Science.gov

Sample records for acid chloride solutions

  1. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM ACIDIC SOLUTIONS USING NO2

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A; Robert Pierce, R; James Laurinat, J

    2006-08-22

    Chloride (Cl{sup -}) salt processing in strong acids is used to recycle plutonium (Pu) from pyrochemical residues. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is studying the potential application of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) gas to effectively convert dissolved pyrochemical salt solutions to chloride-free solutions and improve recovery operations. An NO{sub 2} sparge has been shown to effectively remove Cl{sup -} from solutions containing 6-8 M acid (H{sup +}) and up to 5 M Cl{sup -}. Chloride removal occurs as a result of the competition of at least two reactions, one which is acid-dependent. Below 4 M H+, NO2 reacts with Cl- to produce nitrosyl chloride (ClNO). Between 6 M and 8 M H{sup +}, the reaction of hydrochloric acid (HCl) with nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), facilitated by the presence of NO{sub 2}, strongly affects the rate of Cl{sup -} removal. The effect of heating the acidic Cl{sup -} salt solution without pre-heating the NO{sub 2} gas has minimal effect on Cl{sup -} removal rates when the contact times between NO{sub 2} and the salt solution are on the order of seconds.

  2. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 in Oxalic Acid and Sodium Chloride Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Whalen, M T; King, K J; Hust, G A; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2003-06-24

    Nickel based Alloy 22 (NO6022) is extensively used in aggressive industrial applications, especially due to its resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in high chloride environments. The purpose of this work was to characterize the anodic behavior of Alloy 22 in oxalic acid solution and to compare its behavior to sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions. Standard electrochemical tests such as polarization resistance and cyclic polarization were used. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 in oxalic acid solutions increased rapidly as the temperature and the acid concentration increased. Extrapolation studies show that even at a concentration of 10{sup -4}M oxalic acid, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 would be higher in oxalic acid than in 1 M NaCl solution. Alloy 22 was not susceptible to localized corrosion in oxalic acid solutions. Cyclic polarization tests in 1 M NaCl showed that Alloy 22 was susceptible to crevice corrosion at 90 C but was not susceptible at 60 C.

  3. Photochemical oxidation of chloride ion by ozone in acid aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Levanov, Alexander V; Isaykina, Oksana Ya; Amirova, Nazrin K; Antipenko, Ewald E; Lunin, Valerii V

    2015-11-01

    The experimental investigation of chloride ion oxidation under the action of ozone and ultraviolet radiation with wavelength 254 nm in the bulk of acid aqueous solution at pH 0-2 has been performed. Processes of chloride oxidation in these conditions are the same as the chemical reactions in the system O3 - OH - Cl(-)(aq). Despite its importance in the environment and for ozone-based water treatment, this reaction system has not been previously investigated in the bulk solution. The end products are chlorate ion ClO3(-) and molecular chlorine Cl2. The ions of trivalent iron have been shown to be catalysts of Cl(-) oxidation. The dependencies of the products formation rates on the concentrations of O3 and H(+) have been studied. The chemical mechanism of Cl(-) oxidation and Cl2 emission and ClO3(-) formation has been proposed. According to the mechanism, the dominant primary process of chloride oxidation represents the complex interaction with hydroxyl radical OH with the formation of Cl2(-) anion-radical intermediate. OH radical is generated on ozone photolysis in aqueous solution. The key subsequent processes are the reactions Cl2(-) + O3 → ClO + O2 + Cl(-) and ClO + H2O2 → HOCl + HO2. Until the present time, they have not been taken into consideration on mechanistic description and modelling of Cl(-) oxidation. The final products are formed via the reactions 2ClO → Cl2O2, Cl2O2 + H2O → 2H(+) + Cl(-) + ClO3(-) and HOCl + H(+) + Cl(-) ⇄ H2O + Cl2. Some portion of chloride is oxidized directly by O3 molecule with the formation of molecular chlorine in the end.

  4. Photochemical oxidation of chloride ion by ozone in acid aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Levanov, Alexander V; Isaykina, Oksana Ya; Amirova, Nazrin K; Antipenko, Ewald E; Lunin, Valerii V

    2015-11-01

    The experimental investigation of chloride ion oxidation under the action of ozone and ultraviolet radiation with wavelength 254 nm in the bulk of acid aqueous solution at pH 0-2 has been performed. Processes of chloride oxidation in these conditions are the same as the chemical reactions in the system O3 - OH - Cl(-)(aq). Despite its importance in the environment and for ozone-based water treatment, this reaction system has not been previously investigated in the bulk solution. The end products are chlorate ion ClO3(-) and molecular chlorine Cl2. The ions of trivalent iron have been shown to be catalysts of Cl(-) oxidation. The dependencies of the products formation rates on the concentrations of O3 and H(+) have been studied. The chemical mechanism of Cl(-) oxidation and Cl2 emission and ClO3(-) formation has been proposed. According to the mechanism, the dominant primary process of chloride oxidation represents the complex interaction with hydroxyl radical OH with the formation of Cl2(-) anion-radical intermediate. OH radical is generated on ozone photolysis in aqueous solution. The key subsequent processes are the reactions Cl2(-) + O3 → ClO + O2 + Cl(-) and ClO + H2O2 → HOCl + HO2. Until the present time, they have not been taken into consideration on mechanistic description and modelling of Cl(-) oxidation. The final products are formed via the reactions 2ClO → Cl2O2, Cl2O2 + H2O → 2H(+) + Cl(-) + ClO3(-) and HOCl + H(+) + Cl(-) ⇄ H2O + Cl2. Some portion of chloride is oxidized directly by O3 molecule with the formation of molecular chlorine in the end. PMID:26077317

  5. Leaching of lead from zinc leach residue in acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Mu, Wen-ning; Shen, Hong-tao; Liu, Shao-ming; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2015-05-01

    A process with potentially reduced environmental impacts and occupational hazards of lead-bearing zinc plant residue was studied to achieve a higher recovery of lead via a cost-effective and environmentally friendly process. This paper describes an optimization study on the leaching of lead from zinc leach residue using acidic calcium chloride aqueous solution. Six main process conditions, i.e., the solution pH value, stirring rate, concentration of CaCl2 aqueous solution, liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, leaching temperature, and leaching time, were investigated. The microstructure and components of the residue and tailing were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of experimental results, the optimum reaction conditions were determined to be a solution pH value of 1, a stirring rate of 500 r·min-1, a CaCl2 aqueous solution concentration of 400 g·L-1, a liquid-to-solid mass ratio of 7:1, a leaching temperature of 80°C, and a leaching time of 45 min. The leaching rate of lead under these conditions reached 93.79%, with an iron dissolution rate of 19.28%. Silica did not take part in the chemical reaction during the leaching process and was accumulated in the residue.

  6. Effect of Organic Acid Additions on the General and Localized Corrosion Susceptibility of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Ilevbare, G O; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-28

    Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids.

  7. Viscometric study of chitosan solutions in acetic acid/sodium acetate and acetic acid/sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Costa, Cristiane N; Teixeira, Viviane G; Delpech, Marcia C; Souza, Josefa Virginia S; Costa, Marcos A S

    2015-11-20

    A viscometric study was carried out at 25°C to assess the physical-chemical behavior in solution and the mean viscometric molar mass (M¯v) of chitosan solutions with different deacetylation degrees, in two solvent mixtures: medium 1-acetic acid 0.3mol/L and sodium acetate 0.2mol/L; and medium 2-acetic acid 0.1mol/L and sodium chloride 0.2mol/L. Different equations were employed, by graphical extrapolation, to calculate the intrinsic viscosities [η] and the viscometric constants, to reveal the solvent's quality: Huggins (H), Kraemer (K) and Schulz-Blaschke (SB). For single-point determination, the equations used were SB, Solomon-Ciuta (SC) and Deb-Chanterjee (DC), resulting in a faster form of analysis. The values of ̄M¯v were calculated by applying the equation of Mark-Houwink-Sakurada. The SB and SC equations were most suitable for single-point determination of [η] and ̄M¯v and the Schulz-Blachke constant (kSB), equal to 0.28, already utilized for various systems, can also be employed to analyze chitosan solutions under the conditions studied.

  8. Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions Containing Organic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Rebak, R B

    2005-11-04

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is a nickel based alloy containing alloying elements such as chromium, molybdenum and tungsten. It is highly corrosion resistant both under reducing and under oxidizing conditions. Electrochemical studies such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. Tests were also carried out in NaCl solutions containing oxalic acid or acetic acid. It is shown that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was higher in a solution containing oxalic acid than in a solution of the same pH acidified with HCl. Acetic acid was not corrosive to Alloy 22. The corrosivity of oxalic acid was attributed to its capacity to form stable complex species with metallic cations from Alloy 22.

  9. Analysis of the corrosion of carbon steels in simulated salt repository brines and acid chloride solutions at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.; Kassner, T.F.

    1988-04-01

    An analysis of literature data on the corrosion of carbon steels in anoxic brines and acid chloride solutions was performed, and the results were used to assess the expected life of high-level nuclear waste package containers in a salt repository environment. The corrosion rate of carbon steels in moderately acidic aqueous chloride environments obeys an Arrhenius dependence on temperature and a (pH{sub 2}){sup {minus}1/2} dependence on hydrogen partial pressure. The cathodic reduction of water to produce hydrogen is the rate-controlling step in the corrosion process. An expression for the corrosion rate incorporating these two dependencies was used to estimate the corrosion life of several proposed waste package configurations. 42 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Sorption of uranium(VI) ions from hydrochloric acid and ammonium chloride solutions by anion exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Pakholkov, V.S.; Denisova, L.A.; Rychkov, V.N.; Kurnosenko, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    The sorption of macroscopic quantities of uranium from solutions of UO/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ containing HCl and NH/sub 4/Cl in concentrations from 0.0 to 6.0 M by the AV-17 x 8, AV-16G, EDE-10P, AN-31, AN-2F, AN22, and AN-251 anion exchangers has been investigated under static conditions. The sorption isotherms are described by an equation similar to Freundlich's equation: K/sub d/ = K tilde x C/sub eq/sup 1/z/ or log K/sub d/ = log K tilde + 1/z x log C/sub eq/. Equations describing the dependence of the sorbability (or K/sub d/) on the equilibrium concentration of uranium in the solution have been obtained with the aid of the least-squares method. Conclusions regarding the chemistry of the exchange of uranium ions on anion exchangers in chloride solutions have been drawn on the basis of the UV spectra of the original solutions and the IR spectra of the ion exchangers obtained in this work, as well as the established general laws governing sorption.

  11. Corrosion Mitigation of Copper in Acidic Chloride Pickling Solutions by 2-Amino-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, El-Sayed M.

    2010-08-01

    Corrosion of copper in acidic chloride pickling solutions of 0.5 M HCl and its mitigation by 2-amino-5-ethyl-1,3,4-thiadiazole (AETDA) have been investigated using potentiodynamic polarization, chronoamperometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and weight-loss measurements. The study was also complemented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray (EDX), and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy investigations. The presence of AETDA and the increase of its concentration in the chloride solutions greatly decreased the corrosion rate and increased the surface and polarization resistances of copper as indicated by the electrochemical measurements. Weight-loss data also indicated that AETDA decreases the dissolution of copper coupons in the studied chloride solution. SEM/EDX investigations showed that AETDA molecules are strongly adsorbed onto copper surface. The UV-Visible absorption spectra confirmed that AETDA molecules suppress the corrosion of copper via their interactions with the copper surface via their adsorption then formation of AETDA-Cu complex.

  12. Effects of applied potential on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of 7003 aluminum alloy in acid and alkaline chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-yan; Song, Ren-guo; Sun, Bin; Lu, Hai; Wang, Chao

    2016-07-01

    Potentiodynamic polarization tests and slow strain rate test (SSRT) in combination with fracture morphology observations were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 7003 aluminum alloy (AA7003) in acid and alkaline chloride solutions under various applied potentials ( E a). The results show that AA7003 is to a certain extent susceptible to SCC via anodic dissolution (AD) at open-circuit potential (OCP) and is highly susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement (HE) at high negative E a in the solutions with pH levels of 4 and 11. The susceptibility increases with negative shift in the potential when E a is less than -1000 mV vs. SCE. However, the susceptibility distinctly decreases because of the inhibition of AD when E a is equal to -1000 mV vs. SCE. In addition, the SCC susceptibility of AA7003 in the acid chloride solution is higher than that in the alkaline solution at each potential. Moreover, the effect of hydrogen on SCC increases with increasing hydrogen ion concentration.

  13. Analysis of corrosion data for carbon steels in simulated salt repository brines and acid chloride solutions at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.; Hull, A.B.; Kassner, T.F.

    1988-03-01

    Carbon steel is currently the leading candidate material for fabrication of a container for isolation of high level nuclear waste in a salt repository. Since brine entrapped in the bedded salt can migrate to the container by several transport processes, corrosion is an important consideration in the long-term performance of the waste package. A detailed literature search was performed to compile relevant corrosion data for carbon steels in anoxic acid chloride solutions, and simulated salt repository brines at temperatures between approx. 20 and 400/sup 0/C. The hydrolysis of Mg/sup 2 +/ ions in simulated repository brines containing high magnesium concentrations causes acidification at temperatures above 25/sup 0/C, which, in turn, influences the protective nature of the magnetite corrosion product layer on carbon steel. The corrosion data for the steels were analyzed, and an analytical model for general corrosion was developed to calculate the amount of penetration (i.e., wall thinning) as a function of time, temperature, and the pressure of corrosion product hydrogen than can build up during exposure in a closed system (e.g., a sealed capsule). Both the temperature and pressure dependence of the corrosion rate of steels in anoxic acid chloride solutions indicate that the rate-controlling partial reaction is the cathodic reduction of water to form hydrogen. Variations in the composition and microstructure of the steels or the concentration of the ionic species in the chloride solutions (provided that they do not change the pH significantly) do not appear to strongly influence the corrosion rate.

  14. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, M.L.; Savolainen, J.E.

    1960-01-01

    A method is given for dissolving reactor fuel elements in which the uranium is associated with a relatively inert chromium-containing alloy such as stainless steel. An aqueous mixture of acids comprising 2 to 2.5 molar hydrochloric acid and 4 to 8 molar nitric acid is employed in dissolving the fuel element. In order io reduce corrosion in subsequent processing of the resulting solution, chloride values are removed from the solution by contacting it with concentrated nitric acid at an elevated temperature.

  15. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, W.W.

    1959-08-01

    The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

  16. The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.

    DOE PAGES

    Zalupski, Peter R.; McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-08-05

    Studies on the adsorption characteristics of gold, palladium and platinum on mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) and sulfur-impregnated mesoporous carbon (CMK-3/S) evaluated the benefits/drawbacks of the presence of a layer of elemental sulfur inside mesoporous carbon structures. Adsorption isotherms collected for Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) on those materials suggest that sulfur does enhance the adsorption of those metal ions in mildly acidic environment (pH 3). The isotherms collected in 1 M HCl show that the benefit of sulfur disappears due to the competing influence of large concentration of hydrogen ions on the ion-exchanging mechanism of metal ions sorption on mesoporous carbon surfaces.more » The collected acid dependencies illustrate similar adsorption characteristics for CMK-3 and CMK-3/S in 1-5 M HCl concentration range. Sorption of metal ions from diluted aqueous acidic mixtures of actual leached electronic waste demonstrated the feasibility of recovery of gold from such liquors.« less

  17. The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.

    SciTech Connect

    Zalupski, Peter R.; McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-08-05

    Studies on the adsorption characteristics of gold, palladium and platinum on mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) and sulfur-impregnated mesoporous carbon (CMK-3/S) evaluated the benefits/drawbacks of the presence of a layer of elemental sulfur inside mesoporous carbon structures. Adsorption isotherms collected for Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) on those materials suggest that sulfur does enhance the adsorption of those metal ions in mildly acidic environment (pH 3). The isotherms collected in 1 M HCl show that the benefit of sulfur disappears due to the competing influence of large concentration of hydrogen ions on the ion-exchanging mechanism of metal ions sorption on mesoporous carbon surfaces. The collected acid dependencies illustrate similar adsorption characteristics for CMK-3 and CMK-3/S in 1-5 M HCl concentration range. Sorption of metal ions from diluted aqueous acidic mixtures of actual leached electronic waste demonstrated the feasibility of recovery of gold from such liquors.

  18. Extraction of copper(II) from acid chloride solutions by N-dodecyl- and N,N-dihexylpyridinecarboxamides

    SciTech Connect

    Borowiak-Resterna, A.

    1999-01-01

    N-dodecyl- and N,N-dihexylpyridinecarboxamides with amide group at 2, 3 or 4 position were synthesized. Model individual amides were used to recover copper(II) from chloride solutions at constant water activity and constant total concentration of dissolved species in aqueous solution. It was found, that pyridine-2-carboxamide forms with copper complexes (CuCl{sub 2}){sub x}(Ext){sub 2}. Remaining amides form with copper complexes CuCl{sub 2}(Ext){sub 2}. Monoalkylamides are not suitable for extraction because they and their complexes are slightly soluble in the hydrocarbon diluents. N,N-dialkylpyridinecarboxamides and their copper complexes are sufficiently soluble in the hydrocarbon phase to carry out extraction. However, they are strong extractants and extract efficiently copper already from dilute chloride solutions ([Cl{sup {minus}}] = 0.1 M). They extract also significant amounts of copper from concentrated (3--4 M) nitrate solutions.

  19. Catalytic destruction of perchlorate in ferric chloride and hydrochloric acid solution with control of temperature, pressure and chemical reagents

    DOEpatents

    Gu, Baohua; Cole, David R.; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2004-10-05

    A method is described to decompose perchlorate in a FeCl.sub.3 /HCl aqueous solution such as would be used to regenerate an anion exchange resin used to remove perchlorate. The solution is mixed with a reducing agent, preferably an organic alcohol and/or ferrous chloride, and can be heated to accelerate the decomposition of perchlorate. Lower temperatures may be employed if a catalyst is added.

  20. Disinfective process of strongly acidic electrolyzed product of sodium chloride solution against Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomoyo Matsushita; Nakano, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Shimizu, Mitsuhide; Wu, Hong; Aoki, Hiroaki; Ota, Rie; Kobayashi, Toyohide; Sano, Kouichi

    2012-12-01

    Electrolyzed acid water (EAW) has been studied for its disinfective potential against pathogenic microbes; however, the bactericidal process against Mycobacteria has not been clearly presented. In this study, to clarify the disinfective process against Mycobacteria, EAW-treated bacteria were examined against laboratory strains of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), and Mycobacterium terrae (M. terrae) by recovery culture and observation of morphology, enzymatic assay, and the detection of DNA. All experiments were performed with the use of EAW containing 30 ppm free chlorine that kills Mycobacteria, including three pathogenic clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) and six isolates of other Mycobacteria, within 5 min. In morphology, the bacterial surface became rough, and a longitudinal concavity-like structure appeared. The intrabacterial enzyme of EAW-contacted bacteria was inactivated, but chromosomal DNA was not totally denatured. These results suggest that the bactericidal effect of EAW against Mycobacteria occurs by degradation of the cell wall, followed by denaturation of cytoplasmic proteins, but degeneration of the nucleic acid is not always necessary.

  1. Disinfective process of strongly acidic electrolyzed product of sodium chloride solution against Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomoyo Matsushita; Nakano, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Shimizu, Mitsuhide; Wu, Hong; Aoki, Hiroaki; Ota, Rie; Kobayashi, Toyohide; Sano, Kouichi

    2012-12-01

    Electrolyzed acid water (EAW) has been studied for its disinfective potential against pathogenic microbes; however, the bactericidal process against Mycobacteria has not been clearly presented. In this study, to clarify the disinfective process against Mycobacteria, EAW-treated bacteria were examined against laboratory strains of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), and Mycobacterium terrae (M. terrae) by recovery culture and observation of morphology, enzymatic assay, and the detection of DNA. All experiments were performed with the use of EAW containing 30 ppm free chlorine that kills Mycobacteria, including three pathogenic clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) and six isolates of other Mycobacteria, within 5 min. In morphology, the bacterial surface became rough, and a longitudinal concavity-like structure appeared. The intrabacterial enzyme of EAW-contacted bacteria was inactivated, but chromosomal DNA was not totally denatured. These results suggest that the bactericidal effect of EAW against Mycobacteria occurs by degradation of the cell wall, followed by denaturation of cytoplasmic proteins, but degeneration of the nucleic acid is not always necessary. PMID:23224598

  2. A new dioxime corrosion inhibitor for the protection and conservation of copper: synthesis, characterization and evaluation in acidic chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Baker, Ahmad N.; Al-Qudah, Mahmoud A.

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate a new dioxime compound as a corrosion inhibitor for copper. The compound (4,6-dihydroxy benzene-1,3-dicarbaldehyde dioxime) was synthesized and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization measurements were used to compare the dioxime compound with benzotriazole for their effectiveness as corrosion inhibitors for copper in 0.1 M HCl solution. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to investigate the bonding mechanisms and morphological changes of the two inhibitors on the copper surface. The electrochemical techniques showed that the new dioxime compound was more effective than benzotriazole in inhibiting copper corrosion in the acidic chloride medium. The FTIR and SEM results indicated that the dioxime compound was able to coordinate with copper ions and formed a protective film on the copper surface. It was concluded that the new dioxime compound proved effectiveness to be used as a corrosion inhibitor for the protection and conservation of copper.

  3. Liquid-liquid extraction/separation of platinum(IV) and rhodium(III) from acidic chloride solutions using tri-iso-octylamine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Young; Rajesh Kumar, J; Kim, Joon-Soo; Park, Hyung-Kyu; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2009-08-30

    Liquid-liquid extraction/separation of platinum(IV) and rhodium(III) from acidic chloride solutions was carried out using tri-iso-octylamine (Alamine 308) as an extractant diluted in kerosene. The percentage extraction of platinum(IV) and rhodium(III) increased with increase in acid concentration up to 8 mol L(-1). However, at 10 mol L(-1) HCl concentration, the extraction behavior was reversed, indicating the solvation type mechanism during extraction. The quantitative extraction of approximately 98% platinum(IV) and 36% rhodium(III) was achieved with 0.01 mol L(-1) Alamine 308. The highest separation factor (S.F.=184.7) of platinum(IV) and rhodium(III) was achieved with 0.01 mol L(-1) Alamine 308 at 1.0 mol L(-1) of hydrochloric acid concentration. Alkaline metal salts like sodium chloride, sodium nitrate, sodium thiocyanate, lithium chloride, lithium nitrate, potassium chloride and potassium thiocyanate used for the salting-out effect. LiCl proved as best salt for the extraction of platinum(IV). Temperature effect demonstrates that the extraction process is exothermic. Hydrochloric acid and thiourea mixture proved to be better stripping reagents when compared with other mineral acids and bases. PMID:19285802

  4. Intake of ethanol, sodium chloride, sucrose, citric acid, and quinine hydrochloride solutions by mice: a genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, A A; Reed, D R; Tordoff, M G; Price, R A; Beauchamp, G K

    1996-11-01

    Mice of the 129/J (129) and C57BL/6ByJ (B6) strains and their reciprocal F1 and F2 hybrids were offered solutions of ethanol, sucrose, citric acid, quinine hydrochloride, and NaCl in two-bottle choice tests. Consistent with earlier work, the B6 mice drank more ethanol, sucrose, citric acid, and quinine hydrochloride solution and less NaCl solution than did 129 mice. Analyses of each generation's means and distributions showed that intakes of ethanol, quinine, sucrose, and NaCl were influenced by a few genes. The mode of inheritance was additive in the case of ethanol and quinine, for sucrose the genotype of the 129 strain was recessive, and for NaCl it was dominant. Citric acid intake appeared to be influenced by many genes with small effects, with the 129 genotype dominant. Correlations of sucrose consumption with ethanol and citric acid consumption were found among mice of the F2 generation, and the genetically determined component of these correlations was stronger than the component related to environmental factors. The genetically determined correlation between sucrose and ethanol intakes is consistent with the hypothesis that the higher ethanol intake by B6 mice depends, in part, on higher hedonic attractiveness of its sweet taste component.

  5. Hydrazino-methoxy-1,3,5-triazine Derivatives' Excellent Corrosion Organic Inhibitors of Steel in Acidic Chloride Solution.

    PubMed

    El-Faham, Ayman; Osman, Sameh M; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; El-Mahdy, Gamal A

    2016-06-01

    The corrosion inhibition performance of 2-hydrazino-4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-tirazine (DMeHT), 2,4-dihydrazino-6-methoxy-1,3,5-triaizine (DHMeT), and 2,4,6-tridydrazino-1,3,5-triaizne (TH₃) on steel corrosion in acidic media was examined using electrochemical techniques. The results showed 2,4-Ddihydrazino-6-methoxy-1,3,5-triaizine (DHMeT) gave the best corrosion protection performance among the other hydrazino derivatives even at a low concentration of 25 ppm (95%). The number of hydrazino groups play an important role in the corrosion inhibition, where the two hydrazine groups increased the electrostatic interactions between the protonated tested compounds, the negatively charged steel surface resulted from the adsorption of the chloride anions, and the presence of the methoxy group made the compound more reliable for formation of film protection on the surface of steel through the lone pair of oxygen atoms. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurements suggested that the corrosion process of steel in presence of the hydrazino-s-triazine derivatives (TH₃, DMeHT and DHMeT) were being controlled by the charge transfer reaction. Polarization curves indicated that the examined TH₃, DMeHT and DHMeT behaved as mixed type inhibitors.

  6. Chloride Analysis of RFSA Second Campaign Dissolver Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, H.P.

    2001-05-17

    The dissolver solution from the second RFSA campaign was analyzed for chloride using the recently-developed turbidimetric method. Prior to chloride removal in head end, the solution contained 1625 ppm chloride. After chloride removal with Hg(I) and prior to feeding to solvent extraction, the solution contained only 75 ppm chloride. This report discusses those analysis results.

  7. Hydrolysis of ferric chloride in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lussiez, G.; Beckstead, L.

    1996-11-01

    The Detox{trademark} process uses concentrated ferric chloride and small amounts of catalysts to oxidize organic compounds. It is under consideration for oxidizing transuranic organic wastes. Although the solution is reused extensively, at some point it will reach the acceptable limit of radioactivity or maximum solubility of the radioisotopes. This solution could be cemented, but the volume would be increased substantially because of the poor compatibility of chlorides and cement. A process has been developed that recovers the chloride ions as HCl and either minimizes the volume of radioactive waste or permits recycling of the radioactive chlorides. The process involves a two-step hydrolysis at atmospheric pressure, or preferably under a slight vacuum, and relatively low temperature, about 200{degrees}C. During the first step of the process, hydrolysis occurs according to the reaction below: FeCl{sub 3 liquid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} FeOCl{sub solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas} During the second step, the hot, solid, iron oxychloride is sprayed with water or placed in contact with steam, and hydrolysis proceeds to the iron oxide according to the following reaction: 2 FeOCl{sub solid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3 solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas}. The iron oxide, which contains radioisotopes, can then be disposed of by cementation or encapsulation. Alternately, these chlorides can be washed off of the solids and can then either be recycled or disposed of in some other way.

  8. Acid copper sulfate plating bath: Control of chloride and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Borhani, K.J.

    1992-08-01

    Plated-through holes in high-reliability printed wiring boards require a ductile copper plate of uniform consistency. The level of control of the chemical constituents in the electroplating solutions dictates the physical properties of the copper plate. To improve the control of the chemical bath constituents, in-situ methods for electrochemically determining copper and chloride in acid copper sulfate baths were developed. A solid-state ion-selective electrode was used for the chloride ion and proved to be more reproducible than conventional silver chloride turbidimetric methods. The use of a copper solid-state ion-selective electrode in-situ was also successful in this application.

  9. Effect of chlorides on solution corrosivity of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rooney, P.C.; Bacon, T.R.; DuPart, M.S.; Willbanks, K.D.

    1997-08-01

    Solution corrosivity of MDEA/water solutions containing added HCl or NaCl have been measured by weight loss coupons at 250 F and by linear polarization resistance (LPR) at 208 F using carbon steel, 304SS, 316SS and 410SS. General corrosion as well as pitting or crevice corrosion tendencies were recorded for each species. Based on these results, recommendations are made for chlorides in MDEA that minimizes corrosion in gas treating operations.

  10. Inactivation of biological agents using neutral oxone-chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Delcomyn, Carrie A; Bushway, Karen E; Henley, Michael V

    2006-04-15

    Bleach solutions containing the active ingredient hypochlorite (OCl-) serve as powerful biological disinfectants but are highly caustic and present a significant compatibility issue when applied to contaminated equipment or terrain. A neutral, bicarbonate-buffered aqueous solution of Oxone (2K2HSO5.KHSO4.K2SO4) and sodium chloride that rapidly generates hypochlorite and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in situ was evaluated as a new alternative to bleach for the inactivation of biological agents. The solution produced a free chlorine (HOCl + OCl-) concentration of 3.3 g/L and achieved > or =5.8-log inactivation of spores of Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Aspergillus niger, and Escherichia coli vegetative cells in 1 min at 22 degrees C. Seawaterwas an effective substitute for solid sodium chloride and inactivated 5 to 8 logs of each organism in 10 min over temperatures ranging from -5 degrees C to 55 degrees C. Sporicidal effectiveness increased as free chlorine concentrations shifted from OCl- to HOCl. Neutrally buffered Oxone-chloride and Oxone-seawater solutions are mitigation alternatives for biologically contaminated equipment and environments that would otherwise be decontaminated using caustic bleach solutions.

  11. Inactivation of biological agents using neutral oxone-chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Delcomyn, Carrie A; Bushway, Karen E; Henley, Michael V

    2006-04-15

    Bleach solutions containing the active ingredient hypochlorite (OCl-) serve as powerful biological disinfectants but are highly caustic and present a significant compatibility issue when applied to contaminated equipment or terrain. A neutral, bicarbonate-buffered aqueous solution of Oxone (2K2HSO5.KHSO4.K2SO4) and sodium chloride that rapidly generates hypochlorite and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in situ was evaluated as a new alternative to bleach for the inactivation of biological agents. The solution produced a free chlorine (HOCl + OCl-) concentration of 3.3 g/L and achieved > or =5.8-log inactivation of spores of Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Aspergillus niger, and Escherichia coli vegetative cells in 1 min at 22 degrees C. Seawaterwas an effective substitute for solid sodium chloride and inactivated 5 to 8 logs of each organism in 10 min over temperatures ranging from -5 degrees C to 55 degrees C. Sporicidal effectiveness increased as free chlorine concentrations shifted from OCl- to HOCl. Neutrally buffered Oxone-chloride and Oxone-seawater solutions are mitigation alternatives for biologically contaminated equipment and environments that would otherwise be decontaminated using caustic bleach solutions. PMID:16683620

  12. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride solution... solution must be lined with rubber, corrosion resistant plastic, or a material approved by the...

  13. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride solution... solution must be lined with rubber, corrosion resistant plastic, or a material approved by the...

  14. The electrowinning of copper from a cupric chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H. K.; Wu, X. J.; Rao, P. D.

    1991-08-01

    In this work, the Eh pCl diagram of the CuCl-H2O system was established, and the kinetics of copper dissolution in cupric chloride solution were studied with an emphasis on possible difficulties that may occur during copper electrowinning. The results were used to guide an investigation of copper electrowinning from cupric chloride solution.

  15. Purification of aqueous plutonium chloride solutions via precipitation and washing.

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, M. A.; Salazar, R. R.; Abney, Kent David; Bluhm, E. A.; Danis, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Pyrochemical operations at Los Alamos Plutonium Facility (TA-55) use high temperature melt s of calcium chloride for the reduction of plutonium oxide to plutonium metal and hi gh temperature combined melts of sodium chloride and potassium chloride mixtures for the electrorefining purification of plutonium metal . The remaining plutonium and americium are recovered from thes e salts by dissolution in concentrated hydrochloric acid followed by either solvent extraction or io n exchange for isolation and ultimately converted to oxide after precipitation with oxalic acid . Figur e 1 illustrates the current aqueous chloride flow sheet used for plutonium processing at TA-55 .

  16. Electrolysis of dilute sodium chloride solution in a diaphragm cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kubasov, V.L.; Ivanter, I.A.; Druzhinin, E.A.; Vorob'eva, V.B.

    1986-02-10

    In some cases, as in the production of iodine and bromine, dilute solutions of sodium chloride remain unutilized. In view of the existence of large amounts of unutilized spent sodium chloride solutions and their harmful effect when discharged into the environment, it is desirable to develop a process for production of chlorine and alkali with high current efficiencies, satisfying industrial requirements, from dilute sodium chloride solutions. The authors have therefore studied electrolysis of solutions containing 160 and 180 kg/m/sup 3/ of sodium chloride, having pH of 11.0-11.5, close in composition to solutions from the Cheleken chemical factory. The chlorine and alkali current efficiencies and the compositions of the anolyte, catholyte, and anode gas were determined.

  17. Calcium chloride: a new solution for frozen coal

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    Proved in emergency situations as fast and economical, calcium chloride can be used in conjunction with other techniques for effective prevention of coal freezing. Calcium chloride solution depresses the freezing point, and should the temperature drop below this point, the ice that does form has a far lower compressive strength than ice normally exhibits.

  18. TESTING OF 304L STAINLESS STEEL IN NITRIC ACID ENVIRONMENTS WITH FLUORIDES AND CHLORIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2010-10-04

    Impure radioactive material processed in nitric acid solutions resulted in the presence of chlorides in a dissolver fabricated from 304L stainless steel. An experimental program was conducted to study the effects of chloride in nitric acid/fluoride solutions on the corrosion of 304L stainless steel. The test variables included temperature (80, 95, and 110 C) and the concentrations of nitric acid (6, 12, and 14 M), fluoride (0.01, 0.1, and 0.2 M) and chloride (100, 350, 1000, and 2000 ppm). The impact of welding was also investigated. Results showed that the chloride concentration alone was not a dominant variable affecting the corrosion, but rather the interaction of chloride with fluoride significantly affected corrosion.

  19. [Determination of Chloride Salt Solution by NIR Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Chen, Jian-hong; Jiao, Ming-xing

    2015-07-01

    Determination of chloride salt solution by near infrared spectrum plays a very important role in Biomedicine. The near infrared spectrum analysis of Sodium chloride, potassium chloride, calcium chloride aqueous solution shows that the concentration change of chloride salt can affect hydrogen bond, resulting in the variation of near infrared spectrum of water. The temperature influence on NIR spectrum has been decreased by choosing reasonable wavelength range and the wavelength where the temperature effects are zero (isosbestic point). Chlorine salt prediction model was established based on partial least squares method and used for predicting the concentration of the chlorine ion. The impact on near infrared spectrum of the cation ionic radius, the number of ionic charge, the complex effect of ionic in water has also discussed in this article and the reason of every factor are analysed. Experimental results show that the temperature and concentration will affect the near-infrared spectrum of the solution, It is found that the effect of temperature plays the dominant role at low concentrations of chlorine salt; rather, the ionic dominates at high concentration. Chloride complexes are formed in aqueous solution, It has an effect on hydrogen bond of water combining with the cations in chlorine salt solution, Comparing different chloride solutions at the same concentration, the destruction effects of chloride complexes and catnions on the hydrogen bond of water increases in the sequences: CaCl2 >NaCl>KC. The modeling result shows that the determination coefficients (R2) = 99.97%, the root mean square error of cross validation (RM- SECV) = 4.51, and the residual prediction deviation (RPD) = 62.7, it meets the daily requirements of biochemical detection accuracy.

  20. Pitting corrosion resistance of nickel-titanium rotary instruments with different surface treatments in seventeen percent ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid and sodium chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Antonio; Tripi, Teresa Roberta; Rondelli, Gianni; Condorelli, Guglielmo Guido; Cantatore, Giuseppe; Schäfer, Edgar

    2008-02-01

    This study evaluated the pitting corrosion resistance of nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary instruments with different surface treatments in 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and NaCl solutions. Electropolished RaCe instruments were allocated to group A, non-electropolished RaCe instruments to group B, and physical vapor deposition (PVD)-coated Alpha files to group C (10 instruments per group). Electrochemical measurements were carried out by using a potentiostat for galvanic current measurements. On the basis of electrochemical tests, no localized corrosion problems are to be expected in EDTA. In NaCl, pitting potential occurred at higher values for the electropolished and PVD instruments, indicating an increased corrosion resistance. There appears to be a risk of corrosion for NiTi instruments without surface treatments in contact with NaCl. NiTi files with PVD and electropolishing surface treatments showed an increase corrosion resistance.

  1. The ionic product of water in concentrated tetramethylammonium chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Sipos, P; Bódi, I; May, P M; Hefter, G T

    1997-04-01

    The ionic product of water, pK(w) = - log[H(+)][OH(-)] has been determined in aqueous solutions of tetramethylammonium chloride over the concentration range of 0.1-5.5 M at 25 degrees C using high-precision glass electrode potentiometric titrations. pK(w) data relating to aqueous potassium and sodium chlorides at ionic strengths up to 5 M are markedly lower than the tetramethylammonium chloride results. These differences are almost certainly due to weak associations between potassium and (especially) sodium and hydroxide ions.

  2. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR URANIUM FROM CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Blake, C.A. Jr.; Brown, K.B.; Horner, D.E.

    1960-05-24

    An improvement was made in a uranium extraction process wherein the organic extractant is a phosphine oxide. An aqueous solution containing phosphate ions or sulfate ions together with uranium is provided with a source of chloride ions during the extraction step. The presence of the chloride ions enables a phosphine oxide to extract uranium in the presence of strong uranium- complexing ions such as phosphate or sulfate ions.

  3. LOW TEMPERATURE PROCESS FOR THE REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF CHLORIDES AND NITRATES FROM AQUEOUS NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Savolainen, J.E.

    1963-01-29

    A method is described for reducing the chloride content of a solution derived from the dissolution of a stainless steel clad nuclear fuel element with an aqua regia dissolution medium. The solutlon is adjusted to a nitric acid concentration in the range 5 to 10 M and is countercurrently contacted at room temperature with a gaseous oxide of nitrogen selected from NO, NO/sub 2/, N/sub 2/ O/sub 3/, and N/sub 2/O/sub 4/. Chlo ride is recovered from the contacted solution as nitrosyl chloride. After reduction of the chloride content, the solution is then contacted with gaseous NO to reduce the nitric acid molarity to a desired level. (AEC)

  4. Structure of Hydronium (H3O+)/Chloride (Cl-) Contact Ion Pairs in Aqueous Hydrochloric Acid Solution: A Zundel-like Local Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, John L.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam

    2010-09-15

    Details of the H3O+ and H2O structure in the first solvation shell about Cl- in aqueous HCl solutions are reported from x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements. Results show increasing degrees of contact ion pairing between Cl- and H3O+ as the HCl concentration increases from 6.0 m, 10.0 m and finally 16.1 m HCl (concentrated acid). At the highest acid concentration there are on average, approximately 1.6 H3O+ ions and 4.2 H2O’s in the first shell about Cl-. The structure of the Cl-/H3O+ contact ion pair is distinctly different than that of the H2O structure about Cl-. The Cl-O bond length (2.98Å) for Cl-/H3O+ is approximately 0.16 Å shorter than the Cl-/H2O bond. The bridging proton resides at an intermediate position between Cl and O at 1.60 Å from the Cl- and approximately 1.37 Å from the O of the H3O+. The bridging-proton structure of this contact ion pair, [Cl-H-OH2], is similar to structure of the water Zundel ion, [H2O-H-OH2]+. In both cases there is a shortened Cl-O or O-O bond and the intervening proton bond distances are substantially longer than for the covalent bonds of either HCl or H2O. The results further our understanding of the interaction H3O+ with Cl- that is of interest to fundamental physical chemistry and that has consequences in biochemical, geochemical and atmospheric processes.

  5. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Results Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150°C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. Conclusion The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation

  6. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

    2009-11-16

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent

  7. Bactericidal activity of electrolyzed acid water from solution containing sodium chloride at low concentration, in comparison with that at high concentration.

    PubMed

    Kiura, Hiromasa; Sano, Kouichi; Morimatsu, Shinichi; Nakano, Takashi; Morita, Chizuko; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Maeda, Toyoyuki; Katsuoka, Yoji

    2002-05-01

    Electrolyzed strong acid water (ESW) containing free chlorine at various concentrations is becoming to be available in clinical settings as a disinfectant. ESW is prepared by electrolysis of a NaCl solution, and has a corrosive activity against medical instruments. Although lower concentrations of NaCl and free chlorine are desired to eliminate corrosion, the germicidal effect of ESW with low NaCl and free-chlorine concentrations (ESW-L) has not been fully clarified. In this study, we demonstrated that ESW-L possesses bactericidal activity against Mycobacteria and spores of Bacillus subtilis. The effect was slightly weaker than that of ESW containing higher NaCl and free-chlorine concentrations (ESW-H), but acceptable as a disinfectant. To clarify the mechanism of the bactericidal activity, we investigated ESW-L-treated Pseudomonas aeruginosa by transmission electron microscopy, a bacterial enzyme assay and restriction fragment length polymorphism pattern (RFLP) assay. Since the bacterium, whose growth was completely inhibited by ESW-L, revealed the inactivation of cytoplasmic enzyme, blebs and breaks in its outer membrane and remained complete RFLP of DNA, damage of the outer membrane and inactivation of cytoplasmic enzyme are the important determinants of the bactericidal activity.

  8. Molecular dynamics studies of lanthanum chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W.; Bopp, Ph. ); Probst, M.M. ); Spohr, E. ); Lin, J.L. )

    1990-05-31

    Molecular dynamics studies are reported for LaCl{sub 3} solutions at two different concentrations and temperatures, and for isolated aqueous La{sup 3+} ions. Ion-water clusters La(H{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup 3+} with n = 61 and n = 100 and systems consisting of one ion and 100 or 200 water molecules in the usual periodic box, as well as solutions of 7 (4) cations and 21 (12) anions in 190 (200) water molecules, corresponding to 2 and 1.1 m solutions, respectively, were investigated. The 2 m solution was investigated at two different temperatures. The results for the static structure, with special emphasis on the hydration structure of the La{sup 3+} ion, are discussed in terms of radial distribution functions and resulting hydration numbers, and various other correlations. These results are compared with X-ray data and discussed in light of the hydration numbers observed for aqueous ions in general.

  9. [Properties of benzethonium chloride in micellar solutions and the effect of added sodium chloride].

    PubMed

    Kopecký, F; Kopecká, B; Kaclík, P

    2006-07-01

    Aqueous solutions of the antimicrobially effective quaternary ammonium salt benzethonium chloride (hyamine 1622) were studied using UV spectrophotometry and partially conductometry. The spectra of micellar solutions of benzethonium chloride revealed a concentration-dependent bathochromic and hyperchromic shift of a weak UV absorption band in the region 250-300 nm. This served to elaborate the spectrophotometric determination of the critical micellar concentration (CMC) of benzethonium chloride and the concentration of free benzethonium cations in micellar solutions without an addition of NaCl and with a constant addition of NaCl 0.003, 0.1 and 0.15 mol/l. Premicellar associations were not observed and in NaCl-free solutions CMC 0.0028 mol/l was spectrophotometrically determined. An addition of NaCl resulted in an increased hyperchromic effect and strengthening of micellization, manifested by a more than ten-times decrease in the CMC as well as the concentration of free benzethonium cations in micellar solutions. The courses of the determined concentrations of free benzethonium cations in the solutions both without and with the presence of NaCl were quite similar; their maximal values were always just a little higher than the corresponding CMC and with a further growth of the total concentration of benzethonium chloride there was, on the other hand, a marked decrease in the concentration of its free cations in micellar solution. Possible effects of a decreased concentration of free benzethonium cations due to an added electrolyte on antimicrobial activity and formation of ionic pairs are discussed.

  10. Tetragonal Chicken Egg White Lysozyme Solubility in Sodium Chloride Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    The solubility of chicken egg white lysozyme, crystallized in the tetragonal form was measured in sodium chloride solutions from 1.6 to 30.7 C, using a miniature column solubility apparatus. Sodium chloride solution concentrations ranged from 1 to 7% (w/v). The solutions were buffered with 0.1 M sodium acetate buffer with the solubility being measured at pH values in 0.2 pH unit increments in the range pH 4.0 to 5.4, with data also included at pH 4.5. Lysozyme solubility was found to increase with increases in temperature and decreasing salt concentration. Solution pH has a varied and unpredictable effect on solubility.

  11. Properties of a new liquid desiccant solution - Lithium chloride and calcium chloride mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Ertas, A.; Anderson, E.E.; Kiris, I. )

    1992-09-01

    Desiccants, broadly classified as solid and liquid desiccants, have the property of extracting and retaining moisture from air brought into contact with them. By using either type, moisture in the air is removed and the resulting dry air can be used for air-conditioning or drying purposes. Because of its properties, lithium chloride is the most stable liquid desiccant and has a large dehydration concentration (30% to 45%), but its cost is relatively high ($9.00-13.00 per kg). It is expected that lithium chloride will reduce the relative humidity to as low as 15%. Calcium chloride is the cheapest (45 cents per kg) and most readily available desiccant, but it has the disadvantage of being unstable depending on the air inlet conditions and the concentration of the desiccant in the solution. To stabilize calcium chloride and to decrease the high cost of lithium chloride, the two can be mixed in different weight combinations. The main objective of this research is to measure the physical properties of different combinations of this mixture such as density, viscosity, and vapor pressure which are necessary for analysis of heat and mass transfer in a packed tower desiccant-air contact system. The solubility of this new liquid desiccant under certain temperature-concentrations will also be studied.

  12. Hydration patterns and salting effects in sodium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Weifeng; Mu, Yuguang

    2011-10-01

    The salting effects of 2M sodium chloride electrolyte are studied based on a series of model solutes with properties ranging from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Generally, hydrophobic solutes will be salted out and hydrophilic solutes will be salted in by NaCl solution. The solvation free energy changes are highly correlated with Kirkwood-Buff integrals. The underlying mechanism resorts to the preferential binding of ions and water to solutes. Our results demonstrate that the salting effect not only depends on the salt's position in Hofmeister series, but also on the solutes' specifics. Taking the hydration free energies of solutes and ions as independent variables, a schematic diagram of salting effects is suggested. The resolved multifaceted salting effects rely on the sensitive balance of the tripartite interaction among solutes, ions, and water.

  13. Acid copper sulfate plating bath: Control of chloride and copper. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Borhani, K.J.

    1992-08-01

    Plated-through holes in high-reliability printed wiring boards require a ductile copper plate of uniform consistency. The level of control of the chemical constituents in the electroplating solutions dictates the physical properties of the copper plate. To improve the control of the chemical bath constituents, in-situ methods for electrochemically determining copper and chloride in acid copper sulfate baths were developed. A solid-state ion-selective electrode was used for the chloride ion and proved to be more reproducible than conventional silver chloride turbidimetric methods. The use of a copper solid-state ion-selective electrode in-situ was also successful in this application.

  14. Calcinosis cutis following contact with calcium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Lim, Penny P L; Kossard, Steven; Stapleton, Karen

    2012-11-01

    Calcinosis cutis is the deposition of insoluble calcium in the cutaneous tissue. Calcinosis cutis can be classified as metastatic, dystrophic, idiopathic or exogenous. We report a 48-year-old white man who was dismantling a portable ice skating rink when calcium chloride solution from the pipes spilt onto his clothing. Several days later, he started to develop mildly pruritic erythematous papules, some studded with white deposits and some with umbilication over the exposed areas corresponding to the spillage of the calcium chloride solution. Histological features revealed interstitial fibrohistiocytic reaction with calcium-encrusted degenerated collagen bundles in the dermis which was further confirmed by von Kossa stain. He was commenced on topical corticosteroid cream twice daily and the lesions cleared completely between 6 to 10 weeks.

  15. Calcinosis cutis following contact with calcium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Lim, Penny P L; Kossard, Steven; Stapleton, Karen

    2012-11-01

    Calcinosis cutis is the deposition of insoluble calcium in the cutaneous tissue. Calcinosis cutis can be classified as metastatic, dystrophic, idiopathic or exogenous. We report a 48-year-old white man who was dismantling a portable ice skating rink when calcium chloride solution from the pipes spilt onto his clothing. Several days later, he started to develop mildly pruritic erythematous papules, some studded with white deposits and some with umbilication over the exposed areas corresponding to the spillage of the calcium chloride solution. Histological features revealed interstitial fibrohistiocytic reaction with calcium-encrusted degenerated collagen bundles in the dermis which was further confirmed by von Kossa stain. He was commenced on topical corticosteroid cream twice daily and the lesions cleared completely between 6 to 10 weeks. PMID:23157788

  16. Multi-scale modelling of uranyl chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Thanh-Nghi; Duvail, Magali Villard, Arnaud; Dufrêche, Jean-François; Molina, John Jairo; Guilbaud, Philippe

    2015-01-14

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations with explicit polarization have been successfully used to determine the structural and thermodynamic properties of binary aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride (UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}). Concentrated aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride have been studied to determine the hydration properties and the ion-ion interactions. The bond distances and the coordination number of the hydrated uranyl are in good agreement with available experimental data. Two stable positions of chloride in the second hydration shell of uranyl have been identified. The UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-Cl{sup −} association constants have also been calculated using a multi-scale approach. First, the ion-ion potential averaged over the solvent configurations at infinite dilution (McMillan-Mayer potential) was calculated to establish the dissociation/association processes of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-Cl{sup −} ion pairs in aqueous solution. Then, the association constant was calculated from this potential. The value we obtained for the association constant is in good agreement with the experimental result (K{sub UO{sub 2Cl{sup +}}} = 1.48 l mol{sup −1}), but the resulting activity coefficient appears to be too low at molar concentration.

  17. Behavior of antimony(III) during copper electrowinning in chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.K.; Wu, X.

    1996-04-01

    Contamination of cathodic copper by Sb during electrowinning in chloride solutions is a surface phenomenon. A digitized scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrograph indicates that the Sb is concentrated on the surface /of the cathode. Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis reveals that the Sb-containing layer is a complex salt of Cu, Sb, Cl, and O. Electrochemical measurements show that the adsorption of Sb or Cu species decreases with the increase of acidity of the solution when the solution contains antimony chloride or cuprous chloride. The adsorption increases with the increase of the acidity when the solution contains both Sb and Cu. The discharge of cuprous ions in the adsorbed complex salt releases antimonious ions and then forms a new layer of the complex salt with cuprous ions from the solution. This newly formed complex salt is readsorbed on the surface of the cathode. Thus, Sb concentrates on the surface of the cathode instead of being evenly distributed throughout the copper product. This suggested mechanism also explains the fact that the presence of Sb in the electrolyte enhances the electrodeposition of Cu.

  18. Sodium chloride methanol solution spin-coating process for bulk-heterojunction polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tong-Fang; Hu, Yu-Feng; Deng, Zhen-Bo; Li, Xiong; Zhu, Li-Jie; Wang, Yue; Lv, Long-Feng; Wang, Tie-Ning; Lou, Zhi-Dong; Hou, Yan-Bing; Teng, Feng

    2016-08-01

    The sodium chloride methanol solution process is conducted on the conventional poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells. The device exhibits a power conversion efficiency of up to 3.36%, 18% higher than that of the device without the solution process. The measurements of the active layer by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) indicate a slight phase separation in the vertical direction and a sodium chloride distributed island-like interface between the active layer and the cathode. The capacitance–voltage (C–V) and impedance spectroscopy measurements prove that the sodium chloride methanol process can reduce the electron injection barrier and improve the interfacial contact of polymer solar cells. Therefore, this one-step solution process not only optimizes the phase separation in the active layers but also forms a cathode buffer layer, which can enhance the generation, transport, and collection of photogenerated charge carriers in the device simultaneously. This work indicates that the inexpensive and non-toxic sodium chloride methanol solution process is an efficient one-step method for the low cost manufacturing of polymer solar cells. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 2014JBZ009) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274063, 61377028, 61475014, and 61475017).

  19. Sodium chloride methanol solution spin-coating process for bulk-heterojunction polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tong-Fang; Hu, Yu-Feng; Deng, Zhen-Bo; Li, Xiong; Zhu, Li-Jie; Wang, Yue; Lv, Long-Feng; Wang, Tie-Ning; Lou, Zhi-Dong; Hou, Yan-Bing; Teng, Feng

    2016-08-01

    The sodium chloride methanol solution process is conducted on the conventional poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells. The device exhibits a power conversion efficiency of up to 3.36%, 18% higher than that of the device without the solution process. The measurements of the active layer by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) indicate a slight phase separation in the vertical direction and a sodium chloride distributed island-like interface between the active layer and the cathode. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) and impedance spectroscopy measurements prove that the sodium chloride methanol process can reduce the electron injection barrier and improve the interfacial contact of polymer solar cells. Therefore, this one-step solution process not only optimizes the phase separation in the active layers but also forms a cathode buffer layer, which can enhance the generation, transport, and collection of photogenerated charge carriers in the device simultaneously. This work indicates that the inexpensive and non-toxic sodium chloride methanol solution process is an efficient one-step method for the low cost manufacturing of polymer solar cells. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 2014JBZ009) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274063, 61377028, 61475014, and 61475017).

  20. Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate in a Salicylic Acid Gel

    PubMed Central

    Valins, Whitney

    2009-01-01

    Hyperhidrosis is a common dermatological condition that has a tremendous impact on the quality of life of affected patients. Aluminum chloride hexahydrate is considered first-line therapy for patients with mild-to-moderate hyperhidrosis. This treatment has been proven to be effective in the treatment of hyperhidrosis; however, its use has been limited by significant irritation. In many patients, the irritant dermatitis is so severe that, despite clinical efficacy, this therapy must be discontinued. There are many topical aluminum chloride therapies available. Observations from a busy hyperhidrosis practice revealed decreased irritation and increased efficacy with a novel therapy that combines 15% aluminum chloride hexahydrate with 2% salicylic acid in a gel base. This combination of 15% aluminum chloride hexahydrate with 2% salicylic acid offers patients who have failed aluminum chloride hexahydrate in the past excellent efficacy with minimal irritation. We report seven cases of patients with a history of severe irritation from aluminum chloride who maintained excellent results with this new topical without any significant irritation. PMID:20729946

  1. Production and mitigation of acid chlorides in geothermal steam

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, J.M.; Palmer, D.A.

    1995-06-01

    Measurements of the equilibrium distribution of relatively nonvolatile solutes between aqueous liquid and vapor phases have been made at temperatures to 350{degrees}C for HCl(aq) and chloride salts. These data are directly applicable to problems of corrosive-steam production in geothermal steam systems. Compositions of high-temperature brines which could produce steam having given concentrations of chlorides may be estimated at various boiling temperatures. Effects of mitigation methods (e.g., desuperheating) can be calculated based on liquid-vapor equilibrium constants and solute mass balances under vapor-saturation conditions.

  2. Lead electrowinning in an acid chloride medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Expósito, E.; Iniesta, J.; González-García, J.; Montiel, V.; Aldaz, A.

    The results of an investigation of the electrowinning of lead employing a chloride medium are reported. The electro-deposition lead reaction was studied by voltammetric methods and scanning electron microscope (SEM) microphotographs of the electro-deposited lead were taken. The effects of current density, temperature, catholyte flow and H + concentration were investigated at laboratory scale to optimise operating conditions in order to found adequate values for industrial purposes of the parameters energetic cost and production. For a working current density of 100 mA/cm 2 the current efficiency, energy consumption and production were 90%, 1.32 kW h/kg Pb and 83.4 kg Pb/m 2 per day, respectively.

  3. The stability of aqueous nickel(II) chloride complexes in hydrothermal solutions: Results of UV-Visible spectroscopic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weihua; Migdisov, Artas; Williams-Jones, Anthony

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the thermodynamic properties of aqueous nickel chloride complexes is important for understanding and quantitatively evaluating nickel transport in hydrothermal systems. In this paper, UV-Visible spectroscopic measurements are reported for dissolved nickel in perchlorate, triflic acid and sodium chloride solutions at temperatures up to 250 °C and 100 bar. The observed molar absorbance of Ni2+ in both perchlorate and triflic acid solutions is similar, and the absorbance peak migrates toward lower energy (red-shift) with increasing temperature. The spectra of nickel chloride solutions show a systematic red-shift with increasing temperature and/or chloride concentration. This allowed identification of the nickel chloride species as NiCl+, NiCl2(aq) and NiCl3-, and determination of their formation constants. Based on the experimental data reported in this paper and those of previous experimental studies, formation constants for these nickel chloride complexes have been calculated for temperatures up to 700 °C and pressures up to 2000 bar. The solubility of millerite (NiS) and pentlandite (Ni4.5Fe4.5S8) calculated using these constants shows that nickel dissolves in significantly higher concentrations in hydrothermal solutions than previously estimated. However, the solubility is considerably lower than for corresponding cobalt sulphide minerals. This may explain why hydrothermal nickel deposits are encountered so much less frequently than hydrothermal deposits of cobalt.

  4. Modeling of solute sorption by polyvinyl chloride plastic infusion bags.

    PubMed

    Jenke, D R

    1993-11-01

    Methods for estimating the equilibrium and time-dependent sorption of solutes by polymeric containers have been developed. The methods are specifically applied to the sorption of solutes by polyvinyl chloride (PVC) infusion bags. The methods correlate the partition coefficients and dissociation constant (when appropriate) of the solute, the physical dimensions of the container, and solution pH with single parameters that dictate the shape of the sorption profile. To determine the equilibrium sorption level for PVC containers, the fractional binding of a solute is correlated with its hexane-water and octanol-water partition coefficients. Calculations based on single partition coefficients are less effective in terms of mimicking the behavior of the PVC. To determine the sorption profile (fractional binding versus time), the partition coefficients are related to the fraction binding at a particular time through a single parameter referred to as the sorption number. Equilibrium fractional binding and sorption profiles for various drugs stored in PVC containers are generated with the models and agree well with reported behavior. The effect of pH on the sorption process is also examined.

  5. Localized corrosion of candidate container materials in ferric chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, D L; Lum, B Y; Roy, A K

    1998-10-01

    Localized corrosion behavior of candidate inner and outer container materials of currently-designed nuclear waste package was evaluated in aqueous solutions of various concentrations of ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) at 30 C, 60 C and 90 C using the electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique. Materials tested include A 5 16 carbon steel and high-performance alloys 825, G-3, G-30, C-4, 625. C-22, and Ti Gr-12. A 516 steel suffered from severe general and localized attack including pitting and crevice corrosion. High-nickel alloys 825 and G-3 also became susceptible to severe pitting and crevice corrosion. The extent of localized attack was less pronounced in alloys G-30 and C-4. Alloy 625 experienced severe surface degradation including general corrosion, crevice corrosion and intergranular attack. In contrast, only a slight crevice corrosion tendency was observed with nickel-base alloy C-22 in solutions containing higher concentrations of FeCl{sub 3} at 60 C and 90 C. Ti Gr-12 was immune to localized attack in all tested environments. The test solutions showed significant amount of precipitated particles during and after testing especially at higher temperatures.

  6. Effect of human blood addition on dendritic growth of cupric chloride crystals in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takashi; Shirasaka, Ryukoh; Ogawa, Tomoya; Takakuwa, Yuichi; Furiya, Kei; Tanaka, Akemi; Kogure, Mitsuko; Obata, Hiroshi

    1994-09-01

    An extremely small amount of 0.2% or less (volume ratio) of human blood influences the dendritic growth of cupric chloride crystals in an aqueous solution, with some researchers claiming that the growth depends upon any disease the blood donor might be carrying. This is a very surprising phenomenon. Dendrites grown in a blood-added CuCl 2 ⋯ 2H 2O solution were classified into groups of blue and green by color; all the dendrites grown in an aqueous solution without blood were a single color: blue. A very clear difference between the blue and green dendrites was obtained by thermo-gravimetry/differential thermal analysis, because of positional and numerical difference of water molecules in the cupric chloride crystals. Many tiny granules were observed on facets of the dendrites grown in the blood-added aqueous solutions. Surfaces of the dendrites were surveyed by an electron probe X-ray micro-analyzer and by an X-ray photo-electron spectroscope, and chemical shifts of copper, chlorine, nitrogen, carbon and oxygen signals were found on those dendrites grown in blood-added CuCl 2 ⋯ 2H 2O solutions. This evidence suggests that components of blood including amino acid, peptide and/or protein or some composition of them were chemisorbed on the dendrite surfaces.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of zinc chloride containing poly(acrylic acid) hydrogel by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Seok; Kuang, Jia; Gwon, Hui-Jeong; Lim, Youn-Mook; Jeong, Sung-In; Shin, Young-Min; Seob Khil, Myung; Nho, Young-Chang

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the characterization of zinc chloride incorporated into a poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc) hydrogel prepared by gamma-ray irradiation was investigated. Zinc chloride powder with different concentrations was dissolved in the PAAc solution, and it was crosslinked with gamma-ray irradiation. The effects of various parameters such as zinc ion concentration and irradiation doses on characteristics of the hydrogel formed were investigated in detail for obtaining an antibacterial wound dressing. In addition, the gel content, pH-sensitive (pH 4 or 7) swelling ratio, and UV-vis absorption spectra of the zinc particles in the hydrogels were characterized. Moreover, antibacterial properties of these new materials against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli strains were observed on solid growth media. The antibacterial tests indicated that the zinc chloride containing PAAc hydrogels have good antibacterial activity.

  8. The Effect of Silver Chloride Formation on the Kinetics of Silver Dissolution in Chloride Solution

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hung; Payer, Joe

    2011-01-01

    The precipitation and growth of AgCl on silver in physiological NaCl solution were investigated. AgCl was found to form at bottom of scratches on the surface which may be the less effective sites for diffusion or the favorable sites for heterogeneous nucleation. Patches of silver chloride expanded laterally on the substrate until a continuous film formed. The ionic transport path through this newly formed continuous film was via spaces between AgCl patches. As the film grew, the spaces between AgCl patches closed and ion transport was primarily via micro-channels running through AgCl patches. The decrease of AgCl layer conductivity during film growth were attributed to the clogging of micro-channels or decrease in charge carrier concentration inside the micro-channels. Under thin AgCl layer, i.e. on the order of a micrometer, the dissolution of silver substrate was under mixed activation-Ohmic control. Under thick AgCl layer, i.e. on the order of tens of micrometers, the dissolution of silver substrate was mediated by the Ohmic resistance of AgCl layer. PMID:21516171

  9. The Effect of Silver Chloride Formation on the Kinetics of Silver Dissolution in Chloride Solution.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hung; Payer, Joe

    2011-02-28

    The precipitation and growth of AgCl on silver in physiological NaCl solution were investigated. AgCl was found to form at bottom of scratches on the surface which may be the less effective sites for diffusion or the favorable sites for heterogeneous nucleation. Patches of silver chloride expanded laterally on the substrate until a continuous film formed. The ionic transport path through this newly formed continuous film was via spaces between AgCl patches. As the film grew, the spaces between AgCl patches closed and ion transport was primarily via micro-channels running through AgCl patches. The decrease of AgCl layer conductivity during film growth were attributed to the clogging of micro-channels or decrease in charge carrier concentration inside the micro-channels. Under thin AgCl layer, i.e. on the order of a micrometer, the dissolution of silver substrate was under mixed activation-Ohmic control. Under thick AgCl layer, i.e. on the order of tens of micrometers, the dissolution of silver substrate was mediated by the Ohmic resistance of AgCl layer.

  10. Effect of calcium chloride solution immersion on surface hardness of restorative glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Maho; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Uo, Motohiro

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the concentration of calcium chloride (CaCl2) solution on the surface hardness of restorative glass ionomer cements (GICs). Two high-viscosity GICs, Fuji IX GP and GlasIonomer FX-II, were immersed in several concentrations of CaCl2 solution for 1 day and 1 week. The immersed specimen surfaces were evaluated using microhardness testing, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Immersion in a higher concentration of CaCl2 solution produced a greater increase in the surface hardness. No crystalline substance was observed on the immersed surface. Calcium ions were selectively absorbed in the matrix of the GIC surface after immersion. They reacted with the non-reacted carboxylic acid groups remaining in the cement matrix. These reactions were considered to cause an increase in the surface hardness of the GICs.

  11. The influence of sulphates on chloride binding and pore solution chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.

    1997-12-01

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and OPC/ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) 65% cements containing 2.0 to 9.0% sulphates derived from sodium sulphate and calcium sulphate were investigated in respect to their chloride binding properties and the concentrations of chloride and hydroxyl ions in the pore solutions. Chlorides derived from sodium and calcium chlorides were introduced at the time of mixing. The results indicate that calcium sulphate has a different effect on chloride binding and the pore solution chemistry than sodium sulphate. The slag cement has higher chloride binding capacities as a result of simple replacement for OPC, but at the same sulphate contents, the slag cement does not give the expected higher binding capacities, suggesting that the difference in sulphate content between the two cements may be the main reason for their different chloride binding behavior.

  12. An XAFS study of nickel chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride/ aluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; G Cheek; K Pandya; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Nickel chloride was studied with cyclic voltammetry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquids. Acidic melts display metal stripping peaks which are not observed in the basic melt. EXAFS analysis shows that the nickel is tetrahedrally coordinated with chloride ions in the basic solution. In the acidic solution the nickel is coordinated by six chloride ions that are also associated with aluminum ions.

