Be Rescued by Chaperone Treatment.

    PubMed

    Maier, Kristin; He, Yinghong; Esser, Philipp R; Thriene, Kerstin; Sarca, Daniela; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Dengjel, Jörn; Martin, Ludovic; Has, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Kindler syndrome, a distinct type of epidermolysis bullosa, is a rare disorder caused by mutations in FERMT1, encoding kindlin-1. Most FERMT1 mutations lead to premature termination codons and absence of kindlin-1. Here we investigated the molecular and cellular consequences of a naturally occurring FERMT1 mutation, c.299_301del resulting in a single amino acid deletion, p.R100del. The mutation led to a 50% reduction of FERMT1 mRNA and 90% reduction of kindlin-1 protein in keratinocytes derived from the patient, as compared with control cells. The misfolded p.R100del kindlin-1 mutant was lysosomally degraded and launched a homeostatic unfolded protein response. Sodium-phenylbutyrate significantly increased kindlin-1 mRNA and protein levels and the area of mutant cells, acting as a chemical chaperone and probably also as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. In a recombinant system, low levels of wild-type or p.R100del mutant kindlin-1 were sufficient to improve the cellular phenotype in respect of spreading and proliferation as compared with kindlin-1 negative keratinocytes. The study of this hypomorphic mutation provides evidence that low amounts of kindlin-1 are sufficient to improve the epidermal architecture and Kindler syndrome cellular phenotype and proposes a personalized chaperone therapy for the patient. PMID:26827766

  13. Evaluation of structure, chaperone-like activity and protective ability of peroxynitrite modified human α-Crystallin subunits against copper-mediated ascorbic acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, Maryam; Yousefi, Reza; Khoshaman, Kazem; Moghadam, Sogand Sasan; Kurganov, Boris I

    2016-06-01

    The copper-catalyzed oxidation of ascorbic acid (ASA) to dehydroascorbate (DHA) and hydrogen peroxide plays a central role in pathology of cataract diseases during ageing and in diabetic patients. In the current study, the structural feature, chaperone-like activity and protective ability of peroxynitrite (PON) modified αA- and αB-Crystallin (Cry) against copper-mediated ASA oxidation were studied using different spectroscopic measurements and gel mobility shift assay. Upon PON modification, additional to protein structural alteration, the contents of nitrotyrosine, nitrotryptophan, dityrosine and carbonyl groups were significantly increased. Moreover, αB-Cry demonstrates significantly larger capacity for PON modification than αA-Cry. Also, based on the extent of PON modification, these proteins may display an improved chaperone-like activity and enhanced protective ability against copper-mediated ASA oxidation. In the presence of copper ions, chaperone-like activity of both native and PON-modified α-Cry subunits were appreciably improved. Additionally, binding of copper ions to native and PON-modified proteins results in the significant reduction of their solvent exposed hydrophobic patches. Overall, the increase in chaperone-like activity/ASA protective ability of PON-modified α-Cry and additional enhancement of its chaperoning action with copper ions appear to be an important defense mechanism offered by this protein. PMID:26896727

  14. Anti-diabetic effect of 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, an endoplasmic reticulum stress-reducing chemical chaperone.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Mi; Choi, Jungsook; Nam, Tae-Gyu; Ku, Jin-Mo; Jeong, Kwiwan

    2016-05-15

    Lots of experimental and clinical evidences indicate that chronic exposure to saturated fatty acids and high level of glucose is implicated in insulin resistance, beta cell failure and ultimately type 2 diabetes. In this study, we set up cell-based experimental conditions to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and insulin resistance using high concentration of palmitate (PA). Hydroxynaphthoic acids (HNAs) were formerly identified as novel chemical chaperones to resolve ER stress induced by tunicamycin. In this study, we found the compounds have the same suppressive effect on PA-induced ER stress in HepG2 cells. The representing compound, 3-HNA reduced PA-induced phosphorylation of JNK, IKKβ and IRS1 (S307) and restored insulin signaling cascade which involves insulin receptor β, IRS1 and Akt. The insulin sensitizing effect of 3-HNA was confirmed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, where the compound augmented insulin signaling and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) membrane translocation. 3-HNA also protected the pancreatic beta cells from PA-induced apoptosis by reducing ER stress. Upon 3-HNA treatment to ob/ob mice at 150mg/kg/day dosage, the diabetic parameters including glucose tolerance and systemic insulin sensitivity were significantly improved. Postmortem examination showed that 3-HNA markedly reduced ER stress and insulin resistance in the liver tissues and it sensitized insulin signaling in the liver and the skeletal muscle. Our results demonstrated that 3-HNA can sensitize insulin signaling by coping with lipotoxicity-induced ER stress as a chemical chaperone and suggested it holds therapeutic potential for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26983645

  15. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Targets IFNAR1 for Lysosomal Degradation in Free Fatty Acid Treated HCV Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Ramazan; Chandra, Partha K.; Aboulnasr, Fatma; Panigrahi, Rajesh; Ferraris, Pauline; Aydin, Yucel; Reiss, Krzysztof; Wu, Tong; Balart, Luis A.; Dash, Srikanta

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatic steatosis is a risk factor for both liver disease progression and an impaired response to interferon alpha (IFN-α)-based combination therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Previously, we reported that free fatty acid (FFA)-treated HCV cell culture induces hepatocellular steatosis and impairs the expression of interferon alpha receptor-1 (IFNAR1), which is why the antiviral activity of IFN-α against HCV is impaired. Aim To investigate the molecular mechanism by which IFNAR1 expression is impaired in HCV cell culture with or without free fatty acid-treatment. Method HCV-infected Huh 7.5 cells were cultured with or without a mixture of saturated (palmitate) and unsaturated (oleate) long-chain free fatty acids (FFA). Intracytoplasmic fat accumulation in HCV-infected culture was visualized by oil red staining. Clearance of HCV in FFA cell culture treated with type I IFN (IFN-α) and Type III IFN (IFN-λ) was determined by Renilla luciferase activity, and the expression of HCV core was determined by immunostaining. Activation of Jak-Stat signaling in the FFA-treated HCV culture by IFN-α alone and IFN-λ alone was examined by Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy. Lysosomal degradation of IFNAR1 by chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in the FFA-treated HCV cell culture model was investigated. Results FFA treatment induced dose-dependent hepatocellular steatosis and lipid droplet accumulation in HCV-infected Huh-7.5 cells. FFA treatment of infected culture increased HCV replication in a concentration-dependent manner. Intracellular lipid accumulation led to reduced Stat phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, causing an impaired IFN-α antiviral response and HCV clearance. Type III IFN (IFN-λ), which binds to a separate receptor, induces Stat phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation as well as antiviral clearance in FFA-treated HCV cell culture. We show here that the HCV-induced autophagy response is increased in FFA

  16. Fundamental differences between the nucleic acid chaperone activities of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein and Gag or Gag-derived proteins: Biological implications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tiyun; Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Mitra, Mithun; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rein, Alan; Levin, Judith G.

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 Gag polyprotein precursor has multiple domains including nucleocapsid (NC). Although mature NC and NC embedded in Gag are nucleic acid chaperones (proteins that remodel nucleic acid structure), few studies include detailed analysis of the chaperone activity of partially processed Gag proteins and comparison with NC and Gag. Here we address this issue by using a reconstituted minus-strand transfer system. NC and NC-containing Gag proteins exhibited annealing and duplex destabilizing activities required for strand transfer. Surprisingly, unlike NC, with increasing concentrations, Gag proteins drastically inhibited the DNA elongation step. This result is consistent with “nucleic acid-driven multimerization” of Gag and the reported slow dissociation of Gag from bound nucleic acid, which prevent reverse transcriptase from traversing the template (“roadblock” mechanism). Our findings illustrate one reason why NC (and not Gag) has evolved as a critical cofactor in reverse transcription, a paradigm that might also extend to other retrovirus systems. PMID:20655566

  17. Structural and functional conversion of molecular chaperone ClpB from the gram-positive halophilic lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus mediated by ATP and stress.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Tsuruno, Keigo; Nakayama, Jiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2006-12-01

    In this study, we report the purification, initial structural characterization, and functional analysis of the molecular chaperone ClpB from the gram-positive, halophilic lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus. A recombinant T. halophilus ClpB (ClpB(Tha)) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography, hydroxyapatite chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. As demonstrated by gel filtration chromatography, chemical cross-linking with glutaraldehyde, and electron microscopy, ClpB(Tha) forms a homohexameric single-ring structure in the presence of ATP under nonstress conditions. However, under stress conditions, such as high-temperature (>45 degrees C) and high-salt concentrations (>1 M KCl), it dissociated into dimers and monomers, regardless of the presence of ATP. The hexameric ClpB(Tha) reactivated heat-aggregated proteins dependent upon the DnaK system from T. halophilus (KJE(Tha)) and ATP. Interestingly, the mixture of dimer and monomer ClpB(Tha), which was formed under stress conditions, protected substrate proteins from thermal inactivation and aggregation in a manner similar to those of general molecular chaperones. From these results, we hypothesize that ClpB(Tha) forms dimers and monomers to function as a holding chaperone under stress conditions, whereas it forms a hexamer ring to function as a disaggregating chaperone in cooperation with KJE(Tha) and ATP under poststress conditions. PMID:16997952

  18. Structural and Functional Conversion of Molecular Chaperone ClpB from the Gram-Positive Halophilic Lactic Acid Bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus Mediated by ATP and Stress▿

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Tsuruno, Keigo; Nakayama, Jiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we report the purification, initial structural characterization, and functional analysis of the molecular chaperone ClpB from the gram-positive, halophilic lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus. A recombinant T. halophilus ClpB (ClpBTha) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography, hydroxyapatite chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. As demonstrated by gel filtration chromatography, chemical cross-linking with glutaraldehyde, and electron microscopy, ClpBTha forms a homohexameric single-ring structure in the presence of ATP under nonstress conditions. However, under stress conditions, such as high-temperature (>45°C) and high-salt concentrations (>1 M KCl), it dissociated into dimers and monomers, regardless of the presence of ATP. The hexameric ClpBTha reactivated heat-aggregated proteins dependent upon the DnaK system from T. halophilus (KJETha) and ATP. Interestingly, the mixture of dimer and monomer ClpBTha, which was formed under stress conditions, protected substrate proteins from thermal inactivation and aggregation in a manner similar to those of general molecular chaperones. From these results, we hypothesize that ClpBTha forms dimers and monomers to function as a holding chaperone under stress conditions, whereas it forms a hexamer ring to function as a disaggregating chaperone in cooperation with KJETha and ATP under poststress conditions. PMID:16997952

  19. Molecular chaperone properties of the high molecular weight aggregate from aged lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L.; Boyle, D.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The high molecular weight aggregate (HMWA) fraction was isolated from the water soluble proteins of aged bovine lenses. Its composition and ability to inhibit heat-induced denaturation and aggregation were compared with the lower molecular weight, oligomeric fraction of alpha isolated from the same lens. Although the major components of both fractions were the alpha-A and alpha-B chains, the HMWA fraction possessed a decreased ability to protect other proteins against heat-induced denaturation and aggregation. Immunoelectron microscopy of both fractions demonstrated that alpha particles from the HMWA fraction contained increased amounts of beta and gamma crystallins, bound to a central region of the supramolecular complex. Together, these results demonstrate that alpha crystallins found in the HMWA fraction possess a decreased ability to protect against heat-induced denaturation and aggregation, and suggest that at least part of this decrease could be due to the increased presence of beta and gamma crystallins complexed to the putative chaperone receptor site of the alpha particles.

  20. Catalytic mechanism of S-type phycobiliprotein lyase: chaperone-like action and functional amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Kupka, Michaela; Zhang, Juan; Fu, Wei-Lei; Tu, Jun-Ming; Böhm, Stephan; Su, Ping; Chen, Yu; Zhou, Ming; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2009-12-25

    The phycobilin:cysteine 84-phycobiliprotein lyase, CpcS1, catalyzes phycocyanobilin (PCB) and phycoerythrobilin (PEB) attachment at nearly all cysteine 82 binding sites (consensus numbering) of phycoerythrin, phycoerythrocyanin, phycocyanin, and allophycocyanin (Zhao, K. H., Su, P., Tu, J. M., Wang, X., Liu, H., Plöscher, M., Eichacker, L., Yang, B., Zhou, M., and Scheer, H. (2007) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 14300-14305). We now show that CpcS1 binds PCB and PEB rapidly with bi-exponential kinetics (38/119 and 12/8300 ms, respectively). Chromophore binding to the lyase is reversible and much faster than the spontaneous, but low fidelity chromophore addition to the apo-protein in the absence of the lyase. This indicates kinetic control by the enzyme, which then transfers the chromophore to the apo-protein in a slow (tens of minutes) but stereo- and regioselectively corrects the reaction. This mode of action is reminiscent of chaperones but does not require ATP. The amino acid residues Arg-18 and Arg-149 of the lyase are essential for chromophore attachment in vitro and in Escherichia coli, mutations of His-21, His-22, Trp-75, Trp-140, and Arg-147 result in reduced activity (<30% of wild type in vitro). Mutants R147Q and W69M were active but had reduced capacity for PCB binding; additionally, with W69M there was loss of fidelity in chromophore attachment. Imidazole is a non-competitive inhibitor, supporting a bilin-binding function of histidine. Evidence was obtained that CpcS1 also catalyzes exchange of C-beta84-bound PCB in biliproteins by PEB. PMID:19864423

  1. Aspartic acid functions as carbonyl trapper to inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end products by chemical chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Govindarajan; Saraswathi, N T

    2016-05-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were implicated in pathology of numerous diseases. In this study, we present the bioactivity of aspartic acid (Asp) to inhibit the AGEs. Hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated with glucose, fructose, and ribose in the presence and absence of Asp (100-200 μM). HbA1c inhibition was investigated using human blood and characterized by micro-column ion exchange chromatography. The effect of methyl glyoxal (MG) on hemoglobin and BSA was evaluated by fluorescence spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. The effect of MG on red blood cells morphology was characterized by scanning electron micrographs. Molecular docking was performed on BSA with Asp. Asp is capable of inhibiting the formation of fluorescent AGEs by reacting with the reducing sugars. The presence of Asp as supplement in whole blood reduced the HbA1c% from 8.8 to 6.1. The presence of MG showed an increase in fluorescence and the presence of Asp inhibited the glycation thereby the fluorescence was quenched. MG also affected the electrophoretic mobility of hemoglobin and BSA by forming high molecular weight aggregates. Normal RBCs showed typical biconcave shape. MG modified RBCs showed twisted and elongated shape whereas the presence of ASP tends to protect RBC from twisting. Asp interacted with arginine residues of bovine serum albumin particularly ARG 194, ARG 198, and ARG 217 thereby stabilized the protein complex. We conclude that Asp has dual functions as a chemical chaperone to stabilize protein and as a dicarbonyl trapper, and thereby it can prevent the complications caused by glycation. PMID:26325019

  2. In vivo and in vitro complementation study comparing the function of DnaK chaperone systems from halophilic lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Saruwatari, Kozue; Higashi, Chihana; Tsuruno, Keigo; Matsumoto, Shunsuke; Nakayama, Jiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2008-03-01

    In this study, we characterized the DnaK chaperone system from Tetragenococcus halophilus, a halophilic lactic acid bacterium. An in vivo complementation test showed that under heat stress conditions, T. halophilus DnaK did not rescue the growth of the Escherichia coli dnaK deletion mutant, whereas T. halophilus DnaJ and GrpE complemented the corresponding mutations of E. coli. Purified T. halophilus DnaK showed intrinsic weak ATPase activity and holding chaperone activity in vitro, but T. halophilus DnaK did not cooperate with the purified DnaJ and GrpE from either T. halophilus or E. coli in ATP hydrolysis or luciferase-refolding reactions under the conditions tested. E. coli DnaK, however, cross-reacted with those from both bacteria. This difference in the cooperation with DnaJ and GrpE appears to result in an inability of T. halophilus DnaK to replace the in vivo function of the DnaK chaperone of E. coli. PMID:18323638

  3. NMR spin-echo studies of hydration properties of the molecular chaperone alpha-crystallin in the bovine lens.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Nikolayev, Gennady N; Goryachev, Sergey N; Bours, Johan

    2002-07-29

    The water-binding properties of bovine lens alpha-crystallin, collagen from calf skin and bovine serum albumin (BSA), were investigated with various techniques. The water absorptive capacity was obtained in high vacuum desorption experiments volumetrically, and also gravimetrically in controlled atmosphere experiments. NMR spin-echo technique was used to study the hydration of protein samples and to determine the spin-spin relaxation times (T2) from the protons of water, absorbed on the proteins. Isolated bovine lenses were sectioned into 11-12 morphological layers (from anterior cortex through nucleus to posterior cortex). Crystallin profiles were obtained for each lens layer using thin-layer isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel (IEF). The water content in relation to dry weight of proteins was measured in individual morphological lens layers. During the water vapor uptake P/P(0)=0.75, alpha-crystallin did not absorb water, suggesting that hydrophobic regions of the protein are exposed to the aqueous solvent. At P/P(0)=1.0, the absorption of water by alpha-crystallin was 17% with a single component decay character of spin-echo (T2=3 ms). Addition of water to alpha-crystallin to about 50% of its w/w in the protein sample showed T2=8 ms with only one single component decay of the spin-echo signal. The single component decay character of the spin-echo indicates at the tightly bound water by alpha-crystallin. Under a relative humidity P/P(0)=1.0, collagen and BSA absorbed correspondingly 19.3% and 28% of water and showed a two-component decay curve with T2 of about 5 and 40 ms. The findings demonstrate the presence of two water fractions in collagen and BSA which are separated in space. The IEF data suggest a tight binding of water with alpha-crystallin with similar distribution patterns in the lens layers. The IEF data demonstrate a possible chaperone-like function for alpha-crystallin in the nucleus and inner cortex of the lens, but not in the outer cortex. To

  4. Unique Peptide Substrate Binding Properties of 110-kDa Heat-shock Protein (Hsp110) Determine Its Distinct Chaperone Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xinping; Sarbeng, Evans Boateng; Vorvis, Christina; Kumar, Divya Prasanna; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Qinglian

    2012-01-01

    The molecular chaperone 70-kDa heat-shock proteins (Hsp70s) play essential roles in maintaining protein homeostasis. Hsp110, an Hsp70 homolog, is highly efficient in preventing protein aggregation but lacks the hallmark folding activity seen in Hsp70s. To understand the mechanistic differences between these two chaperones, we first characterized the distinct peptide substrate binding properties of Hsp110s. In contrast to Hsp70s, Hsp110s prefer aromatic residues in their substrates, and the substrate binding and release exhibit remarkably fast kinetics. Sequence and structure comparison revealed significant differences in the two peptide-binding loops: the length and properties are switched. When we swapped these two loops in an Hsp70, the peptide binding properties of this mutant Hsp70 were converted to Hsp110-like, and more impressively, it functionally behaved like an Hsp110. Thus, the peptide substrate binding properties implemented in the peptide-binding loops may determine the chaperone activity differences between Hsp70s and Hsp110s. PMID:22157767

  5. The cleverSuite approach for protein characterization: predictions of structural properties, solubility, chaperone requirements and RNA-binding abilities

    PubMed Central

    Klus, Petr; Bolognesi, Benedetta; Agostini, Federico; Marchese, Domenica; Zanzoni, Andreas; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The recent shift towards high-throughput screening is posing new challenges for the interpretation of experimental results. Here we propose the cleverSuite approach for large-scale characterization of protein groups. Description: The central part of the cleverSuite is the cleverMachine (CM), an algorithm that performs statistics on protein sequences by comparing their physico-chemical propensities. The second element is called cleverClassifier and builds on top of the models generated by the CM to allow classification of new datasets. Results: We applied the cleverSuite to predict secondary structure properties, solubility, chaperone requirements and RNA-binding abilities. Using cross-validation and independent datasets, the cleverSuite reproduces experimental findings with great accuracy and provides models that can be used for future investigations. Availability: The intuitive interface for dataset exploration, analysis and prediction is available at http://s.tartaglialab.com/clever_suite. Contact: gian.tartaglia@crg.es Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24493033

  6. Nitro-Fatty Acids in Plant Signaling: Nitro-Linolenic Acid Induces the Molecular Chaperone Network in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Padilla, María N; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Luque, Francisco; Melguizo, Manuel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Fierro-Risco, Jesús; Peñas-Sanjuán, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2016-02-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs) are the product of the reaction between reactive nitrogen species derived of nitric oxide (NO) and unsaturated fatty acids. In animal systems, NO2-FAs are considered novel signaling mediators of cell function based on a proven antiinflammatory response. Nevertheless, the interaction of NO with fatty acids in plant systems has scarcely been studied. Here, we examine the endogenous occurrence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln) in Arabidopsis and the modulation of NO2-Ln levels throughout this plant's development by mass spectrometry. The observed levels of this NO2-FA at picomolar concentrations suggested its role as a signaling effector of cell function. In fact, a transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq technology established a clear signaling role for this molecule, demonstrating that NO2-Ln was involved in plant defense response against different abiotic-stress conditions, mainly by inducing heat shock proteins and supporting a conserved mechanism of action in both animal and plant defense processes. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that NO2-Ln was also involved in the response to oxidative stress conditions, mainly depicted by H2O2, reactive oxygen species, and oxygen-containing compound responses, with a high induction of ascorbate peroxidase expression. Closely related to these results, NO2-Ln levels significantly rose under several abiotic-stress conditions such as wounding or exposure to salinity, cadmium, and low temperature, thus validating the outcomes found by RNA-seq technology. Jointly, to our knowledge, these are the first results showing the endogenous presence of NO2-Ln in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and supporting the strong signaling role of these molecules in the defense mechanism against different abiotic-stress situations. PMID:26628746

  7. Nitro-Fatty Acids in Plant Signaling: Nitro-Linolenic Acid Induces the Molecular Chaperone Network in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, María N.; Begara-Morales, Juan C.; Luque, Francisco; Melguizo, Manuel; Fierro-Risco, Jesús; Peñas-Sanjuán, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs) are the product of the reaction between reactive nitrogen species derived of nitric oxide (NO) and unsaturated fatty acids. In animal systems, NO2-FAs are considered novel signaling mediators of cell function based on a proven antiinflammatory response. Nevertheless, the interaction of NO with fatty acids in plant systems has scarcely been studied. Here, we examine the endogenous occurrence of nitro-linolenic acid (NO2-Ln) in Arabidopsis and the modulation of NO2-Ln levels throughout this plant’s development by mass spectrometry. The observed levels of this NO2-FA at picomolar concentrations suggested its role as a signaling effector of cell function. In fact, a transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq technology established a clear signaling role for this molecule, demonstrating that NO2-Ln was involved in plant defense response against different abiotic-stress conditions, mainly by inducing heat shock proteins and supporting a conserved mechanism of action in both animal and plant defense processes. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that NO2-Ln was also involved in the response to oxidative stress conditions, mainly depicted by H2O2, reactive oxygen species, and oxygen-containing compound responses, with a high induction of ascorbate peroxidase expression. Closely related to these results, NO2-Ln levels significantly rose under several abiotic-stress conditions such as wounding or exposure to salinity, cadmium, and low temperature, thus validating the outcomes found by RNA-seq technology. Jointly, to our knowledge, these are the first results showing the endogenous presence of NO2-Ln in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and supporting the strong signaling role of these molecules in the defense mechanism against different abiotic-stress situations. PMID:26628746

  8. Chaperone protein HYPK interacts with the first 17 amino acid region of Huntingtin and modulates mutant HTT-mediated aggregation and cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Kamalika Roy; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P.

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • HYPK reduces mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity. • Interaction of HYPK with HTT requires N-terminal 17 amino acid of HTT (HTT-N17). • Deletion of HTT-N17 leads to SDS-soluble, smaller, nuclear aggregates. • These smaller aggregates do not associate with HYPK and are more cytotoxic. • Maybe, interaction of HYPK with amphipathic HTT-N17 block HTT aggregate formation. - Abstract: Huntington’s disease is a polyglutamine expansion disorder, characterized by mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity. Many reports suggests roles of N-terminal 17 amino acid domain of HTT (HTT-N17) towards subcellular localization, aggregate formation and subsequent pathogenicity induced by N-terminal HTT harboring polyQ stretch in pathogenic range. HYPK is a HTT-interacting chaperone which can reduce N-terminal mutant HTT-mediated aggregate formation and cytotoxicity in neuronal cell lines. However, how HYPK interacts with N-terminal fragment of HTT remained unknown. Here we report that specific interaction of HYPK with HTT-N17 is crucial for the chaperone activity of HYPK. Deletion of HTT-N17 leads to formation of tinier, SDS-soluble nuclear aggregates formed by N-terminal mutant HTT. The increased cytotoxicity imparted by these tiny aggregates might be contributed due to loss of interaction with HYPK.

  9. Neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors undergo cognate ligand chaperoning in the endoplasmic reticulum by endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Eshaq, Randa S.; Meshul, Charles K.; Moore, Cynthia; Hood, Rebecca L.; Leidenheimer, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Dysfunction of these receptors is associated with various psychiatric/neurological disorders and drugs targeting this receptor are widely used therapeutic agents. Both the efficacy and plasticity of GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission depends on the number of surface GABAA receptors. An understudied aspect of receptor cell surface expression is the post-translational regulation of receptor biogenesis within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that exogenous GABA can act as a ligand chaperone of recombinant GABAA receptors in the early secretory pathway leading us to now investigate whether endogenous GABA facilitates the biogenesis of GABAA receptors in primary cerebral cortical cultures. In immunofluorescence labeling experiments, we have determined that neurons expressing surface GABAA receptors contain both GABA and its degradative enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T). Treatment of neurons with GABA-T inhibitors, a treatment known to increase intracellular GABA levels, decreases the interaction of the receptor with the ER quality control protein calnexin, concomittantly increasing receptor forward-trafficking and plasma membrane insertion. The effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction is not due to the activation of surface GABAA or GABAB receptors. Consistent with our hypothesis that GABA acts as a cognate ligand chaperone in the ER, immunogold-labeling of rodent brain slices reveals the presence of GABA within the rough ER. The density of this labeling is similar to that present in mitochondria, the organelle in which GABA is degraded. Lastly, the effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction was prevented by pretreatment with a GABA transporter inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that endogenous GABA acts in the rough ER as a cognate ligand chaperone to facilitate the biogenesis of neuronal GABAA receptors. PMID

  10. Both the isomerase and chaperone activities of protein disulfide isomerase are required for the reactivation of reduced and denatured acidic phospholipase A2.

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Y; Zhou, Y; Wang, C

    1997-01-01

    The spontaneous reactivation yield of acidic phospholipase A2 (APLA2), a protein containing seven disulfide bonds, after reduction and denaturation in guanidine hydrochloride is very low. Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) markedly increases the reactivation yield and prevents the aggregation of APLA2 during refolding in a redox buffer containing GSH and GSSG. S-methylated PDI (mPDI), with no isomerase but as nearly full chaperone activity as native PDI, has no effect on either the reactivation or aggregation of APLA2. However, the simultaneous presence of PDI and mPDI in molar ratios to APLA2 of 0.1 and 0.9 respectively fully reactivates the denatured enzyme, as does PDI alone at a ratio of 1. At ratios of 0.1 and 0.15 respectively, they completely suppress APLA2 aggregation, as does PDI alone at a ratio of 0.25. Moreover, delayed addition of PDI to the refolding buffer greatly diminished the reactivation yield of APLA2, but this deteriorating effect can be alleviated markedly by the presence of mPDI in the refolding buffer. Without GSSG, mPDI prevents the aggregation of APLA2 during refolding. It is proposed that the in vitro action of PDI as a foldase consists of both isomerase and chaperone activities, and the latter activity can be fully replaced by mPDI. PMID:9034346

  11. Expression of Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Chaperone Gene (COX20) Improves Tolerance to Weak Acid and Oxidative Stress during Yeast Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Hart, Andrew J.; Keerthiraju, Ethiraju R.; Waldron, Paul R.; Tucker, Gregory A.; Greetham, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the micro-organism of choice for the conversion of fermentable sugars released by the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic material into bioethanol. Pre-treatment of lignocellulosic material releases acetic acid and previous work identified a cytochrome oxidase chaperone gene (COX20) which was significantly up-regulated in yeast cells in the presence of acetic acid. Results A Δcox20 strain was sensitive to the presence of acetic acid compared with the background strain. Overexpressing COX20 using a tetracycline-regulatable expression vector system in a Δcox20 strain, resulted in tolerance to the presence of acetic acid and tolerance could be ablated with addition of tetracycline. Assays also revealed that overexpression improved tolerance to the presence of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. Conclusion This is a study which has utilised tetracycline-regulated protein expression in a fermentation system, which was characterised by improved (or enhanced) tolerance to acetic acid and oxidative stress. PMID:26427054

  12. Large-Scale Conformational Transitions and Dimerization Are Encoded in the Amino-Acid Sequences of Hsp70 Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Malinverni, Duccio; Marsili, Simone; Barducci, Alessandro; De Los Rios, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Hsp70s are a class of ubiquitous and highly conserved molecular chaperones playing a central role in the regulation of proteostasis in the cell. Hsp70s assist a myriad of cellular processes by binding unfolded or misfolded substrates during a complex biochemical cycle involving large-scale structural rearrangements. Here we show that an analysis of coevolution at the residue level fully captures the characteristic large-scale conformational transitions of this protein family, and predicts an evolutionary conserved–and thus functional–homo-dimeric arrangement. Furthermore, we highlight that the features encoding the Hsp70 dimer are more conserved in bacterial than in eukaryotic sequences, suggesting that the known Hsp70/Hsp110 hetero-dimer is a eukaryotic specialization built on a pre-existing template. PMID:26046683

  13. Binding of 3,4,5,6-Tetrahydroxyazepanes to the Acid-[beta]-glucosidase Active Site: Implications for Pharmacological Chaperone Design for Gaucher Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Orwig, Susan D.; Tan, Yun Lei; Grimster, Neil P.; Yu, Zhanqian; Powers, Evan T.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2013-03-07

    Pharmacologic chaperoning is a therapeutic strategy being developed to improve the cellular folding and trafficking defects associated with Gaucher disease, a lysosomal storage disorder caused by point mutations in the gene encoding acid-{beta}-glucosidase (GCase). In this approach, small molecules bind to and stabilize mutant folded or nearly folded GCase in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), increasing the concentration of folded, functional GCase trafficked to the lysosome where the mutant enzyme can hydrolyze the accumulated substrate. To date, the pharmacologic chaperone (PC) candidates that have been investigated largely have been active site-directed inhibitors of GCase, usually containing five- or six-membered rings, such as modified azasugars. Here we show that a seven-membered, nitrogen-containing heterocycle (3,4,5,6-tetrahydroxyazepane) scaffold is also promising for generating PCs for GCase. Crystal structures reveal that the core azepane stabilizes GCase in a variation of its proposed active conformation, whereas binding of an analogue with an N-linked hydroxyethyl tail stabilizes GCase in a conformation in which the active site is covered, also utilizing a loop conformation not seen previously. Although both compounds preferentially stabilize GCase to thermal denaturation at pH 7.4, reflective of the pH in the ER, only the core azepane, which is a mid-micromolar competitive inhibitor, elicits a modest increase in enzyme activity for the neuronopathic G202R and the non-neuronopathic N370S mutant GCase in an intact cell assay. Our results emphasize the importance of the conformational variability of the GCase active site in the design of competitive inhibitors as PCs for Gaucher disease.

  14. Binding of 3,4,5,6-tetrahydroxyazepanes to the acid-β-glucosidase active site: implications for pharmacological chaperone design for Gaucher disease†

    PubMed Central

    Orwig, Susan. D.; Tan, Yun Lei; Grimster, Neil P.; Yu, Zhanqian; Powers, Evan; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological chaperoning is a therapeutic strategy being developed to restore cellular folding and trafficking defects associated with Gaucher disease, a lysosomal storage disorder caused by point mutations in the gene encoding for acid- β-glucosidase (GCase). In this approach, small molecules bind to and stabilize mutant GCase in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), increasing the concentration of folded, functional GCase trafficked to the lysosome where the mutant enzyme can hydrolyze accumulated substrate. To date, pharmacologic chaperone (PC) candidates investigated have largely been active-site-directed inhibitors of GCase, usually containing five- or six-membered rings, such as modified azasugars. Here we show that a seven-membered, nitrogen-containing heterocycle (3,4,5,6-tetrahydroxyazepane) scaffold is also promising for generating PCs for GCase. Crystal structures reveal that the core azepane stabilizes GCase in a variation of its proposed active conformation, whereas binding of an analog with an N-linked hydroxyethyl tail stabilizes a conformation of GCase in which the active site is covered, also utilizing a loop conformation not seen previously. Although both compounds preferentially stabilize GCase to thermal denaturation at pH 7.4, reflective of the pH in the ER, only the core azepane, which is a micromolar competitive inhibitor, elicits a modest increase in enzyme activity for the neuronopathic G202R- and the non-neuronopathic N370S- mutant GCase in an intact cell assay. Our results emphasize the importance of the conformational variability of the GCase active site in the design of competitive inhibitors as PCs for Gaucher disease. PMID:22047104

  15. Molecular chaperones: functional mechanisms and nanotechnological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario Fernández-Fernández, M.; Sot, Begoña; María Valpuesta, José

    2016-08-01

    Molecular chaperones are a group of proteins that assist in protein homeostasis. They not only prevent protein misfolding and aggregation, but also target misfolded proteins for degradation. Despite differences in structure, all types of chaperones share a common general feature, a surface that recognizes and interacts with the misfolded protein. This and other, more specialized properties can be adapted for various nanotechnological purposes, by modification of the original biomolecules or by de novo design based on artificial structures.

  16. Molecular chaperones: functional mechanisms and nanotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, M Rosario; Sot, Begoña; Valpuesta, José María

    2016-08-12

    Molecular chaperones are a group of proteins that assist in protein homeostasis. They not only prevent protein misfolding and aggregation, but also target misfolded proteins for degradation. Despite differences in structure, all types of chaperones share a common general feature, a surface that recognizes and interacts with the misfolded protein. This and other, more specialized properties can be adapted for various nanotechnological purposes, by modification of the original biomolecules or by de novo design based on artificial structures. PMID:27363314

  17. Gymnastics of molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Matthias P

    2010-08-13

    Molecular chaperones assist folding processes and conformational changes in many proteins. In order to do so, they progress through complex conformational cycles themselves. In this review, I discuss the diverse conformational dynamics of the ATP-dependent chaperones of the Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90, and Hsp100 families. PMID:20705236

  18. Forces Driving Chaperone Action.

    PubMed

    Koldewey, Philipp; Stull, Frederick; Horowitz, Scott; Martin, Raoul; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-07-14

    It is still unclear what molecular forces drive chaperone-mediated protein folding. Here, we obtain a detailed mechanistic understanding of the forces that dictate the four key steps of chaperone-client interaction: initial binding, complex stabilization, folding, and release. Contrary to the common belief that chaperones recognize unfolding intermediates by their hydrophobic nature, we discover that the model chaperone Spy uses long-range electrostatic interactions to rapidly bind to its unfolded client protein Im7. Short-range hydrophobic interactions follow, which serve to stabilize the complex. Hydrophobic collapse of the client protein then drives its folding. By burying hydrophobic residues in its core, the client's affinity to Spy decreases, which causes client release. By allowing the client to fold itself, Spy circumvents the need for client-specific folding instructions. This mechanism might help explain how chaperones can facilitate the folding of various unrelated proteins. PMID:27293188

  19. Solution properties of polygalacturonic acid

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, R. W.; Spires, I. P. C.; Tipton, K. F.

    1969-01-01

    1. The specimen of polygalacturonic acid used in these studies was shown to contain very little neutral sugar, methyl ester groups or ash, and only residues of galacturonic acid. Its electrophoretic homogeneity was examined in pyridine–acetic acid buffer at pH6·5 and in borate buffer at pH9·2. The distribution of effective particle weights was shown to be fairly narrow. 2. The pH-titration curve of the polymer gave a pK value of 3·7. 3. The interaction of the polymer with Ruthenium Red was studied and titration curves were obtained for the spectral shifts associated with the formation of a complex. 4. Optical-rotatory-dispersion studies showed that the Drude constant, λc, was dependent on pH. 5. Polygalacturonic acid was shown to display non-Newtonian properties in solution and to have an anomalously high relative specific viscosity at low concentrations. 6. Studies were made of the pH-dependence of the sedimentation coefficient of the polymer. 7. These results are discussed in terms of the structure of the molecule and their relevance to the properties of pectic substances. PMID:5343801

  20. Chaperones in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, James; Wiseman, R. Luke; Chiti, Fabrizio; Dickey, Chad A.; McLean, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular protein homeostasis (proteostasis) maintains the integrity of the proteome and includes protein synthesis, folding, oligomerization, and turnover; chaperone proteins assist with all of these processes. Neurons appear to be especially susceptible to failures in proteostasis, and this is now increasingly recognized as a major origin of neurodegenerative disease. This review, based on a mini-symposium presented at the 2015 Society for Neuroscience meeting, describes new work in the area of neuronal proteostasis, with a specific focus on the roles and therapeutic uses of protein chaperones. We first present a brief review of protein misfolding and aggregation in neurodegenerative disease. We then discuss different aspects of chaperone control of neuronal proteostasis on topics ranging from chaperone engineering, to chaperone-mediated blockade of protein oligomerization and cytotoxicity, to the potential rescue of neurodegenerative processes using modified chaperone proteins. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Aberrant protein homeostasis within neurons results in protein misfolding and aggregation. In this review, we discuss specific roles for protein chaperones in the oligomerization, assembly, and disaggregation of proteins known to be abnormally folded in neurodegenerative disease. Collectively, our goal is to identify therapeutic mechanisms to reduce the cellular toxicity of abnormal aggregates. PMID:26468185

  1. Identification of two p23 co-chaperone isoforms in Leishmania braziliensis exhibiting similar structures and Hsp90 interaction properties despite divergent stabilities.

    PubMed

    Batista, Fernanda A H; Almeida, Glessler S; Seraphim, Thiago V; Silva, Kelly P; Murta, Silvane M F; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Borges, Júlio C

    2015-01-01

    The small acidic protein called p23 acts as a co-chaperone for heat-shock protein of 90 kDa (Hsp90) during its ATPase cycle. p23 proteins inhibit Hsp90 ATPase activity and show intrinsic chaperone activity. A search for p23 in protozoa, especially trypanosomatids, led us to identify two putative proteins in the Leishmania braziliensis genome that share approximately 30% identity with each other and with the human p23. To understand the presence of two p23 isoforms in trypanosomatids, we obtained the recombinant p23 proteins of L. braziliensis (named Lbp23A and Lbp23B) and performed structural and functional studies. The recombinant proteins share similar solution structures; however, temperature- and chemical-induced unfolding experiments showed that Lbp23A is more stable than Lbp23B, suggesting that they may have different functions. Lbp23B prevented the temperature-induced aggregation of malic dehydrogenase more efficiently than did Lbp23A, whereas the two proteins had equivalent efficiencies with respect to preventing the temperature-induced aggregation of luciferase. Both proteins interacted with L. braziliensis Hsp90 (LbHsp90) and inhibited its ATPase activity, although their efficiencies differed. In vivo identification studies suggested that both proteins are present in L. braziliensis cells grown under different conditions, although Lbp23B may undergo post-translation modifications. Interaction studies indicated that both Lbp23 proteins interact with LbHsp90. Taken together, our data suggest that the two protozoa p23 isoforms act similarly when regulating Hsp90 function. However, they also have some differences, indicating that the L. braziliensis Hsp90 machine has features providing an opportunity for novel forms of selective inhibition of protozoan Hsp90. PMID:25369258

  2. Chaperones in control of protein disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Liberek, Krzysztof; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Ziętkiewicz, Szymon

    2008-01-01

    The chaperone protein network controls both initial protein folding and subsequent maintenance of proteins in the cell. Although the native structure of a protein is principally encoded in its amino-acid sequence, the process of folding in vivo very often requires the assistance of molecular chaperones. Chaperones also play a role in a post-translational quality control system and thus are required to maintain the proper conformation of proteins under changing environmental conditions. Many factors leading to unfolding and misfolding of proteins eventually result in protein aggregation. Stress imposed by high temperature was one of the first aggregation-inducing factors studied and remains one of the main models in this field. With massive protein aggregation occurring in response to heat exposure, the cell needs chaperones to control and counteract the aggregation process. Elimination of aggregates can be achieved by solubilization of aggregates and either refolding of the liberated polypeptides or their proteolysis. Here, we focus on the molecular mechanisms by which heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70), Hsp100 and small Hsp chaperones liberate and refold polypeptides trapped in protein aggregates. PMID:18216875

  3. Intracellular fibril formation, calcification, and enrichment of chaperones, cytoskeletal, and intermediate filament proteins in the adult hippocampus CA1 following neonatal exposure to the nonprotein amino acid BMAA.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Berg, Anna-Lena; Hanrieder, Jörg; Arnerup, Gunnel; Lindström, Anna-Karin; Brittebo, Eva B

    2015-03-01

    The environmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease, and recent studies indicate that BMAA can be misincorporated into proteins. BMAA is a developmental neurotoxicant that can induce long-term learning and memory deficits, as well as regionally restricted neuronal degeneration and mineralization in the hippocampal CA1. The aim of the study was to characterize long-term changes (2 weeks to 6 months) further in the brain of adult rats treated neonatally (postnatal days 9-10) with BMAA (460 mg/kg) using immunohistochemistry (IHC), transmission electron microscopy, and laser capture microdissection followed by LC-MS/MS for proteomic analysis. The histological examination demonstrated progressive neurodegenerative changes, astrogliosis, microglial activation, and calcification in the hippocampal CA1 3-6 months after exposure. The IHC showed an increased staining for α-synuclein and ubiquitin in the area. The ultrastructural examination revealed intracellular deposition of abundant bundles of closely packed parallel fibrils in neurons, axons, and astrocytes of the CA1. Proteomic analysis of the affected site demonstrated an enrichment of chaperones (e.g., clusterin, GRP-78), cytoskeletal and intermediate filament proteins, and proteins involved in the antioxidant defense system. Several of the most enriched proteins (plectin, glial fibrillar acidic protein, vimentin, Hsp 27, and ubiquitin) are known to form complex astrocytic inclusions, so-called Rosenthal fibers, in the neurodegenerative disorder Alexander disease. In addition, TDP-43 and the negative regulator of autophagy, GLIPR-2, were exclusively detected. The present study demonstrates that neonatal exposure to BMAA may offer a novel model for the study of hippocampal fibril formation in vivo. PMID:24798087

  4. Human Acid β-Glucosidase Inhibition by Carbohydrate Derived Iminosugars: Towards New Pharmacological Chaperones for Gaucher Disease.

    PubMed

    Parmeggiani, Camilla; Catarzi, Serena; Matassini, Camilla; D'Adamio, Giampiero; Morrone, Amelia; Goti, Andrea; Paoli, Paolo; Cardona, Francesca

    2015-09-21

    A collection of carbohydrate-derived iminosugars belonging to three structurally diversified sub-classes (polyhydroxylated pyrrolidines, piperidines, and pyrrolizidines) was evaluated for inhibition of human acid β-glucosidase (glucocerebrosidase, GCase), the deficient enzyme in Gaucher disease. The synthesis of several new pyrrolidine analogues substituted at the nitrogen or α-carbon atom with alkyl chains of different lengths suggested an interpretation of the inhibition data and led to the discovery of two new GCase inhibitors at sub-micromolar concentration. In the piperidine iminosugar series, two N-alkylated derivatives were found to rescue the residual GCase activity in N370S/RecNcil mutated human fibroblasts (among which one up to 1.5-fold). This study provides the starting point for the identification of new compounds in the treatment of Gaucher disease. PMID:26376302

  5. Aging cellular networks: chaperones as major participants.

    PubMed

    Soti, C; Csermely, P

    2007-01-01

    We increasingly rely on the network approach to understand the complexity of cellular functions. Chaperones (heat shock proteins) are key "networkers", which sequester and repair damaged proteins. In order to link the network approach and chaperones with the aging process, we first summarize the properties of aging networks suggesting a "weak link theory of aging". This theory suggests that age-related random damage primarily affects the overwhelming majority of the low affinity, transient interactions (weak links) in cellular networks leading to increased noise, destabilization and diversity. These processes may be further amplified by age-specific network remodelling and by the sequestration of weakly linked cellular proteins to protein aggregates of aging cells. Chaperones are weakly linked hubs (i.e., network elements with a large number of connections) and inter-modular bridge elements of protein-protein interaction, signalling and mitochondrial networks. As aging proceeds, the increased overload of damaged proteins is an especially important element contributing to cellular disintegration and destabilization. Additionally, chaperone overload may contribute to the increase of "noise" in aging cells, which leads to an increased stochastic resonance resulting in a deficient discrimination between signals and noise. Chaperone- and other multi-target therapies, which restore the missing weak links in aging cellular networks, may emerge as important anti-aging interventions. PMID:16814508

  6. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure–property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group. PMID:26967507

  7. Mitochondrial peroxiredoxin functions as crucial chaperone reservoir in Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Filipa; Castro, Helena; Cruz, Tânia; Tse, Eric; Koldewey, Philipp; Southworth, Daniel R.; Tomás, Ana M.; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic eukaryotic 2-Cys-peroxiredoxins have been widely reported to act as dual-function proteins, either detoxifying reactive oxygen species or acting as chaperones to prevent protein aggregation. Several stimuli, including peroxide-mediated sulfinic acid formation at the active site cysteine, have been proposed to trigger the chaperone activity. However, the mechanism underlying this activation and the extent to which the chaperone function is crucial under physiological conditions in vivo remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that in the vector-borne protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum, mitochondrial peroxiredoxin (Prx) exerts intrinsic ATP-independent chaperone activity, protecting a wide variety of different proteins against heat stress-mediated unfolding in vitro and in vivo. Activation of the chaperone function appears to be induced by temperature-mediated restructuring of the reduced decamers, promoting binding of unfolding client proteins in the center of Prx’s ringlike structure. Client proteins are maintained in a folding-competent conformation until restoration of nonstress conditions, upon which they are released and transferred to ATP-dependent chaperones for refolding. Interference with client binding impairs parasite infectivity, providing compelling evidence for the in vivo importance of Prx’s chaperone function. Our results suggest that reduced Prx provides a mitochondrial chaperone reservoir, which allows L. infantum to deal successfully with protein unfolding conditions during the transition from insect to the mammalian hosts and to generate viable parasites capable of perpetuating infection. PMID:25646478

  8. Acid evaporation property in chemically amplified resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Shuichi; Itani, Toshiro; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Yamana, Mitsuharu; Samoto, Norihiko; Kasama, Kunihiko

    1997-07-01

    The lithographic performance of a chemically amplified resist system very much depends on the photo-generated acid structure. In a previous paper, we reported the molecular structure dependence of two typical photo-generated acids (aromatic sulfonic acid and alkyl sulfonic acid) from the viewpoints of lithographic performance and acid characteristics such as acid generation efficiency, acid diffusion behavior and acid evaporation property. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of the remaining solvent in a resist film on the acid evaporation property. Four types of two-component chemically amplified positive KrF resists were prepared consisting of tert-butoxycarbonyl (t-BOC) protected polyhydroxystyrene and sulfonic acid derivative photo-acid generator (PAG). Here, a different combination of two types of PAGs [2,4-dimethylbenzenesulfonic acid (aromatic sulfonic acid) derivative PAG and cyclohexanesulfonic acid (alkyl sulfonic acid) derivative PAG] and two types of solvents (propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate; PGMEA and ethyl lactate; EL) were evaluated. The aromatic sulfonic acid was able to evaporate easily during post exposure bake (PEB) treatment, but the alkyl sulfonic acid was not. The higher evaporation property of aromatic sulfonic acid might be due to the higher vapor pressure and the longer acid diffusion length. Furthermore, the amount of aromatic sulfonic acid in the PGMEA resist was reduced by more than that in the EL resist. The amount of acid loss also became smaller at a higher prebake temperature. The concentration of the remaining solvent in the resist film decreased with the increasing prebake temperature. We think that the acid evaporation property was affected by the remaining solvent in the resist, film; the large amount of remaining solvent promoted the acid diffusion and eventually accelerated the acid evaporation from the resist film surface in the PGMEA resist. In summary, the acid evaporation property depends on both the acid

  9. Antibiofilm Properties of Acetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Nielsen, Anne K.; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Homøe, Preben; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are known to be extremely tolerant toward antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents. These biofilms cause the persistence of chronic infections. Since antibiotics rarely resolve these infections, the only effective treatment of chronic infections is surgical removal of the infected implant, tissue, or organ and thereby the biofilm. Acetic acid is known for its antimicrobial effect on bacteria in general, but has never been thoroughly tested for its efficacy against bacterial biofilms. In this article, we describe complete eradication of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative biofilms using acetic acid both as a liquid and as a dry salt. In addition, we present our clinical experience of acetic acid treatment of chronic wounds. In conclusion, we here present the first comprehensive in vitro and in vivo testing of acetic acid against bacterial biofilms. PMID:26155378

  10. Molecular chaperones and neuronal proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather L.; Li, Wenwen; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is essential for maintaining the functionality of the proteome. The disruption of proteostasis, due to genetic mutations or an age-related decline, leads to aberrantly folded proteins that typically lose their function. The accumulation of misfolded and aggregated protein is also cytotoxic and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurons have developed an intrinsic protein quality control network, of which molecular chaperones are an essential component. Molecular chaperones function to promote efficient folding and target misfolded proteins for refolding or degradation. Increasing molecular chaperone expression can suppress protein aggregation and toxicity in numerous models of neurodegenerative disease; therefore, molecular chaperones are considered exciting therapeutic targets. Furthermore, mutations in several chaperones cause inherited neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on the importance of molecular chaperones in neurodegenerative diseases, and discuss the advances in understanding their protective mechanisms. PMID:25770416

  11. 4-Hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives as HDAC6-specific inhibitors modulating microtubular structure and HSP90α chaperone activity against prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Carole; Schnekenburger, Michael; Mazumder, Aloran; Teiten, Marie-Hélène; Kirsch, Gilbert; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC)6 is a unique isoenzyme targeting specific substrates including α-tubulin and heat shock protein (HSP)90. HDAC6 is involved in protein trafficking and degradation, cell shape and migration. Deregulation of HDAC6 activity is associated with a variety of diseases including cancer leading to a growing interest for developing HDAC6 inhibitors. Here, we identified two new structurally related 4-hydroxybenzoic acids as selective HDAC6 inhibitors reducing proliferation, colony and spheroid formation as well as viability of prostate cancer cells. Both compounds strongly enhanced α-tubulin acetylation leading to remodeling of microtubular organization. Furthermore, 4-hydroxybenzoic acids decreased HSP90α regulation of the human androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells by increasing HSP90α acetylation levels. Collectively, our data support the potential of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives as HDAC6-specific inhibitors with anti-cancer properties. PMID:26549368

  12. Diltiazem, a L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, also acts as a pharmacological chaperone in Gaucher patient cells.

    PubMed

    Rigat, Brigitte; Mahuran, Don

    2009-04-01

    Recently, inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels, using either Diltiazem or Verapamil, has been reported to partially restore mutant glucocerebrosidase activity in cells from patients with Gaucher disease homozygous for the N370S or L444P alleles, as well as cells from patients with two other lysosomal storage diseases. It was hypothesized that these drugs act on the endoplasmic reticulum, increasing its folding efficiency, inhibited due to altered calcium homeostasis. Several other laboratories have reported that cells carrying either the N370S or the F213I alleles are amenable to enzyme enhancement therapy with pharmacological chaperones, whereas cells homozygous for L444P respond poorly. We found that Verapamil treatment does not enhance mutant enzyme activity in any of the cell lines tested, while Diltiazem moderately increases activity in normal cells, and in N370S/N370S and F213I/L444P, but not in L444P/L444P Gaucher cells, or in either of two adult Tay-Sachs disease cell lines. Since the mode of action of pharmacological chaperones and Diltiazem are believed to be different, we examined the possibility that they could act in concert. Diltiazem co-administered with known chaperones failed to increase enzyme activities above that reached by chaperone-treatment alone in any of the patient cell lines. Thus, we re-examined the possibility that Diltiazem acts as a pharmacological chaperone. We found that, at the acidic pH of lysosomes, Diltiazem was not an inhibitor, nor did its presence increase the heat stability of glucocerebrosidase. However, at neutral pH, found in the endoplasmic reticulum, Diltiazem exhibited both of these properties. Thus Diltiazem exhibits the biochemical characteristics of a glucocerebrosidase pharmacological chaperone. PMID:19167257

  13. Ion exchange properties of humus acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoba, V. N.; Chudnenko, K. V.

    2014-08-01

    Ion exchange equilibriums in a complex of brown humic acids (HAs) and related fulvic acids (FAs) with cations (H+, K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Cu2+, Fe3+, and Al3+) have been studied, and the activity coefficients of the acid monoionic forms have been determined. The composition of the stoichiometric cell in the system of black and brown HAs and related FAs in a leached chernozem of the Ob' region has been calculated with consideration for the earlier studies of the ion exchange properties of black HAs and related FAs. It has been shown that hydrogen, calcium, magnesium, aluminum, and iron are the major components in the exchange complex of humus acids in the leached chernozem with the other cations being of subordinate importance. In spite of some differences between the analytical and calculated compositions of the humus acids, the results of the calculations can be considered satisfactory. They indicate that calculations are feasible for such complex objects as soils, and their accuracy will improve with the expansion of the experimental studies. The physicochemical simulation of the transformation of the humus acid composition under different acid-base conditions shows that the contents of most cations decrease under alkalization, and hydroxides or carbonates become the most stable forms of these cations. Under the acidification of solutions, the binding of alkaline and alkaline-earth elements by humus acids decreases and the adsorption of iron and aluminum by humus acids increases.

  14. Efficient Production of Active Polyhydroxyalkanoate Synthase in Escherichia coli by Coexpression of Molecular Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Nicholas M.; Saika, Azusa; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Sangiambut, Smith; Tsuge, Takeharu; Summers, David K.

    2013-01-01

    The type I polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase from Cupriavidus necator was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli with simultaneous overexpression of chaperone proteins. Compared to expression of synthase alone (14.55 mg liter−1), coexpression with chaperones resulted in the production of larger total quantities of enzyme, including a larger proportion in the soluble fraction. The largest increase was seen when the GroEL/GroES system was coexpressed, resulting in approximately 6-fold-greater enzyme yields (82.37 mg liter−1) than in the absence of coexpressed chaperones. The specific activity of the purified enzyme was unaffected by coexpression with chaperones. Therefore, the increase in yield was attributed to an enhanced soluble fraction of synthase. Chaperones were also coexpressed with a polyhydroxyalkanoate production operon, resulting in the production of polymers with generally reduced molecular weights. This suggests a potential use for chaperones to control the physical properties of the polymer. PMID:23335776

  15. Polyphosphate is a primordial chaperone.

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael J; Wholey, Wei-Yun; Wagner, Nico O; Cremers, Claudia M; Mueller-Schickert, Antje; Hock, Nathaniel T; Krieger, Adam G; Smith, Erica M; Bender, Robert A; Bardwell, James C A; Jakob, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Composed of up to 1,000 phospho-anhydride bond-linked phosphate monomers, inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is one of the most ancient, conserved, and enigmatic molecules in biology. Here we demonstrate that polyP functions as a hitherto unrecognized chaperone. We show that polyP stabilizes proteins in vivo, diminishes the need for other chaperone systems to survive proteotoxic stress conditions, and protects a wide variety of proteins against stress-induced unfolding and aggregation. In vitro studies reveal that polyP has protein-like chaperone qualities, binds to unfolding proteins with high affinity in an ATP-independent manner, and supports their productive refolding once nonstress conditions are restored. Our results uncover a universally important function for polyP and suggest that these long chains of inorganic phosphate may have served as one of nature's first chaperones, a role that continues to the present day. PMID:24560923

  16. Superprotonic solid acids: Structure, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boysen, Dane Andrew

    In this work, the structure and properties of superprotonic MH nXO4-type solid acids (where M = monovalent cation, X = S, Se, P, As, and n = 1, 2) have been investigated and, for the first time, applied in fuel cell devices. Several MH nXO4-type solid acids are known to undergo a "superprotonic" solid-state phase transition upon heating, in which the proton conductivity increases by several orders of magnitude and takes on values of ˜10 -2O-1cm-1. The presence of superprotonic conductivity in fully hydrogen bonded solid acids, such as CsH2PO4, has long been disputed. In these investigations, through the use of pressure, the unequivocal identification of superprotonic behavior in both RbH2PO4 and CsH2PO 4 has been demonstrated, whereas for chemically analogous compounds with smaller cations, such as KH2PO4 and NaH2PO 4, superprotonic conductivity was notably absent. Such observations have led to the adoption of radius ratio rules, in an attempt to identify a critical ion size effect on the presence of superprotonic conductivity in solid acids. It has been found that, while ionic size does play a prominent role in the presence of superprotonic behavior in solid acids, equally important are the effects of ionic and hydrogen bonding. Next, the properties of superprotonic phase transition have been investigated from a thermodynamic standpoint. With contributions from this work, a formulation has been developed that accounts for the entropy resulting from both the disordering of both hydrogen bonds and oxy-anion librations in the superprotonic phase of solid acids. This formulation, fundamentally derived from Linus Pauling's entropy rules for ice, accurately accounts for the change in entropy through a superprotonic phase transition. Lastly, the first proof-of-priniciple fuel cells based upon solid acid electrolytes have been demonstrated. Initial results based upon a sulfate electrolyte, CsHSO4, demonstrated the viability of solid acids, but poor chemical stability

  17. Restoring assembly and activity of cystathionine β-synthase mutants by ligands and chemical chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Kopecká, Jana; Krijt, Jakub; Raková, Kateřina

    2010-01-01

    Misfolding and aggregation of mutant enzymes have been proposed to play role in the pathogenesis of homocystinuria due to cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. Chemical chaperones have been recently shown to facilitate proper assembly of several CBS mutants. To asses the number of patients that may respond to chaperone therapy, we examined the effect of selected CBS ligands and osmolytes on assembly and activity of 27 CBS mutants that represent 70% of known CBS alleles. The mutant enzymes were expressed in a bacterial system, and their properties were assessed by native Western blotting and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay, respectively. We studied the chaperoning activity of δ-aminolevulinic acid (δ-ALA)—a heme precursor—and of three osmolytes betaine, 2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (taurine), and glycerol. Fourteen mutants responded by at least 30% increase in the amount of correctly assembled tetramers and enzymatic activity to the coexpressional presence of either 0.5 mM δ-ALA, 100 mM betaine, and/or 750 mM glycerol. Eight of these mutants (p.R266K, p.P49L, p.R125Q, p.K102N, p.R369C, p.V180A, p.P78R, p.S466L) were rescuable by all of these three substances. Four mutants showed increased formation of tetramers that was not accompanied by changes in activity. Topology of mutations appeared to determine the chaperone responsiveness, as 11 of 14 solvent-exposed mutations were substantially more responsive than three of 13 buried mutations. This study identified chaperone-responsive mutants that represent 56 of 713 known patient-derived CBS alleles and may serve as a basis for exploring pharmacological approaches aimed at correcting misfolding in homocystinuria. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10545-010-9087-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20490928

  18. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II is promoted in vitro by cationic chaperones, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Fry, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron cross-links contributes to the assembly and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Pure RG-II is efficiently dimerized by boric acid (B(OH)3 ) in vitro only if nonbiological agents for example Pb(2+) are added. By contrast, newly synthesized RG-II domains dimerize very rapidly in vivo. We investigated biological agents that might enable this. We tested for three such agents: novel enzymes, borate-transferring ligands and cationic 'chaperones' that facilitate the close approach of two polyanionic RG-II molecules. Dimerization was monitored electrophoretically. Parsley shoot cell-wall enzymes did not affect RG-II dimerization in vitro. Borate-binding ligands (apiose, dehydroascorbic acid, alditols) and small organic cations (including polyamines) also lacked consistent effects. Polylysine bound permanently to RG-II, precluding electrophoretic analysis. However, another polycation, polyhistidine, strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 without irreversible polyhistidine-RG-II complexation. Likewise, partially purified spinach extensins (histidine/lysine-rich cationic glycoproteins), strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 in vitro. Thus certain polycations, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins, can chaperone RG-II, manoeuvring this polyanionic polysaccharide domain such that boron-bridging is favoured. These chaperones dissociate from RG-II after facilitating its dimerization, indicating that they act catalytically rather than stoichiometrically. We propose a natural role for extensin-RG-II interaction in steering cell-wall assembly. PMID:26301520

  19. Hyaluronic acid lipoate: synthesis and physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Picotti, Fabrizio; Fabbian, Matteo; Gianni, Rita; Sechi, Alessandra; Stucchi, Luca; Bosco, Marco

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis and physicochemical characterisation of mixed lipoic and formic esters of hyaluronan (Lipohyal) are presented in this paper. The synthesis was conducted by activating lipoic acid with 1,1'-carbonyldiimidazole to obtain lipoyl imidazolide, which reacted with hyaluronan (HA) in formamide under basic conditions. This procedure allows researchers to modulate easily the degree of substitution over a range of 0.05-1.8. Radical scavenger properties were analysed by UV-vis spectroscopy, where improved performance was demonstrated for Lipohyal with respect to the HA row material and lipoic acid. The chemical modification also causes HA to show an improved resistance to hyaluronidase digestion. These findings show that Lipohyal is a highly interesting derivative for applications in the tricological and dermo-cosmetic field and as an anti-aging ingredient. Moreover, Lipohyal can be easily crosslinked by UV irradiation, resulting in an innovative hydrogel with distinctive viscoelastic properties that is suitable as both a dermal-filler and as an intra-articular medical device. PMID:23465930

  20. Photobiological properties of 3-psoralenacetic acids.

    PubMed

    Dalla Via, Lisa; Marzaro, Giovanni; Mazzoli, Alessandra; Chilin, Adriana; Miolo, Giorgia

    2015-11-01

    Some 4,8-dimethyl-3-psoralenacetic acids were synthesized and studied. All the designed psoralenacetic acids bear alkyl or cycloalkyl substituents at the furan ring. These psoralenacetic acids were shown to be a novel class of psoralen derivatives characterized by an interesting photobiological profile. The carboxylic group at the 3 position, useful to confer hydrophilic properties, appears to be detrimental to the classical intercalation into DNA, likely because of repulsive interactions with the negative surface of the macromolecule. Nevertheless, the new derivatives possess a notable photoantiproliferative activity, due to a peculiar mechanism of action consisting of a decarboxylation step before exerting their photobiological activity. The most active compound 2 is able to induce a noteworthy photocytotoxic effect, with GI50 values being submicromolar on human tumor cell lines and no effect in the dark. The involvement of DNA photoaddition after UVA light-mediated decarboxylation and ROS formation is responsible for its biological activity, as demonstrated comparing the activity profile of the decarboxylated analogue. However, other biological targets seem to be involved in the photooxidative damage, such as proteins. Compound 2 could thus be considered as a prodrug, inactive without UVA light but activated upon specific irradiation, thus preventing unselective side effects and opening new perspectives on agents useful in photochemotherapy. PMID:26415515

  1. RUBISCO ACTIVASE --- RUBISCO'S CATALYTIC CHAPERONE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current status of research on the structure, regulation, mechanism and importance of Rubisco activase is reviewed. The activase is now recognized to be a member of the AAA+ family, whose members participate in macromolecular complexes that perform diverse chaperone-line functions. The conversed ...

  2. Study of receptor-chaperone interactions using the optical technique of spectroscopic ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Tsargorodskaya, Anna; Mustafa, Mohd K; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Lacey, Joanne; Smith, David P; Abell, Benjamin M; Nabok, Alexei

    2011-07-20

    This work describes a detailed quantitative interaction study between the novel plastidial chaperone receptor OEP61 and isoforms of the chaperone types Hsp70 and Hsp90 using the optical method of total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE). The receptor OEP61 was electrostatically immobilized on a gold surface via an intermediate layer of polycations. The TIRE measurements allowed the evaluation of thickness changes in the adsorbed molecular layers as a result of chaperone binding to receptor proteins. Hsp70 chaperone isoforms but not Hsp90 were shown to be capable of binding OEP61. Dynamic TIRE measurements were carried out to evaluate the affinity constants of the above reactions and resulted in clear discrimination between specific and nonspecific binding of chaperones as well as differences in binding properties between the highly similar Hsp70 isoforms. PMID:21767504

  3. Signal peptide protection by specific chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Genest, Olivier; Seduk, Farida; Ilbert, Marianne; Mejean, Vincent; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal . E-mail: iobbi@ibsm.cnrs-mrs.fr

    2006-01-20

    TorD is the private chaperone of TorA, a periplasmic respiratory molybdoenzyme of Escherichia coli. In this study, it is demonstrated that TorD is required to maintain the integrity of the twin-arginine signal sequence of the cytoplasmic TorA precursors. In the absence of TorD, 35 out of the 39 amino acid residues of the signal peptide were lost and the proteolysis of the N-terminal extremity of TorA precursors was not prevented by the molybdenum cofactor insertion. We thus propose that one of the main roles of TorD is to protect the TorA signal peptide to allow translocation of the enzyme by the TAT system.

  4. Pharmacological Targeting of the Hsp70 Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Patury, Srikanth; Miyata, Yoshinari; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    The molecular chaperone, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), acts at multiple steps in a protein’s life cycle, including during the processes of folding, trafficking, remodeling and degradation. To accomplish these various tasks, the activity of Hsp70 is shaped by a host of co-chaperones, which bind to the core chaperone and influence its functions. Genetic studies have strongly linked Hsp70 and its co-chaperones to numerous diseases, including cancer, neurodegeneration and microbial pathogenesis, yet the potential of this chaperone as a therapeutic target remains largely underexplored. Here, we review the current state of Hsp70 as a drug target, with a special emphasis on the important challenges and opportunities imposed by its co-chaperones, protein-protein interactions and allostery. PMID:19860737

  5. Acid-base properties of titanium-antimony oxides catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zenkovets, G.A.; Paukshtis, E.A.; Tarasova, D.V.; Yurchenko, E.N.

    1982-06-01

    The acid-base properties of titanium-antimony oxide catalysts were studied by the methods of back titration and ir spectroscopy. The interrelationship between the acid-base and catalytic properties in the oxidative ammonolysis of propylene was discussed. 3 figures, 1 table.

