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Sample records for acid cleavage structure

  1. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  2. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  3. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  4. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  5. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  6. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  7. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  8. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages 02

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  9. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G; Lyamichev, Victor I; Mast, Andrea L; Brow, Mary Ann D

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  10. A 1.9 Å Crystal Structure of the HDV Ribozyme Precleavage Suggests both Lewis Acid and General Acid Mechanisms Contribute to Phosphodiester Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jui-Hui; Yajima, Rieko; Chadalavada, Durga M.; Chase, Elaine; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Golden, Barbara L.

    2010-11-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and HDV-like ribozymes are self-cleaving RNAs found throughout all kingdoms of life. These RNAs fold into a double-nested pseudoknot structure and cleave RNA, yielding 2{prime},3{prime}-cyclic phosphate and 5{prime}-hydroxyl termini. The active site nucleotide C75 has a pK{sub a} shifted >2 pH units toward neutrality and has been implicated as a general acid/base in the cleavage reaction. An active site Mg{sup 2+} ion that helps activate the 2{prime}-hydroxyl for nucleophilic attack has been characterized biochemically; however, this ion has not been visualized in any previous structures. To create a snapshot of the ribozyme in a state poised for catalysis, we have crystallized and determined the structure of the HDV ribozyme bound to an inhibitor RNA containing a deoxynucleotide at the cleavage site. This structure includes the wild-type C75 nucleotide and Mg{sup 2+} ions, both of which are required for maximal ribozyme activity. This structure suggests that the position of C75 does not change during the cleavage reaction. A partially hydrated Mg{sup 2+} ion is also found within the active site where it interacts with a newly resolved G {center_dot} U reverse wobble. Although the inhibitor exhibits crystallographic disorder, we modeled the ribozyme-substrate complex using the conformation of the inhibitor strand observed in the hammerhead ribozyme. This model suggests that the pro-RP oxygen of the scissile phosphate and the 2{prime}-hydroxyl nucleophile are inner-sphere ligands to the active site Mg{sup 2+} ion. Thus, the HDV ribozyme may use a combination of metal ion Lewis acid and nucleobase general acid strategies to effect RNA cleavage.

  11. Structural basis of cohesin cleavage by separase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhonghui; Luo, Xuelian; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-04-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation requires timely dissolution of chromosome cohesion after chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle. Separase is absolutely essential for cohesion dissolution in organisms from yeast to man. It cleaves the kleisin subunit of cohesin and opens the cohesin ring to allow chromosome segregation. Cohesin cleavage is spatiotemporally controlled by separase-associated regulatory proteins, including the inhibitory chaperone securin, and by phosphorylation of both the enzyme and substrates. Dysregulation of this process causes chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy, contributing to cancer and birth defects. Despite its essential functions, atomic structures of separase have not been determined. Here we report crystal structures of the separase protease domain from the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum, alone or covalently bound to unphosphorylated and phosphorylated inhibitory peptides derived from a cohesin cleavage site. These structures reveal how separase recognizes cohesin and how cohesin phosphorylation by polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) enhances cleavage. Consistent with a previous cellular study, mutating two securin residues in a conserved motif that partly matches the separase cleavage consensus converts securin from a separase inhibitor to a substrate. Our study establishes atomic mechanisms of substrate cleavage by separase and suggests competitive inhibition by securin. PMID:27027290

  12. Oxidative cleavage of erucic acid for the synthesis of brassylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah; Pooja Thapliyal; Erica N. Pfarr; Nicholas S. Dusek; Kristofer L. Schiele; James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to synthesize Brassylic Acid (BA) using oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is an industrial oilseed grown in North Dakota. Crambe has potential as an industrial fatty acid feedstock as a source of Erucic acid (EA). It has approximately 50-60 % of EA, a C{sub 22} monounsaturated fatty acid. Oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids derived from oilseeds produces long chain (9, 11, and 13 carbon atoms) dibasic and monobasic acids. These acids are known commercial feedstocks for the preparation of nylons, polyesters, waxes, surfactants, and perfumes. Other sources of EA are Rapeseed seed oil which 50-60 % of EA. Rapeseed is grown outside USA. The oxidative cleavage of EA was done using a high throughput parallel pressure reactor system. Kinetics of the reaction shows that BA yields reach a saturation at 12 hours. H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} was found to be the best catalyst for the oxidative cleavage of EA. High yields of BA were obtained at 80 C with bubbling of O{sub 2} or 10 bar of O{sub 2} for 12 hours.

  13. Structure elucidation and gene cluster annotation of the O-antigen of Escherichia coli O39; application of anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid for selective cleavage of glycosidic linkages.

    PubMed

    Perepelov, Andrei V; Filatov, Andrei V; Wang, Quan; L'vov, Vyacheslav L; Qian, Ye; Shashkov, Alexander S; Wang, Lei; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2014-03-31

    O-Polysaccharide (O-antigen) accompanied by a minor mannan was isolated from the lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli O39 and studied by component analyses, methylation, Smith degradation, mass spectrometry, and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. In addition, a new approach, solvolysis with anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid, was applied to cleave selectively the rhamnosidic linkage. The following structure of the O-polysaccharide was established: α--D-Galpl-->3-->3)-β-D-Quip4N(R3Hb)-(1-->2)-α-D-Manp-(l-->4)-α-L-Rhap-(1-->3)-α-D-GlcpNAc-(1--> where D-Qui4N(R3Hb) indicates 4,6-dideoxy-4-[(R)-3-hydroxybutanoylamino]-d-glucose. The O-antigen gene cluster of E. coli O39 has been sequenced. The gene functions were tentatively assigned by a comparison with sequences in the available databases and found to be in agreement with the O-polysaccharide structure. PMID:24607538

  14. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and structural investigation of a new charge transfer complex of 2,6-diaminopyridine with 4-nitrophenylacetic acid: Antimicrobial, DNA binding/cleavage and antioxidant studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, Venkatesan; Saravanabhavan, Munusamy; Sekar, Marimuthu

    2015-08-01

    A new hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer complex (CT) formed by the reaction between donor, 2,6-diaminopyridine and acceptor, 4-nitrophenylacetic acid in methanol at room temperature. The crystal was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR spectroscopic studies and thermal studies. The elemental analysis of CT complex, obtained data revealed that the formation of 1:1 ratio CT complex was proposed. Infrared and NMR studies confirm the chemical constituents and molecular structure of the synthesized complex crystal. The high thermal stability is due to the molecular frame work through H-bonding interactions. Structural investigation indicates that cation and anion are linked through strong N+-H⋯O- type of hydrogen bond. The hydrogen bonded charge transfer crystal was screened for its pharmacology, such as antimicrobial, DNA binding/cleavage and antioxidant studies. The CT complex was screened for its antibacterial and antifungal activity against various bacterial and fungal species, which shows good antimicrobial activity. The DNA binding results indicated that the compound could interact with DNA through intercalation. It should have weak to moderate capacity of scavenging with DPPH.