  13. Nucleation and growth of zinc from chloride concentrated solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Trejo, G.; Ortega B, R.; Meas V, Y.; Ozil, P.; Chainet, E.; Nguyen, B.

    1998-12-01

    The electrodeposition of metals is a complex phenomenon influenced by a number of factors that modify the rates of nucleation and growth and determine the properties of the deposits. In this work the authors study the influence of the zinc chloride (ZnCl{sub 2}) concentration on the zinc nucleation process on glassy carbon, in a KCl electrolyte under conditions close to those employed in commercial acid deposition baths for zinc. The electrochemical study was performed using cyclic voltammetry and potentiostatic current-time transients. The charge-transfer coefficient and the formal potential for ZnCl{sub 2} reduction were evaluated from cyclic voltammetry experiments. The nucleation process was analyzed by comparing the transients obtained with the known dimensionless (i/i{sub m}){sup 2} vs. t/t{sub m} response for instantaneous or progressive nucleation. The results show that the nucleation process and the number density of sites are dependent on ZnCl{sub 2} concentration. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the deposits shows that the deposits are homogeneous and compact although a change in the morphology is observed as a function of ZnCl{sub 2} concentration. Evaluation of the corrosion resistance reveals the influence of the nucleation process on the subsequent corrosion resistance of the zinc deposits.

  14. Hyponatremic Chloride-depletion Metabolic Alkalosis Successfully Treated with High Cation-gap Amino Acid.

    PubMed

    Ryuge, Akihiro; Matsui, Katsuomi; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2016-01-01

    Chloride (Cl)-depletion alkalosis (CDA) develops due to the loss of Cl-rich body fluid, i.e., vomiting or diuretics use, and is typically treated with a chloride-rich solution such as normal saline (NS). Although NS is one of the most utilized Cl-rich solutions, high cation-gap amino acid (HCG-AA) predominantly comprises Cl and less sodium, making HCG-AA more efficient in correcting CDA. We herein report a case of CDA with chronic hyponatremia after frequent vomiting, which was successfully treated with HCG-AA without overcorrecting hyponatremia or causing hypervolemia. HCG-AA may be more beneficial than NS for treating hyponatremic or hypervolemic metabolic alkalosis. PMID:27374680

  15. Urinary thiodiglycolic acid levels for vinyl chloride monomer-exposed polyvinyl chloride workers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T J; Huang, Y F; Ma, Y C

    2001-11-01

    Thiodiglycolic acid (TdGA) is the major metabolite of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) detected in human urine. Although urinary TdGA has been reported to be associated with ambient VCM exposure, the relationship between urinary TdGA and a low level of air VCM is not clear. Questionnaires were administered to 16 polyvinyl chloride manufacturing workers to obtain a detailed history of occupation and lifestyle. For each worker, personal air monitoring for VCM was performed and a time-weighted average for VCM exposure was calculated. The urinary TdGA levels at the end of a work shift, and at the commencement of the next shift, were also assessed for each worker. Urine analysis revealed that TdGA levels at the beginning of the next shift were higher than those at the end of that shift. Workers experiencing a VCM exposure greater than 5 ppm in air revealed a urinary TdGA level significantly greater than those experiencing a VCM exposure of less than 5 ppm (P < 0.05). The best fit of regression for urinary TdGA on air VCM was Y = 1.06 + 0.57X for urine collected at the commencement of the following work shift, where X is the air VCM concentration and Y is the urinary TdGA concentration (r2 = 0.65, P < 0.01). We conclude that the urinary TdGA level is best detected at the commencement of the next shift and that it can be used as an exposure marker for polyvinyl chloride workers when the air VCM level to which they are exposed is greater than 5 ppm.

  16. Solution-Derived, Chloride-Containing Minerals as a Waste Form for Alkali Chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Matyas, Josef; McCloy, John S.; Lepry, William C.

    2012-10-01

    Sodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6Cl2] and cancrinite [(Na,K)6Ca2Al6Si6O24Cl4] are environmentally stable, chloride-containing minerals and are a logical waste form option for the mixed alkali chloride salt waste stream that is generated from a proposed electrochemical separations process during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Due to the volatility of chloride salts at moderate temperatures, the ideal processing route for these salts is a low-temperature approach such as the sol-gel process. The sodalite structure can be easily synthesized by the sol-gel process; however, it is produced in the form of a fine powder with particle sizes on the order of 1–10 µm. Due to the small particle size, these powders require additional treatment to form a monolith. In this study, the sol-gel powders were pressed into pellets and fired to achieve > 90% of theoretical density. The cancrinite structure, identified as the best candidate mineral form in terms of waste loading capacity, was only produced on a limited basis following the sol-gel process and converted to sodalite upon firing. Here we discuss the sol-gel process specifics, chemical durability of select waste forms, and the steps taken to maximize chloride-containing phases, decrease chloride loss during pellet firing, and increase pellet densities.

  17. Copper extraction from chloride solutions with mixtures of solvating and chelating reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Borowiak-Resterna, A.; Szymanowski, J.

    2000-01-01

    Equimolar mixtures of N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetrahexylpyridine-3,5-dicarboxamide (L) with 2-hydroxy-5-t-octylbenzophenone oxime or 1-phenyldecane-1,3-dione (HB), were used to extract copper from chloride solutions of various concentration of chloride ions. Chloride ions were then scrubbed out with water or ammoniacal solutions and copper was transferred from the solvate CuCl{sub 2}L{sub 2} to chelate CuB{sub 2}. Both studied systems permit effective extraction of copper and removal of chloride ions from the organic phase. Some protonation of solvating reagent L occurs, however, when copper is stripped from the chelate with hydroxyoxime. This negative effect can be suppressed when 1-phenyldecane-1,3-dione is used as a chelating agent. The scrubbing of chloride ions must be then carried out with ammoniacal solutions to avoid simultaneous stripping of copper.

  18. Intercalation studies of zinc hydroxide chloride: Ammonia and amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe Carbajal

    2012-01-15

    Zinc hydroxide chloride (ZHC) is a layered hydroxide salt with formula Zn{sub 5}(OH){sub 8}Cl{sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O. It was tested as intercalation matrix for the first time and results were compared with intercalation products of the well-known zinc hydroxide nitrate and a Zn/Al layered double hydroxide. Ammonia was intercalated into ZHC, while no significant intercalation occurred in ZHN. Aspartic acid intercalation was only achieved by co-precipitation at pH=10 with ZHC and pH=8 with zinc hydroxide nitrate. Higher pH resistance in ZHC favored total deprotonation of both carboxylic groups of the Asp molecule. ZHC conferred more thermal protection against Asp combustion presenting exothermic peaks even at 452 Degree-Sign C while the exothermic event in ZHN was 366 Degree-Sign C and in the LDH at 276 Degree-Sign C. - Graphical abstract: The zinc hydroxide chloride (ZHC) with formula Zn{sub 5}(OH){sub 8}Cl{sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O was tested as intercalation matrix. In comparison with the well-known zinc hydroxide nitrate (ZHN) and layered double hydroxides (LDH), ZHC was the best matrix for thermal protection of Asp combustion, presenting exothermic peaks even at 452 Degree-Sign C, while the highest exothermic event in ZHN was at 366 Degree-Sign C, and in the LDH it was at 276 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc hydroxide chloride (ZHC) was tested as intercalation matrix for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZHC has higher chemical and thermal stability than zinc hydroxide nitrate and LDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} molecules can be intercalated into ZHC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amino group of amino acids limits the intercalation by ion-exchange.

  19. Effect of chlorides on reinforcing steel exposed to simulated concrete solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kitowski, C.J.; Wheat, H.G.

    1997-03-01

    The behavior of steel in chloride-free and chloride-contaminated simulated concrete solutions was studied to observe the degradation of steel as a result of addition of chlorides. One of the simulated concrete solutions was a saturated calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]{sub 2}) solution while the other was a solution made up of 0.6 M potassium hydroxide (KOH) + 0.2 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) + 0.001 M Ca(OH){sub 2}. Corrosion behavior of the steel was studied electrochemically, and changes in the steel surfaces were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Behavior was compared to that of reinforced concrete cylinders subjected to alternating wetting and drying in 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions.

  20. Effect of chloride concentration on the pitting and repassivation potentials of reinforcing steel in alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.

    1999-11-01

    Reinforcing steel bars ({approximately}12mm diameter and 150mm long) were used in cyclic polarization tests in saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution and simulated concrete pore solution (SPS) with various levels of sodium chloride addition. Below a limiting chloride level ({approximately}O.004M [Cl{sup {minus}}] in Ca(OH){sub 2} solution and {approximately}0.4M [Cl{sup {minus}}] in SPS solution), steel was not found to undergo pitting corrosion even if it was polarized to the oxygen evolution potential ({approximately}O.6V/SCE). At higher NaCl addition, pitting corrosion could often be initiated but the pitting potential was non-deterministic to a great extent. In Ca(OH){sub 2} solution the average pitting potential was found to be strongly dependent on chloride concentration when [Cl{sup {minus}}]{ge}0.008M. In SPS solution, the average pitting potential was almost independent of the chloride concentration when [Cl{sup {minus}}]{ge}0.8M. The repassivation potential was found to be a strong function of the severity of corrosion attack that has occurred on the steel surface before repassivation, rather than a function of the chloride content of the bulk solution. The pitting tendency in chloride-containing SPS and Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions was interpreted on a statistical basis. The threshold thus determined good agreement with other values reported in the literature.

  1. Alcohol solutions of triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride as high-dose radiochromic dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, A.; Wojnárovits, L.; El-assy, N. B.; Afeefy, H. Y.; Al-Sheikhly, M.; Walker, M. L.; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1995-09-01

    The radiolytic reduction of colorless tetrazolium salts in aqueous solution to the highly colored formazan dye is a well-known acid-forming radiation chemical reaction. Radiochromic thin films and three-dimensional hydrocolloid gels have been used for imaging and mapping absorbed dose distributions. The high solubility of 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride (TTC) in alcohols provides a useful liquid dosimeter (45 mM TTC in aerated ethanol) and shows a linear response of absorbance increase (λmax = 480 nm) with dose over the range 1-16 kGy. The linear molar absorption coefficient (ɛm) for the formazan at the absorption peak is 1.5 × 103 m2 mol-1, and the radiation chemical yield for the above solution is G (formazan) = 0.014 μmol J-1. The irradiation temperature coefficient is about 0.8 percent per degree Celsius rise in temperature over the temperature range 0-30 °C but is much larger between 30° and 60 °C. The unirradiated and irradiated solutions are stable over at least five days storage at normal laboratory temperature in the dark, but when stored in daylight at elevated temperature, the unirradiated solution in sealed amber glass ampoules undergoes slow photolytic dye formation, and the irradiated solution experiences initial fading and subsequent reversal (photochromism) when exposed to direct sunlight.

  2. Peptide-based biocoatings for corrosion protection of stainless steel biomaterial in a chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Muruve, Noah G G; Cheng, Y Frank; Feng, Yuanchao; Liu, Tao; Muruve, Daniel A; Hassett, Daniel J; Irvin, Randall T

    2016-11-01

    In this work, PEGylated D-amino acid K122-4 peptide (D-K122-4-PEG), derived from the type IV pilin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, coated on 304 stainless steel was investigated for its corrosion resistant properties in a sodium chloride solution by various electrochemical measurements, surface characterization and molecular dynamics simulation. As a comparison, stainless steel electrodes coated with non-PEGylated D-amino acid retroinverso peptide (RI-K122-4) and D-amino acid K122-4 peptide (D-K122-4) were used as control variables during electrochemical tests. It was found that the D-K122-4-PEG coating is able to protect the stainless steel from corrosion in the solution. The RI-K122-4 coating shows corrosion resistant property and should be investigated further, while the D-K122-4 peptide coating, in contrast, shows little to no effect on corrosion. The morphological characterizations support the corrosion resistance of D-K122-4-PEG on stainless steel. The adsorption of D-K122-4 molecules occurs preferentially on Fe2O3, rather than Cr2O3, present on the stainless steel surface.

  3. Peptide-based biocoatings for corrosion protection of stainless steel biomaterial in a chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Muruve, Noah G G; Cheng, Y Frank; Feng, Yuanchao; Liu, Tao; Muruve, Daniel A; Hassett, Daniel J; Irvin, Randall T

    2016-11-01

    In this work, PEGylated D-amino acid K122-4 peptide (D-K122-4-PEG), derived from the type IV pilin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, coated on 304 stainless steel was investigated for its corrosion resistant properties in a sodium chloride solution by various electrochemical measurements, surface characterization and molecular dynamics simulation. As a comparison, stainless steel electrodes coated with non-PEGylated D-amino acid retroinverso peptide (RI-K122-4) and D-amino acid K122-4 peptide (D-K122-4) were used as control variables during electrochemical tests. It was found that the D-K122-4-PEG coating is able to protect the stainless steel from corrosion in the solution. The RI-K122-4 coating shows corrosion resistant property and should be investigated further, while the D-K122-4 peptide coating, in contrast, shows little to no effect on corrosion. The morphological characterizations support the corrosion resistance of D-K122-4-PEG on stainless steel. The adsorption of D-K122-4 molecules occurs preferentially on Fe2O3, rather than Cr2O3, present on the stainless steel surface. PMID:27524070

  4. Cyclic stress effect on stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steel in chloride and caustic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Di

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a dual-phase material with approximately equal volume amount of austenite and ferrite. It has both great mechanical properties (good ductility and high tensile/fatigue strength) and excellent corrosion resistance due to the mixture of the two phases. Cyclic loadings with high stress level and low frequency are experienced by many structures. However, the existing study on corrosion fatigue (CF) study of various metallic materials has mainly concentrated on relatively high frequency range. No systematic study has been done to understand the ultra-low frequency (˜10-5 Hz) cyclic loading effect on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DSSs. In this study, the ultra-low frequency cyclic loading effect on SCC of DSS 2205 was studied in acidified sodium chloride and caustic white liquor (WL) solutions. The research work focused on the environmental effect on SCC of DSS 2205, the cyclic stress effect on strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205, and the combined environmental and cyclic stress effect on the stress corrosion crack initiation of DSS 2205 in the above environments. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to investigate the electrochemical behavior of DSS 2205 in acidic NaCl solution. Series of slow strain rate tests (SSRTs) at different applied potential values were conducted to reveal the optimum applied potential value for SCC to happen. Room temperature static and cyclic creep tests were performed in air to illustrate the strain accumulation effect of cyclic stresses. Test results showed that cyclic loading could enhance strain accumulation in DSS 2205 compared to static loading. Moreover, the strain accumulation behavior of DSS 2205 was found to be controlled by the two phases of DSS 2205 with different crystal structures. The B.C.C. ferrite phase enhanced strain accumulation due to extensive cross-slips of the dislocations, whereas the F.C.C. austenite phase resisted strain accumulation due to cyclic strain

  5. A diffusive anomaly of water in aqueous sodium chloride solutions at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Soo; Yethiraj, Arun

    2008-02-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are presented for the self-diffusion coefficient of water in aqueous sodium chloride solutions. At temperatures above the freezing point of pure water, the self-diffusion coefficient is a monotonically decreasing function of salt concentration. Below the freezing point of pure water, however, the self-diffusion coefficient is a non-monotonic function of salt concentration, showing a maximum at approximately one molal salt. This suggests that sodium chloride, which is considered a structure-making salt at room temperature, becomes a structure-breaking salt at low temperatures. A qualitative understanding of this effect can be obtained by considering the effect of ions on the residence time of water molecules near other water molecules. A consideration of the freezing point depression of aqueous sodium chloride solutions suggests that the self-diffusion coefficient of water in supercooled sodium chloride solutions is always higher than that in pure (supercooled) water at the same temperature.

  6. An XAFS Study of Tantalum Chloride in the Ionic Liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl Imidazolium Chloride/ aluminum Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Tantalum chloride was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquids (ILs). Anhydrous Ta2Cl10 is more soluble in the basic solution than in the acidic solution and the X-ray absorption data shows that the coordination shell of chlorides around the tantalum is larger in the basic solution. In the acidic solution, tantalum has five chlorides in its coordination shell while in the basic solution; the tantalum is coordinated by seven chlorides. This indicates that the Lewis acidity of the tantalum chloride causes the Ta to coordinate differently in the acidic and the basic solutions.

  7. Extraction of diethylhexylphthalate from total nutrient solution-containing polyvinyl chloride bags.

    PubMed

    Mazur, H I; Stennett, D J; Egging, P K

    1989-01-01

    Total nutrient solution (TNS) is a new method for delivering total parenteral nutrition (TPN) by admixing dextrose, amino acids, and lipids in a single container. Recommendations are to use nonpolyvinyl chloride (PVC) containers for admixture of these solutions. PVC is a hard, brittle, and inflexible substance, and plasticizers, predominantly diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP), are added to impart flexibility. DEHP is a lipid soluble suspected carcinogen, hepatotoxin, and teratogen which has been shown to leach from PVC products containing lipophilic admixtures. The purpose of this study was to quantitate the amount of DEHP which leaches from PVC bags containing TNS. Six study groups, which contained three formulas stored at 25 degrees C +/- 2 degrees C and 4 degrees C +/- 1 degree C, were assayed for DEHP at time 0, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hr, 1 wk, and 3 wk using high-performance liquid chromatography. The control group contained an amino acid source, a carbohydrate source, and standard electrolytes, and the other groups contained a 10% lipid source or a 20% lipid source in addition to the constituents of the control group. Lipid-containing groups demonstrated detectable levels of DEHP at 48 hr, and DEHP content increased in these groups throughout the 21-day study. DEHP concentrations were lower in lipid-containing groups stored at 4 degrees C than comparable groups stored at 25 degrees C.

  8. Antimicrobial Effect of Calcium Chloride Alone and Combined with Lactic Acid Injected into Chicken Breast Meat.

    PubMed

    Alahakoon, Amali U; Jayasena, Dinesh D; Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Sun Hyo; Jo, Cheorun

    2014-01-01

    Chicken breast meat was injected with calcium chloride alone and in combination with lactic acid (0.01% and 0.002%, respectively). The inhibitory effects of the treatments on microbial growth were determined in the injected chicken breast meat stored at 4°C under aerobic packaging condition for 0, 3, and 7 d. Calcium chloride combined with 0.002% and 0.01% lactic acid reduced microbial counts by 0.14 and 1.08 Log CFU/g, respectively, however, calcium chloride alone was unable to inhibit microbial growth. Calcium chloride combined with 0.01% lactic acid was the most effective antimicrobial treatment and resulted in the highest initial redness value. Calcium chloride alone and combined with lactic acid suppressed changes in pH and the Hunter color values during storage. However, injection of calcium chloride and lactic acid had adverse effects on lipid oxidation and sensory characteristics. The higher TBARS values were observed in samples treated with calcium chloride and lactic acid when compared to control over the storage period. Addition of calcium chloride and lactic acid resulted in lower sensory scores for parameters tested, except odor and color, compared to control samples. Therefore, the formulation should be improved in order to overcome such defects prior to industrial application.

  9. Antimicrobial Effect of Calcium Chloride Alone and Combined with Lactic Acid Injected into Chicken Breast Meat

    PubMed Central

    Alahakoon, Amali U.; Jayasena, Dinesh D.; Jung, Samooel; Kim, Sun Hyo

    2014-01-01

    Chicken breast meat was injected with calcium chloride alone and in combination with lactic acid (0.01% and 0.002%, respectively). The inhibitory effects of the treatments on microbial growth were determined in the injected chicken breast meat stored at 4°C under aerobic packaging condition for 0, 3, and 7 d. Calcium chloride combined with 0.002% and 0.01% lactic acid reduced microbial counts by 0.14 and 1.08 Log CFU/g, respectively, however, calcium chloride alone was unable to inhibit microbial growth. Calcium chloride combined with 0.01% lactic acid was the most effective antimicrobial treatment and resulted in the highest initial redness value. Calcium chloride alone and combined with lactic acid suppressed changes in pH and the Hunter color values during storage. However, injection of calcium chloride and lactic acid had adverse effects on lipid oxidation and sensory characteristics. The higher TBARS values were observed in samples treated with calcium chloride and lactic acid when compared to control over the storage period. Addition of calcium chloride and lactic acid resulted in lower sensory scores for parameters tested, except odor and color, compared to control samples. Therefore, the formulation should be improved in order to overcome such defects prior to industrial application. PMID:26760942

  10. Interactions of copper (II) chloride with sucrose, glucose, and fructose in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A. C. F.; Esteso, M. A.; Lobo, V. M. M.; Valente, A. J. M.; Simões, S. M. N.; Sobral, A. J. F. N.; Burrows, H. D.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction between copper (II) chloride and the carbohydrates sucrose, glucose, and fructose has been studied in aqueous solutions at 298.15 and 310.15 K, using measurements of diffusion coefficients and electrical conductivity. Significant effects on the electrical conductivity were observed in the presence of these carbohydrates, suggesting interactions between them and copper chloride. Support for this came from diffusion coefficient measurements. These studies have been complemented by molecular mechanics calculations.

  11. Unilateral segmental hyperhidrosis. Response to 20% aluminum chloride solution and plastic wrap.

    PubMed

    Dworin, A; Sober, A J

    1978-05-01

    A young woman had unilateral dermatomal hyperhidrosis documented by a starch-iodine technique. Evaluation failed to reveal any associated causative conditions. She was treated with 20% aluminum chloride hexahydrate solution in absolute alcohol (Drysol) with a favorable response. With recurrent use, however, she developed miliaria following exertion. Aluminum chloride hexahydrate was shown to be an effective agent to treat this unusual condition, but miliaria with exertion secondary to its use may be a limiting factor. PMID:646401

  12. Redox flow batteries based on supporting solutions containing chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Jianlu; Xia, Guanguang

    2015-09-01

    Redox flow battery systems having a supporting solution that contains Cl.sup.- ions can exhibit improved performance and characteristics. Furthermore, a supporting solution having mixed SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions can provide increased energy density and improved stability and solubility of one or more of the ionic species in the catholyte and/or anolyte. According to one example, a vanadium-based redox flow battery system is characterized by an anolyte having V.sup.2+ and V.sup.3+ in a supporting solution and a catholyte having V.sup.4+ and V.sup.5+ in a supporting solution. The supporting solution can contain Cl.sup.- ions or a mixture of SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions.

  13. Redox flow batteries based on supporting solutions containing chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianlu; Chen, Baowei; Nie, Zimin; Xia, Guanguang

    2014-01-14

    Redox flow battery systems having a supporting solution that contains Cl.sup.- ions can exhibit improved performance and characteristics. Furthermore, a supporting solution having mixed SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions can provide increased energy density and improved stability and solubility of one or more of the ionic species in the catholyte and/or anolyte. According to one example, a vanadium-based redox flow battery system is characterized by an anolyte having V.sup.2+ and V.sup.3+ in a supporting solution and a catholyte having V.sup.4+ and V.sup.5+ in a supporting solution. The supporting solution can contain Cl.sup.- ions or a mixture of SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions.

  14. Redox flow batteries based on supporting solutions containing chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Jianlu; Xia, Guanguang

    2015-07-07

    Redox flow battery systems having a supporting solution that contains Cl.sup.- ions can exhibit improved performance and characteristics. Furthermore, a supporting solution having mixed SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions can provide increased energy density and improved stability and solubility of one or more of the ionic species in the catholyte and/or anolyte. According to one example, a vanadium-based redox flow battery system is characterized by an anolyte having V.sup.2+ and V.sup.3+ in a supporting solution and a catholyte having V.sup.4+ and V.sup.5+ in a supporting solution. The supporting solution can contain Cl.sup.- ions or a mixture of SO.sub.4.sup.2- and Cl.sup.- ions.

  15. Leaching of diethylhexyl phthalate from polyvinyl chloride bags into intravenous cyclosporine solution

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataramanan, R.; Burckart, G.J.; Ptachcinski, R.J.; Blaha, R.; Logue, L.W.; Bahnson, A.; Giam, C.S.; Brady, J.E.

    1986-11-01

    The release of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) from flexible polyvinyl chloride containers into intravenous cyclosporine solutions was studied. Intravenous cyclosporine solution or solutions containing the vehicle Cremophor EL and alcohol in dextrose were prepared in an all-glass system and stored in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bags. Four samples were obtained at different time intervals, and DEHP content was analyzed by gas chromatography. The amount of DEHP that was leached into solutions stored in the PVC bags increased as storage time increased. By 48 hours, nearly 33 mg of DEHP had leached into the solution. Intravenous cyclosporine solutions should be prepared in glass containers to minimize patient exposure to DEHP. If plastic bags are used for preparing cyclosporine injections, the injections must be used immediately after preparation.

  16. Zinc chloride aqueous solution as a solvent for starch.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meiying; Shang, Xiaoqin; Liu, Peng; Xie, Fengwei; Chen, Xiaodong; Sun, Yongyi; Wan, Junyan

    2016-01-20

    It is important to obtain starch-based homogeneous systems for starch modification. Regarding this, an important key point is to find cheap, low-cost and low-toxicity solvents to allow complete dissolution of starch and its easy regeneration. This study reveals that a ZnCl2 aqueous solution is a good non-derivatizing solvent for starch at 50 °C, and can completely dissolve starch granules. The possible formation of a "zinc-starch complex" might account for the dissolution; and the degradation of starch, which was caused by the H(+) inZnCl2 aqueous solution, could not contribute to full dissolution. From polarized light microscopic observation combined with the solution turbidity results, it was found that the lowest ZnCl2 concentration for full dissolution was 29.6 wt.% at 50 °C, with the dissolving time being 4h. Using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR), solid state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), it was revealed that ZnCl2 solution had no chemical reaction with starch glucosides, but only weakened starch hydrogen bonding and converted the crystalline regions to amorphous regions. In addition, as shown by intrinsic viscosity and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), ZnCl2 solution caused degradation of starch macromolecules, which was more serious with a higher concentration of ZnCl2 solution.

  17. Fabrication and Performance of All-Solid-State Chloride Sensors in Synthetic Concrete Pore Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaojian; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Yingzi; Deng, Hongwei

    2010-01-01

    One type of all-solid-state chloride sensor was fabricated using a MnO2 electrode and a Ag/AgCl electrode. The potentiometric response of the sensor to chloride in synthetic concrete pore solutions was systematically studied, and the polarization performance was also evaluated. The results show a good linear relationship between the potential reading of the sensor and the logarithm of chloride activity (concentration ranges from 0.05 to 5.0 M), and the potential value remains stable with increasing immersion time. The existence of K+, Ca2+, Na+ and SO42− ions have little influence on the potentiometric response of the sensor to chloride, but the pH has a significant influence on the potential value of the sensor at low chloride concentration. The potential reading of the sensor increases linearly with the solution temperature over the range from 5 to 45 °C. Meanwhile, an excellent polarization behavior is proven by galvanostatic and potentiodynamic tests. All of the results reveal that the developed sensor has a great potential for monitoring chloride ions in concrete environments. PMID:22163467

  18. Process for defoaming acid gas scrubbing solutions and defoaming solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, E.R.; Robbins, M.L.

    1980-06-17

    The foam in acid gas scrubbing solutions created during an acid gas scrubbing process is reduced or eliminated by the addition of certain polyoxyethylene polyoxypropylene block copolymers as defoaming agents. The defoaming agents are particularly effective when the acid gas scrubbing solution contains an amine having a large hydrophobic moiety.

  19. Nanopore detection of DNA molecules in magnesium chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Liu, Lei; Sha, Jingjie; Ni, Zhonghua; Yi, Hong; Chen, Yunfei

    2013-01-01

    High translocation speed of a DNA strand through a nanopore is a major bottleneck for nanopore detection of DNA molecules. Here, we choose MgCl2 electrolyte as salt solution to control DNA mobility. Experimental results demonstrate that the duration time for straight state translocation events in 1 M MgCl2 solution is about 1.3 ms which is about three times longer than that for the same DNA in 1 M KCl solution. This is because Mg(2+) ions can effectively reduce the surface charge density of the negative DNA strands and then lead to the decrease of the DNA electrophoretic speed. It is also found that the Mg(2+) ions can induce the DNA molecules binding together and reduce the probability of straight DNA translocation events. The nanopore with small diameter can break off the bound DNA strands and increase the occurrence probability of straight DNA translocation events.

  20. Solute rejection by porous glass membranes. I - Hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solutions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Wydeven, T.; Leban, M. I.

    1971-01-01

    Hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea was studied with porous glass membranes in closed-end capillary form, to determine the effect of pressure, temperature, and concentration variations, and lifetime rejection and flux characteristics. Rejection data for sodium chloride were consistent with the functioning of the porous glass as a low-capacity ion-exchange membrane.

  1. Rheology and viscosity scaling of gelatin/1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Congde; Li, Tianduo; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Xiaodeng; Xu, Jing

    2014-05-01

    Gelatin/1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride solutions are prepared by using the ionic liquid 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride as solvent. The rheological properties of the gelatin solutions have been investigated by steady shear and oscillatory shear measurements. In the steady shear measurements, the gelatin solutions with high concentration show a shear-thinning flow behavior at high shear rates, while another shear thinning region can be found in the dilute gelatin solutions at low shear rates. The overlap concentration of gelatin in [amim]Cl is 1.0 wt% and the entanglement concentration is a factor of 4 larger (4.0 wt%). The high intrinsic viscosity (295 mL/g) indicates that the gelatin chains dispersed freely in the ionic liquid and no aggregation phenomenon occurs in dilute gelatin solution. The frequency dependences of modulus changed obviously with an increase in gelatin concentration. The empirical time-temperature superposition principle holds true at the experimental temperatures.

  2. Stability of Melphalan in 0.9% Sodium Chloride Solutions Prepared in Polyvinyl Chloride Bags for Intravenous Injection.

    PubMed

    Desmaris, Romain-Pacôme; Mercier, Lionel; Paci, Angelo

    2015-09-01

    Melphalan is an alkylating agent frequently used in an intravenous formulation to treat hematologic malignancies and solid tumors in both adults and children. According to the manufacturer, melphalan is stable in sterile 0.9% sodium chloride for 90 min at room temperature (RT). Several authors have studied the stability of different concentrations of melphalan; however, most were not adapted to the current manufacturing process applied in pharmaceutical centralized units. This study was conducted to determine the stability of melphalan in 0.9% sodium chloride solutions at concentrations used for intravenous injection in practice. Melphalan is commonly prepared in diluted solutions ranging from 2 to 4 mg/ml for the treatment of adult patients and at lower concentrations (down to 0.5 mg/ml) for pediatric use. Accordingly, these were the three concentrations chosen for this study. Melphalan concentrations were measured with high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC). At RT, admixtures prepared at 4 mg/ml were stable for up to 8 h without protection from light; however, at lower concentrations, such as 0.5 and 2 mg/ml, stability did not exceed 2 h. When refrigerated, melphalan was stable for 24 h at 2 mg/ml; however, at 0.5 and 4 mg/ml, the drug was not stable. Melphalan solutions present with limited stability at 0.5, 2, and 4 mg/ml and are not adapted for delayed administration in pharmaceutical centralized units. However, at 4 mg/ml and at RT, a stability of 8 h is very interesting in practice and allows sufficient time for preparation, pharmaceutical control, transport, and administration.

  3. Electrochemical Evaluation of Stainless Steels in Acidified Sodium Chloride Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; MacDowell, L. G.; Vinje, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation in which several 300-series stainless steels (SS): AISI S30403 SS (UNS S30403), AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603), and AISI 317L SS (LINS S31703), as well as highly-alloyed: SS 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C (UNS S44735), were evaluated using DC electrochemical techniques in three different electrolyte solutions. The solutions consisted of neutral 3.55% NaCl, 3.55% NaCl in 0.1N HCl, and 3.55% NaCl in 1.0N HCl. These solutions were chosen to simulate environments that are less, similar, and more aggressive, respectively, than the conditions at the Space Shuttle launch pads. The electrochemical test results were compared to atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the subject alloys. The electrochemical measurements for the six alloys indicated that the higher-alloyed SS 254-SMO, AL29-4C, and AL-6XN exhibited significantly higher resistance to localized corrosion than the 300-series SS. There was a correlation between the corrosion performance of the alloys during a two-year atmospheric exposure and the corrosion rates calculated from electrochemical (polarization resistance) measurements.

  4. Raman spectroscopic study of sodium chloride water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furić, K.; Ciglenečki, I.; Ćosović, B.

    2000-09-01

    The Raman spectra of NaCl water solutions have been studied in the concentration range between 0 and 3.3 M using a difference technique. The temperature dependence of the spectral profiles observed for the O-H stretching in the high frequency region (between 2500 and 4000 cm -1) was also investigated in the narrow interval around a room temperature. Although the considered bandshape is not of a simple kind, the measured Id/ I0 ratio plotted versus NaCl concentration and temperature fits a straight line in both diagrams very satisfactorily. The linear dependence of Id/ I0 versus NaCl molarity was checked in the study of natural seawater samples for which discrepancies were found. These deviations were attributed to other organic and inorganic dissolved components in the seawater.

  5. Alloy 22 Localized Corrosion Susceptibility In Aqueous Solutions Of Chloride And Nitrate Salts Of Sodium And Potassium At 110 - 150?C

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, S; Hailey, P D; Lian, T; Staggs, K J; Gdowski, G E

    2006-01-17

    Alloy 22 (a nickel-chromium-molybdenum-tungsten alloy) is being investigated for use as the outer barrier of waste containers for a high-level nuclear waste repository in the thick unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Experiments were conducted to assess crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 in de-aerated aqueous solutions of chloride and nitrate salts of potassium and sodium in the temperature range 110-150 C (some limited testing was also conducted at 90 C). Electrochemical tests were run in neutral salt solutions without acid addition and others were run in salt solutions with an initial hydrogen ion concentration of 10{sup -4} molal. The Alloy 22 specimens were weld prism specimens and de-aeration was performed with nitrogen gas. No evidence of crevice corrosion was observed in the range 125-150 C. In the 120 to 160 C temperature range, the anionic concentration of stable aqueous solutions is dominated by nitrate relative to chloride. At nominally 120 C, the minimum nitrate to chloride ratio is about 4.5, and it increases to about 22 at nominally 155 C. The absence of localized corrosion susceptibility in these solutions is attributed to the known inhibiting effect of the nitrate anion. At 110 C, aqueous solutions can have dissolved chloride in excess of nitrate. Localized corrosion was observed at nitrate to chloride ratios up to 1.0, the highest ratio tested. The extent of localized corrosion was confined to the crevice region of the samples, and was limited for nitrate to chloride ratios greater than or equal to 0.3. Aqueous solution chemistry studies indicate that nitrate to chloride ratios of less than 0.5 are possible for temperatures up to nominally 116 C. However, the exact upper temperature limit is unknown and no electrochemical testing was done at these temperatures. Limited comparison between 8 m Cl aqueous solutions of Na + K on the one hand and Ca on the other indicated similar electrochemical E{sub crit} values and similar morphology of attack

  6. Transmittance of distilled water and sodium-chloride-water solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kanayama, K.; Baba, H.

    1988-05-01

    The spectral transmittance of pure water and salt water solutions of various concentrations, which are important for the thermal calculation of a solar pond, is measured experimentally for specimen thickness of 1 to 100 mm by means of an autorecording spectro-radiometer inside an air-conditioned room. On the basis of the measured spectral transmittance, the total transmittance of pure and salty waters to 3 m of water depth is calculated as a ratio of the total radiation energy over all wavelengths arriving at any depth from the water surface of the solar pond to the solar radiation incident upon the water surface with various air masses. According to Nielsens' four-partition method, the effective absorption coefficient is calculated for each wavelength band. Lastly, the transmission properties obtained for pure water, i.e., spectral and total transmittances, absorption wavelength band, and effective absorption coefficient, are compared with past results, and those for salty water with various concentrations are compiled as basic data for the use of solar energy by a solar pond.

  7. Stepwise aggregation of dimethyl-di-n-octylammonium chloride in aqueous solutions: from dimers to vesicles.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Loïc; Nardello-Rataj, Véronique; Turmine, Mireille; Azaroual, Nathalie; Aubry, Jean-Marie

    2010-02-01

    The self-aggregation of dimethyl-di-n-octylammonium chloride, in diluted aqueous solutions, was studied with various experimental and theoretical techniques: zetametry, conductimetry, dimethyl-di-n-octylammonium and chloride-selective electrodes, tensiometry, NMR spectroscopy ((1)H and DOSY), and molecular modeling (PM3 and molecular dynamic). The combination of the data obtained by these techniques led us to propose a stepwise aggregation process with increasing concentration: dimers (0.2-10 mM), bilayers (10-30 mM), and finally vesicles (>30 mM).

  8. Chemical and physical compatibility of an intravenous solution of epinephrine with calcium chloride.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Phillip A; Teng, Yang; Wu, Lei; Sun, Mary; Yang, Zhen; Chow, Diana S-L

    2014-01-01

    An infusion of epinephrine combined with calcium chloride has been used historically as an intravenous inotropic solution to support critically ill heart failure patients with severe cardiogenic shock. There is no reliable data on the stability of this solution beyond three hours. This study was conducted to evaluate the chemical and physical compatibility of epinephrine (0.032 mg/mL) combined with calcium chloride (4 mg/mL) in a solution for intravenous administration up to 26 hours at room temperature. The chemical stability of epinephrine was monitored by measuring epinephrine concentrations using high-performance liquid chromatography. The physical compatibility of the mixture was determined by measuring spectrophotometric absorbance between 400 to 700 nm. Absorbance greater than 0.010 AU was considered an indicator of the presence of precipitation. The results showed epinephrine with calcium chloride was stable together in normal saline up to 26 hours at room temperature, irrespective of exposure to light. The absorbance of epinephrine throughout the study was less than 0.010 AU, indicating no significant precipitation. Conclusions indicate that epinephrine (0.032 mg/mL) combined with calcium chloride (4 mg/mL) in normal saline at room temperature is acceptably stable up to 26 hours for intravenous administration.

  9. Stability of tranexamic acid in 0.9% sodium chloride, stored in type 1 glass vials and ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Susan V; Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D; Jenkins, Donald A; Zietlow, Scott P; Berns, Kathleen S; Park, Myung S

    2014-01-01

    Tranexamic acid has recently been demonstrated to decrease all-cause mortality and deaths due to hemorrhage in trauma patients. The optimal administration of tranexamic acid is within one hour of injury, but not more than three hours from the time of injury. To aid with timely administration, a premixed solution of 1 gram tranexamic acid and 0.9% sodium chloride was proposed to be stocked as a medication in both the aeromedical transport helicopters and Emergency Department at Mayo Clinic Hospital--Rochester Saint Marys Campus. Since no published stability data exists for tranexamic acid diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride, this study was undertaken to determine the stability of tranexamic acid diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride while being stored in two types of containers. Stability was determined through the use of a stability-indicating high-performance liquid reverse phase chromatography assay, pH, and visual tests. Tranexamic acid solutions of 1 gram in 0.9% sodium chloride 65 mL were studied at predetermined intervals for 90 days in ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers, protected from light, and at both controlled room and refrigerated temperatures. Tranexamic acid solutions of 1 gram in 0.9% sodium chloride 50 mL were studied at predetermined intervals for 180 days in clear Type 1 borosilicate glass vials sealed with intact elastomeric, Flourotec-coated stoppers, stored protected from light at controlled room temperature. Solutions stored in the ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers at both storage temperatures maintained at least 98% of initial potency throughout the 90-day study period. Solutions stored in glass vials at controlled room temperature maintained at least 92% of initial potency throughout the 180-day study period. Visual and pH tests revealed stable, clear, colorless, and particulate-free solutions throughout the respective study periods.

  10. Mixed solutions of silver cation and chloride anion in acetonitrile: voltammetric and EQCM study.

    PubMed

    Skompska, Magdalena; Vorotyntsev, Mikhail A; Rajchowska, Aleksandra; Levin, Oleg V

    2010-09-21

    Electrochemical behavior of Pt and Au electrodes in acetonitrile solutions at different concentration ratios of Cl(-) and Ag(+) ions was studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM). The composition of the mixed silver chloride solutions, i.e. the amount of each component of the system (solid AgCl and solute species: Ag(+), Cl(-), AgCl(2)(-)), is governed by the solubility product of AgCl and the stability constant of AgCl(2)(-)complex and depends strongly on the ratio of the total concentrations of chloride and silver ions. In this work we analyze in detail the influence of the Cl(-)/Ag(+) concentration ratio on the value of equilibrium electrode potential and the shape of cyclic voltammograms. We explain the complicated shapes of the experimental curves observed at different concentration ranges, propose the mechanisms of the processes occurring at the electrode and substantiate them by EQCM data.

  11. Extraction of steroidal glucosiduronic acids from aqueous solutions by anionic liquid ion-exchangers

    PubMed Central

    Mattox, Vernon R.; Litwiller, Robert D.; Goodrich, June E.

    1972-01-01

    A pilot study on the extraction of three steroidal glucosiduronic acids from water into organic solutions of liquid ion-exchangers is reported. A single extraction of a 0.5mm aqueous solution of either 11-deoxycorticosterone 21-glucosiduronic acid or cortisone 21-glucosiduronic acid with 0.1m-tetraheptylammonium chloride in chloroform took more than 99% of the conjugate into the organic phase; under the same conditions, the very polar conjugate, β-cortol 3-glucosiduronic acid, was extracted to the extent of 43%. The presence of a small amount of chloride, acetate, or sulphate ion in the aqueous phase inhibited extraction, but making the aqueous phase 4.0m with ammonium sulphate promoted extraction strongly. An increase in the concentration of ion-exchanger in the organic phase also promoted extraction. The amount of cortisone 21-glucosiduronic acid extracted by tetraheptylammonium chloride over the pH range of 3.9 to 10.7 was essentially constant. Chloroform solutions of a tertiary, a secondary, or a primary amine hydrochloride also will extract cortisone 21-glucosiduronic acid from water. The various liquid ion exchangers will extract steroidal glucosiduronic acid methyl esters from water into chloroform, although less completely than the corresponding free acids. The extraction of the glucosiduronic acids from water by tetraheptylammonium chloride occurs by an ion-exchange process; extraction of the esters does not involve ion exchange. PMID:5075264

  12. ELECTROLYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Alter, H.W.; Barney, D.L.

    1958-09-30

    A process is presented for the treatment of radioactivc waste nitric acid solutions. The nitric acid solution is neutralized with an alkali metal hydroxide in an amount sufficient to precipitate insoluble hydroxides, and after separation of the precipitate the solution is electrolyzed to convert the alkali nitrate formed, to alkali hydroxide, gaseous ammonla and oxygen. The solution is then reusable after reducing the volume by evaporating the water and dissolved ammonia.

  13. Nitric acid recovery from waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A. S.

    1959-04-14

    The recovery of nitric acid from aqueous nitrate solutions containing fission products as impurities is described. It is desirable to subject such solutions to concentration by evaporation since nitric acid is regenerated thereby. A difficulty, however, is that the highly radioactive fission product ruthenium is volatilized together with the nitric acid. It has been found that by adding nitrous acid, ruthenium volatilization is suppressed and reduced to a negligible degree so that the distillate obtained is practically free of ruthenium.

  14. Crevice Corrosion Susceptibility of Alloy 22 in Fluoride and Chloride Containing Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Rebak, R B

    2004-11-22

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is highly resistant to crevice corrosion in pure chloride (Cl{sup -}) solutions. Little research has been conducted to explore the resistance of this alloy to other halides such as fluoride (F{sup -}) and bromide (Br{sup -}). Even less information is available exploring the behavior of localized corrosion for Alloy 22 in mixtures of the halide ions. Standard electrochemical tests such as polarization resistance and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP), were conducted to explore the resistance to corrosion of Alloy 22 in deaerated aqueous solutions of 1 M NaCl, 1 M NaF and 0.5 M NaCl + 0.5 M NaF solutions at 60 C and 90 C. Results show that the general corrosion rate was the lowest in the mixed halide solution and the highest in the pure chloride solution. Alloy 22 was not susceptible to localized corrosion in the pure fluoride solution. In 1 M NaCl solution, Alloy 22 was susceptible to crevice corrosion at 90 C. In the mixed halide solution Alloy 22 was susceptible to crevice corrosion both at 60 C and 90 C.

  15. Electrochemical Behavior of Nano-grained Pure Copper in Dilute Alkaline Solution with Chloride Ion Trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Imantalab, Omid; Attarzadeh, Farid Reza

    2016-10-01

    Effect of nano-grained structure on the interface behavior of pure copper in 0.01M KOH solution with chloride ion trace is investigated by various electrochemical techniques. Nano-grained structure was achieved by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) technique. Before any electrochemical measurements, microstructure was evaluated by means of optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM observations showed that nano-grains (with an average size of below 100 nm) appeared after eight passes of ARB. Polarization curves revealed that increasing chloride ion concentration leads to a decrease in the corrosion and pitting potentials of both annealed and nano-grained pure copper samples. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that chloride ion trace lowers passive film resistance and charge-transfer resistance in both annealed and nano-grained samples. Mott-Schottky analysis showed that the surface films formed on annealed and nano-grained samples in KOH solution with and without NaCl addition are of p-type semiconducting behavior. Moreover, this analysis showed that the acceptor density increases by increasing chloride ion concentration.

  16. Electrochemical Behavior of Nano-grained Pure Copper in Dilute Alkaline Solution with Chloride Ion Trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Imantalab, Omid; Attarzadeh, Farid Reza

    2016-08-01

    Effect of nano-grained structure on the interface behavior of pure copper in 0.01M KOH solution with chloride ion trace is investigated by various electrochemical techniques. Nano-grained structure was achieved by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) technique. Before any electrochemical measurements, microstructure was evaluated by means of optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM observations showed that nano-grains (with an average size of below 100 nm) appeared after eight passes of ARB. Polarization curves revealed that increasing chloride ion concentration leads to a decrease in the corrosion and pitting potentials of both annealed and nano-grained pure copper samples. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that chloride ion trace lowers passive film resistance and charge-transfer resistance in both annealed and nano-grained samples. Mott-Schottky analysis showed that the surface films formed on annealed and nano-grained samples in KOH solution with and without NaCl addition are of p-type semiconducting behavior. Moreover, this analysis showed that the acceptor density increases by increasing chloride ion concentration.

  17. Desorption of CO2 from low concentration monoethanolamine solutions using calcium chloride and ultrasound irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kosuke; Okawa, Hirokazu; Fujiwara, Tatsuo; Kato, Takahiro; Sugawara, Katsuyasu

    2015-07-01

    We developed an effective method for desorbing CO2 from low-concentration (0.2 mol/l) monoethanolamine (MEA) solutions using calcium chloride (CaCl2) and ultrasound irradiation at 25 °C. The proportion of CO2 desorbed from the MEA solution was calculated from the amount of CaCO3 generated and the amount of CO2 emitted. The proportion of CO2 desorbed from the MEA solution was much higher when CaCl2 was added than when CaCl2 was not added. We also characterized the CaCO3 that was generated when the solution was treated with ultrasound irradiation and when the solution was stirred. The CaCO3 particles produced were more homogeneous and smaller when ultrasound irradiation was applied than when the solution was stirred.

  18. Ion-exchange extraction of platinum(II,IV) from chloride solutions in the presence of iron(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononova, O. N.; Duba, E. V.; Karplyakova, N. S.; Krylov, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    The sorption concentration of platinum(II,IV) in the presence of iron(III) is studied on new samples of domestically produced ionites of the CYBBER brand. In comparing the sorption and kinetic properties of the new ionites to those of sorbents of the Purolite brand studied earlier, the higher effectiveness of the former is demonstrated via the extraction of platinum(II,IV) ions from strongly and weakly acidic chloride solutions. It is found that the sorbed platinum ions can be completely separated from iron(III) ions through separate elution using 0.01-0.001 M HCl (iron ions) and a thiourea solution (80 g/L) in 0.3 M H2SO4 (platinum ions).

  19. Hydrochloric acid aerosol formation by the interaction of hydrogen chloride with humid air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhein, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions in which hydrochloric acid aerosol is predicted by the interaction of hydrogen chloride gas with the water vapor in humid air are analyzed. The liquid gas phase equilibrium for the HCL-H2O system is expressed in terms of relative humidity and hydrogen chloride concentration as parts per million, units commonly used in pollution studies. Presented are the concentration (wt %) of HC1 in the aerosol and the concentration of aerosol (ppm) predicted.

  20. Performance of cellulose acetate butyrate membranes in hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Leban, M.

    1973-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) membranes are shown to give high salt and urea rejection with water flux of about 3 gallons/sq ft per day at 600 psig. Membranes prepared from a formulation containing glyoxal show a significant increase in flux and decrease in salt and urea rejection with drying time. Zero drying time gives maximum urea and salt rejection and is therefore most suitable for hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution.

  1. Solution nonideality related to solute molecular characteristics of amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Keener, C R; Fullerton, G D; Cameron, I L; Xiong, J

    1995-01-01

    By measuring the freezing-point depression for dilute, aqueous solutions of all water-soluble amino acids, we test the hypothesis that nonideality in aqueous solutions is due to solute-induced water structuring near hydrophobic surfaces and solute-induced water destructuring in the dipolar electric fields generated by the solute. Nonideality is expressed with a single solute/solvent interaction parameter I, calculated from experimental measure of delta T. A related parameter, I(n), gives a method of directly relating solute characteristics to solute-induced water structuring or destructuring. I(n)-values correlate directly with hydrophobic surface area and inversely with dipolar strength. By comparing the nonideality of amino acids with progressively larger hydrophobic side chains, structuring is shown to increase with hydrophobic surface area at a rate of one perturbed water molecule per 8.8 square angstroms, implying monolayer coverage. Destructuring is attributed to dielectric realignment as described by the Debye-Hückel theory, but with a constant separation of charges in the amino-carboxyl dipole. By using dimers and trimers of glycine and alanine, this destructuring is shown to increase with increasing dipole strength using increased separation of fixed dipolar charges. The capacity to predict nonideal solution behavior on the basis of amino acid characteristics will permit prediction of free energy of transfer to water, which may help predict the energetics of folding and unfolding of proteins based on the characteristics of constituent amino acids. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:7711253

  2. Primary stage of the reaction between ozone and chloride ions in aqueous solution: Can chloride ion oxidation by ozone proceed via electron transfer mechanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanov, A. V.; Antipenko, E. E.; Lunin, V. V.

    2012-04-01

    It is found that chloride-ion oxidation by ozone via electron transfer mechanism does not occur due to its extremely high endoergicity and negligibly low rate. It is concluded that all processes supposedly associated with this reaction, particularly ozone decomposition in sodium chloride solution initiated by Cl· atoms, do not take place either. It is shown that experimental data on the products and kinetic regularities of the interaction of O3 with Cl- contradict the assumption that the electron transfer reaction is its primary stage. In fact, chloride-ion oxidation by ozone proceeds via the mechanism of oxygen atom transfer. It is noted that in order to estimate the possibility of using an ozonated physiological saline in medicine, the formation of chloride-ion oxidation products and ozonation byproducts must be taken into account.

  3. Pitting of steam-generator tubing alloys in solutions containing thiosulfate and sulfate or chloride.

    PubMed

    Zhang, William; Carcea, Anatolie G; Newman, Roger C

    2015-01-01

    The pitting of nuclear steam generator tubing alloys 600, 690 and 800 was studied at 60 °C using dilute thiosulfate solutions containing excess sulfate or (for Alloy 600) chloride. A potentiostatic scratch method was used. In sulfate solutions, all alloys pitted at low potentials, reflecting their lack of protective Mo. The alloys demonstrated the most severe pitting at a sulfate : thiosulfate concentration ratio of ∼40. Alloy 600 pitted worst at a chloride : thiosulfate ratio of ∼2000. The results are interpreted through the mutual electromigration of differently charged anions into a pit nucleus, and differences in the major alloy component. PMID:25898311

  4. XAFS Studies of Ni Ta and Nb Chlorides in the Ionic Liquid 1-Ethyl-3-Methyl Imidazolium Chloride / Aluminum Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    W OGrady; D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek

    2011-12-31

    The structures of anhydrous nickel, niobium, and tantalum chlorides have been investigated in situ in acidic and basic ionic liquids (ILs) of 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (EMIC)/AlCl{sub 3} with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The coordination of NiCl{sub 2} changes from tetrahedral in basic solution to octahedral in acidic solution. The NiCl{sub 2} is a strong Lewis acid in that it can induce the AlCl{sub 3} to share its chlorides in the highly acidic IL, forming a structure with six near Cl{sup -} ions and eight further distant Al ions which share the chloride ions surrounding the Ni{sup 2+}. When Nb{sub 2}Cl{sub 10}, a dimer, is added to the acidic or basic solution, the dimer breaks apart and forms two species. In the acid solution, two trigonal bipyramids are formed with five equal chloride distances, while in the basic solution, a square pyramid with four chlorides forming a square base and one shorter axial chloride bond. Ta{sub 2}Cl{sub 10} is also a dimer and divides into half in the acidic solution and forms two trigonal bipyramids. In the basic solution, the dimer breaks apart but the species formed is sufficiently acidic that it attracts two additional chloride ions and forms a seven coordinated tantalum species.

  5. Human body frequency modulation by 0.9% sodium chloride solutions: a new paradigm and perspective for human health.

    PubMed

    Sudan, B J

    2000-08-01

    This case study demonstrates that the normal human body frequency, which can be disturbed by electromagnetic influences of the environment, can be modulated by 0.9% sodium chloride solutions (physiological saline) and that occurrence of allergic reactions have subsequently been suppressed as a result of this modulation. The use of distilled water as control showed no effect on occurrence of allergic reactions. Further observations on the growth of various plants in a greenhouse exposed to various geomagnetic fields support the previous observations on humans. The neutralization of electromagnetic influences on humans using 0.9% sodium chloride solution or by enclosure of plants within a copper wire Faraday cage resulting in a normal and uniform growth of plants as compared with disturbed and irregular growth in unenclosed controls, is demonstrated. These original observations propose a new strategy to suppress or prevent allergic reactions and possibly other effects observed in various human pathologies in relation to a disturbance of human body frequencies. It is hypothesized that the double helix structure of desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) could be modified by environmental electromagnetic fields and that disresonance between the two chains of DNA could lead to the expression of specific pathology. PMID:10904434

  6. Mechanism of chemical activation of sodium chloride in the presence of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Anja K K; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2015-01-01

    Sodium chloride has been shown to promote chlorination of glycerol during thermal processing. However, the detailed mechanism of this reaction is not well understood. Preliminary experiments have indicated that the reaction mixture should contain an amino acid and it should be dissolved thoroughly in water in order to induce chlorination. These observations are consistent with the process of dissociation of sodium chloride and its re-association with amino acid and eventual formation of the chlorinating agent in the form of the hydrochloride salt. Release of HCl from this salt can be manifested in chlorination and hydrolytic reactions occurring during thermal processing. The generation of HCl at room temperature from a mixture of sodium chloride and glycine was confirmed through spectrophotometric monitoring of the pH. Hydrolytic and chlorination reactions were demonstrated through monitoring of formation of HMF and chlorinated products under pyrolytic conditions using glucose or sucrose and amino acid mixtures.

  7. Removal of sodium and chloride ions from aqueous solutions using fique fibers (Furcraea spp.).

    PubMed

    Agudelo, Nikolay; Hinestroza, Juan P; Husserl, Johana

    2016-01-01

    Fique fibers obtained from the leaves of Furcraea spp., a highly abundant plant in the mountains of South America, may offer an alternative as biosorbents in desalination processes as they exhibit high removal capacities (13.26 meq/g for chloride ions and 15.52 meq/g for sodium ions) up to four times higher than exchange capacities commonly observed in synthetic resins. The ion removal capacity of the fibers was also found to be a function of the pH of the solution with the maximum removal of ions obtained at pH 8. Unlike most commercial ion exchange resins, our results suggest that fique fibers allow simultaneous removal of chloride and sodium ions.

  8. Effects of solution pH and synthetic method on destabilization process of polytitanium-silicate-chloride.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Gao, Baoyu; Sun, Yangyang; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yan; Li, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Effect of solution pH on coagulation performance and flock properties of a novel inorganic polymer coagulant-polytitanium-silicate-chloride (PTSC) in humic acid-kaolin water treatment was investigated in this work. PTSC was synthesized by two approaches: composite and co-complexion, denoted as PTSCm and PTSCc respectively. The effect of the synthetic method was also considered. Results indicated that turbidity and DOM removal were improved by addition of polysilicic acid, especially under acidic condition. PTSCc achieved slightly better DOM removal than that of PTSCm. Flocks formed under acidic condition was smaller than those form under alkaline condition. In addition, flocks formed by PTSCc were larger than PTSCm flocks. Results also indicated that flock strength and recovery ability was slightly improved by the addition of PSiA. Moreover, under acidic condition, PTSC flocks had larger fractal dimension with more compact structure, especially for PTSCm flocks. In contrast, they were looser compared with PTC flock, especially for PTSCm flocks under neutral and alkaline conditions. PMID:26994354

  9. Superiority of experts over novices in trueness and precision of concentration estimation of sodium chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tomohiro; Wada, Yuji; Okamoto, Masako; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Yui; Kimura, Atsushi; Kobayakawa, Tatsu; Kawai, Takayuki; Dan, Ippeita; Hayakawa, Fumiyo

    2013-03-01

    Several studies have reported that experts outperform novices in specific domains. However, the superiority of experts in accuracy, taking both trueness and precision into consideration, has not yet been explored. Here, we examined differences between expert and novice performances by evaluating the accuracy of their estimations of physical concentrations of sodium chloride in solutions while employing a visual analog scale. In Experiment 1, 14 experts and 13 novices tasted 6 concentrations of the solutions until they had learned their intensities. Subsequently, they repeatedly rated the concentration of 3 other solutions in random order. Although we did not find a difference between the performances of the 2 groups in trueness (difference between rating and correct concentration), the precision (consistency of ratings for each participant) of experts was higher than that of novices. In Experiment 2, 13 experts who had participated in Experiment 1 and 10 experts and 12 novices who had not participated in Experiment 1 rated the salt concentration in sodium chloride/sucrose mixtures in the same way as in Experiment 1. Both trueness and precision of performance were higher in both expert groups than in the novice group. By introducing precision and trueness parameters, we succeeded in quantifying the estimations of experts and novices in rating the concentration of solutions, revealing experts' superiority even for a task they had not been trained for.

  10. Statics of uranium adsorption from chloride-fluoride solutions by aminocarboxylic polyampholytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pakholkov, V.S.; Denisova, L.A.; Rychkov, V.N.

    1988-03-01

    The adsorption of uranium from UO/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ solutions containing HCl, NH/sub 4/Cl, and HF using polyampholytes ANCB-1, ANCB-7, and ANCB-10, which were synthesized from the corresponding anion-exchange resins AN-31, AV-16D, and AN-61, has been investigated under static conditions. For pure chloride solutions, in a moderate HCl (or NH/sub 4/Cl) concentration range, adsorption occurs via a cation exchange mechanism. Anionic exchange is the main adsorption process for chloride-fluoride solutions containing HCl concentrations up to 2 M. These conclusions have been verified by IR spectroscopic data. The experimental results obtained for mixed chloride-fluoride solutions can be approximated using the following regression equations: (A/sub (0-3)/ = -0.83 + 0.13C/sub HF/ + 0.18C/sub HCl/ + 40.7C/sub U/ + 0.22C/sub HF/ x C/sub HCl/ - 10C/sub HCl/ x C/sub U/ + 30C/sub HF/ x C/sub U/ - 20C/sub HF/ x C/sub HCl/ x C/sub U/ (for the concentration range of HCl from 0 to 3.0 M); and A/sub (3-6)/ = -0.81 + 0.135C/sub HCl/ + 22C/sub U/ (for the HCl concentration range from 3.0 to 6.0 M). The variable A in these equations stands for the adsorptivity in mmole U/g.

  11. Acidic species and chloride depletion in coarse aerosol particles in the US east coast.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunliang; Gao, Yuan

    2008-12-15

    To investigate the interactions of water-soluble acidic species associated with coarse mode aerosol particles (1.8-10 microm) and chlorine depletion, ten sets of size-segregated aerosol samples were collected by a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) in Newark, New Jersey on the U.S. east coast. The samples were grouped into two categories according to the air-mass back trajectories and mass ratios of sodium to magnesium and calcium: Group I was primarily impacted by marine air mass and Group II was dominated by the continental air mass. In Group I, the concentrations of coarse mode nitrate and chloride depletion showed a strong correlation (R2=0.88). Without considering other cations, nitrate was found to account for all of the chloride depletion in coarse particles for most samples. The association of coarse mode nitrate with sea-salt particles is favored when the mass ratio of sodium to calcium is approximately equal to or greater than unity. Excess sulfate accounts for a maximum of 33% of chloride depletion in the coarse particles. Regarding chloride depletion in the different particle sizes, excess nitrate and sulfate account for 89% of the chloride depletion in the particle size range of 1.8-3.2 microm in the sample from July 13-14; all of the determined dicarboxylic acids and mono-carboxylic acids cannot compensate for the rest of the chloride depletion. In Group II, high percentages of chloride depletion were not observed. With nitrate being dominant in chlorine depletion observed at this location, N-containing species from pollution emissions may have profound impact on atmospheric composition through altering chlorine chemistry in this region. PMID:18973925

  12. Bipolar membrane electrodialysis for generation of hydrochloric acid and ammonia from simulated ammonium chloride wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya; Shi, Shaoyuan; Cao, Hongbin; Wu, Xinmin; Zhao, Zhijuan; Wang, Liying

    2016-02-01

    Simulated ammonium chloride wastewater was treated by a lab-scale bipolar membrane electrodialysis for the generation of HCl and NH3·H2O and desalination. The influence of initial concentration of NH4Cl, current density, salt solution volume, initial concentration of acid and base and membrane stack structure on the yields of HCl and NH3·H2O was investigated. The current efficiency and energy consumption were also examined under different conditions. The results showed that, at the current density of 48 mA/cm(2), the highest concentration of HCl and NH3·H2O with initial concentration of 110 g/L NH4Cl was 57.67 g/L and 45.85 g/L, respectively. Higher initial concentration of NH4Cl was favor to reduce unit energy consumption and increase current efficiency of the BMED system. The membrane stack voltage of BMED increased quickly under constant current when the concentration of NH4Cl contained in the solution of salt compartment was depleted below the "inflection point concentration" about 8000 mg/L. It means that the concentration of NH4Cl below 8000 mg/L was no longer suitable for BMED because of higher energy consumption. The HCl and NH3·H2O concentration increased more quickly following the increase of current density. When increasing the volume of NH4Cl, the concentration of HCl and NH3·H2O also increased. The high initial concentration of acid and base could improve the final concentration of them, while the growth rate was decreased. Compared with the BMED system with three compartments, the growth rate of HCl concentration with the two compartments was higher and its unit energy consumption was lower. It meant that the performance of the BMED system could be improved by optimizing operation conditions. The application feasibility of the generation of HCl and NH3·H2O and desalination of ammonium chloride wastewater by BMED was proved. PMID:26674548

  13. Bipolar membrane electrodialysis for generation of hydrochloric acid and ammonia from simulated ammonium chloride wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya; Shi, Shaoyuan; Cao, Hongbin; Wu, Xinmin; Zhao, Zhijuan; Wang, Liying

    2016-02-01

    Simulated ammonium chloride wastewater was treated by a lab-scale bipolar membrane electrodialysis for the generation of HCl and NH3·H2O and desalination. The influence of initial concentration of NH4Cl, current density, salt solution volume, initial concentration of acid and base and membrane stack structure on the yields of HCl and NH3·H2O was investigated. The current efficiency and energy consumption were also examined under different conditions. The results showed that, at the current density of 48 mA/cm(2), the highest concentration of HCl and NH3·H2O with initial concentration of 110 g/L NH4Cl was 57.67 g/L and 45.85 g/L, respectively. Higher initial concentration of NH4Cl was favor to reduce unit energy consumption and increase current efficiency of the BMED system. The membrane stack voltage of BMED increased quickly under constant current when the concentration of NH4Cl contained in the solution of salt compartment was depleted below the "inflection point concentration" about 8000 mg/L. It means that the concentration of NH4Cl below 8000 mg/L was no longer suitable for BMED because of higher energy consumption. The HCl and NH3·H2O concentration increased more quickly following the increase of current density. When increasing the volume of NH4Cl, the concentration of HCl and NH3·H2O also increased. The high initial concentration of acid and base could improve the final concentration of them, while the growth rate was decreased. Compared with the BMED system with three compartments, the growth rate of HCl concentration with the two compartments was higher and its unit energy consumption was lower. It meant that the performance of the BMED system could be improved by optimizing operation conditions. The application feasibility of the generation of HCl and NH3·H2O and desalination of ammonium chloride wastewater by BMED was proved.