  6. Evolution of the Chaperone/Usher Assembly Pathway: Fimbrial Classification Goes Greek†

    PubMed Central

    Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Many Proteobacteria use the chaperone/usher pathway to assemble proteinaceous filaments on the bacterial surface. These filaments can curl into fimbrial or nonfimbrial surface structures (e.g., a capsule or spore coat). This article reviews the phylogeny of operons belonging to the chaperone/usher assembly class to explore the utility of establishing a scheme for subdividing them into clades of phylogenetically related gene clusters. Based on usher amino acid sequence comparisons, our analysis shows that the chaperone/usher assembly class is subdivided into six major phylogenetic clades, which we have termed α-, β-, γ-, κ-, π-, and σ-fimbriae. Members of each clade share related operon structures and encode fimbrial subunits with similar protein domains. The proposed classification system offers a simple and convenient method for assigning newly discovered chaperone/usher systems to one of the six major phylogenetic groups. PMID:18063717

  7. The histone chaperones Vps75 and Nap1 form ring-like, tetrameric structures in solution

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Andrew; Hammond, Colin M.; Stirling, Andrew; Ward, Richard; Shang, Weifeng; El-Mkami, Hassane; Robinson, David A.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Norman, David G.; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2014-01-01

    NAP-1 fold histone chaperones play an important role in escorting histones to and from sites of nucleosome assembly and disassembly. The two NAP-1 fold histone chaperones in budding yeast, Vps75 and Nap1, have previously been crystalized in a characteristic homodimeric conformation. In this study, a combination of small angle X-ray scattering, multi angle light scattering and pulsed electron–electron double resonance approaches were used to show that both Vps75 and Nap1 adopt ring-shaped tetrameric conformations in solution. This suggests that the formation of homotetramers is a common feature of NAP-1 fold histone chaperones. The tetramerisation of NAP-1 fold histone chaperones may act to shield acidic surfaces in the absence of histone cargo thus providing a ‘self-chaperoning’ type mechanism. PMID:24688059

  8. The Pharmacological Chaperone AT2220 Increases the Specific Activity and Lysosomal Delivery of Mutant Acid Alpha-Glucosidase, and Promotes Glycogen Reduction in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Yi; Soska, Rebecca; Feng, Jessie; Dhulipala, Rohini; Frascella, Michelle; Garcia, Anadina; Pellegrino, Lee J.; Xu, Su; Brignol, Nastry; Toth, Matthew J.; Do, Hung V.; Lockhart, David J.; Wustman, Brandon A.; Valenzano, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Pompe disease is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder that results from a deficiency in acid α-glucosidase (GAA) activity due to mutations in the GAA gene. Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of lysosomal glycogen primarily in heart and skeletal muscles, which leads to progressive muscle weakness. We have shown previously that the small molecule pharmacological chaperone AT2220 (1-deoxynojirimycin hydrochloride, duvoglustat hydrochloride) binds and stabilizes wild-type as well as multiple mutant forms of GAA, and can lead to higher cellular levels of GAA. In this study, we examined the effect of AT2220 on mutant GAA, in vitro and in vivo, with a primary focus on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-retained P545L mutant form of human GAA (P545L GAA). AT2220 increased the specific activity of P545L GAA toward both natural (glycogen) and artificial substrates in vitro. Incubation with AT2220 also increased the ER export, lysosomal delivery, proteolytic processing, and stability of P545L GAA. In a new transgenic mouse model of Pompe disease that expresses human P545L on a Gaa knockout background (Tg/KO) and is characterized by reduced GAA activity and elevated glycogen levels in disease-relevant tissues, daily oral administration of AT2220 for 4 weeks resulted in significant and dose-dependent increases in mature lysosomal GAA isoforms and GAA activity in heart and skeletal muscles. Importantly, oral administration of AT2220 also resulted in significant glycogen reduction in disease-relevant tissues. Compared to daily administration, less-frequent AT2220 administration, including repeated cycles of 4 or 5 days with AT2220 followed by 3 or 2 days without drug, respectively, resulted in even greater glycogen reductions. Collectively, these data indicate that AT2220 increases the specific activity, trafficking, and lysosomal stability of P545L GAA, leads to increased levels of mature GAA in lysosomes, and promotes glycogen reduction in situ. As such, AT2220 may

  9. Revisiting the Interaction between the Chaperone Skp and Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Burmann, Björn M.; Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Callon, Morgane; Bond, Peter J.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane comprises two main classes of components, lipids and membrane proteins. These nonsoluble compounds are conveyed across the aqueous periplasm along specific molecular transport routes: the lipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is shuttled by the Lpt system, whereas outer membrane proteins (Omps) are transported by chaperones, including the periplasmic Skp. In this study, we revisit the specificity of the chaperone-lipid interaction of Skp and LPS. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy measurements indicate that LPS interacts with Skp nonspecifically, accompanied by destabilization of the Skp trimer and similar to denaturation by the nonnatural detergent lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO). Bioinformatic analysis of amino acid conservation, structural analysis of LPS-binding proteins, and MD simulations further confirm the absence of a specific LPS binding site on Skp, making a biological relevance of the interaction unlikely. Instead, our analysis reveals a highly conserved salt-bridge network, which likely has a role for Skp function. PMID:25809264

  10. Visualizing chaperone-assisted protein folding.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Scott; Salmon, Loïc; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S; Martin, Raoul; Quan, Shu; Afonine, Pavel V; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Lili; Xu, Qingping; Trievel, Raymond C; Brooks, Charles L; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-07-01

    Challenges in determining the structures of heterogeneous and dynamic protein complexes have greatly hampered past efforts to obtain a mechanistic understanding of many important biological processes. One such process is chaperone-assisted protein folding. Obtaining structural ensembles of chaperone-substrate complexes would ultimately reveal how chaperones help proteins fold into their native state. To address this problem, we devised a new structural biology approach based on X-ray crystallography, termed residual electron and anomalous density (READ). READ enabled us to visualize even sparsely populated conformations of the substrate protein immunity protein 7 (Im7) in complex with the Escherichia coli chaperone Spy, and to capture a series of snapshots depicting the various folding states of Im7 bound to Spy. The ensemble shows that Spy-associated Im7 samples conformations ranging from unfolded to partially folded to native-like states and reveals how a substrate can explore its folding landscape while being bound to a chaperone. PMID:27239796

  11. Nutritional properties of trans fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Sambaiah, K; Lokesh, B R

    1999-08-01

    The role of trans fatty acids (TFA) present in partially hydrogenated fats widely consumed in food and their link with coronary heart disease has been examined in this review. Most of the studies carried out have been on the effects of TFA on blood-lipid profile. The perceived effects of TFA intake depend on the fat or oil with which they are compared and appears to be in between that of dietary saturated fats and monounsaturated fatty acids. When compared to saturated fat, TFA intake shows lower levels of total and LDL-cholesterol in blood. But when both TFA and saturated fatty acids are compared with cis fatty acids or native unhydrogenated oil, increase in total and LDL-cholesterol are noted. The effects of TFA on HDL-cholesterol and Lp(a) are not clearly established. The undesirable effects of TFA can be overcome by inclusion of essential fatty acids at a minimum of 2 energy per cent level in the diet. The link between trans fatty acid intake and coronary heart disease (CHD) are not unequivocally established. PMID:10650721

  12. The chaperone like function of the nonhistone protein HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Osmanov, Taner; Ugrinova, Iva; Pasheva, Evdokia

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► The HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of nucleosome particles. ► The target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA not the histone octamer. ► The acetylation of HMGB1 decreases the stimulating effect of the protein. -- Abstract: Almost all essential nuclear processes as replication, repair, transcription and recombination require the chromatin template to be correctly unwound and than repackaged. The major strategy that the cell uses to overcome the nucleosome barrier is the proper removal of the histone octamer and subsequent deposition onto DNA. Important factors in this multi step phenomenon are the histone chaperones that can assemble nucleosome arrays in vitro in the absence of ATP. The nonhistone protein HMGB1 is a good candidate for a chaperone as its molecule consists of two DNA binding motives, Box’s A and B, and a long nonstructured C tail highly negatively charged. HMGB1 protein is known as a nuclear “architectural” factor for its property to bind preferentially to distorted DNA structures and was reported to kink the double helix. Our experiments show that in the classical stepwise dialysis method for nucleosome assembly the addition of HMGB1 protein stimulates more than two times the formation of middle-positioned nucleosomes. The stimulation effect persists in dialysis free experiment when the reconstitution is possible only in the presence of a chaperone. The addition of HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of a nucleosome in a dose dependant manner. Our results show that the target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA fragment not the histone octamer. One possible explanation for the stimulating effect of HMGB1 is the “architectural” property of the protein to associate with the middle of the DNA fragment and to kink it. The acquired V shaped DNA structure is probably conformationals more favorable to wrap around the prefolded histone octamer. We tested also the role of the post

  13. Thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Amelkovich, Yu A.; Melnikova, T. V.

    2015-04-01

    The thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid fine powder at different percentage were studied. Epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, boric acid as flame-retardant filler, hexamethylenediamine as a curing agent. The prepared samples and starting materials were examined using methods of thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. It was found that the incorporation of boric acid fine powder enhances the thermal stability of epoxy composites.

  14. Clay Minerals as Solid Acids and Their Catalytic Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helsen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses catalytic properties of clays, attributed to acidity of the clay surface. The formation of carbonium ions on montmorillonite is used as a demonstration of the presence of surface acidity, the enhanced dissociation of water molecules when polarized by cations, and the way the surface can interact with organic substances. (Author/JN)

  15. Localization of the chaperone binding site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, D.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The hypothesis derived from models of the multi-oligomeric chaperone complex suggests that partially denatured proteins bind in a central cavity in the aggregate. To test this hypothesis, the molecular chaperone, alpha crystallin, was bound to partially denatured forms of gamma crystallin, and the binding site was visualized by immunogold localization. In an alternative approach, gold particles were directly complexed with gamma crystallin, followed by binding to the alpha crystallin aggregate. In both cases, binding was localized to the central region of the aggregate, confirming for the first time that partially denatured proteins do indeed bind to a central region of the molecular chaperone aggregate.

  16. Threonine 22 phosphorylation attenuates Hsp90 interaction with co-chaperones and affects its chaperone activity

    PubMed Central

    Mollapour, Mehdi; Tsutsumi, Shinji; Truman, Andrew W.; Xu, Wanping; Vaughan, Cara K.; Beebe, Kristin; Konstantinova, Anna; Vourganti, Srinivas; Panaretou, Barry; Piper, Peter W.; Trepel, Jane B.; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Pearl, Laurence H.; Neckers, Len

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone whose activity is regulated not only by co-chaperones but also by distinct post-translational modifications. We report here that casein kinase 2 phosphorylates a conserved threonine residue (T22) in α-helix 1 of the yeast Hsp90 N-domain both in vitro and in vivo. This α-helix participates in a hydrophobic interaction with the catalytic loop in Hsp90's middle domain, helping to stabilize the chaperone's ATPase competent state. Phospho-mimetic mutation of this residue alters Hsp90 ATPase activity and chaperone function, and impacts interaction with the co-chaperones Aha1 and Cdc37. Over-expression of Aha1 stimulates the ATPase activity, restores co-chaperone interactions, and compensates for the functional defects of these Hsp90 mutants. PMID:21419342

  17. Capturing a Dynamic Chaperone-Substrate Interaction Using NMR-Informed Molecular Modeling.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Loïc; Ahlstrom, Logan S; Horowitz, Scott; Dickson, Alex; Brooks, Charles L; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-08-10

    Chaperones maintain a healthy proteome by preventing aggregation and by aiding in protein folding. Precisely how chaperones influence the conformational properties of their substrates, however, remains unclear. To achieve a detailed description of dynamic chaperone-substrate interactions, we fused site-specific NMR information with coarse-grained simulations. Our model system is the binding and folding of a chaperone substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), with the chaperone Spy. We first used an automated procedure in which NMR chemical shifts inform the construction of system-specific force fields that describe each partner individually. The models of the two binding partners are then combined to perform simulations on the chaperone-substrate complex. The binding simulations show excellent agreement with experimental data from multiple biophysical measurements. Upon binding, Im7 interacts with a mixture of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues on Spy's surface, causing conformational exchange within Im7 to slow down as Im7 folds. Meanwhile, the motion of Spy's flexible loop region increases, allowing for better interaction with different substrate conformations, and helping offset losses in Im7 conformational dynamics that occur upon binding and folding. Spy then preferentially releases Im7 into a well-folded state. Our strategy has enabled a residue-level description of a dynamic chaperone-substrate interaction, improving our understanding of how chaperones facilitate substrate folding. More broadly, we validate our approach using two other binding partners, showing that this approach provides a general platform from which to investigate other flexible biomolecular complexes through the integration of NMR data with efficient computational models. PMID:27415450

  18. Sources and Bioactive Properties of Conjugated Dietary Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Alan A; Ross, Paul R; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Stanton, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    The group of conjugated fatty acids known as conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers have been extensively studied with regard to their bioactive potential in treating some of the most prominent human health malignancies. However, CLA isomers are not the only group of potentially bioactive conjugated fatty acids currently undergoing study. In this regard, isomers of conjugated α-linolenic acid, conjugated nonadecadienoic acid and conjugated eicosapentaenoic acid, to name but a few, have undergone experimental assessment. These studies have indicated many of these conjugated fatty acid isomers commonly possess anti-carcinogenic, anti-adipogenic, anti-inflammatory and immune modulating properties, a number of which will be discussed in this review. The mechanisms through which these bioactivities are mediated have not yet been fully elucidated. However, existing evidence indicates that these fatty acids may play a role in modulating the expression of several oncogenes, cell cycle regulators, and genes associated with energy metabolism. Despite such bioactive potential, interest in these conjugated fatty acids has remained low relative to the CLA isomers. This may be partly attributed to the relatively recent emergence of these fatty acids as bioactives, but also due to a lack of awareness regarding sources from which they can be produced. In this review, we will also highlight the common sources of these conjugated fatty acids, including plants, algae, microbes and chemosynthesis. PMID:26968402

  19. Using pharmacological chaperones to restore proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Juan; Di, Xiao-Jing; Mu, Ting-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Normal organismal physiology depends on the maintenance of proteostasis in each cellular compartment to achieve a delicate balance between protein synthesis, folding, trafficking, and degradation while minimizing misfolding and aggregation. Defective proteostasis leads to numerous protein misfolding diseases. Pharmacological chaperones are cell-permeant small molecules that promote the proper folding and trafficking of a protein via direct binding to that protein. They stabilize their target protein in a protein-pharmacological chaperone state, increasing the natively-folded protein population that can effectively engage trafficking machinery for transport to the final destination for function. Here, as regards the application of pharmacological chaperones, we focus on their capability to promote the folding and trafficking of lysosomal enzymes, G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and ion channels, each of which is presently an important drug target. Pharmacological chaperones hold great promise as potential therapeutics to ameliorate a variety of protein misfolding diseases. PMID:24747662

  20. Conformational properties of oxazoline-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staś, Monika; Broda, Małgorzata A.; Siodłak, Dawid

    2016-04-01

    Oxazoline-amino acids (Xaa-Ozn) occur in natural peptides of potentially important bioactivity. The conformations of the model compounds: Ac-(S)-Ala-Ozn(4R-Me), Ac-(S)-Ala-Ozn(4S-Me), and (gauche+, gauche-, anti) Ac-(S)-Val-Ozn(4R-Me) were studied at meta-hybrid M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) method including solvent effect. Boc-L-Ala-L-Ozn-4-COOMe and Boc-L-Val-L-Ozn-4-COOMe were synthesized and studied by FT-IR and NMR-NOE methods. The conformations in crystal state were gathered from the Cambridge Structural Data Base. The main conformational feature of the oxazoline amino acids is the conformation β2 (ϕ,ψ ∼ -161°, -6°), which predominates in weakly polar environment and still is accessible in polar surrounding. The changes of the conformational preferences towards the conformations αR (ϕ,ψ ∼ -70°, -15°) and then β (ϕ,ψ ∼ -57°, -155°) are observed with increase of the environment polarity.

  1. Structural mechanisms of chaperone mediated protein disaggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The ClpB/Hsp104 and Hsp70 classes of molecular chaperones use ATP hydrolysis to dissociate protein aggregates and complexes, and to move proteins through membranes. ClpB/Hsp104 are members of the AAA+ family of proteins which form ring-shaped hexamers. Loops lining the pore in the ring engage substrate proteins as extended polypeptides. Interdomain rotations and conformational changes in these loops coupled to ATP hydrolysis unfold and pull proteins through the pore. This provides a mechanism that progressively disrupts local secondary and tertiary structure in substrates, allowing these chaperones to dissociate stable aggregates such as β-sheet rich prions or coiled coil SNARE complexes. While the ClpB/Hsp104 mechanism appears to embody a true power-stroke in which an ATP powered conformational change in one protein is directly coupled to movement or structural change in another, the mechanism of force generation by Hsp70s is distinct and less well understood. Both active power-stroke and purely passive mechanisms in which Hsp70 captures spontaneous fluctuations in a substrate have been proposed, while a third proposed mechanism—entropic pulling—may be able to generate forces larger than seen in ATP-driven molecular motors without the conformational coupling required for a power-stroke. The disaggregase activity of these chaperones is required for thermotolerance, but unrestrained protein complex/aggregate dissociation is potentially detrimental. Disaggregating chaperones are strongly auto-repressed, and are regulated by co-chaperones which recruit them to protein substrates and activate the disaggregases via mechanisms involving either sequential transfer of substrate from one chaperone to another and/or simultaneous interaction of substrate with multiple chaperones. By effectively subjecting substrates to multiple levels of selection by multiple chaperones, this may insure that these potent disaggregases are only activated in the appropriate context. PMID

  2. Acid-base properties of 2-phenethyldithiocarbamoylacetic acid, an antitumor agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novozhilova, N. E.; Kutina, N. N.; Petukhova, O. A.; Kharitonov, Yu. Ya.

    2013-07-01

    The acid-base properties of the 2-phenethyldithiocarbamoylacetic acid (PET) substance belonging to the class of isothiocyanates and capable of inhibiting the development of tumors on many experimental models were studied. The acidity and hydrolysis constants of the PET substance in ethanol, acetone, aqueous ethanol, and aqueous acetone solutions were determined from the data of potentiometric (pH-metric) titration of ethanol and acetone solutions of PET with aqueous solidum hydroxide at room temperature.

  3. Multitasking SecB chaperones in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Ambre; Bordes, Patricia; Genevaux, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Protein export in bacteria is facilitated by the canonical SecB chaperone, which binds to unfolded precursor proteins, maintains them in a translocation competent state and specifically cooperates with the translocase motor SecA to ensure their proper targeting to the Sec translocon at the cytoplasmic membrane. Besides its key contribution to the Sec pathway, SecB chaperone tasking is critical for the secretion of the Sec-independent heme-binding protein HasA and actively contributes to the cellular network of chaperones that control general proteostasis in Escherichia coli, as judged by the significant interplay found between SecB and the trigger factor, DnaK and GroEL chaperones. Although SecB is mainly a proteobacterial chaperone associated with the presence of an outer membrane and outer membrane proteins, secB-like genes are also found in Gram-positive bacteria as well as in certain phages and plasmids, thus suggesting alternative functions. In addition, a SecB-like protein is also present in the major human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis where it specifically controls a stress-responsive toxin–antitoxin system. This review focuses on such very diverse chaperone functions of SecB, both in E. coli and in other unrelated bacteria. PMID:25538690

  4. Molecular chaperones: multiple functions, pathologies, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Macario, Alberto J L; Conway de Macario, Everly

    2007-01-01

    Cell stressors are ubiquitous and frequent, challenging cells often, which leads to the stress response with activation of anti-stress mechanisms. These mechanisms involve a variety of molecules, including molecular chaperones also known as heat-shock proteins (Hsp). The chaperones treated in this article are proteins that assist other proteins to fold, refold, travel to their place of residence (cytosol, organelle, membrane, extracellular space), and translocate across membranes. Molecular chaperones participate in a variety of physiological processes and are widespread in organisms, tissues, and cells. It follows that chaperone failure will have an impact, possibly serious, on one or more cellular function, which may lead to disease. Chaperones must recognize and interact with proteins in need of assistance or client polypeptides (e.g., nascent at the ribosome, or partially denatured by stressors), and have to interact with other chaperones because the chaperoning mechanism involves teams of chaperone molecules, i.e., multimolecular assemblies or chaperone machines. Consequently, chaperone molecules have structural domains with distinctive functions: bind the client polypeptide, interact with other chaperone molecules to build a machine, and interact with other complexes that integrate the chaperoning network. Also, various chaperones have ATP-binding and ATPase sites because the chaperoning process requires as, a rule, energy from ATP hydrolysis. Alterations in any one of these domains due to a mutation or an aberrant post-translational modification can disrupt the chaperoning process and cause diseases termed chaperonopathies. This article presents the pathologic concept of chaperonopathy with examples, and discusses the potential of using chaperones (genes or proteins) in treatment (chaperonotherapy). In addition, emerging topics within the field of study of chaperones (chaperonology) are highlighted, e.g., genomics (chaperonomics), systems biology

  5. GLYCOLIC ACID PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, IMPURITIES, AND RADIATION EFFECTS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Pickenheim, B.; Bibler, N.

    2010-06-08

    The DWPF is pursuing alternative reductants/flowsheets to increase attainment to meet closure commitment dates. In fiscal year 2009, SRNL evaluated several options and recommended the further assessment of the nitric/formic/glycolic acid flowsheet. SRNL is currently performing testing with this flowsheet to support the DWPF down-select of alternate reductants. As part of the evaluation, SRNL was requested to determine the physical properties of formic and glycolic acid blends. Blends of formic acid in glycolic acid were prepared and their physical properties tested. Increasing amounts of glycolic acid led to increases in blend density, viscosity and surface tension as compared to the 90 wt% formic acid that is currently used at DWPF. These increases are small, however, and are not expected to present any difficulties in terms of processing. The effect of sulfur impurities in technical grade glycolic acid was studied for its impact on DWPF glass quality. While the glycolic acid specification allows for more sulfate than the current formic acid specification, the ultimate impact is expected to be on the order of 0.03 wt% sulfur in glass. Note that lower sulfur content glycolic acid could likely be procured at some increased cost if deemed necessary. A paper study on the effects of radiation on glycolic acid was performed. The analysis indicates that substitution of glycolic acid for formic acid would not increase the radiolytic production rate of H{sub 2} and cause an adverse effect in the SRAT or SME process. It has been cited that glycolic acid solutions that are depleted of O{sub 2} when subjected to large radiation doses produced considerable quantities of a non-diffusive polymeric material. Considering a constant air purge is maintained in the SRAT and the solution is continuously mixed, oxygen depletion seems unlikely, however, if this polymer is formed in the SRAT solution, the rheology of the solution may be affected and pumping of the solution may be

  6. Supercharging Chaperones: A Meeting Toolkit for Maximizing Learning for Youth and Chaperones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Trip and conference chaperones are a wonderful resource in youth development programs. These well-intended volunteers, many parents of youth participating in the event, want the best experience for the youth but are not necessarily trained in positive youth development. A consequence of this circumstance is that not all chaperones provide the best…

  7. The Hydrophobic Region of the DmsA Twin-Arginine Leader Peptide Determines Specificity with Chaperone DmsD

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The system specific chaperone DmsD plays a role in the maturation of the catalytic subunit of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, DmsA. Pre-DmsA contains a 45-amino acid twin-arginine leader peptide that is important for targeting and translocation of folded and cofactor-loaded DmsA by the twin-arginine translocase. DmsD has previously been shown to interact with the complete twin-arginine leader peptide of DmsA. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the thermodynamics of binding between synthetic peptides composed of different portions of the DmsA leader peptide and DmsD. Only those peptides that included the complete and contiguous hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader sequence were able to bind DmsD with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Each of the peptides that were able to bind DmsD also showed some α-helical structure as indicated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that DmsD gained very little thermal stability upon binding any of the DmsA leader peptides tested. Together, these results suggest that a portion of the hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader peptide determines the specificity of binding and may produce helical properties upon binding to DmsD. Overall, this study demonstrates that the recognition of the DmsA twin-arginine leader sequence by the DmsD chaperone shows unexpected rules and confirms further that the biochemistry of the interaction of the chaperone with their leaders demonstrates differences in their molecular interactions. PMID:24093457

  8. The Malarial Exported PFA0660w Is an Hsp40 Co-Chaperone of PfHsp70-x

    PubMed Central

    Daniyan, Michael O.; Boshoff, Aileen; Prinsloo, Earl; Pesce, Eva-Rachele; Blatch, Gregory L.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the human pathogen responsible for the most dangerous malaria infection, survives and develops in mature erythrocytes through the export of proteins needed for remodelling of the host cell. Molecular chaperones of the heat shock protein (Hsp) family are prominent members of the exportome, including a number of Hsp40s and a Hsp70. PFA0660w, a type II Hsp40, has been shown to be exported and possibly form a complex with PfHsp70-x in the infected erythrocyte cytosol. However, the chaperone properties of PFA0660w and its interaction with human and parasite Hsp70s are yet to be investigated. Recombinant PFA0660w was found to exist as a monomer in solution, and was able to significantly stimulate the ATPase activity of PfHsp70-x but not that of a second plasmodial Hsp70 (PfHsp70-1) or a human Hsp70 (HSPA1A), indicating a potential specific functional partnership with PfHsp70-x. Protein binding studies in the presence and absence of ATP suggested that the interaction of PFA0660w with PfHsp70-x most likely represented a co-chaperone/chaperone interaction. Also, PFA0660w alone produced a concentration-dependent suppression of rhodanese aggregation, demonstrating its chaperone properties. Overall, we have provided the first biochemical evidence for the possible role of PFA0660w as a chaperone and as co-chaperone of PfHsp70-x. We propose that these chaperones boost the chaperone power of the infected erythrocyte, enabling successful protein trafficking and folding, and thereby making a fundamental contribution to the pathology of malaria. PMID:26845441

  9. GLYCOLIC ACID PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, IMPURITIES, AND RADIATION EFFECTS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Hay, M.

    2011-06-20

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is pursuing alternative reductants/flowsheets to increase attainment to meet closure commitment dates. In fiscal year 2009, SRNL evaluated several options and recommended the further assessment of the nitric/formic/glycolic acid flowsheet. SRNL is currently performing testing with this flowsheet to support the DWPF down-select of alternate reductants. As part of the evaluation, SRNL was requested to determine the physical properties of formic and glycolic acid blends. Blends of formic acid in glycolic acid were prepared and their physical properties tested. Increasing amounts of glycolic acid led to increases in blend density, viscosity and surface tension as compared to the 90 wt% formic acid that is currently used at DWPF. These increases are small, however, and are not expected to present any difficulties in terms of processing. The effect of sulfur impurities in technical grade glycolic acid was studied for its impact on DWPF glass quality. While the glycolic acid specification allows for more sulfate than the current formic acid specification, the ultimate impact is expected to be on the order of 0.03 wt% sulfur in glass. Note that lower sulfur content glycolic acid could likely be procured at some increased cost if deemed necessary. A paper study on the effects of radiation on glycolic acid was performed. The analysis indicates that substitution of glycolic acid for formic acid would not increase the radiolytic production rate of H{sub 2} and cause an adverse effect in the SRAT or SME process. It has been cited that glycolic acid solutions that are depleted of O{sub 2} when subjected to large radiation doses produced considerable quantities of a non-diffusive polymeric material. Considering a constant air purge is maintained in the SRAT and the solution is continuously mixed, oxygen depletion seems unlikely, however, if this polymer is formed in the SRAT solution, the rheology of the solution may be affected and

  10. New concept in nutrition for the maintenance of the aging eye redox regulation and therapeutic treatment of cataract disease; synergism of natural antioxidant imidazole-containing amino acid-based compounds, chaperone, and glutathione boosting agents: a systemic perspective on aging and longevity emerged from studies in humans.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    Cataract, opacification of the lens, is one of the commonest causes of loss of useful vision during aging, with an estimated 16 million people world-wide affected. The role of nutritional supplementation in prevention of onset or progression of ocular disease is of interest to health care professionals and patients. The aging eye seems to be at considerable risk from oxidative stress. This review outlines the potential role of the new nutritional strategy on redox balance in age-related eye diseases and detail how the synergism and interaction of imidazole-containing amino acid-based compounds (nonhydrolized L-carnosine, histidine), chaperone agents (such as, L-carnosine, D-pantethine), glutathione-boosting agents (N-acetylcysteine, vitamin E, methionine), and N-acetylcarnosine eye drops plays key roles in the function and maintenance of the redox systems in the aging eye and in the treatment of human cataract disease. A novel patented oral health supplement is presented which enhances the anticataract activity of eye drops and activates functional visual acuity. The clinical data demonstrate the effectiveness and safety of a combined oral health care treatment with amino acids possessing chaperone-like activity with N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops. L-carnosine and N-acetylcarnosine protected the chaperone activity of alpha-crystallin and reduced the increased posttranslational modifications of lens proteins. Biological activities of the nonhydrolyzed carnosine in the oral formulation are based on its antioxidant and antiglycating (transglycating) action that, in addition to heavy metal chelation and pH-buffering ability, makes carnosine an essential factor for preventing sight-threatening eye disorders having oxidative stress in their pathogenesis, neurodegeneration, and accumulation of senile features. The findings suggest that synergism is required between carnosine or other imidazole-containing compounds and reduced glutathione in tissues and cells for

  11. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves II, H. James

    2015-01-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or “chemistry space.” Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set. PMID:25802223

  12. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves, H. James, II

    2015-03-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or ``chemistry space.'' Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set.

  13. Chaperones in hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Khachatoorian, Ronik; French, Samuel W

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects approximately 3% of the world population or more than 185 million people worldwide. Each year, an estimated 350000-500000 deaths occur worldwide due to HCV-associated diseases including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is the most common indication for liver transplantation in patients with cirrhosis worldwide. HCV is an enveloped RNA virus classified in the genus Hepacivirus in the Flaviviridae family. The HCV viral life cycle in a cell can be divided into six phases: (1) binding and internalization; (2) cytoplasmic release and uncoating; (3) viral polyprotein translation and processing; (4) RNA genome replication; (5) encapsidation (packaging) and assembly; and (6) virus morphogenesis (maturation) and secretion. Many host factors are involved in the HCV life cycle. Chaperones are an important group of host cytoprotective molecules that coordinate numerous cellular processes including protein folding, multimeric protein assembly, protein trafficking, and protein degradation. All phases of the viral life cycle require chaperone activity and the interaction of viral proteins with chaperones. This review will present our current knowledge and understanding of the role of chaperones in the HCV life cycle. Analysis of chaperones in HCV infection will provide further insights into viral/host interactions and potential therapeutic targets for both HCV and other viruses. PMID:26783419

  14. Synthesis and physical properties of isostearic acids and their esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saturated branched-chain fatty acids (sbc-FAs) are found as minor constituents in several natural fats and oils. Sbc-FAs are of interest since they have lower melting points than their linear counterparts and exhibit good oxidative stability; properties that make them ideally suited in a number of ...

  15. Synthesis and properties of coumaric acid derivative homo-polymers.

    PubMed

    Thi, Tran Hang; Matsusaki, Michiya; Shi, Dongjian; Kaneko, Tatsuo; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2008-01-01

    Poly(4-hydroxycinnamic acid) (P4HCA), poly(3-hydroxycinnamic acid) (P3HCA), poly(3-methoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) (PMHCA) and poly(3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) (PDHCA) were synthesized by the thermal poly-condensation of the corresponding monomers, which are lignin precursors, coumaric acid derivatives consisting of cinnamoyl groups and different position and number of OH groups. The solubility of the homo-polymers in organic solvents decreased in the order of P3HCA > PDHCA > P4HCA > PMHCA. The wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) results indicated that P4HCA or PMHCA with p-OH group had higher crystallinity, in contrast to P3HCA or PDHCA with m-OH group which had lower crystallinity. Crossed-polarizing microscopy suggested that P4HCA had the nematic liquid crystal properties at 220 degrees C and PDHCA showed birefringence properties at 200 degrees C. In cell-adhesion tests, PDHCA showed the highest cell adhesion (ca. 70%), whereas P3HCA, P4HCA and PMHCA had 50, 18 and 10% cell adhesion, respectively. The coumaric acid derivative homo-polymers can be useful as cell adhesion controllable thermotropic polymers for biomedical and environmental fields. PMID:18177555

  16. Geometric properties of nucleic acids with potential for autobuilding

    PubMed Central

    Gruene, Tim; Sheldrick, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Medium- to high-resolution X-ray structures of DNA and RNA molecules were investigated to find geometric properties useful for automated model building in crystallographic electron-density maps. We describe a simple method, starting from a list of electron-density ‘blobs’, for identifying backbone phosphates and nucleic acid bases based on properties of the local electron-density distribution. This knowledge should be useful for the automated building of nucleic acid models into electron-density maps. We show that the distances and angles involving C1′ and the P atoms, using the pseudo-torsion angles and that describe the …P—C1′—P—C1′… chain, provide a promising basis for building the nucleic acid polymer. These quantities show reasonably narrow distributions with asymmetry that should allow the direction of the phosphate backbone to be established. PMID:21173468

  17. Quantitative analysis of the interplay between hsc70 and its co-chaperone HspBP1

    PubMed Central

    Mahboubi, Hicham

    2015-01-01

    Background. Chaperones and their co-factors are components of a cellular network; they collaborate to maintain proteostasis under normal and harmful conditions. In particular, hsp70 family members and their co-chaperones are essential to repair damaged proteins. Co-chaperones are present in different subcellular compartments, where they modulate chaperone activities. Methods and Results. Our studies assessed the relationship between hsc70 and its co-factor HspBP1 in human cancer cells. HspBP1 promotes nucleotide exchange on hsc70, but has also chaperone-independent functions. We characterized the interplay between hsc70 and HspBP1 by quantitative confocal microscopy combined with automated image analyses and statistical evaluation. Stress and the recovery from insult changed significantly the subcellular distribution of hsc70, but had little effect on HspBP1. Single-cell measurements and regression analysis revealed that the links between the chaperone and its co-factor relied on (i) the physiological state of the cell and (ii) the subcellular compartment. As such, we identified a linear relationship and strong correlation between hsc70 and HspBP1 distribution in control and heat-shocked cells; this correlation changed in a compartment-specific fashion during the recovery from stress. Furthermore, we uncovered significant stress-induced changes in the colocalization between hsc70 and HspBP1 in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Discussion. Our quantitative approach defined novel properties of the co-chaperone HspBP1 as they relate to its interplay with hsc70. We propose that changes in cell physiology promote chaperone redistribution and thereby stimulate chaperone-independent functions of HspBP1. PMID:26713263

  18. The FNIP co-chaperones decelerate the Hsp90 chaperone cycle and enhance drug binding

    PubMed Central

    Woodford, Mark R.; Dunn, Diana M.; Blanden, Adam R.; Capriotti, Dante; Loiselle, David; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Panaretou, Barry; Hughes, Philip F.; Smith, Aaron; Ackerman, Wendi; Haystead, Timothy A.; Loh, Stewart N.; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Schmidt, Laura S.; Marston Linehan, W.; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone in eukaryotes involved in maintaining the stability and activity of numerous signalling proteins, also known as clients. Hsp90 ATPase activity is essential for its chaperone function and it is regulated by co-chaperones. Here we show that the tumour suppressor FLCN is an Hsp90 client protein and its binding partners FNIP1/FNIP2 function as co-chaperones. FNIPs decelerate the chaperone cycle, facilitating FLCN interaction with Hsp90, consequently ensuring FLCN stability. FNIPs compete with the activating co-chaperone Aha1 for binding to Hsp90, thereby providing a reciprocal regulatory mechanism for chaperoning of client proteins. Lastly, downregulation of FNIPs desensitizes cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors, whereas FNIPs overexpression in renal tumours compared with adjacent normal tissues correlates with enhanced binding of Hsp90 to its inhibitors. Our findings suggest that FNIPs expression can potentially serve as a predictive indicator of tumour response to Hsp90 inhibitors. PMID:27353360

  19. The FNIP co-chaperones decelerate the Hsp90 chaperone cycle and enhance drug binding.

    PubMed

    Woodford, Mark R; Dunn, Diana M; Blanden, Adam R; Capriotti, Dante; Loiselle, David; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Panaretou, Barry; Hughes, Philip F; Smith, Aaron; Ackerman, Wendi; Haystead, Timothy A; Loh, Stewart N; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Schmidt, Laura S; Marston Linehan, W; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone in eukaryotes involved in maintaining the stability and activity of numerous signalling proteins, also known as clients. Hsp90 ATPase activity is essential for its chaperone function and it is regulated by co-chaperones. Here we show that the tumour suppressor FLCN is an Hsp90 client protein and its binding partners FNIP1/FNIP2 function as co-chaperones. FNIPs decelerate the chaperone cycle, facilitating FLCN interaction with Hsp90, consequently ensuring FLCN stability. FNIPs compete with the activating co-chaperone Aha1 for binding to Hsp90, thereby providing a reciprocal regulatory mechanism for chaperoning of client proteins. Lastly, downregulation of FNIPs desensitizes cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors, whereas FNIPs overexpression in renal tumours compared with adjacent normal tissues correlates with enhanced binding of Hsp90 to its inhibitors. Our findings suggest that FNIPs expression can potentially serve as a predictive indicator of tumour response to Hsp90 inhibitors. PMID:27353360

  20. Allostery in the Hsp70 chaperone proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zuiderweg, Erik R.P.; Bertelsen, Eric B.; Rousaki, Aikaterini; Mayer, Matthias P.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Ahmad, Atta

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock 70 kDa (Hsp70) chaperones are essential to in-vivo protein folding, protein transport and protein re-folding. They carry out these activities using repeated cycles of binding and release of client proteins. This process is under allosteric control of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis. X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques have contributed much to the understanding of the allosteric mechanism linking these activities and the effect of co-chaperones on this mechanism. In this chapter, these findings are critically reviewed. Studies on the allosteric mechanisms of Hsp70 have gained enhanced urgency, as recent studies have implicated this chaperone as a potential drug target in diseases such as Alzheimer's and cancer. Recent approaches to combat these diseases through interference with the Hsp70 allosteric mechanism are discussed. PMID:22576356

  1. The first proton sponge-based amino acids: synthesis, acid-base properties and some reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ozeryanskii, Valery A; Gorbacheva, Anastasia Yu; Pozharskii, Alexander F; Vlasenko, Marina P; Tereznikov, Alexander Yu; Chernov'yants, Margarita S

    2015-08-21

    The first hybrid base constructed from 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (proton sponge or DMAN) and glycine, N-methyl-N-(8-dimethylamino-1-naphthyl)aminoacetic acid, was synthesised in high yield and its hydrobromide was structurally characterised and used to determine the acid-base properties via potentiometric titration. It was found that the basic strength of the DMAN-glycine base (pKa = 11.57, H2O) is on the level of amidine amino acids like arginine and creatine and its structure, zwitterionic vs. neutral, based on the spectroscopic (IR, NMR, mass) and theoretical (DFT) approaches has a strong preference to the zwitterionic form. Unlike glycine, the DMAN-glycine zwitterion is N-chiral and is hydrolytically cleaved with the loss of glycolic acid on heating in DMSO. This reaction together with the mild decarboxylative conversion of proton sponge-based amino acids into 2,3-dihydroperimidinium salts under air-oxygen was monitored with the help of the DMAN-alanine amino acid. The newly devised amino acids are unique as they combine fluorescence, strongly basic and redox-active properties. PMID:26159785

  2. Calcyclin Binding Protein/Siah-1 Interacting Protein Is a Hsp90 Binding Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Góral, Agnieszka; Bieganowski, Paweł; Prus, Wiktor; Krzemień-Ojak, Łucja; Kądziołka, Beata; Fabczak, Hanna; Filipek, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp90 chaperone activity is tightly regulated by interaction with many co-chaperones. Since CacyBP/SIP shares some sequence homology with a known Hsp90 co-chaperone, Sgt1, in this work we performed a set of experiments in order to verify whether CacyBP/SIP can interact with Hsp90. By applying the immunoprecipitation assay we have found that CacyBP/SIP binds to Hsp90 and that the middle (M) domain of Hsp90 is responsible for this binding. Furthermore, the proximity ligation assay (PLA) performed on HEp-2 cells has shown that the CacyBP/SIP-Hsp90 complexes are mainly localized in the cytoplasm of these cells. Using purified proteins and applying an ELISA we have shown that Hsp90 interacts directly with CacyBP/SIP and that the latter protein does not compete with Sgt1 for the binding to Hsp90. Moreover, inhibitors of Hsp90 do not perturb CacyBP/SIP-Hsp90 binding. Luciferase renaturation assay and citrate synthase aggregation assay with the use of recombinant proteins have revealed that CacyBP/SIP exhibits chaperone properties. Also, CacyBP/SIP-3xFLAG expression in HEp-2 cells results in the appearance of more basic Hsp90 forms in 2D electrophoresis, which may indicate that CacyBP/SIP dephosphorylates Hsp90. Altogether, the obtained results suggest that CacyBP/SIP is involved in regulation of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery. PMID:27249023

  3. Role of Nonspecific Interactions in Molecular Chaperones through Model-Based Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrew D.; Huang, Wenjun; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2012-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are large proteins or protein complexes from which many proteins require assistance in order to fold. One unique property of molecular chaperones is the cavity they provide in which proteins fold. The interior surface residues which make up the cavities of molecular chaperone complexes from different organisms has recently been identified, including the well-studied GroEL-GroES chaperonin complex found in Escherichia coli. It was found that the interior of these protein complexes is significantly different than other protein surfaces and that the residues found on the protein surface are able to resist protein adsorption when immobilized on a surface. Yet it remains unknown if these residues passively resist protein binding inside GroEL-GroEs (as demonstrated by experiments that created synthetic mimics of the interior cavity) or if the interior also actively stabilizes protein folding. To answer this question, we have extended entropic models of substrate protein folding inside GroEL-GroES to include interaction energies between substrate proteins and the GroEL-GroES chaperone complex. This model was tested on a set of 528 proteins and the results qualitatively match experimental observations. The interior residues were found to strongly discourage the exposure of any hydrophobic residues, providing an enhanced hydrophobic effect inside the cavity that actively influences protein folding. This work provides both a mechanism for active protein stabilization in GroEL-GroES and a model that matches contemporary understanding of the chaperone protein. PMID:23260050

  4. Affinity chromatography of chaperones based on denatured proteins: Analysis of cell lysates of different origin.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, N Yu; Sikorskaya, E V; Marchenkov, V V; Kashparov, I A; Semisotnov, G V

    2016-03-01

    Molecular chaperones are involved in folding, oligomerization, transport, and degradation of numerous cellular proteins. Most of chaperones are heat-shock proteins (HSPs). A number of diseases of various organisms are accompanied by changes in the structure and functional activity of chaperones, thereby revealing their vital importance. One of the fundamental properties of chaperones is their ability to bind polypeptides lacking a rigid spatial structure. Here, we demonstrate that affinity chromatography using sorbents with covalently attached denatured proteins allows effective purification and quantitative assessment of their bound protein partners. Using pure Escherichia coli chaperone GroEL (Hsp60), the capacity of denatured pepsin or lysozyme-based affinity sorbents was evaluated as 1 mg and 1.4 mg of GroEL per 1 ml of sorbent, respectively. Cell lysates of bacteria (E. coli, Thermus thermophilus, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis), archaea (Halorubrum lacusprofundi) as well as the lysate of rat liver mitochondria were analyzed using affinity carrier with denatured lysozyme. It was found that, apart from Hsp60, other proteins with a molecular weight of about 100, 50, 40, and 20 kDa are able to interact with denatured lysozyme. PMID:26644295

  5. Synthesis and properties of synthetic fulvic acid derived from hematoxylin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Valentina A.; Minaev, Boris F.; Baryshnikov, Gleb V.

    2015-04-01

    A model fulvic acid (FA) was synthesized from a natural dye, hematoxylin, in a slow oxidative polymerization/condensation reaction catalysed by OH- at pH ca. 12. The resulting dark-brown product, acidified to pH ca. 2, did not precipitate from the reaction solution. It was isolated and purified by cation-exchange resin. Its physicochemical and spectroscopic properties, as determined by means of elemental analysis, molecular weight analyses, Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, showed a close resemblance to natural FA. The similarity and differences between synthetic fulvic acids derived from hematoxylin and the natural fulvic acids substances are discussed. Quantum-chemical calculations of the supposed primary oxidation products of hematoxylin are performed and compared with observations.

  6. Evaluation of the Antiradical Properties of Phenolic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Koroleva, Olga; Torkova, Anna; Nikolaev, Ilya; Khrameeva, Ekaterina; Fedorova, Tatyana; Tsentalovich, Mikhail; Amarowicz, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidant capacity (AOC) against peroxyl radical and 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) radical cation was measured for a series of p-hydroxybenzoic (HB) and p-hydroxycinnamic (HC) acids at different pH. Quantum-chemical computation was performed using Gaussian 3.0 software package to calculate the geometry and energy parameters of the same compounds. Significant correlations were revealed between AOC and a number of calculated parameters. The most significant AOC descriptors for the studied compounds against peroxyl radical were found to be HOMO energy, rigidity (η) and Mulliken charge on the carbon atom in m-position to the phenolic hydroxyl. The most significant descriptor of the antioxidant properties against the ABTS radical cation at pH 7.40 is electron transfer enthalpy from the phenolate ion. The mechanism of AOC realization has been proposed for HB and HC acids against both radicals. PMID:25229820

  7. A chemical chaperone induces inhomogeneous conformational changes in flexible proteins.

    PubMed

    Hamdane, Djemel; Velours, Christophe; Cornu, David; Nicaise, Magali; Lombard, Murielle; Fontecave, Marc

    2016-07-27

    Organic osmolytes also known as chemical chaperones are major cellular compounds that favor, by an unclear mechanism, protein's compaction and stabilization of the native state. Here, we have examined the chaperone effect of the naturally occurring trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) osmolyte on a loosely packed protein (LPP), known to be a highly flexible form, using an apoprotein mutant of the flavin-dependent RNA methyltransferase as a model. Thermal and chemical denaturation experiments showed that TMAO stabilizes the structural integrity of the apoprotein dramatically. The denaturation reaction is irreversible indicating that the stability of the apoprotein is under kinetic control. This result implies that the stabilization is due to a TMAO-induced reconfiguration of the flexible LPP state, which leads to conformational limitations of the apoprotein likely driven by favorable entropic contribution. Evidence for the conformational perturbation of the apoprotein had been obtained through several biophysical approaches notably analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, labelling experiments and proteolysis coupled to mass spectrometry. Unexpectedly, TMAO promotes an overall elongation or asymmetrical changes of the hydrodynamic shape of the apoprotein without alteration of the secondary structure. The modulation of the hydrodynamic properties of the protein is associated with diverse inhomogenous conformational changes: loss of the solvent accessible cavities resulting in a dried protein matrix; some side-chain residues initially buried become solvent exposed while some others become hidden. Consequently, the TMAO-induced protein state exhibits impaired capability in the flavin binding process. Our study suggests that the nature of protein conformational changes induced by the chemical chaperones may be specific to protein packing and plasticity. This could be an efficient mechanism by which the cell controls and finely tunes the

  8. Polylactic Acid-Lemongrass Essential Oil Nanocapsules with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria; Florin, Iordache; D'Autilia, Francesca; Carzino, Riccardo; Bianchini, Paolo; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2016-01-01

    Polylactic acid was combined with lemongrass essential oil (EO) to produce functional nanocapsules (NCs). The obtained polylactic acid nanoparticles showed antimicrobial activity both with and without the presence of lemongrass oil; however, the presence of EO improved the activity of the NCs. The presence of lemongrass assisted the formation of well-separated NCs and also provided enhanced antimicrobial properties, since lemongrass is known for its antimicrobial character. Fluorescence microscopy was used to optically observe the nanoparticles and NCs and revealed the attachment of lemongrass oil with the polylactic acid NCs. Dynamic light scattering was used to determine their size. UV absorption was used to determine the exact amount of lemongrass oil found in the polylactic acid-lemongrass oil NCs, which was important for understanding the minimum inhibitory concentration for the antimicrobial experiments. A series of clinically important microbial species were used in the study and the obtained NCs proved to have very good antimicrobial properties against all tested strains. Such NCs can be used for the design of ecological strategies, based on natural alternatives, which may be efficient against severe infections, including those that involve resistant pathogens and biofilms or those with difficult to reach localization. PMID:27399724

  9. Regulation of molecular chaperones through post-translational modifications: Decrypting the chaperone code

    PubMed Central

    Cloutier, Philippe; Coulombe, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones and their associated cofactors form a group of highly specialized proteins that orchestrate the folding and unfolding of other proteins and the assembly and disassembly of protein complexes. Chaperones are found in all cell types and organisms, and their activity must be tightly regulated to maintain normal cell function. Indeed, deregulation of protein folding and protein complex assembly is the cause of various human diseases. Here, we present the results of an extensive review of the literature revealing that the post-translational modification (PTM) of chaperones has been selected during evolution as an efficient mean to regulate the activity and specificity of these key proteins. Because the addition and reciprocal removal of chemical groups can be triggered very rapidly, this mechanism provides an efficient switch to precisely regulate the activity of chaperones on specific substrates. The large number of PTMs detected in chaperones suggests that a combinatory code is at play to regulate function, activity, localization, and substrate specificity for this group of biologically important proteins. This review surveys the core information currently available as a starting point toward the more ambitious endeavor of deciphering the “chaperone code”. PMID:23459247

  10. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru; Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing; Tang, Dongqi; Ji, Chunyan

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  11. [Unfolding chaperone as a prion protein relating molecule].

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Naomi S; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Kaneko, Kiyotoshi

    2003-11-01

    Prion protein exists in two different isoforms, a normal cellular isoform (PrPc) and an abnormal infectious isoform (PrPSc), the latter is a causative agent of prion disease such as mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Amino acid sequences of PrPc and PrPSc are identical, but their conformations are rather different; PrPc rich in non beta-sheet vs. PrPSc rich in beta-sheet isoform. Since the two isoforms have quite different conformation, this host factor might be a molecular chaperone, which enables to override an energy barrier between PrPc and PrPSc. To examine the protein unfolding activities against collectively folded structure exist or not, we constructed an assay system and purified a novel molecular chaperone. Unfolding, from S. cerevisiae. Unfolding consists of oligomeric ring-like structure with the central cavity and has an ATP-dependent protein Unfoldingg activity with broad specificity in vitro, of which targets included PrP in beta-sheet form, alpha-synuclein, and A beta protein. We have also found that mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells contained the activity. Treatment of this factor with an ATP-hydrolyzing enzyme, apyrase, caused the decrease in its protein Unfoldingg activity. It was suggested that the purified protein probably formed homo-oligomer consisting of 4-5 subunits and its activity was ATP-dependent. PMID:15152473

  12. Docosahexaenoic Acid-Derived Fatty Acid Esters of Hydroxy Fatty Acids (FAHFAs) With Anti-inflammatory Properties.

    PubMed

    Kuda, Ondrej; Brezinova, Marie; Rombaldova, Martina; Slavikova, Barbora; Posta, Martin; Beier, Petr; Janovska, Petra; Veleba, Jiri; Kopecky, Jan; Kudova, Eva; Pelikanova, Terezie; Kopecky, Jan

    2016-09-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) is a complex organ with both metabolic and endocrine functions. Dysregulation of all of these functions of WAT, together with low-grade inflammation of the tissue in obese individuals, contributes to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of marine origin play an important role in the resolution of inflammation and exert beneficial metabolic effects. Using experiments in mice and overweight/obese patients with type 2 diabetes, we elucidated the structures of novel members of fatty acid esters of hydroxy fatty acids-lipokines derived from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and linoleic acid, which were present in serum and WAT after n-3 PUFA supplementation. These compounds contained DHA esterified to 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HLA) or 14-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (HDHA), termed 9-DHAHLA, 13-DHAHLA, and 14-DHAHDHA, and were synthesized by adipocytes at concentrations comparable to those of protectins and resolvins derived from DHA in WAT. 13-DHAHLA exerted anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties while reducing macrophage activation by lipopolysaccharides and enhancing the phagocytosis of zymosan particles. Our results document the existence of novel lipid mediators, which are involved in the beneficial anti-inflammatory effects attributed to n-3 PUFAs, in both mice and humans. PMID:27313314

  13. CHIP: a co-chaperone for degradation by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Edkins, Adrienne L

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis relies on a balance between protein folding and protein degradation. Molecular chaperones like Hsp70 and Hsp90 fulfil well-defined roles in protein folding and conformational stability via ATP dependent reaction cycles. These folding cycles are controlled by associations with a cohort of non-client protein co-chaperones, such as Hop, p23 and Aha1. Pro-folding co-chaperones facilitate the transit of the client protein through the chaperone mediated folding process. However, chaperones are also involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation of client proteins. Similar to folding complexes, the ability of chaperones to mediate protein degradation is regulated by co-chaperones, such as the C terminal Hsp70 binding protein (CHIP). CHIP binds to Hsp70 and Hsp90 chaperones through its tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain and functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase using a modified RING finger domain (U-box). This unique combination of domains effectively allows CHIP to network chaperone complexes to the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This chapter reviews the current understanding of CHIP as a co-chaperone that switches Hsp70/Hsp90 chaperone complexes from protein folding to protein degradation. PMID:25487024

  14. Emerging novel concept of chaperone therapies for protein misfolding diseases

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Chaperone therapy is a newly developed molecular therapeutic approach to protein misfolding diseases. Among them we found unstable mutant enzyme proteins in a few lysosomal diseases, resulting in rapid intracellular degradation and loss of function. Active-site binding low molecular competitive inhibitors (chemical chaperones) paradoxically stabilized and enhanced the enzyme activity in somatic cells by correction of the misfolding of enzyme protein. They reached the brain through the blood-brain barrier after oral administration, and corrected pathophysiology of the disease. In addition to these inhibitory chaperones, non-competitive chaperones without inhibitory bioactivity are being developed. Furthermore molecular chaperone therapy utilizing the heat shock protein and other chaperone proteins induced by small molecules has been experimentally tried to handle abnormally accumulated proteins as a new approach particularly to neurodegenerative diseases. These three types of chaperones are promising candidates for various types of diseases, genetic or non-genetic, and neurological or non-neurological, in addition to lysosomal diseases. PMID:24814990

  15. Thermal properties of liquid crystal hexylbenzoic acid/octyloxybenzoic acid mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumus, M.

    2015-03-01

    The thermal behaviors of binary mixture formed from hydrogen bonded nematic liquid crystals 4-hexylbenzoic acid and 4-(octyloxy)benzoic acid, were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The phase transition temperatures and enthalpies were determined by using calorimetric methods on DSC. The DSC results clearly indicate that the produced liquid crystal mixture displays liquid crystalline properties. The phase transition temperature values increase with increasing heating rate between 5 °C/min and 20 °C/min, and the calculated activation energy values show that the reaction arising during the phase transitions of the mixture is regular.

  16. Azasugar inhibitors as pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hill, Chris H.; Viuff, Agnete H.; Spratley, Samantha J.; Salamone, Stéphane; Christensen, Stig H.; Read, Randy J.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Jensen, Henrik H.; Deane, Janet E.

    2015-03-23

    Krabbe disease is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by rapid demyelination of nerve fibers. This disease is caused by defects in the lysosomal enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which hydrolyzes the terminal galactose from glycosphingolipids. These lipids are essential components of eukaryotic cell membranes: substrates of GALC include galactocerebroside, the primary lipid component of myelin, and psychosine, a cytotoxic metabolite. Mutations of GALC that cause misfolding of the protein may be responsive to pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT), whereby small molecules are used to stabilize these mutant proteins, thus correcting trafficking defects and increasing residual catabolic activity in cells. Here we describe amore » new approach for the synthesis of galacto-configured azasugars and the characterization of their interaction with GALC using biophysical, biochemical and crystallographic methods. We identify that the global stabilization of GALC conferred by azasugar derivatives, measured by fluorescence-based thermal shift assays, is directly related to their binding affinity, measured by enzyme inhibition. X-ray crystal structures of these molecules bound in the GALC active site reveal which residues participate in stabilizing interactions, show how potency is achieved and illustrate the penalties of aza/iminosugar ring distortion. The structure–activity relationships described here identify the key physical properties required of pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease and highlight the potential of azasugars as stabilizing agents for future enzyme replacement therapies. This work lays the foundation for new drug-based treatments of Krabbe disease.« less

  17. Azasugar inhibitors as pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Chris H.; Viuff, Agnete H.; Spratley, Samantha J.; Salamone, Stéphane; Christensen, Stig H.; Read, Randy J.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Jensen, Henrik H.; Deane, Janet E.

    2015-03-23

    Krabbe disease is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by rapid demyelination of nerve fibers. This disease is caused by defects in the lysosomal enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which hydrolyzes the terminal galactose from glycosphingolipids. These lipids are essential components of eukaryotic cell membranes: substrates of GALC include galactocerebroside, the primary lipid component of myelin, and psychosine, a cytotoxic metabolite. Mutations of GALC that cause misfolding of the protein may be responsive to pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT), whereby small molecules are used to stabilize these mutant proteins, thus correcting trafficking defects and increasing residual catabolic activity in cells. Here we describe a new approach for the synthesis of galacto-configured azasugars and the characterization of their interaction with GALC using biophysical, biochemical and crystallographic methods. We identify that the global stabilization of GALC conferred by azasugar derivatives, measured by fluorescence-based thermal shift assays, is directly related to their binding affinity, measured by enzyme inhibition. X-ray crystal structures of these molecules bound in the GALC active site reveal which residues participate in stabilizing interactions, show how potency is achieved and illustrate the penalties of aza/iminosugar ring distortion. The structure–activity relationships described here identify the key physical properties required of pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease and highlight the potential of azasugars as stabilizing agents for future enzyme replacement therapies. This work lays the foundation for new drug-based treatments of Krabbe disease.

  18. Properties and structure of raised bog peat humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-10-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic components of soil, peat and natural waters, and their structure and properties differ very much depending on their source. The aims of this study are to characterize humic acids (HAs) from raised bog peat, to evaluate the homogeneity of peat HAs within peat profiles, and to study peat humification impact on properties of HAs. A major impact on the structure of peat HAs have lignin-free raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin). On diagenesis scale, peat HAs have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter, and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, while thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge as a result of abiotic synthesis. However, in comparison with soil, aquatic and other HAs, aromaticity of peat HAs is much lower. Comparatively, the raised bog peat HAs are at the beginning of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups change depending on the peat age and decomposition degree from where HAs have been isolated, and carboxylic acidity of peat HAs increases with peat depth and humification degree.

  19. Acidic properties of sulfated zirconia: An infrared spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Babou, F.; Coudurier, G.; Vedrine, J.C.

    1995-04-01

    Sulfated zirconia with S content of 2 wt.% equivalent to complete coverage of its surface was studied by infrared spectroscopy. At least four sulfated species were identified and exhibited an important and reversible sensitivity to water. These equilibria were demonstrated to exist by the study of adsorption of incremental amounts of water. D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O isotopically enriched water molecules were used to assist interpretation of IR spectra. To characterize acidity features, the probe molecules butane, CO, and H{sub 2}O (as weak bases) or pyridine (as a strong base) were adsorbed. Two Lewis acid sites (L{sub 1} and L{sub 2}) were observed and one Bronsted site (B) related to the zirconia support (L{sub 1}) and the sulfated species (L{sub 2}, B). They were evidenced by pyridine adsorption which was shown to partly displace adsorbed sulfate species. With the help of previous theoretical calculations using an ab initio method and representing the zirconia surface by a mononuclear zirconium complex, it is emphasized that the sulfated zirconia can be visualized as a H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} compound grafted onto the surface of zirconia in a way which makes it very sensitive to water but in a reversible way. Its acidity is similar to that of sulfuric acid but it is not really superacidic. Comparison with other oxides leads us to suggest that the cationic charge borne by the metallic cation is of prime importance for the acidity strength. The role of water on the acidic and catalytic properties for n-butane isomerization reaction is emphasized. 33 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperones and oxidoreductases: critical regulators of tumor cell survival and immunorecognition.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Tomás; Simmen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones and oxidoreductases are abundant enzymes that mediate the production of fully folded secretory and transmembrane proteins. Resisting the Golgi and plasma membrane-directed "bulk flow," ER chaperones and oxidoreductases enter retrograde trafficking whenever they are pulled outside of the ER by their substrates. Solid tumors are characterized by the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), combined with reduced blood flow that leads to low oxygen supply and ER stress. Under these conditions, hypoxia and the unfolded protein response upregulate their target genes. When this occurs, ER oxidoreductases and chaperones become important regulators of tumor growth. However, under these conditions, these proteins not only promote the folding of proteins, but also alter the properties of the plasma membrane and hence modulate tumor immune recognition. For instance, high levels of calreticulin serve as an "eat-me" signal on the surface of tumor cells. Conversely, both intracellular and surface BiP/GRP78 promotes tumor growth. Other ER folding assistants able to modulate the properties of tumor tissue include protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), Ero1α and GRP94. Understanding the roles and mechanisms of ER chaperones in regulating tumor cell functions and immunorecognition will lead to important insight for the development of novel cancer therapies. PMID:25386408

  1. Xylonucleic acid: synthesis, structure, and orthogonal pairing properties

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Mohitosh; Maiti, Munmun; Knies, Christine; Dumbre, Shrinivas; Lescrinier, Eveline; Rosemeyer, Helmut; Ceulemans, Arnout; Herdewijn, Piet

    2015-01-01

    There is a common interest for studying xeno-nucleic acid systems in the fields of synthetic biology and the origin of life, in particular, those with an engineered backbone and possessing novel properties. Along this line, we have investigated xylonucleic acid (XyloNA) containing a potentially prebiotic xylose sugar (a 3′-epimer of ribose) in its backbone. Herein, we report for the first time the synthesis of four XyloNA nucleotide building blocks and the assembly of XyloNA oligonucleotides containing all the natural nucleobases. A detailed investigation of pairing and structural properties of XyloNAs in comparison to DNA/RNA has been performed by thermal UV-melting, CD, and solution state NMR spectroscopic studies. XyloNA has been shown to be an orthogonal self-pairing system which adopts a slightly right-handed extended helical geometry. Our study on one hand, provides understanding for superior structure-function (-pairing) properties of DNA/RNA over XyloNA for selection as an informational polymer in the prebiotic context, while on the other hand, finds potential of XyloNA as an orthogonal genetic system for application in synthetic biology. PMID:26175047

  2. Electrical properties of boundary layers of fatty acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deryagin, B. V.; Snitkovskii, M. M.

    1992-05-01

    Nonlinear current-voltage and coulomb-voltage characteristics with a hysteresis loop, which is peculiar to ferroelectrics, were observed in the boundary layers of individual saturated organic acids and oleic acid which have a domain structure and also an anomalously high conductivity which corresponds, in its order of magnitude, to the lower conductivity limit for metals. These effects are related with the formation of a volume space charge and by the cording of the current (formation of conductivity channels). The electrical properties of the boundary layers change in relation to the thickness: for subcritical thicknesses Ohm's Law is obeyed but for larger thicknesses strong field effects are observed. The thickness at which the system changes into the nonconducting stage has meaning as a physical characteristic of the system.

  3. Octanoic acid confers to royal jelly varroa-repellent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazzi, Francesco; Bortolomeazzi, Renzo; Della Vedova, Giorgio; Del Piccolo, Fabio; Annoscia, Desiderato; Milani, Norberto

    2009-02-01

    The mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman is a parasite of the honeybee Apis mellifera L. and represents a major threat for apiculture in the Western world. Reproduction takes place only inside bee brood cells that are invaded just before sealing; drone cells are preferred over worker cells, whereas queen cells are not normally invaded. Lower incidence of mites in queen cells is at least partly due to the deterrent activity of royal jelly. In this study, the repellent properties of royal jelly were investigated using a lab bioassay. Chemical analysis showed that octanoic acid is a major volatile component of royal jelly; by contrast, the concentration is much lower in drone and worker larval food. Bioassays, carried out under lab conditions, demonstrated that octanoic acid is repellent to the mite. Field studies in bee colonies confirmed that the compound may interfere with the process of cell invasion by the mite.

  4. Octanoic acid confers to royal jelly varroa-repellent properties.

    PubMed

    Nazzi, Francesco; Bortolomeazzi, Renzo; Della Vedova, Giorgio; Del Piccolo, Fabio; Annoscia, Desiderato; Milani, Norberto

    2009-02-01

    The mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman is a parasite of the honeybee Apis mellifera L. and represents a major threat for apiculture in the Western world. Reproduction takes place only inside bee brood cells that are invaded just before sealing; drone cells are preferred over worker cells, whereas queen cells are not normally invaded. Lower incidence of mites in queen cells is at least partly due to the deterrent activity of royal jelly. In this study, the repellent properties of royal jelly were investigated using a lab bioassay. Chemical analysis showed that octanoic acid is a major volatile component of royal jelly; by contrast, the concentration is much lower in drone and worker larval food. Bioassays, carried out under lab conditions, demonstrated that octanoic acid is repellent to the mite. Field studies in bee colonies confirmed that the compound may interfere with the process of cell invasion by the mite. PMID:19050844

  5. Chaperone Activity of Small Heat Shock Proteins Underlies Therapeutic Efficacy in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis*

    PubMed Central

    Kurnellas, Michael P.; Brownell, Sara E.; Su, Leon; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Dolganov, Gregory; Chopra, Sidharth; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Sobel, Raymond A.; Webster, Jonathan; Ousman, Shalina S.; Becker, Rachel A.; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the therapeutic activity of αB crystallin, small heat shock protein B5 (HspB5), was shared with other human sHsps, a set of seven human family members, a mutant of HspB5 G120 known to exhibit reduced chaperone activity, and a mycobacterial sHsp were expressed and purified from bacteria. Each of the recombinant proteins was shown to be a functional chaperone, capable of inhibiting aggregation of denatured insulin with varying efficiency. When injected into mice at the peak of disease, they were all effective in reducing the paralysis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Additional structure activity correlations between chaperone activity and therapeutic function were established when linear regions within HspB5 were examined. A single region, corresponding to residues 73–92 of HspB5, forms amyloid fibrils, exhibited chaperone activity, and was an effective therapeutic for encephalomyelitis. The linkage of the three activities was further established by demonstrating individual substitutions of critical hydrophobic amino acids in the peptide resulted in the loss of all of the functions. PMID:22955287

  6. The chaperone activity and toxicity of ambroxol on Gaucher cells and normal mice.

    PubMed

    Luan, Zhuo; Li, Linjing; Higaki, Katsumi; Nanba, Eiji; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Kousaku

    2013-04-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), caused by a defect of acid β-glucosidase (β-Glu), is one of the most common sphingolipidoses. Recently, ambroxol, an FDA-approved drug used to treat airway mucus hypersecretion and hyaline membrane disease in newborns, was identified as a chemical chaperone for GD. In the present study, we investigated the chaperone activity and toxicity of ambroxol on both cultured GD patient cells and normal mice. We found that ambroxol treatment significantly increased N370S, F213I, N188S/G193W and R120W mutant β-Glu activities in GD fibroblasts with low cytotoxicity. Additionally, we measured the β-Glu activity in the tissues of normal mice which received water containing increasing concentrations of ambroxol ad libitum for one week. No serious adverse effect was observed during this experiment. Ambroxol significantly increased the β-Glu activity in the spleen, heart and cerebellum of the mice. This result showed its oral availability and wide distribution and chaperone activity in the tissues, including the brain, and its lack of acute toxicity. These characteristics of ambroxol would make it a potential therapeutic chaperone in the treatment of GD with neurological manifestations. PMID:22682976

  7. Calcium binding chaperones of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Coe, Helen; Michalak, Marek

    2009-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is a major Ca(2+) store of the cell that impacts many cellular processes within the cell. The endoplasmic reticulum has roles in lipid and sterol synthesis, protein folding, post-translational modification and secretion and these functions are affected by intraluminal endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+). In the endoplasmic reticulum there are several Ca(2+) buffering chaperones including calreticulin, Grp94, BiP and protein disulfide isomerase. Calreticulin is one of the major Ca(2+) binding/buffering chaperones in the endoplasmic reticulum. It has a critical role in Ca(2+) signalling in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and this has significant impacts on many Ca(2+)-dependent pathways including control of transcription during embryonic development. In addition to Ca(2+) buffering, calreticulin plays important role in the correct folding and quality control of newly synthesized glycoproteins. PMID:20093733

  8. 41 CFR 101-42.1102-9 - Acid contaminated and explosive contaminated property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Acid contaminated and explosive contaminated property. 101-42.1102-9 Section 101-42.1102-9 Public Contracts and Property... contaminated and explosive contaminated property. (a) Utilization requirements. (1) Acid contaminated...