  15. Leukocyte Protease Binding to Nucleic Acids Promotes Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Marshall P.; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein (RBP) targets, while adding RNA to recombinant RBP substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Pre-incubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G (CATG). During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which bind NE and CATG. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and NETs in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation. PMID:24771851

  16. Binding and cleavage of nucleic acids by the "hairpin" ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Chowrira, B M; Burke, J M

    1991-09-01

    The "hairpin" ribozyme derived from the minus strand of tobacco ringspot virus satellite RNA [(-)sTRSV] efficiently catalyzes sequence-specific RNA hydrolysis in trans (Feldstein et al., 1989; Hampel & Triz, 1989; Haseloff & Gerlach, 1989). The ribozyme does not cleave DNA. An RNA substrate analogue containing a single deoxyribonucleotide residue 5' to the cleavage site (A-1) binds to the ribozyme efficiently but cannot be cleaved. A DNA substrate analogue with a ribonucleotide at A-1 is cleaved; thus A-1 provides the only 2'-OH required for cleavage. These results support cleavage via a transphosphorylation mechanism initiated by attack of the 2'-OH of A-1 on the scissile phosphodiester. The ribozyme discriminates between DNA and RNA in both binding and cleavage. Results indicate that the 2'-OH of A-1 functions in complex stabilization as well as cleavage. The ribozyme efficiently cleaves a phosphorothioate diester linkage, suggesting that the pro-Rp oxygen at the scissile phosphodiester does not coordinate Mg2+. PMID:1909564

  17. Statistical prediction of protein structural, localization and functional properties by the analysis of its fragment mass distributions after proteolytic cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Bunde, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Structural, localization and functional properties of unknown proteins are often being predicted from their primary polypeptide chains using sequence alignment with already characterized proteins and consequent molecular modeling. Here we suggest an approach to predict various structural and structure-associated properties of proteins directly from the mass distributions of their proteolytic cleavage fragments. For amino-acid-specific cleavages, the distributions of fragment masses are determined by the distributions of inter-amino-acid intervals in the protein, that in turn apparently reflect its structural and structure-related features. Large-scale computer simulations revealed that for transmembrane proteins, either α-helical or β -barrel secondary structure could be predicted with about 90% accuracy after thermolysin cleavage. Moreover, 3/4 intrinsically disordered proteins could be correctly distinguished from proteins with fixed three-dimensional structure belonging to all four SCOP structural classes by combining 3–4 different cleavages. Additionally, in some cases the protein cellular localization (cytosolic or membrane-associated) and its host organism (Firmicute or Proteobacteria) could be predicted with around 80% accuracy. In contrast to cytosolic proteins, for membrane-associated proteins exhibiting specific structural conformations, their monotopic or transmembrane localization and functional group (ATP-binding, transporters, sensors and so on) could be also predicted with high accuracy and particular robustness against missing cleavages. PMID:26924271

  18. Statistical prediction of protein structural, localization and functional properties by the analysis of its fragment mass distributions after proteolytic cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Bunde, Armin

    2016-02-01

    Structural, localization and functional properties of unknown proteins are often being predicted from their primary polypeptide chains using sequence alignment with already characterized proteins and consequent molecular modeling. Here we suggest an approach to predict various structural and structure-associated properties of proteins directly from the mass distributions of their proteolytic cleavage fragments. For amino-acid-specific cleavages, the distributions of fragment masses are determined by the distributions of inter-amino-acid intervals in the protein, that in turn apparently reflect its structural and structure-related features. Large-scale computer simulations revealed that for transmembrane proteins, either α-helical or β -barrel secondary structure could be predicted with about 90% accuracy after thermolysin cleavage. Moreover, 3/4 intrinsically disordered proteins could be correctly distinguished from proteins with fixed three-dimensional structure belonging to all four SCOP structural classes by combining 3-4 different cleavages. Additionally, in some cases the protein cellular localization (cytosolic or membrane-associated) and its host organism (Firmicute or Proteobacteria) could be predicted with around 80% accuracy. In contrast to cytosolic proteins, for membrane-associated proteins exhibiting specific structural conformations, their monotopic or transmembrane localization and functional group (ATP-binding, transporters, sensors and so on) could be also predicted with high accuracy and particular robustness against missing cleavages.

  19. Analysis of mycolic acid cleavage products and cellular fatty acids of Mycobacterium species by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M A; Moss, C W; Silcox, V A; Good, R C

    1986-04-01

    After growth and experimental conditions were established, the mycolic acid cleavage products, constituent fatty acids, and alcohols of representative strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. smegmatis, M. fortuitum complex, M. kansasii, M. gordonae, and M. avium complex were determined by capillary gas chromatography. Reproducible cleavage of mycolic acid methyl esters to tetracosanoic (24:0) or hexacosanoic (26:0) acid methyl esters was achieved by heating the sample in a high-temperature muffle furnace. The major constituent fatty acids in all species were hexadecanoic (16:0) and octadecenoic (18:1 omega 9-c, oleic) acids. With the exception of M. gordonae, 10-methyloctadecanoic acid was found in all species; moreover, M. gordonae was the only species tested which contained 2-methyltetradecanoic acid. M. kansasii was characterized by the presence of 2,4-dimethyltetradecanoic acid, M. avium complex by 2-eicosanol, and M. tuberculosis by 26:0 mycolic acid cleavage product. The mycolic acid cleavage product in the other five species tested was 24:0. Although a limited number of strains and species were tested, preliminary results indicate that this gas chromatographic method can be used to characterize mycobacterial cultures by their mycolic acid cleavage products and constituent fatty acid and alcohol content. PMID:3084554

  20. Analysis of a pyruvic acid acetal-containing polysaccharide by the reductive-cleavage method.

    PubMed

    Zeller, S G; Gray, G R

    1991-04-24

    The applicability of the reductive-cleavage method to the analysis of polysaccharides bearing pyruvic acid acetals has been demonstrated. Direct reductive cleavage of fully methylated gum xanthan yielded the expected products, including 1,5-anhydro-4,6-O-[(S)-1-methoxycarbonylethylidene]-2,3-di-O-methy l-D- mannitol. The latter product was not observed when reductive cleavage was performed subsequent to reduction of ester groups in the fully methylated polysaccharide and mild hydrolysis to remove pyruvic acid acetal substituents. Instead, the latter experiment yielded 1,5-anhydro-2,3-di-O-methyl-D-mannitol, establishing the presence in the polysaccharide of terminal (nonreducing) D-mannopyranosyl groups bearing 4,6-O-(1-carboxyethylidene) substituents. The products of reductive cleavage were characterized, where appropriate, by comparison of the gas chromatographic retention times and chemical ionization- and electron ionization-mass spectra of their acetates to those of authentic standards. Alternatively, the products of reductive cleavage could be characterized without resort to comparison with authentic standards by analysis of the 1H-n.m.r. spectra of their benzoates, which were obtained in pure form by high-performance liquid chromatography. By either method of product characterization, this two-step procedure of analysis reveals the presence of pyruvic-acetal residues in polysaccharides and establishes both the identity of the sugar residue to which they are attached and their positions of attachment. PMID:1769016

  1. 2-Chlorotrityl chloride resin. Studies on anchoring of Fmoc-amino acids and peptide cleavage.

