Science.gov

Sample records for acid chemical reporters

  1. Phenotypic chemical screening using a zebrafish neural crest EMT reporter identifies retinoic acid as an inhibitor of epithelial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Laura; Wang, Jindong; Morrison, Monique A; Whatcott, Clifford; Soh, Katherine K; Warner, Steven; Bearss, David; Jette, Cicely A; Stewart, Rodney A

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenetic program essential for embryogenesis, regeneration and cancer metastasis. In cancer cells, EMT also triggers cellular reprogramming and chemoresistance, which underlie disease relapse and decreased survival. Hence, identifying compounds that block EMT is essential to prevent or eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Here, we establish a whole-animal-based EMT reporter in zebrafish for rapid drug screening, calledTg(snai1b:GFP), which labels epithelial cells undergoing EMT to producesox10-positive neural crest (NC) cells. Time-lapse and lineage analysis ofTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos reveal that cranial NC cells delaminate from two regions: an early population delaminates adjacent to the neural plate, whereas a later population delaminates from within the dorsal neural tube. TreatingTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos with candidate small-molecule EMT-inhibiting compounds identified TP-0903, a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocked cranial NC cell delamination in both the lateral and medial populations. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and chemical rescue experiments show that TP-0903 acts through stimulating retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis and RA-dependent transcription. These studies identify TP-0903 as a new therapeutic for activating RAin vivoand raise the possibility that RA-dependent inhibition of EMT contributes to its prior success in eliminating disseminated cancer cells. PMID:26794130

  2. Phenotypic chemical screening using a zebrafish neural crest EMT reporter identifies retinoic acid as an inhibitor of epithelial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Laura; Wang, Jindong; Morrison, Monique A; Whatcott, Clifford; Soh, Katherine K; Warner, Steven; Bearss, David; Jette, Cicely A; Stewart, Rodney A

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenetic program essential for embryogenesis, regeneration and cancer metastasis. In cancer cells, EMT also triggers cellular reprogramming and chemoresistance, which underlie disease relapse and decreased survival. Hence, identifying compounds that block EMT is essential to prevent or eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Here, we establish a whole-animal-based EMT reporter in zebrafish for rapid drug screening, calledTg(snai1b:GFP), which labels epithelial cells undergoing EMT to producesox10-positive neural crest (NC) cells. Time-lapse and lineage analysis ofTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos reveal that cranial NC cells delaminate from two regions: an early population delaminates adjacent to the neural plate, whereas a later population delaminates from within the dorsal neural tube. TreatingTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos with candidate small-molecule EMT-inhibiting compounds identified TP-0903, a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocked cranial NC cell delamination in both the lateral and medial populations. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and chemical rescue experiments show that TP-0903 acts through stimulating retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis and RA-dependent transcription. These studies identify TP-0903 as a new therapeutic for activating RAin vivoand raise the possibility that RA-dependent inhibition of EMT contributes to its prior success in eliminating disseminated cancer cells.

  3. Phenotypic chemical screening using a zebrafish neural crest EMT reporter identifies retinoic acid as an inhibitor of epithelial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Laura; Wang, Jindong; Morrison, Monique A.; Whatcott, Clifford; Soh, Katherine K.; Warner, Steven; Bearss, David; Jette, Cicely A.; Stewart, Rodney A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenetic program essential for embryogenesis, regeneration and cancer metastasis. In cancer cells, EMT also triggers cellular reprogramming and chemoresistance, which underlie disease relapse and decreased survival. Hence, identifying compounds that block EMT is essential to prevent or eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Here, we establish a whole-animal-based EMT reporter in zebrafish for rapid drug screening, called Tg(snai1b:GFP), which labels epithelial cells undergoing EMT to produce sox10-positive neural crest (NC) cells. Time-lapse and lineage analysis of Tg(snai1b:GFP) embryos reveal that cranial NC cells delaminate from two regions: an early population delaminates adjacent to the neural plate, whereas a later population delaminates from within the dorsal neural tube. Treating Tg(snai1b:GFP) embryos with candidate small-molecule EMT-inhibiting compounds identified TP-0903, a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocked cranial NC cell delamination in both the lateral and medial populations. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and chemical rescue experiments show that TP-0903 acts through stimulating retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis and RA-dependent transcription. These studies identify TP-0903 as a new therapeutic for activating RA in vivo and raise the possibility that RA-dependent inhibition of EMT contributes to its prior success in eliminating disseminated cancer cells. PMID:26794130

  4. Analysis of uncertainties in the regional acid deposition model, version 2 (RADM2), gas-phase chemical mechanism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, D.; Milford, J.B.; Stockwell, W.R.

    1996-04-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed analysis of uncertainties in the RADM2 chemical mechanism, which was developed by Stockwell et al. (1990) for use in urban and regional scale models of the formation and transport of ozone and other photochemical air pollutants. The uncertainty analysis was conducted for box model simulations of chemical conditions representing summertime smog episodes in polluted rural and urban areas. Estimated uncertainties in the rate parameters and product yields of the mechanism were propagated through the simulations using Monte Carlo analysis with a Latin Hypercube Sampling scheme. Uncertainty estimates for the mechanism parameters were compiled from published reviews, supplemented as necessary by original estimates. Correlations between parameters were considered in the analysis as appropriate.

  5. An Acid Hydrocarbon: A Chemical Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Jeffrey T.

    2004-01-01

    The chemical paradox of cyclopentadiene, a hydrocarbon, producing bubbles like a Bronsted acid is observed. The explanation that it is the comparative thermodynamic constancy of the fragrant cyclopentadienyl anion, which produces the powerful effect, resolves the paradox.

  6. Chemical of the Month: Nitric Acid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannu, Sardul S.

    1984-01-01

    Presents background information on nitric acid including old names, history, occurrence, methods of preparation, uses, production, and price. Includes such chemical properties as decomposition; acidity, oxidation of metals and nonmetals; reactions with organic and inorganic compounds; gaseous fluorine; and nitrating properties. Also discusses bond…

  7. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 83-166-1594, Witco Chemical Corporation, Perth Amboy, New Jersey. [Ethylene oxide, glycols, and adipic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, C.E.; Roseman, J.

    1985-05-01

    Area and personel air samples were analyzed for ethylene oxide, glycols, and adipic-acid at the Witco Chemical Corporation, Perth Amboy, New Jersey from November to December, 1983 and May, 1984. The evaluation was requested by the union to investigate possible health effects due to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), glycols, and ethylene oxide. The evaluation was assigned to the New Jersey State Department of Health. The authors conclude that health hazards due to ethylene oxide and airborne fatty acid exposures exist. Recommendations include improving ventilation and work practices and implementing an OSHA approved respirator program.

  8. [The forensic chemical investigation of acetylsalicylic acid].

    PubMed

    Shormanov, V K; Chupak, V V; Pobedonstseva, M N; Maslov, S V; Kibets, N A; Tikhopoeva, N N

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop the universal approach to the quantitative determination of acetylsalicylic acid in biological tissues and fluids to be applied in the practice of forensic chemical expertise with the use of thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, low-pressure column chromatography, and spectrophotometry. A system of solvents consisting of acetone and ethyl acetate (7:3) was proposed as a universal agent for extracting acetylsalicylic acid from the cadaveric tissues and blood. It was shown that acetylsalicylic acid and its principal metabolite, salicylic acid, can be purified from the endogenous admixtures present in the biological materials by column chromatography on silica gel L 40/100 mcm. Salicylic acid in extracts from biological materials was identified and quantified with the use of thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and electronic spectrophotometry. The method for forensic chemical investigation of acetylsalicylic acid has been developed and applied in the analysis of the material provided for expertise. PMID:26856059

  9. Chemical and physical structures of proteinoids and related polyamino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Hajime; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Nomoto, Shinya

    Studies of polyamino acid formation pathways in the prebiotic condition are important for the study of the origins of life. Several pathways of prebiotic polyamino acid formation have been reported. Heating of monoammonium malate [1] and heating of amino acids in molten urea [2] are important pathways of the prebiotic peptide formation. The former case, globular structure called proteinoid microsphere is formed in aqueous conditions. The later case, polyamino acids are formed from unrestricted amino acid species. Heating of aqueous aspargine is also interesting pathway for the prebiotic polyamino acid formation, because polyamino acid formation proceeds in aqueous condition [3]. In this study, we analyzed the chemical structure of the proteinoids and related polyamino acids formed in the above three pathways using with mass spectrometer. In addition, their physical structures are analyzed by the electron and optical microscopes, in order to determine the self-organization abilities. We discuss the relation between the chemical and the physical structures for the origins of life. References [1] Harada, K., J. Org. Chem., 24, 1662 (1959), Fox, S. W., Harada, K., and Kendrick, J., Science, 129, 1221 (1959). [2] Terasaki, M., Nomoto, S., Mita, H., and Shimoyama, A., Chem. Lett., 480 (2002), Mita, H., Nomoto, S., Terasaki, M., Shimoyama, A., and Yamamoto, Y., Int. J. Astrobiol., 4, 145 (2005). [3] Kovacs, K and Nagy, H., Nature, 190, 531 (1961), Munegumi, T., Tanikawa, N., Mita, H. and Harada, K., Viva Origino, 22, 109 (1994).

  10. Chemical approaches to detect and analyze protein sulfenic acids

    PubMed Central

    Furdui, Cristina M.; Poole, Leslie B.

    2013-01-01

    Orchestration of many processes relying on intracellular signal transduction is recognized to require the generation of hydrogen peroxide as a second messenger, yet relatively few molecular details of how this oxidant acts to regulate protein function are currently understood. This review describes emerging chemical tools and approaches that can be applied to study protein oxidation in biological systems, with a particular emphasis on a key player in protein redox regulation, cysteine sulfenic acid. While sulfenic acids (within purified proteins or simple mixtures) are detectable by physical approaches like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry, the propensity of these moieties to undergo further modification in complex biological systems has necessitated the development of chemical probes, reporter groups and analytical approaches to allow for their selective detection and quantification. Provided is an overview of techniques that are currently available for the study of sulfenic acids, and some of the biologically meaningful data that have been collected using such approaches. PMID:24105931

  11. Chemical approaches to detect and analyze protein sulfenic acids.

    PubMed

    Furdui, Cristina M; Poole, Leslie B

    2014-01-01

    Orchestration of many processes relying on intracellular signal transduction is recognized to require the generation of hydrogen peroxide as a second messenger, yet relatively few molecular details of how this oxidant acts to regulate protein function are currently understood. This review describes emerging chemical tools and approaches that can be applied to study protein oxidation in biological systems, with a particular emphasis on a key player in protein redox regulation, cysteine sulfenic acid. While sulfenic acids (within purified proteins or simple mixtures) are detectable by physical approaches like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry, the propensity of these moieties to undergo further modification in complex biological systems has necessitated the development of chemical probes, reporter groups and analytical approaches to allow for their selective detection and quantification. Provided is an overview of techniques that are currently available for the study of sulfenic acids, and some of the biologically meaningful data that have been collected using such approaches.

  12. Acid rain report released

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    A joint report issued January 8, 1986, by special envoys from the United States and Canada recommends that the United States implement a 5-year, $5-billion commercial demonstration program for technologies to control emissions from the burning of coal. The recommendations call for government and industry to share the costs of the proposed program.The report was issued by Drew Lewis, former U.S. Secretary of Transportation, and William Davis, former Premier of Ontario, at the request of U.S. President Ronald Reagan and Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney after a summit conference between the two leaders in March 1985. Discussion of the report is on the agenda for a second meeting this coming March. Reagan has said he will review the report but has not committed himself to endorse its recommendations.

  13. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and chemically induced diabetes mellitus. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Y; Das, U N

    2003-03-01

    In a previous study, we showed that prior oral feeding of oils rich in omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and omega-6 gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid prevent the development of alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus in experimental animals. We also observed that 99% pure omega-6 fatty acids gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid protect against chemically induced diabetes mellitus. Here we report the results of our studies with omega-3 fatty acids. Alloxan-induced in vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis in an insulin-secreting rat insulinoma cell line, RIN, was prevented by prior exposure of these cells to alpha-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid. Prior oral supplementation with alpha-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid prevented alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus. alpha-Linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid not only attenuated chemical-induced diabetes mellitus but also restored the anti-oxidant status to normal range in various tissues. These results suggested that omega-3 fatty acids can abrogate chemically induced diabetes in experimental animals and attenuate the oxidant stress that occurs in diabetes mellitus.

  14. ICMS. Chemical Tracking, Management, and Reporting

    SciTech Connect

    Bramlette, J.; Miles, R.; Carlson, M.; Bargelski, C.

    1997-10-10

    The ICMS provides: management and system users a cost-effective method for identifying, reporting, and tracking chemicals from identifying the chemical when it is received until it enters a waste stream for a facility or area.

  15. A nucleic acid dependent chemical photocatalysis in live human cells.

    PubMed

    Arian, Dumitru; Cló, Emiliano; Gothelf, Kurt V; Mokhir, Andriy

    2010-01-01

    Only two nucleic acid directed chemical reactions that are compatible with live cells have been reported to date. Neither of these processes generate toxic species from nontoxic starting materials. Reactions of the latter type could be applied as gene-specific drugs, for example, in the treatment of cancer. We report here the first example of a chemical reaction that generates a cytotoxic drug from a nontoxic prodrug in the presence of a specific endogeneous ribonucleic acid in live mammalian cells. In this case, the prodrug is triplet oxygen and the drug is singlet oxygen. The key component of this reaction is an inert molecule (InP-2'-OMe-RNA/Q-2'-OMe-RNA; P: photosensitizer; Q: quencher), which becomes an active photosensitizer (InP-2'-OMe-RNA) in the presence of single-stranded nucleic acid targets. Upon irradiation with red light, the photosensitizer produces over 6000 equivalents of toxic singlet oxygen per nucleic acid target. This reaction is highly sequence specific. To detect the generation of singlet oxygen in live cells, we prepared a membrane-permeable and water-soluble fluorescent scavenger, a derivative of 2,5-diphenylisobenzofurane. The scavenger decomposes upon reaction with singlet oxygen and this is manifested in a decrease in the fluorescence intensity. This effect can be conveniently monitored by flow cytometry.

  16. Chemical sciences, annual report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of eleven research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a DOE National Laboratory. In FY 1993, the Division made considerable progress on developing two end-stations and a beamline to advance combustion dynamics at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). In support of DOE`s national role in combustion research and chemical science, the beamline effort will enable researchers from around the world to make fundamental advances in understanding the structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates and transients, and in understanding the dynamics of elementary chemical reactions. The Division has continued to place a strong emphasis on full compliance with environmental health and safety guidelines and regulations and has made progress in technology transfer to industry. Finally, the Division has begun a new program in advanced battery research and development that should help strengthen industrial competitiveness both at home and abroad.

  17. Chemical hazards from acid crater lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bergen, M. J.; Sumarti, S.; Heikens, A.; Bogaard, T. A.; Hartiyatun, S.

    2003-04-01

    Acid crater lakes, which are hosted by a considerable number of active volcanoes, form a potential threat for local ecosystems and human health, as they commonly contain large amounts of dissolved chemicals. Subsurface seepage or overflow can lead to severe deterioration of the water quality of rivers and wells, as observations around several of these volcanoes have shown. The Ijen crater lake in East Java (Indonesia) is a striking example, as this reservoir of hyperacid (pH<0.5) sulphate, chloride and fluoride-rich water is the source of a ca. 50 km long acid river that transports substantial quantities of potentially toxic elements. A downstream trend of increasing pH from <1 to 2.5-4 is largely due to dilution with moderately acid springs (pH= ca. 4) and neutral tributaries (pH= ca. 7) inside the Ijen caldera. Geochemical controls that regulate element transport are subject to seasonal fluctuations in rainfall. Long-term monitoring has shown that fluoride levels pose some of the most severe environmental threats. Its concentration decreases from ca. 1300 mg/kg in the lake to ca. 10 mg/kg in a coastal area downstream, where virtually all of the river water is used for irrigating rice fields and other cropland. Apart from serious problems for agriculture, our survey of 55 drinking water wells in the irrigation area shows that 50% contain fluoride above the 1.5 ppm WHO limit, in line with the observation that dental fluorosis is widespread among the ca. 100,000 residents of the area. A conspicuous spatial correlation between fluoride concentrations and the irrigation system suggest that long-term (century) infiltration of irrigation water may have affected the quality of groundwater. Fluorosis is also a problem in some villages within the caldera, where well water sources may have a more direct subsurface connection with the lake system. From our observations we conclude that water-quality monitoring is especially needed for health reasons in volcanic areas where

  18. Nucleic Acid Templated Chemical Reaction in a Live Vertebrate

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid templated reactions are enabled by the hybridization of probe-reagent conjugates resulting in high effective reagent concentration and fast chemical transformation. We have developed a reaction that harnesses cellular microRNA (miRNA) to yield the cleavage of a linker releasing fluorogenic rhodamine in a live vertebrate. The reaction is based on the catalytic photoreduction of an azide by a ruthenium complex. We showed that this system reports specific expression of miRNA in living tissues of a vertebrate. PMID:27413783

  19. Nucleic Acid Templated Chemical Reaction in a Live Vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Holtzer, Laurent; Oleinich, Igor; Anzola, Marcello; Lindberg, Eric; Sadhu, Kalyan K; Gonzalez-Gaitan, Marcos; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2016-06-22

    Nucleic acid templated reactions are enabled by the hybridization of probe-reagent conjugates resulting in high effective reagent concentration and fast chemical transformation. We have developed a reaction that harnesses cellular microRNA (miRNA) to yield the cleavage of a linker releasing fluorogenic rhodamine in a live vertebrate. The reaction is based on the catalytic photoreduction of an azide by a ruthenium complex. We showed that this system reports specific expression of miRNA in living tissues of a vertebrate.

  20. Role of succinic acid in chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1982-01-01

    Succinic acid is converted into other carboxylic acids by ionizing radiation. The results obtained have been correlated with the ready formation of this compound in prebiotic experiments. Its role in biological systems may be related to its prebiotic occurrence.

  1. Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Sjöblom, Magnus; Matsakas, Leonidas; Christakopoulos, Paul; Rova, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation-based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here, current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium- and Platinum-based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the production of green fuels and chemicals. PMID:26994015

  2. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This report marks the culmination of a 4-month review conducted to identify chemical safety vulnerabilities existing at DOE facilities. This review is an integral part of DOE's efforts to raise its commitment to chemical safety to the same level as that for nuclear safety.

  3. Acid-functionalized polyolefin materials and their use in acid-promoted chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Tian, Chengcheng; Bauer, John Christopher; Dai, Sheng

    2016-06-07

    An acid-functionalized polyolefin material that can be used as an acid catalyst in a wide range of acid-promoted chemical reactions, wherein the acid-functionalized polyolefin material includes a polyolefin backbone on which acid groups are appended. Also described is a method for the preparation of the acid catalyst in which a precursor polyolefin is subjected to ionizing radiation (e.g., electron beam irradiation) of sufficient power and the irradiated precursor polyolefin reacted with at least one vinyl monomer having an acid group thereon. Further described is a method for conducting an acid-promoted chemical reaction, wherein an acid-reactive organic precursor is contacted in liquid form with a solid heterogeneous acid catalyst comprising a polyolefin backbone of at least 1 micron in one dimension and having carboxylic acid groups and either sulfonic acid or phosphoric acid groups appended thereto.

  4. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences).

  5. An unusual circumstance of internal chemical burn injury - a case report.

    PubMed

    Shetty, B Suresh Kumar; Shetty, Mahabalesh; Raj Kumar, K; Shrinidhi; Ullal, Harshavardhan

    2008-10-01

    Chemical burn injuries including nitric acid injuries are rarely seen in routine clinical practice. In this article, we describe a case of chemical burns due to ingestion of nitric acid in which the history was not of an accidental but of a suicidal nature. Spillage of nitric acid (vitriolage) is frequently reported especially in the third-world countries, but an ingestion injury like this is uncommon and rarely reported.

  6. The Chemical Structure and Acid Deterioration of Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollinger, William K., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the chemical structure of paper, including subatomic particles, atoms and molecules, and the forces that bond atoms into molecules, molecules into chains, chains into sheets, and sheets into layers. Acid is defined, and the deleterious role of acid in breaking the forces that bond atoms into molecules is detailed. (EJS)

  7. Chemical transformations of methane in trifluoroacetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnetskaya, M. V.; Svichkarev, O. M.; Budynina, E. M.; Mel'nikov, M. Ya.

    2013-12-01

    The reaction of methane conversion in anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is shown to take place at room temperature and atmospheric pressure and to result in the formation of a resinous product. Signals of ions with molecular weights of 684 and 700 are observed in MALDI-TOF spectra of the dry residue of methane conversion products.

  8. [Polishing of titanium prosthetics (Part 6). The chemical polishing baths containing hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid].

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Y; Miyazaki, T; Suzuki, E; Miyaji, T

    1989-01-01

    Titanium was polished using several chemical polishing baths containing different ratios of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid. The meltage, surface roughness, and surface texture of titanium samples after chemical polishing were affected by the ratio of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid. Generally the meltage increased and surface roughness decreased when the mole concentration of hydrofluoric acid was high and that of nitric acid was low. For example the chemical polishing bath containing 5 mole hydrofluoric acid and 5 mole nitric acid improved the surface texture in one minute, but SEM observation revealed a partially rough surface caused by the excessive solution. The chemical polishing bath containing 1 mole hydrofluoric acid and 5 mole nitric acid did not improve the surface texture in a short time because of low solubility, but improved the surface texture gradually with the extension of the immersion time and a good surface texture was observed by SEM. The chemical polishing using the chemical polishing bath with low solubility and immersion of the prosthetics for a rather long time were considered useful procedures to obtain a smooth surface of titanium prosthetics while maintaining their accuracy.

  9. Annual Report 2000. Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, Steven D.; McDowell, Robin S.

    2001-04-15

    This annual report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program in the year 2000, one of six research programs at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) - a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is meeting the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding by 1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; 2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes relevant to environmental chemistry; and 3) developing state-of-the-art research and analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in natural and contaminated systems.

  10. Perfluoroalkyl chemicals and elevated serum uric acid in US adults

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Anoop; Xiao, Jie; Ducatman, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Perfluoroalkyl chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate, are man-made chemicals that have been detected in the blood of over 98% of the US population. Serum uric acid is a novel biomarker, even mild elevations of which has been implicated in the development of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. We examined the relationship of serum perfluoroalkyl chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate, and elevated uric acid levels in a representative sample of US adults. Methods: We examined 3883 participants from the 1999–2000 and 2003–2006 National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys, a representative, multiethnic population-based survey of noninstitutionalized US adults. Serum perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate were analyzed as quartiles. The main outcome was hyperuricemia. Results: We found that serum levels of perfluoroalkyl chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate, were positively associated with hyperuricemia. This association appeared to be independent of confounders such as age, gender, race-ethnicity, body mass index, diabetes, hypertension, and serum cholesterol. Compared with subjects in quartile 1 (referent), the multivariate odds ratio for hyperuricemia among subjects in quartile 4 was 1.97 (95% confidence interval 1.44–2.70, P < 0.0001) for perfluorooctanoic acid and 1.48% (95% confidence interval 0.99–2.22, P = 0.0433) for perfluorooctane sulfonate. This observed association persisted in subgroup analysis by gender and body mass index. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that elevated levels of perfluoroalkyl chemicals are associated with hyperuricemia even at low perfluoroalkyl chemical exposure levels as seen in the US general population. PMID:22003309

  11. [Hydrofluoric acid poisoning: case report].

    PubMed

    Cortina, Tatiana Judith; Ferrero, Hilario Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid is a highly dangerous substance with industrial and domestically appliances. Clinical manifestations of poisoning depend on exposure mechanism, acid concentration and exposed tissue penetrability. Gastrointestinal tract symptoms do not correlate with injury severity. Patients with history of hydrofluoric acid ingestion should undergo an endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Intoxication requires immediate intervention because systemic toxicity can take place. We present a 5 year old girl who accidentally swallowed 5 ml of 20% hydrofluoric acid. We performed gastrointestinal tract endoscopy post ingestion, which revealed erythematous esophagus and stomach with erosive lesions. Two months later, same study was performed and revealed esophagus and stomach normal mucous membrane.

  12. Acid rain: a background report

    SciTech Connect

    Glustrom, L.; Stolzenberg, J.

    1982-07-08

    This Staff Brief was prepared for the Wisconsin Legislative Council's Special Committee on Acid Rain to provide an introduction to the issue of acid rain. It is divided into four parts. Part I provides an overview on the controversies surrounding the measurement, formation and effects of acid rain. As described in Part I, the term acid rain is used to describe the deposition of acidic components through both wet deposition (e.g., rain or snow) and dry deposition (e.g., direct contact between atmospheric constituents and the land, water or vegetation of the earth). Part II presents background information on state agency activities relating to acid rain in Wisconsin, describes what is known about the occurrence of, susceptibility to and effects of acid rain in Wisconsin, and provides information related to man-made sources of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in Wisconsin. Part III describes major policies and regulations relating to acid rain which have been or are being developed jointly by the United States and Canadian governments, by the United States government and by the State of Wisconsin. Part IV briefly discusses possible areas for Committee action.

  13. Biologically produced succinic acid: A new route to chemical intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The national laboratory consortium has undertaken an R&D project with the Michigan Biotechnology Institute (MBI) to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a chemical intermediate, succinic acid, and various derivatives, from renewable agricultural resources. The projects near-term goal is to demonstrate an economically competetive process for producing 1,4-butanediol and other derivatives from biologically produced succinic acid without generating a major salt waste. The competitiveness to the petrochemical process must be demonstrated.

  14. Chemical remodeling of cell-surface sialic acids through a palladium-triggered bioorthogonal elimination reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Cheng, Bo; Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhaoyue; Hong, Weiyao; Chen, Xing; Chen, Peng R

    2015-04-27

    We herein report a chemical decaging strategy for the in situ generation of neuramic acid (Neu), a unique type of sialic acid, on live cells by the use of a palladium-mediated bioorthogonal elimination reaction. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) were found to be a highly efficient and biocompatible depropargylation catalyst for the direct conversion of metabolically incorporated N-(propargyloxycarbonyl)neuramic acid (Neu5Proc) into Neu on cell-surface glycans. This conversion chemically mimics the enzymatic de-N-acetylation of N-acetylneuramic acid (Neu5Ac), a proposed mechanism for the natural occurrence of Neu on cell-surface glycans. The bioorthogonal elimination was also exploited for the manipulation of cell-surface charge by unmasking the free amine at C5 to neutralize the negatively charged carboxyl group at C1 of sialic acids.

  15. Diphenylarsinic acid poisoning from chemical weapons in Kamisu, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kazuhiro; Tamaoka, Akira; Otsuka, Fujio; Iwasaki, Nobuaki; Shin, Kenji; Matsui, Akira; Endo, Ginji; Kumagai, Yoshito; Ishii, Tetsuro; Shoji, Shin'ichi; Ogata, Tsuyoshi; Ishizaki, Mutsuo; Doi, Mikio; Shimojo, Nobuhiro

    2004-11-01

    We noted a new clinical syndrome with prominent cerebellar symptoms in apartment building residents in Kamisu, Japan. The well that provided drinking water contained diphenylarsinic acid, a degradation product of diphenylcyanoarsine or diphenylchloroarsine, which were developed for use as chemical weapons, inducing severe vomiting and sneezing. Characteristics of diphenylarsinic acid poisoning include brainstem-cerebellar and cerebral symptoms. Mental retardation associated with brain atrophy in magnetic resonance images was evident in some infants. We must be vigilant to prevent or minimize the effects of further diphenylarsinic acid poisoning in Japan or elsewhere.

  16. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting on precursor chemical... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.38 Reporting on precursor chemical substances. (a) Identification of precursor chemical...

  17. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting on precursor chemical... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.38 Reporting on precursor chemical substances. (a) Identification of precursor chemical...

  18. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting on precursor chemical... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT DIBENZO-PARA-DIOXINS/DIBENZOFURANS Specific Chemical Testing/Reporting Requirements § 766.38 Reporting on precursor chemical substances. (a) Identification of precursor chemical...

  19. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    PubMed

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-01

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  20. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 11. Historical changes in surface-water acid-base chemistry in response to acidic deposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Small, M.J.; Kingston, J.C.; Bernert, J.A.; Thomas, D.R.

    1990-09-01

    The objectives of the analyses reported in the State of Science report are to: identify the lake and stream populations in the United States that have experienced chronic changes in biologically significant constituents of surface water chemistry (e.g. pH, Al) in response to acidic deposition; quantify biologically meaningful historical changes in chronic surface water chemistry associated with acidic deposition, with emphasis on ANC, pH, and Al; estimate the proportion of lakes nor acidic that were not acidic in pre-industrial times; estimate the proportional response of each of the major chemical constituents that have changed in response to acidic deposition using a subset of statistically selected Adirondack lakes for which paleolimnological reconstructions of pre-industrial surface water chemistry have been performed; evaluate and improve, where appropriate and feasible, empirical models of predicting changes in ANC; and evaluate the response of seepage lakes to acidic deposition.

  1. Chemical Sintering Generates Uniform Porous Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Cam, Cynthia; Segura, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Implantation of scaffolds for tissue repair has been met with limited success primarily due to the inability to achieve vascularization within the construct. Many strategies have shifted to incorporate pores into these scaffolds to encourage rapid cellular infiltration and subsequent vascular ingrowth. We utilized an efficient chemical sintering technique to create a uniform network of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microspheres for porous hyaluronic acid hydrogel formation. The porous hydrogels generated from chemical sintering possessed comparable pore uniformity and interconnectivity as the commonly used non- and heat sintering techniques. Moreover, similar cell response to the porous hydrogels generated from each sintering approach was observed in cell viability, spreading, proliferation in vitro, as well as, cellular invasion in vivo. We propose chemical sintering of PMMA microspheres using a dilute acetone solution as an alternative method to generating porous hyaluronic acid hydrogels since it requires equal or ten-fold less processing time as the currently used non-sintering or heat sintering technique, respectively. PMID:24120847

  2. Spectroscopic analysis of cinnamic acid using quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod, K. S.; Periandy, S.; Govindarajan, M.

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, FT-IR, FT-Raman, 13C NMR and 1H NMR spectra for cinnamic acid have been recorded for the vibrational and spectroscopic analysis. The observed fundamental frequencies (IR and Raman) were assigned according to their distinctiveness region. The computed frequencies and optimized parameters have been calculated by using HF and DFT (B3LYP) methods and the corresponding results are tabulated. On the basis of the comparison between computed and experimental results assignments of the fundamental vibrational modes are examined. A study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by HF and DFT methods. The alternation of the vibration pattern of the pedestal molecule related to the substitutions was analyzed. The 13C and 1H NMR spectra have been recorded and the chemical shifts have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The Mulliken charges, UV spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO analysis of have been calculated and reported. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was constructed.

  3. Spectroscopic analysis of cinnamic acid using quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Vinod, K S; Periandy, S; Govindarajan, M

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, FT-IR, FT-Raman, (13)C NMR and (1)H NMR spectra for cinnamic acid have been recorded for the vibrational and spectroscopic analysis. The observed fundamental frequencies (IR and Raman) were assigned according to their distinctiveness region. The computed frequencies and optimized parameters have been calculated by using HF and DFT (B3LYP) methods and the corresponding results are tabulated. On the basis of the comparison between computed and experimental results assignments of the fundamental vibrational modes are examined. A study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by HF and DFT methods. The alternation of the vibration pattern of the pedestal molecule related to the substitutions was analyzed. The (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra have been recorded and the chemical shifts have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The Mulliken charges, UV spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO analysis of have been calculated and reported. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was constructed.

  4. Studies on chemical modification and biology of a natural product, gambogic acid (II): Synthesis and bioevaluation of gambogellic acid and its derivatives from gambogic acid as antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinxin; Ma, Junhai; You, Qidong; Zhao, Li; Wang, Fan; Li, Chong; Guo, Qinglong

    2010-09-01

    Gambogic acid (GA) has been reported to be a potent apoptosis inducer. The fact that it is amenable to chemical modification makes GA an attractive molecule for the development of anticancer agents. We firstly reported the synthesis of gambogellic acid, which was generated under acid catalysis from readily available GA by a base-catalyzed diene intramolecular annelation. Sequentially, thirteen new compounds were synthesized and their inhibitory activity on HT-29, Bel-7402, BGC-823, and A549 cell lines were evaluated in vitro by MTT assay, and (38, 40)-epoxy-33-chlorogambogellic acid (4) was identified as a BGC-823 cell apoptosis inducer through MTT cell assay, observations of morphological changes, and Annexin-V/PI double-staining assay. Compound 4 showed significant effects in inducing apoptosis and might serve as a potential lead compound for discovery of new anticancer drugs. Further structure-activity relationships (SARs) of gambogic acid derivatives were discussed.

  5. Annual Report 2002. Chemical Structure & Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, Steven D.; Gephart, Roy E.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) Group of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) from October 2000 through December 2001. Publications, presentations, and collaborations are listed from October 2000 to September 2002. The EMSL is a national user facility located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. The CS&D program supports the Department of Energy?s mission of fostering fundamental research in the natural sciences to provide a basis for new and improved energy technologies and for understanding and mitigating the environmental impacts of energy use and contaminant releases.

  6. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-04-21

    demonstrated that H2-­release from chemical hydrides can occur by a number of different mechanistic pathways and strongly suggest that optimal chemical ­hydride based H2­release systems may require the use of synergistic dehydrogenation methods to induce H2­-loss from chemically different intermediates formed during release reactions. The efficient regeneration of ammonia borane from BNHx spent fuel is one of the most challenging problems that will have to be overcome in order to utilize AB-based hydrogen storage. Three Center partners, LANL, PNNL and Penn, each took different complimentary approaches to AB regeneration. The Penn approach focused on a strategy involving spent-fuel digestion with superacidic acids to produce boron-halides (BX3) that could then be converted to AB by coordination/reduction/displacement processes. While the Penn boron-halide reduction studies successfully demonstrated that a dialkylsulfide-based coordination/reduction/displacement process gave quantitative conversions of BBr3 to ammonia borane with efficient and safe product separations, the fact that AB spent-fuels could not be digested in good yields to BX3 halides led to a No-Go decision on this overall AB-regeneration strategy.

  7. Biologically produced succinic acid: A new route to chemical intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R & D) that uses `green` feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. New alternatives for American industry may lie in the nation`s forests and fields. The national laboratory consortium has undertaken a joint R&D project with the Michigan Biotechnology Institute to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a chemical intermediate, succinic acid, and various derivatives, from renewable agricultural resources.

  8. Chemical functionalization of hyaluronic acid for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Vasi, Ana-Maria; Popa, Marcel Ionel; Butnaru, Maria; Dodi, Gianina; Verestiuc, Liliana

    2014-05-01

    Functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives were obtained by ring opening mechanism of maleic anhydride (MA). FTIR and H(1) NMR spectroscopy were used to confirm the chemical linkage of MA on the hyaluronic acid chains. Thermal analysis (TG-DTG and DSC) and GPC data for the new products revealed the formation of new functional groups, without significant changes in molecular weight and thermal stability. New gels based on hyaluronic acid modified derivatives were obtained by acrylic acid copolymerization in the presence of a redox initiation system. The resulted circular and interconnected pores of the gels were visualized by SEM. The release profiles of an ophthalmic model drug, pilocarpine from tested gels were studied in simulated media. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity and cell proliferation properties indicates the potential of the new systems to be used in contact with biological media in drug delivery applications.

  9. Chemical functionalization of hyaluronic acid for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Vasi, Ana-Maria; Popa, Marcel Ionel; Butnaru, Maria; Dodi, Gianina; Verestiuc, Liliana

    2014-05-01

    Functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives were obtained by ring opening mechanism of maleic anhydride (MA). FTIR and H(1) NMR spectroscopy were used to confirm the chemical linkage of MA on the hyaluronic acid chains. Thermal analysis (TG-DTG and DSC) and GPC data for the new products revealed the formation of new functional groups, without significant changes in molecular weight and thermal stability. New gels based on hyaluronic acid modified derivatives were obtained by acrylic acid copolymerization in the presence of a redox initiation system. The resulted circular and interconnected pores of the gels were visualized by SEM. The release profiles of an ophthalmic model drug, pilocarpine from tested gels were studied in simulated media. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity and cell proliferation properties indicates the potential of the new systems to be used in contact with biological media in drug delivery applications. PMID:24656366

  10. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting on precursor chemical... § 766.38 Reporting on precursor chemical substances. (a) Identification of precursor chemical substances. Precursor chemical substances are produced under conditions that will not yield HDDs and HDFs, but...

  11. 40 CFR 716.50 - Reporting physical and chemical properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting physical and chemical... chemical properties. Studies of physical and chemical properties must be reported under this subpart if...) Degradation by chemical mechanisms—hydrolytic, reductive, and oxidative. (j) Degradation by...

  12. Chemical modification of alginic acid by ultrasonic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdzheva, Dilyana; Denev, Panteley

    2016-03-01

    Abstract: Chemical modification of alginic acid has been done by ultrasonic irradiation to obtain its methylated, ethylated and isopropylated derivatives. The influence of ultrasonic frequency and power on esterification process of alginic acid has been investigated. Alginate derivatives have been characterized by degree of esterification (DE) and IR-FT spectroscopy. It has been found that 45 kHz ultrasonic frequency accelerated modification process as reduced the reaction time from 16 hours to 2 hours. The obtained results showed that ultrasound irradiation increased the reaction efficiency in methanol and depended on the ratio of the M/G.

  13. Formic and Acetic Acid Observations over Colorado by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Organic Acids' Role in Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treadaway, V.; O'Sullivan, D. W.; Heikes, B.; Silwal, I.; McNeill, A.

    2015-12-01

    Formic acid (HFo) and acetic acid (HAc) have both natural and anthropogenic sources and a role in the atmospheric processing of carbon. These organic acids also have an increasing importance in setting the acidity of rain and snow as precipitation nitrate and sulfate concentrations have decreased. Primary emissions for both organic acids include biomass burning, agriculture, and motor vehicle emissions. Secondary production is also a substantial source for both acids especially from biogenic precursors, secondary organic aerosols (SOAs), and photochemical production from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs). Chemical transport models underestimate organic acid concentrations and recent research has sought to develop additional production mechanisms. Here we report HFo and HAc measurements during two campaigns over Colorado using the peroxide chemical ionization mass spectrometer (PCIMS). Iodide clusters of both HFo and HAc were recorded at mass-to-charge ratios of 173 and 187, respectively. The PCIMS was flown aboard the NCAR Gulfstream-V platform during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) and aboard the NCAR C-130 during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE). The DC3 observations were made in May and June 2012 extending from the surface to 13 km over the central and eastern United States. FRAPPE observations were made in July and August 2014 from the surface to 7 km over Colorado. DC3 measurements reported here are focused over the Colorado Front Range and complement the FRAPPE observations. DC3 HFo altitude profiles are characterized by a decrease up to 6 km followed by an increase either back to boundary layer mixing ratio values or higher (a "C" shape). Organic acid measurements from both campaigns are interpreted with an emphasis on emission sources (both natural and anthropogenic) over Colorado and in situ photochemical production especially ozone precursors.

  14. Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures.

  15. Chitosan and chemically modified chitosan beads for acid dyes sorption.

    PubMed

    Azlan, Kamari; Wan Saime, Wan Ngah; Lai Ken, Liew

    2009-01-01

    The capabilities of chitosan and chitosan-EGDE (ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether) beads for removing Acid Red 37 (AR 37) and Acid Blue 25 (AB 25) from aqueous solution were examined. Chitosan beads were cross-linked with EGDE to enhance its chemical resistance and mechanical strength. Experiments were performed as a function of pH, agitation period and concentration of AR 37 and AB 25. It was shown that the adsorption capacities of chitosan for both acid dyes were comparatively higher than those of chitosan-EGDE. This is mainly because cross-linking using EGDE reduces the major adsorption sites -NH3+ on chitosan. Langmuir isotherm model showed the best conformity compared to Freundlich and BET. The kinetic experimental data agreed very well to the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The desorption study revealed that after three cycles of adsorption and desorption by NaOH and HCl, both adsorbents retained their promising adsorption abilities. FT-IR analysis proved that the adsorption of acid dyes onto chitosan-based adsorbents was a physical adsorption. Results also showed that chitosan and chitosan-EGDE beads were favourable adsorbers and could be employed as low-cost alternatives for the removal of acid dyes in wastewater treatment. PMID:19634439

  16. Chemical modulation of chaperone-mediated autophagy by retinoic acid derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Anguiano, Jaime; Garner, Thomas P; Mahalingam, Murugesan; Das, Bhaskar C.; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) contributes to cellular quality control and the cellular response to stress through the selective degradation of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. Decrease in CMA activity occurs in aging and in age-related disorders (for example, neurodegenerative diseases and diabetes). Although prevention of this age-dependent decline through genetic manipulation in mouse has proven beneficial, chemical modulation of CMA is not currently possible, due in part to the lack of information on the signaling mechanisms that modulate this pathway. In this work, we report that signaling through the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) inhibits CMA and apply structure-based chemical design to develop synthetic derivatives of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) to specifically neutralize this inhibitory effect. We demonstrate that chemical enhancement of CMA protects cells from oxidative stress and from proteotoxicity, supporting a potential therapeutic opportunity when reduced CMA contributes to cellular dysfunction and disease. PMID:23584676

  17. Long pulse chemical laser. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bardon, R.L.; Breidenthal, R.E.; Buonadonna, V.R.

    1989-02-01

    This report covers the technical effort through February, 1989. This effort was directed towards the technology associated with the development of a large scale, long pulse DF-CO{sub 2} chemical laser. Optics damage studies performed under Task 1 assessed damage thresholds for diamond-turned salt windows. Task 2 is a multi-faceted task involving the use of PHOCL-50 for laser gain measurements, LTI experiments, and detector testing by LANL personnel. To support these latter tests, PHOCL-50 was upgraded with Boeing funding to incorporate a full aperture outcoupler that increased its energy output by over a factor of 3, to a full kilojoule. The PHOCL-50 carbon block calorimeter was also recalibrated and compared with the LANL Scientech meter. Cloud clearing studies under Task 3 initially concentrated on delivering a Boeing built Cloud Simulation Facility to LANL, and currently involves design of a Cold Cloud Simulation Facility. A Boeing IRAD funded theoretical study on cold cloud clearing revealed that ice clouds may be easier to clear then warm clouds. Task 4 involves the theoretical and experimental study of flow system design as related to laser beam quality. Present efforts on this task are concentrating on temperature gradients induced by the gas filling process. General support for the LPCL field effort is listed under Task 5, with heavy emphasis on assuring reliable operation of the Boeing built Large Slide Valve and other device related tests. The modification of the PHOCL-50 system for testing long pulse DF (4{mu}m only) chemical laser operation is being done under Task 6.

  18. Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO/sub 2/ recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  1. Chemical synthesis of lactic acid from cellulose catalysed by lead(II) ions in water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanliang; Deng, Weiping; Wang, Binju; Zhang, Qinghong; Wan, Xiaoyue; Tang, Zhenchen; Wang, Ye; Zhu, Chun; Cao, Zexing; Wang, Guichang; Wan, Huilin

    2013-01-01

    The direct transformation of cellulose, which is the main component of lignocellulosic biomass, into building-block chemicals is the key to establishing biomass-based sustainable chemical processes. Only limited successes have been achieved for such transformations under mild conditions. Here we report the simple and efficient chemocatalytic conversion of cellulose in water in the presence of dilute lead(II) ions, into lactic acid, which is a high-value chemical used for the production of fine chemicals and biodegradable plastics. The lactic acid yield from microcrystalline cellulose and several lignocellulose-based raw biomasses is >60% at 463 K. Both theoretical and experimental studies suggest that lead(II) in combination with water catalyses a series of cascading steps for lactic acid formation, including the isomerization of glucose formed via the hydrolysis of cellulose into fructose, the selective cleavage of the C3-C4 bond of fructose to trioses and the selective conversion of trioses into lactic acid. PMID:23846730

  2. Plasma-chemical waste treatment of acid gases

    SciTech Connect

    Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.; Daniels, E.J.

    1993-09-01

    The research to date has shown that a H{sub 2}S waste-treatment process based on plasma-chemical dissociation technology is compatible with refinery and high-carbon-oxide acid-gas streams. The minor amounts of impurities produced in the plasma-chemical reactor should be treatable by an internal catalytic reduction step. Furthermore, the plasma-chemical technology appears to be more efficient and more economical than the current technology. The principal key to achieving high conversions with relatively low energies of dissociation is the concept of the high-velocity, cyclonic-flow pattern in the plasma reaction zone coupled with the recycling of unconverted hydrogen sulfide. Future work will include testing the effects of components that might be carried over to the plasma reactor by ``upset`` conditions in the amine purification system of a plant and testing the plasma-chemical process on other industrial wastes streams that contain potentially valuable chemical reagents. The strategy for the commercialization of this technology is to form a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with the Institute of Hydrogen Energy and Plasma Technology of the Russian Scientific Center/Kurchatov Institute and with an American start-up company to develop an ``American`` version of the process and to build a commercial-scale demonstration unit in the United States. The timetable proposed would involve building a ``field test`` facility which would test the plasma-chemical reactor and sulfur recovery unit operations on an industrial hydrogen sulfide waste s at a scale large enough to obtain the energy and material balance data required for a final analysis of the commercial potential of this technology. The field test would then be followed by construction of a commercial demonstration unit in two to three years. The commercial demonstration unit would be a fully integrated plant consisting of one commercial-scale module.

  3. Acid precipitation and human health: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, S.

    1989-08-01

    This report, written for environmental managers in electric utilities, reviews potential indirect human health effects of acid precipitation. Possible exposure routes and materials examined in this review include drinking water contamination (aluminum and mercury), corrosion of metals (lead, cadmium, arsenic, selenium, copper, and zinc) and asbestos from water piping, bioaccumulation of mercury and other metals in fish and game, and uptake of mobilized metals in crops. No direct effects (e.g., skin or eye irritation) of human exposure to acid precipitation have been identified, and air pollutant impacts on health are not included in this review, because these pollutants are acid precipitation precursors, not acid precipitation per se. The literature is summarized, presenting results from researchers' studies to support their conclusions. The review discusses potential acid precipitation impacts on metal levels in drinking water and food, summarizes the health effects of ingestion of these materials, and identifies areas of needed research. Metal-metal interactions in humans that may be related to acid precipitation are identified. Current research programs and planned assessments of the indirect human health effects of acid precipitation are summarized. 136 refs., 38 figs., 17 tabs

  4. Chemical and isotopic compositions in acid residues from various meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kano, N.; Yamakoshi, K.; Matsuzaki, H.; Nogami, K.

    1993-01-01

    We are planning to carry out systematic isotopic investigations of Ru, Mg, etc., in primordial samples. The investigations will be pursued in the context of a study of the pre-history of the solar system. It is hoped that the study will yield direct evidence for processes of nucleosynthesis in the pre-solar stage and detection of extinct radioactive nuclides. In this paper, we present the results of chemical compositions of acid residues obtained from three types of meteorites: Canyon Diablo (IA), Allende (CV3), and Nuevo Mercuro (H5); and the preliminary results of Ru isotopic compositions.

  5. Tank 12H Acidic Chemical Cleaning Sample Analysis And Material Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C. J.; Reboul, S. H.; Wiersma, B. J.; Coleman, C. J.

    2013-11-08

    A process of Bulk Oxalic Acid (BOA) chemical cleaning was performed for Tank 12H during June and July of 2013 to remove all or a portion of the approximately 4400 gallon sludge heel. Three strikes of oxalic acid (nominally 4 wt% or 2 wt%) were used at 55°C and tank volumes of 96- to 140-thousand gallons. This report details the sample analysis of a scrape sample taken prior to BOA cleaning and dip samples taken during BOA cleaning. It also documents a rudimentary material balance for the Tank 12H cleaning results.

  6. Amino Acids from Icy Amines: A Radiation-Chemical Approach to Extraterrestrial Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, J. P.; Moore, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Detections of amino acids in meteorites go back several decades, with at least 100 such compounds being reported for the Murchison meteorite alone. The presence of these extraterrestrial molecules raises questions as to their formation, abundance, thermal stability, racemization, and possible subsequent reactions. Although all of these topics have been studied in laboratories, such work often involves many variables and unknowns. This has led us to seek out model systems with which to uncover reaction products, test chemical predictions, and sited light on underlying reaction mechanisms. This presentation will describe one such study, focusing on amino-acid formation in ices.

  7. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Binbin Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng

    2015-01-15

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2} using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl{sub 2} at 400 °C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of –SO{sub 3}H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and –SO{sub 3}H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles. - Graphical abstract: Sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres with high surface area and superior catalytic performance were prepared by a facile chemical activation route. - Highlights: • Porous carbon spheres solid acid prepared by a facile chemical activation. • It owns high surface area, superior porosity and uniform spherical morphology. • It possesses

  8. 76 FR 50815 - TSCA Inventory Update Reporting Modifications; Chemical Data Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ..., naturally occurring chemical substances, and certain natural gas substances. Manufacturers (including... information reported. EPA believes that expanding the range of chemical substances for which more...

  9. Acid-base chemical mechanism of aspartase from Hafnia alvei.

    PubMed

    Yoon, M Y; Thayer-Cook, K A; Berdis, A J; Karsten, W E; Schnackerz, K D; Cook, P F

    1995-06-20

    An acid-base chemical mechanism is proposed for Hafnia alvei aspartase in which a proton is abstracted from C-3 of the monoanionic form of L-aspartate by an enzyme general base with a pK of 6.3-6.6 in the absence and presence of Mg2+. The resulting carbanion is presumably stabilized by delocalization of electrons into the beta-carboxyl with the assistance of a protonated enzyme group in the vicinity of the beta-carboxyl. Ammonia is then expelled with the assistance of a general acid group that traps an initially expelled NH3 as the final NH4+ product. In agreement with the function of the general acid group, potassium, an analog of NH4+, binds optimally when the group is unprotonated. The pK for the general acid is about 7 in the absence of Mg2+, but is increased by about a pH unit in the presence of Mg2+. Since the same pK values are observed in the pKi(succinate) and V/K pH profile, both enzyme groups must be in their optimum protonation state for efficient binding of reactant in the presence of Mg2+. At the end of a catalytic cycle, both the general base and general acid groups are in a protonation state opposite that in which they started when aspartate was bound. The presence of Mg2+ causes a pH-dependent activation of aspartase exhibited as a partial change in the V and V/Kasp pH profiles. When the aspartase reaction is run in D2O to greater than 50% completion no deuterium is found in the remaining aspartate, indicating that the site is inaccessible to solvent during the catalytic cycle.

  10. Chemical Biodynamics Division. Annual report 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Chemical Biodynamics Division of LBL continues to conduct basic research on the dynamics of living cells and on the interaction of radiant energy with organic matter. Many aspects of this basic research are related to problems of environmental and health effects of fossil fuel combustion, solar energy conversion and chemical/ viral carcinogenesis.

  11. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  12. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Holiday Inn, Ventura, California, 2/16-21/03. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  13. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program is a major component of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), providing a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for the characterization of waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detection and monitoring of trace atmospheric species.

  14. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species.

  15. Gluconic acid from biomass fast pyrolysis oils: specialty chemicals from the thermochemical conversion of biomass.

    PubMed

    Santhanaraj, Daniel; Rover, Marjorie R; Resasco, Daniel E; Brown, Robert C; Crossley, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass to produce a bio-oil followed by catalytic upgrading is a widely studied approach for the potential production of fuels from biomass. Because of the complexity of the bio-oil, most upgrading strategies focus on removing oxygen from the entire mixture to produce fuels. Here we report a novel method for the production of the specialty chemical, gluconic acid, from the pyrolysis of biomass. Through a combination of sequential condensation of pyrolysis vapors and water extraction, a solution rich in levoglucosan is obtained that accounts for over 30% of the carbon in the bio-oil produced from red oak. A simple filtration step yields a stream of high-purity levoglucosan. This stream of levoglucosan is then hydrolyzed and partially oxidized to yield gluconic acid with high purity and selectivity. This combination of cost-effective pyrolysis coupled with simple separation and upgrading could enable a variety of new product markets for chemicals from biomass.

  16. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: PEROX-PURE™ CHEMICAL OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report evaluates the perox-pure™ chemical oxidation technology's ability to remove volatile organic compounds (VOC) and other organic contaminants present in liquid wastes. The report also presents economic data from the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) demon...

  17. The multifaceted role of amino acids in chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasdeit, Henry; Fox, Stefan; Dalai, Punam

    We present an overview of recent ideas about α-amino acids on the Hadean / early Archean Earth and Noachian Mars. Pertinent simulation experiments are discussed. Electrical dis-charges in early Earth's bulk, probably non-reducing atmosphere [1, 2] and in volcanic ash-gas clouds [3] are likely to have synthesized amino acids abiotically. In principle, this may have been followed by the synthesis of peptides. Different kinds of laboratory simulations have, however, revealed severe difficulties with the condensation process under presumed prebiotic conditions. It therefore appears that peptides on the early Earth were mainly di-, tri-and tetramers and slightly longer only in the case of glycine homopeptides. But even such short peptides may have shown primitive catalytic activity after complexation of metal ions to form proto-metalloenzymes. L-enantiomeric excesses (L-ee) of meteoritic amino acids were possibly involved in the origin of biohomochirality [4, 5]. This idea also faces some problems, mainly dilution of the amino acids on Earth and a resulting low overall L-ee. However, as yet unknown reactions might exist that are highly enantioselective even under such unfavorable conditions, perhaps by a combination of autocatalysis and inhibition (compare the Soai reaction). Primor-dial volcanic islands are prebiotically interesting locations. At their hot coasts, solid sea salt probably embedded amino acids [6]. Our laboratory experiments showed that further heating of the salt crusts, simulating the vicinity of lava streams, produced pyrroles among other prod-ucts. Pyrroles are building blocks of biomolecules such as bilins, chlorophylls and heme. Thus, an abiotic route from amino acids to the first photoreceptor and electron-transfer molecules might have existed. There is no reason to assume that the chemical evolutionary processes described above were singular events restricted to Earth and Mars. In fact, they might take place even today on terrestrial exoplanets

  18. Effect of different preservation processes on chemical composition and fatty acid profile of anchovy (Engraulis anchoita).

    PubMed

    Czerner, Marina; Agustinelli, Silvina P; Guccione, Silvana; Yeannes, María I

    2015-01-01

    The effects of salting-ripening, canning and marinating processes on chemical composition and fatty acid profile of anchovy (Engraulis anchoita) were evaluated (p = 0.01), with emphasis on long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Fresh anchovy showed a high proportion of PUFAs (∼45 g/100 g total lipid) with an eicosapentaenoic (EPA) + docosahexaenoic (DHA) content of 27.08 g/100 g total lipid. The salting-ripening process led to the largest changes in the chemical composition and the fatty acid profile, which resulted in a reduction of ∼70% on the total EPA and DHA contents (g/100 g edible portion). Contrary, canned and marinated anchovy presented a fatty acid profile similar to that of fresh anchovy. The use of vegetable oil as covering liquid led to final products with increased ω-6 PUFAs content. Despite the modifications observed, the total amount of essential EPA and DHA fatty acids provided by these products remained high compared with values reported in literature for other foods. PMID:26576657

  19. Effect of different preservation processes on chemical composition and fatty acid profile of anchovy (Engraulis anchoita).