  9. Cross-system excision of chaperone-mediated proteolysis in chaperone-assisted recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Villaverde, Antonio; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2010-01-01

    Main Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones such as DnaK are key components of the control quality network designed to minimize the prevalence of polypeptides with aberrant conformations. This is achieved by both favoring refolding activities but also stimulating proteolytic degradation of folding reluctant species. This last activity is responsible for the decrease of the proteolytic stability of recombinant proteins when co-produced along with DnaK, where an increase in solubility might be associated to a decrease in protein yield. However, when DnaK and its co-chaperone DnaJ are co-produced in cultured insect cells or whole insect larvae (and expectedly, in other heterologous hosts), only positive, folding-related effects of these chaperones are observed, in absence of proteolysis-mediated reduction of recombinant protein yield. PMID:21326941

  10. Phosphonic Acid-Functionalized Polyurethane Dispersions with Improved Adhesion Properties.

    PubMed

    Breucker, Laura; Landfester, Katharina; Taden, Andreas

    2015-11-11

    A facile route to phosphorus-functionalized polyurethane dispersions (P-PUDs) with improved adhesion properties is presented. (Bis)phosphonic acid moieties serve as adhesion promoting sites that are covalently attached via an end-capping reaction to isocyanate-reactive polyurethane particles under aqueous conditions. The synthetic approach circumvents solubility issues, offers great flexibility in terms of polyurethane composition, and allows for the synthesis of semicrystalline systems with thermomechanical response due to reversible physical cross-linking. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to investigate the effect of functionalization on the semicrystallinity. The end-capping conversion was determined via inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and was surprisingly found to be almost independent of the stoichiometry of reaction, suggesting an adsorption-dominated process. Particle charge detection (PCD) experiments reveal that a dense surface coverage of phosphonic acid groups can be attained and that, at high functionalization degrees, the phosphonic adhesion moieties are partially dragged inside the colloidal P-PUD particle. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCMD) investigations conducted with hydroxyapatite (HAP) and stainless steel sensors as model surfaces show a greatly enhanced affinity of the aqueous P-PUDs and furthermore indicate polymer chain rearrangements and autonomous film formation under wet conditions. Due to their facile synthesis, significantly improved adhesion, and variable film properties, P-PUD systems such as the one described here are believed to be of great interest for multiple applications, e.g., adhesives, paints, anticorrosion, or dentistry. PMID:26491881

  11. Synthesis and properties of N-hexadecyl ethylenediamine triacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xixin; Zhao, Jianling; Yao, Xingzhi; Chen, Wentao

    2004-11-15

    A new kind of surfactant named N-hexadecyl ethylenediamine triacetic acid (HED3A) was synthesized from anhydrous ethylenediamine, 1-bromohexadecane, and chloroacetic acid. Testing showed stability of HED3A in hard water, wetting power, dispersing power, and surface tension increased along with pH value. Stability in hard water of trisodium N-hexadecyl ethylenediamine triacetate (3NaHED3A) was at level 4, which was better than that of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (LAS). Other properties of 3NaHED3A including wetting power, dispersing power, emulsifying power, and surface tension had intermediate value between SDS, LAS, AES, peregal-O, and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC). The ethylenediamine triacetic acid (ED3A) group in 3NaHED3A can chelate many kinds of metal ions, which indicates a promising application prospect in many fields including metal anticorrosion, corrosion control agent, additives in electroplating solution, and ore selection and solid surface treatment. PMID:15464823

  12. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by their dedicated chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Pausch, Patrick; Singh, Ujjwala; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Pillet, Benjamin; Murat, Guillaume; Altegoer, Florian; Stier, Gunter; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard; Bange, Gert; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cells produce every minute >160,000 ribosomal proteins. Owing to their difficult physicochemical properties, the synthesis of assembly-competent ribosomal proteins represents a major challenge. Recent evidence highlights that dedicated chaperone proteins recognize the N-terminal regions of ribosomal proteins and promote their soluble expression and delivery to the assembly site. Here we explore the intuitive possibility that ribosomal proteins are captured by dedicated chaperones in a co-translational manner. Affinity purification of four chaperones (Rrb1, Syo1, Sqt1 and Yar1) selectively enriched the mRNAs encoding their specific ribosomal protein clients (Rpl3, Rpl5, Rpl10 and Rps3). X-ray crystallography reveals how the N-terminal, rRNA-binding residues of Rpl10 are shielded by Sqt1's WD-repeat β-propeller, providing mechanistic insight into the incorporation of Rpl10 into pre-60S subunits. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by dedicated chaperones constitutes an elegant mechanism to prevent unspecific interactions and aggregation of ribosomal proteins on their road to incorporation. PMID:26112308

  13. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by their dedicated chaperones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausch, Patrick; Singh, Ujjwala; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Pillet, Benjamin; Murat, Guillaume; Altegoer, Florian; Stier, Gunter; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard; Bange, Gert; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cells produce every minute >160,000 ribosomal proteins. Owing to their difficult physicochemical properties, the synthesis of assembly-competent ribosomal proteins represents a major challenge. Recent evidence highlights that dedicated chaperone proteins recognize the N-terminal regions of ribosomal proteins and promote their soluble expression and delivery to the assembly site. Here we explore the intuitive possibility that ribosomal proteins are captured by dedicated chaperones in a co-translational manner. Affinity purification of four chaperones (Rrb1, Syo1, Sqt1 and Yar1) selectively enriched the mRNAs encoding their specific ribosomal protein clients (Rpl3, Rpl5, Rpl10 and Rps3). X-ray crystallography reveals how the N-terminal, rRNA-binding residues of Rpl10 are shielded by Sqt1's WD-repeat β-propeller, providing mechanistic insight into the incorporation of Rpl10 into pre-60S subunits. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by dedicated chaperones constitutes an elegant mechanism to prevent unspecific interactions and aggregation of ribosomal proteins on their road to incorporation.

  14. Docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid induce changes in the physical properties of a lipid bilayer model membrane.

    PubMed

    Onuki, Yoshinori; Morishita, Mariko; Chiba, Yoshiyuki; Tokiwa, Shinji; Takayama, Kozo

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of fatty acids such as stearic acid (SA, 18:0), oleic acid (OA, 18:1), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) on a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer by determining the phase transition temperature, fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH), and detergent insolubility. Treatment with unsaturated fatty acid broadened and shifted the phase transitions of the DPPC bilayer to a lower temperature. The phase transition temperature and the value of fluorescence anisotropy of DPH at 37 degrees C decreased progressively with increasing treatment amounts of unsaturated fatty acid. A large amount of the DPPC bilayer treated with unsaturated fatty acid was dissolved in Triton X-100, obtaining a low level of detergent insolubility. These modifications of the bilayer physical properties were most pronounced with DHA and EPA treatment. These data show that unsaturated fatty acids, particularly DHA and EPA, induce a marked change in the lipid bilayer structure. The composition of fatty acids in the DPPC bilayer was similar after treatment with various unsaturated fatty acids, suggesting that the different actions of unsaturated fatty acids are attributed to change in the molecular structure (e.g., kinked conformation by double bonds). We further explored the change in physical properties induced by fatty acids dispersed in a water-in-oil-in-water multiple emulsion and found that unsaturated fatty acids acted efficiently on the DPPC bilayer, even when incorporated in emulsion form. PMID:16394552

  15. Correlation between fibroin amino acid sequence and physical silk properties.

    PubMed

    Fedic, Robert; Zurovec, Michal; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2003-09-12

    The fiber properties of lepidopteran silk depend on the amino acid repeats that interact during H-fibroin polymerization. The aim of our research was to relate repeat composition to insect biology and fiber strength. Representative regions of the H-fibroin genes were sequenced and analyzed in three pyralid species: wax moth (Galleria mellonella), European flour moth (Ephestia kuehniella), and Indian meal moth (Plodia interpunctella). The amino acid repeats are species-specific, evidently a diversification of an ancestral region of 43 residues, and include three types of regularly dispersed motifs: modifications of GSSAASAA sequence, stretches of tripeptides GXZ where X and Z represent bulky residues, and sequences similar to PVIVIEE. No concatenations of GX dipeptide or alanine, which are typical for Bombyx silkworms and Antheraea silk moths, respectively, were found. Despite different repeat structure, the silks of G. mellonella and E. kuehniella exhibit similar tensile strength as the Bombyx and Antheraea silks. We suggest that in these latter two species, variations in the repeat length obstruct repeat alignment, but sufficiently long stretches of iterated residues get superposed to interact. In the pyralid H-fibroins, interactions of the widely separated and diverse motifs depend on the precision of repeat matching; silk is strong in G. mellonella and E. kuehniella, with 2-3 types of long homogeneous repeats, and nearly 10 times weaker in P. interpunctella, with seven types of shorter erratic repeats. The high proportion of large amino acids in the H-fibroin of pyralids has probably evolved in connection with the spinning habit of caterpillars that live in protective silk tubes and spin continuously, enlarging the tubes on one end and partly devouring the other one. The silk serves as a depot of energetically rich and essential amino acids that may be scarce in the diet. PMID:12816957

  16. Maf-dependent bacterial flagellin glycosylation occurs before chaperone binding and flagellar T3SS export

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jennifer L; Lowry, Rebecca C; Couto, Narciso A S; Wright, Phillip C; Stafford, Graham P; Shaw, Jonathan G

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial swimming is mediated by rotation of a filament that is assembled via polymerization of flagellin monomers after secretion via a dedicated flagellar Type III secretion system. Several bacteria decorate their flagellin with sialic acid related sugars that is essential for motility. Aeromonas caviae is a model organism for this process as it contains a genetically simple glycosylation system and decorates its flagellin with pseudaminic acid (Pse). The link between flagellin glycosylation and export has yet to be fully determined. We examined the role of glycosylation in the export and assembly process in a strain lacking Maf1, a protein involved in the transfer of Pse onto flagellin at the later stages of the glycosylation pathway. Immunoblotting, established that glycosylation is not required for flagellin export but is essential for filament assembly since non-glycosylated flagellin is still secreted. Maf1 interacts directly with its flagellin substrate in vivo, even in the absence of pseudaminic acid. Flagellin glycosylation in a flagellin chaperone mutant (flaJ) indicated that glycosylation occurs in the cytoplasm before chaperone binding and protein secretion. Preferential chaperone binding to glycosylated flagellin revealed its crucial role, indicating that this system has evolved to favour secretion of the polymerization competent glycosylated form. PMID:24527847

  17. Ferulic Acid: Therapeutic Potential Through Its Antioxidant Property

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Marimuthu; Sudheer, Adluri R.; Menon, Venugopal P.

    2007-01-01

    There has been considerable public and scientific interest in the use of phytochemicals derived from dietary components to combat human diseases. They are naturally occurring substances found in plants. Ferulic acid (FA) is a phytochemical commonly found in fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, sweet corn and rice bran. It arises from metabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine by Shikimate pathway in plants. It exhibits a wide range of therapeutic effects against various diseases like cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative. A wide spectrum of beneficial activity for human health has been advocated for this phenolic compound, at least in part, because of its strong antioxidant activity. FA, a phenolic compound is a strong membrane antioxidant and known to positively affect human health. FA is an effective scavenger of free radicals and it has been approved in certain countries as food additive to prevent lipid peroxidation. It effectively scavenges superoxide anion radical and inhibits the lipid peroxidation. It possesses antioxidant property by virtue of its phenolic hydroxyl group in its structure. The hydroxy and phenoxy groups of FA donate electrons to quench the free radicals. The phenolic radical in turn forms a quinone methide intermediate, which is excreted via the bile. The past few decades have been devoted to intense research on antioxidant property of FA. So, the present review deals with the mechanism of antioxidant property of FA and its possible role in therapeutic usage against various diseases. PMID:18188410

  18. Cloning Expression Purification Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffractino Studies of a 12R-LOX-chaperone Complex

    SciTech Connect

    G Deb; K Boeshanes; W Idler; B Ahvazi

    2011-12-31

    Lipoxygenases are a family of nonheme iron-containing dioxygenases. An Escherichia coli expression system producing the bacterial chaperones GroES and GroEL was engineered and successfully used to produce large quantities of recombinant human 12R-LOX (LOXR; MW 80.34 kDa; 701 amino-acid residues). The co-overproduction of the two chaperones with 12R-LOX resulted in increased solubility of 12R-LOX and allowed the purification of milligram amounts of active enzyme for structural studies by X-ray diffraction. The lipoxygenase protein was purified on an affinity column and a gel-filtration column with chaperone protein (MW 57.16 kDa). The LOXR-chaperone complex was crystallized with ligand by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.5 M ammonium hydrogen phosphate as precipitant. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic system, space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 138.97, b = 266.11, c = 152.26 {angstrom}, {beta} = 101.07{sup o}. Based on the calculated Matthews coefficient (3.1 {angstrom}3 Da{sup -1}), it is estimated that one molecule of LOXR complexed with two molecules of chaperone is present in the asymmetric unit of the crystal lattice. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 4 {angstrom} resolution using synchrotron radiation.

  19. Corrole and Porphyrin Amino Acid Conjugates: Synthesis and Physicochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Karikis, Kostas; Georgilis, Evangelos; Charalambidis, Georgios; Petrou, Athanasia; Vakuliuk, Olena; Chatziioannou, Theodore; Raptaki, Iliana; Tsovola, Sofia; Papakyriacou, Ioanna; Mitraki, Anna; Gryko, Daniel T; Coutsolelos, Athanassios G

    2016-08-01

    A series of conjugates of amino acids with porphyrins and corroles was synthesized. Their self-assembling ability under defined conditions was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The morphology and photophysical properties of these molecules were studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy in solid, liquid, and self-assembled forms. We observed that both corrole and porphyrin conjugated with the l-phenylalanine-l-phenylalanine peptide to form spherical nanostructures with bathochromic shifts in the emission spectra, indicating the formation of aggregates. These aggregates are characterized by the impressive absorption of light over nearly the whole visible range. The broadening of all bands was particularly strong in the case of corroles. The fluorescence lifetimes of self-assembled species were longer as compared to the solid-state form. PMID:27356185

  20. Distinct nucleic acid interaction properties of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein precursor NCp15 explain reduced viral infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Naiyer, Nada; Mitra, Mithun; Li, Jialin; Williams, Mark C.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Gorelick, Robert J.; Wu, Zhengrong; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2014-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) maturation, three different forms of nucleocapsid (NC) protein—NCp15 (p9 + p6), NCp9 (p7 + SP2) and NCp7—appear successively. A mutant virus expressing NCp15 shows greatly reduced infectivity. Mature NCp7 is a chaperone protein that facilitates remodeling of nucleic acids (NAs) during reverse transcription. To understand the strict requirement for NCp15 processing, we compared the chaperone function of the three forms of NC. NCp15 anneals tRNA to the primer-binding site at a similar rate as NCp7, whereas NCp9 is the most efficient annealing protein. Assays to measure NA destabilization show a similar trend. Dynamic light scattering studies reveal that NCp15 forms much smaller aggregates relative to those formed by NCp7 and NCp9. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies suggest that the acidic p6 domain of HIV-1 NCp15 folds back and interacts with the basic zinc fingers. Neutralizing the acidic residues in p6 improves the annealing and aggregation activity of NCp15 to the level of NCp9 and increases the protein–NA aggregate size. Slower NCp15 dissociation kinetics is observed by single-molecule DNA stretching, consistent with the formation of electrostatic inter-protein contacts, which likely contribute to the distinct aggregate morphology, irregular HIV-1 core formation and non-infectious virus. PMID:24813443

  1. Improvement of chaperone activity of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin using electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung Hyun; An, Byung Chull; Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Jae Taek; Cho, Jae-Hyun; Jung, Hyun Suk; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2012-08-01

    The peroxiredoxin protein expressed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaPrx) is a typical 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin that has dual functions as both a thioredoxin-dependent peroxidase and molecular chaperone. As the function of PaPrx is regulated by its structural status, in the present study, we examined the effects of electron beam radiation on the structural modifications of PaPrx, as well as changes to PaPrx peroxidase and chaperone functions. It was found that the chaperone activity of PaPrx was increased approximately 3- to 4-fold at 2 kGy when compared to non-irradiated PaPrx, while its peroxidase activity decreased. This corresponded to a shift from the low molecular weight PaPrx species that acts as a peroxidase to the high molecular weight complex that functions as a chaperone, as detected using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We also investigated the influence of the electron beam on physical protein properties such as hydrophobicity and secondary structure. The exposure of the PaPrx hydrophobic domains in response to irradiation reached a peak at 2 kGy and then decreased in a dose-dependent manner at higher doses. In addition, the exposure of β-sheet and random coil elements on the surface of PaPrx was significantly increased following irradiation with an electron beam, whereas exposure of α-helix and turn elements was decreased. These results suggest that irradiated PaPrx may be a potential candidate for use in bio-engineering systems and various industrial applications, due to its enhanced chaperone activity.

  2. Abc Amino Acids: Design, Synthesis, and Properties of New Photoelastic Amino Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Standaert, Robert F; Park, Dr Seung Bum

    2006-01-01

    Photoisomerizable amino acids provide a direct avenue to the experimental manipulation of bioactive polypeptides, potentially allowing real-time, remote control of biological systems and enabling useful applications in nanobiotechnology. Herein, we report a new class of photoisomerizable amino acids intended to cause pronounced expansion and contraction in the polypeptide backbone, i.e., to be photoelastic. These compounds, termed Abc amino acids, employ a photoisomerizable azobiphenyl chromophore to control the relative disposition of aminomethyl and carboxyl substituents. Molecular modeling of nine Abc isomers led to the identification of one with particularly attractive properties, including the ability to induce contractions up to 13A in the backbone upon transa?cis photoisomerization. This isomer, designated mpAbc, has substituents at meta and para positions on the inner (azo-linked) and outer rings, respectively. An efficient synthesis of Fmoc-protected mpAbc was executed in which the biaryl components were formed via Suzuki couplings and the azo linkage was formed via amine/nitroso condensation; protected forms of three other Abc isomers were prepared similarly. A decapeptide incorporating mpAbc was synthesized by conventional solid-phase methods and displayed characteristic azobenzene photochemical behavior with optimal conversion to the cis isomer at 360 nm and a thermal cisa?trans half life of 100 min. at 80 AoC.

  3. Acidic Properties and Structure-Activity Correlations of Solid Acid Catalysts Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Li, Shenhui; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2016-04-19

    Solid acid materials with tunable structural and acidic properties are promising heterogeneous catalysts for manipulating and/or emulating the activity and selectivity of industrially important catalytic reactions. On the other hand, the performances of acid-catalyzed reactions are mostly dictated by the acidic features, namely, type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount, strength, and local environment of acid sites. The latter is relevant to their location (intra- vs extracrystalline), and possible confinement and Brønsted-Lewis acid synergy effects that may strongly affect the host-guest interactions, reaction mechanism, and shape selectivity of the catalytic system. This account aims to highlight some important applications of state-of-the-art solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for exploring the structural and acidic properties of solid acid catalysts as well as their catalytic performances and relevant reaction pathway invoked. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations may be exploited in conjunction with experimental SSNMR studies to verify the structure-activity correlations of the catalytic system at a microscopic scale. We describe in this Account the developments and applications of advanced ex situ and/or in situ SSNMR techniques, such as two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum magic-angle spinning (DQ MAS) homonuclear correlation spectroscopy for structural investigation of solid acids as well as study of their acidic properties. Moreover, the energies and electronic structures of the catalysts and detailed catalytic reaction processes, including the identification of reaction species, elucidation of reaction mechanism, and verification of structure-activity correlations, made available by DFT theoretical calculations were also discussed. Relevant discussions will focus primarily on results obtained from our laboratories in the past decade, including (i) quantitative and qualitative acidity characterization utilizing assorted probe molecules

  4. Influence of humic acid applications on soil physicochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümüş, İ.; Şeker, C.

    2015-09-01

    Soil structure is often said to be the key to soil productivity since a fertile soil, with desirable soil structure and adequate moisture supply, constitutes a productive soil. Soil structure influences soil water movement and retention, erosion, crusting, nutrient recycling, root penetration and crop yield. The objective of this work is to study, humic acid (HA) application on some physical and chemical properties in weak structured soils investigated. The approach involved establishing a plot experiment in the laboratory conditions. Different rates of HA (control, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 %) were applied to soil at three incubation periods (21, 42 and 62 days). At the end of the each incubation period, the changes in physicochemical properties were measured. Generally, HA addition increased EC values at the all incubation periods. HA applications decreased soil modulus of rupture. Application of HA at the rate of 4 % was significantly increased soil organic carbon contents. HA applications at the rate of 4 % significantly increased both mean soil total nitrogen content and aggregate stability after at three incubation periods (p < 0.05). Therefore, HA was potential to improve structure of soil in short term.

  5. Capturing the misfolds : chaperone-peptide-binding motifs.

    SciTech Connect

    Joachimiak, A.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1997-06-01

    Recently, the crystal structure of the N-terminal fragment of human Hsp90-alpha chaperone and its complex with geldanamycin and the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of yeast Hsp90 have been determined at high resolution. These structures reveal features that shed new light on the Hsp90 chaperone-protein interactions.

  6. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  7. Modulation of human IAPP fibrillation: cosolutes, crowders and chaperones.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mimi; Estel, Kathrin; Seeliger, Janine; Friedrich, Ralf P; Dogan, Susanne; Wanker, Erich E; Winter, Roland; Ebbinghaus, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The cellular environment determines the structure and function of proteins. Marginal changes of the environment can severely affect the energy landscape of protein folding. However, despite the important role of chaperones on protein folding, less is known about chaperonal modulation of protein aggregation and fibrillation considering different classes of chaperones. We find that the pharmacological chaperone O4, the chemical chaperone proline as well as the protein chaperone serum amyloid P component (SAP) are inhibitors of the type 2 diabetes mellitus-related aggregation process of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). By applying biophysical methods such as thioflavin T fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence anisotropy, total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy we analyse and compare their inhibition mechanism. We demonstrate that the fibrillation reaction of human IAPP is strongly inhibited by formation of globular, amorphous assemblies by both, the pharmacological and the protein chaperones. We studied the inhibition mechanism under cell-like conditions by using the artificial crowding agents Ficoll 70 and sucrose. Under such conditions the suppressive effect of proline was decreased, whereas the pharmacological chaperone remains active. PMID:25406896

  8. Toward Instituting a Chaperone Policy in Outpatient Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; Jenkins, Carol; Laney, Tyler; Seidel, Kristy

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: We sought to evaluate child, parent and medical provider preferences for chaperones for outpatient encounters and to evaluate the acceptability and frequency of utilization following institution of a chaperone policy. Secondarily, we sought to understand what medical history and examinations teens consider "sensitive." Design: We…

  9. Oxidative switches in functioning of mammalian copper chaperone Cox17

    PubMed Central

    Voronova, Anastassia; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Meyer, Thomas; Rompel, Annette; Krebs, Bernt; Kazantseva, Jekaterina; Sillard, Rannar; Palumaa, Peep

    2007-01-01

    Cox17, a copper chaperone for cytochrome-c oxidase, is an essential and highly conserved protein in eukaryotic organisms. Yeast and mammalian Cox17 share six conserved cysteine residues, which are involved in complex redox reactions as well as in metal binding and transfer. Mammalian Cox17 exists in three oxidative states, each characterized by distinct metal-binding properties: fully reduced mammalian Cox170S–S binds co-operatively to four Cu+; Cox172S–S, with two disulfide bridges, binds to one of either Cu+ or Zn2+; and Cox173S–S, with three disulfide bridges, does not bind to any metal ions. The Em (midpoint redox potential) values for two redox couples of Cox17, Cox173S–S↔Cox172S–S (Em1) and Cox172S–S↔Cox170S–S (Em2), were determined to be −197 mV and −340 mV respectively. The data indicate that an equilibrium exists in the cytosol between Cox170S-S and Cox172S–S, which is slightly shifted towards Cox170S-S. In the IMS (mitochondrial intermembrane space), the equilibrium is shifted towards Cox172S–S, enabling retention of Cox172S–S in the IMS and leading to the formation of a biologically competent form of the Cox17 protein, Cox172S–S, capable of copper transfer to the copper chaperone Sco1. XAS (X-ray absorption spectroscopy) determined that Cu4Cox17 contains a Cu4S6-type copper–thiolate cluster, which may provide safe storage of an excess of copper ions. PMID:17672825

  10. Celastrol increases glucocerebrosidase activity in Gaucher disease by modulating molecular chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunzhang; Swallows, Cody L.; Zhang, Chao; Lu, Jie; Xiao, Hongbin; Brady, Roscoe O.; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by mutations in the glucosidase, beta, acid gene that encodes glucocerebrosidase (GCase). Glucosidase, beta, acid mutations often cause protein misfolding and quantitative loss of GCase. In the present study, we found that celastrol, an herb derivative with known anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activity, significantly increased the quantity and catalytic activity of GCase. Celastrol interfered with the establishment of the heat-shock protein 90/Hsp90 cochaperone Cdc37/Hsp90-Hsp70-organizing protein chaperone complex with mutant GCase and reduced heat-shock protein 90-associated protein degradation. In addition, celastrol modulated the expression of molecular chaperones. Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 and heat shock 70kDa proteins 1A and 1B were significantly increased by celastrol. Furthermore, BAG family molecular chaperone regulator 3 assisted protein folding and maturation of mutant GCase. These findings provide insight into a therapeutic strategy for Gaucher disease and other human disorders that are associated with protein misfolding. PMID:24351928

  11. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Marcianò, G; Huang, D T

    2016-02-01

    The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding. PMID:26841762

  12. [Effects of UV Radiation on the Physicochemical Properties and Coagulation Properties of Humic Acid Solution].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-dong; Zhang, Ke; Fan, Qing-hai; Zheng, Dan

    2016-03-15

    To investigate the mechanism of UV light in promoting the removal of humic acid ( HA) by coagulation, the variations of the physical and chemical properties of the HA solution before and after UV light radiation were investigated. The effects of the changes in water quality conditions on the removal performance of HA in coagulation were also observed. Experimental results showed that except zeta potential, pH, chromaticity and viscosity of the HA solution exhibited varying degrees of decline after UV radiation. Further study showed that the impact of changes in viscosity of the solution on humic acid coagulation performance was relatively small. Under acidic conditions, the coagulation performance of HA significantly increased. The increase of zeta potential led to easy gathering of colloidal particles and improved the coagulation performance. Furthermore, except for HA with relative molecular mass of between (10-30) x 10³ and less than 10³, there was little variation in the proportion of low molecular weight HA, which may be an important reason that the coagulation performance of the humic acid solution increased after UV radiation. PMID:27337892

  13. CSPα—chaperoning presynaptic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Donnelier, Julien; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic transmission relies on precisely regulated and exceedingly fast protein-protein interactions that involve voltage-gated channels, the exocytosis/endocytosis machinery as well as signaling pathways. Although we have gained an ever more detailed picture of synaptic architecture much remains to be learned about how synapses are maintained. Synaptic chaperones are “folding catalysts” that preserve proteostasis by regulating protein conformation (and therefore protein function) and prevent unwanted protein-protein interactions. Failure to maintain synapses is an early hallmark of several degenerative diseases. Cysteine string protein (CSPα) is a presynaptic vesicle protein and molecular chaperone that has a central role in preventing synaptic loss and neurodegeneration. Over the past few years, a number of different “client proteins” have been implicated as CSPα substrates including voltage-dependent ion channels, signaling proteins and proteins critical to the synaptic vesicle cycle. Here we review the ion channels and synaptic protein complexes under the influence of CSPα and discuss gaps in our current knowledge. PMID:24808827

  14. Acid-base properties of aqueous illite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.; Sun, Z.; Forsling, W.; Tang, H.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, the acid-base properties of illite/water suspensions are examined using the constant capacitance surface complexation model. On the basis of results of potentiometric titrations and solubility experiments, the authors conclude that the proton reactions in the supernatants of illite suspensions can be successfully represented by proton reactions of Al(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup 3+} and Si(OH){sub 4} in water solutions. For illustrating the acidic characteristics of aqueous illite surfaces, two surface protonation models are proposed: (1) one site-one pK{sub a} model, {triple_bond}SOH {r_reversible} {triple_bond}SO{sup {minus}} + H{sup +}, pK{sub a}{sup int} = 4.12-4.23; (2) two sites-two pK{sub a}s model, {triple_bond}S{sub 1}OH {r_reversible} {triple_bond}S{sup 1}O{sup {minus}} + H{sup +}, pK{sub a{sub I}} = 4.17-4.44, and {triple_bond}S{sub II}OH {r_reversible} {triple_bond}S{sub II}O{sup {minus}} + H{sup +}, pK{sub a{sub II}}{sup int} = 6.35-7.74. Evaluation of these two models indicates that both of them can give good descriptions of the experimental data of systems with different illite concentrations and ionic strengths and that the one site-one pK{sub a} model can be considered as a simplification of the two sites-two pK{sub a}s model. Since both models assume only deprotonation reactions at the illite surfaces, they suggest that the surface behavior of the illite is similar to that of amorphous SiO{sub 2}. Model assumptions, experimental procedures, and evaluative criteria are detailed in the paper.

  15. Biological Properties of Acidic Cosmetic Water from Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei-Ting; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Pan, Jian-Liang; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chen, Bing-Hung; Chen, Shi-Hui; Liu, Po-Len; Wang, Hui-Chun; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Hui-Min; Hsiao, Shu-Wen

    2012-01-01

    This current work was to investigate the biological effects of acidic cosmetic water (ACW) on various biological assays. ACW was isolated from seawater and demonstrated several bio-functions at various concentration ranges. ACW showed a satisfactory effect against Staphylococcus aureus, which reduced 90% of bacterial growth after a 5-second exposure. We used cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to test the properties of ACW in inflammatory cytokine release, and it did not induce inflammatory cytokine release from un-stimulated, normal PBMCs. However, ACW was able to inhibit bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine TNF-α released from PBMCs, showing an anti-inflammation potential. Furthermore, ACW did not stimulate the rat basophilic leukemia cell (RBL-2H3) related allergy response on de-granulation. Our data presented ACW with a strong anti-oxidative ability in a superoxide anion radical scavenging assay. In mass spectrometry information, magnesium and zinc ions demonstrated bio-functional detections for anti-inflammation as well as other metal ions such as potassium and calcium were observed. ACW also had minor tyrosinase and melanin decreasing activities in human epidermal melanocytes (HEMn-MP) without apparent cytotoxicity. In addition, the cell proliferation assay illustrated anti-growth and anti-migration effects of ACW on human skin melanoma cells (A375.S2) indicating that it exerted the anti-cancer potential against skin cancer. The results obtained from biological assays showed that ACW possessed multiple bioactivities, including anti-microorganism, anti-inflammation, allergy-free, antioxidant, anti-melanin and anticancer properties. To our knowledge, this was the first report presenting these bioactivities on ACW. PMID:22754342

  16. [Adsorption Properties of Fluorine onto Fulvic Acid-Bentonite Complex].

    PubMed

    Fang, Dun; Tian, Hua-jing; Ye, Xin; He, Ci-li; Dan, You-meng; Wei, Shi-yong

    2016-03-15

    Fulvic Acid-Bentonite (FA-BENT) complex was prepared using coprecipitation method, and basic properties of the complex and sorption properties of fluorine at different environmental conditions were studied. XRD results showed that the d₀₀₁ spacing of FA- BENT complex had no obvious change compared with the raw bentonite, although the diffraction peak intensity of smectite in FA-BENT complex reduced, and indicated that FA mainly existed as a coating on the external surface of bentonite. Some functional groups (such as C==O, −OH, etc. ) of FA were observed in FA-BENT FTIR spectra, thus suggesting ligand exchange-surface complexation between FA and bentonite. Higher initial pH values of the reaction system were in favor of the adsorption of fluorine onto FA-BENT, while the equilibrium capacity decreased with the increase of pH at initial pH ≥ 4.50. The adsorption of fluorine onto FA-BENT was also affected by ionic strength, and the main reason might be the "polarity" effect. The adsorption of fluorine onto FA-BENT followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model and was controlled by chemical process ( R² = 0.999 2). Compared with the Freundlich model, Langmuir model was apparently of a higher goodness of fit (R² > 0.994 9) for absorption of fluorine onto FA-BENT. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption process of fluorine was an spontaneously endothermic reaction, and was an entropy-driven process (ΔH 32.57 kJ · mol⁻¹, ΔS 112.31 J · (mol · K)⁻¹, ΔG −0.65- −1.76 kJ · mol⁻¹). PMID:27337896

  17. Properties of wheat gluten/poly(lactic acid) laminates.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Woo; Gällstedt, Mikael; Hedenqvist, Mikael S

    2010-06-23

    Laminates of compression-molded glycerol-plasticized wheat gluten (WG) films surrounded and supported by poly(lactic acid) (PLA) films have been produced and characterized. The objective was to obtain a fully renewable high gas barrier film with sufficient mechanical integrity to function in, for example, extrusion-coating paper/board applications. It was shown that the lamination made it possible to make films with a broad range of glycerol contents (0-30 wt %) with greater strength than single unsupported WG films. The low plasticizer contents yielded laminates with very good oxygen barrier properties. In addition, whereas the unsupported WG films had an immeasurably high water vapor transmission rate (WVTR), the laminate showed values that were finite and surprisingly, in several cases, also lower than that of PLA. Besides being a mechanical support (as evidenced by bending and tensile data) and a shield between the WG and surrounding moisture, the PLA layer also prevented the loss of the glycerol plasticizer from the WG layer. This was observed after the laminate had been aged on an "absorbing" blotting paper for up to 17 weeks. The interlayer adhesion (peel strength) decreased with decreasing glycerol content and increasing WG film molding temperature (130 degrees C instead of 110 degrees C). The latter effect was probably due to a higher protein aggregation, as revealed by infrared spectroscopy. The lamination temperature (110-140 degrees C) did not, however, have a major effect on the final peel strength. PMID:20504031

  18. Substrate and Substrate-Mimetic Chaperone Binding Sites in Human α-Galactosidase A Revealed by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moise, Adrian; Maeser, Stefan; Rawer, Stephan; Eggers, Frederike; Murphy, Mary; Bornheim, Jeff; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare metabolic disorder of a group of lysosomal storage diseases, caused by deficiency or reduced activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase. Human α-galactosidase A (hαGAL) hydrolyses the terminal α-galactosyl moiety from glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Enzyme deficiency leads to incomplete or blocked breakdown and progressive accumulation of Gb3, with detrimental effects on normal organ functions. FD is successfully treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with purified recombinant hαGAL. An emerging treatment strategy, pharmacologic chaperone therapy (PCT), employs small molecules that can increase and/or reconstitute the activity of lysosomal enzyme trafficking by stabilizing misfolded isoforms. One such chaperone, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin (DGJ), is a structural galactose analogue currently validated in clinical trials. DGJ is an active-site-chaperone that binds at the same or similar location as galactose; however, the molecular determination of chaperone binding sites in lysosomal enzymes represents a considerable challenge. Here we report the identification of the galactose and DGJ binding sites in recombinant α-galactosidase through a new affinity-mass spectrometry-based approach that employs selective proteolytic digestion of the enzyme-galactose or -inhibitor complex. Binding site peptides identified by mass spectrometry, [39-49], [83-100], and [141-168], contain the essential ligand-contacting amino acids, in agreement with the known X-ray crystal structures. The inhibitory effect of DGJ on galactose recognition was directly characterized through competitive binding experiments and mass spectrometry. The methods successfully employed in this study should have high potential for the characterization of (mutated) enzyme-substrate and -chaperone interactions, and for identifying chaperones without inhibitory effects.

  19. Substrate and Substrate-Mimetic Chaperone Binding Sites in Human α-Galactosidase A Revealed by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moise, Adrian; Maeser, Stefan; Rawer, Stephan; Eggers, Frederike; Murphy, Mary; Bornheim, Jeff; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare metabolic disorder of a group of lysosomal storage diseases, caused by deficiency or reduced activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase. Human α-galactosidase A (hαGAL) hydrolyses the terminal α-galactosyl moiety from glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Enzyme deficiency leads to incomplete or blocked breakdown and progressive accumulation of Gb3, with detrimental effects on normal organ functions. FD is successfully treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with purified recombinant hαGAL. An emerging treatment strategy, pharmacologic chaperone therapy (PCT), employs small molecules that can increase and/or reconstitute the activity of lysosomal enzyme trafficking by stabilizing misfolded isoforms. One such chaperone, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin (DGJ), is a structural galactose analogue currently validated in clinical trials. DGJ is an active-site-chaperone that binds at the same or similar location as galactose; however, the molecular determination of chaperone binding sites in lysosomal enzymes represents a considerable challenge. Here we report the identification of the galactose and DGJ binding sites in recombinant α-galactosidase through a new affinity-mass spectrometry-based approach that employs selective proteolytic digestion of the enzyme-galactose or -inhibitor complex. Binding site peptides identified by mass spectrometry, [39-49], [83-100], and [141-168], contain the essential ligand-contacting amino acids, in agreement with the known X-ray crystal structures. The inhibitory effect of DGJ on galactose recognition was directly characterized through competitive binding experiments and mass spectrometry. The methods successfully employed in this study should have high potential for the characterization of (mutated) enzyme-substrate and -chaperone interactions, and for identifying chaperones without inhibitory effects. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27112153

  20. Substrate and Substrate-Mimetic Chaperone Binding Sites in Human α-Galactosidase A Revealed by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moise, Adrian; Maeser, Stefan; Rawer, Stephan; Eggers, Frederike; Murphy, Mary; Bornheim, Jeff; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare metabolic disorder of a group of lysosomal storage diseases, caused by deficiency or reduced activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase. Human α-galactosidase A (hαGAL) hydrolyses the terminal α-galactosyl moiety from glycosphingolipids, predominantly globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). Enzyme deficiency leads to incomplete or blocked breakdown and progressive accumulation of Gb3, with detrimental effects on normal organ functions. FD is successfully treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with purified recombinant hαGAL. An emerging treatment strategy, pharmacologic chaperone therapy (PCT), employs small molecules that can increase and/or reconstitute the activity of lysosomal enzyme trafficking by stabilizing misfolded isoforms. One such chaperone, 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin (DGJ), is a structural galactose analogue currently validated in clinical trials. DGJ is an active-site-chaperone that binds at the same or similar location as galactose; however, the molecular determination of chaperone binding sites in lysosomal enzymes represents a considerable challenge. Here we report the identification of the galactose and DGJ binding sites in recombinant α-galactosidase through a new affinity-mass spectrometry-based approach that employs selective proteolytic digestion of the enzyme-galactose or -inhibitor complex. Binding site peptides identified by mass spectrometry, [39-49], [83-100], and [141-168], contain the essential ligand-contacting amino acids, in agreement with the known X-ray crystal structures. The inhibitory effect of DGJ on galactose recognition was directly characterized through competitive binding experiments and mass spectrometry. The methods successfully employed in this study should have high potential for the characterization of (mutated) enzyme-substrate and -chaperone interactions, and for identifying chaperones without inhibitory effects.

  1. Chemical and structural properties of sweet potato starch treated with organic and inorganic acid.

    PubMed

    Babu, A Surendra; Parimalavalli, R; Jagannadham, K; Rao, J Sudhakara

    2015-09-01

    In the present study sweet potato starch was treated with hydrochloric acid or citric acid at 1 or 5 % concentration and its properties were investigated. Citric acid treatment resulted higher starch yield. Water holding capacity and water absorption index was increased with increased acid concentration. Emulsion properties improved at 5 % acid concentration. The DE value of acid-thinned sweet potato starches was ranged between 1.93 and 3.76 %. Hydrochloric acid treated starches displayed a higher fraction of amylose. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study revealed that all the starches displayed C-type crystalline pattern with varied crystallinity. FT-IR spectra perceived a slight change in percentage intensity of C-H stretch of citric acid modified starches. Starch granules tended to appear less smooth than the native starch granules after acid treatment in Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM) with granule size ranging between 8.00 and 8.90 μm. A drastic decrease in the pasting profile was noticed in hydrochloric acid (5 %) treated starch. While 5 % citric acid treated starch exhibited higher pasting profile. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) showed that peak and conclusion gelatinisation temperatures increased with increase in hydrochloric acid or citric acid concentration. Hence citric acid was found to mimic the hydrochloric acid with some variation which suggests that it may have promising scope in acid modification. PMID:26344988

  2. Promiscuous Substrate Recognition in Folding and Assembly Activities of the Trigger Factor Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Hackert, E.; Hendrickson, W

    2009-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is a molecular chaperone that binds to bacterial ribosomes where it contacts emerging nascent chains, but TF is also abundant free in the cytosol where its activity is less well characterized. In vitro studies show that TF promotes protein refolding. We find here that ribosome-free TF stably associates with and rescues from misfolding a large repertoire of full-length proteins. We identify over 170 members of this cytosolic Escherichia coli TF substrate proteome, including ribosomal protein S7. We analyzed the biochemical properties of a TF:S7 complex from Thermotoga maritima and determined its crystal structure. Thereby, we obtained an atomic-level picture of a promiscuous chaperone in complex with a physiological substrate protein. The structure of the complex reveals the molecular basis of substrate recognition by TF, indicates how TF could accelerate protein folding, and suggests a role for TF in the biogenesis of protein complexes.

  3. Expression and variability of molecular chaperones in the sugarcane expressome.

    PubMed

    Borges, Júlio C; Cagliari, Thiago C; Ramos, Carlos H I

    2007-04-01

    Molecular chaperones perform folding assistance in newly synthesized polypeptides preventing aggregation processes, recovering proteins from aggregates, among other important cellular functions. Thus their study presents great biotechnological importance. The present work discusses the mining for chaperone-related sequences within the sugarcane EST genome project database, which resulted in approximately 300 different sequences. Since molecular chaperones are highly conserved in most organisms studied so far, the number of sequences related to these proteins in sugarcane was very similar to the number found in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. The Hsp70 family was the main molecular chaperone system present in the sugarcane expressome. However, many other relevant molecular chaperones systems were also present. A digital RNA blot analysis showed that 5'ESTs from all molecular chaperones were found in every sugarcane library, despite their heterogeneous expression profiles. The results presented here suggest the importance of molecular chaperones to polypeptide metabolism in sugarcane cells, based on their abundance and variability. Finally, these data have being used to guide more in deep analysis, permitting the choice of specific targets to study. PMID:16687190

  4. Improving the cold flow properties of biodiesel by skeletal isomerization of fatty acid chains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is defined as the mono-alkyl fatty acid esters made from vegetable oil or animal fat lipids. Despite its many advantages, biodiesel from most lipid feedstocks has generally poor cold flow properties. The present study evaluates the fuel related properties of branched-chain fatty acid methy...

  5. Investigation of the extraction properties of dibutyl ester of dibutoxymethane phosphonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, E.; Hala, J.

    1983-01-01

    The extraction properties of the dibutyl ester of dibutoxymethane phosphonic acid (DBDBMP), an analog of TBP with a P-C bond, were shown to be similar to those of TBP except for hydrolysis of DBDBMP in acidic solutions. The formation of acidic organophosphorus compounds during hydrolysis of DBDBMP was confirmed by /sup 31/P-N.M.R. measurements. 4 figures, 1 table.

  6. Effect of oleic acid on the allergenic properties of peanut and cashew allergens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleic acid is the major fatty acid in peanuts and cashews. There is limited information about its effect on peanut and cashew allergens during heating. The objective was to determine if heat treatment with oleic acid changes the allergenic properties of these nut proteins. Peanut and cashew protein...

  7. Thermophysical properties of starch and whey protein composite prepared in presence of organic acid and esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, we prepared starch and protein composite by reactive mixing in presence of various organic acids and found that use of these acid esters resulted in composites with good mechanical properties. In this study, concentration (% w/w) of acid citrates in the starch-protein composites were var...

  8. Properties and biosynthesis of cyclopropane fatty acids in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cronan, J E; Reed, R; Taylor, F R; Jackson, M B

    1979-01-01

    The lipid phase transition of Escherichia coli phospholipids containing cyclopropane fatty acids was compared with the otherwise homologous phospholipids lacking cyclopropane fatty acids. The phase transitions (determined by scanning calorimetry) of the two preparations were essentially identical. Infection of E. coli with phage T3 inhibited cyclopropane fatty acid formation over 98%, whereas infection with mutants which lack the phage coded S-adenosylmethionine cleavage enzyme had no effect on cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis. These data indicate that S-adenosylmethionine is the methylene in cyclopropane fatty acid synthesis. PMID:374358

  9. Ion-exchange properties of strontium hydroxyapatite under acidic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Nishioka, Hitoshi; Moriga, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Hiromu; Moffat, J.B.

    1998-09-01

    The ion exchange of strontium hydroxyapatite (SrHAp) with Pb{sup 2+} has been investigated under acidic conditions at 293 K. The addition of various acids to the exchanging solution enhanced the exchange capacity in the order HCl > HBr > HF > HNO{sub 3} > no acid, corresponding to the formation of halogen apatites with the former three acids or hydrogen phosphate with HNO{sub 3}. Since the ion-exchange capacity of SrHAp under nonacidic conditions is higher than that of chlorapatite, the aforementioned observations can be attributed to the participation of the protons introduced by the acids.z

  10. Maintenance of structure and function of mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperones requires the chaperone Hep1

    PubMed Central

    Sichting, Martin; Mokranjac, Dejana; Azem, Abdussalam; Neupert, Walter; Hell, Kai

    2005-01-01

    Hsp70 chaperones mediate folding of proteins and prevent their misfolding and aggregation. We report here on a new kind of Hsp70 interacting protein in mitochondria, Hep1. Hep1 is a highly conserved protein present in virtually all eukaryotes. Deletion of HEP1 results in a severe growth defect. Cells lacking Hep1 are deficient in processes that need the function of mitochondrial Hsp70s, such as preprotein import and biogenesis of proteins containing FeS clusters. In the mitochondria of these cells, Hsp70s, Ssc1 and Ssq1 accumulate as insoluble aggregates. We show that it is the nucleotide-free form of mtHsp70 that has a high tendency to self-aggregate. This process is efficiently counteracted by Hep1. We conclude that Hep1 acts as a chaperone that is necessary and sufficient to prevent self-aggregation and to thereby maintain the function of the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperones. PMID:15719019

  11. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory properties of some benzoic acid derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Melike; Kiliç, Deryanur; Ünver, Yaǧmur; Şentürk, Murat; Askin, Hakan; Küfrevioǧlu, Ömer Irfan

    2016-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) hydrolyses the neurotransmitter acetylcholine to acetic acid and choline. AChE inhibitors are used in treatment of several neurodegeneartive disorder and Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, inhibition of AChE with some benzoic acid derivatives were investigated. 3-Chloro-benzoic acid (1), 2-hydroxy-5-sulfobenzoic acid (2), 2-(sulfooxy) benzoic acid (3), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (4), 2,3-dimethoxybenzoic (5), and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic (6) were calculated IC50 values AChE enzyme. Kinetic investigations showed that similarly to AChE inhibitors. Benzoic acid derivatives (1-6) investigated are encouraging agents which may be used as lead molecules in order to derivative novel AChE inhibitors that might be useful in medical applications.

  12. Stress chaperone mortalin regulates human melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Renu; Priyandoko, Didik; Gao, Ran; Widodo, Nashi; Nigam, Nupur; Li, Ling; Ahn, Hyo Min; Yun, Chae-Ok; Ando, Nobuhiro; Mahe, Christian; Kaul, Sunil C

    2016-07-01

    In order to identify the cellular factors involved in human melanogenesis, we carried out shRNA-mediated loss-of-function screening in conjunction with induction of melanogenesis by 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol (OAG) in human melanoma cells using biochemical and visual assays. Gene targets of the shRNAs (that caused loss of OAG-induced melanogenesis) and their pathways, as determined by bioinformatics, revealed involvement of proteins that regulate cell stress response, mitochondrial functions, proliferation, and apoptosis. We demonstrate, for the first time, that the mitochondrial stress chaperone mortalin is crucial for melanogenesis. Upregulation of mortalin was closely associated with melanogenesis in in vitro cell-based assays and clinical samples of keloids with hyperpigmentation. Furthermore, its knockdown resulted in compromised melanogenesis. The data proposed mortalin as an important protein that may be targeted to manipulate pigmentation for cosmetic and related disease therapeutics. PMID:27056733

  13. Physical properties of ceramides: effect of fatty acid hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Shah, J; Atienza, J M; Rawlings, A V; Shipley, G G

    1995-09-01

    The structural and thermotropic properties of alpha-hydroxy fatty acid (HFA) and non-hydroxy fatty acid (NFA) ceramides (CER) have been studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction techniques. The DSC of anhydrous HFA-CER shows a single, sharp reversible transition at 95.6 degrees C (delta H = 15.3 kcal/mol). At intermediate hydrations HFA-CER exhibited more complex behavior but at maximum hydration only a single reversible transition is observed at 80.0 degrees C (delta H = 8.5 kcal/mol). X-ray diffraction of hydrated (74% water) HFA-CER at 20 degrees C shows a lamellar structure with a bilayer periodicity d = 60.7 Angstrum; a single wide angle reflection at 4.2 Angstrum is characteristic of hexagonal chain packing. Above the main transition temperature at 91 degrees C, a hexagonal (HII) phase is observed. In contrast, DSC of anhydrous NFA-CER demonstrates two thermal transitions at 81.3 degrees C (delta H = 6.8 kcal/mol) and 85.9 degrees C (delta H = 3.5 kcal/mol). With increasing hydration, both transitions shift towards lower temperatures; at maximum hydration, on heating, the endothermic transitions occur at 72.7 degrees C (delta H = 9.8 kcal/mol) and 81.1 degrees C (delta H = 4.0 kcal/mol). On cooling, there is hysteresis of both transitions. X-ray diffraction of NFA-CER (80% water) at 20 degrees C shows a well-ordered lamellar structure with a bilayer periodicity d = 58.6 Angstrum and three wide-angle reflections at 4.6 Angstrum, 4.2 Angstrum, and 3.8 Angstrum. At 77 degrees C (between the two transitions), again a lamellar structure exists with reduced bilayer periodicity d = 53.1 Angstrum and four wide-angle reflections at 4.6 Angstrum, 4.2 Angstrum, and 3.8 Angstrum are observed. Above the second transition, only a single low angle reflection at 30.0 Angstrum is observed; a diffuse reflection at 4.6 Angstrum is indicative of a melted chain phase. Thus, HFA-CER exhibits a simple phase behavior involving the reversible

  14. Pharmacological Chaperone Therapy: Preclinical Development, Clinical Translation, and Prospects for the Treatment of Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Giancarlo; Andria, Generoso; Valenzano, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of inborn metabolic diseases caused by mutations in genes that encode proteins involved in different lysosomal functions, in most instances acidic hydrolases. Different therapeutic approaches have been developed to treat these disorders. Pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT) is an emerging approach based on small-molecule ligands that selectively bind and stabilize mutant enzymes, increase their cellular levels, and improve lysosomal trafficking and activity. Compared to other approaches, PCT shows advantages, particularly in terms of oral administration, broad biodistribution, and positive impact on patients' quality of life. After preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies, PCT is now being translated in the first clinical trials, either as monotherapy or in combination with enzyme replacement therapy, for some of the most prevalent LSDs. For some LSDs, the results of the first clinical trials are encouraging and warrant further development. Future research in the field of PCT will be directed toward the identification of novel chaperones, including new allosteric drugs, and the exploitation of synergies between chaperone treatment and other therapeutic approaches. PMID:25881001

  15. Activation of RidA chaperone function by N-chlorination

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Alexandra; Langklotz, Sina; Lupilova, Nataliya; Kuhlmann, Katja; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth; Leichert, Lars Ingo Ole

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli RidA is a member of a structurally conserved, yet functionally highly diverse protein family involved in translation inhibition (human), Hsp90-like chaperone activity (fruit fly) and enamine/imine deamination (Salmonella enterica). Here, we show that E. coli RidA modified with HOCl acts as a highly effective chaperone. Although activation of RidA is reversed by treatment with DTT, ascorbic acid, the thioredoxin system and glutathione, it is independent of cysteine modification. Instead, treatment with HOCl or chloramines decreases the amino group content of RidA by reversibly N-chlorinating positively charged residues. N-chlorination increases hydrophobicity of RidA and promotes binding to a wide spectrum of unfolded cytosolic proteins. Deletion of ridA results in an HOCl-sensitive phenotype. HOCl-mediated N-chlorination thus is a cysteine-independent post-translational modification that reversibly turns RidA into an effective chaperone holdase, which plays a crucial role in the protection of cytosolic proteins during oxidative stress. PMID:25517874

  16. The p23 co-chaperone protein is a novel substrate of CK2 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tosoni, Kendra; Costa, Alex; Sarno, Stefania; D'Alessandro, Stefano; Sparla, Francesca; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Zottini, Michela; Ruzzene, Maria

    2011-10-01

    The ubiquitous Ser/Thr protein kinase CK2, which phosphorylates hundreds of substrates and is essential for cell life, plays important roles also in plants; however, only few plant substrates have been identified so far. During a study aimed at identifying proteins targeted by CK2 in plant response to salicylic acid (SA), we found that the Arabidopsis co-chaperone protein p23 is a CK2 target, readily phosphorylated in vitro by human and maize CK2, being also a substrate for an endogenous casein kinase activity present in Arabidopsis extracts, which displays distinctive characteristics of protein kinase CK2. We also demonstrated that p23 and the catalytic subunit of CK2 interact in vitro and possibly in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts, where they colocalize in the cytosol and in the nucleus. Although its exact function is presently unknown, p23 is considered a co-chaperone because of its ability to associate to the chaperone protein Hsp90; therefore, an involvement of p23 in plant signal transduction pathways, such as SA signaling, is highly conceivable, and its phosphorylation may represent a fine mechanism for the regulation of cellular responses. PMID:21735091

  17. THE AMPHOTERIC PROPERTIES OF SOME AMINO-ACIDS AND PEPTIDES.

    PubMed

    Eckweiler, H; Noyes, H M; Falk, K G

    1921-01-20

    The titration curves of solutions of glycine, alanine, alpha-ammo-butyric acid, leucine, glycyl-glycine, alanyl-glycine, alanyl-alanine, acetone, acetamide, urea, acetic acid, and aceturic acid were determined and some of the relations as dependent upon the chemical structures discussed. The isoelectric points of some of the amphoteric electrolytes were found experimentally. The definition of isoelectric point, its theoretical significance, and method of calculation were considered in some detail. PMID:19871865

  18. Acoustic properties of organic acid mixtures in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macavei, I.; Petrisor, V.; Auslaender, D.

    1974-01-01

    The variation of the rate of propagation of ultrasounds in organic acid mixtures in water points to structural changes caused by interactions that take place under conditions of thermal agitation, at different acid concentrations. At the same time, a difference is found in the changes in velocity as a function of the length of the carbon chain of the acids in the mixture as a result of their effect on the groups of water molecules associated by hydrogen bonds.

  19. An Effective Acid Combination for Enhanced Properties and Corrosion Control of Acidizing Sandstone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham

    2016-03-01

    To fulfill the demand of the world energy, more technologies to enhance the recovery of oil production are being developed. Sandstone acidizing has been introduced and it acts as one of the important means to increase oil and gas production. Sandstone acidizing operation generally uses acids, which create or enlarge the flow channels of formation around the wellbore. In sandstone matrix acidizing, acids are injected into the formation at a pressure below the formation fracturing pressure, in which the injected acids react with mineral particles that may restrict the flow of hydrocarbons. Most common combination is Hydrofluoric Acid - Hydrochloric with concentration (3% HF - 12% HCl) known as mud acid. But there are some problems associated with the use of mud acid i.e., corrosion, precipitation. In this paper several new combinations of acids were experimentally screened to identify the most effective combination. The combinations used consist of fluoboric, phosphoric, formic and hydrofluoric acids. Cores were allowed to react with these combinations and results are compared with the mud acid. The parameters, which are analyzed, are Improved Permeability Ratio, strength and mineralogy. The analysis showed that the new acid combination has the potential to be used in sandstone acidizing.

  20. The RNA-Binding Chaperone Hfq Is an Important Global Regulator of Gene Expression in Pasteurella multocida and Plays a Crucial Role in Production of a Number of Virulence Factors, Including Hyaluronic Acid Capsule.

    PubMed

    Mégroz, Marianne; Kleifeld, Oded; Wright, Amy; Powell, David; Harrison, Paul; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D

    2016-05-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of a number of economically important animal diseases, including avian fowl cholera. Numerous P. multocida virulence factors have been identified, including capsule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and filamentous hemagglutinin, but little is known about how the expression of these virulence factors is regulated. Hfq is an RNA-binding protein that facilitates riboregulation via interaction with small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules and their mRNA targets. Here, we show that a P. multocida hfq mutant produces significantly less hyaluronic acid capsule during all growth phases and displays reduced in vivo fitness. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during mid-exponential-phase growth revealed altered transcript levels for 128 genes and altered protein levels for 78 proteins. Further proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during the early exponential growth phase identified 106 proteins that were produced at altered levels. Both the transcript and protein levels for genes/proteins involved in capsule biosynthesis were reduced in the hfq mutant, as were the levels of the filamentous hemagglutinin protein PfhB2 and its secretion partner LspB2. In contrast, there were increased expression levels of three LPS biosynthesis genes, encoding proteins involved in phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine addition to LPS, suggesting that these genes are negatively regulated by Hfq-dependent mechanisms. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that Hfq plays a crucial role in regulating the global expression of P. multocida genes, including the regulation of key P. multocida virulence factors, capsule, LPS, and filamentous hemagglutinin. PMID:26883595

  1. Mechanism of Amyloidogenesis of a Bacterial AAA+ Chaperone.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sze Wah Samuel; Yau, Jason; Ing, Christopher; Liu, Kaiyin; Farber, Patrick; Won, Amy; Bhandari, Vaibhav; Kara-Yacoubian, Nareg; Seraphim, Thiago V; Chakrabarti, Nilmadhab; Kay, Lewis E; Yip, Christopher M; Pomès, Régis; Sharpe, Simon; Houry, Walid A

    2016-07-01

    Amyloids are fibrillar protein superstructures that are commonly associated with diseases in humans and with physiological functions in various organisms. The precise mechanisms of amyloid formation remain to be elucidated. Surprisingly, we discovered that a bacterial Escherichia coli chaperone-like ATPase, regulatory ATPase variant A (RavA), and specifically the LARA domain in RavA, forms amyloids under acidic conditions at elevated temperatures. RavA is involved in modulating the proper assembly of membrane respiratory complexes. LARA contains an N-terminal loop region followed by a β-sandwich-like folded core. Several approaches, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations, were used to determine the mechanism by which LARA switches to an amyloid state. These studies revealed that the folded core of LARA is amyloidogenic and is protected by its N-terminal loop. At low pH and high temperatures, the interaction of the N-terminal loop with the folded core is disrupted, leading to amyloid formation. PMID:27265850

  2. Bacterial Discrimination by FISH using Molecular Chaperon GroE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Maruyama, A.; Kurusu, Y.

    2004-12-01

    FISH(Fluorescence In Situ hybridization) is a powerful method for the analysis of the phylogenetic classification of microorganism in the environment. In many cases, 16s rRNA sequences of microorganisms are employed as target probe. Here we showed that novel probe was used in FISH in order to discriminate among the bacteria including psychrophile, mesophile, and thermophile. Molecular Chaperon GroE is a best characterized protein based on Escherichia coli and essential for bacterial proliferation. In E. coli, the amount of GroEL protein per cell reaches to about 5% of total cellualr protein at heat-shock response. This response occurred at transcription levels, the amount of groEL mRNA increases at about 10-fold per cell, reaches to 0.4% of total synthesized RNA. Therefore, we considered that groEL gene was employed FISH analysis as a target probe. Moreover, we found that Gly-Gly-Met (GGM) repeats in the carboxy-terminal of GroEL strongly conserved among psychrophile and mesophile, but not thermophile. In this report, we attempted to discriminate among the bacteria including psychrophile, mesophile, and thermophile by FISH using the specific sequence of GroEL as a probe. Furthermore, we proposed the novel phylogenetic trees based on the amino acids sequences of carboxy-terminal of GroEL for bacterial evolution by temperature adaptation.

  3. Influence of acid precursors on physicochemical properties of nanosized titania synthesized by thermal-hydrolysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, B.; Sasirekha, N.R.; Chen, Y.-W.

    2008-03-04

    The influence of nature and concentration of acid species on surface morphology and physicochemical properties of titania particles synthesized by direct thermal hydrolysis of titanium tetrachloride was investigated. The acids used were hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and perchloric acid with a concentration of 3 M. Thermal hydrolysis of titanium tetrachloride in hydrochloric acid and perchloric acid with molar ratios of [H{sup +}]/[Ti{sup 4+}] = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0, respectively, was used to study the effect of acid concentration. The synthesized materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and thermogravimetric analysis. Characterization of the samples by X-ray diffraction studies revealed the influence of acid species on the phase transformation of titania. Samples prepared by hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, and perchloric acid formed rutile phase with rhombus primary particles, while sulfuric acid resulted in anatase phase with flake-shaped primary particles. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering results confirmed the nanosized titania particles and the agglomeration of primary particles to form secondary particles in spherical shape. The particle size of titania prepared using perchloric acid was smaller than those prepared with other acid sources. A direct correlation between [H{sup +}]/[Ti{sup 4+}] ratio and particle size of titania was observed.

  4. Surface-active properties of humic and sulfochlorohumic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, I.N.; Mustafina, G.A.; Akkulova, Z.G.; Satymbaeva, A.S.

    2009-10-15

    The surface tension of alkaline solutions of humic acids and their sulfochloroderivatives, which are synthesized by sulfonation of chlorohumic acids isolated from coal chlorinated by the electrochemical method, is investigated. It is established that humic compounds possess weak surface activity. Basic adsorption parameters are calculated.

  5. Enhanced functional properties of tannic acid after thermal hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal hydrolysis processing of fresh tannic acid was carried out in a closed reactor at four different temperatures (65, 100, 150 and 200°C). Pressures reached in the system were 1.3 and 4.8 MPa at 150 and 200°C, respectively. Hydrolysis products (gallic acid and pyrogallol) were separated and qua...

  6. The neural chaperone proSAAS blocks α-synuclein fibrillation and neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jarvela, Timothy S; Lam, Hoa A; Helwig, Michael; Lorenzen, Nikolai; Otzen, Daniel E; McLean, Pamela J; Maidment, Nigel T; Lindberg, Iris

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that chaperone proteins are cytoprotective in neurodegenerative proteinopathies involving protein aggregation; for example, in the accumulation of aggregated α-synuclein into the Lewy bodies present in Parkinson's disease. Of the various chaperones known to be associated with neurodegenerative disease, the small secretory chaperone known as proSAAS (named after four residues in the amino terminal region) has many attractive properties. We show here that proSAAS, widely expressed in neurons throughout the brain, is associated with aggregated synuclein deposits in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease. Recombinant proSAAS potently inhibits the fibrillation of α-synuclein in an in vitro assay; residues 158-180, containing a largely conserved element, are critical to this bioactivity. ProSAAS also exhibits a neuroprotective function; proSAAS-encoding lentivirus blocks α-synuclein-induced cytotoxicity in primary cultures of nigral dopaminergic neurons, and recombinant proSAAS blocks α-synuclein-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Four independent proteomics studies have previously identified proSAAS as a potential cerebrospinal fluid biomarker in various neurodegenerative diseases. Coupled with prior work showing that proSAAS blocks β-amyloid aggregation into fibrils, this study supports the idea that neuronal proSAAS plays an important role in proteostatic processes. ProSAAS thus represents a possible therapeutic target in neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27457957

  7. Characterization of RNA binding and chaperoning activities of HIV-1 Vif protein

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Dona; Bernacchi, Serena; Xavier Guerrero, Santiago; Brachet, Franck; Larue, Valéry; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Tisné, Carine

    2014-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells, containing the cellular anti-HIV defense cytosine deaminases APOBEC3 (A3G and A3F). Vif neutralizes the antiviral activities of the APOBEC3G/F by diverse mechanisms including their degradation through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and their translational inhibition. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by interacting with Pr55Gag, reverse transcriptase and genomic RNA. Here, we expressed and purified full-length and truncated Vif proteins, and analyzed their RNA binding and chaperone properties. First, we showed by CD and NMR spectroscopies that the N-terminal domain of Vif is highly structured in solution, whereas the C-terminal domain remains mainly unfolded. Both domains exhibited substantial RNA binding capacities with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range, whereas the basic unfolded C-terminal domain of Vif was responsible in part for its RNA chaperone activity. Second, we showed by NMR chemical shift mapping that Vif and NCp7 share the same binding sites on tRNALys3, the primer of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Finally, our results indicate that Vif has potent RNA chaperone activity and provide direct evidence for an important role of the unstructured C-terminal domain of Vif in this capacity. PMID:25144404

  8. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid sources and evaluation of their nutritional and functional properties

    PubMed Central

    Abedi, Elahe; Sahari, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have clearly shown the importance of polyunsaturated fatty acids (as essential fatty acids) and their nutritional value for human health. In this review, various sources, nutritional properties, and metabolism routes of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) are introduced. Since the conversion efficiency of linoleic acid (LA) to arachidonic acid (AA) and also α-linolenic acid (ALA) to docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosatetraenoic acid (EPA) is low in humans, looking for the numerous sources of AA, EPA and EPA fatty acids. The sources include aquatic (fish, crustaceans, and mollusks), animal sources (meat, egg, and milk), plant sources including 20 plants, most of which were weeds having a good amount of LC-PUFA, fruits, herbs, and seeds; cyanobacteria; and microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, microalgae, and diatoms). PMID:25473503

  9. Properties of Copolymers of Aspartic Acid and Aliphatic Dicarboxylic Acids Prepared by Reactive Extrusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartic acid may be prepared chemically or by the fermentation of carbohydrates. Currently, low molecular weight polyaspartic acids are prepared commercially by heating aspartic acid at high temperatures (greater than 220 degrees C) for several hours in the solid state. In an effort to develop a ...