    PubMed

    Barlos, K; Chatzi, O; Gatos, D; Stavropoulos, G

    1991-06-01

    The esterification of 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin with Fmoc-amino acids in the presence of DIEA is studied under various conditions. High esterification yields are obtained using 0.6 equiv. Fmoc-amino acid/mmol resin in DCM or DCE, in 25 min, at room temperature. The reaction proceeds without by product formation even in the case of Fmoc-Asn and Fmoc-Gln. The quantitative and easy cleavage of amino acids and peptides from 2-chlorotrityl resin, by using AcOH/TFE/DCM mixtures, is accomplished within 15-60 min at room temperature, while t-butyl type protecting groups remain unaffected. Under these exceptionally mild conditions 2-chlorotrityl cations generated during the cleavage of amino acids and peptides from resin do not attack the nucleophilic side chains of Trp, Met, and Tyr. PMID:1917309

  2. Peptide Nucleic Acid with a Lysine Side Chain at the β-Position: Synthesis and Application for DNA Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Toru; Kuwata, Keiko; Imamura, Yasutada; Demizu, Yosuke; Kurihara, Masaaki; Takano, Masashi; Kittaka, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of new β-Lys peptide nucleic acid (PNA) monomers and their incorporation into a 10-residue PNA sequence. PNA containing β-Lys PNA units formed a stable hybrid duplex with DNA. However, incorporation of β-Lys PNA units caused destabilization of PNA-DNA duplexes to some extent. Electrostatic attractions between β-PNA and DNA could reduce this destabilization effect. Subsequently, bipyridine-conjugated β-Lys PNA was prepared and exhibited sequence selective cleavage of DNA. Based on the structures of the cleavage products and molecular modeling, we reasoned that bipyridine moiety locates within the minor groove of the PNA-DNA duplexes. The lysine side chain of β-PNA is a versatile handle for attaching various functional molecules. PMID:27373637

  3. Lead-catalyzed cleavage of ribonuclease P RNA as a probe for integrity of tertiary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Zito, K; Hüttenhofer, A; Pace, N R

    1993-01-01

    Pb(2+)-catalyzed cleavage of RNA has been shown previously to be a useful probe for tertiary structure. In the present study, Pb2+ cleavage patterns were identified for ribonuclease P RNAs from three phylogenetically disparate organisms, Escherichia coli, Chromatium vinosum, Bacillus subtilis, and for E. coli RNase P RNAs that had been altered by deletions. Each of the native RNAs undergoes cleavage at several sites in the core structure that is common to all bacterial RNase P RNAs. All the cleavages occur in non-paired regions of the secondary structure models of the RNAs, in regions likely to be involved in tertiary interactions. Two cleavage sites occur at homologous positions in all the native RNAs, regardless of sequence variation, suggesting common tertiary structural features. The Pb2+ cleavage sites in four deletion mutants of E. coli RNase P RNA differed from the native pattern, indicating alterations in the tertiary structures of the mutant RNAs. This conclusion is consistent with previously characterized properties of the mutant RNAs. The Pb2+ cleavage assay is thus a useful probe to reveal alteration of tertiary structure in RNase P RNA. Images PMID:7507234

  4. Metabolism of 4-chlorophenol by Azotobacter sp. GP1: structure of the meta cleavage product of 4-chlorocatechol.

    PubMed

    Wieser, M; Eberspächer, J; Vogler, B; Lingens, F

    1994-02-01

    A mutant strain of Azotobacter sp. GP1 converted 4-chlorophenol to 4-chlorocatechol under cometabolic conditions. Under the same conditions the wild-type strain accumulated a yellow compound, which by chemical and spectroscopic methods was identified as 5-chloro-2-hydroxy-6-oxohexadienoic acid (5-chloro-2-hydroxy-muconic semialdehyde). The structure of this compound indicates a meta-proximal cleavage of 4-chlorocatechol. PMID:8132157

  5. Structural Requirements for Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Cleavage in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Rocky; Espenshade, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are central regulators of cellular lipid synthesis and homeostasis. Mammalian SREBPs are proteolytically activated and liberated from the membrane by Golgi Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. Fission yeast SREBPs, Sre1 and Sre2, employ a different mechanism that genetically requires the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase complex for cleavage activation. Here, we established Sre2 as a model to define structural requirements for SREBP cleavage. We showed that Sre2 cleavage does not require the N-terminal basic helix-loop-helix zipper transcription factor domain, thus separating cleavage of Sre2 from its transcription factor function. From a mutagenesis screen of 94 C-terminal residues of Sre2, we isolated 15 residues required for cleavage and further identified a glycine-leucine sequence required for Sre2 cleavage. Importantly, the glycine-leucine sequence is located at a conserved distance before the first transmembrane segment of both Sre1 and Sre2 and cleavage occurs in between this sequence and the membrane. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a broad conservation of this novel glycine-leucine motif in SREBP homologs of ascomycete fungi, including the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus where SREBP is required for virulence. Consistent with this, the sequence was also required for cleavage of the oxygen-responsive transcription factor Sre1 and adaptation to hypoxia, demonstrating functional conservation of this cleavage recognition motif. These cleavage mutants will aid identification of the fungal SREBP protease and facilitate functional dissection of the Dsc E3 ligase required for SREBP activation and fungal pathogenesis. PMID:23729666

  6. Irreversible and reversible topoisomerase II DNA cleavage stimulated by clerocidin: sequence specificity and structural drug determinants.