    PubMed

    Czerner, Marina; Agustinelli, Silvina P; Guccione, Silvana; Yeannes, María I

    2015-01-01

    The effects of salting-ripening, canning and marinating processes on chemical composition and fatty acid profile of anchovy (Engraulis anchoita) were evaluated (p = 0.01), with emphasis on long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Fresh anchovy showed a high proportion of PUFAs (∼45 g/100 g total lipid) with an eicosapentaenoic (EPA) + docosahexaenoic (DHA) content of 27.08 g/100 g total lipid. The salting-ripening process led to the largest changes in the chemical composition and the fatty acid profile, which resulted in a reduction of ∼70% on the total EPA and DHA contents (g/100 g edible portion). Contrary, canned and marinated anchovy presented a fatty acid profile similar to that of fresh anchovy. The use of vegetable oil as covering liquid led to final products with increased ω-6 PUFAs content. Despite the modifications observed, the total amount of essential EPA and DHA fatty acids provided by these products remained high compared with values reported in literature for other foods.

  20. Chemical-Stockpile Disposal Program. Chemical weapons movement history compilation. Historical report 1946-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Brankowitz, W.R.

    1987-06-12

    This report was produced to study the history of past chemical-weapons-movement operations from 1946 to 1986. The history was then to be used as a source of lessons learned for planning any transportation that might be required to implement the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program. The report candidly discusses problems encountered on past chemical-weapons-movement operations and suggests areas in which the movement of chemical weapons can be improved based on past experience. The report summarizes all movement operations from 1946 to 1986, while acknowledging that this record is incomplete for some years because not all movement records were preserved.

  1. Chemical Structure and Dynamics annual report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1998-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS and D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. The authors respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by: (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. The focus of the research is defined primarily by DOE`s environmental problems: fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment, processing and storage of waste materials, cellular effects of chemical and radiological insult, and atmospheric chemistry as it relates to air quality and global change. Twenty-seven projects are described under the following topical sections: Reaction mechanisms at interfaces; High-energy processes at environmental interfaces; Cluster models of the condensed phase; and Miscellaneous.

  2. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 3 consists of eleven appendices containing the following: Field verification reports for Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rocky Flats Plant, Brookhaven National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., and Sandia National Laboratories (NM); Mini-visits to small DOE sites; Working Group meeting, June 7--8, 1994; Commendable practices; Related chemical safety initiatives at DOE; Regulatory framework and industry initiatives related to chemical safety; and Chemical inventory data from field self-evaluation reports.

  3. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, S.D.

    1995-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program was organized as a major component of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. Our program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces, and (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage. This research effort was initiated in 1989 and will continue to evolve over the next few years into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems, such as well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules; and studies of complex systems found in the environment (multispecies, multiphase solutions; solid/liquid, liquid/liquid, and gas/surface interfaces; colloidal dispersions; ultrafine aerosols; and functioning biological systems). The success of this program will result in the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces, and more generally in condensed media, that is comparable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for predictions of macroscopic chemical behavior in condensed and heterogeneous media, adding significantly to the value of field-scale environmental models, the prediction of short- and long-term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other problems related to the primary missions of the DOE.

  4. Annual Report 1998: Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    SD Colson; RS McDowell

    1999-05-10

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Labo- ratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of- the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interracial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in envi- ronmental chemistry and in nuclear waste proc- essing and storage; and (3) developing state-of- the-art analytical methods for characterizing com- plex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. Our program aims at achieving a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces and, more generally, in condensed media, compa- rable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for pre- dicting macroscopic chemical behavior in con- densed and heterogeneous media, which will add significantly to the value of field-scale envi- ronmental models, predictions of short- and long- term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other areas related to the primary missions of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  5. Cometary impact and amino acid survival - Chemical kinetics and thermochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.

    2006-01-01

    The Arrhenius parameters for the initiating reactions in butane thermolysis and the formation of soot, reliable to at least 3000 K, have been applied to the question of the survival of amino acids in cometary impacts on early Earth. The pressure/temperature/time course employed here was that developed in hydrocode simulations for kilometer-sized comets (Pierazzo and Chyba, 1999), with attention to the track below 3000 K where it is shown that potential stabilizing effects of high pressure become unimportant kinetically. The question of survival can then be considered without the need for assignment of activation volumes and the related uncertainties in their application to extreme conditions. The exercise shows that the characteristic times for soot formation in the interval fall well below the cooling periods for impacts ranging from fully vertical down to about 9?? above horizontal. Decarboxylation, which emerges as more rapid than soot formation below 2000-3000 K, continues further down to extremely narrow impact angles, and accordingly cometa??ry delivery of amino acids to early Earth is highly unlikely. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  6. Chemical characteristics, fatty acid composition and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of traditional Greek yogurts.

    PubMed

    Serafeimidou, Amalia; Zlatanos, Spiros; Laskaridis, Kostas; Sagredos, Angelos

    2012-10-15

    Many studies with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) indicate that it has a protective effect against mammary cancer. Because dairy products are the most important dietary sources of CLA, we have investigated the CLA concentrations and additionally the fatty acid profiles and chemical composition of several commercial, traditional, Greek yogurts from different geographical origin. The fat content of yogurts was in the order of goatacids (SFA) were found in low-fat yogurts, of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in sheep milk yogurts and of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in low-fat cow milk yogurts. PMID:23442628

  7. Chemical characteristics, fatty acid composition and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of traditional Greek yogurts.

    PubMed

    Serafeimidou, Amalia; Zlatanos, Spiros; Laskaridis, Kostas; Sagredos, Angelos

    2012-10-15

    Many studies with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) indicate that it has a protective effect against mammary cancer. Because dairy products are the most important dietary sources of CLA, we have investigated the CLA concentrations and additionally the fatty acid profiles and chemical composition of several commercial, traditional, Greek yogurts from different geographical origin. The fat content of yogurts was in the order of goatacids (SFA) were found in low-fat yogurts, of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in sheep milk yogurts and of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in low-fat cow milk yogurts.

  8. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 2 consists of seven appendices containing the following: Tasking memorandums; Project plan for the CSV Review; Field verification guide for the CSV Review; Field verification report, Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Field verification report, Oak Ridge Reservation; Field verification report, Savannah River Site; and the Field verification report, Hanford Site.

  9. Maximizing the electromagnetic and chemical resonances of surface-enhanced Raman scattering for nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Lindsay M; Pang, Lin; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2014-08-26

    Although surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has previously been performed with nucleic acids, the measured intensities for each nucleic acid have varied significantly depending on the SERS substrate and excitation wavelength. We have demonstrated that the charge-transfer (CT) mechanism, also known as the chemical enhancement of SERS, is responsible for the discrepancies previously reported in literature. The electronic states of cytosine and guanine attached to silver atoms are computationally calculated and experimentally measured to be in the visible range, which leads to a resonance Raman effect at the corresponding maximum wavelengths. The resulting SERS measurements are in good agreement with the simulated values, in which cytosine-silver shows stronger enhancement at 532 nm and guanine-silver shows stronger enhancement at 785 nm. An atomic layer of aluminum oxide is deposited on substrates to prevent charge-transfer, and corresponding measurements show weaker Raman signals caused by the suppression of the chemical resonance. These findings suggest the optimal SERS signal can be achieved by tuning the excitation wavelength to match both the electromagnetic and chemical resonances, paving the way for future single molecule detection of nucleic acids other than adenine.

  10. Final report of the safety assessment of methacrylic acid.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    Methacrylic Acid is an organic acid used at concentrations between 50 and 88 percent to pretreat the nail and maximize the adhesion between the nail and artificial nail extender. Methacrylic Acid is readily absorbed through mucous membranes of the lungs, the gastrointestinal tract, and the skin; and is distributed to all major tissues. Oral LD50 values for rats ranged from 277 to 2260 mg/kg; acute toxicity symptoms included severe gastric irritation, gasping, labored respiration, prostration and hematuria. In a short-term inhalation study, rats exposed to Methacrylic Acid at 1300 ppm showed nose and eye irritation and weight loss, while necropsy results and blood and urine tests were normal. Methacrylic Acid is an ocular toxicant in animals. Undiluted Methacrylic Acid is corrosive to the skin of rabbits and guinea pigs. Exposure as limited as 3 minutes can cause severe erythema and slight to moderate edema. Exposure from 15 minutes to 24 hours under occlusive patches can cause marked to severe discoloration, slight to severe subcutaneous hemorrhages, necrosis, ulcerations, severe erythema, edema and concave eschar. Methacrylic Acid was irritating and caused strong rubefaction and scab formation in a guinea pig maximization test at challenge concentrations from 10 to 100 percent. It was difficult to determine if the results were type IV hypersensitivity reactions or simple irritation. In three other studies, guinea pigs were not sensitized. Methacrylic Acid was not a reproductive/developmental toxicant in rats or mice. Methacrylic Acid was negative in Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity tests using strains TA98, TA100, TA1535 and TA1537 both with and without metabolic activation, but was positive in a DNA-cell-binding assay. Case reports involving Methacrylic Acid often involve children. Effects from ingestion include drooling, gagging, and vomiting. Children exposed to Methacrylic Acid as a result of accidental spills caused first and second degree burns to the

  11. Proposed minimum reporting standards for chemical analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a general consensus that supports the need for standardized reporting of metadata or information describing large-scale metabolomics and other functional genomics data sets. Reporting of standard metadata provides a biological and empirical context for the data, facilitates experimental re...

  12. Compliance report, 1997. Acid rain program

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The 1997 Compliance Report once again announces 100 percent compliance with the Acid Rain Program, now in its third year of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) compliance and its second year of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) compliance. Affected facilities continued to exceed the targets set for both pollutants by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The early reductions seen in 1995 and 1996 for SO{sub 2} continue, with affected utility units beating their 1997 target by 23 percent. The overcompliance with the NO{sub x} target also continues, achieving an average emission rate for Phase 1 units 16 percent below the compliance rate.

  13. Miscellaneous chemical basin expedited site characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B.D.; Pemberton, B.E.; Rossabi, J.

    1996-12-01

    A total of twenty nine cone penetrometer test (CPT) pushes in three weeks were conducted for vadose zone characterization of the Miscellaneous Chemical Basin (MCB) waste unit at the Savannah River Site. The shallow, unlined basin received liquid chemical wastes over an 18 year period beginning in 1956. This characterization was initiated to determine the vertical and lateral extent of contamination in the vadose zone and to install vadose zone wells for remediation by barometric pumping or active vapor extraction to help prevent further contamination of groundwater. The CPT locations within the waste site were selected based on results from previous shallow soil gas surveys, groundwater contamination data, and the suspected basin center. Geophysical data and soil gas samples were collected at twenty five locations and twenty five vadose zone wells were installed. The wells were screened to target the clay zones and areas of higher soil gas concentrations. The well construction diagrams are provided in Appendix B. Baro-Ball{trademark} valves for enhanced barometric pumping were installed on each well upon completion to immediately begin the remediation treatability study at the site.

  14. Nucleic Acid Nanostructures for Chemical and Biological Sensing.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard; Wady, Heitham; Subramanian, Hari K K

    2016-05-01

    The nanoscale features of DNA have made it a useful molecule for bottom-up construction of nanomaterials, for example, two- and three-dimensional lattices, nanomachines, and nanodevices. One of the emerging applications of such DNA-based nanostructures is in chemical and biological sensing, where they have proven to be cost-effective, sensitive and have shown promise as point-of-care diagnostic tools. DNA is an ideal molecule for sensing not only because of its specificity but also because it is robust and can function under a broad range of biologically relevant temperatures and conditions. DNA nanostructure-based sensors provide biocompatibility and highly specific detection based on the molecular recognition properties of DNA. They can be used for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism and to sense pH both in solution and in cells. They have also been used to detect clinically relevant tumor biomarkers. In this review, recent advances in DNA-based biosensors for pH, nucleic acids, tumor biomarkers and cancer cell detection are introduced. Some challenges that lie ahead for such biosensors to effectively compete with established technologies are also discussed.

  15. Nucleic Acid Nanostructures for Chemical and Biological Sensing.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard; Wady, Heitham; Subramanian, Hari K K

    2016-05-01

    The nanoscale features of DNA have made it a useful molecule for bottom-up construction of nanomaterials, for example, two- and three-dimensional lattices, nanomachines, and nanodevices. One of the emerging applications of such DNA-based nanostructures is in chemical and biological sensing, where they have proven to be cost-effective, sensitive and have shown promise as point-of-care diagnostic tools. DNA is an ideal molecule for sensing not only because of its specificity but also because it is robust and can function under a broad range of biologically relevant temperatures and conditions. DNA nanostructure-based sensors provide biocompatibility and highly specific detection based on the molecular recognition properties of DNA. They can be used for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism and to sense pH both in solution and in cells. They have also been used to detect clinically relevant tumor biomarkers. In this review, recent advances in DNA-based biosensors for pH, nucleic acids, tumor biomarkers and cancer cell detection are introduced. Some challenges that lie ahead for such biosensors to effectively compete with established technologies are also discussed. PMID:27040036

  16. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  17. Chemical Technology Division. Annual technical report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Laidler, J.J.; Myles, K.M.; Green, D.W.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1996-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1995 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (3) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (4) processes for separating and recovering selected elements from waste streams, concentrating low-level radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; (5) electrometallurgical treatment of different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (6) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems.

  18. 1998 Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, J.P.; Einziger, R.E.; Gay, E.C.; Green, D.W.; Miller, J.F.

    1999-08-06

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1998 are presented.

  19. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials and electrified interfaces. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1997 are presented.

  20. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, N.

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions.

  1. Research in chemical kinetics. Annual report, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, F.S.

    1994-12-31

    Progress is reported on the three projects under this contract: Computational quantum chemistry applied to problems in atmospheric chemistry (heat of formation of HOBr); Methyl halides in seawater (rate of formation and destruction in the oceans); and Thermal reactions of {sup 38}Cl atoms (addition to multiple bonds and abstraction of hydrogen).

  2. Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2012-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. SNL/CA is responsible for tracking chemicals (chemical and biological materials), providing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and for regulatory compliance reporting according to a variety of chemical regulations. The principal regulations for chemical tracking are the Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the California Right-to-Know regulations. The regulations, the Hazard Communication/Lab Standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) are also key to the CM Program. The CM Program is also responsible for supporting chemical safety and information requirements for a variety of Integrated Enabling Services (IMS) programs primarily the Industrial Hygiene, Waste Management, Fire Protection, Air Quality, Emergency Management, Environmental Monitoring and Pollution Prevention programs. The principal program tool is the Chemical Information System (CIS). The system contains two key elements: the MSDS library and the chemical container-tracking database that is readily accessible to all Members of the Sandia Workforce. The primary goal of the CM Program is to ensure safe and effective chemical management at Sandia/CA. This is done by efficiently collecting and managing chemical information for our customers who include Line, regulators, DOE and ES and H programs to ensure compliance with regulations and to streamline customer business processes that require chemical information.

  3. Ozonolysis of Mixed Oleic-Acid/Stearic-Acid Particles: Reaction Kinetics and Chemical Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. T.; Katrib, Y.; Biskos, G.; Buseck, P. R.; Davidovits, P.; Jayne, J. T.; Mochida, M.; Wise, M. E.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    Atmospheric particles directly and indirectly affect global climate and have a primary role in regional issues of air pollution, visibility, and human health. Atmospheric particles have a variety of shapes, dimensions, and chemical compositions, and these physicochemical properties evolve (i.e., "age") during transport of the particles through the atmosphere, in part because of the chemical reactions of particle-phase organic molecules with gas-phase atmospheric oxidants. As a global average, hydroxyl radical (OH) and ozone (O3) are responsible quantitatively for most oxidant aging of atmospheric particles. The reactions of the hydroxyl radical occur in the surface region of a particle because of the nearly diffusion-limited bimolecular rate constant of OH with a variety of organic molecules. Ozone, on the other hand, is a selective agent for the unsaturated bonds of organic molecules and may diffuse a considerable distance into particles prior to reaction. The reaction of oleic acid with ozone has recently emerged as a model system to better understand the atmospheric chemical oxidation processes affecting organic particles. The ozonolysis of mixed oleic-acid/stearic-acid (OL/SA) aerosol particles from 0/100 to 100/0 weight percent composition is studied. The magnitude of the divergence of the particle beam inside an aerosol mass spectrometer shows that, in the concentration range 100/0 to 60/40, the mixed OL/SA particles are liquid prior to reaction. Upon ozonolysis, particles with SA composition greater than 25% change shape, indicating that they have solidified. Transmission electron micrographs show that SA(s) forms needles. For SA compositions greater than 10%, the reaction kinetics exhibit an initial fast decay of OL for low O3 exposure with no further loss of OL at higher O3 exposures. For compositions from 50/50 to 10/90, the residual OL concentration remains at 28+/-2% of its initial value. The initial reactive uptake coefficient for O3, as determined by

  4. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Binbin; Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng

    2015-01-01

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl2 using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl2 at 400 °C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of -SO3H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N2 adsorption-desorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of -SO3H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of -SO3H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and -SO3H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles.

  5. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1994-04-01

    Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support.

  6. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Livesey, J.C.; Reed, D.J.; Adamson, L.F.

    1984-08-01

    The scientific literature on radiation-protective drugs is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms involved in determining the sensitivity of biological material to ionizing radiation and mechanisms of chemical radioprotection. In Section I, the types of radiation are described and the effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems are reviewed. The effects of ionizing radiation are briefly contrasted with the effects of non-ionizing radiation. Section II reviews the contributions of various natural factors which influence the inherent radiosensitivity of biological systems. Inlcuded in the list of these factors are water, oxygen, thiols, vitamins and antioxidants. Brief attention is given to the model describing competition between oxygen and natural radioprotective substances (principally, thiols) in determining the net cellular radiosensitivity. Several theories of the mechanism(s) of action of radioprotective drugs are described in Section III. These mechanisms include the production of hypoxia, detoxication of radiochemical reactive species, stabilization of the radiobiological target and the enhancement of damage repair processes. Section IV describes the current strategies for the treatment of radiation injury. Likely areas in which fruitful research might be performed are described in Section V. 495 references.

  7. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  8. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  9. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  10. Chemical modeling of acid-base properties of soluble biopolymers derived from municipal waste treatment materials.

    PubMed

    Tabasso, Silvia; Berto, Silvia; Rosato, Roberta; Marinos, Janeth Alicia Tafur; Ginepro, Marco; Zelano, Vincenzo; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe; Montoneri, Enzo

    2015-02-04

    This work reports a study of the proton-binding capacity of biopolymers obtained from different materials supplied by a municipal biowaste treatment plant located in Northern Italy. One material was the anaerobic fermentation digestate of the urban wastes organic humid fraction. The others were the compost of home and public gardening residues and the compost of the mix of the above residues, digestate and sewage sludge. These materials were hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to yield the biopolymers by saponification. The biopolymers were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and potentiometric titration. The titration data were elaborated to attain chemical models for interpretation of the proton-binding capacity of the biopolymers obtaining the acidic sites concentrations and their protonation constants. The results obtained with the models and by NMR spectroscopy were elaborated together in order to better characterize the nature of the macromolecules. The chemical nature of the biopolymers was found dependent upon the nature of the sourcing materials.

  11. Environmental monitoring final report: groundwater chemical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    This report presents the results of analyses of groundwater qualtiy at the SRC-I Demonstration Plant site in Newman, Kentucky. Samples were obtained from a network of 23 groundwater observation wells installed during previous studies. The groundwater was well within US EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards for trace metals, radioactivity, and pesticides, but exceeded the standard for coliform bacteria. Several US EPA Secondary Drinking Water Standards were exceeded, namely, manganese, color, iron, and total dissolved solids. Based on the results, Dames and Moore recommend that all wells should be sterilized and those wells built in 1980 should be redeveloped. 1 figure, 6 tables.

  12. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1990 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for coal- fired magnetohydrodynamics and fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for a high-level waste repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, concentrating plutonium solids in pyrochemical residues by aqueous biphase extraction, and treating natural and process waters contaminated by volatile organic compounds; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 66 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical analysis of Isonicotinic acid methyl ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoba, D.; Periandy, S.; Govindarajan, M.; Gayathri, P.

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, an organic compound Isonicotinic acid methyl ester (INAME) was structurally characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman, and NMR and UV spectroscopy. The optimized geometrical parameters and energies of all different and possible conformers of INAME are obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) by B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. There are three conformers (SI, SII-1, and SII-2) for this molecule (ground state). The most stable conformer of INAME is SI conformer. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of INAME in the ground state have been calculated by using HF and density functional method (B3LYP) 6-311++G (d,p) basis set. Detailed vibrational spectral analysis has been carried out and assignments of the observed fundamental bands have been proposed on the basis of peak positions and relative intensities. The computed vibrational frequencies were compared with the experimental frequencies, which yield good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by time independent DFT approach. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and thermodynamic properties were performed. The electric dipole moment (μ) and first hyper polarizability (β) values of the investigated molecule were computed using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. The calculated results show that the INAME molecule may have microscopic nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior with non zero values. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method.

  14. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M.; Exner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3–0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r2) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  15. 2-Keto acids based biosynthesis pathways for renewable fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yohei; Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-03-01

    Global energy and environmental concerns have driven the development of biological chemical production from renewable sources. Biological processes using microorganisms are efficient and have been traditionally utilized to convert biomass (i.e., glucose) to useful chemicals such as amino acids. To produce desired fuels and chemicals with high yield and rate, metabolic pathways have been enhanced and expanded with metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches. 2-Keto acids, which are key intermediates in amino acid biosynthesis, can be converted to a wide range of chemicals. 2-Keto acid pathways were engineered in previous research efforts and these studies demonstrated that 2-keto acid pathways have high potential for novel metabolic routes with high productivity. In this review, we discuss recently developed 2-keto acid-based pathways.

  16. Research in Chemical Kinetics. Annual Report, 1993

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Rowland, F. S.

    1993-01-01

    Progress on the seven projects under this contract is reported. The projects are: (1) Chlorine atom reactions with vinyl bromide. Mass spectrometric investigations of the anti-Markownikoff rule. (2) Chlorine atom reactions with CF{sub 2}{double_bond}CFBr. (3) Gas phase thermal {sup 38}Cl reactions with (CH{sub 2}{double_bond}CH){sub n}M (M=Sn, Si, n=4; M=Sb, n=3; M=Hg, n=2). (4) Gas phase reactions of thermal chlorine atoms with (CH{sub 3}){sub 4}M (M=C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb). (5) Hydrogen abstraction reactions by thermal chlorine atoms with HFCs, HCFCs, and halomethanes. (6) Half-stabilization pressure of chlorine atoms plus ethylene in a nitrogen bath. (7) {sup 14}C content of atmospheric OCS, C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8}.

  17. Research in chemical kinetics. Annual report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, F.S.

    1993-12-31

    Progress on the seven projects under this contract is reported. The projects are: (1) Chlorine atom reactions with vinyl bromide. Mass spectrometric investigations of the anti-Markownikoff rule. (2) Chlorine atom reactions with CF{sub 2}{double_bond}CFBr. (3) Gas phase thermal {sup 38}Cl reactions with (CH{sub 2}{double_bond}CH){sub n}M (M=Sn, Si, n=4; M=Sb, n=3; M=Hg, n=2). (4) Gas phase reactions of thermal chlorine atoms with (CH{sub 3}){sub 4}M (M=C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb). (5) Hydrogen abstraction reactions by thermal chlorine atoms with HFCs, HCFCs, and halomethanes. (6) Half-stabilization pressure of chlorine atoms plus ethylene in a nitrogen bath. (7) {sup 14}C content of atmospheric OCS, C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8}.

  18. Chemical and physical transformations of aluminosilicate clay minerals due to acid treatment and consequences for heterogeneous ice nucleation.

    PubMed

    Sihvonen, Sarah K; Schill, Gregory P; Lyktey, Nicholas A; Veghte, Daniel P; Tolbert, Margaret A; Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2014-09-25

    Mineral dust aerosol is one of the largest contributors to global ice nuclei, but physical and chemical processing of dust during atmospheric transport can alter its ice nucleation activity. In particular, several recent studies have noted that sulfuric and nitric acids inhibit heterogeneous ice nucleation in the regime below liquid water saturation in aluminosilicate clay minerals. We have exposed kaolinite, KGa-1b and KGa-2, and montmorillonite, STx-1b and SWy-2, to aqueous sulfuric and nitric acid to determine the physical and chemical changes that are responsible for the observed deactivation. To characterize the changes to the samples upon acid treatment, we use X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. We find that the reaction of kaolinite and montmorillonite with aqueous sulfuric acid results in the formation of hydrated aluminum sulfate. In addition, sulfuric and nitric acids induce large structural changes in montmorillonite. We additionally report the supersaturation with respect to ice required for the onset of ice nucleation for these acid-treated species. On the basis of lattice spacing arguments, we explain how the chemical and physical changes observed upon acid treatment could lead to the observed reduction in ice nucleation activity. PMID:25211030

  19. Chemical and physical transformations of aluminosilicate clay minerals due to acid treatment and consequences for heterogeneous ice nucleation.

    PubMed

    Sihvonen, Sarah K; Schill, Gregory P; Lyktey, Nicholas A; Veghte, Daniel P; Tolbert, Margaret A; Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2014-09-25

    Mineral dust aerosol is one of the largest contributors to global ice nuclei, but physical and chemical processing of dust during atmospheric transport can alter its ice nucleation activity. In particular, several recent studies have noted that sulfuric and nitric acids inhibit heterogeneous ice nucleation in the regime below liquid water saturation in aluminosilicate clay minerals. We have exposed kaolinite, KGa-1b and KGa-2, and montmorillonite, STx-1b and SWy-2, to aqueous sulfuric and nitric acid to determine the physical and chemical changes that are responsible for the observed deactivation. To characterize the changes to the samples upon acid treatment, we use X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. We find that the reaction of kaolinite and montmorillonite with aqueous sulfuric acid results in the formation of hydrated aluminum sulfate. In addition, sulfuric and nitric acids induce large structural changes in montmorillonite. We additionally report the supersaturation with respect to ice required for the onset of ice nucleation for these acid-treated species. On the basis of lattice spacing arguments, we explain how the chemical and physical changes observed upon acid treatment could lead to the observed reduction in ice nucleation activity.

  20. Chemical and biological status of lakes and streams in the upper midwest: assessment of acidic deposition effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiener, J.G.; Eilers, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Many lakes in three areas in the Upper Midwest - northeastern Minnesota, northern Wisconsin, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan - have low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and may be susceptible to change by acidic deposition. Northcentral Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan together contain about 150-300 acidic lakes (ANC ≤ 0), whereas none have been found in Minnesota. These acidic lakes are precipitation-dominated, Clearwater seepage lakes having small surface area, shallow depth, and low concentrations of dissolved organic carbon. The spatial distribution of these acidic lakes parallels a west to east gradient of increasing sulfate and hydrogen ion deposition. Several of these acidic lakes exhibit chemical characteristics and biological changes consistent with those observed elsewhere in waters reported to be acidified by acidic deposition. However, an hypothesis of recent lake acidification is not supported by analyses of either historical chemical data or diatom remains in lake sediments, and natural sources of acidity and alternative ecological processes have not been conclusively eliminated as causative factors. Streams in this three-state region have high ANC and appear to be insensitive to acidic deposition. The species richness and composition of lacustrine fish communities in the region are partly related to pH and associated chemical factors. Sport fishes considered acid-sensitive and of primary concern with regard to acidification include walleye, smallmouth bass, and black crappie. The fishery in at least one lake, Morgan Lake in Wisconsin (pH 4.6), may have declined because of acidification. Given the general lack of quantitative fishery data for acidic Wisconsin and Michigan lakes, however, more general conclusions concerning impacts or the absence of impacts of acidification on the region's fishery resources are not possible.

  1. Mitigation of acid deposition: Liming of surface waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoshesky, J.; Price, R.; DeMuro, J.

    1989-05-01

    In recent years acid deposition has become a serious concern internationally. Scientific literature has documented the acidification of numerous lakes and streams in North America and Scandinavia resulting in the depletion or total loss of fisheries and other aquatic biota. Liming represents the only common corrective practice aimed specifically at remediating an affected acid receptor. This report reviews a range of liming technologies and liming materials, as well as the effect of surface-water liming on water quality and aquatic biota. As background to the liming discussion, the hydrologic cycle and the factors that make surface waters sensitive to acid deposition are also discussed. Finally, a brief review of some of the liming projects that have been conducted, or are currently in operation is presented, giving special emphasis to mitigation efforts in Maryland. Liming has been effectively used to counteract surface-water acidification in parts of Scandinavia, Canada, and the U.S. To date, liming has generally been shown to improve physical and chemical conditions and enhance the biological recovery of aquatic ecosystems affected by acidification.

  2. Production and applications of carbohydrate-derived sugar acids as generic biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Mehtiö, Tuomas; Toivari, Mervi; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Harlin, Ali; Penttilä, Merja; Koivula, Anu

    2016-10-01

    This review considers the chemical and biotechnological synthesis of acids that are obtained by direct oxidation of mono- or oligosaccharide, referred to as sugar acids. It focuses on sugar acids which can be readily derived from plant biomass sources and their current and future applications. The three main classes of sugar acids are aldonic, aldaric and uronic acids. Interest in organic acids derived from sugars has recently increased, as part of the interest to develop biorefineries which produce not only biofuels, but also chemicals to replace those currently derived from petroleum. More than half of the most desirable biologically produced platform chemicals are organic acids. Currently, the only sugar acid with high commercial production is d-gluconic acid. However, other sugar acids such as d-glucaric and meso-galactaric acids are being produced at a lower scale. The sugar acids have application as sequestering agents and binders, corrosion inhibitors, biodegradable chelators for pharmaceuticals and pH regulators. There is also considerable interest in the use of these molecules in the production of synthetic polymers, including polyamides, polyesters and hydrogels. Further development of these sugar acids will lead to higher volume production of the appropriate sugar acids and will help support the next generation of biorefineries.

  3. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 15. Liming acidic surface waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olem, H.; Thornelof, E.; Sandoy, S.; Schreiber, R.K.

    1990-09-01

    The document describes the science and technology of aquatic liming--a method for improving the water quality of acidic surface waters to restore or enhance fisheries. The report is a comprehensive compilation of years of research in North America and Europe by dozens of scientists. Several mitigation technologies--including those that have only been proposed--are critically evaluated along with the effects of liming on water chemistry and aquatic biota. Through these evaluations, the state of the science and technology of aquatic liming is identified for the reader. Whole-lake liming is now recognized as a valuable management tool for acidic surface waters and their fisheries. However, some liming technologies are considered experimental and will need further evaluation. Distinctions between technologies are included--as is the distinction between liming acidic surface waters and reducing acidifying emissions.

  4. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October-December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-02-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October--December 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included efforts to optimize the processing conditions for Enhanced Sludge Washing of Hanford tank sludge, the testing of candidate absorbers and ion exchangers under continuous-flow conditions using actual supernatant from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, and attempts to develop a cesium-specific spherical inorganic sorbent for the treatment of acidic high-salt waste solutions. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed and experimental collaborative efforts with Russian scientists to determine the solidification conditions of yttrium barium, and copper oxides from their melts were completed.

  5. Chemical modifications of natural triterpenes - glycyrrhetinic and boswellic acids: evaluation of their biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Subba Rao, G. S. R.; Kondaiah, Paturu; Singh, Sanjay K.; Ravanan, Palaniyandi; Sporn, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic analogues of naturally occurring triterpenoids; glycyrrhetinic acid, arjunolic acid and boswellic acids, by modification of A-ring with a cyano- and enone- functionalities, have been reported. A novel method of synthesis of α-cyanoenones from isoxazoles is reported. Bio-assays using primary mouse macrophages and tumor cell lines indicate potent anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities associated with cyanoenones of boswellic acid and glycyrrhetinic acid. PMID:20622928

  6. Investigation of chemically-reacting supersonic internal flows. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chitsomboon, T.; Tiwari, S.N.

    1985-09-01

    This report covers work done on the research project, Analysis and Computation of Internal Flow Field in a Scramjet Engine. The governing equations of two-dimensional chemically-reacting flows are presented together with the global two-step chemistry model. The finite-difference algorithm used is illustrated and the method of circumventing the stiffness is discussed. The computer program developed is used to solve two model problems of a premixed chemically-reacting flow. The results obtained are physically reasonable.

  7. Glacial Acetic Acid Adverse Events: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Doles, William; Wilkerson, Garrett; Morrison, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    Glacial acetic acid is a dangerous chemical that has been associated with several adverse drug events involving patients over recent years. When diluted to the proper concentration, acetic acid solutions have a variety of medicinal uses. Unfortunately, despite warnings, the improper dilution of concentrated glacial acetic acid has resulted in severe burns and other related morbidities. We report on 2 additional case reports of adverse drug events involving glacial acetic acid as well as a review of the literature. A summary of published case reports is provided, including the intended and actual concentration of glacial acetic acid involved, the indication for use, degree of exposure, and resultant outcome. Strategies that have been recommended to improve patient safety are summarized within the context of the key elements of the medication use process. PMID:26448660

  8. Findings of the chlorofluorocarbon chemical substitutes international committee. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.P.

    1988-04-01

    The report presents the findings of a select international committee of experts from industry and academia on the subject of chemical substitutes for fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The committee, over the course of two meetings, reviewed and discussed data and information on chemical alternatives for fully halogenated CFCs now in use. The committee acknowledged that, while there are many other possible chemical replacements, there is a dearth of information on these compounds with regard to property data, toxicity, and performance in end-use applications.

  9. Chemical and biological nonproliferation program. FY99 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-03-01

    This document is the first of what will become an annual report documenting the progress made by the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP). It is intended to be a summary of the program's activities that will be of interest to both policy and technical audiences. This report and the annual CBNP Summer Review Meeting are important vehicles for communication with the broader chemical and biological defense and nonproliferation communities. The Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program Strategic Plan is also available and provides additional detail on the program's context and goals. The body of the report consists of an overview of the program's philosophy, goals and recent progress in the major program areas. In addition, an appendix is provided with more detailed project summaries that will be of interest to the technical community.

  10. Distillation of natural fatty acids and their chemical derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Well over 1,000 different fatty acids are known which are natural components of fats, oils (triacylglycerols), and other related compounds. These fatty acids can have different alkyl chain lengths, 0-6 carbon-carbon double bonds possessing cis- or trans-geometry, and can contain a variety of functio...

  11. Purely Chemical Approach for Preparation of d-α-Amino Acids via (S)-to-(R)-Interconversion of Unprotected Tailor-Made α-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Nian, Yong; Wang, Jiang; Zhou, Shengbin; Dai, Wenhao; Wang, Shuni; Moriwaki, Hiroki; Kawashima, Aki; Soloshonok, Vadim A; Liu, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Unnatural (R)-α-amino acids (α-AAs) are in growing demand in the biomedical research and pharmaceutical industries. In this work, we present development of a purely chemical approach for preparation of (R)-α-AAs via (S)-to-(R)-interconversion of natural and tailor-made (S)-α-AAs. The method can be used on free, unprotected α-AAs and features a remarkable structural generality including substrates bearing tertiary alkyl chains and reactive functional groups. These attractive characteristics, combined with simplicity of reaction conditions and virtually complete stereochemical outcome, constitute a true methodological advance in this area, rivaling previously reported chemical and biocatalytic approaches.

  12. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-07-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  13. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A.; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  14. Gluconic acid from biomass fast pyrolysis oils: specialty chemicals from the thermochemical conversion of biomass.

    PubMed

    Santhanaraj, Daniel; Rover, Marjorie R; Resasco, Daniel E; Brown, Robert C; Crossley, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass to produce a bio-oil followed by catalytic upgrading is a widely studied approach for the potential production of fuels from biomass. Because of the complexity of the bio-oil, most upgrading strategies focus on removing oxygen from the entire mixture to produce fuels. Here we report a novel method for the production of the specialty chemical, gluconic acid, from the pyrolysis of biomass. Through a combination of sequential condensation of pyrolysis vapors and water extraction, a solution rich in levoglucosan is obtained that accounts for over 30% of the carbon in the bio-oil produced from red oak. A simple filtration step yields a stream of high-purity levoglucosan. This stream of levoglucosan is then hydrolyzed and partially oxidized to yield gluconic acid with high purity and selectivity. This combination of cost-effective pyrolysis coupled with simple separation and upgrading could enable a variety of new product markets for chemicals from biomass. PMID:25204798

  15. Acid rain information book. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    Acid rain is one of the most widely publicized environmental issues of the day. The potential consequences of increasingly widespread acid rain demand that this phenomenon be carefully evaluated. Reveiw of the literature shows a rapidly growing body of knowledge, but also reveals major gaps in understanding that need to be narrowed. This document discusses major aspects of the acid rain phenomenon, points out areas of uncertainty, and summarizes current and projected research by responsible government agencies and other concerned organizations.

  16. Formation of nitric acid hydrates - A chemical equilibrium approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Roland H.

    1990-01-01

    Published data are used to calculate equilibrium constants for reactions of the formation of nitric acid hydrates over the temperature range 190 to 205 K. Standard enthalpies of formation and standard entropies are calculated for the tri- and mono-hydrates. These are shown to be in reasonable agreement with earlier calorimetric measurements. The formation of nitric acid trihydrate in the polar stratosphere is discussed in terms of these equilibrium constants.

  17. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program.

  18. 76 FR 48093 - Hazardous Chemical Reporting: Revisions to the Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory Forms...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... governments with information concerning potential chemical hazards present in their communities.'' See 55 FR 30632, Community Right-to- Know Reporting Requirements, Final Rule, July 26, 1990. II. What are the... published in 1987 and were amended in 1990. Recently, State and local agencies requested that EPA...

  19. Chemical characterisation and application of acid whey in fermented milk.

    PubMed

    Lievore, Paolla; Simões, Deise R S; Silva, Karolline M; Drunkler, Northon L; Barana, Ana C; Nogueira, Alessandro; Demiate, Ivo M

    2015-04-01

    Acid whey is a by-product from cheese processing that can be employed in beverage formulations due to its high nutritional quality. The objective of the present work was to study the physicochemical characterisation of acid whey from Petit Suisse-type cheese production and use this by-product in the formulation of fermented milk, substituting water. In addition, a reduction in the fermentation period was tested. Both the final product and the acid whey were analysed considering physicochemical determinations, and the fermented milk was evaluated by means of sensory analysis, including multiple comparison and acceptance tests, as well as purchase intention. The results of the physicochemical analyses showed that whey which was produced during both winter and summer presented higher values of protein (1.22 and 0.97 %, w/v, respectively), but there were no differences in lactose content. During the autumn, the highest solid extract was found in whey (6.00 %, w/v), with larger amounts of lactose (4.73 %, w/v) and ash (0.83 %, w/v). When analysing the fermented milk produced with added acid whey, the acceptance test resulted in 90 % of acceptance; the purchase intention showed that 54 % of the consumers would 'certainly buy' and 38 % would 'probably buy' the product. Using acid whey in a fermented milk formulation was technically viable, allowing by-product value aggregation, avoiding discharge, lowering water consumption and shortening the fermentation period. PMID:25829588

  20. Chemical Degradation Studies on a Series of Dithiophosphinic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Freiderich, Melissa E; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Peterman, D. R.; Marc, Philippe L; Klaehn, John D.

    2014-01-01

    In this study a significant increase in the stability of a series of dithiophosphinic acids (DPAHs) under oxidizing acidic conditions was achieved. The degradation behavior of a series of DPAHs, designed for lanthanide/actinide separation, was examined. The stability of the DPAHs, when contacted with varying nitric acid concentrations, was tested and monitored using 31P {1H} NMR. Changes in the functional groups of the DPAHs resulted in substantial increases in the stability. However, all the DPAHs eventually showed signs of degradation when placed in contact with 2 M HNO3. The addition of a radical scavenger, hydrazine, inhibited the degradation of the DPAHs. With small amounts of hydrazine, five of the DPAHs remained stable for over a month in direct contact with 2 M HNO3.

  1. Chemical Degradation Studies on a Series of Dithiophosphinic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Melissa E. Freiderich; Dean R. Peterman; John R. Klaehn; Philippe Marc; Laetitia H. Delmau

    2014-04-01

    A significant increase in the stability of a series of dithiophosphinic acids (DPAHs) under oxidizing acidic conditions was achieved. The degradation behavior of a series of DPAHs, designed for lanthanide/actinide separation, was examined. The stability of the DPAHs, when contacted with varying nitric acid concentrations, was tested and monitored using 31P {1H} NMR. Changes in the functional groups of the DPAHs resulted in substantial increases in the stability. However, when placed in contact with 2 M HNO3 all the DPAHs eventually showed signs of degradation. The addition of a radical scavenger, hydrazine, inhibited the degradation of the DPAHs. In the presence of a small concentration of hydrazine, five of the DPAHs remained stable for over a month in direct contact with 2 M HNO3.

  2. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  3. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Labudde, D; Leitner, D; Krüger, M; Oschkinat, H

    2003-01-01

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  4. Chemical doping of MoS2 multilayer by p-toluene sulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andleeb, Shaista; Singh, Arun Kumar; Eom, Jonghwa

    2015-06-01

    We report the tailoring of the electrical properties of mechanically exfoliated multilayer (ML) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) by chemical doping. Electrical charge transport and Raman spectroscopy measurements revealed that the p-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA) imposes n-doping in ML MoS2. The shift of threshold voltage for ML MoS2 transistor was analyzed as a function of reaction time. The threshold voltage shifted toward more negative gate voltages with increasing reaction time, which indicates an n-type doping effect. The shift of the Raman peak positions was also analyzed as a function of reaction time. PTSA treatment improved the field-effect mobility by a factor of ~4 without degrading the electrical characteristics of MoS2 devices.

  5. Malignant lymphoma and exposure to chemicals, especially organic solvents, chlorophenols and phenoxy acids: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Hardell, L.; Eriksson, M.; Lenner, P.; Lundgren, E.

    1981-01-01

    A number of men with malignant lymphoma of the histiocytic type and previous exposure to phenoxy acids or chlorophenols were observed and reported in 1979. A matched case-control study has therefore been performed with cases of malignant lymphoma (Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma). This study included 169 cases and 338 controls. The results indicate that exposure to phenoxy acids, chlorophenols, and organic solvents may be a causative factor in malignant lymphoma. Combined exposure of these chemicals seemed to increase the risk. Exposure to various other agents was not obviously different in cases and in controls. PMID:7470379

  6. Acid-Base Chemistry According to Robert Boyle: Chemical Reactions in Words as well as Symbols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodney, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Examples of acid-base reactions from Robert Boyle's "The Sceptical Chemist" are used to illustrate the rich information content of chemical equations. Boyle required lengthy passages of florid language to describe the same reaction that can be done quite simply with a chemical equation. Reading or hearing the words, however, enriches the student's…

  7. Quantitative Survey and Structural Classification of Fracking Chemicals Reported in Unconventional Gas Exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Martin; Schreglmann, Kathrin

    2015-04-01

    Few technologies are being discussed in such controversial terms as hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") in the recovery of unconventional gas. Particular concern regards the chemicals that may return to the surface as a result of hydraulic fracturing. These are either "fracking chemicals" - chemicals that are injected together with the fracking fluid to optimize the fracturing performance or geogenic substances which may turn up during gas production, in the so-called produced water originating from the target formation. Knowledge about them is warranted for several reasons. (1) Monitoring. Air emissions are reported to arise from well drilling, the gas itself or condensate tanks. In addition, potential spills and accidents bear the danger of surface and shallow groundwater contaminations. Monitoring strategies are therefore warranted to screen for "indicator" substances of potential impacts. (2) Chemical Analysis. To meet these analytical demands, target substances must be defined so that adequate sampling approaches and analytical methods can be developed. (3) Transformation in the Subsurface. Identification and classification of fracking chemicals (aromatics vs. alcohols vs. acids, esters, etc.) is further important to assess the possibility of subsurface reactions which may potentially generate new, as yet unidentified transformation products. (4) Wastewater Treatment. For the same reason chemical knowledge is important for optimized wastewater treatment strategies. (5) Human and Ecosystem Health. Knowledge of the most frequent fracking chemicals is further essential for risk assessment (environmental behavior, toxicity) (6) Public Discussions. Finally, an overview of reported fracking chemicals can provide unbiased scientific into current public debates and enable critical reviews of Green Chemistry approaches. Presently, however, such information is not readily available. We aim to close this knowledge gap by providing a quantitative overview of chemical

  8. Efficient, chemical-catalytic approach to the production of 3-hydroxypropanoic acid by oxidation of biomass-derived levulinic acid with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linglin; Dutta, Saikat; Mascal, Mark

    2015-04-13

    3-Hydroxypropanoic acid (HPA), a precursor to acrylic acid, can be produced in high yield by oxidation of the biomass-derived platform chemical levulinic acid. While treatment of levulinic acid with H2 O2 under acidic conditions gives predominantly succinic acid, a remarkable reversal of selectivity is observed under basic conditions, leading either directly to HPA or, under modified conditions, initially to 3-(hydroperoxy)propanoic acid, which can be quantitatively hydrogenated to HPA. PMID:25736835

  9. Federal report on acid rain draws criticism

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1987-09-18

    Congress established a 10-year interagency research program in 1980 to examine the causes and effects of acid rain and recommend actions to limit or reduce its harmful effects. On September 17, the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) is scheduled to release its interim assessment. The impression that emerges from the summary is that there is not much to worry about. Acid rain has negligible or no effects on crops and forests, though tropospheric ozone may be a serious problem. Only a small number of lakes have been acidified, and no further significant acidification is likely in the northeast. No abrupt increase in damage to crops, forests, and lakes is likely at current emissions.

  10. Microbial production of fatty acid-derived fuels and chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Lennen, Rebecca M; Pfleger, Brian F

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid metabolism is an attractive route to produce liquid transportation fuels and commodity oleochemicals from renewable feedstocks. Recently, genes and enzymes, which comprise metabolic pathways for producing fatty acid-derived compounds (e.g. esters, alkanes, olefins, ketones, alcohols, polyesters) have been elucidated and used in engineered microbial hosts. The resulting strains often generate products at low percentages of maximum theoretical yields, leaving significant room for metabolic engineering. Economically viable processes will require strains to approach theoretical yields, particularly for replacement of petroleum-derived fuels. This review will describe recent progress toward this goal, highlighting the scientific discoveries of each pathway, ongoing biochemical studies to understand each enzyme, and metabolic engineering strategies that are being used to improve strain performance. PMID:23541503

  11. Tanzawaic Acids, a Chemically Novel Set of Bacterial Conjugation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Getino, María; Fernández-López, Raúl; Palencia-Gándara, Carolina; Campos-Gómez, Javier; Sánchez-López, Jose M.; Martínez, Marta; Fernández, Antonio; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation is the main mechanism for the dissemination of multiple antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. This dissemination could be controlled by molecules that interfere with the conjugation process. A search for conjugation inhibitors among a collection of 1,632 natural compounds, identified tanzawaic acids A and B as best hits. They specially inhibited IncW and IncFII conjugative systems, including plasmids mobilized by them. Plasmids belonging to IncFI, IncI, IncL/M, IncX and IncH incompatibility groups were targeted to a lesser extent, whereas IncN and IncP plasmids were unaffected. Tanzawaic acids showed reduced toxicity in bacterial, fungal or human cells, when compared to synthetic conjugation inhibitors, opening the possibility of their deployment in complex environments, including natural settings relevant for antibiotic resistance dissemination. PMID:26812051

  12. Glucosylation of aroma chemicals and hydroxy fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fong-Chin; Hinkelmann, Jens; Schwab, Wilfried

    2015-12-20

    To explore the utility of glycosyltransferases as novel biocatalysts, we isolated the glycosyltransferase genes CaUGT2 and SbUGTA1 from Catharanthus roseus and Starmerella bombicola, respectively and heterologously expressed them in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant proteins were assayed with a variety of small molecule substrates. Carvacrol and its phenol isomer thymol are efficiently glucosylated by CaUGT2. The Vmax/Km ratios show that CaUGT2 exhibits the highest specificity towards carvacrol, followed by thymol, geraniol, eugenol, vanillin, menthol, and tyrosol. In contrast, SbUGTA1 accepts ω-hydroxy fatty acids and 1-alkanols as substrates. The Vmax/Km ratios indicate that SbUGTA1 exhibits the highest specificity towards 16-hydroxy palmitic acid, followed by octanol, decanol, and hexadecanol. In biotransformation experiments 23, 88 and 99% of octanol, 16-hydroxy palmitic acid, and decanol, respectively is converted into the corresponding β-glucosides by E. coli cells expressing SbUGTA1 whereas those cells expressing CaUGT2 glucosylate 18, 61, 77 and 97% of applied eugenol, thymol, vanillin, and carvacrol, respectively. To optimize the biotransformation rate, the effects of the concentration of IPTG, glucose, and substrate on the production of glucosides were tested. Taken together, this procedure is a simple operation, environmentally friendly, and is useful for the preparation of glycosides as additives for food and cosmetics. PMID:26481830

  13. Chemometrics review for chemical sensor development, task 7 report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    This report, the seventh in a series on the evaluation of several chemical sensors for use in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) site characterization and monitoring programs, concentrates on the potential use of chemometrics techniques in analysis of sensor data. Chemometrics is the chemical discipline that uses mathematical, statistical, and other methods that employ formal logic to: design or select optimal measurement procedures and experiments and provide maximum relevant chemical information by analyzing chemical data. The report emphasizes the latter aspect. In a formal sense, two distinct phases are in chemometrics applications to analytical chemistry problems: (1) the exploratory data analysis phase and (2) the calibration and prediction phase. For use in real-world problems, it is wise to add a third aspect - the independent validation and verification phase. In practical applications, such as the ERWM work, and in order of decreasing difficulties, the most difficult tasks in chemometrics are: establishing the necessary infrastructure (to manage sampling records, data handling, and data storage and related aspects), exploring data analysis, and solving calibration problems, especially for nonlinear models. Chemometrics techniques are different for what are called zeroth-, first-, and second-order systems, and the details depend on the form of the assumed functional relationship between the measured response and the concentrations of components in mixtures. In general, linear relationships can be handled relatively easily, but nonlinear relationships can be difficult.

  14. Acid-base chemistry of white wine: analytical characterisation and chemical modelling.

    PubMed

    Prenesti, Enrico; Berto, Silvia; Toso, Simona; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    A chemical model of the acid-base properties is optimized for each white wine under study, together with the calculation of their ionic strength, taking into account the contributions of all significant ionic species (strong electrolytes and weak one sensitive to the chemical equilibria). Coupling the HPLC-IEC and HPLC-RP methods, we are able to quantify up to 12 carboxylic acids, the most relevant substances responsible of the acid-base equilibria of wine. The analytical concentration of carboxylic acids and of other acid-base active substances was used as input, with the total acidity, for the chemical modelling step of the study based on the contemporary treatment of overlapped protonation equilibria. New protonation constants were refined (L-lactic and succinic acids) with respect to our previous investigation on red wines. Attention was paid for mixed solvent (ethanol-water mixture), ionic strength, and temperature to ensure a thermodynamic level to the study. Validation of the chemical model optimized is achieved by way of conductometric measurements and using a synthetic "wine" especially adapted for testing.

  15. Acid-Base Chemistry of White Wine: Analytical Characterisation and Chemical Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Prenesti, Enrico; Berto, Silvia; Toso, Simona; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    A chemical model of the acid-base properties is optimized for each white wine under study, together with the calculation of their ionic strength, taking into account the contributions of all significant ionic species (strong electrolytes and weak one sensitive to the chemical equilibria). Coupling the HPLC-IEC and HPLC-RP methods, we are able to quantify up to 12 carboxylic acids, the most relevant substances responsible of the acid-base equilibria of wine. The analytical concentration of carboxylic acids and of other acid-base active substances was used as input, with the total acidity, for the chemical modelling step of the study based on the contemporary treatment of overlapped protonation equilibria. New protonation constants were refined (L-lactic and succinic acids) with respect to our previous investigation on red wines. Attention was paid for mixed solvent (ethanol-water mixture), ionic strength, and temperature to ensure a thermodynamic level to the study. Validation of the chemical model optimized is achieved by way of conductometric measurements and using a synthetic “wine” especially adapted for testing. PMID:22566762

  16. Using solid-phase microextraction to determine partition coefficients to humic acids and bioavailable concentrations of hydrophobic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, E.U.; Meijer, S.N.; Vaes, W.H.J.; Verhaar, H.J.M.; Hermens, J.L.M.

    1998-11-01

    In the current study, the suitability of negligible depletion solid-phase microextraction (nd-SPME) to determine free fractions of chemicals in aquatic environments was explored. The potential interferences of the dissolved matrix (i.e., humic acids) with the SPME measurements were tested. Results show that nd-SPME measures only the freely dissolved fraction and that the measurements are not disturbed by the humic acids. In addition, nd-SPME was used to determine partition coefficients between dissolved organic carbon and water for four hydrophobic chemicals. Obtained values are in excellent agreement with previously reported data. Finally, the bioaccumulation of hexachlorobenzene and PCB 77 to Daphnia magna was determined in the presence and absence of humic acids. The bioconcentration factors (BCF) were calculated based on total as well as on free concentration. Lower BCF values are obtained in the presence of humic acids using total concentrations, whereas equal BCFs are found using free concentrations measured with nd-SPME. Therefore, the authors can conclude that negligible depletion SPME is a good technique to determine bioavailable concentrations of hydrophobic chemicals in aquatic environments.

  17. Chemical evaluation of soil-solution in acid forest soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    Soil-solution chemistry is commonly studied in forests through the use of soil lysimeters.This approach is impractical for regional survey studies, however, because lysimeter installation and operation is expensive and time consuming. To address these problems, a new technique was developed to compare soil-solution chemistry among red spruce stands in New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine. Soil solutions were expelled by positive air pressure from soil that had been placed in a sealed cylinder. Before the air pressure was applied, a solution chemically similar to throughfall was added to the soil to bring it to approximate field capacity. After the solution sample was expelled, the soil was removed from the cylinder and chemically analyzed. The method was tested with homogenized Oa and Bs horizon soils collected from a red spruce stand in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, a red spruce stand in east-central Vermont, and a mixed hardwood stand in the Catskill Mountains of New York. Reproducibility, effects of varying the reaction time between adding throughfall and expelling soil solution (5-65 minutes) and effects of varying the chemical composition of added throughfall, were evaluated. In general, results showed that (i) the method was reproducible (coefficients of variation were generally < 15%), (ii) variations in the length of reaction-time did not affect expelled solution concentrations, and (iii) adding and expelling solution did not cause detectable changes in soil exchange chemistry. Concentrations of expelled solutions varied with the concentrations of added throughfall; the lower the CEC, the more sensitive expelled solution concentrations were to the chemical concentrations of added throughfall. Addition of a tracer (NaBr) showed that the expelled solution was a mixture of added solution and solution that preexisted in the soil. Comparisons of expelled solution concentrations with concentrations of soil solutions collected by zero-tension and

  18. Lipid complex effect on fatty acid profile and chemical composition of cow milk and cheese.

    PubMed

    Bodkowski, R; Czyż, K; Kupczyński, R; Patkowska-Sokoła, B; Nowakowski, P; Wiliczkiewicz, A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of administration of lipid complex (LC) on cow milk and cheese characteristics was studied. Lipid complex was elaborated based on grapeseed oil with synthesized conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and Atlantic mackerel oil enriched in n-3 fatty acids. The 4-wk experiment was conducted on 30 Polish Holstein Friesian cows. The experimental group cow diet was supplemented with 400 g/d of LC (containing 38% CLA, and eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid in a relative amount of 36.5%) on a humic-mineral carrier. The chemical composition and fatty acid profile of milk and rennet cheese from raw fresh milk were analyzed. Lipid complex supplementation of the total mixed ration had no effect on milk yield and milk composition, except fat content, which decreased from 4.6 to 4.1%, a 10.9% decrease. Milk from cows treated with LC had greater relative amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly polyunsaturated fatty acids, and lesser relative amounts of saturated fatty acids. Lipid complex addition changed milk fat fatty acid profile: C18:2 cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 isomer (CLA) contents increased by 278 and 233%, respectively, as did eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6) contents. Milk fat fatty acid profile changes were correlated with the modifications in rennet cheese fatty acid profile. Lipid complex supplementation of dairy cows produced considerable changes in the biological value of milk and cheese fat.