  10. Antimicrobial Property of Lauric Acid Against Propionibacterium acnes: Its Therapeutic Potential for Inflammatory Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Kao, Mandy C.; Fang, Jia-You; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Zhang, Liangfang; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2009-01-01

    The strong bactericidal properties of lauric acid (C12:0), a middle chain-free fatty acid commonly found in natural products, have been shown in a number of studies. However, it has not been demonstrated whether lauric acid can be used for acne treatment as a natural antibiotic against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), which promotes follicular inflammation (inflammatory acne). This study evaluated the antimicrobial property of lauric acid against P. acnes both in vitro and in vivo. Incubation of the skin bacteria P. acnes, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) with lauric acid yielded minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values against the bacterial growth over 15 times lower than those of benzoyl peroxide (BPO). The lower MIC values of lauric acid indicate stronger antimicrobial properties than that of BPO. The detected values of half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of lauric acid on P. acnes, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis growth indicate that P. acnes is the most sensitive to lauric acid among these bacteria. In addition, lauric acid did not induce cytotoxicity to human sebocytes. Notably, both intradermal injection and epicutaneous application of lauric acid effectively decreased the number of P. acnes colonized with mouse ears, thereby relieving P. acnes-induced ear swelling and granulomatous inflammation. The obtained data highlight the potential of using lauric acid as an alternative treatment for antibiotic therapy of acne vulgaris. PMID:19387482

  11. Withaferin A Analogs That Target the AAA+ Chaperone p97.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shasha; Tillotson, Joseph; Wijeratne, E M Kithsiri; Xu, Ya-ming; Kang, MinJin; Wu, Tongde; Lau, Eric C; Mesa, Celestina; Mason, Damian J; Brown, Robert V; La Clair, James J; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie; Zhang, Donna D; Chapman, Eli

    2015-08-21

    Understanding the mode of action (MOA) of many natural products can be puzzling with mechanistic clues that seem to lack a common thread. One such puzzle lies in the evaluation of the antitumor properties of the natural product withaferin A (WFA). A variety of seemingly unrelated pathways have been identified to explain its activity, suggesting a lack of selectivity. We now show that WFA acts as an inhibitor of the chaperone, p97, both in vitro and in cell models in addition to inhibiting the proteasome in vitro. Through medicinal chemistry, we have refined the activity of WFA toward p97 and away from the proteasome. Subsequent studies indicated that these WFA analogs retained p97 activity and cytostatic activity in cell models, suggesting that the modes of action reported for WFA could be connected by proteostasis modulation. Through this endeavor, we highlight how the parallel integration of medicinal chemistry with chemical biology offers a potent solution to one of natures' intriguing molecular puzzles. PMID:26006219

  12. Molecular chaperones and heat shock proteins in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingbo; Metzler, Bernhard; Jahangiri, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    In response to stress stimuli, mammalian cells activate an ancient signaling pathway leading to the transient expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs are a family of proteins serving as molecular chaperones that prevent the formation of nonspecific protein aggregates and assist proteins in the acquisition of their native structures. Physiologically, HSPs play a protective role in the homeostasis of the vessel wall but have an impact on immunoinflammatory processes in pathological conditions involved in the development of atherosclerosis. For instance, some members of HSPs have been shown to have immunoregulatory properties and modification of innate and adaptive response to HSPs, and can protect the vessel wall from the disease. On the other hand, a high degree of sequence homology between microbial and mammalian HSPs, due to evolutionary conservation, carries a risk of misdirected autoimmunity against HSPs expressed on the stressed cells of vascular endothelium. Furthermore, HSPs and anti-HSP antibodies have been shown to elicit production of proinflammatory cytokines. Potential therapeutic use of HSP in prevention of atherosclerosis involves achieving optimal balance between protective and immunogenic effects of HSPs and in the progress of research on vaccination. In this review, we update the progress of studies on HSPs and the integrity of the vessel wall, discuss the mechanism by which HSPs exert their role in the disease development, and highlight the potential clinic translation in the research field. PMID:22058161

  13. Aqueous Phase Photo-Oxidation of Succinic Acid: Changes in Hygroscopic Properties and Reaction Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, P. K.; Ninokawa, A.; Hofstra, J.; de Lijser, P.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have been identified as important factors in understanding climate change. The extent to which aerosols affect climate is determined, in part, by hygroscopic properties which can change as a result of atmospheric processing. Dicarboxylic acids, components of atmospheric aerosol, have a wide range of hygroscopic properties and can undergo oxidation and photolysis reactions in the atmosphere. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of succinic acid aerosol, a non-hygroscopic four carbon dicarboxylic acid, were measured with a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and compared to reaction products resulting from the aqueous phase photo-oxidation reaction of hydrogen peroxide and succinic acid. Reaction products were determined and quantified using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a function of hydrogen peroxide:succinic acid concentration ratio and photolysis time. Although reaction products include larger non-hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. adipic acid) and smaller hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. malonic and oxalic acids), comparison of hygroscopic growth curves to Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) predictions suggests that the hygroscopic properties of many of the product mixtures are largely independent of the hygroscopicity of the individual components. This study provides a framework for future investigations to fully understand and predict the role of chemical reactions in altering atmospheric conditions that affect climate.

  14. Chemical Chaperones Reduce ER Stress and Restore Glucose Homeostasis in a Mouse Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Umut; Yilmaz, Erkan; Özcan, Lale; Furuhashi, Masato; Vaillancourt, Eric; Smith, Ross O.; Görgün, Cem Z.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2006-08-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key link between obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Here, we provide evidence that this mechanistic link can be exploited for therapeutic purposes with orally active chemical chaperones. 4-Phenyl butyric acid and taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid alleviated ER stress in cells and whole animals. Treatment of obese and diabetic mice with these compounds resulted in normalization of hyperglycemia, restoration of systemic insulin sensitivity, resolution of fatty liver disease, and enhancement of insulin action in liver, muscle, and adipose tissues. Our results demonstrate that chemical chaperones enhance the adaptive capacity of the ER and act as potent antidiabetic modalities with potential application in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  15. Chemical Chaperones Reduce ER Stress and Restore Glucose Homeostasis in a Mouse Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Umut; Yilmaz, Erkan; Özcan, Lale; Furuhashi, Masato; Vaillancourt, Eric; Smith, Ross O.; Görgün, Cem Z.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key link between obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Here, we provide evidence that this mechanistic link can be exploited for therapeutic purposes with orally active chemical chaperones. 4-Phenyl butyric acid and taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid alleviated ER stress in cells and whole animals. Treatment of obese and diabetic mice with these compounds resulted in normalization of hyperglycemia, restoration of systemic insulin sensitivity, resolution of fatty liver disease, and enhancement of insulin action in liver, muscle, and adipose tissues. Our results demonstrate that chemical chaperones enhance the adaptive capacity of the ER and act as potent antidiabetic modalities with potential application in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:16931765

  16. Acidic properties of supported niobium oxide catalysts: An infrared spectroscopy investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Datka, J.; Turek, A.M.; Jehng, J.M.; Wachs, I.E. )

    1992-05-01

    Chemisorption of pyridine was applied as a method for studying the acidic properties of niobium pentoxide supported on silica, magnesia, alumina, titania, and zirconia. The infrared spectra of adsorbed pyridine were used to evaluate the concentration and the relative strength of Broensted and Lewis acid sites. Lewis acidity was found in all the supported niobium oxide systems, while Broensted acid sites were only detected for niobia supported on the alumina and silica supports. The origin and characteristics of the surface acid sites present in supported niobium oxide catalysts are discussed in the present study.

  17. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus. PMID:24694369

  18. Synthesis and biological properties of amino acids and peptides containing a tetrazolyl moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E. A.; Trifonov, R. E.

    2015-09-01

    Literature data published mainly in the last 15 years on the synthesis and biological properties of amino acid analogues and derivatives containing tetrazolyl moieties are analyzed. Tetrazolyl analogues and derivatives of amino acids and peptides are shown to be promising for medicinal chemistry. Being polynitrogen heterocyclic systems comprising four endocyclic nitrogen atoms, tetrazoles can behave as acids and bases and form strong hydrogen bonds with proton donors (more rarely, with acceptors). They have high metabolic stability and are able to penetrate biological membranes. The review also considers the synthesis and properties of linear and cyclic peptides based on modified amino acids incorporating a tetrazolyl moiety. A special issue is the discussion of the biological properties of tetrazole-containing amino acids and peptides, which exhibit high biological activity and can be used to design new drugs. The bibliography includes 200 references.

  19. Physicochemical Properties of β-Glucan from Acid Hydrolyzed Barley

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Jang, Gwi Yeong; Hwang, In Guk; Kim, Hyun Young; Woo, Koan Sik; Kim, Kee Jong; Lee, Mi Ja; Kim, Tae Jip; Lee, Junsoo; Jeong, Heon Sang

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate changes in the content and purity, as well as physical characteristics of β-glucan extracted from acid hydrolyzed whole grain barleys. Waxy and non-waxy barleys (Hordeum vulgare) were hydrolyzed with different concentrations of HCl (0.1~0.5 N) for 1 h. As the HCl concentration increased, the contents of total and soluble β-glucan from acid hydrolyzed barley decreased. However the ratio of soluble/total β-glucan content and purities of β-glucan significantly increased. The ratio of β-(1→4)/β-(1→3) linkages, molecular weight, and viscosity of soluble β-glucan of raw barleys were 2.28~2.52, 6.0~7.0×105 g/mol, and 12.8~32.8 centipoise (cP). Those of isolated soluble β-glucan were significantly decreased to 2.05~2.15, 6.6~7.8×103 g/mol, and 3.6~4.2 cP, respectively, with increasing acid concentration. The re-solubility of raw barley β-glucan was about 50%, but increased to 97% with increasing acid concentration. Acid hydrolysis was shown to be an effective method to produce β-glucan with high ratio of soluble β-glucan content, purity, water solubility, and low viscosity. PMID:26175998

  20. Effect of dicarbonyl-induced browning on alpha-crystallin chaperone-like activity: physiological significance and caveats of in vitro aggregation assays.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Satish; Reddy, P Yadagiri; Kumar, P Anil; Surolia, Ira; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash

    2004-04-15

    Alpha-crystallin is a member of the small heat-shock protein family and functions like a molecular chaperone, and may thus help in maintaining the transparency of the eye lens by protecting the lens proteins from various stress conditions. Non-enzymic glycation of long-lived proteins has been implicated in several age- and diabetes-related complications, including cataract. Dicarbonyl compounds such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal have been identified as the predominant source for the formation of advanced glycation end-products in various tissues including the lens. We have investigated the effect of non-enzymic browning of alpha-crystallin by reactive dicarbonyls on its molecular chaperone-like function. Non-enzymic browning of bovine alpha-crystallin in vitro caused, along with altered secondary and tertiary structures, cross-linking and high-molecular-mass aggregation. Notwithstanding these structural changes, methylglyoxal- and glyoxal-modified alpha-crystallin showed enhanced anti-aggregation activity in various in vitro aggregation assays. Paradoxically, increased chaperone-like activity of modified alpha-crystallin was not associated with increased surface hydrophobicity and rather showed less 8-anilinonaphthalene-l-sulphonic acid binding. In contrast, the chaperone-like function of modified alpha-crystallin was found to be reduced in assays that monitor the prevention of enzyme inactivation by UV-B and heat. Moreover, incubation of bovine lens with methylglyoxal in organ culture resulted in cataract formation with accumulation of advanced glycation end-products and recovery of alpha-crystallin in high proportions in the insoluble fraction. Furthermore, soluble alpha-crystallin from methylglyoxal-treated lenses showed decreased chaperone-like activity. Thus, in addition to describing the effects of methylglyoxal and glyoxal on structure and chaperone-like activity, our studies also bring out an important caveat of aggregation assays in the context of the

  1. Polymers with complexing properties. Simple poly(amino acids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roque, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The free amino (0.3 equiv/residue) and carboxyl (0.5 equiv/residue) groups of thermal polylysine increased dramatically on treatment with distilled water. The total hydrolysis of such a polymer was abnormal in that only about 50% of the expected amino acids were recovered. Poly (lysine-co-alanine-co-glycine) under usual conditions hydrolyzed completely in 8 hours; whereas, when it was pretreated with diazomethane, a normal period of 24 hours was required to give (nearly) the same amounts of each free amino acid as compared with those obtained from the untreated polymer. The amino groups of the basic thermal poly(amino acids) were sterically hindered. The existence of nitrogen atoms linking two or three chains and reactive groups (anhydride, imine) were proposed.

  2. Electroactive self-doped poly(amic acid) with oligoaniline and sulfonic acid groups: synthesis and electrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Chi, Maoqiang; Wang, Shutao; Liang, Yuan; Chao, Danming; Wang, Ce

    2014-06-01

    A novel poly(amic acid) with pendant aniline tetramer and sulfonic acid groups (ESPAA) was synthesized by ternary polymerization and characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectra, ((1))H NMR and gel permeation chromatography. The polymer showed good thermal stability and excellent solubility in the common organic solvents. The electrochemical properties were investigated carefully on a CHI 660A Electrochemical Workstation. The polymer displayed good electroactivity in acid, neutral and even in alkaline solutions (pH=1-10) due to the self-doping effect between aniline tetramer and sulfonic/carboxylic acid groups. It also exhibited satisfactory electrochromic performance with high contrast value, acceptable coloration efficiency and fast switching time in the range of pH=1-9. PMID:24703661

  3. The archaeal molecular chaperone machine: peculiarities and paradoxes.

    PubMed Central

    Macario, A J; de Macario, E C

    1999-01-01

    A major finding within the field of archaea and molecular chaperones has been the demonstration that, while some species have the stress (heat-shock) gene hsp70(dnaK), others do not. This gene encodes Hsp70(DnaK), an essential molecular chaperone in bacteria and eukaryotes. Due to the physiological importance and the high degree of conservation of this protein, its absence in archaeal organisms has raised intriguing questions pertaining to the evolution of the chaperone machine as a whole and that of its components in particular, namely, Hsp70(DnaK), Hsp40(DnaJ), and GrpE. Another archaeal paradox is that the proteins coded by these genes are very similar to bacterial homologs, as if the genes had been received via lateral transfer from bacteria, whereas the upstream flanking regions have no bacterial markers, but instead have typical archaeal promoters, which are like those of eukaryotes. Furthermore, the chaperonin system in all archaea studied to the present, including those that possess a bacterial-like chaperone machine, is similar to that of the eukaryotic-cell cytosol. Thus, two chaperoning systems that are designed to interact with a compatible partner, e.g., the bacterial chaperone machine physiologically interacts with the bacterial but not with the eucaryal chaperonins, coexist in archaeal cells in spite of their apparent functional incompatibility. It is difficult to understand how these hybrid characteristics of the archaeal chaperoning system became established and work, if one bears in mind the classical ideas learned from studying bacteria and eukaryotes. No doubt, archaea are intriguing organisms that offer an opportunity to find novel molecules and mechanisms that will, most likely, enhance our understanding of the stress response and the protein folding and refolding processes in the three phylogenetic domains. PMID:10430558

  4. A Fluorescent sp2-iminosugar with pharmacological chaperone activity for gaucher disease: synthesis and intracellular distribution studies.

    PubMed

    Luan, Zhuo; Higaki, Katsumi; Aguilar-Moncayo, Matilde; Li, Linjing; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Nanba, Eiji; Ohno, Kousaku; García-Moreno, M Isabel; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, José M; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki

    2010-11-22

    Gaucher disease (GD) is the most prevalent lysosomal-storage disorder, it is caused by mutations of acid β-glucosidase (β-glucocerebrosidase; β-Glu). Recently, we found that bicyclic nojirimycin (NJ) derivatives of the sp(2)-iminosugar type, including the 6-thio-N'-octyl-(5N,6S)-octyliminomethylidene derivative (6S-NOI-NJ), behaved as very selective competitive inhibitors of the lysosomal β-Glu and exhibited remarkable chaperone activities for several GD mutations. To obtain information about the cellular uptake pathway and intracellular distribution of this family of chaperones, we have synthesized a fluorescent analogue that maintains the fused piperidine-thiazolidine bicyclic skeleton and incorporates a dansyl group in the N'-substituent, namely 6-thio-(5N,6S)-[4-(N'-dansylamino)butyliminomethylidene]nojirimycin (6S-NDI-NJ). This structural modification does not significantly modify the biological activity of the glycomimetic as a chemical chaperone. Our study showed that 6S-NDI-NJ is mainly located in lysosome-related organelles in both normal and GD fibroblasts, and the fluorescent intensity of 6S-NDI-NJ in the lysosome is related to the β-Glu concentration level. 6S-NDI-NJ also can enter cultured neuronal cells and act as a chaperone. Competitive inhibition studies of 6S-NDI-NJ uptake in fibroblasts showed that high concentrations of D-glucose have no effect on chaperone internalization, suggesting that it enters the cells through glucose-transporter-independent mechanisms. PMID:21064079

  5. Characterization of thermal and mechanical properties of opligo(glycerol-glutaric acid)s

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dibutyltin oxide was used to catalyze the synthesis of oligo(glycerol-glutaric acid)s in the absence and presence of solvent. Reaction times were either 10h or 24h for reactions performed in DMF and 24h for the neat reaction. The oligomers were obtained on average in 84% yield and were characteriz...

  6. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Au-Nanoparticles Conjugated with Lipoic Acid in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejo-Durán, M.; Cornejo-Monroy, D.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.; Olivares-Vargas, A.; Castano, V. M.

    2014-08-01

    Gold nanoparticles were chemically conjugated with lipoic acid to control their optical properties. Z-scan and other optical techniques were used to characterize the non-linear behavior of the resulting nanostructured materials. The results show that the nonlinearity is of thermal origin, which can be controlled by the use of lipoic acid as well as other organic molecules conjugated onto metal nanoparticles. In particular, the presence of lipoic acid increases n_2 and dn/dT.

  7. Optical properties of chitosan in aqueous solution of L- and D-ascorbic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinkina, Olga N.; Shipovskaya, Anna B.; Kazmicheva, Olga F.

    2016-04-01

    The optical properties of aqueous chitosan solutions in L- and D-ascorbic acids were studied by optical rotatory dispersion and spectrophotometry. The specific optical rotation [α] of all chitosan solutions tested was positive, in contrast to aqueous solutions of the ascorbic acid enantiomers, which exhibit an inverse relationship of [α] values. Significant differences in the absolute values of [α] of the chitosan solutions at polymer-acid ratios exceeding the equimolar one were found.

  8. Effects of acid, salt and soaking time on the dielectric properties of acidified vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to design a continuous microwave process for pasteurization of acidified vegetables, equilibration phenomena in acid and salt solutions must be examined with regards to changes in dielectric properties. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of acid and salt concentration o...

  9. Effects of swelling on the viscoelastic properties of polyester films made from glycerol and glutaric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viscoelastic properties have been determined for poly(glycerol-co-glutaric acid) films synthesized from Lewis acid-catalyzed polyesterifications. The polymers were prepared by synthesizing polymer gels that were subsequently cured at 125 degrees C to form polymer films. The polymers were evaluated ...

  10. Large-scale gene expression profiling reveals physiological response to deletion of chaperone dnaKJ in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dongjie; Liu, Chuanpeng; Liu, Lushan; Zhu, Lingxiang; Peng, Fang; Zhou, Qiming

    2016-01-01

    Chaperone DnaK and its co-chaperone DnaJ plays various essential roles such as in assisting in the folding of nascent peptides, preventing protein aggregation and maintaining cellular protein homeostasis. Global transcriptional changes in vivo associated with deletion of dnaKJ were monitored using DNA microarray to elucidate the role of DnaKJ at the transcriptional level. Microarray profiling and bioinformatics analysis revealed that a few chaperone and protease genes, stress-related genes and genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation were up-regulated, whereas various transporter genes, pentose phosphate pathway and transcriptional regulation related genes were down-regulated. This study is the first to systematically analyze the alterations at the transcriptional level in vivo in deletion of dnaKJ. Fatty acid methyl esters analysis indicated that the amount of unsaturated fatty acid sharply increased and subcellular location prediction analysis showed a marked decrease in transcription of inner-membrane protein genes, which might have triggered the development of aberrant cell shape and susceptibility for some antibiotics in the ΔdnaKJ strain. PMID:27242140

  11. Effects of pH and Iminosugar Pharmacological Chaperones on Lysosomal Glycosidase Structure and Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, Raquel L.; D’aquino, J. Alejandro; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.

    2009-06-05

    Human lysosomal enzymes acid-{beta}-glucosidase (GCase) and acid-{alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-Gal A) hydrolyze the sphingolipids glucosyl- and globotriaosylceramide, respectively, and mutations in these enzymes lead to the lipid metabolism disorders Gaucher and Fabry disease, respectively. We have investigated the structure and stability of GCase and {alpha}-Gal A in a neutral-pH environment reflective of the endoplasmic reticulum and an acidic-pH environment reflective of the lysosome. These details are important for the development of pharmacological chaperone therapy for Gaucher and Fabry disease, in which small molecules bind mutant enzymes in the ER to enable the mutant enzyme to meet quality control requirements for lysosomal trafficking. We report crystal structures of apo GCase at pH 4.5, at pH 5.5, and in complex with the pharmacological chaperone isofagomine (IFG) at pH 7.5. We also present thermostability analysis of GCase at pH 7.4 and 5.2 using differential scanning calorimetry. We compare our results with analogous experiments using {alpha}-Gal A and the chaperone 1-deoxygalactonijirimycin (DGJ), including the first structure of {alpha}-Gal A with DGJ. Both GCase and {alpha}-Gal A are more stable at lysosomal pH with and without their respective iminosugars bound, and notably, the stability of the GCase-IFG complex is pH sensitive. We show that the conformations of the active site loops in GCase are sensitive to ligand binding but not pH, whereas analogous galactose- or DGJ-dependent conformational changes in {alpha}-Gal A are not seen. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from {alpha}-Gal A unfolding indicate two-state, van't Hoff unfolding in the absence of the iminosugar at neutral and lysosomal pH, and non-two-state unfolding in the presence of DGJ. Taken together, these results provide insight into how GCase and {alpha}-Gal A are thermodynamically stabilized by iminosugars and suggest strategies for the development of new pharmacological

  12. Acid Rain Affecting the Electrical Properties of Outdoor Composite Dielectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinsheng; Kumagai, Seiji; Yoshimura, Noboru

    1998-12-01

    Acid rain is precipitation with acidity, i.e., pH, below 5.6. There is an increasing interest in the degradation of the electrical properties of outdoor composite dielectric materials under severe contaminant conditions such as acid rain. In this study, the degradation effects of acid rain on the outdoor composite dielectrics are investigated by accelerated aging due to artificial acid rain. Based on the investigation of acid rain, the composition of artificial acid rain is chosen to agree with the actual composition of precipitation. The surface potential, breakdown voltage, tracking resistance, and surface discharge current of dielectric materials are studied. Furthermore, the degradation mechanisms of electrical properties of composite dielectrics are discussed by investigating the degradation of the chemical and physical microstructures of material surface using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), the X-ray diffraction spectrum (XDS), and the metalloscope. Experimental results show that the outdoor polymeric dielectrics suffer severely and degrade due to acid rain so that their surface electrical properties deteriorate after aging. The erosion, by acid rain, of the energized dielectric materials is larger than that of outdoor materials used for other purposes.

  13. Thermal properties of poly (lactic acid)/milkweed composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, most polymer composites utilize petroleum-based materials that are non-degradable and difficult to recycle or incur substantial cost for disposal. Green composites can be used in nondurable limited applications. In order to determine the degree of compatibility between Poly (lactic Acid...

  14. GAS PERMEATION PROPERTIES OF POLY(LACTIC ACID). (R826733)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The need for the development of polymeric materials based on renewable resources has led to the development of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) which is being produced from a feedstock of corn rather than petroleum. The present study examines the permeation of nitrogen...

  15. Preparation and physical properties of chitin fatty acids esters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Byung Y; Ding, Qiong; Montgomery, Rex

    2009-02-17

    Trifluoroacetic anhydride is an effective promoter for the preparation of chitin single- and mixed-acid esters. Complete dissolution is achieved within 30 min when powdered chitin is heated at 70 degrees C in a mixed solution of carboxylic acid(s) and trifluoroacetic anhydride. Chitin esters prepared are chitin acetate, chitin butyrate, chitin hexanoate and chitin octanoate, chitin co-acetate/butyrate, chitin co-acetate/hexanoate, chitin co-acetate/octanoate, chitin co-acetate/palmitate, each from a solution of the respective reactants. The products have degrees of O-acyl substitution in a range of DS 1-2 depending on the nature of acyl group, as analyzed by gas-liquid and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Acetic acid as a mutual component for the mixed-acid esters increases the total degree of substitution, and the acetyl substitution is close to the relative distribution in the reaction mixture for chitin co-acetate/butyrate. It is favored over hexanoate, octanoate, and palmitate. The parent molecules, as calculated by the composition of the chitin esters and their molecular weights by light-scattering spectroscopy, are 30 kDa for the smallest and 150-151 kDa for the largest. Films of these chitin derivatives when cast from solution are strong and flexible with limited extensibility. By dynamic mechanical analysis of the ester film, it was found that both the glass transition temperature (T(g)) and the tensile modulus (E' at 25 degrees C) are highest for chitin acetate (218 degrees C and 5.8 GPa), and lowest for chitin octanoate (182 degrees C and 1.5 GPa). For the other esters, these values lie between the above-cited values, where the T(g) and the E' decrease with an increase in the chain length of the acyl constituent. PMID:19091309

  16. Interaction of Heat Shock Protein 90 and the Co-chaperone Cpr6 with Ura2, a Bifunctional Enzyme Required for Pyrimidine Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Zuehlke, Abbey D.; Wren, Nicholas; Tenge, Victoria; Johnson, Jill L.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an essential protein required for the activity and stability of multiple proteins termed clients. Hsp90 cooperates with a set of co-chaperone proteins that modulate Hsp90 activity and/or target clients to Hsp90 for folding. Many of the Hsp90 co-chaperones, including Cpr6 and Cpr7, contain tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains that bind a common acceptor site at the carboxyl terminus of Hsp90. We found that Cpr6 and Hsp90 interacted with Ura2, a protein critical for pyrimidine biosynthesis. Mutation or inhibition of Hsp90 resulted in decreased accumulation of Ura2, indicating it is an Hsp90 client. Cpr6 interacted with Ura2 in the absence of stable Cpr6-Hsp90 interaction, suggesting a direct interaction. However, loss of Cpr6 did not alter the Ura2-Hsp90 interaction or Ura2 accumulation. The TPR domain of Cpr6 was required for Ura2 interaction, but other TPR containing co-chaperones, including Cpr7, failed to interact with Ura2 or rescue CPR6-dependent growth defects. Further analysis suggests that the carboxyl-terminal 100 amino acids of Cpr6 and Cpr7 are critical for specifying their unique functions, providing new information about this important class of Hsp90 co-chaperones. PMID:23926110

  17. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of SrcA, a Multi-cargo Type III Secretion Chaperone in Salmonella Required for Pathogenic Association with a Host

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.; Zhang, K; Andres, S; Fnag, Y; Kaniuk, N; Hannemann, M; Brumell, J; Foster, L; Junop, M; Coombes, B

    2010-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria colonize and exploit host niches using a protein apparatus called a type III secretion system (T3SS) that translocates bacterial effector proteins into host cells where their functions are essential for pathogenesis. A suite of T3SS-associated chaperone proteins bind cargo in the bacterial cytosol, establishing protein interaction networks needed for effector translocation into host cells. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a T3SS encoded in a large genomic island (SPI-2) is required for intracellular infection, but the chaperone complement required for effector translocation by this system is not known. Using a reverse genetics approach, we identified a multi-cargo secretion chaperone that is functionally integrated with the SPI-2-encoded T3SS and required for systemic infection in mice. Crystallographic analysis of SrcA at a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom} revealed a dimer similar to the CesT chaperone from enteropathogenic E. coli but lacking a 17-amino acid extension at the carboxyl terminus. Further biochemical and quantitative proteomics data revealed three protein interactions with SrcA, including two effector cargos (SseL and PipB2) and the type III-associated ATPase, SsaN, that increases the efficiency of effector translocation. Using competitive infections in mice we show that SrcA increases bacterial fitness during host infection, highlighting the in vivo importance of effector chaperones for the SPI-2 T3SS.

  18. Inhibitors of the AAA+ Chaperone p97

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Eli; Maksim, Nick; de la Cruz, Fabian; La Clair, James J.

    2015-01-01

    It is remarkable that a pathway as ubiquitous as protein quality control can be targeted to treat cancer. Bortezomib, an inhibitor of the proteasome, was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) more than 10 years ago to treat refractory myeloma and later extended to lymphoma. Its use has increased the survival rate of myeloma patients by as much as three years. This success was followed with the recent accelerated approval of the natural product derived proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (Kyprolis®), which is used to treat patients with bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma. The success of these two drugs has validated protein quality control as a viable target to fight select cancers, but begs the question why are proteasome inhibitors limited to lymphoma and myeloma? More recently, these limitations have encouraged the search for additional targets within the protein quality control system that might offer heightened cancer cell specificity, enhanced clinical utility, a lower rate of resistance, reduced toxicity, and mitigated side effects. One promising target is p97, an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) chaperone. p97 figures prominently in protein quality control as well as serving a variety of other cellular functions associated with cancer. More than a decade ago, it was determined that up-regulation of p97 in many forms of cancer correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Since these initial discoveries, a mechanistic explanation for this observation has been partially illuminated, but details are lacking. Understandably, given this clinical correlation, myriad roles within the cell, and its importance in protein quality control, p97 has emerged as a potential therapeutic target. This review provides an overview of efforts towards the discovery of small molecule inhibitors of p97, offering a synopsis of efforts that parallel the excellent reviews that currently exist on p97 structure, function, and physiology. PMID

  19. A Novel Method for Assessing the Chaperone Activity of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hristozova, Nevena; Tompa, Peter; Kovacs, Denes

    2016-01-01

    Protein chaperones are molecular machines which function both during homeostasis and stress conditions in all living organisms. Depending on their specific function, molecular chaperones are involved in a plethora of cellular processes by playing key roles in nascent protein chain folding, transport and quality control. Among stress protein families-molecules expressed during adverse conditions, infection, and diseases-chaperones are highly abundant. Their molecular functions range from stabilizing stress-susceptible molecules and membranes to assisting the refolding of stress-damaged proteins, thereby acting as protective barriers against cellular damage. Here we propose a novel technique to test and measure the capability for protective activity of known and putative chaperones in a semi-high throughput manner on a plate reader. The current state of the art does not allow the in vitro measurements of chaperone activity in a highly parallel manner with high accuracy or high reproducibility, thus we believe that the method we report will be of significant benefit in this direction. The use of this method may lead to a considerable increase in the number of experimentally verified proteins with such functions, and may also allow the dissection of their molecular mechanism for a better understanding of their function. PMID:27564234

  20. A Novel Method for Assessing the Chaperone Activity of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hristozova, Nevena; Tompa, Peter; Kovacs, Denes

    2016-01-01

    Protein chaperones are molecular machines which function both during homeostasis and stress conditions in all living organisms. Depending on their specific function, molecular chaperones are involved in a plethora of cellular processes by playing key roles in nascent protein chain folding, transport and quality control. Among stress protein families–molecules expressed during adverse conditions, infection, and diseases–chaperones are highly abundant. Their molecular functions range from stabilizing stress-susceptible molecules and membranes to assisting the refolding of stress-damaged proteins, thereby acting as protective barriers against cellular damage. Here we propose a novel technique to test and measure the capability for protective activity of known and putative chaperones in a semi-high throughput manner on a plate reader. The current state of the art does not allow the in vitro measurements of chaperone activity in a highly parallel manner with high accuracy or high reproducibility, thus we believe that the method we report will be of significant benefit in this direction. The use of this method may lead to a considerable increase in the number of experimentally verified proteins with such functions, and may also allow the dissection of their molecular mechanism for a better understanding of their function. PMID:27564234

  1. DegP Chaperone Suppresses Toxic Inner Membrane Translocation Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Braselmann, Esther; Chaney, Julie L; Champion, Matthew M; Clark, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria includes a variety of molecular chaperones that shepherd the folding and targeting of secreted proteins. A central player of this quality control network is DegP, a protease also suggested to have a chaperone function. We serendipitously discovered that production of the Bordetella pertussis autotransporter virulence protein pertactin is lethal in Escherichia coli ΔdegP strains. We investigated specific contributions of DegP to secretion of pertactin as a model system to test the functions of DegP in vivo. The DegP chaperone activity was sufficient to restore growth during pertactin production. This chaperone dependency could be relieved by changing the pertactin signal sequence: an E. coli signal sequence leading to co-translational inner membrane (IM) translocation was sufficient to suppress lethality in the absence of DegP, whereas an E. coli post-translational signal sequence was sufficient to recapitulate the lethal phenotype. These results identify a novel connection between the DegP chaperone and the mechanism used to translocate a protein across the IM. Lethality coincided with loss of periplasmic proteins, soluble σE, and proteins regulated by this essential stress response. These results suggest post-translational IM translocation can lead to the formation of toxic periplasmic folding intermediates, which DegP can suppress. PMID:27626276

  2. Chaperone-assisted selective autophagy is essential for muscle maintenance.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Verena; Dick, Nikolaus; Tawo, Riga; Dreiseidler, Michael; Wenzel, Daniela; Hesse, Michael; Fürst, Dieter O; Saftig, Paul; Saint, Robert; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Hoch, Michael; Höhfeld, Jörg

    2010-01-26

    How are biological structures maintained in a cellular environment that constantly threatens protein integrity? Here we elucidate proteostasis mechanisms affecting the Z disk, a protein assembly essential for actin anchoring in striated muscles, which is subjected to mechanical, thermal, and oxidative stress during contraction [1]. Based on the characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster cochaperone Starvin (Stv), we define a conserved chaperone machinery required for Z disk maintenance. Instead of keeping Z disk proteins in a folded conformation, this machinery facilitates the degradation of damaged components, such as filamin, through chaperone-assisted selective autophagy (CASA). Stv and its mammalian ortholog BAG-3 coordinate the activity of Hsc70 and the small heat shock protein HspB8 during disposal that is initiated by the chaperone-associated ubiquitin ligase CHIP and the autophagic ubiquitin adaptor p62. CASA is thus distinct from chaperone-mediated autophagy, previously shown to facilitate the ubiquitin-independent, direct translocation of a client across the lysosomal membrane [2]. Impaired CASA results in Z disk disintegration and progressive muscle weakness in flies, mice, and men. Our findings reveal the importance of chaperone-assisted degradation for the preservation of cellular structures and identify muscle as a tissue that highly relies on an intact proteostasis network, thereby shedding light on diverse myopathies and aging. PMID:20060297

  3. Dissecting the Escherichia coli periplasmic chaperone network using differential proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Vertommen, Didier; Silhavy, Thomas J.; Collet, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    β-barrel proteins, or outer membrane proteins (OMPs), perform many essential functions in Gram-negative bacteria, but questions remain about the mechanism by which they are assembled into the outer membrane (OM). In Escherichia coli, β-barrels are escorted across the periplasm by chaperones, most notably SurA and Skp. However, the contributions of these two chaperones to the assembly of the OM proteome remained unclear. We used differential proteomics to determine how the elimination of Skp and SurA affects the assembly of many OMPs. We have shown that removal of Skp has no impact on the levels of the 63 identified OM proteins. However, depletion of SurA in the skp strain has a marked impact on the OM proteome, diminishing the levels of almost all β-barrel proteins. Our results are consistent with a model in which SurA plays a primary chaperone role in E. coli. Furthermore, they suggest that while no OMPs prefer the Skp chaperone pathway in wild-type cells, most can use Skp efficiently when SurA is absent. Our data, which provide a unique glimpse into the protein content of the non-viable surA skp mutant, clarify the roles of the periplasmic chaperones in E. coli. PMID:22589188

  4. Influence of group composition of sulfonic acids on properties of sulfonate additives

    SciTech Connect

    Katrenko, T.I.; Bessonova, R.N.; Kuznetsova, M.G.; Potolovskii, L.A.

    1983-05-01

    Three types of sulfonic acids are formed in sulfonation of petroleum oils-- oil-soluble, oil-insoluble, and water-soluble. This study investigates the influence of the different acids on neutral calcium sulfonates. Samples are recovered from As-14 oil. Oil-insoluble synthesis failed. Water-soluble acid did synthesize with a mix of oil- and water-soluble sulfonates. Neutral calcium sulfonates synthesized from oil-soluble had good properties, from oil-insoluble, bad properties. Oil-insoluble sulfonate also has an inverse effect on cleanup, and it interferes with carbonation. These findings will help with improvements in the sulfonate additive manufacturing process.

  5. Luminescent and magnetic properties of europium compounds with cinnamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinovskaya, I. V.; Tkachenko, I. A.; Mirochnik, A. G.; Karasev, V. E.; Kavun, V. Ya.

    2011-03-01

    The temperature dependences of the molar magnetic susceptibility of luminescent europium compounds with cinnamic acid [Eu(Cin)3] n and Eu(Cin)3 · 2D · H2O (where Cin is the cinnamic acid anion and D is phen (1,10-phenanthroline) or dipy (2,2-dipyridyl)) were studied at temperatures from 300 to 2 K. The molar magnetic susceptibility of the compounds increased in the series Eu(Cin)3 · 2dipy · H2O < Eu(Cin)3 · 2phen · H2O < [Eu(Cin)3] n . The energy distances λlum between the 7 F 0 ground level and the 7 F 1 state in the luminescence spectra correlated well with λmagn obtained from magnetochemical data.

  6. [Cardioprotective properties of new glutamic acid derivative under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Sadikova, N V; Berestovitskaia, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2014-01-01

    The effect of new glutamic acid derivative on the cardiac ino- and chronotropic functions has been studied in experiments on rats exposed to 24-hour immobilization-and-pain stress. It is established that glutamic acid derivative RGPU-238 (glufimet) at a dose of 28.7 mg/kg increases the increment of myocardial contractility and relaxation rates and left ventricular pressure in stress-tested animals by 13 1,1, 72.4, and 118.6%, respectively, as compared to the control group during the test for adrenoreactivity. Compound RGPU-238 increases the increment of the maximum intensity of myocardium functioning by 196.5 % at 30 sec of isometric workload as compared to the control group. The cardioprotective effect of compound RGPU-238 is 1.5 - 2 times higher than that of the reference drug phenibut. PMID:25365864

  7. Molecular mechanism of the chaperone function of mini-α-crystallin, a 19-residue peptide of human α-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Priya R; Pande, Ajay; Shekhtman, Alexander; Pande, Jayanti

    2015-01-20

    α-Crystallin is the archetypical chaperone of the small heat-shock protein family, all members of which contain the so-called "α-crystallin domain" (ACD). This domain and the N- and C-terminal extensions are considered the main functional units in its chaperone function. Previous studies have shown that a 19-residue fragment of the ACD of human αA-crystallin called mini-αA-crystallin (MAC) shows chaperone properties similar to those of the parent protein. Subsequent studies have confirmed the function of this peptide, but no studies have addressed the mechanistic basis for the chaperone function of MAC. Using human γD-crystallin (HGD), a key substrate protein for parent α-crystallin in the ocular lens, we show here that MAC not only protects HGD from aggregation during thermal and chemical unfolding but also binds weakly and reversibly to HGD (Kd ≈ 200-700 μM) even when HGD is in the native state. However, at temperatures favoring the unfolding of HGD, MAC forms a stable complex with HGD similar to parent α-crystallin. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we identify the residues in HGD that are involved in these two modes of binding and show that MAC protects HGD from aggregation by binding to Phe 56 and Val 132 at the domain interface of the target protein, and residues Val 164 to Leu 167 in the core of the C-terminal domain. Furthermore, we suggest that the low-affinity, reversible binding of MAC on the surface of HGD in the native state is involved in facilitating its binding to both the domain interface and core regions during the early stages of the unfolding of HGD. This work highlights some structural features of MAC and MAC-like peptides that affect their chaperone activity and can potentially be manipulated for translational studies. PMID:25478825

  8. Antisickling properties of divanilloylquinic acids isolated from Fagara zanthoxyloides Lam. (Rutaceae).

    PubMed

    Ouattara, B; Jansen, O; Angenot, L; Guissou, I P; Frédérich, M; Fondu, P; Tits, M

    2009-03-01

    Fagara zanthoxyloides Lam. (syn. Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides) (Rutaceae) is the most cited Fagara species for the treatment and the prevention of sickle cell disease crisis. Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a public health problem in many countries particularly in Africa. The present study was designed to evaluate the antisickling properties of three isomeric divanilloylquinic acids (3,4-O-divanilloylquinic acid or burkinabin A; 3,5-O-divanilloylquinic acid or burkinabin B and 4,5-O-divanilloylquinic acid or burkinabin C) identified previously by LC/MS/NMR analysis in the root bark of F. zanthoxyloides [Ouattara et al., 2004. LC/MS/NMR analysis of isomeric divanilloylquinic acids from the root bark of Fagara zanthoxyloides Lam. Phytochemistry 65, 1145-1151]. The three isomers showed interesting antisickling properties which increased from burkinabins A to C. PMID:19110407

  9. African Cucurbita pepo L.: properties of seed and variability in fatty acid composition of seed oil.

    PubMed

    Younis, Y M; Ghirmay, S; al-Shihry, S S

    2000-05-01

    Pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo) seeds are used locally in Eritrea to treat tapeworm. Seeds were found to be rich in oil (approximately 35%), protein (38%), alpha-tocoferols (3 mg/100 g) and carbohydrate content (approximately 37%). The physico-chemical properties and fatty acid composition of the seed oil were examined. The four dominant fatty acids found are: palmitic C16:0 (13.3%), stearic C18:0 (8.0%), oleic C18:1 (29.0%) and linoleic C18:2 (47.0%). The oil contains an appreciable amount of unsaturated fatty acids (78.0%) and found to be a rich source of linoleic acid (47.0%). Within the three localities of the study, variations exist in seed properties and the fatty acid composition of the oil. PMID:10846750

  10. Crystal Structure and Function of Human Nucleoplasmin (Npm2): A Histone Chaperone in Oocytes and Embryos

    SciTech Connect

    O Platonova; I Akey; J Head; C Akey

    2011-12-31

    Human Npm2 is an ortholog of Xenopus nucleoplasmin (Np), a chaperone that binds histones. We have determined the crystal structure of a truncated Npm2-core at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution and show that the N-terminal domains of Npm2 and Np form similar pentamers. This allowed us to model an Npm2 decamer which may be formed by hydrogen bonds between quasi-conserved residues in the interface between two pentamers. Interestingly, the Npm2 pentamer lacks a prototypical A1-acidic tract in each of its subunits. This feature may be responsible for the inability of Npm2-core to bind histones. However, Npm2 with a large acidic tract in its C-terminal tail (Npm2-A2) is able to bind histones and form large complexes. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments and biochemical analysis of loop mutations support the premise that nucleoplasmins form decamers when they bind H2A-H2B dimers and H3-H4 tetramers simultaneously. In the absence of histone tetramers, these chaperones bind H2A-H2B dimers with a single pentamer forming the central hub. When taken together, our data provide insights into the mechanism of histone binding by nucleoplasmins.

  11. NPM1/B23: A Multifunctional Chaperone in Ribosome Biogenesis and Chromatin Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Mikael S.

    2011-01-01

    At a first glance, ribosome biogenesis and chromatin remodeling are quite different processes, but they share a common problem involving interactions between charged nucleic acids and small basic proteins that may result in unwanted intracellular aggregations. The multifunctional nuclear acidic chaperone NPM1 (B23/nucleophosmin) is active in several stages of ribosome biogenesis, chromatin remodeling, and mitosis as well as in DNA repair, replication and transcription. In addition, NPM1 plays an important role in the Myc-ARF-p53 pathway as well as in SUMO regulation. However, the relative importance of NPM1 in these processes remains unclear. Provided herein is an update on the expanding list of the diverse activities and interacting partners of NPM1. Mechanisms of NPM1 nuclear export functions of NPM1 in the nucleolus and at the mitotic spindle are discussed in relation to tumor development. It is argued that the suggested function of NPM1 as a histone chaperone could explain several, but not all, of the effects observed in cells following changes in NPM1 expression. A future challenge is to understand how NPM1 is activated, recruited, and controlled to carry out its functions. PMID:21152184

  12. Plasmodium falciparum-encoded exported hsp70/hsp40 chaperone/co-chaperone complexes within the host erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Külzer, Simone; Charnaud, Sarah; Dagan, Tal; Riedel, Jan; Mandal, Pradipta; Pesce, Eva R; Blatch, Gregory L; Crabb, Brendan S; Gilson, Paul R; Przyborski, Jude M

    2012-11-01

    Malaria parasites modify their host cell, the mature human erythrocyte. We are interested in the molecules mediating these processes, and have recently described a family of parasite-encoded heat shock proteins (PfHsp40s) that are targeted to the host cell, and implicated in host cell modification. Hsp40s generally function as co-chaperones of members of the Hsp70 family, and until now it was thought that human Hsp70 acts as the PfHsp40 interaction partner within the host cell. Here we revise this hypothesis, and identify and characterize an exported parasite-encoded Hsp70, referred to as PfHsp70-x. PfHsp70-x is exported to the host erythrocyte where it forms a complex with PfHsp40s in structures known as J-dots, and is closely associated with PfEMP1. Interestingly, Hsp70-x is encoded only by parasite species that export the major virulence factor EMP1, implying a possible role for Hsp70-x in EMP1 presentation at the surface of the infected erythrocyte. Our data strongly support the presence of parasite-encoded chaperone/co-chaperone complexes within the host erythrocyte, which are involved in protein traffic through the host cell. The host-pathogen interaction within the infected erythrocyte is more complex than previously thought, and is driven notonly by parasite co-chaperones, but also by the parasite-encoded chaperone Hsp70-x itself. PMID:22925632

  13. Substrate protein folds while it is bound to the ATP-independent chaperone Spy.

    PubMed

    Stull, Frederick; Koldewey, Philipp; Humes, Julia R; Radford, Sheena E; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones assist in the folding of many proteins in the cell. Although the most well-studied chaperones use cycles of ATP binding and hydrolysis to assist in protein folding, a number of chaperones have been identified that promote folding in the absence of high-energy cofactors. Precisely how ATP-independent chaperones accomplish this feat is unclear. Here we characterized the kinetic mechanism of substrate folding by the small ATP-independent chaperone Spy from Escherichia coli. Spy rapidly associates with its substrate, immunity protein 7 (Im7), thereby eliminating Im7's potential for aggregation. Remarkably, Spy then allows Im7 to fully fold into its native state while it remains bound to the surface of the chaperone. These results establish a potentially widespread mechanism whereby ATP-independent chaperones assist in protein refolding. They also provide compelling evidence that substrate proteins can fold while being continuously bound to a chaperone. PMID:26619265

  14. Molecular chaperones and the epigenetics of longevity and cancer resistance.

    PubMed

    Krøll, Jens

    2007-04-01

    The inherent immortality of embryonic stem cells demonstrates that replicative senescence as possibly the aging of species are epigenetic phenomena. The cellular level of expression of the housekeeping molecular chaperones correlates with longevity and cancer resistance of species. The chaperones are cancer antagonists by acting as genetic buffers, stabilizing the normal phenotype. Probably the progressive age-related silencing of the housekeeping genes contributes to the phenotype of aging, with the associated increase in cancer incidence. The present review concerns epigenetic chemical, immunological, and hormonal mechanisms, activating chaperone- and immune-response genes, which have proved effective in increasing longevity and cancer resistance. The relation of steroid hormone levels to species longevity, the anticarcinogenic activity of pregnancy hormones, and the influence of hormones on the longevity of social insects, illustrates the importance of hormonal mechanisms for the activation of longevity genes. PMID:17460166

  15. Review: The HSP90 molecular chaperone-an enigmatic ATPase.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Laurence H

    2016-08-01

    The HSP90 molecular chaperone is involved in the activation and cellular stabilization of a range of 'client' proteins, of which oncogenic protein kinases and nuclear steroid hormone receptors are of particular biomedical significance. Work over the last two decades has revealed a conformational cycle critical to the biological function of HSP90, coupled to an inherent ATPase activity that is regulated and manipulated by many of the co-chaperones proteins with which it collaborates. Pharmacological inhibition of HSP90 ATPase activity results in degradation of client proteins in vivo, and is a promising target for development of new cancer therapeutics. Despite this, the actual function that HSP90s conformationally-coupled ATPase activity provides in its biological role as a molecular chaperone remains obscure. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 594-607, 2016. PMID:26991466

  16. Pathways of allosteric regulation in Hsp70 chaperones.

    PubMed

    Kityk, Roman; Vogel, Markus; Schlecht, Rainer; Bukau, Bernd; Mayer, Matthias P

    2015-01-01

    Central to the protein folding activity of Hsp70 chaperones is their ability to interact with protein substrates in an ATP-controlled manner, which relies on allosteric regulation between their nucleotide-binding (NBD) and substrate-binding domains (SBD). Here we dissect this mechanism by analysing mutant variants of the Escherichia coli Hsp70 DnaK blocked at distinct steps of allosteric communication. We show that the SBD inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the NBD through a highly conserved hydrogen bond network, and define the signal transduction pathway that allows bound substrates to trigger ATP hydrolysis. We identify variants deficient in only one direction of allosteric control and demonstrate that ATP-induced substrate release is more important for chaperone activity than substrate-stimulated ATP hydrolysis. These findings provide evidence of an unexpected dichotomic allostery mechanism in Hsp70 chaperones and provide the basis for a comprehensive mechanical model of allostery in Hsp70s. PMID:26383706

  17. Tuning the properties of polyhydroxybutyrate films using acetic acid via solvent casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbukarasu, Preetam; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2015-12-01

    Biodegradable polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) films were fabricated using acetic acid as an alternative to common solvents such as chloroform. The PHB films were prepared using a solvent casting process at temperatures ranging from 80 °C to 160 °C. The crystallinity, mechanical properties and surface morphology of the films cast at different temperatures were characterized and compared to PHB films cast using chloroform as a solvent. Results revealed that the properties of the PHB film varied considerably with solvent casting temperature. In general, samples processed with acetic acid at low temperatures had comparable mechanical properties to PHB cast using chloroform. This acetic acid based method is environmentally friendly, cost efficient and allows more flexible processing conditions and broader ranges of polymer properties than traditional methods.

  18. Tuning the properties of polyhydroxybutyrate films using acetic acid via solvent casting

    PubMed Central

    Anbukarasu, Preetam; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) films were fabricated using acetic acid as an alternative to common solvents such as chloroform. The PHB films were prepared using a solvent casting process at temperatures ranging from 80 °C to 160 °C. The crystallinity, mechanical properties and surface morphology of the films cast at different temperatures were characterized and compared to PHB films cast using chloroform as a solvent. Results revealed that the properties of the PHB film varied considerably with solvent casting temperature. In general, samples processed with acetic acid at low temperatures had comparable mechanical properties to PHB cast using chloroform. This acetic acid based method is environmentally friendly, cost efficient and allows more flexible processing conditions and broader ranges of polymer properties than traditional methods. PMID:26640089

  19. Surface-Active and Performance Properties of Cationic Imidazolinium Surfactants Based on Different Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, Divya; Tyagi, V. K.

    Imidazoline surfactants belong to the category of cationic surfactants. Cationic surfactants are often quaternary nitrogen salts and are widely used both in nonaqueous systems and in applications such as textile softeners, dispersants, and emulsifiers. This study describes the surface-active properties of cationic imidazolinium surfactants synthesized from different fatty acids. Their laundry performance in combination with nonionic surfactants like detergency, foaming property, softening property, rewettability etc., is also emphasized.

  20. Pharmacological properties of acid N-thiazolylamide FFA2 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew J; Tsoulou, Christina; Ward, Emma; Gower, Elaine; Bhudia, Nisha; Chowdhury, Forhad; Dean, Tony W; Faucher, Nicolas; Gangar, Akanksha; Dowell, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    FFA2 is a receptor for short-chain fatty acids. Propionate (C3) and 4-chloro-α-(1-methylethyl)-N-2-thiazolyl-benzeneacetamide (4-CMTB), the prototypical synthetic FFA2 agonist, evoke calcium mobilization in neutrophils and inhibit lipolysis in adipocytes via this G-protein-coupled receptor. 4-CMTB contains an N-thiazolylamide motif but no acid group, and 4-CMTB and C3 bind to different sites on FFA2 and show allosteric cooperativity. Recently, FFA2 agonists have been described that contain both N-thiazolylamide and carboxylate groups, reminiscent of bitopic ligands. These are thought to engage the carboxylate-binding site on FFA2, but preliminary evidence suggests they do not bind to the same site as 4-CMTB even though both contain N-thiazolylamide. Here, we describe the characterization of four FFA2 ligands containing both N-thiazolylamide and carboxylate. (R)-3-benzyl-4-((4-(2-chlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl)(methyl)amino)-4-oxobutanoic acid (compound 14) exhibits allosteric agonism with 4-CMTB but not C3. Three other compounds agonize FFA2 in [35S]GTPγS-incorporation or cAMP assays but behave as inverse agonists in yeast-based gene-reporter assays, showing orthosteric antagonism of C3 responses but allosteric antagonism of 4-CMTB responses. Thus, the bitopic-like FFA2 ligands engage the orthosteric site but do not compete at the site of 4-CMTB binding on an FFA2 receptor molecule. Compound 14 activates FFA2 on human neutrophils and mouse adipocytes, but appears not to inhibit lipolysis upon treatment of human primary adipocytes in spite of the presence of a functional FFA2 receptor in these cells. Hence, these new ligands may reveal differences in coupling of FFA2 between human and rodent adipose tissues. PMID:26236484

  1. Antibacterial properties of soap containing some fatty acid esters.

    PubMed

    Pandey, N K; Natraj, C V; Kalle, G P; Nambudiry, M E

    1985-02-01

    Synopsis Chemical microbial inhibitors compatible with formulations of soaps and deodorant perfumes are more effective if they are substantive to the skin. However, highly effective inhibitors are toxic and their substantivity on skin may accentuate the toxicity. Natural compounds such as short to medium chain fatty acids and their derivatives, which are known to be germicidal, offer a viable alternative to chemical inhibitors. We report here the synthesis of sodium 2-lauroyloxy propionate and an in vivo method to test its substantivity on skin following its incorporation in soaps. Among several compounds tested, sodium 2-lauroyloxy propionate was found to be highly substantive in soap formulation. PMID:19460009

  2. Properties of nanocellulose isolated from corncob residue using sulfuric acid, formic acid, oxidative and mechanical methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Bin; Du, Haishun; Lv, Dong; Zhang, Yuedong; Yu, Guang; Mu, Xindong; Peng, Hui

    2016-10-20

    In this work, nanocellulose was extracted from bleached corncob residue (CCR), an underutilized lignocellulose waste from furfural industry, using four different methods (i.e. sulfuric acid hydrolysis, formic acid (FA) hydrolysis, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation, and pulp refining, respectively). The self-assembled structure, morphology, dimension, crystallinity, chemical structure and thermal stability of prepared nanocellulose were investigated. FA hydrolysis produced longer cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) than the one obtained by sulfuric acid hydrolysis, and resulted in high crystallinity and thermal stability due to its preferential degradation of amorphous cellulose and lignin. The cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) with fine and individualized structure could be isolated by TEMPO-mediated oxidation. In comparison with other nanocellulose products, the intensive pulp refining led to the CNFs with the longest length and the thickest diameter. This comparative study can help to provide an insight into the utilization of CCR as a potential source for nanocellulose production. PMID:27474618

  3. Polyetheretherketone/poly (glycolic acid) blend scaffolds with biodegradable properties.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Chenying; Wu, Ping; Zhong, Yancheng; Feng, Pei; Gao, Chengde; Huang, Wei; Zhou, Zhiyang; Chen, Li; Shuai, Cijun

    2016-10-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is widely applied in tissue engineering due to its good biocompatibility and mechanical properties. However, the slow degradation rate limits its further application. In this study, PEEK blended with plyglycolicacid (PGA) was used to fabricate porous scaffolds via selective laser sintering. The results demonstrated that the blend scaffolds could gradually degrade, and the degradation rate was able to regulate by tailoring the PGA content. Moreover, the scaffolds maintained good biocompatibility and suitable mechanical properties. These were explained as follows: PGA on the surface layer of the scaffolds might degrade first owing to its exposure to the ambient medium. The degraded PGA left much space, which could promote cell attachment and proliferation. Meanwhile, the slow degradation of PEEK was beneficial to sustaining the scaffolds' strength and stable structure. PMID:27398735

  4. Specific chaperones and regulatory domains in control of amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Landreh, Michael; Rising, Anna; Presto, Jenny; Jörnvall, Hans; Johansson, Jan

    2015-10-30

    Many proteins can form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, but only about 30 amyloids are linked to disease, whereas some proteins form physiological amyloid-like assemblies. This raises questions of how the formation of toxic protein species during amyloidogenesis is prevented or contained in vivo. Intrinsic chaperoning or regulatory factors can control the aggregation in different protein systems, thereby preventing unwanted aggregation and enabling the biological use of amyloidogenic proteins. The molecular actions of these chaperones and regulators provide clues to the prevention of amyloid disease, as well as to the harnessing of amyloidogenic proteins in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:26354437

  5. Metal ion complexation properties of fulvic acids extracted from composted sewage sludge as compared to a soil fulvic acid.

    PubMed

    Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G; Oliveira, César J S

    2002-07-01

    Complexation properties of an anthropogenic fulvic acid (FA) extracted from a composted sewage sludge (csFA) for Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) were studied at pH=6 and at a concentration of 25 mg L(-1). For the case of Cu(II), a particular analysis of the complexation phenomena was done at pH values of 3, 4, 5 and 6 and at aqueous FA concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 mg L(-1) by synchronous excitation molecular fluorescence spectroscopy (SyF). Potentiometric titrimetry with Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and H+ ion-selective electrodes and acid-base conductimetric titrations were used to obtain experimental information about the acid properties and complexation phenomena. A comparison of the results obtained for csFA with a natural soil FA (sFA) was made. Differences have been detected in the structural composition of the two samples and in the structure of the binding sites. In the csFA, binding site structures containing nitrogen probably play an important role in the complexation, besides oxygen containing structures. Complexation by sFA is mainly due to carboxylic and phenolic structures. Nevertheless, this work shows that csFA have macroscopic complexation properties (magnitude of the conditional stability constant and binding sites concentration) somewhat similar to the natural sFA samples. PMID:12188141

  6. Humic acids: Structural properties and multiple functionalities for novel technological developments.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Bruna Alice Gomes; Motta, Fernanda Lopes; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade

    2016-05-01

    Humic acids (HAs) are macromolecules that comprise humic substances (HS), which are organic matter distributed in terrestrial soil, natural water, and sediment. HAs differ from the other HS fractions (fulvic acid and humins) in that they are soluble in alkaline media, partially soluble in water, and insoluble in acidic media. Due to their amphiphilic character, HAs form micelle-like structures in neutral to acidic conditions, which are useful in agriculture, pollution remediation, medicine and pharmaceuticals. HAs have undefined compositions that vary according to the origin, process of obtainment, and functional groups present in their structures, such as quinones, phenols, and carboxylic acids. Quinones are responsible for the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HAs, which are useful for wound healing and have fungicidal/bactericidal properties. Phenols and carboxylic acids deprotonate in neutral and alkaline media and are responsible for various other functions, such as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of HAs. In particular, the presence of phenolic groups in HAs provides antioxidant properties due to their free radical scavenging capacity. This paper describes the main multifunctionalities of HAs associated with their structures and properties, focusing on human health applications, and we note perspectives that may lead to novel technological developments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review to address this topic from this approach. PMID:26952503

  7. Functions of the histone chaperone nucleolin in diseases.

    PubMed

    Storck, Sébastien; Shukla, Manu; Dimitrov, Stefan; Bouvet, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Alteration of nuclear morphology is often used by pathologist as diagnostic marker for malignancies like cancer. In particular, the staining of cells by the silver staining methods (AgNOR) has been proved to be an important tool for predicting the clinical outcome of some cancer diseases. Two major argyrophilic proteins responsible for the strong staining of cells in interphase are the nucleophosmin (B23) and the nucleolin (C23) nucleolar proteins. Interestingly these two proteins have been described as chromatin associated proteins with histone chaperone activities and also as proteins able to regulate chromatin transcription. Nucleolin seems to be over-expressed in highly proliferative cells and is involved in many aspect of gene expression: chromatin remodeling, DNA recombination and replication, RNA transcription by RNA polymerase I and II, rRNA processing, mRNA stabilisation, cytokinesis and apoptosis. Interestingly, nucleolin is also found on the cell surface in a wide range of cancer cells, a property which is being used as a marker for the diagnosis of cancer and for the development of anti-cancer drugs to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells. In addition to its implication in cancer, nucleolin has been described not only as a marker or as a protein being involved in many diseases like viral infections, autoimmune diseases, Alzheimer's disease pathology but also in drug resistance. In this review we will focus on the chromatin associated functions of nucleolin and discuss the functions of nucleolin or its use as diagnostic marker and as a target for therapy PMID:17484127

  8. Characterization of DNA Binding and Retinoic Acid Binding Properties of Retinoic Acid Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Na; Schule, Roland; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Evans, Ronald M.

    1991-05-01

    High-level expression of the full-length human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α and the DNA binding domain of the RAR in Escherichia coli was achieved by using a T7 RNA polymerase-directed expression system. After induction, full-length RAR protein was produced at an estimated level of 20% of the total bacterial proteins. Both intact RAR molecules and the DNA binding domain bind to the cognate DNA response element with high specificity in the absence of retinoic acid. However, this binding is enhanced to a great extent upon the addition of eukaryotic cell extracts. The factor responsible for this enhancement is heat-sensitive and forms a complex with RAR that binds to DNA and exhibits a distinct migration pattern in the gel-mobility-shift assay. The interaction site of the factor with RAR is localized in the 70-amino acid DNA binding region of RAR. The hormone binding ability of the RARα protein was assayed by a charcoal absorption assay and the RAR protein was found to bind to retinoic acid with a K_d of 2.1 x 10-10 M.

  9. Mid-Infrared Spectroscopic Properties of Humic Acid and Fulvic Acid-Soil Mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The detection of humic materials in soils is essential in order to determine organic matter (SOM) stability and C sequestration on agricultural land. Mid-Infrared (MidIR) spectroscopy has been used to characterize SOM quality [1], study extracted soil humic acids [2], develop calibrations for quanti...

  10. Mid-Infrared Spectroscopic Properties of Humic Acid and Fulvic Acid-Soil Mixtures.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The detection of humic materials in soils is essential in order to determine organic matter (SOM) stability and C sequestration on agricultural land. Mid-Infrared (MidIR) spectroscopy has been used to characterize SOM quality [1], study extracted soil humic acids [2], develop calibrations for quanti...

  11. Molecular characterization of two novel molecular chaperones in bacterial-challenged Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haihong; Shao, Yina; Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Chenghua; Lv, Zhimeng; Jin, Chunhua

    2015-10-01

    Molecular chaperones of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) are involved in protein folding and assembly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Increasing evidences also suggest that these two molecules play an important role in immune response. In the present study, we cloned and characterized GRP78 and PDI genes from Apostichopus japonicus by RNA-seq and RACE approaches (designated as AjGRP78 and AjPDI, respectively). The AjGRP78 cDNA was of 2355bp including an open reading frame (ORF) of 2013 bp encoding a protein of 670 amino acids with three heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family signatures. AjGRP78 contained a 23-amino acid signal peptide at the N-terminus and a HDEL motif at the C-terminus, which supported the location of the protein in the ER. The full length cDNA of AjPDI was of 1893 bp with a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 153 bp, a 3' UTR of 228 bp and an ORF of 1512 bp encoding a protein of 503 amino acids. A 17-amino acid signal peptide, two thioredoxin domains with two active sites of CGHC, and KDEL retention signal were totally conserved in the deduced amino acid of AjPDI. Phylogenic analysis and multiple alignments have shown that both genes shared remarkably higher degree of structural conservation and sequence identities with other counterparts from invertebrates and vertebrates, further supporting that the two proteins were novel members of molecular chaperone family. Spatial expression analysis revealed that AjGRP78 mRNA transcripts were dominantly expressed in the tentacle, while AjPDI mRNA levels were abundant in the muscle, intestine and respiratory trees. For Vibrio splendidus challenged sea cucumber, the peak expression of AjGRP78 and AjPDI mRNAs in coelomocytes were detected at 24h with 1.73-fold increase and at 6h with 1.83-fold increase compared with the control group, respectively. Similarly, a significant increase in the relative mRNA levels of AjGRP78 and AjPDI was also identified in 1 μg mL(-1

  12. Optical property of iron binding to Suwannee River fulvic acid.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Li, Mingyang; Wang, Dongsheng; Xiao, Feng

    2013-05-01

    In this work, absorbance and fluorescence spectra were used to study iron binding to standard Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). The differential logarithm-transformed absorbance and fluorescence spectra of SRFA induced by iron binding were processed to examine the nature of the observed phenomena and to investigate the contributions of discrete binding sites present in SRFA. Both the Fe-differential log-transformed absorbance and fluorescence were well correlated to the bound iron concentrations predicted based on the Non-ideal Competitive Adsorption (NICA-Donnan) model at iron concentrations below 10.0μM (R(2)>0.99 for absorbance and R(2)>0.97 for fluorescence) and over a wide pH range of 3.5-8.0. At pH3.5, both the Fe-differential log-transformed absorbance and fluorescence vs. iron bound spectra exhibited significantly lower slopes than those at pH5.0, 7.0, and 8.0. These results suggest that a different set of complexation-active chromophores and fluorophores are responsible for iron binding at low pH values or that the NICA-Donnan model is limited at low pH. Because phenolic and carboxylic complex sites of different fluorophores respond to iron quenching, the fluorescence data indicate three stages of iron binding to phenolic, carboxylic, and Donnan gels (electrostatic interactions) in SRFA (with R(2)>0.99 at each stage). The agreement between observations from spectroscopic indices and established metal-binding models shows that the absorbance and fluorescence spectra provide important information about the involvement of metal complexation of specific functional groups typical for fulvic acids. PMID:23499223

  13. Neutrophil migration inhibitory properties of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The role of fatty acid structure, metabolism, and possible second messenger systems.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, A; Goh, D; Harvey, D P; Robinson, B S; Hii, C S; Bates, E J; Hardy, S J; Johnson, D W; Poulos, A

    1994-01-01

    The n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) appear to have antiinflammatory properties that can be partly explained by their biological activity on leukocytes. Since leukocyte emigration is an essential component of the inflammatory response, we have examined the effects of the n-3 PUFA (eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids) on neutrophil random and chemotactic movement. Preexposure of neutrophils for 15-30 min to 1-10 micrograms/ml PUFA reduced the random and chemotactic migration to both FMLP- and fungi-activated complement. The inhibitory effect diminished with increasing saturation and carbon chain length, and methylation abolished this activity. Arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids were the most active fatty acids. The PUFA concentration required to inhibit migration was dependent on cell number, suggesting that the fatty acid effects on leukocyte migration in vivo may be governed by the stage of the inflammatory response. It was concluded that the PUFA rather than their metabolites were responsible for the inhibition since: (a) antioxidants did not prevent the PUFA-induced migration inhibition and the hydroxylated intermediates were less active, and (b) inhibitors of the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways were without effect. Inhibitors of protein kinases and calmodulin-dependent enzyme system did not prevent the PUFA-induced migration inhibition, which was also independent of phospholipase D-catalyzed hydrolysis of phospholipids. It is also shown that PUFA decrease the FMLP-induced Ca2+ mobilization. Images PMID:8132744

  14. Structural stability and prebiotic properties of resistant starch type 3 increase bile acid turnover and lower secondary bile acid formation.