  14. The phosphine oxides Cyanex 921 and Cyanex 923 as carriers for facilitated transport of chromium (VI)-chloride aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Alguacil, Francisco José; López-Delgado, Aurora; Alonso, Manuel; Sastre, Ana Maria

    2004-11-01

    The behaviour of the phosphine oxides Cyanex 921 and Cyanex 923 in the facilitated transport of chromium (VI) from chloride solutions is described. Transport is studied as a function of several variables such as stirring speeds of the aqueous phases, membrane phase diluent, hydrochloric acid concentration in the source phase and chromium and carrier concentrations. The separation of chromium (VI) from other metals presented in the source phase as well as the behaviour of phosphine oxides with respect to other neutral organophosphorous derivatives (tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) and dibutyl butylphosphonate (DBBP)) are also investigated. Moreover, by using hydrazine sulphate in the receiving phase, Cr(VI) is immediately reduced to the less toxic Cr(III).

  15. Low-frequency dynamics of aqueous alkali chloride solutions as probed by terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kann, Z. R.; Skinner, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Terahertz (far infrared) spectroscopy provides a useful tool for probing both ionic motions in solution and the effect of ionic solutes on the dynamics of the solvent. In this study, we calculate terahertz spectra of aqueous alkali chloride solutions using classical but novel (the water model includes three-body interactions, the ion parameterization is non-standard, and the dipole surface is polarizable) molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated spectra compare reasonably well to experimental spectra. Decomposition of the calculated spectra is used to gain a deeper understanding of the physical phenomena underlying the spectra and the connection to, for instance, the vibrational density of states for the ions. The decomposed results are also used to explain many of the cation-dependent trends observed in the experimental spectra.

  16. Low-frequency dynamics of aqueous alkali chloride solutions as probed by terahertz spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kann, Z R; Skinner, J L

    2016-06-21

    Terahertz (far infrared) spectroscopy provides a useful tool for probing both ionic motions in solution and the effect of ionic solutes on the dynamics of the solvent. In this study, we calculate terahertz spectra of aqueous alkali chloride solutions using classical but novel (the water model includes three-body interactions, the ion parameterization is non-standard, and the dipole surface is polarizable) molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated spectra compare reasonably well to experimental spectra. Decomposition of the calculated spectra is used to gain a deeper understanding of the physical phenomena underlying the spectra and the connection to, for instance, the vibrational density of states for the ions. The decomposed results are also used to explain many of the cation-dependent trends observed in the experimental spectra. PMID:27334173

  17. Hydrophobic collapse of foldamer capsules drives picomolar-level chloride binding in aqueous acetonitrile solutions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yuran; Liu, Yun; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Flood, Amar H

    2013-09-25

    Aqueous media are competitive environments in which to perform host-guest chemistry, particularly when the guest is highly charged. While hydrophobic binding is a recognized approach to this challenge in which apolar pockets can be designed to recognize apolar guests in water, complementary strategies are required for hydrophilic anions like chloride. Here, we present evidence of such an alternative mechanism, used everyday by proteins yet rare for artificial receptors, wherein hydrophobic interactions are shown to be responsible for organizing and stabilizing an aryl-triazole foldamer to help extract hydrophilic chloride ions from increasingly aqueous solutions. Therein, a double-helical complex gains stability upon burial of ∼80% of the π surfaces that simultaneously creates a potent, solvent-excluding microenvironment for hydrogen bonding. The chloride's overall affinity to the duplex is substantial in 25% water v/v in acetonitrile (log β2 = 12.6), and it remains strong (log β2 = 13.0) as the water content is increased to 50%. With the rise in predictable designs of abiological foldamers, this water-assisted strategy can, in principle, be utilized for binding other hydrophilic guests.

  18. Comparison of Sodium Chloride Tablets-Induced, Sodium Chloride Solution-Induced, and Glycerol-Induced Hyperhydration on Fluid Balance Responses in Healthy Men.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Félix A; Asselin, Audrey; Goulet, Eric D B

    2016-10-01

    Savoie, FA, Asselin, A, and Goulet, EDB. Comparison of sodium chloride tablets-induced, sodium chloride solution-induced, and glycerol-induced hyperhydration on fluid balance responses in healthy men. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2880-2891, 2016-Sodium chloride solution-induced hyperhydration (NaCl-SolIH) is a powerful strategy to increase body water before exercise. However, NaCl-SolIH is associated with an unpleasant salty taste, potentially dissuading some athletes from using it and coaches from recommending it. Therefore, we evaluated the hyperhydrating potential of sodium chloride tablets-induced hyperhydration (NaCl-TabIH), which bypasses the palatability issue of NaCl-SolIH without sacrificing sodium chloride content, and compared it to NaCl-SolIH and glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH). Sixteen healthy males (age: 21 ± 2 years; fat-free mass (FFM): 65 ± 6 kg) underwent three, 3-hour long passive hyperhydration protocols during which they drank, over the first 60 minutes, 30-ml·kg FFM of an artificially sweetened solution. During NaCl-TabIH, participants swallowed 7.5, 1 g each, sodium chloride tablets with every liter of solution. During NaCl-SolIH, an equal quantity of sodium chloride tablets was dissolved in each liter of solution. With GIH, the glycerol concentration was 46.7 g·L. Urine production, fluid retention, hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma volume, and perceptual variables were monitored throughout the trials. Total fluid intake was 1948 ± 182 ml. After 3 hour, there were no significant differences among treatments for hemoglobin, hematocrit, and plasma volume changes. Fluid retention was significantly greater with NaCl-SolIH (1150 ± 287 ml) than NaCl-TabIH (905 ± 340 ml) or GIH (800 ± 211 ml), with no difference between NaCl-TabIH and GIH. No differences were found among treatments for perceptual variables. NaCl-TabIH and GIH are equally effective, but inferior than NaCl-SolIH. NaCl-TabIH represents an alternative to hyperhydration induced

  19. Comparison of Sodium Chloride Tablets-Induced, Sodium Chloride Solution-Induced, and Glycerol-Induced Hyperhydration on Fluid Balance Responses in Healthy Men.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Félix A; Asselin, Audrey; Goulet, Eric D B

    2016-10-01

    Savoie, FA, Asselin, A, and Goulet, EDB. Comparison of sodium chloride tablets-induced, sodium chloride solution-induced, and glycerol-induced hyperhydration on fluid balance responses in healthy men. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2880-2891, 2016-Sodium chloride solution-induced hyperhydration (NaCl-SolIH) is a powerful strategy to increase body water before exercise. However, NaCl-SolIH is associated with an unpleasant salty taste, potentially dissuading some athletes from using it and coaches from recommending it. Therefore, we evaluated the hyperhydrating potential of sodium chloride tablets-induced hyperhydration (NaCl-TabIH), which bypasses the palatability issue of NaCl-SolIH without sacrificing sodium chloride content, and compared it to NaCl-SolIH and glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH). Sixteen healthy males (age: 21 ± 2 years; fat-free mass (FFM): 65 ± 6 kg) underwent three, 3-hour long passive hyperhydration protocols during which they drank, over the first 60 minutes, 30-ml·kg FFM of an artificially sweetened solution. During NaCl-TabIH, participants swallowed 7.5, 1 g each, sodium chloride tablets with every liter of solution. During NaCl-SolIH, an equal quantity of sodium chloride tablets was dissolved in each liter of solution. With GIH, the glycerol concentration was 46.7 g·L. Urine production, fluid retention, hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma volume, and perceptual variables were monitored throughout the trials. Total fluid intake was 1948 ± 182 ml. After 3 hour, there were no significant differences among treatments for hemoglobin, hematocrit, and plasma volume changes. Fluid retention was significantly greater with NaCl-SolIH (1150 ± 287 ml) than NaCl-TabIH (905 ± 340 ml) or GIH (800 ± 211 ml), with no difference between NaCl-TabIH and GIH. No differences were found among treatments for perceptual variables. NaCl-TabIH and GIH are equally effective, but inferior than NaCl-SolIH. NaCl-TabIH represents an alternative to hyperhydration induced

  20. Spectrophotometric techniques to determine tranexamic acid: Kinetic studies using ninhydrin and direct measuring using ferric chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arayne, M. Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Siddiqui, Farhan Ahmed; Mirza, Agha Zeeshan; Zuberi, M. Hashim

    2008-11-01

    Two simple and sensitive spectrophotometric methods in ultraviolet and visible region are described for the determination of tranexamic acid in pure form and pharmaceutical preparations. The first method is based on the reaction of the drug with ninhydrin at boiling temperature and by measuring the increase in absorbance at 575 nm as a function of time. The initial rate, rate constant and fixed time (120 min) procedures were used for constructing the calibration graphs to determine the concentration of the drug, which showed a linear response over the concentration range 16-37 μg mL -1 with correlation coefficient " r" 0.9997, 0.996, 0.9999, LOQ 6.968, 7.138, 2.462 μgmL -1 and LOD 2.090, 2.141 and 0.739 μgmL -1, respectively. In second method tranexamic acid was reacted with ferric chloride solution, yellowish orange colored chromogen showed λ max at 375 nm showing linearity in the concentration range of 50-800 μg mL -1 with correlation coefficient " r" 0.9997, LOQ 6.227 μgmL -1 and LOD 1.868 μgmL -1. The variables affecting the development of the color were optimized and the developed methods were validated statistically and through recovery studies. These results were also verified by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The proposed methods have been successfully applied to the determination of tranexamic acid in commercial pharmaceutical formulation.

  1. Humic acids as electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial oxidation of vinyl chloride and dichloroethene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride and [1,2- 14C]dichloroethene to 14CO2 under humic acid-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that waterborne contaminants can be oxidized by using humic acid compounds as electron acceptors and suggest that natural aquatic systems have a much larger capacity for contaminant oxidation than previously thought.

  2. Corrosion inhibitors in concrete. Part II: Effect on chloride threshold values for corrosion of steel in synthetic pore solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mammoliti, L.; Hansson, C.M.; Hope, B.B.

    1999-10-01

    The effectiveness of four commercially available corrosion inhibitors for use in cement-based materials was assessed in synthetic concrete pore solution containing chlorides. The effect of the surface topography of the sample and the composition of the pore solution was also assessed. Although in a parallel study the inhibitors were observed to delay the onset of corrosion, in these tests in pore solution they were found to be ineffective in increasing the chloride threshold value of reinforcing steel exposed to chlorides and had little influence on the progression of corrosion once initiated. This suggests that chemical reactions within the cement phase are responsible for the observed results. Metallographically polished samples proved the most resistant to corrosion regardless of electrolyte composition and samples with all surface finishes exhibited lower resistance in solutions containing only calcium hydroxide than in the higher pH synthetic concrete pore solutions.

  3. Influence of sodium chloride, pH, and lactic acid bacteria on anaerobic lactic acid utilization during fermented cucumber spoilage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumbers are preserved commercially by natural fermentations in 5% to 8% sodium chloride (NaCl) brines. Occasionally, fermented cucumbers spoil after the primary fermentation is complete. This spoilage has been characterized by decreases in lactic acid and a rise in brine pH caused by microbial ins...

  4. Reference electrode for strong oxidizing acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Rigdon, Lester P.; Harrar, Jackson E.; Bullock, Sr., Jack C.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    1990-01-01

    A reference electrode for the measurement of the oxidation-reduction potentials of solutions is especially suitable for oxidizing solutions such as highly concentrated and fuming nitric acids, the solutions of nitrogen oxides, N.sub.2 O.sub.4 and N.sub.2 O.sub.5, in nitric acids. The reference electrode is fabricated of entirely inert materials, has a half cell of Pt/Ce(IV)/Ce(III)/70 wt. % HNO.sub.3, and includes a double-junction design with an intermediate solution of 70 wt. % HNO.sub.3. The liquid junctions are made from Corning No. 7930 glass for low resistance and negligible solution leakage.

  5. Equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration investigations of perchlorate removal from aqueous solution using poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride.

    PubMed

    Roach, Jim D; Tush, Daniel

    2008-02-01

    Use of perchlorate salts in military activities and the aerospace industry is widespread. These salts are highly water-soluble and are, to a large extent, kinetically inert as aqueous species. As a groundwater contaminant, perchlorate is now being detected in an increasing number of locations and is believed to interfere with the uptake of iodide by the thyroid, which can result in decreased hormone production. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has established a reference dose for perchlorate of 0.0007 mg/kg/day, which translates to a drinking water equivalent level of 24.5 ppb. This study investigated the application of polyelectrolyte-enhanced ultrafiltration (PEUF) for the selective removal of perchlorate from aqueous solution through equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration experiments. Using poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride, the effectiveness and efficiency of PEUF in the removal of perchlorate from other aqueous solution components was investigated by testing parameters such as polyelectrolyte concentration, pH, and ionic strength. Removal of perchlorate from synthetic groundwater initially containing 10.3 ppm perchlorate and also containing chloride, sulfate, and carbonate was also examined. Perchlorate separations of greater than 95% were achieved, even in the presence of 10-fold excesses of competing ions. PMID:17915279

  6. Molecular dynamics studies on the thermodynamics of supercooled sodium chloride aqueous solution at different concentrations.

    PubMed

    Corradini, D; Gallo, P; Rovere, M

    2010-07-21

    In this paper we compare recent results obtained by means of molecular dynamics computer simulations on the thermodynamics of TIP4P bulk water and on solutions of sodium chloride in TIP4P water. The concentrations studied are c = 0.67, 1.36 and 2.10 mol kg( - 1). The results are checked against change of water-salt potential and size effects. The systems are studied in a wide range of temperatures, going from ambient temperature to the supercooled region. Analysis of simulated state points, performed on the isochores and on the isotherm plane, allowed the determination of the limit of mechanical stability and of the temperature of maximum density lines. While the presence of ions in the system does not affect the limit of mechanical stability with respect to the bulk, it causes the temperature of the maximum density line to shift to lower pressure and temperature upon increasing concentration. The occurrence of minima in the trend of potential energy as a function of density and the inflections in the low temperature isotherms suggest the presence of liquid-liquid coexistence for bulk water and for the sodium chloride solutions at all concentrations studied.

  7. Morphological analysis of pits formed on Al 2024-T3 in chloride aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. W. J.; Bustamante, A. G.; Codaro, E. N.; Nakazato, R. Z.; Hein, L. R. O.

    2004-09-01

    It has been used a new image analysis method, based on segmentation by shape parameters, for pits morphology examination from Al 2024 aluminum-copper alloy in chloride aqueous solution. Corrosion behavior of this alloys in naturally aerated 3.5% NaCl solution has been investigated through open circuit potential measurements. Afterwards, pits have been characterized by image analysis taking density and size measurements right from corroded surfaces. Morphological investigation has been conducted for profiles, cut orthogonally from mean surface planes, and observed through light microscopy. Image analysis data could demonstrate that pits are wider than deep, evoluting for conical, quasi-conical or irregular shapes. Most pits have presented a quasi-conical morphology, but the wider ones have evoluted to an irregular shape influenced by sub-surface microstructure. Image analysis based on shape segmentation could enhance the differences on morphological behavior.

  8. ¹H NMR diffusion studies of water self-diffusion in supercooled aqueous sodium chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Garbacz, Piotr; Price, William S

    2014-05-01

    The physical properties of aqueous sodium chloride solutions have been studied theoretically, but so far no experimental diffusion data have been obtained under supercooled conditions. Here the results of (1)H NMR translational diffusion measurements of water in sodium chloride solutions in the temperature range 230 to 300 K and sodium chloride concentrations up to 4.2 mol/kg are presented. It was found that the diffusion data were well-described by the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher relationship with concentration-dependent parameters D0, B, and T0. The results indicate that under supercooled conditions the influence of sodium chloride on water diffusion is much smaller than predicted by molecular dynamics simulations.

  9. Current techniques in acid-chloride corrosion control and monitoring at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Hirtz, Paul; Buck, Cliff; Kunzman, Russell

    1991-01-01

    Acid chloride corrosion of geothermal well casings, production piping and power plant equipment has resulted in costly corrosion damage, frequent curtailments of power plants and the permanent shut-in of wells in certain areas of The Geysers. Techniques have been developed to mitigate these corrosion problems, allowing continued production of steam from high chloride wells with minimal impact on production and power generation facilities.The optimization of water and caustic steam scrubbing, steam/liquid separation and process fluid chemistry has led to effective and reliable corrosion mitigation systems currently in routine use at The Geysers. When properly operated, these systems can yield steam purities equal to or greater than those encountered in areas of The Geysers where chloride corrosion is not a problem. Developments in corrosion monitoring techniques, steam sampling and analytical methodologies for trace impurities, and computer modeling of the fluid chemistry has been instrumental in the success of this technology.

  10. Choline Chloride Catalyzed Amidation of Fatty Acid Ester to Monoethanolamide: A Green Approach.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pramod; Pratap, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Choline chloride catalyzed efficient method for amidation of fatty acid methyl ester to monoethanolamide respectively. This is a solvent free, ecofriendly, 100% chemo selective and economically viable path for alkanolamide synthesis. The Kinetics of amidation of methyl ester were studied and found to be first order with respect to the concentration of ethanolamine. The activation energy (Ea) for the amidation of lauric acid methyl ester catalyzed by choline chloride was found to be 50.20 KJ mol(-1). The 98% conversion of lauric acid monoethanolamide was obtained at 110°C in 1 h with 6% weight of catalyst and 1:1.5 molar ratio of methyl ester to ethanolamine under nitrogen atmosphere. PMID:26666271

  11. Ionic surfactant aggregates in saline solutions: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the presence of excess sodium chloride (NaCl) or calcium chloride (CaCl(2)).

    PubMed

    Sammalkorpi, Maria; Karttunen, Mikko; Haataja, Mikko

    2009-04-30

    The properties of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) aggregates in saline solutions of excess sodium chloride (NaCl) or calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) ions were studied through extensive molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent. We find that the ionic strength of the solution affects not only the aggregate size of the resulting anionic micelles but also their structure. Specifically, the presence of CaCl(2) induces more compact and densely packed micelles with a significant reduction in gauche defects in the SDS hydrocarbon chains in comparison with NaCl. Furthermore, we observe significantly more stable salt bridges between the charged SDS head groups mediated by Ca(2+) than Na(+). The presence of these salt bridges helps stabilize the more densely packed micelles.

  12. Rheological Behaviors of Polyacrylonitrile/1-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Chloride Concentrated Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weiwei; Cheng, Lingyan; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Huaping; Yu, Mingfang

    2007-01-01

    One of the room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl) was chosen to prepare the concentrated solutions of Polyacrylonitrile (PAN). The rheological behaviors of the solutions were measured with rotational rheometry under different conditions, including temperatures, concentration, and molecular weight of PAN. The solutions exhibited shear-thinning behaviors, similar to that of PAN/DMF solutions. The viscosities decreased with the increasing of shear rates. However, the viscosity decreased sharply at high shear rates when the concentration was up to 16wt%. The dependence of the viscosity on temperature was analyzed through the determination of the apparent activation energy. Unusually, the viscosity of solutions of higher concentration is lower than that of lower concentration. Similarly, the viscosity of low molecular weight PAN was higher than high molecular weight PAN at high shear rates. The dynamic rheological measurement indicates the loss modulus is much higher than storage modulus. The trend of complex viscosity is similar with the result of static rheological measurement. The interaction between PAN and ionic liquid [BMIM]Cl was discussed.

  13. Structure simulations for the 0.22 and 1 molar aqueous dimethylammonium chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Peter I

    2012-01-14

    Monte Carlo simulations have been performed for characterizing the 0.22 and 1 molar aqueous dimethylammonium chloride solutions at p = 1 atm and T = 310 K. On the basis of potential of mean force curves for the two systems with increasing concentrations, the N···N separations of about 8.7 and 7.5 Å correspond to a vague and a more pronounced minimum, respectively. Nitrogen separations at the minima are considerably smaller than those what the cations would take if the solutes comprised uniform local solute density on a microscale. The derived N by N coordination numbers predict non-negligible cation association and concomitant inhomogeneity for the studied systems. The calculated N···N distance distribution in the molar solution indicates that about 12% of the N···N separations are shorter than 8.5 Å compared with R(N···N) = 11.84 Å corresponding to the closest distance in a uniform cation local density. Despite a global minimum of -1.79 ± 0.63 kcal mol(-1) at N···Cl separation of 3.24 Å, obtained from the pmf for the 0.22 molar model, the N by Cl coordination number is only 0.14 in the first coordination shell, suggesting frequent disruption of an N-H(+)···Cl(+) hydrogen bond in a relatively dilute solution. The expression for the chemical potential of a solute includes a concentration-dependent activity coefficient, whose varying values are expected to reflect the different degrees of solute association in the 0.2-1 molar range. Theoretical follow-up of the changes in the activity coefficient values is difficult, thus calculation of the K(c) equilibrium constant has been proposed by considering 1 molar solutions as the standard state.

  14. [The influence of an isotonic solution containing benzalkonium chloride and a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium from the nasal cavity in vitro].

    PubMed

    Laberko, E L; Bogomil'sky, M R; Soldatsky, Yu L; Pogosova, I E

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of an isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride and of a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium in the nasal cavity in vitro. To this effect, we investigated the cytological material obtained from 35 children presenting with adenoid tissue hypertrophy. The tissue samples were taken from the nasal cavity by the standard method. A cellular biopsy obtained from each patient was distributed between three tubes that contained isotonic saline solution supplemented by benzalconium chloride (0.1 mg/ml), a hypertonic seawater solution, and a standard physiological saline solution. It was shown that the number of the viable cells in both isotonic solutions was statistically comparable and significantly higher than in the hypertonic solution (p<0.05). The ciliary beat frequency of the cells embedded in the two isotonic solutions was not significantly different but considerably exceeded that in the hypertonic seawater solution (p<0.05). Thus, the present study has demonstrated the absence of the ciliotoxic influence of isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride at a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml and the strong ciliotoxic effect of the hypertonic seawater solution. This finding gives reason to recommend isotonic solutions for the regular application whereas hypertonic solutions can be prescribed only during infectious and/or inflammatory ENT diseases. PMID:27213656

  15. [The influence of an isotonic solution containing benzalkonium chloride and a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium from the nasal cavity in vitro].

    PubMed

    Laberko, E L; Bogomil'sky, M R; Soldatsky, Yu L; Pogosova, I E

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of an isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride and of a hypertonic seawater solution on the function of ciliary epithelium in the nasal cavity in vitro. To this effect, we investigated the cytological material obtained from 35 children presenting with adenoid tissue hypertrophy. The tissue samples were taken from the nasal cavity by the standard method. A cellular biopsy obtained from each patient was distributed between three tubes that contained isotonic saline solution supplemented by benzalconium chloride (0.1 mg/ml), a hypertonic seawater solution, and a standard physiological saline solution. It was shown that the number of the viable cells in both isotonic solutions was statistically comparable and significantly higher than in the hypertonic solution (p<0.05). The ciliary beat frequency of the cells embedded in the two isotonic solutions was not significantly different but considerably exceeded that in the hypertonic seawater solution (p<0.05). Thus, the present study has demonstrated the absence of the ciliotoxic influence of isotonic saline solution containing benzalconium chloride at a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml and the strong ciliotoxic effect of the hypertonic seawater solution. This finding gives reason to recommend isotonic solutions for the regular application whereas hypertonic solutions can be prescribed only during infectious and/or inflammatory ENT diseases.

  16. Reentrant condensation of lysozyme: Implications for studying dynamics of lysozyme in aqueous solutions of lithium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neill, Hugh Michael

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have outlined the use of eutectic solution of lithium chloride in water to study microscopic dynamics of lysozyme in an aqueous solvent that is remarkably similar to pure water in many respects, yet allows experiments over a wide temperature range without the solvent crystallization. The eutectic point in (H2O)R(LiCl) system corresponds to R 7.3, and it is of interest to investigate whether less concentrated aqueous solutions of LiCl could be employed in low-temperature studies of a solvated protein. We have investigated a range of concentrations of lysozyme and LiCl in aqueous solutions to identify systems that do not show phase separation and avoid solvent crystallization on cooling down. Compared to the lysozyme concentration in solution, the concentration of LiCl in the aqueous solvent plays the major role in determining systems suitable for low-temperature studies. We have observed interesting and rich phase behavior reminiscent of reentrant condensation of proteins.

  17. Reentrant condensation of lysozyme: Implications for studying dynamics of lysozyme in aqueous solutions of lithium chloride.

    PubMed

    Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neill, Hugh

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have outlined the use of eutectic solutions of lithium chloride in water to study microscopic dynamics of lysozyme in an aqueous solvent that is remarkably similar to pure water in many respects, yet allows experiments over a wide temperature range without solvent crystallization. The eutectic point in a (H2O)R(LiCl) system corresponds to R ≈ 7.3, and it is of interest to investigate whether less-concentrated aqueous solutions of LiCl could be used in low-temperature studies of a solvated protein. We have investigated a range of concentrations of lysozyme and LiCl in aqueous solutions to identify systems that do not show phase separation and avoid solvent crystallization on cooling down. Compared to the lysozyme concentration in solution, the concentration of LiCl in the aqueous solvent plays the major role in determining systems suitable for low-temperature studies. We have observed interesting and rich phase behavior reminiscent of reentrant condensation of proteins. PMID:26819974

  18. CONDUCTIVITY TITRATION OF GELATIN SOLUTIONS WITH ACIDS.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, D I

    1923-11-20

    Titrations have been made, by the conductivity method, of gelatin solutions with hydrochloric and sulphuric acids. The results indicate an end-point at about 8.6 cc. of N/10 acid per gm. of gelatin, or a combining weight of about 1,160. These results are in fair agreement with those previously obtained by the hydrogen electrode method. Better agreement between the two methods was found in the case of deaminized gelatin. The data are in accord with a purely chemical conception of the combination between protein and acid.

  19. Interfacial behavior of perchlorate versus chloride ions in saturated aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, S; Kuo, I W; Baer, M D; Bluhm, H

    2009-04-14

    In recent years combination of theoretical and experimental work have presented a novel view of the aqueous interface wherein hard and/or multiply charged ions are excluded from the interface, but large polarizable anions show interfacial enhancement relative to the bulk. The observed trend in the propensity of anions to adsorb at the air/water interface appears to be reverse of the Hofmeister series for anions. This study focuses on experimental and theoretical examination of the partitioning behavior of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) and chloride (Cl{sup -}) ions at the air/water interface. We have used ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique to directly probe the interfacial concentrations of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and Cl{sup -} ions in sodium perchlorate and sodium chloride solutions, respectively. Experimental observations are compared with first principles molecular dynamics simulations. Both experimental and simulation results show enhancement of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} ion at the interface, compared with the absence of such enhancement in the case of Cl{sup -} ion. These observations are in agreement with the expected trend in the interfacial propensity of anions based on the Hofmeister series.

  20. Electrical conductivity of acidic sulfate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, Hiroshi; Peters, Ernest; Awakura, Yasuhiro; Park, Sung Kook

    1987-03-01

    The electrical conductivities of the aqueous solution system of H2SO4-MSO4 (involving ZnSO4, MgSO4, Na2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4), reported by Tozawa et al., were examined in terms of a (H2O) and H+ ion concentration. The equations to compute the concentrations of various species in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions containing metal sulfates were derived for a typical example of the H2SO4-ZnSO4-MgSO4-(Na2SO4)-H2O system. It was found that the H+ ion concentrations in concentrated sulfuric acid solutions corresponding to practical zinc electrowinning solutions are very high and remain almost constant with or without the addition of metal sulfates. The addition of metal sulfates to aqueous sulfuric acid solution causes a decrease in electrical conductivity, and this phenomenon is attributed to a decrease in water activity, which reflects a decrease in the amount of free water. The relationship between conductivity and water activity at a constant H+ ion concentration is independent of the kind of sulfates added. On the other hand, any increase in H+ ion concentration results in an increase in electrical conductivity. A novel method for the prediction of electrical conductivity of acidic sulfate solution is proposed that uses the calculated data of water activity and the calculated H+ ion concentration. Also, the authors examined an extension of the Robinson-Bower equation to calculate water activity in quarternary solutions based on molarity instead of molality, and found that such calculated values are in satisfactory agreement with those determined experimentally by a transpiration method.

  1. Reduction of mercury from mackerel fillet using combined solution of cysteine, EDTA, and sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Hajeb, P; Jinap, S

    2012-06-13

    An acidic solution containing mercury chelating agents to eliminate mercury in raw fish (mackerel) fillet was developed. The solution contained hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide, cysteine, EDTA, and NaCl. The optimum conditions for mercury reduction were achieved using response surface methodology (RSM) at cysteine concentration of 1.25%, EDTA of 275 mg/L, NaCl of 0.5%, pH of 3.75, and exposure time of 18 min. The optimized conditions produced a solution which can remove up to 91% mercury from raw fish fillet. Cysteine and EDTA were identified as potential chelating agents with the greatest potential for use. The solution can be employed in fish industries to reduce mercury in highly contaminated fish.

  2. Equilibriums between Cu, Fe, and Zn sulfides and oxides in chloride solution: A thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strel'Tsova, N. I.

    2009-10-01

    The results of thermodynamic modeling of equilibriums between Cu, Fe, and Zn sulfides and oxides pertaining to the Cu-Fe-Zn-S-O2 system in water and aqueous chloride solution are presented. The system comprises solid phases of constant composition: pyrite, pyrrhotite, hematite, magnetite, wüstite, γ-iron, chalcocite, covellite, cuprite, native copper, chalcopyrite, and bornite, as well as more than 100 ions, complexes, and molecules in an aqueous solution. The GIBBS program with the UNITHERM thermodynamic dataset used in calculations allows numerical analysis of phase assemblages in a dry system and in equilibrium with an aqueous solution. How the temperature, pressure, and the composition of the solution in the system opened for oxygen and sulfur affects the composition of phase assemblages was considered in temperature and pressure ranges of 50-350 C and 100-1000 bar, respectively. Decrease in temperature leads to a shift in stability fields of the studied phases toward the region of elevated oxygen and sulfur partial pressures. Variation of temperature is an important factor affecting precipitation of ore minerals, primarily, Cu- and Zn-bearing. The calculation results are presented in tables and diagrams. Each point in the (log m_{S_{tot} } - log f_{O_2 } ) diagram is characterized by a single possible assemblage of phases equilibrated with a solution of the given composition within the considered temperature and pressure range. Since the composition of the mineral assemblage is controlled by physicochemical conditions at the moment of mineral formation, comparison of the calculation results with mineral assemblages at ore deposits makes it possible to estimate the parameters of ore deposition at the early stage of investigation, including oxygen and sulfur activity and, occasionally, the composition and salinity of the solution. These parameters control the formation of such assemblages.

  3. Generalized chloride mass balance: Forward and inverse solutions for one-dimensional tracer convection under transient flux

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, T.R.; Murphy, E.M.

    1996-12-01

    Forward and inverse solutions are provided for analysis of inert tracer profiles resulting from one-dimensional convective transport under fluxes which vary with time and space separately. The developments are displayed as an extension of conventional chloride mass balance (CMB) techniques to account for transient as well as space-dependent water fluxes. The conventional chloride mass balance has been used over two decades to estimate recharge over large time scales in arid environments. In this mass balance approach, the chloride concentration in the pore water, originating from atmospheric fallout, is inversely proportional to the flux of water through the sediments. The CMB method is especially applicable to arid and semi-arid regions where evapotranspirative enrichment of the pore water produces a distinct chloride profile in the unsaturated zone. The solutions presented allow incorporation of transient fluxes and boundary conditions in CMB analysis, and allow analysis of tracer profile data which is not constant with depth below extraction zone in terms of a rational water transport model. A closed-form inverse solution is derived which shows uniqueness of model parameter and boundary condition (including paleoprecipitation) estimation, for the specified flow model. Recent expressions of the conventional chloride mass balance technique are derived from the general model presented here; the conventional CMB is shown to be fully compatible with this transient flow model and it requires the steady-state assumption on chloride mass deposition only (and not on water fluxes or boundary conditions). The solutions and results are demonstrated on chloride profile data from west central New Mexico.

  4. Structural changes in axillary eccrine glands following long-term treatment with aluminium chloride hexahydrate solution.

    PubMed

    Hölzle, E; Braun-Falco, O

    1984-04-01

    Axillary skin biopsies from fifteen patients with axillary hyperhidrosis who had received long-term treatment with aqueous aluminium chloride solution were examined histologically. The apocrine glands were normal, but the eccrine glands showed conspicuous morphological changes of varying severity. These included vacuolization of the secretory epithelium, dilatation of eccrine acini with atrophy of secretory cells, and accumulation of PAS-positive, diastase-resistant material in the dilated lumen of the secretory coils. The histological changes correlated in most patients with decreased secretion of sweat. We conclude that long-term blockage of the distal acrosyringium due to aluminium salts may lead to functional and structural degeneration of the eccrine acini. PMID:6712884

  5. A method of calculating quartz solubilities in aqueous sodium chloride solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    1983-01-01

    The aqueous silica species that form when quartz dissolves in water or saline solutions are hydrated. Therefore, the amount of quartz that will dissolve at a given temperature is influenced by the prevailing activity of water. Using a standard state in which there are 1,000 g of water (55.51 moles) per 1,000 cm3 of solution allows activity of water in a NaCl solution at high temperature to be closely approximated by the effective density of water, pe, in that solution, i.e. the product of the density of the NaCl solution times the weight fraction of water in the solution, corrected for the amount of water strongly bound to aqueous silica and Na+ as water of hydration. Generally, the hydration of water correction is negligible. The solubility of quartz in pure water is well known over a large temperature-pressure range. An empirical formula expresses that solubility in terms of temperature and density of water and thus takes care of activity coefficient and pressure-effect terms. Solubilities of quartz in NaCl solutions can be calculated by using that equation and substituting pe, for the density of pure water. Calculated and experimentally determined quartz solubilities in NaCl solutions show excellent agreement when the experiments were carried out in non-reactive platinum, gold, or gold plus titanium containers. Reactive metal containers generally yield dissolved silica concentrations higher than calculated, probably because of the formation of metal chlorides plus NaOH and H2. In the absence of NaOH there appears to be no detectable silica complexing in NaCl solutions, and the variation in quartz solubility with NaCl concentration at constant temperature can be accounted for entirely by variations in the activity of water. The average hydration number per molecule of dissolved SiO2 in liquid water and NaCl solutions decreases from about 2.4 at 200??C to about 2.1 at 350??C. This suggests that H4SiO4 may be the dominant aqueous silica species at 350??C, but other

  6. Solid solution barium–strontium chlorides with tunable ammonia desorption properties and superior storage capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Bialy, Agata; Blanchard, Didier; Vegge, Tejs; Quaade, Ulrich J.

    2015-01-15

    Metal halide ammines are very attractive materials for ammonia absorption and storage—applications where the practically accessible or usable gravimetric and volumetric storage densities are of critical importance. Here we present, that by combining advanced computational materials prediction with spray drying and in situ thermogravimetric and structural characterization, we synthesize a range of new, stable barium-strontium chloride solid solutions with superior ammonia storage densities. By tuning the barium/strontium ratio, different crystallographic phases and compositions can be obtained with different ammonia ab- and desorption properties. In particular it is shown, that in the molar range of 35–50% barium and 65–50% strontium, stable materials can be produced with a practically usable ammonia density (both volumetric and gravimetric) that is higher than any of the pure metal halides, and with a practically accessible volumetric ammonia densities in excess of 99% of liquid ammonia. - Graphical abstract: Thermal desorption curves of ammonia from Ba{sub x}Sr{sub (1−x)}Cl{sub 2} mixtures with x equal to 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 and atomic structure of Sr(NH{sub 3}){sub 8}Cl{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Solid solutions of strontium and barium chloride were synthesized by spray drying. • Adjusting molar ratios led to different crystallographic phases and compositions. • Different molar ratios led to different ammonia ab-/desorption properties. • 35–50 mol% BaCl{sub 2} in SrCl{sub 2} yields higher ammonia density than any other metal halide. • DFT calculations can be used to predict properties of the mixtures.

  7. Formation of aqueous solutions on Mars via deliquescence of chloride-perchlorate binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, R. V.; Chevrier, V. F.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    Perchlorate salts, known to exist on Mars, can readily absorb water vapor and deliquesce into aqueous solutions even at low temperatures. The multiple soluble ionic species, such as chloride salts, present in the Martian subsurface may affect this deliquescence. Here we study the deliquescence (solid to aqueous transition) and efflorescence (aqueous to solid transition) of three perchlorate/chloride mixtures: KClO4/KCl at 253 K, NaClO4/NaCl at 243 and 253 K, and Mg(ClO4)2/MgCl2 at 243 and 253 K. A Raman microscope with an environmental cell was used to monitor the phase transitions of internally mixed ClO-4/Cl- particles as a function of the perchlorate mole fraction. The eutonic relative humidity (where deliquescence begins to occur regardless of ClO-4 mole fraction), deliquescence relative humidity (DRH, where complete deliquescence occurs), and efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) were measured for several perchlorate mole ratios for each cation system. At the temperatures studied, the eutonic relative humidity was measured to be 28% RH for Mg(ClO4)2/MgCl2 mixtures, 38% RH for NaClO4/NaCl mixtures, and 82% RH for KClO4/KCl mixtures. The DRH depends on the perchlorate mole ratio, but is below the DRH of the least deliquescent (highest DRH) pure salt. When humidity is lowered around an aqueous salt mixture, we find that efflorescence occurs at an RH below the DRH due to the kinetic inhibition of crystallization. The ERH values of the salt solutions were as low as 5% RH for Mg(ClO4)2/MgCl2 mixtures, as low as 13% RH for NaClO4/NaCl mixtures, and as low as 66% RH for KClO4/KCl mixtures. The low eutonic RH values for the Na+ and Mg2+ perchlorate/chloride mixtures are important: wherever Mg(ClO4)2 and MgCl2 or NaClO4 and NaCl coexist at the temperatures studied, mixtures will contain a stable aqueous phase above 28 or 38% RH, respectively, regardless of the perchlorate mole fraction. This liquid water may persist until 5 or 13% RH, respectively.

  8. The interaction of polycrystalline copper films with dilute aqueous solutions of cupric chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Lois Harper

    1989-10-01

    In the electronics industry, thin films of copper deposited on substrates are used as electrically conductive paths to interconnect semiconductor devices and other computer components. The dissolution of copper in a dilute aqueous cupric chloride solution was studied to achieve an understanding of the role microstructure plays in the dissolution process. A multi-technique approach was taken using combinations of solution chemistry, computer modeling, and microstructural characterization techniques to analyze as-received samples and to monitor the dissolution process. This latter approach allowed reaction rates and activation energies to be calculated from speciation concentrations derived from computer modeling of known thermochemical reactions. In conjunction with the solution analysis, surface techniques were used to analyze the concentration distribution of the various elements after sample exposure to the etchant. The etching characteristics of the polycrystalline thin copper films are dependent on the film's microstructure. A procedure is suggested that will aid future researchers in the correlation of microstructure and dissolution characteristics of different copper samples prior to mass production of metallization for microelectronic circuits.

  9. A study of the electrochemical behavior in tungsten and caustic solutions and platinum/iridium in chloride solutions, informal report

    SciTech Connect

    Vitus, C.M.; Isaacs, H.S.; Schroeder, V.

    1994-11-22

    Platinum/iridium and tungsten wires were electronically etched in chloride and caustic solution, respectively, to produce tips with high aspect ratio. A direct relationship between the meniscus and the aspect ratio of etched tips was established. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that higher aspect ratios were obtained by changing the geometry of the meniscus during the etch either by an increase in the applied a.c. voltage or with the addition of a nonpolar layer above the electrolytic solution during the etching process. Above the breakdown voltage, two possible mechanisms appeared to control the etching process by expediting chemical dissolution: cavitation and sparking. Cavitation caused erosion due to the force of evolved gases against the electrode and sparking attacked the surface by vaporizing the metal. Sparking commenced on both wires near 24V. This voltage corresponded to a minimum in the plot of total etch time versus voltage. From light emission studies, sparking on Pt/Ir was associated with the ionization of Pt, Ir, Ca, and Cl. A compositional analysis of insoluble black particles produced during a.c. and d.c. etching of Pt/Ir revealed Pt and Ir as the major constituents of the product. The sparking process was shown to have a potential use in micromachining.

  10. The stability of calcium chloride ion pairs in aqueous solutions at temperatures between 100 and 360 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Williams-Jones, A.E. ); Seward, T.M. )

    1989-02-01

    The speciation of calcium in chloride solutions has been investigated between 100 and 360{degree}C by measuring the solubility of AgCl in HCl-CaCl{sub 2} solutions in which chloride varies from 0.3 to 3.0 m and calcium is maintained constant at 0.1 m. Cumulative equilibrium formation constants of calcium chloride ion pairs were evaluated using a non-liner least squares procedure. Association constants of calcium chloride ion pairs from the data at 100{degree}C. However, at 150{degree}C the cumulative formation constants for CaCl{sup +} and CaCl{sup 0}{sub 2} are 0.85 and 1.73, respectively. The stability field for CaCl{sup +} decreases with increasing temperature, whereas that for CaCl{sup 0}{sub 2} increases sharply and at 360{degree}C K{sub 2} is 4.95 {center dot} 10{sup 4}. Higher order calcium chloride ion pairs either do not form or have stability fields too small to be detected by the methods used in this study. The neutral aqueous calcium chloride ion pair CaCl{sup 0}{sub 2} contributes significantly to calcium speciation in intermediate to high salinity hydrothermal solutions: at 250{degree}C, 50 mol percent of the calcium in a 1 m HCl solution occurs as CaCl{sup 0}{sub 2}. The effect of this ion pairing is to increase the pH stability limits and solubilities of calcium-bearing minerals in such solutions.

  11. Sulfate, chloride and fluoride retention in Andosols exposed to volcanic acid emissions.

    PubMed

    Delmelle, Pierre; Delfosse, Thomas; Delvaux, Bruno

    2003-01-01

    The continuous emissions of SO(2), HCl and HF by Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, represent a substantial source of atmospheric S-, Cl- and F-containing acid inputs for local ecosystems. We report on the effects of such acid depositions on the sulfate, chloride and fluoride contents in soils (0-40 cm) from two distinct transects located downwind from the volcano. The first transect corresponds to relatively undifferentiated Vitric Andosols, and the second transect to more weathered Eutric Andosols. These soils are exposed to various rates of volcanogenic acid addition, with the Vitric sites being generally more affected. Prolonged acid inputs have led to a general pH decrease and reduced exchangeable base cation concentrations in the Andosols. The concentrations of 0.5 M NH(4)F- and 0.016 M KH(2)PO(4)-extractable sulfate (NH(4)F-S and KH(2)PO(4)-S, respectively) indicate that volcanic S addition has increased the inorganic sulfate content of the Vitric and Eutric soils at all depths. In this process, the rate of sulfate accumulation is also dependent on soil allophane contents. For all soils, NH(4)F extracted systematically more (up to 40 times) sulfate than KH(2)PO(4). This difference suggests sulfate incorporation into an aluminum hydroxy sulfate phase, whose contribution to total inorganic sulfate in the Vitric and Eutric Andosols is estimated from approximately 34 to 95% and approximately 65 to 98%, respectively. The distribution of KH(2)PO(4)-extractable chloride in the Vitric and Eutric Andosols exposed to volcanic Cl inputs reveals that added chloride readily migrates through the soil profiles. In contrast, reaction of fluoride with Al and Fe oxyhydroxides and allophanes is an important sink mechanism in the Masaya Andosols exposed to airborne volcanic F. Fluoride dominates the anion distribution in all soil horizons, although F is the least concentrated element in the volcanic emissions and depositions. The soil anion distribution reflects preferential retention

  12. Formation of linear polyenes in poly(vinyl alcohol) films catalyzed by phosphotungstic acid, aluminum chloride, and hydrochloric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretinnikov, O. N.; Sushko, N. I.; Malyi, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Formation of linear polyenes-(CH=CH)n-via acid-catalyzed thermal dehydration of polyvinyl alcohol in 9- to 40-µm-thick films of this polymer containing hydrochloric acid, aluminum chloride, and phosphotungstic acid as dehydration catalysts was studied by electronic absorption spectroscopy. The concentration of long-chain ( n ≥ 8) polyenes in films containing phosphotungstic acid is found to monotonically increase with the duration of thermal treatment of films, although the kinetics of this process is independent of film thickness. In films containing hydrochloric acid and aluminum chloride, the formation rate of polyenes with n ≥ 8 rapidly drops as film thickness decreases and the annealing time increases. As a result, at a film thickness of less than 10-12 µm, long-chain polyenes are not formed at all in these films no matter how long thermal duration is. The reason for this behavior is that hydrochloric acid catalyzing polymer dehydration in these films evaporates from the films during thermal treatment, the evaporation rate inversely depending on film thickness.

  13. Histological effects of aqueous acids and gaseous hydrogen chloride on bean leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Swiecki, T.J.; Endress, A.G.; Taylor, O.C.

    1982-01-01

    Primary leaves of Phaseoulus vulgaris L. (pinto bean), 9 or 12 days from sowing, were exposed to aqueous acids, chloride salts, or hydrogen chloride gas. Leaves were examined for the presence and severity of resultant visible injury and samples for light and scanning electron microscopy. Exposure to 0.06 N HCl, HNO/sub 3/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or 14.5-19.0 mg m/sup -3/ gaseous HCl for 20 min evoked similar foliar injury including glazing and necrosis of the laminas. This injury appeared to result initially from plasmolysis and collapse of the epidermis and subsequently of the underlying mesophyll. Cellular injury was accompanied by various cytoplasmic alterations. Microscopic symptoms observed in leaves exposed to gaseous HCl or aqueous acids included vesicles and particulates within the larger vacuoles. Similar symptoms were present in leaves exposed to polyethylene glycol 6000. Differential effects included formation of necrotic pits and preferential injury to paravascular tissues in leaves treated with aqueous acids and crystalline chloroplast inclusions in gaseous HCl-treated and water-stressed leaves. The visible and microscopic appearances of leaves exposed to aqueous acids or gaseous HCl were compared and related to injury stemming from acid precipitation and a possible mechanism of action for gaseous HCl phytotoxicity.

  14. The central role of chloride in the metabolic acid-base changes in canine parvoviral enteritis.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Richard K; Schoeman, Johan P; Leisewitz, Andrew L

    2014-04-01

    The acid-base disturbances in canine parvoviral (CPV) enteritis are not well described. In addition, the mechanisms causing these perturbations have not been fully elucidated. The purpose of the present study was to assess acid-base changes in puppies suffering from CPV enteritis, using a modified strong ion model (SIM). The hypothesis of the study was that severe acid-base disturbances would be present and that the SIM would provide insights into pathological mechanisms, which have not been fully appreciated by the Henderson-Hasselbalch model. The study analysed retrospective data, obtained from 42 puppies with confirmed CPV enteritis and 10 healthy control dogs. The CPV-enteritis group had been allocated a clinical score, to allow classification of the data according to clinical severity. The effects of changes in free water, chloride, l-lactate, albumin and phosphate were calculated, using a modification of the base excess algorithm. When the data were summated for each patient, and correlated to each individual component, the most important contributor to the metabolic acid-base changes, according to the SIM, was chloride (P<0.001). Severely-affected animals tended to demonstrate hypochloraemic alkalosis, whereas mildly-affected puppies had a hyperchloraemic acidosis (P=0.007). In conclusion, the acid-base disturbances in CPV enteritis are multifactorial and complex, with the SIM providing information in terms of the origin of these changes.

  15. Reactivity of NaCl with Secondary Organic Acids: An Important Mechanism of the Chloride Depletion in Sea Salt Particles Mixed with Organic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Laskin, A.; Kelly, S.; Gilles, M. K.; Shilling, J. E.; Zelenyuk, A.; Wilson, J. M.; Tivanski, A.

    2012-12-01

    Sea salt particles, one of the major sources of atmospheric aerosols, undergo complex multi-phase reactions and have profound consequences on their physical and chemical properties, thus on climate. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of sea salt chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids. Some studies have also showed that the chloride deficit cannot be fully compensated for this mechanism. We present an important pathway contributing to this chloride depletion: reactions of weak organic acids with sea salt particles. NaCl particles internally mixed with secondary organic materials generated from the reactions of limonene and alpha-pinene with ozone served as surrogates for sea salt particles mixed with organic materials. Chemical imaging analysis of these particles was conducted using complementary techniques including computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), and micro-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). Substantial chloride depletion and formation of organic salts were observed along with distinctive changes in particle morphology after hydration/dehydration processes. The results indicate that secondary organic acids can effectively react with NaCl particles resulting in displacement of chloride and release of gaseous HCl. This is consistent with a recent field study showing chloride depletion in sea salt particles mixed with organic materials which cannot be fully compensated by inorganic acid displacement. Although the formation of the organic salts is not thermodynamically favored in bulk aqueous solution, these reactions are driven by the high volatility and evaporation of gaseous HCl in particles, especially during hydration/dehydration processes. The

  16. Analysis of antibacterial efficacy of plasma-treated sodium chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Mareike A. C.; Mann, Miriam; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the change of chemical composition of sodium chloride solutions (NaCl, 0.85%) induced by non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment and subsequent effects on bacteria (Escherichia coli) are investigated. Besides acidification caused by APP, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitrite (\\text{NO}2- ), and nitrate (\\text{NO}3- ) are generated as stable end-products of various chemical reactions in APP-treated liquids. Inactivation kinetics and reduction factors were recorded for E. coli (K12). Almost identical antimicrobial effects were observed with both direct APP exposure to bacteria suspension and exposure of APP-treated liquids to bacteria (indirect treatment). Consequently, main bactericidal effects are caused by chemical reactions which are mediated via the liquid phase. Moreover, APP-treated liquids have shown long-term activity (30 min) that possibly correlates with the ratio of \\text{NO}2- /H2O2. Therefore, \\text{NO}2- and H2O2 are identified as key agents for antimicrobial short- and long-term effects, respectively. The antimicrobial stability observed is strongly dependent on the used treatment regime and correlates additionally with the altered chemical composition of APP-treated liquids. Besides these effects, it was also shown that bacteria do not acquire resistance to such APP-treated solutions.

  17. Speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Hlushak, S; Simonin, J P; De Sio, S; Bernard, O; Ruas, A; Pochon, P; Jan, S; Moisy, P

    2013-02-28

    In this study, speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid at 25 °C was assessed in two independent ways. First, Raman experiments were carried out and interpreted in terms of free nitrate ions, ion pairs and neutral HNO(3) molecules. In parallel, a model was developed to account for the formation of these two kinds of pairs. It was based on an extension of the binding mean spherical approximation (BiMSA), or associative MSA (AMSA), in which the size and the charge of the ions in the chemical pair may differ from those of the free ions. A simultaneous fit of the osmotic coefficient and of the proportion of free ions (obtained from Raman spectroscopy experiments) led to an estimation of the speciation in nitric acid solutions. The result obtained using this procedure was compared with the estimation obtained from the Raman experiments.

  18. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  19. Wet oxidation of salicylic acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Collado, Sergio; Garrido, Laura; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2010-11-15

    Salicylic acid is a frequent pollutant in several industrial wastewaters. Uncatalyzed wet air oxidation, which is a promising technique for the treatment of phenolic effluents, has not been analyzed yet for the removal of salicylic acid. The effect of different conditions of pH (1.3-12.3), pressure (1.0-4.1 MPa), temperature (413-443 K), and initial concentrations (1.45-14.50 mM) on the wet oxidation of salicylate/salicylic acid solutions have here been investigated. The pH value of the reaction media was found to be a key parameter for the rate of the oxidation process with an optimum at pH 3.1, when the concentrations of salicylic acid and salicylate were similar. The oxidation reaction followed pseudofirst-order kinetics with respect to salicylic acid and 0.82 order with respect to dissolved oxygen. Additionally, the evolution of the color during the wet oxidation was analyzed and discussed in relation with the formation of intermediate compounds. Then, a reaction pathway for the noncatalytic wet oxidation of the salicylic acid was proposed.

  20. Conformational structure and energetics of 2-methylphenyl(2'-methoxyphenyl)iodonium chloride: evidence for solution clusters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Sok; Hodoscek, Milan; Chun, Joong-Hyun; Pike, Victor W

    2010-09-10

    Diaryliodonium salts allow the efficient incorporation of cyclotron-produced [(18)F]fluoride ions into electron-rich and electron-deficient arenes to provide potential radiotracers for molecular imaging in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET). This process (ArI(+)Ar'+(18)F(-)→Ar(18)F+Ar'I) is still not well understood mechanistically. To better understand this and similar reactions, it would be valuable to understand the structures of diaryliodonium salts in organic media, where the reactions are typically conducted. In this endeavor, the X-ray structure of a representative iodonium salt, 2-methylphenyl(2'-methoxyphenyl)iodonium chloride (1), was determined. Our X-ray structure analysis showed 1 to have the conformational M-P dimer as the unit cell with hypervalent iodine as a stereogenic center in each conformer. With the ab initio replica path method we constructed the inversion path between the two enantiomers of 1, thereby revealing two additional pairs of enantiomers that are likely to undergo fast interconversion in solution. Also LC-MS of 1 showed the presence of dimeric and tetrameric anion-bridged clusters in weak organic solution. This observation is consistent with the energetics of 1, both as monomeric and dimeric forms in MeCN, calculated at the B3LYP/DGDZVP level. These evidences of the existence of dimeric and higher order clusters of 1 in solution are relevant to achieve a deeper general understanding of the mechanism and outcome of reactions of diaryliodonium salts in organic media with nucleophiles, such as the [(18)F]fluoride ion.

  1. Pictorial Analogies XI: Concentrations and Acidity of Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortman, John J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents pictorial analogies of several concepts relating to solutions for chemistry students. These include concentration of solution, strength of solution, supersaturated solution, and conjugate acid-base pairs. Among the examples are comparison of acid strength to percentage of strong soldiers or making supersaturated solution analogous to a…

  2. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  3. Stress corrosion cracking and life prediction evaluation of austenitic stainless steels in calcium chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Leinonen, H.

    1996-05-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SS) in calcium chloride solutions was studied using a constant-load method. Initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracks were examined using fractography. The distribution of cracks was classified. A physical cracking was introduced, and creep deformation measurements were performed. The steady-state strain rate obtained from the corrosion elongation curve (elongation-vs-time curve) showed a linear function of time to failure (t{sub f}). This implied that {var_epsilon}{sub ss} can be applied as a parameter for prediction of t{sub f}. Furthermore, {var_epsilon}{sub ss} below which no failure occurs within a laboratory time scale was estimated. Based on results obtained, the critical values of stress below which no SCC occurred were evaluated. Based upon creep measurements in a noncorrosive environment, the influence of environment on {var_epsilon}{sub ss} was more than fivefold. Cracking characteristics were divided into three categories according to the crack initiation distribution. Transgranular cracking predominated at relatively low {sigma} and {var_epsilon}{sub ss}.

  4. Lithium chloride ionic association in dilute aqueous solution: a constrained molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhigang; Duan, Zhenhao

    2004-02-01

    Constrained molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate the lithium chloride ionic associations in dilute aqueous solutions over a wide temperature range. Solvent mediated potentials of mean force have been carefully calculated at different thermodynamic conditions. Two intermediate states of ionic association can be well identified with an energy barrier from the oscillatory free energy profile. Clear pictures for the microscopic association structures are presented with a remarkable feature of strong hydration effect of lithium ion and the bridging role of its hydrating complex. Experimental association constants have been reasonably reproduced and a general trend of the increasing ionic association at high temperatures and low densities was observed. Additional simulations with different numbers of water molecules have been performed to check the possible artifacts introducing from periodic and finite size effects and confirm the reliability of our simulation results. Marginal differences of the simulated curves are believed to result from the significant compensation and canceling effect between the bare ionic forces and solvent induced mean force. Finally we confirmed the importance of accurate descriptions of dielectric properties of solvent in the ionic association study.

  5. Ruthenium(II)-catalyzed oxidative C-H alkenylations of sulfonic acids, sulfonyl chlorides and sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenbo; Mei, Ruhuai; Tenti, Giammarco; Ackermann, Lutz

    2014-11-10

    Twofold C-H functionalization of aromatic sulfonic acids was achieved with an in situ generated ruthenium(II) catalyst. The optimized cross-dehydrogenative alkenylation protocol proved applicable to differently substituted arenes and a variety of alkenes, including vinyl arenes, sulfones, nitriles and ketones. The robustness of the ruthenium(II) catalyst was demonstrated by the chemoselective oxidative olefination of sulfonamides as well as sulfonyl chlorides. Mechanistic studies provided support for a reversible, acetate-assisted C-H ruthenation, along with a subsequent olefin insertion.

  6. A Method for Monitoring Organic Chlorides, Hydrochloric Acid and Chlorine in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, J. E.; Menichelli, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    While not commonly presented in nonurban atmospheres, organic chlorides, hydrochloric acid and chlorine are significant in industrial air pollution and industrial hygiene. Based on a microcoulometer, a much more sensitive method than has heretofore been available has been developed for monitoring these air impurities. The method has a response time (90%) of about twenty seconds, requires no calibration, is accurate to +/- 2.5%, and specific except for bromide and iodide interferences. The instrument is portable and has been operated unattended for 18 hours without difficulty.

  7. Hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous hydrogen chloride partitioning in a cloud contaminated by solid rocket exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Bendura, R. J.; Wornom, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Partitioning of hydrogen chloride between hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous HCl in the lower atmosphere was experimentally investigated in a solid rocket exhaust cloud diluted with humid ambient air. Airborne measurements were obtained of gaseous HCl, total HCl, relative humidity and temperature to evaluate the conditions under which aerosol formation occurs in the troposphere in the presence of hygroscopic HCl vapor. Equilibrium predictions of HCl aerosol formation accurately predict the measured HCl partitioning over a range of total HCl concentrations from 0.6 to 16 ppm.

  8. Chloride Anions Regulate Kinetics but Not Voltage-Sensor Qmax of the Solute Carrier SLC26a5.

    PubMed

    Santos-Sacchi, Joseph; Song, Lei

    2016-06-01

    In general, SLC26 solute carriers serve to transport a variety of anions across biological membranes. However, prestin (SLC26a5) has evolved, now serving as a motor protein in outer hair cells (OHCs) of the mammalian inner ear and is required for cochlear amplification, a mechanical feedback mechanism to boost auditory performance. The mechanical activity of the OHC imparted by prestin is driven by voltage and controlled by anions, chiefly intracellular chloride. Current opinion is that chloride anions control the Boltzmann characteristics of the voltage sensor responsible for prestin activity, including Qmax, the total sensor charge moved within the membrane, and Vh, a measure of prestin's operating voltage range. Here, we show that standard narrow-band, high-frequency admittance measures of nonlinear capacitance (NLC), an alternate representation of the sensor's charge-voltage (Q-V) relationship, is inadequate for assessment of Qmax, an estimate of the sum of unitary charges contributed by all voltage sensors within the membrane. Prestin's slow transition rates and chloride-binding kinetics adversely influence these estimates, contributing to the prevalent concept that intracellular chloride level controls the quantity of sensor charge moved. By monitoring charge movement across frequency, using measures of multifrequency admittance, expanded displacement current integration, and OHC electromotility, we find that chloride influences prestin kinetics, thereby controlling charge magnitude at any particular frequency of interrogation. Importantly, however, this chloride dependence vanishes as frequency decreases, with Qmax asymptoting at a level irrespective of the chloride level. These data indicate that prestin activity is significantly low-pass in the frequency domain, with important implications for cochlear amplification. We also note that the occurrence of voltage-dependent charge movements in other SLC26 family members may be hidden by inadequate

  9. 21 CFR 184.1426 - Magnesium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium chloride. 184.1426 Section 184.1426 Food... GRAS § 184.1426 Magnesium chloride. (a) Magnesium chloride (MgC12·6H2O, CAS Reg. No. 7786-30-3) is a... prepared by dissolving magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate in aqueous hydrochloric acid solution...

  10. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  11. Phytic Acid and Sodium Chloride Show Marked Synergistic Bactericidal Effects against Nonadapted and Acid-Adapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Hee

    2015-01-01

    The synergistic antimicrobial effects of phytic acid (PA), a natural extract from rice bran, plus sodium chloride against Escherichia coli O157:H7 were examined. Exposure to NaCl alone at concentrations up to 36% (wt/wt) for 5 min did not reduce bacterial populations. The bactericidal effects of PA alone were much greater than those of other organic acids (acetic, citric, lactic, and malic acids) under the same experimental conditions (P < 0.05). Combining PA and NaCl under conditions that yielded negligible effects when each was used alone led to marked synergistic effects. For example, whereas 0.4% PA or 3 or 4% NaCl alone had little or no effect on cell viability, combining the two completely inactivated both nonadapted and acid-adapted cells, reducing their numbers to unrecoverable levels (>7-log CFU/ml reduction). Flow cytometry confirmed that PA disrupted the cell membrane to a greater extent than did other organic acids, although the cells remained viable. The combination of PA and NaCl induced complete disintegration of the cell membrane. By comparison, none of the other organic acids acted synergistically with NaCl, and neither did NaCl-HCl solutions at the same pH values as the test solutions of PA plus NaCl. These results suggest that PA has great potential as an effective bacterial membrane-permeabilizing agent, and we show that the combination is a promising alternative to conventional chemical disinfectants. These findings provide new insight into the utility of natural compounds as novel antimicrobial agents and increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the antibacterial activity of PA. PMID:26637600

  12. Phytic Acid and Sodium Chloride Show Marked Synergistic Bactericidal Effects against Nonadapted and Acid-Adapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Hee; Rhee, Min Suk

    2015-12-04

    The synergistic antimicrobial effects of phytic acid (PA), a natural extract from rice bran, plus sodium chloride against Escherichia coli O157:H7 were examined. Exposure to NaCl alone at concentrations up to 36% (wt/wt) for 5 min did not reduce bacterial populations. The bactericidal effects of PA alone were much greater than those of other organic acids (acetic, citric, lactic, and malic acids) under the same experimental conditions (P < 0.05). Combining PA and NaCl under conditions that yielded negligible effects when each was used alone led to marked synergistic effects. For example, whereas 0.4% PA or 3 or 4% NaCl alone had little or no effect on cell viability, combining the two completely inactivated both nonadapted and acid-adapted cells, reducing their numbers to unrecoverable levels (>7-log CFU/ml reduction). Flow cytometry confirmed that PA disrupted the cell membrane to a greater extent than did other organic acids, although the cells remained viable. The combination of PA and NaCl induced complete disintegration of the cell membrane. By comparison, none of the other organic acids acted synergistically with NaCl, and neither did NaCl-HCl solutions at the same pH values as the test solutions of PA plus NaCl. These results suggest that PA has great potential as an effective bacterial membrane-permeabilizing agent, and we show that the combination is a promising alternative to conventional chemical disinfectants. These findings provide new insight into the utility of natural compounds as novel antimicrobial agents and increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the antibacterial activity of PA.

  13. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  14. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  15. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-06

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

  16. Combined effects of lanthanum (III) chloride and acid rain on photosynthetic parameters in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Wang, Wen; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) pollution and acid rain are environmental issues, and their deleterious effects on plants attract worldwide attention. These two issues exist simultaneously in many regions, especially in some rice-growing areas. However, little is known about the combined effects of REEs and acid rain on plants. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum chloride (LaCl3), one type of REE salt, and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice were investigated. We showed that the combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 4.5 increased net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatic conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), Hill reaction activity (HRA), apparent quantum yield (AQY) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) in rice. The combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 3.5 began to behave toxic effects on photosynthesis (decreasing Pn, Gs, HRA, AQY and CE, and increasing Ci), and the maximally toxic effects were observed in the combined treatment of 2449.0 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 2.5. Moreover, the combined effects of LaCl3 and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice depended on the growth stage of rice, with the maximal effects occurring at the booting stage. Furthermore, the combined treatment of high-concentration LaCl3 and low-pH acid rain had more serious effects on photosynthesis in rice than LaCl3 or acid rain treatment alone. Finally, the combined effect of LaCl3 and acid rain on Pn in rice resulted from the changes in stomatic (Gs, Ci) and non-stomatic (HRA, AQY and CE) factors.

  17. Combined effects of lanthanum (III) chloride and acid rain on photosynthetic parameters in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Wang, Wen; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) pollution and acid rain are environmental issues, and their deleterious effects on plants attract worldwide attention. These two issues exist simultaneously in many regions, especially in some rice-growing areas. However, little is known about the combined effects of REEs and acid rain on plants. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum chloride (LaCl3), one type of REE salt, and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice were investigated. We showed that the combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 4.5 increased net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatic conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), Hill reaction activity (HRA), apparent quantum yield (AQY) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) in rice. The combined treatment of 81.6 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 3.5 began to behave toxic effects on photosynthesis (decreasing Pn, Gs, HRA, AQY and CE, and increasing Ci), and the maximally toxic effects were observed in the combined treatment of 2449.0 μM LaCl3 and acid rain at pH 2.5. Moreover, the combined effects of LaCl3 and acid rain on photosynthesis in rice depended on the growth stage of rice, with the maximal effects occurring at the booting stage. Furthermore, the combined treatment of high-concentration LaCl3 and low-pH acid rain had more serious effects on photosynthesis in rice than LaCl3 or acid rain treatment alone. Finally, the combined effect of LaCl3 and acid rain on Pn in rice resulted from the changes in stomatic (Gs, Ci) and non-stomatic (HRA, AQY and CE) factors. PMID:25048927

  18. Solubility of xenon in amino-acid solutions. II. Nine less-soluble amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennan, Richard P.; Himm, Jeffrey F.; Pollack, Gerald L.