  19. Lipid complex effect on fatty acid profile and chemical composition of cow milk and cheese.

    PubMed

    Bodkowski, R; Czyż, K; Kupczyński, R; Patkowska-Sokoła, B; Nowakowski, P; Wiliczkiewicz, A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of administration of lipid complex (LC) on cow milk and cheese characteristics was studied. Lipid complex was elaborated based on grapeseed oil with synthesized conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and Atlantic mackerel oil enriched in n-3 fatty acids. The 4-wk experiment was conducted on 30 Polish Holstein Friesian cows. The experimental group cow diet was supplemented with 400 g/d of LC (containing 38% CLA, and eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid in a relative amount of 36.5%) on a humic-mineral carrier. The chemical composition and fatty acid profile of milk and rennet cheese from raw fresh milk were analyzed. Lipid complex supplementation of the total mixed ration had no effect on milk yield and milk composition, except fat content, which decreased from 4.6 to 4.1%, a 10.9% decrease. Milk from cows treated with LC had greater relative amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly polyunsaturated fatty acids, and lesser relative amounts of saturated fatty acids. Lipid complex addition changed milk fat fatty acid profile: C18:2 cis-9,trans-11 and trans-10,cis-12 isomer (CLA) contents increased by 278 and 233%, respectively, as did eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6) contents. Milk fat fatty acid profile changes were correlated with the modifications in rennet cheese fatty acid profile. Lipid complex supplementation of dairy cows produced considerable changes in the biological value of milk and cheese fat. PMID:26506539

  20. Nine-size system for chemical defense gloves. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Robinette, K.M.; Annis, J.F.

    1986-07-01

    The purpose of this effort was to meet the need for improved sizing of chemical defense gloves for Air Force men and women. A nine-size system was developed from available hand data. The development process and size values are presented in this report. Some summary statistics and regression equations are provided to aid investigators who may wish to make modifications. Although the anthropometric sizing system outlined in this report is statistically sound, it is experimental. The authors recommend that anthropometric fit-testing be conducted prior to full-scale glove production.

  1. Biological and chemical technologies research. FY 1995 annual summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1995 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program. This BCTR program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1995 (ASR 95) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1995; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents; and awards arising from work supported by the BCTR.

  2. Acid deposition in Maryland: a report to the Governor and General Assembly (1986). Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Power Plant Research Program coordinates Maryland's acid-deposition research and reports research results annually. The report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition, its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy-conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  3. Chemical Modeling of Acid-Base Properties of Soluble Biopolymers Derived from Municipal Waste Treatment Materials

    PubMed Central

    Tabasso, Silvia; Berto, Silvia; Rosato, Roberta; Tafur Marinos, Janeth Alicia; Ginepro, Marco; Zelano, Vincenzo; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe; Montoneri, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    This work reports a study of the proton-binding capacity of biopolymers obtained from different materials supplied by a municipal biowaste treatment plant located in Northern Italy. One material was the anaerobic fermentation digestate of the urban wastes organic humid fraction. The others were the compost of home and public gardening residues and the compost of the mix of the above residues, digestate and sewage sludge. These materials were hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to yield the biopolymers by saponification. The biopolymers were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and potentiometric titration. The titration data were elaborated to attain chemical models for interpretation of the proton-binding capacity of the biopolymers obtaining the acidic sites concentrations and their protonation constants. The results obtained with the models and by NMR spectroscopy were elaborated together in order to better characterize the nature of the macromolecules. The chemical nature of the biopolymers was found dependent upon the nature of the sourcing materials. PMID:25658795

  4. Chemical modeling of acid-base properties of soluble biopolymers derived from municipal waste treatment materials.

    PubMed

    Tabasso, Silvia; Berto, Silvia; Rosato, Roberta; Marinos, Janeth Alicia Tafur; Ginepro, Marco; Zelano, Vincenzo; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe; Montoneri, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    This work reports a study of the proton-binding capacity of biopolymers obtained from different materials supplied by a municipal biowaste treatment plant located in Northern Italy. One material was the anaerobic fermentation digestate of the urban wastes organic humid fraction. The others were the compost of home and public gardening residues and the compost of the mix of the above residues, digestate and sewage sludge. These materials were hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to yield the biopolymers by saponification. The biopolymers were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and potentiometric titration. The titration data were elaborated to attain chemical models for interpretation of the proton-binding capacity of the biopolymers obtaining the acidic sites concentrations and their protonation constants. The results obtained with the models and by NMR spectroscopy were elaborated together in order to better characterize the nature of the macromolecules. The chemical nature of the biopolymers was found dependent upon the nature of the sourcing materials. PMID:25658795

  5. Refractometric fiber optic mode-filtered light chemical sensor for acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Leiji; Wang, Kemin; Xiao, Dan; Yang, Xiaohai; Chen, Rui

    2001-09-01

    A refractometric fiber-optic chemical sensor bas don mode- filtered light detection (MFLD) was designed. This sensor was fabricated by inserting a non-chem- or bio-modified fiber core into a silica capillary with a CCD detector as the multichannel-signal capture. An interesting observation was obtained that there is an increase in signal with a decrease in sample refractive index in this unclad fiber sensor, just contrary to the polymer-clad fiber instead sensor reported previously. Academic deduction of the light propagation in detail, which was demonstrated by our experimental results, further interprets the reason of the difference between the unclad sensor and the polymer-clad sensor, and provides theoretical foundation on development of a MFLD-derived analyzer with synchronization of separation and assay in future work. This sensor was also demonstrated to successfully apply to detection of acetic acid with linear response of 0-90 percent and relative coefficient of 0.9972. The sensor's advantages in high S/N ratio and instant response show its potentials in food and chemical industries as a general sensor.

  6. Carboxylic acid reductase is a versatile enzyme for the conversion of fatty acids into fuels and chemical commodities.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, M Kalim; Turner, Nicholas J; Jones, Patrik R

    2013-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons such as fatty alcohols and petroleum-derived alkanes have numerous applications in the chemical industry. In recent years, the renewable synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons has been made possible by engineering microbes to overaccumulate fatty acids. However, to generate end products with the desired physicochemical properties (e.g., fatty aldehydes, alkanes, and alcohols), further conversion of the fatty acid is necessary. A carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) from Mycobacterium marinum was found to convert a wide range of aliphatic fatty acids (C(6)-C(18)) into corresponding aldehydes. Together with the broad-substrate specificity of an aldehyde reductase or an aldehyde decarbonylase, the catalytic conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols (C(8)-C(16)) or fatty alkanes (C(7)-C(15)) was reconstituted in vitro. This concept was applied in vivo, in combination with a chain-length-specific thioesterase, to engineer Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains that were capable of synthesizing fatty alcohols and alkanes. A fatty alcohol titer exceeding 350 mg·L(-1) was obtained in minimal media supplemented with glucose. Moreover, by combining the CAR-dependent pathway with an exogenous fatty acid-generating lipase, natural oils (coconut oil, palm oil, and algal oil bodies) were enzymatically converted into fatty alcohols across a broad chain-length range (C(8)-C(18)). Together with complementing enzymes, the broad substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of CAR opens the road for direct and tailored enzyme-catalyzed conversion of lipids into user-ready chemical commodities.

  7. Evaluation of synthetic naphthalene derivatives as novel chemical chaperones that mimic 4-phenylbutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Mimori, Seisuke; Koshikawa, Yukari; Mashima, Yu; Mitsunaga, Katsuyoshi; Kawada, Koichi; Kaneko, Masayuki; Okuma, Yasunobu; Nomura, Yasuyuki; Murakami, Yasuoki; Kanzaki, Tetsuto; Hamana, Hiroshi

    2015-02-15

    The chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) has potential as an agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the requirement of high concentrations warrants chemical optimization for clinical use. In this study, novel naphthalene derivatives with a greater chemical chaperone activity than 4-PBA were synthesized with analogy to the benzene ring. All novel compounds showed chemical chaperone activity, and 2 and 5 possessed high activity. In subsequent experiments, the protective effects of the compounds were examined in Parkinson's disease model cells, and low toxicity of 9 and 11 was related to amphiphilic substitution with naphthalene.

  8. Monitoring of chemical contaminants in BWRs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, B.H.; Elliott, J.C.; Head, R.A.; Osterle, J.E.; Tunder, R.S.

    1985-07-01

    Off standard water quality in BWRs has been a recurrent problem due to a number of causes such as: (1) main condenser inleakage; (2) performance of the reactor water cleanup and condensate demineralizer systems; (3) leakage or intrusion of ion exchange resins from these systems; and (4) intrusion of various chemical contaminants into radwaste. Intrusion of chemical contaminants includes such organic substances as lubricating oils, cleaning solvents, and refrigerant materials. These organics, being non-ionic, are not removed by the radwaste demineralizers and eventually enter the primary coolant by way of the condensate storage tank. Once in the primary coolant, the organics decompose under the influence of heat and radiation to produce hydrogen halides, organic acids, or other products, resulting in high reactor water conductivity and low pH. These effects can cause corrosive attack on various components in the system. The objectives of this EPRI program are: (1) to identify chemical contaminants that could potentially enter the BWR water systems; (2) to determine the potential impact of intrusion on the BWR; (3) to identify means to prevent or mitigate an intrusion; (4) to identify methods for organic cleanup following a spill; and (5) to establish requirements and identify methods of monitoring organics following an intrusion. 31 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

  9. Use and reported adverse effects of new chemical entities.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, D L; Goetsch, R A; Dreis, M W

    1989-03-01

    Reports submitted to the FDA through 1987 of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to new chemical entities (NCEs) approved after 1983 are described, and estimates of each NCE's proportionate use in hospitals and within its therapeutic class are reported. This review was limited to those domestic spontaneous ADR reports submitted to the FDA by healthcare professionals. NCEs accounted for approximately 20% of the total number of domestic spontaneous ADR reports received in 1987, 22% of the reports of serious ADRs, and 24% of the reports that listed death as an outcome. Data on the use of these NCEs were obtained through the U.S. Pharmaceutical Market--Drugstores and Hospitals and the National Prescription Audit. Of the 93 drugs designated as NCEs in 1987, 65 had measurable use, with 41% of those used principally in hospitals. Most hospital-use NCEs were injectable antimicrobial agents, surgical drugs, and radioactive diagnostic agents. Because NCEs account for a disproportionate share of the ADRs reported to the FDA, and because of the high use of NCEs in hospitals, hospital pharmacists should be aware of the importance of monitoring and reporting serious ADRs associated with NCEs. PMID:2719041

  10. Selective Chemical Conversion of Sugars in Aqueous Solutions without Alkali to Lactic Acid Over a Zn-Sn-Beta Lewis Acid-Base Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Zheng; Peng, Boyu; Gu, Minyan; Zhou, Xuefei; Xiang, Bo; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-05-01

    Lactic acid is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of a wide range of chemicals. However, in aqueous solutions without alkali, its efficient preparation via the direct catalysis of sugars is hindered by a side dehydration reaction to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural due to Brønsted acid, which originates from organic acids. Herein, we report that a previously unappreciated combination of common two metal mixed catalyst (Zn-Sn-Beta) prepared via solid-state ion exchange synergistically promoted this reaction. In water without a base, a conversion exceeding 99% for sucrose with a lactic acid yield of 54% was achieved within 2 hours at 190 °C under ambient air pressure. Studies of the acid and base properties of the Zn-Sn-Beta zeolite suggest that the introduction of Zn into the Sn-Beta zeolite sequentially enhanced both the Lewis acid and base sites, and the base sites inhibited a series of side reactions related to fructose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and its subsequent decomposition.

  11. Selective Chemical Conversion of Sugars in Aqueous Solutions without Alkali to Lactic Acid Over a Zn-Sn-Beta Lewis Acid-Base Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Zheng; Peng, Boyu; Gu, Minyan; Zhou, Xuefei; Xiang, Bo; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of a wide range of chemicals. However, in aqueous solutions without alkali, its efficient preparation via the direct catalysis of sugars is hindered by a side dehydration reaction to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural due to Brønsted acid, which originates from organic acids. Herein, we report that a previously unappreciated combination of common two metal mixed catalyst (Zn-Sn-Beta) prepared via solid-state ion exchange synergistically promoted this reaction. In water without a base, a conversion exceeding 99% for sucrose with a lactic acid yield of 54% was achieved within 2 hours at 190 °C under ambient air pressure. Studies of the acid and base properties of the Zn-Sn-Beta zeolite suggest that the introduction of Zn into the Sn-Beta zeolite sequentially enhanced both the Lewis acid and base sites, and the base sites inhibited a series of side reactions related to fructose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and its subsequent decomposition. PMID:27222322

  12. Selective Chemical Conversion of Sugars in Aqueous Solutions without Alkali to Lactic Acid Over a Zn-Sn-Beta Lewis Acid-Base Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Zheng; Peng, Boyu; Gu, Minyan; Zhou, Xuefei; Xiang, Bo; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of a wide range of chemicals. However, in aqueous solutions without alkali, its efficient preparation via the direct catalysis of sugars is hindered by a side dehydration reaction to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural due to Brønsted acid, which originates from organic acids. Herein, we report that a previously unappreciated combination of common two metal mixed catalyst (Zn-Sn-Beta) prepared via solid-state ion exchange synergistically promoted this reaction. In water without a base, a conversion exceeding 99% for sucrose with a lactic acid yield of 54% was achieved within 2 hours at 190 °C under ambient air pressure. Studies of the acid and base properties of the Zn-Sn-Beta zeolite suggest that the introduction of Zn into the Sn-Beta zeolite sequentially enhanced both the Lewis acid and base sites, and the base sites inhibited a series of side reactions related to fructose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and its subsequent decomposition. PMID:27222322

  13. Selective Chemical Conversion of Sugars in Aqueous Solutions without Alkali to Lactic Acid Over a Zn-Sn-Beta Lewis Acid-Base Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenjie; Shen, Zheng; Peng, Boyu; Gu, Minyan; Zhou, Xuefei; Xiang, Bo; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-05-25

    Lactic acid is an important platform molecule in the synthesis of a wide range of chemicals. However, in aqueous solutions without alkali, its efficient preparation via the direct catalysis of sugars is hindered by a side dehydration reaction to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural due to Brønsted acid, which originates from organic acids. Herein, we report that a previously unappreciated combination of common two metal mixed catalyst (Zn-Sn-Beta) prepared via solid-state ion exchange synergistically promoted this reaction. In water without a base, a conversion exceeding 99% for sucrose with a lactic acid yield of 54% was achieved within 2 hours at 190 °C under ambient air pressure. Studies of the acid and base properties of the Zn-Sn-Beta zeolite suggest that the introduction of Zn into the Sn-Beta zeolite sequentially enhanced both the Lewis acid and base sites, and the base sites inhibited a series of side reactions related to fructose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and its subsequent decomposition.

  14. Chemical reduction of europium(III) in hydrochloric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Atanasyants, A.G.; Gurinov, Yu.S.; Sofenina, E.V.

    1988-07-10

    The authors have devised a method for use at set pH and temperature, in which the volume of hydrogen produced is recorded and samples are taken for europium(II) analysis. The solution is poured into a glass cell with a thermostatic jacket; argon is passed through a capillary tube 2 for 0.5 h before the reduction is started, with the bubbling rate determined from the change in level in a burette. This burette is also used to record the hydrogen volume. The europium(II) concentration is determined by titration with potassium dichromate by a standard method. Europium is reduced by zinc in acid solution. The zinc consumption in hydrogen production can be reduced by operating at pH 2-3, with the precipitant introduced after the reaction starts.

  15. Engineered Barrier Systems Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    W.E. Lowry

    2001-12-13

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01.

  16. Experimental and quantum-chemical studies of the reactions of 6-methyluracil with succinic and fumaric acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terent'ev, A. O.; Borisova, N. S.; Khamitov, E. M.; Zimin, Yu. S.; Mustafin, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    Possible structures of 6-methyluracil complexes with succinic and fumaric acids are studied by quantum-chemical means. The possibility of complex formation occurring between 6-methyluracil and the acids in the ionized and nonionized states is evaluated. The form of the complexes containing the nonionized acid is found to dominate. The quantum-chemical calculation data are consistent with the experimental results.

  17. BCTR: Biological and Chemical Technologies Research 1994 annual summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G.

    1995-02-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1994 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). Although the OIT was reorganized in 1991 and AICD no longer exists, this document reports on efforts conducted under the former structure. The annual summary report for 1994 (ASR 94) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1994; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  18. Synthesis of a Sulfonated Two-Dimensional Covalent Organic Framework as an Efficient Solid Acid Catalyst for Biobased Chemical Conversion.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yongwu; Hu, Zhigang; Gao, Yongjun; Yuan, Daqiang; Kang, Zixi; Qian, Yuhong; Yan, Ning; Zhao, Dan

    2015-10-12

    Because of limited framework stability tolerance, de novo synthesis of sulfonated covalent organic frameworks (COFs) remains challenging and unexplored. Herein, a sulfonated two-dimensional crystalline COF, termed TFP-DABA, was synthesized directly from 1,3,5-triformylphloroglucinol and 2,5-diaminobenzenesulfonic acid through a previously reported Schiff base condensation reaction, followed by irreversible enol-to-keto tautomerization, which strengthened its structural stability. TFP-DABA is a highly efficient solid acid catalyst for fructose conversion with remarkable yields (97 % for 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and 65 % for 2,5-diformylfuran), good chemoselectivity, and good recyclability. The present study sheds light on the de novo synthesis of sulfonated COFs as novel solid acid catalysts for biobased chemical conversion.

  19. Synthesis of a Sulfonated Two-Dimensional Covalent Organic Framework as an Efficient Solid Acid Catalyst for Biobased Chemical Conversion.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yongwu; Hu, Zhigang; Gao, Yongjun; Yuan, Daqiang; Kang, Zixi; Qian, Yuhong; Yan, Ning; Zhao, Dan

    2015-10-12

    Because of limited framework stability tolerance, de novo synthesis of sulfonated covalent organic frameworks (COFs) remains challenging and unexplored. Herein, a sulfonated two-dimensional crystalline COF, termed TFP-DABA, was synthesized directly from 1,3,5-triformylphloroglucinol and 2,5-diaminobenzenesulfonic acid through a previously reported Schiff base condensation reaction, followed by irreversible enol-to-keto tautomerization, which strengthened its structural stability. TFP-DABA is a highly efficient solid acid catalyst for fructose conversion with remarkable yields (97 % for 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and 65 % for 2,5-diformylfuran), good chemoselectivity, and good recyclability. The present study sheds light on the de novo synthesis of sulfonated COFs as novel solid acid catalysts for biobased chemical conversion. PMID:26448524

  20. Seismic and source characteristics of large chemical explosions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adushkin, V.V.; Kostuchenko, V.N.; Pernik, L.M.; Sultanov, D.D.; Zcikanovsky, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    From the very beginning of its arrangement in 1947, the Institute for Dynamics of the Geospheres RAS (former Special Sector of the Institute for physics of the Earth, RAS) was providing scientific observations of effects of nuclear explosions, as well as large-scale detonations of HE, on environment. This report presents principal results of instrumental observations obtained from various large-scale chemical explosions conducted in the Former-Soviet Union in the period of time from 1957 to 1989. Considering principal aim of the work, tamped and equivalent chemical explosions have been selected with total weights from several hundreds to several thousands ton. In particular, the selected explosions were aimed to study scaling law from excavation explosions, seismic effect of tamped explosions, and for dam construction for hydropower stations and soil melioration. Instrumental data on surface explosions of total weight in the same range aimed to test military technics and special objects are not included.

  1. Simple quantification of surface carboxylic acids on chemically oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Hyejin; Kim, Seong-Taek; Lee, Jong Doo; Yim, Sanggyu

    2013-02-01

    The surface of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) was chemically oxidized using nitric acid and sulfuric-nitric acid mixtures. Thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy revealed that the use of acid mixtures led to higher degree of oxidation. More quantitative identification of surface carboxylic acids was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and acid-base titration. However, these techniques are costly and require very long analysis times to promptly respond to the extent of the reaction. We propose a much simpler method using pH measurements and pre-determined pKa value in order to estimate the concentration of carboxylic acids on the oxidized MWCNT surfaces. The results from this technique were consistent with those obtained from XPS and titration, and it is expected that this simple quantification method can provide a cheap and fast way to monitor and control the oxidation reaction of MWCNT.

  2. Antioxidant Activity of Caffeic Acid against Iron-Induced Free Radical Generation—A Chemical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C.; Maurício, Ângelo Q.; Rettori, Daniel; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is a phenolic compound widely found in coffee beans with known beneficial effects in vivo. Many studies showed that CA has anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic, antibacterial and anti-carcinogenic properties, which could be linked to its antioxidant activity. Taking in consideration the reported in vitro antioxidant mechanism of other polyphenols, our working hypothesis was that the CA antioxidant activity could be related to its metal-chelating property. With that in mind, we sought to investigate the chemical antioxidant mechanism of CA against in vitro iron-induced oxidative damage under different assay conditions. CA was able to prevent hydroxyl radical formation promoted by the classical Fenton reaction, as determined by 2-deoxyribose (2-DR) oxidative degradation and DMPO hydroxylation. In addition to its ability to prevent hydroxyl radical formation, CA had a great inhibition of membrane lipid peroxidation. In the lipid peroxidation assays CA acted as both metal-chelator and as hydrogen donor, preventing the deleterious action promoted by lipid-derived peroxyl and alkoxyl radicals. Our results indicate that the observed antioxidant effects were mostly due to the formation of iron-CA complexes, which are able to prevent 2-DR oxidation and DMPO hydroxylation. Noteworthy, the formation of iron-CA complexes and prevention of oxidative damage was directly related to the pH of the medium, showing better antioxidant activity at higher pH values. Moreover, in the presence of lipid membranes the antioxidant potency of CA was much higher, indicating its enhanced effectiveness in a hydrophobic environment. Overall, our results show that CA acts as an antioxidant through an iron chelating mechanism, preventing the formation of free hydroxyl radicals and, therefore, inhibiting Fenton-induced oxidative damage. The chemical properties of CA described here—in association with its reported signaling effects—could be an explanation to its beneficial effects

  3. Antioxidant Activity of Caffeic Acid against Iron-Induced Free Radical Generation--A Chemical Approach.

    PubMed

    Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C; Maurício, Ângelo Q; Rettori, Daniel; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is a phenolic compound widely found in coffee beans with known beneficial effects in vivo. Many studies showed that CA has anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic, antibacterial and anti-carcinogenic properties, which could be linked to its antioxidant activity. Taking in consideration the reported in vitro antioxidant mechanism of other polyphenols, our working hypothesis was that the CA antioxidant activity could be related to its metal-chelating property. With that in mind, we sought to investigate the chemical antioxidant mechanism of CA against in vitro iron-induced oxidative damage under different assay conditions. CA was able to prevent hydroxyl radical formation promoted by the classical Fenton reaction, as determined by 2-deoxyribose (2-DR) oxidative degradation and DMPO hydroxylation. In addition to its ability to prevent hydroxyl radical formation, CA had a great inhibition of membrane lipid peroxidation. In the lipid peroxidation assays CA acted as both metal-chelator and as hydrogen donor, preventing the deleterious action promoted by lipid-derived peroxyl and alkoxyl radicals. Our results indicate that the observed antioxidant effects were mostly due to the formation of iron-CA complexes, which are able to prevent 2-DR oxidation and DMPO hydroxylation. Noteworthy, the formation of iron-CA complexes and prevention of oxidative damage was directly related to the pH of the medium, showing better antioxidant activity at higher pH values. Moreover, in the presence of lipid membranes the antioxidant potency of CA was much higher, indicating its enhanced effectiveness in a hydrophobic environment. Overall, our results show that CA acts as an antioxidant through an iron chelating mechanism, preventing the formation of free hydroxyl radicals and, therefore, inhibiting Fenton-induced oxidative damage. The chemical properties of CA described here--in association with its reported signaling effects--could be an explanation to its beneficial effects

  4. Antioxidant Activity of Caffeic Acid against Iron-Induced Free Radical Generation--A Chemical Approach.

    PubMed

    Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C; Maurício, Ângelo Q; Rettori, Daniel; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is a phenolic compound widely found in coffee beans with known beneficial effects in vivo. Many studies showed that CA has anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic, antibacterial and anti-carcinogenic properties, which could be linked to its antioxidant activity. Taking in consideration the reported in vitro antioxidant mechanism of other polyphenols, our working hypothesis was that the CA antioxidant activity could be related to its metal-chelating property. With that in mind, we sought to investigate the chemical antioxidant mechanism of CA against in vitro iron-induced oxidative damage under different assay conditions. CA was able to prevent hydroxyl radical formation promoted by the classical Fenton reaction, as determined by 2-deoxyribose (2-DR) oxidative degradation and DMPO hydroxylation. In addition to its ability to prevent hydroxyl radical formation, CA had a great inhibition of membrane lipid peroxidation. In the lipid peroxidation assays CA acted as both metal-chelator and as hydrogen donor, preventing the deleterious action promoted by lipid-derived peroxyl and alkoxyl radicals. Our results indicate that the observed antioxidant effects were mostly due to the formation of iron-CA complexes, which are able to prevent 2-DR oxidation and DMPO hydroxylation. Noteworthy, the formation of iron-CA complexes and prevention of oxidative damage was directly related to the pH of the medium, showing better antioxidant activity at higher pH values. Moreover, in the presence of lipid membranes the antioxidant potency of CA was much higher, indicating its enhanced effectiveness in a hydrophobic environment. Overall, our results show that CA acts as an antioxidant through an iron chelating mechanism, preventing the formation of free hydroxyl radicals and, therefore, inhibiting Fenton-induced oxidative damage. The chemical properties of CA described here--in association with its reported signaling effects--could be an explanation to its beneficial effects

  5. Chemically induced strength changes in sandstone. Report of Investigations/1993

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, W.P.; Dolinar, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical alteration of the compressive strength of sandstone has been investigated by the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM). Successful development of this technology would offer an attractive alternative to the methods now used for stress control in mines. Sandstone cores were stressed to failure under uniaxial compression at two different strain rates. Specimens saturated with either distilled or tap water showed an average 14% reduction in stress at failure compared with those dried in vacuum. Samples saturated with dilute solutions of aluminum chloride, hydrochloric acid, and polyethylene oxide showed no statistically significant difference in failure stress compared with those saturated with water. By contrast, compressive strength of the cores was increased some 7% by saturation with the nonpolar solvent carbon tetrachloride. No correlation was found between zeta potential and compressive strength.

  6. Chemical modification of amino acids by atmospheric-pressure cold plasma in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Eisuke; Kitamura, Tsuyoshi; Kuwabara, Junpei; Ikawa, Satoshi; Yoshizawa, Shunsuke; Shiraki, Kentaro; Kawasaki, Hideya; Arakawa, Ryuichi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2014-07-01

    Plasma medicine is an attractive new research area, but the principles of plasma modification of biomolecules in aqueous solution remain elusive. In this study, we investigated the chemical effects of atmospheric-pressure cold plasma on 20 naturally occurring amino acids in aqueous solution. High-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that chemical modifications of 14 amino acids were observed after plasma treatment: (i) hydroxylation and nitration of aromatic rings in tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan; (ii) sulfonation and disulfide linkage formation of thiol groups in cysteine; (iii) sulfoxidation of methionine and (iv) amidation and ring-opening of five-membered rings in histidine and proline. A competitive reaction experiment using 20 amino acids demonstrated that sulfur-containing and aromatic amino acids were preferentially decreased by the plasma treatment. These data provide fundamental information for elucidating the mechanism of protein inactivation for biomedical plasma applications.

  7. The effect of lactic acid bacterial starter culture and chemical additives on wilted rice straw silage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Su; Shi, Wei; Huang, Lin-Ting; Ding, Cheng-Long; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2016-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are suitable for rice straw silage fermentation, but have been studied rarely, and rice straw as raw material for ensiling is difficult because of its disadvantages, such as low nutrition for microbial activities and low abundances of natural populations of LAB. So we investigated the effect of application of LAB and chemical additives on the fermentation quality and microbial community of wilted rice straw silage. Treatment with chemical additives increased the concentrations of crude protein (CP), water soluble carbohydrate (WSC), acetic acid and lactic acid, reduced the concentrations of acid detergent fiber (ADF) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF), but did not effectively inhibit the growth of spoilage organisms. Inoculation with LABs did not improve the nutritional value of the silage because of poor growth of LABs in wilted rice straw. Inoculation with LAB and addition of chemical materials improved the quality of silage similar to the effects of addition of chemical materials alone. Growth of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria was inhibited by this mixed treatment and the LAB gradually dominated the microbial community. In summary, the fermentation quality of wilted rice straw silage had improved by addition of LAB and chemical materials. PMID:26429595

  8. The effect of lactic acid bacterial starter culture and chemical additives on wilted rice straw silage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Su; Shi, Wei; Huang, Lin-Ting; Ding, Cheng-Long; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2016-04-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are suitable for rice straw silage fermentation, but have been studied rarely, and rice straw as raw material for ensiling is difficult because of its disadvantages, such as low nutrition for microbial activities and low abundances of natural populations of LAB. So we investigated the effect of application of LAB and chemical additives on the fermentation quality and microbial community of wilted rice straw silage. Treatment with chemical additives increased the concentrations of crude protein (CP), water soluble carbohydrate (WSC), acetic acid and lactic acid, reduced the concentrations of acid detergent fiber (ADF) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF), but did not effectively inhibit the growth of spoilage organisms. Inoculation with LABs did not improve the nutritional value of the silage because of poor growth of LABs in wilted rice straw. Inoculation with LAB and addition of chemical materials improved the quality of silage similar to the effects of addition of chemical materials alone. Growth of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria was inhibited by this mixed treatment and the LAB gradually dominated the microbial community. In summary, the fermentation quality of wilted rice straw silage had improved by addition of LAB and chemical materials.

  9. Chemical ionization of clusters formed from sulfuric acid and dimethylamine or diamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Coty N.; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2016-10-01

    Chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometers are used to study atmospheric nucleation by detecting clusters produced by reactions of sulfuric acid and various basic gases. These instruments typically use nitrate to deprotonate and thus chemically ionize the clusters. In this study, we compare cluster concentrations measured using either nitrate or acetate. Clusters were formed in a flow reactor from vapors of sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, ethylene diamine, tetramethylethylene diamine, or butanediamine (also known as putrescine). These comparisons show that nitrate is unable to chemically ionize clusters with high base content. In addition, we vary the ion-molecule reaction time to probe ion processes which include proton-transfer, ion-molecule clustering, and decomposition of ions. Ion decomposition upon deprotonation by acetate/nitrate was observed. More studies are needed to quantify to what extent ion decomposition affects observed cluster content and concentrations, especially those chemically ionized with acetate since it deprotonates more types of clusters than nitrate.Model calculations of the neutral and ion cluster formation pathways are also presented to better identify the cluster types that are not efficiently deprotonated by nitrate. Comparison of model and measured clusters indicate that sulfuric acid dimers with two diamines and sulfuric acid trimers with two or more base molecules are not efficiently chemical ionized by nitrate. We conclude that acetate CI provides better information on cluster abundancies and their base content than nitrate CI.

  10. Production of Fatty Acid-derived valuable chemicals in synthetic microbes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ai-Qun; Pratomo Juwono, Nina Kurniasih; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid derivatives, such as hydroxy fatty acids, fatty alcohols, fatty acid methyl/ethyl esters, and fatty alka(e)nes, have a wide range of industrial applications including plastics, lubricants, and fuels. Currently, these chemicals are obtained mainly through chemical synthesis, which is complex and costly, and their availability from natural biological sources is extremely limited. Metabolic engineering of microorganisms has provided a platform for effective production of these valuable biochemicals. Notably, synthetic biology-based metabolic engineering strategies have been extensively applied to refactor microorganisms for improved biochemical production. Here, we reviewed: (i) the current status of metabolic engineering of microbes that produce fatty acid-derived valuable chemicals, and (ii) the recent progress of synthetic biology approaches that assist metabolic engineering, such as mRNA secondary structure engineering, sensor-regulator system, regulatable expression system, ultrasensitive input/output control system, and computer science-based design of complex gene circuits. Furthermore, key challenges and strategies were discussed. Finally, we concluded that synthetic biology provides useful metabolic engineering strategies for economically viable production of fatty acid-derived valuable chemicals in engineered microbes.

  11. Production of Fatty Acid-Derived Valuable Chemicals in Synthetic Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ai-Qun; Pratomo Juwono, Nina Kurniasih; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid derivatives, such as hydroxy fatty acids, fatty alcohols, fatty acid methyl/ethyl esters, and fatty alka(e)nes, have a wide range of industrial applications including plastics, lubricants, and fuels. Currently, these chemicals are obtained mainly through chemical synthesis, which is complex and costly, and their availability from natural biological sources is extremely limited. Metabolic engineering of microorganisms has provided a platform for effective production of these valuable biochemicals. Notably, synthetic biology-based metabolic engineering strategies have been extensively applied to refactor microorganisms for improved biochemical production. Here, we reviewed: (i) the current status of metabolic engineering of microbes that produce fatty acid-derived valuable chemicals, and (ii) the recent progress of synthetic biology approaches that assist metabolic engineering, such as mRNA secondary structure engineering, sensor-regulator system, regulatable expression system, ultrasensitive input/output control system, and computer science-based design of complex gene circuits. Furthermore, key challenges and strategies were discussed. Finally, we concluded that synthetic biology provides useful metabolic engineering strategies for economically viable production of fatty acid-derived valuable chemicals in engineered microbes. PMID:25566540

  12. Low molecular weight chemicals, hypersensitivity, and direct toxicity: the acid anhydrides.

    PubMed Central

    Venables, K M

    1989-01-01

    The acid anhydrides are a group of reactive chemicals used widely in alkyd and epoxy resins. The major hazards to health are mucosal and skin irritation and sensitisation of the respiratory tract. Most occupational asthma caused by acid anhydrides appears to be immunologically mediated. Immunological mechanisms have been proposed to explain an influenza-like syndrome and pulmonary haemorrhage, but direct toxicity may also be important in the aetiology of these conditions. PMID:2653411

  13. Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-December 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  14. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April-June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during th eperiod April-June 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  15. Treatment of olive mill wastewater by chemical processes: effect of acid cracking pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Hande Gursoy-Haksevenler, B; Arslan-Alaton, Idil

    2014-01-01

    The effect of acid cracking (pH 2.0; T 70 °C) and filtration as a pretreatment step on the chemical treatability of olive mill wastewater (chemical oxygen demand (COD) 150,000 m/L; total organic carbon (TOC) 36,000 mg/L; oil-grease 8,200 mg/L; total phenols 3,800 mg/L) was investigated. FeCl3 coagulation, Ca(OH)2 precipitation, electrocoagulation using stainless steel electrodes and the Fenton's reagent were applied as chemical treatment methods. Removal performances were examined in terms of COD, TOC, oil-grease, total phenols, colour, suspended solids and acute toxicity with the photobacterium Vibrio fischeri. Significant oil-grease (95%) and suspended solids (96%) accompanied with 58% COD, 43% TOC, 39% total phenols and 80% colour removals were obtained by acid cracking-filtration pretreatment. Among the investigated chemical treatment processes, electrocoagulation and the Fenton's reagent were found more effective after pretreatment, especially in terms of total phenols removal. Total phenols removal increased from 39 to 72% when pretreatment was applied, while no significant additional (≈10-15%) COD and TOC removals were obtained when acid cracking was coupled with chemical treatment. The acute toxicity of the original olive mill wastewater sample increased considerably after pretreatment from 75 to 89% (measured for the 10-fold diluted wastewater sample). An operating cost analysis was also performed for the selected chemical treatment processes.

  16. Treatment of olive mill wastewater by chemical processes: effect of acid cracking pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Hande Gursoy-Haksevenler, B; Arslan-Alaton, Idil

    2014-01-01

    The effect of acid cracking (pH 2.0; T 70 °C) and filtration as a pretreatment step on the chemical treatability of olive mill wastewater (chemical oxygen demand (COD) 150,000 m/L; total organic carbon (TOC) 36,000 mg/L; oil-grease 8,200 mg/L; total phenols 3,800 mg/L) was investigated. FeCl3 coagulation, Ca(OH)2 precipitation, electrocoagulation using stainless steel electrodes and the Fenton's reagent were applied as chemical treatment methods. Removal performances were examined in terms of COD, TOC, oil-grease, total phenols, colour, suspended solids and acute toxicity with the photobacterium Vibrio fischeri. Significant oil-grease (95%) and suspended solids (96%) accompanied with 58% COD, 43% TOC, 39% total phenols and 80% colour removals were obtained by acid cracking-filtration pretreatment. Among the investigated chemical treatment processes, electrocoagulation and the Fenton's reagent were found more effective after pretreatment, especially in terms of total phenols removal. Total phenols removal increased from 39 to 72% when pretreatment was applied, while no significant additional (≈10-15%) COD and TOC removals were obtained when acid cracking was coupled with chemical treatment. The acute toxicity of the original olive mill wastewater sample increased considerably after pretreatment from 75 to 89% (measured for the 10-fold diluted wastewater sample). An operating cost analysis was also performed for the selected chemical treatment processes. PMID:24718336

  17. Site remediation via Dispersion by Chemical Reaction (DCR). Special report

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, G.M.; Payne, J.R.; Brar, G.S.

    1997-08-01

    The DCR (Dispersion by Chemical Reaction) technologies are a group of patented waste treatment processes using CaO (quicklime) for the immobilization of heavily oiled sludges, oil-contaminated soils, acid-tars, and heavy metals in Ca(OH)2 and CaCO3 matrices. The objectives of this project were to: (1) evaluate the DCR process for remediating soils contaminated with pesticides, petroleum hydrocarbons (oils and fuels), and heavy metals in cold regions and (2) evaluate DCR-treated oil-contaminated soil as a non-frost-susceptible (NFS) construction material. Three major studies evaluated the DCR process to remediate (1) hydrocarbons at Eareckson Air Force Station on Shemya in the Aleutians, (2) pesticide-contaminated soils from Rocky Mt. Arsenal, and (3) heavy-metal contaminated soils from a former zinc smelter site at Palmerton, Pennsylvania. The DCR process was successful in stabilizing liquid organics and heavy metals in contaminated soils. The chemical properties of soils contaminated by solid organics (asphalt tar and pesticides) were not generally improved by the DCR process, but even in these cases, the physical properties were improved for potential reuse as construction materials.

  18. Liquid chromatographic analysis of phosphoamino acids at femtomole level using chemical derivatization with N-hydroxysuccinimidyl fluorescein-O-acetate.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ying-Hua; Li, Rong-Jun; Zhang, Hua-Shan; Du, Xiao-Lan; Wang, Hong

    2007-10-01

    Phosphorylation of amino acid residues in proteins plays a major role in biological systems. In this paper, a reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method based on chemical derivatization has been described for the separation and quantification of phosphoamino acids at femtomole level, using fluorimetric detection (FLD). The protocol involved pre-column derivatization of phosphoamino acids with N-hydroxysuccinimidyl fluorescein-O-acetate (SIFA) and subsequent separation on ZORBAX Eclipse XDB-C8 column. Several experimental factors that influenced derivatization and separation were carefully investigated. The derivatization was performed at 40 degrees C for 40 min in borate buffer (pH 8.5). Under the optimum conditions, phosphoserine (P-Ser), phosphothreonine (P-Thr) and phosphotyrosine (P-Tyr) were satisfactorily separated in 8 min. The detection limits (signal-to-noise ratio=3) for the phosphoamino acids could reach 10-20 fmol, which was the lowest value reported for HPLC methods and comparable to those obtained by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection methods. The proposed method has been validated and used to characterize the phosphoamino acids in the hydrolyzed phosphorylated protein samples. The results clearly demonstrated the potential of this technique to study phosphoamino acids as well as provided a new analytical methodology that should be applicable to the study of phosphorylation of protein in biological system.

  19. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis.

  20. Chemical Compatibility Testing Final Report Including Test Plans and Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    NIMITZ,JONATHAN S.; ALLRED,RONALD E.; GORDON,BRENT W.; NIGREY,PAUL J.; MCCONNELL,PAUL E.

    2001-07-01

    This report provides an independent assessment of information on mixed waste streams, chemical compatibility information on polymers, and standard test methods for polymer properties. It includes a technology review of mixed low-level waste (LLW) streams and material compatibilities, validation for the plan to test the compatibility of simulated mixed wastes with potential seal and liner materials, and the test plan itself. Potential packaging materials were reviewed and evaluated for compatibility with expected hazardous wastes. The chemical and physical property measurements required for testing container materials were determined. Test methodologies for evaluating compatibility were collected and reviewed for applicability. A test plan to meet US Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Agency requirements was developed. The expected wastes were compared with the chemical resistances of polymers, the top-ranking polymers were selected for testing, and the most applicable test methods for candidate seal and liner materials were determined. Five recommended solutions to simulate mixed LLW streams are described. The test plan includes descriptions of test materials, test procedures, data collection protocols, safety and environmental considerations, and quality assurance procedures. The recommended order of testing to be conducted is specified.

  1. Recycling of Cu powder from industrial sludge by combined acid leaching, chemical exchange and ferrite process.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yao-Jen; Chang, Chien-Kuei; You, Chen-Feng; Lou, Jie-Chung

    2010-09-15

    A method in combination of acid leaching, chemical exchange and ferrite process was applied to recycle copper and confer higher chemical stability to the sludge generated from etching process in printed circuit board industry. Ninety-five percent copper could be recycled in the form of powder from the sludge. Moreover, not only the wastewater after chemical exchange can be treated to fulfill the effluent standard, but also the sludge can satisfy the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) limits made by Taiwan's environmental protection administration. PMID:20638967

  2. Certain glycol ethers eliminated from toxic chemical release reporting requirements

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    Effective June 28, 1994, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) eliminated high molecular weight glycol ethers from the reporting requirements of section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA). EPCRA (42 U.S.C. 11023) is also referred to as Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. EPA redefined the glycol ethers category list of chemicals subject to reporting based on an EPA review of available human health data on short-chain glycol ethers. EPA is removing only the surfactant glycol ethers, which are high molecular weight glycol ethers, i.e., those with pendant alkyl groups and that typically have eight or more carbon atoms. The redefinition retains certain glycol ethers (i.e., ethylene glycol ethers where there are 1,2, or 3 repeating ethylene oxide groups) in the category. These are reasonably anticipated to cause adverse human health effects.

  3. GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL WITH SLUDGE AND SUPERNATE SIMULANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.; Zamecnik, J.

    2012-08-28

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating changes to its current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet to improve processing cycle times. This will enable the facility to support higher canister production while maximizing waste loading. Higher throughput is needed in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC) since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the DWPF gas chromatographs (GC) and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, reducing or eliminating the amount of formic acid used in the CPC is being developed. Earlier work at Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with an 80:20 molar blend of glycolic and formic acids has the potential to remove mercury in the SRAT without any significant catalytic hydrogen generation. This report summarizes the research completed to determine the feasibility of processing without formic acid. In earlier development of the glycolic-formic acid flowsheet, one run (GF8) was completed without formic acid. It is of particular interest that mercury was successfully removed in GF8, no formic acid at 125% stoichiometry. Glycolic acid did not show the ability to reduce mercury to elemental mercury in initial screening studies, which is why previous testing focused on using the formic/glycolic blend. The objective of the testing detailed in this document is to determine the viability of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in processing sludge over a wide compositional range as requested by DWPF. This work was performed under the guidance of Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The details regarding the simulant preparation and analysis have been documented previously.

  4. Top value platform chemicals: bio-based production of organic acids.

    PubMed

    Becker, Judith; Lange, Anna; Fabarius, Jonathan; Wittmann, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Driven by the quest for sustainability, recent years have seen a tremendous progress in bio-based production routes from renewable raw materials to commercial goods. Particularly, the production of organic acids has crystallized as a competitive and fast-evolving field, related to the broad applicability of organic acids for direct use, as polymer building blocks, and as commodity chemicals. Here, we review recent advances in metabolic engineering and industrial market scenarios with focus on organic acids as top value products from biomass, accessible through fermentation and biotransformation. PMID:26360870

  5. Natural products as biofuels and bio-based chemicals: fatty acids and isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Beller, Harry R; Lee, Taek Soon; Katz, Leonard

    2015-09-23

    Although natural products are best known for their use in medicine and agriculture, a number of fatty acid-derived and isoprenoid natural products are being developed for use as renewable biofuels and bio-based chemicals. This review summarizes recent work on fatty acid-derived compounds (fatty acid alkyl esters, fatty alcohols, medium- and short-chain methyl ketones, alkanes, α-olefins, and long-chain internal alkenes) and isoprenoids, including hemiterpenes (e.g., isoprene and isopentanol), monoterpenes (e.g., limonene), and sesquiterpenes (e.g., farnesene and bisabolene).

  6. Top value platform chemicals: bio-based production of organic acids.

    PubMed

    Becker, Judith; Lange, Anna; Fabarius, Jonathan; Wittmann, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Driven by the quest for sustainability, recent years have seen a tremendous progress in bio-based production routes from renewable raw materials to commercial goods. Particularly, the production of organic acids has crystallized as a competitive and fast-evolving field, related to the broad applicability of organic acids for direct use, as polymer building blocks, and as commodity chemicals. Here, we review recent advances in metabolic engineering and industrial market scenarios with focus on organic acids as top value products from biomass, accessible through fermentation and biotransformation.

  7. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of phosphoric acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Z; Kovács, Z

    1985-07-01

    (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of alkyi and alkylaryl phosphates, condensed phosphates, phosphoric arids and their salts, are reported. These are listed by classes of compounds so that relationships between chemical shifts and the substituent groups on phosphorus atoms can be recognized. These relationships are useful for qualitative identification of the specific compounds listed and of related compounds by extrapolation.

  8. Five Decades with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Chemical Synthesis, Enzymatic Formation, Lipid Peroxidation and Its Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Catalá, Angel

    2013-01-01

    I have been involved in research on polyunsaturated fatty acids since 1964 and this review is intended to cover some of the most important aspects of this work. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have followed me during my whole scientific career and I have published a number of studies concerned with different aspects of them such as chemical synthesis, enzymatic formation, metabolism, transport, physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of a reconstructed desaturase system in liposomes, lipid peroxidation, and their effects. The first project I became involved in was the organic synthesis of [1-14C] eicosa-11,14-dienoic acid, with the aim of demonstrating the participation of that compound as a possible intermediary in the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid “in vivo.” From 1966 to 1982, I was involved in several projects that study the metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the eighties, we studied fatty acid binding protein. From 1990 up to now, our laboratory has been interested in the lipid peroxidation of biological membranes from various tissues and different species as well as liposomes prepared with phospholipids rich in PUFAs. We tested the effect of many antioxidants such as alpha tocopherol, vitamin A, melatonin and its structural analogues, and conjugated linoleic acid, among others. PMID:24490074

  9. Carboxylic acid reductase is a versatile enzyme for the conversion of fatty acids into fuels and chemical commodities

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, M. Kalim; Turner, Nicholas J.; Jones, Patrik R.

    2013-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons such as fatty alcohols and petroleum-derived alkanes have numerous applications in the chemical industry. In recent years, the renewable synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons has been made possible by engineering microbes to overaccumulate fatty acids. However, to generate end products with the desired physicochemical properties (e.g., fatty aldehydes, alkanes, and alcohols), further conversion of the fatty acid is necessary. A carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) from Mycobacterium marinum was found to convert a wide range of aliphatic fatty acids (C6–C18) into corresponding aldehydes. Together with the broad-substrate specificity of an aldehyde reductase or an aldehyde decarbonylase, the catalytic conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols (C8–C16) or fatty alkanes (C7–C15) was reconstituted in vitro. This concept was applied in vivo, in combination with a chain-length-specific thioesterase, to engineer Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains that were capable of synthesizing fatty alcohols and alkanes. A fatty alcohol titer exceeding 350 mg·L−1 was obtained in minimal media supplemented with glucose. Moreover, by combining the CAR-dependent pathway with an exogenous fatty acid-generating lipase, natural oils (coconut oil, palm oil, and algal oil bodies) were enzymatically converted into fatty alcohols across a broad chain-length range (C8–C18). Together with complementing enzymes, the broad substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of CAR opens the road for direct and tailored enzyme-catalyzed conversion of lipids into user-ready chemical commodities. PMID:23248280

  10. Carboxylic acid reductase is a versatile enzyme for the conversion of fatty acids into fuels and chemical commodities.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, M Kalim; Turner, Nicholas J; Jones, Patrik R

    2013-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons such as fatty alcohols and petroleum-derived alkanes have numerous applications in the chemical industry. In recent years, the renewable synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons has been made possible by engineering microbes to overaccumulate fatty acids. However, to generate end products with the desired physicochemical properties (e.g., fatty aldehydes, alkanes, and alcohols), further conversion of the fatty acid is necessary. A carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) from Mycobacterium marinum was found to convert a wide range of aliphatic fatty acids (C(6)-C(18)) into corresponding aldehydes. Together with the broad-substrate specificity of an aldehyde reductase or an aldehyde decarbonylase, the catalytic conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols (C(8)-C(16)) or fatty alkanes (C(7)-C(15)) was reconstituted in vitro. This concept was applied in vivo, in combination with a chain-length-specific thioesterase, to engineer Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains that were capable of synthesizing fatty alcohols and alkanes. A fatty alcohol titer exceeding 350 mg·L(-1) was obtained in minimal media supplemented with glucose. Moreover, by combining the CAR-dependent pathway with an exogenous fatty acid-generating lipase, natural oils (coconut oil, palm oil, and algal oil bodies) were enzymatically converted into fatty alcohols across a broad chain-length range (C(8)-C(18)). Together with complementing enzymes, the broad substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of CAR opens the road for direct and tailored enzyme-catalyzed conversion of lipids into user-ready chemical commodities. PMID:23248280

  11. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January--March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1997. Created in March 1997 when the CTD Chemical Development and Energy Research sections were combined, the Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within seven major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, and Biotechnology Research. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described in the report, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  12. Correlation between chemical structure and rodent repellency of benzoic acid derivatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fearn, J.E.; DeWitt, J.B.

    1965-01-01

    Sixty-five benzoic acid derivatives were either prepared or obtained from commercial concerns, tested for rat repellency, and their indices of repellency computed. The data from these tests were considered analytically for any correlation between chemical structure and rat repellency. The results suggest a qualitative relationship which is useful in deciding probability of repellency in other compounds.

  13. Chemical oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The oxidation of six phenolic acids by soil Fe and Mn oxides was demonstrated by changes in phenolic acid extractability from soil with time, by production of Fe(II) and soluble Mn from the oxidation reaction, by quantitative recoveries of added phenolic acids from soil pretreated with dithionite-citrate to remove Fe and Mn oxides, and by the reactivity of phenolic acids in the presence of pure Mn and Fe oxides. The reactivities of phenolic acids were associated with the structures of the chemicals. Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring increased reactivity, and cinnamic acid derivatives were more reactive than benzoic acid derivatives. Oxidation products of /sup 14/C labeled ferulic acid were sorbed to MnO/sub 2/ within minutes and were unextractable by organic solvents unless the mineral was pretreated with 6 M HCl or 0.5 M NaOH. The oxidation rate of ferulic acid by MnO/sub 2/ approached zero after four days even with a surplus of reactants.

  14. Trace metals of an acid mine drainage stream using a chemical model (WATEQ) and sediment analysis

    SciTech Connect

    West, K.A. ); Wilson, T.P. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The high metal contents common to the discharge of acid-mine drainage (AMD) from mines and mine spoils is an environmental concern to both government and industry. This paper reports the results of investigation of the behavior of metals in an AMD system at a former surface coal mine in Tuscarawas County, Oh. AMD discharges from seeps travels, in respective order through a laminar flow stream; a Typha-dominated wetland; a turbulent flow stream; and a sediment retention pond. Dissolved metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cr, Cd, Cu, and Al) major and minor components, and other parameters (pH, dissolved oxygen and Eh) were measured in the AMD water at each sample location. A chemical mineral equilibrium model (WATEQ) was used to predict the minerals which should precipitate at each site. Results suggest that the seeps are supersaturated and should be precipitating hematite, goethite and magnetite (iron oxides), and siderite (iron carbonate), whereas water of the other downstream sites were at or below equilibrium conditions for these minerals. The hydrogeochemistry of the AMD was further studied using sequential chemical attacks on the precipitate sediment surface coatings, in order to determine metal concentrations in the exchangeable, carbonate, Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide, and oxidizable fractions. The carbonate and exchangeable fractions of the precipitate are dominated by Ca and Fe, as well as Mg in the carbonate fraction. The Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide fraction contained Fe, Al, Mn, Mg, and trace metals, and also contained the greatest concentration of total elements in the system. The Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide is therefore, the major sink for metals of this AMD system. The decrease in the concentration of metals in the sediment precipitates in the downstream locations, is consistent with WATEQ and water analysis results.

  15. Acidic deposition: Effects on agricultural crops: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, D.S.; Johnston, J.W. Jr.; Taylor, G.E. Jr.; Luxmoore, R.J.; McConathy, R.K.; McLaughlin, S.B.; Norby, R.J.; Abner, C.H.; Heagle, A.S.; Dubay, D.T.

    1987-04-01

    During the late 1970's there developed an increasing recognition that attempts to understand the impact of acidic precipitation on vegetation would be difficult to interpret without also being able to understand the relationship between acid precipitation and other, potentially interacting stresses. Important among these other stress factors are the mixture of gaseous pollutants to which vegetation is also exposed during the growing season. The research project described in this report was conceived and developed to address the role and importance of the contribution of wet deposition (acid rain) to crop vegetation growth and yield in the context of the ambient gaseous pollutant environment existing in an agricultural field situation.

  16. Retinoic acid-mediated gene expression in transgenic reporter zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Perz-Edwards, A; Hardison, N L; Linney, E

    2001-01-01

    Retinoic acid-mediated gene activation is important for normal vertebrate development. The size and nature of retinoic acid make it difficult to identify the precise cellular location of this signaling molecule throughout an embryo. Additionally, retinoic acid (RA) signaling is regulated by a complex combination of receptors, coactivators, and antagonizing proteins. Thus, in order to integrate these signals and identify regions within a whole developing embryo where cells can respond transcriptionally to retinoic acid, we have used a reporter transgenic approach. We have generated several stable lines of transgenic zebrafish which use retinoic acid response elements to drive fluorescent protein expression. In these zebrafish lines, transgene expression is localized to regions of the neural tube, retina, notochord, somites, heart, pronephric ducts, branchial arches, and jaw muscles in embryos and larvae. Transgene expression can be induced in additional regions of the neural tube and retina as well as the immature notochord, hatching gland, enveloping cell layer, and fin by exposing embryos to retinoic acid. Treatment with retinoic acid synthase inhibitors, citral and diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB), during neurulation, greatly reduces transgene expression. DEAB treatment of embryos at gastrulation phenocopies the embryonic effects of vitamin A deprivation or targeted disruption of the RA synthase retinaldehyde dehydrogenase-2 in other vertebrates. Together these data suggest that the reporter expression we see in zebrafish is dependent upon conserved vertebrate pathways of RA synthesis.

  17. Technology Evaluation Workshop Report for Tank Waste Chemical Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Eberlein, S.J.