    PubMed

    Dongowski, Gerhard; Jacobasch, Gisela; Schmiedl, Detlef

    2005-11-16

    Microbial metabolism is essential in maintaining a healthy mucosa in the large bowel, preferentially through butyrate specific mechanisms. This system depends on starch supply. Two structurally different resistant starches type 3 (RS3) have been investigated with respect to their resistance to digestion, fermentability, and their effects on the composition and turnover of bile acids in rats. RSA (a mixture of retrograded maltodextrins and branched high molecular weight polymers), which is more resistant than RSB (a retrograded potato starch), increased the rate of fermentation accompanied by a decrease of pH in cecum, colon, and feces. Because they were bound to RS3, less bile acids were reabsorbed, resulting in a higher turnover through the large bowel. Because of the rise of volume, the bile acid level was unchanged and the formation of secondary bile acids was partly suppressed. The results proved a strong relation between RS3, short chain fatty acid production, and microflora. However, butyrate specific benefits are only achieved by an intake of RS3 that result in good fermentation properties, which depend on the kind of the resistant starch structures. PMID:16277431

  15. Structure-property relationships in halogenbenzoic acids: Thermodynamics of sublimation, fusion, vaporization and solubility.

    PubMed

    Zherikova, Kseniya V; Svetlov, Aleksey A; Kuratieva, Natalia V; Verevkin, Sergey P

    2016-10-01

    Temperature dependences of vapor pressures for 2-, 3-, and 4-bromobenzoic acid, as well as for five isomeric bromo-methylbenzoic acids were studied by the transpiration method. Melting temperatures and enthalpies of fusion for all isomeric bromo-methylbenzoic acids and 4-bromobenzoic acid were measured with a DSC. The molar enthalpies of sublimation and vaporization were derived. These data together with results available in the literature were collected and checked for internal consistency using a group-additivity procedure and results from X-ray structural diffraction studies. Specific (hydrogen bonding) interactions in the liquid and in the crystal phase of halogenbenzoic acids were quantified based on experimental values of vaporization and sublimation enthalpies. Structure-property correlations of solubilities of halogenobenzoic acids with sublimation pressures and sublimation enthalpies were developed and solubilities of bromo-benzoic acids were estimated. These new results resolve much of the ambiguity in the available thermochemical and solubility data on bromobenzoic acids. The approach based on structure property correlations can be applied for the assessment of water solubility of sparingly soluble drugs. PMID:27424058

  16. Dynamic mechanical and swelling properties of maleated hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Kai; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-06-01

    A series of maleated hyaluronan (MaHA) are developed by modification with maleic anhydride. The degrees of substitution (DS) of MaHA vary between 7% and 75%. The DS of MaHA is both higher and wider than methacrylated HA derivatives (MeHA) reported in the literature. MaHA hydrogels are then prepared by photopolymerization and their dynamic mechanical and swelling properties of the hydrogels are investigated. The results showed that MaHA hydrogels with moderate DS (25%, 50% and 65%) have higher storage modulus and lower equilibrium swelling ratios than those with either low or high DS (7%, 15% and 75%). Theoretical analyses also suggest a similar pattern among hydrogels with different DS. The results confirm that the increased cross-linking density enhances the strength of hydrogels. Meanwhile, the hydrophilicity of introduced groups during modification and the degree of incomplete crosslinking reaction might have negative impact on the mechanical and swelling properties of MaHA hydrogels. PMID:25843871

  17. Peat humic acids and their complex forming properties as influenced by peat humification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudare, D.; Klavins, M.

    2012-04-01

    To study paleoenvironmental changes of importance is understanding of processes of organic matter diagenesis, especially changes of refractory part of natural organic substances - humic substances. Studies of the living organic matter humification process are also essential for understanding of the carbon biogeochemical cycle. The aim of this study was to analyze peat organic matter diagenesis: changes of properties of humic acids, relations between the humification process, properties of peat, peat humic acids, their ability to interact with metal ions, as well ability to accumulate metals. The analysis were carried out on samples of humic substances preparatively extracted from three ombrotrophic bog peat profiles to identify the links between peat age, decomposition and humification degree, botanical composition and properties of peat humic acids elemental (C, H, N, O), functional (-COOH, -OH) composition, structural characteristics - UV, fluorescence, FTIR. The found variability of peat properties is less significant than differences in the properties of peat-forming living matter, thus revealing the dominant impact of humification process on the properties of peat. Correspondingly, composition of peat humic acids is little affected by differences in the properties of precursor living organic material, and such indicators as decomposition degree, humification degree, humic acid elemental ratio and concentrations of acidic functional groups are the best descriptors of changes in organic matter during the process of organic matter diagenesis and humification. Peat ability to accumulate major and trace elements depends on the character of element supply, potency of metal ions to bind functionalities in the peat, with an emphasis on the structure of peat humic acid, pH reaction, oxygen presence, presence of complexing compounds, inorganic ions and many other factors. Major and trace element presence in peat is of importance as an indicator of peat genesis and

  18. Effect of leucine-to-methionine substitutions on the diffraction quality of histone chaperone SET/TAF-Ibeta/INHAT crystals.

    PubMed

    Senda, Miki; Muto, Shinsuke; Horikoshi, Masami; Senda, Toshiya

    2008-10-01

    One of the most frequent problems in crystallization is poor quality of the crystals. In order to overcome this obstacle several methods have been utilized, including amino-acid substitutions of the target protein. Here, an example is presented of crystal-quality improvement by leucine-to-methionine substitutions. A variant protein with three amino-acid substitutions enabled improvement of the crystal quality of the histone chaperone SET/TAF-Ibeta/INHAT when combined with optimization of the cryoconditions. This procedure improved the resolution of the SET/TAF-Ibeta/INHAT crystals from around 5.5 to 2.3 A without changing the crystallization conditions. PMID:18931446

  19. Enhancement of the Electrical Properties of CVD-Grown Graphene with Ascorbic Acid Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chunmiao; Chen, Zhiying; Zhang, Haoran; Zhang, Yaqian; Zhang, Yanhui; Sui, Yanping; Yu, Guanghui; Cao, Yijiang

    2016-02-01

    Ascorbic acid was used to modify to chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene films transferred onto SiO2 substrate. Residual polymer (polymethyl methacrylate), Fe3+, Cl-, H2O, and O2 affected the electrical and thermal properties on graphene during the transfer or device fabrication processes. Exposure of transferred graphene to ascorbic acid resulted in significantly enhanced electrical properties with increased charge carrier mobility. All devices exhibited more than 30% improvement in room temperature carrier mobility in air. The carrier mobility of the treated graphene did not significantly decrease in 21 days. This result can be attributed to electron donation to graphene through the -OH functional group in ascorbic acid that is absorbed in graphene. This work provides a method to enhance the electrical properties of CVD-grown graphene.

  20. Pharmacological properties of protocatechuic Acid and its potential roles as complementary medicine.

    PubMed

    Semaming, Yoswaris; Pannengpetch, Patchareewan; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the reported pharmacological properties of protocatechuic acid (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid), a type of phenolic acid found in many food plants such as olives and white grapes. PCA is a major metabolite of anthocyanin. The pharmacological actions of PCA have been shown to include strong in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity. In in vivo experiments using rats and mice, PCA has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory as well as antihyperglycemic and antiapoptotic activities. Furthermore, PCA has been shown to inhibit chemical carcinogenesis and exert proapoptotic and antiproliferative effects in different cancerous tissues. Moreover, in vitro studies have shown PCA to have antimicrobial activities and also to exert synergistic interaction with some antibiotics against resistant pathogens. This review aims to comprehensively summarize the pharmacological properties of PCA reported to date with an emphasis on its biological properties and mechanisms of action which could be therapeutically useful in a clinical setting. PMID:25737736

  1. Pharmacological Properties of Protocatechuic Acid and Its Potential Roles as Complementary Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Semaming, Yoswaris; Pannengpetch, Patchareewan; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the reported pharmacological properties of protocatechuic acid (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid), a type of phenolic acid found in many food plants such as olives and white grapes. PCA is a major metabolite of anthocyanin. The pharmacological actions of PCA have been shown to include strong in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity. In in vivo experiments using rats and mice, PCA has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory as well as antihyperglycemic and antiapoptotic activities. Furthermore, PCA has been shown to inhibit chemical carcinogenesis and exert proapoptotic and antiproliferative effects in different cancerous tissues. Moreover, in vitro studies have shown PCA to have antimicrobial activities and also to exert synergistic interaction with some antibiotics against resistant pathogens. This review aims to comprehensively summarize the pharmacological properties of PCA reported to date with an emphasis on its biological properties and mechanisms of action which could be therapeutically useful in a clinical setting. PMID:25737736

  2. Copper-mediated dimerization of CopZ, a predicted copper chaperone from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Kihlken, Margaret A; Leech, Andrew P; Le Brun, Nick E

    2002-01-01

    Understanding the metal-binding properties and solution states of metallo-chaperones is a key step in understanding how they function in metal ion transfer. Using spectroscopic, bioanalytical and biochemical methods, we have investigated the copper-binding properties and association states of the putative copper chaperone of Bacillus subtilis, CopZ, and a variant of the protein lacking the two cysteine residues of the MXCXXC copper-binding motif. We show that copper-free CopZ exists as a monomer, but that addition of copper(I) causes the protein to associate into homodimers. The nature of the copper(I)-CopZ complex is dependent on the level of copper loading, and we report the detection of three distinct forms, containing 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 copper(I) ions per protein. The presence of excess dithiothreitol has a significant effect on copper(I) binding to CopZ, such that, in its presence, copper(I)-CopZ occurs mainly as a monomer species. Data for copper binding to the double-cysteine variant of CopZ are consistent with an essential role for these residues in tight copper binding in the wild-type protein. We conclude that the complex nature of copper(I) binding to CopZ may underpin mechanisms of protein-to-protein copper(I) transfer. PMID:12238948

  3. Chaperone potential of Pulicaria undulata extract in preventing aggregation of stressed proteins.

    PubMed

    Ghahghaei, Arezou; Valizadeh, Jafar; Nazari, Shahrzad; Ravandeh, Mehdi

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the effect of an aqueous extract of Pulicaria undulata on the 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT)-induced aggregation of proteins. The effects of the chaperone properties of P. undulata extract on protein aggregation were determined by measuring light scattering absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The aqueous extract of P. undulata possesses good chaperone properties but the protection effect was varied in different protein. The extract showed a higher level of protection in high molecular weight proteins than in those of low molecular weight. Using a fluorescence study, the present study provides information on the hydrophobic area of proteins interacting with the P. undulata extract. In fact, by increasing the concentration of the P. undulata extract, the hydrophic area of the protein decreased. CD spectroscopy also revealed that DTT caused changes in both the tertiary and the secondary structure of the proteins, while in the presence of P. undulata extract, there was little change. Our finding suggests the possibility of using P. undulata extract for the inhibition of aggregation and the deposition of protein in disease. PMID:24599512

  4. Chaperone-enhanced purification of unconventional myosin 15, a molecular motor specialized for stereocilia protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Bird, Jonathan E; Takagi, Yasuharu; Billington, Neil; Strub, Marie-Paule; Sellers, James R; Friedman, Thomas B

    2014-08-26

    Unconventional myosin 15 is a molecular motor expressed in inner ear hair cells that transports protein cargos within developing mechanosensory stereocilia. Mutations of myosin 15 cause profound hearing loss in humans and mice; however, the properties of this motor and its regulation within the stereocilia organelle are unknown. To address these questions, we expressed a subfragment 1-like (S1) truncation of mouse myosin 15, comprising the predicted motor domain plus three light-chain binding sites. Following unsuccessful attempts to express functional myosin 15-S1 using the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9)-baculovirus system, we discovered that coexpression of the muscle-myosin-specific chaperone UNC45B, in addition to the chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) significantly increased the yield of functional protein. Surprisingly, myosin 15-S1 did not bind calmodulin with high affinity. Instead, the IQ domains bound essential and regulatory light chains that are normally associated with class II myosins. We show that myosin 15-S1 is a barbed-end-directed motor that moves actin filaments in a gliding assay (∼ 430 nm · s(-1) at 30 °C), using a power stroke of 7.9 nm. The maximum ATPase rate (k(cat) ∼ 6 s(-1)) was similar to the actin-detachment rate (k(det) = 6.2 s(-1)) determined in single molecule optical trapping experiments, indicating that myosin 15-S1 was rate limited by transit through strongly actin-bound states, similar to other processive myosin motors. Our data further indicate that in addition to folding muscle myosin, UNC45B facilitates maturation of an unconventional myosin. We speculate that chaperone coexpression may be a simple method to optimize the purification of other myosin motors from Sf9 insect cells. PMID:25114250

  5. Molecular chaperones and proteostasis regulation during redox imbalance☆

    PubMed Central

    Niforou, Katerina; Cheimonidou, Christina; Trougakos, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    Free radicals originate from both exogenous environmental sources and as by-products of the respiratory chain and cellular oxygen metabolism. Sustained accumulation of free radicals, beyond a physiological level, induces oxidative stress that is harmful for the cellular homeodynamics as it promotes the oxidative damage and stochastic modification of all cellular biomolecules including proteins. In relation to proteome stability and maintenance, the increased concentration of oxidants disrupts the functionality of cellular protein machines resulting eventually in proteotoxic stress and the deregulation of the proteostasis (homeostasis of the proteome) network (PN). PN curates the proteome in the various cellular compartments and the extracellular milieu by modulating protein synthesis and protein machines assembly, protein recycling and stress responses, as well as refolding or degradation of damaged proteins. Molecular chaperones are key players of the PN since they facilitate folding of nascent polypeptides, as well as holding, folding, and/or degradation of unfolded, misfolded, or non-native proteins. Therefore, the expression and the activity of the molecular chaperones are tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and post-translational level at organismal states of increased oxidative and, consequently, proteotoxic stress, including ageing and various age-related diseases (e.g. degenerative diseases and cancer). In the current review we present a synopsis of the various classes of intra- and extracellular chaperones, the effects of oxidants on cellular homeodynamics and diseases and the redox regulation of chaperones. PMID:24563850

  6. Pharmacological chaperones for human α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase.

    PubMed

    Clark, Nathaniel E; Metcalf, Matthew C; Best, Daniel; Fleet, George W J; Garman, Scott C

    2012-10-23

    Schindler/Kanzaki disease is an inherited metabolic disease with no current treatment options. This neurologic disease results from a defect in the lysosomal α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (α-NAGAL) enzyme. In this report, we show evidence that the iminosugar DGJNAc can inhibit, stabilize, and chaperone human α-NAGAL both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that a related iminosugar DGJ (currently in phase III clinical trials for another metabolic disorder, Fabry disease) can also chaperone human α-NAGAL in Schindler/Kanzaki disease. The 1.4- and 1.5-Å crystal structures of human α-NAGAL complexes reveal the different binding modes of iminosugars compared with glycosides. We show how differences in two functional groups result in >9 kcal/mol of additional binding energy and explain the molecular interactions responsible for the unexpectedly high affinity of the pharmacological chaperones. These results open two avenues for treatment of Schindler/Kanzaki disease and elucidate the atomic basis for pharmacological chaperoning in the entire family of lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:23045655

  7. Pharmacological chaperones for human α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Nathaniel E.; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Best, Daniel; Fleet, George W. J.; Garman, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Schindler/Kanzaki disease is an inherited metabolic disease with no current treatment options. This neurologic disease results from a defect in the lysosomal α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (α-NAGAL) enzyme. In this report, we show evidence that the iminosugar DGJNAc can inhibit, stabilize, and chaperone human α-NAGAL both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that a related iminosugar DGJ (currently in phase III clinical trials for another metabolic disorder, Fabry disease) can also chaperone human α-NAGAL in Schindler/Kanzaki disease. The 1.4- and 1.5-Å crystal structures of human α-NAGAL complexes reveal the different binding modes of iminosugars compared with glycosides. We show how differences in two functional groups result in >9 kcal/mol of additional binding energy and explain the molecular interactions responsible for the unexpectedly high affinity of the pharmacological chaperones. These results open two avenues for treatment of Schindler/Kanzaki disease and elucidate the atomic basis for pharmacological chaperoning in the entire family of lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:23045655

  8. Super Spy variants implicate flexibility in chaperone action

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Shu; Wang, Lili; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Makepeace, Karl AT; Horowitz, Scott; Yang, Jianyi; Zhang, Yang; Borchers, Christoph H; Bardwell, James CA

    2014-01-01

    Experimental study of the role of disorder in protein function is challenging. It has been proposed that proteins utilize disordered regions in the adaptive recognition of their various binding partners. However apart from a few exceptions, defining the importance of disorder in promiscuous binding interactions has proven to be difficult. In this paper, we have utilized a genetic selection that links protein stability to antibiotic resistance to isolate variants of the newly discovered chaperone Spy that show an up to 7 fold improved chaperone activity against a variety of substrates. These “Super Spy” variants show tighter binding to client proteins and are generally more unstable than is wild type Spy and show increases in apparent flexibility. We establish a good relationship between the degree of their instability and the improvement they show in their chaperone activity. Our results provide evidence for the importance of disorder and flexibility in chaperone function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01584.001 PMID:24497545

  9. Chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhonen, P. M.; Linna, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation through a nanometer-scale pore assisted by chaperones binding to the polymer is a process encountered in vivo for proteins. Studying the relevant models by computer simulations is computationally demanding. Accordingly, previous studies are either for stiff polymers in three dimensions or flexible polymers in two dimensions. Here, we study chaperone-assisted translocation of flexible polymers in three dimensions using Langevin dynamics. We show that differences in binding mechanisms, more specifically, whether a chaperone can bind to a single site or multiple sites on the polymer, lead to substantial differences in translocation dynamics in three dimensions. We show that the single-binding mode leads to dynamics that is very much like that in the constant-force driven translocation and accordingly mainly determined by tension propagation on the cis side. We obtain β ≈1.26 for the exponent for the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length. This fairly low value can be explained by the additional friction due to binding particles. The multiple-site binding leads to translocation the dynamics of which is mainly determined by the trans side. For this process we obtain β ≈1.36 . This value can be explained by our derivation of β =4 /3 for constant-bias translocation, where translocated polymer segments form a globule on the trans side. Our results pave the way for understanding and utilizing chaperone-assisted translocation where variations in microscopic details lead to rich variations in the emerging dynamics.

  10. RNA chaperones buffer deleterious mutations in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Rudan, Marina; Schneider, Dominique; Warnecke, Tobias; Krisko, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Both proteins and RNAs can misfold into non-functional conformations. Protein chaperones promote native folding of nascent polypeptides and refolding of misfolded species, thereby buffering mutations that compromise protein structure and function. Here, we show that RNA chaperones can also act as mutation buffers that enhance organismal fitness. Using competition assays, we demonstrate that overexpression of select RNA chaperones, including three DEAD box RNA helicases (DBRHs) (CsdA, SrmB, RhlB) and the cold shock protein CspA, improves fitness of two independently evolved Escherichia coli mutator strains that have accumulated deleterious mutations during short- and long-term laboratory evolution. We identify strain-specific mutations that are deleterious and subject to buffering when introduced individually into the ancestral genotype. For DBRHs, we show that buffering requires helicase activity, implicating RNA structural remodelling in the buffering process. Our results suggest that RNA chaperones might play a fundamental role in RNA evolution and evolvability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04745.001 PMID:25806682

  11. Hsp100/ClpB Chaperone Function and Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Vierling, Elizabeth

    2015-01-27

    The supported research investigated the mechanism of action of a unique class of molecular chaperones in higher plants, the Hsp100/ClpB proteins, with the ultimate goal of defining how these chaperones influence plant growth, development, stress tolerance and productivity. Molecular chaperones are essential effectors of cellular “protein quality control”, which comprises processes that ensure the proper folding, localization, activation and turnover of proteins. Hsp100/ClpB proteins are required for temperature acclimation in plants, optimal seed yield, and proper chloroplast development. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and genetic and molecular approaches were used to investigate two of the three members of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins in plants, cytosolic AtHsp101 and chloroplast-localized AtClpB-p. Investigating the chaperone activity of the Hsp100/ClpB proteins addresses DOE goals in that this activity impacts how “plants generate and assemble components” as well as “allowing for their self repair”. Additionally, Hsp100/ClpB protein function in plants is directly required for optimal “utilization of biological energy” and is involved in “mechanisms that control the architecture of energy transduction systems”.

  12. Effect of citric acid concentration and hydrolysis time on physicochemical properties of sweet potato starches.

    PubMed

    Surendra Babu, Ayenampudi; Parimalavalli, Ramanathan; Rudra, Shalini Gaur

    2015-09-01

    Physicochemical properties of citric acid treated sweet potato starches were investigated in the present study. Sweet potato starch was hydrolyzed using citric acid with different concentrations (1 and 5%) and time periods (1 and 11 h) at 45 °C and was denoted as citric acid treated starch (CTS1 to CTS4) based on their experimental conditions. The recovery yield of acid treated starches was above 85%. The CTS4 sample displayed the highest amylose (around 31%) and water holding capacity its melting temperature was 47.66 °C. The digestibility rate was slightly increased for 78.58% for the CTS3 and CTS4. The gel strength of acid modified starches ranged from 0.27 kg to 1.11 kg. RVA results of acid thinned starches confirmed a low viscosity profile. CTS3 starch illustrated lower enthalpy compared to all other modified starches. All starch samples exhibited a shear-thinning behavior. SEM analysis revealed that the extent of visible degradation was increased at higher hydrolysis time and acid concentration. The CTS3 satisfied the criteria required for starch to act as a fat mimetic. Overall results conveyed that the citric acid treatment of sweet potato starch with 5% acid concentration and 11h period was an ideal condition for the preparation of a fat replacer. PMID:26188303

  13. Microstructure and far infrared emission properties of tourmaline powders eroded by hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinsheng; Li, Juan; Meng, Junping; Ding, Yan; Xue, Gang

    2010-03-01

    The microstructure and far infrared emission properties of tourmaline powders eroded by hydrochloric acid were investigated. The indexes including crystal structure, unit cell volume, microstructure and infrared spectra were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the crystal structure was not changed; however, the unit cell volume decreased, the angularities of tourmaline particles became smooth, and there appeared nanohollows on their surfaces. The infrared emission properties were enhanced at proper concentrations of hydrochloric acid solutions. PMID:20355630

  14. Surface properties of superfine alumina trihydrate after surface modification with stearic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gui-hua; Zhou, Bo-hao; Li, Yun-feng; Qi, Tian-gui; Li, Xiao-bin

    2015-05-01

    The surface properties of superfine alumina trihydrate (ATH) after surface modification were studied by measuring the contact angle, active ratio, oil adsorption, total organic carbon, adsorption ratio, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum. The contact angle increased initially and then slowly decreased with an increase of the amount of stearic acid. However, the surface free energy decreased initially and then increased. Surface modification with stearic acid or sodium stearate can benefit from elevating temperature. The base surface tension component and the free energy of Lewis acid-base both declined sharply following the surface modification. Excess stearic acid was physically adsorbed in the form of multilayer adsorption, and an interaction between oxygen on the ATH surface and hydroxyl in stearic acid was subsequently determined. Our results further indicated that the contact angle and adsorption ratio can be used as control indicators for surface modification compared with active ratio, oil adsorption and total organic carbon.

  15. BIOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF NUCLEIC ACIDS AT SURFACES RELEVANT TO MICROARRAY PERFORMANCE

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Archana N.; Grainger, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Both clinical and analytical metrics produced by microarray-based assay technology have recognized problems in reproducibility, reliability and analytical sensitivity. These issues are often attributed to poor understanding and control of nucleic acid behaviors and properties at solid-liquid interfaces. Nucleic acid hybridization, central to DNA and RNA microarray formats, depends on the properties and behaviors of single strand (ss) nucleic acids (e.g., probe oligomeric DNA) bound to surfaces. ssDNA’s persistence length, radius of gyration, electrostatics, conformations on different surfaces and under various assay conditions, its chain flexibility and curvature, charging effects in ionic solutions, and fluorescent labeling all influence its physical chemistry and hybridization under assay conditions. Nucleic acid (e.g., both RNA and DNA) target interactions with immobilized ssDNA strands are highly impacted by these biophysical states. Furthermore, the kinetics, thermodynamics, and enthalpic and entropic contributions to DNA hybridization reflect global probe/target structures and interaction dynamics. Here we review several biophysical issues relevant to oligomeric nucleic acid molecular behaviors at surfaces and their influences on duplex formation that influence microarray assay performance. Correlation of biophysical aspects of single and double-stranded nucleic acids with their complexes in bulk solution is common. Such analysis at surfaces is not commonly reported, despite its importance to microarray assays. We seek to provide further insight into nucleic acid-surface challenges facing microarray diagnostic formats that have hindered their clinical adoption and compromise their research quality and value as genomics tools. PMID:24765522

  16. A method for determining thermophysical properties of organic material in aqueous solutions: Succinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riipinen, I.; Svenningsson, B.; Bilde, M.; Gaman, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-12-01

    A method for determining evaporation rates and thermodynamic properties of aqueous solution droplets is introduced. The method combines evaporation rate measurements using modified TDMA technique with data evaluation using an accurate evaporation model. The first set of data has been collected and evaluated for succinic acid aqueous solution droplets. Evaporation rates of succinic acid solution droplets have been measured using a TDMA system at controlled relative humidity (65%) and temperature (298 K). A temperature-dependent expression for the saturation vapour pressure of pure liquid phase succinic acid at atmospheric temperatures has been derived by analysing the evaporation rate data with a numerical model. The obtained saturation vapour pressure of liquid phase succinic acid is ln( p) = 118.41 - 16204.8/ T - 12.452ln( T). The vapour pressure is in unit of Pascal and the temperature in Kelvin. A linear expression for the enthalpy of vaporization for liquid state succinic acid is also presented. According to the results presented in the following, a literature expression for the vapour pressure of liquid phase succinic acid defined for temperatures higher than 461 K [Yaws, C.L., 2003. Yaws' Handbook of Thermodynamic and Physical Properties of Chemical Compounds, Knovel] can be extrapolated to atmospheric temperatures with very good accuracy. The results also suggest that at 298 K the mass accommodation coefficient of succinic acid is unity or very close to unity.

  17. Aha1 can act as an autonomous chaperone to prevent aggregation of stressed proteins.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vishwadeepak; Darnauer, Stefanie; Hartwig, Nadine R; Obermann, Wolfgang M J

    2014-12-26

    Aha1 (activator of Hsp90 ATPase) stimulates the ATPase activity of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 to accelerate the conformational cycle during which client proteins attain their final shape. Thereby, Aha1 promotes effective folding of Hsp90-dependent clients such as steroid receptors and many kinases involved in cellular signaling. In our current study, we find that Aha1 plays a novel, additional role beyond regulating the Hsp90 ATP hydrolysis rate. We propose a new concept suggesting that Aha1 acts as an autonomous chaperone and associates with stress-denatured proteins to prevent them from aggregation similar to the chaperonin GroEL. Our study reveals that an N-terminal sequence of 22 amino acids, present in human but absent from yeast Aha1, is critical for this capability. However, in lieu of fostering their refolding, Aha1 allows ubiquitination of bound clients by the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP. Accordingly, Aha1 may promote disposal of folding defective proteins by the cellular protein quality control. PMID:25378400

  18. The Hsp110 molecular chaperone stabilizes apolipoprotein B from endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD).

    PubMed

    Hrizo, Stacy L; Gusarova, Viktoria; Habiel, David M; Goeckeler, Jennifer L; Fisher, Edward A; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2007-11-01

    Apolipoprotein B (apoB) is the most abundant protein in low density lipoproteins and plays key roles in cholesterol homeostasis. The co-translational degradation of apoB is controlled by fatty acid levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is mediated by the proteasome. To define the mechanism of apoB degradation, we employed a cell-free system in which proteasome-dependent degradation is recapitulated with yeast cytosol, and we developed an apoB yeast expression system. We discovered that a yeast Hsp110, Sse1p, associates with and stabilizes apoB, which contrasts with data indicating that select Hsp70s and Hsp90s facilitate apoB degradation. However, the Ssb Hsp70 chaperones have no effect on apoB turnover. To determine whether our results are relevant in mammalian cells, Hsp110 was overexpressed in hepatocytes, and enhanced apoB secretion was observed. This study indicates that chaperones within distinct complexes can play unique roles during ER-associated degradation (ERAD), establishes a role for Sse1/Hsp110 in ERAD, and identifies Hsp110 as a target to lower cholesterol. PMID:17823116

  19. Properties and structure of peat humic acids depending on humification and precursor biota in bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-04-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic component of soil, peat and natural waters, but their structure and properties very much differs depending on their source. The aim of this study is to characterize humic acids from raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the homogeneity of humic acids isolated from the bog bodies and study peat humification impact on properties of humic acids. A major impact on the structure of peat humic acids have raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin) void of lignin. For characterization of peat humic acids their elemental (CHNOS), functional (-COOH, phenolic OH) analysis, spectroscopic characterization (UV, fluorescence, FTIR, 1H NMR, CP/MAS 13C NMR, ESR) and degradation studies (Py-GC/MS) were done. Peat humic acids (HA) have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, but thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge. Comparatively, the studied peat HAs are at the start of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups changes depending on the depth of peat from which HAs have been isolated: and carboxylic acidity is increasing with depth of peat location and the humification degree. The ability to influence the surface tension of peat humic acids isolated from a well-characterized bog profile demonstrates dependence on age and humification degree. With increase of the humification degree and age of humic acids, their molecular complexity and ability to influence surface tension decreases; even so, the impact of the biological precursor (peat-forming bryophytes and plants) can be identified.

  20. Magnetic properties, acid neutralization capacity, and net acid production of rocks in the Animas River Watershed Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCafferty, Anne E.; Yager, Douglas B.; Horton, Radley M.; Diehl, Sharon F.

    2006-01-01

    Federal land managers along with local stakeholders in the Upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colorado are actively designing and implementing mine waste remediation projects to mitigate the effects of acid mine drainage from several abandoned hard rock metal mines and mills. Local source rocks with high acid neutralization capacity (ANC) within the watershed are of interest to land managers for use in these remediation projects. A suite of representative samples was collected from propylitic to weakly sericitic-altered volcanic and plutonic rocks exposed in outcrops throughout the watershed. Acid-base accounting laboratory methods coupled with mineralogic and geochemical characterization provide insight into lithologies that have a range of ANC and net acid production (NAP). Petrophysical lab determinations of magnetic susceptibility converted to estimates for percent magnetite show correlation with the environmental properties of ANC and NAP for many of the lithologies. A goal of our study is to interpret watershed-scale airborne magnetic data for regional mapping of rocks that have varying degrees of ANC and NAP. Results of our preliminary work are presented here.

  1. Modulation of human stratum corneum properties by salicylic acid and all-trans-retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Goffin, V; Piérard, G E

    1998-01-01

    Topical all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) has been reported to decrease the in vivo skin response to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). The converse was also shown with a synergistic effect of RA following prior applications of SLS. The reason for such effects is not clear. We employed measures of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), squamometry and sequential corneosurfametry to explore the protective activity of a 0.05% RA cream at the level of the stratum corneum. Nonionic oil-in-water emulsions with or without 5% salicylic acid (SA) served as test product references. Data indicated that the RA formulation was responsible for a stochastic impairment in the TEWL and for an increased intercorneocyte cohesion. SA and the unmedicated emulsion did not lead to similar TEWL changes. The squamometry test proved to be very sensitive to disclose the effects of SA and RA without, however, allowing to distinguish the difference in the physiological processes involved. The corneosurfametry bioassay did not show any protection or synergistic effect between RA or SA and SLS challenge on the stratum corneum. This is in contrast to a previous work showing a positive protective effect afforded by retinol against SLS. The combined effects of irritant compounds affecting the stratum corneum are complex. The precise reason for some of their biological consequences remains a conundrum. On balance, products such as SA and RA do not appear to afford protection or impairment to a surfactant challenge at the level of the stratum corneum. PMID:9885411

  2. The measles virus (MV) glycoproteins interact with cellular chaperones in the endoplasmic reticulum and MV infection upregulates chaperone expression.

    PubMed

    Bolt, G

    2001-01-01

    The present study examines the coprecipitation of measles virus (MV) glycoproteins with host cell endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone proteins. Both the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) glycoproteins interacted with calnexin and GRP78, whereas interaction with calreticulin was only demonstrated for the H glycoprotein. The alpha-glucosidase inhibitor castanospermine reduced and delayed the association of F proteins with calnexin. We have previously shown that alpha-glucosidase activity is important for the functionality and antigenicity of the MV F glycoprotein and for release of MV particles from infected cells. Thus, interaction with calnexin appears vital for processing of nascent MV F protein into its functional conformation. In contrast to many other viral glycoproteins, a substantial proportion of the pulsed MV glycoproteins remained associated with ER chaperones for more than 2(1/2) h. Thus, the slow and incomplete migration of MV glycoproteins to the cell surface may result from their retention by ER chaperones, probably due to malfolding. MV infection upregulated the cellular expression of calreticulin and GRP78 and also increased their presence at the cell surface. The chaperone proteins are involved in a wide range of cellular processes, and their induction by MV may play a role for the pathogenesis of measles and its sequelae. PMID:11765911

  3. Enhancement of soluble expression of codon-optimized Thermomicrobium roseum sarcosine oxidase in Escherichia coli via chaperone co-expression.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yanjun; Feng, Shoushuai; Xin, Yu; Yang, Hailin; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Wu; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-20

    The codon-optimized sarcosine oxidase from Thermomicrobium roseum (TrSOX) was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and its soluble expression was significantly enhanced via the co-expression of chaperones. With the assistance of whole-genome analysis of T. roseum DSM 5159, the sox gene was predicated and its sequence was optimized based on the codon bias of E. coli. The TrSOX gene was successfully constructed in the pET28a plasmid. After induction with IPTG for 8h, SDS-PAGE analysis of crude enzyme solutions showed a significant 43 kDa protein band, indicating SOX was successfully expressed in E. coli. However, the dark band corresponding to the intracellular insoluble fraction indicated that most of TrSOX enzyme existed in the inactive form in "inclusion bodies" owing to the "hot spots" of TrSOX. Furthermore, the co-expression of five different combinations of chaperones indicated that the soluble expression of TrSOX was greatly improved by the co-expression of molecular chaperones GroES-GroEL and DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE-GroES-GroEL. Additionally, the analysis of intramolecular forces indicated that the hydrophobic amino acids, hydrogen bonds, and ionic bonds were favorable for enhancing the interaction and stability of TrSOX secondary structure. This study provides a novel strategy for enhancing the soluble expression of TrSOX in E. coli. PMID:26626227

  4. Characterization and Structure of a Novel Zn2+ and [2Fe-2S]-Containing Copper Chaperone from Archaeoglobus fulgidus

    SciTech Connect

    Sazinsky,M.; LeMoine, B.; Orofino, M.; Davydo, R.; Bencze, K.; Stemmler, T.; Hoffman, B.; Arguello, J.; Rosenzweig, A.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial CopZ proteins deliver copper to P{sub 1B}-type Cu{sup +}-ATPases that are homologous to the human Wilson and Menkes disease proteins. The genome of the hyperthermophile Archaeoglobus fulgidus encodes a putative CopZ copper chaperone that contains an unusual cysteine-rich N-terminal domain of 130 amino acids in addition to a C-terminal copper binding domain with a conserved CXXC motif. The N-terminal domain (CopZ-NT) is homologous to proteins found only in extremophiles and is the only such protein that is fused to a copper chaperone. Surprisingly, optical, electron paramagnetic resonance, and x-ray absorption spectroscopic data indicate the presence of a [2Fe-2S] cluster in CopZ-NT. The intact CopZ protein binds two copper ions, one in each domain. The 1.8{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of CopZ-NT reveals that the [2Fe-2S] cluster is housed within a novel fold and that the protein also binds a zinc ion at a four-cysteine site. CopZ can deliver Cu{sup +} to the A. fulgidus CopA N-terminal metal binding domain and is capable of reducing Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup +}. This unique fusion of a redox-active domain with a CXXC-containing copper chaperone domain is relevant to the evolution of copper homeostatic mechanisms and suggests new models for copper trafficking.

  5. Identification of peptides in human Hsp20 and Hsp27 that possess molecular chaperone and anti-apoptotic activities

    PubMed Central

    Nahomi, Rooban B.; DiMauro, Michael A.; Wang, Benlian; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have identified peptides in the ‘crystallin-domain’ of the small heat-shock protein (sHSP) α-crystallin with chaperone and anti-apoptotic activities. We found that peptides in heat-shock protein Hsp20 (G71HFSVLLDVKHFSPEEIAVK91) and Hsp27 (D93RWRVSLDVNHFAPDELTVK113) with sequence homology to α-crystallin also have robust chaperone and anti-apoptotic activities. Both peptides inhibited hyperthermic and chemically induced aggregation of client proteins. The scrambled peptides of Hsp20 and Hsp27 showed no such effects. The chaperone activities of the peptides were better than those from αA- and αB-crystallin. HeLa cells took up the FITC-conjugated Hsp20 peptide and, when the cells were thermally stressed, the peptide was translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The two peptides inhibited apoptosis in HeLa cells by blocking cytochrome c release from the mitochondria and caspase-3 activation. We found that scrambling the last four amino acids in the two peptides (KAIV in Hsp20 and KTLV in Hsp27) made them unable to enter cells and ineffective against stress-induced apoptosis. Intraperitoneal injection of the peptides prevented sodium-selenite-induced cataract formation in rats by inhibiting protein aggregation and oxidative stress. Our study has identified peptides from Hsp20 and Hsp27 that may have therapeutic benefit in diseases where protein aggregation and apoptosis are contributing factors. PMID:25332102

  6. Drosophila Frataxin: an Iron Chaperone During Cellular [2Fe-2S] Cluster Bioassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kondapalli,K.; Kok, N.; Dancis, A.; Stemmler, T.

    2008-01-01

    Frataxin, a mitochondrial protein that is directly involved in regulating cellular iron homeostasis, has been suggested to serve as an iron chaperone during cellular Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. In humans, decreased amounts or impaired function of frataxin causes the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder Friedreich's ataxia. Cellular production of Fe-S clusters is accomplished by the Fe cofactor assembly platform enzymes Isu (eukaryotes) and IscU (prokaryotes). In this report, we have characterized the overall stability and iron binding properties of the Drosophila frataxin homologue (Dfh). Dfh is highly folded with secondary structural elements consistent with the structurally characterized frataxin orthologs. While the melting temperature (TM {approx} 59 C) and chemical stability ([urea]50% {approx} 2.4 M) of Drosophila frataxin, measured using circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy, closely match values determined for the human ortholog, pure Dfh is more stable against autodegradation than both the human and yeast proteins. The ferrous iron binding affinity (Kd {approx} 6.0 {mu}M) and optimal metal to protein stoichiometry (1:1) for Dfh have been measured using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Under anaerobic conditions with salt present, holo-Dfh is a stable iron-loaded protein monomer. Frataxin prevents reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative damage to DNA when presented with both Fe(II) and H2O2. Ferrous iron bound to Dfh is high-spin and held in a partially symmetric Fe-(O/N)6 coordination environment, as determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) simulations indicate the average Fe-O/N bond length in Dfh is 2.13 Angstroms, consistent with a ligand geometry constructed by water and carboxylate oxygens most likely supplied in part by surface-exposed conserved acidic residues located on helix 1 and strand 1 in the structurally characterized frataxin orthologs. The iron

  7. Drosophila Frataxin: An Iron Chaperone During Cellular Fe-S Cluster Bioassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kondapalli, K.C.; Kok, N.M.; Dancis, A.; Stemmler, T.L.

    2009-05-20

    Frataxin, a mitochondrial protein that is directly involved in regulating cellular iron homeostasis, has been suggested to serve as an iron chaperone during cellular Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. In humans, decreased amounts or impaired function of frataxin causes the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder Friedreich's ataxia. Cellular production of Fe-S clusters is accomplished by the Fe cofactor assembly platform enzymes Isu (eukaryotes) and IscU (prokaryotes). In this report, we have characterized the overall stability and iron binding properties of the Drosophila frataxin homologue (Dfh). Dfh is highly folded with secondary structural elements consistent with the structurally characterized frataxin orthologs. While the melting temperature (T{sub M} {approx} 59 C) and chemical stability ([urea]{sub 50} {approx} 2.4 M) of Drosophila frataxin, measured using circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy, closely match values determined for the human ortholog, pure Dfh is more stable against autodegradation than both the human and yeast proteins. The ferrous iron binding affinity (K{sub d} {approx} 6.0 {micro}M) and optimal metal to protein stoichiometry (1:1) for Dfh have been measured using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Under anaerobic conditions with salt present, holo-Dfh is a stable iron-loaded protein monomer. Frataxin prevents reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative damage to DNA when presented with both Fe(II) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Ferrous iron bound to Dfh is high-spin and held in a partially symmetric Fe-(O/N){sub 6} coordination environment, as determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) simulations indicate the average Fe-O/N bond length in Dfh is 2.13 {angstrom}, consistent with a ligand geometry constructed by water and carboxylate oxygens most likely supplied in part by surface-exposed conserved acidic residues located on helix 1 and strand 1 in the structurally

  8. Drosophila Frataxin: An Iron Chaperone during Cellular Fe–S Cluster Bioassembly†

    PubMed Central

    Kondapalli, Kalyan C.; Kok, Nicole M.; Dancis, Andrew; Stemmler, Timothy L.

    2009-01-01

    Frataxin, a mitochondrial protein that is directly involved in regulating cellular iron homeostasis, has been suggested to serve as an iron chaperone during cellular Fe–S cluster biosynthesis. In humans, decreased amounts or impaired function of frataxin causes the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder Friedreich’s ataxia. Cellular production of Fe–S clusters is accomplished by the Fe cofactor assembly platform enzymes Isu (eukaryotes) and IscU (prokaryotes). In this report, we have characterized the overall stability and iron binding properties of the Drosophila frataxin homologue (Dfh). Dfh is highly folded with secondary structural elements consistent with the structurally characterized frataxin orthologs. While the melting temperature (TM ≈ 59 °C) and chemical stability ([urea]50% ≈ 2.4 M) of Drosophila frataxin, measured using circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy, closely match values determined for the human ortholog, pure Dfh is more stable against autodegradation than both the human and yeast proteins. The ferrous iron binding affinity (Kd ≈ 6.0 μM) and optimal metal to protein stoichiometry (1:1) for Dfh have been measured using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Under anaerobic conditions with salt present, holo-Dfh is a stable iron-loaded protein monomer. Frataxin prevents reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative damage to DNA when presented with both Fe(II) and H2O2. Ferrous iron bound to Dfh is high-spin and held in a partially symmetric Fe–(O/N)6 coordination environment, as determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) simulations indicate the average Fe–O/N bond length in Dfh is 2.13 Å, consistent with a ligand geometry constructed by water and carboxylate oxygens most likely supplied in part by surface-exposed conserved acidic residues located on helix 1 and strand 1 in the structurally characterized frataxin orthologs. The iron

  9. Antioxidant and pro-oxidant properties of active rosemary constituents: carnosol and carnosic acid.

    PubMed

    Aruoma, O I; Halliwell, B; Aeschbach, R; Löligers, J

    1992-02-01

    1. Carnosol and carnosic acid have been suggested to account for over 90% of the antioxidant properties of rosemary extract. 2. Purified carnosol and carnosic acid are powerful inhibitors of lipid peroxidation in microsomal and liposomal systems, more effective than propyl gallate. 3. Carnosol and carnosic acid are good scavengers of peroxyl radicals (CCl3O2.) generated by pulse radiolysis, with calculated rate constants of 1-3 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 and 2.7 x 10(7) M-1 s-1 respectively. 4. Carnosic acid reacted with HOCl in such a way as to protect the protein alpha 1-antiproteinase against inactivation. 5. Both carnosol and carnosic acid stimulated DNA damage in the bleomycin assay but they scavenged hydroxyl radicals in the deoxyribose assay. The calculated rate constants for reaction with .OH in the deoxyribose system for carnosol and carnosic acid were 8.7 x 10(10) M-1 s-1 and 5.9 x 10(10) M-1 s-1 respectively. 6. Carnosic acid appears to scavenge H2O2, but it could also act as a substrate for the peroxidase system. 7. Carnosic acid and carnosol reduce cytochrome c but with a rate constant significantly lower than that of O2(-.). PMID:1378672

  10. Isoquercitrin Esters with Mono- or Dicarboxylic Acids: Enzymatic Preparation and Properties.

    PubMed

    Vavříková, Eva; Langschwager, Fanny; Jezova-Kalachova, Lubica; Křenková, Alena; Mikulová, Barbora; Kuzma, Marek; Křen, Vladimír; Valentová, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    A series of isoquercitrin (quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside) esters with mono- or dicarboxylic acids was designed to modulate hydro- and lipophilicity and biological properties. Esterification of isoquercitrin was accomplished by direct chemoenzymatic reaction using Novozym 435 (lipase from Candida antarctica), which accepted C₅- to C12-dicarboxylic acids; the shorter ones, such as oxalic (C₂), malonic (C₃), succinic (C₄) and maleic (C₄) acids were not substrates of the lipase. Lipophilicity of monocarboxylic acid derivatives, measured as log P, increased with the chain length. Esters with glutaric and adipic acids exhibited hydrophilicity, and the dodecanedioic acid hemiester was more lipophilic. All derivatives were less able to reduce Folin-Ciocalteau reagent (FCR) and scavenge DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) than isoquercitrin; ABTS (2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) radical-scavenging activity was comparable. Dodecanoate and palmitate were the least active in FCR and ABTS scavenging; dodecanoate and hemiglutarate were the strongest DPPH scavengers. In contrast, most derivatives were much better inhibitors of microsomal lipoperoxidation than isoquercitrin; butyrate and hexanoate were the most efficient. Anti-lipoperoxidant activity of monocarboxylic derivatives, except acetates, decreased with increasing aliphatic chain. The opposite trend was noted for dicarboxylic acid hemiesters, isoquercitrin hemidodecanedioate being the most active. Overall, IQ butyrate, hexanoate and hemidodecanedioate are the most promising candidates for further studies. PMID:27338349

  11. Isoquercitrin Esters with Mono- or Dicarboxylic Acids: Enzymatic Preparation and Properties

    PubMed Central

    Vavříková, Eva; Langschwager, Fanny; Jezova-Kalachova, Lubica; Křenková, Alena; Mikulová, Barbora; Kuzma, Marek; Křen, Vladimír; Valentová, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    A series of isoquercitrin (quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside) esters with mono- or dicarboxylic acids was designed to modulate hydro- and lipophilicity and biological properties. Esterification of isoquercitrin was accomplished by direct chemoenzymatic reaction using Novozym 435 (lipase from Candida antarctica), which accepted C5- to C12-dicarboxylic acids; the shorter ones, such as oxalic (C2), malonic (C3), succinic (C4) and maleic (C4) acids were not substrates of the lipase. Lipophilicity of monocarboxylic acid derivatives, measured as log P, increased with the chain length. Esters with glutaric and adipic acids exhibited hydrophilicity, and the dodecanedioic acid hemiester was more lipophilic. All derivatives were less able to reduce Folin–Ciocalteau reagent (FCR) and scavenge DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) than isoquercitrin; ABTS (2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) radical-scavenging activity was comparable. Dodecanoate and palmitate were the least active in FCR and ABTS scavenging; dodecanoate and hemiglutarate were the strongest DPPH scavengers. In contrast, most derivatives were much better inhibitors of microsomal lipoperoxidation than isoquercitrin; butyrate and hexanoate were the most efficient. Anti-lipoperoxidant activity of monocarboxylic derivatives, except acetates, decreased with increasing aliphatic chain. The opposite trend was noted for dicarboxylic acid hemiesters, isoquercitrin hemidodecanedioate being the most active. Overall, IQ butyrate, hexanoate and hemidodecanedioate are the most promising candidates for further studies. PMID:27338349

  12. Micromechanical properties of intercalated compounds of graphite oxide with dodecahydro- closо-dodecaboric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, A. A.; Saldin, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    The micromechanical properties (Young's modulus, deformation, and adhesion) of the intercalated compound of graphite oxide with dodecahydro- closo-dodecaboric acid were studied by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy and compared with the same characteristics of the starting graphite oxide. The significant difference in the micromechanical properties of the materials under study is dictated by differences in the topography and properties of their film surface, which, in turn, can be determined by their chemical composition. The introduction of dodecahydro- closo-dodecaboric acid in the interplanar space of graphite oxide affects the structuring of the latter. A considerable increase in the adhesion of the intercalated compound relative to that of oxide graphite is explained by high adhesive properties of the introduced acid, the Young's modulus of graphite oxide being higher than that of the intercalated compound. This was attributed to the high hydrophilicity of dodecahydro- closo-dodecaboric acid and the difficulty of water removal from the interplanar space; water plasticizes the material, which becomes softer than graphite oxide. The difference in the structure of the coating of the intercalated compounds and the starting graphite oxide was found to be also reflected by their Raman spectra, namely, by the increased intensity of the D line with the preserved position of the G line, which points to the impurity nature of the intercalate and the unchanged hexagonal lattice of graphite.

  13. Effects of high-melting methyl esters on crystallization properties of fatty acid methyl ester mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is a renewable alternative diesel fuel made from vegetable oils and animal fats. The most common form of biodiesel in the United States are fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) from soybean, canola, and used cooking oils, waste greases, and tallow. Cold flow properties of biodiesel depend on th...

  14. Luminescent and triboluminescent properties of europium(III) complex with cinnamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinovskaya, I. V.; Mirochnik, A. G.; Nagornyi, I. G.

    2014-10-01

    An intensely emitting crystalline europium(III) complex with cinnamic acid [Eu(Cin)3] n and exhibiting triboluminescent properties is synthesized. It is established that the measured photo- and triboluminescence spectra are identical for the above polymeric non-centrosymmetric complex and are determined by the characteristic f-f luminescence of the europium(III) ion.

  15. Some Antifungal Properties of Sorbic Acid Extracted from Berries of Rowan (Sorbus Aucuparia).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Ulrich

    1985-01-01

    The food preservative sorbic acid can be extracted from Eurasian mountain ash berries (commercially available) and used to show antifungal properties in microbiological investigations. Techniques for extraction, purification, ultraviolet analysis, and experiments displaying antifungal activity are described. A systematic search for similar…

  16. [Chemico-physical property and bile acid binding capacity of several antacids].

    PubMed

    Salvioli, G; Tambara, E; Gaetti, E; Lugli, R

    1989-01-01

    Liquid alginate (Gaviscon) binds small amount of bile acids. At pH 7 its viscosity (at low shear rate) is higher than that of other antiacids. High viscosity reduces the diffusion rate of bile salts and glucose and this property can play a role in the treatment of gastro-esophageal and duodeno-gastric refluxes. PMID:2548124

  17. Physical and mechanical properties of extruded poly(lactic acid)-based Paulownia elongata biocomposites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Paulownia wood flour (PWF), a byproduct of milling lumber, was tested as bio-filler with polylactic acid (PLA). Paulownia wood (PW) shavings were milled and separated into particle fractions and then blended with PLA with a single screw extruder. Mechanical and thermal properties were tested. Dif...

  18. Effect of soybean oil fatty acid composition and selenium application on biodiesel properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel consisting of principally monounsaturated fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) has been reported to strike the best balance between cold flow properties and oxidative stability, therefore producing a superior fuel. In addition, treating biodiesel with antioxidants such as selenium also increas...

  19. Effects of polyalkylene glycols and fatty acid soaps on properties of synthetic lubricating-cooling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Stulii, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The lack of any effect of the polyalkylene glycols on the series of properties of the fatty acid soaps was confirmed by replacing the PEG-35 in the synthetic lubricating-cooling fluid (LCF) by a polyethylene glycol with a molecular weight of 400 or 6000, a propylene oxide oligomer with a molecular weight of 700, or a copolymer of ethylene and propylene oxides (Pluronic 44, Pluriol PE-6400, Hydropol 200). Attempts to select surfactants and optimal concentrations in synthetic LCFs based on polyalkylene glycols. Indicates that of the studied soaps, those of the most interest are the triethanolamine soaps of individual C/sub 6/-C/sub 10/ fatty acids and commercial mixed C/sub 7/-C/sub 9/ synthetic fatty acids. Finds that the polyalkylene glycols and the indicated soaps supplement each other, imparting the required set of properties to the LCF.

  20. Variability of humic acid properties depending on their precursor material: a study of peat profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of variation of peat composition, presence of trace elements in the peat and HSs within peat profiles can give information on the character of transformation of organic matter, important for C biogeochemical cycling, but also about impacts of climate change and human activities. In peat the transformation and decay process of living organic matter (humification) is retarded by the acidic and anaerobic environment, but at the same time the peat can provide information on environmental and paleo-environmental conditions of the past. The aim of the present study is to analyze the elemental and functional composition, spectral characteristics of humic acids isolated from a well characterized raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the impact of the character of humification processes on the peat HA properties. A comparative and complex characterization of humic acids (HAs) isolated from peat profiles of different origin in Latvia was carried out. Elemental and functional analysis of the isolated HAs was done, their acidity and molecular weights estimated. Spectral characterization included UV-Vis, IR, and electron spin resonance and fluorescence spectra. Structural characterization of HAs was by both 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Comparison of position of studied humic acids in the Van Krevelen graph was done, thus locating them in the biogeochemical transformation processes of organic matter. Properties of HAs isolated from the Latvian peat were compared with HA from other sources (soil, water, coal and synthetic humic substances). Major properties of peat HAs depended on their origin, indicating the importance of humification processes. HAs isolated from peat of more recent origin were more similar to soil HAs, but from older sources there was a greater degree of humification. Changes of surface tension of solutions of humic acids stress the differences in aggregation character - ability to form supramacromolecular complexes of humic substances

  1. Targeting ligand-operated chaperone sigma-1 receptors in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Teruo, Hayashi; Shang-Yi, Tsai; Tomohisa, Mori; Michiko, Fujimoto; Tsung-Ping, Su

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Current conventional therapeutic drugs for the treatment of psychiatric or neurodegenerative disorders have certain limitations of use. Psychotherapeutic drugs such as typical and atypical antipsychotics, tricyclic antidepressants, and selective monoamine reuptake inhibitors, aim to normalize the hyper- or hypo-neurotransmission of monoaminergic systems. Despite their great contribution to the outcomes of psychiatric patients, these agents often exert severe side effects and require chronic treatments to promote amelioration of symptoms. Furthermore, drugs available for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders are severely limited. Areas covered This review discusses recent evidence that has shed light on sigma-1 receptor ligands, which may serve as a new class of antidepressants or neuroprotective agents. Sigma-1 receptors are novel ligand-operated molecular chaperones regulating a variety of signal transduction, ER stress, cellular redox, cellular survival, and synaptogenesis. Selective sigma-1 receptor ligands exert rapid antidepressant-like, anxiolytic, antinociceptive and robust neuroprotective actions in preclinical studies. The review also looks at recent studies which suggest that reactive oxygen species might play a crucial role as signal integrators at the downstream of Sig-1Rs Expert opinion The significant advances in sigma receptor research in the last decade have begun to elucidate the intracellular signal cascades upstream and downstream of sigma-1 receptors. The novel ligand-operated properties of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone may enable a variety of interventions by which stress-related cellular systems are pharmacologically controlled. PMID:21375464

  2. Individual and collective contributions of chaperoning and degradation to protein homeostasis in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Cho, Younhee; Zhang, Xin; Pobre, Kristine Faye R; Liu, Yu; Powers, David L; Kelly, Jeffery W; Gierasch, Lila M; Powers, Evan T

    2015-04-14

    The folding fate of a protein in vivo is determined by the interplay between a protein's folding energy landscape and the actions of the proteostasis network, including molecular chaperones and degradation enzymes. The mechanisms of individual components of the E. coli proteostasis network have been studied extensively, but much less is known about how they function as a system. We used an integrated experimental and computational approach to quantitatively analyze the folding outcomes (native folding versus aggregation versus degradation) of three test proteins biosynthesized in E. coli under a variety of conditions. Overexpression of the entire proteostasis network benefited all three test proteins, but the effect of upregulating individual chaperones or the major degradation enzyme, Lon, varied for proteins with different biophysical properties. In sum, the impact of the E. coli proteostasis network is a consequence of concerted action by the Hsp70 system (DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE), the Hsp60 system (GroEL/GroES), and Lon. PMID:25843722

  3. Anatomy of RISC: how do small RNAs and chaperones activate Argonaute proteins?

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Kotaro

    2016-09-01

    RNA silencing is a eukaryote-specific phenomenon in which microRNAs and small interfering RNAs degrade messenger RNAs containing a complementary sequence. To this end, these small RNAs need to be loaded onto an Argonaute protein (AGO protein) to form the effector complex referred to as RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). RISC assembly undergoes multiple and sequential steps with the aid of Hsc70/Hsp90 chaperone machinery. The molecular mechanisms for this assembly process remain unclear, despite their significance for the development of gene silencing techniques and RNA interference-based therapeutics. This review dissects the currently available structures of AGO proteins and proposes models and hypotheses for RISC assembly, covering the conformation of unloaded AGO proteins, the chaperone-assisted duplex loading, and the slicer-dependent and slicer-independent duplex separation. The differences in the properties of RISC between prokaryotes and eukaryotes will also be clarified. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:637-660. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1356 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27184117

  4. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone GRP170: From Immunobiology to Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxia; Pezeshki, Abdul Mohammad; Yu, Xiaofei; Guo, Chunqing; Subjeck, John R.; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-regulated protein 170 (GRP170) is the largest member of glucose-regulated protein family that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). As a component of the ER chaperone network, GRP170 assists in protein folding, assembly, and transportation of secretory or transmembrane proteins. The well documented cytoprotective activity of intracellular GRP170 due to its intrinsic chaperoning property has been shown to provide a survival benefit in cancer cells during tumor progression or metastasis. Accumulating evidence shows that extracellular GRP170 displays a superior capacity in delivering tumor antigens to specialized antigen-presenting cells for cross-presentation, resulting in generation of an anti-tumor immune response dependent on cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. This unique feature of GRP170 provides a molecular basis for using GRP170 as an immunostimulatory adjuvant to develop a recombinant vaccine for therapeutic immunization against cancers. This review summarizes the latest findings in understanding the biological effects of GRP170 on cell functions and tumor progression. The immunomodulating activities of GRP170 during interactions with the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system as well as its therapeutic applications in cancer immunotherapy will be discussed. PMID:25629003

  5. Individual and Collective Contributions of Chaperoning and Degradation to Protein Homeostasis in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Younhee; Zhang, Xin; Pobre, Kristine Faye R.; Liu, Yu; Powers, David L.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Gierasch, Lila M.; Powers, Evan T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The folding fate of a protein in vivo is determined by the interplay between a protein’s folding energy landscape and the actions of the proteostasis network, including molecular chaperones and degradation enzymes. The mechanisms of individual components of the E. coli proteostasis network have been studied extensively, but much less is known about how they function as a system. We used an integrated experimental and computational approach to quantitatively analyze the folding outcomes (native folding vs. aggregation vs. degradation) of three test proteins biosynthesized in E. coli under a variety of conditions. Overexpression of the entire proteostasis network benefited all three test proteins, but the effect of upregulating individual chaperones or the major degradation enzyme, Lon, varied for proteins with different biophysical properties. In sum, the impact of the E. coli proteostasis network is a consequence of concerted action by the Hsp70 system (DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE), the Hsp60 system (GroEL/GroES), and Lon. PMID:25843722

  6. The role of Vif oligomerization and RNA chaperone activity in HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Batisse, Julien; Guerrero, Santiago; Bernacchi, Serena; Sleiman, Dona; Gabus, Caroline; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Marquet, Roland; Tisné, Carine; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells that involve most natural HIV-1 target cells. Vif counteracts the packaging of two cellular cytidine deaminases named APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F by diverse mechanisms including the recruitment of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and the proteasomal degradation of A3G/A3F, the inhibition of A3G mRNA translation or by a direct competition mechanism. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by participating in virus assembly and Gag processing, thus regulating the final stage of virion formation notably genomic RNA dimerization and by inhibiting the initiation of reverse transcription. Vif is a small pleiotropic protein with multiple domains, and recent studies highlighted the importance of Vif conformation and flexibility in counteracting A3G and in binding RNA. In this review, we will focus on the oligomerization and RNA chaperone properties of Vif and show that the intrinsic disordered nature of some Vif domains could play an important role in virus assembly and replication. Experimental evidence demonstrating the RNA chaperone activity of Vif will be presented. PMID:22728817

  7. Impact of phytic acid on nutrient bioaccessibility and antioxidant properties of dehusked rice.

    PubMed

    Lee, H H; Loh, S P; Bong, C F J; Sarbini, S R; Yiu, P H

    2015-12-01

    Whole grains consumption promotes health benefits, but demonstrates controversial impacts from phytic acid in meeting requirements of good health. Therefore, this study was aimed to determine the nutrient bioaccessibility and antioxidant properties of rice cultivars named "Adan" or "Bario" and deduce the nutritional impact of phytic acid. Majority of the dehusked rice in the collection showed an acceptable level of in-vitro starch digestibility and in-vitro protein digestibility, but were poor in antioxidant properties and bioaccessibility of minerals (Ca, Fe and Zn). The drawbacks identified in the rice cultivars were due to relatively high phytic acid content (2420.6 ± 94.6 mg/100 g) and low phenolic content (152.39 ± 18.84 μg GAE/g). The relationship between phytic acid content and mineral bioaccessibility was strongest in calcium (r = 0.60), followed by iron (r = 0.40) and zinc (r = 0.27). Phytic acid content did not significantly correlate with in-vitro starch digestibility and in-vitro protein digestibility but showed a weak relationship with antioxidant properties. These suggest that phytic acid could significantly impair the mineral bioaccessibility of dehusked rice, and also act as an important antioxidant in non-pigmented rice. Bario rice cultivars offered dehusked rice with wide range of in-vitro digestibility of starch and protein, and also pigmented rice as a good source of antioxidants. However, there is a need to reduce phytic acid content in dehusked rice for improved mineral bioaccessibility among Bario rice cultivars. PMID:26604353

  8. Modification of fish skin collagen film and absorption property of tannic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiying; Zhao, Lu; Guo, Shidong; Xia, Yu; Zhou, Peng

    2014-06-01

    Fish collagen is a biomacromolecule material and is usually used as a clarifying agent. However, fish collagen is not recyclable, and sedimentation usually occurs in the clarification process using fish collagen so that the filtration process is inevitable. This work aimed to provide a recyclable modified fish skin collagen film (MFCF) for adsorption of tannic acids. The collagen from channel catfish skin was extracted and used for preparation of the fish skin collagen film (FCF) and MFCF. The result indicated that the mechanical properties of MFCF were improved by addition of 2 ml/L glycerol, 6 ml/L polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and 2 ml/L glutaraldehyde in 15 g/L collagen solution. As the most important property of adsorption material, the hydroscopicity of MFCF was only 54%, significantly lower than that of FCF (295%). Therefore, MFCF would not collapse in water. The infrared and thermal properties of MFCF were also investigated in this work. Results indicated that, in comparison to FCF, the physical and chemical properties of MFCF had been improved significantly. MFCF had higher shrink temperature (79.3 °C) and it did not collapse in distilled water at normal temperature. Furthermore, absorption and desorption properties of tannic acid were studied. MFCF showed good capability of absorption and desorption of tannic acid, which leaded to the suggestion that MFCF could have potential applications in adsorption material. PMID:24876642

  9. Physicochemical Properties and Fatty Acid Profiles of Elaeagnus mollis Diels Nut Oils.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaohua; Yang, Ruinan; Dong, Caiwen; Yang, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    The physicochemical properties, fatty acid profiles, content of tocopherol and sterol of the oils extracted from the nuts of Elaeagnus mollis Diels grown in different regions of China were studied in this work. The results indicated that the Elaeagnus mollis Diels nut oils contained about 0.2% sterols and the tocopherol contents were in the range of 119.6-128.6mg/100g. The nut oils were all rich in unsaturated fatty acids, especially oleic acid and linoleic acid. Furthermore, the main triacylglycerols species of the nut oils were all dilinoleoyl-monoolein (LOL), dioleoyl-monolinoleoyl (OLO) and trilinoleate (LLL). This work might be useful for developing applications for Elaeagnus mollis Diels nut oil. PMID:26632946

  10. Nucleic acid polymeric properties and electrostatics: Directly comparing theory and simulation with experiment.

    PubMed

    Sim, Adelene Y L

    2016-06-01

    Nucleic acids are biopolymers that carry genetic information and are also involved in various gene regulation functions such as gene silencing and protein translation. Because of their negatively charged backbones, nucleic acids are polyelectrolytes. To adequately understand nucleic acid folding and function, we need to properly describe its i) polymer/polyelectrolyte properties and ii) associating ion atmosphere. While various theories and simulation models have been developed to describe nucleic acids and the ions around them, many of these theories/simulations have not been well evaluated due to complexities in comparison with experiment. In this review, I discuss some recent experiments that have been strategically designed for straightforward comparison with theories and simulation models. Such data serve as excellent benchmarks to identify limitations in prevailing theories and simulation parameters. PMID:26482088

  11. Modification of silicon nitride slip properties by poly(acrylic acid)

    SciTech Connect

    Hackley, V.A.; Maglhan, S.G.