    1988-05-01

    Ostwald solubility (L) of xenon gas, as the radioisotope 133Xe, has been measured as a function of solute concentration, at 25.0 °C, in aqueous solutions of nine amino acids. The amino-acid concentrations investigated covered much of their solubility ranges in water, viz., asparagine monohydrate (0-0.19 M), cysteine (0-1.16 M), glutamine (0-0.22 M), histidine (0-0.26 M), isoleucine (0-0.19 M), methionine (0-0.22 M), serine (0-0.38 M), threonine (0-1.4 M), and valine (0-0.34 M). We have previously reported solubility results for aqueous solutions of six other, generally more soluble, amino acids (alanine, arginine, glycine, hydroxyproline, lysine, and proline), of sucrose and sodium chloride. In general, L decreases approximately linearly with increasing solute concentration in these solutions. If we postulate that the observed decreases in gas solubility are due to hydration, the results under some assumptions can be used to calculate hydration numbers (H), i.e., the number of H2O molecules associated with each amino-acid solute molecule. The average values of hydration number (H¯) obtained at 25.0 °C are 15.3±1.5 for asparagine, 6.8±0.3 for cysteine, 11.5±1.1 for glutamine, 7.3±0.7 for histidine, 5.9±0.4 for isoleucine, 10.6±0.8 for methionine, 11.2±1.3 for serine, 7.7± 1.0 for threonine, and 6.6±0.6 for valine. We have also measured the temperature dependence of solubility L(T) from 5-40 °C for arginine, glycine, and proline, and obtained hydration numbers H¯(T) in this range. Between 25-40 °C, arginine has an H¯ near zero. This may be evidence for an attractive interaction between xenon and arginine molecules in aqueous solution.

  19. [The hepatotropic action of sodium chloride and hydrocarbonate mineral water containing humic acids (an experimental study)].

    PubMed

    Verigo, N S; Ulashchik, V S

    2015-01-01

    The present article summarizes the results of experimental studies on the hepatotropic action of native and modified low-mineralized sodium chloride and bicarbonate waters differing in the content of humic acids. It was found that the most beneficial changes after a course of 21 day therapy with the use of such mineral waters for the treatment of experimental hepatitis were observed after the application of the water with a humic acid content of roughly 20 g/dm3. Such treatment resulted in the significant improvement of the liver antitoxic function, intensification of basal metabolism, reduction of the inflammatory processes, normalization of the hepatic enzyme activity, and stimulation of proteinsynthetic function in parallel with positive dynamics of the morphological and histochemical characteristics of the liver.

  20. Aqueous Solutions of the Ionic Liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium Chloride Denature Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Gary A; Heller, William T

    2009-01-01

    As we advance our understanding, ionic liquids (ILs) are finding ever broader scope within the chemical sciences including, most recently, pharmaceutical, enzymatic, and bioanalytical applications. With examples of enzymatic activity reported in both neat ILs and in IL/water mixtures, enzymes are frequently assumed to adopt a quasi-native conformation, even if little work has been carried out to date toward characterizing the conformation, dynamics, active-site perturbation, cooperativity of unfolding transitions, free energy of stabilization, or aggregation/oligomerization state of enzymes in the presence of an IL solvent component. In this study, human serum albumin and equine heart cytochrome c were characterized in aqueous solutions of the fully water-miscible IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, [bmim]Cl, by small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering. At [bmim]Cl concentrations up to 25 vol.%, these two proteins were found to largely retain their higher-order structures whereas both proteins become highly denatured at the highest IL concentration studied here (i.e., 50 vol.% [bmim]Cl). The response of these proteins to [bmim]Cl is analogous to their behavior in the widely studied denaturants guanidine hydrochloride and urea which similarly lead to random coil conformations at excessive molar concentrations. Interestingly, human serum albumin dimerizes in response to [bmim]Cl, whereas cytochrome c remains predominantly in monomeric form. These results have important implications for enzymatic studies in aqueous IL media, as they suggest a facile pathway through which biocatalytic activity can be altered in these nascent and potentially green electrolyte systems.

  1. Structure and corrosive wear resistance of plasma-nitrided alloy steels in 3% sodium chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.K.; Shih, H.C. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    Type 304 stainless steel (SS), type 410 SS, and type 4140 low-alloy steel were plasma nitrided in a commercial furnace at 560 C for 50 h. Microstructure and the composition of the nitrided layer were analyzed. The resistance to corrosive wear was evaluated by a tribotest in which the specimen was held under potentiostatic control at anodic and cathodic potentials in 3% sodium chloride solution (pH 6.8). Electrochemical polarization measurements were made, and the surface morphology and composition after corrosive wear were examined. Wear rates at cathodic potentials were very low, but significant weight losses were observed as the applied potentials were increased anodically. The coefficient of friction varied in a fashion similar to the wear rate. For the untreated alloys, the magnitude of the wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased as follows: type 4140 alloy > type 41 SS > type 304 SS. For the plasma-nitrided alloys, the ranking was: type 304 SS > type 410 SS. type 4140 alloy. Plasma nitriding was shown to be beneficial to the corrosive wear resistance of type 4140 alloy, but an adverse effect was obtained for types 304 and 410 SS. These findings could be interpreted in terms of the electrochemical polarization characteristics of a static specimen and were strongly related to the subtleties of the nitrided microstructures. The stable chromium nitride (CrN) segregated in the [gamma]-iron (type 304 SS) and [alpha]-Fe (type 41 SS) matrices and resulted in a pitting and spalling type of corrosive wear mechanism. The phases [epsilon]-(Fe, Cr)[sub 2-3]N and [gamma]-(Fe, Cr)[sub 4]N enriched in the surface layer of nitrided type 4140 alloy provided excellent corrosive wear resistance.

  2. The Structure of Nickel Chloride in the Ionic Liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methyl Imidazolium Chloride/Aluminum Chloride: X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    The structure of anhydrous nickel chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride and aluminum chloride has been investigated with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) in both Lewis acid and Lewis base solutions. The EXAFS data of NiCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O crystals were also recorded and analyzed to demonstrate the difference file technique. The difference file technique is used to obtain the structural information for the very closely spaced coordination shells of chloride and oxygen in NiCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O and they are found to agree very closely with the X-ray diffraction data. The difference file technique is then used to analyze the nickel chloride in the ionic liquid solutions. Even though anhydrous NiCl{sub 2} is more soluble in the basic solution than in the acidic solution, the EXAFS data show a single coordination of four chlorides in a tetrahedron around the nickel atom in the basic solution. In a weak acid solution, there are six chlorides in a single octahedral coordination shell around the nickel. However, in a strong acid solution, in addition to the octahedral chloride-coordination shell, there is a second coordination shell of eight aluminum atoms in the form of a simple cube.

  3. Optical Properties of Sodium Chloride Solution Within the Spectral Range from 300 to 2500 nm at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingcan; Liu, Linhua; Zhao, Junming; Tan, Jianyu

    2015-05-01

    The optical properties of sodium chloride (NaCl) solution were experimentally determined by double optical pathlength transmission method in the spectral range from 300 to 2500 nm at the NaCl concentration range from 0 to 360 g/L. The results show that the refractive index of NaCl solution increases with NaCl concentrations and correlates nonlinearly with the concentration of NaCl solution. The absorption index of NaCl solution increases with NaCl concentrations in the visible spectral range of 300-700 nm, but varies little in the near-infrared spectral range of 700-2500 nm at room temperature. For the sake of applications, the fitted formulae of the refractive index and absorption index of NaCl solution as a function of wavelength and NaCl concentration are presented.

  4. Transport of sodium across the isolated bovine rumen epithelium: interaction with short-chain fatty acids, chloride and bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Sehested, J; Diernaes, L; Moller, P D; Skadhauge, E

    1996-01-01

    -1). There was no effect of the Cl(-)-HCO3- exchange inhibitor DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid; 0.5 mmol l-1) on sodium transport. HCO3- (13 mmol l-1) and CO2 (5%) themselves had only a small and non-significant stimulating effect on sodium fluxes, however, in the presence, but not the absence of HCO3- and CO2 in the experimental solutions acetazolamide (1 mmol l-1) significantly reduced active sodium transport. It is concluded that SCFAs could stimulate the active sodium and chloride transport as a result of their metabolism. The CO2 produced could stimulate apical Na(+)-H+ and Cl(-)-HCO3- exchangers running in parallel via increased H+ and HCO3- gradients.

  5. Electrolytic regeneration of acid cupric chloride printed circuit board etchant. Final report, August 1, 1995--October 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, J.E.; Smialek, R.J.

    1997-04-18

    The overall objective of this ERIP program was to make substantial progress in further developing a process for electrolytic regeneration of acid cupric chloride etchant - a process which was initially demonstrated in in-house studies and EPA Phase I and Phase II SBIRs. Specific objectives of the work were: (1) to define optimum system operating conditions by conducting a systematic study of process parameters, (2) to develop or find a superior electrolyic cell separator material, (3) to determine an optimum activation procedure for the flow-through carbon/graphite felt electrodes which are so critical to process performance, (4) to demonstrate - on the pre-prototype scale - electrolytic compensation for oxygen ingress - which causes etchant solution growth, and (5) to begin engineering design work on a prototype-scale regeneration unit. Parametric studies looked at the effect that key plating parameters have on copper deposit quality. Parameters tested included (a) velocity past the plating cathodes, (b) copper concentration in the catholyte solution from which the copper is being plated, (c) plating current density, and (d) catholyte cupric ion concentration. The most significant effects were obtained for velocity changes. The work showed that catholyte velocities above 0.5 ft/sec were needed to get adequate plating at 77.5 mA/cm{sup 2} and higher currents, and that even higher flow was better.

  6. Sodium Chloride Diffusion in Low-Acid Foods during Thermal Processing and Storage.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Ellen R; Tang, Juming; Sablani, Shyam S

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed at modeling sodium chloride (NaCl) diffusion in foods during thermal processing using analytical and numerical solutions and at investigating the changes in NaCl concentrations during storage after processing. Potato, radish, and salmon samples in 1% or 3% NaCl solutions were heated at 90, 105, or 121 °C for 5 to 240 min to simulate pasteurization and sterilization. Selected samples were stored at 4 or 22 °C for up to 28 d. Radish had the largest equilibrium NaCl concentrations and equilibrium distribution coefficients, but smallest effective diffusion coefficients, indicating that a greater amount of NaCl diffused into the radish at a slower rate. Effective diffusion coefficients determined using the analytical solution ranged from 0.2 × 10(-8) to 2.6 × 10(-8) m²/s. Numerical and analytical solutions showed good agreement with experimental data, with average coefficients of determination for samples in 1% NaCl at 121 °C of 0.98 and 0.95, respectively. During storage, food samples equilibrated to a similar NaCl concentration regardless of the thermal processing severity. The results suggest that sensory evaluation of multiphase (solid and liquid) products should occur at least 14 d after processing to allow enough time for the salt to equilibrate within the product. PMID:27060992

  7. Sodium Chloride Diffusion in Low-Acid Foods during Thermal Processing and Storage.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Ellen R; Tang, Juming; Sablani, Shyam S

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed at modeling sodium chloride (NaCl) diffusion in foods during thermal processing using analytical and numerical solutions and at investigating the changes in NaCl concentrations during storage after processing. Potato, radish, and salmon samples in 1% or 3% NaCl solutions were heated at 90, 105, or 121 °C for 5 to 240 min to simulate pasteurization and sterilization. Selected samples were stored at 4 or 22 °C for up to 28 d. Radish had the largest equilibrium NaCl concentrations and equilibrium distribution coefficients, but smallest effective diffusion coefficients, indicating that a greater amount of NaCl diffused into the radish at a slower rate. Effective diffusion coefficients determined using the analytical solution ranged from 0.2 × 10(-8) to 2.6 × 10(-8) m²/s. Numerical and analytical solutions showed good agreement with experimental data, with average coefficients of determination for samples in 1% NaCl at 121 °C of 0.98 and 0.95, respectively. During storage, food samples equilibrated to a similar NaCl concentration regardless of the thermal processing severity. The results suggest that sensory evaluation of multiphase (solid and liquid) products should occur at least 14 d after processing to allow enough time for the salt to equilibrate within the product.

  8. Hydrometallurgical extraction of zinc from CaO treated EAF dust in ammonium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takahiro; Chairaksa-Fujimoto, Romchat; Maruyama, Katsuya; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2016-01-25

    Zinc in Electric Arc Furnace dust or EAF dust mainly exists as ZnFe2O4 and ZnO. While ZnO can be simply dissolved into either an acidic or alkaline solution, it is difficult to dissolve ZnFe2O4. In our previous work, we introduced a process called "CaO treatment", a preliminary pyrometallurgical process designed to transform the ZnFe2O4 in the EAF dust into ZnO and Ca2Fe2O5. The halogens and others heavy metals were favorably vaporized during CaO treatment with no essential evaporation loss of zinc and iron, leaving CaO treated dust which consisted mainly of ZnO and Ca2Fe2O5 and no problematic ZnFe2O4 compound. In this work, the selective leaching of zinc over iron and calcium in the CaO treated dust was investigated using an NH4Cl solution. The effects of temperature, reaction time and NH4Cl concentration on dissolution behavior were examined. While most of the zinc in the CaO treated dust was extracted after 2 h at 70 °C with 2 M NH4Cl, only about 20% of calcium was leached in NH4Cl solution. However, the iron did not dissolve and remained as Ca2Fe2O5 in residue. It was confirmed that zinc can be effectively recovered using NH4Cl solution.

  9. Effect of benzalkonium chloride-free latanoprost ophthalmic solution on ocular surface in patients with glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Walimbe, Tejaswini; Chelerkar, Vidya; Bhagat, Purvi; Joshi, Abhijeet; Raut, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Benzalkonium chloride (BAK), included as a preservative in many topical treatments for glaucoma, induces significant toxicity and alters tear breakup time (TBUT). BAK-containing latanoprost, an ester prodrug of prostaglandin F2α, can cause ocular adverse events (AEs) associated with BAK. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of BAK-free latanoprost. Patients and methods A prospective, open-label, single-arm, multicenter, 8-week study in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension taking BAK-containing latanoprost for ≥12 months was performed. Patients were switched to BAK-free latanoprost ophthalmic solution 0.005% administered once daily, and eyes were assessed after 28 and 56 days. Primary efficacy and safety variables were TBUT and treatment-emergent AEs, respectively. Results At day 56, 40 eyes were evaluable. Mean TBUT increased significantly from baseline (3.67±1.60 seconds) to 5.03±2.64 and 6.06±3.39 seconds after 28 and 56 days of treatment with BAK-free latanoprost (P<0.0001). Ocular Surface Disease Index© (OSDI©) score also decreased significantly to 12.06±13.40 and 7.06±10.75 at 28 and 56 days, respectively, versus baseline (18.09±18.61, P<0.0001). In addition, inferior corneal staining score decreased significantly to 0.53 from baseline (0.85, P=0.0033). A reduction in conjunctival hyperemia and intraocular pressure was observed at both time points. No treatment-related serious AEs were evident and 12 (26.08%) treatment-emergent AEs occurred in seven patients, with eye pain and irritation being the most frequent. No clinically significant changes in vital signs or slit lamp examinations were observed. Conclusion Results indicate that switching from BAK-containing latanoprost to BAK-free latanoprost resulted in significant improvements in TBUT, OSDI© score, and inferior corneal staining score, and measurable reductions in conjunctival hyperemia score. Furthermore, BAK

  10. A convenient iodination method for alcohols using cesium iodide/methanesulfonic acid and its comparison using cesium iodide/p-toluenesulfonic acid or cesium iodide/aluminium chloride.

    PubMed

    Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Zia-Ullah; Perveen, Shahnaz; Hayat, Safdar; Ali, Muhammad; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    In situ generation of hydrogen iodide from cesium iodide/methanesulfonic acid was found to be an attractive reagent combination for the conversion of alkyl, allyl, and benzyl alcohols to their corresponding iodides under mild conditions. The method is compared with that using cesium iodide/p-toluenesulfonic acid or cesium iodide/aluminium chloride.

  11. Spectrophotometric determination of vanadium in metallurgical products with carminic acid and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, N.L.; Blokh, M. Sh.; Guseva, T.D.

    1985-11-01

    According to the authors, there is an increasing demand for sensitive, selective, and rapid methods of determining low levels of vanadium in metallurgical products, and solvent-extraction methods do not meet the requirements. The authors used an anthraquinone dye carminic acid (CA) as a chromophoric organic reagent: 1, 3, 4, 6-tetrahydroxy-2-R-5carboxy-8-methylanthra-9, 10-quinone. The CSA was cetyltrimethylammonium chloride CTA. The three-component system was examined in order to devise a reasonably sensitive and rapid method of determining vanadium in metallurgical products. A study is made of the complexing in the system formed by vanadium (IV) with CA and the CSA. The optimum conditions for the formation of the complex have been established together with the spectrophotometric characteristics. A spectrophotometric method has been devised for determining from 0.05 to 5% of vanadium in metallurgical products with a relative standard deviation of not more than 0.04.

  12. Dilute nitric or nitrous acid solution containing halide ions as effective media for pure gold dissolution.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Masashi; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Okamura, Kei

    2015-08-14

    The greatly enhanced oxidation ability of dilute aqueous nitric acid (0.10-2.0 mol L(-1)) containing bromide and iodide salts as well as chloride salts has been examined based on the dissolution kinetics of pure gold at 30-60 °C. It has been found that bromide salts are more effective than chloride salts in gaining the ability of dissolving gold in dilute aqueous nitric acid solution. At 60 °C, a piece of gold-wire (ca. 20 mg) is dissolved in 20 mL of as low as 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution containing 1.0-5.0 mol L(-1) NaBr and the dissolution rate constant, log(k/s(-1)), increases linearly (from -5.78 to -4.52) with the increasing NaBr concentration. The addition of organic solvents, such as acetonitrile and acetic acid, causes acceleration of gold dissolution in LiBr and NaBr solutions. With increasing MeCN contents, for instance, the log(k/s(-1)) value of 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution containing 2.0 mol L(-1) NaBr increases linearly from -5.30 to -4.61 at 30% (v/v) MeCN. The bromide salts affect the gold dissolution rate constant in the order of KBr < NaBr < LiBr < CaBr2. With increasing NaI concentration (0.20-3.0 mol L(-1)), some acceleration in log(k/s(-1)) of 0.50 or 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution has been observed; however, the slope of acceleration as the function of NaI concentration is much smaller than that of NaCl or NaBr. The gold dissolution ability has been examined also for nitrous acid containing chloride and bromide ions at 35 °C. The NaNO2 solution containing twice or more amounts of HX (X = Cl, Br) gives the maximum efficiency for gold dissolution, according to the log(k/s(-1)) values of the mixed solutions of NaNO2 (0.10-2.0 mol L(-1)) and HX of various concentrations. The influence of oxidation by dilute nitric and nitrous acids on the gold dissolution is discussed from the standpoint of the redox potentials in "modified" aqueous solutions and not of the changes in the activity coefficients of ions.

  13. Heterogeneous interactions of chlorine nitrate, hydrogen chloride, and nitric acid with sulfuric acid surfaces at stratospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Rossi, Michel J.; Golden, David M.

    1988-01-01

    The heterogeneous interactions of ClONO2, HCl, and HNO3 with sulfuric acid surfaces were studied using a Knudsen cell flow reactor. The surfaces studied, chosen to simulate global stratospheric particulate, were composed of 65-75 percent H2SO4 solutions at temperatures in the range -63 to -43 C. Heterogeneous loss, but not reaction, of HNO3 and HCl occurred on these surfaces; the measured sticking coefficients are reported. Chlorine nitrate reacted on the cold sulfuric acid surfaces, producing gas-phase HOCl and condensed HNO3. CLONO2 also reacted with HCl dissolved in the 65-percent H2SO4 solution at -63 C, forming gaseous Cl2. In all cases studied, the sticking and/or reaction coefficients were much larger for the 65-percent H2SO4 solution at -63 C than for the 75-percent solution at -43 C.

  14. The electrodeposition of cobalt, iron, antimony and their aluminum alloys from acidic aluminum chloride 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride room-temperature molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, John Anthony

    The electrodeposition of cobalt, iron, antimony, and their aluminum alloys was investigated in the room-temperature molten salt, aluminum chloride-1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (AlClsb3-MeEtimCl). Solutions of Co(II), Fe(II), and Sb(III) were prepared by controlled-potential coulometric anodization of the respective metal in Lewis acidic melt. The plating and stripping of these metals was investigated using cyclic voltammetry, rotating disk and rotating ring-disk electrode voltammetry, controlled potential coulometry, and potential step chronoamperometry. Bulk deposits of the pure and aluminum-alloyed metals were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction methods. The underpotential co-deposition of aluminum was observed during the electrodeposition of cobalt and iron; however, this phenomenon did not occur during the electrodeposition of antimony. The results of this investigation suggest that both a positive work function difference between the transition metal and aluminum and the mutual solubility of these components determine whether or not the co-deposition of aluminum takes place. Two electroanalytical techniques were developed for the analysis of co-deposited aluminum alloys: the first was based on anodic linear sweep voltammetry at a rotating-ring-disk electrode. The second was derived from the transition metal ion concentration changes observed during bulk deposition experiments. In the first technique, an alloy deposit was stripped from the disk electrode while the ring potential was held at a value where only one of the ions oxidized from the alloy could be reduced. In the second technique, the concentration of transition metal ions was monitored in an undivided cell with an anode made from the depositing metal. The co-deposition of aluminum was signalled by an increase in the transition metal ion concentration. The alloy composition data resulting from

  15. Nitric acid uptake by sulfuric acid solutions under stratospheric conditions - Determination of Henry's Law solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reihs, Christa M.; Golden, David M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1990-01-01

    The uptake of nitric acid by sulfuric acid solutions representative of stratospheric particulate at low temperatures was measured to determine the solubility of nitric acid in sulfuric acid solutions as a function of H2SO4 concentration and solution temperature. Solubilities are reported for sulfuric acid solutions ranging from 58 to 87 wt pct H2SO4 over a temperature range from 188 to 240 K, showing that, in general, the solubility of nitric acid increases with decreasing sulfuric acid concentration and with decreasing temperature. The measured solubilities indicate that nitric acid in the global stratosphere will be found predominantly in the gas phase.

  16. Effects of temperature and pressure on stress corrosion cracking behavior of 310S stainless steel in chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yunpan; Zhou, Cheng; Chen, Songying; Wang, Ruiyan

    2016-06-01

    310S is an austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications, having strong resistance of oxidation, hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking(SCC) is the main corrosion failure mode for 310S stainless steel. Past researched about SCC of 310S primarily focus on the corrosion mechanism and influence of temperature and corrosive media, but few studies concern the combined influence of temperature, pressure and chloride. For a better understanding of temperature and pressure's effects on SCC of 310S stainless steel, prepared samples are investigated via slow strain rate tensile test(SSRT) in different temperature and pressure in NACE A solution. The result shows that the SCC sensibility indexes of 310S stainless steel increase with the rise of temperature and reach maximum at 10MPa and 160°C, increasing by 22.3% compared with that at 10 MPa and 80 °C. Instead, the sensibility decreases with the pressure up. Besides, the fractures begin to transform from the ductile fracture to the brittle fracture with the increase of temperature. 310S stainless steel has an obvious tendency of stress corrosion at 10MPa and 160°C and the fracture surface exists cleavage steps, river patterns and some local secondary cracks, having obvious brittle fracture characteristics. The SCC cracks initiate from inclusions and tiny pits in the matrix and propagate into the matrix along the cross section gradually until rupture. In particular, the oxygen and chloride play an important role on the SCC of 310S stainless steel in NACE A solution. The chloride damages passivating film, causing pitting corrosion, concentrating in the cracks and accelerated SSC ultimately. The research reveals the combined influence of temperature, pressure and chloride on the SCC of 310S, which can be a guide to the application of 310S stainless steel in super-heater tube.

  17. Infrared optical constants of crystalline sodium chloride dihydrate: application to study the crystallization of aqueous sodium chloride solution droplets at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Schnaiter, Martin

    2012-08-23

    Complex refractive indices of sodium chloride dihydrate, NaCl·2H(2)O, have been retrieved in the 6000-800 cm(-1) wavenumber regime from the infrared extinction spectra of crystallized aqueous NaCl solution droplets. The data set is valid in the temperature range from 235 to 216 K and was inferred from crystallization experiments with airborne particles performed in the large coolable aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The retrieval concept was based on the Kramers-Kronig relationship for a complex function of the optical constants n and k whose imaginary part is proportional to the optical depth of a small particle absorption spectrum in the Rayleigh approximation. The appropriate proportionality factor was inferred from a fitting algorithm applied to the extinction spectra of about 1 μm sized particles, which, apart from absorption, also featured a pronounced scattering contribution. NaCl·2H(2)O is the thermodynamically stable crystalline solid in the sodium chloride-water system below the peritectic at 273.3 K; above 273.3 K, the anhydrous NaCl is more stable. In contrast to anhydrous NaCl crystals, the dihydrate particles reveal prominent absorption signatures at mid-infrared wavelengths due to the hydration water molecules. Formation of NaCl·2H(2)O was only detected at temperatures clearly below the peritectic and was first evidenced in a crystallization experiment conducted at 235 K. We have employed the retrieved refractive indices of NaCl·2H(2)O to quantify the temperature dependent partitioning between anhydrous and dihydrate NaCl particles upon crystallization of aqueous NaCl solution droplets. It was found that the temperature range from 235 to 216 K represents the transition regime where the composition of the crystallized particle ensemble changes from almost only NaCl to almost only NaCl·2H(2)O particles. Compared to the findings on the NaCl/NaCl·2H(2)O partitioning from a recent study conducted with micron

  18. Infrared optical constants of crystalline sodium chloride dihydrate: application to study the crystallization of aqueous sodium chloride solution droplets at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Schnaiter, Martin

    2012-08-23

    Complex refractive indices of sodium chloride dihydrate, NaCl·2H(2)O, have been retrieved in the 6000-800 cm(-1) wavenumber regime from the infrared extinction spectra of crystallized aqueous NaCl solution droplets. The data set is valid in the temperature range from 235 to 216 K and was inferred from crystallization experiments with airborne particles performed in the large coolable aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The retrieval concept was based on the Kramers-Kronig relationship for a complex function of the optical constants n and k whose imaginary part is proportional to the optical depth of a small particle absorption spectrum in the Rayleigh approximation. The appropriate proportionality factor was inferred from a fitting algorithm applied to the extinction spectra of about 1 μm sized particles, which, apart from absorption, also featured a pronounced scattering contribution. NaCl·2H(2)O is the thermodynamically stable crystalline solid in the sodium chloride-water system below the peritectic at 273.3 K; above 273.3 K, the anhydrous NaCl is more stable. In contrast to anhydrous NaCl crystals, the dihydrate particles reveal prominent absorption signatures at mid-infrared wavelengths due to the hydration water molecules. Formation of NaCl·2H(2)O was only detected at temperatures clearly below the peritectic and was first evidenced in a crystallization experiment conducted at 235 K. We have employed the retrieved refractive indices of NaCl·2H(2)O to quantify the temperature dependent partitioning between anhydrous and dihydrate NaCl particles upon crystallization of aqueous NaCl solution droplets. It was found that the temperature range from 235 to 216 K represents the transition regime where the composition of the crystallized particle ensemble changes from almost only NaCl to almost only NaCl·2H(2)O particles. Compared to the findings on the NaCl/NaCl·2H(2)O partitioning from a recent study conducted with micron

  19. Phase and extraction equilibria in water-polyethyleneglycol ethers of monoethanolamides of synthetic fatty acid-ammonium chloride systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnov, A. E.; Golovkina, A. V.; Kudryashova, O. S.; Denisova, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    Phase equilibria in layering systems of water, polyethyleneglycol ethers of monoethanolamides of synthetic fatty acids (SFAs) (synthamide-5), and ammonium chloride are studied. The possibility of using such systems for the liquid extraction of metal ions is evaluated. The effect the nature of salting-out agents has on the processes of segregation of the systems has been considered.

  20. Phase, morphology, and hygroscopicity of mixed oleic acid/sodium chloride/water aerosol particles before and after ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Dennis-Smither, Benjamin J; Hanford, Kate L; Kwamena, Nana-Owusua A; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P

    2012-06-21

    Aerosol optical tweezers are used to probe the phase, morphology, and hygroscopicity of single aerosol particles consisting of an inorganic component, sodium chloride, and a water insoluble organic component, oleic acid. Coagulation of oleic acid aerosol with an optically trapped aqueous sodium chloride droplet leads to formation of a phase-separated particle with two partially engulfed liquid phases. The dependence of the phase and morphology of the trapped particle with variation in relative humidity (RH) is investigated by cavity enhanced Raman spectroscopy over the RH range <5% to >95%. The efflorescence and deliquescence behavior of the inorganic component is shown to be unaffected by the presence of the organic phase. Whereas efflorescence occurs promptly (<1 s), the deliquescence process requires both dissolution of the inorganic component and the adoption of an equilibrium morphology for the resulting two phase particle, occurring on a time-scale of <20 s. Comparative measurements of the hygroscopicity of mixed aqueous sodium chloride/oleic acid droplets with undoped aqueous sodium chloride droplets show that the oleic acid does not impact on the equilibration partitioning of water between the inorganic component and the gas phase or the time response of evaporation/condensation. The oxidative aging of the particles through reaction with ozone is shown to increase the hygroscopicity of the organic component.

  1. Calculated Third Order Rate Constants for Interpreting the Mechanisms of Hydrolyses of Chloroformates, Carboxylic Acid Halides, Sulfonyl Chlorides and Phosphorochloridates

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, T. William

    2015-01-01

    Hydrolyses of acid derivatives (e.g., carboxylic acid chlorides and fluorides, fluoro- and chloroformates, sulfonyl chlorides, phosphorochloridates, anhydrides) exhibit pseudo-first order kinetics. Reaction mechanisms vary from those involving a cationic intermediate (SN1) to concerted SN2 processes, and further to third order reactions, in which one solvent molecule acts as the attacking nucleophile and a second molecule acts as a general base catalyst. A unified framework is discussed, in which there are two reaction channels—an SN1-SN2 spectrum and an SN2-SN3 spectrum. Third order rate constants (k3) are calculated for solvolytic reactions in a wide range of compositions of acetone-water mixtures, and are shown to be either approximately constant or correlated with the Grunwald-Winstein Y parameter. These data and kinetic solvent isotope effects, provide the experimental evidence for the SN2-SN3 spectrum (e.g., for chloro- and fluoroformates, chloroacetyl chloride, p-nitrobenzoyl p-toluenesulfonate, sulfonyl chlorides). Deviations from linearity lead to U- or V-shaped plots, which assist in the identification of the point at which the reaction channel changes from SN2-SN3 to SN1-SN2 (e.g., for benzoyl chloride). PMID:26006228

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Adsorption of Poly(acrylic acid) and Poly(methacrylic acid) on Dodecyltrimethylammonium Chloride Micelle in Water: Effect of Charge Density.

    PubMed

    Sulatha, Muralidharan S; Natarajan, Upendra

    2015-09-24

    We have investigated the interaction of dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DoTA) micelle with weak polyelectrolytes, poly(acrylic acid) and poly(methacrylic acid). Anionic as well as un-ionized forms of the polyelectrolytes were studied. Polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes were formed within 5-11 ns of the simulation time and were found to be stable. Association is driven purely by electrostatic interactions for anionic chains whereas dispersion interactions also play a dominant role in the case of un-ionized chains. Surfactant headgroup nitrogen atoms are in close contact with the carboxylic oxygens of the polyelectrolyte chain at a distance of 0.35 nm. In the complexes, the polyelectrolyte chains are adsorbed on to the hydrophilic micellar surface and do not penetrate into the hydrophobic core of the micelle. Polyacrylate chain shows higher affinity for complex formation with DoTA as compared to polymethacrylate chain. Anionic polyelectrolyte chains show higher interaction strength as compared to corresponding un-ionized chains. Anionic chains act as polymeric counterion in the complexes, resulting in the displacement of counterions (Na(+) and Cl(-)) into the bulk solution. Anionic chains show distinct shrinkage upon adsorption onto the micelle. Detailed information about the microscopic structure and binding characteristics of these complexes is in agreement with available experimental literature. PMID:26355463

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Adsorption of Poly(acrylic acid) and Poly(methacrylic acid) on Dodecyltrimethylammonium Chloride Micelle in Water: Effect of Charge Density.

    PubMed

    Sulatha, Muralidharan S; Natarajan, Upendra

    2015-09-24

    We have investigated the interaction of dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DoTA) micelle with weak polyelectrolytes, poly(acrylic acid) and poly(methacrylic acid). Anionic as well as un-ionized forms of the polyelectrolytes were studied. Polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes were formed within 5-11 ns of the simulation time and were found to be stable. Association is driven purely by electrostatic interactions for anionic chains whereas dispersion interactions also play a dominant role in the case of un-ionized chains. Surfactant headgroup nitrogen atoms are in close contact with the carboxylic oxygens of the polyelectrolyte chain at a distance of 0.35 nm. In the complexes, the polyelectrolyte chains are adsorbed on to the hydrophilic micellar surface and do not penetrate into the hydrophobic core of the micelle. Polyacrylate chain shows higher affinity for complex formation with DoTA as compared to polymethacrylate chain. Anionic polyelectrolyte chains show higher interaction strength as compared to corresponding un-ionized chains. Anionic chains act as polymeric counterion in the complexes, resulting in the displacement of counterions (Na(+) and Cl(-)) into the bulk solution. Anionic chains show distinct shrinkage upon adsorption onto the micelle. Detailed information about the microscopic structure and binding characteristics of these complexes is in agreement with available experimental literature.

  4. Structural, dynamic, and transport properties of concentrated aqueous sodium chloride solutions under an external static electric field.

    PubMed

    Ren, Gan; Shi, Rui; Wang, Yanting

    2014-04-24

    In the absence of an external electric field, it has already been known that ion clusters are formed instantaneously in moderately concentrated ionic solutions. In this work, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the changes of structural, dynamic, and transport properties in a sodium chloride solution under an external electric field from the ion cluster perspective. Our MD simulation results indicate that, with a strong external electric field E (≥0.1 V/nm) applied, ion clusters become smaller and less net charged, and the structures and dynamics as well as transport properties of the ion solution become anisotropic. The influence of the cluster structure and shell structure to transport properties was analyzed and the Einstein relation was found invalid in this system.

  5. Development of a Combined Solution Formulation of Atropine Sulfate and Obidoxime Chloride for Autoinjector and Evaluation of Its Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ettehadi, Hossein Ali; Ghalandari, Rouhollah; Shafaati, Alireza; Foroutan, Seyed Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Atropine (AT) and oximes, alone or in combination, have been proven greatly valuable therapeutics in the treatment of organophosphates intoxications. An injectable mixture of AT and obidoxime (OB) was formulated for the administration by automatic self-injector. The aqueous single dose solution contained 275 mg obidoxime chloride and 2.5 mg atropine sulfate per 1 mL (220 mg and 2 mg per 0.8 effective dose, respectively). The final solution was sterilized by filtration through a 0.22 μm pore size filter. This more concentrated solution allowed to use a smaller size and lighter weight cartridge. Quality control tests, including assay of the two major compounds were performed separately, using reversed-phase HPLC methods. Besides, the stability test was carried out according to ICH guideline for the accelerated test. The obtained results showed that the proposed formulation is stable over a period of 2 years after preparation. PMID:24250669

  6. Novel short chain fatty acids restore chloride secretion in cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Toan D. . E-mail: T1Nguyen@u.washington.edu; Kim, Ug-Sung; Perrine, Susan P.

    2006-03-31

    Phenylalanine deletion at position 508 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator ({delta}F508-CFTR), the most common mutation in cystic fibrosis (CF), causes a misfolded protein exhibiting partial chloride conductance and impaired trafficking to the plasma membrane. 4-Phenylbutyrate corrects defective {delta}F508-CFTR trafficking in vitro, but is not clinically efficacious. From a panel of short chain fatty acid derivatives, we showed that 2,2-dimethyl-butyrate (ST20) and {alpha}-methylhydrocinnamic acid (ST7), exhibiting high oral bioavailability and sustained plasma levels, correct the {delta}F508-CFTR defect. Pre-incubation ({>=}6 h) of CF IB3-1 airway cells with {>=}1 mM ST7 or ST20 restored the ability of 100 {mu}M forskolin to stimulate an {sup 125}I{sup -} efflux. This efflux was fully inhibited by NPPB, DPC, or glibenclamide, suggesting mediation through CFTR. Partial inhibition by DIDS suggests possible contribution from an additional Cl{sup -} channel regulated by CFTR. Thus, ST7 and ST20 offer treatment potential for CF caused by the {delta}F508 mutation.

  7. A statistical assessment of the quantitative uptake of vinyl chloride monomer from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Withey, J R; Collins, B T

    1976-11-01

    The presence of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) in foodstuffs and its demonstrated carcinogenic potential when administered by the oral route has raised questions concerning the quantitative estimation of the safety of the use of food packaging fabricated from rigid polyvinyl chloride. A statistical model, which was tested by curve-fitting data obtained from an oral uptake study, has been demonstrated to be of predictive value. Ninety-five percent condifence limits were also calculated, and the data from this study were compared with those from a previous gas phase exposure study. It was concluded that if the total daily liquid intake contained 20 ppm of VCM then the area generated under the blood level-time curve, for rats, would be equivalent to an inhalation exposure of about 2 ppm for 24 hr.

  8. Molecular dynamics study on the growth of structure I methane hydrate in aqueous solution of sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Tung, Yen-Tien; Chen, Li-Jen; Chen, Yan-Ping; Lin, Shiang-Tai

    2012-12-01

    The structure, thermodynamic, and kinetic properties of methane hydrates formed from the aqueous solution of sodium chloride are investigated based on molecular dynamics simulations. A three-phase molecular model consisting of a slab of methane hydrate phase, a slab of liquid water containing sodium chloride, and a gas phase of methane molecules is used. The decrease in the three-phase coexisting temperatures (by 2-3 K) at different pressures (10-100 MPa) for aqueous NaCl solutions (about 2 mol %) confirms the thermodynamic inhibition of NaCl. The growth rate of methane hydrates in NaCl solution is found to be half to one-third of that in pure water. The kinetic inhibition of NaCl is found to be a result of the reduced water repelling at the growing interface due to the strong hydration of ions. Individual ions or NaCl ion pairs can replace water molecules to participate in the formation of the cage structures. The distortion of water cages due to the presence of ions may result in a reduced fraction of occupation of methane in the cage cavities. Our results provide useful insights into the mechanism of growth of methane hydrates in seawater and the desalination.

  9. Effect of divalent ions on electroosmotic transport in a sodium chloride aqueous solution confined in an amorphous silica nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlisk, A. T.; Zambrano, Harvey; Cevheri, Necmettin; Yoda, Minami; Computational Micro-; Nanofluidics Lab Team; The Fluids, Optical; Interfacial Diagnostics Lab Team

    2012-11-01

    A critical enabling technology for the next generation of nanoscale devices, such as nanoscale ``lab on a chip'' systems, is controlling electroosmotic flow (EOF) in nanochannels. In this work, we control EOF in an aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution confined in a silica nanochannel by systematically adding different amounts of divalent ions. Multivalent ions have a different affinity for the silica surface and different hydration characteristics in comparison to monovalent ions. Therefore by adding Mg++ and Ca++ to the sodium chloride solution, the electroosmotic velocity and the structure of the electrical double layer will be modified. The effects of adding Mg++ and Ca++ will be compared using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the EOF at different electric fields of a NaCl solution in a silica nanochannel with different fractions of Ca++ and Mg++ ions. In general, the wall zeta-potential magnitude, and hence the EOF velocity, decreases as the Ca++ or Mg++ concentration increases. The system responds linearly with electric field. We will compare the computational results with the experimental data of Cevheri and Yoda (2012). This work is supported by Army Research Office (ARO) grant number W911NF1010290.

  10. Shock Hugoniot and equations of states of water, castor oil, and aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, sucrose and gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gojani, A. B.; Ohtani, K.; Takayama, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a result of experiments for the determination of reliable shock Hugoniot curves of liquids, in particular, at relatively low pressure region, which are needed to perform precise numerical simulations of shock wave/tissue interaction prior to the development of shock wave related therapeutic devices. Underwater shock waves were generated by explosions of laser ignited 10 mg silver azide pellets, which were temporally and spatially well controlled. Measuring temporal variation of shock velocities and over-pressures in caster oil, aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, sucrose and gelatin with various concentrations, we succeeded to determine shock Hugoniot curves of these liquids and hence parameters describing Tait type equations of state.

  11. Comparison of Electrochemical Methods to Determine Crevice Corrosion Repassivation Potential of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    K. Evans; A. Yilmaz; S. Day; L. Wong; J. Estill

    2004-08-23

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is a nickel-based alloy highly resistant to corrosion. In some aggressive conditions of high chloride concentration, temperature and applied potential, Alloy 22 may suffer crevice corrosion, a form of localized corrosion. There are several electrochemical methods that can be used to determine localized corrosion in metallic alloys. One of the most popular for rapid screening is the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP). This work compares the repassivation potentials obtained using CPP to related repassivation potential values obtained using the Tsujikawa-Hisamatsu Electrochemical (THE) method and the potentiostatic (POT) method. Studied variables included temperature and chloride concentration. The temperature was varied from 30 C and 120 C and the chloride concentration was varied between 0.0005 M to 4 M. Results show that similar repassivation potentials were obtained for Alloy 22 using CPP and THE methods. Generally, under more aggressive conditions, the repassivation potentials were more conservative using the CPP method. POT tests confirmed the validity of the repassivation potential as a threshold below which localized corrosion does not nucleate. The mode of attack in the tested specimens varied depending if the test method was CPP or THE; however, the repassivation potential remained the same.

  12. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose pretreated with zinc chloride and hydrochloric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.F.; Gong, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    Microcrystalline cellulose, Avicel, was dissolved in a concentrated solution of ZnCl/sub 2/ and 0.5% hydrochloric acid followed by heating at 145/sup 0/C for 6 min. after cooling, cellulose in its amorphous form was precipitated by the addition of acetone. The resulting cellulose was hydrolyzed by cellulase derived from Trichoderma viride. At concentrations of 20% cellulose and 1% cellulase, cellulose was hydrolyzed completely for form a solution of 19% glucose and 1% cellobiose within 72 h of incubation. 1 figure, 5 tables.

  13. Effect of pore water velocities and solute input methods on chloride transport in the undisturbed soil columns of Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, BeiBei; Wang, QuanJiu

    2016-04-01

    Studies on solute transport under different pore water velocity and solute input methods in undisturbed soil could play instructive roles for crop production. Based on the experiments in the laboratory, the effect of solute input methods with small pulse input and large pulse input, as well as four pore water velocities, on chloride transport in the undisturbed soil columns obtained from the Loess Plateau under controlled condition was studied. Chloride breakthrough curves (BTCs) were generated using the miscible displacement method under water-saturated, steady flow conditions. Using the 0.15 mol L-1 CaCl2 solution as a tracer, a small pulse (0.1 pore volumes) was first induced, and then, after all the solution was wash off, a large pulse (0.5 pore volumes) was conducted. The convection-dispersion equation (CDE) and the two-region model (T-R) were used to describe the BTCs, and their prediction accuracies and fitted parameters were compared as well. All the BTCs obtained for the different input methods and the four pore water velocities were all smooth. However, the shapes of the BTCs varied greatly; small pulse inputs resulted in more rapid attainment of peak values that appeared earlier with increases in pore water velocity, whereas large pulse inputs resulted in an opposite trend. Both models could fit the experimental data well, but the prediction accuracy of the T-R was better. The values of the dispersivity, λ, calculated from the dispersion coefficient obtained from the CDE were about one order of magnitude larger than those calculated from the dispersion coefficient given by the T-R, but the calculated Peclet number, Pe, was lower. The mobile-immobile partition coefficient, β, decreased, while the mass exchange coefficient increased with increases in pore water velocity.

  14. Slow dynamics of water molecules in an aqueous solution of lithium chloride probed by neutron spin-echo.

    PubMed

    Mamontov, E; Ohl, M

    2013-07-14

    Aqueous solutions of lithium chloride are uniquely similar to pure water in the parameters such as glass transition temperature, Tg, yet they could be supercooled without freezing down to below 200 K even in the bulk state. This provides advantageous opportunity to study low-temperature dynamics of water molecules in water-like environment in the bulk rather than nano-confined state. Using high-resolution neutron spin-echo data, we argue that the critical temperature, Tc, which is also common between lithium chloride aqueous solutions and pure water, is associated with the split of a secondary relaxation from the main structural relaxation on cooling down. Our results do not allow distinguishing between a well-defined separate secondary relaxation process and the "excess wing" scenario, in which the temperature dependence of the secondary relaxation follows the main relaxation. Importantly, however, in either of these scenarios the secondary relaxation is associated with density-density fluctuations, measurable in a neutron scattering experiment. Neutron scattering could be the only experimental technique with the capability of providing information on the spatial characteristics of the secondary relaxation through the dependence of the signal on the scattering momentum transfer. We propose a simple method for such analysis. PMID:23689686

  15. The role of macrocyclic compounds in the extraction and possible separation of platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyothi, Rajesh Kumar; Lee, Jin-Young

    2016-06-01

    Macrocyclic compounds (crown ethers), specifically 18-crown-6 (18-C-6), benzo-15-crown-5 (B-15-C-5), di-benzo-18-crown-6 (DB-18-C-6) and di-cyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC-18C-6), are used as extractants as well as synergists with amine-group extractants. Platinum and rhodium belong to platinum-group metals (PGMs) and have very similar ionic radii and similar properties. The separation of PGMs is most useful for the preparation of functional materials. Macrocyclic compounds are tested for platinum and rhodium separation and are found to achieve marginal separation. Amines (used as extractants) are paired with macrocyclic compounds (used as synergists), and the separation factor between platinum and rhodium is increased with synergistic enhancement from a chloride solution. The present study discusses extraction chemistry, separation factors and the synergy between platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions. To ensure accurate data, the aqueous samples in this study are analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES).

  16. The role of macrocyclic compounds in the extraction and possible separation of platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions

    PubMed Central

    Jyothi, Rajesh Kumar; Lee, Jin-Young

    2016-01-01

    Macrocyclic compounds (crown ethers), specifically 18-crown-6 (18-C-6), benzo-15-crown-5 (B-15-C-5), di-benzo-18-crown-6 (DB-18-C-6) and di-cyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DC-18C-6), are used as extractants as well as synergists with amine-group extractants. Platinum and rhodium belong to platinum-group metals (PGMs) and have very similar ionic radii and similar properties. The separation of PGMs is most useful for the preparation of functional materials. Macrocyclic compounds are tested for platinum and rhodium separation and are found to achieve marginal separation. Amines (used as extractants) are paired with macrocyclic compounds (used as synergists), and the separation factor between platinum and rhodium is increased with synergistic enhancement from a chloride solution. The present study discusses extraction chemistry, separation factors and the synergy between platinum and rhodium from chloride solutions. To ensure accurate data, the aqueous samples in this study are analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). PMID:27283394

  17. Synthesis of TiO(2) (Anatase) by Sol-Gel Process Performed in Metal Chlorides Saturated Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Robson Fernandes

    2001-07-15

    Titania powders were synthesized by a sol-gel process using titanium tetrabutoxide as a precursor. The syntheses were performed in water or in saturated aqueous solutions of KCl, CaCl(2), NiCl(2), CoCl(2), and MnCl(2). It is demonstrated, by X-ray diffraction patterns of the synthesized powders that the samples obtained in saturated aqueous solutions of metal chlorides are crystalline (anatase phase) with some minor amount of brookite phase, whereas the sample synthesized in water is amorphous in nature. Thus, it is shown that the anatase phase can be obtained independently on any previous or further treatment of the synthesized powder, such as hydrothermal or heat treatment, providing a new, simple, quick, and inexpensive route to synthesize anatase powders. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  18. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  19. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-03-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 5 figs.

  20. Process for the recovery of strontium from acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1990-12-31

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium and technetium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant is a macrocyclic polyether in a diluent which is insoluble in water, but which will itself dissolve a small amount of water. The process will extract strontium and technetium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  1. Effect of Fluid Flow on Zinc Electrodeposits from Acid Chloride Electrolytes. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmassir, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Zinc was deposited potentiostatically from acid chloride baths. Once bath chemistry and electrochemistry were controlled, the study was focused on convective mass transfer at horizontal electrodes and its effect on cell performance. A laser schlieren imaging technique allowed in situ observations of flow patterns and their correlation with current transients. Convection was turbulent and mass transfer as a function of Rayleigh number was well correlated by: Sh = 0.14 R to the 1/3 power. Similarly, convection initiation time was correlated by DT/d squared = 38 Ra to the -2/3 power. Time scale of fluctuations was about half the initiation time. Taking the boundary layer thickness as a characteristic length, a critical Rayleigh number for the onset of convection was deduced: Ra sub CR = 5000. Placing the anode on the top of the cathode completely changed the flow pattern but kept the I-t curves identical whereas the use of a cathode grid doubled the limiting current. A well defined plateau in the current voltage curves suggested that hydrogen evolution has been successfully inhibited. Finally, long time deposition showed that convection at horizontal electrodes increased the induction time for dentrite growth by at least a factor of 2 with respect to a vertical wire.

  2. Ultrasensitive Detection of Ferulic Acid Using Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) Functionalized Graphene-Based Electrochemical Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin-jie; Gao, Xia; Zhang, Pei; Feng, Shi-lan; Hu, Fang-di; Li, Ying-dong; Wang, Chun-ming

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical redox of ferulic acid (FA) was investigated systematically by cyclic voltammetry (CV) with a poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) functionalized graphene-modified glassy carbon electrode (PDDA-G/GCE) as a working electrode. A simple and sensitive differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique was proposed for the direct quantitative determination of FA in Angelica sinensis and spiked human urine samples for the first time. The dependence of the intensities of currents and potentials on nature of the supporting electrolyte, pH, scan rate, and concentration was investigated. Under optimal conditions, the proposed sensor exhibited excellent electrochemical sensitivity to FA, and the oxidation peak current was proportional to FA concentration in the range of 8.95 × 10−8 M ~5.29 × 10−5 M, with a relatively low detection limit of 4.42 × 10−8 M. This fabricated sensor also displayed acceptable reproducibility, long-term stability, and high selectivity with negligible interferences from common interfering species. Besides, it was applied to detect FA in Angelica sinensis and biological samples with satisfactory results, making it a potential alternative tool for the quantitative detection of FA in pharmaceutical analysis. PMID:24900937

  3. Study on the interaction of morphine chloride with deoxyribonucleic acid by fluorescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. F.; Dong, C.

    2009-01-01

    The mode and mechanism of the interaction of morphine chloride, an important alkaloid compound to calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct DNA) was investigated from absorption and fluorescence titration techniques. Hypochromic effect was founded in the absorption spectra of morphine when concentration of DNA increased. The decreased fluorescence study revealed non-cooperative binding of the morphine to DNA with an affinity of 3.94 × 10 3 M -1, and the stoichiometry of binding was characterized to be about one morphine molecule per nucleotide. Stern-Volmer plots at different temperatures proved that the quenching mechanism was static. Ferrocyanide quenching study showed that the magnitude of KSV of the bound morphine was lower than that of the free one. In addition, it was found that ionic strength could affect the binding of morphine and DNA. Fluorescence polarization and denatured DNA studies also applied strong evidences that morphine molecule was partially intercalated between every alternate base pairs of ct DNA. As observed from above experiments, intercalation was well supported as the binding mode of morphine and ct DNA.

  4. Protic acid resin enhanced 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride pretreatment of Arundo donax Linn.

    PubMed

    You, Tingting; Zhang, Liming; Zhou, Sukun; Xu, Feng

    2014-09-01

    To improve the cellulose digestibility of energy crop Arudo donax Linn. with cost-efficient, a novel pretreatment of protic acid resin Amberlyst 35DRY catalyzed inexpensive ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C4mim]Cl) was developed in this work. The pretreatment was performed at 160°C with [C4mim]Cl for 1.5h, followed by Amberlyst 35DRY catalyzed at 90°C for 1h. The IL-Amberlyst pretreatment was demonstrated to be effective, evidenced by the reduction in cellulose crystallinity (31.4%) and increased porosity caused by extensive swelling the undissolved biomass and partial depolymerization of the longer cellulose chain of the dissolved biomass by Amberlyst. Consequently, a higher glucose yield (92.8%) was obtained than for the single [C4mim]Cl pretreatment (42.8%) at an enzyme loading of 20 FPU/g substrate. Overall, the enhanced pretreatment was competitive by using inexpensive and recyclable IL-Amberlyst 35DRY pretreated system with shorter processing time and reduced enzyme usage. PMID:25001325

  5. Removal of copper (II) from aqueous solutions by flotation using polyaluminum chloride silicate (PAX-XL60 S) as coagulant and carbonate ion as activator.

    PubMed

    Ghazy, S E; Mahmoud, I A; Ragab, A H

    2006-01-01

    Flotation is a separation technology for removing toxic heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. Here a simple and rapid flotation procedure is presented for the removal of copper(II) from aqueous solutions. It is based on the use of polyaluminum chloride silicate (PAX-XL60 S) as coagulant and flocculent, carbonate ion as activator and oleic acid (HOL) as surfactant. Both ion and precipitate flotation are included depending on the solution pH. Ion and precipitate flotation in the aqueous HOL-PAX-XL60 S-Cu2+-CO3(2-) system gave powerful preferential removal of Cu2+ (F -100%) over the HOL-PAX-XL60 S-Cu2+ system containing no CO3(2+) ion (F approximately 86%). The role of CO3(2-) ion is also evident from decreasing the dose of PAX-XL60 S from 700 mg l(-1) to 200 mg l(-1). The other parameters, influencing the flotation process, namely: metal ion, surfactant and PAX-XL60 S concentrations, ionic strength, temperature and foreign ions were examined. Moreover, the procedure was successfully applied to recover Cu2+ ions from different volumes up to 11 and from natural water samples. PMID:16457175

  6. Removal of copper (II) from aqueous solutions by flotation using polyaluminum chloride silicate (PAX-XL60 S) as coagulant and carbonate ion as activator.

    PubMed

    Ghazy, S E; Mahmoud, I A; Ragab, A H

    2006-01-01

    Flotation is a separation technology for removing toxic heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. Here a simple and rapid flotation procedure is presented for the removal of copper(II) from aqueous solutions. It is based on the use of polyaluminum chloride silicate (PAX-XL60 S) as coagulant and flocculent, carbonate ion as activator and oleic acid (HOL) as surfactant. Both ion and precipitate flotation are included depending on the solution pH. Ion and precipitate flotation in the aqueous HOL-PAX-XL60 S-Cu2+-CO3(2-) system gave powerful preferential removal of Cu2+ (F -100%) over the HOL-PAX-XL60 S-Cu2+ system containing no CO3(2+) ion (F approximately 86%). The role of CO3(2-) ion is also evident from decreasing the dose of PAX-XL60 S from 700 mg l(-1) to 200 mg l(-1). The other parameters, influencing the flotation process, namely: metal ion, surfactant and PAX-XL60 S concentrations, ionic strength, temperature and foreign ions were examined. Moreover, the procedure was successfully applied to recover Cu2+ ions from different volumes up to 11 and from natural water samples.

  7. Comparison of the release behaviors of di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and tri(2-ethylhexyl) trimellitate from the polyvinyl-chloride infusion set into pharmaceutical solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yang, Fengmin; Shen, Gang; Yang, Yueyang; Tang, Yalin

    2015-05-01

    Polyvinyl-chloride (PVC) with plasticizers of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and tris(2-ethyl- hexyl) trimellitate (TOTM) is widely used in medical and paramedical appliances. However, such plasticizers can leach from PVC products into contact solutions. The aim of this study is to investigate the release behaviors of DEHP and TOTM from the PVC intravenous infusion set into various pharmaceutical solutions under the simulated clinical conditions, such as the lipophilic substances (paclitaxel) , parenteral nutrition (fat emulsion injection) , acid and alkali pharmaceutical solution (levofloxacin hydrochloride injection, pH 3.0-5.0 and furosemide, pH 8.0-9.0). A simple and rapid high-performance liquid chromatographic method with UV detection (HPLC-UV) for the determination of DEHP or TOTM released from PVC medical devices into the above intravenous preparations was developed. The cumulative amounts of DEHP or TOTM released in 24 h were in the same following order: paclitaxel > fat emulsion injection levofloxacin hydrochloride > furosemide solution. From a comparison of the cumulative amounts of released DEHP and TOTM from the above solutions, we found that the cumulative amount of TOTM is far less than that of DEHP, under the same conditions. The cumulative amount of the DEHP released in 24 h in the paclitaxel solution was 21. 14 mg, while under the same conditions, the cumulative amount of TOTM was only 0. 078 mg. The cumulative amount of DEHP is assumed to be about 270 times that of the released TOTM. Thus TOTM could be a superior alternative to DEHP for use in medical devices because of its potential lower leachability.

  8. Analysis of phthalic acid diesters, monoester, and other plasticizers in polyvinyl chloride household products in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Tsuyoshi; Isama, Kazuo; Matsuoka, Atsuko

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of six phthalic acid diesters (PAEs) [di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), diisononyl phthalate (DINP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DNOP), and diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP)], two non-phthalic plasticizers [di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA), 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutylate (TMPDIB)], and mono 2-ethylhexyl phthalate(MEHP) in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) household products that children often places in their mouths and/or contact with their skin (41 products, 47 samples) in Japan. The detection frequencies of the studied compounds were as follows: DEHP (79 %), DINP-2 (13 %), DINP-1 (11 %), DBP (8.5 %), DEHA (8.5 %), DIDP (4.3 %), and DNOP (2.1 %). Concentrations of these compounds ranged from 0.021 % to 48 %. BBP and TMPDIB were not detected in the all samples. Most samples contained DEHP and DINP at high concentrations over 0.1 %. High concentrations of PAEs were detected in PVC household products that appear appealing to children and can possibly be licked and chewed by them. Di(2-ethylhexyl) terephtalete, diisononyl 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, acetyl tributyl citrate, and di(2-ethylhexyl) 4-cyclohexene-1,2-dicarboxylate used as substitute plasticizers were also detected in several samples. MEHP was present in 70 % of the samples, with concentrations ranging from trace amounts to 140 μg/g. The ratios of MEHP against DEHP were 6.2 × 10(-4) to 1.6 × 10(-1) %. MEHP in the household products investigated in this study was most probably an impurity in DEHP. The high concentrations of PAEs detected in products that children often place in their mouth reveal the importance of replacing plasticizers in common household products, and not just children's toys, with safer alternatives.

  9. A Fiber-Optic Sensor Using an Aqueous Solution of Sodium Chloride to Measure Temperature and Water Level Simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Sim, Hyeok In; Shin, Sang Hun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Moon, Joo Hyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2014-01-01

    A fiber-optic sensor system using a multiplexed array of sensing probes based on an aqueous solution of sodium chloride (NaCl solution) and an optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR) for simultaneous measurement of temperature and water level is proposed. By changing the temperature, the refractive index of the NaCl solution is varied and Fresnel reflection arising at the interface between the distal end of optical fiber and the NaCl solution is then also changed. We measured the modified optical power of the light reflected from the sensing probe using a portable OTDR device and also obtained the relationship between the temperature of water and the optical power. In this study, the water level was simply determined by measuring the signal difference of the optical power due to the temperature difference of individual sensing probes placed inside and outside of the water. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the temperature and water level can be obtained simultaneously by measuring optical powers of light reflected from sensing probes based on the NaCl solution. It is anticipated that the proposed fiber-optic sensor system makes it possible to remotely monitor the real-time change of temperature and water level of the spent fuel pool during a loss of power accident. PMID:25310471

  10. Slow strain rate fracture of high-strength steel at controlled electrochemical potentials in ammonium chloride, potassium chloride, and ammonium nitrate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.T.; Nichols, D.E.; Daniels, R.D.

    1992-08-15

    Slow strain rate testing has been undertaken to determine the effects of individual chemical species on the fracture process of high-strength 4340 steel. Test environments included potassium chloride, ammonium nitrate, and ammonium chloride at concentrations from 0.001 to 1.0 mole por liter at ambient temperature. Tests were performed at cathodic and anodic controlled potentials, as well as at the open-circuit potential, to delineate the stress corrosion cracking range.

  11. An experimental study of zinc chloride speciation from 300 to 600 °C and 0.5 to 2.0 kbar in buffered hydrothermal solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cygan, G.L.; Hemley, J.J.; d'Angelo, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    The solubility of sphalerite (ZnS) was measured in KCl-HCl-H2O solutions at 300-600??C and 0.5-2.0 kbar. The silicate assemblage K-feldspar-muscovite (or andalusite)-quartz was used to buffer the solution to acid conditions, resulting in the total solubility reaction 2K+ + KAl2AlSi3O10(OH)2 + 6SiO2 + ZnS + nCl- = ZnCln(2-n) + 3KAlSi3O8 + H2S. (muscovite) (quartz) (sphalerite) (K-feldspar) A computer retrieval technique was used to derive average chloride ligand numbers for chlorozinc species at 0.25-2.0 molal total chloride. This technique mathematically solves for the average ligand number using a series of pertinent chemical relations at P and T. Mono- and di-chlorozinc species were found to predominate throughout the pressure-temperature-composition range investigated. The logarithms of the first and second dissociation constants for ZnCl20 were evaluated over the P-T range; for example, at 1 kbar, the values -0.41 and -1.42 were computed for the logarithm of the first dissociation constant, while -7.62 and -10.57 were computed for the logarithm of the second dissociation constant, for 400 and 500??C, respectively. Results are compared to past studies conducted at subcritical conditions and differ in that we find no evidence for more highly coordinated chloro-zinc species except possibly for ZnCl3- at 600??C, 1 and 2 kbar. Our results are consistent with electrostatic theory, which favors lower charged to neutral molecules in low dielectric-constant media. ?? 1994.

  12. REDUCTION OF ACIDITY OF NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS BY USE OF FORMALDEHYDE

    DOEpatents

    Healy, T.V.

    1958-05-20

    A continuous method is described of concentrating by evaporation and reducing the nitrate ion content of an aqueous solution of metallic salts containing nitric acid not in excess of 8N. It consists of heating the solution and then passing formaldehyde into the heated solution to bring about decomposition of the nitric acid. The evolved gases containing NO are contacted countercurrently with an aqueous metal salt solution containing nitric acid in excess of 8N so as to bring about decomposition of the nitric acid and lower the normality to at least 8N, whereupon it is passed into the body of heated solution.

  13. Dissociation quotient of benzoic acid in aqueous sodium chloride media to 250{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Kettler, R.M.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The dissociation quotient of benzoic acid was determined potentiometrically in a concentration cell fitted with hydrogen electrodes. The hydrogen ion molality of benzoic acid/benzoate solutions was measured relative to a standard aqueous HCl solution at seven temperatures from 5 to 250{degrees}C and at seven ionic strengths ranging from 0.1 to 5.0 molal (NaCl). The molal dissociation quotients and selected literature data were fitted in the isocoulombic (all anionic) form by a six-term equation. This treatment yielded the following thermodynamic quantities for the acid dissociation equilibrium at 25{degrees}C and 1 bar: logK{sub a} = -4.206{+-}0.006, {Delta}H{sub a}{sup 0} = 0.3{+-}0.3 kJ-mol{sup {minus}1}, {Delta}S{sub a}{sup 0} = -79.6{+-}1.0 J-mol{sup {minus}1}-K{sup {minus}1}, and {Delta}C{sub p;a}{sup 0} = -207{+-}5 J-mol{sup {minus}1}-K{sup {minus}1}. A five-term equation derived to describe the dependence of the dissociation constant on solvent density is accurate to 250{degrees}C and 200 MPa.