    1994-04-01

    A Tank Waste Chemical Characterization Technology Evaluation Workshop was held August 24--26, 1993. The workshop was intended to identify and evaluate technologies appropriate for the in situ and hot cell characterization of the chemical composition of Hanford waste tank materials. The participants were asked to identify technologies that show applicability to the needs and good prospects for deployment in the hot cell or tanks. They were also asked to identify the tasks required to pursue the development of specific technologies to deployment readiness. This report describes the findings of the workshop. Three focus areas were identified for detailed discussion: (1) elemental analysis, (2) molecular analysis, and (3) gas analysis. The technologies were restricted to those which do not require sample preparation. Attachment 1 contains the final workshop agenda and a complete list of attendees. An information package (Attachment 2) was provided to all participants in advance to provide information about the Hanford tank environment, needs, current characterization practices, potential deployment approaches, and the evaluation procedure. The participants also received a summary of potential technologies (Attachment 3). The workshop opened with a plenary session, describing the background and issues in more detail. Copies of these presentations are contained in Attachments 4, 5 and 6. This session was followed by breakout sessions in each of the three focus areas. The workshop closed with a plenary session where each focus group presented its findings. This report summarizes the findings of each of the focus groups. The evaluation criteria and information about specific technologies are tabulated at the end of each section in the report. The detailed notes from each focus group are contained in Attachments 7, 8 and 9.

  18. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January-March 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies.

  19. Annual report, spring 2015. Alternative chemical cleaning methods for high level waste tanks-corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrwas, R. B.

    2015-07-06

    The testing presented in this report is in support of the investigation of the Alternative Chemical Cleaning program to aid in developing strategies and technologies to chemically clean radioactive High Level Waste tanks prior to tank closure. The data and conclusions presented here were the examination of the corrosion rates of A285 carbon steel and 304L stainless steel when interacted with the chemical cleaning solution composed of 0.18 M nitric acid and 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid. This solution has been proposed as a dissolution solution that would be used to remove the remaining hard heel portion of the sludge in the waste tanks. This solution was combined with the HM and PUREX simulated sludge with dilution ratios that represent the bulk oxalic cleaning process (20:1 ratio, acid solution to simulant) and the cumulative volume associated with multiple acid strikes (50:1 ratio). The testing was conducted over 28 days at 50°C and deployed two methods to invest the corrosion conditions; passive weight loss coupon and an active electrochemical probe were used to collect data on the corrosion rate and material performance. In addition to investigating the chemical cleaning solutions, electrochemical corrosion testing was performed on acidic and basic solutions containing sodium permanganate at room temperature to explore the corrosion impacts if these solutions were to be implemented to retrieve remaining actinides that are currently in the sludge of the tank.

  20. Chemical modification of an alpha 3-fucosyltransferase; definition of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Britten, C J; Bird, M I

    1997-02-11

    The biosynthesis of the carbohydrate antigen sialyl Lewis X (sLe(x)) is dependent on the activity of an alpha 3-fucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.152, GDP-fucose:Gal beta (1-4)GlcNAc-R alpha (1-3)fucosyltransferase). This enzyme catalyses the transfer of fucose from GDP-beta-fucose to the 3-OH of N-acetylglucosamine present in lactosamine acceptors. In this report, we have investigated the amino acids essential for the activity of a recombinant alpha 3-fucosyltransferase (FucT-VI) through chemical modification of the enzyme with group-selective reagents. FucT-VI activity was found to be particularly sensitive to the histidine-selective reagent diethylpyrocarbonate and the cysteine reagent N-ethylmaleimide, with IC50 values of less than 200 microM. Reagents selective for arginine and lysine had no effect on enzyme activity. The inclusion of GDP-beta-fucose during preincubation with NEM reduces the rate of inactivation whereas inclusion of an acceptor saccharide for the enzyme, Gal beta (1-4)GlcNAc, had no effect. No protective effect with either GDP-beta-fucose or Gal beta (1-4)GlcNAc was observed on treatment of the enzyme with diethylpyrocarbonate. These data suggest that in addition to an NEM-reactive cysteine in, or adjacent to, the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, FucT-VI possesses histidine residue(s) that are essential for enzyme activity.

  1. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains the Executive summary; Introduction; Summary of vulnerabilities; Management systems weaknesses; Commendable practices; Summary of management response plan; Conclusions; and a Glossary of chemical terms.

  2. Environmental comparison of biobased chemicals from glutamic acid with their petrochemical equivalents.

    PubMed

    Lammens, Tijs M; Potting, José; Sanders, Johan P M; De Boer, Imke J M

    2011-10-01

    Glutamic acid is an important constituent of waste streams from biofuels production. It is an interesting starting material for the synthesis of biobased chemicals, thereby decreasing the dependency on fossil fuels. The objective of this paper was to compare the environmental impact of four biobased chemicals from glutamic acid with their petrochemical equivalents, that is, N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP), N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP), acrylonitrile (ACN), and succinonitrile (SCN). A consequential life cycle assessment was performed, wherein glutamic acid was obtained from sugar beet vinasse. The removed glutamic acid was substituted with cane molasses and ureum. The comparison between the four biobased and petrochemical products showed that for NMP and NVP the biobased version had less impact on the environment, while for ACN and SCN the petrochemical version had less impact on the environment. For the latter two an optimized scenario was computed, which showed that the process for SCN can be improved to a level at which it can compete with the petrochemical process. For biobased ACN large improvements are required to make it competitive with its petrochemical equivalent. The results of this LCA and the research preceding it also show that glutamic acid can be a building block for a variety of molecules that are currently produced from petrochemical resources. Currently, most methods to produce biobased products are biotechnological processes based on sugar, but this paper demonstrates that the use of amino acids from low-value byproducts can certainly be a method as well. PMID:21870885

  3. Functional Imaging of Chemically Active Surfaces with Optical Reporter Microbeads

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Punkaj; Nair, Sumitha; Narayan, Sreenath; Gratzl, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach to allow for continuous imaging of concentration fields that evolve at surfaces due to release, uptake, and mass transport of molecules, without significant interference of the concentration fields by the chemical imaging itself. The technique utilizes optical “reporter” microbeads immobilized in a thin layer of transparent and inert hydrogel on top of the surface. The hydrogel has minimal density and therefore diffusion in and across it is like in water. Imaging the immobilized microbeads over time provides quantitative concentration measurements at each location where an optical reporter resides. Using image analysis in post-processing these spatially discrete measurements can be transformed into contiguous maps of the dynamic concentration field across the entire surface. If the microbeads are small enough relative to the dimensions of the region of interest and sparsely applied then chemical imaging will not noticeably affect the evolution of concentration fields. In this work colorimetric optode microbeads a few micrometers in diameter were used to image surface concentration distributions on the millimeter scale. PMID:26332766

  4. Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the results of a literature review to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate gaseous products produced by the gasification or combustion of coal in fixed-, fluidized-, and entrained-bed gasifiers, direct coal-fired turbines, and pressurized-fluidized-bed combustors. Several impurities, such as H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and trace metal compounds are generated during coal conversion, and they must be removed from the coal gas or the combustor flue gas to meet environmental standards. The use of membranes to separate these noxious gases is an attractive alternative to their removal by sorbents such as zinc titanate or calcium oxide. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. The U.S. Department of Energy is supporting investigations to develop inorganic membranes for separating hydrogen from coal gas streams and noxious impurities from hot coal- and flue-gas streams. Membrane materials that have been investigated in the past include glass (silica), alumina, zirconia, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt).

  5. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-{Tc} systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  6. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H[sub 2], and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO[sub 2], potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-[Tc] systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  7. Autopsy report for chemical burns from cresol solution.

    PubMed

    Emoto, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Shikata, Nobuaki; Tsubura, Airo; Nagasaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Cresol, which is used as a disinfectant and insecticide, has erosive effects on epidermal and epithelial tissues in the body. Oral exposure causes gastrointestinal corrosive injuries as a direct chemical burn. We report herein a case of suicidal poisoning by ingestion of cresol solution. An octogenarian man with depression was found dead approximately 14 h after exposure to less than 500 mL of saponated cresol solution. Macroscopically, corrosive lesions such as red-to-brown-colored epithelium and edematous thickening of walls were seen in the skin, mouth, oral cavity, esophagus, and stomach. Histopathologically, coagulative necrosis and vascular dilatation were detected from mucosal to muscular layers in the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. Congestive edema of the lungs, edematous changes in the brain, and proximal tubular necrosis of the kidneys were seen, suggesting acute circulatory disturbance due to shock. This human case offers valuable information on the direct irritation and shock induced by systemic exposure to corrosive substances.

  8. Autopsy report for chemical burns from cresol solution.

    PubMed

    Emoto, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Shikata, Nobuaki; Tsubura, Airo; Nagasaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Cresol, which is used as a disinfectant and insecticide, has erosive effects on epidermal and epithelial tissues in the body. Oral exposure causes gastrointestinal corrosive injuries as a direct chemical burn. We report herein a case of suicidal poisoning by ingestion of cresol solution. An octogenarian man with depression was found dead approximately 14 h after exposure to less than 500 mL of saponated cresol solution. Macroscopically, corrosive lesions such as red-to-brown-colored epithelium and edematous thickening of walls were seen in the skin, mouth, oral cavity, esophagus, and stomach. Histopathologically, coagulative necrosis and vascular dilatation were detected from mucosal to muscular layers in the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. Congestive edema of the lungs, edematous changes in the brain, and proximal tubular necrosis of the kidneys were seen, suggesting acute circulatory disturbance due to shock. This human case offers valuable information on the direct irritation and shock induced by systemic exposure to corrosive substances. PMID:26404918

  9. Chemical-cleaning solvent and process testing. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Jevec, J.M.; Leedy, W.S.

    1983-04-01

    Laboratory and pilot plant investigations were conducted to develop and qualify chemical cleaning solvents, procedures, analysis methods and monitoring techniques to safely remove magnetite, copper and copper oxide sludges from the secondary side of nuclear steam generators. The results of this program found that a two-step procedure involving two different solvents should be used. A solvent composed of 10% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), 1% hydrazine (N/sub 2/H/sub 4/), 5 to 10 mL/L CI-801 (a nonproprietary corrosion inhibitor), pH adjusted to 7.0 with ammonia used at a temperature of 93/sup 0/C (200/sup 0/C) will dissolve magnetite in a reasonable period of time. Corrosion produced by this solvent in tests on materials of which steam generators are constructed was reasonably low in all cases. A solvent composed of 5% EDTA, 2% hydrogen peroxide, with the pH first adjusted to 7.0 with ammonia and then to 10.0 with ethylenediamine (EDA) was developed to dissolve copper and copper oxides. This solvent is most effective when used at ambient temperature.

  10. Dioxin Registry report for Thompson Chemical Company, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, D.A.; Fingerhut, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    An industrial hygiene survey was conducted at the Thompson Chemical Company, St. Louis, Missouri. The company manufactured sodium-2,4,5-trichlorophenate (NaTCP), 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic-acid (2,4,5-T), and esters and amines of 2,4,5-T from 1949 through 1970. The company manufactured Agent-Orange for the Air Force from 1967 until 1969. The facility, its processes, its workforce, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (1746016) (TCDD) analytical results for these products were examined. As this firm filed for bankruptcy in 1970, there was only limited data available. The facility employed about 12 persons year round and about double this number during the busy season and during the Agent-Orange contract. Almost no information was available about the production processes. Nine persons developed chloracne after an accident and fire in the NaTCP process. Few personnel records were available. The authors conclude that workers employed from 1949 through 1970 are suitable for inclusion into the Dioxin Registry. There is not enough information available to construct a TCDD exposure matrix for this site.

  11. NEXAFS Chemical State and Bond Lengths of p-Aminobenzoic Acid in Solution and Solid State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. S.; Gainar, A.; Suljoti, E.; Xiao, J.; Golnak, R.; Aziz, E. F.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state and solution pH-dependent NEXAFS studies allow direct observation of the electronic state of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as a function of its chemical environment, revealing the chemical state and bonding of the chemical species. Variations in the ionization potential (IP) and 1s→π* resonances unequivocally identify the chemical species (neutral, cationic, or anionic) present and the varying local environment. Shifts in σ* shape resonances relative to the IP in the NEXAFS spectra vary with C-N bond length, and the important effect of minor alterations in bond length is confirmed with nitrogen FEFF calculations, leading to the possibility of bond length determination in solution.

  12. Influence of 4-cyano-4'-biphenylcarboxylic acid on the orientational ordering of cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals at chemically functionalized surfaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon-Seo; Jang, Chang-Hyun; Tingey, Matthew L; Lowe, Aaron M; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2006-12-15

    We report two methods that involve tailoring of the chemical composition of the nematic liquid crystal 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl to achieve control over the orientational ordering of the liquid crystal on chemically functionalized surfaces. The first method involves the direct addition of 4-cyano-4'-biphenylcarboxylic acid to 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl. The second method involves exposure of 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl to ultraviolet light and photochemical generation of a range of products, including 4-cyano-4'-biphenylcarboxylic acid. The addition of the acid or exposure to ultraviolet light accelerated the rate at which the liquid crystal exhibited an orientational transition from planar to perpendicular (homeotropic) alignment on surfaces presenting ammonium groups. The appearance of the homeotropic orientation of the UV-treated 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl on ammonium-terminated surfaces was dependent on the thickness of the film of liquid crystal (13-50 mum), consistent with a dipolar coupling between the liquid crystal and the electric field associated with an electrical double layer generated at the ammonium surface. Although the addition of 4-cyano-4'-biphenylcarboxylic acid or UV treatment of the liquid crystal also promoted homeotropic orientations on surfaces presenting hydroxyl groups, the orientations of the UV-treated liquid crystal on the hydroxyl-terminated surface did not change with thickness of the film of liquid crystal in the manner observed on the ammonium-terminated surfaces. The latter result indicates that the mechanism leading to homeotropic anchoring on hydroxyl-terminated surfaces is distinct from that on ammonium-terminated surfaces. Measurements performed using polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy suggest that hydrogen bonding between the 4-cyano-4'-biphenylcarboxylic acid and the hydroxyl-terminated surface is responsible for the homeotropic anchoring on the surface. Finally, the orientation of the liquid

  13. Chemical composition and amino acid profiles of goose muscles from native Polish breeds.

    PubMed

    Okruszek, A; Woloszyn, J; Haraf, G; Orkusz, A; Werenska, M

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the chemical and amino acid composition of breast (pectoralis major) and thigh (biceps femoris) muscles in 17-wk-old geese from 2 Polish conservative flocks: Rypińska (Ry, n = 20) and Garbonosa (Ga, n = 20). The geese were fed ad libitum during the experimental period on the same complete feed. Genotypes affected the moisture and fat content of breast and thigh meat. The Ga geese were characterized by higher moisture as well as lower fat lipid content compared with the Ry breast and thigh muscles. The amino acid proportions of meat proteins depended on the goose flock and type of muscles, where significant differences were found. The proteins of Ga breast muscles contained more glutamic acid, glycine, lysine, tryptophan, histidine, and methionine, and less aspartic acid, proline, serine, leucine, valine, phenyloalanine, tyrosine, and threonine than the Ry geese (P ≤ 0.05). The proteins of Ry thigh muscles were characterized by higher content of proline, serine, and essential amino acids (without lysine and methionine) and lower glutamic and asparagine acid, alanine, and glycine compared with the Ga flock. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization (1991) standard, tryptophan was the amino acid limiting the nutritional value of meat proteins of Ry breast muscles (amino acid score for tryptophan = 90%). Except for tryptophan, the meat proteins of the investigated raw materials contained more essential amino acids than the standard. The total content of essential amino acids for all investigated muscles was also higher (52.51 to 55.54%) than the standard (33.90%). It is evident that muscle protein from both flocks of geese have been characterized by high nutritional value. The values of the essential amino acid index of breast muscle proteins were similar in both flocks.

  14. Nitric-phosphoric acid etching effects on the surface chemical composition of CdTe thin film.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Irfan; Ding, Huanjun; Xia, Wei; Lin, Hao; Tang, Ching W.; Gao, Yongli

    2009-03-01

    Nitric-phosphoric (NP) acid etching has been regarded as one of the most successful methods for the formation of low resistance back contact with the metal electrode in CdTe based solar cells. We report back surface chemical composition for eight different durations of NP etching of CdTe polycrystalline thin film. We studied the surfaces with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS), inverse photoemission spectroscopy (IEPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Etching dependence on the back surface composition and electronic structure was observed. Valence and conduction band shifts relative to the Fermi level of the system with different etching duration were analyzed. The sample was left in open ambient condition for three weeks and XPS data were obtained again in order to study the difference in surface chemical composition with the pristine CdTe film. Unetched and highly etched part of the sample were sputtered and the depth profile analyzed.

  15. Comparative analysis of chemical compositions between non-transgenic soybean seeds and those from plants over-expressing AtJMT, the gene for jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kyong-Hee; Kim, Do Young; Pack, In-Soon; Park, Jung-Ho; Seo, Jun Sung; Choi, Yang Do; Cheong, Jong-Joo; Kim, Chung Ho; Kim, Chang-Gi

    2016-04-01

    Transgenic overexpression of the Arabidopsis gene for jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (AtJMT) is involved in regulating jasmonate-related plant responses. To examine its role in the compositional profile of soybean (Glycine max), we compared the seeds from field-grown plants that over-express AtJMT with those of the non-transgenic, wild-type (WT) counterpart. Our analysis of chemical compositions included proximates, amino acids, fatty acids, isoflavones, and antinutrients. Overexpression of AtJMT in the seeds resulted in decreased amounts of tryptophan, palmitic acid, linolenic acid, and stachyose, but increased levels of gadoleic acid and genistein. In particular, seeds from the transgenic soybeans contained 120.0-130.5% more genistein and 60.5-82.1% less stachyose than the WT. A separate evaluation of ingredient values showed that all were within the reference ranges reported for commercially available soybeans, thereby demonstrating the substantial equivalence of these transgenic and non-transgenic seeds.

  16. Comparative study of humic acid removal and floc characteristics by electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation.

    PubMed

    Semerjian, Lucy; Damaj, Ahmad; Salam, Darine

    2015-11-01

    The current study aims at investigating the efficiency of electrocoagulation for the removal of humic acid from contaminated waters. In parallel, conventional chemical coagulation was conducted to asses humic acid removal patterns. The effect of varying contributing parameters (matrix pH, humic acid concentration, type of electrode (aluminum vs. iron), current density, solution conductivity, and distance between electrodes) was considered to optimize the electrocoagulation process for the best attainable humic acid removal efficiencies. Optimum removals were recorded at pH of 5.0-5.5, an electrical conductivity of 3000 μS/cm at 25 °C, and an electrode distance of 1 cm for both electrode types. With aluminum electrodes, a current density of 0.05 mA/cm2 outperformed 0.1 mA/cm2 yet not higher densities, whereas a current density of 0.8 mA/cm2 was needed for iron electrodes to exhibit comparable performance. With both electrode types, higher initial humic acid concentrations were removed at a slower rate but ultimately attained almost complete removals. On the other hand, the best humic acid removals (∼90%) by chemical coagulation were achieved at 4 mg/L for both coagulants. Also, higher removals were attained at elevated initial humic acid concentrations. Humic acid removals of 90% or higher at an initial HA concentration of 40 mg/L were exhibited, yet alum performed better at the highest experimented concentration. It was evident that iron flocs were larger, denser, and more geometrical in shape compared to aluminum flocs.

  17. Identification of nematicidal fatty acids and triglycerides from seeds of Jubaea chilensis by GC-EI-MS and chemical transformation methods.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jian-Qiao; Eppler, C Mark; Montenegro, Gloria; Timmins, Scott D; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2005-01-01

    Nematicidal bioassay-guided fractionation of the n-hexane extract of the seeds of Jubaea chilensis led to the identification of eight known fatty acids and a mixture of triglycerides, reported for the first time for this species. In addition, their corresponding methyl esters were identified to be artifacts generated during the extraction and isolation procedures by using GC-EI-MS and chemical transformation methods. The fatty acid composition of the triglycerides was analyzed by GC-EI-MS and chemical transformation techniques. Among the 17 compounds, only lauric acid and myristic acid exhibited significant inhibitory effects on the movement of Caenorhabditis elegans with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 75 microg/ml. PMID:16163824

  18. Highly efficient chemical process to convert mucic acid into adipic acid and DFT studies of the mechanism of the rhenium-catalyzed deoxydehydration.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiukai; Wu, Di; Lu, Ting; Yi, Guangshun; Su, Haibin; Zhang, Yugen

    2014-04-14

    The production of bulk chemicals and fuels from renewable bio-based feedstocks is of significant importance for the sustainability of human society. Adipic acid, as one of the most-demanded drop-in chemicals from a bioresource, is used primarily for the large-volume production of nylon-6,6 polyamide. It is highly desirable to develop sustainable and environmentally friendly processes for the production of adipic acid from renewable feedstocks. However, currently there is no suitable bio-adipic acid synthesis process. Demonstrated herein is the highly efficient synthetic protocol for the conversion of mucic acid into adipic acid through the oxorhenium-complex-catalyzed deoxydehydration (DODH) reaction and subsequent Pt/C-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation. Quantitative yields (99 %) were achieved for the conversion of mucic acid into muconic acid and adipic acid either in separate sequences or in a one-step process.

  19. Evidence that Chemical Chaperone 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Binds to Human Serum Albumin at Fatty Acid Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    James, Joel; Shihabudeen, Mohamed Sham; Kulshrestha, Shweta; Goel, Varun; Thirumurugan, Kavitha

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress elicits unfolded protein response to counteract the accumulating unfolded protein load inside a cell. The chemical chaperone, 4-Phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) is a FDA approved drug that alleviates endoplasmic reticulum stress by assisting protein folding. It is found efficacious to augment pathological conditions like type 2 diabetes, obesity and neurodegeneration. This study explores the binding nature of 4-PBA with human serum albumin (HSA) through spectroscopic and molecular dynamics approaches, and the results show that 4-PBA has high binding specificity to Sudlow Site II (Fatty acid binding site 3, subdomain IIIA). Ligand displacement studies, RMSD stabilization profiles and MM-PBSA binding free energy calculation confirm the same. The binding constant as calculated from fluorescence spectroscopic studies was found to be kPBA = 2.69 x 105 M-1. Like long chain fatty acids, 4-PBA induces conformational changes on HSA as shown by circular dichroism, and it elicits stable binding at Sudlow Site II (fatty acid binding site 3) by forming strong hydrogen bonding and a salt bridge between domain II and III of HSA. This minimizes the fluctuation of HSA backbone as shown by limited conformational space occupancy in the principal component analysis. The overall hydrophobicity of W214 pocket (located at subdomain IIA), increases upon occupancy of 4-PBA at any FA site. Descriptors of this pocket formed by residues from other subdomains largely play a role in compensating the dynamic movement of W214. PMID:26181488

  20. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  1. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI‐APi‐TOF (Chemical Ionization‐Atmospheric Pressure interface‐Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI‐APi‐TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4‐H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self‐contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  2. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI‐APi‐TOF (Chemical Ionization‐Atmospheric Pressure interface‐Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI‐APi‐TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4‐H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self‐contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit. PMID:27610289

  3. Chemical repair of base lesions, AP-sites, and strand breaks on plasmid DNA in dilute aqueous solution by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Kuniki; Urushibara, Ayumi; Yamashita, Shinichi; Shikazono, Naoya; Yokoya, Akinari; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We report a novel mechanism of radiation protection of DNA by chemical activity of ascorbic acid. •The “chemical repair” of DNA damage was revealed using biochemical assay and chemical kinetics analysis. •We found that ascorbic acid significantly repairs precursors of nucleobase lesions and abasic sites. •However, ascorbic acid seldom repairs precursors of DNA-strand breaks. -- Abstract: We quantified the damage yields produced in plasmid DNA by γ-irradiation in the presence of low concentrations (10–100 μM) of ascorbic acid, which is a major antioxidant in living systems, to clarify whether it chemically repairs radiation damage in DNA. The yield of DNA single strand breaks induced by irradiation was analyzed with agarose gel electrophoresis as conformational changes in closed circular plasmids. Base lesions and abasic sites were also observed as additional conformational changes by treating irradiated samples with glycosylase proteins. By comparing the suppression efficiencies to the induction of each DNA lesion, in addition to scavenging of the OH radicals derived from water radiolysis, it was found that ascorbic acid promotes the chemical repair of precursors of AP-sites and base lesions more effectively than those of single strand breaks. We estimated the efficiency of the chemical repair of each lesion using a kinetic model. Approximately 50–60% of base lesions and AP-sites were repaired by 10 μM ascorbic acid, although strand breaks were largely unrepaired by ascorbic acid at low concentrations. The methods in this study will provide a route to understanding the mechanistic aspects of antioxidant activity in living systems.

  4. Chemical disinfection of combined sewer overflow waters using performic acid or peracetic acids.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Ravi Kumar; Thornberg, Dines; Berner, Jesper; Gramstad, Robin; Öjstedt, Ulrik; Sharma, Anitha Kumari; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2014-08-15

    We investigated the possibility of applying performic acid (PFA) and peracetic acid (PAA) for disinfection of combined sewer overflow (CSO) in existing CSO management infrastructures. The disinfection power of PFA and PAA towards Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus was studied in batch-scale and pre-field experiments. In the batch-scale experiment, 2.5 mg L(-1) PAA removed approximately 4 log unit of E. coli and Enterococcus from CSO with a 360 min contact time. The removal of E. coli and Enterococcus from CSO was always around or above 3 log units using 2-4 mg L(-1) PFA; with a 20 min contact time in both batch-scale and pre-field experiments. There was no toxicological effect measured by Vibrio fischeri when CSO was disinfected with PFA; a slight toxic effect was observed on CSO disinfected with PAA. When the design for PFA based disinfection was applied to CSO collected from an authentic event, the disinfection efficiencies were confirmed and degradation rates were slightly higher than predicted in simulated CSO. PMID:24918873

  5. Practical approach to physical-chemical acid-base management. Stewart at the bedside.

    PubMed

    Magder, Sheldon; Emami, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The late Peter Stewart developed an approach to the analysis of acid-base disturbances in biological systems based on basic physical-chemical principles. His key argument was that the traditional carbon dioxide/bicarbonate analysis with just the use of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation does not account for the important role in the regulation of H(+) concentration played by strong ions, weak acids and water itself. Acceptance of his analysis has been limited because it requires a complicated set of calculations to account for all the variables and it does not provide simple clinical guidance. However, the analysis can be made more pragmatic by using a series of simple equations to quantify the major processes in acid-base disturbances. These include the traditional PCO2 component and the addition of four metabolic processes, which we classify as "water-effects," "chloride-effects," "albumin effects," and "others." Six values are required for the analysis: [Na(+)], [Cl(-)], pH, Pco2, albumin concentration, and base excess. The advantage of this approach is that it gives a better understanding of the mechanisms behind acid-base abnormalities and more readily leads to clinical actions that can prevent or correct the abnormalities. We have developed a simple free mobile app that can be used to input the necessary values to use this approach at the bedside (Physical/Chemical Acid Base Calculator).

  6. [Effects of abscisic acid on chemical components content and color of Glycyrrhiza uralensis].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yu; Liu, Chun-sheng; Liu, Yong; Song, Xiao-na; Gu, Xuan

    2015-05-01

    An experiment was conducted using cultivated Glycyrrhiza uralensis in age of one year to study the effects of abscisic acid (ABA) on chemical components content and color of G. uralensis. By using different concentrations of ABA spraying on leaves, the change of the chemical component content was analyzed within 45 d after ABA stimulation, and the effects on quality were studied combined with colorimetric analysis data. It turned out that in some sense the content of glycyrrhizic acid and liquiritin had increased within 45 d, especially for liquiritin. After high concentrations of ABA (3.96 mg · L(-1)) stimulating, the content of glycyrrhizic acid rose 52% while liquiritin up 392% within 30 d. Then they both showed a decline in the content of glycyrrhizic acid and liquiritin on 45 d. Color index values of a* and b* were all significantly higher than that of the control group within 45 d, which meant the color of powders turned toward red and yellow. The conclusion was that ABA (3.96 mg · L(-1)) stimulating could not only improve the quality in the traditional sense through the color of G. uralensis, but also in the modern sense by improving the content of glycyrrhizic acid and liquiritin. PMID:26323130

  7. Chemical stability of acid rock drainage treatment sludge and implications for sludge management

    SciTech Connect

    Danny M. McDonald; John A. Webb; Jeff Taylor

    2006-03-15

    To assess the chemical stability of sludges generated by neutralizing acid rock drainage (ARD) with alkaline reagents, synthetic ARD was treated with hydrated lime (batch and high-density sludge process), limestone, and two proprietary reagents (KB-1 and Bauxsol). The amorphous metal hydroxide sludge produced was leached using deionized water, U.S. EPA methods (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, synthetic precipitation leaching procedure), and the new strong acid leach test (SALT), which leaches the sludge with a series of sulfuric acid extractant solutions; the pH decreases by {approximately} 1 pH unit with each test, until the final pH is {approximately}2. Sludges precipitated by all reagents had very similar leachabilities except for KB-1 and Bauxsol, which released more aluminum. SALT showed that lowering the pH of the leaching solution mobilized more metals from the sludges. Iron, aluminum, copper, and zinc began to leach at pH 2.5-3, {approximately}4.5, {approximately}5.5, and 6-6.5, respectively. The leachability of ARD treatment sludges is determined by the final pH of the leachate. A higher neutralization potential (e.g., a greater content of unreacted neutralizing agent) makes sludges inherently more chemically stable. Thus, when ARD or any acidic metalliferous wastewater is treated, a choice must be made between efficient reagent use and resistance to acid attack. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Chemical stability of acid rock drainage treatment sludge and implications for sludge management.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Danny M; Webb, John A; Taylor, Jeff

    2006-03-15

    To assess the chemical stability of sludges generated by neutralizing acid rock drainage (ARD) with alkaline reagents, synthetic ARD was treated with hydrated lime (batch and high-density sludge process), limestone, and two proprietary reagents (KB-1 and Bauxsol). The amorphous metal hydroxide sludge produced was leached using deionized water, U.S. EPA methods (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, synthetic precipitation leaching procedure), and the new strong acid leach test (SALT), which leaches the sludge with a series of sulfuric acid extractant solutions; the pH decreases by approximately 1 pH unit with each test, until the final pH is approximately 2. Sludges precipitated by all reagents had very similar leachabilities except for KB-1 and Bauxsol, which released more aluminum. SALT showed that lowering the pH of the leaching solution mobilized more metals from the sludges. Iron, aluminum, copper, and zinc began to leach at pH 2.5-3, approximately 4.5, approximately 5.5, and 6-6.5, respectively. The leachability of ARD treatment sludges is determined by the final pH of the leachate. A higher neutralization potential (e.g., a greater content of unreacted neutralizing agent) makes sludges inherently more chemically stable. Thus, when ARD or any acidic metalliferous wastewater is treated, a choice must be made between efficient reagent use and resistance to acid attack. PMID:16570625

  9. [Effects of abscisic acid on chemical components content and color of Glycyrrhiza uralensis].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yu; Liu, Chun-sheng; Liu, Yong; Song, Xiao-na; Gu, Xuan

    2015-05-01

    An experiment was conducted using cultivated Glycyrrhiza uralensis in age of one year to study the effects of abscisic acid (ABA) on chemical components content and color of G. uralensis. By using different concentrations of ABA spraying on leaves, the change of the chemical component content was analyzed within 45 d after ABA stimulation, and the effects on quality were studied combined with colorimetric analysis data. It turned out that in some sense the content of glycyrrhizic acid and liquiritin had increased within 45 d, especially for liquiritin. After high concentrations of ABA (3.96 mg · L(-1)) stimulating, the content of glycyrrhizic acid rose 52% while liquiritin up 392% within 30 d. Then they both showed a decline in the content of glycyrrhizic acid and liquiritin on 45 d. Color index values of a* and b* were all significantly higher than that of the control group within 45 d, which meant the color of powders turned toward red and yellow. The conclusion was that ABA (3.96 mg · L(-1)) stimulating could not only improve the quality in the traditional sense through the color of G. uralensis, but also in the modern sense by improving the content of glycyrrhizic acid and liquiritin.

  10. Beyond terrestrial biology: charting the chemical universe of α-amino acid structures.

    PubMed

    Meringer, Markus; Cleaves, H James; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-11-25

    α-Amino acids are fundamental to biochemistry as the monomeric building blocks with which cells construct proteins according to genetic instructions. However, the 20 amino acids of the standard genetic code represent a tiny fraction of the number of α-amino acid chemical structures that could plausibly play such a role, both from the perspective of natural processes by which life emerged and evolved, and from the perspective of human-engineered genetically coded proteins. Until now, efforts to describe the structures comprising this broader set, or even estimate their number, have been hampered by the complex combinatorial properties of organic molecules. Here, we use computer software based on graph theory and constructive combinatorics in order to conduct an efficient and exhaustive search of the chemical structures implied by two careful and precise definitions of the α-amino acids relevant to coded biological proteins. Our results include two virtual libraries of α-amino acid structures corresponding to these different approaches, comprising 121 044 and 3 846 structures, respectively, and suggest a simple approach to exploring much larger, as yet uncomputed, libraries of interest. PMID:24152173

  11. Beyond terrestrial biology: charting the chemical universe of α-amino acid structures.

    PubMed

    Meringer, Markus; Cleaves, H James; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-11-25

    α-Amino acids are fundamental to biochemistry as the monomeric building blocks with which cells construct proteins according to genetic instructions. However, the 20 amino acids of the standard genetic code represent a tiny fraction of the number of α-amino acid chemical structures that could plausibly play such a role, both from the perspective of natural processes by which life emerged and evolved, and from the perspective of human-engineered genetically coded proteins. Until now, efforts to describe the structures comprising this broader set, or even estimate their number, have been hampered by the complex combinatorial properties of organic molecules. Here, we use computer software based on graph theory and constructive combinatorics in order to conduct an efficient and exhaustive search of the chemical structures implied by two careful and precise definitions of the α-amino acids relevant to coded biological proteins. Our results include two virtual libraries of α-amino acid structures corresponding to these different approaches, comprising 121 044 and 3 846 structures, respectively, and suggest a simple approach to exploring much larger, as yet uncomputed, libraries of interest.

  12. Design of a New Type of Compact Chemical Heater for Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kamal G; Guelig, Dylan; Diesburg, Steven; Buser, Joshua; Burton, Robert; LaBarre, Paul; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Weigl, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Previous chemical heater designs for isothermal nucleic acid amplification have been based on solid-liquid phase transition, but using this approach, developers have identified design challenges en route to developing a low-cost, disposable device. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a new heater configuration suitable for isothermal amplification in which one reactant of an exothermic reaction is a liquid-gas phase-change material, thereby eliminating the need for a separate phase-change compartment. This design offers potentially enhanced performance and energy density compared to other chemical and electric heaters. PMID:26430883

  13. Design of a New Type of Compact Chemical Heater for Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kamal G.; Guelig, Dylan; Diesburg, Steven; Buser, Joshua; Burton, Robert; LaBarre, Paul; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Weigl, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Previous chemical heater designs for isothermal nucleic acid amplification have been based on solid-liquid phase transition, but using this approach, developers have identified design challenges en route to developing a low-cost, disposable device. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a new heater configuration suitable for isothermal amplification in which one reactant of an exothermic reaction is a liquid-gas phase-change material, thereby eliminating the need for a separate phase-change compartment. This design offers potentially enhanced performance and energy density compared to other chemical and electric heaters. PMID:26430883

  14. Improving surface functional properties of tofu whey-derived peptides by chemical modification with fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Matemu, Athanasia Oswald; Katayama, Shigeru; Kayahara, Hisataka; Murasawa, Hisashi; Nakamura, Soichiro

    2012-04-01

    Effect of acylation with saturated fatty acids on surface functional properties of tofu whey-derived peptides was investigated. Tofu whey (TW) and soy proteins (7S, 11S, and acid-precipitated soy protein [APP]) were hydrolyzed by Protease M 'Amano' G, and resulting peptide mixtures were acylated with esterified fatty acids of different chain length (6C to 18C) to form a covalent linkage between the carboxyl group of fatty acid and the free amino groups of peptide. Acylation significantly (P < 0.05) increased emulsifying properties of 7S, 11S, and APP peptides independent of fatty acid chain length. Acylation decreased water binding capacity although oil binding capacity of acylated tofu whey ultra filtered fraction (UFTW < 3 kDa), 7S- and 11S-peptides were improved compared to native peptides. 7S peptides acylated with long chain fatty acids had shown significant higher surface hydrophobicity as in contrast with acylated UFTW < 3 kDa and APP peptides. Fluorescence spectra studies revealed structural conformation of acylated soy peptides as compared to native peptides. This study shows that chemical modification with fatty acids can further affect functional properties of soy proteins.

  15. Quantum-chemical study of electronically excited states of protolytic forms of vanillic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vusovich, O. V.; Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Sokolova, I. V.; Vasil'eva, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The paper describes an analysis of possible ways of deactivation of electronically excited states of 4-hydroxy- 3-methoxy-benzoic acid (vanillic acid) and its protolytic forms with the use of quantum-chemical methods INDO/S (intermediate neglect of differential overlap with a spectroscopic parameterization) and MEP (molecular electrostatic potential). The ratio of radiative and non-radiative deactivation channels of the electronic excitation energy is established. The rate constants of photophysical processes (internal and intercombination conversions) occurring after the absorption of light in these forms are evaluated.

  16. Substituent efects on the carbon-13 chemical shifts in α-phenylpyridylacrylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, B. Ž.; Mis̆ić-Vukovic, M.; Vajs, V. E.; Čanadi, J. J.

    1992-03-01

    The 13C N.M.R. spectra of some substituted α-phenylpyridylacrylic acids, α-phenyl, α-(3-pyrydyl) and α-(3-pyrydyl-N-oxide) cinnamic acids were determined in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide (d 6-DMSO). It has been shown that the subsitutent chemical shifts (SCS) for C βatom ethylenic bond of the examined compounds correlated linearely with the summ of the corresponding substituent constants in the both rings (σ x + σ Y). This correlation was interpreted as evidence that the electronic effects of both substituents are involved in conjugated aromatic system.

  17. Study on NO2 absorption by ascorbic acid and various chemicals*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Wu, Cheng-zhi; Fang, He-liang; Shi, Yao; Lei, Le-cheng

    2006-01-01

    Study on NO2 absorption aimed at seeking a better NO2 absorption chemical at pH 4.5~7.0 for application to existing wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The results from the double-stirred reactor indicated that ascorbic acid has very high absorption rate at this pH range. The rate constant of ascorbic acid reaction with NO2 (0~1000×10−6 mol/mol) is about 3.54×106 mol/(L·s) at pH 5.4~6.5 at 55 °C. PMID:16365924

  18. PISCES field chemical emissions monitoring project: Site 102 emissions report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report is one of a series sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in the area of trace substance emissions from fossil-fuel power plants. This report presents the results of a sampling and analytical study to characterize trace substances emissions at Site 102. Site 102 is a cyclone boiler burning a sub-bituminous coal. Site 102 employs an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. The objective of this report is to transmit the detailed data to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assist the Agency in evaluating utility trace chemical emissions as well as the associated health risk impacts--as mandated in Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. This report does not attempt to compare the results with other sites. An assessment of data from all plants that have been tested is presented in the Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report (EPRI TR-104614).

  19. Potential human health effects of acid rain: report of a workshop.

    PubMed

    Goyer, R A; Bachmann, J; Clarkson, T W; Ferris, B G; Graham, J; Mushak, P; Perl, D P; Rall, D P; Schlesinger, R; Sharpe, W

    1985-05-01

    This report summarizes the potential impact of the acid precipitation phenomenon on human health. There are two major components to this phenomenon: the predepositional phase, during which there is direct human exposure to acidic substances from ambient air, and the post-depositional phase, in which the deposition of acid materials on water and soil results in the mobilization, transport, and even chemical transformation of toxic metals. Acidification increases bioconversion of mercury to methylmercury, which accumulates in fish, increasing the risk to toxicity in people who eat fish. Increase in water and soil content of lead and cadmium increases human exposure to these metals which become additive to other sources presently under regulatory control. The potential adverse health effects of increased human exposure to aluminum is not known at the present time.

  20. Potential human health effects of acid rain: report of a workshop

    PubMed Central

    Goyer, Robert A.; Bachmann, John; Clarkson, Thomas W.; Ferris, Benjamin G.; Graham, Judith; Mushak, Paul; Perl, Daniel P.; Rall, David P.; Schlesinger, Richard; Sharpe, William; Wood, John M.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the potential impact of the acid precipitation phenomenon on human health. There are two major components to this phenomenon: the predepositional phase, during which there is direct human exposure to acidic substances from ambient air, and the post-depositional phase, in which the deposition of acid materials on water and soil results in the mobilization, transport, and even chemical transformation of toxic metals. Acidification increases bioconversion of mercury to methylmercury, which accumulates in fish, increasing the risk to toxicity in people who eat fish. Increase in water and soil content of lead and cadmium increases human exposure to these metals which become additive to other sources presently under regulatory control. The potential adverse health effects of increased human exposure to aluminum is not known at the present time. PMID:3896772

  1. [New biological active derivatives of indomethacin and acetylsalicylic acid. Synthesis, physico-chemical characterisation and structure validation].

    PubMed

    Stan, Catalina; Stefanache, Alina; Dumitrache, M

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that niflumic acid glycinamide has a good antiinflammatory action useful in gum inflammatory diseases. The objective of this study was to obtain new glycinamides of acetylsalicylic acid and indomethacin, which could have a better antiinflammatory action than niflumic acid glycinamide. The study presents the synthesis, physico-chemical characterisation and structure validation of these glycinamides.

  2. The chemical chaperones tauroursodeoxycholic and 4-phenylbutyric acid accelerate thyroid hormone activation and energy expenditure

    PubMed Central

    da-Silva, Wagner S.; Ribich, Scott; e Drigo, Rafael Arrojo; Castillo, Melany; Patty, Mary-Elizabeth; Bianco, Antonio C.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of cell lines endogenously expressing the thyroid hormone activating enzyme type 2 deiodinase (D2) to the chemical chaperones tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) or 4-phenylbutiric acid (4-PBA) increases D2 expression, activity and T3 production. In brown adipocytes, TUDCA or 4-PBA induced T3-dependent genes and oxygen consumption (~2-fold), an effect partially lost in D2 knockout cells. In wild type, but not in D2 knockout mice, administration of TUDCA lowered the respiratory quotient, doubled brown adipose tissue D2 activity and normalized the glucose intolerance associated with high fat feeding. Thus, D2 plays a critical role in the metabolic effects of chemical chaperones. PMID:21237159

  3. Chemical analyses of rocks, minerals, and detritus, Yucca Mountain--Preliminary report, special report No. 11

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.A.; Livingston, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    This chemical analysis study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed assessment of the geology and geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. This report is preliminary in the sense that more chemical analyses may be needed in the future and also in the sense that these chemical analyses should be considered as a small part of a much larger geological data base. The interpretations discussed herein may be modified as that larger data base is examined and established. All of the chemical analyses performed to date are shown in Table 1. There are three parts to this table: (1) trace element analyses on rocks (limestone and tuff) and minerals (calcite/opal), (2) rare earth analyses on rocks (tuff) and minerals (calcite/opal), and (3) major element analyses + CO{sub 2} on rocks (tuff) and detritus sand. In this report, for each of the three parts of the table, the data and its possible significance will be discussed first, then some overall conclusions will be made, and finally some recommendations for future work will be offered.

  4. Pyroglutamic acid-induced metabolic acidosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Luyasu, S; Wamelink, M M C; Galanti, L; Dive, A

    2014-06-01

    High anion gap metabolic acidosis due to pyroglutamic acid (5-oxoproline) is a rare complication of acetaminophen treatment (which depletes glutathione stores) and is often associated with clinically moderate to severe encephalopathy. Acquired 5-oxoprolinase deficiency (penicillins) or the presence of other risk factors of glutathione depletion such as malnutrition or sepsis seems to be necessary for symptoms development. We report the case of a 55-year-old women who developed a symptomatic overproduction of 5-oxoproline during flucloxacillin treatment for severe sepsis while receiving acetaminophen for fever control. Hemodialysis accelerated the clearance of the accumulated organic acid, and was followed by a sustained clinical improvement.

  5. Physical and chemical limnological study of an acid mine lake in Sullivan County, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Broomall, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    Southwestern Indiana has numerous lakes developed in abandoned coal mine spoils which support recreational sports fisheries. Some lakes, due to exposure to acid mine drainage from coal wastes and pyritic spoils, are unsuitable habitats for fisheries development. This study examines a publicly owned acid mine lake with an area of approximately 51 ha, following reclamation and elimination of acid producing areas in its drainage basin. Fifteen physico-chemical sample collections were made over a thirteen month period (1991--1992). Parameters sampled included pH, total acidity, iron, manganese, and aluminum. Comparisons were made to historic pre-reclamation water quality data and to established models of acid mine lake recovery. Due to the local topography and exposure to prevailing winds, the lake was generally well mixed throughout the study. Virtually no summer stratification was found, but typical winter season stratification occurred. The water column was well oxygenated throughout the study. Secchi disk transparency varied from 2.5 m to clear to lake bottom (6 m). This study found no significant change in lake water pH (2.9--3.0 to 3.0--3.2 s.u.) since reclamation activities in 1988. However, changes in total acidity and total metal concentrations had occurred since reclamation which suggested that the lake was in early recovery stages. No trends in water quality improvement were determined which could assist in planning toward the eventual establishment of a sports fishery.

  6. Stochastic acid-based quenching in chemically amplified photoresists: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Chris A.; Biafore, John J.; Smith, Mark D.

    2011-04-01

    BACKGROUND: The stochastic nature of acid-base quenching in chemically amplified photoresists leads to variations in the resulting acid concentration during post-exposure bake, which leads to line-edge roughness (LER) of the resulting features. METHODS: Using a stochastic resist simulator, we predicted the mean and standard deviation of the acid concentration after post-exposure bake for an open-frame exposure and fit the results to empirical expressions. RESULTS: The mean acid concentration after quenching can be predicted using the reaction-limited rate equation and an effective rate constant. The effective quenching rate constant is predicted by an empirical expression. A second empirical expression for the standard deviation of the acid concentration matched the output of the PROLITH stochastic resist model to within a few percent CONCLUSIONS: Predicting the stochastic uncertainty in acid concentration during post-exposure bake for 193-nm and extreme ultraviolet resists allows optimization of resist processing and formulations, and may form the basis of a comprehensive LER model.

  7. Preparation and physico-chemical properties of hydrogels from carboxymethyl cassava starch crosslinked with citric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonkham, Sasikan; Sangseethong, Kunruedee; Chatakanon, Pathama; Niamnuy, Chalida; Nakasaki, Kiyohiko; Sriroth, Klanarong

    2014-06-01

    Recently, environmentally friendly hydrogels prepared from renewable bio-based resources have drawn significant attention from both industrial and academic sectors. In this study, chemically crosslinked hydrogels have been developed from cassava starch which is a bio-based polymer using a non-toxic citric acid as a crosslinking agent. Cassava starch was first modified by carboxymethylation to improve its water absorbency property. The carboxymethyl cassava starch (CMCS) obtained was then crosslinked with citric acid at different concentrations and reaction times. The gel fraction of hydrogels increased progressively with increasing citric acid concentration. Free swelling capacity of hydrogels in de-ionized water, saline solution and buffers at various pHs as well as absorption under load were investigated. The results revealed that swelling behavior and mechanical characteristic of hydrogels depended on the citric acid concentration used in reaction. Increasing citric acid concentration resulted in hydrogels with stronger network but lower swelling and absorption capacity. The cassava starch hydrogels developed were sensitive to ionic strength and pH of surrounding medium, showing much reduced swelling capacity in saline salt solution and acidic buffers.

  8. A comparison of neutralization efficiency of chemicals with respect to acidic Kopili River water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapil, Nibedita; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G.

    2016-02-01

    Among all the renewable sources of energy, hydropower is the most potential source which is economical, non-polluting and eco-friendly. The efficiency of hydropower plant in the long run depends on many factors like water and sediment quality. Erosive and corrosive wear of machine parts like turbine is a complex phenomenon. The problem becomes more acute if the hydroenvironment is acidic in nature. The wear and tear due to corrosion/erosion caused by acid mine drainage (AMD) from coal mines reduces the efficiency and the life of the equipments. In this work, neutralization of the acidic water of the Kopili River, Assam, India was investigated using a number of basic chemicals and quantitatively estimating their effectiveness and actual requirement. The acidic water of the river, used as the cooling water, has been found responsible for damaging the equipments of the Kopili Hydro Electric Power Project (KHEP), Assam/Meghalaya, India by reducing the life of all metallic parts through corrosion. In this work, use is made of a number of basic materials like calcium carbonate, calcium hydroxide, calcium oxide, sodium carbonate, sodium hydroxide, and ammonia to examine their neutralization efficiency with respect to the acidic water and it was found that quick lime or raw lime (CaO) has the highest neutralization capacity. Suggestions have been made for meeting the problem of acidity of the river water.

  9. Remediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater using acid/BOF slag enhanced chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, T T; Kao, C M; Wang, J Y

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of applying acid/H(2)O(2)/basic oxygen furnace slag (BOF slag) and acid/S(2)O(8)(2-)/BOF slag systems to enhance the chemical oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater. Results from the bench-scale study indicate that TCE oxidation via the Fenton-like oxidation process can be enhanced with the addition of BOF slag at low pH (pH=2-5.2) and neutral (pH=7.1) conditions. Because the BOF slag has iron abundant properties (14% of FeO and 6% of Fe(2)O(3)), it can be sustainably reused for the supplement of iron minerals during the Fenton-like or persulfate oxidation processes. Results indicate that higher TCE removal efficiency (84%) was obtained with the addition of inorganic acid for the activation of Fenton-like reaction compared with the experiments with organic acids addition (with efficiency of 10-15% lower) (BOF slag=10gL(-1); initial pH=5.2). This could be due to the fact that organic acids would compete with TCE for available oxidants. Results also indicate that the pH value had a linear correlation with the observed first-order decay constant of TCE, and thus, lower pH caused a higher TCE oxidation rate.

  10. Degradation of Single Stranded Nucleic Acids by the Chemical Nuclease Activity of the Metal Complex [Cu(phen)(nal)]+

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Ramírez, Norma; Mendoza-Díaz, Guillermo; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2003-01-01

    The chemical design of metal complexes of the type [Cu(phen)(antib)]+ (where antib is a quinolone or a fluoroquinolone) has been carried out in an approach to better understand how the coordination of their components affect the activity of quinolones. The ability of [Cu(phen)(nal)]+ to interact with DNA in vivo and its capacity to promote the degradation of plasmid and chromosomal DNA, under reductive conditions has been previously reported. However whether this compound utilizes other intracellular targets to promote bacterial killing was a question that deserved to be answered. In this paper, the studies of the chemical nuclease properties encoded by the metal complex [Cu(phen)(nal)]+ were extended by using different types of single chain nucleic acids, i.e, ribosomal and tumor mosaic virus RNAs as well as poly-dA-dT. Our results showed that degradation of the nucleic acids occurred only under reductive conditions. Although MPA and [3-mercaptoethanol were the chemical reducers that best assisted the nuclease reaction, other biological compounds such as citric and succinic acid also were shown to act like reducers in that reaction. All.hough the nuclease activity of [Cu(phen)(nal)]+ was comparable to that exhibited by bis copper phenanthroline [Cu(phen)z]2+our results showed that none of the individual components of [Cu(phen)(nal)]+ was able to promote the degradation of either the RNAs or poly(dA-dT). These results strongly support the hypothesis that the metal complex [Cu(phen)(nal)] uses not only DNA but also RNA as targets to promote bacterial killing. PMID:18365040

  11. C-1s NEXAFS spectroscopy reveals chemical fractionation of humic acid by cation-induced coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Christl,I.; Kretzschmar, R.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of cation-induced coagulation on the chemical composition of dissolved and coagulated fractions of humic acid was investigated in batch coagulation experiments for additions of aluminum at pH 4 and 5, iron at pH 4, and calcium and lead at pH 6. The partitioning of organic carbon and metals was determined by analyzing total organic carbon and total metal contents of the dissolved phase. Both the dissolved and the coagulated humic acid fractions were characterized using synchrotron scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and C-1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Intensities of {pi}* transitions of carboxyl carbon and {sigma}* transitions of alkyl, O-alkyl, and carboxyl carbon decreased with increasing metal concentration for the dissolved humic acid fractions. This decrease was accompanied by an increase of the respective intensities in the coagulated fraction as shown for lead. Intensities of aromatic and phenolic carbon were affected to a larger extent only by aluminum and iron additions. The changes observed in the C-1s NEXAFS spectra coincided with an increasing removal of organic carbon from the dissolved phase with increasing total metal concentrations. We conclude that humic acid was chemically fractionated by cation-induced coagulation, which preferentially removed functional groups involved in metal-cation binding from solution.

  12. Coupling of hydrologic transport and chemical reactions in a stream affected by acid mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, B.A.; Broshears, R.E.; Bencala, K.E.; McKnight, Diane M.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream, examined the coupling of hydrologic transport to chemical reactions affecting metal concentrations. Injection of LiCl as a conservative tracer was used to determine discharge and residence time along a 1497-m reach. Transport of metals downstream from inflows of acidic, metal-rich water was evaluated based on synoptic samples of metal concentrations and the hydrologic characteristics of the stream. Transport of SO4 and Mn was generally conservative, but in the subreaches most affected by acidic inflows, transport was reactive. Both 0.1-??m filtered and particulate Fe were reactive over most of the stream reach. Filtered Al partitioned to the particulate phase in response to high instream concentrations. Simulations that accounted for the removal of SO4, Mn, Fe, and Al with first-order reactions reproduced the steady-state profiles. The calculated rate constants for net removal used in the simulations embody several processes that occur on a stream-reach scale. The comparison between rates of hydrologie transport and chemical reactions indicates that reactions are only important over short distances in the stream near the acidic inflows, where reactions occur on a comparable time scale with hydrologic transport and thus affect metal concentrations.

  13. Water chemical ionization mass spectrometry of aldehydes, ketones esters, and carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Miller, D.J.

    1986-11-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI) of aliphatic and aromatic carbonyl compounds using water as the reagent gas provides intense pseudomolecular ions and class-specific fragmentation patterns that can be used to identify aliphatic aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and esters. The length of ester acyl and alkyl groups can easily be determined on the basis of loss of alcohols from the protonated parent. Water CI provides for an approximately 200:1 selectivity of carbonyl species over alkanes. No reagent ions are detected above 55 amu, allowing species as small as acetone, propanal, acetic acid, and methyl formate to be identified. When deuterate water was used as the reagent, only the carboxylic acids and ..beta..-diketones showed significant H/D exchange. The use of water CI to identify carbonyl compounds in a wastewater from the supercritical water extraction of lignite coal, in lemon oil, and in whiskey volatiles is discussed.