    1996-06-01

    Acrylic-acid based polyelectrolytes are used for dispersion and rheology control of ceramic powder slips. This study focuses on the Si{sub 3}N4/H{sub 2}O/poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) system, with the goal of improving our basic understanding of the mechanisms which may significantly affect slip properties during processing. A variety of experimental techniques were employed, including potentiometric titration, electroacoustic analysis, adsorption isotherms, and controlled-stress rheology. The slips exhibited complex behavior over a wide range of conditions in which solids concentration, PAA molecular weight and concentration, and pH were varied. Polymer charge and conformation were found to have significant impact on the flow properties. Pseudoplastic behavior was attributed to the presence of free polymer. The flow properties were also found to be highly pH dependent.

  12. Effect of ascorbic acid on the properties of ammonia caramel colorant additives and acrylamide formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxing; Gu, Zhengbiao

    2014-09-01

    Ammonia caramels are among the most widely used colorant additives in the food industry. They are commonly prepared through the Maillard reaction and caramelization of mixtures of reducing sugars with ammonia or ammonium salts. Antioxidants are known to inhibit acrylamide formation during the Maillard reaction, and they may affect the properties of the ammonia caramel products. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the antioxidant ascorbic acid on the properties of ammonia caramel. A mixture of glucose and ammonia was allowed to react at 120 °C for 60 min in the presence of ascorbic acid at final concentrations of 0 to 0.08 M. The ammonia caramels obtained from these reactions were all positively charged. As the concentration of ascorbic acid increased, the color intensity of the ammonia caramel showed a decreasing trend, while the intensity of the fluorescence and total amount of pyrazines in the volatiles showed a tendency to increase. The addition of ascorbic acid did not result in obvious changes in the UV-visible spectra of the ammonia caramels and the types of pyrazines in the volatiles were also unchanged. It is noteworthy that the addition of 0.02 to 0.08 M ascorbic acid did reduce the formation of the by-product acrylamide, a harmful substance in food. When the concentration of ascorbic acid added reached 0.04 M, the content of acrylamide in the ammonia caramel was 20.53 μg/L, which was approximately 44% lower than that without ascorbic acid. As a result, ascorbic acid can be considered to improve the quality and safety of ammonia caramels. PMID:25204396

  13. Roles of intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in functional regulation of the Hsp70 J-protein co-chaperone sis1

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hyun Young; Ziegelhoffer, Thomas; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Baranowski, Maciej; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2015-02-13

    Unlike other Hsp70 molecular chaperones, those of the eukaryotic cytosol have four residues, EEVD, at their C-termini. EEVD(Hsp70) binds adaptor proteins of the Hsp90 chaperone system and mitochondrial membrane preprotein receptors, thereby facilitating processing of Hsp70-bound clients through protein folding and translocation pathways. Among J-protein co-chaperones functioning in these pathways Sis1 is unique, as it also binds the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. However, little is known about the role of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction. We found that deletion of EEVD(Hsp70) abolished the ability of Sis1, but not the ubiquitous J-protein Ydj1, to partner with Hsp70 in in vitro protein refolding. Sis1 co-chaperone activity with Hsp70ΔEEVD was restored upon substitution of a glutamic acid of the J-domain. Structural analysis revealed that this key glutamic acid, which is not present in Ydj1, forms a salt bridge with an arginine of the immediately adjacent glycine-rich region. Thus, restoration of Sis1 in vitro activity suggests that intramolecular interaction(s) between the J-domain and glycine-rich region controls co-chaperone activity, which is optimal only when Sis1 interacts with the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. Yet, we found that disruption of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction enhances the ability of Sis1 to substitute for Ydj1 in vivo. Our results are consistent with the idea that interaction of Sis1 with EEVD(Hsp70) minimizes transfer of Sis1-bound clients to Hsp70s that are primed for client transfer to folding and translocation pathways by their preassociation with EEVD-binding adaptor proteins. Finally, these interactions may be one means by which cells triage Ydj1- and Sis1-bound clients to productive and quality control pathways, respectively.

  14. Roles of intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in functional regulation of the Hsp70 J-protein co-chaperone sis1

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Hyun Young; Ziegelhoffer, Thomas; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Ciesielski, Szymon J.; Baranowski, Maciej; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2015-02-13

    Unlike other Hsp70 molecular chaperones, those of the eukaryotic cytosol have four residues, EEVD, at their C-termini. EEVD(Hsp70) binds adaptor proteins of the Hsp90 chaperone system and mitochondrial membrane preprotein receptors, thereby facilitating processing of Hsp70-bound clients through protein folding and translocation pathways. Among J-protein co-chaperones functioning in these pathways Sis1 is unique, as it also binds the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. However, little is known about the role of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction. We found that deletion of EEVD(Hsp70) abolished the ability of Sis1, but not the ubiquitous J-protein Ydj1, to partner with Hsp70 in in vitro protein refolding. Sis1 co-chaperone activitymore » with Hsp70ΔEEVD was restored upon substitution of a glutamic acid of the J-domain. Structural analysis revealed that this key glutamic acid, which is not present in Ydj1, forms a salt bridge with an arginine of the immediately adjacent glycine-rich region. Thus, restoration of Sis1 in vitro activity suggests that intramolecular interaction(s) between the J-domain and glycine-rich region controls co-chaperone activity, which is optimal only when Sis1 interacts with the EEVD(Hsp70) motif. Yet, we found that disruption of the Sis1:EEVD(Hsp70) interaction enhances the ability of Sis1 to substitute for Ydj1 in vivo. Our results are consistent with the idea that interaction of Sis1 with EEVD(Hsp70) minimizes transfer of Sis1-bound clients to Hsp70s that are primed for client transfer to folding and translocation pathways by their preassociation with EEVD-binding adaptor proteins. Finally, these interactions may be one means by which cells triage Ydj1- and Sis1-bound clients to productive and quality control pathways, respectively.« less

  15. A unique binding mode enables MCM2 to chaperone histones H3-H4 at replication forks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongda; Strømme, Caroline B; Saredi, Giulia; Hödl, Martina; Strandsby, Anne; González-Aguilera, Cristina; Chen, Shoudeng; Groth, Anja; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2015-08-01

    During DNA replication, chromatin is reassembled by recycling of modified old histones and deposition of new ones. How histone dynamics integrates with DNA replication to maintain genome and epigenome information remains unclear. Here, we reveal how human MCM2, part of the replicative helicase, chaperones histones H3-H4. Our first structure shows an H3-H4 tetramer bound by two MCM2 histone-binding domains (HBDs), which hijack interaction sites used by nucleosomal DNA. Our second structure reveals MCM2 and ASF1 cochaperoning an H3-H4 dimer. Mutational analyses show that the MCM2 HBD is required for MCM2-7 histone-chaperone function and normal cell proliferation. Further, we show that MCM2 can chaperone both new and old canonical histones H3-H4 as well as H3.3 and CENPA variants. The unique histone-binding mode of MCM2 thus endows the replicative helicase with ideal properties for recycling histones genome wide during DNA replication. PMID:26167883

  16. Characterization of RNA binding and chaperoning activities of HIV-1 Vif protein. Importance of the C-terminal unstructured tail.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Dona; Bernacchi, Serena; Xavier Guerrero, Santiago; Brachet, Franck; Larue, Valéry; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Tisne, Carine

    2014-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells, containing the cellular anti-HIV defense cytosine deaminases APOBEC3 (A3G and A3F). Vif neutralizes the antiviral activities of the APOBEC3G/F by diverse mechanisms including their degradation through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and their translational inhibition. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by interacting with Pr55(Gag), reverse transcriptase and genomic RNA. Here, we expressed and purified full-length and truncated Vif proteins, and analyzed their RNA binding and chaperone properties. First, we showed by CD and NMR spectroscopies that the N-terminal domain of Vif is highly structured in solution, whereas the C-terminal domain remains mainly unfolded. Both domains exhibited substantial RNA binding capacities with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range, whereas the basic unfolded C-terminal domain of Vif was responsible in part for its RNA chaperone activity. Second, we showed by NMR chemical shift mapping that Vif and NCp7 share the same binding sites on tRNA(Lys) 3, the primer of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Finally, our results indicate that Vif has potent RNA chaperone activity and provide direct evidence for an important role of the unstructured C-terminal domain of Vif in this capacity. PMID:25144404

  17. Evaluation of the acid properties of porous zirconium-doped and undoped silica materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fuentes-Perujo, D.; Santamaria-Gonzalez, J.; Merida-Robles, J.; Rodriguez-Castellon, E.; Jimenez-Lopez, A.; Maireles-Torres, P. . E-mail: maireles@uma.es; Moreno-Tost, R.

    2006-07-15

    A series of porous silica and Zr-doped silica molecular sieves, belonging to the MCM-41 and MSU families, were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K. Their acid properties have been evaluated by NH{sub 3}-TPD, adsorption of pyridine and deuterated acetonitrile coupled to FT-IR spectroscopy and the catalytic tests of isopropanol decomposition and isomerization of 1-butene. The acidity of purely siliceous solids were, in all cases, very low, while the incorporation of Zr(IV) into the siliceous framework produced an enhancement of the acidity. The adsorption of basic probe molecules and the catalytic behaviour revealed that Zr-doped MSU-type silica was more acidic than the analogous Zr-MCM-41 solid, with a similar Zr content. This high acidity observed in the case of Zr-doped silica samples is due to the presence of surface zirconium atoms with a low coordination, mainly creating Lewis acid sites. - Graphical abstract: The adsorption of basic probe molecules and the catalytic behaviour have revealed that MSU-type materials are more acidic than the analogous MCM-41 solids, mainly after the incorporation of zirconium into the silica framework.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Thermoplastic Polyurethanes Laminated Glass Treated by Acid Etching Combined with Cold Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xibao; Lu, Jinshan; Luo, Junming; Zhang, Jianjun; Ou, Junfei; Xu, Haitao

    2014-10-01

    To overcome the problem of interlaminar delamination of thermoplastic polyurethane laminated glass, silicate glass was etched with hydrofluoric acid and thermoplastic polyurethane was then treated with cold plasma. Compared with the untreated samples, the interlaminar shear strength of acid etching samples, cold plasma-treated samples and acid etching combined with cold plasma-treated samples increased by 97%, 84% and 341%, respectively. Acid etching combined with cold plasma-treated samples exhibited a higher flexural strength and strain as compared with the untreated samples. The impact energy of acid etching samples, cold plasma-treated samples and acid etching combined with cold plasma-treated samples increased by 8.7%, 8.1% and 11.6%, respectively, in comparison with the untreated samples. FT-IR analysis showed that a large number of -C=O, -CO-N and -CO-O-C- groups appeared on the surface of cold plasma-treated thermoplastic polyurethane, which resulted in the formation of hydrogen bonds. SEM results showed that some pittings formed on the surface of the silicate glass treated by acid etching, which resulted in the formation of a three-dimensional interface structure between the silicate glass and polyurethane. Hydrogen bonds combined with the three-dimensional interface between silicate glass and polyurethanes co-improved the mechanical properties of thermoplastic polyurethanes laminated glass.

  19. Degradation of lipid droplet-associated proteins by chaperone-mediated autophagy facilitates lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Susmita; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) selectively degrades a subset of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. A potent physiological activator of CMA is nutrient deprivation, a condition in which intracellular triglyceride stores or lipid droplets (LD) also undergo hydrolysis (lipolysis) to generate free fatty acids for energetic purposes. Here we report that LD-associated proteins perilipin 2 (PLIN2) and perilipin 3 (PLIN3) are CMA substrates and their degradation via CMA precedes lipolysis. In vivo studies revealed that CMA degradation of PLIN2 and PLIN3 was enhanced during starvation, concurrent with elevated levels of cytosolic adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and macroautophagy proteins on LD. CMA blockage both in cultured cells and mouse liver or expression of CMA-resistant PLINs lead to reduced association of ATGL and macrolipophagy-related proteins with LD and the subsequent decrease in lipid oxidation and accumulation of LD. We propose a role of CMA in LD biology and in the maintenance of lipid homeostasis. PMID:25961502

  20. Core acid treatment influence on well reservoir properties in Kazan oil-gas condensate field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janishevskii, A.; Ezhova, A.

    2015-11-01

    The research involves investigation of the influence of hydrochloric acid (HCI-12%) and mud acid (mixture: HCl - 10% and HF - 3%) treatment on the Upper-Jurassic reservoir properties in Kazan oil-gas condensate field wells. The sample collection included three lots of core cylinders from one and the same depth (all in all 42). Two lots of core cylinders were distributed as following: first lot - reservoir properties were determined, and, then thin sections were cut off from cylinder faces; second lot- core cylinders were exposed to hydrochloric acid treatment, then, after flushing the reservoir properties were determined, and thin sections were prepared. Based on the quantitative petrographic rock analysis, involvin 42 thin sections, the following factors were determined: granulometric mineral composition, cement content, intergranular contacts and pore space structure. According to the comparative analysis of initial samples, the following was determined: content decrease of feldspar, clay and mica fragments, mica, clay and carbonate cement; increase of pore spaces while in the investigated samples- on exposure of rocks to acids effective porosity and permeability value range is ambiguous.

  1. Physiological and regulatory properties of the general amino acid transport system of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    DeBusk, R M; DeBusk, A G

    1980-01-01

    The fundamental properties of the general amino acid transport system of Neurospora crassa were investigated in the conidial stage of the life cycle. The transport activity was found to be under genetic control, and an isogenic set of mutants deficient for the neutral, basic, or general amino acid transport systems and combinations thereof was constructed and used for analyzing the properties specific to the general permease. Amino acid transport by this system was found to be a carrier-mediated active process with broad specificity for the neutral and basic amino acids. Kinetic analysis revealed that a common binding site functioned to transport both neutral and basic amino acids and that the permease had a high affinity for its substrates. The kinetic parameters Km, Vmax, and Ki were defined for several substrates. Two modes of regulation were detected: substrate inhibition and ammonium repression. Activity of the general system was enhanced by the removal of ammonium ions from the incubation medium with a concomitant decline in either neutral or basic permease activity, suggesting that a common component exists between the neutral and the general systems and between the basic and the general systems. PMID:6447141

  2. Synthesis and biological properties of caffeic acid-PNA dimers containing guanine.

    PubMed

    Gaglione, Maria; Malgieri, Gaetano; Pacifico, Severina; Severino, Valeria; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Russo, Luigi; Fiorentino, Antonio; Messere, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA; 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) is endowed with high antioxidant activity. CA derivatives (such as amides) have gained a lot of attention due to their antioxidative, antitumor and antimicrobial properties as well as stable characteristics. Caffeoyl-peptide derivatives showed different antioxidant activity depending on the type and the sequence of amino acid used. For these reasons, we decided to combine CA with Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) to test whether the new PNA-CA amide derivatives would result in an improvement or gain of CA's biological (i.e., antioxidant, cytotoxic, cytoprotective) properties. We performed the synthesis and characterization of seven dimer conjugates with various combinations of nucleic acid bases and focused NMR studies on the model compound ga-CA dimer. We demonstrate that PNA dimers containing guanine conjugated to CA exhibited different biological activities depending on composition and sequence of the nucleobases. The dimer ag-CA protected HepG2, SK-B-NE(2), and C6 cells from a cytotoxic dose of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). PMID:23912270

  3. Properties of a new acid-buffering bioadhesive vaginal formulation (ACIDFORM).

    PubMed

    Garg, S; Anderson, R A; Chany, C J; Waller, D P; Diao, X H; Vermani, K; Zaneveld, L J

    2001-07-01

    Vaginal prophylactic methodology may prevent heterosexual transmission of the HIV and other sexually transmitted disease-causing organisms as well as unplanned pregnancies. A new delivery system (ACIDFORM) was designed with acid-buffering, bioadhesive, and viscosity-retaining properties to (1) maintain the acidic vaginal milieu (the low pH inactivates many pathogens and spermatozoa), (2) form a protective layer over the vaginal/cervical epithelium (minimizing contact with pathogenic organisms), and (3) provide long-term vaginal retention. A Phase I clinical study with ACIDFORM provided initial information about its safety and showed the formation of a layer over the vaginal/cervical epithelium [1; Amaral et al., Contraception 1999;60:361-6]. To study the properties of the gel (without active ingredient) in more detail, ACIDFORM's acid-buffering, bioadhesive, viscosity-retaining, and spermicidal properties were compared in vitro to marketed formulations, and its long-term stability was assessed. ACIDFORM, either when titrated with NaOH or when mixed directly with semen, is highly acid buffering and much more effective than Aci-Jel, a commercial acid-buffering vaginal product. ACIDFORM adheres well to two model membranes (excised sheep vagina and cellophane) and is more bioadhesive than Conceptrol, Advantage S, Replens, Aci-Jel, and K-Y jelly. On dilution, ACIDFORM also retains its viscosity better than these marketed products. ACIDFORM is spermicidal and is stable for at least 2 years. These results suggest that ACIDFORM has advantages over presently marketed vaginal delivery systems. The gel may either be useful by itself as an antimicrobial contraceptive product or as a formulation vehicle for an active ingredient with antimicrobial and/or contraceptive properties. PMID:11535216

  4. Acid-responsive properties of fibrils from heat-induced whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Hua; Wang, Jing; Dong, Shi-Rong; Cheng, Wen; Kong, Bao-Hua; Tan, Jun-Yan

    2016-08-01

    The heat-induced fibrils of whey protein concentrate (WPC) have demonstrated an acid-responsive property; that is, the fibrils went through formation-depolymerization-reformation as pH was adjusted to 1.8, 6.5, and back to 1.8. We investigated the microstructure, driving force, and thermal stability of 3.0% (wt) WPC nanofibrils adjusted between pH 6.5 and 1.8 twice. The results showed that the nanofibrils had acid-responsive properties and good thermal stability after reheating for 10h at 90°C and adjusting pH from 1.8 to 6.5 to 1.8. The content of WPC fibril aggregates was not much different with the prolongation of heating times during pH variation. Although the nanofibrils' structure could be destroyed only by changing the pH, the essence of this destruction might only form fiber fragments, polymers that would restore a fibrous structure upon returning to pH 1.8. A described model for the acid-responsive assembly of fibrils of WPC was proposed. The fibrils went through formation-depolymerization-reformation by weaker noncovalent interactions (surface hydrophobicity) as pH changed from 1.8 to 6.5 back to 1.8. However, the fibrils lost the acid-responsive properties because much more S-S (disulfide) formation occurred when the solution was adjusted to pH 6.5 and reheated. Meanwhile, fibrils still possessed acid-responsive properties when reheated at pH 1.8, and the content of fibrils slightly increased with a further reduction of α-helix structure. PMID:27265171

  5. Crystal Structures of Cisplatin Bound to a Human Copper Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-08-16

    Copper trafficking proteins, including the chaperone Atox1 and the P{sub 1B}-type ATPase ATP7B, have been implicated in cellular resistance to the anticancer drug cisplatin. We have determined two crystal structures of cisplatin-Atox1 adducts that reveal platinum coordination by the conserved CXXC copper-binding motif. Direct interaction of cisplatin with this functionally relevant site has significant implications for understanding the molecular basis for resistance mediated by copper transport pathways.

  6. Generalized iterative annealing model for the action of RNA chaperones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D.

    2013-09-01

    As a consequence of the rugged landscape of RNA molecules their folding is described by the kinetic partitioning mechanism according to which only a small fraction (ϕF) reaches the folded state while the remaining fraction of molecules is kinetically trapped in misfolded intermediates. The transition from the misfolded states to the native state can far exceed biologically relevant time. Thus, RNA folding in vivo is often aided by protein cofactors, called RNA chaperones, that can rescue RNAs from a multitude of misfolded structures. We consider two models, based on chemical kinetics and chemical master equation, for describing assisted folding. In the passive model, applicable for class I substrates, transient interactions of misfolded structures with RNA chaperones alone are sufficient to destabilize the misfolded structures, thus entropically lowering the barrier to folding. For this mechanism to be efficient the intermediate ribonucleoprotein complex between collapsed RNA and protein cofactor should have optimal stability. We also introduce an active model (suitable for stringent substrates with small ϕF), which accounts for the recent experimental findings on the action of CYT-19 on the group I intron ribozyme, showing that RNA chaperones do not discriminate between the misfolded and the native states. In the active model, the RNA chaperone system utilizes chemical energy of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis to repeatedly bind and release misfolded and folded RNAs, resulting in substantial increase of yield of the native state. The theory outlined here shows, in accord with experiments, that in the steady state the native state does not form with unit probability.

  7. Pharmacological Chaperoning: A Primer on Mechanism and Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Katelyn G.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately forty percent of diseases are attributable to protein misfolding, including those for which genetic mutation produces misfolding mutants. Intriguingly, many of these mutants are not terminally misfolded since native-like folding, and subsequent trafficking to functional locations, can be induced by target-specific, small molecules variably termed pharmacological chaperones, pharmacoperones, or pharmacochaperones (PCs). PC targets include enzymes, receptors, transporters, and ion channels, revealing the breadth of proteins that can be engaged by ligand-assisted folding. The purpose of this review is to provide an integrated primer of the diverse mechanisms and pharmacology of PCs. In this regard, we examine the structural mechanisms that underlie PC rescue of misfolding mutants, including the ability of PCs to act as surrogates for defective intramolecular interactions and, at the intermolecular level, overcome oligomerization deficiencies and dominant negative effects, as well as influence the subunit stoichiometry of heteropentameric receptors. Not surprisingly, PC-mediated structural correction of misfolding mutants normalizes interactions with molecular chaperones that participate in protein quality control and forward-trafficking. A variety of small molecules have proven to be efficacious PCs and the advantages and disadvantages of employing orthostatic antagonists, active-site inhibitors, orthostatic agonists, and allosteric modulator PCs is considered. Also examined is the possibility that several therapeutic agents may have unrecognized activity as PCs, and this chaperoning activity may mediate/contribute to therapeutic action and/or account for adverse effects. Lastly, we explore evidence that pharmacological chaperoning exploits intrinsic ligand-assisted folding mechanisms. Given the widespread applicability of PC rescue of mutants associated with protein folding disorders, both in vitro and in vivo, the therapeutic potential of PCs is vast

  8. The boron oxide{endash}boric acid system: Nanoscale mechanical and wear properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.; Unertl, W.N.; Erdemir, A.

    1999-08-01

    The film that forms spontaneously when boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is exposed to humid air is a solid lubricant. This film is usually assumed to be boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), the stable bulk phase. We describe the nanometer-scale surface morphology, mechanical properties, and tribological properties of these films and compare them with crystals precipitated from saturated solutions of boric acid. Scanning force microscopy (SFM) and low-load indentation were the primary experimental tools. Mechanical properties and their variation with depth are reported. In all cases, the surfaces were covered with a layer that has different mechanical properties than the underlying bulk. The films formed on boron oxide showed no evidence of crystalline structure. A thin surface layer was rapidly removed, followed by slower wear of the underlying film. The thickness of this initial layer was sensitive to sample preparation conditions, including humidity. Friction on the worn surface was lower than on the as-formed surface in all cases. In contrast, the SFM tip was unable to cause any wear to the surface film on the precipitated crystals. Indentation pop-in features were common for precipitated crystals but did not occur on the films formed on boron oxide. The surface structures were more complex than assumed in models put forth previously to explain the mechanism of lubricity in the boron oxide{endash}boric acid{endash}water system. {copyright} {ital 1999 Materials Research Society.}

  9. Polyesters Based on Linoleic Acid for Biolubricant Basestocks: Low-Temperature, Tribological and Rheological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Bashar Mudhaffar; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Hairunisa, Nany; Yousif, Emad; Basu, Roma Choudhury

    2016-01-01

    Presently, plant oils which contain high percentage of linoleic acid 1 are perceived to be a viable alternative to mineral oil for biolubricant applications due to their biodegradability and technical properties. In order to get biodegradable lubricant, triester derivatives compounds (1–5) were synthesized and characterized. The processes involved were monoepoxidation of linoleic acid 2, oxirane ring opening 3, esterification 4 and acylation 5. The structures of the products were confirmed by FTIR, 1H and 13C-NMR and LC-MS. The results that showed lowest temperature properties were obtained for triester 5, with a pour point value (PP) of -73°C, highest onset temperature (260°C) and lowest volatility at 0.30%. Viscosity index (VI) increased for the ester’s synthetic compounds (2, 3, 4, 5), while the PP decreased. This behavior is the result of the increase of the chain length of the branching agents. Triester based linoleic acid has improved properties such as low-temperature and tribological properties. These results will make it feasible for plant oil to be used for biolubricants, fuels in chain saws, transmission oil and brake fluid. PMID:27008312

  10. Polyesters Based on Linoleic Acid for Biolubricant Basestocks: Low-Temperature, Tribological and Rheological Properties.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Bashar Mudhaffar; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Hairunisa, Nany; Yousif, Emad; Basu, Roma Choudhury

    2016-01-01

    Presently, plant oils which contain high percentage of linoleic acid 1 are perceived to be a viable alternative to mineral oil for biolubricant applications due to their biodegradability and technical properties. In order to get biodegradable lubricant, triester derivatives compounds (1-5) were synthesized and characterized. The processes involved were monoepoxidation of linoleic acid 2, oxirane ring opening 3, esterification 4 and acylation 5. The structures of the products were confirmed by FTIR, 1H and 13C-NMR and LC-MS. The results that showed lowest temperature properties were obtained for triester 5, with a pour point value (PP) of -73°C, highest onset temperature (260°C) and lowest volatility at 0.30%. Viscosity index (VI) increased for the ester's synthetic compounds (2, 3, 4, 5), while the PP decreased. This behavior is the result of the increase of the chain length of the branching agents. Triester based linoleic acid has improved properties such as low-temperature and tribological properties. These results will make it feasible for plant oil to be used for biolubricants, fuels in chain saws, transmission oil and brake fluid. PMID:27008312

  11. Micellization properties of zwitterionic surfactants derived from nicotinic acid in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederkehr, N.A.; Kalyanasundaram, K.; Graetzel, M. ); Viscardi, G.; Savarino, P.; Barni, E. )

    1991-01-01

    Various properties of monomeric and micellar (aggregated) forms of a series of zwitterionic surfactants based on nicotinic acid (N-alkylnicotinic acids), R-NA (R = C{sub 8}, C{sub 10}, C{sub 12}, C{sub 14}, and C{sub 16}) have been determined in aqueous solution by utilization of a number of physical methods (visible light absorption, fluorescence probe analysis, surfactant tension measurements, and low-angle light scattering): protonation equilibria, extent of counterion adsorption, critical micellar temperature, critical micellar concentration, and micellar aggregation number.

  12. Effect of physical ageing on properties of PLA plasticized with oligomeric esters of lactic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldo, R.; Ambrogi, V.; Avella, M.; Avolio, R.; Carfagna, C.; Cocca, M.; Errico, M. E.; Gentile, G.

    2014-05-01

    Two oligomeric esters of lactic acid with carboxyl or hydroxyl terminal groups were employed to plasticize polylactic acid. The miscibility of the blends as well as the mechanical, thermal and gas/vapour transport properties were tested as a function of plasticizer content and of physical ageing. A ductile PLA behavior was obtained with the addition of at least 20 wt% of both esters supplying an increase of elongation at break values higher than 400%. These blends retain their ductile feature also after ageing. Finally migration tests proved the compliance of these materials with the EU regulation for food contact plastics.

  13. Effect of L-Methionine on the Optical Properties of Potassium Acid Phthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parey, N. A.; Shah, M. A.

    The effect of L-methionine doping on the optical properties of potassium acid phthalate have been studied. Bulk single crystals of L-methionine-doped potassium acid phthalate (LMDKAP) were grown by a slow cooling method using a constant temperature bath. X-ray powder diffraction study has revealed the significant variation in the cell parameter values and the shift in peak positions, which confirms the presence of dopant in the sample. The UV-VIS cut off wavelength of LMDKAP was found to be 300 nm and it is slightly less than KAP. The presence of functional groups present in LMDKAP were confirmed through FT-IR analysis.

  14. α-hydroxy acids mediated synthesis of hollow silver nanoshells and their optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadhich, B.; Saha, A.; Priyam, A.

    2016-05-01

    The α-hydroxy-acids (i.e. glycolic, malic, citric) plays crucial role in the formation of hollow silver nanoshells and in its plasmonic properties. The SPR peak varied in a wide range from 400-527 nm with variation in chain length and molar concentration or ratio of the acids. The stability was also affected by chain length. Zeta potential analyzed for the stability of hollow silver nanoshells (HAgNS). The hollow structure of these nanocrystals with aspect ratio (Outer diameter/ shell thickness) 2 to 5 is confirmed by HR-TEM.

  15. Study on corrosion resistance of high - entropy alloy in medium acid liquid and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florea, I.; Buluc, G.; Florea, R. M.; Soare, V.; Carcea, I.

    2015-11-01

    High-entropy alloy is a new alloy which is different from traditional alloys. The high entropy alloys were started in Tsing Hua University of Taiwan since 1995 by Yeh et al. Consisting of a variety of elements, each element occupying a similar compared with other alloy elements to form a high entropy. We could define high entropy alloys as having approximately equal concentrations, made up of a group of 5 to 11 major elements. In general, the content of each element is not more than 35% by weight of the alloy. During the investigation it turned out that this alloy has a high hardness and is also corrosion proof and also strength and good thermal stability. In the experimental area, scientists used different tools, including traditional casting, mechanical alloying, sputtering, splat-quenching to obtain the high entropy alloys with different alloying elements and then to investigate the corresponding microstructures and mechanical, chemical, thermal, and electronic performances. The present study is aimed to investigate the corrosion resistance in a different medium acid and try to put in evidence the mechanical properties. Forasmuch of the wide composition range and the enormous number of alloy systems in high entropy alloys, the mechanical properties of high entropy alloys can vary significantly. In terms of hardness, the most critical factors are: hardness/strength of each composing phase in the alloy, distribution of the composing phases. The corrosion resistance of an high entropy alloy was made in acid liquid such as 10%HNO3-3%HF, 10%H2SO4, 5%HCl and then was investigated, respectively with weight loss experiment. Weight loss test was carried out by put the samples into the acid solution for corrosion. The solution was maintained at a constant room temperature. The liquid formulations used for tests were 3% hydrofluoric acid with 10% nitric acid, 10% sulphuric acid, 5% hydrochloric acid. Weight loss of the samples was measured by electronic scale.

  16. Properties of whey protein-based films containing organic acids and nisin to control Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Pintado, Cristina M B S; Ferreira, Maria A S S; Sousa, Isabel

    2009-09-01

    Whey protein isolate and glycerol were mixed to form a matrix to incorporate antimicrobial agents and produce edible films with antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from cheeses. Various organic acids were used to decrease pH down to approximately 3. In a preliminary assay without nisin, the effect of each organic acid was evaluated with respect to the rheological properties of the film solutions and the inhibitory and mechanical properties of the films. Lactic, malic, and citric acids (3%, wt/vol), which were used in a subsequent study of their combined inhibitory effect with nisin (50 IU/ml), had significantly higher antilisterial activity (P < 0.05) compared with the control (2 N HCl, 3% [wt/vol], with nisin). The largest mean zone of inhibition was 4.00 +/- 0.92 mm for malic acid with nisin. Under small-amplitude oscillatory stress, the protein-glycerol-acid film solutions exhibited a predominantly viscous behavior or a weak gel behavior, with the storage modulus (G') slightly higher than the loss modulus (G"). The malic acid-based solution was the only one whose viscosity was not influenced by the addition of nisin. The addition of nisin resulted in a nonsignificant (P > 0.05) increase in the percentage of elongation at break. Results from tensile and puncture stress were variable, but in general no significant differences were found after the incorporation of nisin. The overall results support the use of malic acid with nisin to produce effective antimicrobial films to control L. monocytogenes growth. PMID:19777891

  17. Spectroscopic Investigation of Surface Dependent Acid-base Property of Ceria Nanoshapes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Zili; Mann, Amanda K; Li, Meijun; Overbury, Steven

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their well-known redox character, the acid-base property is another interesting aspect of ceria-based catalysts. Herein, the effect of surface structure on the acid-base property of ceria was studied in detail by utilizing ceria nanocrystals with different morphologies (cubes, octahedra and rods) that exhibit crystallographically well-defined surface facets. The nature, type, strength and amount of acid and base sites on these ceria nanoshapes were investigated via in situ IR spectroscopy combined with various probe molecules. Pyridine adsorption shows the presence of Lewis acid sites (Ce cations) on the ceria nanoshapes. These Lewis acid sites are relatively weak andmore » similar in strength among the three nanoshapes according to the probing by both pyridine and acetonitrile. Both Br nsted (hydroxyl group) and Lewis (surface lattice oxygen) base sites are present on the ceria nanoshapes as probed by CO2 adsorption. CO2 and chloroform adsorption indicate that the strength and amount of the Lewis base sites are shape dependent: rods > cubes > octahedra. The weak and strong surface dependence of the acid and base sites, respectively, are a result of interplay between the surface structure dependent coordination unsaturation status of the Ce cations and O anions and the amount of defect sites on the three ceria nanoshapes. Furthermore, it was found that the nature of the acid-base sites of ceria can be impacted by impurities, such as Na and P residues that result from their use as structure-directing reagent in the hydrothermal synthesis of the ceria nanocrystals. This observation calls for precaution in interpreting the catalytic behavior of nanoshaped ceria where trace impurities may be present.« less

  18. Dynamic periplasmic chaperone reservoir facilitates biogenesis of outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Costello, Shawn M; Plummer, Ashlee M; Fleming, Patrick J; Fleming, Karen G

    2016-08-16

    Outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis is critical to bacterial physiology because the cellular envelope is vital to bacterial pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance. The process of OMP biogenesis has been studied in vivo, and each of its components has been studied in isolation in vitro. This work integrates parameters and observations from both in vivo and in vitro experiments into a holistic computational model termed "Outer Membrane Protein Biogenesis Model" (OMPBioM). We use OMPBioM to assess OMP biogenesis mathematically in a global manner. Using deterministic and stochastic methods, we are able to simulate OMP biogenesis under varying genetic conditions, each of which successfully replicates experimental observations. We observe that OMPs have a prolonged lifetime in the periplasm where an unfolded OMP makes, on average, hundreds of short-lived interactions with chaperones before folding into its native state. We find that some periplasmic chaperones function primarily as quality-control factors; this function complements the folding catalysis function of other chaperones. Additionally, the effective rate for the β-barrel assembly machinery complex necessary for physiological folding was found to be higher than has currently been observed in vitro. Overall, we find a finely tuned balance between thermodynamic and kinetic parameters maximizes OMP folding flux and minimizes aggregation and unnecessary degradation. In sum, OMPBioM provides a global view of OMP biogenesis that yields unique insights into this essential pathway. PMID:27482090

  19. Nucleolar protein B23 has molecular chaperone activities.

    PubMed Central

    Szebeni, A.; Olson, M. O.

    1999-01-01

    Protein B23 is an abundant, multifunctional nucleolar phosphoprotein whose activities are proposed to play a role in ribosome assembly. Szebeni et al. (1997) showed stimulation of nuclear import in vitro by protein B23 and suggested that this effect was due to a molecular chaperone-like activity. Protein B23 was tested for chaperone activities using several protein substrates. The temperature-dependent and -independent aggregation of the HIV-1 Rev protein was measured using a zero angle light scattering (turbidity) assay. Protein B23 inhibited the aggregation of the Rev protein, with the amount of inhibition proportional to the concentration of B23 added. This activity was saturable with nearly complete inhibition when the molar ratio of B23:Rev was slightly above one. Protein B23 also protected liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH), carboxypeptidase A, citrate synthase, and rhodanese from aggregation during thermal denaturation and preserved the enzyme activity of LADH under these conditions. In addition, protein B23 was able to promote the restoration of activity of LADH previously denatured with guanidine-HCl. Protein B23 preferentially bound denatured substrates and exposed hydrophobic regions when complexed with denatured proteins. Thus, by several criteria, protein B23 behaves like a molecular chaperone; these activities may be related to its role in ribosome biogenesis. PMID:10211837

  20. Potential synergy between tau aggregation inhibitors and tau chaperone modulators

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Tau is a soluble, microtubule-associated protein known to aberrantly form amyloid-positive aggregates. This pathology is characteristic for more than 15 neuropathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer’s disease. Finding therapeutics to reverse or remove this non-native tau state is of great interest; however, at this time only one drug is entering phase III clinical trials for treating tauopathies. Generally, tau manipulation by therapeutics can either directly or indirectly alter tau aggregation and stability. Drugs that bind and change the conformation of tau itself are largely classified as aggregation inhibitors, while drugs that alter the activity of a tau-effector protein fall into several categories, such as kinase inhibitors, microtubule stabilizers, or chaperone modulators. Chaperone inhibitors that have proven effective in tau models include heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, heat shock protein 70 inhibitors and activators, as well as inducers of heat shock proteins. While many of these compounds can alter tau levels and/or aggregation states, it is possible that combining these approaches may produce the most optimal outcome. However, because many of these compounds have multiple off-target effects or poor blood–brain barrier permeability, the development of this synergistic therapeutic strategy presents significant challenges. This review will summarize many of the drugs that have been identified to alter tau biology, with special focus on therapeutics that prevent tau aggregation and regulate chaperone-mediated clearance of tau. PMID:24041111

  1. Heat shock proteins: molecular chaperones of protein biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, E A; Gambill, B D; Nelson, R J

    1993-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) were first identified as proteins whose synthesis was enhanced by stresses such as an increase in temperature. Recently, several of the major Hsps have been shown to be intimately involved in protein biogenesis through a direct interaction with a wide variety of proteins. As a reflection of this role, these Hsps have been referred to as molecular chaperones. Hsp70s interact with incompletely folded proteins, such as nascent chains on ribosomes and proteins in the process of translocation from the cytosol into mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum. Hsp60 also binds to unfolded proteins, preventing aggregation and facilitating protein folding. Although less well defined, other Hsps such as Hsp90 also play important roles in modulating the activity of a number of proteins. The function of the proteolytic system is intertwined with that of molecular chaperones. Several components of this system, encoded by heat-inducible genes, are responsible for the degradation of abnormal or misfolded proteins. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven very useful in the analysis of the role of molecular chaperones in protein maturation, translocation, and degradation. In this review, results of experiments are discussed within the context of experiments with other organisms in an attempt to describe the current state of understanding of these ubiquitous and important proteins. PMID:8336673

  2. Some distinguishable properties between acid-stable and neutral types of alpha-amylases from acid-producing koji.

    PubMed

    Suganuma, Toshihiko; Fujita, Kiyotaka; Kitahara, Kanefumi

    2007-11-01

    The highly humid climate of Japan facilitates the growth of various molds. Among these molds, Aspergillus oryzae is the most important and popular in Japan, and has been used as yellow-koji in producing many traditional fermented beverages and foods, such as Japanese sake, and soy sauce. Taka-amylase A (TAA), a major enzyme produced by the mold, is well known worldwide to be a leading enzyme for industrial utilization and academic study, since many extensive studies have been carried out with TAA. In southern Kyushu, the other koji's of citric acid-producing molds have often been used, such as in the production of a traditional distilled liquor of shochu. The koji molds black-koji and white-koji produce two types of alpha-amylase, namely, acid-stable (AA) and common neutral (NA). The latter enzyme is enzymatically and genetically similar to TAA. In this review, we investigate AA from three molds, Aspergillus niger, A. kawachii and A. awamori, and the yeast Cryptococcus sp. regarding the distinguishable properties between AA and NA. (i) The N-terminus amino acid sequences of AA determined by molecular cloning started with the sequence of L-S-A-, whereas those of NA started with A-T-P-. (ii) Most of the full sequences of AA were composed of, besides a core catalytic domain, an extra domain of a hinge region and a carbohydrate binding domain, which could be responsible for raw-starch-digestibility. The AA from A. niger has no exceptionally extra domain, similarly to NA. (iii) Simple methods for distinguishing AA from NA using CNP-alpha-G3 and G5 as substrates were developed by our group. (iv) The number of subsite in AA on the basis of its cleavage pattern of maltooligosaccharides was estimated to be five, which differs from that of TAA, 7-9. AA has many advantages in industrial applications, such as its acid-stability, thermostability, and raw-starch digesting properties. PMID:18086434

  3. [An endogenous dithiol with antioxidant properties: alpha-lipoic acid, potential uses in cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Ghibu, S; Richard, C; Delemasure, S; Vergely, C; Mogosan, C; Muresan, A

    2008-06-01

    Alpha-Lipoic acid (ALA) is a natural compound, chemically named 1,2-dithiolane-3-pentanoic acid, also referred to as thioctic acid. In humans, ALA is synthetized by the liver and other tissues with high metabolic activity: heart, kidney. ALA is both water and fat soluble and therefore, is widely distributed in both cellular membranes and cytosol. Recently, a greater deal of attention has been given to antioxidant function for ALA and its reduced formed: dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA). ALA scavenges hydroxyl radicals, hypochlorous acid and singlet oxygen. It may also exert antioxidant effects in biological systems through transitional metal chelation. Dihydrolipoic acid has been shown to have antioxidant but also pro-oxidant properties in systems in which hydroxyl radical was generated. ALA/DHLA ratio has the capacity to recycle endogenous antioxidants such as vitamin E. A number of experimental as well as clinical studies point to the usefulness of ALA as a therapeutic agent for such diverse conditions as diabetes, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, neuropathy, neurodegenerative diseases and ischemia-reperfusion injury. ALA represents a potential agent on the vascular endothelium, recording to ALA/DHLA redox couple is one of the most powerful biological antioxidant systems. PMID:18571145

  4. Evaluation of the acid properties of porous zirconium-doped and undoped silica materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Perujo, D.; Santamaría-González, J.; Mérida-Robles, J.; Rodríguez-Castellón, E.; Jiménez-López, A.; Maireles-Torres, P.; Moreno-Tost, R.; Mariscal, R.

    2006-07-01

    A series of porous silica and Zr-doped silica molecular sieves, belonging to the MCM-41 and MSU families, were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N 2 adsorption at 77 K. Their acid properties have been evaluated by NH 3-TPD, adsorption of pyridine and deuterated acetonitrile coupled to FT-IR spectroscopy and the catalytic tests of isopropanol decomposition and isomerization of 1-butene. The acidity of purely siliceous solids were, in all cases, very low, while the incorporation of Zr(IV) into the siliceous framework produced an enhancement of the acidity. The adsorption of basic probe molecules and the catalytic behaviour revealed that Zr-doped MSU-type silica was more acidic than the analogous Zr-MCM-41 solid, with a similar Zr content. This high acidity observed in the case of Zr-doped silica samples is due to the presence of surface zirconium atoms with a low coordination, mainly creating Lewis acid sites.

  5. Preparation and physico-chemical properties of hydrogels from carboxymethyl cassava starch crosslinked with citric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonkham, Sasikan; Sangseethong, Kunruedee; Chatakanon, Pathama; Niamnuy, Chalida; Nakasaki, Kiyohiko; Sriroth, Klanarong

    2014-06-01

    Recently, environmentally friendly hydrogels prepared from renewable bio-based resources have drawn significant attention from both industrial and academic sectors. In this study, chemically crosslinked hydrogels have been developed from cassava starch which is a bio-based polymer using a non-toxic citric acid as a crosslinking agent. Cassava starch was first modified by carboxymethylation to improve its water absorbency property. The carboxymethyl cassava starch (CMCS) obtained was then crosslinked with citric acid at different concentrations and reaction times. The gel fraction of hydrogels increased progressively with increasing citric acid concentration. Free swelling capacity of hydrogels in de-ionized water, saline solution and buffers at various pHs as well as absorption under load were investigated. The results revealed that swelling behavior and mechanical characteristic of hydrogels depended on the citric acid concentration used in reaction. Increasing citric acid concentration resulted in hydrogels with stronger network but lower swelling and absorption capacity. The cassava starch hydrogels developed were sensitive to ionic strength and pH of surrounding medium, showing much reduced swelling capacity in saline salt solution and acidic buffers.

  6. Biodegradation and Mechanical Properties of Poly(lactic acid)/Poly(butylene succinate) Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Satomi

    Polymer blends were fabricated with poly(lactic acid) (PLA) with better mechanical properties and poly(butylene succinate) (PBSU) with better biodegradable properties to clarify the effect of the blending ratio on the biodegradable and mechanical properties of the blends. The specimens were heat treated to improve the reduction in stiffness due to blending. Hydrolysis and soil burial tests up to 16 weeks were conducted to investigate the biodegradation properties. Young's modulus increased with increasing contents of PLA, whereas tensile strength is lowest in the PLA/PBSU (50/50) polymer blend before biodegradation because of the immiscibility of PLA and PBSU. Young's modulus kept constant up 16 weeks both in the hydrolysis and the soil burial tests. On the other hand, tensile strength decreased remarkably in the hydrolysis tests. The observation results of the specimen surface and the fracture surface indicate that the surface and bulk degradation occur in hydrolysis and soil burial tests, respectively

  7. Elastic Properties of Nucleic Acids by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Ribezzi-Crivellari, Marco; Ritort, Felix

    2016-07-01

    We review the current knowledge on the use of single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques to extrapolate the elastic properties of nucleic acids. We emphasize the lesser-known elastic properties of single-stranded DNA. We discuss the importance of accurately determining the elastic response in pulling experiments, and we review the simplest models used to rationalize the experimental data as well as the experimental approaches used to pull single-stranded DNA. Applications used to investigate DNA conformational transitions and secondary structure formation are also highlighted. Finally, we provide an overview of the effects of salt and temperature and briefly discuss the effects of contour length and sequence dependence. PMID:27145878

  8. Investigation of Antifouling Properties of Surfaces Featuring Zwitterionic α-Aminophosphonic Acid Moieties.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Natalie; Zimmermann, Phyllis; Heisig, Peter; Klitsche, Franziska; Maison, Wolfgang; Theato, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Zwitterionic thin films containing α-amino phosphonic acid moieties were successfully introduced on silicon surfaces and their antifouling properties were investigated. Initially, the substrates were modified with a hybrid polymer, composed of poly(methylsilsesquioxane) (PMSSQ) and poly(4-vinyl benzaldehyde) (PStCHO). Next, a Kabachnik-Fields post-polymerization modification (sur-KF-PMR) of the functionalized aldehyde surfaces was conducted with different amines and dialkyl phosphonates. After subsequent deprotection reaction of dialkyl phosphonates, the obtained zwitterionic surfaces were characterized by various techniques and we found excellent antifouling properties of the resulting films. PMID:26332285

  9. The species- and site-specific acid-base properties of penicillamine and its homodisulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzahosseini, Arash; Szilvay, András; Noszál, Béla

    2014-08-01

    Penicillamine, penicillamine disulfide and 4 related compounds were studied by 1H NMR-pH titrations and case-tailored evaluation methods. The resulting acid-base properties are quantified in terms of 14 macroscopic and 28 microscopic protonation constants and the concomitant 7 interactivity parameters. The species- and site-specific basicities are interpreted by means of inductive and shielding effects through various intra- and intermolecular comparisons. The thiolate basicities determined this way are key parameters and exclusive means for the prediction of thiolate oxidizabilities and chelate forming properties in order to understand and influence chelation therapy and oxidative stress at the molecular level.

  10. Microstructure and properties of continuously cast, lead-alloy strip for lead/acid battery grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, N.-Y.; Valeriote, E. M. L.; Sklarchuk, J.

    Lead/acid battery grid alloys, such as low-antimony-lead and lead-calcium-tin alloys with and without silver, are successfully continuously cast into strip using Cominco's Multi-Alloy Caster™. The mechanical and electrochemical properties of the continuously cast, low-antimony-lead strip are strongly dependent on the arsenic content in the alloys. On the other hand, the tin:calcium (Sn:Ca) ratio in the PbCaSn alloys plays an important role in the development of the microstructure and the mechanical properties of these alloys.

  11. Interaction of Benzimidazoles and Benzotriazole: Its Corrosion Protection Properties on Mild Steel in Hydrochloric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya, K.; Mohan, Revathi; Joseph, Abraham

    2014-11-01

    Synergistic hydrogen-bonded interaction of alkyl benzimidazoles and 1,2,3-benzotrizole and its corrosion protection properties on mild steel in hydrochloric acid at different temperatures have been studied using polarization, EIS, adsorption, surface studies, and computational methods. The extent of synergistic interaction increases with temperature. Quantum chemical approach is used to calculate some electronic properties of the molecules and to ascertain the synergistic interaction, inhibitive effect, and molecular structures. The corrosion inhibition efficiencies and the global chemical reactivity relate to some parameters, such as total energy, E HOMO, E LUMO, and gap energy (Δ E). 1,2,3-Benzotrizole interacts with benzimidazoles derivatives up to a bond length of approximately 1.99 Å. This interaction represents the formation of a hydrogen bond between the 1,2,3-benzotrizole and benzimidazoles. This synergistic interaction of 1,2,3-benzotrizole and benzimidazole derivatives offers extended inhibition efficiency toward mild steel in hydrochloric acid.

  12. Novel interaction between the major bacterial heat shock chaperone (GroESL) and an RNA chaperone (CspC).

    PubMed

    Lenz, Gal; Ron, Eliora Z

    2014-01-23

    The heat shock response is one of the main global regulatory networks in all organisms and involves an increased cellular level of chaperones and proteases to enable correct protein folding and balanced growth. One of the major heat shock chaperones in Escherichia coli is GroESL, composed of GroES and GroEL (the bacterial Hsp10 and Hsp60 homologues), which is essential for refolding of misfolded proteins. GroESL was previously shown to play a role in the regulation of the heat shock response by promoting the proteolysis of the regulatory protein--sigma32 (RpoH), the heat shock transcription activator. Here we show the involvement of GroESL in another proteolytic process, this of the major RNA chaperone--CspC--that specifically stabilizes the transcripts of several stress-related genes. Evidence is provided for an interaction between GroESL and CspC that results in enhanced, temperature-dependent proteolysis of the latter. This interaction is of regulatory importance, as reduction in the cellular levels of CspC leads to a decrease in stability of the major heat shock gene transcripts. PMID:24148697

  13. Zinc-L-carnosine binds to molecular chaperone HSP70 and inhibits the chaperone activity of the protein.

    PubMed

    Haga, Asami; Okamoto, Tomoya; Yamada, Shintaroh; Kubota, Toshihiko; Sanpei, Ann; Takahashi, Shota; Nakayama, Masahiro; Nagai, Miki; Otaka, Michiro; Miyazaki, Toshio; Nunomura, Wataru; Grave, Ewa; Itoh, Hideaki

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the specific binding proteins of Zinc-L-carnosine (Polaprezinc) using Polaprezinc-affinity column chromatography in vitro. A protein having a 70-kDa molecular mass was eluted by the linear gradient of 0-1.0 mM Polaprezinc from the affinity column and the protein was identified as the molecular chaperone HSP70 by immunoblotting. The chaperone activity of HSP70 was completely suppressed by Polaprezinc. The ATPase activity of HSP70 was affected to some extent by the reagent. In the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum, the secondary structure of HSP70 was changed in the presence of Polaprezinc, i.e. it decreased in the α-helix. We have determined the Polaprezinc-binding domain of HSP70 by using recombinant HSP70N- and C-domains. Although Polaprezinc could bind to both the N-terminal and the C-terminal of HSP70, the HSP70N-domain has a high affinity to the drug. Regarding the peptide cleavage of the HSP70N- and C-domains with proteinase K, the intact HSP70N still remained in the presence of Polaprezinc. On the other hand, the quantity of the intact C-domain slightly decreased under the same conditions along with the newly digested small peptides appeared. It has been suggested that Polaprezinc binds to HSP70 especially in the N-domains, suppresses the chaperone activity and delays an ATPase activities of HSP70. PMID:23687308

  14. Chaperone-assisted excisive recombination, a solitary role for DnaJ (Hsp40) chaperone in lysogeny escape.

    PubMed

    Champ, Stéphanie; Puvirajesinghe, Tania M; Perrody, Elsa; Menouni, Rachid; Genevaux, Pierre; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2011-11-11

    Temperate bacteriophage lytic development is intrinsically related to the stress response in particular at the DNA replication and virion maturation steps. Alternatively, temperate phages become lysogenic and integrate their genome into the host chromosome. Under stressful conditions, the prophage resumes a lytic development program, and the phage DNA is excised before being replicated. The KplE1 defective prophage of Escherichia coli K12 constitutes a model system because it is fully competent for integrative as well as excisive recombination and presents an atypical recombination module, which is conserved in various phage genomes. In this work, we identified the host-encoded stress-responsive molecular chaperone DnaJ (Hsp40) as an active participant in KplE1 prophage excision. We first show that the recombination directionality factor TorI of KplE1 specifically interacts with DnaJ. In addition, we found that DnaJ dramatically enhances both TorI binding to its DNA target and excisive recombination in vitro. Remarkably, such stimulatory effect by DnaJ was performed independently of its DnaK chaperone partner and did not require a functional DnaJ J-domain. Taken together, our results underline a novel and unsuspected functional interaction between the generic host stress-regulated chaperone and temperate bacteriophage lysogenic development. PMID:21908845

  15. Inhibitor versus chaperone behaviour of d-fagomine, DAB and LAB sp(2)-iminosugar conjugates against glycosidases: A structure-activity relationship study in Gaucher fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mena-Barragán, Teresa; García-Moreno, M Isabel; Nanba, Eiji; Higaki, Katsumi; Concia, Alda Lisa; Clapés, Pere; García Fernández, José Manuel; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen

    2016-10-01

    A library of sp(2)-iminosugar conjugates derived from the piperidine iminosugar d-fagomine and the enantiomeric pyrrolidine iminosugars DAB and LAB has been generated in only two steps involving direct coupling of the fully unprotected polyhydroxylated heterocycles with isothiocyanates, to give monocyclic thiourea adducts, and further intramolecular nucleophilic displacement of the δ-located primary hydroxyl group by the thiocarbonyl sulphur atom, affording bicyclic isothioureas. These transformations led to a dramatic shift in the inhibitory selectivity from α- to β-glucosidases, with inhibition potencies that depended strongly on the nature of the aglycone-type moiety in the conjugates. Some of the new derivatives behaved as potent inhibitors of human β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase), the lysosomal enzyme whose dysfunction is responsible for Gaucher disease. Moreover, GCase inhibition was 10-fold weaker at pH 5 as compared to pH 7, which is generally considered as a good property for pharmacological chaperones. Surprisingly, most of the compounds strongly inhibited GCase in wild type fibroblasts at rather low concentrations, showing an unfavourable chaperone/inhibitor balance on disease-associated GCase mutants in cellulo. A structure-activity relationship analysis points to the need for keeping a contiguous triol system in the glycone moiety of the conjugates to elicit a chaperone effect. In any case, the results reported here represent a proof of concept of the utmost importance of implementing diversity-oriented strategies for the identification and optimization of potent and specific glycosidase inhibitors and chaperones. PMID:26361824

  16. Effect of acetic acid on physical properties of pregelatinized wheat and corn starch gels.

    PubMed

    Majzoobi, Mahsa; Kaveh, Zahra; Farahnaky, Asgar

    2016-04-01

    Pregelatinized starches are physically modified starches with ability to absorb water and increase viscosity at ambient temperature. The main purpose of this study was to determine how different concentrations of acetic acid (0, 500, 1000, 10,000 mg/kg) can affect functional properties of pregelatinized wheat and corn starches (PGWS and PGCS, respectively) produced by a twin drum drier. With increasing acetic acid following changes occurred for both samples; cold water solubility (at 25 °C) increased, water absorption and apparent cold water viscosity (at 25 °C) reduced, the smooth surface of the starch particles converted to an uneven surface as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, cohesiveness, consistency and turbidity of the starch gels reduced while their syneresis increased. It was found that in presence of acetic acid, PGWS resulted in higher water absorption and apparent cold water viscosity and produced more cohesive and turbid gels with less syneresis compared to PGCS. PMID:26593546

  17. Amino acid composition and antioxidant properties of pea seed ( Pisum sativum L.) enzymatic protein hydrolysate fractions.

    PubMed

    Pownall, Trisha L; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2010-04-28

    The amino acid composition and antioxidant activities of peptide fractions obtained from HPLC separation of a pea protein hydrolysate (PPH) were studied. Thermolysin hydrolysis of pea protein isolate and ultrafiltration (3 kDa molecular weight cutoff membrane) yielded a PPH that was separated into five fractions (F1-F5) on a C(18) reverse phase HPLC column. The fractions that eluted later from the column (F3-F5) contained higher contents hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids when compared to fractions that eluted early or the original PPH. Fractions F3-F5 also exhibited the strongest radical scavenging and metal chelating activities; however, hydrophobic character did not seem to contribute to reducing power of the peptides. In comparison to glutathione, the peptide fractions had significantly higher (p < 0.05) ability to inhibit linoleic acid oxidation and chelate metals. In contrast, glutathione had significantly higher (p < 0.05) free radical scavenging properties than the peptide fractions. PMID:20359226

  18. Cultural symbolism of fish and the psychotropic properties of omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Reis, L C; Hibbeln, J R

    2006-01-01

    Fish is a food with unique psychotropic properties. Consumption of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, rich in seafood, reduces depression, aggression and anger while improving mental well-being. We posit that symbols of fish have become linked to the emotional states induced by long-chain fatty acid by associative pairings, both conscious and unconscious. The limbic and hippocampal activity necessary for memory formation containing emotional content and the labeling of social context by cortical processes appears to be optimized by diets rich in long-chain omega-3 fatty acid. In this critical literature survey, we find that fish have been culturally labeled as symbols of emotional well-being and social healing in religious and medical practices among independent cultures, for at least six millennia. This understanding of the perception of fish as a symbolically healing or purifying food can assist current messages improving public health. PMID:16962306

  19. Screening of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria based on gastrointestinal properties and perfluorooctanoate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jiali; Wang, Fan; Xu, Qi; Yin, Boxing; Fang, Dongsheng; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q; Wang, Gang; Chen, Wei

    2016-08-01

    The consumption of lactic acid bacteria capable of binding or degrading food-borne carcinogens may reduce human exposure to these deleterious compounds. In this study, 25 Lactobacillus strains isolated from human, plant, or dairy environments were investigated for their potential probiotic capacity against perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) toxicity. The PFOA binding, tolerance ability, and acid and bile salt tolerance were investigated and assessed by principal component analysis. Additionally, the effect of different pH levels and binding times was assessed. These strains exhibited different degrees of PFOA binding; the strain with the highest PFOA binding capability was Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM738, which bound to 49.40 ± 1.5 % of available PFOA. This strain also exhibited relatively good cellular antioxidative properties, acid and bile salt tolerance, and adhesion to Caco-2 cells. This study suggests that L. plantarum CCFM738 could be used as a potential probiotic in food applications against PFOA toxicity. PMID:27094185

  20. Histochemical properties of sialic acids and antimicrobial substances in canine anal glands

    PubMed Central

    Nara, T.; Yasui, T.; Fujimori, O.; Meyer, W.; Tsukise, A.

    2011-01-01

    The functional properties of sialic acids appear to be manifold. Additionally, antimicrobial substances serve as a non-specific defense against microorganisms. In this study, therefore, the localization of sialic acids and antimicrobial substances in the anal glands of dog was studied by sialoglycoconjugate histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. The secretory epithelium, luminal secretions and excretory ducts exhibited high levels of sialoglycoconjugates that terminated in Siaα2-6Gal/GalNAc or Siaα2-3Gal1-4GlcNAc. Additionally, O-acetylated sialic acids were detectable in these glandular structures. Antimicrobial substances, such as lysozyme, immunoglobulin A (IgA), lactoferrin and the peptide group of β-defensins, were also demonstrated as products of the anal glands. The results obtained are discussed with regard to the functional significance of the anal glands. These secretory products may create a defensive barrier against microbial invasion at the anal mucosa. PMID:22073376

  1. Thermodynamic and Ultrasonic Properties of Ascorbic Acid in Aqueous Protic Ionic Liquid Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vickramjeet; Sharma, Gyanendra; Gardas, Ramesh L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report the thermodynamic and ultrasonic properties of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in water and in presence of newly synthesized ammonium based protic ionic liquid (diethylethanolammonium propionate) as a function of concentration and temperature. Apparent molar volume and apparent molar isentropic compression, which characterize the solvation state of ascorbic acid (AA) in presence of protic ionic liquid (PIL) has been determined from precise density and speed of sound measurements at temperatures (293.15 to 328.15) K with 5 K interval. The strength of molecular interactions prevailing in ternary solutions has been discussed on the basis of infinite dilution partial molar volume and partial molar isentropic compression, corresponding volume of transfer and interaction coefficients. Result has been discussed in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions occurring between ascorbic acid and PIL in ternary solutions (AA + water + PIL). PMID:26009887

  2. Structures and physical properties of the cocrystals of adefovir dipivoxil with dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sungyup; Lee, Jonghwi; Kim, Il Won

    2013-06-01

    The cocrystallization of adefovir dipivoxil (AD) with suberic acid (SUB) or succinic acid (SUC) was examined. X-ray diffraction was used to determine the structures of AD/SUB and AD/SUC cocrystals. Both cocrystals were formed via multiple hydrogen bonds between the adenine part of AD and the carboxylic acid groups of SUB or SUC. Longer SUB effectively dispersed AD molecules, and AD hydrogen-bonded only to SUB. When shorter SUC was used, AD formed hydrogen bonding with both SUC and adjacent AD. As a result, the cocrystal compositions were AD/SUB=1:1 and AD/SUC=2:1. Both cocrystals displayed superior thermal stability and increased aqueous solubility. The present study demonstrated that the adenine and similar structures of active pharmaceutical ingredients could be used to produce cocrystals of improved physical properties.

  3. Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres and their acid catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hui; Zhang, Jianming; Zhang, Yuxiao; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang

    2013-10-01

    Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres bearing sulfonic acid groups (MPCS-SO3H) were prepared by incomplete carbonization of glucose in silica crystal bead template, followed by sulfonation and removal of the template. The composition and porous structure of the obtained carbon spheres were investigated by physical adsorption of nitrogen, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. While the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of carbon spheres. The catalytic properties of the MPCS-SO3H were evaluated by esterification of ethanol with acetic acid, indicating that MPCS-SO3H possess remarkable catalytic performance (high stability and acid catalytic ability) for the esterification.

  4. Luminescent properties of compounds of europium(III) with quinaldic acid and β-diketones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinovskaya, I. V.; Mirochnik, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    We have obtained luminescent complex compounds of europium(III) with quinaldic acid and β- diketones of composition Eu(Quin)2β-dic • H;2O, where Quin is the anion of quinaldic acid, and β-dic is the anion of acetylacetone (acac), benzoylacetone (bzac), or dibenzoylmethane (dbm). The spectral properties of the obtained compounds have been examined. The joint presence of quinaldic acid and β-diketone in the coordination sphere of europium(III) leads to a broadening of the absorption spectral range of the investigated complex compounds. We have found that the "anomalous" Stark structure of luminescence spectra and the luminescence quenching of complexes at 300 K are determined by the occurrence of a high-lying ligand-europium(III) charge-transfer state.

  5. Unique properties of silver cations in solid-acid catalysis by zeolites and heteropolyacids.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yoshio; Baba, Toshihide

    2015-06-28

    Ag(+)-exchanged zeolites exhibit unique catalytic properties caused by the combination of their redox and acidic properties. Partial reduction of Ag(+) ions in zeolites with hydrogen leads to the formation of acidic protons and silver metal particles, which can be observed using X-ray powder diffraction patterns (XRD). By simply evacuating hydrogen from the system, the silver metal particles are returned back to Ag(+) ions and at the same time, acidic protons are eliminated. This interconversion of Ag(+) ions and silver metal or gaseous hydrogen and surface protons is reflexed in the catalytic activities of Ag(+)-exchanged zeolites for acid-catalyzed reactions: the activity of Ag(+)-exchanged Y zeolite (Ag-Y) reversibly changes with the partial pressure of hydrogen. Furthermore, the activity of Ag-Y in the presence of hydrogen is higher than that of H(+)-exchanged Y zeolite (H-Y). Similar phenomena are also observed for the silver salt of dodecatungstophosphoric acid (Ag3PW12O40). Ag(+)-exchanged ZSM-5 zeolite (Ag-ZSM-5) is a very selective catalyst for aromatization of alkanes, alkenes and methanol. Examination of the activation step of lower alkanes revealed that Ag(+) ions dramatically enhance the dehydrogenation of the alkanes via heterolytic dissociation of the alkanes into carbenium ions and hydride species. Ag(+)-exchanged zeolites can also activate methane. The reaction of methane with ethene and benzene gives propene and toluene, respectively. Ag-ZSM-5 is a very stable catalyst under hydrothermal conditions because of the interconversion properties of Ag(+) ions and silver metal in the zeolite. PMID:26018842

  6. Poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(glycolic acid) microfibrillar polymer-polymer composites: Preparation and viscoelastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, L. D.; Fakirov, S.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2015-05-01

    Microfibrillar composites (MFCs) from petrochemical-derived polymers have been investigated for several years and the technique can result in significant improvements in mechanical properties when compared with the neat matrix material of the respective composite. The current work applies the technique to biodegradable, biocompatible polymers for potential applications in bioabsorbable medical devices. MFCs were prepared from melt blended poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) via cold drawing then compression molding of extruded yarn. These MFCs were shown to have higher Young's moduli than that of neat PLLA but for load-bearing applications the creep characteristics are of interest. The MFC sheets resulting from compression molding were subjected to tensile relaxation tests at 37°C in the fiber orientation direction. Specimens were also tested via dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). Neat PLLA specimens were subjected to the same tests for comparison. Results indicate that at 37°C PLLA/PGA MFCs exhibit lower creep resistance than that of neat PLLA due to the more rapid relaxation of stress observed. DMTA results elucidate the loss modulus changes in PLLA/PGA MFCs which occur as the material approaches the glass transition temperature of PGA (˜45°C).