    PubMed

    Binaschi, M; Zagotto, G; Palumbo, M; Zunino, F; Farinosi, R; Capranico, G

    1997-05-01

    In contrast to other topoisomerase II poisons, the microbial terpenoid clerocidin was shown to stimulate irreversible topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage. To establish the structural determinants for drug activity, in this study we have investigated intensity patterns and sequence specificity of clerocidin-stimulated DNA cleavage using 5'-end 32P-labeled DNA fragments. At a majority of the sites, clerocidin-stimulated cleavage did not revert upon NaCl addition; nevertheless, at some sites, cleavage completely reverted. Statistical analyses showed that drug-preferred bases were different in the two cases: guanine and cytosine were highly preferred at position -1 at irreversible and reversible sites, respectively. These results demonstrated that cleavage irreversibility was site selective and required a guanine at the 3' end of the cut. Further experiments revealed that some irreversible sites showed an abnormal electrophoretic mobility in sequencing gels with respect to cleaved bands generated by 4-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide, suggesting a chemical alteration of the DNA strand. Interestingly, the ability to stimulate irreversible cleavage progressively decreased over time when clerocidin was stored in ethanol. Under these conditions, nuclear magnetic resonance measurements demonstrated that the drug underwent structural modifications that involved the C-12-C-15 side chain. Thus, the results indicate that a specific moiety of clerocidin may react with the DNA (guanine at -1) in the ternary complex, resulting in cleavage irreversibility and in altered DNA mobility in sequencing gels. PMID:9135013

  7. Extension of microwave-accelerated residue-specific acid cleavage to proteins with carbohydrate side chains and disulfide linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinxi; Shefcheck, Kevin; Callahan, John; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-12-01

    This laboratory has introduced a chemical method for residue-specific protein cleavage and has provided a preliminary assessment of the suitability of microwave-accelerated acid cleavage as a proteomic tool. This report is a continuing assessment of the fate of common protein modifications in microwave-accelerated acid cleavage. We have examined the cleavage of ribonuclease A and the related N-linked glycoprotein ribonuclease B, and the O-linked glycoprotein alpha crystallin A chain, using MALDI-TOF and LC-ESI-MS to identify the peptide products. RNase A and B each contains four disulfide bonds, and the addition of a reducing reagent, such as dithiothreitol, was found to be required to achieve efficient acidic proteolysis. The linkage of the glycosidic group to the asparagine side chain in ribonuclease B was found not to be cleaved by brief microwave treatment in 12.5% acetic acid. The distribution of the heterogeneous carbohydrate side chain in the glycopeptide products of acid cleavage was compared to that of the glycopeptide products of tryptic digestion. Hydrolysis within the carbohydrate chain itself is minimal under the conditions used. The O-linked side chain on alpha crystalline A was found to be cleaved during acid cleavage of the protein.

  8. Amino acid sequence requirements in the human IgA1 hinge for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Batten, M R; Kilian, M; Woof, J M

    2002-08-01

    All the IgA1 proteases of the different pathogenic species of Streptococcus cleave the hinge of the alpha chain of human IgA1 only at one proline-threonine peptide bond. In order to study the importance of these amino acids for cleavage, several hinge mutant recombinant IgA1 antibodies were constructed. The mutations were found to be without major effect upon the structure or functional abilities of the antibodies. However, they had a major effect upon their sensitivity to cleavage by some of the IgA1 proteases. PMID:12196126

  9. Brønsted acid mediated N-O bond cleavage for α-amination of ketones through the aromatic nitroso aldol reaction.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Isai; Sahoo, Harekrishna; Baidya, Mahiuddin

    2016-02-11

    A Brønsted acid mediated N-O bond cleavage for α-amination of ketones has been developed through the nitroso aldol reaction of less-reactive aromatic nitroso compounds and silyl enol ethers having a disilane (-SiMe2TMS) backbone. This transformation is operationally simple and scalable, offering structurally diverse α-amino ketones in high yields (up to 98%) with complete regioselectivity. It represents a mechanistically unique and rare example of a metal-free N-O bond cleavage process. PMID:26810365

  10. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Copper-Binding Mutant of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB: Insight into the Key Role of the Active Site Aspartic Acid in Hg-Carbon Bond Cleavage and Metal Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Haytham M; Lecoq, Lauriane; Stevenson, Michael; Mansour, Ahmed; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Sygusch, Jurgen; Wilcox, Dean E; Omichinski, James G

    2016-02-23

    In bacterial resistance to mercury, the organomercurial lyase (MerB) plays a key role in the detoxification pathway through its ability to cleave Hg-carbon bonds. Two cysteines (C96 and C159; Escherichia coli MerB numbering) and an aspartic acid (D99) have been identified as the key catalytic residues, and these three residues are conserved in all but four known MerB variants, where the aspartic acid is replaced with a serine. To understand the role of the active site serine, we characterized the structure and metal binding properties of an E. coli MerB mutant with a serine substituted for D99 (MerB D99S) as well as one of the native MerB variants containing a serine residue in the active site (Bacillus megaterium MerB2). Surprisingly, the MerB D99S protein copurified with a bound metal that was determined to be Cu(II) from UV-vis absorption, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies. X-ray structural studies revealed that the Cu(II) is bound to the active site cysteine residues of MerB D99S, but that it is displaced following the addition of either an organomercurial substrate or an ionic mercury product. In contrast, the B. megaterium MerB2 protein does not copurify with copper, but the structure of the B. megaterium MerB2-Hg complex is highly similar to the structure of the MerB D99S-Hg complexes. These results demonstrate that the active site aspartic acid is crucial for both the enzymatic activity and metal binding specificity of MerB proteins and suggest a possible functional relationship between MerB and its only known structural homologue, the copper-binding protein NosL. PMID:26820485

  11. Autotransporter structure reveals intra-barrel cleavage followed by conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Travis J.; Dautin, Nathalie; Lukacik, Petra; Bernstein, Harris D.; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2008-01-01

    Autotransporters are virulence factors produced by Gram-negative bacteria that consist of two domains, an N-terminal “passenger domain” and a C-terminal “β-domain”. β-domains form β-barrel structures in the outer membrane while passenger domains are translocated into the extracellular space. In some autotransporters, the two domains are separated by proteolytic cleavage. Using X-ray crystallography, we solved the 2.7 Å structure of the post-cleavage state of the β-domain of EspP, an autotransporter produced by E. coli O157:H7. The structure consists of a 12-stranded β-barrel with the passenger / β-domain cleavage junction located inside the barrel pore, approximately mid-way between the extracellular and periplasmic surfaces of the outer membrane. The structure reveals an unprecedented intra-barrel cleavage mechanism and suggests that two conformational changes occur in the β-domain post-cleavage, one conferring increased stability on the β-domain and another restricting access to the barrel pore. PMID:17994105

  12. Expression of a human proprotein processing enzyme: correct cleavage of the von Willebrand factor precursor at a paired basic amino acid site.