  14. Comparison of efficacy of chemical peeling with 25% trichloroacetic acid and 0.1% retinoic acid for facial rejuvenation

    PubMed Central

    Gurel, Mehmet Salih; Gungor, Sule; Tekeli, Omur; Canat, Dilek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Skin aging is a problem which negatively affects the psyche of the person, social relations, as well as work life and health and which compels the patients to find appropriate treatment methods. Numerous treatment methods have been developed in order to delay aging and to reduce the aging effects in addition to having a younger, healthier and more beautiful facial appearance. Aim To compare the efficiency, cosmetic results and possible adverse effects of the peeling treatment with 25% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and 0.1% retinoic acid for facial rejuvenation in patients presenting with skin aging. Material and methods Fifty female patients in total presenting with medium and advanced degree skin aging were subject to this study. Two separate treatment groups were formed; the first group underwent chemical skin treatment with 25% TCA while the other group was applied with 0.1% retinoic acid treatment. Following the 4 months’ treatment the patients were controlled three times in total for post lesional hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentation, scars, skin irritation and other possible changes per month. The pretreatment and first follow-up visit, and final control images were comparatively evaluated by three observers via specific software. Results The healing rates of the group subject to retinoic acid were statistically higher (p < 0.05) compared to patients in the TCA group in the final follow-up visit following the treatment according to the first and second observers. On the other hand, according to the third observer, patients applied with retinoic acid presented with higher healing rates compared to those treated with TCA, however; this rate was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The frequency of TCA- and retinoic acid-associated adverse effects was similar in both groups (p > 0.05). As a result of both treatments, a reduction in the quality of life scores as well as a pronounced recovery (p = 0.001) in the quality of life of those patients

  15. Quantitative Survey and Structural Classification of Hydraulic Fracturing Chemicals Reported in Unconventional Gas Production.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Martin; Hoelzer, Kathrin

    2016-04-01

    Much interest is directed at the chemical structure of hydraulic fracturing (HF) additives in unconventional gas exploitation. To bridge the gap between existing alphabetical disclosures by function/CAS number and emerging scientific contributions on fate and toxicity, we review the structural properties which motivate HF applications, and which determine environmental fate and toxicity. Our quantitative overview relied on voluntary U.S. disclosures evaluated from the FracFocus registry by different sources and on a House of Representatives ("Waxman") list. Out of over 1000 reported substances, classification by chemistry yielded succinct subsets able to illustrate the rationale of their use, and physicochemical properties relevant for environmental fate, toxicity and chemical analysis. While many substances were nontoxic, frequent disclosures also included notorious groundwater contaminants like petroleum hydrocarbons (solvents), precursors of endocrine disruptors like nonylphenols (nonemulsifiers), toxic propargyl alcohol (corrosion inhibitor), tetramethylammonium (clay stabilizer), biocides or strong oxidants. Application of highly oxidizing chemicals, together with occasional disclosures of putative delayed acids and complexing agents (i.e., compounds designed to react in the subsurface) suggests that relevant transformation products may be formed. To adequately investigate such reactions, available information is not sufficient, but instead a full disclosure of HF additives is necessary. PMID:26902161

  16. Chemical force titrations of amine- and sulfonic acid-modified poly(dimethylsiloxane).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Oleschuk, Richard D; Horton, J Hugh

    2005-02-15

    Chemical force titrations-measurements of the adhesive interaction between a pair of suitably chemically modified atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and sample surfaces as a function of pH-have been carried out for various combinations of silanol, amine, carboxylic acid, and sulfonic acid functional groups on both tip and sample. The primary surface material studied was poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Surface modification was carried out using a plasma oxidation process to form silanol sites; further modification with amine or sulfonic acid sites was carried out by reaction of the silanol sites with the appropriate trialkoxysilane derivative. AFM tips were also modified using trialkoxysilane compounds. In the cases of tip/sample combinations with the same functional group on each, surface pK(1/2) values could be determined. In several "mixed" tip/sample combinations, a peak appeared in the titration curve midway between the surface pK(1/2) values of the tip and sample, consistent with an ionic H-bonding model for the interactions. The amine/sulfonic acid pair showed more complex behavior; the amine-terminated tip/sulfonic acid-terminated PDMS surface force titration curve consisted of two peaks centered at pH 4 and pH 8. Reversing the tip/sample pair resulted in the peak positions being shifted upward by 1.0 pH unit. The peak appearing at lower pH is assigned to electrostatic interactions between the two oppositely charged surfaces, whereas the higher pH peak is believed to arise due to ionic H-bonding interactions. AFM images show the effects on surface patterning of amine- and sulfonic acid-modified PDMS surfaces that have undergone two different oxidation methods (air plasma oxidation and Tesla coil oxidation). The surface morphologies of freshly prepared and 24 h aged air plasma oxidized PDMS are also discussed in this study.

  17. In situ chemical functionalization of gallium nitride with phosphonic acid derivatives during etching.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Stewart J; Greenough, Michelle; Arellano, Consuelo; Paskova, Tania; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2014-03-01

    In situ functionalization of polar (c plane) and nonpolar (a plane) gallium nitride (GaN) was performed by adding (3-bromopropyl) phosphonic acid or propyl phosphonic acid to a phosphoric acid etch. The target was to modulate the emission properties and oxide formation of GaN, which was explored through surface characterization with atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and water contact angle. The use of (3-bromopropyl) phosphonic acid and propyl phosphonic acid in phosphoric acid demonstrated lower amounts of gallium oxide formation and greater hydrophobicity for both sample sets, while also improving PL emission of polar GaN samples. In addition to crystal orientation, growth-related factors such as defect density in bulk GaN versus thin GaN films residing on sapphire substrates were investigated as well as their responses to in situ functionalization. Thin nonpolar GaN layers were the most sensitive to etching treatments due in part to higher defect densities (stacking faults and threading dislocations), which accounts for large surface depressions. High-quality GaN (both free-standing bulk polar and bulk nonpolar) demonstrated increased sensitivity to oxide formation. Room-temperature PL stands out as an excellent technique to identify nonradiative recombination as observed in the spectra of heteroepitaxially grown GaN samples. The chemical methods applied to tune optical and physical properties of GaN provide a quantitative framework for future novel chemical and biochemical sensor development.

  18. Cholinium-amino acid based ionic liquids: a new method of synthesis and physico-chemical characterization.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Serena; Masci, Giancarlo; Casciotta, Francesco; Caminiti, Ruggero; Scarpellini, Eleonora; Campetella, Marco; Gontrani, Lorenzo

    2015-08-28

    In the present work we report the synthesis and physico-chemical characterization in terms of the viscosity and density of a wide series of cholinium-amino acid based room temperature ionic liquids ([Ch][AA] RTILs). 18 different amino acids were used to obtain 14 room temperature ILs. Among the most common AAs, only valine did not form an RTIL but it is a liquid above 80 °C. With respect to the methods reported in the literature we propose a synthesis based on potentiometric titration which has several advantages such as shorter preparation time, stoichiometry within ±1%, very high yields (close to 100%), high reproducibility, and no use of organic solvents, thus being more environmentally friendly. We tried to prepare dianionic ILs with some AAs with two potentially ionisable groups but in all cases the salts were solids at room temperature. All the ILs were characterized by (1)H NMR to confirm the stoichiometry. Physico-chemical properties such as density, viscosity, refractive index and conductivity were measured as a function of temperature and correlated with empirical equations. The values were compared with the data already reported in the literature for some [Ch][AA] ILs. The thermal expansion coefficient αp and the molar volume Vm were also calculated from the experimental density values. Due to the high number of AAs explored and their structural heterogeneity we have been able to find some interesting correlations between the data obtained and the structural features of the AAs in terms of the alkyl chain length, hydrogen bonding ability, stacking and cyclization. Some parameters were also found to be in good agreement with those reported for other ILs. We think that these data can give an important contribution to the understanding of the structure-property relationship of ILs because they focused on the structural effect of the anions, while most data in the literature are focussed on the cations. PMID:26206450

  19. 1997 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    Heather McBride

    1997-07-01

    The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (EPCIL4), Title III, Section 313 [also known as the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA)], as modified by Executive Order 12856, requires all federal facilities to submit an annual Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report every July for the preceding calendar year. Owners and operators of manufacturing, processing, or production facilities are required to report their toxic chemical releases to all environmental mediums (air, water, soil, etc.). At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), nitric acid was the only toxic chemical used in 1997 that met the reportable threshold limit of 10,000 lb. Form R is the only documentation required by the Environmental Protection Agency, and it is included in the appendix of this report. This report, as requested by DOE, is provided for documentation purposes. In addition, a detailed description of the evaluation and reporting process for chemicals and processes at LANL has been included.

  20. FY13 GLYCOLIC-NITRIC ACID FLOWSHEET DEMONSTRATIONS OF THE DWPF CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL WITH SIMULANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Zamecnik, J.; Best, D.

    2014-03-13

    Savannah River Remediation is evaluating changes to its current Defense Waste Processing Facility flowsheet to replace formic acid with glycolic acid in order to improve processing cycle times and decrease by approximately 100x the production of hydrogen, a potentially flammable gas. Higher throughput is needed in the Chemical Processing Cell since the installation of the bubblers into the melter has increased melt rate. Due to the significant maintenance required for the safety significant gas chromatographs and the potential for production of flammable quantities of hydrogen, eliminating the use of formic acid is highly desirable. Previous testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory has shown that replacing formic acid with glycolic acid allows the reduction and removal of mercury without significant catalytic hydrogen generation. Five back-to-back Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycles and four back-to-back Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were successful in demonstrating the viability of the nitric/glycolic acid flowsheet. The testing was completed in FY13 to determine the impact of process heels (approximately 25% of the material is left behind after transfers). In addition, back-to-back experiments might identify longer-term processing problems. The testing was designed to be prototypic by including sludge simulant, Actinide Removal Product simulant, nitric acid, glycolic acid, and Strip Effluent simulant containing Next Generation Solvent in the SRAT processing and SRAT product simulant, decontamination frit slurry, and process frit slurry in the SME processing. A heel was produced in the first cycle and each subsequent cycle utilized the remaining heel from the previous cycle. Lower SRAT purges were utilized due to the low hydrogen generation. Design basis addition rates and boilup rates were used so the processing time was shorter than current processing rates.

  1. F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, samples from the six FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site flagging criteria and turbidity standards during the quarter are the focus of this report.

  2. Investigation of reports of sexual dysfunction among male chemical workers manufacturing stilbene derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, M.M.; Wegman, D.H.; Greaves, I.A.; Hammond, S.K.; Ellenbecker, M.J.; Spark, R.F.; Smith, E.R. )

    1990-01-01

    A Health Hazard Evaluation was conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in an area of a large chemical plant that manufactured the stilbene derivative 4,4'-diaminostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid, an intermediate used for the production of optical brightening agents. Men employed in the area reported problems with impotence. The study population consisted of 44 men aged 20-57 years (mean age 37) employed in the area at the time of the evaluation. An industrial hygiene investigation, health and work history questionnaire survey, physical examinations, and blood chemistry and serum hormone evaluation were conducted. Fourteen percent of the men reported symptoms of impotence over the preceding 6 or more months, 7% had potency problems of shorter duration, and 7% were not currently impotent but had experienced impotence for 6 or more months in the past; 36% experienced decreased libido, all since beginning work in the production area. Low levels of serum testosterone (less than 350 ng/dl) were observed in 37% of the men. The low serum testosterone concentrations were not accounted for fully by diurnal variation or an effect of rotating shift work. It is suggested that exposures to chemicals possessing estrogenic activity may be related to the observed health effects in these workers.

  3. Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content. [nitrogen 15-enriched nitric acid

    DOEpatents

    Michaels, E.D.

    1981-02-25

    A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content includes: a chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products. A particular embodiment of the process in the production of nitrogen-15-enriched nitric acid.

  4. Comparison between electrocoagulation and chemical precipitation for metals removal from acidic soil leachate.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Nathalie; Drogui, Patrick; Montané, Camille; Hausler, Robert; Mercier, Guy; Blais, Jean-François

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a quantitative comparison between electrocoagulation and chemical precipitation based on heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) removal from acidic soil leachate (ASL) at the laboratory pilot scale. Chemical precipitation was evaluated using either calcium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide, whereas electrocoagulation was evaluated via an electrolytic cell using mild steel electrodes. Chemical precipitation was as effective as electrocoagulation in removing metals from ASL having low contamination levels (30 mg Pbl(-1) and 18 mg Znl(-1)). For ASL enriched with different metals (each concentration of metals was initially adjusted to 100 mg l(-1)), the residual Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations at the end of the experiments were below the acceptable level recommended for discharge in sewage urban works (more than 99.8% of metal was removed) using either electrocoagulation or chemical precipitation. Cd was more effectively removed by electrochemical treatment, whereas Ni was easily removed by chemical treatment. The cost for energy, chemicals and disposal of metallic residue of electrocoagulation process ranged from USD 8.83 to 13.95 tds(-1), which was up to five times lower than that recorded using chemical precipitation. Highly effective electrocoagulation was observed as the ASL was specifically enriched with high concentration of Pb (250-2000 mg Pbl(-1)). More than 99.5% of Pb was removed regardless of the initial Pb concentration imposed in ASL and, in all cases, the residual Pb concentrations (0.0-1.44 mg l(-1)) were below the limiting value (2.0 mg l(-1)) for effluent discharge in sewage works.

  5. 48 CFR 52.223-14 - Toxic Chemical Release Reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... not manufacture, process, or otherwise use any toxic chemicals listed in 40 CFR 372.65; (2) The... established under section 313(f) of EPCRA, 42 U.S.C. 11023(f) (including the alternate thresholds at 40 CFR... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toxic Chemical...

  6. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July--September 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  7. Structural resistance of chemically modified 1-D nanostructured titanates in inorganic acid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Marinkovic, Bojan A.; Fredholm, Yann C.; Morgado, Edisson

    2010-10-15

    Sodium containing one-dimensional nanostructured layered titanates (1-D NSLT) were produced both from commercial anatase powder and Brazilian natural rutile mineral sands by alkali hydrothermal process. The 1-D NSLT were chemically modified with proton, cobalt or iron via ionic exchange and all products were additionally submitted to intensive inorganic acid aging (pH = 0.5) for 28 days. The morphology and crystal structure transformations of chemically modified 1-D NSLT were followed by transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was found that the original sodium rich 1-D NSLT and cobalt substituted 1-D NSLT were completely converted to rutile nanoparticles, while the protonated form was transformed in a 70%-30% (by weight) anatase-rutile nanoparticles mixture, very similar to that of the well-known TiO{sub 2}-photocatalyst P25 (Degussa). The iron substituted 1-D NSLT presented better acid resistance as 13% of the original structure and morphology remained, the rest being converted in rutile. A significant amount of remaining 1-D NSLT was also observed after the acid treatment of the product obtained from rutile sand. The results showed that phase transformation of NSLT into titanium dioxide polymorph in inorganic acid conditions were controllable by varying the exchanged cations. Finally, the possibility to transform, through acid aging, 1-D NSLT obtained from Brazilian natural rutile sand into TiO{sub 2}-polymorphs was demonstrated for the first time to the best of authors' knowledge, opening path for producing TiO{sub 2}-nanoproducts with different morphologies through a simple process and from a low cost precursor.

  8. Practical use of chemical shift databases for protein solid-state NMR: 2D chemical shift maps and amino-acid assignment with secondary-structure information.

    PubMed

    Fritzsching, K J; Yang, Y; Schmidt-Rohr, K; Hong, Mei

    2013-06-01

    We introduce a Python-based program that utilizes the large database of (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank to rapidly predict the amino acid type and secondary structure from correlated chemical shifts. The program, called PACSYlite Unified Query (PLUQ), is designed to help assign peaks obtained from 2D (13)C-(13)C, (15)N-(13)C, or 3D (15)N-(13)C-(13)C magic-angle-spinning correlation spectra. We show secondary-structure specific 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation maps of all twenty amino acids, constructed from a chemical shift database of 262,209 residues. The maps reveal interesting conformation-dependent chemical shift distributions and facilitate searching of correlation peaks during amino-acid type assignment. Based on these correlations, PLUQ outputs the most likely amino acid types and the associated secondary structures from inputs of experimental chemical shifts. We test the assignment accuracy using four high-quality protein structures. Based on only the Cα and Cβ chemical shifts, the highest-ranked PLUQ assignments were 40-60 % correct in both the amino-acid type and the secondary structure. For three input chemical shifts (CO-Cα-Cβ or N-Cα-Cβ), the first-ranked assignments were correct for 60 % of the residues, while within the top three predictions, the correct assignments were found for 80 % of the residues. PLUQ and the chemical shift maps are expected to be useful at the first stage of sequential assignment, for combination with automated sequential assignment programs, and for highly disordered proteins for which secondary structure analysis is the main goal of structure determination.

  9. CORROSION TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CHEMICAL CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Mickalonis, J.; Subramanian, K.; Ketusky, E.

    2011-10-14

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid has been selected for this purpose because it is an effective chelating agent for the solids and is not as corrosive as other acids. Electrochemical and immersion studies were conducted to investigate the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated chemical cleaning environments. The effects of temperature, agitation, and the presence of sludge solids in the oxalic acid on the corrosion rate and the likelihood of hydrogen evolution were determined. The testing showed that the corrosion rates decreased significantly in the presence of the sludge solids. Corrosion rates increased with agitation, however, the changes were less noticeable.

  10. Dissolution of cerium(IV)-lanthanide(III) oxides: comparative effect of chemical composition, temperature, and acidity.

    PubMed

    Horlait, D; Clavier, N; Szenknect, S; Dacheux, N; Dubois, V

    2012-03-19

    The dissolution of Ce(1-x)Ln(x)O(2-x/2) solid solutions was undertaken in various acid media in order to evaluate the effects of several physicochemical parameters such as chemical composition, temperature, and acidity on the reaction kinetics. The normalized dissolution rates (R(L,0)) were found to be strongly modified by the trivalent lanthanide incorporation rate, due to the presence of oxygen vacancies decreasing the samples cohesion. Conversely, the nature of the trivalent cation considered only weakly impacted the R(L,0) values. The dependence of the normalized dissolution rates on the temperature then appeared to be of the same order of magnitude than that of chemical composition. Moreover, it allowed determining the corresponding activation energy (E(A) ≈ 60-85 kJ·mol(-1)) which accounts for a dissolution driven by surface-controlled reactions. A similar conclusion was made regarding the acidity of the solution: the partial order related to (H(3)O(+)) reaching about 0.7. Finally, the prevailing effect of the incorporation of aliovalent cations in the fluorite-type CeO(2) matrix on the dissolution kinetics precluded the observation of slight effects such as those linked to the complexing agents or to the crystal structure of the samples.

  11. Acid mine drainage treatment using by-products from quicklime manufacturing as neutralization chemicals.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Sarpola, Arja; Hu, Tao; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate whether by-products from quicklime manufacturing could be used instead of commercial quicklime (CaO) or hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2), which are traditionally used as neutralization chemicals in acid mine drainage treatment. Four by-products were studied and the results were compared with quicklime and hydrated lime. The studied by-products were partly burnt lime stored outdoors, partly burnt lime stored in a silo, kiln dust and a mixture of partly burnt lime stored outdoors and dolomite. Present application options for these by-products are limited and they are largely considered waste. Chemical precipitation experiments were performed with the jar test. All the studied by-products removed over 99% of Al, As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Zn and approximately 60% of sulphate from acid mine drainage. However, the neutralization capacity of the by-products and thus the amount of by-product needed as well as the amount of sludge produced varied. The results indicated that two out of the four studied by-products could be used as an alternative to quicklime or hydrated lime for acid mine drainage treatment. PMID:25193795

  12. Β-hydroxymyristic acid as a chemical marker to detect endotoxins in dialysis water.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rupesh K; Robert-Peillard, Fabien; Ravier, Sylvain; Coulomb, Bruno; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2015-02-01

    An analytical chemical method has been developed for determination of β-hydroxymyristic acid (β-HMA), a component of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs/endotoxins) in dialysis water. In our investigation, the β-HMA component was used as a chemical marker for endotoxin presence in dialysis water because it is available in the molecular subunit (lipid A) and responsible for toxicity. It is the most abundant saturated fatty acid in that subunit. The developed method is based on fluorescence derivatization with 4-nitro-7-piperazino-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-PZ). A high-performance liquid chromatographic separation of the β-HMA derivative was achieved using an octadecyl silica column in gradient elution. A wide dynamic range of β-HMA was tested and a calibration curve was constructed with accuracy of 90% and variability of less than 10%. The limits of detection and quantification obtained were 2 and 5μM, respectively. The developed method was applied to detect endotoxins in dialysis water by alkaline hydrolysis of LPS using NaOH (0.25M) at 60°C for 2h. After hydrolysis, free acid was detected as its NBD-PZ derivative using high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS). Good recovery rates ranging from 98 to 105% were obtained for β-HMA in dialysis water.

  13. Chemical noise reduction via mass spectrometry and ion/ion charge inversion: amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hassell, Kerry M; LeBlanc, Yves C; McLuckey, Scott A

    2011-05-01

    Charge inversion ion/ion reactions can provide a significant reduction in chemical noise associated with mass spectra derived from complex mixtures for species composed of both acidic and basic sites, provided the ions derived from the matrix largely undergo neutralization. Amino acids constitute an important class of amphoteric compounds that undergo relatively efficient charge inversion. Precipitated plasma constitutes a relatively complex biological matrix that yields detectable signals at essentially every mass-to-charge value over a wide range. This chemical noise can be dramatically reduced using multiply charged reagent ions that can invert the charge of species amenable to the transfer of multiple charges upon a single interaction and by detecting product ions of opposite polarity. The principle is illustrated here with amino acids present in precipitated plasma subjected to ionization in the positive mode, reaction with anions derived from negative nanoelectrospray ionization of poly (amido amine) dendrimer generation 3.5, and mass analysis in the negative ion mode. PMID:21456599

  14. Dissolution of cerium(IV)-lanthanide(III) oxides: Comparative effect of chemical composition, temperature, and acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Horlait, D.; Clavier, N.; Szenknect, S.; Dacheux, N.; Dubois, V.

    2012-03-15

    The dissolution of Ce{sub 1-x}Ln{sub x}O{sub 2-x/2} solid solutions was undertaken in various acid media in order to evaluate the effects of several physicochemical parameters such as chemical composition, temperature, and acidity on the reaction kinetics. The normalized dissolution rates (R{sub L,0}) were found to be strongly modified by the trivalent lanthanide incorporation rate, due to the presence of oxygen vacancies decreasing the samples cohesion. Conversely, the nature of the trivalent cation considered only weakly impacted the R{sub L,0} values. The dependence of the normalized dissolution rates on the temperature then appeared to be of the same order of magnitude than that of chemical composition. Moreover, it allowed determining the corresponding activation energy (E{sub A} ≅ 60-85 kJ.mol{sup -1}) which accounts for a dissolution driven by surface-controlled reactions. A similar conclusion was made regarding the acidity of the solution: the partial order related to (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) reaching about 0.7. Finally, the prevailing effect of the incorporation of aliovalent cations in the fluorite-type CeO{sub 2} matrix on the dissolution kinetics precluded the observation of slight effects such as those linked to the complexing agents or to the crystal structure of the samples. (authors)

  15. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division, April--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  16. 40 CFR 721.10512 - Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10512 Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... fatty acid maleic acid amides (PMNs P-07-563 and P-07-564) are subject to reporting under this...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10512 - Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10512 Fatty acid maleic acid amides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... fatty acid maleic acid amides (PMNs P-07-563 and P-07-564) are subject to reporting under this...

  18. Geochemistry, mineralogy, and chemical modeling of the acid crater lake of Kawah Ijen Volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmelle, Pierre; Bernard, Alain

    1994-06-01

    The Kawah Ijen volcano—with a record of phreatic eruptions—has its 1000 m wide crater filled with a lake that has existed for at least one century. At present, the lake waters are hot ( T ≈ 37° C), strongly mineralized (TDS = 105 g/L) and extremely acidic ( pH ≈ 0.4). By its volume, the Javanese lake is probably the largest accumulation in the world of such acidic waters. Mineralogy of the suspended solids within the lake waters suggests that concentrations of Si, Ca, Ti, and Ba are controlled by precipitation of silica, gypsum, anatase, and barite. Lake sediment is composed of chemical precipitates with composition similar to the suspended solids. Thermodynamic calculations predict that the lake waters have reached equilibrium with respect to α-cristobalite, barite, gypsum, anglesite, celestite, and amorphous silica, in agreement with the analytical observations. Significant concentrations of ferric iron suggest that the current lake waters are fairly oxidized. Sulfides are absent in the water column but are always present in the native S spherules that form porous aggregates which float on the lake. The presence of native S provides direct evidence of more reduced conditions at the lake floor where H 2S is probably being injected into the lake. With progressive addition of H 2S to the acid waters, native S, pyrite, and enargite are theoretically predicted to be saturated. Reactions between upward streaming H 2S-bearing gases discharged by subaqueous fumaroles, and metals dissolved in the acidic waters could initiate precipitation of these sulfides. A model of direct absorption of hot magmatic gases into cool water accounts for the extreme acidity of the crater lake. Results show that strongly acidic, sulfate-rich solutions are formed under oxidizing conditions at high gas/water ratios. Reactions between the acidic fluids and the Ijen andesite were modeled to account for elevated cation concentrations in lake water. Current concentrations of conservative

  19. 15 CFR 745.2 - End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. 745.2 Section 745.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS § 745.2 End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. Note: The End-Use Certificate requirement...

  20. 15 CFR 745.2 - End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. 745.2 Section 745.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS § 745.2 End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. Note: The End-Use Certificate requirement...

  1. 15 CFR 745.2 - End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. 745.2 Section 745.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS § 745.2 End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. Note: The End-Use Certificate requirement...

  2. 15 CFR 745.2 - End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. 745.2 Section 745.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS § 745.2 End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. Note: The End-Use Certificate requirement...

  3. 15 CFR 745.2 - End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. 745.2 Section 745.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REQUIREMENTS § 745.2 End-Use Certificate reporting requirements under the Chemical Weapons Convention. Note: The End-Use Certificate requirement...

  4. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described. (CBS)

  5. A model for heterogeneous chemical processes on the surfaces of ice and nitric acid trihydrate particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Turco, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    The study presents a model that incorporates the physics and physical chemistry of ice surfaces relevant to polar stratospheric clouds. Surface concentrations of H2O, HCl, HOCl, ClONO2, and N2O5 on ice and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) crystals are computed, and surface reaction rates and reaction probabilities (sticking coefficients) are determined. For gas pressures of about 10 exp -7 torr and temperatures in the range of 180-200 K, HCl completely coats ice and water-rich NAT surfaces, while HOCl, ClOHO2, and N2O5 may cover 0.01-1 percent of these surfaces. The energy parameters are used to calculate surface temperatures such as adsorption and desorption constants, surface coverages, reaction rate coefficients, surface diffusion coefficients, and reaction probabilities for various species and chemical interactions on ice and NAT surfaces. Implications for chemical processing on polar stratospheric clouds are discussed.

  6. Lysergic acid diethylamide antagonizes shaking induced in rats by five chemically different compounds.

    PubMed

    Cowan, A; Watson, T

    1978-04-14

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), sodium valproate, AF-3-5 (1-[2-hydroxyphenyl]-4-[3-nitrophenyl]-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyrimidine-2-one), RX336-M (7,8-dihydro-5',6'-dimethylcyclohex-5'-eno-1',2',8',14 codeinone), and Sgd 8473 (alpha-[4-chlorobenzylideneamino)-oxy]-isobutyric acid) each induced repetitive shaking of the body of rats after intraperitoneal injection. This action of the five diverse chemicals appears to be subserved by a common pharmacological component, because pretreatment with d-lysergic acid diethylamide (0.03--1.0 mg kg-1, s.c.) attenuated the shaking behavior in a dose-related manner, and cross tolerance was found between RX336-M and TRH, sodium valproate, and AG-3-5.

  7. Modeling of fermentation with continuous lactic acid removal by extraction utilizing reversible chemical complexation

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.; King, C.J.

    1995-07-01

    Extractive fermentation is a technique that can be used to reduce end-product inhibition by removing fermentation products in situ or in an external recycle loop. A model is presented for fermentation with continuous lactic acid removal by extraction utilizing chemical complexation. The model is formulated considering the kinetics of cell growth and the equilibrium distribution of lactic acid between aqueous and organic phases. Simulations have been carried out for different sets of operating conditions. The choice of pH balances faster kinetics at higher pH against lower product concentrations in the solvent and more difficult regeneration. A key need is for liquid extractants or solid sorbents combining stronger uptake ability with economical regeneration and satisfactory biocompatibility.

  8. Chemical Constituents from Flueggea virosa and the Structural Revision of Dehydrochebulic Acid Trimethyl Ester.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chih-Hua; Lin, Ying-Ju; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Huang, Hui-Chi; Yeh, Yung-Ju; Wu, Tian-Shung; Hwang, Syh-Yuan; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2016-01-01

    In an attempt to study the chemical constituents from the twigs and leaves of Flueggea virosa, a new terpenoid, 9(10→20)-abeo-ent-podocarpane, 3β,10α-dihydroxy-12-methoxy-13- methyl-9(10→20)-abeo-ent-podocarpa-6,8,11,13-tetraene (1), as well as five known compounds were characterized. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. In addition, the structure of dehydrochebulic acid trimethyl ester was revised as (2S,3R)-4E-dehydrochebulic acid trimethyl ester based on a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study. The in vitro anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) activity and cytotoxicity against Huh7.5 cells for the isolated compounds were evaluated. PMID:27649134

  9. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes - May 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Kevin C.; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Christopher, Aardahl L.

    2008-05-12

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence FY2008 Second Quarter Milestone Report: Technical report describing assessment of hydrogen storage materials and progress towards meeting DOE’s hydrogen storage targets.

  10. Chemically Activated Formation of Organic Acids in Reactions of the Criegee Intermediate with Aldehydes and Ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.

    2013-08-08

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, .CH2OO.) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between .CH2OO. and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48–51 kcal mol-1 lower in energy, formed via 1,3- cycloaddition of .CH2OO. across the CQO bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O–O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO o CH3CHO o CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10-4 times lower than the initial .CH2OO. concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  11. Synthesis of CuFeS2 thin films from acidic chemical baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonpe, Dipak; Gattu, Ketan; More, Ganesh; Upadhye, Deepak; Mahajan, Sandip; Sharma, Ramphal

    2016-05-01

    The growth of Copper iron sulfide nanocrystalline thin films onto glass substrates has been achieved by chemical bath deposition at acidic values of pH. The deposited thin films were characterized for their optoelectronic properties using Raman, UV-Vis spectroscopy. The Raman analysis confirms the formation of CuFeS2 thin film. The thin film with nanosized crystallites of CuFeS2 showed a bandgap of 0.7eV from UV-vis absorption spectroscopy.

  12. Lead-acid bipolar battery assembled with primary chemically formed positive pasted electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, H.; Shamsipur, M.; Ghasemi, S.; Mousavi, M. F.

    Primary chemically formed lead dioxide (PbO 2) was used as positive electrode in preparation of lead-acid bipolar batteries. Chemical oxidation was carried out by both mixing and dipping methods using an optimized amount of ammonium persulfate as a suitable oxidizing agent. X-ray diffraction studies showed that the weight ratio of β-PbO 2 to α-PbO 2 is more for mixing method before electrochemical forming. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to investigate charge transfer resistance of the lead dioxide obtained by mixing and dipping methods before and after electrochemical forming. Four types of bipolar lead-acid batteries were produced with: (1) lead substrate and conventional electroforming; (2) carbon doped polyethylene substrate with conventional electroforming; (3) carbon doped polyethylene substrate with chemical forming after curing and drying steps in oxidant bath, followed by electrochemical forming, and (4) carbon doped polyethylene substrate with primary chemical oxidation in mixing step, followed by conventional electroforming. The capacity and cycle-life tests of the prepared bipolar batteries were performed by a home-made battery tester and using the pulsed current method. The prepared batteries showed low weight, high capacity, high energy density and high power density. The first capacities of bipolar batteries of type 1-4 were found to be 152, 150, 180 and 198 mAh g -1, respectively. The experimental results showed that the prepared 6 V bipolar batteries of type 1-4 have power density (per cell unit) of 59.7, 57.4, 78.46 and 83.30 mW g -1 (W kg -1), respectively.

  13. An Industrial Dental-Erosion by Chromic Acid: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dülgergil, Ç. Türksel; Erdemir, Ebru Olgun; Ercan, Ertuḡrul; Erdemir, Ali

    2007-01-01

    A case of uncommon occupational dental erosion was reported in an individual who had worked in the war industry for twenty years. This occupation involved daily, at least 8 hours, inhalation of chromic acid being used for cleaning of barrel of cannons. The erosion manifested as dental sensitivity with excessive cervical erosion even with pulpal exposure in certain teeth. Moreover, due to the adverse effect of the chemical against to gingival and/or periodontal tissues, the lesions were extremely harmful with respect to the exposed root-cementum. After proper periodontal therapy, cervical lesions were treated conservatively with a compomer based restorative material without cavity preparation. Although today it is not common due to the well-controlled working conditions, occupational combined dental and medical problems via airborne fumes and/or elements can be seen at workers in chemical factories. A cumulative biohazardous effect is generally seen as not only medical but also dental disorders. PMID:19212488

  14. White biotechnology for green chemistry: fermentative 2-oxocarboxylic acids as novel building blocks for subsequent chemical syntheses.

    PubMed

    Stottmeister, U; Aurich, A; Wilde, H; Andersch, J; Schmidt, S; Sicker, D

    2005-12-01

    Functionalized compounds, which are difficult to produce by classical chemical synthesis, are of special interest as biotechnologically available targets. They represent useful building blocks for subsequent organic syntheses, wherein they can undergo stereoselective or regioselective reactions. "White Biotechnology" (as defined by the European Chemical Industry [ http://www.europabio.org/white_biotech.htm ], as part of a sustainable "Green Chemistry,") supports new applications of chemicals produced via biotechnology. Environmental aspects of this interdisciplinary combination include: Use of renewable feedstock Optimization of biotechnological processes by means of: New "high performance" microorganisms On-line measurement of substrates and products in bioreactors Alternative product isolation, resulting in higher yields, and lower energy demand In this overview we describe biotechnologically produced pyruvic, 2-oxopentaric and 2-oxohexaric acids as promising new building blocks for synthetic chemistry. In the first part, the microbial formation of 2-oxocarboxylic acids (2-OCAs) in general, and optimization of the fermentation steps required to form pyruvic acid, 2-oxoglutaric acid, and 2-oxo-D-gluconic acid are described, highlighting the fundamental advantages in comparison to chemical syntheses. In the second part, a set of chemical formula schemes demonstrate that 2-OCAs are applicable as building blocks in the chemical synthesis of, e.g., hydrophilic triazines, spiro-connected heterocycles, benzotriazines, and pyranoic amino acids. Finally, some perspectives are discussed. PMID:15995855

  15. A quantitative investigation of the chemical space surrounding amino acid alphabet formation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Freeland, Stephen J

    2008-01-21

    To date, explanations for the origin and emergence of the alphabet of amino acids encoded by the standard genetic code have been largely qualitative and speculative. Here, with the help of computational chemistry, we present the first quantitative exploration of nature's "choices" set against various models for plausible alternatives. Specifically, we consider the chemical space defined by three fundamental biophysical properties (size, charge, and hydrophobicity) to ask whether the amino acids that entered the genetic code exhibit a higher diversity than random samples of similar size drawn from several different definitions of amino acid possibility space. We found that in terms of the properties studied, the full, standard set of 20 biologically encoded amino acids is indeed significantly more diverse than an equivalently sized group drawn at random from the set of plausible, prebiotic alternatives (using the Murchison meteorite as a model for pre-biotic plausibility). However, when the set of possible amino acids is enlarged to include those that are produced by standard biosynthetic pathways (reflecting the widespread idea that many members of the standard alphabet were recruited in this way), then the genetically encoded amino acids can no longer be distinguished as more diverse than a random sample. Finally, if we turn to consider the overlap between biologically encoded amino acids and those that are prebiotically plausible, then we find that the biologically encoded subset are no more diverse as a group than would be expected from a random sample, unless the definition of "random sample" is adjusted to reflect possible prebiotic abundance (again, using the contents of the Murchison meteorite as our estimator). This final result is contingent on the accuracy of our computational estimates for amino acid properties, and prebiotic abundances, and an exploration of the likely effect of errors in our estimation reveals that our results should be treated with

  16. A quantitative investigation of the chemical space surrounding amino acid alphabet formation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Freeland, Stephen J

    2008-01-21

    To date, explanations for the origin and emergence of the alphabet of amino acids encoded by the standard genetic code have been largely qualitative and speculative. Here, with the help of computational chemistry, we present the first quantitative exploration of nature's "choices" set against various models for plausible alternatives. Specifically, we consider the chemical space defined by three fundamental biophysical properties (size, charge, and hydrophobicity) to ask whether the amino acids that entered the genetic code exhibit a higher diversity than random samples of similar size drawn from several different definitions of amino acid possibility space. We found that in terms of the properties studied, the full, standard set of 20 biologically encoded amino acids is indeed significantly more diverse than an equivalently sized group drawn at random from the set of plausible, prebiotic alternatives (using the Murchison meteorite as a model for pre-biotic plausibility). However, when the set of possible amino acids is enlarged to include those that are produced by standard biosynthetic pathways (reflecting the widespread idea that many members of the standard alphabet were recruited in this way), then the genetically encoded amino acids can no longer be distinguished as more diverse than a random sample. Finally, if we turn to consider the overlap between biologically encoded amino acids and those that are prebiotically plausible, then we find that the biologically encoded subset are no more diverse as a group than would be expected from a random sample, unless the definition of "random sample" is adjusted to reflect possible prebiotic abundance (again, using the contents of the Murchison meteorite as our estimator). This final result is contingent on the accuracy of our computational estimates for amino acid properties, and prebiotic abundances, and an exploration of the likely effect of errors in our estimation reveals that our results should be treated with

  17. Chemical Computer Man: Chemical Agent Response Simulation (CARS). Technical report, January 1983-September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.G.; Mioduszewski, R.J.

    1988-03-01

    The Chemical Computer Man: Chemical Agent Response Simulation (CARS) is a computer model and simulation program for estimating the dynamic changes in human physiological dysfunction resulting from exposures to chemical-threat nerve agents. The newly developed CARS methodology simulates agent exposure effects on the following five indices of human physiological function: mental, vision, cardio-respiratory, visceral, and limbs. Mathematical models and the application of basic pharmacokinetic principles were incorporated into the simulation so that for each chemical exposure, the relationship between exposure dosage, absorbed dosage (agent blood plasma concentration), and level of physiological response are computed as a function of time. CARS, as a simulation tool, is designed for the users with little or no computer-related experience. The model combines maximum flexibility with a comprehensive user-friendly interactive menu-driven system. Users define an exposure problem and obtain immediate results displayed in tabular, graphical, and image formats. CARS has broad scientific and engineering applications, not only in technology for the soldier in the area of Chemical Defense, but also in minimizing animal testing in biomedical and toxicological research and the development of a modeling system for human exposure to hazardous-waste chemicals.

  18. P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, and parameters characterizing suitability as a drinking water supply. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During fourth quarter 1992, a sample from well PAC 6 exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. Iron and manganese each exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells PAC 2, 5, and 6. No analytes exceeded the final PDWS in wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin during 1992.

  19. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program: 1990 Integrated Assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The document, the 'Integrated Assessment,' is a summary of the causes and effects of acidic deposition and a comparison of the costs and effectiveness of alternative emission control scenarios. In developing the 'Integrated Assessment,' it was NAPAP's goal to produce a structured compilation of policy-relevant technical information. The Integrated Assessment is based on findings and data from a series of twenty-seven State-of-Science/Technology Reports (SOS/T) on acidic deposition published by NAPAP in 1990. The scope of the documents includes: (1) emissions, atmospheric processes and deposition; (2) effects on surface waters, forests, agricultural crops, exposed materials, human health, and visibility; and (3) control technologies, future emissions, and effects valuation.

  20. 40 CFR 711.5 - Chemical substances for which information must be reported.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chemical substances for which information must be reported. 711.5 Section 711.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT TSCA CHEMICAL DATA REPORTING REQUIREMENTS § 711.5...

  1. 40 CFR 372.22 - Covered facilities for toxic chemical release reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Covered facilities for toxic chemical... (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS TOXIC CHEMICAL RELEASE REPORTING: COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW Reporting Requirements § 372.22 Covered facilities for toxic...

  2. 40 CFR 372.22 - Covered facilities for toxic chemical release reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Covered facilities for toxic chemical... (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS TOXIC CHEMICAL RELEASE REPORTING: COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW Reporting Requirements § 372.22 Covered facilities for toxic...

  3. 40 CFR 372.22 - Covered facilities for toxic chemical release reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Covered facilities for toxic chemical... (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS TOXIC CHEMICAL RELEASE REPORTING: COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW Reporting Requirements § 372.22 Covered facilities for toxic...

  4. 40 CFR 372.22 - Covered facilities for toxic chemical release reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Covered facilities for toxic chemical... (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS TOXIC CHEMICAL RELEASE REPORTING: COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW Reporting Requirements § 372.22 Covered facilities for toxic...

  5. 40 CFR 370.14 - How do I report mixtures containing hazardous chemicals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I report mixtures containing...: COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW Who Must Comply § 370.14 How do I report mixtures containing hazardous chemicals? (a) For a mixture containing a hazardous chemical, use the following table to determine if a...

  6. 40 CFR 370.14 - How do I report mixtures containing hazardous chemicals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I report mixtures containing...: COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW Who Must Comply § 370.14 How do I report mixtures containing hazardous chemicals? (a) For a mixture containing a hazardous chemical, use the following table to determine if a...

  7. 40 CFR 370.14 - How do I report mixtures containing hazardous chemicals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I report mixtures containing...: COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW Who Must Comply § 370.14 How do I report mixtures containing hazardous chemicals? (a) For a mixture containing a hazardous chemical, use the following table to determine if a...

  8. 40 CFR 370.14 - How do I report mixtures containing hazardous chemicals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I report mixtures containing...: COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW Who Must Comply § 370.14 How do I report mixtures containing hazardous chemicals? (a) For a mixture containing a hazardous chemical, use the following table to determine if a...

  9. 40 CFR 370.14 - How do I report mixtures containing hazardous chemicals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I report mixtures containing...: COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW Who Must Comply § 370.14 How do I report mixtures containing hazardous chemicals? (a) For a mixture containing a hazardous chemical, use the following table to determine if a...

  10. Do enantiomers of benzenesulfonic acid exist? Electron diffraction and quantum chemical study of molecular structure of benzenesulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giricheva, Nina I.; Girichev, Georgiy V.; Medvedeva, Yulia S.; Ivanov, Sergey N.; Petrov, Vyacheslav M.; Fedorov, Mikhail S.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular structure of benzenesulfonic acid was studied by gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical (B3LYP/cc-pVTZ, МР2/cc-pVDZ, МР2/cc-pVTZ) methods. On the base of mass spectrometric analysis it was found that saturated vapor at Т = 396(9) K is represented by only molecular species, monomeric benzenesulfonic acid. Theoretical calculations showed that the molecule has two mirror conformers of C1 symmetry which can invert to each other via transition state of Cs symmetry by rotation of OH-group around Ssbnd O(H) bond. Both computational methods, B3LYP and MP2, resulted in the same structure of enantiomers; the MP2/cc-pVDZ calculations denoted a over-barrier transition between enantiomers at the temperature of electron diffraction experiment, while B3LYP and MP2 calculations with cc-pVTZ basis set estimated the barrier height to be comparable with the thermal energy value. Two geometric models of C1 and Cs symmetry were examined in gas electron diffraction structural analysis. It was established that the structure of C1 symmetry (Rf = 3.3%) demonstrated the best fit with GED data in comparison with Cs structure (Rf = 3.8%). In conformer of C1 symmetry an ordinary bond Ssbnd O(Н) is located almost orthogonal to benzene ring plane, and an Osbnd H bond practically eclipses one of Sdbnd O bonds of SO3H fragment. The following internuclear distances (Å) in benzenesulfonic acid were determined: rh1(Csbnd H)av = 1.116(6), rh1(Csbnd C)ср = 1.402(4), rh1(Csbnd S) = 1.770(5), rh1(Sdbnd O)av = 1.438(4), rh1(Ssbnd O) = 1.623(4), rh1(Osbnd H) = 0.870(17). Calculations of internal rotation potential functions and NBO-analysis of electron density distribution in a conformer and transition states between enantiomers were performed to establish the reasons of stability of the found asymmetric structure of the studied molecule. The structure of free molecule of benzenesulfonic acid was compared with that of molecular form in crystal.

  11. Boiler chemical cleaning waste management manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, G.P.; Holcombe, L.J.; Owen, M.L.; Rohlack, L.A.; Stohs, M.

    1992-08-01

    Boiler chemical cleaning waste is generated during power plant outages when the water-side of the boiler and condenser tubes are cleaned to remove built-up scale and corrosion products that reduce heat transfer efficiency. The cleaning agents are designed to remove scale and deposits; thus, the spent cleaning solutions contain dissolved and suspended metals such as iron and copper, with lesser amounts of chromium, magnesium, nickel and zinc. The alternatives for managing boiler chemical cleaning waste include strategies for minimizing the generation of the waste, pretreatment, physical/chemical treatment, ponding, evaporation in the boiler, contract disposal, and reuse in wet scrubbers. The selection of a particular management option will be influenced by the cleaning chemical used, tube metallurgy, environmental regulations, and particulars of the plant such as the facilities and equipment available for treatment and the plant physical layout. The continued evolution of air, water, and solid waste regulations will greatly influence the choices available for cleaning chemicals, vendors, and boiler cleaning waste management options. This manual presents cost information and detailed laboratory and field data on the options available for management of this waste stream.

  12. Structural and spectroscopic characterization of 2,3-difluorobenzoic acid and 2,4-difluorobenzoic acid with experimental techniques and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Cinar, Zeliha; Cinar, Mehmet

    2011-09-01

    In this study, the molecular conformation, vibrational and electronic transition analysis of 2,3-difluorobenzoic acid and 2,4-difluorobenzoic acid (C 7H 4F 2O 2) were presented using experimental techniques (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV) and quantum chemical calculations. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra in solid state were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm -1 and 4000-5 cm -1, respectively. The UV absorption spectra of the compounds that dissolved in ethanol were recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The structural properties of the molecules in the ground state were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) employing 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Optimized structure of compounds was interpreted and compared with the earlier reported experimental values. The scaled vibrational wavenumbers were compared with experimental results. The complete assignments were performed on the basis of the experimental data and total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. A study on the electronic properties, such as absorption wavelength, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energy, were performed by time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach. Based on the UV spectra and TD-DFT calculations, the electronic structure and the assignments of the absorption bands of steady compounds were discussed. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that charge transfer occurs within the molecules.

  13. Alternate fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas: Vinyl acetate monomer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Colberg; Nick A. Collins; Edwin F. Holcombe; Gerald C. Tustin; Joseph R. Zoeller

    1999-01-01

    There has been a long-standing desire on the part of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy to replace the existing ethylene-based vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) process with an entirely synthesis gas-based process. Although there are a large number of process options for the conversion of synthesis gas to VAM, Eastman Chemical Company undertook an analytical approach, based on known chemical and economic principles, to reduce the potential candidate processes to a select group of eight processes. The critical technologies that would be required for these routes were: (1) the esterification of acetaldehyde (AcH) with ketene to generate VAM, (2) the hydrogenation of ketene to acetaldehyde, (3) the hydrogenation of acetic acid to acetaldehyde, and (4) the reductive carbonylation of methanol to acetaldehyde. This report describes the selection process for the candidate processes, the successful development of the key technologies, and the economic assessments for the preferred routes. In addition, improvements in the conversion of acetic anhydride and acetaldehyde to VAM are discussed. The conclusion from this study is that, with the technology developed in this study, VAM may be produced from synthesis gas, but the cost of production is about 15% higher than the conventional oxidative acetoxylation of ethylene, primarily due to higher capital associated with the synthesis gas-based processes.

  14. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    During first quarter 1993, samples from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin received comprehensive analyses. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the final PDWS only in well HAC 1 during first quarter 1993. Aluminum exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells HAC 2, 3, and 4. Iron was elevated in well HAC 1, 2, and 3. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard.

  15. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, samples from the seven older KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, and other constituents. New wells FAC 8 and 9 received the first of four quarters of comprehensive analyses and GC/MS VOA (gas chromatograph/ mass spectrometer volatile organic analyses). Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency's Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are discussed in this report.

  16. NIPER/DOE Chemical EOR Workshop. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, B.L.; Llave, F.M.; Tham, Min K.

    1993-10-01

    A Chemical EOR Workshop was held on June 23--24, 1993 in Houston, Texas. The objectives of this workshop were to evaluate the potential for chemical Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) to repower significant quantities of remaining domestic oil, to assess the role of the Department of Energy (DOE) and petroleum industry to achieve this potential, and to assess the research needs in chemical EOR. Fifty-six research engineers and scientists from major oil companies, independent oil companies, academic institutes, research institutes, and DOE attended this workshop. Opening remarks were given by Alex Crawley from DOE Bartlesville Project Office and Thomas E. Burchfield of the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER). The keynote address was delivered by Donald Juckett, Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary for Gas and Petroleum Technology. Ten papers on the state-of-the-art in chemical EOR technologies and recent field test experience were presented on the first day. Two workshops, one on surfactant/alkali flooding and the other on profile modification/polymer flooding, were held on the second day. It was concluded that chemical EOR has the potential of recovering significant quantities of remaining oil, and it is the only method that has the potential of economically recovering residual oil from reservoirs of shallow and medium depth. It is recommended that funding of support research in chemical EOR be continued and sustained to provide continuity and expertise for future advanced oil recovery technologies. Selected papers are being indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. Perfluorononanoic acid in combination with 14 chemicals exerts low-dose mixture effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Hadrup, Niels; Pedersen, Mikael; Skov, Kasper; Hansen, Niels Lund; Berthelsen, Line Olrik; Kongsbak, Kristine; Boberg, Julie; Dybdahl, Marianne; Hass, Ulla; Frandsen, Henrik; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2016-03-01

    Humans are simultaneously exposed to several chemicals that act jointly to induce mixture effects. At doses close to or higher than no-observed adverse effect levels, chemicals usually act additively in experimental studies. However, we are lacking knowledge on the importance of exposure to complex real-world mixtures at more relevant human exposure levels. We hypothesised that adverse mixture effects occur at doses approaching high-end human exposure levels. A mixture (Mix) of 14 chemicals at a combined dose of 2.5 mg/kg bw/day was tested in combination with perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) at doses of 0.0125 (Low PFNA), 0.25 (Mid PFNA) and 5 (High PFNA) mg/kg bw/day by oral administration for 14 days in juvenile male rats. Indication of a toxicokinetic interaction was found, as simultaneous exposure to PFNA and the Mix caused a 2.8-fold increase in plasma PFNA concentrations at Low PFNA. An increase in testosterone and dihydrotestosterone plasma concentrations was observed for Low PFNA + Mix. This effect was considered non-monotonic, as higher doses did not cause this effect. Reduced LH plasma concentrations together with increased androgen concentrations indicate a disturbed pituitary-testis axis caused by the 15-chemical mixture. Low PFNA by itself increased the corticosterone plasma concentration, an effect which was normalised after simultaneous exposure to Mix. This combined with affected ACTH plasma concentrations and down-regulation of 11β HSD mRNA in livers indicates a disturbed pituitary-adrenal axis. In conclusion, our data suggest that mixtures of environmental chemicals at doses approaching high-end human exposure levels can cause a hormonal imbalance and disturb steroid hormones and their regulation. These effects may be non-monotonic and were observed at low doses. Whether this reflects a more general phenomenon that should be taken into consideration when predicting human mixture effects or represents a rarer phenomenon remains to be shown.

  18. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Two techniques believed capable of chemically dissolving the corrosion products in the annuli between tubes and support plates were developed in laboratory work in Phase I of this project and were pilot tested in Indian Point Unit No. 1 steam generators. In Phase II, one of the techniques was shown to be inadequate on an actual sample taken from an Indian Point Unit No. 2 steam generator. The other technique was modified slightly, and it was demonstrated that the tube/support plate annulus could be chemically cleaned effectively.

  19. Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the production of chemical feedstocks. Progress report, March 1-August 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D. I.C.

    1980-09-01

    Progress is reported in this coordinated research program to effect the microbiological degradation of cellulosic biomass by anaerobic microorganisms possessing cellulolytic enzymes. Three main areas of research are discussed: increasing enzyme levels through genetics, mutations, and genetic manipulation; the direct conversion of cellulosic biomass to liquid fuel (ethanol); and the production of chemical feedstocks from biomass (acrylic acid, acetone/butanol, and acetic acid). (DMC)

  20. No evidence for the induction of brown algal chemical defense by the phytohormones jasmonic acid and methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Wiesemeier, Theresa; Jahn, Karsten; Pohnert, Georg

    2008-12-01

    Induced chemical defense reactions are widespread in marine brown algae. Despite the evidence that the biosynthesis of defense metabolites can be up-regulated upon herbivory, we do not know how this regulation of biosynthetic pathways to secondary metabolites is achieved in brown algae. In higher plants, the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) is crucial for the mediation of induced chemical defenses, and several findings of this metabolite from marine sources have been reported. We tested the hypothesis that JA or related metabolites play a role in induced brown algal defense. Quantification of oxylipins with a detection limit around 20 ng g(-1) algal tissue did not reveal the presence of JA in the seven examined brown algal species Dictyota dichotoma, Colpomenia peregrina, Ectocarpus fasciculatus, Fucus vesiculosus, Himanthalia elongata, Saccharina latissima (formerly Laminaria saccharina), and Sargassum muticum. Moreover, treatment with ecologically relevant concentrations of JA and methyl jasmonate did not lead to a significant change in the profile of medium- and non-polar metabolites of the tested algae. Only when high concentrations of > or =500 microg ml(-1) medium of the phytohormones were applied that a metabolic response which could be attributed to unspecific stress was observed. Bioassays with D. dichotoma that focused on medium- and non-polar compounds confirmed the lack of a biological role of JA and methyl jasmonate in the induction of algal induced chemical defenses. The phytohormone-treated samples did not exhibit any increased defense potential towards the amphipod Ampithoe longimana and the isopod Paracerceis caudata. JA and related phytohormones, known to be active in higher plants, thus appear to play no role in brown algae for induction of the defense chemicals studied here. PMID:19020937

  1. No evidence for the induction of brown algal chemical defense by the phytohormones jasmonic acid and methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Wiesemeier, Theresa; Jahn, Karsten; Pohnert, Georg

    2008-12-01

    Induced chemical defense reactions are widespread in marine brown algae. Despite the evidence that the biosynthesis of defense metabolites can be up-regulated upon herbivory, we do not know how this regulation of biosynthetic pathways to secondary metabolites is achieved in brown algae. In higher plants, the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) is crucial for the mediation of induced chemical defenses, and several findings of this metabolite from marine sources have been reported. We tested the hypothesis that JA or related metabolites play a role in induced brown algal defense. Quantification of oxylipins with a detection limit around 20 ng g(-1) algal tissue did not reveal the presence of JA in the seven examined brown algal species Dictyota dichotoma, Colpomenia peregrina, Ectocarpus fasciculatus, Fucus vesiculosus, Himanthalia elongata, Saccharina latissima (formerly Laminaria saccharina), and Sargassum muticum. Moreover, treatment with ecologically relevant concentrations of JA and methyl jasmonate did not lead to a significant change in the profile of medium- and non-polar metabolites of the tested algae. Only when high concentrations of > or =500 microg ml(-1) medium of the phytohormones were applied that a metabolic response which could be attributed to unspecific stress was observed. Bioassays with D. dichotoma that focused on medium- and non-polar compounds confirmed the lack of a biological role of JA and methyl jasmonate in the induction of algal induced chemical defenses. The phytohormone-treated samples did not exhibit any increased defense potential towards the amphipod Ampithoe longimana and the isopod Paracerceis caudata. JA and related phytohormones, known to be active in higher plants, thus appear to play no role in brown algae for induction of the defense chemicals studied here.