  7. Mechanical, thermal, and biodegradable properties of polylactic acid (PLA)/coir fibre biocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Y.; Ghataura, A.; Haroosh, H. J.

    2013-08-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA)/coir fibre biocomposites were fabricated using a compression moulding technique. The effects of fibre content (5-30 wt%) and fibre treatment on mechanical, thermal and biodegradable properties of biocomposites were holistically investigated via mechanical testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and soil burial method to understand the applicability of manufacturing eco-efficient and sustainable "green composites".

  8. Plant pentacyclic triterpenic acids as modulators of lipid membrane physical properties.

    PubMed

    Prades, Jesús; Vögler, Oliver; Alemany, Regina; Gomez-Florit, Manuel; Funari, Sérgio S; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Barceló, Francisca

    2011-03-01

    Free triterpenic acids (TTPs) present in plants are bioactive compounds exhibiting multiple nutriceutical activities. The underlying molecular mechanisms have only been examined in part and mainly focused on anti-inflammatory properties, cancer and cardiovascular diseases, in all of which TTPs frequently affect membrane-related proteins. Based on the structural characteristics of TTPs, we assume that their effect on biophysical properties of cell membranes could play a role for their biological activity. In this context, our study is focused on the compounds, oleanolic (3β-hydroxy-12-oleanen-28-oic acid, OLA), maslinic (2α,3β-dihydroxy-12-oleanen-28-oic acid, MSL) and ursolic ((3β)-3-hydroxyurs-12-en-28-oic acid, URL) as the most important TTPs present in orujo olive oil. X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance and Laurdan fluorescence data provide experimental evidence that OLA, MSL and URL altered the structural properties of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC-Cholesterol (Cho) rich membranes, being located into the polar-hydrophobic interphase. Specifically, in DPPC membranes, TTPs altered the structural order of the L(β'), phase without destabilizing the lipid bilayer. The existence of a nonbilayer isotropic phase in coexistence with the liquid crystalline L(α) phase, as observed in DPPC:URL samples, indicated the presence of lipid structures with high curvature (probably inverted micelles). In DPPC:Cho membranes, TTPs affected the membrane phase properties increasing the Laurdan GP values above 40°C. MSL and URL induced segregation of Cho within the bilayer, in contrast to OLA, that reduced the structural organization of the membrane. These results strengthen the relevance of TTP interactions with cell membranes as a molecular mechanism underlying their broad spectrum of biological effects. PMID:21167812

  9. Properties of acid-induced currents in mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    Ergonul, Zuhal; Yang, Lei; Palmer, Lawrence G

    2016-05-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are cation channels that are activated by protons (H(+)). They are expressed in neurons throughout the nervous system and may play important roles in several neurologic disorders including inflammation, cerebral ischemia, seizures, neurodegeneration, anxiety, depression, and migraine. ASICs generally produce transient currents that desensitize in response to a decrease in extracellular pH Under certain conditions, the inactivation of ASICs can be incomplete and allow them to produce sustained currents. Here, we characterize the properties of both transient and sustained acid-induced currents in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. At pH levels between 7.3 and 7.1 they include "window currents" through ASICs. With stronger acid signals sustained currents are maintained in the absence of extracellular Na(+) or the presence of the ASIC blockers amiloride and Psalmotoxin-1(PcTx1). These sustained responses may have several different origins in these cells, including acid-induced stimulation of inward Cl(-) currents, block of outward K(+) currents, and augmentation of inward H(+) currents, properties that distinguish these novel sustained currents from the well-characterized transient currents. PMID:27173673

  10. Physical Property Requirements of Ion-exchange Polymer Membranes for Acid-base Flow Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddecha, Supacharee; Thayer, Peter; Jorne', Jacob; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2013-03-01

    Flow batteries offer feasible solutions to grid-scale storage of intermittent power. We are developing a new type of flow battery that reversibly controls an acid-base neutralization reaction. The battery consists of two highly reversible hydrogen gas electrodes that are exposed to low and high pH process streams. A brine solution runs between the acid and base streams and is separated by cationic and anionic exchange membranes. For both charge and discharge phases, hydrogen gas is produced at one electrode and consumed at the other. During charging, an external potential is applied across the two electrodes to electrochemically produce acid and base from the fed brine solution. Discharge involves electrochemical neutralization of acid and base streams, resulting in current flow through an external load. Several charge and discharge cycles were performed to demonstrate proof of concept. Experiments were conducted to determine the physical property requirements of the ionic exchange polymer layers. Properties including ion conductivity, permselectivity, and membrane stability will be discussed.

  11. Stearic acid based oleogels: a study on the molecular, thermal and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Sagiri, S S; Singh, Vinay K; Pal, K; Banerjee, I; Basak, Piyali

    2015-03-01

    Stearic acid and its derivatives have been used as gelators in food and pharmaceutical gel formulations. However, the mechanism pertaining to the stearic acid based gelation has not been deciphered yet. Keeping that in mind, we investigated the role of stearic acid on physic-chemical properties of oleogel. For this purpose, two different oil (sesame oil and soy bean oil) formulations/oleogels were prepared. In depth analysis of gel kinetics, gel microstructure, molecular interactions, thermal and mechanical behaviors of the oleogels were done. The properties of the oleogels were dependent on the type of the vegetable oil used and the concentration of the stearic acid. Avrami analysis of DSC thermograms indicated that heterogeneous nucleation was coupled with the one-dimensional growth of gelator fibers as the key phenomenon in the formation of oleogels. Viscoelastic and pseudoplastic nature of the oleogels was analyzed in-depth by fitting the stress relaxation data in modified Peleg's model and rheological studies, respectively. Textural studies have revealed that the coexistence of hydrogen bond dissipation and formation of new bonds is possible under stress conditions in the physical oleogels. PMID:25579972

  12. Properties of kojic acid and curcumin: Assay on cell B16-F1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiharto, Ariff, Arbakariya; Ahmad, Syahida; Hamid, Muhajir

    2016-03-01

    Ultra violet (UV) exposure and oxidative stress are casually linked to skin disorders. They can increase melanin synthesis, proliferation of melanocytes, and hyperpigmentation. It is possible that antioxidants or inhibitors may have a beneficial effect on skin health to reduce hyperpigmentation. In the last few years, a huge number of natural herbal extracts have been tested to reduce hyperpigmentation. The objective of this study was to determine and to compare of kojic acid and curcumin properties to viability cell B16-F1. In this study, our data showed that the viability of cell B16-F1 was 63.91% for kojic acid and 64.12% for curcumin at concentration 100 µg/ml. Further investigation assay of antioxidant activities, indicated that IC50 for kojic acid is 63.8 µg/ml and curcumin is 16.05 µg/ml. Based on the data, kojic acid and curcumin have potential antioxidant properties to reduce hyperpigmentation with low toxicity effect in cell B16-F1.

  13. Two for the Price of One: A Neuroprotective Chaperone Kit within NAD Synthase Protein NMNAT2.

    PubMed

    Lavado-Roldán, Angela; Fernández-Chacón, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    One of the most fascinating properties of the brain is the ability to function smoothly across decades of a lifespan. Neurons are nondividing mature cells specialized in fast electrical and chemical communication at synapses. Often, neurons and synapses operate at high levels of activity through sophisticated arborizations of long axons and dendrites that nevertheless stay healthy throughout years. On the other hand, aging and activity-dependent stress strike onto the protein machineries turning proteins unfolded and prone to form pathological aggregates associated with neurodegeneration. How do neurons protect from those insults and remain healthy for their whole life? Ali and colleagues now present a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) acts not only as a NAD synthase involved in axonal maintenance but as a molecular chaperone helping neurons to overcome protein unfolding and protein aggregation. PMID:27454736

  14. Two for the Price of One: A Neuroprotective Chaperone Kit within NAD Synthase Protein NMNAT2

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    One of the most fascinating properties of the brain is the ability to function smoothly across decades of a lifespan. Neurons are nondividing mature cells specialized in fast electrical and chemical communication at synapses. Often, neurons and synapses operate at high levels of activity through sophisticated arborizations of long axons and dendrites that nevertheless stay healthy throughout years. On the other hand, aging and activity-dependent stress strike onto the protein machineries turning proteins unfolded and prone to form pathological aggregates associated with neurodegeneration. How do neurons protect from those insults and remain healthy for their whole life? Ali and colleagues now present a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) acts not only as a NAD synthase involved in axonal maintenance but as a molecular chaperone helping neurons to overcome protein unfolding and protein aggregation. PMID:27454736

  15. Textural and structural properties and surface acidity characterization of mesoporous silica-zirconia molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Castellón, E.; Jiménez-López, A.; Maireles-Torres, P.; Jones, D. J.; Rozière, J.; Trombetta, M.; Busca, G.; Lenarda, M.; Storaro, L.

    2003-11-01

    Homogeneous mesoporous zirconium-containing MCM-41 type silica were prepared by supramolecular templating and their textural and structural properties were studied using powder X-ray diffraction, N 2 porosimetry, atomic force microscopy, EXAFS, XPS, and UV-VIS-NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Their acid properties were also studied by using IR spectroscopy and by the use of catalytic tests such as the decomposition of isopropanol and the isomerization of 1-butene. The materials prepared show a good degree of crystallinity with a regular ordering of the pores into a hexagonal arrangement and high thermal stability. The specific surface area of the prepared materials decreases as the zirconium content rises. Zirconium atoms are in coordination 7 to 8 and located at the surface of the pores such that a high proportion of the oxygen atoms bonded to zirconium corresponds to surface non-condensed oxygen atoms. Both facts are responsible for the acid properties of the solids that show weak Brønsted and medium strong Lewis acidity.

  16. Removal of acid and direct dye by epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine: flocculation performance and floc aggregation properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Fang; Gao, Bao-Yu; Yue, Qin-Yan; Wang, Yan; Yang, Zhong-Lian

    2012-06-01

    A cationic organic flocculant epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine (EPI-DMA) was employed for the treatment of acid and direct dye. The study aims at investigating the flocculation performance of EPI-DMA for the model dye, and corresponding floc aggregation properties, which were determined by jar test and photometric dispersion analysis, respectively. The interactions between cationic flocculant and anionic dye were investigated through spectra analysis. The results showed that EPI-DMA effectively decolorized the tested acid and direct dye. The viscosity and cationicity of EPI-DMA had different influence on the removal of different dye. Chemical interaction was observed between quaternary ammonium of EPI-DMA and sulfonic group of dye. The flocculation dynamic process showed that flocs with better aggregation and sedimentation properties were produced by EPI-DMA with higher viscosity and cationicity for acid dye. Contrarily, flocs with the best aggregation and sedimentation properties were produced by EPI-DMA with the lowest viscosity and cationicity for direct dye. PMID:22209132

  17. The role of HSP70 and its co-chaperones in protein misfolding, aggregation and disease.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Emma J; Cheetham, Michael E; Chapple, J Paul; van der Spuy, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Molecular chaperones and their associated co-chaperones are essential in health and disease as they are key facilitators of protein folding, quality control and function. In particular, the HSP70 molecular chaperone networks have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases caused by aberrant protein folding. The pathogenesis of these disorders usually includes the formation of deposits of misfolded, aggregated protein. HSP70 and its co-chaperones have been recognised as potent modulators of inclusion formation and cell survival in cellular and animal models of neurodegenerative disease. In has become evident that the HSP70 chaperone machine functions not only in folding, but also in proteasome mediated degradation of neurodegenerative disease proteins. Thus, there has been a great deal of interest in the potential manipulation of molecular chaperones as a therapeutic approach for many neurodegenerations. Furthermore, mutations in several HSP70 co-chaperones and putative co-chaperones have been identified as causing inherited neurodegenerative and cardiac disorders, directly linking the HSP70 chaperone system to human disease. PMID:25487025

  18. Effect of Site-directed Mutagenesis of Methylglyoxal- Modifiable Arginine Residues on the Structure and Chaperone Function of Human αA-crystallin

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Ashis; Miller, Antonia; Oya-Ito, Tomoko; Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Bhat, Manjunatha; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2008-01-01

    We reported previously that chemical modification of human αA-crystallin by a metabolic dicarbonyl compound, methylglyoxal (MGO), enhances its chaperone-like function, a phenomenon which we attributed to formation of argpyrimidine at arginine residues (R) 21, 49 and 103. This structural change removes the positive charge on the arginine residues. To explore this mechanism further, we replaced these three R residues with a neutral alanine (A) residue one at time or in combination and examined the impact on the structure and chaperone function. Measurement of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and near-UV CD spectra revealed alteration of the microenvironment of aromatic amino acid residue in mutant proteins. When compared to wild type (wt) αA-crystallin, the chaperone function of R21A and R103A mutants increased 20% and 18% as measured by the insulin aggregation assay, and increased it as much as 39% and 28% when measured by the citrate synthase (CS) aggregation assay. While the R49A mutant lost most of its chaperone function, R21A/R103A and R21A/R49A/R103A mutants had slightly better function (6–14% and 10–14%) than the wt protein in these assays. R21A and R103A mutants had higher surface hydrophobicity than wt αA-crystallin, but the R49A mutant had lower hydrophobicity. R21A and R103A mutants, but not the R49A mutant, were more efficient than wt protein in refolding guanidine hydrochloride-treated malate dehydrogenase to its native state. Our findings indicate that the positive charges on R21, R49 and R103 are important determinants of the chaperone function of αA-crystallin and suggest that chemical modification of arginine residues may play a role in protein aggregation during lens aging and cataract formation. PMID:16584192

  19. Structural Bioinformatics and Protein Docking Analysis of the Molecular Chaperone-Kinase Interactions: Towards Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Kinases by Targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 Chaperone Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lawless, Nathan; Blacklock, Kristin; Berrigan, Elizabeth; Verkhivker, Gennady

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental role of the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone system in mediating maturation of protein kinase clients and supporting kinase functional activity is essential for the integrity and viability of signaling pathways involved in cell cycle control and organism development. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, the molecular mechanisms and guiding principles of kinase recruitment to the chaperone system are lacking quantitative characterization. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with protein kinase clients by modern experimental techniques is highly challenging, owing to a transient nature of chaperone-mediated interactions. In this work, we used experimentally-guided protein docking to probe the allosteric nature of the Hsp90-Cdc37 binding with the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) kinase clients. The results of docking simulations suggest that the kinase recognition and recruitment to the chaperone system may be primarily determined by Cdc37 targeting of the N-terminal kinase lobe. The interactions of Hsp90 with the C-terminal kinase lobe may provide additional “molecular brakes” that can lock (or unlock) kinase from the system during client loading (release) stages. The results of this study support a central role of the Cdc37 chaperone in recognition and recruitment of the kinase clients. Structural analysis may have useful implications in developing strategies for allosteric inhibition of protein kinases by targeting the Hsp90-Cdc37 chaperone machinery. PMID:24287464

  20. Integrated magnetic tweezers and single-molecule FRET for investigating the mechanical properties of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Long, Xi; Parks, Joseph W; Stone, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    Many enzymes promote structural changes in their nucleic acid substrates via application of piconewton forces over nanometer length scales. Magnetic tweezers (MT) is a single molecule force spectroscopy method widely used for studying the energetics of such mechanical processes. MT permits stable application of a wide range of forces and torques over long time scales with nanometer spatial resolution. However, in any force spectroscopy experiment, the ability to monitor structural changes in nucleic acids with nanometer sensitivity requires the system of interest to be held under high degrees of tension to improve signal to noise. This limitation prohibits measurement of structural changes within nucleic acids under physiologically relevant conditions of low stretching forces. To overcome this challenge, researchers have integrated a spatially sensitive fluorescence spectroscopy method, single molecule-FRET, with MT to allow simultaneous observation and manipulation of nanoscale structural transitions over a wide range of forces. Here, we describe a method for using this hybrid instrument to analyze the mechanical properties of nucleic acids. We expect that this method for analysis of nucleic acid structure will be easily adapted for experiments aiming to interrogate the mechanical responses of other biological macromolecules. PMID:27320203

  1. Effects of fatty acid surfactants on the magnetic and magnetohydrodynamic properties of ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Rajesh; Black, Correy; Sudakar, C.; Keyes, P. H.; Naik, Ratna; Lawes, G.; Vaishnava, Prem; Rablau, Cornel; Kahn, David; Lavoie, Melissa; Garg, Vijayendra K.; Oliveira, A. C.

    2009-12-01

    We prepared Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles having diameters of approximately 12 nm by chemical coprecipitation, which were coated with three different fatty acid surfactants: oleic acid, lauric acid, and myristic acid. From x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements we confirmed that Fe3O4 is the only phase present in the samples. The zero field cooled magnetization curves for the nanoparticles exhibit broad peaks, consistent with superparamagnetic blocking for the polydisperse samples, and a saturation magnetization smaller than that for bulk Fe3O4. Although there are minimal differences in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles having different surfactants, we find significant changes in the hydrodynamic response depending on chain length. Hyperthermia measurements show considerably larger response for oleic acid-coated samples, while magneto-optical studies indicate that these samples have slower dynamics of aggregation under the influence of a dc field. These results suggest that the magnetohydrodynamic response of ferrofluids can be controlled by judiciously selecting appropriate surfactants.

  2. Mechanical and microstructural properties of two-step acid-base catalyzed silica gels

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, D.E.; Kirkbir, F.; Murata, H.; Chaudhuri, S.R.; Sarkar, A.

    1994-12-31

    The mechanical and microstructural properties of two-step acid-base catalyzed silica gels were examined as functions of aging time, catalyst concentration, and hydrolysis time. Cylindrical gels were prepared using Si(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH, and H{sub 2}O, with HCl followed by NH{sub 3} as catalysts. Mechanical properties were obtained from three-point bend tests, and the microstructures of dried gels were analyzed using nitrogen adsorption/desorption techniques. Gel strength initially increased with aging time at 70 C, then leveled off after about one week. When the sol was hydrolyzed for less than two hours, there were significant differences in the properties of gels catalyzed with relative molar amounts of 0.0001 and 0.0002 HCl. However, as the hydrolysis time was increased, the gels all had similar properties, independent of the amount of HCl. The amount of NH{sub 3} influenced gelation time and to a lesser extent, the strength, but had no observable effect on pore size. The two-step catalysis procedure produced gels with strength and pore size combinations intermediate to those of either single acid or base-catalyzed gels.

  3. Carbon quantum dots with photo-generated proton property as efficient visible light controlled acid catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Kong, Weiqian; Liu, Juan; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Xing; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-12-01

    Developing light-driven acid catalyst will be very meaningful for the controlled-acid catalytic processes towards a green chemical industry. Here, based on scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and ΔpH testing, we demonstrate that the 5-10 nm carbon quantum dots (CQDs) synthesized by electrochemical ablation of graphite have strong light-induced proton properties under visible light in solution, which can be used as an acid catalyst. The 5-10 nm CQDs' catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the illumination intensity and the temperature of the reaction system. As an effective visible light driven and controlled acid-catalyst, 5-10 nm CQDs can catalyze a series of organic reactions (esterification, Beckmann rearrangement and aldol condensation) with high conversion (34.7-46.2%, respectively) in water solution under visible light, while the 1-4 nm CQDs and 10-2000 nm graphite do not have such excellent catalytic activity. The use of 5-10 nm CQDs as a light responsive and controllable photocatalyst is truly a novel application of carbon-based nanomaterials, which may significantly push research in the current catalytic industry, environmental pollution and energy issues.Developing light-driven acid catalyst will be very meaningful for the controlled-acid catalytic processes towards a green chemical industry. Here, based on scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and ΔpH testing, we demonstrate that the 5-10 nm carbon quantum dots (CQDs) synthesized by electrochemical ablation of graphite have strong light-induced proton properties under visible light in solution, which can be used as an acid catalyst. The 5-10 nm CQDs' catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the illumination intensity and the temperature of the reaction system. As an effective visible light driven and controlled acid-catalyst, 5-10 nm CQDs can catalyze a series of organic reactions (esterification, Beckmann rearrangement and aldol condensation) with high conversion (34

  4. Technological and safety properties of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Spanish dry-cured sausages.

    PubMed

    Landeta, G; Curiel, J A; Carrascosa, A V; Muñoz, R; de las Rivas, B

    2013-10-01

    Technological and safety-related properties were analyzed in lactic acid bacteria isolated from Spanish dry-cured sausages in order to select them as starter cultures. In relation to technological properties, all the strains showed significative nitrate reductase activity; Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei and 52% of the Enterococcus faecium strains showed lipolytic activity and only Lactobacillus sakei strains (43%) were able to form biofilms. Related to safety aspects, E. faecium strains were the most resistant to antibiotics, whereas, L. sakei strains were the most sensitive. In relation to virulence factors, in the E. faecium strains analyzed, only the presence of efaA gene was detected. The analysis of biogenic amine production showed that most E. faecium strains and L. sakei Al-142 produced tyramine. In conclusion, L. paracasei Al-128 and L. sakei Al-143 strains possess the best properties to be selected as adequate and safe meat starter cultures. PMID:23743032

  5. The properties of antimicrobial films derived from poly(lactic acid)/starch/chitosan blended matrix.

    PubMed

    Bie, Pingping; Liu, Peng; Yu, Long; Li, Xiaoxi; Chen, Ling; Xie, Fengwei

    2013-10-15

    An antimicrobial material with a slow release property was developed based on poly(lactic acid)/starch/chitosan blends, in which chitosan acted as an antimicrobial agent while PLA and starch together were used as a slow-releasing device. An increase in the starch content drastically improved the hydrophilicity of the blends, which was favorable for the diffusion of the embedded chitosan. Moreover, the release of chitosan was observed to occur in two stages, with a very fast release stage initially and a slow but durable release stage as the latter. These two stages exhibited the effectiveness and long residual action of antimicrobial property of the blends respectively, demonstrating the suitability to be used for foods with high water activity, such as fresh meat. The tensile and thermal properties further verified the promising use of the blend material in packaging. PMID:23987434

  6. Evaluation of structural and functional properties of chitosan-chlorogenic acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zihao; Gao, Yanxiang

    2016-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were to first synthesize chitosan-chlorogenic acid (CA) covalent complex and then compare structural and functional properties between chitosan-CA covalent complex and physical complex. First, chitosan-CA covalent complex was synthesized and its total phenolic content was as high as 276.5 ± 6.2 mg/g. Then structural and functional properties of chitosan-CA covalent and physical complexes were analyzed. The covalent reaction induced formation of both amide and ester bonds in chitosan. Data of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the complexations of CA changed crystallinity and morphology of chitosan, and covalent complexation induced a larger change of physical structure than physical complexation. In terms of functional properties, chitosan-CA covalent complex exhibited better thermal stability than physical complex in terms of antioxidant activity, and the viscosity of chitosan was significantly increased by covalent modification. PMID:26820353

  7. Targeted delivery of pharmacological chaperones for Gaucher disease to macrophages by a mannosylated cyclodextrin carrier.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lavado, Julio; de la Mata, Mario; Jiménez-Blanco, José L; García-Moreno, M Isabel; Benito, Juan M; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A; Higaki, Katsumi; Nanba, Eiji; Ohno, Kousaku; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, José M

    2014-04-14

    Gaucher disease (GD) is a rare monogenetic disorder leading to dysfunction of acid β-glucosidase (β-glucocerebrosidase; GCase) and accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes, especially in macrophages (Gaucher cells). Many of the mutations at the origin of GD do not impair the catalytic activity of GCase, but cause misfolding and subsequent degradation by the quality control system at the endoplasmic reticulum. Pharmacological chaperones (PCs) capable of restoring the correct folding and trafficking of the endogenous mutant enzyme represent promising alternatives to the currently available enzyme replacement and substrate reduction therapies (ERT and SRT, respectively), but unfavorable biodistribution and potential side-effects remain important issues. We have now designed a strategy to enhance the controlled delivery of PCs to macrophages that exploit the formation of ternary complexes between the PC, a trivalent mannosylated β-cyclodextrin (βCD) conjugate and the macrophage mannose receptor (MMR). First, PC candidates with appropriate relative avidities towards the βCD cavity and the GCase active site were selected to ensure efficient transfer of the PC cargo from the host to the GCase active site. Control experiments confirmed that the βCD carrier was selectively recognized by mannose-specific lectins and that the corresponding PC:mannosylated βCD supramolecular complex retained both the chaperoning activity, as confirmed in human GD fibroblasts, and the MMR binding ability. Finally, fluorescence microscopy techniques proved targeting and cellular uptake of the PC-loaded system in macrophages. Altogether, the results support that combined cyclodextrin encapsulation and glycotargeting may improve the efficacy of PCs for GD. PMID:24589885

  8. Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 produces furanomycin, a non-proteinogenic amino acid with selective antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 has been extensively studied because of its plant growth promoting properties and potential as a biocontrol agent. The genome of SBW25 has been sequenced, and among sequenced strains of pseudomonads, SBW25 appears to be most closely related to P. fluorescens WH6. In the authors’ laboratories, WH6 was previously shown to produce and secrete 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine (FVG), a non-proteinogenic amino acid with selective herbicidal and antimicrobial activity. Although SBW25 does not have the genetic capacity to produce FVG, we were interested in determining whether this pseudomonad might produce some other type of non-proteinogenic amino acid. Results P. fluorescens SBW25 was found to produce and secrete a ninhydrin-reactive compound with selective antimicrobial properties. This compound was purified from SBW25 culture filtrate and identified as the non-proteinogenic amino acid L-furanomycin [2S,2′R,5′S)-2-amino-2-(5′methyl-2′,5′-dihydrofuran-2′-yl)acetic acid]. Conclusions The identification of furanomycin as a secondary metabolite of SBW25 is the first report of the production of furanomycin by a pseudomonad. This compound was known previously only as a natural product produced by a strain of Streptomyces. This report adds furanomycin to the small list of non-proteinogenic amino acids that have been identified as secondary products of pseudomonads. This study also extends the list of bacteria that are inhibited by furanomycin to include several plant pathogenic bacteria. PMID:23688329

  9. In Vitro Properties of Potential Probiotic Indigenous Lactic Acid Bacteria Originating from Traditional Pickles

    PubMed Central

    Tokatlı, Mehmet; Gülgör, Gökşen; Bağder Elmacı, Simel; Arslankoz İşleyen, Nurdan; Özçelik, Filiz

    2015-01-01

    The suitable properties of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains (preselected among 153 strains on the basis of their potential technological properties) isolated from traditional Çubuk pickles were examined in vitro. For this purpose, these strains (21 Lactobacillus plantarum, 11 Pediococcus ethanolidurans, and 7 Lactobacillus brevis) were tested for the ability to survive at pH 2.5, resistance to bile salts, viability in the presence of pepsin-pancreatin, ability to deconjugate bile salts, cholesterol assimilation, and surface hydrophobicity properties. Most of the properties tested could be assumed to be strain-dependent. However, L. plantarum and L. brevis species were found to possess desirable probiotic properties to a greater extent compared to P. ethanolidurans. In contrast to P. ethanolidurans strains, the tested L. plantarum and L. brevis strains exhibited bile salt tolerance, albeit to different extent. All tested strains showed less resistance to intestinal conditions than gastric juice environment. Based on the survival under gastrointestinal conditions, 22 of the 39 strains were selected for further characterization. The eight strains having the highest cholesterol assimilation and surface hydrophobicity ratios could be taken as promising probiotic candidates for further in vivo studies, because of the strongest variations found among the tested strains with regard to these properties. PMID:26101771

  10. In Vitro Properties of Potential Probiotic Indigenous Lactic Acid Bacteria Originating from Traditional Pickles.

    PubMed

    Tokatlı, Mehmet; Gülgör, Gökşen; Bağder Elmacı, Simel; Arslankoz İşleyen, Nurdan; Özçelik, Filiz

    2015-01-01

    The suitable properties of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains (preselected among 153 strains on the basis of their potential technological properties) isolated from traditional Çubuk pickles were examined in vitro. For this purpose, these strains (21 Lactobacillus plantarum, 11 Pediococcus ethanolidurans, and 7 Lactobacillus brevis) were tested for the ability to survive at pH 2.5, resistance to bile salts, viability in the presence of pepsin-pancreatin, ability to deconjugate bile salts, cholesterol assimilation, and surface hydrophobicity properties. Most of the properties tested could be assumed to be strain-dependent. However, L. plantarum and L. brevis species were found to possess desirable probiotic properties to a greater extent compared to P. ethanolidurans. In contrast to P. ethanolidurans strains, the tested L. plantarum and L. brevis strains exhibited bile salt tolerance, albeit to different extent. All tested strains showed less resistance to intestinal conditions than gastric juice environment. Based on the survival under gastrointestinal conditions, 22 of the 39 strains were selected for further characterization. The eight strains having the highest cholesterol assimilation and surface hydrophobicity ratios could be taken as promising probiotic candidates for further in vivo studies, because of the strongest variations found among the tested strains with regard to these properties. PMID:26101771

  11. Chaperone proteins and brain tumors: Potential targets and possible therapeutics1

    PubMed Central

    Graner, Michael W.; Bigner, Darell D.

    2005-01-01

    Chaperone proteins are most notable for the proteo- and cyotoprotective capacities they afford during cellular stress. Under conditions of cellular normalcy, chaperones still play integral roles in the folding of nascent polypeptides into functional entities, in assisting in intracellular/intraorganellar transport, in assembly and maintenance of multi-subunit protein complexes, and in aiding and abetting the degradation of senescent proteins. Tumors frequently have relatively enhanced needs for chaperone number and activity because of the stresses of rapid proliferation, increased metabolism, and overall genetic instability. Thus, it may be possible to take advantage of this reliance that tumor cells have on chaperones by pharmacologic and biologic means. Certain chaperones are abundant in the brain, which implies important roles for them. While it is presumed that the requirements of brain tumors for chaperone proteins are similar to those of any other cell type, tumor or otherwise, very little inquiry has been directed at the possibility of using chaperone proteins as therapeutic targets or even as therapeutic agents against central nervous system malignancies. This review highlights some of the research on the functions of chaperone proteins, on what can be done to modify those functions, and on the physiological responses that tumors and organisms can have to chaperone-targeted or chaperone-based therapies. In particular, this review will also underscore areas of research where brain tumors have been part of the field, although in general those instances are few and far between. This relative dearth of research devoted to chaperone protein targets and therapeutics in brain tumors reveals much untrodden turf to explore for potential treatments of these dreadfully refractive diseases. PMID:16053701

  12. Genomic organization of ATOX1, a human copper chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Po-Ching; Koeller, David M; Kaler, Stephen G

    2003-01-01

    Background Copper is an essential trace element that plays a critical role in the survival of all living organisms. Menkes disease and occipital horn syndrome (OHS) are allelic disorders of copper transport caused by defects in a X-linked gene (ATP7A) that encodes a P-type ATPase that transports copper across cellular membranes, including the trans-Golgi network. Genetic studies in yeast recently revealed a new family of cytoplasmic proteins called copper chaperones which bind copper ions and deliver them to specific cellular pathways. Biochemical studies of the human homolog of one copper chaperone, ATOX1, indicate direct interaction with the Menkes/OHS protein. Although no disease-associated mutations have been reported in ATOX1, mice with disruption of the ATOX1 locus demonstrate perinatal mortality similar to that observed in the brindled mice (Mobr), a mouse model of Menkes disease. The cDNA sequence for ATOX1 is known, and the genomic organization has not been reported. Results We determined the genomic structure of ATOX1. The gene contains 4 exons spanning a genomic distance of approximately 16 kb. The translation start codon is located in the 3' end of exon 1 and the termination codon in exon 3. We developed a PCR-based assay to amplify the coding regions and splice junctions from genomic DNA. We screened for ATOX1 mutations in two patients with classical Menkes disease phenotypes and one individual with occipital horn syndrome who had no alterations detected in ATP7A, as well as an adult female with chronic anemia, low serum copper and evidence of mild dopamine-beta-hydroxylase deficiency and no alterations in the ATOX1 coding or splice junction sequences were found. Conclusions In this study, we characterized the genomic structure of the human copper chaperone ATOX1 to facilitate screening of this gene from genomic DNA in patients whose clinical or biochemical phenotypes suggest impaired copper transport. PMID:12594858

  13. A density functional study on dielectric properties of acrylic acid grafted polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruuska, Henna; Arola, Eero; Kortelainen, Tommi; Rantala, Tapio T.; Kannus, Kari; Valkealahti, Seppo

    2011-04-01

    Influence of acrylic acid grafting of isotactic polypropylene on the dielectric properties of the polymer is investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, both in the molecular modeling and three-dimensional (3D) bulk periodic system frameworks. In our molecular modeling calculations, polarizability volume, and polarizability volume per mass which reflects the permittivity of the polymer, as well as the HOMO-LUMO gap, one of the important measures indicating the electrical breakdown voltage strength, were examined for oligomers with various chain lengths and carboxyl mixture ratios. When a polypropylene oligomer is grafted with carboxyl groups (cf. acrylic acid), our calculations show that the increase of the polarizability volume α' of the oligomer is proportional to the increase of its mass m, while the ratio {{α^ ' } { α^ ' } m} decreases from the value of a pure polymer when increasing the mixture ratio. The decreasing ratio of {{α^ ' } {α^ ' } m} under carboxyl grafting indicates that the material permittivity might also decrease if the mass density of the material remains constant. Furthermore, our calculations show that the HOMO-LUMO gap energy decreases by only about 15% in grafting, but this decrease seems to be independent on the mixture ratio of carboxyl. This indicates that by doping polymers with additives better dielectric properties can be tailored. Finally, using the first-principles molecular DFT results for polarizability volume per mass in connection with the classical Clausius-Mossotti relation, we have estimated static permittivity for acrylic acid grafted polypropylene, assuming the structural density keeping constant under grafting. The computed permittivity values are in a qualitative agreement with the recent experiments, showing increasing tendency of the permittivity as a function of the grafting composition. In order to validate our molecular DFT based approach, we have also carried out extensive three

  14. A density functional study on dielectric properties of acrylic acid grafted polypropylene.

    PubMed

    Ruuska, Henna; Arola, Eero; Kortelainen, Tommi; Rantala, Tapio T; Kannus, Kari; Valkealahti, Seppo

    2011-04-01

    Influence of acrylic acid grafting of isotactic polypropylene on the dielectric properties of the polymer is investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, both in the molecular modeling and three-dimensional (3D) bulk periodic system frameworks. In our molecular modeling calculations, polarizability volume, and polarizability volume per mass which reflects the permittivity of the polymer, as well as the HOMO-LUMO gap, one of the important measures indicating the electrical breakdown voltage strength, were examined for oligomers with various chain lengths and carboxyl mixture ratios. When a polypropylene oligomer is grafted with carboxyl groups (cf. acrylic acid), our calculations show that the increase of the polarizability volume α' of the oligomer is proportional to the increase of its mass m, while the ratio α'/m decreases from the value of a pure polymer when increasing the mixture ratio. The decreasing ratio of α'/m under carboxyl grafting indicates that the material permittivity might also decrease if the mass density of the material remains constant. Furthermore, our calculations show that the HOMO-LUMO gap energy decreases by only about 15% in grafting, but this decrease seems to be independent on the mixture ratio of carboxyl. This indicates that by doping polymers with additives better dielectric properties can be tailored. Finally, using the first-principles molecular DFT results for polarizability volume per mass in connection with the classical Clausius-Mossotti relation, we have estimated static permittivity for acrylic acid grafted polypropylene, assuming the structural density keeping constant under grafting. The computed permittivity values are in a qualitative agreement with the recent experiments, showing increasing tendency of the permittivity as a function of the grafting composition. In order to validate our molecular DFT based approach, we have also carried out extensive three-dimensional bulk periodic first

  15. Theoretical insights into the properties of amino acid ionic liquids in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xueying; Ai, Hongqi

    2016-07-01

    This report presents a systematic investigation of the interactions of water molecule(s) with a series of amino acid cations (Gly(+), Ala(+), Val(+), and Leu(+)), halogen anions (Cl(-), Br(-), BF4 (-), and PF6 (-)), and clusters (GlyCl) n (n = 1-5). The results reveal that H-bonds between amino acid ionic liquids (AAILs) and water molecules are crucial to the properties of aqueous solution of AAILs. The properties of AAIL in water solution depend on the alkyl chain of the amino acid cation, the size of the halogen anion, and the number of water molecules, which provides a certain theoretical basis for the design and application of new AAILs. A series of calculations for some different models showed that quadruple-GlyCl hydrate represents a basic unit for the Gly-water binary system, and can be employed as the simplest model for studying an AAIL-water cluster. On the basis of this model, the effects of water on the hygroscopicity, speed of solubility, viscosity, density, solution enthalpy, and polarity of the AAIL were also predicted. Most importantly, unlike traditional ILs, the novel GlyCl-type AAIL favors interaction of its cationic part, rather than its anionic part, with surrounding water molecules, thus amino acid cationic ILs expand the types of IL available, increasing the choice of ILs for different purposes. We hope that the application of this AAIL in many fields will lead to optimization of this class of compound and be of benefit to the environment. Graphical Abstract Quadruple-GlyCl hydrate represents the basic unit for a GlyCl-water binary system, which can be employed as the simplest model for studying an amino acid ionic liquid (AAIL)-water cluster. The effects of available water on some properties of AAIL are predicted. GlyCl-type AAIL is a novel IL, which prefers its cationic part over its anionic part for interaction with surrounding water molecules. The properties of AAIL in water solution can be adjusted by varying the ion used and the

  16. Study on the Effects of Adipic Acid on Properties of Dicyandiamide-Cured Electrically Conductive Adhesive and the Interaction Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Wan, Chao; Fu, Yonggao; Chen, Hongtao; Liu, Xiaojian; Li, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    A small quantity of adipic acid was found to improve the performance of dicyandiamide-cured electrically conductive adhesive (ECA) by enhancing its electrical conductivity and mechanical properties. The mechanism of action of the adipic acid and its effects on the ECA were examined. The results indicated that adipic acid replaced the electrically insulating lubricant on the surface of the silver flakes, which significantly improved the electrical conductivity. Specifically, one of the acidic functional groups in adipic acid reacted with the silver flakes, and an amidation reaction occurred between the other acidic functional group in adipic acid and the dicyandiamide, which participated in the curing reaction. Therefore, adipic acid may act as a coupling agent to improve the overall ECA performance.

  17. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals That Argonaute Reshapes the Binding Properties of Its Nucleic Acid Guides

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, William E.; Jolly, Samson M.; Moore, Melissa J.; Zamore, Phillip D.; Serebrov, Victor

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Argonaute proteins repress gene expression and defend against foreign nucleic acids using short RNAs or DNAs to specify the correct target RNA or DNA sequence. We have developed single-molecule methods to analyze target binding and cleavage mediated by the Argonaute:guide complex, RISC. We find that both eukaryotic and prokaryotic Argonaute proteins reshape the fundamental properties of RNA:RNA, RNA:DNA, and DNA:DNA hybridization: a small RNA or DNA bound to Argonaute as a guide no longer follows the well-established rules by which oligonucleotides find, bind, and dissociate from complementary nucleic acid sequences. Argonautes distinguish substrates from targets with similar complementarity. Mouse AGO2, for example, binds tighter to miRNA targets than its RNAi cleavage product, even though the cleaved product contains more base pairs. By re-writing the rules for nucleic acid hybridization, Argonautes allow oligonucleotides to serve as specificity determinants with thermodynamic and kinetic properties more typical of RNA-binding proteins than of RNA or DNA. PMID:26140592

  18. Fundamentals of poly(lactic acid) microstructure, crystallization behavior, and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Shuhui

    Poly(lactic acid) is an environmentally-benign biodegradable and sustainable thermoplastic material, which has found broad applications as food packaging films and as non-woven fibers. The crystallization and deformation mechanisms of the polymer are largely determined by the distribution of conformation and configuration. Knowledge of these mechanisms is needed to understand the mechanical and thermal properties on which processing conditions mainly depend. In conjunction with laser light scattering, Raman spectroscopy and normal coordinate analysis are used in this thesis to elucidate these properties. Vibrational spectroscopic theory, Flory's rotational isomeric state (RIS) theory, Gaussian chain statistics and statistical mechanics are used to relate experimental data to molecular chain structure. A refined RIS model is proposed, chain rigidity recalculated and chain statistics discussed. A Raman spectroscopic characterization method for crystalline and amorphous phase orientation has been developed. A shrinkage model is also proposed to interpret the dimensional stability for fibers and uni- or biaxially stretched films. A study of stereocomplexation formed by poly(l-lactic acid) and poly(d-lactic acid) is also presented.

  19. Preparation and characterization of physicochemical properties of glacial acetic acid modified Gadung (Diocorea hispida Dennst) flours.

    PubMed

    Kumoro, Andri Cahyo; Amalia, Rizka; Budiyati, Catarina Sri; Retnowati, Diah Susetyo; Ratnawati, Ratnawati

    2015-10-01

    In addition to the presence of antinutrients, the inferior physicochemical properties of flours has caused gadung (Dioscorea hispida dennst) becomes one of the underutilized tubers in the world. Acetylation is one of the starch modification methods to alter the physicochemical properties of starch, namely swelling power and solubility. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of reaction time, glacial acetic acid/flour mass ratio and pH on gadung flour acetylation at ambient temperature. The acetylation was carried out by reacting gadung flour slurry of 20 % consistency with glacial acetic acid under alkaline condition. The results show that in general degree of substitution and swelling power increased with the increase of reaction time, while the solubility was not affected by reaction time after 10 min acetylation. Acetylation led to significant changes in morphology and structure of gadung flour starch granules. Overall, all the acetylated gadung flours obtained in this work were having higher swelling power and solubility than the native flour. Acetylation of gadung flour using glacial acetic acid with 1:3 mass ratio and pH 8.0 at ambient temperature for 30 min resulted gadung flours with swelling power and solubility similar to that of Korean wheat flour. PMID:26396408

  20. Characterization and functional properties of mango peel pectin extracted by ultrasound assisted citric acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miaomiao; Huang, Bohui; Fan, Chuanhui; Zhao, Kaili; Hu, Hao; Xu, Xiaoyun; Pan, Siyi; Liu, Fengxia

    2016-10-01

    Pectin was extracted from 'Tainong No. 1' mango peels, using a chelating agent-citric acid as extraction medium by ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and conventional extraction (CE) at temperatures of 20 and 80°C. Chemical structures, rheological and emulsifying properties of mango peel pectins (MPPs) were comparatively studied with laboratory grade citrus pectin (CP). All MPPs exhibited higher protein content (4.74%-5.94%), degree of methoxylation (85.43-88.38%), average molecular weight (Mw, 378.4-2858kDa) than the CP, but lower galacuronic acid content (GalA, 52.21-53.35%). CE or UAE at 80°C resulted in significantly higher pectin yield than those at 20°C, while the extraction time for UAE-80°C (15min) was significantly shorter compared to CE-80°C (2h) with comparable pectin yield. Moreover, MPPs extracted at 80°C were observed with higher GalA and protein content, higher Mw, resulting in higher viscosity, better emulsifying capacity and stability, as compared to those extracted at 20°C and the CP. Therefore, these results suggested that MPPs from 'Tainong No. 1' may become a highly promising pectin with good thickening and emulsifying properties, using ultrasound-assisted citric acid as an efficient and eco-friendly extraction method. PMID:27283236

  1. Some Properties of Acid Protease from the Thermophilic Fungus, Penicillium duponti K1014

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Hikotaka; Iwaasa, Takashi; Yokotsuka, Tamotsu

    1973-01-01

    A purified acid protease from a true thermophilic fungus, Penicillium duponti K1014, was most active at pH 2.5 for milk casein and at pH 3.0 for hemoglobin. The enzyme was stable at a pH range of 2.5 to 6.0 at 30 C for 20 h. The acid protease retained full activity after 1 h at 60 C at a pH range between 3.5 and 5.5. At the most stable pH of 4.5, more than 65% of its activity remained after heat treatment for 1 h at 70 C. These thermal properties show the enzyme as a thermophilic protein. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by sodium lauryl sulfate and oxidizing reagents such as potassium permanganate and N-bromosuccinimide. No inhibition was caused by chelating reagents, potato inhibitor, and those reagents which convert sulfhydryl groups to mercaptides. Reducing reagents showed an activating effect. The enzyme showed the trypsinogen-activating property at an acidic pH range; optimal trypsinogen activation was obtained at a pH of approximately 3.0. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was estimated to be pH 3.89 by disk electrofocusing. By using gel filtration, an approximate value of 41,000 was estimated for the molecular weight. PMID:4699217

  2. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals that Argonaute Reshapes the Binding Properties of Its Nucleic Acid Guides.

    PubMed

    Salomon, William E; Jolly, Samson M; Moore, Melissa J; Zamore, Phillip D; Serebrov, Victor

    2015-07-01

    Argonaute proteins repress gene expression and defend against foreign nucleic acids using short RNAs or DNAs to specify the correct target RNA or DNA sequence. We have developed single-molecule methods to analyze target binding and cleavage mediated by the Argonaute:guide complex, RISC. We find that both eukaryotic and prokaryotic Argonaute proteins reshape the fundamental properties of RNA:RNA, RNA:DNA, and DNA:DNA hybridization—a small RNA or DNA bound to Argonaute as a guide no longer follows the well-established rules by which oligonucleotides find, bind, and dissociate from complementary nucleic acid sequences. Argonautes distinguish substrates from targets with similar complementarity. Mouse AGO2, for example, binds tighter to miRNA targets than its RNAi cleavage product, even though the cleaved product contains more base pairs. By re-writing the rules for nucleic acid hybridization, Argonautes allow oligonucleotides to serve as specificity determinants with thermodynamic and kinetic properties more typical of RNA-binding proteins than of RNA or DNA. PMID:26140592

  3. Controlled release properties of zein-fatty acid blend films for multiple bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Arcan, Iskender; Yemenicioğlu, Ahmet

    2014-08-13

    To develop edible films having controlled release properties for multiple bioactive compounds, hydrophobicity and morphology of zein films were modified by blending zein with oleic (C18:1)Δ⁹, linoleic (C18:2)Δ(9,12), or lauric (C₁₂) acids in the presence of lecithin. The blend zein films showed 2-8.5- and 1.6-2.9-fold lower initial release rates for the model active compounds, lysozyme (LYS) and (+)-catechin (CAT), than the zein control films, respectively. The change of fatty acid chain length affected both CAT and LYS release rates while the change of fatty acid double bond number affected only the CAT release rate. The film morphologies suggested that the blend films owe their controlled release properties mainly to the microspheres formed within their matrix and encapsulation of active compounds. The blend films showed antilisterial activity and antioxidant activity up to 81 μmol Trolox/cm². The controlled release of multiple bioactive compounds from a single film showed the possibility of combining application of active and bioactive packaging technologies and improving not only safety and quality but also health benefits of packed food. PMID:25025594

  4. Molecular structure, spectroscopic properties and DFT calculations of 2-(methylthio)nicotinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökce, Halil; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2013-10-01

    The analyses of possible conformations, molecular structures, vibrational and electronic properties of 2-(methylthio)nicotinic acid molecule, C7H7NO2S, with the synonym 2-(methylsulfanyl)nicotinic acid have been first presented theoretically. At the same time, FT-IR and micro-Raman spectra of 2-(methylthio)nicotinic acid were recorded in the regions 400-4000 cm-1 and 100-4000 cm-1, respectively. In our calculations, the DFTB3LYP method with 6-311G(d, p) basis set was used to have the structural and spectroscopic data about the mentioned molecule in the ground state and the results obtained were compared with experimental values. Furthermore, gauge invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts in different solvents, UV-vis TD-DFT calculations, the highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO-2, HOMO-1, HOMO), lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), molecular electrostatic potantial (MEP) surface, atomic charges and thermodynamic properties of molecule have been theoretically verified and simulated at the mentioned level. The energetic behavior of title molecule in different solvent media was investigated by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311G(d, p) basis set in terms of integral equation formalism polarizable continuum model (IEFPCM). In addition, the calculated infrared intensities, Raman activities, reduce masses and force constants of the compound under study have been also reported.

  5. Susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to bactericidal properties of medium-chain monoglycerides and free fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Petschow, B W; Batema, R P; Ford, L L

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that various short- and medium-chain free fatty acids (FFAs) and their corresponding monoacylglycerol esters (MGs) have antibacterial activity in vitro against primarily gram-positive bacteria. More recent studies have also shown that the growth of Helicobacter spp. is inhibited by linoleic acid and arachidonic acid. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to the in vitro bactericidal properties of medium-chain MGs and FFAs. Incubation of H. pylori with saturated MGs, ranging in carbon chain length from C10:0 to C14:0, at 1 mM caused a 4-log-unit or greater reduction in the number of viable bacteria after exposure for 1 h. Lower levels of bactericidal activity were observed with C9:0, C15:0, and C16:0 MGs. In contrast, lauric acid (C12:0) was the only medium-chain saturated FFA with bactericidal activity against H. pylori. The MGs and FFAs were bactericidal after incubation for as little as 15 min at neutral or acidic pHs. Higher levels of MGs and FFAs were required for bactericidal activity in the presence of higher amounts of protein in liquid diets. We also found that the frequency of spontaneous development of resistance by H. pylori was higher for metronidazole and tetracycline (10(-5) to 10(-6)) than for C10:0 MG, C12:0 MG, and C12:0 FFA (< 10(-8)). Collectively, our data demonstrate that H. pylori is rapidly inactivated by medium-chain MGs and lauric acid and exhibits a relatively low frequency of spontaneous development of resistance to the bactericidal activity of MGs. Further studies are needed to establish whether MGs may be useful either alone or with other known therapeutic agents in the management of H. pylori infections in humans. PMID:8834870

  6. The small heat shock proteins family: the long forgotten chaperones.

    PubMed

    Garrido, C; Paul, C; Seigneuric, R; Kampinga, H H

    2012-10-01

    Small heat shock proteins are a rather heterogeneous family of ATP-independent chaperones, some of which have been proven to block protein aggregation and help the cells to survive stressful conditions. Although much less studied than high molecular weight HSPs like HSP70/HSPA or HSP90/HSPC, their implication in physio-pathological processes and human diseases is now well evidenced, as it will be discussed in the different reviews of this special issue. In this mini-review we will just present a general introduction about the small heat shock proteins family. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Small HSPs in physiology and pathology. PMID:22449631

  7. Modification of the Technical Properties of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 by Supplementing the Growth Medium with Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Sybesma, W. F. H.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of supplementing growth medium with unsaturated fatty acids on the technical properties of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533, such as heat and acid tolerance, and inhibition of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection. Our results showed that the membrane composition and morphology of L. johnsonii NCC 533 were significantly changed by supplementing a minimal Lactobacillus medium with oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids. The ratio of saturated to unsaturated plus cyclic fatty acids in the bacterial membrane decreased by almost 2-fold when minimal medium was supplemented with unsaturated fatty acids (10 μg/ml). The subsequent acid and heat tolerance of L. johnsonii decreased by 6- and 20-fold when the strain was grown in the presence of linoleic and linolenic acids, respectively, compared with growth in oleic acid (all at 10 μg/ml). Following acid exposure, significantly higher (P < 0.05) oleic acid content was detected in the membrane when growth medium was supplemented with linoleic or linolenic acid, indicating that saturation of the membrane fatty acids occurred during acid stress. Cell integrity was determined in real time during stressed conditions using a fluorescent viability kit in combination with flow cytometric analysis. Following heat shock (at 62.5°C for 5 min), L. johnsonii was unable to form colonies; however, 60% of the bacteria showed no cell integrity loss, which could indicate that the elevated heat inactivated vital processes within the cell, rendering it incapable of replication. Furthermore, L. johnsonii grown in fatty acid-enriched minimal medium had different adhesion properties and caused a 2-fold decrease in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium UK1-lux invasion of HT-29 epithelial cells compared with bacteria grown in minimal medium alone. This could be related to changes in the hydrophobicity and fluidity of the membrane. Our study shows that technical

  8. A Critical Review of the Properties of Fusidic Acid and Analytical Methods for Its Determination.

    PubMed

    Curbete, Mariane Machado; Salgado, Hérida Regina Nunes

    2016-07-01

    Fusidic acid, an antibiotic produced from the Fusidium coccineum fungus, belongs to the class of steroids, but has no corticosteroid effects. It is indicated for the treatment of infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. The aim of this study was to search for the properties of fusidic acid published so far in the literature, as well as the methods developed for its determination in biological samples and pharmaceutical formulations. From the findings, we can conclude that fusidic acid has been used for decades and is indicated for the treatment of serious infections caused by Gram-positive microorganisms to this day. Furthermore, it is a hypoallergenic agent, has low toxicity, shows low resistance, and has no cross-resistance with other clinically used antibiotics. The analytical method of high-performance liquid chromatography has been widely used for determining fusidic acid, since it can reduce the cost and time of analysis, making it more viable for routine quality control in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:26337404

  9. Nucleic acid-binding properties of the RRM-containing protein RDM1

    SciTech Connect

    Hamimes, Samia; Bourgeon, Dominique; Stasiak, Alicja Z.; Stasiak, Andrzej; Van Dyck, Eric . E-mail: Vandyck@iarc.fr

    2006-05-26

    RDM1 (RAD52 Motif 1) is a vertebrate protein involved in the cellular response to the anti-cancer drug cisplatin. In addition to an RNA recognition motif, RDM1 contains a small amino acid motif, named RD motif, which it shares with the recombination and repair protein, RAD52. RDM1 binds to single- and double-stranded DNA, and recognizes DNA distortions induced by cisplatin adducts in vitro. Here, we have performed an in-depth analysis of the nucleic acid-binding properties of RDM1 using gel-shift assays and electron microscopy. We show that RDM1 possesses acidic pH-dependent DNA-binding activity and that it binds RNA as well as DNA, and we present evidence from competition gel-shift experiments that RDM1 may be capable of discrimination between the two nucleic acids. Based on reported studies of RAD52, we have generated an RDM1 variant mutated in its RD motif. We find that the L{sub 119}GF {sup {yields}} AAA mutation affects the mode of RDM1 binding to single-stranded DNA.

  10. Optical and thermal properties of azo derivatives of salicylic acid thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneim, M. M.; El-Ghamaz, N. A.; El-Sonbati, A. Z.; Diab, M. A.; El-Bindary, A. A.; Serag, L. S.

    2015-02-01

    N-acryloyl-4-aminosalicylic acid (4-AMSA), monomer (HL) and 5-(4‧-alkyl phenylazo)-N-acryloyl-4-aminosalicylic acid (HLn) are synthesized and characterized with various physico-chemical techniques. Thin films of 5-(4‧-alkyl phenylazo)-N-acryloyl-4-aminosalicylic acid (HLn) are prepared by spin coating technique. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of 4-aminosalicylic acid (4-ASA) and its derivatives are investigated in powder and thin film forms. Thermal properties of the compounds are investigated by thermogravemetric analysis (TGA). The optical energy gap and the type of optical transition are investigated in the wavelength range (200-2500 nm) for 4-ASA, HL and HLn. The values of fundamental energy gap (Eg) are in the range 3.60-3.69 eV for all compounds and the type of optical transition is found to be indirect allowed. The onset energy gap Eg∗ appeared only for azodye compounds is found to be in the range 0.95-1.55 eV depending on the substituent function groups. The refractive index, n, shows a normal dispersion in the wavelength range 650-2500 nm, while shows anomalous dispersion in the wavelength rang 200-650 nm. The dispersion parameters ε∞, εL, Ed, Eo and N /m∗ are calculated. The photoluminescence phenomena (PL) appear for thin films of 4-ASA and its derivatives show three main emission transitions.

  11. Effect of carboxylic acids as compatibilizer agent on mechanical properties of thermoplastic starch and polypropylene blends.

    PubMed

    Martins, Andréa Bercini; Santana, Ruth Marlene Campomanes

    2016-01-01

    In this work, polypropylene/thermoplastic starch (PP/TPS) blends were prepared as an alternative material to use in disposable packaging, reducing the negative polymeric environmental impact. Unfortunately, this material displays morphological characteristics typical of immiscible polymer blends and a compatibilizer agent is needed. Three different carboxyl acids: myristic (C14), palmitic (C16) and stearic acids (C18) were used as natural compatibilizer agent (NCA). The effects of NCA on the mechanical, physical, thermal and morphological properties of PP/TPS blends were investigated and compared against PP/TPS with and without PP-grafted maleic anhydride (PPgMA). When compared to PP/TPS, blends with C18, PPgMA and C14 presented an improvement of 25, 22 and 17% in tensile strength at break and of 180, 194 and 259% in elongation at break, respectively. The highest increase, 54%, in the impact strength was achieved with C14 incorporation. Improvements could be seen, through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, in the compatibility between the immiscible components by acids incorporation. These results showed that carboxylic acids, specifically C14, could be used as compatibilizer agent and could substitute PPgMA. PMID:26453854

  12. Unravelling the properties of supported copper oxide: can the particle size induce acidic behaviour?

    PubMed

    Zaccheria, Federica; Scotti, Nicola; Marelli, Marcello; Psaro, Rinaldo; Ravasio, Nicoletta

    2013-02-01

    There is a renewed interest in designing solid acid catalysts particularly due to the significance of Lewis acid catalyzed processes such as Friedel-Crafts acylation and alkylation and cellulose hydrolysis for the development of sustainable chemistry. This paper reports a new focus point on the properties of supported CuO on silica, a material that up to now has been considered only as the precursor of an effective hydrogenation catalyst. Thus, it deals with a re-interpretation of some of our results with supported copper oxide aimed to unveil the root of acidic activity exhibited by this material, e.g. in alcoholysis reactions. Several techniques were used to highlight the very high dispersion of the oxide phase on the support allowing us to ascribe the acidic behavior to coordinative unsaturation of the very small CuO particles. In turn this unsaturation makes the CuO particles prone to coordinate surrounding molecules present in the reaction mixture and to exchange them according to their nucleophilicity. PMID:23207422

  13. Optical properties of internally mixed aerosol particles composed of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Miriam A; Hasenkopf, Christa A; Beaver, Melinda R; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2009-12-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of internally mixed aerosol particles composed of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulfate using cavity ring-down aerosol extinction spectroscopy at a wavelength of 532 nm. The real refractive indices of these nonabsorbing species were retrieved from the extinction and concentration of the particles using Mie scattering theory. We obtain refractive indices for pure ammonium sulfate and pure dicarboxylic acids that are consistent with literature values, where they exist, to within experimental error. For mixed particles, however, our data deviates significantly from a volume-weighted average of the pure components. Surprisingly, the real refractive indices of internal mixtures of succinic acid and ammonium sulfate are higher than either of the pure components at the highest organic weight fractions. For binary internal mixtures of oxalic or adipic acid with ammonium sulfate, the real refractive indices of the mixtures are approximately the same as ammonium sulfate for all organic weight fractions. Various optical mixing rules for homogeneous and slightly heterogeneous systems fail to explain the experimental real refractive indices. It is likely that complex particle morphologies are responsible for the observed behavior of the mixed particles. Implications of our results for atmospheric modeling and aerosol structure are discussed. PMID:19877658

  14. Structure-based model for light-harvesting properties of nucleic acid nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Keyao; Boulais, Etienne; Yang, Lun; Bathe, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Programmed self-assembly of DNA enables the rational design of megadalton-scale macromolecular assemblies with sub-nanometer scale precision. These assemblies can be programmed to serve as structural scaffolds for secondary chromophore molecules with light-harvesting properties. Like in natural systems, the local and global spatial organization of these synthetic scaffolded chromophore systems plays a crucial role in their emergent excitonic and optical properties. Previously, we introduced a computational model to predict the large-scale 3D solution structure and flexibility of nucleic acid nanostructures programmed using the principle of scaffolded DNA origami. Here, we use Förster resonance energy transfer theory to simulate the temporal dynamics of dye excitation and energy transfer accounting both for overall DNA nanostructure architecture as well as atomic-level DNA and dye chemical structure and composition. Results are used to calculate emergent optical properties including effective absorption cross-section, absorption and emission spectra and total power transferred to a biomimetic reaction center in an existing seven-helix double stranded DNA-based antenna. This structure-based computational framework enables the efficient in silico evaluation of nucleic acid nanostructures for diverse light-harvesting and photonic applications. PMID:24311563

  15. Structure-based model for light-harvesting properties of nucleic acid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Pan, Keyao; Boulais, Etienne; Yang, Lun; Bathe, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Programmed self-assembly of DNA enables the rational design of megadalton-scale macromolecular assemblies with sub-nanometer scale precision. These assemblies can be programmed to serve as structural scaffolds for secondary chromophore molecules with light-harvesting properties. Like in natural systems, the local and global spatial organization of these synthetic scaffolded chromophore systems plays a crucial role in their emergent excitonic and optical properties. Previously, we introduced a computational model to predict the large-scale 3D solution structure and flexibility of nucleic acid nanostructures programmed using the principle of scaffolded DNA origami. Here, we use Förster resonance energy transfer theory to simulate the temporal dynamics of dye excitation and energy transfer accounting both for overall DNA nanostructure architecture as well as atomic-level DNA and dye chemical structure and composition. Results are used to calculate emergent optical properties including effective absorption cross-section, absorption and emission spectra and total power transferred to a biomimetic reaction center in an existing seven-helix double stranded DNA-based antenna. This structure-based computational framework enables the efficient in silico evaluation of nucleic acid nanostructures for diverse light-harvesting and photonic applications. PMID:24311563

  16. Density functional theory studies on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and electronic properties of cyanuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhaharan, M.; Prabakaran, A. R.; Srinivasan, S.; Gunasekaran, S.

    2015-03-01

    The present work has been carried out a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and NBO analysis of cyanuric acid. The FT-IR (100-4000 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (400-4000 cm-1) of cyanuric acid were recorded. In DFT methods, Becke's three parameter exchange-functional (B3) combined with gradient-corrected correlation functional of Lee, Yang and Parr (LYP) by implementing the split-valence polarized 6-31G(d,p) and 6-31++G(d,p) basis sets have been considered for the computation of the molecular structure optimization, vibrational frequencies, thermodynamic properties and energies of the optimized structures. The density functional theory (DFT) result complements the experimental findings. The electronic properties, such as HOMO-LUMO energies and molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) are also performed. Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges is also calculated. The first order hyperpolarizability (βtotal) of this molecular system and related properties (β, μ and Δα) are calculated using DFT/B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods. The thermodynamic functions (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) from spectroscopic data by statistical methods were also obtained for the range of temperature 50-1000 K.

  17. Thermal properties of phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole membranes in water and methanol-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nores-Pondal, Federico J.; Buera, M. Pilar; Corti, Horacio R.

    The thermal properties of phosphoric acid-doped poly[2-2‧-(m-phenylene)-5-5‧ bi-benzimidazole] (PBI) and poly[2,5-benzimidazole] (ABPBI) membranes, ionomeric materials with promising properties to be used as electrolytes in direct methanol and in high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, were studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique in the temperature range from -145 °C to 200 °C. The DSC scans of samples equilibrated in water at different relative humidities (RH) and in liquid water-methanol mixtures were analyzed in relation to glass transition, water crystallization/melting and solvent desorption in different temperature regions. The thermal relaxation observed in the very low temperature region could be ascribed to the glass transition of the H 3PO 4-H 2O mixture confined in the polymeric matrix. After cooling the samples up to -145 °C, frozen water was detected in PBI and ABPBI at different RH, although at 100% RH less amount of water had crystallized than that observed in Nafion membranes under the same conditions. Even more important is the fact that the freezing degree of water is much lower in ABPBI membranes equilibrated in liquid water-methanol mixtures than that observed for PBI and, in a previous study, for Nafion. Thus, apart from other well known properties, acid-doped ABPBI emerges as an excellent ionomer for applications in direct methanol fuel cells working in cold environments.

  18. Enhanced biocompatibility and antibacterial property of polyurethane materials modified with citric acid and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian-Ming; Wu, Xing-Ze; Qiu, Yun-Ren

    2016-08-01

    Citric acid (CA) and chitosan (CS) were covalently immobilized on polyurethane (PU) materials to improve the biocompatibility and antibacterial property. The polyurethane pre-polymer with isocyanate group was synthesized by one pot method, and then grafted with citric acid, followed by blending with polyethersulfone (PES) to prepare the blend membrane by phase-inversion method so that chitosan can be grafted from the membrane via esterification and acylation reactions eventually. The native and modified membranes were characterized by attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, water contact angle measurement, and tensile strength test. Protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, hemolysis assay, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin time, and adsorption of Ca(2+) were executed to evaluate the blood compatibility of the membranes decorated by CA and CS. Particularly, the antibacterial activities on the modified membranes were evaluated based on a vitro antibacterial test. It could be concluded that the modified membrane had good anticoagulant property and antibacterial property. PMID:27102367

  19. PHARMACOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF ORALLY AVAILABLE, AMPHIPATHIC POLYAMINOCARBOXYLIC ACID CHELATORS FOR ACTINIDE DECORPORATION

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Scott C.; Wang, Xuli; Bowman, Beth M.

    2010-01-01

    Commonly used water-soluble polyaminocarboxylic acid (PACA) chelators, such as (EDTA) and DTPA, require intravenous or subcutaneous administration due to their poor bioavailability. The bioavailability of PACAs can be improved by the addition of differing lengths of alkyl side chains that alter amphipathic properties. Orally administered amphipathic triethylenetetramine pentaacetic acid (TT) compounds are efficacious for decorporation of Pu and Am. The synthesis, efficacy, binding affinities, and some initial pharmacokinetics properties of amphipathic TT chelators are reviewed. 14C-Labeled C12TT and C22TT chelators are reasonably well absorbed from the intestine and have a substantial biliary/fecal excretion pathway, unlike DTPA, which is mostly excreted in the urine. Whole body retention times are increased as a function of increasing lipophilicity. Neutron-induced autoradiography studies demonstrate that the oral administration of the chelators can substantially inhibit the redistribution of 239Pu in skeletal tissues. In summary, amphipathic TT-based chelators have favorable bioavailability, have a significant biliary excretion pathway, have demonstrated efficacy for americium and plutonium and are thus good candidates for further development. Furthermore, some of the pharmacological properties can be manipulated by changing the lengths of the alkyl side chains and this may have some advantage for decorporation of certain metals and radionuclides. PMID:20699705

  20. Comparison of some spectroscopic and physico-chemical properties of humic acids extracted from sewage sludge and bottom sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polak, J.; Bartoszek, M.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2009-04-01

    Comparison of the physico-chemical properties was carried out for humic acids extracted from sewage sludge and bottom sediments. The isolated humic acids were investigated by means of EPR, IR, UV/vis spectroscopic methods and elementary analysis AE. On the basis of earlier studies it was stated that humic acids extracted from sewage sludge can be divided into humic acids extracted from raw sewage sludge and from sewage sludge after the digestion process. The digestion process was found to have the most significant effect on the physico-chemical properties of humic acids extracted from sludge during sewage treatment. Humic acids extracted from sewage sludge had higher free radical concentration than humic acid extracted from bottom sediments. Values of the g-factor were similar for all studied samples. However, it is noteworthy that g-factor values for humic acid extracted from raw sewage sludge and from bottom sediments were lower in comparison to the humic acid extracted from sewage sludge after the fermentation processes. The IR spectra of all studied humic acids confirmed the presence of functional groups characteristic for humic substances. It was also observed that humic acids extracted from bottom sediments had a more aromatic character and contained less carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen than those extracted from the sewage sludge.