  14. Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  15. Assessing the effectiveness of 30% sodium chloride aqueous solution for the preservation of fixed anatomical specimens: a 5-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Fabrício Singaretti

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical specimens used in human or veterinary anatomy laboratories are usually prepared with formaldehyde (a cancerous and teratogenic substance), glycerin (an expensive and viscous fluid), or ethanol (which is flammable). This research aimed to verify the viability of an aqueous 30% sodium chloride solution for preservation of anatomical specimens previously fixed with formaldehyde. Anatomical specimens of ruminant, carnivorous, equine, swine and birds were used. All were previously fixed with an aqueous 20% formaldehyde solution and held for 7 days in a 10% aqueous solution of the same active ingredient. During the first phase of the experiment, small specimens of animal tissue previously fixed in formaldehyde were distributed in vials with different concentrations of formaldehyde, with or without 30% sodium chloride solution, a group containing only 30% sodium chloride, and a control group containing only water. During this phase, no contamination was observed in any specimen containing 30% sodium chloride solution, whether alone or in combination with different concentrations of formaldehyde. In the second phase of the experiment, the 30% sodium chloride solution, found to be optimal in the first phase of the experiment, was tested for its long-term preservation properties. For a period of 5 years, the preserved specimens were evaluated three times a week for visual contamination, odors, and changes in color and texture. There was no visual contamination or decay found in any specimen. Furthermore, no strange odors, or changes in color or softness were noted. The 30% sodium chloride solution was determined to be effective in the preservation of anatomic specimens previously fixed in formaldehyde. PMID:24762210

  16. Assessing the effectiveness of 30% sodium chloride aqueous solution for the preservation of fixed anatomical specimens: a 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Fabrício Singaretti

    2014-07-01

    Anatomical specimens used in human or veterinary anatomy laboratories are usually prepared with formaldehyde (a cancerous and teratogenic substance), glycerin (an expensive and viscous fluid), or ethanol (which is flammable). This research aimed to verify the viability of an aqueous 30% sodium chloride solution for preservation of anatomical specimens previously fixed with formaldehyde. Anatomical specimens of ruminant, carnivorous, equine, swine and birds were used. All were previously fixed with an aqueous 20% formaldehyde solution and held for 7 days in a 10% aqueous solution of the same active ingredient. During the first phase of the experiment, small specimens of animal tissue previously fixed in formaldehyde were distributed in vials with different concentrations of formaldehyde, with or without 30% sodium chloride solution, a group containing only 30% sodium chloride, and a control group containing only water. During this phase, no contamination was observed in any specimen containing 30% sodium chloride solution, whether alone or in combination with different concentrations of formaldehyde. In the second phase of the experiment, the 30% sodium chloride solution, found to be optimal in the first phase of the experiment, was tested for its long-term preservation properties. For a period of 5 years, the preserved specimens were evaluated three times a week for visual contamination, odors, and changes in color and texture. There was no visual contamination or decay found in any specimen. Furthermore, no strange odors, or changes in color or softness were noted. The 30% sodium chloride solution was determined to be effective in the preservation of anatomic specimens previously fixed in formaldehyde.

  17. Viscosities of the ternary solution dimethyl sulfoxide/water/sodium chloride at subzero temperatures and their application in cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaozhi; Yu, Xiaoyi; Chen, Zhaojie; Chen, Guangming

    2013-04-01

    Vitrification is considered as the most promising method for long-term storage of tissues and organs. An effective way to reduce the accompanied cryoprotectant (CPA) toxicity, during CPA addition/removal, is to operate at low temperatures. The permeation process of CPA into/out of biomaterials is affected by the viscosity of CPA solution, especially at low temperatures. The objective of the present study is to measure the viscosity of the ternary solution, dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO)/water/sodium chloride (NaCl), at low temperatures and in a wide range of concentrations. A rotary viscometer coupled with a low temperature thermostat bath was used. The measurement was carried out at temperatures from -10 to -50°C. The highest mass fraction of Me2SO was 75% (w/w) and the lowest mass fraction of Me2SO was the value that kept the solution unfrozen at the measurement temperature. The concentration of NaCl was kept as a constant [0.85% (w/w), the normal salt content of extracellular fluids]. The Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model was employed to fit the obtained viscosity data. As an example, the effect of solution viscosity on modeling the permeation of Me2SO into articular cartilage was qualitatively analyzed.

  18. [Bactericidal effect of acidic electrolyzed water--comparison of chemical acidic sodium hydrochloride (NaOCl) solution].

    PubMed

    Iwasawa, A; Nakamura, Y

    1996-09-01

    Acidic electrolyzed water is made recently by various kinds of machines and is widely utilized. In this study, we intended to clarify the relationship between the concentration of chloride and pH in the bactericidal effects with acidic electrolyzed water. The effects of weak or strong acidic electrolyzed water were compared with a pseudo-acidic water of pH adjusted by diluted hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide, on Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomononas aeruginosa. At pH 5.0 approximately 6.0, 3 bacterial strains were killed soon after being exposed to the acidic water containing chloride 50 mg/liter, and the amount of chloride did not change after allowing to stand open for 6 hours. At pH 2.67 approximately 2.80, the bactericidal effects was observed at the concentration of chloride 5 mg/liter, and 80% of chloride remained after allowing to stand for 6 hours. These results indicated that newly made strong acidic water is more effective under a smaller amount of chloride at pH 2.7, and that weak acidic electrolyzed water should be used, if stable bactericidal effect is expected in cleaning the surroundings. PMID:8921674

  19. Study on Treatment of acidic and highly concentrated fluoride waste water using calcium oxide-calcium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, T.; Gao, X. R.; Zheng, T.; Wang, P.

    2016-08-01

    There are problems with treating acidic waste water containing high concentration fluorine by chemical precipitation, including the low sludge setting velocity and the high difficulty of reaching the criterion. In Heilongjiang province, a graphite factory producing high-purity graphite generates acidic waste water with a high concentration of fluorine. In this paper, the effect of removals on the concentration of fluoride with the combined treatment of calcium oxide and calcium chloride were discussed with regard to acid waste water. The study improved the sludge characteristics by using polyacrylamide (PAM) and polymeric aluminum chloride (PAC). The effect of different coagulants on sludge was evaluated by the sludge settlement ratio (SV), sludge volume index (SVI) and sludge moisture content. The results showed that the optimal combination for 100 ml waste water was calcium oxide addition amount of 14 g, a calcium chloride addition amount of 2.5 g, a PAM addition amount of 350 mg/L, and the effluent fluoride concentration was below 6 mg/L. PAM significantly improved the sludge settling velocity. The sludge settlement ratio reduced from 87.6% to 60%. The process for wastewater treatment was easily operated and involved low expenditure.

  20. Transcriptional analysis of different stress response genes in Escherichia coli strains subjected to sodium chloride and lactic acid stress.

    PubMed

    Peng, Silvio; Stephan, Roger; Hummerjohann, Jörg; Tasara, Taurai

    2014-12-01

    Survival of Escherichia coli in food depends on its ability to adapt against encountered stress typically involving induction of stress response genes. In this study, the transcriptional induction of selected acid (cadA, speF) and salt (kdpA, proP, proW, otsA, betA) stress response genes was investigated among five E. coli strains, including three Shiga toxin-producing strains, exposed to sodium chloride or lactic acid stress. Transcriptional induction upon lactic acid stress exposure was similar in all but one E. coli strain, which lacked the lysine decarboxylase gene cadA. In response to sodium chloride stress exposure, proW and otsA were similarly induced, while significant differences were observed between the E. coli strains in induction of kdpA, proP and betA. The kdpA and betA genes were significantly induced in four and three strains, respectively, whereas one strain did not induce these genes. The proP gene was only induced in two E. coli strains. Interestingly, transcriptional induction differences in response to sodium chloride stress exposure were associated with survival phenotypes observed for the E. coli strains in cheese as the E. coli strain lacking significant induction in three salt stress response genes investigated also survived poorly compared to the other E. coli strains in cheese.

  1. Corrosion of dental amalgams in solutions of organic acids.

    PubMed

    Palaghias, G

    1986-06-01

    A conventional and two high copper amalgams were tested in 0.5% aqueous solutions of acetic, formic, lactic and succinic acid. The corrosion behavior of the amalgams in the different solutions was evaluated by analyzing the soluble corrosion products using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer every month during a 6-month experimental period. The high copper amalgams showed a high dissolution rate in formic and lactic acid solutions from the initial stages of immersion when compared to the conventional. Later a marked decrease of the dissolution rate could be observed but it still remained at high levels. In acetic acid the amounts of elements dissolved from high copper amalgams were much less. Conventional amalgam released much smaller amounts of elements in almost all solutions tested except in the case of silver in lactic acid. Finally, in succinic acid solution, the amounts of elements dissolved were unexpectedly small considering the low pH of the solution and the dissolution rates of the amalgams in the other organic acid solutions. PMID:3461548

  2. Growth/no growth interfaces of table olive related yeasts for natamycin, citric acid and sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-López, F N; Bautista-Gallego, J; Romero-Gil, V; Rodríguez-Gómez, F; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2012-04-16

    The present work uses a logistic/probabilistic model to obtain the growth/no growth interfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Candida boidinii (three yeast species commonly isolated from table olives) as a function of the diverse combinations of natamycin (0-30 mg/L), citric acid (0.00-0.45%) and sodium chloride (3-6%). Mathematical models obtained individually for each yeast species showed that progressive concentrations of citric acid decreased the effect of natamycin, which was only observed below 0.15% citric acid. Sodium chloride concentrations around 5% slightly increased S. cerevisiae and C. boidinii resistance to natamycin, although concentrations above 6% of NaCl always favoured inhibition by this antimycotic. An overall growth/no growth interface, built considering data from the three yeast species, revealed that inhibition in the absence of citric acid and at 4.5% NaCl can be reached using natamycin concentrations between 12 and 30 mg/L for growth probabilities between 0.10 and 0.01, respectively. Results obtained in this survey show that is not advisable to use jointly natamycin and citric acid in table olive packaging because of the observed antagonistic effects between both preservatives, but table olives processed without citric acid could allow the application of the antifungal.

  3. Analysis of electrochemical noise for Type 410 stainless steel in chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.G.; Inman, M.E.; Hudson, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    The electrochemical noise resulting from the corrosion of Type 410 stainless steel under open circuit conditions in solutions of widely different corrosivity has been examined. Parameters derived from electrochemical noise measurements and conventional electrochemical measurements were correlated with one another and with post-test examination on the specimens. Both the noise resistance and the polarization resistance increased with decreases in solution corrosivity. In all of the solutions studied, the noise resistance was found to be consistently higher than the polarization resistance. In solutions in which pitting occurred, the open circuit potential of the electrode versus a true reference electrode was more sensitive to the transition to stable pitting than was the pitting index.

  4. Corrosion inhibition of a mild steel by aniline and alkylamines in acidic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, H.; Han, K.N.; Guan, Y.C.

    1998-09-01

    Corrosion inhibition of a mild steel in acid solutions by alkylamines (ALK-AM) and aniline hydrochloric (ANL-HCl) salts was investigated in the presence of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and sodium chloride (NaCl) using a potentiostat, a contact-angle goniometer, a scanning electron microscope (SEM), a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), and an atomic force microscope (AFM). Results showed chloride ions (Cl{sup {minus}}) had a pronounced effect on inhibition of amines and ANL for corrosion of mild steel. In the presence of Cl{sup {minus}} ions, cationic types of surfactants (ALK-AM and ANL) were attached to the surface through formation of chloride precipitate at the surface. In the absence of the organic inhibitors, corrosion initiated along grain boundaries of ferrite and pearlite structures. In the presence of the organic inhibitor, however, the steel surface was covered by an organic salt precipitation, and the corrosion rate was reduced significantly.

  5. Release of cetyl pyridinium chloride from fatty acid chelate temporary dental cement

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Andrew; Coleman, Nichola J.; Tüzüner, Tamer; Bagis, Bora; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Nicholson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether the antimicrobial nature of a fatty acid chelate temporary dental cement can be enhanced by the addition of 5% cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC). Materials and methods The temporary cement, Cavex Temporary was employed, and additions of CPC were made to either the base or the catalyst paste prior to mixing the cement. Release of CPC from set cement specimens was followed using reverse-phase HPLC for a period of up to 2 weeks following specimen preparation. Potential interactions between Cavex and CPC were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and antimicrobial effects were determined using zone of inhibition measurements after 24 h with disc-shaped specimens in cultured Streptococcus mutans. Results FTIR showed no interaction between CPC and the components of the cement. CPC release was found to follow a diffusion mechanism for the first 6 h or so, and to equilibrate after approximately 2 weeks, with no significant differences between release profiles when the additive was incorporated into the base or the catalyst paste. Diffusion was rapid, and had a diffusion coefficient of approximately 1 × 10−9 m2 s−1 in both cases. Total release was in the range 10–12% of the CPC loading. Zones of inhibition around discs containing CPC were significantly larger than those around the control discs of CPC-free cement. Conclusions The antimicrobial character of this temporary cement can be enhanced by the addition of CPC. Such enhancement is of potential clinical value, though further in vivo work is needed to confirm this. PMID:27335898

  6. N2O5 oxidizes chloride to Cl2 in acidic atmospheric aerosol.

    PubMed

    Roberts, James M; Osthoff, Hans D; Brown, Steven S; Ravishankara, A R

    2008-08-22

    Molecular chlorine (Cl2) is an important yet poorly understood trace constituent of the lower atmosphere. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed for the conversion of particle-bound chloride (Cl-) to gas-phase Cl2, the detailed processes involved remain uncertain. Here, we show that reaction of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) with aerosol-phase chloride yields Cl2 at low pH (<2) and should constitute an important halogen activation pathway in the atmosphere.

  7. Estimation of chloride in oxidizing media by means of ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Subrananian, G; Chandra, N; Rao, G P

    1984-01-01

    Chloride concentrations down to the ppm level in a large excess of chlorate or perchlorate can be quantitatively estimated by use of chloride ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). Similarly traces of chloride in chromic acid solutions can be estimated with a heterogeneous silicone-rubber based chloride ISE. However, homogeneous chloride ISEs pose a problem for practical applications, because their response in chromic acid solutions changes with time owing to chemical attack on the membrane surface. In permanganate solutions, both homogeneous and heterogeneous type electrodes can be used for monitoring chloride ions. The Orion electrode, however, was found to show a slightly super-Nernstian response in such solutions. The presence of 10(-3)M iron(III) had no adverse effect on the performance of these electrodes in permanganate solutions.

  8. Decomposition Studies of Triphenylboron, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboric Acid in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions Containing Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.; Peterson, R. A.

    1997-02-11

    This report documents the copper-catalyzed chemical kinetics of triphenylboron, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboric acid (3PB, 2PB and PBA) in aqueous alkaline solution contained in carbon-steel vessels between 40 and 70 degrees C.

  9. X-ray characterization of an organic inorganic solution grown crystal: case of 2-amino-5-nitropyridinium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, N.; Lefaucheux, F.; Ibanez, A.; Lorut, F.; Baruchel, J.

    2004-02-01

    The crystallline quality of 2-amino-5-nitropyridinium chloride gorwn in solution was examined by X-ray topography. Strong white beam coming from synchrotron was irradiated to an as-grown crystal to avoid an absorption of X-ray. Topographs were taken in transmission geometry (Laue setup). The image obtained by the reflections 3¯ 0 3 , 601, 6 1 2¯ and 1 7 0 planes showed fine grey contrast in nearly the whole section. Inclusions and strained growth sector boundaries were clearly observed in these images. These defects disappeared far from the seed in the direction of c-axis. The whole section of the reflection 1 7 0 was full of fine lines along c-axis with white and black contrast. It was found that a dendritic growth leaded to the formation of whiskers slightly misoriented along c-axis.

  10. Blue-Green Color Tunable Solution Processable Organolead Chloride-Bromide Mixed Halide Perovskites for Optoelectronic Applications.

    PubMed

    Sadhanala, Aditya; Ahmad, Shahab; Zhao, Baodan; Giesbrecht, Nadja; Pearce, Phoebe M; Deschler, Felix; Hoye, Robert L Z; Gödel, Karl C; Bein, Thomas; Docampo, Pablo; Dutton, Siân E; De Volder, Michael F L; Friend, Richard H

    2015-09-01

    Solution-processed organo-lead halide perovskites are produced with sharp, color-pure electroluminescence that can be tuned from blue to green region of visible spectrum (425-570 nm). This was accomplished by controlling the halide composition of CH3NH3Pb(BrxCl1-x)3 [0 ≤ x ≤ 1] perovskites. The bandgap and lattice parameters change monotonically with composition. The films possess remarkably sharp band edges and a clean bandgap, with a single optically active phase. These chloride-bromide perovskites can potentially be used in optoelectronic devices like solar cells and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Here we demonstrate high color-purity, tunable LEDs with narrow emission full width at half maxima (FWHM) and low turn on voltages using thin-films of these perovskite materials, including a blue CH3NH3PbCl3 perovskite LED with a narrow emission FWHM of 5 nm.

  11. Blue-Green Color Tunable Solution Processable Organolead Chloride-Bromide Mixed Halide Perovskites for Optoelectronic Applications.

    PubMed

    Sadhanala, Aditya; Ahmad, Shahab; Zhao, Baodan; Giesbrecht, Nadja; Pearce, Phoebe M; Deschler, Felix; Hoye, Robert L Z; Gödel, Karl C; Bein, Thomas; Docampo, Pablo; Dutton, Siân E; De Volder, Michael F L; Friend, Richard H

    2015-09-01

    Solution-processed organo-lead halide perovskites are produced with sharp, color-pure electroluminescence that can be tuned from blue to green region of visible spectrum (425-570 nm). This was accomplished by controlling the halide composition of CH3NH3Pb(BrxCl1-x)3 [0 ≤ x ≤ 1] perovskites. The bandgap and lattice parameters change monotonically with composition. The films possess remarkably sharp band edges and a clean bandgap, with a single optically active phase. These chloride-bromide perovskites can potentially be used in optoelectronic devices like solar cells and light emitting diodes (LEDs). Here we demonstrate high color-purity, tunable LEDs with narrow emission full width at half maxima (FWHM) and low turn on voltages using thin-films of these perovskite materials, including a blue CH3NH3PbCl3 perovskite LED with a narrow emission FWHM of 5 nm. PMID:26236949

  12. Antimicrobial Efficacy of a Sulfuric Acid and Sodium Sulfate Blend, Peroxyacetic Acid, and Cetylpyridinium Chloride against Salmonella on Inoculated Chicken Wings.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brittney R; Yang, Xiang; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Delmore, Robert J; Woerner, Dale R; Reagan, James O; Morgan, J Brad; Belk, Keith E

    2015-11-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a commercial blend of sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate (SSS) in reducing Salmonella on inoculated whole chilled chicken wings and to compare its efficacy to peroxyacetic acid (PAA) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). Wings were spot inoculated (5 to 6 log CFU/ml of sample rinsate) with a five-strain mixture of novobiocin- and nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella and then left untreated (control) or treated by immersing individual wings in 350 ml of antimicrobial solution. An initial study evaluated two treatment immersion times, 10 and 20 s, of SSS (pH 1.1) and compared cell recoveries following rinsing of treated samples with buffered peptone water or Dey/Engley neutralizing broth. In a second study, inoculated wings were treated with SSS (pH 1.1; 20 s), PAA (700 ppm, 20 s), or CPC (4,000 ppm, 10 s) and analyzed for survivors immediately after treatment (0 h) and after 24 h of aerobic storage at 4°C. Color and pH analyses were also conducted in the latter study. Recovery of Salmonella survivors following treatment with SSS (10 or 20 s) was not (P ≥ 0.05) affected by the type of cell recovery rinse solution (buffered peptone water or Dey/Engley neutralizing broth), but there was an effect (P < 0.05) of SSS treatment time. Immersion of samples for 10 or 20 s in SSS resulted in pathogen reductions of 0.8 to 0.9 and 1.1 to 1.2 log CFU/ml, respectively. Results of the second study showed that there was an interaction (P < 0.05) between antimicrobial type and storage time. Efficacy against Salmonella at 0 h increased in the order CPC , SSS , PAA; however, after 24 h of aerobic storage, pathogen counts of SSS- and PAA-treated wings did not differ (P ≥ 0.05). Overall, the results indicated that SSS applied at pH 1.1 for 20 s was an effective antimicrobial intervention to reduce Salmonella contamination on chicken wings. PMID:26555519

  13. Antimicrobial Efficacy of a Sulfuric Acid and Sodium Sulfate Blend, Peroxyacetic Acid, and Cetylpyridinium Chloride against Salmonella on Inoculated Chicken Wings.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brittney R; Yang, Xiang; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Delmore, Robert J; Woerner, Dale R; Reagan, James O; Morgan, J Brad; Belk, Keith E

    2015-11-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a commercial blend of sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate (SSS) in reducing Salmonella on inoculated whole chilled chicken wings and to compare its efficacy to peroxyacetic acid (PAA) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). Wings were spot inoculated (5 to 6 log CFU/ml of sample rinsate) with a five-strain mixture of novobiocin- and nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella and then left untreated (control) or treated by immersing individual wings in 350 ml of antimicrobial solution. An initial study evaluated two treatment immersion times, 10 and 20 s, of SSS (pH 1.1) and compared cell recoveries following rinsing of treated samples with buffered peptone water or Dey/Engley neutralizing broth. In a second study, inoculated wings were treated with SSS (pH 1.1; 20 s), PAA (700 ppm, 20 s), or CPC (4,000 ppm, 10 s) and analyzed for survivors immediately after treatment (0 h) and after 24 h of aerobic storage at 4°C. Color and pH analyses were also conducted in the latter study. Recovery of Salmonella survivors following treatment with SSS (10 or 20 s) was not (P ≥ 0.05) affected by the type of cell recovery rinse solution (buffered peptone water or Dey/Engley neutralizing broth), but there was an effect (P < 0.05) of SSS treatment time. Immersion of samples for 10 or 20 s in SSS resulted in pathogen reductions of 0.8 to 0.9 and 1.1 to 1.2 log CFU/ml, respectively. Results of the second study showed that there was an interaction (P < 0.05) between antimicrobial type and storage time. Efficacy against Salmonella at 0 h increased in the order CPC , SSS , PAA; however, after 24 h of aerobic storage, pathogen counts of SSS- and PAA-treated wings did not differ (P ≥ 0.05). Overall, the results indicated that SSS applied at pH 1.1 for 20 s was an effective antimicrobial intervention to reduce Salmonella contamination on chicken wings.

  14. Pain and swelling after periapical surgery related to the hemostatic agent used: Anesthetic solution with vasoconstrictor or aluminum chloride

    PubMed Central

    Maestre-Ferrín, Laura; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Gay-Escoda, Cosme; von-Arx, Tomas; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess pain and swelling in the first 7 days after periapical surgery and their relationship with the agent used for bleeding control. Study Design: A prospective study was conducted between October 2006 and March 2009. Patients subjected to root surgery, who completed the questionnaire and who consented to the postoperative instructions were included in the study. The subjects were divided into two groups according to the hemostatic agent used: A) gauze impregnated with anesthetic solution with vasoconstrictor; or B) aluminum chloride. The patients were administered a questionnaire, and were asked to record the severity of their pain and swelling on a plain horizontal visual analog scale (VAS). Data were recorded by the patients on the first 7 postoperative days. In addition, the patients were asked to record analgesic consumption. Results: A total of 76 questionnaires (34 in group A and 42 in group B) were taken to be correctly completed. Pain was reported to be most intense two hours after surgery. At this point 52.6% of the patients had no pain. Seventy-five percent of the patients consumed analgesics in the first 24 hours. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of the intensity of pain or in the consumption of analgesics. Swelling reached its maximum peak on the second day; at this point, 60.6% of the patients suffered mild or moderate swelling. The Expasyl™ group showed significantly greater swelling than the gauzes group. Conclusion: The type of hemostatic agent used did not influence either the degree of pain or the need for analgesia among the patients in this study. However, the patients belonging to the Expasyl™ group suffered greater swelling than the patients treated with gauzes impregnated with anesthetic solution with vasoconstrictor. Key words:Hemostasis, periradicular surgery, aluminum chloride, pain, swelling. PMID:22322510

  15. Vacuum-jacketed hydrofluoric acid solution calorimeter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.

    1965-01-01

    A vacuum-jacketed metal calorimeter for determining heats of solution in aqueous HF was constructed. The reaction vessel was made of copper and was heavily gold plated. The calorimeter has a cooling constant of 0.6 cal-deg -1-min-1, approximately 1/4 that of the air-jacketed calorimeters most commonly used with HF. It reaches equilibrium within 10 min after turning off the heater current. Measurements of the heat of solution of reagent grade KCl(-100 mesh dried 2 h at 200??C) at a mole ratio of 1 KCl to 200 H2O gave ??H = 4198??11 cal at 25??C. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

  16. Comments on the paper: 'Optical reflectance, optical refractive index and optical conductivity measurements of nonlinear optics for L-aspartic acid nickel chloride single crystal'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.; Naik, Suvidha G.; Dhavskar, Kiran T.

    2016-02-01

    We argue that the 'L-aspartic acid nickel chloride' crystal reported by the authors of the title paper (Optics Communications, 291 (2013) 304-308) is actually the well-known diaqua(L-aspartato)nickel(II) hydrate crystal.

  17. Nylon Dissolution in Nitric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    KESSINGER, GLENF.

    2004-06-16

    H Area Operations is planning to process Pu-contaminated uranium scrap in support of de-inventory efforts. Nylon bags will be used to hold materials to be dissolved in H-Canyon. Based on this set of twelve nylon dissolutions, it is concluded that (when other variables are held constant): increased acid concentration results in increased dissolution rates; increased acid concentration results in a lower dissolution onset temperature; little, if any, H plus is consumed during the depolymerization process; and 2.0-3.0 M HNO3, with 0.025 M KF and 2 g/L B, is satisfactory for the dissolution of nylon bag materials to be used during H-Canyon processing.

  18. Study on Corrosion Performance of Cu-Te-Se Alloys in a 3.5% Sodium Chloride Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Lin; Li, Meng; Zeng, Tao; Zhu, Dachuan

    2015-11-01

    Samples of Cu-Te-Se alloys, previously aged or treated as a solid solution, were immersed in 3.5% (mass fraction) sodium chloride solution to investigate their corrosion resistance at room temperature by determining their corrosive weight loss. The morphologies of the precipitated phase and surface products following immersion were observed by scanning electron microscope. In addition, energy-dispersive spectroscopic analysis was used to determine the elemental constituents of precipitated phase and corroded surface of the alloy samples. The phase composition was measured by x-ray diffraction, and the electrochemical polarization behavior of the samples was determined using an electrochemical workstation. The experimental results revealed that the alloy samples appeared to corrode uniformly, which was accompanied by a small amount of localized corrosion. There was the possibility that localized corrosion could increase following aging treatment. The addition of a small amount of tellurium and selenium to the alloy appeared to retard oxygen adsorption on the copper in the alloy, which has ameliorated the alloy corrosion due to the similar physical and chemical properties of oxygen. In comparison to the solid solution state, the corrosion resistance of the alloy appeared to decline slightly following aging treatment.

  19. Corrosion of commercially pure Al 99.5 in chloride solutions containing carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and copper ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoergum, A.; Sigurdsson, H.; Nisancioglu, K.

    1995-07-01

    There has been a certain amount of interest recently in the use of aluminum alloys as an alternative material to steel for the processing and transmission of produced crude oil in the offshore oil industry. The corrosion behavior of aluminum in solutions containing chloride, carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and copper ions at various concentrations and temperatures has been of frequent interest in connection with applications in direct contact with a corrosive aqueous phase, such as in natural waters and produced brines. Available information about the combined effects of these species on aluminum is conflicting. A more systematic study was undertaken using commercially pure aluminum (DIN Al 99.5 [AA 1050A]) as the test material. Corrosion tests performed in Cl{sup {minus}} solutions containing these species indicated that dissolved CO{sub 2}-HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} combinations giving a neutral solution pH resulted in low corrosion rates for aluminum. The added presence of small Cu{sup 2+} concentrations could have been detrimental but did not produce a synergistic effect. High temperatures in general caused increased corrosion rates, except near pH 9, where the cathodic intermetallic phases passivated. The observed corrosion behavior was explained in terms of cathodic polarization data for the aluminum matrix and the Al{sub 3}Fe intermetallic particles.

  20. Raman spectra of amino acids and their aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyong; Zhu, Xian; Fan, Qi; Wan, Xueliang

    2011-03-01

    Amino acids are the basic "building blocks" that combine to form proteins and play an important physiological role in all life-forms. Amino acids can be used as models for the examination of the importance of intermolecular bonding in life processes. Raman spectra serve to obtain information regarding molecular conformation, giving valuable insights into the topology of more complex molecules (peptides and proteins). In this paper, amino acids and their aqueous solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons of certain values for these frequencies in amino acids and their aqueous solutions are given. Spectra of solids when compared to those of the solute in solution are invariably much more complex and almost always sharper. We present a collection of Raman spectra of 18 kinds of amino acids ( L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, cystine, L-glutamic acid, L-glycine, L-histidine, L-isoluecine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-phenylalanine, L-methionone, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-valine) and their aqueous solutions that can serve as references for the interpretation of Raman spectra of proteins and biological materials.

  1. Petrographic evidence of calcium oxychloride formation in mortars exposed to magnesium chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Lawrence . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Peterson, Karl . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Touton, Sayward . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Van Dam, Tom . E-mail: cee@mtu.edu; Johnston, Dan . E-mail: Dan.Johnston@state.sd.us

    2006-08-15

    Many researchers have reported chemical interactions between CaCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2} solutions and hardened Portland cement paste. One potentially destructive phase reported in the literature is calcium oxychloride (3CaO.CaCl{sub 2}.15H{sub 2}O). In the past, limited numbers of researchers have reported identification of this phase by X-ray diffraction. In this work, petrographic evidence of oxychloride formation is presented based on optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis. This evidence indicates that calcium oxychloride does form in mortars exposed to MgCl{sub 2} solutions.

  2. Cooling and Freezing Behaviors of Aqueous Sodium Chloride Solution in a Closed Rectangular Container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narumi, Akira; Kashiwagi, Takao; Nakane, Ichirou

    This paper investigates cooling and freezing behaviors of NaCl aqueous solution in a rectangular container equipped with horizontal partitions of micro porous film in order to determine the mechanisms of heat and mass transfer through cell wall for the purpose of freezing food. For comparison, experiments were performed using partitions of copper plate, no partition, and water. These processes were visualized and measured using real-time laser holographic interferometry. It was found that there was very little difference in the cooling process due to partitions, but that there were significant differences in freezing process when NaCl aqueous solution is used.

  3. Polymerization of beta-amino acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have compared carbonyl diimidazole (CDI) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as activating agents for the oligomerization of negatively-charged alpha- and beta-amino acids in homogeneous aqueous solution. alpha-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using CDI, but not by EDAC. beta-Amino acids can be oligomerized efficiently using EDAC, but not by CDI. Aspartic acid, an alpha- and beta-dicarboxylic acid is oligomerized efficiently by both reagents. These results are explained in terms of the mechanisms of the reactions, and their relevance to prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  4. Long-term cement-corrosion in chloride-rich solutions - a thermodynamic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bube, C.; Metz, V.; Schild, D.; Bohnert, E.; Kienzler, B.

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear waste disposal relies on safe enclosure of radionuclides over long time-scales. Most experiments on interactions of radionuclides with barrier materials are running for several months, in some cases up to a few years. Very few experiments are available that confirm the results on longer time-scales and reassure that equilibrium conditions will be approached on the long term. This communication presents the latest results of full-scale cement corrosion experiments doped with uranium, which have been conducted for up to 22 years. Cemented waste simulates of 200L size were doped with Unat and exposed to MgCl2-rich or NaCl-saturated brine in the Asse salt mine (T = 28 ± 1 ° C). Solution composition and pH were monitored regularly. Some of the experiments were terminated in order to sample and analyze the solid phases. A geochemical code with a Pitzer database for high ionic strength systems is used to calculate the aqueous and solid phases expected at equilibrium conditions. In order to evaluate the thermodynamic database for the cementitious system, calculated solid phases and solution compositions were additionally compared to results of laboratory experiments on cement corrosion in MgCl2-rich solutions with mass to volume ratios (m/V) between 0.025 and 1.0. Solid and solution composition of the laboratory experiments after ~3 years agree well with results predicted from the thermodynamic calculations. With increasing m/V, transformation of the initial MgCl2-rich solutions into CaCl2-rich solutions is observed. This exchange reaction of Mg from the solution against Ca in the cement leads to a pHm (-log[H+]) increase up to 12 (from initial values around 9). Major solid phases found by analytical methods are also obtained in the calculations (e.g. gypsum, calcite, hydrotalcite / friedel's salt, brucite). Discrepancies are caused by various amorphous phases, which cannot be represented in the database. In the full-scale experiments (with m/V around 2.7), a

  5. Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

    1983-07-26

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  6. Precipitation of plutonium from acidic solutions using magnesium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.

    1994-12-05

    Magnesium oxide will be used as a neutralizing agent for acidic plutonium-containing solutions. It is expected that as the magnesium oxide dissolves, the pH of the solution will rise, and plutonium will precipitate. The resulting solid will be tested for suitability to storage. The liquid is expected to contain plutonium levels that meet disposal limit requirements.

  7. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Gary A [Kennewick, WA; Smith, Jeffrey W [Lancaster, OH; Ihle, Nathan C [Walla Walla, WA

    1984-01-01

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with portland cement to form concrete.

  8. Method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, G.A.; Smith, J.W.; Ihle, N.C.

    1982-07-08

    A method for incorporating radioactive phosphoric acid solutions in concrete is described wherein the phosphoric acid is reacted with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to form a precipitate of hydroxyapatite and the hydroxyapatite is mixed with Portland cement to form concrete.

  9. Effect of sodium and potassium salts on the extraction of 1-butanol from aqueous solution by the ethyl esters of soybean oil fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Griffith, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of 0 to 0.15 M sodium chloride, sulfate, and sulfite, and potassium acid phosphate on the extraction of 0.1 to 4.1% 1-butanol from aqueous solutions (derived from fermentation of wood pulp liquors) at 25, 40, and 55 C was evaluated using a factorial experiment. The changes in distribution coefficient were small, with mild increases occurring with increasing temperature and increasing sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, and potassium acid phosphate. Mild decreases in 1-butanol extraction occurred with increasing sodium sulfite. 6 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Phosphorylation of glyceric acid in aqueous solution using trimetaphosphate.

    PubMed

    Kolb, V; Orgel, L E

    1996-02-01

    The phosphorylation of glyceric acid is an interesting prebiotic reaction because it converts a simple, potentially prebiotic organic molecule into phosphate derivatives that are central to carbohydrate metabolism. We find that 0.05 M glyceric acid in the presence of 0.5 M trimetaphosphate in alkaline solution gives a mixture of 2- and 3-phosphoglyceric acids in combined yields of up to 40%. PMID:11536746

  11. Phosphorylation of Glyceric Acid in Aqueous Solution Using Trimetaphosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Vera; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    The phosphorylation of glyceric acid is an interesting prebiotic reaction because it converts a simple, potentially prebiotic organic molecule into phosphate derivatives that are central to carbohydrate metabolism. We find that 0.05 M glyceric acid in the presence of 0.5 M trimetaphosphate in alkaline solution gives a mixture of 2- and 3-phosphoglyceric acids in combined yields of up to 40%.

  12. Reduction of Plutonium in Acidic Solutions by Mesoporous Carbons

    DOE PAGES

    Parsons-Moss, Tashi; Jones, Stephen; Wang, Jinxiu; Wu, Zhangxiong; Uribe, Eva; Zhao, Dongyuan; Nitsche, Heino

    2015-12-19

    Batch contact experiments with several porous carbon materials showed that carbon solids spontaneously reduce the oxidation state of plutonium in 1-1.5 M acid solutions, without significant adsorption. The final oxidation state and rate of Pu reduction varies with the solution matrix, and also depends on the surface chemistry and surface area of the carbon. It was demonstrated that acidic Pu(VI) solutions can be reduced to Pu(III) by passing through a column of porous carbon particles, offering an easy alternative to electrolysis with a potentiostat.

  13. Thermophysical properties of sodium nitrate and sodium chloride solutions and their effects on fluid flow in unsaturated media

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2001-10-01

    Understanding movement of saline sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}) waste solutions is important for assessing the contaminant migration near leaking waste storage tanks in the unsaturated zone at the Hanford site (Washington, USA). The purpose of this study is to contribute a basic understanding of effects of the thermophysical behavior of NaNO{sub 3} solutions on fluid flow in unsaturated media. We first present mathematical expressions for the dependence of density, viscosity, solubility and vapor pressure of NaNO{sub 3} solutions on both salt concentration and temperature, which were determined by fitting from published measured data. Because the previous studies of thermophysical behavior of sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions can provide a basis for those of NaNO{sub 3} solutions, we also present a comparison of thermophysical properties of both salt solutions. We have implemented the functional thermophysical properties of NaNO{sub 3} solutions into a new TOUGH2 equation-of-state module EWASG-NaNO{sub 3}, which is modified from a previous TOUGH2 equation-of-state module EWASG for NaCl. Using the simulation tool, we have investigated effects of the thermophysical properties on fluid flow in unsaturated media. The effect of density and viscosity of saline solutions has been long recognized. Here we focus our attention on the effect of vapor pressure lowering due to salinity. We present simulations of a one-dimensional problem to study this salinity-driven fluid flow. A number of simulations were performed using different values of thermal conductivity, permeability, and temperature, to illustrate conditions and parameters controlling these processes. Results indicate that heat conduction plays a very important role in this salinity-driven vapor diffusion by maintaining a nearly constant temperature. The smaller the permeability, the more water is transferred into the saline environment. Effects of permeability on water flow are also complicated by effects of capillary

  14. [Adsorption Characteristics of Nitrate and Phosphate from Aqueous Solution on Zirconium-Hexadecyltrimethylammonium Chloride Modified Activated Carbon].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen-jing; Lin, Jian-wei; Zhan, Yan-hui; Wang, Hong

    2015-06-01

    A novel adsorbent material, i.e., zirconium-cationic surfactant modified activated carbon (ZrSMAC) was prepared by loading zirconium hydroxide and hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) on activated carbon, and was used as an adsorbent for nitrate and phosphate removal from aqueous solution. The adsorption characteristics of nitrate and phosphate on ZrSMAC from aqueous solution were investigated in batch mode. Results showed that the ZrSMAC was effective for nitrate and phosphate removal from aqueous solution. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted both the nitrate and phosphate kinetic experimental data well. The equilibrium isotherm data of nitrate adsorption onto the ZrSMAC were well fitted to the Langmuir, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) and Freundlich isotherm models. The equilibrium isotherm data of phosphate adsorption onto the ZrSMAC could be described by the Langmuir and,D- R isotherm models. According to the Langmuir isotherm model, the maximum nitrate and phosphate adsorption capacities for the ZrSMAC were 7.58 mg x g(-1) and 10.9 mg x g(-1), respectively. High pH value was unfavorable for nitrate and phosphate adsorption onto the ZrSMAC. The presence of Cl-, HCO3- and SO4(2-) in solution reduced the nitrate and phosphate adsorption capacities for the ZrSMAC. The nitrate adsorption capacity for the ZrSMAC was reduced by the presence of coexisting phosphate in solution, and the phosphate adsorption capacity for the ZrSMAC was also reduced by the presence of coexisting nitrate in solution. About 90% of nitrate adsorbed on the ZrSMAC could be desorbed in 1 mol x L(-1) NaCl solution, and about 78% of phosphate adsorbed on the ZrSMAC could be desorbed in 1 mol x L(-1) NaOH solution. The adsorption mechanism of nitrate on the ZrSMAC included the anion exchange interactions and electrostatic attraction, and the adsorption mechanism of phosphate on the ZrSMAC included the ligand exchange interaction, electrostatic attraction and anion exchange interaction.

  15. FT-Raman spectroscopic analysis of the most probable structures in aluminum chloride and tetrahydrofuran solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Carolina C.; Campos, Thiago B. C.; Alves, Wagner A.

    2012-11-01

    A study by concentration-dependent Raman spectroscopy is presented for solutions of AlCl3 in THF. The formation of small amounts of AlCl4- has been evidenced by the appearance of only one band at 348 cm-1 in the most diluted salt solution. Another band at 330 cm-1 starts rising with increasing salt concentration and it seems to belong to the [AlCl3(THF)3] complex. Indeed, this octahedral entity was confirmed by the quantitative analysis performed at the band envelope at 915 cm-1. At this region, additional bands at 927 and 858 cm-1 were observed and assigned to the C-C and C-O stretching modes, respectively, of THF molecules coordinated to the aluminum salt. Besides them, another band at 1042 cm-1 clearly reveals the existence of this population of molecules. Although neutral octahedral complexes seem to be the major species in more concentrated salt solutions, the Raman spectra show the presence of complex ions in whole studied concentration range.

  16. Saturated sodium chloride solution under an external static electric field: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Gan; Wang, Yan-Ting

    2015-12-01

    The behavior of saturated aqueous NaCl solutions under a constant external electric field (E) was studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Our dynamic MD simulations indicated that the irreversible nucleation process towards crystallization is accelerated by a moderate E but retarded or even prohibited under a stronger E, which can be understood by the competition between self-diffusion and drift motion. The former increases with E, thereby accelerating the nucleation process, whereas the latter pulls oppositely charged ions apart under a stronger E, thereby decelerating nucleation. Additionally, our steady-state MD simulations indicated that a first-order phase transition occurs in saturated solutions at a certain threshold Ec. The magnitude of Ec increases with concentration because larger clusters form more easily when the solution is more concentrated and require a stronger E to dissociate. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB932804) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91227115, 11274319, and 11421063).

  17. Comparisons of fixation of heat, radiation, and heat plus radiation damage by anisotonic sodium chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Azzam, E.I.

    1982-06-01

    Heat treatment at temperatures greater than 40 degrees C synergistically enhanced damage produced by ionizing radiation. Researchers experiments indicated that radiation damage in exponentially growing Chinese hamster cells could be fixed in a dose-dependent manner by postirradiation treatment with both hypertonic and hypotonic NaCl solutions. At a 1,000-rad dose level, survival could be depressed by a factor of about 260. For various treatments at either 42 or 45 degrees C, exposure after heating to anisotonic solutions did not result in the fixation of heat damage. When cells were heated at 45 degrees C for 5 minutes and irradiated with 500 rad before or after heating or given 500 rad without heating and then exposed to 0.05 M NaCl solutions for 120 minutes, survival was reduced by factors of 875, 667, and 12, respectively. For heat treatments at lower temperatures, such as 41.5 or 42 degrees C, less damage fixation for the combined treatments was observed. The data indicated that heat and radiation damage were different and damage from the combined treatments was not the same for low- and high-treatment temperatures.

  18. Radiation effect on poly(vinylbenzyltrimethylammonium chloride) in aqueous solution: pulse radiolysis and steady-state study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virendra; Bhardwaj, Yatendra K; Sabharwal, Sunil; Mohan, Hari

    2004-06-01

    Poly(vinylbenzyltrimethylammonium chloride) (PVBT) has been synthesized by radiation-induced polymerization of Vinylbenzyltrimethylammonium chloride (VBT). The viscosity average molecular weight of synthesized polymer was estimated to be approximately 10(5) by viscosity measurements. The radiation-induced affects on PVBT have been investigated by steady-state and pulse radiolysis (PR) techniques. The reactions of primary radicals (*)OH, e(aq)(-), and H(*) generated by the radiolysis of water with PVBT were studied. The reactions of some other species such as N(3)(*), Cl(2)(*-), Br(2)(*-), SO(4)(*-), and CO(2)(*-) with PVBT were also investigated. The results indicate that the reactivity of these species toward PVBT is lower then that with the monomer VBT. The rate constants for the reactions of OH radical and H atom with PVBT were evaluated both by competition kinetics and by direct observation of the buildup of transient species. The difference in the rate constant values evaluated by the two methods indicated that (*)OH and H(*) react with PVBT to give more than one species. It was observed that the OH radical and H atom react with PVBT in different manners. Near neutral pH, the OH radicals react to form an adduct and to generate a radical by abstracting methylenic H atom. The H atom, however, also abstracts the H atom from the PVBT backbone. The rate constant value for the reaction of hydrated electron with PVBT was found to be 3.1 currency 10(9) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1). Steady-state irradiation studies of the aqueous PVBT solution indicated that PVBT predominantly undergoes cross-linking on irradiation. Cross-linking is a function of dose rate, concentration, and ambient of irradiation. At concentrations < 2%, only intramolecular cross-linking takes place, whereas beyond this concentration, the intermolecular cross-linking of polymer chains takes place to form a soft gel. The gel dose (D(gel)) is a function of the ambient of irradiation.

  19. Study of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solehudin, Agus; Nurdin, Isdiriayani

    2014-03-01

    Corrosion and inhibition studies on API 5LX65 carbon steel in chloride solution containing various concentrations of benzotriazole has been conducted at temperature of 70°C using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Corroded carbon steel surface with and without inhibitor have been observed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The objectives of this research are to study the performance of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors. The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H2S at different BTAH concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of BTAH concentrations from 0 to 10 mmol/l. The inhibition efficiency of BTAH was found to be affected by its concentration. The optimum efficiency obtained of BTAH is 93% at concentration of 5 mmol/l. The result of XRD and EDS analysis reveal the iron sulfide (FeS) formation on corroded carbon steel surface without inhibitor. The EDS spectrum show the Nitrogen (N) bond on carbon steel surface inhibited by BTAH.

  20. Study of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Solehudin, Agus; Nurdin, Isdiriayani

    2014-03-24

    Corrosion and inhibition studies on API 5LX65 carbon steel in chloride solution containing various concentrations of benzotriazole has been conducted at temperature of 70°C using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Corroded carbon steel surface with and without inhibitor have been observed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The objectives of this research are to study the performance of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors. The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H{sub 2}S at different BTAH concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of BTAH concentrations from 0 to 10 mmol/l. The inhibition efficiency of BTAH was found to be affected by its concentration. The optimum efficiency obtained of BTAH is 93% at concentration of 5 mmol/l. The result of XRD and EDS analysis reveal the iron sulfide (FeS) formation on corroded carbon steel surface without inhibitor. The EDS spectrum show the Nitrogen (N) bond on carbon steel surface inhibited by BTAH.

  1. Modulating the structure and properties of poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)/poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) multilayers with concentrated salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Han, Lulu; Mao, Zhengwei; Wuliyasu, He; Wu, Jindan; Gong, Xiao; Yang, Yuguang; Gao, Changyou

    2012-01-10

    Poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS)/poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) multilayers were treated with 1-5 M NaCl solutions, resulting in continuous changes in the physicochemical properties of the multilayers. Significant mass loss was observed when the salt concentration was higher than 2 M and reached as high as 72% in a 5 M NaCl solution. The disassembly occurred initially in the superficial layers and then developed in the bulk multilayers. For the multilayers with PDADMAC as the outmost layer, the molar ratio of PSS/PDADMAC was increased and the surface chemistry was changed from PDADMAC domination below 2 M NaCl to PSS domination above 3 M NaCl. Owing to the higher concentrations of uncompensated for polyelectrolytes at both lower and higher salt concentrations, the swelling ratio of the multilayers was decreased until reaching 3 M NaCl and then was increased significantly again. The salt-treated PSS/PDADMAC thin films are expected to show different behaviors in terms of the physical adsorption of various functional substances, cell adhesion and proliferation, and chemical reaction activity.

  2. Magnesium hydroxide as the neutralizing agent for radioactive hydrochloric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, M.J.; Fife, K.W.

    1995-10-01

    The current technology at Los Alamos for removing actinides from acidic chloride waste streams is precipitation with approximately 10 M potassium hydroxide. Although successful, there are many inherent drawbacks to this precipitation technique which will be detailed in this paper. Magnesium hydroxide (K{sub sp} = 1.3 x 10{sup -11}) has limited solubility in water and as a result of the common ion effect, cannot generate a filtrate with a pH greater than 9. At a pH of 9, calcium (K{sub sp} = 5.5 x 10{sup -6}) will not coprecipitate as the hydroxide. This is an important factor since many acidic chloride feeds to hydroxide precipitation contain significant amounts of calcium. In addition, neutralization with Mg(OH){sub 2} produces a more filterable precipitate because neutralization occurs as the Mg(OH){sub 2} is dissolved by the acid rather than as a result of the much faster liquid/liquid reaction of KOH with the waste acid. This slower solid/liquid reaction allows time for crystal growth to occur and produces more easily filterable precipitates. On the other hand, neutralization of spent acid with strong KOH that yields numerous hydroxide ions in solution almost instantaneously forming a much larger volume of small crystallites that result in gelatinous, slow-filtering precipitates. Magnesium hydroxide also offers a safety advantage. Although mildly irritating, it is a weak base and safe and easy to handle. From a waste minimization perspective, Mg(OH){sub 2} offers many advantages. First, the magnesium hydroxide is added as a solid. This step eliminates the diluent water used in KOH neutralizations. Secondly, because the particle size of the precipitate is larger, more actinides are caught on the filter paper resulting in a smaller amount of actinide being transferred to the TA-50 Liquid Waste Treatment Facility. Third, the amount of solids that must be reprocessed is significantly smaller resulting in less waste generation from the downstream processes.

  3. Inefficacy of osmotic backwash induced by sodium chloride salt solution in controlling SWRO membrane fouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooque, A. Mohammed; Al-Jeshi, Subhi; Saeed, Mohamed O.; Alreweli, Ali

    2014-12-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of osmotic backwash induced by high salt (NaCl) concentration solution on feed side of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, online and offline, in controlling membrane fouling and therefore minimizing/eliminating the need for chemical cleaning. SWRO membranes were deliberately fouled by feeding seawater from an open intake located on the Arabian Gulf Coast without dosing chemicals. The fouled membranes were subjected to offline cleaning with the salt solution of up to 25 % concentration. Despite the partial removal of foulants from the membrane surface, SWRO membrane performance could not be restored, indicating the ineffectiveness of osmotic backwash in aiding offline salt cleaning. Similarly, online osmotic backwash was found to be not only ineffective in removing foulants from membrane surfaces but actually increased the fouling rate, as indicated by faster fouling rates compared to other cases. Although the driving force required for the osmotic backwash existed, the generated back flow proved to be insufficient to detach foulants from membrane surfaces. During the study period, the average SWRO membrane flux was maintained between 19 and 23 LMH, whereas the average generated back flow flux by high salt concentration solution was only 11 LMH, which was not adequate to remove foulants from membrane surfaces. Moreover, it seems that the membrane configuration as well as inherent microstructure of SWRO membrane places certain constraints on the osmotic backwash process and renders osmotic backwash ineffective in tackling SWRO membrane fouling. Hence, chemical cleaning is essential to restore SWRO membrane performance whenever fouling occurs, and the use of highly concentrated salt solution does not have any significant benefit. Membrane autopsy revealed only an insignificant accumulation of biofouling layer despite the absence of disinfection. However, it was shown that culturable biofilm bacteria species

  4. Uranium (VI) ion exchange on nitrogen-phosphorus-containing polyampholytes in chloride-fluoride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pakholkov, V.S.; Denisova, L.A.; Richkov, V.A.; Roshchepkina, L.I.

    1988-09-01

    The adsorption of uranium form UO/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ solutions containing HCl, NH/sub 4/Cl, and HF has been studied using polyampholyte resins ANKF-1, ANKF-2, and ANKF-3D. The effects of HCl, NH/sub 4/Cl, and HF over broad concentration ranges on uranium adsorption have also been investigated. Based on adsorption data and the results of elemental analysis and IR spectroscopy conclusions have been drawn concerning the composition of adsorbed ions and their binding forms with functional groups. A mathematical model to describe the adsorption process has been proposed.

  5. Self-consistent field theory investigation of the behavior of hyaluronic acid chains in aqueous salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogovitsin, E. A.; Budkov, Yu. A.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we continue to develop a field-theoretic methodology, which combines the technique of Gaussian equivalent representation for the calculation of functional integrals with the continuous Gaussian thread model of flexible polymers for solving statistical-mechanical problems of polyelectrolyte solutions. We present new analytic expressions for the osmotic pressure, the potential of mean force, and the monomer-monomer pair distribution function, and employ them to investigate the structural and thermodynamic quantities of the polyelectrolyte system. We demonstrate the applicability of the method for systems of polyelectrolyte chains in which the monomers interact via a Yukawa-type pair potential. As a specific example, the present work focuses on aqueous solutions of hyaluronic acid with added salts NaCl and CaCl2. Hyaluronic acid is a high molecular weight linear polysaccharide, which has a multitude of roles in biological tissues. We conclude that the effect of sodium chloride and calcium chloride on the osmotic properties of hyaluronic acid solutions can be accounted for by their contributions to the ionic strength. Nevertheless, the effects of coiling and self-association can be stimulated in solution by added salt.

  6. Response surface optimization of acid red 119 dye from simulated wastewater using Al based waterworks sludge and polyaluminium chloride as coagulant.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, S Sadri; Moghaddam, M R Alavi; Arami, M

    2011-04-01

    In this research, the performance of Polyaluminium Chloride (PAC) and Polyaluminium Chloride sludge (PACS) as coagulants for acid red 119 (AR119) dye removal from aqueous solutions were compared. The sample of PACS was collected from "Baba Sheikh Ali" water treatment plant (Isfahan, Iran) where PAC is used as a coagulant in the coagulation/flocculation process. A response surface methodology was applied to evaluate the simple and combined effects of the operating variables including initial pH, coagulant dosage and initial dye concentration and to optimize the operating conditions of the treatment process. Results reveal that the optimal conditions for dye removal were initial pH 3.42, coagulant dosage of 4.55 g dried PACS/L and initial dye concentration of 140 mg/L for PACS, while the optimal initial pH, coagulant dosage and initial dye concentration for PAC were 3.8, 57 mg/L and 140 mg/L, respectively. Under these optimal values of process parameters, the dye removal efficiency of 94.1% and 95.25% was observed for PACS and PAC, respectively. Although lower amount of PAC in comparison with PACS was needed for specific dye removal, the reuse of PACS as a low-cost material can offer some advantages such as high efficiency for AR119 dye removal and economic savings on overall water and wastewater treatment plant operation costs. PMID:21216522

  7. Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of 316LN SS in Acidified Sodium Chloride Solution at Applied Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonguzhali, A.; Pujar, M. G.; Mallika, C.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2015-05-01

    The influence of acidified 1 M NaCl solution by addition of 2 ml/L of HCl on the cyclic plastic deformation of AISI Type 316LN SS containing 0.07 wt.% and 0.22 wt.% N was investigated as a function of the applied potentials. The corrosion fatigue (CF) behavior of stainless steel (SS) was explained vis-a-vis the dislocation behavior, the propensity to form microcracks, and the evolution of the current transients based on the studies carried out at both room-temperature and boiling conditions. CF experiments were conducted using round tensile specimens at a stress ratio of 0.5 and a frequency of 0.1 Hz. Two different kinds of damage mechanisms were observed (I) the damage mechanism in the stable-passive state was correlated with the localization of the anodic dissolution due to a depassivation-repassivation process, whereas (II) the cyclic stress induced pitting corrosion in the metastable pitting state, which resulted in formation of microcracks. The study of the microcracking process and its evolution is a key to the physical mechanism by which the fatigue life of stainless steels would be affected in an aqueous corrosive solution under the applied potential.

  8. A comparative study on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of iron and X-65 steel in 4.0 wt % sodium chloride solution after different exposure intervals.

    PubMed

    Sherif, El-Sayed M

    2014-07-09

    In this work, the results obtained from studying the anodic dissolution of pure iron and API X-65 5L pipeline steel after 40 min and 12 h exposure period in 4.0 wt % NaCl solutions at room temperature were reported. Potential-time, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization, and chronoamperometric current-time at constant potential techniques were employed. It has been found that the iron electrode corrodes in the chloride test solutions faster than the API X-65 5L steel does under the same conditions. Increasing the exposure period for the electrodes from 40 min to 12 h showed a significant reduction in the corrosion parameters for both iron and steel in the 4.0 wt % NaCl solution. Results together confirmed clearly that the X-65 steel is superior to iron against corrosion in sodium chloride solutions.

  9. Does Nitric Acid Dissociate at the Aqueous Solution Surface?

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Tanza; Winter, Berndt; Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.; Hemminger, J. C.

    2011-11-03

    Nitric acid is a prevalent component of atmospheric aerosols, and the extent of nitric acid dissociation at aqueous interfaces is relevant to its role in heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry. Several experimental and theoretical studies have suggested that the extent of dissociation of nitric acid near aqueous interfaces is less than in bulk solution. Here, dissociation of HNO3 at the surface of aqueous nitric acid is quantified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the nitrogen local electronic structure. The relative amounts of undissociated HNO3(aq) and dissociated NO3-(aq) are identified by the distinguishable N1s core-level photoelectron spectra of the two species, and we determine the degree of dissociation, αint, in the interface (the first ~3 layers of solution) as a function of HNO3 concentration. Our measurements show that dissociation is decreased by approximately 20% near the solution interface compared with bulk, and furthermore that dissociation occurs even in the top-most solution layer. The experimental results are supported by first-principles MD simulations, which show that hydrogen-bonds between HNO3 and water molecules at the solution surface stabilize the molecular form at low concentration, in analogy to the stabilization of molecular HNO3 that occurs in bulk solution at high concentration. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  10. Corrosion Behavior of Stainless Steels in Neutral and Acidified Sodium Chloride Solutions by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; Kolady, M. R.; Vinje, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the corrosion performance of three alloys by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and to compare the results with those obtained during a two-year atmospheric exposure study.' Three alloys: AL6XN (UNS N08367), 254SM0 (UNS S32154), and 304L (UNS S30403) were included in the study. 304L was included as a control. The alloys were tested in three electrolyte solutions which consisted of neutral 3.55% NaC1, 3.55% NaC1 in 0.lN HC1, and 3.55% NaC1 in 1.ON HC1. These conditions were expected to be less severe, similar, and more severe respectively than the conditions at NASA's Kennedy Space Center launch pads.

  11. Separation of mercury from aqueous mercuric chloride solutions by onion skins

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, S.; Konishi, Y.; Tomisaki, H.; Nakanishi, M.

    1986-01-01

    The separation of mercury from aqueous HgCl/sub 2/ solutions by onion skins (outermost coat) was studied both experimentally and theoretically. The distribution equilibria were measured by the batchwise method. The experimental results revealed that onion skin is a useful material for separating mercury from aqueous systems. The distribution data obtained at 25/sup 0/C were analyzed by using the theory based on the law of mass action. The separation of dissolved mercury by onion skins was found to be a process accompanied by an ion-exchange reaction of the cationic complex HgCl/sup +/ and an adsorption of the neutral complex HgCl/sub 2/. The equilibrium constants of the ion-exchange and adsorption processes at 25/sup 0/C and the mercury-binding capacity of onion skins were determined. Further, it was found that the distribution equilibrium of mercury is comparatively insensitive to temperature.

  12. Volume change effect on the salt-finger stability of directionally solidifying ammonium chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Chen, Falin

    1995-09-01

    The effect of the volume change due to phase transformation on the stability of salt-finger convection of directionally solidifying NH 4Cl aqueous solution cooling from below is investigated. The basic flow, induced by the volume change, not only changes the morphology and the depth of the dendritic mushy layer, but also influences the stability of salt-finger convection. A new mathematical model is proposed, which differs from the previous one mainly on the dynamical condition at the melt/mush interface. This difference not only leads to a less stable state, but can also be crucial to the dynamical behavior of the oscillatory instability mode since the convection cells of this mode are coupled viscously through the interface. In the discussion, special emphasis is placed on the volume change effect on the instability mode competition, which may be influential to the stability characteristics of the subsequent plume convection.

  13. Corrosion behavior of aluminum-alumina composites in aerated 3.5 percent chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo Hurtado, Paul Omar

    Aluminum based metal matrix composites are finding many applications in engineering. Of these Al-Al2O3 composites appear to have promise in a number of defense applications because of their mechanical properties. However, their corrosion behavior remains suspect, especially in marine environments. While efforts are being made to improve the corrosion resistance of Al-Al2O3 composites, the mechanism of corrosion is not well known. In this study, the corrosion behavior of powder metallurgy processed Al-Cu alloy reinforced with 10, 15, 20 and 25 vol. % Al2O3 particles (XT 1129, XT 2009, XT 2048, XT 2031) was evaluated in aerated 3.5% NaCl solution using microstructural and electrochemical measurements. AA1100-O and AA2024T4 monolithic alloys were also studied for comparison purposes. The composites and unreinforced alloys were subjected to potentiodynamic polarization and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) testing. Addition of 25 vol. % Al2O 3 to the base alloys was found to increase its corrosion resistance considerably. Microstructural studies revealed the presence of intermetallic Al2Cu particles in these composites that appeared to play an important role in the observations. Pitting potential for these composites was near corrosion potential values, and repassivation potential was below the corresponding corrosion potential, indicating that these materials begin to corrode spontaneously as soon as they come in contact with the 3.5 % NaCl solution. EIS measurements indicate the occurrence of adsorption/diffusion phenomena at the interface of the composites which ultimately initiate localized or pitting corrosion. Polarization resistance values were extracted from the EIS data for all the materials tested. Electrically equivalent circuits are proposed to describe and substantiate the corrosive processes occurring in these Al-Al2O 3 composite materials.

  14. Dephosphorization of Steelmaking Slag by Leaching with Acidic Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yong; Diao, Jiang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Xiaosa; Zhang, Tao; Xie, Bing

    2015-12-01

    In the present paper, dephosphorization of steelmaking slag by leaching with acidic aqueous solution composed of citric acid, sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid and ion-exchanged water was investigated. The buffer solution of C6H8O7-NaOH-HCl system prevented changes in the pH values. Kinetic parameters including leaching temperature, slag particle size and pH values of the solution were optimized. The results showed that temperature has no obvious effect on the dissolution ratio of phosphorus. However, it has a significant effect on the dissolution ratio of iron. The dephosphorization rate increases with the decrease of slag particle size and the pH value of the solution. Over 90% of the phosphorus can be dissolved in the solution while the corresponding leaching ratio of iron was only 30% below the optimal condition. Leaching kinetics of dephosphorization follow the unreacted shrinking core model with a rate controlled step by the solid diffusion layer, the corresponding apparent activation energy being 1.233 kJ mol-1. A semiempirical kinetic equation was established. After leaching, most of the nC2S-C3P solid solution in the steelmaking slag was selectively dissolved in the aqueous solution and the iron content in the solid residue was correspondingly enriched.

  15. Dephosphorization of Steelmaking Slag by Leaching with Acidic Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yong; Diao, Jiang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Xiaosa; Zhang, Tao; Xie, Bing

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, dephosphorization of steelmaking slag by leaching with acidic aqueous solution composed of citric acid, sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid and ion-exchanged water was investigated. The buffer solution of C6H8O7-NaOH-HCl system prevented changes in the pH values. Kinetic parameters including leaching temperature, slag particle size and pH values of the solution were optimized. The results showed that temperature has no obvious effect on the dissolution ratio of phosphorus. However, it has a significant effect on the dissolution ratio of iron. The dephosphorization rate increases with the decrease of slag particle size and the pH value of the solution. Over 90% of the phosphorus can be dissolved in the solution while the corresponding leaching ratio of iron was only 30% below the optimal condition. Leaching kinetics of dephosphorization follow the unreacted shrinking core model with a rate controlled step by the solid diffusion layer, the corresponding apparent activation energy being 1.233 kJ mol-1. A semiempirical kinetic equation was established. After leaching, most of the nC2S-C3P solid solution in the steelmaking slag was selectively dissolved in the aqueous solution and the iron content in the solid residue was correspondingly enriched.

  16. Small volume resuscitation with hypertonic sodium chloride solution in cattle undergoing surgical correction of abomasal volvulus.

    PubMed

    Sickinger, M; Doll, K; Roloff, N C; Halekoh, U

    2014-09-01

    A randomized clinical trial was conducted to compare the efficacy of rapid intravenous (IV) infusion of a 7.2% hypertonic saline solution with that of continuous application of an isotonic solution in stabilizing the circulation of cows with abomasal volvulus. Cattle treated with hypertonic saline had a significantly greater reduction in volume deficit within the first 10 min of therapy than cows treated with isotonic saline (from 5.9 ± 4.8 to 2.1 ± 4.4 L/100 kg vs. 7.0 ± 4.5 to 4.9 ± 3.8 L/100 kg, respectively). The central venous pressure (CVP) of the cows given the hypertonic saline rose within the first 10 min of therapy from 7.3 ± 3.5 to 10.8 ± 3.4 cm H2O, while the CVP of the cattle treated with isotonic saline did not increase significantly during this time. Sixty minutes after the start of the infusion, the CVP of the isotonic group was still significantly lower than that of the hypertonic group (9.5 ± 2.1 vs. 10.3 ± 3.3 cm H2O, respectively). Within the first 60 min, the base excess decreased from 5.5 ± 6.9 to 4.7 ± 6.2 mmol/L in the hypertonic group whereas it increased from 5.6 ± 5.7 to 6.8 ± 5.4 mmol/L in the isotonic group. These results suggest that for cows with abomasal volvulus, IV therapy with hypertonic saline may improve the haemodynamic and circulatory situation considerably faster and more effectively than continuous infusion with isotonic saline.

  17. γ-Irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negron-Mendoza, Alicia; Graff, Rebecca L.; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1980-12-01

    The γ-irradiation of malic acid in aqueous solutions was studied under initially oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions in an attempt to determine the possible interconversion of malic acid into other carboxylic acids, specifically those associated with Krebs cycle. The effect of dose on product formation of the system was investigated. Gas-liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry was used as the principal means of identification of the non-volatile products. Thin layer chromotography and direct probe mass spectroscopy were also employed. The findings show that a variety of carboxylic acids are formed, with malonic and succinic acids in greatest abundance. These products have all been identified as being formed in the γ-irradiation of acetic acid, suggesting a common intermediary. Since these molecules fit into a metabolic cycle, it is strongly suggestive that prebiotic pathways provided the basis for biological systems.