  2. Biodistribution profiling of the chemical modified hyaluronic acid derivatives used for oral delivery system.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chien-Ming; Huang, Yu-Wen; Sheu, Ming-Thau; Ho, Hsiu-O

    2014-03-01

    A series of adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH)-modified hyaluronic acid (HA-ADH) compounds were synthesized and conjugated with QDots (QDots-HA conjugates) to assess the effects of the molecular weight (MW) and extent of chemical modification of HA on its biodistribution. Their physicochemical structures were confirmed by complementary application of GPC, (1)H NMR, FTIR, and UV-vis spectroscopic methods. In vivo imaging of QDots-HA conjugates after oral administration was analyzed to investigate their biodistribution in nude mice. Simultaneously, real-time bioimaging was confirmed by an anatomical analysis to investigate the organ-specific accumulation of conjugates. QDot-HA conjugates with a higher MW of HA or high modification presented relatively slow clearance leading to an extension of the retention time for up to 10 days, whereas those with lower MWs of HA or a low modification extent exhibited quick absorption and elimination after oral administration. Taken together, HA derivatives with suitable MWs and chemical modification extents can be used to design new, more-sophisticated, and intelligent HA-based vehicles for oral delivery with diverse characteristics. PMID:24315950

  3. Chemical treatment of olive pomace: effect on acid-basic properties and metal biosorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Martín-Lara, M A; Pagnanelli, F; Mainelli, S; Calero, M; Toro, L

    2008-08-15

    In this study, olive pomace, an agricultural waste that is very abundant in Mediterranean area, was modified by two chemical treatments in order to improve its biosorption capacity. Potentiometric titrations and IR analyses were used to characterise untreated olive pomace (OP), olive pomace treated by phosphoric acid (PAOP) and treated by hydrogen peroxide (HPOP). Acid-base properties of all investigated biosorbents were characterised by two main kinds of active sites, whose nature and concentration were determined by a mechanistic model assuming continuous distribution for the proton affinity constants. Titration modelling denoted that all investigated biosorbents (OP, PAOP and HPOP) were characterised by the same kinds of active sites (carboxylic and phenolic), but with different total concentrations with PAOP richer than OP and HPOP. Single metal equilibrium studies in batch reactors were carried out to determine the capacity of these sorbents for copper and cadmium ions at constant pH. Experimental data were analysed and compared using the Langmuir isotherm. The order of maximum uptake capacity of copper and cadmium ions on different biosorbents was PAOP>HPOP>OP. The maximum adsorption capacity of copper and cadmium, was obtained as 0.48 and 0.10 mmol/g, respectively, for PAOP. Metal biosorption tests in presence of Na(+) in solution were also carried out in order to evaluate the effect of chemical treatment on biomass selectivity. These data showed that PAOP is more selective for cadmium than the other sorbents, while similar selectivity was observed for copper. PMID:18242836

  4. Chemical treatment of olive pomace: effect on acid-basic properties and metal biosorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Martín-Lara, M A; Pagnanelli, F; Mainelli, S; Calero, M; Toro, L

    2008-08-15

    In this study, olive pomace, an agricultural waste that is very abundant in Mediterranean area, was modified by two chemical treatments in order to improve its biosorption capacity. Potentiometric titrations and IR analyses were used to characterise untreated olive pomace (OP), olive pomace treated by phosphoric acid (PAOP) and treated by hydrogen peroxide (HPOP). Acid-base properties of all investigated biosorbents were characterised by two main kinds of active sites, whose nature and concentration were determined by a mechanistic model assuming continuous distribution for the proton affinity constants. Titration modelling denoted that all investigated biosorbents (OP, PAOP and HPOP) were characterised by the same kinds of active sites (carboxylic and phenolic), but with different total concentrations with PAOP richer than OP and HPOP. Single metal equilibrium studies in batch reactors were carried out to determine the capacity of these sorbents for copper and cadmium ions at constant pH. Experimental data were analysed and compared using the Langmuir isotherm. The order of maximum uptake capacity of copper and cadmium ions on different biosorbents was PAOP>HPOP>OP. The maximum adsorption capacity of copper and cadmium, was obtained as 0.48 and 0.10 mmol/g, respectively, for PAOP. Metal biosorption tests in presence of Na(+) in solution were also carried out in order to evaluate the effect of chemical treatment on biomass selectivity. These data showed that PAOP is more selective for cadmium than the other sorbents, while similar selectivity was observed for copper.

  5. Glycolic acid chemical peeling improves inflammatory acne eruptions through its inhibitory and bactericidal effects on Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Yuko; Hayashi, Nobukazu; Takeda, Mikiko; Ashikaga, Sayaka; Kawashima, Makoto

    2012-04-01

    Glycolic acid chemical peeling is effective for treating comedones, and some clinical data show that it also improves inflammatory eruptions. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism of glycolic acid chemical peeling to improve inflammatory acne. To assess growth inhibitory and bactericidal effects of glycolic acid on Propionibacterium acnes in vitro, we used an agar diffusion method and a time-kill method. To reveal bactericidal effects in vivo, we established an agar-attached method which correlated well with the ordinary swab-wash method, and we used the agar-attached method to compare the numbers of propionibacteria on the cheek treated with glycolic acid chemical peeling. Our results show that 30% glycolic acid (at pH 1.5, 3.5 and 5.5) formed growth inhibitory circles in the agar diffusion method, but the diameters of those circles were smaller than with 1% nadifloxacin lotion or 1% clindamycin gel. In the time-kill method, 30% glycolic acid (at pH 1.5 and 3.5) or 1% nadifloxacin lotion reduced the number of P. acnes to less than 100 CFU/mL within 5 min. In contrast, in 30% glycolic acid (at pH 5.5) or in 1% clindamycin gel, P. acnes survived for more than 4 h. Chemical peeling with 35% glycolic acid (at pH 1.2) decreased the number of propionibacteria on the cheeks of patients compared with untreated controls (P < 0.01). Our results demonstrate that glycolic acid has moderate growth inhibitory and bactericidal effects on P. acnes, and that chemical peeling with glycolic acid works on inflammatory acne via those effects. PMID:21950544

  6. Glycolic acid chemical peeling improves inflammatory acne eruptions through its inhibitory and bactericidal effects on Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Yuko; Hayashi, Nobukazu; Takeda, Mikiko; Ashikaga, Sayaka; Kawashima, Makoto

    2012-04-01

    Glycolic acid chemical peeling is effective for treating comedones, and some clinical data show that it also improves inflammatory eruptions. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism of glycolic acid chemical peeling to improve inflammatory acne. To assess growth inhibitory and bactericidal effects of glycolic acid on Propionibacterium acnes in vitro, we used an agar diffusion method and a time-kill method. To reveal bactericidal effects in vivo, we established an agar-attached method which correlated well with the ordinary swab-wash method, and we used the agar-attached method to compare the numbers of propionibacteria on the cheek treated with glycolic acid chemical peeling. Our results show that 30% glycolic acid (at pH 1.5, 3.5 and 5.5) formed growth inhibitory circles in the agar diffusion method, but the diameters of those circles were smaller than with 1% nadifloxacin lotion or 1% clindamycin gel. In the time-kill method, 30% glycolic acid (at pH 1.5 and 3.5) or 1% nadifloxacin lotion reduced the number of P. acnes to less than 100 CFU/mL within 5 min. In contrast, in 30% glycolic acid (at pH 5.5) or in 1% clindamycin gel, P. acnes survived for more than 4 h. Chemical peeling with 35% glycolic acid (at pH 1.2) decreased the number of propionibacteria on the cheeks of patients compared with untreated controls (P < 0.01). Our results demonstrate that glycolic acid has moderate growth inhibitory and bactericidal effects on P. acnes, and that chemical peeling with glycolic acid works on inflammatory acne via those effects.

  7. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... molecular structure is conducive to HDD/HDF formation under favorable reaction conditions when they are used... research and development purposes are not required to report under this section (c) Data to be reported... (a) of this section must report process and reaction condition data on Part II of EPA Form...

  8. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1991, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin of Savannah River Plant were analyzed for indicator parameters, turbidity, major ions, volatile organic compounds, radionuclides, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria and turbidity standards during the quarter, with summary results for the year, are presented in this report. No constituents exceeded the PDWS at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin. Iron and total organic halogens exceeded Flag 2 criteria in sidegradient-to-downgradient well KAC 7 but not in other KAC wells. No priority pollutants (EPA, 1990) exceeded the PDWS or the Flag 2 criteria in wells KAC 1 and 3. None of the KAC wells exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. Lead exceeded the PDWS in well KAC 7 during first quarter. No other constituent exceeded the PDWS at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin during the year.

  9. Fatty acid from the renewable sources: a promising feedstock for the production of biofuels and biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Cheng, Tao; Xian, Mo; Cao, Yujin; Fang, Fang; Zou, Huibin

    2014-01-01

    With the depletion of the nonrenewable petrochemical resources and the increasing concerns of environmental pollution globally, biofuels and biobased chemicals produced from the renewable resources appear to be of great strategic significance. The present review described the progress in the biosynthesis of fatty acid and its derivatives from renewable biomass and emphasized the importance of fatty acid serving as the platform chemical and feedstock for a variety of chemicals. Due to the low efficient conversions of lignocellulosic biomass or carbon dioxide to fatty acid, we also put forward that rational strategies for the production of fatty acid and its derivatives should further derive from the consideration of whole bioprocess (pretreatment, saccharification, fermentation, separation), multiscale analysis and interdisciplinary combinations (omics, kinetics, metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, fermentation and so on). PMID:24361277

  10. Fatty acid from the renewable sources: a promising feedstock for the production of biofuels and biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Cheng, Tao; Xian, Mo; Cao, Yujin; Fang, Fang; Zou, Huibin

    2014-01-01

    With the depletion of the nonrenewable petrochemical resources and the increasing concerns of environmental pollution globally, biofuels and biobased chemicals produced from the renewable resources appear to be of great strategic significance. The present review described the progress in the biosynthesis of fatty acid and its derivatives from renewable biomass and emphasized the importance of fatty acid serving as the platform chemical and feedstock for a variety of chemicals. Due to the low efficient conversions of lignocellulosic biomass or carbon dioxide to fatty acid, we also put forward that rational strategies for the production of fatty acid and its derivatives should further derive from the consideration of whole bioprocess (pretreatment, saccharification, fermentation, separation), multiscale analysis and interdisciplinary combinations (omics, kinetics, metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, fermentation and so on).

  11. Acid-base chemical reaction model for nucleation rates in the polluted atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Modi; Titcombe, Mari; Jiang, Jingkun; Jen, Coty; Kuang, Chongai; Fischer, Marc L.; Eisele, Fred L.; Siepmann, J. Ilja; Hanson, David R.; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.

    2013-05-01

    Measurements of aerosol number distributions down to one molecule have provided information that we've used to develop a new approach for modeling atmospheric nucleation rates. Measurements were carried out with the Cluster Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (Cluster CIMS), the scanning mobility spectrometer using a diethylene glycol condensation particle counter as detector (DEG SMPS), and an ambient pressure proton transfer mass spectrometer for ammonia and amines (AmPMS). The model explains nucleation as a result of cluster evolution due to a sequence of acid-base reactions. We conclude that the smallest stable cluster contains four sulfuric acid molecules. The model leads to a simple analytic expression for nucleation rates that is reasonably consistent (i.e., ± 10x) with atmospheric observations. The model predicts that nucleation rates are equal to a prefactor, P<1, times the sulfuric acid vapor collision rate, (i.e., J=Pṡ0.5ṡk11 *[H2SO4]2).

  12. [Bile acids and endotoxins: physico-chemical defense of the body].

    PubMed

    Bertók, L

    1999-01-01

    The toxic effects of endotoxin--the cell wall component of Gram negative intestinal bacteria--under experimental conditions can be induced only when they are administered parenterally. However, in naturally occurring enteroendotoxemic diseases (e.g. septic and various shocks, etc.), the endotoxin absorbs from the intestinal tract. The cause and mode of translocation was unknown. The generally used experimental shock models differ from natural diseases only in the mode by which endotoxin enters the blood circulation. If the common bile ducts of rats were chronically cannulated (bile deprived animals) perorally administered endotoxin was absorbed from the intestinal canal into blood circulation and provoked endotoxin shock. The translocation of endotoxins and consequent shock can be prevented by sodium deoxycholate or natural biles. The bile acids can split the endotoxin macromolecule (atoxic fragments). A similar destructive detergent action might will be a significant factor against potential infectious agents with lipoprotein outer structure (e.g. so-called "big" viruses). This defense mechanism of macrooganisms based on the detergent activity of bile acids is called as physico-chemical defense system. On the basis of this knowledge the bile acids might be used in the prevention and therapy of some clinical processes (e.g. hepatorenal syndrome; psoriasis).

  13. Chemical and enzymatic preparation of acylglycerols containing C18 furanoid fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lie Ken Jie, M S; Syed-Rahmatullah, M S

    1995-01-01

    C18 furanoid triacylglycerol [glycerol tri-(9,12-epoxy-9,11-octadecadienoate)] was prepared by chemical transformation of triricinolein isolated from castor oil. The procedure involved oxidation, epoxidation and cyclization of the epoxy-keto intermediate with sodium azide and ammonium chloride in aqueous ethanol. The furanoid triacylglycerol was also obtained by esterification of C18 furanoid fatty acid with glycerol using Novozyme 435 (Novo Nordisk A.S., Bagsvaerd, Denmark) as biocatalyst. When Lipozyme (Novo Nordisk A.S.) was used, a mixture of the furanoid 1(3)-rac-monoacylglycerol and 1,3-diacylglycerol was obtained. In order to obtain the C18 furanoid 1,2(2,3)-diacylglycerol, selective hydrolysis of the furanoid triacylglycerol was achieved using porcine pancreatic lipase in tris(hydroxymethyl) methylamine buffer. Interesterification of triolein with methyl C18 furanoid ester in the presence of Lipozyme showed maximum incorporation of 34% of furanoid fatty acid. Extension of the interesterification to vegetable oils (olive, peanut, sunflower, corn and palm oil) allowed a maximum of 24% furanoid acid incorporation to be achieved. PMID:7760692

  14. Production of levulinic acid and use as a platform chemical for derived products

    SciTech Connect

    Bozell, J.J.; Moens, L.; Elliott, D.C.; Wang, Y.; Neuenscwander, G.G.; Fitzpatrick, S.W.; Bilski, R.J.; Jarnefeld, J.L.

    1999-07-01

    Levulinic acid (LA) can be produced cost effectively and in high yield from renewable feedstocks in a new industrial process. The technology is being demonstrated on a one ton/day scale at a facility in South Glens Falls, New York. Low cost LA can be used as a platform chemical for the production of a wide range of value-added products. This research has demonstrated that LA can be converted to methyltetrahydrofuran (MTHF), a solvent and fuel extender. MTHF is produced in {gt}80% molar yield via a single stage catalytic hydrogenation process. A new preparation of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (DALA), a broad spectrum herbicide from LA has also been developed. Each step in this new process proceeds in high ({gt}80%) yield and affords DALA (as the hydrochloride salt) in greater than 90% purity, giving a process that could be commercially viable. LA is also being investigated as a starting material for the production of diphenolic acid (DPA), a direct replacement for bisphenol A.

  15. Chemical Reporter for Visualizing Metabolic Cross-Talk between Carbohydrate Metabolism and Protein Modification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic chemical reporters have been largely used to study posttranslational modifications. Generally, it was assumed that these reporters entered one biosynthetic pathway, resulting in labeling of one type of modification. However, because they are metabolized by cells before their addition onto proteins, metabolic chemical reporters potentially provide a unique opportunity to read-out on both modifications of interest and cellular metabolism. We report here the development of a metabolic chemical reporter 1-deoxy-N-pentynyl glucosamine (1-deoxy-GlcNAlk). This small-molecule cannot be incorporated into glycans; however, treatment of mammalian cells results in labeling of a variety proteins and enables their visualization and identification. Competition of this labeling with sodium acetate and an acetyltransferase inhibitor suggests that 1-deoxy-GlcNAlk can enter the protein acetylation pathway. These results demonstrate that metabolic chemical reporters have the potential to isolate and potentially discover cross-talk between metabolic pathways in living cells. PMID:25062036

  16. Chemical reporter for visualizing metabolic cross-talk between carbohydrate metabolism and protein modification.

    PubMed

    Zaro, Balyn W; Chuh, Kelly N; Pratt, Matthew R

    2014-09-19

    Metabolic chemical reporters have been largely used to study posttranslational modifications. Generally, it was assumed that these reporters entered one biosynthetic pathway, resulting in labeling of one type of modification. However, because they are metabolized by cells before their addition onto proteins, metabolic chemical reporters potentially provide a unique opportunity to read-out on both modifications of interest and cellular metabolism. We report here the development of a metabolic chemical reporter 1-deoxy-N-pentynyl glucosamine (1-deoxy-GlcNAlk). This small-molecule cannot be incorporated into glycans; however, treatment of mammalian cells results in labeling of a variety proteins and enables their visualization and identification. Competition of this labeling with sodium acetate and an acetyltransferase inhibitor suggests that 1-deoxy-GlcNAlk can enter the protein acetylation pathway. These results demonstrate that metabolic chemical reporters have the potential to isolate and potentially discover cross-talk between metabolic pathways in living cells.

  17. In Situ Sensors for the Chemical Industry- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, J D; Knittel, Trevor

    2006-06-30

    The project focused on analytical techniques that can be applied in situ. The innovative component of this project is the focus on achieving a significant breakthrough in two of the three primary Process Analytical (PA) fields. PA measurements can roughly be broken down into:Single component measurements, Multiple component measurements and Multiple component isomer analysis. This project targeted single component measurements and multiple component measurements with two basic technologies, and to move these measurements to the process, achieving many of the process control needs. During the project the following achievements were made: Development of a low cost Tunable Diode Laser (TDL) Analyzer system for measurement of 1) Oxygen in process and combustion applications, 2) part per million (ppm) H2O impurities in aggressive service, 3) ppm CO in large scale combustion systems. This product is now commercially available Development of a process pathlength enhanced (high sensitivity) Laser Based Analyzer for measurement of product impurities. This product is now commercially available. Development of signal processing methods to eliminate measurement errors in complex and changing backgrounds (critical to chemical industry measurements). This development is incorporated into 2 commercially available products. Development of signal processing methods to allow multi-component measurements in complex chemical streams. This development is incorporated into 2 commercially available products. Development of process interface designs to allow in-situ application of TDL technology in aggressive (corrosive, high temperature, high pressure) commonly found in chemical processes. This development is incorporated in the commercially available ASI TDL analyzer. Field proving of 3 laser-based analyzer systems in process control and combustion applications at Dow Chemical. Laser based analyzers have been available for >5yrs, however significant product price/performance issues have

  18. The selective conversion of glutamic acid in amino acid mixtures using glutamate decarboxylase--a means of separating amino acids for synthesizing biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yinglai; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids (AAs) derived from hydrolysis of protein rest streams are interesting feedstocks for the chemical industry due to their functionality. However, separation of AAs is required before they can be used for further applications. Electrodialysis may be applied to separate AAs, but its efficiency is limited when separating AAs with similar isoelectric points. To aid the separation, specific conversion of an AA to a useful product with different charge behavior to the remaining compounds is desired. Here the separation of L-aspartic acid (Asp) and L-glutamic acid (Glu) was studied. L-Glutamate α-decarboxylase (GAD, Type I, EC 4.1.1.15) was applied to specifically convert Glu into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA has a different charge behavior from Asp therefore allowing a potential separation by electrodialysis. Competitive inhibition and reduced operational stability caused by Asp could be eliminated by maintaining a sufficiently high concentration of Glu. Immobilization of GAD does not reduce the enzyme's initial activity. However, the operational stability was slightly reduced. An initial study on the reaction operating in a continuous mode was performed using a column reactor packed with immobilized GAD. As the reaction mixture was only passed once through the reactor, the conversion of Glu was lower than expected. To complete the conversion of Glu, the stream containing Asp and unreacted Glu might be recirculated back to the reactor after GABA has been removed. Overall, the reaction by GAD is specific to Glu and can be applied to aid the electrodialysis separation of Asp and Glu. PMID:24616376

  19. The selective conversion of glutamic acid in amino acid mixtures using glutamate decarboxylase--a means of separating amino acids for synthesizing biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yinglai; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids (AAs) derived from hydrolysis of protein rest streams are interesting feedstocks for the chemical industry due to their functionality. However, separation of AAs is required before they can be used for further applications. Electrodialysis may be applied to separate AAs, but its efficiency is limited when separating AAs with similar isoelectric points. To aid the separation, specific conversion of an AA to a useful product with different charge behavior to the remaining compounds is desired. Here the separation of L-aspartic acid (Asp) and L-glutamic acid (Glu) was studied. L-Glutamate α-decarboxylase (GAD, Type I, EC 4.1.1.15) was applied to specifically convert Glu into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA has a different charge behavior from Asp therefore allowing a potential separation by electrodialysis. Competitive inhibition and reduced operational stability caused by Asp could be eliminated by maintaining a sufficiently high concentration of Glu. Immobilization of GAD does not reduce the enzyme's initial activity. However, the operational stability was slightly reduced. An initial study on the reaction operating in a continuous mode was performed using a column reactor packed with immobilized GAD. As the reaction mixture was only passed once through the reactor, the conversion of Glu was lower than expected. To complete the conversion of Glu, the stream containing Asp and unreacted Glu might be recirculated back to the reactor after GABA has been removed. Overall, the reaction by GAD is specific to Glu and can be applied to aid the electrodialysis separation of Asp and Glu.

  20. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from textile dyeing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    Facilities engaged in textile dyeing may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist textile dyers in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  1. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from wood preserving operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    Facilities engaged in wood preserving operations may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist facilities engaged in wood preserving operations in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  2. Effluent discharge chemical demilitarization alternate technology research hd chemical neutralization and bio-treatment. Final report, September-February 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, J.A.; Haley, M.V.; Kurnas, C.W.

    1996-09-01

    A review was undertaken to establish technical regulatory guidance on the discharge of waste, to a Federally Owned, or Publicly Owned Treatment Works, resulting from the neutralization and biodegradation of HD mustard agent. This report is a review of specific and general pretreatment requirements, proper hazardous waste exclusion, and statute and regulatory prohibition on discharge of chemical warfare agent. A waste water discharge resulting from the proper treatment of chemical warfare agent, which destroys the agent and reduces toxicity, can meet applicable federal, state, and local discharge standards and laws.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF INDIVIDUAL CHEMICAL REACTIONS CONSUMING ACID DURING NUCLEAR WASTE PROCESSING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 136B

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Newell, J.; Stone, M.

    2009-09-02

    Conversion of legacy radioactive high-level waste at the Savannah River Site into a stable glass waste form involves a chemical pretreatment process to prepare the waste for vitrification. Waste slurry is treated with nitric and formic acids to achieve certain goals. The total quantity of acid added to a batch of waste slurry is constrained by the catalytic activity of trace noble metal fission products in the waste that can convert formic acid into hydrogen gas at many hundreds of times the radiolytic hydrogen generation rate. A large block of experimental process simulations were performed to characterize the chemical reactions that consume acid prior to hydrogen generation. The analysis led to a new equation for predicting the quantity of acid required to process a given volume of waste slurry.

  4. Simulating the Changes of Minerals and Elements under Chemical Weathering by Acid Hydrothermal Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, F.; Chen, H.

    2013-12-01

    In paleoenvironmental research, previous investigations reveal that the intensity of chemical weathering can be inferred from the elemental variations of marine or lacustrine sediments. Different kinds of rocks from Taiwan were applied in hydrothermal experiments to simulate element proportions and leaching sequence under chemical weathering. In our experiments, powder samples (2g) are treated in sulfuric acid solutions (20 ml) of 0.05M and 0.5M at 150°C for 1, 4, 7, 14, 30 and 60 days, respectively. We can further discuss mineral alteration and relative elemental migration according to the experimental results. There is no obvious variation in mineral phase and element at 0.05M, but the results of 0.5M have significant variations. The elemental contents are affected by the mineral leaching and secondary mineral deposited, so we use XRD and SEM to identify the existence of secondary minerals and their compositions. Our research exhibits that K/Rb, Ti/Al and Rb/Sr ratios show similar trend in most parent rocks (i.e. granite, andesite, quartz sandstone, calcite sandstone and mudstone) at 0.5M long-term experiments; however, the CIA value, was generally used as the proxy of chemical weathering, keep in a stable condition. The K/Rb and Ti/Al ratio increase, but Rb/Sr ratio decreases. In contrast, the actinolite schist and serpentinite show the different result. It is probably caused by the major mineral, chlorite and serpentinite in the rocks. We conclude that the major element Ti is relatively stable. Therefore, we use each element divided by Ti for judging relatively enriched or depleted under chemical weathering processes. Finally, we find that K/Rb ratio, which has obvious variations, is seldom influenced by mineral assemblage, so it can be regarded as a suitable weathering proxy.

  5. Inventory development for perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) in Turkey: challenges to control chemicals in articles and products.

    PubMed

    Korucu, M Kemal; Gedik, Kadir; Weber, Roland; Karademir, Aykan; Kurt-Karakus, Perihan Binnur

    2015-10-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and related substances have been listed as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Stockholm Convention. Countries which have ratified the Convention need to take appropriate actions to control PFOS use and release. This study compiles and enhances the findings of the first inventory of PFOS and related substances use in Turkey conducted within the frame of the Stockholm Convention National Implementation Plan (NIP) update. The specific Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System (Harmonized System (HS)) codes of imported and exported goods that possibly contain PFOS and 165 of Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) numbers of PFOS-related substances were assessed for acquiring information from customs and other authorities. However, with the current approaches available, no useful information could be compiled since HS codes are not specific enough and CAS numbers are not used by customs. Furthermore, the cut-off volume in chemical databases in Turkey and the reporting limit in the HS system (0.1 %) are too high for controlling PFOS. The attempt of modeling imported volumes by a Monte Carlo simulation did not also result in a satisfactory estimate, giving an upper-bound estimate above the global production volumes. The replies to questionnaires were not satisfactory, highlighting that an elaborated approach is needed in the communication with potentially PFOS-using stakeholders. The experience of the challenges of gathering information on PFOS in articles and products revealed the gaps of controlling highly hazardous substances in products and articles and the need of improvements.

  6. Chemical Composition, Nitrogen Fractions and Amino Acids Profile of Milk from Different Animal Species.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Saima; Huma, Nuzhat; Pasha, Imran; Sameen, Aysha; Mukhtar, Omer; Khan, Muhammad Issa

    2016-07-01

    Milk composition is an imperative aspect which influences the quality of dairy products. The objective of study was to compare the chemical composition, nitrogen fractions and amino acids profile of milk from buffalo, cow, sheep, goat, and camel. Sheep milk was found to be highest in fat (6.82%±0.04%), solid-not-fat (11.24%±0.02%), total solids (18.05%±0.05%), protein (5.15%±0.06%) and casein (3.87%±0.04%) contents followed by buffalo milk. Maximum whey proteins were observed in camel milk (0.80%±0.03%), buffalo (0.68%±0.02%) and sheep (0.66%±0.02%) milk. The non-protein-nitrogen contents varied from 0.33% to 0.62% among different milk species. The highest r-values were recorded for correlations between crude protein and casein in buffalo (r = 0.82), cow (r = 0.88), sheep (r = 0.86) and goat milk (r = 0.98). The caseins and whey proteins were also positively correlated with true proteins in all milk species. A favorable balance of branched-chain amino acids; leucine, isoleucine, and valine were found both in casein and whey proteins. Leucine content was highest in cow (108±2.3 mg/g), camel (96±2.2 mg/g) and buffalo (90±2.4 mg/g) milk caseins. Maximum concentrations of isoleucine, phenylalanine, and histidine were noticed in goat milk caseins. Glutamic acid and proline were dominant among non-essential amino acids. Conclusively, current exploration is important for milk processors to design nutritious and consistent quality end products. PMID:26954163

  7. Chemical Composition, Nitrogen Fractions and Amino Acids Profile of Milk from Different Animal Species

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, Saima; Huma, Nuzhat; Pasha, Imran; Sameen, Aysha; Mukhtar, Omer; Khan, Muhammad Issa

    2016-01-01

    Milk composition is an imperative aspect which influences the quality of dairy products. The objective of study was to compare the chemical composition, nitrogen fractions and amino acids profile of milk from buffalo, cow, sheep, goat, and camel. Sheep milk was found to be highest in fat (6.82%±0.04%), solid-not-fat (11.24%±0.02%), total solids (18.05%±0.05%), protein (5.15%±0.06%) and casein (3.87%±0.04%) contents followed by buffalo milk. Maximum whey proteins were observed in camel milk (0.80%±0.03%), buffalo (0.68%±0.02%) and sheep (0.66%±0.02%) milk. The non-protein-nitrogen contents varied from 0.33% to 0.62% among different milk species. The highest r-values were recorded for correlations between crude protein and casein in buffalo (r = 0.82), cow (r = 0.88), sheep (r = 0.86) and goat milk (r = 0.98). The caseins and whey proteins were also positively correlated with true proteins in all milk species. A favorable balance of branched-chain amino acids; leucine, isoleucine, and valine were found both in casein and whey proteins. Leucine content was highest in cow (108±2.3 mg/g), camel (96±2.2 mg/g) and buffalo (90±2.4 mg/g) milk caseins. Maximum concentrations of isoleucine, phenylalanine, and histidine were noticed in goat milk caseins. Glutamic acid and proline were dominant among non-essential amino acids. Conclusively, current exploration is important for milk processors to design nutritious and consistent quality end products. PMID:26954163

  8. Chemical rescue, multiple ionizable groups, and general acid-base catalysis in the HDV genomic ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Anne T; Wadkins, Timothy S; Been, Michael D

    2006-07-01

    In the ribozyme from the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) genomic strand RNA, a cytosine side chain is proposed to facilitate proton transfer in the transition state of the reaction and, thus, act as a general acid-base catalyst. Mutation of this active-site cytosine (C75) reduced RNA cleavage rates by as much as one million-fold, but addition of exogenous cytosine and certain nucleobase or imidazole analogs can partially rescue activity in these mutants. However, pH-rate profiles for the rescued reactions were bell shaped, and only one leg of the pH-rate curve could be attributed to ionization of the exogenous nucleobase or buffer. When a second potential ionizable nucleobase (C41) was removed, one leg of the bell-shaped curve was eliminated in the chemical-rescue reaction. With this construct, the apparent pK(a) determined from the pH-rate profile correlated with the solution pK(a) of the buffer, and the contribution of the buffer to the rate enhancement could be directly evaluated in a free-energy or Brønsted plot. The free-energy relationship between the acid dissociation constant of the buffer and the rate constant for cleavage (Brønsted value, beta, = approximately 0.5) was consistent with a mechanism in which the buffer acted as a general acid-base catalyst. These data support the hypothesis that cytosine 75, in the intact ribozyme, acts as a general acid-base catalyst.

  9. Chemical composition of rainwater and the acid neutralizing effect at Beijing and Chizhou city, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhifang; Wu, Yao; Liu, Wen-Jing; Liang, Chong-Shan; Ji, Jianpeng; Zhao, Tong; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-10-01

    The chemical compositions were measured in rainwater samples collected during 2011-2012 from two representative cities, Beijing in north China and Chizhou city in south China. The rainwater was highly acidic with a volume-weighted mean (VWM) pH of 4.56, ranging from 3.77 to 5.67, and about 94% of the samples had pH below 5.0 in Chizhou. The pH values of rainwater in Beijing ranged from 3.78 to 6.62, with a VWM value of 4.85. The predominant ions in the precipitation were SO42 -, Ca2 + and NH4+ at both sites. The VWM concentrations of ions in rainwater were higher in Beijing, and the SO42 - concentration of rainwater in Beijing was about twice that in Chizhou. However, due to the weaker neutralization of acidity, the rainwater from Chizhou had relatively low pH values. According to the results of linear regression analysis, the percentage of the potential acidity counteracted by Ca2 + and NH4+ was higher in rainwater in Beijing (90.7%) than that in Chizhou (70.8%). Using Na as an indicator of marine origin, and Al for the terrestrial inputs, the proportions of sea salt and terrestrial elements were estimated from elemental ratios. More than 98% of SO42 - and Ca2 + in rainwater samples are non-sea-salt origin at both sites. Coal combustion may be the main source of SO42 -, and local and remote soil dust may be an important source of Ca2 + in Beijing rainwater. The high concentrations of alkaline ions (Ca2 + and NH4+) have played an important role to neutralize the acidity of rainwater in Beijing.

  10. Chemical Profiles of Microalgae with Emphasis on Lipids: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J. R.; Tillett, D. M.; Suen, Y.; Hubbard, J.; Tornabene, T. G.

    1986-02-01

    This final report details progress during the third year of this subcontract. The overall objective of this subcontract was two fold: to provide the analytical capability required for selecting microalgae strains with high energy contents and to develop fundamental knowledge required for optimizing the energy yield from microalgae cultures. The progress made towards these objectives during this year is detailed in this report.

  11. GLYCOLIC-FORMIC ACID FLOWSHEET FINAL REPORT FOR DOWNSELECTION DECISION

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Stone, M.; Newell, J.; Best, D.

    2011-03-10

    Flowsheet testing was performed to develop the nitric-glycolic-formic acid flowsheet (referred to as the glycolic-formic flowsheet throughout the rest of the report) as an alternative to the nitric/formic flowsheet currently being processed at the DWPF. This new flowsheet has shown that mercury can be removed in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) with minimal hydrogen generation. All processing objectives were also met, including greatly reducing the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product yield stress as compared to the baseline nitric/formic flowsheet. Forty-six runs were performed in total, including the baseline run and the melter feed preparation runs. Significant results are summarized. The baseline nitric/formic flowsheet run, using the SB6 simulant produced by Harrell was extremely difficult to process successfully under existing DWPF acceptance criteria with this simulant at the HM levels of noble metals. While nitrite was destroyed and mercury was removed to near the DWPF limit, the rheology of the SRAT and SME products were well above design basis and hydrogen generation far exceeded the DWPF SRAT limit. In addition, mixing during the SME cycle was very poor. In this sense, the nitric/glycolic/formic acid flowsheet represents a significant upgrade over the current flowsheet. Mercury was successfully removed with almost no hydrogen generation and the SRAT and SME products yield stresses were within process limits or previously processed ranges. The glycolic-formic flowsheet has a very wide processing window. Testing was completed from 100% to 200% of acid stoichiometry and using a glycolic-formic mixture from 40% to 100% glycolic acid. The testing met all processing requirements throughout these processing windows. This should allow processing at an acid stoichiometry of 100% and a glycolic-formic mixture of 80% glycolic acid with minimal hydrogen generation. It should also allow processing endpoints in the SRAT and SME at significantly higher

  12. Increased neuronal and astroglial aquaporin-1 immunoreactivity in rat striatum by chemical preconditioning with 3-nitropropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Akihiko; Tsunoda, Ayako; Yamamoto, Teiji; Tada, Mari; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2016-07-28

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is a water channel expressed in the choroid plexus and participates in forming cerebrospinal fluid. Interestingly, reactive astrocytes also express AQP1 in the central nervous system under some pathological conditions. On the other hand, 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) is a mitochondrial toxin that causes selective degeneration of striatum; however, its chemical preconditioning is neuroprotective against cerebral ischemia. We previously reported that mild 3NP application is accompanied with numerous reactive astrocytes in rat striatum devoid of typical necrotic lesions. Therefore, we studied whether AQP1 in the rat striatum could be upregulated with reactive astrocytosis using the 3NP model. Immunohistochemical or immunofluorescence analysis showed that reactive astrocytosis in the striatum, which upregulates glial fibrillary acidic protein and glutamine synthetase, was induced by mild doses of 3NP administration. Intriguingly, after 3NP treatment, AQP1 was intensely expressed not only by the subpopulation of astroglia but also by neurons. The AQP1 immunoreactivity became more intensified at the early-subtoxic stage (ES: 24-48h), but not as much in the delayed-subtoxic stage (DS: 96-120h). In contrast, AQP4 expression in the striatum was downregulated after 3NP treatment, in particular during the ES stage. AQP1 upregulation/AQP4 downregulation induced under subtoxic 3NP treatment may play a pivotal role in water homeostasis and cell viability in the striatum. PMID:27181510

  13. Chemical profile and seasonal variation of phenolic acid content in bastard balm (Melittis melissophyllum L., Lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Skrzypczak-Pietraszek, Ewa; Pietraszek, Jacek

    2012-07-01

    Melittis melissophyllum L. is an old medicinal plant. Nowadays it is only used in the folk medicine but formerly it has been applied in the official medicine as a natural product described in French Pharmacopoeia. M. melissophyllum herbs used in our studies were collected from two localities in Poland in May and September. Methanolic plant extracts were purified by means of solid-phase extraction and then analysed by HPLC-DAD for their phenolic acid profile. Eleven compounds were identified in all plant samples and quantitatively analysed as: protocatechuic, chlorogenic, p-hydroxybenzoic, vanillic, caffeic, syringic, p-coumaric, ferulic, sinapic, o-coumaric and cinnamic acid. Plant materials contained free and bound phenolic acids. The main compounds were: p-hydroxybenzoic acid (30.21-54.16 mg/100 g dw and 37.04-56.75 mg/100 g dw, free and bound, respectively) and p-coumaric acid (40.48-80.55 mg/100 g dw and 28.09-40.85 mg/100 g dw, free and bound, respectively). The highest amounts of the investigated compounds were found in all samples collected in September, e.g. p-hydroxybenzoic acid (September 51.72-54.16 mg/100 g dw vs. May 30.21-34.07 mg/100 g dw), p-coumaric acid (September 77.14-80.55 mg/100 g dw vs. May 40.48-43.2 5mg/100 g dw). Multivariate statistical and data mining techniques, such as cluster analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA), were used to characterize the sample populations according to the geographical localities, vegetation period and compound form (free or bound). To the best of our knowledge we report for the first time the results of quantitative analysis of M. melissophyllum phenolic acids and seasonal variation of their content. Plant herbs are usually collected at flowering for plant derived medical preparations. Our results show that it is not always the optimal time for the highest contents of active compounds. PMID:22513117

  14. Report of the Fifth Biennial Conference on Chemical Education: Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Two papers are reported on, one dealing with a course on inorganic reaction mechanisms for college seniors, and the other on the set-up necessary to provide students with an automatic potentiometric titration facility. (BB)

  15. Chemical characterization of Campylobacter jejuni lipopolysaccharides containing N-acetylneuraminic acid and 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, A P; Rietschel, E T; Kosunen, T U; Zähringer, U

    1991-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of four nonencapsulated strains of the human enteric pathogen Campylobacter jejuni were chemically characterized. When applied to two of the strains, extraction by a modified phenol-chloroform-petroleum ether method (H. Brade and C. Galanos, Eur. J. Biochem. 122:233-237, 1982) gave better yields of LPS than did extraction by the conventional hot phenol-water technique. Constituents common to all LPS were D-glucose, D-galactose, L-glycero-D-manno-heptose, 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid, D-glucuronic acid, D-galactosamine, and phosphorylethanolamine. Phosphate was present in a relatively high amount. In addition, the LPS of three strains contained N-acetylneuraminic acid, whereas the LPS of the strain lacking this component contained 3-amino-3,6-dideoxy-D-glucose. The lipid A component contained phosphate with D-glucosamine and 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucose as the major amino sugars. Ethanolamine-phosphate was present also. The major fatty acids were ester- and amide-bound 3-hydroxytetradecanoic and ester-bound hexadecanoic acids, with a minor amount of ester-bound tetradecanoic acid. This is the first report of N-acetylneuraminic acid in the oligosaccharide moiety and diaminoglucose in the lipid A of C. jejuni LPS. PMID:1987154

  16. Trapping of organophosphorus chemical nerve agents in water with amino acid functionalized baskets.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Yian; Dalkiliç, Erdin; Peterson, Paul W; Pandit, Aroh; Dastan, Arif; Brown, Jason D; Polen, Shane M; Hadad, Christopher M; Badjić, Jovica D

    2014-04-01

    We prepared eleven amino-acid functionalized baskets and used (1) H NMR spectroscopy to quantify their affinity for entrapping dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP, 118 Å(3) ) in aqueous phosphate buffer at pH=7.0±0.1; note that DMMP guest is akin in size to chemical nerve agent sarin (132 Å(3) ). The binding interaction (Ka ) was found to vary with the size of substituent groups at the basket's rim. In particular, the degree of branching at the first carbon of each substituent had the greatest effect on the host-guest interaction, as described with the Verloop's B1 steric parameter. The branching at the remote carbons, however, did not perturb the encapsulation, which is important for guiding the design of more effective hosts and catalysts in future. PMID:24616086

  17. Towards Self-Replicating Chemical Systems Based on Cytidylic and Guanylic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1999-01-01

    This project was aimed towards a better understanding of template-directed reactions and, based on this, towards the development of efficient non-enzymatic RNA replicating systems. These systems could serve as models for the prebiotic synthesis of an RNA world. The major objectives of this project are: (a) To elucidate the mechanistic aspects of template-directed (TD) chemistry and (b) to identify active boundary regions, or conditions, environmental and other, that favor "organized chemistry" and stereo-selective polymerization of nucleotides. "Organized chemistry" may lead to enhanced polymerization efficiency which in turn is expected to facilitate the road towards a self-replicating chemical system based on all four nucleic acid bases.

  18. Chemical transport through continental crust: (Annual) progress report, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-20

    The main objective of these studies is to understand the extent and mechanisms of chemical migration over a range of temperatures and in diverse geologic media. During 1988--1989 we continued to attack these problems through studies in the granite-pegmatite systems of the Black Hills, South Dakota. Mineral chemistry, major element chemistry and trace element modeling of the Harney Peak Granite (Black Hills, South Dakota) suggest that 75% to 80% fractional crystallization was the dominant mechanism in producing evolved tourmaline-bearing granite (high B, Li, Rb, Cs, Be, Nb) from a biotite-muscovite granite. To evaluate the petrogenetic-evolutionary relations between the granite and the surrounding rare-element pegmatite field, over 500 K-feldspars (Kf) were analyzed from 60 unzoned to complexly zoned pegmatites. Pegmatites with Kf relatively high in Ba (>140 ppM) and relatively low in Rb (<1000 ppM) and Cs (<30 ppM) are distributed in regions of high pegmatite density (>200 pegmatites/sq. mile), whereas highly evolved pegmatites with Kf enriched in Rb (>4000 ppM) and Cs (>500 ppM) are distributed in regions of low pegmatite density (<100 pegmatites/sq. mile). The extent of pegmatite evolution as reflected in the Kf documents the relation between the degree of fractionation and internal zoning characteristics. Modeling of these data is a major task for the next grant year to provide new insights into chemical and thermal transport in the midcrust.

  19. Chemical production from industrial by-product gases: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

    1981-04-01

    The potential for conservation of natural gas is studied and the technical and economic feasibility and the implementation of ventures to produce such chemicals using carbon monoxide and hydrogen from byproduct gases are determined. A survey was performed of potential chemical products and byproduct gas sources. Byproduct gases from the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries were selected for detailed study. Gas sampling, preliminary design, market surveys, and economic analyses were performed for specific sources in the selected industries. The study showed that production of methanol or ammonia from byproduct gas at the sites studied in the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries is technically feasible but not economically viable under current conditions. Several other applications are identified as having the potential for better economics. The survey performed identified a need for an improved method of recovering carbon monoxide from dilute gases. A modest experimental program was directed toward the development of a permselective membrane to fulfill that need. A practical membrane was not developed but further investigation along the same lines is recommended. (MCW)

  20. Chemical characterization and dynamics of particulate combined amino acids in Pacific surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukasaki, Ayumi; Tanoue, Eiichiro

    2010-01-01

    Particulate organic matter (POM) in surface water plays an essential role in maintaining marine ecosystem and is a complex mixture of living POM (organisms) and non-living POM (detritus). Transformation of organic constituents of organisms to detritus may be the most active part in the decomposition processes of organic matter in marine biogeochemistry. Distribution and chemical fractionation of particulate combined amino acids (PCAAs) in surface waters from Southern Ocean to tropical waters along a transect of 170°W were examined to clarify the transfer processes of organic constituents of organisms to detritus. The observational facts may be summarized as follows. 1) Degradation Index (DI) based on principal component analysis of amino acid composition of bulk PCAAs agreed with the traditional degradation indicators of bulk POM, i.e., PCAAs-carbon (C)/particulate organic carbon (POC), PCAAs-nitrogen (N)/particulate nitrogen (PN) and C/N. 2) PCAAs were distinguished into 3 fractions, i.e., Urea-soluble, Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)-soluble and SDS/Urea-insoluble fractions, by means of solubility against reagents frequently used for protein extraction from biological samples. Proportions of PCAAs of the 3 fractions to bulk PCAAs were almost constant, although concentrations of the PCAAs of 3 fractions as well as bulk in seawater varied two orders of magnitude over the transect. 3) There was no significant difference among DI values of the 3 fractions, although molecular mass distributions of the Urea-soluble and SDS-soluble fractions determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were different. The results indicated that no one fraction was particularly susceptible to degradation and that there is a common mechanism for transferring and maintaining the similar chemical quality of bulk POM over the transect.

  1. In vitro cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of diphenylarsinic acid, a degradation product of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Takafumi; Suzuki, Toshihide; Isono, Hideo; Kaise, Toshikazu

    2004-10-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid [DPAs(V)], a degradation product of diphenylcyanoarsine or diphenylchloroarsine, both of which were developed as chemical warfare agents, was investigated in terms of its capacity to induce cytotoxic effects, numerical and structural changes of chromosomes, and abnormalities of centrosome integrity and spindle organizations in conjunction with the effects of glutathione (GSH) depletion. DPAs(V) had toxic effects on cultured human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells at concentrations more than 0.5 mM. Depletion of GSH reduced the toxic effects of DPAs(V) as well as dimethylarsinic acid [DMAs(V)] toxicity, while toxicity by arsenite [iAs(III)] was enhanced. Exogenously added sulfhydryl (SH) compounds, such as dimercapropropane sulfonate (DMPS), GSH, and dithiothreitol (DTT), enhanced the toxic effects of DPAs(V) while they suppressed iAs(III) toxicity. DPAs(V) caused an increase in the mitotic index, and also structural and numerical changes in chromosomes in V79 Chinese hamster cells. Abnormality of centrosome integrity in mitotic V79 cells and multipolar spindles was also induced by DPAs(V) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. These results suggested that highly toxic chemicals were generated by the interaction of DPAs(V) with SH compounds. Moreover, enhancements of toxicity by a combination of DPAs(V) and SH compounds suggested a risk in the use of SH compounds as a remedy for intoxication by diphenylarsenic compounds. Investigations on the effects of SH compounds on animals intoxicated with DPAs(V) are warranted.

  2. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for indicator parameters, groundwater quality parameters, parameters indicating suitability as drinking water, and other constituents. New wells KAC 8 and 9 also were sampled for GC/MS VOA (gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer volatile organic analyses). Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. Iron exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in wells KAC 6 and 7, and specific conductance exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in new well KAC 9. No samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard.

  3. H-area acid/caustic basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, samples from the four HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin of Savannah River Plant were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria and turbidity standards during the quarter are the focus of this report. Tritium exceeded the PDWS in HAC 1, 2, 3, and 4 during first quarter 1992. Tritium activities in upgradient well HAC 4 appeared similar to tritium levels in well HAC 1, 2, and 3. Specific conductance and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in wells HAC 2 and 3, respectively. No well samples exceeded the SRS turbidity standard.

  4. H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1991, samples from the HAC monitoring wells at the H-Area Acid/Caustic Basin of Savannah River Plant were analyzed for indicator parameters, turbidity, major ions, volatile organic compounds, radionuclides, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards (PDWS) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria and turbidity standards during the quarter, with summary results for the year, are the focus of this report. Tritium activities exceeded the PDWS in 4 wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in 1 well, and specific conductance exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well HAC 2. No priority pollutant (EPA, 1990) exceeded the PDWS or Flag 2 criteria in 2 wells. None of the HAC wells exceeded the SRS turbidity standard. Elevated tritium activities were found in all four HAC wells every quarter. Elevated total radium occurred in well HAC 2 during third quarter.

  5. 40 CFR 372.85 - Toxic chemical release reporting form and instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Information on transfers of the chemical in wastes to off-site locations as follows: (i) For transfers to... relative to waste treatment: (i) An indication of the general type of wastestream containing the reported... reporting year. (3) The only exception to this TRI electronic reporting requirement of paragraph (c)...

  6. Chemical evolution. XXI - The amino acids released on hydrolysis of HCN oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J. P.; Wos, J. D.; Nooner, D. W.; Oro, J.

    1974-01-01

    Major amino acids released by hydrolysis of acidic and basic HCN oligomers are identified by chromatography as Gly, Asp, and diaminosuccinic acid. Smaller amounts of Ala, Ile and alpha-aminoisobutyric acid are also detected. The amino acids released did not change appreciably when the hydrolysis medium was changed from neutral to acidic or basic. The presence of both meso and d, l-diaminosuccinic acids was established by paper chromatography and on an amino acid analyzer.

  7. Initial chemical and biological characterization of hydrotreated solvent refined coal (SRC-II) liquids: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, W.C.; Wilson, B.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Craun, J.C.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the results of both chemical and biomedical research performed on a solvent refined coal (SRC-II) research material (distillate blend) which was produced by the pilot plant facility at Fort Lewis, Washington. Samples of this distillate blend were subjected to research-scale hydrotreatment by Universal Oil Products, Inc., prior to chemical and biological analysis at PNL. The samples are considered to be, in general, generically representative of raw or hydrotreated materials which might be produced by demonstration or commercial-scale facilities. The above described feedstock and hydrotreated materials were analyzed for chemical composition both prior to and after chemical fractionation. The fractionation procedure used was an acid-base-neutral solvent extraction. The fractions produced, as well as the unfractionated materials, were subjected to microbial mutagenesis testing (Ames assay) and to further chemical analysis. The principal components of the unmodified distillate blend are two and three ringed aromatic and heteroatomic species together with high concentrations of phenolic and polynuclear aromatic components relative to typical levels found in petroleum crudes. The Ames assay mutagenic response for the unfractionated material, as well as the fractions produced by the solvent separation, was reduced considerably in the hydrotreated materials compared to that of the feedstock. Total mutagenic response for the hydrotreated products was approximately 1% of that in the untreated feedstock. The concentrations of two important genetically active compound classes, the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and the primary aromatic amines, were considerably reduced in both of the hydrotreated products compared to the feedstock.

  8. 48 CFR 52.223-13 - Certification of Toxic Chemical Release Reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... manufacture, process, or otherwise use any toxic chemicals listed in 40 CFR 372.65; □ (ii) The facility does... under section 313(f) of EPCRA, 42 U.S.C. 11023(f) (including the alternate thresholds at 40 CFR 372.27... Chemical Release Reporting. 52.223-13 Section 52.223-13 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  9. 40 CFR 370.12 - What hazardous chemicals must I report under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... required to have an MSDS and meets the definition of hazardous chemical under the OSHA regulations found at 29 CFR 1910.1200(c). ...) You must report any hazardous chemical for which you are required to prepare or have available an...

  10. 40 CFR 370.12 - What hazardous chemicals must I report under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... required to have an MSDS and meets the definition of hazardous chemical under the OSHA regulations found at 29 CFR 1910.1200(c). ...) You must report any hazardous chemical for which you are required to prepare or have available an...

  11. 40 CFR 370.12 - What hazardous chemicals must I report under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... required to have an MSDS and meets the definition of hazardous chemical under the OSHA regulations found at 29 CFR 1910.1200(c). ...) You must report any hazardous chemical for which you are required to prepare or have available an...

  12. 40 CFR 370.12 - What hazardous chemicals must I report under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... required to have an MSDS and meets the definition of hazardous chemical under the OSHA regulations found at 29 CFR 1910.1200(c). ...) You must report any hazardous chemical for which you are required to prepare or have available an...

  13. 40 CFR 370.12 - What hazardous chemicals must I report under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... required to have an MSDS and meets the definition of hazardous chemical under the OSHA regulations found at 29 CFR 1910.1200(c). ...) You must report any hazardous chemical for which you are required to prepare or have available an...

  14. 40 CFR 372.85 - Toxic chemical release reporting form and instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... subsequent changes to the Form R or Form R Schedule 1 will be posted on this Web site. Submitters may also... following: (1) An indication of whether the report: (i) Claims chemical identity as trade secret. (ii... identity is claimed trade secret, a generic name for the chemical. (11) A mixture component identity if...

  15. Chemical, sensory and shelf life evaluation of sliced salmon treated with salts of organic acids

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Khalid Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the shelf life, chemical quality and sensory attributes of salmon slices treated by dipping in 2.5% aqueous solution of sodium acetate (NaA), sodium lactate (NaL), or sodium citrate (NaC) during refrigerated storage at 1 °C. The chemical analyses demonstrated significant reduction in K value, hypoxanthine (Hx) concentration, total volatile base nitrogen (TVB-N), and trimethylamine (TMA) in treated salmon slices when compared with the control. Sensory scores of treated salmon were in a typical category for appearance, juiciness and tenderness compared with the control. Only minor changes in the sensory attributes were recognized by few panellists in NaA- and NaL-treated samples. A shelf life of 12, 12 and 15 days has been estimated for salmon treated with NaL, NaC, and NaA, respectively, versus 8 days for control. The salts of organic acids can therefore be used as safe preservatives for fish under refrigerated storage. PMID:17245440

  16. Quantum chemical computations, vibrational spectroscopic analysis and antimicrobial studies of 2,3-Pyrazinedicarboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaula, T. Joselin; Packiavathi, A.; Manimaran, D.; Joe, I. Hubert; Rastogi, V. K.; Jothy, V. Bena

    2015-03-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations at B3PW91 level with 6-311G (d) basis sets were carried out for 2,3-Pyrazinedicarboxylic acid (PDCA) to analyze in detail the equilibrium geometries and vibrational spectra. Calculations reveal that the optimized geometry closely resembles the experimental XRD data. Vibrational spectra were analyzed on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) of each vibrational mode, which provides quantitative as well as qualitative interpretation of IR and Raman spectra. Information about size, shape, charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecule were obtained by mapping electron density isosurface with the electrostatic potential surface (ESP). Based on optimized ground state geometries, NBO analysis was performed to study donor-acceptor (bond-antibond) interactions. TD-DFT analysis was also performed to calculate energies, oscillator strength of electronic singlet-singlet transitions and the absorption wavelengths. The 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule in the ground state were calculated by gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with the experimental values. PDCA was screened for its antimicrobial activity and found to exhibit antifungal and antibacterial effects. Molecular docking was also performed for the different receptors.