    PubMed Central

    Wise, R J; Barr, P J; Wong, P A; Kiefer, M C; Brake, A J; Kaufman, R J

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular proteolytic processing of precursor polypeptides is an essential step in the maturation of many proteins, including plasma proteins, hormones, neuropeptides, and growth factors. Most frequently, propeptide cleavage occurs after paired basic amino acid residues. To date, no mammalian propeptide processing enzyme with such specificity has been purified or cloned and functionally characterized. We report the isolation and functional expression of a cDNA encoding a propeptide-cleaving enzyme from a human liver cell line. The encoded protein, called PACE (paired basic amino acid cleaving enzyme), has structural homology to the well-characterized subtilisin-like protease Kex2 from yeast. The functional specificity of PACE for mediating propeptide cleavage at paired basic amino acid residues was demonstrated by the enhancement of propeptide processing of human von Willebrand factor when coexpressed with PACE in COS-1 cells. Images PMID:2251280

  13. Structural basis for substrate recognition and processive cleavage mechanisms of the trimeric exonuclease PhoExo I

    PubMed Central

    Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Ishino, Sonoko; Tsutsumi, Kanae; Ito, Tomoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Tanokura, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Nucleases play important roles in nucleic acid processes, such as replication, repair and recombination. Recently, we identified a novel single-strand specific 3′-5′ exonuclease, PfuExo I, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which may be involved in the Thermococcales-specific DNA repair system. PfuExo I forms a trimer and cleaves single-stranded DNA at every two nucleotides. Here, we report the structural basis for the cleavage mechanism of this novel exonuclease family. A structural analysis of PhoExo I, the homologous enzyme from P. horikoshii OT3, showed that PhoExo I utilizes an RNase H-like active site and possesses a 3′-OH recognition site ∼9 Å away from the active site, which enables cleavage at every two nucleotides. Analyses of the heterotrimeric and monomeric PhoExo I activities showed that trimerization is indispensable for its processive cleavage mechanism, but only one active site of the trimer is required. PMID:26138487

  14. CATABOLISM OF AROMATIC BIOGENIC AMINES BY 'PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA' PA01 VIA META CLEAVAGE OF HOMOPROTOCATECHUIC ACID (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas aruginosa PA01 catabolized the aromatic amines tyramine and octopamine through 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPA). Meta ring cleavage was mediated by 3-4-dihydroxyphenylacetate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPADO), producing 2-hydroxy-5-carboxymeth...

  15. Multiple nucleic acid cleavage modes in divergent type III CRISPR systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Graham, Shirley; Tello, Agnes; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is an RNA-guided adaptive immune system that protects bacteria and archaea from invading nucleic acids. Type III systems (Cmr, Csm) have been shown to cleave RNA targets in vitro and some are capable of transcription-dependent DNA targeting. The crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has two divergent subtypes of the type III system (Sso-IIID and a Cmr7-containing variant of Sso-IIIB). Here, we report that both the Sso-IIID and Sso-IIIB complexes cleave cognate RNA targets with a ruler mechanism and 6 or 12 nt spacing that relates to the organization of the Cas7 backbone. This backbone-mediated cleavage activity thus appears universal for the type III systems. The Sso-IIIB complex is also known to possess a distinct ‘UA’ cleavage mode. The predominant activity observed in vitro depends on the relative molar concentration of protein and target RNA. The Sso-IIID complex can cleave plasmid DNA targets in vitro, generating linear DNA products with an activity that is dependent on both the cyclase and HD nuclease domains of the Cas10 subunit, suggesting a role for both nuclease active sites in the degradation of double-stranded DNA targets. PMID:26801642

  16. Structural basis for the fast self-cleavage reaction catalyzed by the twister ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Eiler, Daniel; Wang, Jimin; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Twister is a recently discovered RNA motif that is estimated to have one of the fastest known catalytic rates of any naturally occurring small self-cleaving ribozyme. We determined the 4.1-Å resolution crystal structure of a twister sequence from an organism that has not been cultured in isolation, and it shows an ordered scissile phosphate and nucleotide 5′ to the cleavage site. A second crystal structure of twister from Orzyza sativa determined at 3.1-Å resolution exhibits a disordered scissile phosphate and nucleotide 5′ to the cleavage site. The core of twister is stabilized by base pairing, a large network of stacking interactions, and two pseudoknots. We observe three nucleotides that appear to mediate catalysis: a guanosine that we propose deprotonates the 2′-hydroxyl of the nucleotide 5′ to the cleavage site and a conserved adenosine. We suggest the adenosine neutralizes the negative charge on a nonbridging phosphate oxygen atom at the cleavage site. The active site also positions the labile linkage for in-line nucleophilic attack, and thus twister appears to simultaneously use three strategies proposed for small self-cleaving ribozymes. The twister crystal structures (i) show its global structure, (ii) demonstrate the significance of the double pseudoknot fold, (iii) provide a possible hypothesis for enhanced catalysis, and (iv) illuminate the roles of all 10 highly conserved nucleotides of twister that participate in the formation of its small and stable catalytic pocket. PMID:25157168

  17. Crystal Structure of the 25 kDa Subunit of Human Cleavage Factor I{m}

    SciTech Connect

    Coseno,M.; Martin, G.; Berger, C.; Gilmartin, G.; Keller, W.; Doublie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Cleavage factor Im is an essential component of the pre-messenger RNA 3'-end processing machinery in higher eukaryotes, participating in both the polyadenylation and cleavage steps. Cleavage factor Im is an oligomer composed of a small 25 kDa subunit (CF Im25) and a variable larger subunit of either 59, 68 or 72 kDa. The small subunit also interacts with RNA, poly(A) polymerase, and the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein. These protein-protein interactions are thought to be facilitated by the Nudix domain of CF Im25, a hydrolase motif with a characteristic {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} fold and a conserved catalytic sequence or Nudix box. We present here the crystal structures of human CF Im25 in its free and diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A) bound forms at 1.85 and 1.80 Angstroms, respectively. CF Im25 crystallizes as a dimer and presents the classical Nudix fold. Results from crystallographic and biochemical experiments suggest that CF Im25 makes use of its Nudix fold to bind but not hydrolyze ATP and Ap4A. The complex and apo protein structures provide insight into the active oligomeric state of CF Im and suggest a possible role of nucleotide binding in either the polyadenylation and/or cleavage steps of pre-messenger RNA 3'-end processing.