  18. Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Alloy 7050-T7451 Exposed to Aqueous Chloride Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Reinhold

    2016-03-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 7050-T7451 plate material was investigated in short-transverse direction performing constant load and constant extension rate tests. Smooth and notched tensile specimens were permanently immersed in substitute ocean water and in an aqueous solution of 0.6 M NaCl + 0.06 M (NH4)2SO4. Alloy 7050-T7451 exhibited high SCC resistance in both synthetic environments. However, conducting cyclic loading tests, environment-induced cracking was observed. Applying a sawtooth waveform, notched tensile specimens were strained under constant load amplitude conditions at constant displacement rates ranging from 2 × 10-6 to 2 × 10-4 mms-1. The stress ratio R = σ min/ σ max was 0.1 with maximum stresses of 300 and 400 MPa. When cyclically loaded in substitute ocean water, notched specimens failed predominantly by transgranular environment-induced cracking. Striations were observed on the cleavage-like facets. The number of cycles-to-failure decreased with decreasing displacement rate. A slope of 0.5 was obtained by fitting the logarithmic plot of number of cycles-to-failure vs nominal loading frequency, indicating a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism controlled by diffusion.

  19. Adsorption of uranium (VI) from mixed chloride-fluoride solutions by anion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Pakholkov, V.S.; Denisova, L.A.; Rychkov, V.N.; Kurnosenko, N.A.

    1988-03-01

    Experimental data are reported and discussed concerning the adsorption of uranium from 0.025 M solutions of UO/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/, containing HCl, HF, and NH/sub 4/Cl over a wide concentration range, using anion-exchange resins of varying basicities. UV and IR spectroscopic studies were conducted in order to clarify the chemical mechanism of uranium adsorption. Adsorption isotherms for all of the ion-exchange resins studied are convex in shape and can be described by the following equations: log K/sub d/ = a + b (-log C/sub e/), and log A = a + (b + 1) log C/sub e/, where A is the adsorptivity in mmole U/g; K/sub d/ is the distribution coefficient in mg/liter; and C/sub e/ is the equilibrium concentration of U in mmole/ml. General mathematical models have been obtained to describe the adsorption process; these consist of a system of regression equations derived from the results of a complete 2/sup 3/ factorial study.

  20. Combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride on chloroplast structure and functional elements in rice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-05-01

    Acid rain and rare earth element (REE) pollution exist simultaneously in many agricultural regions. However, how REE pollution and acid rain affect plant growth in combination remains largely unknown. In this study, the combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) on chloroplast morphology, chloroplast ultrastructure, functional element contents, chlorophyll content, and the net photosynthetic rate (P n) in rice (Oryza sativa) were investigated by simulating acid rain and rare earth pollution. Under the combined treatment of simulated acid rain at pH 4.5 and 0.08 mM LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane was smooth, proteins on this membrane were uniform, chloroplast structure was integrated, and the thylakoids were orderly arranged, and simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a mild antagonistic effect; the Mg, Ca, Mn contents, the chlorophyll content, and the P n increased under this combined treatment, with a synergistic effect of simulated acid rain and LaCl3. Under other combined treatments of simulated acid rain and LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane surface was uneven, a clear "hole" was observed on the surface of chloroplasts, and the thylakoids were dissolved and loose; and the P n and contents of functional elements (P, Mg, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mo) and chlorophyll decreased. Under these combined treatments, simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a synergistic effect. Based on the above results, a model of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis was established in order to reveal the combined effects on plant photosynthesis, especially on the photosynthetic organelle-chloroplast. Our results would provide some references for further understanding the mechanism of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis. PMID:26815371

  1. Combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride on chloroplast structure and functional elements in rice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-05-01

    Acid rain and rare earth element (REE) pollution exist simultaneously in many agricultural regions. However, how REE pollution and acid rain affect plant growth in combination remains largely unknown. In this study, the combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) on chloroplast morphology, chloroplast ultrastructure, functional element contents, chlorophyll content, and the net photosynthetic rate (P n) in rice (Oryza sativa) were investigated by simulating acid rain and rare earth pollution. Under the combined treatment of simulated acid rain at pH 4.5 and 0.08 mM LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane was smooth, proteins on this membrane were uniform, chloroplast structure was integrated, and the thylakoids were orderly arranged, and simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a mild antagonistic effect; the Mg, Ca, Mn contents, the chlorophyll content, and the P n increased under this combined treatment, with a synergistic effect of simulated acid rain and LaCl3. Under other combined treatments of simulated acid rain and LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane surface was uneven, a clear "hole" was observed on the surface of chloroplasts, and the thylakoids were dissolved and loose; and the P n and contents of functional elements (P, Mg, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mo) and chlorophyll decreased. Under these combined treatments, simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a synergistic effect. Based on the above results, a model of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis was established in order to reveal the combined effects on plant photosynthesis, especially on the photosynthetic organelle-chloroplast. Our results would provide some references for further understanding the mechanism of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis.

  2. NMR sequential assignments and solution structure of chlorotoxin, a small scorpion toxin that blocks chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Lippens, G; Najib, J; Wodak, S J; Tartar, A

    1995-01-10

    The solution structure of chlorotoxin, a small toxin purified from the venom of the Leiurus quinquestriatus scorpion, has been determined using 2D 1H NMR spectroscopy. Analysis of the NMR data shows that the structure consists of a small three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet packed against an alpha-helix, thereby adopting the same fold as charybdotoxin and other members of the short scorpion toxin family [Arseniev et al. (1984) FEBS Lett. 165, 57-62; Martins et al. (1990) FEBS Lett. 260, 249-253; Bontems et al. (1991) Science 254, 1521-1523]. Three disulfide bonds of chlorotoxin (Cys5-Cys28, Cys16-Cys33, and Cys20-Cys35), cross-linking the alpha-helix to the beta-sheet, follow the common pattern found in the other short scorpion toxins. The fourth disulfide bridge (Cys2-Cys19) links the small N-terminal beta strand to the rest of the molecule, in contrast to charybdotoxin where this disulfide bridge is absent and the first strand interacts with the rest of the molecule by several contacts between hydrophobic residues. Another structural difference between chlorotoxin and charybdotoxin is observed at the level of the alpha-beta turn. This difference is accompanied by a change in the electrostatic potential surface, which is largely positive at the level of this turn in chlorotoxin, whereas no such positive potential surface can be found at the same position in charybdotoxin. In the latter protein, the positive surface is formed by different charged residues situated on the solvent-exposed site of the C-terminal beta-sheet.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Highly accurate boronimeter assay of concentrated boric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, R.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The Random-Walk Boronimeter has successfully been used as an on-line indicator of boric acid concentration in an operating commercial pressurized water reactor. The principle has been adapted for measurement of discrete samples to high accuracy and to concentrations up to 6000 ppm natural boron in light water. Boric acid concentration in an aqueous solution is a necessary measurement in many nuclear power plants, particularly those that use boric acid dissolved in the reactor coolant as a reactivity control system. Other nuclear plants use a high-concentration boric acid solution as a backup shutdown system. Such a shutdown system depends on rapid injection of the solution and frequent surveillance of the fluid to ensure the presence of the neutron absorber. The two methods typically used to measure boric acid are the chemical and the physical methods. The chemical method uses titration to determine the ionic concentration of the BO[sub 3] ions and infers the boron concentration. The physical method uses the attenuation of neutrons by the solution and infers the boron concentration from the neutron absorption properties. This paper describes the Random-Walk Boronimeter configured to measure discrete samples to high accuracy and high concentration.

  4. Radiolysis of aqueous solutions of 2-aminoethanethiosulfuric acid. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grachev, S.A.; Koroleva, I.K.; Kropachev, E.V.; Litvyakova, G.I.

    1982-07-10

    In the radiolysis products of aerated and deaerated solutions of the 2-aminoethanethiosulfuric acid the authors have identified cystamine monoxide, cystamine, taurine, mercamine, the sulfate ion, the sulfite ion, and the dithionate ion. The yields of these products under different conditions have been determined. Results indicated that the sulfate ion is formed both from the divalent and the hexavalent sulfur atom of the 2-aminoethanethiosulfuric acid moelcule. A possible radiolysis mechanism is discussed.

  5. Influence of the current density on the electrochemical treatment of concentrated 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride solutions on diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Marcionilio, Suzana M L de Oliveira; Alves, Gisele M; E Silva, Rachel B Góes; Marques, Pablo J Lima; Maia, Poliana D; Neto, Brenno A D; Linares, José J

    2016-10-01

    This paper focuses on the influence of the current density treatment of a concentrated 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMImCl) solution on an electrochemical reactor with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode. The decrease in the total organic carbon (TOC) and the BMImCl concentration demonstrate the capability of BDD in oxidizing ionic liquids (ILs) and further mineralizing (to CO2 and NO3 (-)) more rapidly at higher current densities in spite of the reduced current efficiency of the process. Moreover, the presence of Cl(-) led to the formation of oxychlorinated anions (mostly ClO3 (-) and ClO4 (-)) and, in combination with the ammonia generated in the cathode from the nitrate reduction, chloramines, more intensely at higher current density. Finally, the analysis of the intermediates formed revealed no apparent influence of the current density on the BMImCl degradation mechanism. The current density presents therefore a complex influence on the IL treatment process that is discussed throughout this paper.

  6. An investigation into the use of cuprous chloride for the removal of radioactive iodide from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Gu, Ping; Jia, Lin; Zhang, Guanghui

    2016-01-25

    Cuprous chloride (CuCl) was examined as a precipitant to remove iodide (I(-)) from aqueous solutions. The effects of the dosage of CuCl, reaction time, initial concentrations of I(-) and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) on I(-) removal were investigated. The results showed that the optimized removal efficiency of I(-) reached approximately 95.8% when the dosage was 150 mg/L, the initial I(-) concentration ranged from 5 to 40 mg/L and the reaction time was 15 min. The removal efficiency decreased from 95.8% to 76.0% with the addition of HCO3(-) at a concentration in the range of 0-107 mg/L. Furthermore, the dissociation of CuCl, the disproportionation reaction of Cu(+), the precipitation of cuprous iodide (CuI) and cuprous oxide (Cu2O), and the formations of copper sulfide (CuxS, 1≤x<2) were identified as the primary reactions using the PHREEQC software and the measurements of water quality parameters under various conditions. X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was performed before and after the reaction, helping to elucidate the reaction mechanism. This study can provide a promising method to address radioactive I(-) pollution in water. PMID:26448493

  7. An investigation into the use of cuprous chloride for the removal of radioactive iodide from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Gu, Ping; Jia, Lin; Zhang, Guanghui

    2016-01-25

    Cuprous chloride (CuCl) was examined as a precipitant to remove iodide (I(-)) from aqueous solutions. The effects of the dosage of CuCl, reaction time, initial concentrations of I(-) and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) on I(-) removal were investigated. The results showed that the optimized removal efficiency of I(-) reached approximately 95.8% when the dosage was 150 mg/L, the initial I(-) concentration ranged from 5 to 40 mg/L and the reaction time was 15 min. The removal efficiency decreased from 95.8% to 76.0% with the addition of HCO3(-) at a concentration in the range of 0-107 mg/L. Furthermore, the dissociation of CuCl, the disproportionation reaction of Cu(+), the precipitation of cuprous iodide (CuI) and cuprous oxide (Cu2O), and the formations of copper sulfide (CuxS, 1≤x<2) were identified as the primary reactions using the PHREEQC software and the measurements of water quality parameters under various conditions. X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was performed before and after the reaction, helping to elucidate the reaction mechanism. This study can provide a promising method to address radioactive I(-) pollution in water.

  8. Bioactivity of porous titanium with hydrogen peroxide solution with or without tantalum chloride treatment at a low temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chaoyong; Liang, Kailu; Tan, Jing; Xiang, Zhou; Fan, Hongsong; Zhang, Xingdong

    2013-04-01

    In this study, porous titanium was treated by a hydrogen peroxide solution with (HT) or without (HO) tantalum chloride at a low temperature to endow its bioactivity. The microstructure, film stability and in vitro and in vivo bioactivity of HT-treated and HO-treated porous titanium were investigated, and the non-treated one was used as control. After HT treatment, a well-crystallized titania nanoparticle film consisting of anatase phase with good film stability was formed on the surface of porous titanium, and the tantalum element appeared in the film, while the HO-treated porous titanium surface showed a dual structure with well-aligned nanorods as an outer layer and condensed nanoparticles as an inner layer consisting of a mixture of well-crystallized anatase and rutile phases. In vitro bioactivity assessment showed that both HT- and HO-treated porous titanium possessed high apatite-forming ability. More importantly, after implantation in the dorsal muscles of dogs, the HT- and HO-treated implants induced ectopic bone formation in its inner pores after 5 months, while the non-treated one did not. The present study showed that HT-treated porous titanium possessed good film stability and bioactivity to be used as bone repair materials in clinic under load-bearing conditions.

  9. Removal of malachite green dye from aqueous solution using mesoporous silica synthesized from 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekka, Basanti; Nayak, Soumitra Ranjan; Dash, Priyabrat; Patel, Raj Kishore

    2016-04-01

    In this research, mesoporous silica was synthesized via a modified sol-gel route using 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride and was employed to remove malachite green (MG) dye from aqueous solution. Subsequently, this material was characterized and identified by different techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), N2 adsorption-desorption method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and thermosgravimetric analysis (TGA). Unique properties such as high surface area and pore diameter, in addition to highly reactive atoms and presence of various functional groups make the mesoporous silica possible for efficient removal of malachite green (MG). In batch experimental set-up, optimum conditions for quantitative removal of MG by mesoporous silica was attained by varying different variables such as adsorbent dosage, initial dye concentration, contact time, and pH. Optimum values were set as pH of 8.0, 0.5 g of adsorbent at contact time of 120 min. The adsorption of MG follows the pseudo-second-order rate equation. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Freundlich model at all amount of adsorbent, while maximum adsorption capacity was 5.981 mg g-1 for 0.5 g mesoporous silica synthesized in IL.

  10. Chloride as tracer of solute transport in the aquifer-aquitard system in the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Xingxing; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Wang, Ya

    2016-08-01

    A 1D numerical model is constructed to investigate the impact of sedimentation and sea level changes on transport of Cl- in the aquifer-aquitard system in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China. The model simulates the evolution of the vertical Cl- concentration profiles during the Holocene. Sedimentation is modeled as a moving boundary problem. Chloride concentration profiles are reconstructed for nine boreholes, covering a wide area of the PRD, from northwest to southeast. Satisfactory agreement is obtained between simulated and measured Cl- concentration profiles. Diffusion solely is adequate to reproduce the vertical Cl- concentration profiles, which indicates that diffusion is the regionally dominant vertical transport mechanism across the aquitards in the PRD. The estimated effective diffusion coefficients of the aquitards range from 2.0 × 10-11 to 2.0 × 10-10 m2/s. The effective diffusion coefficients of the aquifers range from 3.0 × 10-11 to 4.0 × 10-10 m2/s. Advective transport tends to underestimate Cl- concentrations in the aquitard and overestimate Cl- concentrations in the basal aquifer. The results of this study will help understand the mechanisms of solute transport in the PRD and other deltas with similar geological and hydrogeological characteristics.

  11. Re-passivation Potential of Alloy 22 in Chloride plus Nitrate Solutions using the Potentiodynamic-Galvano-static-Potentiostatic Method

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Kenneth J.; Rebak, Raul B.

    2007-07-01

    In general, the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to suffer crevice corrosion is measured using the Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) technique. This is a fast technique that gives rather accurate and reproducible values of re-passivation potential (ER1) in most cases. In the fringes of susceptibility, when the environment is not highly aggressive, the values of re-passivation potential using the CPP technique may not be highly reproducible, especially because the technique is fast. To circumvent this, the re-passivation potential of Alloy 22 was measured using a slower method that combines Potentiodynamic-Galvano-static-Potentiostatic steps (called here the Tsujikawa-Hisamatsu Electrochemical or THE method). The THE method applies the charge to the specimen in a more controlled way, which may give more reproducible re-passivation potential values, especially when the environment is not aggressive. The values of re-passivation potential of Alloy 22 in sodium chloride plus potassium nitrate solutions were measured using the THE and CPP methods. Results show that both methods yield similar values of re-passivation potential, especially under aggressive conditions. (authors)

  12. Highly microporous carbons derived from a complex of glutamic acid and zinc chloride for use in supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiao-Ling; Lu, An-Hui; He, Bin; Li, Wen-Cui

    2016-09-01

    The selection of carbon precursor is an important factor when designing carbon materials. In this study, a complex derived from L-glutamic acid and zinc chloride was used to prepare highly microporous carbons via facile pyrolysis. L-glutamic acid, a new carbon precursor with nitrogen functionality, coordinated with zinc chloride resulted in a homogeneous distribution of Zn2+ on the molecular level. During pyrolysis, the evaporation of the in situ formed zinc species creates an abundance of micropores together with the inert gases. The obtained carbons exhibit high specific surface area (SBET: 1203 m2 g-1) and a rich nitrogen content (4.52 wt%). In excess of 89% of the pore volume consists of micropores with pore size ranging from 0.5 to 1.2 nm. These carbons have been shown to be suitable for use as supercapacitor electrodes, and have been tested in 6 M KOH where a capacitance of 217 F g-1 was achieved at a current density of 0.5 A g-1. A long cycling life of 30 000 cycles was achieved at a current density of 1 A g-1, with only a 9% loss in capacity. The leakage current through a two-electrode device was measured as 2.3 μA per mg of electrode and the self-discharge characteristics were minimal.

  13. Removal and recovery of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, and acetic acid from aqueous solutions using a soluble polyelectrolyte.

    PubMed

    Carter, Brian; Gilcrease, Patrick C; Menkhaus, Todd J

    2011-09-01

    In the cellulosic ethanol process, furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), and acetic acid are formed during the high temperature acidic pretreatment step needed to convert biomass into fermentable sugars. These compounds can inhibit cellulase enzymes and fermentation organisms at relatively low concentrations (≥ 1 g/L). Effective removal of these inhibitory compounds would allow the use of more severe pretreatment conditions to improve sugar yields and lead to more efficient fermentations; if recovered and purified, they could also be sold as valuable by-products. This study investigated the separation of aldhehydes (furfural and HMF) and organic acid (acetic acid) inhibitory compounds from simple aqueous solutions by using polyethyleneimene (PEI), a soluble cationic polyelectrolyte. PEI added to simple solutions of each inhibitor at a ratio of 1 mol of functional group to 1 mol inhibitor removed up to 89.1, 58.6, and 81.5 wt% of acetic acid, HMF, and furfural, respectively. Furfural and HMF were recovered after removal by washing the polyelectrolyte/inhibitor complex with dilute sulfuric acid solution. Recoveries up to 81.0 and 97.0 wt% were achieved for furfural and HMF, respectively. The interaction between PEI and acetic acid was easily disrupted by the addition of chloride ions, sulfate ions, or hydroxide ions. The use of soluble polymers for the removal and recovery of inhibitory compounds from biomass slurries is a promising approach to enhance the efficiency and economics of an envisioned biorefinery.

  14. Amino acids as chiral auxiliaries in cyanuric chloride-based chiral derivatizing agents for enantioseparation by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Batra, Sonika; Bhushan, Ravi

    2014-11-01

    This review summarizes and critically evaluates the recent research on application of amino acids and amino acid amides as chiral auxiliaries in cyanuric chloride (CC) based chiral derivatizing agents (CDRs), used in the indirect approach for enantiomeric resolution. Methods of synthesis of such CDRs, methods for synthesis of diastereomers of a variety of racemic compounds and parameters of liquid chromatographic separation, along with their prospects and their limitations in indirect enantioresolution, are discussed. Application of the said CDR(s) and the technical approach to be used that are discussed should be beneficial for control of enantiomeric purity in pharmaceutical industry, verification of enantiomeric ratio of commercial formulations and the development of methods for indirect resolution of a variety of chiral compounds. Derivatization methods are particularly required when a chromophore is to be introduced in low UV absorbing molecules, for their detection.

  15. Preparation of robust polyamide microcapsules by interfacial polycondensation of p-phenylenediamine and sebacoyl chloride and plasticization with oleic acid.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Natacha; Martins, Gabriela V; Bastos, Margarida M S M; Gois, Joana R; Coelho, Jorge F J; Marques, Juliana; Tavares, Carlos J; Magalhães, Fernão D

    2015-01-01

    Microcapsules produced by interfacial polycondensation of p-phenylenediamine (PPD) and sebacoyl chloride (SC) were studied. The products were characterized in terms of morphology, mean diameter and effectiveness of dodecane encapsulation. The use of Tween 20 as dispersion stabilizer, in comparison with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), reduced considerably the mean diameter of the microcapsules and originated smoother wall surfaces. When compared to ethylenediamine (EDA), microcapsules produced with PPD monomer were more rigid and brittle, prone to fracture during processing and ineffective retention of the core liquid. The use of diethylenetriamine (DETA) cross-linker in combination with PPD did not decrease capsule fragility. On the other hand, addition of a small fraction of oleic acid to the organic phase remarkably improved wall toughness and lead to successful encapsulation of the core-oil. Oleic acid is believed to act as a plasticizer. Its incorporation in the polymeric wall was demonstrated by FTIR and (1)H-NMR.

  16. Methanol Uptake by Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Essin, A. M.; Golden, D. M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global methanol budget is currently unbalanced, with source terms significantly larger than the sinks terms. To evaluate possible losses of gaseous methanol to sulfate aerosols, the solubility and reactivity of methanol in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols is under investigation. Methanol will partition into sulfate aerosols according to its Henry's law solubility. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H*, for cold (196 - 220 K) solutions ranging between 45 and 70 wt % H2SO4. We have found that methanol solubility ranges from approx. 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 7) M/atm for UT/LS conditions. Solubility increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. Although methanol is slightly more soluble than are acetone and formaldehyde, current data indicate that uptake by clean aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and any rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H is not significant over our experimental time scale for solutions below 80 wt % H2SO4. To confirm this directly, results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique will also be presented.

  17. Removal of fluoride in aqueous solution by adsorption on acid activated water treatment sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinitnantharat, Soydoa; Kositchaiyong, Sriwilai; Chiarakorn, Siriluk

    2010-06-01

    This paper reports the use of a pellet of adsorbent made from water treatment sludge (S) and acid activated water treatment sludge (SH) for removal of fluoride in the batch equilibration technique. The influence of pH, adsorbent dosage, temperature and effect of other ions were employed to find out the feasibility of acid activated adsorbent to remove fluoride to the permissible concentration of 0.7 mg/L. The results from the adsorption isotherm followed both Langmuir and Freundlich models and the highest fluoride removal was found for adsorbent activated with acetic acid at 2.0 mol/L. The optimum adsorbent dosage was found at 40 g/L, 0.01 mol/L acid activated adsorbent which was able to adsorb fluoride from 10 down to 0.11 mg/L. The adsorption capacity was decreased when the temperature increased. This revealed that the adsorption of fluoride on SH was exothermic. In the presence of nitrate and carbonate ions in the aqueous solution, fluoride removal efficiency of SH decreased from 94.4% to 86.6% and 90.8%, respectively. However, there is no significant effect in the presence of sulfate and chloride ions.

  18. Effects of acid and metal solutions on seedling foliage of two western conifers. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, J.; Weaver, T.; Cole, D.M.

    1994-11-01

    A greenhouse study tested the effects of three acids and five metals on foliage of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugs menziesii) seedlings. The seedlings were treated with a single immersion of foliage into solutions of three acids (HCL, H2S04, and HN3) and five metal chlorides (ZnC12, CdC12, HgC12, CuC12, and PbC12) each at five different concentration levels. Injury to the foliage was recorded after 5 weeks by counting needles that were chlorotic (yellow) or dead. Statistically significant (p < 0.05) effects were observed for both acids and metals. The effects of metals were far greater than the effects of acids for both species.

  19. An outbreak of illness after occupational exposure to ozone and acid chlorides.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, T P; Tsin, T W; O'Kelly, F J

    1985-01-01

    New labelling processes installed without adequate ventilation control in an electric motor factory exposed production line workers to toxic gases. Symptoms of eye and respiratory tract irritation together with complaints of headache, fever, chills, dizziness, malaise, general weakness, nausea, and vomiting were widespread. Chest signs, radiographic abnormalities, reduction in ventilatory function, and blood gas abnormalities were found in some cases. Epidemiological analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of cases supported an exposure effect relationship. Investigations suggested ozone and possibly phosgene and associated trichloroacetyl chlorides as the toxic agents that were generated by an ultraviolet print curing arrangement and perchloroethylene used as a cleaning solvent. PMID:4041387

  20. Characterization of metal ion-nucleic acid interactions in solution.

    PubMed

    Pechlaner, Maria; Sigel, Roland K O

    2012-01-01

    Metal ions are inextricably involved with nucleic acids due to their polyanionic nature. In order to understand the structure and function of RNAs and DNAs, one needs to have detailed pictures on the structural, thermodynamic, and kinetic properties of metal ion interactions with these biomacromolecules. In this review we first compile the physicochemical properties of metal ions found and used in combination with nucleic acids in solution. The main part then describes the various methods developed over the past decades to investigate metal ion binding by nucleic acids in solution. This includes for example hydrolytic and radical cleavage experiments, mutational approaches, as well as kinetic isotope effects. In addition, spectroscopic techniques like EPR, lanthanide(III) luminescence, IR and Raman as well as various NMR methods are summarized. Aside from gaining knowledge about the thermodynamic properties on the metal ion-nucleic acid interactions, especially NMR can be used to extract information on the kinetics of ligand exchange rates of the metal ions applied. The final section deals with the influence of anions, buffers, and the solvent permittivity on the binding equilibria between metal ions and nucleic acids. Little is known on some of these aspects, but it is clear that these three factors have a large influence on the interaction between metal ions and nucleic acids.

  1. Bile acids stimulate chloride secretion through CFTR and calcium-activated Cl- channels in Calu-3 airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Siobhán M; Mroz, Magdalena S; Greene, Catherine M; Keely, Stephen J; Harvey, Brian J

    2014-09-01

    Bile acids resulting from the aspiration of gastroesophageal refluxate are often present in the lower airways of people with cystic fibrosis and other respiratory distress diseases. Surprisingly, there is little or no information on the modulation of airway epithelial ion transport by bile acids. The secretory effect of a variety of conjugated and unconjugated secondary bile acids was investigated in Calu-3 airway epithelial cells grown under an air-liquid interface and mounted in Ussing chambers. Electrogenic transepithelial ion transport was measured as short-circuit current (Isc). The taurine-conjugated secondary bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA), was found to be the most potent modulator of basal ion transport. Acute treatment (5 min) of Calu-3 cells with TDCA (25 μM) on the basolateral side caused a stimulation of Isc, and removal of extracellular Cl(-) abolished this response. TDCA produced an increase in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-dependent current that was abolished by pretreatment with the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh172. TDCA treatment also increased Cl(-) secretion through calcium-activated chloride (CaCC) channels and increased the Na(+)/K(+) pump current. Acute treatment with TDCA resulted in a rapid cellular influx of Ca(2+) and increased cAMP levels in Calu-3 cells. Bile acid receptor-selective activation with INT-777 revealed TGR5 localized at the basolateral membrane as the receptor involved in TDCA-induced Cl(-) secretion. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that low concentrations of bile acids can modulate Cl(-) secretion in airway epithelial cells, and this effect is dependent on both the duration and sidedness of exposure to the bile acid.

  2. Influence of the anions on the N-cationic benzethonium salts in the solid state and solution: Chloride, bromide, hydroxide and citrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradies, Henrich H.; Reichelt, Hendrik

    2016-06-01

    The crystal structures of the hydrated cationic surfactant benzethonium (Bzth) chloride, bromide, hydroxide, and citrate have been determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and compared with their structures in solution well above their critical micelle concentration. The differences in the nature of the various anions of the four Bzth-X materials lead to unique anion environments and 3-D molecular arrangements. The water molecule in the monoclinic Bzth-Cl or Bzth-Br forms is hydrogen bonded to the halides and particularly to the hydrogens of the methoxy groups of the Bzth moiety notwithstanding the weak Brønsted acidity of the methoxy hydrogens. The citrate strongly interacts with the hydrogens of the methoxy group forming an embedded anionic spherical cluster of a radius of 2.6 Å. The Bzth-OH crystallizes in a hexagonal lattice with two water molecules and reveals free water molecules forming hydrogen bonded channels through the Bzth-OH crystal along the c-axis. The distances between the cationic nitrogen and the halides are 4.04 Å and 4.20 Å, significantly longer than expected for typical van der Waals distances of 3.30 Å. The structures show weakly interacting, alternating apolar and polar layers, which run parallel to the crystallographic a-b planes or a-c planes. The Bzth-X salts were also examined in aqueous solution containing 20% (v/v) ethanol and 1.0 % (v/v) glycerol well above their critical micelle concentration by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The [1,1,1] planes for the Bzth Cl or Br, the [0,0,2] and [1,1,0] planes for the Bzth-citrate, the [2,-1,0] planes and the [0,0,1] planes for the Bzth-OH found in the crystalline phase were also present in the solution phase, accordingly, the preservation of these phases are a strong indication of periodicity in the solution phase.

  3. Studies of removal of platinum(IV) ion microquantities from the model solutions of aluminium, copper, iron, nickel and zinc chloride macroquantities on the anion exchanger Duolite S 37.

    PubMed

    Hubicki, Z; Wójcik, G

    2006-08-25

    Platinum has been widely applied in catalytic industry and the recovery of noble metals from industrial wastes becomes an economic issue. The laboratory studies of platinum(IV) microquantities removal from 1M aluminium, copper, iron, nickel and zinc chloride solutions in 0.1M hydrochloric acid solutions on the anion exchanger Duolite S 37 of the functional secondary and tertiary amine groups were carried out. For this anion exchanger the fraction extracted values (%E, Pt(IV)) as well as the sorption isotherms were determined depending on the kind of aqueous phase and phase contact time. Moreover, the bed and weight distribution coefficients as well as working and total ion-exchange capacities were calculated from the platinum(IV) breakthrough curves. Kinetic parameters were determined. PMID:16469435

  4. Ion-pair formation in aqueous strontium chloride and strontium hydroxide solutions under hydrothermal conditions by AC conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Arcis, H; Zimmerman, G H; Tremaine, P R

    2014-09-01

    Frequency-dependent electrical conductivities of solutions of aqueous strontium hydroxide and strontium chloride have been measured from T = 295 K to T = 625 K at p = 20 MPa, over a very wide range of ionic strength (3 × 10(-5) to 0.2 mol kg(-1)), using a high-precision flow AC conductivity instrument. Experimental values for the concentration-dependent equivalent conductivity, Λ, of the two electrolytes were fitted with the Turq-Blum-Bernard-Kunz ("TBBK") ionic conductivity model, to determine ionic association constants, K(A,m). The TBBK fits yielded statistically significant formation constants for the species SrOH(+) and SrCl(+) at all temperatures, and for Sr(OH)2(0) and SrCl2(0) at temperatures above 446 K. The first and second stepwise association constants for the ion pairs followed the order K(A1)(SrOH(+)) > K(A1)(SrCl(+)) > K(A2)[Sr(OH)2(0)] > K(A2)[SrCl2(0)], consistent with long-range solvent polarization effects associated with the lower static dielectric constant and high compressibility of water at elevated temperatures. The stepwise association constants to form SrCl(+) agree with previously reported values for CaCl(+) to within the combined experimental error at high temperatures and, at temperatures below ∼375 K, the values of log10 KA1 for strontium are lower than those for calcium by up to ∼0.3-0.4 units. The association constants for the species SrOH(+) and Sr(OH)2(0) are the first accurate values to be reported for hydroxide ion pairs with any divalent cation under these conditions.

  5. Structure and Stability of Long Rod-like Dodecyltrimethylammonium Chloride Micelles in Solutions of Hydroxybenzoates: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Gujt, Jure; Bešter-Rogač, Marija; Spohr, Eckhard

    2016-08-16

    The relative position of the hydroxylic and carboxylic groups in the isomeric hydroxybenzoate (HB) anions is experimentally known to have a large impact on the thermodynamics of micellization of cationic surfactants, such as dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DTAC), and on the structure of the resulting micelles. To understand the effect of the different isomers on the molecular level, we employed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study systems containing infinitely long cylindrical DTAC micelles in aqueous solutions of the sodium salts of all three isomers of HB at a temperature and a pressure of 298.15 K and 1 atm. In all studied systems, the number of DTAC unimers is identical to the number of HB anions. At this concentration, the initially cylindrical micelles remain stable, irrespective of the nature of the isomer, whereas micelles rapidly disintegrated in the absence of HB anions. The HB isomers decrease the line density of unimers along the micellar axis and its concomitant thickness in the order o-HB > m-HB > p-HB. It is further observed that o-HB anions penetrate more deeply into the micellar core, induce a more ordered internal structure of the micelle, and are oriented more strongly than the other two isomers. In addition, the ortho isomer shows two different preferential orientations with respect to the radial direction of the cylindrical micelle; it can either be incorporated almost completely into the micelle or it can be attached through hydrogen bonding to one of those o-HB anions that are already incorporated into the micelle, and thus stick out of the micellar surface. PMID:27442259

  6. Evaporation kinetics of acetic acid-water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, K.; Wong, N.; Saykally, R.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The transport of water molecules across vapor-liquid interfaces in the atmosphere is a crucial step in the formation and evolution of cloud droplets. Despite decades of study, the effects of solutes on the mechanism and rate of evaporation and condensation remain poorly characterized. The present work aims to determine the effect of atmospherically-relevant solutes on the evaporation rate of water. In our experiments, we create a train of micron-sized droplets and measure their temperature via Raman thermometry as they undergo evaporation without condensation. Analysis of the cooling rate yields the evaporation coefficient (γ). Previous work has shown that inorganic salts have little effect on γ, with surface-adsorbing anions causing a slight reduction in the coefficient from that measured for pure water. Organic acids are ubiquitous in aqueous aerosol and have been shown to disrupt the surface structure of water. Here we describe measurements of the evaporation rate of acetic acid solutions, showing that acetic acid reduces γ to a larger extent than inorganic ions, and that γ decreases with increasing acetic acid concentration.

  7. Concentration dependence of ionic conductance measured with ion-selective sub-micro pipette probes in aqueous sodium and potassium chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, J. W.; Takami, T.; Lee, J.-K.; Kawai, T.; Park, B. H.

    2011-07-01

    Selective ionic currents in aqueous sodium and potassium chloride solutions with concentrations from 0.01 M to 1.0 M were measured using sub-micro pipette probes in which a poly(vinyl chloride) film containing crown ethers selectively filtered sodium or potassium ions. The selective ionic currents were monitored with a sub-picoampere current measurement system developed from the techniques of TΩ-gap impedance scanning tunneling microscopy. The ionic currents increased with the concentration of the corresponding solution, and thus these sub-micro pipette probes can be applied to detect local ionic concentration of a specific ion in living cells with ionic concentration higher than 0.1 M.

  8. Solution Preserves Nucleic Acids in Body-Fluid Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    A solution has been formulated to preserve deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) in specimens of blood, saliva, and other bodily fluids. Specimens of this type are collected for diagnostic molecular pathology, which is becoming the method of choice for diagnosis of many diseases. The solution makes it possible to store such specimens at room temperature, without risk of decomposition, for subsequent analysis in a laboratory that could be remote from the sampling location. Thus, the solution could be a means to bring the benefits of diagnostic molecular pathology to geographic regions where refrigeration equipment and diagnostic laboratories are not available. The table lists the ingredients of the solution. The functions of the ingredients are the following: EDTA chelates divalent cations that are necessary cofactors for nuclease activity. In so doing, it functionally removes these cations and thereby retards the action of nucleases. EDTA also stabilizes the DNA helix. Tris serves as a buffering agent, which is needed because minor contaminants in an unbuffered solution can exert pronounced effects on pH and thereby cause spontaneous degradation of DNA. SDS is an ionic detergent that inhibits ribonuclease activity. SDS has been used in some lysis buffers and as a storage buffer for RNA after purification. The use of the solution is straightforward. For example, a sample of saliva is collected by placing a cotton roll around in the subject's mouth until it becomes saturated, then the cotton is placed in a collection tube. Next, 1.5 mL of the solution are injected directly into the cotton and the tube is capped for storage at room temperature. The effectiveness of the solution has been demonstrated in tests on specimens of saliva containing herpes simplex virus. In the tests, the viral DNA, as amplified by polymerase chain reaction, was detected even after storage for 120 days.

  9. Crystal structure of 4-carbamoylpyridinium chloride.

    PubMed

    Fellows, Simon M; Prior, Timothy J

    2016-04-01

    The hydro-chloride salt of isonicotinamide, C6H7N2O(+)·Cl(-), has been synthesized from a dilute solution of hydro-chloric acid in aceto-nitrile. The compound displays monoclinic symmetry (space group C2/c) at 150 K, similar to the related hydro-chloride salt of nicotinamide. The asymmetric unit contains one protonated isonicotinamide mol-ecule and a chloride anion. An array of hydrogen-bonding inter-actions, including a peculiar bifurcated pyridinium-chloride inter-action, results in linear chains running almost perpendicularly in the [150] and [1-50] directions within the structure. A description of the hydrogen-bonding network and comparison with similar compounds are presented. PMID:27375858

  10. Crystal structure of 4-carbamoylpyridinium chloride

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, Simon M.; Prior, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The hydro­chloride salt of isonicotinamide, C6H7N2O+·Cl−, has been synthesized from a dilute solution of hydro­chloric acid in aceto­nitrile. The compound displays monoclinic symmetry (space group C2/c) at 150 K, similar to the related hydro­chloride salt of nicotinamide. The asymmetric unit contains one protonated isonicotinamide mol­ecule and a chloride anion. An array of hydrogen-bonding inter­actions, including a peculiar bifurcated pyridinium–chloride inter­action, results in linear chains running almost perpendicularly in the [150] and [1-50] directions within the structure. A description of the hydrogen-bonding network and comparison with similar compounds are presented. PMID:27375858

  11. Solution influence on biomolecular equilibria - Nucleic acid base associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; Burt, S. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Various attempts to construct an understanding of the influence of solution environment on biomolecular equilibria at the molecular level using computer simulation are discussed. First, the application of the formal statistical thermodynamic program for investigating biomolecular equilibria in solution is presented, addressing modeling and conceptual simplications such as perturbative methods, long-range interaction approximations, surface thermodynamics, and hydration shell. Then, Monte Carlo calculations on the associations of nucleic acid bases in both polar and nonpolar solvents such as water and carbon tetrachloride are carried out. The solvent contribution to the enthalpy of base association is positive (destabilizing) in both polar and nonpolar solvents while negative enthalpies for stacked complexes are obtained only when the solute-solute in vacuo energy is added to the total energy. The release upon association of solvent molecules from the first hydration layer around a solute to the bulk is accompanied by an increase in solute-solvent energy and decrease in solvent-solvent energy. The techniques presented are expectd to displace less molecular and more heuristic modeling of biomolecular equilibria in solution.

  12. Effect of sodium chloride on solute-solvent interactions in aqueous polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Nuno R; Ferreira, Luisa A; Madeira, Pedro P; Teixeira, José A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2015-12-18

    Partition behavior of eight small organic compounds and six proteins was examined in poly(ethylene glycol)-8000-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase systems containing 0.215M NaCl and 0.5M osmolyte (sorbitol, sucrose, TMAO) and poly(ethylene glycol)-10000-sodium sulfate-0.215M NaCl system, all in 0.01M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8. The differences between the solvent properties of the coexisting phases (solvent dipolarity/polarizability, hydrogen bond donor acidity, and hydrogen bond acceptor basicity) were characterized with solvatochromic dyes using the solvatochromic comparison method. Differences between the electrostatic properties of the phases were determined by analysis of partitioning of sodium salts of dinitrophenylated (DNP-) amino acids with aliphatic alkyl side-chain. The partition coefficients of all compounds examined (including proteins) were described in terms of solute-solvent interactions. The results obtained in the study show that solute-solvent interactions of nonionic organic compounds and proteins in polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase system change in the presence of NaCl additive. PMID:26615710

  13. Effect of sodium chloride on solute-solvent interactions in aqueous polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Nuno R; Ferreira, Luisa A; Madeira, Pedro P; Teixeira, José A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2015-12-18

    Partition behavior of eight small organic compounds and six proteins was examined in poly(ethylene glycol)-8000-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase systems containing 0.215M NaCl and 0.5M osmolyte (sorbitol, sucrose, TMAO) and poly(ethylene glycol)-10000-sodium sulfate-0.215M NaCl system, all in 0.01M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8. The differences between the solvent properties of the coexisting phases (solvent dipolarity/polarizability, hydrogen bond donor acidity, and hydrogen bond acceptor basicity) were characterized with solvatochromic dyes using the solvatochromic comparison method. Differences between the electrostatic properties of the phases were determined by analysis of partitioning of sodium salts of dinitrophenylated (DNP-) amino acids with aliphatic alkyl side-chain. The partition coefficients of all compounds examined (including proteins) were described in terms of solute-solvent interactions. The results obtained in the study show that solute-solvent interactions of nonionic organic compounds and proteins in polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase system change in the presence of NaCl additive.

  14. Credneramides A and B: neuromodulatory phenethylamine and isopentylamine derivatives of a vinyl chloride-containing fatty acid from cf. Trichodesmium sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Karla L; Suyama, Takashi L; Engene, Niclas; Debonsi, Hosana; Cao, Zhengyu; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Spadafora, Carmenza; Murray, Thomas F; Gerwick, William H

    2012-01-27

    Credneramides A (1) and B (2), two vinyl chloride-containing metabolites, were isolated from a Papua New Guinea collection of cf. Trichodesmium sp. nov. and expand a recently described class of vinyl chloride-containing natural products. The precursor fatty acid, credneric acid (3), was isolated from both the aqueous and organic fractions of the parent fraction as well as from another geographically and phylogenetically distinct cyanobacterial collection (Panama). Credneramides A and B inhibited spontaneous calcium oscillations in murine cerebrocortical neurons at low micromolar concentrations (1, IC(50) 4.0 μM; 2, IC(50) 3.8 μM).

  15. Universal charge quenching and stability of proteins in 1-methyl-3-alkyl (hexyl/octyl) imidazolium chloride ionic liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Kamla; Bohidar, H B

    2012-09-13

    This study reports pH dependent stability of protein dispersions of five common proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA), human serum albumin (HSA), immunoglobulin (IgG), β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg), and gelatin-B (Gel-B), all having isoelectric pH, pI ≈ 5, in room temperature ionic liquid solutions of 1-methyl-3-alkyl (hexyl/octyl) imidazolium chloride (concentration 0-0.2% w/v). Molecular hydrophobicity index, (H-index = hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) of these molecules spanned the range 0.43-0.87. Electrophoretic characteristics, surface tension data and hydrodynamic size information revealed that IL solutions provide dispersion stability owing to specific protein-IL binding which did not alter their pI values though their surface charge was considerably screened. Change in maximum (ζ(max)) and minimum (ζ(min)) zeta potential values observed at pH ~3 (maximum protonated state) and pH ~8 (maximum deprotonated state) could be described universally as function of IL concentration, c as Δζ(x) = [1 - exp(-ac)] where Δζ(x) is either |(ζ(max) - ζ(w))|/ζ(w) or |(ζ(min) - ζ(w))|/ζ(w), and ζ(w) is the corresponding value in water. Tensiometry data showed two major stages of protein-IL interactions: (i) for c < cmc of IL, the IL molecules selectively bind with imidazolium cation through electrostatic forces forming protein-IL (complex) and (ii) for c> cmc free IL-aggregates begin to form. Similarly, we can define Δγ(x) as either |(γ(max) - γ(w))|/γ(w) at pH 3 or |(γ(min) - γ(w))|/γ(w) at pH 8. Both Δζ(x) and Δγ(x) showed linear dependence with c, Δγ(min, max) (or Δζ(min, max)) = (1 - K(γ) (or K(ζ)) H-index), where the slopes K(ζ) and K(γ) defined intermolecular interactions. Hydrodynamic radii data revealed protein stabilization, circular dichroism spectra implied retention of secondary structures, and Raman spectra confirmed a marginal increase in water structure. Results concluded that selective binding of IL molecules to protein surface in

  16. Universal charge quenching and stability of proteins in 1-methyl-3-alkyl (hexyl/octyl) imidazolium chloride ionic liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Kamla; Bohidar, H B

    2012-09-13

    This study reports pH dependent stability of protein dispersions of five common proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA), human serum albumin (HSA), immunoglobulin (IgG), β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg), and gelatin-B (Gel-B), all having isoelectric pH, pI ≈ 5, in room temperature ionic liquid solutions of 1-methyl-3-alkyl (hexyl/octyl) imidazolium chloride (concentration 0-0.2% w/v). Molecular hydrophobicity index, (H-index = hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) of these molecules spanned the range 0.43-0.87. Electrophoretic characteristics, surface tension data and hydrodynamic size information revealed that IL solutions provide dispersion stability owing to specific protein-IL binding which did not alter their pI values though their surface charge was considerably screened. Change in maximum (ζ(max)) and minimum (ζ(min)) zeta potential values observed at pH ~3 (maximum protonated state) and pH ~8 (maximum deprotonated state) could be described universally as function of IL concentration, c as Δζ(x) = [1 - exp(-ac)] where Δζ(x) is either |(ζ(max) - ζ(w))|/ζ(w) or |(ζ(min) - ζ(w))|/ζ(w), and ζ(w) is the corresponding value in water. Tensiometry data showed two major stages of protein-IL interactions: (i) for c < cmc of IL, the IL molecules selectively bind with imidazolium cation through electrostatic forces forming protein-IL (complex) and (ii) for c> cmc free IL-aggregates begin to form. Similarly, we can define Δγ(x) as either |(γ(max) - γ(w))|/γ(w) at pH 3 or |(γ(min) - γ(w))|/γ(w) at pH 8. Both Δζ(x) and Δγ(x) showed linear dependence with c, Δγ(min, max) (or Δζ(min, max)) = (1 - K(γ) (or K(ζ)) H-index), where the slopes K(ζ) and K(γ) defined intermolecular interactions. Hydrodynamic radii data revealed protein stabilization, circular dichroism spectra implied retention of secondary structures, and Raman spectra confirmed a marginal increase in water structure. Results concluded that selective binding of IL molecules to protein surface in

  17. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Kalina, Dale G.; Kaplan, Louis; Mason, George W.

    1985-01-01

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions with an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  18. Adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from chloride solutions obtained by leaching chlorinated spent automotive catalysts on ion-exchange resin Diaion WA21J.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shaobo; Pan, Tonglin; Liu, Xinqiang; Yuan, Lei; Wang, Jinchao; Zhang, Yongjian; Guo, Zhanchen

    2010-07-15

    It was found that Rh, Pd and Pt contained in the spent ceramic automotive catalysts could be effectively extracted by dry chlorination with chlorine. In order to concentrate Rh(III) ions contained in the chloride solutions obtained, thermodynamic and kinetics studies for adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from the chloride solutions on an anionic exchange resin Diaion WA21J were carried out. Rh, Pd, Pt, Al, Fe, Si, Zn and Pb from the chloride solution could be adsorbed on the resin. The distribution coefficients (K(d)) of Rh(III) decreased with the increase in initial Rh(III) concentration or in adsorption temperature. The isothermal adsorption of Rh(III) was found to fit Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich models under the adsorption conditions. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities Q(max) based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms were 6.39, 6.61 and 5.81 mg/g for temperatures 18, 28 and 40 degrees C, respectively. The apparent adsorption energy of Rh was about -7.6 kJ/mol and thus Rh(III) adsorption was a physical type. The experimental data obtained could be better simulated by pseudo-first-order kinetic model and the activation energy obtained was 6.54 J/mol. The adsorption rate of Rh(III) was controlled by intraparticle diffusion in most of time of adsorption process.

  19. Adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from chloride solutions obtained by leaching chlorinated spent automotive catalysts on ion-exchange resin Diaion WA21J.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shaobo; Pan, Tonglin; Liu, Xinqiang; Yuan, Lei; Wang, Jinchao; Zhang, Yongjian; Guo, Zhanchen

    2010-07-15

    It was found that Rh, Pd and Pt contained in the spent ceramic automotive catalysts could be effectively extracted by dry chlorination with chlorine. In order to concentrate Rh(III) ions contained in the chloride solutions obtained, thermodynamic and kinetics studies for adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from the chloride solutions on an anionic exchange resin Diaion WA21J were carried out. Rh, Pd, Pt, Al, Fe, Si, Zn and Pb from the chloride solution could be adsorbed on the resin. The distribution coefficients (K(d)) of Rh(III) decreased with the increase in initial Rh(III) concentration or in adsorption temperature. The isothermal adsorption of Rh(III) was found to fit Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich models under the adsorption conditions. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities Q(max) based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms were 6.39, 6.61 and 5.81 mg/g for temperatures 18, 28 and 40 degrees C, respectively. The apparent adsorption energy of Rh was about -7.6 kJ/mol and thus Rh(III) adsorption was a physical type. The experimental data obtained could be better simulated by pseudo-first-order kinetic model and the activation energy obtained was 6.54 J/mol. The adsorption rate of Rh(III) was controlled by intraparticle diffusion in most of time of adsorption process. PMID:20346581

  20. Selective conversion of cellulose in corncob residue to levulinic acid in an aluminum trichloride-sodium chloride system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianmei; Jiang, Zhicheng; Hu, Libin; Hu, Changwei

    2014-09-01

    Increased energy consumption and environmental concerns have driven efforts to produce chemicals from renewable biomass with high selectivity. Here, the selective conversion of cellulose in corncob residue, a process waste from the production of xylose, to levulinic acid was carried out using AlCl3 as catalyst and NaCl as promoter by a hydrothermal method at relatively low temperature. A levulinic acid yield of 46.8 mol% was obtained, and the total selectivity to levulinic acid with formic acid was beyond 90%. NaCl selectively promoted the dissolution of cellulose from corncob residue, and significantly improved the yield and selectivity to levulinic acid by inhibiting lactic acid formation in the subsequent dehydration process. Owing to the salt effect of NaCl, the obtained levulinic acid could be efficiently extracted to tetrahydrofuran from aqueous solution. The aqueous solution with AlCl3 and NaCl could be recycled 4 times. Because of the limited conversion of lignin, this process allows for the production of levulinic acid with high selectivity directly from corncob residue in a simple separation process.

  1. Selective conversion of cellulose in corncob residue to levulinic acid in an aluminum trichloride-sodium chloride system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianmei; Jiang, Zhicheng; Hu, Libin; Hu, Changwei

    2014-09-01

    Increased energy consumption and environmental concerns have driven efforts to produce chemicals from renewable biomass with high selectivity. Here, the selective conversion of cellulose in corncob residue, a process waste from the production of xylose, to levulinic acid was carried out using AlCl3 as catalyst and NaCl as promoter by a hydrothermal method at relatively low temperature. A levulinic acid yield of 46.8 mol% was obtained, and the total selectivity to levulinic acid with formic acid was beyond 90%. NaCl selectively promoted the dissolution of cellulose from corncob residue, and significantly improved the yield and selectivity to levulinic acid by inhibiting lactic acid formation in the subsequent dehydration process. Owing to the salt effect of NaCl, the obtained levulinic acid could be efficiently extracted to tetrahydrofuran from aqueous solution. The aqueous solution with AlCl3 and NaCl could be recycled 4 times. Because of the limited conversion of lignin, this process allows for the production of levulinic acid with high selectivity directly from corncob residue in a simple separation process. PMID:25045141

  2. Influence of sodium chloride concentration on the controlled lactic acid fermentation of "Almagro" eggplants.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, C; Palop, L; Sánchez, I

    1999-12-01

    The effect of a commercial Lactobacillus starter and sodium chloride concentration on the fermentation of "Almagro" eggplants (Solanum melongena L. var. esculentum depressum) was studied. The results of fermentation using added starter and varying salt concentrations (4, 6, and 10% w/v) in brine were compared with the results of spontaneous fermentation taking place in brine with a salt concentration of 4%. Fresh fruits, medium in size (34-44 g), were used in all cases; all fruits were blanched under identical conditions. Temperature in the fermenters was 32+/-2 degrees C. The results obtained indicate that addition of a suitable starter shortened the fermentation process, provided the salt concentration in the brine did not exceed 6%. In the conditions tested, the eggplants obtained after fermentation were found to be of good quality though somewhat bitter which may explained by the starter employed.

  3. Effect of the cation model on the equilibrium structure of poly-L-glutamate in aqueous sodium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Gabriel; Soetens, Jean-Christophe; Jacquemin, Denis; Bopp, Philippe A

    2015-12-14

    We demonstrate that different sets of Lennard-Jones parameters proposed for the Na(+) ion, in conjunction with the empirical combining rules routinely used in simulation packages, can lead to essentially different equilibrium structures for a deprotonated poly-L-glutamic acid molecule (poly-L-glutamate) dissolved in a 0.3M aqueous NaCl solution. It is, however, difficult to discriminate a priori between these model potentials; when investigating the structure of the Na(+)-solvation shell in bulk NaCl solution, all parameter sets lead to radial distribution functions and solvation numbers in broad agreement with the available experimental data. We do not find any such dependency of the equilibrium structure on the parameters associated with the Cl(-) ion. This work does not aim at recommending a particular set of parameters for any particular purpose. Instead, it stresses the model dependence of simulation results for complex systems such as biomolecules in solution and thus the difficulties if simulations are to be used for unbiased predictions, or to discriminate between contradictory experiments. However, this opens the possibility of validating a model specifically in view of analyzing experimental data believed to be reliable.

  4. Effect of the cation model on the equilibrium structure of poly-L-glutamate in aqueous sodium chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Gabriel; Soetens, Jean-Christophe; Jacquemin, Denis; Bopp, Philippe A.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that different sets of Lennard-Jones parameters proposed for the Na+ ion, in conjunction with the empirical combining rules routinely used in simulation packages, can lead to essentially different equilibrium structures for a deprotonated poly-L-glutamic acid molecule (poly-L-glutamate) dissolved in a 0.3M aqueous NaCl solution. It is, however, difficult to discriminate a priori between these model potentials; when investigating the structure of the Na+-solvation shell in bulk NaCl solution, all parameter sets lead to radial distribution functions and solvation numbers in broad agreement with the available experimental data. We do not find any such dependency of the equilibrium structure on the parameters associated with the Cl- ion. This work does not aim at recommending a particular set of parameters for any particular purpose. Instead, it stresses the model dependence of simulation results for complex systems such as biomolecules in solution and thus the difficulties if simulations are to be used for unbiased predictions, or to discriminate between contradictory experiments. However, this opens the possibility of validating a model specifically in view of analyzing experimental data believed to be reliable.

  5. DC diaphragm discharge in water solutions of selected organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyhnankova, Edita J.; Hammer, Malte U.; Reuter, Stephan; Krcma, Frantisek

    2015-07-01

    Effect of four simple organic acids water solution on a DC diaphragm discharge was studied. Efficiency of the discharge was quantified by the hydrogen peroxide production determined by UV-VIS spectrometry of a H2O2 complex formed with specific titanium reagent. Automatic titration was used to study the pH behaviour after the plasma treatment. Optical emission spectroscopy overview spectra were recorded and detailed spectra of OH band and Hβ line were used to calculate the rotational temperature and comparison of the line profile (reflecting electron concentration) in the acid solutions. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  6. Interaction of Ethyl Alcohol Vapor with Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the uptake of ethyl alcohol (ethanol) vapor by sulfuric acid solutions over the range approx.40 to approx.80 wt % H2SO4 and temperatures of 193-273 K. Laboratory studies used a fast flow-tube reactor coupled to an electron-impact ionization mass spectrometer for detection of ethanol and reaction products. The uptake coefficients ((gamma)) were measured and found to vary from 0.019 to 0.072, depending upon the acid composition and temperature. At concentrations greater than approx.70 wt % and in dilute solutions colder than 220 K, the values approached approx.0.07. We also determined the effective solubility constant of ethanol in approx.40 wt % H2SO4 in the temperature range 203-223 K. The potential implications to the budget of ethanol in the global troposphere are briefly discussed.

  7. An ellipsometric study of mild steel in hydrochloric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brakenbury, W. R. E.; Grzeskowiak, R.

    1986-04-01

    An ellipsometric study has been made on mild steel in hydrochloric acid solutions, in a situation where film growth is not expected. The results are considered to be due to roughening and have been interpreted in terms of a Fenstermaker-McCrackin type roughening model. It appears that the ellipsometer is sensitive mainly to a small scale roughening consisting of etch pits of a few nanometers in dimensions rather than the larger roughened features easily seen by microscopic examination.

  8. Recovery of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with activated coals

    SciTech Connect

    Troshkina, I.D.; Naing, K.Z.; Ushanova, O.N.; P'o, V.; Abdusalomov, A.A.

    2006-09-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic characteristics of rhenium sorption from sulfuric acid solutions (pH 2) by activated coals produced from coal raw materials (China) were studied. Constants of the Henry equation describing isotherms of rhenium sorption by activated coals were calculated. The effective diffusion coefficients of rhenium in the coals were determined. The dynamic characteristics of rhenium sorption and desorption were determined for the activated coal with the best capacity and kinetic characteristics.

  9. Dynamics of the separation of amino acid and mineral salt in the stationary dialysis of solutions with an MK-40 profiled sulfo group cation exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'eva, V. I.; Vorob'eva, E. A.

    2012-11-01

    The conjugated diffusion transport of amino acid and mineral salt through a profiled sulfo group cation exchange membrane that simulates the extraction of amino acid from wash waters of microbiological production containing mineral components not used in synthesis is studied. The competitive nature of the conjugation of flows resulting in a decrease in the rate of the mass transfer of components and their separation factor is established from a comparative analysis of experimental data on the diffusion transfer of phenylalanine and sodium chloride in the form of hydrogen from individual and mixed solutions through a profiled sulfo group cation exchange membrane. The range of concentrations and the ratio of components in solution corresponding to the effective separation of phenylalanine and sodium chloride are determined.

  10. Methanol Uptake By Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols in the global budget of methanol, the solubility and reactivity of CH3OH in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions are under investigation. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H(*), for methanol dissolution into 45 to 70 percent by weight H2SO4. We find that methanol solubility ranges from 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 8) M/atm and increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and all rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Our data indicate that simple uptake by aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These results differ from those recently reported in the literature, and an explanation of this disparity will be presented. In addition to solvation, reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H may proceed in the atmosphere but is not significant under our experimental conditions. Results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique confirm this directly. In addition, the extent of methanol sequestration via formation of mono- and dimethylsulfate will be evaluated under several atmospheric conditions.

  11. Thermodynamics of DL-α-aminobutyric acid induced solvation mechanism in aqueous KCl solutions at 288.15-308.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, S.; Ghosh, S.; Hossain, A.; Mahali, K.; Roy, S.; Dolui, B. K.

    2016-09-01

    The solubilities of DL-α-aminobutyric acid in KCl solutions of different concentrations are measured at 288.15-308.15 K. Gibbs energies and entropies have been determined for transfer of α-aminobutyric acid form water to aqueous KCl solution at 298.15 K. The cavity, dipole-dipole and other interactions affecting the solubility, as well as stability of the amino acid in solution are also evaluated. Gibbs energy and entropy of transfer due to interactions are computed to create the model of the complex solute-solvent and solventsolvent interactions. Molar volume, densities, dipole moment of solvent and diameter of co-solvent in aqueous potassium chloride are also evaluated.

  12. Micellar solubilization in strongly interacting binary surfactant systems. [Binary surfactant systems of: dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride + sodium dodecyl sulfate; benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium chloride + tetradecyltrimethylammonium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Treiner, C. ); Nortz, M.; Vaution, C. )

    1990-07-01

    The apparent partition coefficient P of barbituric acids between micelles and water has been determined in mixed binary surfactant solutions from solubility measurements in the whole micellar composition range. The binary systems chosen ranged from the strongly interacting system dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride + sodium dodecyl sulfate to weakly interacting systems such as benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium chloride + tetradecyltrimethyammonium chloride. In all cases studied, mixed micelle formation is unfavorable to micellar solubilization. A correlation is found between the unlike surfactants interaction energy, as measured by the regular solution parameter {beta} and the solute partition coefficient change upon surfactant mixing. By use of literature data on micellar solubilization in binary surfactant solutions, it is shown that the change of P for solutes which are solubilized by surface adsorption is generally governed by the sign and amplitude of the interaction parameter {beta}.

  13. An empirical equation with tables of smoothed solubilities of methane in water and aqueous sodium chloride solutions up to 25 weight percent, 360 degrees C, and 138 MPa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, John L.

    1978-01-01

    The total pressure for the system H2O-CH 4 is given by p(total) = P(H2O,t) + exp10[log x(CH 4) - a - b x(CH4)], where P(H2O,t) is the vapor pressure of H2O liquid at the temperature t (?C) and x(CH 4) is the molal concentration of methane in the solution. The terms a and b are functions of temperature only. Where the total pressure and temperature are known, the concentration of methane, x(CH4), is found by iteration. The concentration of methane in a sodium chloride brine, y(CH4), is estimated using the function log y(CH4) = log x(CH4) - A I, where A is the salting out constant and I is the ionic strength. For sodium chloride solutions, the ionic strength is equal to the molality of the salt. The equations are valid to 360?C, 138 MPa, and 25 weight percent sodium chloride.

  14. A novel digestion method based on a choline chloride-oxalic acid deep eutectic solvent for determining Cu, Fe, and Zn in fish samples.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Emadaldin; Ghanemi, Kamal; Fallah-Mehrjardi, Mehdi; Dadolahi-Sohrab, Ali

    2013-01-31

    A novel and efficient digestion method based on choline chloride-oxalic acid (ChCl-Ox) deep eutectic solvent (DES) was developed for flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) determination of Cu, Zn, and Fe in biological fish samples. Key parameters that influence analyte recovery were investigated and optimized, using the fish protein certified reference material (CRM, DORM-3) throughout the procedure. In this method, 100 mg of the sample was dissolved in ChCl-Ox (1:2, molar ratio) at 100°C for 45 min. Then, 5.0 mL HNO(3) (1.0 M) was added. After centrifugation, the supernatant solution was filtered, diluted to a known volume, and analyzed by FAAS. Under optimized conditions, an excellent agreement between the obtained results and the certified values was observed, using Student's t-test (P=0.05); the extraction recovery of the all elements was greater than 95.3%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of analytes in different tissues (muscle, liver, and gills) having a broad concentration range in a marine fish sample. The reproducibility of the method was validated by analyzing all samples by our method in a different laboratory, using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). For comparison, a conventional acid digestion (CAD) method was also used for the determination of analytes in all studied samples. The simplicity of the proposed experimental procedure, high extraction efficiency, short analysis time, lack of concentrated acids and oxidizing agents, and the use of safe and inexpensive components demonstrate the high potential of ChCl-Ox (1:2) for routine trace metal analysis in biological samples.

  15. A novel digestion method based on a choline chloride-oxalic acid deep eutectic solvent for determining Cu, Fe, and Zn in fish samples.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Emadaldin; Ghanemi, Kamal; Fallah-Mehrjardi, Mehdi; Dadolahi-Sohrab, Ali

    2013-01-31

    A novel and efficient digestion method based on choline chloride-oxalic acid (ChCl-Ox) deep eutectic solvent (DES) was developed for flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) determination of Cu, Zn, and Fe in biological fish samples. Key parameters that influence analyte recovery were investigated and optimized, using the fish protein certified reference material (CRM, DORM-3) throughout the procedure. In this method, 100 mg of the sample was dissolved in ChCl-Ox (1:2, molar ratio) at 100°C for 45 min. Then, 5.0 mL HNO(3) (1.0 M) was added. After centrifugation, the supernatant solution was filtered, diluted to a known volume, and analyzed by FAAS. Under optimized conditions, an excellent agreement between the obtained results and the certified values was observed, using Student's t-test (P=0.05); the extraction recovery of the all elements was greater than 95.3%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of analytes in different tissues (muscle, liver, and gills) having a broad concentration range in a marine fish sample. The reproducibility of the method was validated by analyzing all samples by our method in a different laboratory, using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). For comparison, a conventional acid digestion (CAD) method was also used for the determination of analytes in all studied samples. The simplicity of the proposed experimental procedure, high extraction efficiency, short analysis time, lack of concentrated acids and oxidizing agents, and the use of safe and inexpensive components demonstrate the high potential of ChCl-Ox (1:2) for routine trace metal analysis in biological samples. PMID:23327946

  16. Value of plasma chloride concentration and acid-base status in the differential diagnosis of hyperpara-thyroidism from other causes of hypercalcaemia

    PubMed Central

    Wills, M. R.

    1971-01-01

    A study is reported of the estimation of plasma chloride concentration and acid-base status in the differentiation of primary hyperparathyroidism from all other causes of hypercalcaemia. In the two groups of patients studied, all of whom had hypercalcaemia, there was complete separation between the two groups on the basis of plasma chloride concentration and acid-base status. In 16 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism the increase in plasma chloride concentration and associated metabolic acidosis could have been accounted for by the known renal tubular effects of parathyroid hormone. In 13 patients with hypercalcaemia due to various other causes the decrease in plasma chloride concentration and associated metabolic alkalosis could be accounted for either by the known effects of an excess of calcium-ion on the renal tubules, or perhaps by suppression of endogenous parathyroid hormone secretion. In patients with hypercalcaemia and hypophosphataemia of `pseudohyperparathyroidism' associated with non-endocrine tumours it is postulated that the low plasma chloride concentrations and metabolic alkalosis found in these patients were due either to a differing biological activity of the parathyroid-hormone-like polypeptide secreted by the tumour cells, or possibly to simultaneous secretion by these cells of an ACTH-like polypeptide. PMID:5573436

  17. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the •NO2 radical.