  17. Life in the light: nucleic acid photoproperties as a legacy of chemical evolution.

    PubMed

    Beckstead, Ashley A; Zhang, Yuyuan; de Vries, Mattanjah S; Kohler, Bern

    2016-09-21

    Photophysical investigations of the canonical nucleobases that make up DNA and RNA during the past 15 years have revealed that excited states formed by the absorption of UV radiation decay with subpicosecond lifetimes (i.e., <10(-12) s). Ultrashort lifetimes are a general property of absorbing sunscreen molecules, suggesting that the nucleobases are molecular survivors of a harsh UV environment. Encoding the genome using photostable building blocks is an elegant solution to the threat of photochemical damage. Ultrafast excited-state deactivation strongly supports the hypothesis that UV radiation played a major role in shaping molecular inventories on the early Earth before the emergence of life and the subsequent development of a protective ozone shield. Here, we review the general physical and chemical principles that underlie the photostability, or "UV hardiness", of modern nucleic acids and discuss the possible implications of these findings for prebiotic chemical evolution. In RNA and DNA strands, much longer-lived excited states are observed, which at first glance appear to increase the risk of photochemistry. It is proposed that the dramatically different photoproperties that emerge from assemblies of photostable building blocks may explain the transition from a world of molecular survival to a world in which energy-rich excited electronic states were eventually tamed for biological purposes such as energy transduction, signaling, and repair of the genetic machinery. PMID:27539809

  18. Microwave enhanced chemical reduction process for nitrite-containing wastewater treatment using sulfaminic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Wang, Peng; Liu, Qingsong; Cao, Hailei

    2010-01-01

    High-concentration nitrite-containing wastewater that presents extreme toxicity to human health and organisms is difficult to be treated using traditional biological process. In this study, a novel microwave-enhanced chemical reduction process (MECRP) using sulfaminic acid (SA) was proposed as a new manner to treat such type of wastewater. Based on lab-scale experiments, it was shown that 75%-80% nitrite (NO2-) could be removed within time as short as 4 min under 50 W microwave irradiation in pH range 5-10 when molar ratio of SA to nitrite (SA/NO2-) was 0.8. Pilot-scale investigations demonstrated that MECRP was able to achieve nitrite and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal with efficiency up to 80% and 20%, respectively under operating conditions of SA concentration 80 kg/m3, SA/NO2- ratio 0.8, microwave power 3.4 kW, and stirring time 3 min. Five-day biological oxygen demand (BOD5)/COD value of treated effluent after MECRP was increased from 0.05 to 0.36 (by 620%), which clearly suggested a considerable improvement of biodegradability for subsequent biological treatment. This study provided a demonstration of using microwave irradiation to enhance reaction between SA and nitrite in a short time, in which nitrite in wastewater was completely converted into nitrogen gas without leaving any sludge and secondary pollutants. PMID:20397387

  19. Quantum chemical computations, vibrational spectroscopic analysis and antimicrobial studies of 2,3-Pyrazinedicarboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Beaula, T Joselin; Packiavathi, A; Manimaran, D; Joe, I Hubert; Rastogi, V K; Jothy, V Bena

    2015-03-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations at B3PW91 level with 6-311G (d) basis sets were carried out for 2,3-Pyrazinedicarboxylic acid (PDCA) to analyze in detail the equilibrium geometries and vibrational spectra. Calculations reveal that the optimized geometry closely resembles the experimental XRD data. Vibrational spectra were analyzed on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) of each vibrational mode, which provides quantitative as well as qualitative interpretation of IR and Raman spectra. Information about size, shape, charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecule were obtained by mapping electron density isosurface with the electrostatic potential surface (ESP). Based on optimized ground state geometries, NBO analysis was performed to study donor-acceptor (bond-antibond) interactions. TD-DFT analysis was also performed to calculate energies, oscillator strength of electronic singlet-singlet transitions and the absorption wavelengths. The (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule in the ground state were calculated by gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with the experimental values. PDCA was screened for its antimicrobial activity and found to exhibit antifungal and antibacterial effects. Molecular docking was also performed for the different receptors.

  20. Chemical Genetics Uncovers Novel Inhibitors of Lignification, Including p-Iodobenzoic Acid Targeting CINNAMATE-4-HYDROXYLASE.

    PubMed

    Van de Wouwer, Dorien; Vanholme, Ruben; Decou, Raphaël; Goeminne, Geert; Audenaert, Dominique; Nguyen, Long; Höfer, René; Pesquet, Edouard; Vanholme, Bartel; Boerjan, Wout

    2016-09-01

    Plant secondary-thickened cell walls are characterized by the presence of lignin, a recalcitrant and hydrophobic polymer that provides mechanical strength and ensures long-distance water transport. Exactly the recalcitrance and hydrophobicity of lignin put a burden on the industrial processing efficiency of lignocellulosic biomass. Both forward and reverse genetic strategies have been used intensively to unravel the molecular mechanism of lignin deposition. As an alternative strategy, we introduce here a forward chemical genetic approach to find candidate inhibitors of lignification. A high-throughput assay to assess lignification in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings was developed and used to screen a 10-k library of structurally diverse, synthetic molecules. Of the 73 compounds that reduced lignin deposition, 39 that had a major impact were retained and classified into five clusters based on the shift they induced in the phenolic profile of Arabidopsis seedlings. One representative compound of each cluster was selected for further lignin-specific assays, leading to the identification of an aromatic compound that is processed in the plant into two fragments, both having inhibitory activity against lignification. One fragment, p-iodobenzoic acid, was further characterized as a new inhibitor of CINNAMATE 4-HYDROXYLASE, a key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway synthesizing the building blocks of the lignin polymer. As such, we provide proof of concept of this chemical biology approach to screen for inhibitors of lignification and present a broad array of putative inhibitors of lignin deposition for further characterization. PMID:27485881

  1. Comparison of liquid chemical sterilization with peracetic acid and ethylene oxide sterilization for long narrow lumens.

    PubMed

    Alfa, M J; DeGagne, P; Olson, N; Hizon, R

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how well peracetic acid liquid chemical sterilization (LCPAS) killed test organisms in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum and 0.65% salt challenge (RPMI-S) compared with a 100% ethylene oxide (ETO) sterilizer and an ETO hydrochlorofluorocarbon (ETO-HCFC) sterilization method with long (125 cm), narrow (3-mm internal diameter) flexible lumens as the test carrier. The inoculated lumens were dried overnight before processing. The test organisms included Mycobacterium chelonei, Enterococcus faecalis, and Bacillus subtilis. For all 3 organisms tested, the LCPAS process resulted in a 6 log10 reduction in bacterial load compared with a 2.5 log10 to 6 log10 reduction for the 100% ETO and ETO-HCFC sterilizers. Sterilization was achieved for 100%, 61%, and 67% of the lumen test carriers for the LCPAS, 100% ETO, and ETO-HCFC sterilizers, respectively. The data indicate that of the sterilization methods evaluated, LCPAS was the most effective for sterilizing narrow flexible lumens in the presence of residual inorganic and organic soil. This effectiveness was achieved through a combination of organism wash-off and peracetic acid sterilant killing of organisms. Salt was the major compounding factor for effective ETO gas sterilization, because carriers inoculated with organisms in 10% fetal bovine serum alone all were sterilized by both 100% ETO and ETO-HCFC sterilization methods. Our data support the critical need to ensure adequate precleaning of narrow flexible lumen endoscopes before any sterilization method. PMID:9795674

  2. Chemical genetics reveals negative regulation of abscisic acid signaling by a plant immune response pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Hauser, Felix; Ha, Tracy; Xue, Shaowu; Böhmer, Maik; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Munemasa, Shintaro; Hubbard, Katharine; Peine, Nora; Lee, Byeong-Ha; Lee, Stephen; Robert, Nadia; Parker, Jane E; Schroeder, Julian I

    2011-06-01

    Coordinated regulation of protection mechanisms against environmental abiotic stress and pathogen attack is essential for plant adaptation and survival. Initial abiotic stress can interfere with disease-resistance signaling [1-6]. Conversely, initial plant immune signaling may interrupt subsequent abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction [7, 8]. However, the processes involved in this crosstalk between these signaling networks have not been determined. By screening a 9600-compound chemical library, we identified a small molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that rapidly downregulates ABA-dependent gene expression and also inhibits ABA-induced stomatal closure. Transcriptome analyses show that DFPM also stimulates expression of plant defense-related genes. Major early regulators of pathogen-resistance responses, including EDS1, PAD4, RAR1, and SGT1b, are required for DFPM-and notably also for Pseudomonas-interference with ABA signal transduction, whereas salicylic acid, EDS16, and NPR1 are not necessary. Although DFPM does not interfere with early ABA perception by PYR/RCAR receptors or ABA activation of SnRK2 kinases, it disrupts cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling and downstream anion channel activation in a PAD4-dependent manner. Our findings provide evidence that activation of EDS1/PAD4-dependent plant immune responses rapidly disrupts ABA signal transduction and that this occurs at the level of Ca(2+) signaling, illuminating how the initial biotic stress pathway interferes with ABA signaling.

  3. Synthesis, structural characterization and quantum chemical studies of silicon-containing benzoic acid derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaltariov, Mirela-Fernanda; Cojocaru, Corneliu; Shova, Sergiu; Sacarescu, Liviu; Cazacu, Maria

    2016-09-01

    The present paper is concerned with the synthesis and molecular structure investigation of two new benzoic acid derivatives having trimethylsilyl tails, 4-((trimethylsilyl)methoxy) and 4-(3-(trimethylsilyl)propoxy)benzoic acids. The structures of the novel compounds have been confirmed by X-ray crystallography, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H and 13C NMR). The theoretical studies of molecules were conducted by using the quantum chemical methods, such as Density Functional Theory (DFT B3LYP/6-31 + G**), Hartree-Fock (HF/6-31 + G**) and semiempirical computations (PM3, PM6 and PM7). The optimized molecular geometries have been found to be in good agreement with experimental structures resulted from the X-ray diffraction. The maximum electronic absorption bands observed at 272-287 nm (UV-vis spectra) have been assigned to π → π* transitions, which were in reasonable agreement with the time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. The computed vibrational frequencies by DFT method were assigned and compared with the experimental FTIR spectra. The mapped electrostatic potentials revealed the reactive sites, which corroborated the observation of the dimer supramolecular structures formed in the crystals by hydrogen-bonding. The energies of frontier molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO), energy gap, dipole moment and molecular descriptors for the new compounds were calculated and discussed.

  4. Chemical response of lakes in the Adirondack Region of New York to declines in acidic deposition.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Charles T; Driscoll, Kimberley M; Roy, Karen M; Mitchell, Myron J

    2003-05-15

    Long-term changes in the chemistry of wet deposition and lake water were investigated in the Adirondack Region of New York. Marked decreases in concentrations of SO4(2-) and H+ in wet deposition have occurred at two sites since the late 1970s. These decreases are consistent with long-term declines in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the eastern United States. Changes in wet NO3- deposition and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions have been minor over the same interval. Virtually all Adirondack Lakes have shown marked decreases in concentrations of SO4(2-), which coincide with decreases in atmospheric S deposition. Concentrations of NO3- have also decreased in several Adirondack lakes. As atmospheric N deposition has not changed over this period, the mechanism contributing to this apparent increase in lake/watershed N retention is not evident. Decreases in concentrations of SO4(2-) + NO3- have resulted in increases in acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) and pH and resulted in a shift in the speciation of monomeric Al from toxic inorganic species toward less toxic organic forms in some lakes. Nevertheless, many lakes continue to exhibit pH values and concentrations of inorganic monomeric Al that are critical to aquatic biota. Extrapolation of rates of ANC increase suggests that the time frame of chemical recovery of Adirondack Lakes will be several decades if current decreases in acidic deposition are maintained.

  5. Decreased acid deposition and the chemical recovery of Killarney, Ontario, lakes.

    PubMed

    Keller, Wendel; Heneberry, Jocelyne H; Dixit, Sushil S

    2003-04-01

    Lakes in Killarney Park near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, have shown dramatic water quality changes including general increases in pH and alkalinity, and decreases in SO4(2-), base cations and metals. While some lakes have recovered to pH > 6.0, many are still highly acidic despite decades of improvement. Very high historical S deposition related to emissions from the Sudbury metal smelters dominated the acidification process in this region. However, since the implementation of substantial S emission controls (90%) at the smelters, the Sudbury emissions are no longer the major source of S deposition in the Sudbury area. Wet deposition of SO4(2-) and SO4(2-) concentrations in lakewaters at Killarney now approach values in the Dorset, Ontario, area, about 200 km from Sudbury. This suggests that the S deposition to the Killarney area is now primarily from long-range transport, not from local sources. Studies of Killarney lakes are revealing the complex nature of the chemical recovery process. As lake acidity decreases, other changes including decreased Ca2+ concentrations, increased transparency, and altered thermal regimes may potentially affect some of these ecosystems. It is clear that continuing assessments of the recovery of Killarney lakes, within a multiple-stressor framework, are needed.

  6. Comparison of liquid chemical sterilization with peracetic acid and ethylene oxide sterilization for long narrow lumens.

    PubMed

    Alfa, M J; DeGagne, P; Olson, N; Hizon, R

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how well peracetic acid liquid chemical sterilization (LCPAS) killed test organisms in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum and 0.65% salt challenge (RPMI-S) compared with a 100% ethylene oxide (ETO) sterilizer and an ETO hydrochlorofluorocarbon (ETO-HCFC) sterilization method with long (125 cm), narrow (3-mm internal diameter) flexible lumens as the test carrier. The inoculated lumens were dried overnight before processing. The test organisms included Mycobacterium chelonei, Enterococcus faecalis, and Bacillus subtilis. For all 3 organisms tested, the LCPAS process resulted in a 6 log10 reduction in bacterial load compared with a 2.5 log10 to 6 log10 reduction for the 100% ETO and ETO-HCFC sterilizers. Sterilization was achieved for 100%, 61%, and 67% of the lumen test carriers for the LCPAS, 100% ETO, and ETO-HCFC sterilizers, respectively. The data indicate that of the sterilization methods evaluated, LCPAS was the most effective for sterilizing narrow flexible lumens in the presence of residual inorganic and organic soil. This effectiveness was achieved through a combination of organism wash-off and peracetic acid sterilant killing of organisms. Salt was the major compounding factor for effective ETO gas sterilization, because carriers inoculated with organisms in 10% fetal bovine serum alone all were sterilized by both 100% ETO and ETO-HCFC sterilization methods. Our data support the critical need to ensure adequate precleaning of narrow flexible lumen endoscopes before any sterilization method.

  7. Surface Chemical Compositions and Dispersity of Starch Nanocrystals Formed by Sulfuric and Hydrochloric Acid Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benxi; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Surface chemical compositions of starch nanocrystals (SNC) prepared using sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) hydrolysis were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FT-IR. The results showed that carboxyl groups and sulfate esters were presented in SNC after hydrolysis with H2SO4, while no sulfate esters were detected in SNC during HCl-hydrolysis. TEM results showed that, compared to H2SO4-hydrolyzed sample, a wider size distribution of SNC prepared by HCl-hydrolysis were observed. Zeta-potentials were −23.1 and −5.02 mV for H2SO4- and HCl-hydrolyzed SNC suspensions at pH 6.5, respectively. Nevertheless, the zeta-potential values decreased to −32.3 and −10.2 mV as the dispersion pH was adjusted to 10.6. After placed 48 h at pH 10.6, zeta-potential increased to −24.1 mV for H2SO4-hydrolyzed SNC, while no change was detected for HCl-hydrolyzed one. The higher zeta-potential and relative small particle distribution of SNC caused more stable suspensions compared to HCl-hydrolyzed sample. PMID:24586246

  8. Surface chemical compositions and dispersity of starch nanocrystals formed by sulfuric and hydrochloric acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Benxi; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Tian, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    Surface chemical compositions of starch nanocrystals (SNC) prepared using sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) hydrolysis were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and FT-IR. The results showed that carboxyl groups and sulfate esters were presented in SNC after hydrolysis with H2SO4, while no sulfate esters were detected in SNC during HCl-hydrolysis. TEM results showed that, compared to H2SO4-hydrolyzed sample, a wider size distribution of SNC prepared by HCl-hydrolysis were observed. Zeta-potentials were -23.1 and -5.02 mV for H2SO4- and HCl-hydrolyzed SNC suspensions at pH 6.5, respectively. Nevertheless, the zeta-potential values decreased to -32.3 and -10.2 mV as the dispersion pH was adjusted to 10.6. After placed 48 h at pH 10.6, zeta-potential increased to -24.1 mV for H2SO4-hydrolyzed SNC, while no change was detected for HCl-hydrolyzed one. The higher zeta-potential and relative small particle distribution of SNC caused more stable suspensions compared to HCl-hydrolyzed sample.

  9. Dexterity testing of chemical-defense gloves. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Robinette, K.M.; Ervin; Zehner, G.F.

    1986-05-01

    Chemical-defense gloves (12.5-mil Epichlorohydron/Butyl, 14-mil Epichlorohydron/Butyl, and 7-mil Butyl with Nomex overgloves) were subjected to four dexterity tests (O'Connor Finger Dexterity Test, Pennsylvania Bi-Manual Worksample-Assembly, Minnesota Rate of Manipulation Turning, and the Crawford Small Test). Results indicated that subjects performances were most impaired by the 7-mil Butyl with Nomex overglove. Though differences between the other three gloved conditions were not always statistically significant, subjects performed silghtly better while wearing the Epichlorohydron/Butyl gloves, no matter which thickness, than they did while wearing the 15-mil butyl gloves. High negative correlation between anthropometry and gloved tests scores of subjects suggested that poor glove fit may also have affected subjects performances.

  10. Reactions of hydrazines with chemicals found in environment. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Judeikis, H.S.; Damschen, D.E.

    1992-01-24

    Reactions of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine with selected species of interest that are found in the environment have been investigated. Included are aqueous phase reactions that can occur in atmospheric aerosols, groundwater, or soils in contact with groundwater, as well as selected gas phase reactions. Reactants include oxygen and hydrogen peroxide (both reactants in the presence and absence of catalysts), ozone, nitrous acid, sulfur dioxide, and acetone (as a model for environmental ketones and aldehydes). Rate constants for the reactions have been determined, or upper limits set. In several instances, reaction products have been identified. By far, the fastest reactions measured were those involving the hydrazines and ozone with (second-order) rate constants up to 2.4 x 107 liter/mole-sec.

  11. Generalized chemical route to develop fatty acid capped highly dispersed semiconducting metal sulphide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Jayesh D.; Mighri, Frej; Ajji, Abdellah

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: ► Chemical route for the synthesis of OA-capped CdS, ZnS and PbS at low temperature. ► Synthesized nanocrystals via thermolysis of their metal–oleate complexes. ► Size quantized nanocrystals were highly dispersed and stable at room temperature. -- Abstract: This work deals with the synthesis of highly dispersed semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs) of cadmium sulphide (CdS), zinc sulphide (ZnS) and lead sulphide (PbS) through a simple and generalized process using oleic acid (OA) as surfactant. To synthesize these NCs, metal–oleate (M–O) complexes were obtained from the reaction at 140 °C between metal acetates and OA in hexanes media. Subsequently, M–O complexes were sulphurized using thioacetamide at the same temperature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterizations show that the synthesized products are of nanoscale-size with highly crystalline cubic phase. The optical absorption of OA-capped metal sulphide NCs confirms that their size quantization induced a large shift towards visible region. Photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of CdS NCs shows a broad band-edge emission with shallow and deep-trap emissions, while PL spectrum of ZnS NCs reveals a broad emission due to defects states on the surface. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy indicate that fatty acid monolayers were bound strongly on the nanocrystal surface as a carboxylate and the two oxygen atoms of the carboxylate were coordinated symmetrically to the surface of the NCs. The strong binding between the fatty acid and the NCs surface enhances the stability of NCs colloids. In general, this generalized route has a great potential in developing nanoscale metal sulphides for opto-electronic devices.

  12. Ceramic films and interfaces: Chemical and mechanical properties. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, R.

    1993-06-05

    Results are reported in two areas: (1) understanding the mechanism of superplasticity in those that show unusual resistance to intergranular cavitation, and (2) understanding the growth of heteroepitaxial films of oxides by CVD (NiO, TiO{sub 2}).

  13. Light-Activated Amino Acid Transport Systems in Halobacterium halobium Envelope Vesicles: Role of Chemical and Electrical Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDonald, Russell E.; Greene, Richard V.; Lanyi, Janos K.

    1977-01-01

    The accumulation of 20 commonly occurring L-amino acids by cell envelope vesicles of Halobacterium halobium, in response to light-induced membrane potential and an artificially created sodium gradient, has been studied. Nineteen of these amino acids are actively accumulated under either or both of these conditions. Glutamate is unique in that its uptake is driven only by a chemical gradient for sodium. Amino acid concentrations at half-maximal uptake rates (Km) and maximal transport rates (V(sub max) have been determined for the uptake of all 19 amino acids. The transport systems have been partially characterized with respect to groups of amino acids transported by common carriers, cation effects, and relative response to the electrical and chemical components of the sodium gradient, the driving forces for uptake. The data presented clearly show that the carrier systems, which are responsible for uptake of individual amino acids, are as variable in their properties as those found in other organisms, i. e., some are highly specific for individual amino acids, some transport several amino acids competitively, some are activated by a chemical gradient of sodium only, and some function also in the complete absence of such a gradient. For all amino acids, Na(+) and K(+) are both required for maximal rate of uptake. The carriers for L-leucine and L-histidine are symmetrical in that these amino acids are transported in both directions across the vesicle membrane. It is suggested that coupling of substrate transport to metabolic energy via transient ionic gradients may be a general phenomenon in procaryotes.

  14. First Chemical Feature Based Pharmacophore Modeling of Potent Retinoidal Retinoic Acid Metabolism Blocking Agents (RAMBAs): Identification of Novel RAMBA Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Purushottamachar, Puranik; Patel, Jyoti B.; Gediya, Lalji K; Clement, Omoshile O.; Njar, Vincent C. O.

    2011-01-01

    The first three-dimensional (3D) pharmacophore model was developed for potent retinoidal retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents (RAMBAs) with IC50 values ranging from 0.0009 to 5.84 nM. The seven common chemical features in these RAMBAs as deduced by the Catalyst/HipHop program include five hydrophobic groups (hydrophobes), one hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) and one ring aromatic group. Using the pharmacophore model as a 3D search query against NCI and Maybridge conformational Catalyst formatted databases; we retrieved several compounds with different structures (scaffolds) as hits. Twenty one retrieved hits were tested for RAMBA activity at 100 nM concentration. The most potent of these compounds, NCI10308597 and HTS01914 showed inhibitory potencies less (54.7% and 53.2%, respectively, at 100 nM) than those of our best previously reported RAMBAs VN/12-1 and VN/14-1 (90% and 86%, respectively, at 100 nM). Docking studies using a CYP26A1 homology model revealed that our most potent RAMBAs showed similar binding to the one observed for a series of RAMBAs reported previously by others. Our data shows the potential of our pharmacophore model in identifying structurally diverse and potent RAMBAs. Further refinement of the model and searches of other robust databases is currently in progress with a view to identifying and optimizing new leads. PMID:22130607

  15. Evaluation of Biomonitoring Data from the CDC National Exposure Report in a Risk Assessment Context: Perspectives across Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Biomonitoring data reported in the National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals (NER) provide information on the presence and concentrations of more than 400 chemicals in human blood and urine. Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) and other risk assessment...

  16. Comparative analysis of some essential amino acids and available lysine in Acacia colei and A. tumida seeds using chemical methods and an amino acid analyzer.

    PubMed

    Falade, Olumuyiwa S; Adewusi, Steve R A

    2013-01-01

    Methionine, cysteine, tryptophan, and available lysine were determined in Acacia colei and A. tumida seeds and some cereals using chemical methods, and the results were compared to those obtained using an amino acid analyzer. Ba(OH)2 hydrolysis gave the best result of the three methods of hydrolysis (acid, base, and enzyme) tried. Oxidized methionine, cysteine, and tryptophan were not detected, but S-carboxyethylcysteine was estimated as cysteine by the chemical methods, thus overestimating cysteine's content in Acacia seeds. Tryptophan and methionine were higher in cereals than in Acacia seeds, while the level of cysteine and available lysine was higher in Acacia seeds than in cereals. These results agreed with values obtained using the amino acid analyzer and could therefore be used in low budget laboratories.

  17. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains a discussion of the chemical safety improvements planned or already underway at DOE sites to correct facility or site-specific vulnerabilities. The main part of the report is a discussion of each of the programmatic deficiencies; a description of the tasks to be accomplished; the specific actions to be taken; and the organizational responsibilities for implementation.

  18. Thoracic Duct Chylous Fistula Following Severe Electric Injury Combined with Sulfuric Acid Burns: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Fei; Cheng, Dasheng; Qian, Mingyuan; Lu, Wei; Li, Huatao; Tang, Hongtai; Xia, Zhaofan

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 32 Final Diagnosis: Thoracic duct chylous fistula Symptoms: Fistula Medication: — Clinical Procedure: A boneless muscle flap transplantatio Specialty: — Objective: Rare disease Background: As patients with thoracic duct injuries often suffer from severe local soft tissue defects, integrated surgical treatment is needed to achieve damage repair and wound closure. However, thoracic duct chylous fistula is rare in burn patients, although it typically involves severe soft tissue damage in the neck or chest. Case Report: A 32-year-old male patient fell after accidentally contacting an electric current (380 V) and knocked over a barrel of sulfuric acid. The sulfuric acid continuously poured onto his left neck and chest, causing combined electrical and sulfuric acid burn injuries to his anterior and posterior torso, and various parts of his limbs (25% of his total body surface area). During treatment, chylous fistula developed in the left clavicular region, which we diagnosed as thoracic duct chylous fistula. We used diet control, intravenous nutritional support, and continuous somatostatin to reduce the chylous fistula output, and hydrophilic silver ion-containing dressings for wound coverage. A boneless muscle flap was used to seal the left clavicular cavity, and, integrated, these led to resolution of the chylous fistula. Conclusions: Patients with severe electric or chemical burns in the neck or chest may be complicated with thoracic duct injuries. Although conservative treatment can control chylous fistula, wound cavity filling using a muscle flap is an effective approach for wound healing. PMID:27725628

  19. Evaluation of Chemical Abstracts(4) - Analysis of Technical Reports Collection -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Nobumasa

    It has been long time since various data bases appeared. Amid so-called information flood data bases have played a role in improving performances of industrial activities or social life by providing appropriate information at right time from them. Particularly CA Search is indispensable and important to persons who are engaged in R & D in chemistry and the related fields. For the purpose of advancing on-line searching efficiency by clarifying the scope and coverage by document type the author analyzed the information covered in CA, which results were reported in the series of articles "Evaluation of CA". In this article the author analyzed the coverage of technical reports and compared the result with NTIS file.

  20. An Atypical Cause of Alkali Chemical Burn: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Boutefnouchet, T.; Moiemen, N.; Papini, R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary It has already been reported that wet ash turns into a strong alkali agent, which can cause full-thickness skin burns. A case is presented which has the particularity of sustained, self-inflicted contact with wet ash. The coal used was the self-igniting type normally used for burning scented weed or for smoking the hubbly bubbly or shisha pipe. PMID:21991229

  1. Development of chemical vapor composites, CVC materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-05

    Industry has a critical need for high-temperature operable ceramic composites that are strong, non-brittle, light weight, and corrosion resistant. Improvements in energy efficiency, reduced emissions and increased productivity can be achieved in many industrial processes with ceramic composites if the reaction temperature and pressure are increased. Ceramic composites offer the potential to meet these material requirements in a variety of industrial applications. However, their use is often restricted by high cost. The Chemical Vapor composite, CVC, process can reduce the high costs and multiple fabrication steps presently required for ceramic fabrication. CVC deposition has the potential to eliminate many difficult processing problems and greatly increase fabrication rates for composites. With CVC, the manufacturing process can control the composites` density, microstructure and composition during growth. The CVC process: can grow or deposit material 100 times faster than conventional techniques; does not require an expensive woven preform to infiltrate; can use high modulus fibers that cannot be woven into a preform; can deposit composites to tolerances of less than 0.025 mm on one surface without further machining.

  2. First reported fatalities associated with the 'research chemical' 2-methoxydiphenidine.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Simon P; Brandt, Simon D; Wallach, Jason; Morris, Hamilton; Kavanagh, Pierce V

    2015-05-01

    2-Methoxydiphenidine, i.e. 1-[1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-2-phenylethyl]piperidine, also known as 'MXP' or '2-MeO-diphenidine' (or 2-MXP), has been available as a 'research chemical' since 2013 as a purported alternative to the 'dissociative anesthetics' methoxetamine and ketamine. Three deaths which involved the detection of 2-MXP in post-mortem blood and urine were encountered in forensic casework. The 2-, 3- and 4-methoxyphenyl positional isomers were synthesized to confirm the identity and concentration of 2-MXP. The 2-MXP femoral blood concentrations in the cases were found to be 24.0, 2.0 and 1.36 mg/L (the latter with an alternative cause of death). Some additional prescription drugs were encountered at therapeutic concentrations in all three cases. Analysis of the biofluids allowed the detection and characterization of various metabolites, including the suggested presence of hydroxy-2-MXP as the main metabolite with the hydroxyl group located on the piperidine rather than the phenyl or benzyl moiety. Additional metabolites included O-desmethyl-2-MXP and hydroxylated O-desmethyl-2-MXP. Diphenidine and hydroxy-diphenidine, also showing the presence of the hydroxyl group on the piperidine ring, were also detected. It was not possible to identify whether these arose from 2-MXP biotransformation or whether they represented the presence of diphenidine as a separate substance. These are the first published fatalities involving 2-MXP and presents analytical data to assist analytical toxicologists with future casework.

  3. Acid deposition in Maryland: Summary of results through 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuro, J.; Bowman, M.; Maxwell, C.; Asante-Duah, D.; Meyers, S.

    1990-06-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Research and Monitoring Program coordinates Maryland's acid deposition research and reports research results annually. The report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition, its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  4. Acid deposition in Maryland: the status of knowledge in 1987. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Power Plant Research Program coordinates Maryland's acid deposition research and reports research results annually. The report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy-conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  5. Acid deposition in Maryland: summary of results through 1988. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Research and Monitoring Program coordinates Maryland's acid-deposition research and reports research results annually. This report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  6. Terminal alkenes as versatile chemical reporter groups for metabolic oligosaccharide engineering.

    PubMed

    Späte, Anne-Katrin; Schart, Verena F; Schöllkopf, Sophie; Niederwieser, Andrea; Wittmann, Valentin

    2014-12-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand (DAinv reaction) of 1,2,4,5-tetrazines with electron rich or strained alkenes was proven to be a bioorthogonal ligation reaction that proceeds fast and with high yields. An important application of the DAinv reaction is metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE) which allows the visualization of glycoconjugates in living cells. In this approach, a sugar derivative bearing a chemical reporter group is metabolically incorporated into cellular glycoconjugates and subsequently derivatized with a probe by means of a bioorthogonal ligation reaction. Here, we investigated a series of new mannosamine and glucosamine derivatives with carbamate-linked side chains of varying length terminated by alkene groups and their suitability for labeling cell-surface glycans. Kinetic investigations showed that the reactivity of the alkenes in DAinv reactions increases with growing chain length. When applied to MOE, one of the compounds, peracetylated N-butenyloxycarbonylmannosamine, was especially well suited for labeling cell-surface glycans. Obviously, the length of its side chain represents the optimal balance between incorporation efficiency and speed of the labeling reaction. Sialidase treatment of the cells before the bioorthogonal labeling reaction showed that this sugar derivative is attached to the glycans in form of the corresponding sialic acid derivative and not epimerized to another hexosamine derivative to a considerable extent.

  7. Perceived treatment efficacy for conventional and alternative therapies reported by persons with multiple chemical sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Pamela Reed; Elms, Amy Nicole-Marie; Ruding, Lisa Ann

    2003-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a condition in which persons experience negative health effects in multiple organ systems from exposure to low levels of common chemicals. Although symptoms experienced from particular chemicals vary across persons, they are generally stable within persons. The sensitivities often spread over time, first to related chemicals and then to other classes of chemicals. This study examined self-reported perceived treatment efficacy of 101 treatments used by 917 persons with self-reported MCS. Treatments examined included environmental medicine techniques, holistic therapies, individual nutritional supplements, detoxification techniques, body therapies, Eastern-origin techniques, newer therapies, prescription items, and others. The three most highly rated treatments were creating a chemical-free living space, chemical avoidance, and prayer. Both creating a chemical-free living space and chemical avoidance were rated by 95% of respondents as helpful. Results for most therapies were mixed. Participants had consulted a mean of 12 health care providers and spent over one-third of their annual income on health care costs. We discuss this drain on personal resources and describe respondents' attitudes toward the possibility of healing from MCS. PMID:12948890

  8. DEPOSITION TANK CORROSION TESTING FOR ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING POST OXALIC ACID DESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2011-08-29

    An Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed to aid in the high level waste tank closure at the Savannah River Site. The ECC process uses an advanced oxidation process (AOP) to destroy the oxalic acid that is used to remove residual sludge from a waste tank prior to closure. The AOP process treats the dissolved sludge with ozone to decompose the oxalic acid through reactions with hydroxyl radicals. The effluent from this oxalic acid decomposition is to be sent to a Type III waste tank and may be corrosive to these tanks. As part of the hazardous simulant testing that was conducted at the ECC vendor location, corrosion testing was conducted to determine the general corrosion rate for the deposition tank and to assess the susceptibility to localized corrosion, especially pitting. Both of these factors impact the calculation of hydrogen gas generation and the structural integrity of the tanks, which are considered safety class functions. The testing consisted of immersion and electrochemical testing of A537 carbon steel, the material of construction of Type III tanks, and 304L stainless steel, the material of construction for transfer piping. Tests were conducted in solutions removed from the destruction loop of the prototype ECC set up. Hazardous simulants, which were manufactured at SRNL, were used as representative sludges for F-area and H-area waste tanks. Oxalic acid concentrations of 1 and 2.5% were used to dissolve the sludge as a feed to the ECC process. Test solutions included the uninhibited effluent, as well as the effluent treated for corrosion control. The corrosion control options included mixing with an inhibited supernate and the addition of hydroxide. Evaporation of the uninhibited effluent was also tested since it may have a positive impact on reducing corrosion. All corrosion testing was conducted at 50 C. The uninhibited effluent was found to increase the corrosion rate by an order of magnitude from less than 1 mil per year (mpy

  9. Chemical durability of glaze on Zsolnay architectural ceramics (Budapest, Hungary) in acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baricza, Ágnes; Bajnóczi, Bernadett; May, Zoltán; Tóth, Mária; Szabó, Csaba

    2015-04-01

    Zsolnay glazed architectural ceramics are among the most famous Hungarian ceramics, however, there is no profound knowledge about the deterioration of these building materials. The present study aims to reveal the influence of acidic solutions in the deterioration of Zsolnay ceramics. The studied ceramics are glazed roof tiles, which originate from two buildings in Budapest: one is located in the densely built-up city centre with high traffic rate and another one is in a city quarter with moderate traffic and more open space. The roof tiles represent the construction and the renovation periods of the buildings. The ceramics were mainly covered by lead glazes in the construction period and mainly alkali glazes in the renovation periods. The glaze of the tiles were coloured with iron (for yellow glaze) or chromium/copper/iron (for green glazes) in the case of the building located in the city centre, whereas cobalt was used as colorant and tin oxide as opacifier for the blue glaze of the ceramics of the other building. Six tiles were selected from each building. Sulphuric acid (H2SO4) solutions of pH2 and pH4 were used to measure the durability of the glazes up to 14 days at room temperature. The surfaces of the glazed ceramics after the treatment were measured by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDS techniques to determine the precipitated phases on the surface of the glaze. Electron microprobe analysis was used to quantitatively characterise phases found and to determine the chemical composition of the treated glaze. The recovered sulphuric acid solutions were measured with ICP-OES technique in order to quantify the extent of the ion exchange between the glaze and the solutions. There is a significant difference in the dissolution rates in the treatments with sulphuric acid solutions of pH2 and pH4, respectively. The solution of pH2 induced greater ion exchange (approx. 7-10 times) from the glaze compared to the solution of pH4. Alkali and alkali earth

  10. Volatile organic chemical emissions from carpets. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Wooley, J.D.; Daisey, J.M.

    1992-04-01

    The primary objective of this research, was to measure the emission rates of selected individual VOC, including low molecular-weight aldehydes, released by samples of four new carpets that are typical of the major types of carpets used in residences, schools and offices. The carpet samples were collected directly from the manufacturers` mills and packaged to preserve their chemical integrity. The measurements of the concentrations and emission rates of these compounds were made under simulated indoor conditions in a 20-M{sup 3} environmental chamber designed specifically for investigations of VOC. The measurements were conducted over a period of one week following the installation of the carpet samples in the chamber. Duplicate experiments were conducted for one carpet. In addition, the concentrations and emission rates of VOC resulting from the installation of a new carpet in a residence were measured over a period of seven weeks. The stabilities of the week-long ventilation rates and temperatures were one percent relative standard deviation. The four carpets emitted a variety of VOC, 40 of which were positively identified. Eight of these were considered to be dominant. They were (in order of chromatographic retention time) formaldehyde, vinyl acetate, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane), 1,2-propanediol (propylene glycol), styrene, 2-ethyl-l-hexanol, 4-phenylcyclohexene (4-PCH), and 2,6 di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT). With the exception of formaldehyde, only limited data are available on the toxicity and irritancy of these compounds at low concentrations. Therefore, it is difficult to determine at this time the potential magnitude of the health and comfort effects that may occur among the population from exposures to emissions from new carpets. The concentrations and emission rates of most compounds decreased rapidly over the first 12 h of the experiments.

  11. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1997-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October-December 1996. The report describes ten tasks conducted in four major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area -- Chemical Processes for Waste Management -- includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Components by Caustic Leaching, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, Development and Testing of Inorganic Sorbents, and Sludge Treatment Studies. Within the second research area -- Reactor Fuel Chemistry -- the distribution of iodine in containment during an AP600 design-basis accident was evaluated using models in the TRENDS code. Within the third research area -- Thermodynamics -- efforts continued in the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of energy-Related Materials task. The fourth major research area -- Processes for Waste Management -- includes work on these tasks: Ion-Exchange Process for Heavy Metals Removal, Search for Technetium in Natural Metallurgical Residues, and Waste Form Development and Testing of a Glass- and Cement-Based Dedicated Hot-Cell Facility.

  12. Investigating the chemical changes of chlorogenic acids during coffee brewing: conjugate addition of water to the olefinic moiety of chlorogenic acids and their quinides.

    PubMed

    Matei, Marius Febi; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-12-12

    Coffee is one of the most popular and consumed beverages in the world and is associated with a series of benefits for human health. In this study we focus on the reactivity of chlorogenic acids, the most abundant secondary metabolites in coffee, during the coffee brewing process. We report on the hydroxylation of the chlorogenic acid cinnamoyl substituent by conjugate addition of water to form 3-hydroxydihydrocaffeic acid derivatives using a series of model compounds including monocaffeoyl and dicaffeoylquinic acids and quinic acid lactones. The regiochemistry of conjugate addition was established based on targeted tandem MS experiments. Following conjugate addition of water a reversible water elimination yielding cis-cinnamoyl derivatives accompanied by acyl migration products was observed in model systems. We also report the formation of all of these derivatives during the coffee brewing process.

  13. Olfaction Presentation System Using Odor Scanner and Odor-Emitting Apparatus Coupled with Chemical Capsules of Alginic Acid Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakairi, Minoru; Nishimura, Ayako; Suzuki, Daisuke

    For the purpose of the application of odor to information technology, we have developed an odor-emitting apparatus coupled with chemical capsules made of alginic acid polymer. This apparatus consists of a chemical capsule cartridge including chemical capsules of odor ingredients, valves to control odor emission, and a temperature control unit. Different odors can be easily emitted by using the apparatus. We have developed an integrated system of vision, audio and olfactory information in which odor strength can be controlled coinciding with on-screen moving images based on analytical results from the odor scanner.

  14. Efficient conversion of polyamides to ω-hydroxyalkanoic acids: a new method for chemical recycling of waste plastics.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Akio; Ikeda, Kosuke; Suzuki, Shuzo; Kato, Kazunari; Akinari, Yugo; Sugimoto, Tsunemi; Kashiwagi, Kohichi; Kaiso, Kouji; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Makoto

    2014-09-01

    An efficient transformation of polyamides to ω-hydroxy alkanoic acids was achieved. Treatment of nylon-12 with supercritical MeOH in the presence of glycolic acid gave methyl ω-hydroxydodecanoate in 85% yield and the alcohol/alkene selectivity in the product was enhanced to up to 9.5:1. The use of (18)O-enriched acetic acid for the reaction successfully introduced an (18)O atom at the alcoholic OH group in the product. This strategy may provide a new and economical solution for the chemical recycling of waste plastics.

  15. Chemical, crystallographic and stable isotopic properties of alunite and jarosite from acid-Hypersaline Australian lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpers, C.N.; Rye, R.O.; Nordstrom, D.K.; White, L.D.; King, B.-S.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical, crystallographic and isotopic analyses were made on samples containing alunite and jarosite from the sediments of four acid, hypersaline lakes in southeastern and southwestern Australia. The alunite and jarosite are K-rich with relatively low Na contents based on chemical analysis and determination of unit cell dimensions by powder X-ray diffraction. Correcting the chemical analyses of fine-grained mineral concentrates from Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, for the presence of halite, silica and poorly crystalline aluminosilicates, the following formulas indicate best estimates for solid-solution compositions: for alunite, K0.87Na0.04(H3O)0.09(Al 0.92Fe0.08)3(SO4)2(OH) 6 and for jarosite, K0.89Na0.07(H3O)0.04(Fe 0.80Al0.20)3(SO4)2(OH) 6. The ??D-values of alunite are notably larger than those for jarosite from Lake Tyrrell and it appears that the minerals have closely approached hydrogen isotope equilibrium with the acidic regional groundwaters. The ??D results are consistent with a fractionation ???60-70??? between alunite and jarosite observed in other areas. However, interpretation of ??D results is complicated by large variability in fluid ??DH2O from evaporation, mixing and possible ion hydration effects in the brine. ??D-values of water derived from jarosite by step-wise heating tend to be smaller at 250??C, at which temperature hydronium and other non-hydroxyl water is liberated, than at 550??C, where water is derived from the hydroxyl site, but the differences are not sufficiently different to invalidate measurements of total ??D obtained by conventional, single-step heating methods. ??34S-values for alunite and jarosite from the four lakes (+19.7 to +21.2??? CDT) and for aqueous sulfate from Lake Tyrrell (+18.3 to +19.8???) are close to the values for modern evaporites (+21.5 ??0.3???) and seawater (+20??0.5???) and are probably typical of seawater-derived aerosols in arid coastal environments. ??34-S-values slightly smaller than that for seawater may

  16. Chemical Reaction between Boric Acid and Phosphine Indicates Boric Acid as an Antidote for Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Motahareh; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed F.; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Aluminium phosphide (AlP) is a fumigant pesticide which protects stored grains from insects and rodents. When it comes into contact with moisture, AlP releases phosphine (PH3), a highly toxic gas. No efficient antidote has been found for AlP poisoning so far and most people who are poisoned do not survive. Boric acid is a Lewis acid with an empty p orbital which accepts electrons. This study aimed to investigate the neutralisation of PH3 gas with boric acid. Methods: This study was carried out at the Baharlou Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, between December 2013 and February 2014. The volume of released gas, rate of gas evolution and changes in pH were measured during reactions of AlP tablets with water, acidified water, saturated boric acid solution, acidified saturated boric acid solution, activated charcoal and acidified activated charcoal. Infrared spectroscopy was used to study the resulting probable adduct between PH3 and boric acid. Results: Activated charcoal significantly reduced the volume of released gas (P <0.01). Although boric acid did not significantly reduce the volume of released gas, it significantly reduced the rate of gas evolution (P <0.01). A gaseous adduct was formed in the reaction between pure AlP and boric acid. Conclusion: These findings indicate that boric acid may be an efficient and non-toxic antidote for PH3 poisoning. PMID:27606109

  17. Chemical Reaction between Boric Acid and Phosphine Indicates Boric Acid as an Antidote for Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Motahareh; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed F.; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Aluminium phosphide (AlP) is a fumigant pesticide which protects stored grains from insects and rodents. When it comes into contact with moisture, AlP releases phosphine (PH3), a highly toxic gas. No efficient antidote has been found for AlP poisoning so far and most people who are poisoned do not survive. Boric acid is a Lewis acid with an empty p orbital which accepts electrons. This study aimed to investigate the neutralisation of PH3 gas with boric acid. Methods: This study was carried out at the Baharlou Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, between December 2013 and February 2014. The volume of released gas, rate of gas evolution and changes in pH were measured during reactions of AlP tablets with water, acidified water, saturated boric acid solution, acidified saturated boric acid solution, activated charcoal and acidified activated charcoal. Infrared spectroscopy was used to study the resulting probable adduct between PH3 and boric acid. Results: Activated charcoal significantly reduced the volume of released gas (P <0.01). Although boric acid did not significantly reduce the volume of released gas, it significantly reduced the rate of gas evolution (P <0.01). A gaseous adduct was formed in the reaction between pure AlP and boric acid. Conclusion: These findings indicate that boric acid may be an efficient and non-toxic antidote for PH3 poisoning.

  18. State acid rain permitting programs: A report from EPA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    States and EPA are laying the groundwork for state acid rain permitting in Phase 2 of the Acid Rain Program. Early indications suggest a high degree of state compliance with the acid rain permitting requirements of the Acid Rain Program. Phase 2 acid rain permitting forms have been revised and are available on EPA`s Technology Transfer Network. EPA has developed a policy and rationale concerning submission of Phase 2 permit applications, as well as suggested state timing and methodology regarding adoption of 40 CFR Part 76, the NO{sub x} regulation.

  19. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical Development Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period April--June 1996. The report describes 12 tasks conducted in 4 major areas of research and development within the section. The first major research area--Chemical Processes for Waste Management--includes the following tasks: Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, Partitioning of Sludge Components by Caustic Leaching, Studies on Treatment of Dissolved MVST Sludge Using TRUEX Process, ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} Test Program, Hot Demonstration of Proposed Commercial Nuclide Removal Technology, Sludge Treatment Studies, and Development and Testing of Inorganic Sorbents. Within the second research area--Reactor Fuel Chemistry--a new scope of work for the Technical Assistance in Review of Advanced Reactors task has been established to include assessments of iodine behavior nd pH control in operating nuclear reactor containments as well as in advanced reactor systems. This task is on hold, awaiting finalization of the revised proposal and receipt of the necessary information from Westinghouse to permit the start of the study. Within the third research area--Thermodynamics--the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Energy-Related Materials task has used a differential thermal analysis (DTA)/thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to study the phase transitions of phase-pure YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (123). The fourth major research area--Processes for Waste Management--includes work on these tasks: Ion Exchange Process for Heavy Metals Removal, Hot Cell Cross-Flow Filtration Studies of Gunite Tank Sludges, and Chemical Conversion of Nitrate Directly to Nitrogen Gas: A Feasibility Study.

  20. Light-induced nitrous acid (HONO) production from NO2 heterogeneous reactions on household chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Alvarez, Elena; Sörgel, Matthias; Gligorovski, Sasho; Bassil, Sabina; Bartolomei, Vincent; Coulomb, Bruno; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Wortham, Henri

    2014-10-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) can be generated in various indoor environments directly during combustion processes or indirectly via heterogeneous NO2 reactions with water adsorbed layers on diverse surfaces. Indoors not only the concentrations of NO2 are higher but the surface to volume (S/V) ratios are larger and therefore the potential of HONO production is significantly elevated compared to outdoors. It has been claimed that the UV solar light is largely attenuated indoors. Here, we show that solar light (λ > 340 nm) penetrates indoors and can influence the heterogeneous reactions of gas-phase NO2 with various household surfaces. The NO2 to HONO conversion mediated by light on surfaces covered with domestic chemicals has been determined at atmospherically relevant conditions i.e. 50 ppb NO2 and 50% RH. The formation rates of HONO were enhanced in presence of light for all the studied surfaces and are determined in the following order: 1.3·109 molecules cm-2 s-1 for borosilicate glass, 1.7·109 molecules cm-2 s-1 for bathroom cleaner, 1.0·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 on alkaline detergent (floor cleaner), 1.3·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 for white wall paint and 2.7·1010 molecules cm-2 s-1 for lacquer. These results highlight the potential of household chemicals, used for cleaning purposes to generate HONO indoors through light-enhanced NO2 heterogeneous reactions. The results obtained have been applied to predict the timely evolution of HONO in a real indoor environment using a dynamic mass balance model. A steady state mixing ratio of HONO has been estimated at 1.6 ppb assuming a contribution from glass, paint and lacquer and considering the photolysis of HONO as the most important loss process.

  1. Tuning hemoglobin-poly(acrylic acid) interactions by controlled chemical modification with triethylenetetramine.

    PubMed

    Thilakarathne, Vindya K; Briand, Victoria A; Kasi, Rajeswari M; Kumar, Challa V

    2012-10-25

    Protein-polymer interactions play a very important role in a number of applications, but details of these interactions are not fully understood. Chemical modification was introduced here to tune protein-polymer interactions in a systematic manner, where methemoglobin (Hb) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) served as a model system. Under similar conditions of pH and ionic strength, the influence of protein charge on Hb/PAA interaction was studied using chemically modified Hb by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). A small fraction of COOH groups of Hb were amidated with triethylenetetramine (TETA) or ammonium chloride to produce the corresponding charge ladders of Hb-TETA and Hb-ammonia derivatives, respectively. All the Hb/PAA complexes produced here are bioactive, entirely soluble in water, and indicated the retention of Hb structure to a significant extent. Binding of Hb to PAA was exothermic (ΔH < 0). The binding of Hb-TETA charge ladder to PAA indicated decrease of ΔH from -8 ± 0.2 to -89 ± 4 kcal/mol, at a rate of -3.8 kcal/mol per unit charge introduced via modification. The Hb-ammonia charge ladder, in contrast, showed a decrease of ΔH from -8 ± 0.2 to -17 ± 1.5 kcal/mol, at much slower rate of -1.0 kcal/mol per unit charge. Thus, the amine used for the modification played a strong role in tuning Hb/PAA interactions, even after correcting for the charge, synergistically. Charge clustering may be responsible for this synergy, and this interesting observation may be exploited to construct protein/polymer platforms for advanced biomacromolecular applications.

  2. Acid base properties of cyanobacterial surfaces. II: Silica as a chemical stressor influencing cell surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalonde, S. V.; Smith, D. S.; Owttrim, G. W.; Konhauser, K. O.

    2008-03-01

    Bacteria grow in complex solutions where the adsorption of aqueous species and nucleation of mineral phases on the cell surface may interfere with membrane-dependent homeostatic functions. While previous investigations have provided evidence that bacteria may alter their surface chemical properties in response to environmental stimuli, to our knowledge no effort has been made to evaluate surface compositional changes resulting from non-nutritional chemical stresses within a quantitative framework applicable to surface complexation modeling. We consider here the influence of exposure to silica on cyanobacterial surface chemistry, particularly in light of the propensity for cyanobacteria to become silicified in geothermal environments. Using data modeled from over 50 potentiometric titrations of the unsheathed cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, we find that both abiotic geochemical and biotic biochemical-assimilatory factors have important and different effects on cell surface chemistry. Changes in functional group distribution that resulted from growth by different nitrogen assimilation pathways were greatest in the absence of dissolved silica and less important in its presence. Furthermore, out of the three nitrogen assimilation pathways investigated, in terms of surface functional group distribution, nitrate-reducing cultures were least sensitive, and ammonium-assimilating cultures were most sensitive, to changes in media silica concentration. When functional group distributions were plotted as a function of silica concentration, it appears that, with higher silica concentrations, basic groups (p Ka > 7) increase in concentration relative to acidic groups (p Ka < 7), and the total ligand densities (on a per-weight basis) decreased. The results imply a decrease in both the magnitude and density of surface charge as the net result of growth at high silica concentrations. Thus, Anabaena sp. appears to actively respond to growth in silicifying solutions by

  3. Surface of Lactic Acid Bacteria: Relationships between Chemical Composition and Physicochemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Boonaert, Christophe J. P.; Rouxhet, Paul G.

    2000-01-01

    The surface chemical composition and physicochemical properties (hydrophobicity and zeta potential) of two lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetilactis and Lactobacillus helveticus, have been investigated using cells harvested in exponential or stationary growth phase. The surface composition determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was converted into a molecular composition in terms of proteins, polysaccharides, and hydrocarbonlike compounds. The concentration of the last was always below 15% (wt/wt), which is related to the hydrophilic character revealed by water contact angles of less than 30°. The surfaces of L. lactis cells had a polysaccharide concentration about twice that of proteins. The S-layer of L. helveticus was either interrupted or crossed by polysaccharide-rich compounds; the concentration of the latter was higher in the stationary growth phase than in the exponential growth phase. Further progress was made in the interpretation of XPS data in terms of chemical functions by showing that the oxygen component at 531.2 eV contains a contribution of phosphate in addition to the main contribution of the peptide link. The isoelectric points were around 2 and 3, and the electrophoretic mobilities above pH 5 (ionic strength, 1 mM) were about −3.0 × 10−8 and −0.6 × 10−8 m2 s−1 V−1 for L. lactis and L. helveticus, respectively. The electrokinetic properties of the latter reveal the influence of carboxyl groups, while the difference between the two strains is related to a difference between N/P surface concentration ratios, reflecting the relative exposure of proteins and phosphate groups at the surface. PMID:10831437

  4. Chemical composition and minerals in pyrite ash of an abandoned sulphuric acid production plant.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcos L S; Ward, Colin R; Izquierdo, Maria; Sampaio, Carlos H; de Brum, Irineu A S; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Sabedot, Sydney; Querol, Xavier; Silva, Luis F O

    2012-07-15

    The extraction of sulphur produces a hematite-rich waste, known as roasted pyrite ash, which contains significant amounts of environmentally sensitive elements in variable concentrations and modes of occurrence. Whilst the mineralogy of roasted pyrite ash associated with iron or copper mining has been studied, as this is the main source of sulphur worldwide, the mineralogy, and more importantly, the characterization of submicron, ultrafine and nanoparticles, in coal-derived roasted pyrite ash remain to be resolved. In this work we provide essential data on the chemical composition and nanomineralogical assemblage of roasted pyrite ash. XRD, HR-TEM and FE-SEM were used to identify a large variety of minerals of anthropogenic origin. These phases result from highly complex chemical reactions occurring during the processing of coal pyrite of southern Brazil for sulphur extraction and further manufacture of sulphuric acid. Iron-rich submicron, ultrafine and nanoparticles within the ash may contain high proportions of toxic elements such as As, Se, U, among others. A number of elements, such as As, Cr, Cu, Co, La, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, Ti, Zn, and Zr, were found to be present in individual nanoparticles and submicron, ultrafine and nanominerals (e.g. oxides, sulphates, clays) in concentrations of up to 5%. The study of nanominerals in roasted pyrite ash from coal rejects is important to develop an understanding on the nature of this by-product, and to assess the interaction between emitted nanominerals, ultra-fine particles, and atmospheric gases, rain or body fluids, and thus to evaluate the environmental and health impacts of pyrite ash materials.

  5. Herbivore induction of jasmonic acid and chemical defences reduce photosynthesis in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Nabity, Paul D; Zavala, Jorge A; DeLucia, Evan H

    2013-01-01

    Herbivory initiates a shift in plant metabolism from growth to defence that may reduce fitness in the absence of further herbivory. However, the defence-induced changes in carbon assimilation that precede this reallocation in resources remain largely undetermined. This study characterized the response of photosynthesis to herbivore induction of jasmonic acid (JA)-related defences in Nicotiana attenuata to increase understanding of these mechanisms. It was hypothesized that JA-induced defences would immediately reduce the component processes of photosynthesis upon attack and was predicted that wild-type plants would suffer greater reductions in photosynthesis than plants lacking JA-induced defences. Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and thermal spatial patterns were measured together with the production of defence-related metabolites after attack and through recovery. Herbivore damage immediately reduced electron transport and gas exchange in wild-type plants, and gas exchange remained suppressed for several days after attack. The sustained reductions in gas exchange occurred concurrently with increased defence metabolites in wild-type plants, whereas plants lacking JA-induced defences suffered minimal suppression in photosynthesis and no increase in defence metabolite production. This suppression in photosynthesis occurred only after sustained defence signalling and defence chemical mobilization, whereas a short bout of feeding damage only transiently altered components of photosynthesis. It was identified that lipoxygenase signalling interacted with photosynthetic electron transport and that the resulting JA-related metabolites reduced photosynthesis. These data represent a metabolic cost to mounting a chemical defence against herbivory and link defence-signalling networks to the differential effects of herbivory on photosynthesis in remaining leaf tissues in a time-dependent manner.