  1. [CHAPERONES FUNCTION HSP60 AND HSP90 AND THEIR ROLE IN CARDIAC PATHOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Kazimirko, V K; Kutovoy, V V; Bobyk, V I; Kozak, I O; Ivanitskaya, L M; Dubkova, A G; Silanteva, T S

    2014-01-01

    In review provides information about the function oft the body of chaperones and their role in the development of pathological processes, including--atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Marked comminications systems chaperones to the immune and endocrine systems, and inflammation. PMID:26492771

  2. Model systems of protein-misfolding diseases reveal chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chaperones and co-chaperones enable protein folding and degradation, safeguarding the proteome against proteotoxic stress. Chaperones display dynamic responses to exogenous and endogenous stressors and thus constitute a key component of the proteostasis network (PN), an intricately regulated network of quality control and repair pathways that cooperate to maintain cellular proteostasis. It has been hypothesized that aging leads to chronic stress on the proteome and that this could underlie many age-associated diseases such as neurodegeneration. Understanding the dynamics of chaperone function during aging and disease-related proteotoxic stress could reveal specific chaperone systems that fail to respond to protein misfolding. Through the use of suppressor and enhancer screens, key chaperones crucial for proteostasis maintenance have been identified in model organisms that express misfolded disease-related proteins. This review provides a literature-based analysis of these genetic studies and highlights prominent chaperone modifiers of proteotoxicity, which include the HSP70-HSP40 machine and small HSPs. Taken together, these studies in model systems can inform strategies for therapeutic regulation of chaperone functionality, to manage aging-related proteotoxic stress and to delay the onset of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27491084

  3. Targeting Molecular Chaperones for the Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis: Is It a Viable Approach?

    PubMed

    Heard, Ashley; Thompson, Jake; Carver, Jessica; Bakey, Michelle; Wang, X Robert

    2015-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is largely caused by protein misfolding and the loss of function of a plasma membrane anion channel known as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The most common CF-causing mutation, F508del, leads to severe conformational defect in CFTR. The cellular chaperone machinery plays an important role in CFTR biogenesis and quality control. Multiple attempts have been made to improve the cell surface functional expression of the mutant CFTR by modulating the expression of components of the cellular chaperone machinery. The efficacy of such an approach has been low largely due to the severe intrinsic folding defects of the F508del CFTR. Moreover, the impact of chaperone perturbation on the chaperone machinery itself and on other physiologically important proteins might lead to potentially severe side effects. Approaches aimed at disrupting chaperone-CFTR interactions show greater efficacy, and are compatible with small-molecule drug discovery and gene therapy. Combination between chaperone modulators and F508del correctors might further enhance potency and specificity. As molecular chaperones play important roles in regulating inflammation and immunity, they can be potential targets for controlling airway infection and inflammation in patients. If such effects can be synergized with chaperone-mediated regulation of CFTR biogenesis and quality control, more efficacious therapeutics will be developed to combat CF lung disease. PMID:25981601

  4. Effects of Inorganic Fillers on the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Poly(lactic acid)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingxun; Wang, Tongxin; Chow, Laurence C.; Yang, Mingshu; Mitchell, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Addition of filler to polylactic acid (PLA) may affect its crystallization behavior and mechanical properties. The effects of talc and hydroxyapatite (HA) on the thermal and mechanical properties of two types of PLA (one amorphous and one semicrystalline) have been investigated. The composites were prepared by melt blending followed by injection molding. The molecular weight, morphology, mechanical properties, and thermal properties have been characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), scanning electron microscope (SEM), instron tensile tester, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). It was found that the melting blending led to homogeneous distribution of the inorganic filler within the PLA matrix but decreased the molecular weight of PLA. Regarding the filler, addition of talc increased the crystallinity of PLA, but HA decreased the crystallinity of PLA. The tensile strength of the composites depended on the crystallinity of PLA and the interfacial properties between PLA and the filler, but both talc and HA filler increased the toughness of PLA. PMID:25717339

  5. Effect of amino acid doping on the growth and ferroelectric properties of triglycine sulphate single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, C.M.; Sankar, R.; Mohan Kumar, R.; Jayavel, R.

    2008-02-05

    Effect of amino acids (L-leucine and isoleucine) doping on the growth aspects and ferroelectric properties of triglycine sulphate crystals has been studied. Pure and doped crystals were grown from aqueous solution by low temperature solution growth technique. The cell parameter values were found to significantly vary for doped crystals. Fourier transform infrared analysis confirmed the presence of functional groups in the grown crystal. Morphology study reveals that amino acid doping induces faster growth rate along b-direction leading to a wide b-plane and hence suitable for pyroelectric detector applications. Ferroelectric domain structure has been studied by atomic force microscopy and hysteresis measurements reveal an increase of coercive field due to the formation of single domain pattern.

  6. Morphologies, mechanical properties and thermal stability of poly(lactic acid) toughened by precipitated barium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinian; Wang, Chuang; Shao, Kaiyun; Ding, Guoxin; Tao, Yulun; Zhu, Jinbo

    2015-11-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-based composites were prepared by blending PLA with precipitated barium sulfate (BaSO4) modified with stearic acid. The morphologies, mechanical properties and thermal stability of samples with increased mass fraction of BaSO4 were investigated. Results showed that PLA was toughened and reinforced simultaneously by incorporation of precipitated BaSO4 particles. The highest impact toughness and elongation at break were both achieved at 15% BaSO4, while the elastic modulus increased monotonically with increasing BaSO4 loading. Little effect of BaSO4 on the thermal behavior of PLA was observed in the present case. However, the thermal stability of PLA/BaSO4 composites at high temperature was enhanced.

  7. Dithiol amino acids can structurally shape and enhance the ligand-binding properties of polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shiyu; Gopalakrishnan, Ranganath; Schaer, Tifany; Marger, Fabrice; Hovius, Ruud; Bertrand, Daniel; Pojer, Florence; Heinis, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The disulfide bonds that form between two cysteine residues are important in defining and rigidifying the structures of proteins and peptides. In polypeptides containing multiple cysteine residues, disulfide isomerization can lead to multiple products with different biological activities. Here, we describe the development of a dithiol amino acid (Dtaa) that can form two disulfide bridges at a single amino acid site. Application of Dtaas to a serine protease inhibitor and a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitor that contain disulfide constraints enhanced their inhibitory activities 40- and 7.6-fold, respectively. X-ray crystallographic and NMR structure analysis show that the peptide ligands containing Dtaas have retained their native tertiary structures. We furthermore show that replacement of two cysteines by Dtaas can avoid the formation of disulfide bond isomers. With these properties, Dtaas are likely to have broad application in the rational design or directed evolution of peptides and proteins with high activity and stability.

  8. Alkali and Acid Solubilization Effects on Rheological Properties of Horse Mackerel Muscle Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo-Deaño, L.; Tovar, C. A.

    2008-07-01

    Influence of the acid (Type A) and alkali (Type B) solubilization of muscle proteins in the viscoelastic properties of surimi and surimi gels made from horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) muscle were evaluated. Stress and frequency sweep tests showed that surimi from method B presents higher viscoelastic moduli, lowest values of phase angle and minimum viscoelastic moduli dependence with frequency than surimi A. These results show a high inicial protein aggregation in surimi B, that could explain the greater firmness and hardness of this sample, showing a more compact network structure. From static and dynamic tests, gel developed from alkali solubilization resulted in higher gel strength and more rigid network than that from acidic pH, despite the incial protein aggregation of surimi B its protein keeps better gelation capacity. The less structural quality of GA gel is likely due to the more lipid content on the surimi as compared to alkali treatment.

  9. [Properties of a cephalosporinase produced by Proteus penneri inhibited by clavulanic acid].

    PubMed

    Miro, E; Barthelemy, M; Peduzzi, J; Reynaud, A; Morand, A; Prats, G; Labia, R

    1994-05-01

    P. penneri produces an inducible cephalosporinase, as many Enterobacteriaceae. Nevertheless this betalactamase is susceptible to clavulanic acid which is an exception also encountered for P. vulgaris. The authors studied the enzyme produced by P. penneri 14HBC resistant to cefotaxime (MIC 16 mg/l) isolated in Spain in 1992. This betalactamase of isoelectric point 6.65 hydrolyzes first generation cephalosporins, amoxycillin and poorly ticarcillin as it occurs for all cephalosporinases. However, this enzyme hydrolyzes strongly oxyimino-cephalosporins: cefuroxime, cefotaxime, cefepime, cefpirome as it occurs with extended-spectrum betalactamases. Cephamycins and imipenem are not substrates. Clavulanic acid has a very good affinity for this betalactamase which is inactivated progressively. These properties are similar to those of the enzyme of P. vulgaris Ro104 of isoelectric point 8.3 which, contrarily to other cephalosporinases, belongs to the structural Ambler's class A. PMID:7824319

  10. Cloning, expression and crystallisation of SGT1 co-chaperone protein from Glaciozyma antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Nur Athirah; Bakar, Farah Diba Abu; Beddoe, Travis; Murad, Abdul Munir Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Studies on psycrophiles are now in the limelight of today's post genomic era as they fascinate the research and development industries. The discovery from Glaciozyma antarctica, an extreme cold adapted yeast from Antarctica shows promising future to provide cost effective natural sustainable energy and create wider understanding of the property that permits this organisms to adapt to extreme temperature downshift. In plants and yeast, studies show the interaction between SGT1 and HSP90 are essential for disease resistance and heat stress by activating a number of resistance proteins. Here we report for the first time cloning, expression and crystallization of the recombinant SGT1 protein of G. antarctica (rGa_SGT1), a highly conserved eukaryotic protein that interacts with the molecular chaperones HSP90 (heat shock protein 90) apparently associated in a role of co-chaperone that may play important role in cold adaptation. The sequence analysis of rGa_SGT1 revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of SGT1 protein. In this study, we present the outlines and results of protein structural study of G. antarctica SGT1 protein. We validate this approach by starting with cloning the target insert into Ligation Independent Cloning system proceeded with expression using E. coli system, and crystallisation of the target rGA_SGT1 protein. The work is still on going with the target subunit of the complex proteins yielded crystals. These results, still ongoing, open a platform for better understanding of the uniqueness of this crucial molecular machine function in cold adaptation.

  11. A pH Switch Regulates the Inverse Relationship between Membranolytic and Chaperone-like Activities of HSP-1/2, a Major Protein of Horse Seminal Plasma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C Sudheer; Swamy, Musti J

    2016-07-01

    HSP-1/2, a major protein of horse seminal plasma binds to choline phospholipids present on the sperm plasma membrane and perturbs its structure by intercalating into the hydrophobic core, which results in an efflux of choline phospholipids and cholesterol, an important event in sperm capacitation. HSP-1/2 also exhibits chaperone-like activity (CLA) in vitro and protects target proteins against various kinds of stress. In the present study we show that HSP-1/2 exhibits destabilizing activity toward model supported and cell membranes. The membranolytic activity of HSP-1/2 is found to be pH dependent, with lytic activity being high at mildly acidic pH (6.0-6.5) and low at mildly basic pH (8.0-8.5). Interestingly, the CLA is also found to be pH dependent, with high activity at mildly basic pH and low activity at mildly acidic pH. Taken together the present studies demonstrate that the membranolytic and chaperone-like activities of HSP-1/2 have an inverse relationship and are regulated via a pH switch, which is reversible. The higher CLA observed at mildly basic pH could be correlated to an increase in surface hydrophobicity of the protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting regulation of two different activities of a chaperone protein by a pH switch. PMID:27292547

  12. Effect of Hyaluronic Acid Incorporation Method on the Stability and Biological Properties of Polyurethane-Hyaluronic Acid Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Amaliris; Rathnam, Kashmila R.; Masters, Kristyn S.

    2014-01-01

    The high failure rate of small diameter vascular grafts continues to drive the development of new materials and modification strategies that address this clinical problem, with biomolecule incorporation typically achieved via surface-based modification of various biomaterials. In this work, we examined whether the method of biomolecule incorporation (i.e., bulk vs. surface modification) into a polyurethane (PU) polymer impacted biomaterial performance in the context of vascular applications. Specifically, hyaluronic acid (HA) was incorporated into a poly(ether urethane) via bulk copolymerization or covalent surface tethering, and the resulting PU-HA materials characterized with respect to both physical and biological properties. Modification of PU with HA by either surface or bulk methods yielded materials that, when tested under static conditions, possessed no significant differences in their ability to resist protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, and bacterial adhesion, while supporting endothelial cell culture. However, only bulk-modified PU-HA materials were able to fully retain these characteristics following material exposure to flow, demonstrating a superior ability to retain the incorporated HA and minimize enzymatic degradation, protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, and bacterial adhesion. Thus, despite bulk methods rarely being implemented in the context of biomolecule attachment, these results demonstrate improved performance of PU-HA upon bulk, rather than surface, incorporation of HA. Although explored only in the context of PU-HA, the findings revealed by these experiments have broader implications for the design and evaluation of vascular graft modification strategies. PMID:24276670

  13. Semisynthetic bile acid FXR and TGR5 agonists: physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetics, and metabolism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Roda, Aldo; Pellicciari, Roberto; Gioiello, Antimo; Neri, Flavia; Camborata, Cecilia; Passeri, Daniela; De Franco, Francesca; Spinozzi, Silvia; Colliva, Carolina; Adorini, Luciano; Montagnani, Marco; Aldini, Rita

    2014-07-01

    We report on the relationship between the structure-pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and therapeutic activity of semisynthetic bile acid analogs, including 6α-ethyl-3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid (a selective farnesoid X receptor [FXR] receptor agonist), 6α-ethyl-23(S)-methyl-3α,7α,12α-trihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid (a specific Takeda G protein-coupled receptor 5 [TGR5] receptor agonist), and 6α-ethyl-3α,7α-dihydroxy-24-nor-5β-cholan-23-sulfate (a dual FXR/TGR5 agonist). We measured the main physicochemical properties of these molecules, including ionization constants, water solubility, lipophilicity, detergency, and protein binding. Biliary secretion and metabolism and plasma and hepatic concentrations were evaluated by high-pressure liquid chromatography-electrospray-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry in bile fistula rat and compared with natural analogs chenodeoxycholic, cholic acid, and taurochenodexycholic acid and intestinal bacteria metabolism was evaluated in terms of 7α-dehydroxylase substrate-specificity in anaerobic human stool culture. The semisynthetic derivatives detergency, measured in terms of their critical micellar concentration, was quite similar to the natural analogs. They were slightly more lipophilic than the corresponding natural analogs, evaluated by their 1-octanol water partition coefficient (log P), because of the ethyl group in 6 position, which makes these molecules very stable toward bacterial 7-dehydroxylation. The hepatic metabolism and biliary secretion were different: 6α-ethyl-3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid, as chenodeoxycholic acid, was efficiently conjugated with taurine in the liver and, only in this form, promptly and efficiently secreted in bile. 6α-Ethyl-23(S)-methyl-3α,7α,12α-trihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid was poorly conjugated with taurine because of the steric hindrance of the methyl at C23(S) position metabolized to the C23(R) isomer and partly conjugated with taurine. Conversely, 6

  14. Mechanical and acid neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition of amorphous calcium phosphate dental nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Jennifer L.; Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2012-01-01

    Dental composites do not hinder bacteria colonization and plaque formation. Caries at the restoration margins is a frequent reason for replacement of existing restorations, which accounts for 50 to 70% of all restorations. The objectives of this study were to examine the filler level effect on nanocomposite containing nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and investigate the load-bearing and acid-neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition. NACP with 116-nm particle size were synthesized via a spray-drying technique and incorporated into a resin. Flexural strength of nanocomposite with 10 to 30% NACP fillers matched the strength of a commercial hybrid composite (p > 0.1). Nanocomposite with 40% NACP matched the strength of a microfill composite, which was 2-fold that of a resin-modified glass ionomer. Nanocomposite with 40% NACP neutralized a lactic acid solution of pH 4 by rapidly increasing the pH to 5.69 in 10 min. In contrast, the commercial controls had pH staying at near 4. Using Streptoccocus mutans, an agar disk-diffusion test showed no inhibition zone for commercial controls. In contrast, the inhibition zone was (2.5 ± 0.7) mm for nanocomposite with 40% NACP. Crystal violet staining showed that S. mutans coverage on nanocomposite was 1/4 that on commercial composite. In conclusion, novel calcium–phosphate nanocomposite matched the mechanical properties of commercial composite and rapidly neutralized lactic acid of pH 4. The nanocomposite appeared to moderately reduce the S. mutans growth, and further study is needed to obtain strong antimicrobial properties. The new nanocomposite may have potential to reduce secondary caries and restoration fracture, two main challenges facing tooth cavity restorations. PMID:21504057

  15. Mechanical and acid neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition of amorphous calcium phosphate dental nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Jennifer L; Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C; Xu, Hockin H K

    2011-07-01

    Dental composites do not hinder bacteria colonization and plaque formation. Caries at the restoration margins is a frequent reason for replacement of existing restorations, which accounts for 50 to 70% of all restorations. The objectives of this study were to examine the filler level effect on nanocomposite containing nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) and investigate the load-bearing and acid-neutralizing properties and bacteria inhibition. NACP with 116-nm particle size were synthesized via a spray-drying technique and incorporated into a resin. Flexural strength of nanocomposite with 10 to 30% NACP fillers matched the strength of a commercial hybrid composite (p > 0.1). Nanocomposite with 40% NACP matched the strength of a microfill composite, which was 2-fold that of a resin-modified glass ionomer. Nanocomposite with 40% NACP neutralized a lactic acid solution of pH 4 by rapidly increasing the pH to 5.69 in 10 min. In contrast, the commercial controls had pH staying at near 4. Using Streptoccocus mutans, an agar disk-diffusion test showed no inhibition zone for commercial controls. In contrast, the inhibition zone was (2.5 ± 0.7) mm for nanocomposite with 40% NACP. Crystal violet staining showed that S. mutans coverage on nanocomposite was 1/4 that on commercial composite. In conclusion, novel calcium-phosphate nanocomposite matched the mechanical properties of commercial composite and rapidly neutralized lactic acid of pH 4. The nanocomposite appeared to moderately reduce the S. mutans growth, and further study is needed to obtain strong antimicrobial properties. The new nanocomposite may have potential to reduce secondary caries and restoration fracture, two main challenges facing tooth cavity restorations. PMID:21504057

  16. Tyrosine 601 of Bacillus subtilis DnaK Undergoes Phosphorylation and Is Crucial for Chaperone Activity and Heat Shock Survival‡

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Macek, Boris; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    In order to screen for cellular substrates of the Bacillus subtilis BY-kinase PtkA, and its cognate phosphotyrosine-protein phosphatase PtpZ, we performed a triple Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture-based quantitative phosphoproteome analysis. Detected tyrosine phosphorylation sites for which the phosphorylation level decreased in the ΔptkA strain and increased in the ΔptpZ strain, compared to the wild type (WT), were considered as potential substrates of PtkA/PtpZ. One of those sites was the residue tyrosine 601 of the molecular chaperone DnaK. We confirmed that DnaK is a substrate of PtkA and PtpZ by in vitro phosphorylation and dephosphorylation assays. In vitro, DnaK Y601F mutant exhibited impaired interaction with its co-chaperones DnaJ and GrpE, along with diminished capacity to hydrolyze ATP and assist the re-folding of denatured proteins. In vivo, loss of DnaK phosphorylation in the mutant strain dnaK Y601F, or in the strain overexpressing the phosphatase PtpZ, led to diminished survival upon heat shock, consistent with the in vitro results. The decreased survival of the mutant dnaK Y601F at an elevated temperature could be rescued by complementing with the WT dnaK allele expressed ectopically. We concluded that the residue tyrosine 601 of DnaK can be phosphorylated and dephosphorylated by PtkA and PtpZ, respectively. Furthermore, Y601 is important for DnaK chaperone activity and heat shock survival of B. subtilis. PMID:27148221

  17. Kinetic analysis reveals the diversity of microscopic mechanisms through which molecular chaperones suppress amyloid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Linse, Sara; Månsson, Cecilia; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Presto, Jenny; Johansson, Jan; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-03-01

    It is increasingly recognized that molecular chaperones play a key role in modulating the formation of amyloid fibrils, a process associated with a wide range of human disorders. Understanding the detailed mechanisms by which they perform this function, however, has been challenging because of the great complexity of the protein aggregation process itself. In this work, we build on a previous kinetic approach and develop a model that considers pairwise interactions between molecular chaperones and different protein species to identify the protein components targeted by the chaperones and the corresponding microscopic reaction steps that are inhibited. We show that these interactions conserve the topology of the unperturbed reaction network but modify the connectivity weights between the different microscopic steps. Moreover, by analysing several protein-molecular chaperone systems, we reveal the striking diversity in the microscopic mechanisms by which molecular chaperones act to suppress amyloid formation.

  18. Copper transporters and chaperones: Their function on angiogenesis and cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Bharathi Devi, S R; Dhivya M, Aloysius; Sulochana, K N

    2016-09-01

    Copper, although known as a micronutrient, has a pivotal role in modulating the cellular metabolism. Many studies have reported the role of copper in angiogenesis. Copper chaperones are intracellular proteins that mediate copper trafficking to various cell organelles. However, the role and function of copper chaperones in relation to angiogenesis has to be further explored. The intracellular copper levels when in excess are deleterious and certain mutations of copper chaperones have been shown to induce cell death and influence various cellular metabolisms. The study of these chaperones will be helpful in understanding the players in the cascade of events in angiogenesis and their role in cellular metabolic pathways. In this review we have briefly listed the copper chaperones associated with angiogenic and metabolic signalling and their function. PMID:27581939

  19. Kinetic analysis reveals the diversity of microscopic mechanisms through which molecular chaperones suppress amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Linse, Sara; Månsson, Cecilia; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Presto, Jenny; Johansson, Jan; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that molecular chaperones play a key role in modulating the formation of amyloid fibrils, a process associated with a wide range of human disorders. Understanding the detailed mechanisms by which they perform this function, however, has been challenging because of the great complexity of the protein aggregation process itself. In this work, we build on a previous kinetic approach and develop a model that considers pairwise interactions between molecular chaperones and different protein species to identify the protein components targeted by the chaperones and the corresponding microscopic reaction steps that are inhibited. We show that these interactions conserve the topology of the unperturbed reaction network but modify the connectivity weights between the different microscopic steps. Moreover, by analysing several protein-molecular chaperone systems, we reveal the striking diversity in the microscopic mechanisms by which molecular chaperones act to suppress amyloid formation. PMID:27009901

  20. Spectral and Acid-Base Properties of Hydroxyflavones in Micellar Solutions of Cationic Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkovska, N. A.; Barvinchenko, V. N.; Fedyanina, T. V.; Rugal', A. A.

    2014-09-01

    It has been shown that the spectral characteristics (intensity, position of the absorption band) and the acid-base properties in a series of structurally similar hydroxyflavones depend on the concentration of the cationic surfactants miramistin and decamethoxin in aqueous solutions, and the extent of their changes is more pronounced for hydrophobic quercetin than for hydrophilic rutin. For the first time, we have determined the apparent dissociation constants of quercetin and rutin in solutions of these cationic surfactants (pKa1) over a broad concentration range and we have established that they decrease in the series water-decamethoxin-miramistin.

  1. Comparison of different ibuprofen-amino acid compounds with respect to emulsifying and cytotoxic properties.

    PubMed

    Baydoun, Luma; Düvel, Andreas; Daniels, Rolf; Drust, Andreas; Goldhagen, Thorsten; Schwan, Irina; Zeidler, Christian; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2004-04-15

    Sodium ibuprofen (Ibu-Na) and different ibuprofen-amino acid compounds, lysinate (Ibu-Lys), arginate (Ibu-Arg) and histidinate (Ibu-His), were evaluated for emulsifying, haemolytic and cytotoxic properties. The highest reduction of surface tension was obtained with Ibu-Lys which shows good emulsifying qualities. At the same time, Ibu-Lys reveals the highest haemolytic activity and affects porcine cornea integrity. However, incorporation of Ibu-Lys into an emulsion system significantly decreases haemolysis. On the contrary Ibu-Arg, which shows a lower surface tension reduction, allows, unlike Ibu-Na and Ibu-His, for comparably stable emulsions with comparable erythrocyte damage. PMID:15072792

  2. Structural basis underlying viral hijacking of a histone chaperone complex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongda; Deng, Zhong; Vladimirova, Olga; Wiedmer, Andreas; Lu, Fang; Lieberman, Paul M; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2016-01-01

    The histone H3.3 chaperone DAXX is implicated in formation of heterochromatin and transcription silencing, especially for newly infecting DNA virus genomes entering the nucleus. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can efficiently establish stable latent infection as a chromatinized episome in the nucleus of infected cells. The EBV tegument BNRF1 is a DAXX-interacting protein required for the establishment of selective viral gene expression during latency. Here we report the structure of BNRF1 DAXX-interaction domain (DID) in complex with DAXX histone-binding domain (HBD) and histones H3.3-H4. BNRF1 DID contacts DAXX HBD and histones through non-conserved loops. The BNRF1-DAXX interface is responsible for BNRF1 localization to PML-nuclear bodies typically associated with host-antiviral resistance and transcriptional repression. Paradoxically, the interface is also required for selective transcription activation of viral latent cycle genes required for driving B-cell proliferation. These findings reveal molecular details of virus reprogramming of an antiviral histone chaperone to promote viral latency and cellular immortalization. PMID:27581705

  3. Ambroxol as a pharmacological chaperone for mutant glucocerebrosidase

    PubMed Central

    Bendikov-Bar, Inna; Maor, Gali; Filocamo, Mirella; Horowitz, Mia

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes due to mutations in the GBA1 gene encoding the lysosomal hydrolase β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase). The disease has a broad spectrum of phenotypes, which were divided into three different Types; Type 1 GD is not associated with primary neurological disease while Types 2 and 3 are associated with central nervous system disease. GCase molecules are synthesized on endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound polyribosomes, translocated into the ER and following modifications and correct folding, shuttle to the lysosomes. Mutant GCase molecules, which fail to fold correctly, undergo ER associated degradation (ERAD) in the proteasomes, the degree of which is one of the factors that determine GD severity. Several pharmacological chaperones have already been shown to assist correct folding of mutant GCase molecules in the ER, thus facilitating their trafficking to the lysosomes. Ambroxol, a known expectorant, is one such chaperone. Here we show that ambroxol increases both the lysosomal fraction and the enzymatic activity of several mutant GCase variants in skin fibroblasts derived from Type 1 and Type 2 GD patients. PMID:23158495

  4. Tau triage decisions mediated by the chaperone network.

    PubMed

    Cook, Casey; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    The pathological accumulation of the microtubule-binding protein tau is linked to an increasing number of neurodegenerative conditions associated with aging, though the mechanisms by which tau accumulates in disease are unclear. In this review, we will summarize our previous research assessing the mechanism of action, as well as the therapeutic potential of Hsp90 inhibition for the treatment of tauopathies. Specifically, we describe the development of a high-throughput screening approach to identify and rank compounds, and demonstrate the selective elimination of aberrant p-tau species in the brain following treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor. Additionally, we identify CHIP as an essential component of the Hsp90 chaperone complex that mediates tau degradation, and present evidence to suggest that CHIP functions to identify and sequester neurotoxic tau species. Finally, we discuss recent data identifying an additional mechanism by which CHIP modulates protein triage decisions involving Hsp90. Specifically, CHIP indirectly regulates Hsp90 chaperone activity by modulating steady-state levels of the Hsp90 deacetylase, HDAC6, thus influencing both the acetylation state and function of Hsp90. Thus future research directions will focus on the manipulation of this network to promote degradation of pathogenic tau species in disease. PMID:22596270

  5. Anticancer Gold(III) Porphyrins Target Mitochondrial Chaperone Hsp60.

    PubMed

    Hu, Di; Liu, Yungen; Lai, Yau-Tsz; Tong, Ka-Chung; Fung, Yi-Man; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2016-01-22

    Identification of the molecular target(s) of anticancer metal complexes is a formidable challenge since most of them are unstable toward ligand exchange reaction(s) or biological reduction under physiological conditions. Gold(III) meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (gold-1 a) is notable for its high stability in biological milieux and potent in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities. Herein, extensive chemical biology approaches employing photo-affinity labeling, click chemistry, chemical proteomics, cellular thermal shift, saturation-transfer difference NMR, protein fluorescence quenching, and protein chaperone assays were used to provide compelling evidence that heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60), a mitochondrial chaperone and potential anticancer target, is a direct target of gold-1 a in vitro and in cells. Structure-activity studies with a panel of non-porphyrin gold(III) complexes and other metalloporphyrins revealed that Hsp60 inhibition is specifically dependent on both the gold(III) ion and the porphyrin ligand. PMID:26663758

  6. Ambroxol as a pharmacological chaperone for mutant glucocerebrosidase.

    PubMed

    Bendikov-Bar, Inna; Maor, Gali; Filocamo, Mirella; Horowitz, Mia

    2013-02-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is characterized by accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes due to mutations in the GBA1 gene encoding the lysosomal hydrolase β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase). The disease has a broad spectrum of phenotypes, which were divided into three different Types; Type 1 GD is not associated with primary neurological disease while Types 2 and 3 are associated with central nervous system disease. GCase molecules are synthesized on endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound polyribosomes, translocated into the ER and following modifications and correct folding, shuttle to the lysosomes. Mutant GCase molecules, which fail to fold correctly, undergo ER associated degradation (ERAD) in the proteasomes, the degree of which is one of the factors that determine GD severity. Several pharmacological chaperones have already been shown to assist correct folding of mutant GCase molecules in the ER, thus facilitating their trafficking to the lysosomes. Ambroxol, a known expectorant, is one such chaperone. Here we show that ambroxol increases both the lysosomal fraction and the enzymatic activity of several mutant GCase variants in skin fibroblasts derived from Type 1 and Type 2 GD patients. PMID:23158495

  7. Co-chaperone CHIP promotes aggregation of ataxin-1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Young; Ryu, Jeong Hee; Kim, Hyo-Sun; Park, Sung Goo; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Kang, Sunghyun; Myung, Pyung Keun; Cho, Sayeon; Park, Byoung Chul; Lee, Do Hee

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that co-chaperone/E3 ligase CHIP (C-terminus of hsp70-interacting protein) mediates the ubiquitylation and suppresses the aggregation of polyglutamine (polyQ) proteins, such as huntingtin or ataxin-3. In this study, we investigated the effects of CHIP on the degradation of another polyQ protein ataxin-1. Interestingly CHIP associates not only with the polyQ-expanded ataxin-1 but also with the normal ataxin-1. Moreover, by enhancing ataxin-1 ubiquitylation, CHIP over-expression leads to a reduction in the solubility of ataxin-1 and thus increases the aggregate formation, especially that of polyQ-expanded ataxin-1. Domain analysis revealed that the TPR domain is required for the promotion of aggregation. By contrast, other co-chaperones or E3 ligases, such as BAG-1 or parkin, did not show similar effects on the aggregation of ataxin-1. Importantly, the effect of CHIP is impaired by the mutation of Ser776 of ataxin-1 whose phosphorylation is crucial for ataxin-1 aggregation. Our findings suggest that the role of CHIP in aggregation of polyQ proteins greatly varies depending on the context of full-length polyQ proteins. PMID:17127076

  8. Physicochemical properties of oleic acid-based partially fluorinated gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Umemoto, Naoki; Aburai, Kenichi; Takamatsu, Yuichiro; Endo, Takeshi; Kitiyanan, Boonyarach; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    We have developed oleic acid-based partially fluorinated gemini surfactants with carboxylic acid headgroups. The fluorocarbon chain is covalently bound to the terminal carbonyl group of oleic acid via a -CH(2)CH(2)OCO- unit, and the carboxylic acid headgroups are introduced to the cis double bond of oleic acid via -OCOCH(2)CH(2)- units. The aqueous solution properties of these surfactants were studied at pH 9 in the presence of 10 mmol dm–3 NaCl by means of static surface tension, pyrene fluorescence, and dynamic light scattering measurements. The resulting surface tension data demonstrate that the partially fluorinated gemini surfactants exhibit excellent surface activity in their dilute aqueous solutions. In addition, the surfactants are suggested to form micellar aggregates 2–4 nm in diameter. We also studied the aqueous temperature-concentration phase diagrams of the partially fluorinated gemini surfactants (disodium salts) on the basis of visual observations (through a crossed polarizer), polarized optical microscopy, and small angle X-ray scattering measurements. Several phase states including micellar solution phase, hexagonal phase, bicontinuous cubic phase, and lamellar phase were observed along with the coexistence of these phases in certain regions. Assemblies with lesser positive curvature tend to be formed with increasing surfactant concentration, increasing temperature, and increasing fluorocarbon chain length. A comparison of the phase diagrams of the partially fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactant systems suggests that close molecular packing is inhibited within the assemblies of the partially fluorinated surfactants because of the limited miscibility between the fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon units. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic report focusing on the temperature-concentration phase diagrams of (partially) fluorinated gemini surfactants over a wide range of compositions and temperatures. PMID:24712085

  9. Characterization of Drosophila CMP-sialic acid synthetase activity reveals unusual enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Mertsalov, Ilya B; Novikov, Boris N; Scott, Hilary; Dangott, Lawrence; Panin, Vladislav M

    2016-07-01

    CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS) is a key enzyme of the sialylation pathway. CSAS produces the activated sugar donor, CMP-sialic acid, which serves as a substrate for sialyltransferases to modify glycan termini with sialic acid. Unlike other animal CSASs that normally localize in the nucleus, Drosophila melanogaster CSAS (DmCSAS) localizes in the cell secretory compartment, predominantly in the Golgi, which suggests that this enzyme has properties distinct from those of its vertebrate counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant DmCSAS and characterized its activity in vitro Our experiments revealed several unique features of this enzyme. DmCSAS displays specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate, shows preference for lower pH and can function with a broad range of metal cofactors. When tested at a pH corresponding to the Golgi compartment, the enzyme showed significant activity with several metal cations, including Zn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+) and Mn(2+), whereas the activity with Mg(2+) was found to be low. Protein sequence analysis and site-specific mutagenesis identified an aspartic acid residue that is necessary for enzymatic activity and predicted to be involved in co-ordinating a metal cofactor. DmCSAS enzymatic activity was found to be essential in vivo for rescuing the phenotype of DmCSAS mutants. Finally, our experiments revealed a steep dependence of the enzymatic activity on temperature. Taken together, our results indicate that DmCSAS underwent evolutionary adaptation to pH and ionic environment different from that of counterpart synthetases in vertebrates. Our data also suggest that environmental temperatures can regulate Drosophila sialylation, thus modulating neural transmission. PMID:27114558

  10. Antiviral properties of caffeic acid phenethyl ester and its potential application.

    PubMed

    Erdemli, Hacı Kemal; Akyol, Sumeyya; Armutcu, Ferah; Akyol, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is found in a variety of plants and well-known the active ingredient of the honeybee propolis. CAPE showed anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, antimitogenic, antiviral, and immunomodulatory properties in several studies. The beneficial effects of CAPE on different health issues attracted scientists to make more studies on CAPE. Specifically, the anti-viral effects of CAPE and its molecular mechanisms may reveal the important properties of virus-induced diseases. CAPE and its targets may have important roles to design new therapeutics and understand the molecular mechanisms of virus-related diseases. In this mini-review, we summarize the antiviral effects of CAPE under the light of medical and chemical literature. PMID:26649239

  11. Equilibrium phase diagrams and water absorption properties of aqueous mixtures of malonic acid and inorganic salts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo, D.; Salgado-Olea, G.

    2006-12-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are usually complex mixtures of inorganic and organic components. Although the thermodynamic properties of inorganic aerosols have been widely studied, the effect of organics on such properties is still under discussion. Solubility in water, water activity of aqueous solutions, deliquescence relative humidity (DRH), eutonic composition, and eutonic DRH were determined for bulk mixtures of malonic acid with ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, and ammonium nitrate at 25oC over the full range of composition (from 0 wt% to the solubility limit of the mixture components). The data was used to construct equilibrium phase diagrams, which show the phase of the mixtures as a function of total composition, dry mixture composition, water content, and ambient relative humidity. Measured water activity of liquid solutions was compared with an extended Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) expression, which then was used to predict water absorption of the mixtures.

  12. Impact property enhancement of poly (lactic acid) with different flexible copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likittanaprasong, N.; Seadan, M.; Suttiruengwong, S.

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this work was to improve the impact property of Poly (lactic acid) (PLA) by blending with different copolymers. Six flexible copolymers, namely, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) powder, Biomax, polybutyrate adipate co-terephthalate (PBAT), polyether block amide (PEBAX), ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) and ethylene acrylic elastomer (EAE), with loading less than 20wt% were used and compared. The rheological, mechanical and morphological properties of samples were investigated by melt flow index, tensile testing, impact testing and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. It was found that PLA added 20wt% EAE showed the highest impact strength (59.5 kJ/m2), which was 22 times higher than neat PLA. The elongation at break was also increased by 12 folds compared to neat PLA. The SEM images showed good interface and distribution for PLA containing 20wt% EAE, 15 phr Biomax and 20 wt% PEBAX.

  13. Characterization of physicochemical properties of perfluorodecanoic acid-polyquaternium cellulose hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Bierbrauer, Karina L; Alasino, Roxana V; Strumia, Miriam C; Beltramo, Dante M

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the nature and stability of the interactions established between polyquaternium (PQ10) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) in terms of different variables such as composition, ionic strength, pH and temperature. The PQ10-PFDA complex formation is interpreted in view of electrostatic associations between carboxylic and quaternary amino group. The properties of the systems were characterized by rheology analysis. The adhesive properties of complex were also assessed. One of the macroscopic features of the new material formed in solution was the increase in viscosity from 6 Pas for 1% PQ10 (MW 1.7×10(6) g mol(-1)) to about 1000 Pas by the addition of enough PFDA to reach 1:0.5 ammonium:carboxylic group molar ratio. At this proportion, PQ10 and PFDA form a network structure with a maximum viscosity and storage modulus. This maximum coincides with an increased mucoadhesive work. PMID:21925848

  14. Structure and properties of poly (lactic acid)/Sterculia urens uniaxial fabric biocomposites.

    PubMed

    Jayaramudu, J; Reddy, G Siva Mohan; Varaprasad, K; Sadiku, E R; Ray, S Sinha; Rajulu, A Varada

    2013-05-15

    Uniaxial cellulose fabric Sterculia urens reinforced poly (lactic acid) (PLA) matrix biocomposites were prepared by a two-roll mill. In order to assess the suitability of Sterculia fabric as reinforcement for PLA matrix, the PLA/Sterculia fabric biocomposites were prepared. Tensile parameters, such as maximum stress, Young's modulus and elongation-at-break, were determined using the Universal Testing Machine. The effect of alkali treatment and silane-coupling agent on the tensile properties of PLA-based biocomposites was studied. The results of thermogravimetric analysis show that uniaxial treatment of the fabric can improve the degradation temperature of the biocomposites. Moreover, morphological studies by scanning electron microscopy confirmed that better adhesion between the uniaxial fabric and the matrix was achieved. It was established that standard PLA resins are suitable for the manufacture of S. urens uniaxial fabric reinforced biocomposites with excellent engineering properties, useful for food packaging. PMID:23544638

  15. Physicochemical and mechanical properties of paracetamol cocrystal with 5-nitroisophthalic acid.

    PubMed

    Hiendrawan, Stevanus; Veriansyah, Bambang; Widjojokusumo, Edward; Soewandhi, Sundani Nurono; Wikarsa, Saleh; Tjandrawinata, Raymond R

    2016-01-30

    We report novel pharmaceutical cocrystal of a popular antipyretic drug paracetamol (PCA) with coformer 5-nitroisophhthalic acid (5NIP) to improve its tabletability. The cocrystal (PCA-5NIP at molar ratio of 1:1) was synthesized by solvent evaporation technique using methanol as solvent. The physicochemical properties of cocrystal were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), hot stage polarized microscopy (HSPM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Stability of the cocrystal was assessed by storing them at 40°C/75% RH for one month. Compared to PCA, the cocrystal displayed superior tableting performance. PCA-5NIP cocrystal showed a similar dissolution profile as compared to PCA and exhibited good stability. This study showed the utility of PCA-5NIP cocrystal for improving mechanical properties of PCA. PMID:26657269

  16. Fluorescence, spectroscopic and NLO properties of green tea extract in deoxyribonucleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Ana-Maria; Rau, Ileana; Kajzar, Francois; Meghea, Aurelia

    2013-11-01

    Natural, purely biological deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-green tea extract (GTE) complexes at different concentrations were prepared and characterized for their spectroscopic, fluorescent, linear and nonlinear optical properties. The complexes can be processed into good optical quality thin films by solution casting. They fluoresce when excited in UV absorption band, with a significantly larger quantum yield for the DNA-GTE complex than for a pure GTE solution. The thin film refractive indices were determined by Fabry-Perot (FP) interference patterns. The third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of thin films were determined by the optical third-harmonic generation technique at 1064.2 nm fundamental wavelength. The phase of THG susceptibility was determined from the concentration variation of THG susceptibility. It reveals presence of a two-photon resonance with a band lying in the optical gap.

  17. Nutrient Regulation: Conjugated Linoleic Acid's Inflammatory and Browning Properties in Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wan; McIntosh, Michael K

    2016-07-17

    Obesity is the most widespread nutritional disease in the United States. Developing effective and safe strategies to manage excess body weight is therefore of paramount importance. One potential strategy to reduce obesity is to consume conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplements containing isomers cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12, or trans-10, cis-12 alone. Proposed antiobesity mechanisms of CLA include regulation of (a) adipogenesis, (b) lipid metabolism, (c) inflammation, (d) adipocyte apoptosis, (e) browning or beiging of adipose tissue, and (f) energy metabolism. However, causality of CLA-mediated responses to body fat loss, particularly the linkage between inflammation, thermogenesis, and energy metabolism, is unclear. This review examines whether CLA's antiobesity properties are due to inflammatory signaling and considers CLA's linkage with lipogenesis, lipolysis, thermogenesis, and browning of white and brown adipose tissue. We propose a series of questions and studies to interrogate the role of the sympathetic nervous system in mediating CLA's antiobesity properties. PMID:27431366

  18. Neural networks applied to determine the thermophysical properties of amino acid based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Cancilla, John C; Perez, Ana; Wierzchoś, Kacper; Torrecilla, José S

    2016-03-01

    A series of models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been designed to estimate the thermophysical properties of different amino acid-based ionic liquids (AAILs). Three different databases of AAILs were modeled using these algorithms with the goal set to estimate the density, viscosity, refractive index, ionic conductivity, and thermal expansion coefficient, and requiring only data regarding temperature and electronic polarizability of the chemicals. Additionally, a global model was designed combining all of the databases to determine the robustness of the method. In general, the results were successful, reaching mean prediction errors below 1% in many cases, as well as a statistically reliable and accurate global model. Attaining these successful models is a relevant fact as AAILs are novel biodegradable and biocompatible compounds which may soon make their way into the health sector forming a part of useful biomedical applications. Therefore, understanding the behavior and being able to estimate their thermophysical properties becomes crucial. PMID:26899458

  19. Antiviral properties of caffeic acid phenethyl ester and its potential application

    PubMed Central

    Erdemli, Hacı Kemal; Akyol, Sumeyya; Armutcu, Ferah; Akyol, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is found in a variety of plants and well-known the active ingredient of the honeybee propolis. CAPE showed anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, antimitogenic, antiviral, and immunomodulatory properties in several studies. The beneficial effects of CAPE on different health issues attracted scientists to make more studies on CAPE. Specifically, the anti-viral effects of CAPE and its molecular mechanisms may reveal the important properties of virus-induced diseases. CAPE and its targets may have important roles to design new therapeutics and understand the molecular mechanisms of virus-related diseases. In this mini-review, we summarize the antiviral effects of CAPE under the light of medical and chemical literature. PMID:26649239

  20. Surface Modification of PET Fabric by Graft Copolymerization with Acrylic Acid and Its Antibacterial Properties

    PubMed Central

    Abdolahifard, M.; Bahrami, S. Hajir; Malek, R. M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Graft copolymerization of acrylic acid (AA) onto Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabrics with the aid of benzoyl peroxide was carried out. The effect of polymerization parameters on the graft yield was studied. Percent grafting was enhanced significantly by increasing benzoyl peroxide (BP) concentrations up to 3.84 g/lit and then decreased upon further increase in initiator concentration. Preswelling of PET leads to changes in its sorption-diffusion properties and favors an increase in the degree of grafting. The antibiotics treated grafted fabrics showed antibacterial properties towards gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. FTIR and SEM were used to characterize AA-grafted polyester fabrics. PMID:24052819

  1. Classification of chemical chaperones based on their effect on protein folding landscapes.

    PubMed

    Dandage, Rohan; Bandyopadhyay, Anannya; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Saxena, Kanika; Dalal, Vijit; Das, Aritri; Chakraborty, Kausik

    2015-03-20

    Various small molecules present in biological systems can assist protein folding in vitro and are known as chemical chaperones. De novo design of chemical chaperones with higher activity than currently known examples is desirable to ameliorate protein misfolding and aggregation in multiple contexts. However, this development has been hindered by limited knowledge of their activities. It is thought that chemical chaperones are typically poor solvents for a protein backbone and hence facilitate native structure formation. However, it is unknown if different chemical chaperones can act differently to modulate folding energy landscapes. Using a model slow folding protein, double-mutant Maltose-binding protein (DM-MBP), we show that a canonical chemical chaperone, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), accelerates refolding by decreasing the flexibility of the refolding intermediate (RI). Among a number of small molecules that chaperone DM-MBP folding, proline and serine stabilize the transition state (TS) enthalpically, while trehalose behaves like TMAO and increases the rate of barrier crossing through nonenthalpic processes. We propose a two-group classification of chemical chaperones based upon their thermodynamic effect on RI and TS, which is also supported by single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) studies. Interestingly, for a different test protein, the molecular mechanisms of the two groups of chaperones are not conserved. This provides a glimpse into the complexity of chemical chaperoning activity of osmolytes. Future work would allow us to engineer synergism between the two classes to design more efficient chemical chaperones to ameliorate protein misfolding and aggregation problems. PMID:25493352

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperones and Their Roles in the Immunogenicity of Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Graner, Michael W.; Lillehei, Kevin O.; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major site of passage for proteins en route to other organelles, to the cell surface, and to the extracellular space. It is also the transport route for peptides generated in the cytosol by the proteasome into the ER for loading onto major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules for eventual antigen presentation at the cell surface. Chaperones within the ER are critical for many of these processes; however, outside the ER certain of those chaperones may play important and direct roles in immune responses. In some cases, particular ER chaperones have been utilized as vaccines against tumors or infectious disease pathogens when purified from tumor tissue or recombinantly generated and loaded with antigen. In other cases, the cell surface location of ER chaperones has implications for immune responses as well as possible tumor resistance. We have produced heat-shock protein/chaperone protein-based cancer vaccines called “chaperone-rich cell lysate” (CRCL) that are conglomerates of chaperones enriched from solid tumors by an isoelectric focusing technique. These preparations have been effective against numerous murine tumors, as well as in a canine with an advanced lung carcinoma treated with autologous CRCL. We also published extensive proteomic analyses of CRCL prepared from human surgically resected tumor samples. Of note, these preparations contained at least 10 ER chaperones and a number of other residents, along with many other chaperones/heat-shock proteins. Gene ontology and network analyses utilizing these proteins essentially recapitulate the antigen presentation pathways and interconnections. In conjunction with our current knowledge of cell surface/extracellular ER chaperones, these data collectively suggest that a systems-level view may provide insight into the potent immune stimulatory activities of CRCL with an emphasis on the roles of ER components in those processes. PMID:25610811

  3. Changes in the physiological properties and kinetics of citric acid accumulation via carbon ion irradiation mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger *

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Chen, Ji-hong; Wang, Shu-yang; Liu, Jing; Song, Yuan; Wu, Qing-feng; Li, Wen-jian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to produce citric acid from corn starch using a newly isolated mutant of Aspergillus niger, and to analyze the relationship between changes in the physiological properties of A. niger induced by carbon ion irradiation and citric acid accumulation. Our results showed that the physiological characteristics of conidia in A. niger were closely related to citric acid accumulation and that lower growth rate and viability of conidia may be beneficial to citric acid accumulation. Using corn starch as a raw material, a high-yielding citric acid mutant, named HW2, was obtained. In a 10-L bioreactor, HW2 can accumulate 118.9 g/L citric acid with a residual total sugar concentration of only 14.4 g/L. This represented an 18% increase in citric acid accumulation and a 12.5% decrease in sugar utilization compared with the original strain.

  4. Examination of the Addictive and Behavioral Properties of Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Inhibitor SBFI26.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Clavin, Brendan H; Hamilton, John; O'Rourke, Joseph R; Maher, Thomas; Koumas, Christopher; Miao, Erick; Lankop, Jessenia; Elhage, Aya; Haj-Dahmane, Samir; Deutsch, Dale; Kaczocha, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic properties of cannabinoids have been well demonstrated but are overshadowed by such adverse effects as cognitive and motor dysfunction, as well as their potential for addiction. Recent research on the natural lipid ligands of cannabinoid receptors, also known as endocannabinoids, has shed light on the mechanisms of intracellular transport of the endocannabinoid anandamide by fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase. These findings facilitated the recent development of SBFI26, a pharmacological inhibitor of epidermal- and brain-specific FABP5 and FABP7, which effectively increases anandamide signaling. The goal of this study was to examine this compound for any possible rewarding and addictive properties as well as effects on locomotor activity, working/recognition memory, and propensity for sociability and preference for social novelty (SN) given its recently reported anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Male C57BL mice were split into four treatment groups and conditioned with 5.0, 20.0, 40.0 mg/kg SBFI26, or vehicle during a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Following CPP, mice underwent a battery of behavioral tests [open field, novel object recognition (NOR), social interaction (SI), and SN] paired with acute SBFI26 administration. Results showed that SBFI26 did not produce CPP or conditioned place aversion regardless of dose and did not induce any differences in locomotor and exploratory activity during CPP- or SBFI26-paired open field activity. We also observed no differences between treatment groups in NOR, SI, and SN. In conclusion, as SBFI26 was shown previously by our group to have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, here we show that it does not pose a risk of dependence or motor and cognitive impairment under the conditions tested. PMID:27092087

  5. Examination of the Addictive and Behavioral Properties of Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Inhibitor SBFI26

    PubMed Central

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; Clavin, Brendan H.; Hamilton, John; O’Rourke, Joseph R.; Maher, Thomas; Koumas, Christopher; Miao, Erick; Lankop, Jessenia; Elhage, Aya; Haj-Dahmane, Samir; Deutsch, Dale; Kaczocha, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic properties of cannabinoids have been well demonstrated but are overshadowed by such adverse effects as cognitive and motor dysfunction, as well as their potential for addiction. Recent research on the natural lipid ligands of cannabinoid receptors, also known as endocannabinoids, has shed light on the mechanisms of intracellular transport of the endocannabinoid anandamide by fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase. These findings facilitated the recent development of SBFI26, a pharmacological inhibitor of epidermal- and brain-specific FABP5 and FABP7, which effectively increases anandamide signaling. The goal of this study was to examine this compound for any possible rewarding and addictive properties as well as effects on locomotor activity, working/recognition memory, and propensity for sociability and preference for social novelty (SN) given its recently reported anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Male C57BL mice were split into four treatment groups and conditioned with 5.0, 20.0, 40.0 mg/kg SBFI26, or vehicle during a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Following CPP, mice underwent a battery of behavioral tests [open field, novel object recognition (NOR), social interaction (SI), and SN] paired with acute SBFI26 administration. Results showed that SBFI26 did not produce CPP or conditioned place aversion regardless of dose and did not induce any differences in locomotor and exploratory activity during CPP- or SBFI26-paired open field activity. We also observed no differences between treatment groups in NOR, SI, and SN. In conclusion, as SBFI26 was shown previously by our group to have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, here we show that it does not pose a risk of dependence or motor and cognitive impairment under the conditions tested. PMID:27092087

  6. Thermodynamic properties and cloud droplet activation of a series of oxo-acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frosch, Mia; Platt, Stephen; Zardini, Alessandro; Bilde, Merete

    2010-05-01

    Submicron sized aerosol particles in the Earth's atmosphere influence visibility, human health, and global climate (IPCC, 2007). The organic mass fraction of the atmospheric aerosol has been estimated at 20-90% of the total aerosol mass mass (Kanakidou et al., 2005). Many of the organic species found in the particle phase in the atmosphere are produced via the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions such as terpenes and sesquiterpenes (Hallquist et al. 2009). We have investigated the thermodynamic properties of four aliphatic oxo-dicarboyxlic acids identified or thought to be present in atmospheric particulate matter: oxosuccinic acid, 2-oxoglutaric acid, 3-oxoglutaric acid, and 4-oxopimelic acid. The compounds were characterized in terms of their cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, vapor pressure, density, and tendency to decarboxylate in aqueous solution. We deployed a variety of experimental techniques and instruments: a CCN counter, a Tandem Differential Mobililty Analyzer (TDMA) coupled with a laminar flow tube (Bilde, 2003), and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Generally, the presence of the oxo functional group causes the vapor pressure of the compounds to diminish by an order of magnitude with respect to the parent dicarboxylic acid, and it tends to increase the CCN activity. Dicarboxylic acids with an oxo-group in the β-position were found to decarboxylate in aqueous solution. IPCC: Climate Change (2007): The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. Kanakidou, M., Seinfeld, J. H., Pandis, S. N., Barnes, I., Dentener, F. J., Facchini, M. C., Van Dingenen, R., Ervens, B., Nenes, A., Nielsen, C. J., Swietlicki, E., Putaud, J. P., Balkanski, Y., Fuzzi, S., Horth, J., Moortgat, G. K., Winterhalter, R., Myhre, C. E. L., Tsigaridis, K., Vignati, E., Stephanou, E. G., and Wilson, J (2005). Atmos

  7. Modulation of biomechanical properties of hyaluronic acid hydrogels by crosslinking agents.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung Chul; Yoo, Mi Ae; Lee, Su Yeon; Lee, Hyun Ji; Son, Dong Hoon; Jung, Jessica; Noh, Insup; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2015-09-01

    Modulation of both mechanical properties and biocompatibilities of hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels is very importance for their applications in biomaterials. Pure HA solution was converted into a hydrogel by using butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDE) as a crosslinking agent. Mechanical properties of the HA hydrogels have been evaluated by adding up different amount of BDDEs. While the mechanical properties of the obtained HA hydrogels were evaluated by measuring their crosslinking degrees, elastic modulus and viscosity, their in vitro biocompatibilities were done by measuring the degrees of anti-inflammatory reactions, cell viabilities and cytotoxicity. The degrees of anti-inflammatory reactions were determined by measuring the amount of nitric oxides (NOs) released from lipopolysaccharide(LPS)(+)-induced macrophages; cell viability was evaluated by observing differences in the behaviors of fibroblasts covered with the HA hydrogels, compared with those covered with the films of Teflon and Latex. Cytotoxicity of the HA hydrogels was also evaluated by measuring the degrees of viability of the cells exposed on the extracts of the HA hydrogels over those of Teflon, Latex and pure HA solutions by the assays of thiazoly blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT), neutral reds, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). The results showed that employment of BDDEs beyond critical amounts showed lower biocompatibility of the crosslinked HA hydrogels but higher crosslinking degrees and mechanical properties, indicating the importance of controlling the HA concentrations, BDDE amounts and their reaction times for the synthesis of the crosslinked HA hydrogels for their clinical applications as biomaterials. PMID:25691334

  8. N-terminal arm of orchardgrass Hsp17.2 (DgHsp17.2) is essential for both in vitro chaperone activity and in vivo thermotolerance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Seo, Kyung Hye; Choi, Young Jin; Cheong, Mi Sun; Son, Daeyoung

    2016-02-01

    Small heat shock proteins are well-known to function as chaperone in the protection of proteins and subcellular structures against stress-induced denaturation in many cell compartments. Irrespective of such general functional assignment, a proof of function in a living organism is missing. Here, we used heat-induced orchardgrass small Hsp17.2 (DgHsp17.2). Its function in in vitro chaperone properties has shown in protecting the model substrate, malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and citrate synthase (CS). Overexpression of DgHsp17.2 triggering strong chaperone activity enhanced in vivo thermotolerance of yeast cells. To identify the functional domain on DgHsp17.2 and correlationship between in vitro chaperone property and in vivo thermotolerance, we generated truncation mutants of DgHsp17.2 and showed essentiality of the N-terminal arm of DgHsp17.2 for the chaperone function. In addition, beyond for acquisition of thermotolerance irrespective of sequences are diverse among the small Hsps. However, any truncation mutants of DgHsp17.2 did not exhibit strong interaction with orchardgrass heat shock protein 70 (DgHsp70) different from mature DgHsp17.2, indicating that full-length DgHsp17.2 is necessary for cooperating with Hsp70 protein. Our study indicates that the N-terminal arm of DgHsp17.2 is an important region for chaperone activity and thermotolerance. PMID:26724757

  9. Changes in redox properties of humic acids upon sorption to alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subdiaga, Edisson; Orsetti, Silvia; Jindal, Sharmishta; Haderlein, Stefan B.

    2016-04-01

    1. Introduction A prominent role of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in biogeochemical processes is its ability to act as an electron shuttle, accelerating rates between a bulk electron donor and an acceptor. The underlying processes are reversible redox reactions of quinone moieties.1 This shuttling effect has been studied in two major areas: transformation of redox active pollutants and microbial respiration.2-3 Previous studies primarily compared effects in the presence or absence of NOM without addressing the redox properties of NOM nor its speciation. The interaction between humic acids (HA) and minerals might change properties and reactivity of organic matter. Specifically, we investigate whether changes in the redox properties of a HA occur upon sorption to redox inactive minerals. Since fractionation and conformational rearrangements of NOM moieties upon sorption are likely to happen, the redox properties of the NOM fractions upon sorption might differ as well. 2. Materials and methods Elliot Soil Humic Acid (ESHA), Pahokee Peat Humic Acid (PPHA) and Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) were used as received from IHSS. Aluminum oxide (Al2O3) was suspended in 0.1M KCl. Sorption was studied at pH 7.0 in duplicate batch experiments for several HA/Al2O3 ratios. For the suspension (mineral + sorbed HA, plus dissolved HA), the filtrate (0.45μm) and the HA stock solution, the electron donating and accepting capacities (EDC and EAC) were determined following established procedures.4 3. Results All studied HA-Al2O3 systems showed similar behavior with regard to changes in redox properties. There was a significant increase in the EDC of the whole suspension compared to the stock solutions and the non-sorbed HA in the filtrate (up to 300% for PPHA). This effect was more pronounced with increasing amounts of sorbed HA in the suspension. Although ESHA had the highest sorption capacity on Al2O3 (~ 6 times higher than PPHA & SRHA), it showed the smallest changes in redox

  10. Site-specific acid-base properties of pholcodine and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Z; Hosztafi, S; Noszál, B

    2006-11-01

    The acid-base properties of pholcodine, a cough-depressant agent, and related compounds including metabolites were studied by 1H NMR-pH titrations, and are characterised in terms of macroscopic and microscopic protonation constants. New N-methylated derivatives were also synthesized in order to quantitate site- and nucleus-specific protonation shifts and to unravel microscopic acid-base equilibria. The piperidine nitrogen was found to be 38 and 400 times more basic than its morpholine counterpart in pholcodine and norpholcodine, respectively. The protonation data show that the molecule of pholcodine bears an average of positive charge of 1.07 at physiological pH, preventing it from entering the central nervous system, a plausible reason for its lack of analgesic or addictive properties. The protonation constants of pholcodine and its derivatives are interpreted by comparing with related molecules of pharmaceutical interest. The pH-dependent relative concentrations of the variously protonated forms of pholcodine and morphine are depicted in distribution diagrams. PMID:17004059

  11. Dissolution properties of co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations in buffer and biorelevant media.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, A T; DeClerck, L; Löbmann, K; Grohganz, H; Rades, T; Laitinen, R

    2015-07-01

    Co-amorphous formulations, particularly binary drug-amino acid mixtures, have been shown to provide enhanced dissolution for poorly-soluble drugs and improved physical stability of the amorphous state. However, to date the dissolution properties (mainly intrinsic dissolution rate) of the co-amorphous formulations have been tested only in buffers and their supersaturation ability remain unexplored. Consequently, dissolution studies in simulated intestinal fluids need to be conducted in order to better evaluate the potential of these systems in increasing the oral bioavailability of biopharmaceutics classification system class II drugs. In this study, solubility and dissolution properties of the co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine, gibenclamide-serine, glibenclamide-threonine and glibenclamide-serine-threonine were studied in phosphate buffer pH 7.2 and biorelevant media (fasted and fed state simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF and FeSSIF, respectively)). The co-amorphous formulations were found to provide a long-lasting supersaturation and improve the dissolution of the drugs compared to the crystalline and amorphous drugs alone in buffer. Similar improvement, but in lesser extent, was observed in biorelevant media suggesting that a dissolution advantage observed in aqueous buffers may overestimate the advantage in vivo. However, the results show that, in addition to stability advantage shown earlier, co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations provide dissolution advantage over crystalline drugs in both aqueous and biorelevant conditions. PMID:26373205

  12. Predictions of the physicochemical properties of amino acid side chain analogs using molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Alauddin; Sandler, Stanley I

    2016-03-01

    A candidate drug compound is released for clinical trails (in vivo activity) only if its physicochemical properties meet desirable bioavailability and partitioning criteria. Amino acid side chain analogs play vital role in the functionalities of protein and peptides and as such are important in drug discovery. We demonstrate here that the predictions of solvation free energies in water, in 1-octanol, and self-solvation free energies computed using force field-based expanded ensemble molecular dynamics simulation provide good accuracy compared to existing empirical and semi-empirical methods. These solvation free energies are then, as shown here, used for the prediction of a wide range of physicochemical properties important in the assessment of bioavailability and partitioning of compounds. In particular, we consider here the vapor pressure, the solubility in both water and 1-octanol, and the air-water, air-octanol, and octanol-water partition coefficients of amino acid side chain analogs computed from the solvation free energies. The calculated solvation free energies using different force fields are compared against each other and with available experimental data. The protocol here can also be used for a newly designed drug and other molecules where force field parameters and charges are obtained from density functional theory. PMID:26864716

  13. Divalent Amino-Acid-Based Amphiphilic Antioxidants: Synthesis, Self-Assembling Properties, and Biological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rosselin, Marie; Meyer, Grégory; Guillet, Pierre; Cheviet, Thomas; Walther, Guillaume; Meister, Annette; Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra; Durand, Grégory

    2016-03-16

    We report herein the synthesis of a divalent amphiphilic carrier onto which α-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) and 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox) antioxidants were grafted to give the divalent derivative called FATxPBN. The divalent carrier consists of two lysine amino acids as a scaffold upon which the antioxidant moieties are grafted, a perfluorinated chain that supplies hydrophobicity, and a sugar-based polar headgroup that ensures water solubility. For the sake of comparison, a divalent PBN derivative called FADiPBN was also synthesized. The self-aggregation properties of FATxPBN and FADiPBN were studied by means of surface tension, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy methods, and showed they form small micelles (i.e., 12 and 6 nm diameter, respectively) at submillimolar concentrations (i.e., 0.01 and 0.05 mM, respectively), in agreement with partition coefficient values. The superior antioxidant properties of FATxPBN over FADiPBN and the parent compounds PBN and Trolox were demonstrated using in vitro ABTS(•+) reduction (98%) and soybean lipoxygenase inhibition (94%) assays. Finally, FATxPBN was found to significantly inhibit hyperglycemia-induced toxicity on an ex-vivo rat model, demonstrating its potency as a bioactive antioxidant against oxidative stress-induced damage. PMID:26850367

  14. Thermodynamic and structural properties of the acid molten globule state of horse cytochrome C.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shigeyoshi; Seki, Yasutaka; Katoh, Etsuko; Kidokoro, Shun-ichi

    2011-04-19

    To understand the stabilization, folding, and functional mechanisms of proteins, it is very important to understand the structural and thermodynamic properties of the molten globule state. In this study, the global structure of the acid molten globule state, which we call MG1, of horse cytochrome c at low pH and high salt concentrations was evaluated by solution X-ray scattering (SXS), dynamic light scattering, and circular dichroism measurements. MG1 was globular and slightly (3%) larger than the native state, N. Calorimetric methods, such as differential scanning calorimetry and isothermal acid-titration calorimetry, were used to evaluate the thermodynamic parameters in the transitions of N to MG1 and MG1 to denatured state D of horse cytochrome c. The heat capacity change, ΔC(p), in the N-to-MG1 transition was determined to be 2.56 kJ K(-1) mol(-1), indicating the increase in the level of hydration in the MG1 state. Moreover, the intermediate state on the thermal N-to-D transition of horse cytochrome c at pH 4 under low-salt conditions showed the same structural and thermodynamic properties of the MG1 state in both SXS and calorimetric measurements. The Gibbs free energy changes (ΔG) for the N-to-MG1 and N-to-D transitions at 15 °C were 10.9 and 42.2 kJ mol(-1), respectively. PMID:21388230

  15. Effect of lactobionic acid on the acidification, rheological properties and aroma release of dairy gels.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jéssica C Bigaski; Granato, Daniel; Masson, Maria Lucia; Andriot, Isabelle; Mosca, Ana Carolina; Salles, Christian; Guichard, Elisabeth

    2016-09-15

    The food industry is investigating new technological applications of lactobionic acid (LBA). In the current work, the effect of lactobionic acid on the acidification of dairy gels (pH 5.5 and 6.2), rheological properties using a double compression test, sodium mobility using (23)Na NMR technique and aroma release using headspace GC-FID were studied. Our results showed that it is possible to use LBA as an alternative to glucono-δ-lactone (GDL) for the production of dairy gels with a controlled pH value. Small differences in the rheological properties and in the amount of aroma volatile organic compounds that were released in the vapour phase, but no significant difference in the sodium ion mobility were obtained. The gels produced with LBA were less firm and released less volatile aroma compounds than the gels produced with GDL. The gels at pH 6.2 were firmer than those at pH 5.5 and had a more organised structure around the sodium ions. PMID:27080885