  18. Effect of phytic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and chitosan solutions on microhardness of the human radicular dentin

    PubMed Central

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Jaiswal, Shikha; Bansal, Parul; Arora, Rohit; Raj, Shalya; Malhotra, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of phytic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and chitosan solutions on the microhardness of human radicular dentin. Materials and Methods: Thirty dentin specimens were randomly divided into three groups of 10 specimens each according to the irrigant used: G1 — 1% phytic acid, G2 — 17% EDTA, and G3 — 0.2% chitosan. A standardized volume of each chelating solution was used for 3 min. Dentin microhardness was measured before and after application at the cervical, middle, and apical levels with a Vickers indenter under a 200-g load and a 10-s dwell time. The results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student's t test. Results: Microhardness of the radicular dentin varied at the cervical, middle, and apical levels. EDTA had the greatest overall effect, causing a sharp percentage reduction in dentin microhardness with a significant difference from phytic acid and chitosan (P = 0.002). However, phytic acid and chitosan differed insignificantly from each other (P = 0.887). Conclusion: All tested chelating solutions reduced microhardness of the radicular dentin layer at all the levels. However, reduction was least at the apical level. EDTA caused more reduction in dentin microhardness than chitosan while phytic acid reduced the least. PMID:27099428

  19. Synthesis of nesquehonite by reaction of gaseous CO2 with Mg chloride solution: its potential role in the sequestration of carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ferrini, Vincenzo; De Vito, Caterina; Mignardi, Silvano

    2009-09-15

    In this paper is reported a novel method to synthesize nesquehonite, MgCO(3) x 3H(2)O, via reaction of a flux of CO(2) with Mg chloride solution at 20+/-2 degrees C. The reaction rate is rapid, with carbonate deposition almost complete in about 10 min. The full characterization of the product of synthesis has been performed to investigate its potential role as a "CO(2)-sequestering medium" and a means of disposing Mg-rich wastewater. We investigated the nesquehonite synthesized using SEM, XRD, FTIR and thermal analysis. The thermodynamic and chemical stability of this low-temperature hydrated carbonate of Mg and its possible transformation products make our method a promising complementary solution to other methods of CO(2) sequestration. Carbonation via magnesium chloride aqueous solutions at standard conditions represents a simple and permanent method of trapping CO(2). It could be applied at point sources of CO(2) emission and could involve rejected brine from desalination plants and other saline aqueous wastes (i.e., "produced water"). The likelihood of using the resulting nesquehonite and the by-products of the process in a large number of applications makes our method an even more attractive solution.

  20. Electrophysiological characterization of ivermectin triple actions on Musca chloride channels gated by l-glutamic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Toshinori; Kita, Tomo; Nakata, Yunosuke; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2016-10-01

    Ivermectin (IVM) is a macrocyclic lactone that exerts antifilarial, antiparasitic, and insecticidal effects on nematodes and insects by acting on l-glutamic acid-gated chloride channels (GluCls). IVM also acts as an allosteric modulator of various other ion channels. Although the IVM binding site in the Caenorhabditis elegans GluCl was identified by X-ray crystallographic analysis, the mechanism of action of IVM in insects is not well defined. We therefore examined the action of IVM on the housefly (Musca domestica) GluCl and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated ion channel (GABACl). For both channels, IVM induced currents by itself, potentiated currents induced by low concentrations of agonists, and inhibited currents induced by high concentrations of agonists. Despite exerting common actions on both types of channels, GluCls were more susceptible to IVM actions than GABACls, indicating that GluCls are the primary target of IVM. Substitution of an amino acid residue in the third transmembrane segment (G312M in GluCls, and G333A and G333M in GABACls) resulted in significantly reduced levels or loss of activation, potentiation, and antagonism of the channels, indicating that these three actions result from the interaction of IVM with amino acid residues in the transmembrane intersubunit crevice.

  1. Electrophysiological characterization of ivermectin triple actions on Musca chloride channels gated by l-glutamic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Toshinori; Kita, Tomo; Nakata, Yunosuke; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2016-10-01

    Ivermectin (IVM) is a macrocyclic lactone that exerts antifilarial, antiparasitic, and insecticidal effects on nematodes and insects by acting on l-glutamic acid-gated chloride channels (GluCls). IVM also acts as an allosteric modulator of various other ion channels. Although the IVM binding site in the Caenorhabditis elegans GluCl was identified by X-ray crystallographic analysis, the mechanism of action of IVM in insects is not well defined. We therefore examined the action of IVM on the housefly (Musca domestica) GluCl and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated ion channel (GABACl). For both channels, IVM induced currents by itself, potentiated currents induced by low concentrations of agonists, and inhibited currents induced by high concentrations of agonists. Despite exerting common actions on both types of channels, GluCls were more susceptible to IVM actions than GABACls, indicating that GluCls are the primary target of IVM. Substitution of an amino acid residue in the third transmembrane segment (G312M in GluCls, and G333A and G333M in GABACls) resulted in significantly reduced levels or loss of activation, potentiation, and antagonism of the channels, indicating that these three actions result from the interaction of IVM with amino acid residues in the transmembrane intersubunit crevice. PMID:27543424

  2. A Solution NMR Investigation into the Early Events of Amelogenin Nanosphere Self-Assembly Initiated with Sodium Chloride or Calcium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Bekhazi, Jacky G.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2008-12-08

    Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy, new insights into the early intermolecular interactions stabilizing amelogenin supramolecular assembly and the potential role of calcium ions have been discovered. Two-dimensional 1H-15N spectra were recorded for 15N-labeled amelogenin as a function of increasing Ca2+ concentration starting from monomeric conditions. Evidence for protein-protein interactions were observed between residues E18 and E40 in the N-terminus. At higher Ca2+ concentrations there was concurrent involvement of residues in both the N- (Y12-Q56) and the C-terminus (Q144-T171). Neither specific residues nor their stepwise interaction have previously been identified in the initial stages of nanosphere assembly.

  3. Elution of zinc in dust discharged from electric arc furnace in carbonic acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, S.; Sasaki, T.; Sasano, J.; Izaki, M.

    2012-03-01

    The dust discharged from an electric arc furnace (EAF) is a valuable resource of zinc. As a fundamental study of extraction of zinc, iron and chlorine in the EAF dust, the elution behavior of them in carbonic acid solution was studied. The influence of the weight of the EAF dust on the elution behavior was examined in this study. Experiment was carried out putting the EAF dust from 1 g to 200 g in weight into 1 L of water that was introduced by CO2. Generally, the pH in the aqueous solution increased with an increase in weight of the additive EAF dust. Maximums of the eluted concentrations of zinc and chloride ion increased with an increase in the weight of the additive EAF dust whereas the extraction ratios of both of them decreased with an increase in the weight of the additive EAF dust. Iron in the EAF dust remained in the dust without elution. The limit of extraction of zinc from the EAF dust to water was given by the solubilities of ZnFe2O4 and ZnO expressed by eq. (6) and eq. (9) respectively.

  4. DNA single strand breaks in peripheral lymphocytes associated with urinary thiodiglycolic acid levels in polyvinyl chloride workers.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu-Chen; Yang, Huei-Ting; Ma, Yee-Chung; Huang, Ming-Feng; Chang, Wushou P; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2004-07-11

    The association between vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) exposure and DNA damage has been established. However, the relationship between individual exposure and DNA single strand breaks was limited. Since environmental monitoring may not reflect the actual exposure, a useful marker of exposure is needed to assess the individual exposure. In our previous study, we have found a high correlation between air VCM level and urinary thiodiglycolic acid (TdGA) at the commencement of the next shift. Here, we further used comet assay to evaluate the relationship between urinary TdGA levels and DNA single strand breaks in polyvinyl chloride monomer (PVC) workers. Urinary TdGA levels (n=26) at the commencement of the following shift were analyzed. Ten of the 26 workers also had personal air sampling for air VCM exposure. Questionnaires were administered to obtain epidemiological information including detailed history of occupation and lifestyles. Workers experiencing air VCM level greater than 5 ppm had higher tail moment and tail intensity (%) than those experiencing VCM exposure between 1 and 5, or <1 ppm, respectively (P < 0.05). The results also revealed that level of DNA single strand breaks, including tail moment and tail intensity, were increased with urinary TdGA level. The dose-response relationship of urinary TdGA level and DNA single strand breaks was particularly significant among the workers with 4 mg/g Cr of urinary TdGA level, which is equivalent to 5 ppm air VCM level. We concluded that air VCM exposure greater than 5 ppm could induce DNA damage. Further sensitive assay should be developed for the diction of DNA damage when air VCM exposure below 5 ppm.

  5. An Alternative Reaction Course in O-Glycosidation with O-Glycosyl Trichloroacetimidates as Glycosyl Donors and Lewis Acidic Metal Salts as Catalyst: Acid-Base Catalysis with Gold Chloride-Glycosyl Acceptor Adducts.

    PubMed

    Peng, Peng; Schmidt, Richard R

    2015-10-01

    Gold(III) chloride as catalyst for O-glycosyl trichloroacetimidate activation revealed low affinity to the glycosyl donor but high affinity to the hydroxy group of the acceptor alcohol moiety, thus leading to catalyst-acceptor adduct formation. Charge separation in this adduct, increasing the proton acidity and the oxygen nucleophilicity, permits donor activation and concomitant acceptor transfer in a hydrogen-bond mediated S(N)2-type transition state. Hence, the sequential binding between acceptor and catalyst and then with the glycosyl donor enables self-organization of an ordered transition-state. This way, with various acceptors, even at temperatures below -60 °C, fast and high yielding glycosidations in high anomeric selectivities were recorded, showing the power of this gold(III) chloride acid-base catalysis. Alternative reaction courses via hydrogen chloride or HAuCl4 activation or intermediate generation of glycosyl chloride as the real donor could be excluded. With partially O-protected acceptors, prone to bidentate ligation to gold(III) chloride, particularly high reactivities and anomeric selectivities were observed. Gold(I) chloride follows the same catalyst-acceptor adduct driven acid-base catalysis reaction course.

  6. Emission spectroscopy of the predissociative excited state dynamics of acrolein, acrylic acid, and acryloyl chloride at 199 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Arendt, M.F.; Browning, P.W.; Butler, L.J.

    1995-10-08

    The emission spectroscopy of acrolein (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O), acrylic acid (C{sub 2}H{sub 3}COOH), and acryloyl chloride (C{sub 2}H{sub 3}COCl) excited at 199 nm elucidates the dominant electronic character of the excited state reached by the optical transition at this wavelength. Progressions in the C=C and C=O stretching overtones and various combination bands suggest the antibonding orbital has mixed {pi}*(C=C)/{pi}*(C=O) character. We interpret the results in conjunction with {ital ab} {ital initio} calculations at the configuration interaction singles level to identify the influence of resonance in the excited state of these conjugated molecules. The results on acrylic acid are of particular interest as excitation in this absorption band produces the HOCO intermediate of the OH+CO{r_arrow}H+CO{sub 2} reaction that is important in combustion. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  7. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.

    2012-02-22

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. For 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 10.5 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2 g/L and 0.25 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}.

  8. In vitro influence of D/L-lactic acid, sodium chloride and sodium nitrite on the infectivity of feline calicivirus and of ECHO virus as potential surrogates for foodborne viruses.

    PubMed

    Straube, J; Albert, T; Manteufel, J; Heinze, J; Fehlhaber, K; Truyen, U

    2011-11-15

    The importance of foodborne viruses is increasingly recognized. Thus, the effect of commonly used food preservation methods on the infectivity of viruses is questioned. In this context, we investigated the antiviral properties of D,L-lactic acid, sodium chloride and sodium nitrite by in vitro studies. Two model viruses, Feline Calicivirus (FCV) and Enteric Cytophatic Human Orphan (ECHO) virus, were chosen for this study simulating important foodborne viruses (human noroviruses (NoV) and human enteroviruses, resp.). The model viruses were exposed to different solutions of D,L-lactic acid (0.1-0.4% w/w, pH 6.0-3.2), of sodium chloride (2-20%, w/v) and of sodium nitrite (100, 150 and 200 ppm) at 4 and 20 °C for a maximum of 7 days. Different results were obtained for the two viruses. ECHO virus was highly stable against D,L-lactic acid and sodium chloride when tested under all conditions. On the contrary, FCV showed less stability but was not effectively inactivated when exposed to low acid and high salt conditions at refrigeration temperatures (4 °C). FCV titers decreased more markedly at 20 °C than 4 °C in all experiments. Sodium nitrite did not show any effect on the inactivation of both viruses. The results indicate that acidification, salting or curing maybe insufficient for effective inactivation of foodborne viruses such as NoV or human enteroviruses during food processing. Thus, application of higher temperature during fermentation and ripening processes maybe more effective toward the inactivation kinetics of less stable viruses. Nevertheless, more studies are needed to examine the antiviral properties of these preserving agents on virus survival and inactivation kinetics in the complex food matrix.

  9. Copper-Catalyzed Thioetherification Reactions of Alkyl Halides, Triphenyltin Chloride, and Arylboronic Acids with Nitroarenes in the Presence of Sulfur Sources.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Abed; Rostami, Amin; Ghaderi, Arash

    2015-09-01

    In this article, we report three odorless methods for the thioarylation and thioalkylation of different nitroarenes using alkyl halides (Br, Cl), triphenyltin chloride, and arylboronic acids as the coupling partners. Triphenyltin chloride is capable of delivering all of its phenyl groups to the product. Depending on the reaction, sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate (Na2S2O3·5H2O), S8/KF, and S8/NaOH systems are found to be effective sources of sulfur in the presence of copper salts. The use of green solvents, inexpensive catalysts, and user-friendly starting materials has made these methods interesting from a green chemistry standpoint. PMID:26272238

  10. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Willem M

    2011-08-30

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which serve as scientific paradigms. Moreover, functional and comparative metagenomic studies are taking off and provide a wealth of insight in the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in a variety of applications, ranging from starters in complex fermentations to their marketing as probiotics. In this new era of high throughput analysis, biology has become big science. Hence, there is a need to systematically store the generated information, apply this in an intelligent way, and provide modalities for constructing self-learning systems that can be used for future improvements. This review addresses these systems solutions with a state of the art overview of the present paradigms that relate to the use of lactic acid bacteria in industrial applications. Moreover, an outlook is presented of the future developments that include the transition into practice as well as the use of lactic acid bacteria in synthetic biology and other next generation applications. PMID:21995776

  11. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which serve as scientific paradigms. Moreover, functional and comparative metagenomic studies are taking off and provide a wealth of insight in the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in a variety of applications, ranging from starters in complex fermentations to their marketing as probiotics. In this new era of high throughput analysis, biology has become big science. Hence, there is a need to systematically store the generated information, apply this in an intelligent way, and provide modalities for constructing self-learning systems that can be used for future improvements. This review addresses these systems solutions with a state of the art overview of the present paradigms that relate to the use of lactic acid bacteria in industrial applications. Moreover, an outlook is presented of the future developments that include the transition into practice as well as the use of lactic acid bacteria in synthetic biology and other next generation applications. PMID:21995776

  12. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Willem M

    2011-08-30

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which serve as scientific paradigms. Moreover, functional and comparative metagenomic studies are taking off and provide a wealth of insight in the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in a variety of applications, ranging from starters in complex fermentations to their marketing as probiotics. In this new era of high throughput analysis, biology has become big science. Hence, there is a need to systematically store the generated information, apply this in an intelligent way, and provide modalities for constructing self-learning systems that can be used for future improvements. This review addresses these systems solutions with a state of the art overview of the present paradigms that relate to the use of lactic acid bacteria in industrial applications. Moreover, an outlook is presented of the future developments that include the transition into practice as well as the use of lactic acid bacteria in synthetic biology and other next generation applications.

  13. Sorption of acid red 57 from aqueous solution onto sepiolite.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Mahir; Demirbaş, Ozkan; Celikçapa, Sermet; Doğan, Mehmet

    2004-12-10

    Sepiolite, a highly porous mineral, is becoming widely used as an alternative material in areas where sorptive, catalytic and rheological applications are required. High ion exchange capacity and high surface area and more importantly its relatively cheap price make it an attractive adsorbent. In this study, the adsorption of acid red 57 by natural mesoporous sepiolite has been examined in order to measure the ability of this mineral to remove coloured textile dyes from wastewater. For this purpose, a series of batch adsorption tests of acid red 57 from aqueous sepiolite solutions have been systematically investigated as a function of parameters such as pH, ionic strength and temperature. Adsorption equilibrium was reached within 1h. The removal of acid red 57 decreases with pH from 3 to 9 and temperature from 25 to 55 degrees C, whereas it increases with ionic strength from 0 to 0.5 mol L(-1). Adsorption isotherms of acid red on sepiolite were determined and correlated with common isotherm equations such as Langmuir and Freundlich models. It was found that the Langmuir model appears to fit the isotherm data better than the Freundlich model. The physical properties of this adsorbent were consistent with the parameters obtained from the isotherm equations. Approximately, 21.49% weight loss was observed. The surface area value of sepiolite was 342 m2 g(-1) at 105 degrees C, and it increased to 357 m2 g(-1) at 200 degrees C. Further increase in temperature caused channel plugging and crystal structure deformation, as a result the surface area values showed a decrease with temperature. The data obtained from adsorption isotherms at different temperatures have been used to calculate some thermodynamic quantities such as the Gibbs energy, heat and entropy of adsorption. The thermodynamic data indicate that acid red 57 adsorption onto sepiolite is characterized by physical adsorption. The dimensionless separation factor (RL) have shown that sepiolite can be used for

  14. Adsorption of Pd(II) complexes from chloride solutions obtained by leaching chlorinated spent automotive catalysts on ion exchange resin Diaion WA21J.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shaobo; Pan, Tonglin; Liu, Xinqiang; Yuan, Lei; Zhang, Yongjian; Wang, Jinchao; Guo, Zhanchen

    2010-05-01

    It was found that Rh, Pd and Pt contained in the spent ceramic automotive catalysts could be effectively extracted by dry chlorination with chlorine. In order to concentrate Pd(II) contained in the chloride solution obtained from the dry chlorination process, thermodynamic and kinetics studies for adsorption of Pd(II) complexes from the chloride solutions on anionic exchange resin Diaion WA21J were carried out. It was found that Pd, Pt, Rh, Al, Fe, Si, Zn and Pb from the chloride solution could be adsorbed on the resin. The isothermal adsorption of Pd(II) was found to fit Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich models under the adsorption conditions. The adsorption of Pd(II) on the resin was favorable according to the values of 1/n and R(L) from Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms, respectively. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities Q(max) based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms were 5.70, 4.84 and 4.05 mg/g and the corresponding value X(m) based on Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich were 5.55, 4.69 and 4.01 mg/g at temperatures 18 degrees C, 28 degrees C and 40 degrees C, respectively. The apparent adsorption energies (E(ad)) based on Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich isotherm were -15.43, -16.22 and -23.57 kJ/mol for the temperatures 18 degrees C, 28 degrees C and 40 degrees C, respectively. Chemical adsorption was a main mechanism involved in the adsorption process. Pd(II) adsorption on the resin could be accelerated by increasing the adsorption temperature. The adsorption of Pd(II) from the chloride solution on the resin underwent pseudo-first order kinetic process and the apparent adsorption activation energy E(a) was 15.0 kJ/mol. The intra-particle diffusion was a main rate controlling step in the Pd(II) adsorption process under the adsorption conditions.

  15. Electrocatalytic hydrogenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Youngkook; Birdja, Yuvraj Y; Raoufmoghaddam, Saeed; Koper, Marc T M

    2015-05-22

    Electrocatalytic hydrogenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) is studied on solid metal electrodes in acidic solution (0.5 M H2 SO4 ) by correlating voltammetry with on-line HPLC product analysis. Three soluble products from HMF hydrogenation are distinguished: 2,5-dihydroxymethylfuran (DHMF), 2,5-dihydroxymethyltetrahydrofuran (DHMTHF), and 2,5-dimethyl-2,3-dihydrofuran (DMDHF). Based on the dominant reaction products, the metal catalysts are divided into three groups: (1) metals mainly forming DHMF (Fe, Ni, Cu, and Pb), (2) metals forming DHMF and DMDHF depending on the applied potentials (Co, Ag, Au, Cd, Sb, and Bi), and (3) metals forming mainly DMDHF (Pd, Pt, Al, Zn, In, and Sb). Nickel and antimony are the most active catalysts for DHMF (0.95 mM cm(-2) at ca. -0.35 VRHE and -20 mA cm(-2) ) and DMDHF (0.7 mM cm(-2) at -0.6 VRHE and -5 mA cm(-2) ), respectively. The pH of the solution plays an important role in the hydrogenation of HMF: acidic condition lowers the activation energy for HMF hydro-genation and hydrogenates the furan ring further to tetrahydrofuran.

  16. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang-Rong; Li, Hua-Bin; Li, Xiao-Yan; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2004-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a priority pollutant in the USA and many other countries. Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is environmentally favorable as the latter species is not toxic to most living organisms and also has a low mobility and bioavailability. Reduction of Cr(VI) by ascorbic acid (vitamin C) as a reductant was studied using potassium dichromate solution as the model pollutant. Effects of concentration of vitamin C, pH, temperature, irradiation and reaction time on the reduction of Cr(VI) were examined. Cr(VI) might be reduced by vitamin C not only in acidic conditions but also in weakly alkaline solutions. The reduction of Cr(VI) by vitamin C might occur not only under irradiation but also in the dark. Vitamin C is an important biological reductant in humans and animals, and not toxic. It is water-soluble and can easily permeate through various types of soils. The results indicate that vitamin C could be used in effective remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soils and groundwater in a wide range of pH, with or without sunlight. PMID:15488923

  17. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang-Rong; Li, Hua-Bin; Li, Xiao-Yan; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2004-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a priority pollutant in the USA and many other countries. Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is environmentally favorable as the latter species is not toxic to most living organisms and also has a low mobility and bioavailability. Reduction of Cr(VI) by ascorbic acid (vitamin C) as a reductant was studied using potassium dichromate solution as the model pollutant. Effects of concentration of vitamin C, pH, temperature, irradiation and reaction time on the reduction of Cr(VI) were examined. Cr(VI) might be reduced by vitamin C not only in acidic conditions but also in weakly alkaline solutions. The reduction of Cr(VI) by vitamin C might occur not only under irradiation but also in the dark. Vitamin C is an important biological reductant in humans and animals, and not toxic. It is water-soluble and can easily permeate through various types of soils. The results indicate that vitamin C could be used in effective remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soils and groundwater in a wide range of pH, with or without sunlight.

  18. Effects of chloride ion on degradation of Acid Orange 7 by sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation process: implications for formation of chlorinated aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ruixia; Ramjaun, Sadiqua N; Wang, Zhaohui; Liu, Jianshe

    2011-11-30

    Sodium chloride is a common salt used during textile wet processes. Here a dual effect of chloride (i.e. inhibitory and accelerating effect) on azo dye (Acid Orange 7, AO7) degradation in an emerging cobalt/peroxymonosulfate (Co/PMS) advanced oxidation process (AOP) was reported. Compared to OH-based AOPs, high concentrations of chloride (>5mM) can significantly enhance dye decoloration independent of the presence of the Co(2+) catalyst, but did greatly inhibit dye mineralization to an extent which was closely dependent upon the chloride content. Both UV-vis absorbance spectra and AOX determination indicated the formation of some refractory byproducts. Some chlorinated aromatic compounds, including 3-chloroisocoumain, 2-chloro-7-hydroxynaphthalene, 1,3,5-trichloro-2-nitrobenzene and tetrachlorohydroquione, were identified by GC-MS measurement in both Co/PMS/Cl(-) and PMS/Cl(-) reaction systems. Based on those experimental results, two possible branched (SO(4)(-)radical-based and non-radical) reaction pathways are proposed. This is one of the very few studies dealing with chlorinated organic intermediates formed via chlorine radical/active chlorine species (HOCl/Cl(2)) attack on dye compounds. Therefore, this finding may have significant technical implications for utilizing Co/PMS regent to detoxify chloride-rich azo dyes wastewater.

  19. Corrosion resistance of flaky aluminum pigment coated with cerium oxides/hydroxides in chloride and acidic electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niroumandrad, S.; Rostami, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance the corrosion resistance of lamellar aluminum pigment through surface treatment by cerium oxides/hydroxides. The surface composition of the pigments was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The corrosion resistance of the pigment was evaluated by conventional hydrogen evolution measurements in acidic solution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Ce-rich coating composed of Ce2O3 and CeO2 was precipitated on the pigment surface after immersion in the cerium solution. The corrosion resistance of pigment was significantly enhanced after modification with cerium layer.

  20. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates.

    PubMed

    Ahoranta, Sarita H; Kokko, Marika E; Papirio, Stefano; Özkaya, Bestamin; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of acidic solution containing 5g/L of Fe(II) and 10mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7h, 96-98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pH<2.4. As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the system. In shake flask experiments, As(V) sorbed onto jarosite better than As(III). Moreover, the sorption capacity of biogenic jarosite was significantly higher than that of synthetic jarosite. The developed bioprocess simultaneously and efficiently removes iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment. PMID:26705889

  1. Adaptation of sweeteners in water and in tannic acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Pecore, S D; Booth, B J; Losee, M L; Carr, B T; Sattely-Miller, E; Graham, B G; Warwick, Z S

    1994-03-01

    Repeated exposure to a tastant often leads to a decrease in magnitude of the perceived intensity; this phenomenon is termed adaptation. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of adaptation of the sweet response for a variety of sweeteners in water and in the presence of two levels of tannic acid. Sweetness intensity ratings were given by a trained panel for 14 sweeteners: three sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose), two polyhydric alcohols (mannitol, sorbitol), two terpenoid glycosides (rebaudioside-A, stevioside), two dipeptide derivatives (alitame, aspartame), one sulfamate (sodium cyclamate), one protein (thaumatin), two N-sulfonyl amides (acesulfame-K, sodium saccharin), and one dihydrochalcone (neohesperidin dihydrochalcone). Panelists were given four isointense concentrations of each sweetener by itself and in the presence of two concentrations of tannic acid. Each sweetener concentration was tasted and rated four consecutive times with a 30 s interval between each taste and a 2 min interval between each concentration. Within a taste session, a series of concentrations of a given sweetener was presented in ascending order of magnitude. Adaptation was calculated as the decrease in intensity from the first to the fourth sample. The greatest adaptation in water solutions was found for acesulfame-K, Na saccharin, rebaudioside-A, and stevioside. This was followed by the dipeptide sweeteners, alitame and aspartame. The least adaptation occurred with the sugars, polyhydric alcohols, and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Adaptation was greater in tannic acid solutions than in water for six sweeteners. Adaptation of sweet taste may result from the desensitization of sweetener receptors analogous to the homologous desensitization found in the beta adrenergic system.

  2. Precipitation of plutonium from acidic solutions using magnesium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.

    1994-09-06

    Plutonium (IV) is only marginally soluble in alkaline solution. Precipitation of plutonium using sodium or potassium hydroxide to neutralize acidic solutions produces a gelatinous solid that is difficult to filter and an endpoint that is difficult to control. If the pH of the solution is too high, additional species precipitate producing an increased volume of solids separated. The use of magnesium oxide as a reagent has advantages. It is added as a solid (volume of liquid waste produced is minimized), the pH is self-limiting (pH does not exceed about 8.5), and the solids precipitated are more granular (larger particle size) than those produced using KOH or NaOH. Following precipitation, the raffinate is expected to meet criteria for disposal to tank farms. The solid will be heated in a furnace to dry it and convert any hydroxide salts to the oxide form. The material will be cooled in a desiccator. The material is expected to meet vault storage criteria.

  3. Conformation of poly(γ-glutamic acid) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Muroga, Yoshio; Nakaya, Asami; Inoue, Atsuki; Itoh, Daiki; Abiru, Masaya; Wada, Kaori; Takada, Masako; Ikake, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    Local conformation and overall conformation of poly(γ-DL-glutamic acid) (PγDLGA) and poly(γ-L-glutamic acid) (PγLGA) in aqueous solution was studied as a function of degree of ionization ε by (1) H-NMR, circular dichroism, and potentiometric titration. It was clarified that their local conformation is represented by random coil over an entire ε range and their overall conformation is represented by expanded random-coil in a range of ε > ε(*) , where ε(*) is about 0.3, 0.35, 0.45, and 0.5 for added-salt concentration of 0.02M, 0.05M, 0.1M, and 0.2M, respectively. In a range of ε < ε(*) , however, ε dependence of their overall conformation is significantly differentiated from each other. PγDLGA tends to aggregate intramolecularly and/or intermolecularly with decreasing ε, but PγLGA still behaves as expanded random-coil. It is speculated that spatial arrangement of adjacent carboxyl groups along the backbone chain essentially affects the overall conformation of PγGA in acidic media.

  4. Infrared optical constants of H2O ice, amorphous nitric acid solutions, and nitric acid hydrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Jordon, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We determined the infrared optical constants of nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dihydrate, nitric acid monohydrate, and solid amorphous nitric acid solutions which crystallize to form these hydrates. We have also found the infrared optical constants of H2O ice. We measured the transmission of infrared light throught thin films of varying thickness over the frequency range from about 7000 to 500/cm at temperatures below 200 K. We developed a theory for the transmission of light through a substrate that has thin films on both sides. We used an iterative Kramers-Kronig technique to determine the optical constants which gave the best match between measured transmission spectra and those calculated for a variety of films of different thickness. These optical constants should be useful for calculations of the infrared spectrum of polar stratospheric clouds.

  5. Effects of supplemental potassium and sodium chloride salts on ruminal turnover rates, acid-base and mineral status of lactating dairy cows during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Schneider, P L; Beede, D K; Wilcox, C J

    1988-01-01

    Effects of added dietary sodium and potassium chloride salts on ruminal turnover rates, acid-base balance and mineral status of lactating dairy cows experiencing a nycterohemeral cycle of heat stress were examined. Black globe-humidity index in the chambers averaged 94 during the daytime and 68 during the nighttime. Four ruminally cannulated multiparous Holstein cows in mid-lactation were confined in climatic chambers for a single-reversal experiment consisting of two 17-d periods. To the basal diet (50% corn silage: 50% concentrate, which contained .97% potassium, .19% sodium and .20% chloride), 1.25% sodium chloride plus 1.85% potassium chloride were added, making the high mineral treatment (1.93% potassium, 68% sodium and 1.85% chloride). Liquid dilution rates from the rumen were measured by chromium-ethylenediaminetetraacetate disappearance. Turnover rates of solids were determined by appearance of ytterbium in feces. Ruminal contents, arterial blood and urine were collected hourly for 26 h. Grab samples of feces were sampled over 6 d. Dry matter intakes and milk yields were not affected by the diets (averaging 17.8 and 21.1 kg/d, respectively). Cows fed the high mineral diet drank 17% more water (P less than .01). Tests for homogeneity of regression were utilized to compare chromium disappearance and ytterbium appearance data, which were best described by second-order polynomial functions. Increased ruminal chromium disappearance (P less than .01) and decreased total volatile fatty acid concentrations (P less than .01) suggested faster liquid dilution rates with high mineral diet, but turnover rates of solids were not affected. Urinary potassium secretion compensated for the high potassium content of the high mineral diet without an alkalogenic effect on acid-base status. Lower urine pH and higher urine ammonium concentrations during cool hours suggested that the high chloride content of the high mineral diet had an acidogenic effect. The results are

  6. In situ measurements of atmospheric nitrous acid by chemical ionization mass spectrometry using chloride ion transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Jun; Kato, Takehiro; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2009-10-15

    Recently, chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) has been widely applied to the in situ measurements of atmospheric trace species. In this article, we propose a new chemical ionization scheme using a chloride ion transfer reaction from SO(2)Cl(-) as the reagent ion and discuss the applicability of this technique to the detection of nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere. From laboratory investigations, the detection sensitivity was found to depend on the flow rate of SO(2) introduced into the ion source region and the pressure inside the chemical ionization region, which suggests that the chemical ionization reaction is reversible. The detection sensitivity was well described in terms of the forward and backward rates. The present limit of detection is estimated to be 60 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) for an integration time of 1 min. Improvement of the CIMS instrument would enable the measurements of the daytime level of HONO, which might be less than 50 pptv. In addition, the possibility of the interference is discussed from thermodynamic considerations based on ab initio calculations, and the effects of the sampling artifacts are experimentally quantified.

  7. Genoprotective effect of hyaluronic acid against benzalkonium chloride-induced DNA damage in human corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Han; Zhang, Huina; Wang, Changjun; Wu, Yihua; Xie, Jiajun; Jin, Xiuming; Yang, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate hyaluronic acid (HA) protection on cultured human corneal epithelial cells (HCEs) against benzalkonium chloride (BAC)-induced DNA damage and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase. Methods Cells were incubated with different concentrations of BAC with or without the presence of 0.2% HA for 30 min. DNA damage to HCEs was examined by alkaline comet assay and by immunofluorescence microscopic detection of the phosphorylated form of histone variant H2AX (γH2AX) foci. ROS production was assessed by the fluorescent probe, 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Cell apoptosis was determined with annexin V staining by flow cytometry. Results HA significantly reduced BAC-induced DNA damage as indicated by the tail length (TL) and tail moment (TM) of alkaline comet assay and by γH2AX foci formation, respectively. Moreover, HA significantly decreased BAC-induced ROS increase and cell apoptosis. However, exposure to HA alone did not produce any significant change in DNA damage, ROS generation, or cell apoptosis. Conclusions BAC could induce DNA damage and cell apoptosis in HCEs, probably through increasing oxidative stress. Furthermore, HA was an effective protective agent that had antioxidant properties and could decrease DNA damage and cell apoptosis induced by BAC. PMID:22219631

  8. Water-soluble N-[(2-hydroxy-3-trimethylammonium)propyl]chitosan chloride as a nucleic acids vector for cell transfection.

    PubMed

    Faizuloev, Evgeny; Marova, Anna; Nikonova, Alexandra; Volkova, Irina; Gorshkova, Marina; Izumrudov, Vladimir

    2012-08-01

    To endow the cationic polysaccharides with solubility in the whole pH-range without loss of functionality of the amino groups, different chitosan samples were treated with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride. Each modified unit of the exhaustively alkylated quaternized chitosan (QCht) contained both quaternary and secondary amino groups. The intercalated dye displacement assay and ζ-potential measurements implied stability of QCht polyplexes at physiological conditions and protonation of the secondary amino groups in slightly acidic media which is favorable for transfection according to proton sponge mechanism. The cytotoxicity and transfection efficacy increased with the chain lengthening. Nevertheless, the longest chains of QCht, 250 kDa were less toxic than PEI for COS-1 cells and revealed comparable and even significantly higher transfection activity of siRNA and plasmid DNA, respectively. Thus, highly polymerized QCht (250 kDa) provided the highest level of the plasmid DNA transfection being 5 and 80 times more active than QCht (100 kDa) and QCht (50 kDa), respectively, and 4-fold more effective than PEI, 25 kDa. The established influence of QCht molecular weight on toxicity and transfection efficacy allows elaborating polysaccharide vectors that possess rational balance of these characteristics. PMID:24750918

  9. Individual differences in sour and salt sensitivity: detection and quality recognition thresholds for citric acid and sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Wise, Paul M; Breslin, Paul A S

    2013-05-01

    Taste sensitivity is assessed with various techniques, including absolute detection and quality recognition. For any stimulus, one might expect individual differences in sensitivity to be reflected in all measures, but they are often surprisingly independent. Here, we focus on sensitivity to sour and salty taste, in part because processing of these qualities is poorly understood relative to other tastes. In Study 1, we measured retest reliability for detection (modified, forced-choice staircase method) and recognition (modified Harris-Kalmus procedure) for both citric acid (CA) and sodium chloride (NaCl). Despite good retest reliability, individual differences in detection and recognition were weakly correlated, suggesting that detection and recognition of sour and salty stimuli may reflect different physiological processes. In Study 2, a subset of subjects returned to contribute full detection (psychometric) functions for CA and NaCl. Thresholds estimated from full detection functions correlated with both staircase and recognition thresholds, suggesting that both tasks may reflect absolute sensitivity to some extent. However, the ranges of individual differences were systematically compressed for staircase thresholds relative to those from full detection functions. Thus, individual differences in sensitivity appear to interact with different test methodologies in lawful ways. More work will be required to understand how different taste phenotypes relate to one another.

  10. In situ measurements of atmospheric nitrous acid by chemical ionization mass spectrometry using chloride ion transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Jun; Kato, Takehiro; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2009-10-15

    Recently, chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) has been widely applied to the in situ measurements of atmospheric trace species. In this article, we propose a new chemical ionization scheme using a chloride ion transfer reaction from SO(2)Cl(-) as the reagent ion and discuss the applicability of this technique to the detection of nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere. From laboratory investigations, the detection sensitivity was found to depend on the flow rate of SO(2) introduced into the ion source region and the pressure inside the chemical ionization region, which suggests that the chemical ionization reaction is reversible. The detection sensitivity was well described in terms of the forward and backward rates. The present limit of detection is estimated to be 60 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) for an integration time of 1 min. Improvement of the CIMS instrument would enable the measurements of the daytime level of HONO, which might be less than 50 pptv. In addition, the possibility of the interference is discussed from thermodynamic considerations based on ab initio calculations, and the effects of the sampling artifacts are experimentally quantified. PMID:19746928

  11. The inhibitive mechanisms of nitrite and molybdate anions on initiation and propagation of pitting corrosion for mild steel in chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Zuo, Yu

    2015-10-01

    The inhibitive mechanism of NO2- and MoO42- on the initiation and propagation of pitting corrosion for mild steel in chloride solution was studied with electrochemical methods and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In 0.1 M NaCl solution both the addition of 0.2 M NaNO2 and 0.2 M Na2MoO4 effectively promoted passivation of mild steel. The passive film on the steel surface formed in NaCl + NO2- solution was composed of mainly γ-Fe2O3, and the film formed in NaCl + MoO42- solution was composed of two components: one is Fe2(MoO4)3 and the other is an oxide composed of Fe and O. The film formed in NaNO2 solution has lower oxygen vacancies and larger impedance than the film formed in Na2MoO4 solution. NO2- shows better inhibition to the initiation of pitting corrosion than MoO42-, which is attributed to its strong oxidability that results in the formation of a stable γ-Fe2O3 film. However, in NaNO2 solution, once a pit forms, it is more difficult to get repassivated than the situation in Na2MoO4 solution. The main reason is due to that in a propagating pit MoO42- anions result in increased solution pH value, but conversely NO2- anions lead to a decreased solution pH value within a pit.

  12. Accumulation of Amino Acids in Rhizobium sp. Strain WR1001 in Response to Sodium Chloride Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Sui-Sheng T.; Tsai, Victor Y.; Lichens, Georgia M.; Noma, Amy T.

    1982-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain WR1001, isolated from the Sonoran Desert by Eskew and Ting, was found to be able to grow in defined medium containing NaCl up to 500 mM, a concentration approaching that of sea water. Therefore, it is a valuable strain for studying the biochemical basis of salt tolerance. Intracellular free glutamate was found to increase rapidly in response to osmotic stress by NaCl. It accounted for 88% of the amino acid pool when the bacterium was grown in 500 mM NaCl. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in glutamate biosynthesis was examined in several Rhizobium strains. Both NADH- and NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activities in various Rhizobium strains were observed. The range of activity differed considerably depending on the particular strain. KCl (500 mM) did not stimulate glutamate dehydrogenase activity, as reported in a number of bacterial strains by Measures. The low activity of glutamate dehydrogenase in Rhizobium sp. strain WR1001 apparently cannot fulfill a biosynthetic function of glutamate formation in response to medium NaCl concentrations. PMID:16346049

  13. The extraction of actinides from nitric acid solutions with diamides of dipicolinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapka, Joseph L.; Paulenova, Alena; Alyapyshev, Mikhail Yu; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Law, Jack D.; Herbst, R. Scott

    2010-03-01

    Diamides of dipicolinic acid (N,N'-diethyl-N,N'-ditolyl-dipicolinamide, EtTDPA) were synthesized and evaluated for their extraction capability for actinides. In this work the extractions of neptunium(V), protactinium(V), and thorium(IV) with EtTDPA in a polar fluorinated diluent from nitric acid were investigated. EtTDPA shows a high affinity for Th(IV) even at millimolar concentrations. Np(V) and Pa(V) are both reasonably extractable with EtTDPA; however, near saturated solutions are required to achieve appreciable distribution ratios. A comparison with previously published actinide extraction data is given.

  14. Influence of sodium chloride and glucose on acid-induced gelation of heat-denatured ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Choi, S J; Lee, S E; Moon, T W

    2008-06-01

    We examined the effects of NaCl and glucose on cold-set ovalbumin gelation. Cold-set gels were prepared by adding glucono-delta-lactone (GDL) to a 2% heated ovalbumin solution. For the gel prepared from ovalbumin heat-denatured with NaCl and glucose, the gel with 10 mM NaCl was most transparent and had high gel strength. Its maximum complex shear modulus (G*) and turbidity were 2.5 times greater and 3 times lower, respectively, than those of the gel without NaCl. The turbidity of the gel with the higher NaCl content increased steeply after the addition of GDL and did not change during the experimental period. The maximum G* of the gel exhibited positive correlations with the molar mass, radius, and surface hydrophobicity of soluble aggregates and the NaCl content, but the turbidity exhibited negative correlations with these factors. The presence of glucose did not significantly affect the turbidity or rheological properties of the gel. For the gel prepared by adding NaCl and glucose with GDL, the presence of glucose did not affect the turbidity, but the maximum G* decreased in inverse proportion to the glucose content. The turbidity of the gel with higher NaCl content (>or= 50 mM) was the greatest among all samples, and the increased turbidity was maintained throughout the measurements. The gels with 50 and 100 mM NaCl exhibited thixotropy during shearing at a constant shear rate. Therefore, the presence of NaCl and glucose during cold gelation could facilitate the preparation of cold-set gels having various properties for food applications.

  15. Radiolysis gases from nitric acid solutions containing HSA and HAN

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1994-10-28

    The concentration of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the radiolytically produced off-gas from 2.76-4.25M HNO{sub 3}/PU solutions has been found to be greatly reduced in the presence of sulfamic acid (HSA) and hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN). The H{sub 2} concentration ([H{sub 2}]) is reduced from 35 percent to about 4 percent by dilution caused from an increase in the production rates of nitrogen (N{sub 2}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and oxygen (O{sub 2}) gases. The generation rate of H{sub 2} was not affected by HSA or HAN giving a measured radiolytic yield, G(H{sub 2}), value of 0.201 molecules/100 eV for 2.765M NO{sub 3}{sup -} solution (a value of 0.213 is predicted from previous data). The G(H{sub 2}) values are dependent on the solution nitrate concentration ([NO{sub 3}{sup -}]). The generation rates of N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} are not dependent on the [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] in this narrow range, but are dependent on the presence of HSA and the concentration of HAN. The percentage [H{sub 2}] for the 2.5 to 3.0M NO{sub 3}{sup -} range expected in the off- from the FB-Line Pu{sup +3} Hold Tanks is conservatively estimated to be about 3.5 to 4.5 % for Pu + 3 solutions initially containing 0.023M HAN/0.165M HSA. The upper limit [H{sub 2}] may actually be about 4.1 % (4.3 % at 90 % confidence limits) but more {open_quotes}initial{close_quotes} off-gas rate data is needed at about 2.9M [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] in Pu{sup +3} solution for verification. Addition of ascorbic acid had no effect on the off-gas rate of Pu{sup +3} solutions containing HSA and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations higher than those expected in the hold tanks. The maximum {open_quotes}hold time{close_quotes} for 50 grams/liter Pu{sup +3}/0.165M HSA/0.023M HAN/2.5-3.0M HNO{sub 3} solution is 20.3{+-}2.1 days. After this time the HSA initially present will become exhausted and the [H{sub 2}] will increase to 35 %. This hold time may be longer in [NO{sub 3}{sup -}] < 3.0M, but again more study is needed.

  16. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R. A.

    2012-03-12

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 °C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. At 25 °C, for 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 11 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2.5 g/L and 0.8 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The solubility of Gd in 4 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate at 10 °C is about 1.5 g/L. For 6 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate, the solubility of Gd at 10

  17. Volumetric and acoustic properties of D-mannitol in aqueous sodium or magnesium chloride solutions over temperature range of 293.15-313.15K.

    PubMed

    Warmińska, Dorota

    2012-02-15

    Apparent molar volumes and apparent molar compressibilities for d-mannitol in (1, 5 and 10) % aqueous sodium or magnesium chloride have been determined from solution density measurements at T=(293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 310.15, and 313.15)K and sound velocity measurements at T=(293.15 and 310.15)K as a function of the concentration of sugar alcohol. The limiting apparent molar volumes and limiting apparent molar compressibilities have been obtained from the Masson equation. The corresponding transfer parameters and expansion coefficients were also estimated. These parameters have been discussed in terms of d-mannitol-cosolute (NaCl or MgCl(2)) interactions in aqueous solutions and thus used to understand the mixing effects due to these interactions.

  18. Optical properties of chitosan in aqueous solution of L- and D-ascorbic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinkina, Olga N.; Shipovskaya, Anna B.; Kazmicheva, Olga F.

    2016-04-01

    The optical properties of aqueous chitosan solutions in L- and D-ascorbic acids were studied by optical rotatory dispersion and spectrophotometry. The specific optical rotation [α] of all chitosan solutions tested was positive, in contrast to aqueous solutions of the ascorbic acid enantiomers, which exhibit an inverse relationship of [α] values. Significant differences in the absolute values of [α] of the chitosan solutions at polymer-acid ratios exceeding the equimolar one were found.

  19. Passive and transpassive anodic behavior of chalcopyrite in acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, G. W.; Wadsworth, M. E.; El-Raghy, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of CuFeS2 in various acid solutions was studied using electrodes made from massive samples. The primary techniques employed were potentiodynamic polarization and constant potential experiments supplemented by capacitance measurements. It was the purpose of this study to investigate the behavior of: (1) several sources of CuFeS2 in H2SO4 electrolytes, and (2) a single source of CuFeS2 in various dilute acids. Electrochemical characterization of CuFeS2 from various locations was performed in 1 M H2SO4 which showed significant differences in their behavior. All samples exhibited passive-like response during anodic polarization. The current density in this passive region was reproducible and showed differences of up to two orders of magnitude between samples from different sources which has been attributed mainly to the presence of impurities in some of the samples. During anodic polarization CuFeS2 was found to be sensitive to pH at higher potential, but insensitive at low potential in sulfate solution. In addition, current decay measurements at constant potential in the low potential-passive region were found to follow the Sato-Cohen (logarithmic) model for solid film formation. Based on current and mass balance measurements, two intermediate sulfide phases appeared to form in the sequence CuFeS2 → S, → S2. At higher potentials, in the transpassive region, the observed increase in current is compatible with the decomposition of water to form chemisorbed oxygen which releases copper and forms sulfate ions.

  20. Passive and transpassive anodic behavior of chalcopyrite in acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, G. W.; Wadsworth, M. E.; El-Raghy, S. M.

    1982-12-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of CuFeS2 in various acid solutions was studied using electrodes made from massive samples. The primary techniques employed were potentiodynamic polarization and constant potential experiments supplemented by capacitance measurements. It was the purpose of this study to investigate the behavior of: (1) several sources of CuFeS2 in H2SO4 electrolytes, and (2) a single source of CuFeS2 in various dilute acids. Electrochemical characterization of CuFeS2 from various locations was performed in 1 M H2SO4 which showed significant differences in their behavior. All samples exhibited passive-like response during anodic polarization. The current density in this passive region was reproducible and showed differences of up to two orders of magnitude between samples from different sources which has been attributed mainly to the presence of impurities in some of the samples. During anodic polarization CuFeS2 was found to be sensitive to pH at higher potential, but insensitive at low potential in sulfate solution. In addition, current decay measurements at constant potential in the low potential-passive region were found to follow the Sato-Cohen (logarithmic) model for solid film formation. Based on current and mass balance measurements, two intermediate sulfide phases appeared to form in the sequence CuFeS2→S1→S2. At higher potentials, in the transpassive region, the observed increase in current is compatible with the decomposition of water to form chemisorbed oxygen which releases copper and forms sulfate ions.

  1. Effects of chronic exposure to soft, acidic water on gill development and chloride cell numbers in embryo-larval brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conklin, D.J.; Mowbray, R.C.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1992-01-01

    Recruitment failure is considered to be a major factor contributing to the decline of fish populations in soft, acidic waters; direct mortality of embryo-larval fishes has been postulated as a major cause of the decline. Little is understood of the physiological consequences to embryo-larval fishes of prolonged exposure to soft, acidic waters; however, dysfunction of respiratory and ionoregulatory processes is suspected. In order to evaluate the effects of acid exposure on the respiratory and ionoregulatory systems of developing brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, differences in gill morphology and numbers of chloride cells were compared between groups cf developing embryo-larval fish continuously exposed to moderately hard well water (130.0 mg.l-1 as CaCO3, pH 7.94) or to reconstituted soft, acidic water (4.4 mg.l-1 as CaCO3, pH 5.25) designed to mimic acidic waters of northern Wisconsin acidified lakes. Exposures were maintained for up to 48 days (82 days after fertilization) during critical periods of growth and differentiation of branchial structures. The second right gill arch of each fish was examined for changes in the development of filaments and lamellae and for differences in numbers of chloride cells. Gills of fish that developed in soft, acidic water contained greater numbers of normal and degenerating chloride cells, exhibited hyperplasia of primary epithelium and multiple fusions of adjacent filaments and lamellar epithelium than the gills of control fish. Filament and lamellar lengths and numbers of lamellae per filament were significantly less (P< 0.05) in fish that developed in soft, acidic water than in fish exposed to well water.

  2. Solution structures of europium(III) complexes of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Latva, M.; Kankara, J.; Haapakka, K.

    1996-04-01

    Coordination of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) with europium(III) has been studied at different concentrations in solution using {sup 7}F{sub 0}{yields}{sup 5}D{sub 0} excitation spectroscopy and excited-state lifetime measurements. EDTA forms with Eu(III) ion three different species in equimolar solutions at room temperature. At low pH values EuEDTAH is formed and at higher pH values than 1.5 two EuEDTA{sup -} complexes, which differ from each other with one water molecule in the first coordination sphere of the Eu(III) ion, total coordination number and coordination geometry, are also formed. When the concentration of EDTA is higher than the concentration of Eu(III), an EuEDTA(EDTAH){sup 4-} species where the second EDTA is weakly coordinated to EuEDTA{sup -}, is formed. If the concentration of Eu(III) ion is higher than EDTA, the extra Eu(III) ions associate with EuEDTA{sup -} and link to one of the carboxylate groups of EDTA thus causing a shortening of the excited-state lifetime of the EuEDTA{sup -} complex.

  3. Rare earth element geochemistry of acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride geothermal systems from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.J.; Palmer, M.R.; Kemp, A.J.; Sturchio, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations have been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) in acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride waters and the associated sinters and volcanic rocks from the Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA, geothermal system. REE concentrations in the volcanic rocks range from 222 to 347 ppm: their chondrite-normalised REE patterns are typical of upper continental crust, with LREE > HREE and negative Eu anomalies. Total REE concentrations in the fluids range from 3 to 1133 nmol kg{sup -1} ({ge}162 ppm), and {Sigma}REE concentrations in sinter are {ge}181 ppm. REE abundances and patterns in drill core material from YNP indicate some REE mobility. Relative to the host rocks the REE patterns of the fluids are variably depleted in HREEs and LREEs, and usually have a pronounced positive Eu anomaly. This decoupling of Eu from the REE suite suggests that (1) Eu has been preferentially removed either from the host rock glass or from the host rock minerals, or (2) the waters are from a high temperature or reducing environment where Eu{sup 2+} is more soluble than the trivalent REEs. Since the latter is inconsistent with production of acid-sulphate springs in a low temperature, oxidising near-surface environment, we suggest that the positive Eu anomalies in the fluids result from preferential dissolution of a Eu-rich phase in the host rock. Spatial and temporal variations in major element chemistry and pH of the springs sampled from Norris Geyser Basin and Crater Hills accompany variations in REE concentrations and patterns of individual geothermal springs. These are possibly related to changes in subsurface plumbing, which results in variations in mixing and dilution of the geothermal fluids and may have lead to changes in the extent and nature of REE complexing. 37 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Uptake of ozone to mixed sodium bromide/ citric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Tao; Steimle, Emilie; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Kato, Shunsuke; Lampimäki, Markus; Brown, Matthew; van Bokhoven, Jeroen; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Sea-salt solution - air interfaces play an important role in the chemistry of the marine boundary layer. The reaction of ozone (O3) with bromide is of interest in the context of formation of photolabile halogens (Br2, BrCl) in the marine boundary layer. Recent experiments have suggested that the bromide oxidation rate is related to the surface concentration of bromide [1] and inversely related to the gas phase concentration of O3, an indication for a precursor mediated reaction at the surface [2]. So far, the effect of organics (such as those occurring at the ocean surface or in marine aerosols) on the reaction of O3 with bromide aerosols has not been studied yet. In our study we investigate the uptake kinetics of O3 to a mixed solution of sodium bromide (NaBr) and citric acid (CA), which represents highly oxidized organic compounds present in the environment, with a well-established coated wall flow tube technique, which leads to exposure of the film to O3 allowing the heterogeneous reactions to take place and the loss of O3 being measured. The results indicate that the uptake of O3 to the films with the higher bromide concentrations (0.34M and 4M) is independent of the gas phase concentration and roughly consistent with uptake limited by reaction in the bulk. For the lower bromide concentration (84mM), however, we observe a trend of the uptake coefficient to decrease with increasing O3 concentration, indicating an increasing importance of a surface reaction. In an attempt to constrain the kinetic data, we employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to get insight into the surface composition of the aqueous solution - air interface. Previous XPS studies have shown that halide ion concentrations are enhanced at the aqueous solution air interface [3-4], which likely promotes the surface reactions of bromide or iodide with O3. A first XPS study of ternary solutions of KI with butanol indicated the importance of specific interactions of the cation with the alcohol

  5. Microwave and infrared spectra, adjusted r0 structural parameters, conformational stabilities, vibrational assignments, and theoretical calculations of cyclobutylcarboxylic acid chloride.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Joshua J; Darkhalil, Ikhlas D; Deodhar, Bhushan S; Gounev, Todor K; Gurusinghe, Ranil M; Tubergen, Michael J; Groner, Peter; Durig, James R

    2013-08-01

    The FT-microwave spectrum of cyclobutylcarboxylic acid chloride, c-C4H7C(O)Cl, has been recorded and 153 transitions for the (35)Cl and (37)Cl isotopologues have been assigned for the gauche-equatorial (g-Eq) conformation. The ground state rotational constants were determined for (35)Cl [(37)Cl]: A = 4349.8429(25) [4322.0555(56)] MHz, B = 1414.8032(25) [1384.5058(25)] MHz, and C = 1148.2411(25) [1126.3546(25)] MHz. From these rotational constants and ab initio predicted parameters, adjusted r0 parameters are reported with distances (Å) rCα-C = 1.491(4), rC═O = 1.193(3), rCα-Cβ = 1.553(4), rCα-Cβ' = 1.540(4), rCγ-Cβ = 1.547(4), rCγ-Cβ' = 1.546(4), rC-Cl = 1.801(3) and angles (deg) τCγCβCβ'Cα = 30.9(5). Variable temperature (-70 to -100 °C) infrared spectra (4000 to 400 cm(-1)) were recorded in liquid xenon and the g-Eq conformer was determined the most stable form, with enthalpy differences of 91 ± 9 cm(-1) (1.09 ± 0.11 kJ/mol) for the gauche-axial (g-Ax) form and 173 ± 17 cm(-1) (2.07 ± 0.20 kJ/mol) for the trans-equatorial (t-Eq) conformer. The relative amounts at ambient temperature are 54% g-Eq, 35 ± 1% g-Ax, and 12 ± 1% t-Eq forms. Vibrational assignments have been provided for the three conformers and theoretical calculations were carried out. The results are discussed and compared to corresponding properties of related molecules.

  6. Chloride-inducible transient apoplastic alkalinizations induce stomata closure by controlling abscisic acid distribution between leaf apoplast and guard cells in salt-stressed Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Mithöfer, Axel; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Zörb, Christian; Muehling, Karl H

    2015-11-01

    Chloride stress causes the leaf apoplast transiently to alkalize, an event that is presumed to contribute to the ability of plants to adapt to saline conditions. However, the initiation of coordinated processes downstream of the alkalinization is unknown. We hypothesize that chloride-inducible pH dynamics are a key chemical feature modulating the compartmental distribution of abscisic acid (ABA) and, as a consequence, affecting stomata aperture. Apoplastic pH and stomata aperture dynamics in intact Vicia faba leaves were monitored by microscopy-based ratio imaging and porometric measurements of stomatal conductance. ABA concentrations in leaf apoplast and guard cells were compared with pH dynamics by gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results demonstrate that, upon chloride addition to roots, an alkalizing factor that initiates the pH dynamic propagates from root to leaf in a way similar to xylem-distributed water. In leaves, it induces a systemic transient apoplastic alkalinization that causes apoplastic ABA concentration to increase, followed by an elevation of endogenous guard cell ABA. We conclude that the transient alkalinization, which is a remote effect of chloride stress, modulates the compartmental distribution of ABA between the leaf apoplast and the guard cells and, in this way, is instrumental in inducing stomata closure during the beginning of salinity. PMID:26096890

  7. Chloride-inducible transient apoplastic alkalinizations induce stomata closure by controlling abscisic acid distribution between leaf apoplast and guard cells in salt-stressed Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Mithöfer, Axel; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Zörb, Christian; Muehling, Karl H

    2015-11-01

    Chloride stress causes the leaf apoplast transiently to alkalize, an event that is presumed to contribute to the ability of plants to adapt to saline conditions. However, the initiation of coordinated processes downstream of the alkalinization is unknown. We hypothesize that chloride-inducible pH dynamics are a key chemical feature modulating the compartmental distribution of abscisic acid (ABA) and, as a consequence, affecting stomata aperture. Apoplastic pH and stomata aperture dynamics in intact Vicia faba leaves were monitored by microscopy-based ratio imaging and porometric measurements of stomatal conductance. ABA concentrations in leaf apoplast and guard cells were compared with pH dynamics by gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results demonstrate that, upon chloride addition to roots, an alkalizing factor that initiates the pH dynamic propagates from root to leaf in a way similar to xylem-distributed water. In leaves, it induces a systemic transient apoplastic alkalinization that causes apoplastic ABA concentration to increase, followed by an elevation of endogenous guard cell ABA. We conclude that the transient alkalinization, which is a remote effect of chloride stress, modulates the compartmental distribution of ABA between the leaf apoplast and the guard cells and, in this way, is instrumental in inducing stomata closure during the beginning of salinity.

  8. Interaction of trace elements in acid mine drainage solution with humic acid.

    PubMed

    Suteerapataranon, Siripat; Bouby, Muriel; Geckeis, Horst; Fanghänel, Thomas; Grudpan, Kate

    2006-06-01

    The release of metal ions from a coal mining tailing area, Lamphun, Northern Thailand, is studied by leaching tests. Considerable amounts of Mn, Fe, Al, Ni and Co are dissolved in both simulated rain water (pH 4) and 10 mg L(-1) humic acid (HA) solution (Aldrich humic acid, pH 7). Due to the presence of oxidizing pyrite and sulfide minerals, the pH in both leachates decreases down to approximately 3 combined with high sulfate concentrations typical to acid mine drainage (AMD) water composition. Interaction of the acidic leachates upon mixing with ground- and surface water containing natural organic matter is simulated by subsequent dilution (1:100; 1:200; 1:300; 1:500) with a 10 mg L(-1) HA solution (ionic strength: 10(-3) mol L(-1)). Combining asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) with UV/Vis and ICP-MS detection allows for the investigation of metal ion interaction with HA colloid and colloid size evolution. Formation of colloid aggregates is observed by filtration and AsFlFFF depending on the degree of the dilution. While the average HA size is initially found to be 2 nm, metal-HA complexes are always found to be larger. Such observation is attributed to a metal induced HA agglomeration, which is found even at low coverage of HA functional groups with metal ions. Increasing the metal ion to HA ratio, the HA bound metal ions and the HA entities are growing in size from <3 to >450 nm. At high metal ion to HA ratios, precipitation of FeOOH phases and HA agglomeration due to colloid charge neutralization by complete saturation of HA complexing sites are responsible for the fact that most of Fe and Al precipitate and are found in a size fraction >450 nm. In the more diluted solutions, HA is more relevant as a carrier for metal ion mobilization.

  9. Integral equation theory for the electrode-electrolyte interface with the central force water model. Results for an aqueous solution of sodium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vossen, M.; Forstmann, F.

    1995-12-01

    The structure of an aqueous solution of sodium chloride at a planar surface is investigated by integral equation techniques. With the central force water model the aqueous electrolyte is modelled as a mixture of sodium and chloride ions, and partially charged hydrogen and oxygen atoms interacting via effective spherically symmetric pair potentials. The correlation functions obtained from the Ornstein-Zernike equation with reference hypernetted chain closure give a good description of the bulk structure (e.g., hydrogen bonded water network, solvation shell). With the bulk information and the Wertheim-Lovett-Mou-Buff equation we have calculated the density profiles at the uncharged and charged surfaces. The rather rigid ice-like water structure found previously at the neutral surface strongly repels the ions. Steric interactions between the ions of different sizes and the ice-like water structure dominate the ionic distribution near the surface. This model electrolyte also responds differently to opposite charges on the surface. We found the asymmetry in the differential capacitance curve determined entirely by the response of the interfacial water structure.

  10. Release of nitrous acid and nitrogen dioxide from nitrate photolysis in acidic aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Scharko, Nicole K; Berke, Andrew E; Raff, Jonathan D

    2014-10-21

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) is an abundant component of aerosols, boundary layer surface films, and surface water. Photolysis of NO3(-) leads to NO2 and HONO, both of which play important roles in tropospheric ozone and OH production. Field and laboratory studies suggest that NO3¯ photochemistry is a more important source of HONO than once thought, although a mechanistic understanding of the variables controlling this process is lacking. We present results of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy measurements of NO2 and HONO emitted during photodegradation of aqueous NO3(-) under acidic conditions. Nitrous acid is formed in higher quantities at pH 2-4 than expected based on consideration of primary photochemical channels alone. Both experimental and modeled results indicate that the additional HONO is not due to enhanced NO3(-) absorption cross sections or effective quantum yields, but rather to secondary reactions of NO2 in solution. We find that NO2 is more efficiently hydrolyzed in solution when it is generated in situ during NO3(-) photolysis than for the heterogeneous system where mass transfer of gaseous NO2 into bulk solution is prohibitively slow. The presence of nonchromophoric OH scavengers that are naturally present in the environment increases HONO production 4-fold, and therefore play an important role in enhancing daytime HONO formation from NO3(-) photochemistry.

  11. Comparison of peak shape in hydrophilic interaction chromatography using acidic salt buffers and simple acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Heaton, James C; Russell, Joseph J; Underwood, Tim; Boughtflower, Robert; McCalley, David V

    2014-06-20

    The retention and peak shape of neutral, basic and acidic solutes was studied on hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) stationary phases that showed both strong and weak ionic retention characteristics, using aqueous-acetonitrile mobile phases containing either formic acid (FA), ammonium formate (AF) or phosphoric acid (PA). The effect of organic solvent concentration on the results was also studied. Peak shape was good for neutrals under most mobile phase conditions. However, peak shapes for ionised solutes, particularly for basic compounds, were considerably worse in FA than AF. Even neutral compounds showed deterioration in performance with FA when the mobile phase water concentration was reduced. The poor performance in FA cannot be entirely attributed to the negative impact of ionic retention on ionised silanols on the underlying silica base materials, as results using PA at lower pH (where their ionisation is suppressed) were inferior to those in AF. Besides the moderating influence of the salt cation on ionic retention, it is likely that salt buffers improve peak shape due to the increased ionic strength of the mobile phase and its impact on the formation of the water layer on the column surface.

  12. Chloride flux in phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Phagocytes, such as neutrophils and macrophages, engulf microbes into phagosomes and launch chemical attacks to kill and degrade them. Such a critical innate immune function necessitates ion participation. Chloride, the most abundant anion in the human body, is an indispensable constituent of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2 O2 -halide system that produces the potent microbicide hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It also serves as a balancing ion to set membrane potentials, optimize cytosolic and phagosomal pH, and regulate phagosomal enzymatic activities. Deficient supply of this anion to or defective attainment of this anion by phagocytes is linked to innate immune defects. However, how phagocytes acquire chloride from their residing environment especially when they are deployed to epithelium-lined lumens, and how chloride is intracellularly transported to phagosomes remain largely unknown. This review article will provide an overview of chloride protein carriers, potential mechanisms for phagocytic chloride preservation and acquisition, intracellular chloride supply to phagosomes for oxidant production, and methods to measure chloride levels in phagocytes and their phagosomes. PMID:27558337

  13. The solubility of quartz in aqueous sodium chloride solution at 350°C and 180 to 500 bars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, Robert O.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Bischoff, James L.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility of quartz in 2, 3, and 4 molal NaCl was measured at 350°C and pressures ranging from 180 to 500 bars. The molal solubility in each of the salt solutions is greater than that in pure water throughout the measured pressure range, with the ratio of solubility in NaCl solution to solubility in pure water decreasing as pressure is increased. The measured solubilities are significantly higher than solubilities calculated using a simple model in which the water activity in NaCl solutions decreases either in proportion to decreasing vapor pressure of the solution as salinity is increased or in proportion to decreasing mole fraction of water in the solvent.