  6. Long-term chemical and biological improvement in an acid mine drainage-impacted watershed.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Bruce E; Kruse, Natalie A; Bowman, Jennifer R

    2014-11-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a common result of coal and metal mining worldwide caused by weathering of metal sulfides exposed during mining. AMD typically results in low-pH, high-metal, high-conductivity water that does not support aquatic life. Chemical water quality improvement does not necessarily lead to rapid biological recovery. Little Raccoon Creek, a major tributary to Raccoon Creek in the Western Allegheny Plateau of Ohio, drains 401 km(2), has a legacy of AMD that stems from mining activities over more than a century. Since 1999, seven major passive treatments systems have been installed in the watershed to a total of over $6.5 million. This study analyzes the hourly water quality data collected at a United States Geological Survey gage station alongside trends in fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Both fish and macroinvertebrate communities have shown a statistically significant improvement in the lower reaches of Little Raccoon Creek since treatment began. Long-term chemical monitoring shows a significant increase in pH, but no significant change in conductivity. The conductivity data is well correlated with sulfate concentrations and discharge, while the pH is well correlated with net  alkalinity data, but not with discharge. Significant investment in passive treatment systems and land reclamation has decreased the percent occurrence of pH measurements below the target of 6.5 and has led to recovery of both fish and macroinvertebrate communities in the downstream reaches of Little Raccoon Creek. Long-term monitoring has proven to be a valuable tool to assess success of a high-cost remediation program. PMID:25063535

  7. Perfluorinated acids as novel chemical tracers of global circulation of ocean waters.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Taniyasu, Sachi; Petrick, Gert; Wei, Si; Gamo, Toshitaka; Lam, Paul K S; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2008-01-01

    Perfluorinated acids (PFAs) such as perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are global environmental contaminants. The physicochemical properties of PFAs are unique in that they have high water solubilities despite the low reactivity of carbon-fluorine bond, which also imparts high stability in the environment. Because of the high water solubilities, the open-ocean water column is suggested to be the final sink for PFOS and PFOA. However, little is known on the distribution of PFAs in the oceans around the world. Here we describe the horizontal (spatial) and vertical distribution of PFAs in ocean waters worldwide. PFOS and PFOA concentrations in the North Atlantic Ocean ranged from 8.6 to 36pg l(-1) and from 52 to 338pg l(-1), respectively, whereas the corresponding concentrations in the Mid Atlantic Ocean were 13-73pg l(-1) and 67-439pg l(-1). These were completely different from the surface waters of the South Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean (overall range of <5-11pg l(-1) for PFOS and PFOA). Vertical profiles of PFAs in the marine water column were associated with the global ocean circulation theory. Vertical profiles of PFAs in water columns from the Labrador Sea reflected the influx of the North Atlantic Current in surface waters, the Labrador Current in subsurface waters, and the Denmark Strait Overflow Water in deep layers below 2000m. Striking differences in the vertical and spatial distribution of PFAs, depending on the oceans, suggest that these persistent acids can serve as useful chemical tracers to allow us to study oceanic transportation by major water currents. The results provide evidence that PFA concentrations and profiles in the oceans adhere to a pattern consistent with the global "Broecker's Conveyor Belt" theory of open ocean water circulation.

  8. Chemical-Stockpile Disposal Program. Chemical agent and munition disposal. Summary of the US Army's experience. Final report, July 1972-August 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Flamm, K.J.; Kwan, Q.; McNulty, W.B.

    1987-09-21

    This report was prepared in support of the U.S. Army's Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, and Discuss the Army's industrial-scale chemical agent and munitions disposal experience. Since 1969, when the National Academy of Science recommended that ocean dumping be discontinued as a method of chemical agent and munition disposal, the Army has destroyed nearly 15 million pounds of chemical agents by either chemical neutralization or incineration. This experience has been incorporated into the design of the Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System, which is being constructed on a small island in the Pacific Ocean, and the proposed CSDP disposal plants.

  9. Chemical compositions, free amino acid contents and antioxidant activities of Hanwoo (Bos taurus coreanae) beef by cut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate chemical compositions, free amino acid contents, and antioxidant activities of different cuts of Hanwoo (Bos taurus coreanae) beef. Beef preferences and prices in the Korean market depend on cut. Therefore, comparisons were made between high-preference (gr...

  10. Stereoregularity of poly (lactic acid) and their model compounds as studied by NMR and quantum chemical calculations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to understand the origin of the tacticity splitting in the NMR spectrum of poly(lactic acid), monomer model compound and dimer model compounds (both isotactic and syndiotactic) were synthesized and their 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts observed. Two energetically stable conformations were o...

  11. Acidification in the Adirondacks: Defining the Biota in trophic Levels of 30 Chemically Diverse Acid-Impacted Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Adirondack Mountains in New York State have a varied surficial geology and chemically diverse surface waters that are among the most impacted by acid deposition in the U.S. No single Adirondack investigation has been comprehensive in defining the effects of acidification on ...

  12. Chemically defined media and auxotrophy of the prolific l-lactic acid producer Lactococcus lactis IO-1.

    PubMed

    Machii, Miki; Watanabe, Satoru; Zendo, Takeshi; Chibazakura, Taku; Sonomoto, Kenji; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2013-05-01

    Two chemically defined media, CDM-1G and CDM-1X, that use glucose and xylose as carbon sources, respectively, were prepared for Lactococcus lactis strain IO-1. The maximal cell density at 600 nm in CDM-1G exceeded 2. Omission growth experiments indicated that IO-1 is auxotrophic for 2 vitamins and 6 amino acids.

  13. Acidification in the Adirondacks: defining the biota in trophic levels of 30 chemically diverse acid-impacted lakes.

    PubMed

    Nierzwicki-Bauer, Sandra A; Boylen, Charles W; Eichler, Lawrence W; Harrison, James P; Sutherland, James W; Shaw, William; Daniels, Robert A; Charles, Donald F; Acker, Frank W; Sullivan, Timothy J; Momen, Bahram; Bukaveckas, Paul

    2010-08-01

    The Adirondack Mountains in New York State have a varied surficial geology and chemically diverse surface waters that are among the most impacted by acid deposition in the U.S. No single Adirondack investigation has been comprehensive in defining the effects of acidification on species diversity, from bacteria through fish, essential for understanding the full impact of acidification on biota. Baseline midsummer chemistry and community composition are presented for a group of chemically diverse Adirondack lakes. Species richness of all trophic levels except bacteria is significantly correlated with lake acid-base chemistry. The loss of taxa observed per unit pH was similar: bacterial genera (2.50), bacterial classes (1.43), phytoplankton (3.97), rotifers (3.56), crustaceans (1.75), macrophytes (3.96), and fish (3.72). Specific pH criteria were applied to the communities to define and identify acid-tolerant (pH<5.0), acid-resistant (pH 5.0-5.6), and acid-sensitive (pH>5.6) species which could serve as indicators. Acid-tolerant and acid-sensitive categories are at end-points along the pH scale, significantly different at P<0.05; the acid-resistant category is the range of pH between these end-points, where community changes continually occur as the ecosystem moves in one direction or another. The biota acid tolerance classification (batc) system described herein provides a clear distinction between the taxonomic groups identified in these subcategories and can be used to evaluate the impact of acid deposition on different trophic levels of biological communities.

  14. PEROX-PURE CHEMICAL OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY PEROXIDATION SYSTEMS, INC. - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report evaluates the perox-pure™ chemical oxidation technology’s ability to remove volatile organic compounds (VOC) and other organic contaminants present in liquid wastes. This report also presents economic data from the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) dem...

  15. [Bactericidal effect of acidic electrolyzed water--comparison of chemical acidic sodium hydrochloride (NaOCl) solution].

    PubMed

    Iwasawa, A; Nakamura, Y

    1996-09-01

    Acidic electrolyzed water is made recently by various kinds of machines and is widely utilized. In this study, we intended to clarify the relationship between the concentration of chloride and pH in the bactericidal effects with acidic electrolyzed water. The effects of weak or strong acidic electrolyzed water were compared with a pseudo-acidic water of pH adjusted by diluted hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide, on Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomononas aeruginosa. At pH 5.0 approximately 6.0, 3 bacterial strains were killed soon after being exposed to the acidic water containing chloride 50 mg/liter, and the amount of chloride did not change after allowing to stand open for 6 hours. At pH 2.67 approximately 2.80, the bactericidal effects was observed at the concentration of chloride 5 mg/liter, and 80% of chloride remained after allowing to stand for 6 hours. These results indicated that newly made strong acidic water is more effective under a smaller amount of chloride at pH 2.7, and that weak acidic electrolyzed water should be used, if stable bactericidal effect is expected in cleaning the surroundings. PMID:8921674

  16. Chemical relaxation of H bonds in formic acid vapor studied by resonant photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, A.; Mehl, J. B.; Hess, P.

    1994-02-01

    The chemical relaxation of hydrogen bonds in dimeric formic acid (methanoic acid) was studied in the gas phase by means of precise measurement of the speed of sound and the sound absorption as functions of the pressure and the temperature by exciting standing acoustic waves. The first radial acoustic resonance of a cylindrical cavity was excited by a modulated CO2 laser beam. Resonance profiles were measured and recorded by a computer-controlled system. Due to the high information content of this method, a consistent set of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters can be obtained. The equilibrium constants of the dimer/monomer and the cis-/trans-monomer equilibrium, the dissociation rate constant of (HCOOH)2 and the mean relaxation time of the vibrational states of the monomer-dimer mixture were determined by fitting a detailed theoretical model of the resonator to the measured values for the resonance frequency and the resonance broadening for total pressures in the range from 0.3 to 50 mbar and temperatures from 290 to 325 K. We obtained 159±2 J/(mol K) for the entropy and 61.8±0.5 kJ/mol for the enthalpy of dissociation at 300 K. We inferred a value for the enthalpy of isomerization of 10±5 kJ/mol. For the first time the pressure dependence of the dissociation rate constant was determined. It was found that the unimolecular decay is in the second-order regime at these low pressures as expected. The mean collision efficiency for the dissociation process relative to the dimer was obtained for HCOOH, He, and Ar to be 0.5±0.2, 0.05±0.02, and 0.08±0.02, respectively, independent of the temperature. We measured an average (pτ) value of 10±2 ns bar for the relaxation of the vibrational degrees of freedom. The activation energy of the dissociation of dimeric formic acid was determined to be 33±1 kJ/mol.

  17. Exploring the other side of biologically relevant chemical space: insights into carboxylic, sulfonic and phosphonic acid bioisosteric relationships.

    PubMed

    Macchiarulo, Antonio; Pellicciari, Roberto

    2007-11-01

    Bioisosteric replacements have been widely and successfully applied to develop bioisosteric series of biologically active compounds in medicinal chemistry. In this work, the concept of bioisosterism is revisited using a novel approach based on charting the "other side" of biologically relevant chemical space. This space is composed by the ensemble of binding sites of protein structures. Explorations into the "other side" of biologically relevant chemical space are exploited to gain insight into the principles that rules molecular recognition and bioisosteric relationships of molecular fragments. We focused, in particular, on the construction of the "other side" of chemical space covered by binding sites of small molecules containing carboxylic, sulfonic, and phosphonic acidic groups. The analysis of differences in the occupation of that space by distinct types of binding sites unveils how evolution has worked in assessing principles that rule the selectivity of molecular recognition, and improves our knowledge on the molecular basis of bioisosteric relationships among carboxylic, sulfonic, and phosphonic acidic groups.

  18. The effect of phosphoric acid concentration on the synthesis of nano-whiskers of calcium metaphosphate by chemical precipitation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Nengjian; Zhang, Yin; Kong, Deshuang; Zhu, Jianping; Tao, Yaqiu; Qiu, Tai

    2011-10-01

    Calcium metaphosphate (CMP) nano-whiskers were produced by a chemical precipitation method. In order to produce nano-powders, CMP was prepared by the mixing of two precursors, calcium oxide (CaO) and phosphate acid (H3PO4). Sparingly soluble chemicals, the Ca/P ratio of the mixture was set to be 0.50 to produce stoichiometric CMP, were chemical agitated in phosphate acid solution. At least 3 hours of pre-hydrolysis of phosphorus precursor were required to obtain CMP phase. The CMP powders were dried in a drying oven at 60 °C for 7 days and then followed by a heat treatment at 390 °C for 8hours. The obtained powder was analyzed using XRD, XRF, FT-IR, SEM, TG-DTA, Zeta Potential Meter, Specific Surface Area, and Particle Size Analyzer. The results showed that obtained CMP nano-whiskers have a significantly powder characteristics.

  19. 76 FR 54932 - TSCA Inventory Update Reporting Modifications; Chemical Data Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... Product 8002-05-9 Petroleum. 8002-74-2 Paraffin waxes and hydrocarbon waxes. 8006-20-0 Fuel gases, low and...-4 Asphalt. 61789-60-4 Pitch. 63231-60-7 Paraffin waxes and hydrocarbon waxes, microcryst. 64741-41-9...), acid- treated spent. 64742-26-3 Hydrocarbon waxes (petroleum), acid- treated. 64742-27-4...

  20. 2004 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stockton

    2006-01-15

    Section 313 of Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. For reporting year 2004, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds, nitric acid, and nitrate compounds as required under the EPCRA Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2004 above the reportable thresholds. This document provides a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2004, as well as background information about data included on the Form R reports.

  1. Temperature dependence of the 31P chemical shifts of nucleic acids. A prode of phosphate ester torsional conformations.

    PubMed

    Gorenstein, D G; Findlay, J B; Momii, R K; Luxon, B A; Kar, D

    1976-08-24

    The temperature dependence of the 31P chemical shifts of the ribodinucleoside monophosphates, ApA, GpC, CpC, UpU, and ApU, of the deoxyribonucleic acids, d-ApT, TpT, d-ApA, and d-pApT, and of the homopolyribonucleic acids poly(G), poly(U), poly(A) is shown to provide information on the helix-coli transition in nucleic acids. The base stacked, helical structure with a gauche,gauche phosphate ester torsional conformation is 0.2-0.6 ppm upfield from the random coil conformation. In contrast, the 31P chemical shifts of dimethyl and diethyl phosphate do not change significantly with temperature. These results support our earlier hypothesis that 31P shifts are sensitive probes of torsional conformations with phosphate esters in gauche,gauche conformations having 31P shifts upfield from nongauche conformations.

  2. Effects of chemical oxidants on perfluoroalkyl acid transport in one-dimensional porous media columns.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Erica R; Siegrist, Robert L; McCray, John E; Higgins, Christopher P

    2015-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a remediation approach that is often used to remediate soil and groundwater contaminated with fuels and chlorinated solvents. At many aqueous film-forming foam-impacted sites, perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) can also be present at concentrations warranting concern. Laboratory experiments were completed using flow-through one-dimensional columns to improve our understanding of how ISCO (i.e., activated persulfate, permanganate, or catalyzed hydrogen peroxide) could affect the fate and transport of PFAAs in saturated porous media. While the resultant data suggest that standard ISCO is not a viable remediation strategy for PFAA decomposition, substantial changes in PFAA transport were observed upon and following the application of ISCO. In general, activated persulfate decreased PFAA transport, while permanganate and catalyzed hydrogen peroxide increased PFAA transport. PFAA sorption increased in the presence of increased aqueous polyvalent cation concentrations or decreased pH. The changes in contaminant mobility were greater than what would be predicted on the basis of aqueous chemistry considerations alone, suggesting that the application of ISCO results in changes to the porous media matrix (e.g., soil organic matter quality) that also influence transport. The application of ISCO is likely to result in changes in PFAA transport, where the direction (increased or decreased transport) and magnitude are dependent on PFAA characteristics, oxidant characteristics, and site-specific factors. PMID:25621878

  3. Effects of chemical oxidants on perfluoroalkyl acid transport in one-dimensional porous media columns.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Erica R; Siegrist, Robert L; McCray, John E; Higgins, Christopher P

    2015-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a remediation approach that is often used to remediate soil and groundwater contaminated with fuels and chlorinated solvents. At many aqueous film-forming foam-impacted sites, perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) can also be present at concentrations warranting concern. Laboratory experiments were completed using flow-through one-dimensional columns to improve our understanding of how ISCO (i.e., activated persulfate, permanganate, or catalyzed hydrogen peroxide) could affect the fate and transport of PFAAs in saturated porous media. While the resultant data suggest that standard ISCO is not a viable remediation strategy for PFAA decomposition, substantial changes in PFAA transport were observed upon and following the application of ISCO. In general, activated persulfate decreased PFAA transport, while permanganate and catalyzed hydrogen peroxide increased PFAA transport. PFAA sorption increased in the presence of increased aqueous polyvalent cation concentrations or decreased pH. The changes in contaminant mobility were greater than what would be predicted on the basis of aqueous chemistry considerations alone, suggesting that the application of ISCO results in changes to the porous media matrix (e.g., soil organic matter quality) that also influence transport. The application of ISCO is likely to result in changes in PFAA transport, where the direction (increased or decreased transport) and magnitude are dependent on PFAA characteristics, oxidant characteristics, and site-specific factors.

  4. Zirconium(IV) tungstate nanoparticles prepared through chemical co-precipitation method and its function as solid acid catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadanandan, Manoj; Bhaskaran, Beena

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of zirconium(IV) tungstate nanoparticles, a new and efficient catalyst for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and esterification of acetic acid with various alcohols. The nanoparticle catalyst was prepared using the room temperature chemical co-precipitation method. The catalyst was characterized with thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area. The crystallite size was found to be ~20 nm as revealed by XRD, HRTEM and AFM. The Na+ exchange capacity was found to be 2.76 meq g-1 and the surface area of the compound measured using BET method was found to be 250-265 m2 g-1. The high value of ion exchange capacity indicates the presence of surface hydroxyl groups. The prepared nanoparticles have proven to be excellent catalysts for both oxidation and ester synthesis under mild reaction conditions. The mechanism of the catalytic reaction was studied as well.

  5. K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, samples from the seven older KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were analyzed for herbicides, indicator parameters, major ions, pesticides, radionuclides, turbidity, and other constituents. New wells FAC 8 and 9 received the first of four quarters of comprehensive analyses and GC/MS VOA (gas chromatograph/ mass spectrometer volatile organic analyses). Monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standards during the quarter are discussed in this report.

  6. Determination of thermodynamic and transport parameters of naphthenic acids and organic process chemicals in oil sand tailings pond water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomeng; Robinson, Lisa; Wen, Qing; Kasperski, Kim L

    2013-07-01

    Oil sand tailings pond water contains naphthenic acids and process chemicals (e.g., alkyl sulphates, quaternary ammonium compounds, and alkylphenol ethoxylates). These chemicals are toxic and can seep through the foundation of the tailings pond to the subsurface, potentially affecting the quality of groundwater. As a result, it is important to measure the thermodynamic and transport parameters of these chemicals in order to study the transport behavior of contaminants through the foundation as well as underground. In this study, batch adsorption studies and column experiments were performed. It was found that the transport parameters of these chemicals are related to their molecular structures and other properties. The computer program (CXTFIT) was used to further evaluate the transport process in the column experiments. The results from this study show that the transport of naphthenic acids in a glass column is an equilibrium process while the transport of process chemicals seems to be a non-equilibrium process. At the end of this paper we present a real-world case study in which the transport of the contaminants through the foundation of an external tailings pond is calculated using the lab-measured data. The results show that long-term groundwater monitoring of contaminant transport at the oil sand mining site may be necessary to avoid chemicals from reaching any nearby receptors. PMID:23736740

  7. Determination of thermodynamic and transport parameters of naphthenic acids and organic process chemicals in oil sand tailings pond water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomeng; Robinson, Lisa; Wen, Qing; Kasperski, Kim L

    2013-07-01

    Oil sand tailings pond water contains naphthenic acids and process chemicals (e.g., alkyl sulphates, quaternary ammonium compounds, and alkylphenol ethoxylates). These chemicals are toxic and can seep through the foundation of the tailings pond to the subsurface, potentially affecting the quality of groundwater. As a result, it is important to measure the thermodynamic and transport parameters of these chemicals in order to study the transport behavior of contaminants through the foundation as well as underground. In this study, batch adsorption studies and column experiments were performed. It was found that the transport parameters of these chemicals are related to their molecular structures and other properties. The computer program (CXTFIT) was used to further evaluate the transport process in the column experiments. The results from this study show that the transport of naphthenic acids in a glass column is an equilibrium process while the transport of process chemicals seems to be a non-equilibrium process. At the end of this paper we present a real-world case study in which the transport of the contaminants through the foundation of an external tailings pond is calculated using the lab-measured data. The results show that long-term groundwater monitoring of contaminant transport at the oil sand mining site may be necessary to avoid chemicals from reaching any nearby receptors.

  8. Chemical characteristics and sources of organic acids in precipitation at a semi-urban site in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Lee, X. Q.; Cao, F.

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the chemical characteristics and sources of organic acids in precipitation in Southwest China, 105 rainwater samples were collected at a semi-urban site in Anshun from June 2007 to June 2008. Organic acids and major anions were analyzed along with pH and electrical conductivity. The pH values varied from 3.57 to 7.09 for all the rainfall events sampled, with an average of 4.67 which was typical acidic value. Formic, acetic and oxalic acids were found to be the predominant carboxylic acids and their volume weighted average (VWA) concentrations were 8.77, 6.93 and 2.84 μmol l -1, respectively. These organic acids were estimated to account for 8.1% to the total free acidity (TFA) in precipitation. The concentrations of the majority organic acids at studied site had a clear seasonal pattern, reaching higher levels during the non-growing season than those in growing season, which was attributed to dilution effect of heavy rainfall during the growing season. The seasonal variation of wet deposition flux of these organic acids confirmed higher source strength of biogenic emissions from vegetation during the growing season. Formic-to-acetic acids ratio (F/A), an indicator of primary versus secondary sources of these organic acids, suggested that primary sources from vehicular emission, biomass burning, soil and vegetation emissions were dominant sources. In addition, the lowest concentrations of organic acids were found under type S, when air masses originated from the marine (South China Sea) during Southern Asian Monsoon period. And the highest concentrations were observed in precipitation events from Northeast China (type NE), prevailing mostly during winter with the lowest rainfall.

  9. Case Report: Valproic Acid and Risperidone Treatment Leading to Development of Hyperammonemia and Mania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Teri; Reynolds, Charles A.; Caplan, Rochelle

    2007-01-01

    This case report describes two children who developed hyperammonemia together with frank manic behavior during treatment with a combination of valproic acid and risperidone. One child had been maintained on valproic acid for years and risperidone was added. In the second case, valproic acid was introduced to a child who had been treated with…

  10. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-September 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    2001-04-16

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-September 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within ten major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Physical Properties Research, Biochemical Engineering, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structures and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of the Cell Operations involved the testing of two continuously stirred tank reactors in series to evaluate the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium and transuranics from supernatant. Within the area of Process Chemistry, various topics related to solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge were addressed. Saltcake dissolution efforts continued, including the development of a predictive algorithm. New initiatives for the section included modeling activities centered on detection of hydrogen in {sup 233}U storage wells and wax formation in petroleum mixtures, as well as support for the Spallation Neutron Source (investigation of transmutation products formed during operation). Other activities involved in situ grouting and evaluation of options for use (i.e., as castable shapes) of depleted uranium. In a continuation of activities of the preceding

  11. Insight into acid-base nucleation experiments by comparison of the chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud P; Sarnela, Nina; Dommen, Josef; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Jokinen, Tuija; Sipilä, Mikko; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Almeida, Joao; Breitenlechner, Martin; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Tomé, António; Virtanen, Annele; Viisanen, Yrjö; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Curtius, Joachim; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the nucleation of sulfuric acid together with two bases (ammonia and dimethylamine), at the CLOUD chamber at CERN. The chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters was studied using three Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometers: two were operated in positive and negative mode to detect the chamber ions, while the third was equipped with a nitrate ion chemical ionization source allowing detection of neutral clusters. Taking into account the possible fragmentation that can happen during the charging of the ions or within the first stage of the mass spectrometer, the cluster formation proceeded via essentially one-to-one acid-base addition for all of the clusters, independent of the type of the base. For the positive clusters, the charge is carried by one excess protonated base, while for the negative clusters it is carried by a deprotonated acid; the same is true for the neutral clusters after these have been ionized. During the experiments involving sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, it was possible to study the appearance time for all the clusters (positive, negative, and neutral). It appeared that, after the formation of the clusters containing three molecules of sulfuric acid, the clusters grow at a similar speed, independent of their charge. The growth rate is then probably limited by the arrival rate of sulfuric acid or cluster-cluster collision.

  12. Insight into acid-base nucleation experiments by comparison of the chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud P; Sarnela, Nina; Dommen, Josef; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Jokinen, Tuija; Sipilä, Mikko; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Almeida, Joao; Breitenlechner, Martin; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Tomé, António; Virtanen, Annele; Viisanen, Yrjö; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Curtius, Joachim; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the nucleation of sulfuric acid together with two bases (ammonia and dimethylamine), at the CLOUD chamber at CERN. The chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters was studied using three Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometers: two were operated in positive and negative mode to detect the chamber ions, while the third was equipped with a nitrate ion chemical ionization source allowing detection of neutral clusters. Taking into account the possible fragmentation that can happen during the charging of the ions or within the first stage of the mass spectrometer, the cluster formation proceeded via essentially one-to-one acid-base addition for all of the clusters, independent of the type of the base. For the positive clusters, the charge is carried by one excess protonated base, while for the negative clusters it is carried by a deprotonated acid; the same is true for the neutral clusters after these have been ionized. During the experiments involving sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, it was possible to study the appearance time for all the clusters (positive, negative, and neutral). It appeared that, after the formation of the clusters containing three molecules of sulfuric acid, the clusters grow at a similar speed, independent of their charge. The growth rate is then probably limited by the arrival rate of sulfuric acid or cluster-cluster collision. PMID:25406110

  13. Chemical structure of humic acids - Part 2, the molecular aggregation of some humic acid fractions in N, N-dimethylformamide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Pinckney, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Humic acid fractions form molecular aggregates in solution. In previous studies we have shown by small angle X-ray scattering that the size of these aggregates is a function of pH. In this study we have found that the size of the aggregates of two humic acid fractions in water and buffers and in dimethylformamide solutions can be changed by oxidation with molecular oxygen and air. These results cast new light on the bonding mechanisms that cause aggregation of the humic acid particles in solution. We have interpreted the changes in aggregation sizes as being brought about by changes in intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding of the humic particles. Solvation of the humic molecules by dimethylformamide interferes with some of the hydrogen bonding reactions between proton donor and acceptor groups on the same humic acid molecules or on different molecules.

  14. Chemical-Stockpile Disposal Program. Monitoring concept plan. Final report, November 1986-September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Kuryk, B.A.; Roux, R.G.; Brankowitz, W.R.; Flamm, K.J.; Owens, P.M.

    1987-09-10

    Monitoring concepts for all aspects of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program are presented. The chemical-agent monitoring standards and equipment are described, and their application to storage, handling, transport, and disposal of chemical agents and munitions is discussed. The report describes the monitoring and control of the disposal-process conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure, etc.) as a means of ensuring safe plant operations. Industrial-pollutant monitoring is also covered. Organizational monitoring and control concepts are described for all aspects of the program.

  15. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 14. Methods for projecting future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, K.W.; Marmorek, D.; Ryan, P.F.; Heltcher, K.; Robinson, D.

    1990-09-01

    The objectives of the report are to: critically evaluate methods for projecting future effects of acidic deposition on surface water acid-base chemistry; review and evaluate techniques and procedures for analyzing projection uncertainty; review procedures for estimating regional lake and stream population attributes; review the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Direct/Delayed Response Project (DDRP) methodology for projecting the effects of acidic deposition on future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry; and present the models, uncertainty estimators, population estimators, and proposed approach selected to project the effects of acidic deposition on future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry in the NAPAP 1990 Integrated Assessment and discuss the selection rationale.

  16. ALPHA SARCIN, A NEW ANTITUMOR AGENT. I. ISOLATION, PURIFICATION, CHEMICAL COMPOSITION, AND THE IDENTITY OF A NEW AMINO ACID.

    PubMed

    OLSON, B H; GOERNER, G L

    1965-05-01

    Isolation and purification procedures are given for the new antitumor agent, alpha sarcin. These procedures include the use of column ion exchange with a carboxylic resin (Amberlite IRC50), dialysis, decolorization with activated charcoal, gradient salt chromatography, salt removal, and drying from the frozen state. The final product has an activity of 800 sarcoma 180 mouse dilution units per mg. The amino acid composition of the purified material is reported. All of the usual amino acids found in proteins were present except methionine. In addition to the usual amino acids, an unknown amino acid was present in the acid hydrolysate. The latter was isolated, and was found to yield phenylalanine and kynurenine. This compound, which has been named "sarcinine," is extremely stable in 6 n hydrochloric acid in the absence of air, and is unstable in alkali. Sarcinine has also been found in two other antitumor peptides produced by aspergilli, and so may relate significantly to the antitumor properties of these peptides.

  17. Chemical Biodynamics Division: Annual report, October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    The research in the Laboratory of Chemical Biodynamics is almost entirely fundamental research. The biological research component is strongly dominated by a long term interest in two main themes which make up our Structural Biology Program. The first interest has to do with understanding the molecular dynamics of photosynthesis. The Laboratory's investigators are studying the various components that make up the photosynthetic reaction center complexes in many different organisms. This work not only involves understanding the kinetics of energy transfer and storage in plants, but also includes studies to work out how photosynthetic cells regulate the expression of genes encoding the photosynthetic apparatus. The second biological theme is a series of investigations into the relationship between structure and function in nucleic acids. Our basic mission in this program is to couple our chemical and biophysical expertise to understand how not only the primary structure of nucleic acids, but also higher levels of structure including interactions with proteins and other nucleic acids regulate the functional activity of genes. In the chemical sciences work in the Laboratory, our investigators are increasing our understanding of the fundamental chemistry of electronically excited molecules, a critical dimension of every photosynthetic energy storage process. We are developing approaches not only toward the utilization of sophisticated chemistry to store photon energy, but also to develop systems that can emulate the photosynthetic apparatus in the trapping and transfer of photosynthetic energy.

  18. Gallic Acid as a Complexing Agent for Copper Chemical Mechanical Polishing Slurries at Neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yung Jun; Kang, Min Cheol; Kwon, Oh Joong; Kim, Jae Jeong

    2011-05-01

    Gallic acid was investigated as a new complexing agent for copper (Cu) chemical mechanical polishing slurries at neutral pH. Addition of 0.03 M gallic acid and 1.12 M H2O2 at pH 7 resulted in a Cu removal rate of 560.73±17.49 nm/min, and the ratio of the Cu removal rate to the Cu dissolution rate was 14.8. Addition of gallic acid improved the slurry performance compared to glycine addition. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and contact angle measurements showed that addition of gallic acid enhanced the Cu polishing behavior by suppressing the formation of surface Cu oxide.

  19. Single-step enantioselective amino acid flux analysis by capillary electrophoresis using on-line sample preconcentration with chemical derivatization.

    PubMed

    Ptolemy, Adam S; Tran, Lara; Britz-McKibbin, Philip

    2006-07-15

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) represents a versatile platform for integrating sample pretreatment with chemical analysis because of its ability to tune analyte electromigration and band dispersion properties in discontinuous electrolyte systems. In this article, a single-step method that combines on-line sample preconcentration with in-capillary chemical derivatization is developed for rapid, sensitive, and enantioselective analysis of micromolar levels of amino acids that lack intrinsic chromophores by CE with UV detection. Time-resolved electrophoretic studies revealed two distinct stages of amino acid band narrowing within the original long sample injection plug occurring both prior to and after in-capillary labeling via zone passing by ortho-phthalaldehyde/N-acetyl l-cysteine (OPA/NAC). This technique enabled direct analysis of d-amino acids in a 95% enantiomeric excess mixture with sub-micromolar detection limits and minimal sample handling, where the capillary functions as a preconcentrator, microreactor, and chiral selector. On-line sample preconcentration with chemical derivatization CE (SPCD-CE) was applied to study the enantioselective amino acid flux in Escherichia coli bacteria cultures, which demonstrated a unique l-Ala efflux into the extracellular medium. New strategies for high-throughput analyses of low-abundance metabolites are important for understanding fundamental physiological processes in bacteria required for screening the efficacy of new classes of antibiotics as well as altered metabolism in genetically modified mutant strains.

  20. Single-step enantioselective amino acid flux analysis by capillary electrophoresis using on-line sample preconcentration with chemical derivatization.

    PubMed

    Ptolemy, Adam S; Tran, Lara; Britz-McKibbin, Philip

    2006-07-15

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) represents a versatile platform for integrating sample pretreatment with chemical analysis because of its ability to tune analyte electromigration and band dispersion properties in discontinuous electrolyte systems. In this article, a single-step method that combines on-line sample preconcentration with in-capillary chemical derivatization is developed for rapid, sensitive, and enantioselective analysis of micromolar levels of amino acids that lack intrinsic chromophores by CE with UV detection. Time-resolved electrophoretic studies revealed two distinct stages of amino acid band narrowing within the original long sample injection plug occurring both prior to and after in-capillary labeling via zone passing by ortho-phthalaldehyde/N-acetyl l-cysteine (OPA/NAC). This technique enabled direct analysis of d-amino acids in a 95% enantiomeric excess mixture with sub-micromolar detection limits and minimal sample handling, where the capillary functions as a preconcentrator, microreactor, and chiral selector. On-line sample preconcentration with chemical derivatization CE (SPCD-CE) was applied to study the enantioselective amino acid flux in Escherichia coli bacteria cultures, which demonstrated a unique l-Ala efflux into the extracellular medium. New strategies for high-throughput analyses of low-abundance metabolites are important for understanding fundamental physiological processes in bacteria required for screening the efficacy of new classes of antibiotics as well as altered metabolism in genetically modified mutant strains. PMID:16753129

  1. Evaluation of accelerated H/sup +/ applications in predicting soil chemical and microbial changes due to acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Killham, K.; Firestone, M.K.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison was made between three acidified, simulated rain treatments which have been used to assess the impact of acid rain on soil chemical and microbial processes. There were significant differences in effects on chemical and microbial characteristics of soil exposed to the three treatments due to differences in the rate of H/sup +/ ion application, even though the total quantity of protons supplied was the same in each case. An input of 30 cm of simulated rain of pH 3.0 over 6 months increased microbial activity and caused only slight changes in soil pH and soil nitrogen status. Treatments in which the rate of H/sup +/ input was accelerated by increasing solution volume, or acidity, inhibited microbial activity and caused soil chemical changes in excess of those produced by the more gradual yet equivalent H/sup +/ loading. We conclude that the effects of short-term, accelerated acid treatments cannot be used to realistically forecast long-term impacts of acid rain. The results of such experiments may be useful in identifying processes or parameters for studies of longer duration.

  2. Re-engineering nalidixic acid's chemical scaffold: A step towards the development of novel anti-tubercular and anti-bacterial leads for resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Peraman, Ramalingam; Varma, Raghu Veer; Reddy, Y Padmanabha

    2015-10-01

    Occurrence of antibacterial and antimycobacterial resistance stimulated a thrust to discover new drugs for infectious diseases. Herein we report the work on re-engineering nalidixic acid's chemical scaffold for newer leads. Stepwise clubbing of quinoxaline, 1,2,4-triazole/1,3,4-oxadiazole with nalidixic acid yielded better compounds. Compounds were screened against ciprofloxacin resistant bacteria and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv species. Results were obtained as minimum inhibitory concentration, it was evident that molecule with quinoxaline linked azide as side chain served as antitubercular lead (<6.25 μg/ml) whilst molecule with oxadiazole or triazole linked quinoxaline side chain served as anti-bacterial lead. Few compounds were significantly active against Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris with MIC less than 0.06 μg/ml and relatively potent than ciprofloxacin. No true compound was potentially active against Salmonella species as compared to amoxicillin.

  3. The possible role of hydrothermal vents in chemical evolution: Succinic acid radiolysis and thermolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Castañeda, J.; Colín-García, M.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.

    2014-07-01

    In this research, the behavior under a high radiation field or high temperature of succinic acid, a dicarboxylic acid clue in metabolic routes, is studied. For this purpose, the molecule was irradiated with gamma rays in oxygen-free aqueous solutions, and the thermal decomposition was studied in a static system at temperatures up to 90 °C, simulating a white hydrothermal vent. Our results indicate that a succinic acid is a relatively stable compound under irradiation. The gamma radiolysis yields carbon dioxide and di- and tricarboxylic acids such as malonic, carboxysuccinic, and citric acids. The main products obtained by the thermal treatment were CO2 and propionic acid.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of extracts of chemical races of the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea and their physodic acid, chloroatranorin, atranorin, and olivetoric acid constituents.

    PubMed

    Türk, Hayrettin; Yilmaz, Meral; Tay, Turgay; Türk, Ayşen Ozdemir; Kivanç, Merih

    2006-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity and the MIC values of the ethanol, chloroform, diethyl ether, and acetone extracts of the chemical races of Pseudevernia furfuracea (var. furfuracea and var. ceratea) and their physodic acid, chloroatranorin, atranorin, and olivetoric acid constituents have been investigated against some microorganisms. Nearly all extracts of both chemical races showed antimicrobial activity against Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Alternaria alternata, Ascochyta rabiei, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium moniliforme, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Penicillium notatum. There was no antimicrobial activity of the extracts against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas syringae, Salmonella typhimurium, Alternaria citri, Alternaria tenuissima, and Gaeumannomyces graminis. Chloroatranorin and olivetoric acid were active against the same microorganisms with few exceptions. Physodic acid was active against about the same bacteria and yeasts and inactive against all of the filamentous fungi tested. Also no activity of atranorin against the filamentous fungi was observed. PMID:16989308

  5. Chemical vectors for gene delivery: a current review on polymers, peptides and lipids containing histidine or imidazole as nucleic acids carriers

    PubMed Central

    Midoux, Patrick; Pichon, Chantal; Yaouanc, Jean-Jacques; Jaffrès, Paul-Alain

    2009-01-01

    DNA/cationic lipid (lipoplexes), DNA/cationic polymer (polyplexes) and DNA/cationic polymer/cationic lipid (lipopolyplexes) electrostatic complexes are proposed as non-viral nucleic acids delivery systems. These DNA-nanoparticles are taken up by the cells through endocytosis processes, but the low capacity of DNA to escape from endosomes is regarded as the major limitations of their transfection efficiency. Here, we present a current report on a particular class of carriers including the polymers, peptides and lipids, which is based on the exploitation of the imidazole ring as an endosome destabilization device to favour the nucleic acids delivery in the cytosol. The imidazole ring of histidine is a weak base that has the ability to acquire a cationic charge when the pH of the environment drops bellow 6. As it has been demonstrated for poly(histidine), this phenomena can induce membrane fusion and/or membrane permeation in an acidic medium. Moreover, the accumulation of histidine residues inside acidic vesicles can induce a proton sponge effect, which increases their osmolarity and their swelling. The proof of concept has been shown with polylysine partially substituted with histidine residues that has caused a dramatic increase by 3–4.5 orders of magnitude of the transfection efficiency of DNA/polylysine polyplexes. Then, several histidine-rich polymers and peptides as well as lipids with imidazole, imidazolinium or imidazolium polar head have been reported to be efficient carriers to deliver nucleic acids including genes, mRNA or SiRNA in vitro and in vivo. More remarkable, histidylated carriers are often weakly cytotoxic, making them promising chemical vectors for nucleic acids delivery. This article is part of a themed section on Vector Design and Drug Delivery. For a list of all articles in this section see the end of this paper, or visit: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:19459843

  6. Mechanistic insights into the decomposition of fructose to hydroxy methyl furfural in neutral and acidic environments using high-level quantum chemical methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, R. S.; Redfern, P. C.; Greeley, J.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2011-03-28

    Efficient catalytic chemical transformation of fructose to hydroxy methyl furfural (HMF) is one of the key steps for attaining industrial level conversion of biomass to useful chemicals. We report an investigation of the reaction mechanisms for the decomposition of fructose to HMF in both neutral and acidic environments at the Gaussian-4 level of theory including calculation of enthalpies, free energies, and effective solvation interactions. In neutral water solvent, the transformation of fructose to HMF involves a four step reaction sequence with four transition states. The effective activation energy relative to fructose in neutral water at 298 K is very large, about 74 kcal/mol, so that transformation in neutral media around this temperature is unlikely. In contrast, the computed potential energy surface is much more favorable for the transformation in acidic media at 498 K, as the effective activation barrier is about 39 kcal/mol. The transformation in acidic media is a much more complex mechanism involving dehydration and hydrogen transfer steps, which are more favorable when protonated intermediates are involved.

  7. Mechanistic insights into the decomposition of fructose to hydroxy methyl furfural in neutral and acidic environments using high-level quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Assary, Rajeev S; Redfern, Paul C; Greeley, Jeffrey; Curtiss, Larry A

    2011-04-21

    Efficient catalytic chemical transformation of fructose to hydroxy methyl furfural (HMF) is one of the key steps for attaining industrial level conversion of biomass to useful chemicals. We report an investigation of the reaction mechanisms for the decomposition of fructose to HMF in both neutral and acidic environments at the Gaussian-4 level of theory including calculation of enthalpies, free energies, and effective solvation interactions. In neutral water solvent, the transformation of fructose to HMF involves a four step reaction sequence with four transition states. The effective activation energy relative to fructose in neutral water at 298 K is very large, about 74 kcal/mol, so that transformation in neutral media around this temperature is unlikely. In contrast, the computed potential energy surface is much more favorable for the transformation in acidic media at 498 K, as the effective activation barrier is about 39 kcal/mol. The transformation in acidic media is a much more complex mechanism involving dehydration and hydrogen transfer steps, which are more favorable when protonated intermediates are involved. PMID:21443225

  8. Mechanistic Insights into the Decomposition of Fructose to Hydroxy Methyl Furfural in Neutral and Acidic Environments Using High-Level Quantum Chemical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Redfern, Paul C.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2011-04-21

    Efficient catalytic chemical transformation of fructose to hydroxy methyl furfural (HMF) is one of the key steps for attaining industrial level conversion of biomass to useful chemicals. We report an investigation of the reaction mechanisms for the decomposition of fructose to HMF in both neutral and acidic environments at the Gaussian-4 level of theory including calculation of enthalpies, free energies, and effective solvation interactions. In neutral water solvent, the transformation of fructose to HMF involves a four step reaction sequence with four transition states. The effective activation energy relative to fructose in neutral water at 298 K is very large, about 74 kcal/mol, so that transformation in neutral media around this temperature is unlikely. In contrast, the computed potential energy surface is much more favorable for the transformation in acidic media at 498 K, as the effective activation barrier is about 39 kcal/mol. The transformation in acidic media is a much more complex mechanism involving dehydration and hydrogen transfer steps, which are more favorable when protonated intermediates are involved.

  9. Mechanistic Insights into the Decomposition of Fructose to Hydroxy Methyl Furfural in Neutral and Acidic Environments Using High-Level Quantum Chemical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Redfern, Paul C.; Greeley, Jeffrey; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2011-03-28

    Efficient catalytic chemical transformation of fructose to hydroxy methyl furfural (HMF) is one of the key steps for attaining industrial level conversion of biomass to useful chemicals. We report an investigation of the reaction mechanisms for the decomposition of fructose to HMF in both neutral and acidic environments at the Gaussian-4 level of theory including calculation of enthalpies, free energies, and effective solvation interactions. In neutral water solvent, the transformation of fructose to HMF involves a four step reaction sequence with four transition states. The effective activation energy relative to fructose in neutral water at 298 K is very large, about 74 kcal/mol, so that transformation in neutral media around this temperature is unlikely. In contrast, the computed potential energy surface is much more favorable for the transformation in acidic media at 498 K, as the effective activation barrier is about 39 kcal/mol. The transformation in acidic media is a much more complex mechanism involving dehydration and hydrogen transfer steps, which are more favorable when protonated intermediates are involved.

  10. Analysis of issues concerning acid rain. Report to the Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Although science has largely determined that man made emissions cause acid rain, there is uncertainty concerning the extent and timing of its anticipated effects. Thus, at the present time scientific information alone does not lead unequivocally to a conclusion on whether it is appropriate to begin control actions now or to avail better understanding. Given this uncertainty, decisionmakers must weight the risks of further, potentially avoidable environmental damage against the risks of economic impacts from acid rain control actions which may ultimately prove to be unwarranted. The implications of current scientific knowledge for policy decisions on acid rain are examined.

  11. Chemical composition and bioactivity properties of size-fractions separated from a vermicompost humic acid.

    PubMed

    Canellas, Luciano P; Piccolo, Alessandro; Dobbss, Leonardo B; Spaccini, Riccardo; Olivares, Fábio L; Zandonadi, Daniel B; Façanha, Arnoldo R

    2010-01-01

    Preparative high performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) was applied to humic acids (HA) extracted from vermicompost in order to separate humic matter of different molecular dimension and evaluate the relationship between chemical properties of size-fractions (SF) and their effects on plant root growth. Molecular dimensions of components in humic SF was further achieved by diffusion-ordered nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (DOSY-NMR) based on diffusion coefficients (D), while carbon distribution was evaluated by solid state (CP/MAS) (13)C NMR. Seedlings of maize and Arabidopsis were treated with different concentrations of SF to evaluate root growth. Six different SF were obtained and their carbohydrate-like content and alkyl chain length decreased with decreasing molecular size. Progressive reduction of aromatic carbon was also observed with decreasing molecular size of separated fractions. Diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra showed that SF were composed of complex mixtures of aliphatic, aromatic and carbohydrates constituents that could be separated on the basis of their diffusion. All SF promoted root growth in Arabidopsis and maize seedlings but the effects differed according to molecular size and plant species. In Arabidopsis seedlings, the bulk HA and its SF revealed a classical large auxin-like exogenous response, i.e.: shortened the principal root axis and induced lateral roots, while the effects in maize corresponded to low auxin-like levels, as suggested by enhanced principal axis length and induction of lateral roots. The reduction of humic heterogeneity obtained in HPSEC separated size-fractions suggested that their physiological influence on root growth and architecture was less an effect of their size than their content of specific bioactive molecules. However, these molecules may be dynamically released from humic superstructures and exert their bioactivity when weaker is the humic conformational stability as that obtained

  12. Towards Self-Replicating Chemical Systems Based on Cytidylic and Guanylic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Bernasconi, Claude F.

    1997-01-01

    This project is aimed towards a better understanding of template-directed reactions and, based on this, towards the development of efficient non-enzymatic RNA replicating systems. These systems could serve as models for the prebiotic synthesis of an RNA world. The major objectives of this project were: (a) To elucidate the mechanistic aspects of template-directed (TD) chemistry, (b) to identify the conditions, environmental and other, that favor "organized chemistry" and stereo selective polymerization of nucleotides and (c) to search and, hopefully, find catalysts that will improve the efficiency of these reactions. Enhanced efficiency is expected to facilitate the road towards a self-replicating chemical system based on all four nucleic acid bases. During the first nine months of the granting period from January 1997 to October 1997, we have made substantial progress towards the first two objectives. During this period our activities were directed towards (1) synthesizing activated nucleotides to be used as substrates, (2) using these substrates in order to determine the effect of the leaving group (imidazole (Im), 2-methylimidazole (2-MeIm), and 2,4-dimethylimidazole (2,4-diMeIm)) in the product distribution, (3) developing techniques for analysis of mixtures by LC/MS, (4) creating a protocol in order to obtain kinetic parameters of the dimerization reaction and (5) analyzing kinetic data obtained with the poly(C)/2-MeImpG system. With the exception of item (5), the experimental work for the projects (1) - (4) is still in progress. A list of publications and manuscripts resulted from this research is enclosed.

  13. Chemical surface modification of calcium carbonate particles with stearic acid using different treating methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhi; Daly, Michael; Clémence, Lopez; Geever, Luke M.; Major, Ian; Higginbotham, Clement L.; Devine, Declan M.

    2016-08-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is often treated with stearic acid (SA) to decrease its polarity. However, the method of application of the SA treatments has a strong influence on CaCO3 thermoplastic composite's interfacial structure and distribution. Several of papers describe the promising effects of SA surface treatment, but few compare the treatment process and its effect on the properties of the final thermoplastic composite. In the current study, we assessed a new SA treatment method, namely, complex treatment for polymer composite fabrication with HDPE. Subsequently, a comparative study was performed between the "complex" process and the other existing methods. The composites were assessed using different experiments included scanning electron microscopy (SEM), void content, density, wettability, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and tensile tests. It was observed that the "complex" surface treatment yielded composites with a significantly lower voids content and higher density compared to other surface treatments. This indicates that after the "complex" treatment process, the CaCO3 particles and HDPE matrix are more tightly packed than other methods. DSC and wettability results suggest that the "wet" and "complex" treated CaCO3 composites had a significantly higher heat of fusion and moisture resistance compared to the "dry" treated CaCO3 composites. Furthermore, "wet" and "complex" treated CaCO3 composites have a significantly higher tensile strength than the composites containing untreated and "dry" treated CaCO3. This is mainly because the "wet" and "complex" treatment processes have increased adsorption density of stearate, which enhances the interfacial interaction between matrix and filler. These results confirm that the chemical adsorption of the surfactant ions at the solid-liquid interface is higher than at other interface. From this study, it was concluded that the utilization of the "complex" method minimised the negative effects of void

  14. Nutritional value of 15 corn gluten meals for growing pigs: chemical composition, energy content and amino acid digestibility.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ying; Zuo, Lei; Wang, Fengli; Li, Defa; Lai, Changhua

    2012-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the chemical composition, energy content and amino acid digestibility for corn gluten meals (CGM) and to develop prediction equations for estimating energy content and amino acid digestibility for growing pigs based on the chemical characteristics of these meals. The 15 CGM tested were obtained from seven Chinese companies. Experiment 1 was conducted to determine the digestible (DE) and metabolisable energy (ME) of the 15 CGM. The 18 growing barrows (38 +/- 4 kg) were assigned to three 6 x 6 Latin square designs. The 15 CGM test diets were formulated to contain 19.20% CGM, which replaced 20% of the energy supplied by corn and crystalline amino acid in the basal diet. Experiment 2 was conducted to determine the apparent (AID) and standardised (SID) ileal digestibility of the crude protein (CP) and amino acids in the 15 CGM using chromic oxide as an inert marker. The 18 growing barrows (25 +/- 2 kg) fitted with a simple T-cannula were assigned to three 6 x 6 Latin square designs. The 15 test diets contained 35% of one of the 15 CGM as the sole source of amino acids in the diet. The results showed a considerable variation in the chemical composition of CGM within and among plants. On dry matter basis, the DE and ME content of the CGM ranged from 18.8 to 21.0 MJ/kg and from 18.0 to 19.9 MJ/kg, respectively. There were no significant differences in the AID and SID for CP, arginine, lysine, glycine and proline among the 15 CGM, however, for all the other amino acids, significant differences were found for their AID and SID. With R2 values exceeding 0.50, the DE of CGM can be predicted accurately from CP and fibre content and ME from starch and fibre content. Suitable prediction equations for SID of methionine were also developed.

  15. Use of (high temperature) ammoniated citric acid for boiler chemical cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    Georgia Power`s primary boiler cleaning solvent in the past has been hydrochloric acid. Citric acid has recently been used on two boilers in an effort to move to a safer and more environmentally acceptable cleaning solvent. As with any change, there is a learning curve and the (new) cleaning process has to be proven with regard to process consistency and cleaning effectiveness. This paper describes our experiences with citric acid along with comparisons of past hydrochloric acid cleanings.

  16. Production of carrier-peptide conjugates using chemically reactive unnatural amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G

    2014-01-28

    Provided are methods of making carrier polypeptide that include incorporating a first unnatural amino acid into a carrier polypeptide variant, incorporating a second unnatural amino acid into a target polypeptide variant, and reacting the first and second unnatural amino acids to produce the conjugate. Conjugates produced using the provided methods are also provided. In addition, orthogonal translation systems in methylotrophic yeast and methods of using these systems to produce carrier and target polypeptide variants comprising unnatural amino acids are provided.

  17. Production of carrier-peptide conjugates using chemically reactive unnatural amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G.

    2015-08-18

    Provided are methods of making carrier polypeptide that include incorporating a first unnatural amino acid into a carrier polypeptide variant, incorporating a second unnatural amino acid into a target polypeptide variant, and reacting the first and second unnatural amino acids to produce the conjugate. Conjugates produced using the provided methods are also provided. In addition, orthogonal translation systems in methylotrophic yeast and methods of using these systems to produce carrier and target polypeptide variants comprising unnatural amino acids are provided.

  18. Production of carrier-peptide conjugates using chemically reactive unnatural amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Young, Travis; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-12-17

    Provided are methods of making carrier polypeptide that include incorporating a first unnatural amino acid into a carrier polypeptide variant, incorporating a second unnatural amino acid into a target polypeptide variant, and reacting the first and second unnatural amino acids to produce the conjugate. Conjugates produced using the provided methods are also provided. In addition, orthogonal translation systems in methylotrophic yeast and methods of using these systems to produce carrier and target polypeptide variants comprising unnatural amino acids are provided.

  19. Final report on the safety assessment of Maleic Acid.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    Maleic Acid is a dicarboxylic acid that functions as a fragrance ingredient and pH adjuster in cosmetics - it is used in a few cosmetic product formulations at low concentrations. Maleic Acid is commonly used in research studies to induce Fanconi syndrome in rats and dogs in an attempt to study the mechanism of this disease. One such study found decreased glomerular filtration rate in rats given 9.0 mmol/kg, but not with 1.5 mmol/kg, Maleic Acid intraperitoneally. Preincubation with 0.75 mmol/L of Maleic Acid reduced sperm penetration of golden hamster eggs to zero. Maleic Acid failed to induce any significant increases in revertant count in strains TA1535, TA1537, TA98, and TA100 at concentrations up to 7500 mu g/plate. A concentration of 2.0 x 10(-2) M Maleic Acid did show a positive pattern in a DNA synthesis inhibition test. Maleic Acid at 10%, pH 1.0, applied for 30 s on rabbit eyes, caused permanent opacity. A 1% solution, pH 1.0, applied for 2 min caused cloudiness of the cornea, but no lasting injury, and a 5% solution, also at pH 1.0, had a similar but more intense effect, with recovery delayed 6 to 7 days. Application of 10 mu l Maleic Acid (pH not stated) to the volar forearm and labia majora of 21 female Caucasians produced an inflammatory response at 24 and 48 h, which varied from minimal erythema to marked erythema with marked vesiculation. Maleic Acid at 20% (pH not stated) applied to one forearm daily for a period of 6 weeks to 50 human subjects produced acute vesicular dermatitis in 17 subjects, who were dropped from the study. Only five of the remaining subjects accommodated to the treatment, the rest had varying degrees of inflammation or hyperirritable skin. Although Maleic Acid itself may be a dermal and/or ocular irritant, its use as a pH adjustor in cosmetic formulations dictates that most of the acid will be neutralized into various maleate salts. Therefore, the concentration of free Maleic Acid is expected to be low, and dermal or systemic

  20. Process for chemical reaction of amino acids and amides yielding selective conversion products

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Jonathan E.

    2006-05-23

    The invention relates to processes for converting amino acids and amides to desirable conversion products including pyrrolidines, pyrrolidinones, and other N-substituted products. L-glutamic acid and L-pyroglutamic acid provide general reaction pathways to numerous and valuable selective conversion products with varied potential industrial uses.