  18. Mechanistic Investigation of Acid-Catalyzed Cleavage of Aryl-Ether Linkages: Implications for Lignin Depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, M. R.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-oxygen bonds are the primary inter-monomer linkages lignin polymers in plant cell walls, and as such, catalyst development to cleave these linkages is of paramount importance to deconstruct biomass to its constituent monomers for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. For many decades, acid catalysis has been used to depolymerize lignin. Lignin is a primary component of plant cell walls, which is connected primarily by aryl-ether linkages, and the mechanism of its deconstruction by acid is not well understood, likely due to its heterogeneous and complex nature compared to cellulose. For effective biomass conversion strategies, utilization of lignin is of significant relevance and as such understanding the mechanisms of catalytic lignin deconstruction to constituent monomers and oligomers is of keen interest. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the acid catalysis of a range of dimeric species exhibiting the b-O-4 linkage, the most common inter-monomer linkage in lignin. We demonstrate that the presence of a phenolic species dramatically increases the rate of cleavage in acid at 150 degrees C. Quantum mechanical calculations on dimers with the para-hydroxyl group demonstrate that this acid-catalyzed pathway differs from the nonphenolic dimmers. Importantly, this result implies that depolymerization of native lignin in the plant cell wall will proceed via an unzipping mechanism wherein b-O-4 linkages will be cleaved from the ends of the branched, polymer chains inwards toward the center of the polymer. To test this hypothesis further, we synthesized a homopolymer of b-O-4 with a phenolic hydroxyl group, and demonstrate that it is cleaved in acid from the end containing the phenolic hydroxyl group. This result suggests that genetic modifications to lignin biosynthesis pathways in plants that will enable lower severity processes to fractionate lignin for upgrading and for easier access to the carbohydrate fraction of

  19. Microtubules are the only structural constituent of the spindle apparatus required for induction of cell cleavage.

    PubMed

    Alsop, G Bradley; Zhang, Dahong

    2003-08-01

    Structural constituents of the spindle apparatus essential for cleavage induction remain undefined. Findings from various cell types using different approaches suggest the importance of all structural constituents, including asters, the central spindle, and chromosomes. In this study, we systematically dissected the role of each constituent in cleavage induction in grasshopper spermatocytes and narrowed the essential one down to bundled microtubules. Using micromanipulation, we produced "cells" containing only asters, a truncated central spindle lacking both asters and chromosomes, or microtubules alone. We show that furrow induction occurs under all circumstances, so long as sufficient microtubules are present. Microtubules, as the only spindle structural constituent, undergo dramatic, stage-specific reorganizations, radiating toward cell cortex in "metaphase," disassembling in "anaphase," and bundling into arrays in "telophase." Furrow induction usually occurs at multisites around microtubule bundles, but only those induced by sustained bundles ingress. We suggest that microtubules, regardless of source, are the only structural constituent of the spindle apparatus essential for cleavage furrow induction. PMID:12900392

  20. Amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Batten, Margaret R; Senior, Bernard W; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-03-01

    The amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by IgA1 proteases of different species of Streptococcus were investigated. Recombinant IgA1 antibodies were generated with point mutations at proline 227 and threonine 228, the residues lying on either side of the peptide bond at which all streptococcal IgA1 proteases cleave wild-type human IgA1. The amino acid substitutions produced no major effect upon the structure of the mutant IgA1 antibodies or their functional ability to bind to Fcalpha receptors. However, the substitutions had a substantial effect upon sensitivity to cleavage with some streptococcal IgA1 proteases, with, in some cases, a single point mutation rendering the antibody resistant to a particular IgA1 protease. This effect was least marked with the IgA1 protease from Streptococcus pneumoniae, which showed no absolute requirement for either proline or threonine at residues 227 to 228. By contrast, the IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis had an absolute requirement for proline at 227 but not for threonine at 228, which could be replaced by valine. There was evidence in S. mitis that proteases from different strains may have different amino acid requirements for cleavage. Remarkably, some streptococcal proteases appeared able to cleave the hinge at a distant alternative site if substitution prevented efficient cleavage of the original site. Hence, this study has identified key residues required for the recognition of the IgA1 hinge as a substrate by streptococcal IgA1 proteases, and it marks a preliminary step towards development of specific enzyme inhibitors. PMID:12595464

  1. DNA cleavage by new oxovanadium(IV) complexes of N-salicylidene alpha-amino acids and phenanthroline bases in the photodynamic therapy window.

    PubMed

    Sasmal, Pijus K; Patra, Ashis K; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2007-12-24

    Oxovanadium(IV) complexes [VO(salmet)(B)] (1-3) and [VO(saltrp)(B)] (4-6), where salmet and saltrp are N-salicylidene-l-methionate and N-salicylidene-l-tryptophanate, respectively, and B is a N,N-donor heterocyclic base (viz. 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, 1, 4), dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, 2, 5), and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz, 3, 6)) are prepared and characterized and their DNA binding and photoinduced DNA cleavage activity studied. Complexes 1, 2, and 4 are structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The molecular structure shows the presence of a vanadyl group in the VO3N3 coordination geometry. The dianionic alpha-amino acid Schiff base acts as a tridentate O,N,O-donor ligand in a meridional binding mode. The N,N-donor heterocyclic base displays a chelating mode of bonding with a N-donor site trans to the oxo group. The complexes show a d-d band in the range of 680-710 nm in DMF with a shoulder near 840 nm. They exhibit an irreversible oxidative cyclic voltammetric response near 0.8 V assignable to the V(V)/V(IV) couple and a quasi-reversible V(IV)/V(III) redox couple near -1.1 V vs SCE in DMF-0.1 M TBAP. The complexes show good binding propensity to calf thymus DNA giving binding constant values in the range from 5.2 x 10(4) to 7.2 x 10(5) M(-1). The binding site size, thermal melting, and viscosity data suggest DNA surface and/or groove binding nature of the complexes. The complexes show poor "chemical nuclease" activity in the dark in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid or hydrogen peroxide. The dpq and dppz complexes show efficient DNA cleavage activity on irradiation with UV-A light of 365 nm via a mechanistic pathway involving formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species. They also show significant DNA cleavage activity on photoexcitation in red light (>750 nm) by (1)O2 species. Observation of red-light-induced cleavage of DNA is unprecedented in the vanadium chemistry. The DNA cleavage activity is

  2. Structural Basis for Accelerated Cleavage of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI) by Human Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Salameh,M.; Soares, A.; Hockla, A.; Radisky, E.