  14. Analysis of amino acids by HPLC/electrospray negative ion tandem mass spectrometry using 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl chloride (Fmoc-Cl) derivatization.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Jörg; Abel, Steffen

    2014-12-01

    A new method for the determination of amino acids is presented. It combines established methods for the derivatization of primary and secondary amino groups with 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl chloride (Fmoc-Cl) with the subsequent amino acid specific detection of the derivatives by LC-ESI-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The derivatization proceeds within 5 min, and the resulting amino acid derivatives can be rapidly purified from matrix by solid-phase extraction (SPE) on HR-X resin and separated by reversed-phase HPLC. The Fmoc derivatives yield several amino acid specific fragment ions which opened the possibility to select amino acid specific MRM transitions. The method was applied to all 20 proteinogenic amino acids, and the quantification was performed using L-norvaline as standard. A limit of detection as low as 1 fmol/µl with a linear range of up to 125 pmol/µl could be obtained. Intraday and interday precisions were lower than 10 % relative standard deviations for most of the amino acids. Quantification using L-norvaline as internal standard gave very similar results compared to the quantification using deuterated amino acid as internal standards. Using this protocol, it was possible to record the amino acid profiles of only a single root from Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings and to compare it with the amino acid profiles of 20 dissected root meristems (200 μm).

  15. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  16. Laboratory studies of the low-temperature deliquescence of calcium chloride salts: Relevance to aqueous solutions on Mars and in the Antarctic Dry Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, R. V.; Chevrier, V.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    There is significant interest in the possible existence of liquid water on current Mars. This water would likely exist as a brine in order to be stable on Mars today. It has been proposed that soil salts could form aqueous solutions through either the melting of ice by low-eutectic salts, or by the deliquescence of hygroscopic salts present in the Martian soil. The focus thus far has largely been on perchlorate species, which can melt ice at temperatures as low as 206 K and can deliquesce at relative humidity values as low as 38% RH. A Mars-relevant salt that has been neglected thus far is calcium chloride (CaCl2). Calcium has been reported to be an abundant cation at the Phoenix landing site and Mars Science Laboratory instruments have recently identified calcium as well. Simulations suggest subsurface CaCl2 is an ideal candidate to produce brines with seasonality consistent with observed recurring slope lineae (RSL) (Chevrier et al., 2012). Finally, the only terrestrial site where RSL-like features have been observed (near Don Juan Pond in the Antarctic Dry Valleys) contains abundant CaCl2. These seasonal slope streaks are thought to form when CaCl2 in the soil deliquesces due to contact with atmospheric water vapor (Dickson et al., 2013). It is important to understand how this CaCl2 interacts with water vapor at low temperatures relevant to Mars and the Martian analog sites. Here we use a Raman microscope and environmental cell to monitor the low-temperature (223 - 273 K) deliquescence (solid to aqueous phase transition) and efflorescence (aqueous to solid phase transition) of three hydration states of CaCl2 (dihydrate, tetrahydrate, hexahydrate). We have found that the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) increases with increasing hydration state, which is an expected result. Average DRH values over the temperature range studied are 20.0 × 2.6% RH for the dihydrate, 31.8 × 6.3% RH for the tetrahydrate and 60.7 × 1.6% RH for the hexahydrate. Once the aqueous

  17. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Effect of Electrochemical Treatment in a Lithium Chloride Solution on Field Emission from Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Chun; Yuan, Guang; Gu, Chang-Zhi

    2009-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are electrochemically treated in a lithium chloride solution at a concentration 0.1 mol/L. The field emission properties of the CNTs are investigated at different temperatures before and after the electrochemical treatment. After treatment, the turn-on voltage to produce field emission current of 10 μA decreases from 4.2 kV to 2.7 kV and the field emission current increases distinctly, but the stability falls off. Based on the Fowler-Nordheim plot, the values of the work function for the CNTs are calculated, which reveals that work function decreases after the electrochemical treatment. These results are attributed to the decrease of the work function of the carbon nanotubes.

  18. Large-scale production of anhydrous nitric acid and nitric acid solutions of dinitrogen pentoxide

    DOEpatents

    Harrar, Jackson E.; Quong, Roland; Rigdon, Lester P.; McGuire, Raymond R.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for a large scale, electrochemical production of anhydrous nitric acid and N.sub.2 O.sub.5. The method includes oxidizing a solution of N.sub.2 O.sub.4 /aqueous-HNO.sub.3 at the anode, while reducing aqueous HNO.sub.3 at the cathode, in a flow electrolyzer constructed of special materials. N.sub.2 O.sub.4 is produced at the cathode and may be separated and recycled as a feedstock for use in the anolyte. The process is controlled by regulating the electrolysis current until the desired products are obtained. The chemical compositions of the anolyte and catholyte are monitored by measurement of the solution density and the concentrations of N.sub.2 O.sub.4.

  19. Chloride Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Addison disease, or increased salt intake. If both chloride and sodium levels are high in a person on a ... anything else I should know? Drugs that affect sodium blood levels will also cause changes in chloride. In addition, swallowing large amounts of baking soda ...

  20. Thermogravimetric Thin Aqueous Film Corrosion Studies of Alloy 22; Calcium Chloride Solutions at 150C and Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hailey, P; Gdoowski, G

    2002-11-12

    The extent of reaction of alloy-22 with limited amounts of aqueous calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) was investigated. Alloy-22 is a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-chromium-molybdenum-tungsten alloy. Specimens were polished to a mirror finish prior to aerosol salt deposition. An aqueous film was formed by deliquescence of deposited CaCl{sub 2} at 150 C and 22.5% relative humidity (RH). The reactant gas was a continuous flow of purified humidified laboratory air. The reaction progress as a function of time was continuously measured in-situ by a micro-balance. An initial weight gain due to deliquescence of the CaCl{sub 2} was observed. A steady weight loss was observed over the next 72 hours, after which no further weight change was observed. During this weight loss, white precipitates formed and the specimen's surface became visibly dry. The precipitate crystals were identified as Ca(OH){sub 2} by post-test Raman spectroscopy; however, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that there was a significant amount of chlorine contained in them.

  1. Electrical Transport and Grain Growth in Solution-Cast, Chloride-Terminated Cadmium Selenide Nanocrystal Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the evolution of electrical transport and grain size during the sintering of thin films spin-cast from soluble phosphine and amine-bound, chloride-terminated cadmium selenide nanocrystals. Sintering of the nanocrystals occurs in three distinct stages as the annealing temperature is increased: (1) reversible desorption of the organic ligands (≤150 °C), (2) irreversible particle fusion (200–300 °C), and (3) ripening of the grains to >5 nm domains (>200 °C). Grain growth occurs at 200 °C in films with 8 atom % Cl–, while films with 3 atom % Cl– resist growth until 300 °C. Fused nanocrystalline thin films (grain size = 4.5–5.5 nm) on thermally grown silicon dioxide gate dielectrics produce field-effect transistors with electron mobilities as high as 25 cm2/(Vs) and on/off ratios of 105 with less than 0.5 V hysteresis in threshold voltage without the addition of indium. PMID:24960255

  2. Mechanism and toxicity research of benzalkonium chloride oxidation in aqueous solution by H2O2/Fe(2+) process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Xia, Yu-Feng; Hong, Jun-Ming

    2016-09-01

    As widely used disinfectants, the pollution caused by benzalkonium chloride (BAC) has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Since it is not suitable for biodegradation, BAC was degraded firstly by Fenton advanced oxidation technologies (AOTs) in this research to enhance the biodegradability of the pollutions. The result revealed that the optimal molar ratio of H2O2/Fe(2+) for BAC degradation was 10:1, and the COD removal rate was 32 %. To clarify the pathway of degradation, the technique of GC-MS was implemented herein to identify intermediates and the toxicity of those BAC intermediates were also novelty tested through microbial fuel cells (MFC). The findings indicated that ten transformation products including benzyl dimethyl amine and dodecane were formed during the H2O2/Fe(2+) processes, which means the degradation pathway of BAC was initiated both on the hydrophobic (alkyl chain) and hydrophilic (benzyl and ammonium moiety) region of the surfactant. The toxicity of BAC before and after treated by Fenton process was monitored through MFC system. The electricity generation was improved 337 % after BAC was treated by H2O2/Fe(2+) oxidation processes which indicated that the toxicity of those intermediates were much lower than BAC. The mechanism and toxicity research in this paper could provide the in-depth understanding to the pathway of BAC degradation and proved the possibility of AOTs for the pretreatment of a biodegradation process. PMID:27250091

  3. A pulse radiolysis study of salicylic acid and 5-sulpho-salicylic acid in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Kamal; Mukherjee, T.

    2006-01-01

    Reactions of H, OH, eaq- and some one-electron oxidants have been studied with salicylic acid and 5-sulpho-salicylic acid in aqueous solutions. Rate constants for the reaction of eaq- with these compounds were of the order of 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and this reaction led to the formation of reducing radicals which could transfer electron to methyl viologen. Other one-electron reductants were not able to reduce these compounds. OH radicals reacted with these compounds by addition pathway with very high rate constants (>10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1) while O rad - radical anions could oxidize these molecules to give phenoxyl type of radicals. Amongst the one-electron oxidants, only N 3rad and SO 4rad - could oxidize salicylic acid while 5-sulpho-salicylic acid could be oxidized only by SO 4- radicals indicating that while one-electron reduction potential for semi-oxidized SA may be<1.33 V vs. NHE (the E o1 for N 3rad radical), it is more than 1.33 V vs. NHE for semi-oxidized SSA species.

  4. Uptake of Hypobromous Acid (HOBr) by Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions: Low-Temperature Solubility and Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Ashbourn, Samatha F. M.; Rammer, Thomas A.; Golden, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is a key species linking inorganic bromine to the chlorine and odd hydrogen chemical families. We have measured the solubility of HOBr in 45 - 70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol composition. Over the temperature range 201 - 252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, with an effective Henry's law coefficient, H* = 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 7) mol/L/atm. H* is inversely dependent on temperature, with Delta H = -46.2 kJ/mol and Delta S = -106.2 J/mol/K for 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions. Our study includes temperatures which overlap both previous measurements of HOBr solubility. For uptake into aqueous 45 wt% H2SO4, the solubility can be described by log H* = 3665/T - 10.63. For 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4, log H* = 2412/T - 5.55. At temperatures colder than approx. 213 K, the solubility of HOBr in 45 wt% H2SO4 is noticeably larger than in 70 wt% H2SO4. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols should contain equilibrium concentrations of HOBr which equal or exceed those of HBr. Our measurements indicate chemical reaction of HOBr upon uptake into aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases followed by evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2, particularly at 70 wt% H2SO4.

  5. Rhodamine-modified upconversion nanophosphors for ratiometric detection of hypochlorous acid in aqueous solution and living cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Pei, Wenbo; Wang, Chenyuan; Zhu, Jixin; Wu, Jiansheng; Yan, Qinyu; Huang, Ling; Huang, Wei; Yao, Cheng; Loo, Joachim Say Chye; Zhang, Qichun

    2014-09-10

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO) enzyme-mediated peroxidation of chloride ions, acts as a key microbicidal agent in immune systems. However, misregulated production of HOCl could damage host tissues and cause many inflammation-related diseases. Due to its biological importance, many efforts have been focused on developing fluorescent probes to image HOCl in living system. Compared with those conventional fluorescent probes, up-conversion luminescence (UCL) detection system has been proven to exhibit a lot of advantages including no photo-bleaching, higher light penetration depth, no autofluorescence and less damage to biosamples. Herein, we report a novel water-soluble organic-nano detection system based on rhodamine-modified UCNPs for UCL-sensing HOCl. Upon the interaction with HOCl, the green UCL emission intensity in the detection system were gradually decreased, but the emissions in the NIR region almost have no change, which is very important for the ratiometric UCL detection of HOCl in aqueous solution. More importantly, RBH1-UCNPs could be used for the ratiometric UCL visualization of HOCl released by MPO-mediated peroxidation of chloride ions in living cells. This organic-nano system could be further developed into a novel next-generation imaging technique for bio-imaging HOCl in living system without background noise. PMID:24497481

  6. Dietary sodium chloride intake independently predicts the degree of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis in healthy humans consuming a net acid-producing diet.

    PubMed

    Frassetto, Lynda A; Morris, R Curtis; Sebastian, Anthony

    2007-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that typical American net acid-producing diets predict a low-grade metabolic acidosis of severity proportional to the diet net acid load as indexed by the steady-state renal net acid excretion rate (NAE). We now investigate whether a sodium (Na) chloride (Cl) containing diet likewise associates with a low-grade metabolic acidosis of severity proportional to the sodium chloride content of the diet as indexed by the steady-state Na and Cl excretion rates. In the steady-state preintervention periods of our previously reported studies comprising 77 healthy subjects, we averaged in each subject three to six values of blood hydrogen ion concentration ([H]b), plasma bicarbonate concentration ([HCO(3)(-)]p), the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Pco(2)), the urinary excretion rates of Na, Cl, NAE, and renal function as measured by creatinine clearance (CrCl), and performed multivariate analyses. Dietary Cl strongly correlated positively with dietary Na (P < 0.001) and was an independent negative predictor of [HCO(3)(-)]p after adjustment for diet net acid load, Pco(2) and CrCl, and positive and negative predictors, respectively, of [H]b and [HCO(3)(-)]p after adjustment for diet acid load and Pco(2). These data provide the first evidence that, in healthy humans, the diet loads of NaCl and net acid independently predict systemic acid-base status, with increasing degrees of low-grade hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis as the loads increase. Assuming a causal relationship, over their respective ranges of variation, NaCl has approximately 50-100% of the acidosis-producing effect of the diet net acid load.

  7. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7773-01-5) is a pink... manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore in hydrochloric acid. The...

  8. Extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from nitric acid solutions by di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid dissolved in kerosene.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Sheng; Tsai, Teh-Hua

    2012-01-04

    The extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from a nitric acid solution using di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as an acidic extractant of organophosphorus compounds dissolved in kerosene was studied. By graphical and numerical analysis, the compositions of indium-D2EHPA complexes in organic phase and stoichiometry of the extraction reaction were examined. Nitric acid solutions with various indium concentrations at 25 °C were used to obtain the equilibrium constant of InR₃ in the organic phase. The experimental results showed that the extraction distribution ratios of indium(III) between the organic phase and the aqueous solution increased when either the pH value of the aqueous solution and/or the concentration of the organic phase extractant increased. Finally, the recovery efficiency of indium(III) in nitric acid was measured.

  9. Unsaturated fatty acids in alkane solution: adsorption to steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Sarah M; Persson, Karin; Mueller, Gregor; Kronberg, Bengt; Clarke, Jim; Chtaib, Mohammed; Claesson, Per M

    2007-10-01

    The adsorption of the unsaturated fatty acids oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acid on steel surfaces has been investigated by means of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Two different solvents were used, n-hexadecane and its highly branched isomer, viz., 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane. The area occupied per molecule of oleic acid at 1 wt % corresponds to what is needed for adsorption parallel to the surface. At the same concentration, the adsorbed amount of linoleic acid and linolenic acid indicates that they adsorb in multilayers. The chemisorbed amount estimated from static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) measurements was found to be similar for the three unsaturated fatty acids. In the case of linolenic acid, it was found that the presence of water significantly alters the adsorption, most likely because of the precipitation of fatty acid/water aggregates. Furthermore, static SIMS results indicate that the amount of water used here inhibits the chemisorption of linolenic acid.

  10. Application of cyanuric chloride-based six new chiral derivatizing reagents having amino acids and amino acid amides as chiral auxiliaries for enantioresolution of proteinogenic amino acids by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Ravi; Dixit, Shuchi

    2012-04-01

    Six dichloro-s-triazine (DCT) reagents having L-Leu, D-Phg, L-Val, L-Met, L-Ala and L-Met-NH(2) as chiral auxiliaries in cyanuric chloride were introduced for enantioseparation of 13 proteinogenic amino acids. Four other DCTs and six monochloro-s-triazine (MCT) reagents having amino acid amides as chiral auxiliaries were also synthesized. These 16 chiral derivatizing reagents (CDRs) were used for synthesis of diastereomers of all the 13 analytes using microwave irradiation, which were resolved by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) using C18 column and gradient eluting mixture of aqueous TFA and acetonitrile with UV detection at 230 nm. It required only 60-90 s for derivatization using microwave irradiation. Better resolution and lower retention times were observed for the diastereomers prepared with CDRs having amino acids as chiral auxiliaries as compared to counterparts prepared with reagents having amino acid amides as chiral auxiliaries. As the best resolution of all the 13 analytes was observed for their diastereomers prepared using the DCT reagent having L-Leu as chiral auxiliary, this CDR was further employed for derivatization of Lys, Tyr, His and Arg followed by RP-HPLC analysis of resulting diastereomers. The results are discussed in light of acid and amide groups of chiral auxiliaries constituting CDRs, electronegativities of the atoms of achiral moieties constituting CDRs and hydrophobicities of side chains of amino acids constituting CDRs and analytes.

  11. The rare earth element geochemistry of acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride geothermal systems from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Anita J.; Palmer, Martin R.; Sturchio, Neil C.; Kemp, Anthony J.

    1997-02-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations have been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) in acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride waters and the associated sinters and volcanic rocks from the Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA, geothermal system. REE concentrations in the volcanic rocks range from 222 to 347 ppm; their chondite-normalised REE patterns are typical of upper continental crust, with LREE > HREE and negative Eu anomalies. Total REE concentrations in the fluids range from 3 to 1133 nmol kg -1 (≥ 162 ppm), and ΣREE concentrations in sinter are ≥ 181 ppm. REE abundances and patterns in drill core material from YNP indicate some REE mobility. Normalisation of REE concentrations in altered Lava Creek Tuff (LCT) from Y-12 drill core to REE concentrations in fresh LCT indicate that the REE overall have been depleted with the exception of Eu, which has been decoupled from the REE series and concentrated in the altered rocks. Relative to the host rocks the REE patterns of the fluids are variably depleted in HREEs and LREEs, and usually have a pronounced positive Eu anomaly. This decoupling of Eu from the REE suite suggests that (1) Eu has been preferentially removed either from the host rock glass or from the host rock minerals, or (2) the waters are from a high temperature or reducing environment where Eu 2+ is more soluble than the trivalent REEs. Since the latter is inconsistent with production of acid-sulphate springs in a low temperature, oxidising near-surface environment, we suggest that the positive Eu anomalies in the fluids result from preferential dissolution of a Eu-rich phase in the host rock. Spatial and temporal variations in major element chemistry and pH of the springs sampled from Norris Geyser Basin and Crater Hills accompany variations in REE concentrations and patterns of individual geothermal springs. These are possibly related to changes in subsurface plumbing, which results in variations in

  12. Influence of heterocyclic anils on corrosion inhibition and hydrogen permeation through mild steel in acid chloride environments

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A. Khan, M.A.W.; Ajmal, M.; Muralidharan, S.; Iyer, S.V.

    1997-06-01

    The heterocyclic anils 2-salicylideneaminobenzothiazole (SABT), 2-salicylideneamino-6-methoxybenzothiazole (SAMEOBT) were investigated to evaluate their efficiency as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel (MS) in 1 M hydrochloric acid at concentrations from 100 ppm to 500 ppm and temperatures from 35 C to 60 C. SACLBT performed best, giving an inhibition efficiency as high as 98% even at a very low concentration and higher temperature. Potentiodynamic polarization studies showed inhibition was under cathodic control. These compounds reduced hydrogen permeation through MS in 1 M HCl solution. Adsorption on the MS surface followed Temkin`s adsorption isotherms. Surface analysis of the MS surface exposed with SACLBT proved adsorption of this compound on the surface occurred through interaction of lone pairs of nitrogen, sulfur, and chlorine atoms with the metal surface.

  13. XAFS measurements on zinc chloride aqueous solutions from ambient to supercritical conditions using the diamond anvil cell

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    1999-01-01

    The structure and bonding properties of metal complexes in subcritical and supercritical fluids are still largely unknown. Conventional high pressure and temperature cell designs impose considerable limitations on the pressure, temperature, and concentration of metal salts required for measurements on solutions under supercritical conditions. In this study, we demonstrate the first application of the diamond anvil cell, specially designed for x-ray absorption studies of first-row transition metal ions in supercritical fluids. Zn K-edge XAFS spectra were measured from aqueous solutions of 1-2m ZnCl2 and up to 6m NaCl, at temperatures ranging from 25-660 ??C and pressures up to 800 MPa. Our results indicate that the ZnCl42- complex is predominant in the 1m ZnCl2/6m NaCl solution, while ZnCl2(H2O)2 is similarly predominant in the 2m ZnCl2 solution, at all temperatures and pressures. The Zn-Cl bond length of both types of chlorozinc(II) complexes was found to decrease at a rate of about 0.01 A??/100 ??C.

  14. Isothermal heat measurements of TBP-nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; Cavin, W.S.

    1994-12-16

    Net heats of reaction were measured in an isothermal calorimeter for both single phase (organic) and two phase (organic and aqueous) TBP/HNO{sub 3} reacting solutions at temperatures above 100 C. The oxidation rate constant was determined to be 5.4E-4 min{sup {minus}1} at 110 C for an open ``vented`` system as compared to 1.33 E-3 min{sup {minus}1} in the closed system. The heat released per unit material oxidized was also reduced. The oxidation in both phases was found to be first order in nitric acid and pseudo-zero order in butylnitrate and water. The hydrolysis (esterification) rate constant determined by Nichols` (1.33E-3 min{sup {minus}1}) fit the experimental data from this work well. Forced evaporation of the volatile components by the product gases from oxidation resulted in a cooling mechanism which more than balanced the heat from the oxidation reaction in the two-phased systems. Rate expressions were derived and rate constants determined for both the single and two phase systems. An approximating mathematical model was developed to fit the experimental data and to extrapolate beyond the experimental conditions. This model shows that one foot of ``reacting`` 14.3M HNO{sub 3} aqueous phase solution at 121 C will transport sufficient water to the organic phase to replace evaporative losses, maintaining endothermicity, for organic layers up to 12.2 + 6.0 feet deep. If the pressure in a reacting system is allowed to increase due to insufficient venting the temperature of the organic phase would increase in temperature to reach a new equilibrium. The rate of oxidation would increase not only due to the increase in temperature but also from the increased concentration of dissolved HNO{sub 3} reduction products. Another important factor is that the cooling system described in this work becomes less effective as the total pressure increases. These factors probably contributed to the explosion at Tomsk.

  15. Effect of citric acid on the acidification of artificial pepsin solution for metacercariae isolation from fish.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ki; Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Young-Sang; Chun, Hyang Sook; Park, Ki Hwan; Ko, Seong-Hee; Chai, Jong-Yil; Shin, Eun-Hee

    2013-11-15

    Artificial digestive solution based on pepsin is essential for collecting metacercariae from fish. To promote the enzymatic reactivity of pepsin, the pH of the solution has to be adjusted to pH 1.0-2.0. Hydrochloride (HCl) is usually used for this purpose, but the use of HCl raises safety concerns. The aim of this work was to address the usefulness of citric acid as an alternative for HCl for the acidification of pepsin solution, and to examine its potential to damage metacercariae during in vitro digestion as compared with HCl. Changes in pH after adding 1-9% of citric acid (m/v) to pepsin solution were compared to a 1% HCl (v/v) addition. Digestion of fish muscle was evaluated by measuring released protein concentrations by spectrophotometry. In addition, survival rates of metacercariae in pepsin solution were determined at different citric acid concentrations and were compared that of with 1% HCl. The present study shows that addition of citric acid reduced the pH of pepsin solutions to the required level. Addition of more than 5% of citric acid resulted in the effective digestion of fish muscle over 3h in vitro, and 5% citric acid was less lethal to metacercariae than 1% HCl in pepsin solution. Pepsin solution containing 5% citric acid had digestive capacity superior to pepsin solution containing 1% HCl after 3h incubation with released protein concentrations of 12.0 ng/ml for 5% citric acid and 9.6 ng/ml for 1% HCl. Accordingly, the present study suggests that the addition of 5% citric acid to pepsin solution is a good alternative to 1% HCl in infection studies because citric acid is a stable at room temperature and has a good safety profile. In addition, we suggest that the use of citric acid enables the preparation of commercial digestive solutions for the detection of microorganisms in fish and other vertebrate muscle tissue.

  16. Electrochemical behavior and corrosion resistance of Ti-15Mo alloy in naturally-aerated solutions, containing chloride and fluoride ions.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A V; Oliveira, N T C; dos Santos, M L; Guastaldi, A C

    2015-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior and corrosion resistance of Ti-15Mo alloy to applications as biomaterials in solutions 0.15 mol L(-1) Ringer, 0.15 mol L(-1) Ringer plus 0.036 mol L(-1) NaF and 0.036 mol L(-1) NaF (containing 1,500 ppm of fluoride ions, F(-)) were investigated using open-circuit potential, cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope. Corrosion resistance and electrochemical stability of the Ti-15Mo alloy decreased in solutions containing F(-) ions. In all cases, there were formation and growth of TiO2 and MoO3 (a protector film), not being observed pitting corrosion, which might enable Ti-15Mo alloys to be used as biomedical implant, at least in the studied conditions, since the electrochemical stability and corrosion resistance of the passive films formed are necessary conditions for osseointegration.

  17. Study of caffeine as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solehudin, Agus; Berman, Ega Taqwali; Nurdin, Isdiriayani

    2015-09-01

    The corrosion behaviour of steel surface in the absence and presence of caffeine in 3.5% NaCl solution containing dissolved H2S gas is studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H2S at different caffeine concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of caffeine concentrations from 0 to 0,1 mmol/l. Whereas, the corrosion rate increase with increasing of caffeine concentrations from 1 to 10 mmol/l. It is clear that no inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitor concentration. The optimum value of inhibition efficiency was 90% at a caffeine concentration of 0.1 mmol/l. This suggests that caffeine's performance as a corrosion inhibitor is more effective at a concentration of 0.1 mmol/l.

  18. Effect of weak acid hypochlorous solution on selected viruses and bacteria of laboratory rodents.

    PubMed

    Taharaguchi, Motoko; Takimoto, Kazuhiro; Zamoto-Niikura, Aya; Yamada, Yasuko K

    2014-01-01

    Weak acid hypochlorous solution (WAHS) is known to have efficacy for inactivating pathogens and to be relatively safe with respect to the live body. Based on these advantages, many animal facilities have recently been introducing WAHS for daily cleaning of animal houses. In this study, we determined the effect of WAHS in inactivating specific pathogens of laboratory rodents and pathogens of opportunistic infection. WAHS with an actual chloride concentration of 60 ppm and a pH value of 6.0 was generated using purpose-built equipment. One volume of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), Sendai virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Pasteurella pneumotropica, Corynebacterium kutscheri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was mixed with 9 or 99 volumes of WAHS (×10 and ×100 reaction) for various periods (0.5, 1, and 5 min) at 25°C. After incubation, the remaining infectious viruses and live bacteria were determined by plaque assay or culture. In the ×100 reaction mixture, infectious viruses and live bacteria could not be detected for any of the pathogens examined even with the 0.5-min incubation. However, the effects for MHV, B. bronchiseptica, and P. aeruginosa were variable in the ×10 reaction mixture with the 0.5- and 1-min incubations. Sufficient effects were obtained by elongation of the reaction time to 5 min. In the case of MHV, reducing organic substances in the virus stock resulted in the WAHS being completely effective. WAHS is recommended for daily cleaning in animal facilities but should be used properly in order to obtain a sufficient effect, which includes such things as using a large enough volume to reduce effects of organic substances. PMID:24770639

  19. Ultrasonic degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Dükkanci, M; Gündüz, G

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes the ultrasonic degradation of oxalic acid. The effects of ultrasonic power, H(2)O(2), NaCl, external gases on the degradation of oxalic acid were investigated. Reactor flask containing oxalic acid was immersed in the ultrasonic bath with water as the coupling fluid. Representative samples withdrawn were analysed by volumetric titration. Degradation degree of oxalic acid increased with increasing ultrasonic power. It was observed that H(2)O(2) has negative contribution on the degradation of oxalic acid and there was an optimum concentration of NaCl for enhancing the degradation degree of oxalic acid. Although bubbling nitrogen gave higher degradation than that for bubbling air, both gases (for 20 min before sonication and during sonication together) could not help to enhance the degradation of oxalic acid when compared with the degradation without gas passage. PMID:16352455

  20. Synergistic effects in solvent-extraction systems based on alkylsalicylic acids. III. Extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and yttrium from chloride media in the presence of dialkyl and diaryl sulphoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, J.S.; Preez, A.C. du

    1996-08-01

    Dialkyl and diaryl sulphoxides were found to cause synergistic shifts in the pH{sub 50} values for the extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and yttrium from sodium chloride media by solutions of alkylsalicylic acids in xylene. The extent of the synergistic shift for a given sulphoxide increases with increasing steric bulk of the alkylsalicylic acid used. With the homologous series of dialkyl sulphoxides R{sub 2}SO, where R = n-butyl, n-hexyl, and n-octyl, there is little variation in the size of the synergistic shift for a given alkylsalicylic acid. For a series of sulphoxides containing similar numbers of carbon atoms, the extent of the shift increases with the introduction of alicyclic rings, but decreases when aromatic rings are introduced, for example, in the order of R: cyclohexyl > n-hexyl > phenyl, although the effect is not very marked. For a given extractant mixture, the pH{sub 50} values decrease from lanthanum to samarium and then increase from samarium to lutetium. The separation between the pH{sub 50} values for lanthanum and lutetium increases with increasing steric bulk of both the alkylsalicylic acid (HA) and the sulphoxide (L), but the separations between adjacent lanthanides are in all cases too small to be of any practical use. Slope-analysis treatment of metal-distribution data, and measurements of the solubility of the neodymium-alkylsalicylic acid complex in xylene solutions of the sulphoxides are consistent with the extraction of a mixed-ligand complex of the type NdA{sub 3}L{sub 2}. 22 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Effect of sodium chloride and citric acid on growth and toxin production by A. caviae and A. sobria at moderate and low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ghazaleh, B M

    2000-10-01

    The effect of sodium chloride and citric acid on hemolysin and caseinase production by Aeromonas caviae and Aeromonas sobria at 32 degrees C and 5 degrees C was investigated. At 32 degrees C, although both strains were tolerant to 3% NaCl in TSB, the production of caseinase was decreased in the presence of 1-3% NaCl, and the production of hemolysin was abolished by 2-3% NaCl. Citric acid (0.03%) was less effective than NaCl in reducing hemolysin and caseinase production by both strains at 32 degrees C. A combination of low temperature (5 degrees C) and citric acid treatment reduced hemolysin and caseinase production by both strains. A combination of low temperature (5 degrees C) and NaCl (3%) treatment was the most effective procedure in reducing growth and hemolysin and caseinase production by the tested strains.

  2. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  3. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  4. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  5. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  6. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  7. Mathematical modeling of cadmium(II) solvent extraction from neutral and acidic chloride media using Cyanex 923 extractant as a metal carrier.

    PubMed

    Leopold, A A; Coll, M T; Fortuny, A; Rathore, N S; Sastre, A M

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes experimental work and the mathematical modeling of solvent extraction of cadmium(II) from neutral and acidic aqueous chloride media with a Cyanex 923 extractant in Exxol D-100. Solvent extraction experiments were carried out to analyze the influence of variations in the composition of the aqueous and organic phases on the efficiency of cadmium(II) extraction. In neutral and acidic chloride conditions, the extraction of cadmium(II) by the organophosphorous extractant Cyanex 923 (L) is based on the solvation mechanism of neutral H(n)CdCl((2+n)) species and the formation of H(n)CdCl((2+n))L(q) complexes in the organic phase, where n=0, 1, 2 and q=1, 2. The mathematical model of cadmium(II) extraction was derived from the mass balances and chemical equilibria involved in the separation system. The model was computed with the Matlab software. The equilibrium parameters for metal extraction, i.e. the stability constants of the aqueous Cd-Cl complexes, the formation constants of the acidic Cd-Cl species and the metal equilibrium extraction constants, were proposed. The optimized constants were appropriate, as there was good agreement when the model was fitted to the experimental data for each of the experiments.

  8. Chemical evaluation of soil-solution in acid forest soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    Soil-solution chemistry is commonly studied in forests through the use of soil lysimeters.This approach is impractical for regional survey studies, however, because lysimeter installation and operation is expensive and time consuming. To address these problems, a new technique was developed to compare soil-solution chemistry among red spruce stands in New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine. Soil solutions were expelled by positive air pressure from soil that had been placed in a sealed cylinder. Before the air pressure was applied, a solution chemically similar to throughfall was added to the soil to bring it to approximate field capacity. After the solution sample was expelled, the soil was removed from the cylinder and chemically analyzed. The method was tested with homogenized Oa and Bs horizon soils collected from a red spruce stand in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, a red spruce stand in east-central Vermont, and a mixed hardwood stand in the Catskill Mountains of New York. Reproducibility, effects of varying the reaction time between adding throughfall and expelling soil solution (5-65 minutes) and effects of varying the chemical composition of added throughfall, were evaluated. In general, results showed that (i) the method was reproducible (coefficients of variation were generally < 15%), (ii) variations in the length of reaction-time did not affect expelled solution concentrations, and (iii) adding and expelling solution did not cause detectable changes in soil exchange chemistry. Concentrations of expelled solutions varied with the concentrations of added throughfall; the lower the CEC, the more sensitive expelled solution concentrations were to the chemical concentrations of added throughfall. Addition of a tracer (NaBr) showed that the expelled solution was a mixture of added solution and solution that preexisted in the soil. Comparisons of expelled solution concentrations with concentrations of soil solutions collected by zero-tension and

  9. Evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in an alkaline NaCl solution with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate and lanthanum chloride inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Biner; Wang, Yishan; Zuo, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in 0.58 g L-1 NaCl solution (pH 10) with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) and lanthanum chloride inhibitors was studied with electrochemical and surface analysis methods. With the addition of the compounded LaCl3 and SDBS inhibitors, in the early stage the polarization behavior of AA 2024-T3 changed from active corrosion to passivation, and both the general corrosion and pitting corrosion were inhibited. However, with the immersion time extended, the passive behavior gradually disappeared and pitting happened at the Cu-rich phases. After 24 h immersion, the compounded inhibitors still showed good inhibition for general corrosion, but the polarization curve again presented the characteristic similar to active polarization. The compounded inhibitors also inhibited the pitting corrosion to some extent. The acting mechanism of the inhibitors SDBS and La3Cl on the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in the test solution was discussed.

  10. A simple, efficient and environmentally benign synthetic protocol for the synthesis of spirooxindoles using choline chloride-oxalic acid eutectic mixture as catalyst/solvent system.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Sarita; Rajawat, Anshu; Tailor, Yogesh Kumar; Kumar, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    An efficient and environmentally benign domino protocol has been presented for the synthesis of structurally diverse spirooxindoles spiroannulated with pyranopyridopyrimidines, indenopyridopyrimidines, and chromenopyridopyrimidines involving three-component reaction of aminouracils, isatins and cyclic carbonyl compounds in deep eutectic solvent (choline chloride-oxalic acid: 1:1) which acts as efficient catalyst and environmentally benign reaction medium. The present protocol offers several advantages such as operational simplicity with easy workup, shorter reaction times excellent yields with superior atom economy and environmentally benign reaction conditions with the use of cost-effective, recyclable, non-toxic and bio-degradable DES as catalyst/solvent.

  11. A simple, efficient and environmentally benign synthetic protocol for the synthesis of spirooxindoles using choline chloride-oxalic acid eutectic mixture as catalyst/solvent system.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Sarita; Rajawat, Anshu; Tailor, Yogesh Kumar; Kumar, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    An efficient and environmentally benign domino protocol has been presented for the synthesis of structurally diverse spirooxindoles spiroannulated with pyranopyridopyrimidines, indenopyridopyrimidines, and chromenopyridopyrimidines involving three-component reaction of aminouracils, isatins and cyclic carbonyl compounds in deep eutectic solvent (choline chloride-oxalic acid: 1:1) which acts as efficient catalyst and environmentally benign reaction medium. The present protocol offers several advantages such as operational simplicity with easy workup, shorter reaction times excellent yields with superior atom economy and environmentally benign reaction conditions with the use of cost-effective, recyclable, non-toxic and bio-degradable DES as catalyst/solvent. PMID:25329839

  12. Convergent access to polycyclic cyclopentanoids from α,β-unsaturated acid chlorides and alkynes through a reductive coupling, nazarov cyclization sequence.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Jason H; Jackson, Kristal; White, Jonathan M; Flynn, Bernard L

    2014-04-18

    Reductive coupling of α,β-unsaturated acid chlorides A with alkynoyls B provides convergent access to Nazarov cyclization precursors, α-carboxy divinyl ketones C. Cyclization of C gives an intermediate oxyallyl cation intermediate D, which can be trapped with tethered arenes (Ar). The resultant products can be further cyclized through nucleophilic displacement of suitable leaving groups X by tethered OH groups to give lactones (in a subsequent step). Where X is a suitable chiral auxiliary (e.g., oxazolidinone) this strategy affords access to homochiral cyclopentanoids. PMID:24697736

  13. A high-salinity solution with calcium chloride enables RNase-free, easy plasmid isolation within 55 minutes.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Noboru; Koebis, Michinori; Yonemura, Yoji; Mitsuhashi, Hiroaki; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2013-12-01

    We dramatically improved a plasmid-isolation protocol based on the popular alkaline-sodium dodecyl sulfate plasmid isolation method. Our modified method provides significant time and cost savings. We used a modified solution during the neutralization step, which allowed us to skip several subsequent handling steps, saving a great amount of time. The plasmids purified by this method were of high quality, and the optical density ratio 260 and 280 was approximately 1.8. Plasmid DNA isolated by our method was of sufficient quality to perform subsequent restriction enzyme cuts and other downstream experiments, including budding yeast transformation, cultured cell transfection, and Caenorhabditis elegans injection experiments.

  14. Vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R

    1999-01-01

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is an important plastic resin for construction, pipe and tubing, siding, and other uses. Exposures to vinyl chloride monomer during the early years of production resulted in an important sentinel health event: the recognition of an excess of a rare liver cancer, hepatic angiosarcoma, at facilities throughout the world. Several other syndromes, including acro-osteolysis, also have been associated with PVC, but less clearly with vinyl chloride. Extensive research ranging from large-scale epidemiologic studies to biomarker research into molecular mechanisms continues to provide valuable insight into the pathogenesis of occupational cancer.

  15. Effect of Microstructure on the Electrochemical Behavior of Ti-10 Mass% Mn Alloys in High Chloride Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Toshiyasu

    2016-02-01

    The effect of microstructure on the corrosion of heat-treated Ti-10 mass% Mn alloys was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 10% NaCl solution of pH 0.5 at 97 °C. Sample of solution heat treatment (ST) had a single β phase, and samples subjected to the aging heat treatment at 600 °C had α phase precipitation in β phases. The EIS measurements showed that the corrosion resistance of the aging heat-treated samples showed lower values than ST sample, however, much higher values than pure Ti. Thus, Mn was effective to increase the corrosion resistance of Ti alloys. Laser micrographs of heat-treated samples indicated that α phase was selectively corroded and made the pit after the corrosion test. The transmission electron microscope (TEM)-energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDXS) analyses showed that the Mn content was 9 mass% in the β phase and 0.7 mass% in α phase. Hence, it was understood that less-Mn α phase was selectively corroded in the corrosion test. However, as compared with pure Ti, the aging heat-treated samples showed much higher resistance against the corrosion by the 0.7 mass% Mn in α phase. Finally, it was concluded that it was possible to keep the high corrosion resistance for heat-treated Ti-10 mass% Mn alloy by controlling the microstructure of α phase.

  16. Adsorption equilibria between liposome membrane formed of phosphatidylcholine and aqueous sodium chloride solution as a function of pH.

    PubMed

    Kotyńska, J; Figaszewski, Z A

    2005-12-30

    The effect has been studied of the adsorption of ions (H(+), Na(+), OH(-), Cl(-)) which are present in solution upon the electric charge of the liposome membrane formed of phosphatidylcholine (PC). The surface charge density of the membrane was determined as a function of pH and electrolyte concentration from electrophoretic mobility measurements. The measurements were carried out by the laser-Doppler microelectrophoresis method. A four-equilibria model has been proposed to describe the phenomena occurring on the membrane surface. The equilibria in which the adsorption of other ions on the liposome membrane surface was involved were assumed to exist beside the equilibria in which the H(+) and OH(-) ions were engaged. The idea was confirmed by mathematical calculations. Association constants of the liposome membrane surface with ions of solution (K(AH), K(ANa), K(BOH), K(BCl)) were determined. The proposed model has been proved to be correct by comparing the resulting theoretic charge variation curves of the lecithin membrane with the experimental data.

  17. The ototoxic effect of boric acid solutions applied into the middle ear of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Oztürkcan, Sedat; Dündar, Riza; Katilmis, Hüseyin; Ilknur, Ali Ekber; Aktaş, Sinem; Haciömeroğlu, Senem

    2009-05-01

    This study analyzed the ototoxic effects of boric acid solutions. Boric acid solutions have been used as otologic preparations for many years. Boric acid is commonly found in solutions prepared with alcohol or distilled water but can also be found in a powder form. These preparations are used for both their antiseptic and acidic qualities in external and middle ear infections. We investigated the ototoxic effect of boric acid solutions on guinea pigs. We are unaware of any similar, previously published study of this subject in English. The study was conducted on 28 young albino guinea pigs. Prior to application of the boric acid solution under general anesthesia, an Auditory Brainstem Response (ABRs) test was applied to the right ear of the guinea pigs. Following the test, a perforation was created on the tympanic membrane of the right ear of each guinea pig and small gelfoam pieces were inserted into the perforated area. Test solutions were administered to the middle ear for 10 days by means of a transcanal route. Fifteen days after inserting the gelfoams in all of the guinea pigs, we anasthesized the guinea pigs and removed the gelfoams from the perforated region of the ear and then performed an ABRs on each guinea pig. The ABRs were within the normal range before the applications. After the application, no significant changes were detected in the ABRs thresholds in neither the saline group nor the group administered boric acid and distilled water solution; however, significant changes were detected in the ABRs thresholds of the Gentamicine and boric acid and alcohol solution groups. We believe that a 4% boric acid solution prepared with distilled water can be a more reliable preparation than a 4% boric acid solution prepared with alcohol.

  18. The standard enthalpies of formation of crystalline N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid and its aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernyavskaya, N. V.; Volkov, A. V.; Nikol'Skii, V. M.

    2007-07-01

    The energy of combustion of N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid (CMAA) was determined by bomb calorimetry in oxygen. The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of crystalline N-(carboxymethyl)aspartic acid were calculated. The heat effects of solution of crystalline CMAA in water and a solution of sodium hydroxide were measured at 298.15 K by direct calorimetry. The standard enthalpies of formation of CMAA and its dissociation products in aqueous solution were determined.

  19. A new electrochemical noise technique for monitoring the localized corrosion of 304 stainless steel in chloride-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Benish, M.L.; Sikora, J.; Shaw, B.; Sikora, E.; Yaffe, M.; Krebs, A.; Martinchek, G.

    1998-12-31

    A new electrochemical noise technique was developed to investigate metastable pitting by applying a bias potential between two nominally identical working electrodes. The current flowing between the biased working electrodes was measured with a zero resistance ammeter. Potential was measured between one working electrode and a reference electrode. These tests were conducted using 304 stainless steel working electrodes in a 0.5 M NaCl + borate buffer solution. A bias potential of 150 to 200 mV was used to localize the anodic and cathodic reactions to their respective electrodes. The noise signal was significantly affected by conditioning the electrodes at open circuit. When the electrodes were conditioned for several days, the breakdown potential increased, and the frequency and magnitude of the current transients increased. However, when the conditioning time was increased to a month, all metastable pitting transients disappeared, indicating an enhanced passive film.

  20. Solution properties and taste behavior of lactose monohydrate in aqueous ascorbic acid solutions at different temperatures: Volumetric and rheological approach.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Sinha, Biswajit

    2016-11-15

    The densities and viscosities of lactose monohydrate in aqueous ascorbic acid solutions with several molal concentrations m=(0.00-0.08)molkg(-1) of ascorbic acid were determined at T=(298.15-318.15)K and pressure p=101kPa. Using experimental data apparent molar volume (ϕV), standard partial molar volume (ϕV(0)), the slope (SV(∗)), apparent specific volumes (ϕVsp), standard isobaric partial molar expansibility (ϕE(0)) and its temperature dependence [Formula: see text] the viscosity B-coefficient and solvation number (Sn) were determined. Viscosity B-coefficients were further employed to obtain the free energies of activation of viscous flow per mole of the solvents (Δμ1(0≠)) and of the solute (Δμ2(0≠)). Effects of molality, solute structure and temperature and taste behavior were analyzed in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions; results revealed that the solutions are characterized predominantly by solute-solvent interactions and lactose monohydrate behaves as a long-range structure maker. PMID:27283672

  1. Solvent Extraction of Tellurium from Chloride Solutions Using Tri-n-butyl Phosphate: Conditions and Thermodynamic Data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongchan; Guo, Yafei; Deng, Tianlong; Chen, Yu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The extractive separation of tellurium (IV) from hydrochloric acid media with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) in kerosene was investigated. The dependence on the extraction of tellurium species, concentrations of tellurium and TBP, extraction time and stage, organic/aqueous ratio, and interferences from coexist metallic ions were examined and are discussed. Besides, the stripping agent and stripping time were also studied. It was found that the extraction reaction corresponds to the neutral complex formation mechanism and the extracted species is TeCl4·3TBP and that the extraction process is exothermic. The thermodynamic parameters of enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS), and free energy (ΔG) of the extraction process were evaluated at −26.2 kJ·mol−1, −65.6 J·mol−1·K−1, and −7.0 kJ·mol−1, respectively at 293 K. PMID:24757422

  2. Sucrose and KF quenching system for solution phase parallel synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Sunil; Watpade, Rahul; Toche, Raghunath

    2016-01-01

    The KF, sucrose (table sugar) exploited as quenching system in solution phase parallel synthesis. Excess of electrophiles were covalently trapped with hydroxyl functionality of sucrose and due to polar nature of sucrose derivative was solubilize in water. Potassium fluoride used to convert various excess electrophilic reagents such as acid chlorides, sulfonyl chlorides, isocyanates to corresponding fluorides, which are less susceptible for hydrolysis and subsequently sucrose traps these fluorides and dissolves them in water thus removing them from reaction mixture. Various excess electrophilic reagents such as acid chlorides, sulfonyl chlorides, and isocyanates were quenched successfully to give pure products in excellent yields. PMID:27462506

  3. Effect of bicarbonate ion additives on pitting corrosion of type 316L stainless steel in aqueous 0.5 M sodium chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.J.; Pyun, S.I.; Lee, W.J.; Kim, H.P.

    1999-04-01

    The effect of bicarbonate ions (HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) on pitting corrosion of type 316L stainless steel (SS, UNS S3 1603) was investigated in aqueous 0.5 M sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using potentiodynamic polarization, the abrading electrode technique, alternating current (AC) impedance spectroscopy combined with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Addition of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions to NaCl solutions extended the passive potential region in width and, at the same time, raised the pitting potential in value on the potentiodynamic polarization curve. Potentiostatic current transients obtained from the moment just after interrupting the abrading action showed the repassivation rate of propagating pits increased and that the pit growth rate decreased with increasing HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ion concentration. Over the whole applied potential, the oxide film resistance was higher in the presence of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions. The pit number density decreased with increasing HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ion concentration. Moreover, addition of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions to NaCl solutions retarded lateral pit growth, while promoting downward pit growth from the surface. The bare surface of the specimen repassivated preferentially along the pit mouth and walls, compared to the pit bottom, as a result of formation of a surface film with a high content of protective mixed ferrous-chromous carbonate ([Fe,Cr]CO{sub 3}) that formed from preferential adsorption of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions.

  4. Biosorption of acidic textile dyestuffs from aqueous solution by Paecilomyces sp. isolated from acidic mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Çabuk, Ahmet; Aytar, Pınar; Gedikli, Serap; Özel, Yasemin Kevser; Kocabıyık, Erçin

    2013-07-01

    Removal of textile dyestuffs from aqueous solution by biosorption onto a dead fungal biomass isolated from acidic mine drainage in the Çanakkale Region of Turkey was investigated. The fungus was found to be a promising biosorbent and identified as Paecilomyces sp. The optimal conditions for bioremediation were as follows: pH, 2.0; initial dyestuff concentration, 50 mg l(-1) for Reactive Yellow 85 and Reactive Orange 12, and 75 mg l(-1) for Reactive Black 8; biomass dosage, 2 g l(-1) for Reactive Yellow 85, 3 g l(-1) for Reactive Orange 12, 4 g l(-1) for Reactive Black 8; temperature, 25 °C; and agitation rate, 100 rpm. Zeta potential measurements indicated an electrostatic interaction between the binding sites and dye anions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that amine, hydroxyl, carbonyl, and amide bonds were involved in the dyestuff biosorption. A toxicity investigation was also carried out before and after the biosorption process. These results showed that the toxicities for the reactive dyestuffs in aqueous solutions after biosorption studies decreased. The Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models were used for the mathematical description of the biosorption equilibrium, and isotherm constants were evaluated for each dyestuff. Equilibrium data of biosorption of RY85 and RO12 dyestuffs fitted well to both models at the studied concentration and temperature.

  5. Moessbauer spectroscopy study on the corrosion resistance of plasma nitrided ASTM F138 stainless steel in chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, S.D. de; Olzon-Dionysio, M.; Basso, R.L.O.; Souza, S. de

    2010-10-15

    Plasma nitriding of ASTM F138 stainless steel samples has been carried out using dc glow discharge under 80% H{sub 2}-20% N{sub 2} gas mixture, at 673 K, and 2, 4, and 7 h time intervals, in order to investigate the influence of treatment time on the microstructure and the corrosion resistance properties. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, glancing angle X-ray diffraction and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, besides electrochemical tests in NaCl aerated solution. A modified layer of about 6 {mu}m was observed for all the nitrided samples, independent of nitriding time. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows broad {gamma}{sub N} phase peaks, signifying a great degree of nitrogen supersaturation. Besides {gamma}{sub N,} the Moessbauer spectroscopy results indicated the occurrence of {gamma}' and {epsilon} phases, as well as some other less important phases. Corrosion measurements demonstrate that the plasma nitriding time affects the corrosion resistance and the best performance is reached at 4 h treatment. It seems that the {epsilon}/{gamma}' fraction ratio plays an important role on the resistance corrosion. Additionally, the Moessbauer spectroscopy was decisive in this study, since it was able to identify and quantify the iron phases that influence the corrosion resistance of plasma nitrided ASTM F138 samples.

  6. Lipid-protein globules of avian egg yolk. Isolation and properties of globules stable in concentrated sodium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Vadehra, D V; Bain, J M; Burley, R W

    1977-09-15

    A new type of globular particle, the 'insoluble yolk globule', was isolated from the egg yolk of three avian species (hen, duck, and emu) by centrifugation or gel-filtration chromatography. These globules are stable in NaCl and urea solutions at concentrations that dissolve or disrupt other constituents of yolk, The isolated globules are about 1% of the dry yolk of hen's and duck's eggs but about 8% emu's-egg yolk. Most of these globules are less than 2 micrometer in diameter. Electron micrographs of sections show a preponderance of globules in the range 0.125-0.25 micrometer, each with a thick shell surrounding a feature-less anterior. Globules with the same appearance were seen in sections of unfractionated yolk. Two kinds of larger particles were also observed: (i) particles with a distinct outer membrane and a vesiculated interior; (ii) featureless spheres, possibly of lipid. The insoluble yolk globules comprise protein (8-11% by dry wt.), phospholipid (31-35% total lipid), triacylglycerols (49-53%), cholesterol (8%) and cholesteryl esters (2-3%); the variations being among species. The phospholipid is accessible to phospholipase C. The isolated protein is heterogeneous and resembles the apoprotein from the yolk low-density lipoprotein.

  7. An XAFS Study of Niobium chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride/ aluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; K Pandya; G Cheek; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Niobium chloride was studied with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquids. Although anhydrous Nb2Cl10 is more soluble in the basic melt than in the acidic melt, the EXAFS data shows that the coordination shell around the niobium does not change in the different ionic liquids. Both the acidic and basic melts show a coordination of five chlorides in the first shell. This indicates that in this series of ionic liquids, the Nb2Cl10 breaks up into two NbCl5 entities in both the acidic and the basic melts.

  8. Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Scheitlin, Frank M.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  9. Process for the removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same

    DOEpatents

    Scheitlin, F.M.

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of /sup 226/Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  10. Balanced versus chloride-rich solutions for fluid resuscitation in brain-injured patients: a randomised double-blind pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We sought to investigate whether the use of balanced solutions reduces the incidence of hyperchloraemic acidosis without increasing the risk for intracranial hypertension in patients with severe brain injury. Methods We conducted a single-centre, two-arm, randomised, double-blind, pilot controlled trial in Nantes, France. Patients with severe traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤8) or subarachnoid haemorrhage (World Federation of Neurosurgical Society grade III or higher) who were mechanically ventilated were randomised within the first 12 hours after brain injury to receive either isotonic balanced solutions (crystalloid and hydroxyethyl starch; balanced group) or isotonic sodium chloride solutions (crystalloid and hydroxyethyl starch; saline group) for 48 hours. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis within 48 hours. Results Forty-two patients were included, of whom one patient in each group was excluded (one consent withdrawn and one use of forbidden therapy). Nineteen patients (95%) in the saline group and thirteen (65%) in the balanced group presented with hyperchloraemic acidosis within the first 48 hours (hazard ratio = 0.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11 to 0.70; P = 0.006). In the saline group, pH (P = .004) and strong ion deficit (P = 0.047) were lower and chloraemia was higher (P = 0.002) than in the balanced group. Intracranial pressure was not different between the study groups (mean difference 4 mmHg [-1;8]; P = 0.088). Seven patients (35%) in the saline group and eight (40%) in the balanced group developed intracranial hypertension (P = 0.744). Three patients (14%) in the saline group and five (25%) in the balanced group died (P = 0.387). Conclusions This study provides evidence that balanced solutions reduce the incidence of hyperchloraemic acidosis in brain-injured patients compared to saline solutions. Even if the study was not powered sufficiently for this endpoint

  11. Discoloration of titanium alloy in acidic saline solutions with peroxide.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Shinji; Hattori, Masayuki; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare corrosion behavior in several titanium alloys with immersion in acidulated saline solutions containing hydrogen peroxide. Seven types of titanium alloy were immersed in saline solutions with varying levels of pH and hydrogen peroxide content, and resulting differences in color and release of metallic elements determined in each alloy. Some alloys were characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy. Ti-55Ni alloy showed a high level of dissolution and difference in color. With immersion in solution containing hydrogen peroxide at pH 4, the other alloys showed a marked difference in color but a low level of dissolution. The formation of a thick oxide film was observed in commercially pure titanium showing discoloration. The results suggest that discoloration in titanium alloys immersed in hydrogen peroxide-containing acidulated solutions is caused by an increase in the thickness of this oxide film, whereas discoloration of Ti-55Ni is caused by corrosion. PMID:23370866

  12. Separation of ions in acidic solution by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, M.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective method for separating ionic species according to differences in their electrophoretic mobilities. CE separations of amino acids by direct detection are difficult due to their similar electrophoretic mobilities and low absorbances. However, native amino acids can be separated by CE as cations at a low pH by adding an alkanesulfonic acid to the electrolyte carrier which imparts selectivity to the system. Derivatization is unnecessary when direct UV detection is used at 185 nm. Simultaneous speciation of metal cations such as vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V) can easily be performed without complexation prior to analysis. An indirect UV detection scheme for acidic conditions was also developed using guanidine as the background carrier electrolyte (BCE) for the indirect detection of metal cations. Three chapters have been removed for separate processing. This report contains introductory material, references, and general conclusions. 80 refs.

  13. Dynamic dielectric properties of some carboxylic acid esters in benzene solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneim, Ahmed M.; Stockhause, Martina; Becker, U.; Biedenkap, R.; Elsebrock, R.

    1997-06-01

    The dielectric absorption spectrum between some MHz and 36 GHz has been measured at 20 degrees C for S(-)-lactic acid methylester, succinic acid dimethylester, L(-)- malic acid dimethylester and L(+)-tartaric acid diethylester, over the whole concentration range of benzene solutions of these substances. The loss function can be described by up to four Debye type spectral components. The relaxation parameters are reported and discussed in particular with respect to association effects.

  14. Near infrared photochemistry of pyruvic acid in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Molly C; Vaida, Veronica

    2012-06-21

    Recent experimental and theoretical results have suggested that organic acids such as pyruvic acid, can be photolyzed in the ground electronic state by the excitation of the OH stretch vibrational overtone. These overtones absorb in the near-infrared and visible regions of the spectrum where the solar photons are plentiful and could provide a reaction pathway for the organic acids and alcohols that are abundant in the earth's atmosphere. In this paper the overtone initiated photochemistry of aqueous pyruvic acid is investigated by monitoring the evolution of carbon dioxide. In these experiments CO(2) is being produced by excitation in the near-infrared, between 850 nm and ∼1150 nm (11,765-8696 cm(-1)), where the second OH vibrational overtone (Δν = 3) of pyruvic acid is expected to absorb. These findings show not only that the overtone initiated photochemical decarboxylation reaction occurs but also that in the aqueous phase it occurs at a lower energy than was predicted for the overtone initiated reaction of pyruvic acid in the gas phase (13,380 cm(-1)). A quantum yield of (3.5 ± 1.0) × 10(-4) is estimated, suggesting that although this process does occur, it does so with a very low efficiency.

  15. New insights into structural alteration of enamel apatite induced by citric acid and sodium fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojie; Klocke, Arndt; Mihailova, Boriana; Tosheva, Lubomira; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2008-07-24

    Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and complementary scanning electron microscopy were applied to analyze the surface structure of enamel apatite exposed to citric acid and to investigate the protective potential of fluorine-containing reagents against citric acid-induced erosion. Enamel and, for comparison, geological hydroxylapatite samples were treated with aqueous solutions of citric acid and sodium fluoride of different concentrations, ranging from 0.01 to 0.5 mol/L for citric acid solutions and from 0.5 to 2.0% for fluoride solutions. The two solutions were applied either simultaneously or consecutively. The citric acid-induced structural modification of apatite increases with the increase in the citric acid concentration and the number of treatments. The application of sodium fluoride alone does not suppress the atomic level changes in apatite exposed to acidic agents. The addition of sodium fluoride to citric acid solutions leads to formation of surface CaF2 and considerably reduces the changes in the apatite P-O-Ca framework. However, the CaF2 globules deposited on the enamel surface seem to be insufficient to prevent the alteration of the apatite structure upon further exposure to acidic agents. No evidence for fluorine-induced recovery of the apatite structure was found.

  16. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles obtained by pulsed laser ablation in pure water and in chloride solution

    PubMed Central

    Perito, Brunella; Giorgetti, Emilia; Marsili, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have increasingly gained importance as antibacterial agents with applications in several fields due to their strong, broad-range antimicrobial properties. AgNP synthesis by pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) permits the preparation of stable Ag colloids in pure solvents without capping or stabilizing agents, producing AgNPs more suitable for biomedical applications than those prepared with common, wet chemical preparation techniques. To date, only a few investigations into the antimicrobial effect of AgNPs produced by PLAL have been performed. These have mainly been performed by ablation in water with nanosecond pulse widths. We previously observed a strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal from such AgNPs by “activating” the NP surface by the addition of a small quantity of LiCl to the colloid. Such surface effects could also influence the antimicrobial activity of the NPs. Their activity, on the other hand, could also be affected by other parameters linked to the ablation conditions, such as the pulse width. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs was evaluated for NPs obtained either by nanosecond (ns) or picosecond (ps) PLAL using a 1064 nm ablation wavelength, in pure water or in LiCl aqueous solution, with Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis as references for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. In all cases, AgNPs with an average diameter less than 10 nm were obtained, which has been shown in previous works to be the most effective size for bactericidal activity. The measured zeta-potential values were very negative, indicating excellent long-term colloidal stability. Antibacterial activity was observed against both microorganisms for the four AgNP formulations, but the ps-ablated nanoparticles were shown to more effectively inhibit the growth of both microorganisms. Moreover, LiCl modified AgNPs were the most effective, showing minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values in a

  17. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles obtained by pulsed laser ablation in pure water and in chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Perito, Brunella; Giorgetti, Emilia; Marsili, Paolo; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have increasingly gained importance as antibacterial agents with applications in several fields due to their strong, broad-range antimicrobial properties. AgNP synthesis by pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) permits the preparation of stable Ag colloids in pure solvents without capping or stabilizing agents, producing AgNPs more suitable for biomedical applications than those prepared with common, wet chemical preparation techniques. To date, only a few investigations into the antimicrobial effect of AgNPs produced by PLAL have been performed. These have mainly been performed by ablation in water with nanosecond pulse widths. We previously observed a strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal from such AgNPs by "activating" the NP surface by the addition of a small quantity of LiCl to the colloid. Such surface effects could also influence the antimicrobial activity of the NPs. Their activity, on the other hand, could also be affected by other parameters linked to the ablation conditions, such as the pulse width. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs was evaluated for NPs obtained either by nanosecond (ns) or picosecond (ps) PLAL using a 1064 nm ablation wavelength, in pure water or in LiCl aqueous solution, with Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis as references for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. In all cases, AgNPs with an average diameter less than 10 nm were obtained, which has been shown in previous works to be the most effective size for bactericidal activity. The measured zeta-potential values were very negative, indicating excellent long-term colloidal stability. Antibacterial activity was observed against both microorganisms for the four AgNP formulations, but the ps-ablated nanoparticles were shown to more effectively inhibit the growth of both microorganisms. Moreover, LiCl modified AgNPs were the most effective, showing minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values in a restricted

  18. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles obtained by pulsed laser ablation in pure water and in chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Perito, Brunella; Giorgetti, Emilia; Marsili, Paolo; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have increasingly gained importance as antibacterial agents with applications in several fields due to their strong, broad-range antimicrobial properties. AgNP synthesis by pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) permits the preparation of stable Ag colloids in pure solvents without capping or stabilizing agents, producing AgNPs more suitable for biomedical applications than those prepared with common, wet chemical preparation techniques. To date, only a few investigations into the antimicrobial effect of AgNPs produced by PLAL have been performed. These have mainly been performed by ablation in water with nanosecond pulse widths. We previously observed a strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal from such AgNPs by "activating" the NP surface by the addition of a small quantity of LiCl to the colloid. Such surface effects could also influence the antimicrobial activity of the NPs. Their activity, on the other hand, could also be affected by other parameters linked to the ablation conditions, such as the pulse width. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs was evaluated for NPs obtained either by nanosecond (ns) or picosecond (ps) PLAL using a 1064 nm ablation wavelength, in pure water or in LiCl aqueous solution, with Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis as references for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. In all cases, AgNPs with an average diameter less than 10 nm were obtained, which has been shown in previous works to be the most effective size for bactericidal activity. The measured zeta-potential values were very negative, indicating excellent long-term colloidal stability. Antibacterial activity was observed against both microorganisms for the four AgNP formulations, but the ps-ablated nanoparticles were shown to more effectively inhibit the growth of both microorganisms. Moreover, LiCl modified AgNPs were the most effective, showing minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values in a restricted

  19. PROCESS OF SECURING PLUTONIUM IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS IN ITS TRIVALENT OXIDATION STATE

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, J.R.

    1958-08-26

    >Various processes for the recovery of plutonium require that the plutonium be obtalned and maintained in the reduced or trivalent state in solution. Ferrous ions are commonly used as the reducing agent for this purpose, but it is difficult to maintain the plutonium in a reduced state in nitric acid solutions due to the oxidizing effects of the acid. It has been found that the addition of a stabilizing or holding reductant to such solution prevents reoxidation of the plutonium. Sulfamate ions have been found to be ideally suitable as such a stabilizer even in the presence of nitric acid.

  20. Reprocessing system with nuclide separation based on chromatography in hydrochloric acid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Tachibana, Yu; Koyama, Shi-ichi

    2013-07-01

    We have proposed the reprocessing system with nuclide separation processes based on the chromatographic technique in the hydrochloric acid solution system. Our proposed system consists of the dissolution process, the reprocessing process, the minor actinide separation process, and nuclide separation processes. In the reprocessing and separation processes, the pyridine resin is used as a main separation media. It was confirmed that the dissolution in the hydrochloric acid solution is easily achieved by the plasma voloxidation and by the addition of oxygen peroxide into the hydrochloric acid solution.