    2008-01-01

    Human mesotrypsin is an isoform of trypsin that displays unusual resistance to polypeptide trypsin inhibitors and has been observed to cleave several such inhibitors as substrates. Whereas substitution of arginine for the highly conserved glycine 193 in the trypsin active site has been implicated as a critical factor in the inhibitor resistance of mesotrypsin, how this substitution leads to accelerated inhibitor cleavage is not clear. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) forms an extremely stable and cleavage-resistant complex with trypsin, and thus provides a rigorous challenge of mesotrypsin catalytic activity toward polypeptide inhibitors. Here, we report kinetic constants for mesotrypsin and the highly homologous (but inhibitor sensitive) human cationic trypsin, describing inhibition by, and cleavage of BPTI, as well as crystal structures of the mesotrypsin-BPTI and human cationic trypsin-BPTI complexes. We find that mesotrypsin cleaves BPTI with a rate constant accelerated 350-fold over that of human cationic trypsin and 150,000-fold over that of bovine trypsin. From the crystal structures, we see that small conformational adjustments limited to several side chains enable mesotrypsin-BPTI complex formation, surmounting the predicted steric clash introduced by Arg-193. Our results show that the mesotrypsin-BPTI interface favors catalysis through (a) electrostatic repulsion between the closely spaced mesotrypsin Arg-193 and BPTI Arg-17, and (b) elimination of two hydrogen bonds between the enzyme and the amine leaving group portion of BPTI. Our model predicts that these deleterious interactions accelerate leaving group dissociation and deacylation.

  3. Acquisition of a novel eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site confers intracellular cleavage of an H7N7 influenza virus hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Sun, Xiangjie; Chung, Changik; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2012-12-05

    A critical feature of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1 and H7N7) is the efficient intracellular cleavage of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. H7N7 viruses also exist in equine species, and a unique feature of the equine H7N7 HA is the presence of an eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site. Here, we show that three histidine residues within the unique insertion of the equine H7N7 HA are essential for intracellular cleavage. An asparagine residue within the insertion-derived glycosylation site was also found to be essential for intracellular cleavage. The presence of the histidine residues also appear to be involved in triggering fusion, since mutation of the histidine residues resulted in a destabilizing effect. Importantly, the addition of a tetrabasic site and the eleven amino acid insertion conferred efficient intracellular cleavage to the HA of an H7N3 low pathogenicity avian influenza virus. Our studies show that acquisition of the eleven amino acid insertion offers an alternative mechanism for intracellular cleavage of influenza HA.

  4. Crystal Structure of Thermus Aquaticus Gfh1, a Gre-factor Paralog that Inhibits rather than Stimulates transcript Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Lamour,V.; Hogan, B.; Erie, D.; Darst, S.

    2006-01-01

    Transcription elongation in bacteria is promoted by Gre-factors, which stimulate an endogenous, endonucleolytic transcript cleavage activity of the RNA polymerase. A GreA paralog, Gfh1, present in Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus, has the opposite effect on elongation complexes, inhibiting rather than stimulating transcript cleavage. We have determined the 3.3 Angstroms-resolution X-ray crystal structure of T. aquaticus Gfh1. The structure reveals an N-terminal and a C-terminal domain with close structural similarity to the domains of GreA, but with an unexpected conformational change in terms of the orientation of the domains with respect to each other. However, structural and functional analysis suggests that when complexed with RNA polymerase, Gfh1 adopts a conformation similar to that of GreA. These results reveal considerable structural flexibility for Gfh1, and for Gre-factors in general, as suggested by structural modeling, and point to a possible role for the conformational switch in Gre-factor and Gfh1 regulation. The opposite functional effect of Gfh1 compared with GreA may be determined by three structural characteristics. First, Gfh1 lacks the basic patch present in Gre-factors that likely plays a role in anchoring the 3'-fragment of the backtracked RNA. Second, the loop at the tip of the N-terminal coiled-coil is highly flexible and contains extra acidic residues compared with GreA. Third, the N-terminal coiled-coil finger lacks a kink in the first a-helix, resulting in a straight coiled-coil compared with GreA. The latter two characteristics suggest that Gfh1 chelates a magnesium ion in the RNA polymerase active site (like GreA) but in a catalytically inactive configuration.

  5. NMR structure of the active conformation of the Varkud satellite ribozyme cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Mitchell, G. Thomas; Gendron, Patrick; Major, François; Andersen, Angela A.; Collins, Richard A.; Legault, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    Substrate cleavage by the Neurospora Varkud satellite (VS) ribozyme involves a structural change in the stem-loop I substrate from an inactive to an active conformation. We have determined the NMR solution structure of a mutant stem-loop I that mimics the active conformation of the cleavage site internal loop. This structure shares many similarities, but also significant differences, with the previously determined structures of the inactive internal loop. The active internal loop displays different base-pairing interactions and forms a novel RNA fold composed exclusively of sheared G-A base pairs. From chemical-shift mapping we identified two Mg2+ binding sites in the active internal loop. One of the Mg2+ binding sites forms in the active but not the inactive conformation of the internal loop and is likely important for catalysis. Using the structure comparison program mc-search, we identified the active internal loop fold in other RNA structures. In Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA, this RNA fold is directly involved in a long-range tertiary interaction. An analogous tertiary interaction may form between the active internal loop of the substrate and the catalytic domain of the VS ribozyme. The combination of NMR and bioinformatic approaches presented here has identified a novel RNA fold and provides insights into the structural basis of catalytic function in the Neurospora VS ribozyme. PMID:12782785

  6. Synthesis of o-Carboxyarylacrylic Acids by Room Temperature Oxidative Cleavage of Hydroxynaphthalenes and Higher Aromatics with Oxone.

    PubMed

    Parida, Keshaba Nanda; Moorthy, Jarugu Narasimha

    2015-08-21

    A simple procedure for the synthesis of a variety of o-carboxyarylacrylic acids has been developed with Oxone (2KHSO5·KHSO4·K2SO4); the oxidation reaction involves the stirring of methoxy/hydroxy-substituted naphthalenes, phenanthrenes, anthracenes, etc. with Oxone in an acetonitrile-water mixture (1:1, v/v) at rt. Mechanistically, the reaction proceeds via initial oxidation of naphthalene to o-quinone, which undergoes cleavage to the corresponding o-carboxyarylacrylic acid. The higher aromatics are found to yield carboxymethyl lactones derived from the initially formed o-carboxyarylacrylic acids. PMID:26194877

  7. Structure and Cell Wall Cleavage by Modular Lytic Transglycosylase MltC of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The lytic transglycosylases are essential bacterial enzymes that catalyze the nonhydrolytic cleavage of the glycan strands of the bacterial cell wall. We describe here the structural and catalytic properties of MltC, one of the seven lytic transglycosylases found in the genome of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. The 2.3 Å resolution X-ray structure of a soluble construct of MltC shows a unique, compared to known lytic transglycosylase structures, two-domain structure characterized by an expansive active site of 53 Å length extending through an interface between the domains. The structures of three complexes of MltC with cell wall analogues suggest the positioning of the peptidoglycan in the active site both as a substrate and as a product. One complex is suggested to correspond to an intermediate in the course of sequential and exolytic cleavage of the peptidoglycan. Moreover, MltC partitioned its reactive oxocarbenium-like intermediate between trapping by the C6-hydroxyl of the muramyl moiety (lytic transglycosylase activity, the major path) and by water (muramidase activity). Genomic analysis identifies the presence of an MltC homologue in no less than 791 bacterial genomes. While the role of MltC in cell wall assembly and maturation remains uncertain, we propose a functional role for this enzyme as befits the uniqueness of its two-domain structure. PMID:24988330

  8. Structure and cell wall cleavage by modular lytic transglycosylase MltC of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Artola-Recolons, Cecilia; Lee, Mijoon; Bernardo-García, Noelia; Blázquez, Blas; Hesek, Dusan; Bartual, Sergio G; Mahasenan, Kiran V; Lastochkin, Elena; Pi, Hualiang; Boggess, Bill; Meindl, Kathrin; Usón, Isabel; Fisher, Jed F; Mobashery, Shahriar; Hermoso, Juan A

    2014-09-19

    The lytic transglycosylases are essential bacterial enzymes that catalyze the nonhydrolytic cleavage of the glycan strands of the bacterial cell wall. We describe here the structural and catalytic properties of MltC, one of the seven lytic transglycosylases found in the genome of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. The 2.3 Å resolution X-ray structure of a soluble construct of MltC shows a unique, compared to known lytic transglycosylase structures, two-domain structure characterized by an expansive active site of 53 Å length extending through an interface between the domains. The structures of three complexes of MltC with cell wall analogues suggest the positioning of the peptidoglycan in the active site both as a substrate and as a product. One complex is suggested to correspond to an intermediate in the course of sequential and exolytic cleavage of the peptidoglycan. Moreover, MltC partitioned its reactive oxocarbenium-like intermediate between trapping by the C6-hydroxyl of the muramyl moiety (lytic transglycosylase activity, the major path) and by water (muramidase activity). Genomic analysis identifies the presence of an MltC homologue in no less than 791 bacterial genomes. While the role of MltC in cell wall assembly and maturation remains uncertain, we propose a functional role for this enzyme as befits the uniqueness of its two-domain structure. PMID:24988330

  9. Serum Collagen Type II Cleavage Epitope and Serum Hyaluronic Acid as Biomarkers for Treatment Monitoring of Dogs with Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, José M.; Rubio, Mónica; Spinella, Giuseppe; Cuervo, Belén; Sopena, Joaquín; Cugat, Ramón; Garcia-Balletbó, Montserrat; Dominguez, Juan M.; Granados, Maria; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Ceron, José J.; Carrillo, José M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of serum type II collagen cleavage epitope and serum hyaluronic acid as biomarkers for treatment monitoring in osteoarthritic dogs. For this purpose, a treatment model based on mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue combined with plasma rich in growth factors was used. This clinical study included 10 dogs with hip osteoarthritis. Both analytes were measured in serum at baseline, just before applying the treatment, and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. These results were compared with those obtained from force plate analysis using the same animals during the same study period. Levels of type II collagen cleavage epitope decreased and those of hyaluronic acid increased with clinical improvement objectively verified via force plate analysis, suggesting these two biomarkers could be effective as indicators of clinical development of joint disease in dogs. PMID:26886592

  10. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array*

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca2+-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10′ of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. The kcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5–1,710 M−1s−1. Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and −2 with a similar kcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5′. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P′-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achieved kcat/Km prediction with r = 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3′, and P4′ sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our

  11. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array.

    PubMed

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10' of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. Thekcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5-1,710 M(-1)s(-1) Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and -2 with a similarkcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5'. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P'-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achievedkcat/Kmprediction withr= 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3', and P4' sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our binary-QSAR model

  12. Semiconductor Surface Structure Determination via Low Energy Positron Diffraction: Cleavage Faces of Cadmium-Selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsky, Thomas Neil

    Low energy positron diffraction (LEPD) is used to determine the surface structure of the wurtzite CdSe(1010) and CdSe(1120) cleavage faces. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) is also performed, utilizing a beam optical system which produces both a e^+ and e ^- beam with the same phase-space characteristics, i.e. 1 mm-deg. Both e^+ and e^- measurements were collected from the same sample surface of each cleavage face, removing systematic errors from the comparison. Dynamical calculations were performed for both the LEPD and LEED using the R-factor methodology of Duke et al. For the (1010) surface, the calculations and analyses were performed at Brandeis via link to the John Von Neumann Supercomputer Center at Princeton, NJ. For the (1120) surface, the LEPD calculations and analysis was performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories, while the LEED calculations were performed by Princeton University. Resulting surface structures for CdSe(1010) are in accord with the proposed reconstruction model of Wang and Duke, indicating a bond-length-conserving rotation of the surface dimer. The best-fit values of the bond-rotation angle omega are 15^circ +/- 5^circ as determined by LEPD and omega = 21.5^ circ +/- 4^ circ as determined by LEED. These values are in agreement with the predicted value of omega = 17^circ. For CdSe(1120), the best-fit LEPD results indicate an omega of 27^circ +/- 7^circ while preliminary LEED results indicate an omega of 35^circ +/- 5^circ. Both values for this previously undetermined surface are also in agreement with the theoretically predicted value of omega = 32^circ . These results serve to confirm a universal model of reconstruction which describes the surface structures of both the zincblende and wurtzite compound semiconductor cleavage faces.

  13. Structural basis for DNA cleavage by the potent antiproliferative agent (-)-lomaiviticin A.

    PubMed

    Woo, Christina M; Li, Zhenwu; Paulson, Eric K; Herzon, Seth B

    2016-03-15

    (-)-Lomaiviticin A (1) is a complex antiproliferative metabolite that inhibits the growth of many cultured cancer cell lines at low nanomolar-picomolar concentrations. (-)-Lomaiviticin A (1) possesses a C2-symmetric structure that contains two unusual diazotetrahydrobenzo[b]fluorene (diazofluorene) functional groups. Nucleophilic activation of each diazofluorene within 1 produces vinyl radical intermediates that affect hydrogen atom abstraction from DNA, leading to the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Certain DNA DSB repair-deficient cell lines are sensitized toward 1, and 1 is under evaluation in preclinical models of these tumor types. However, the mode of binding of 1 to DNA had not been determined. Here we elucidate the structure of a 1:1 complex between 1 and the duplex d(GCTATAGC)2 by NMR spectroscopy and computational modeling. Unexpectedly, we show that both diazofluorene residues of 1 penetrate the duplex. This binding disrupts base pairing leading to ejection of the central AT bases, while placing the proreactive centers of 1 in close proximity to each strand. DNA binding may also enhance the reactivity of 1 toward nucleophilic activation through steric compression and conformational restriction (an example of shape-dependent catalysis). This study provides a structural basis for the DNA cleavage activity of 1, will guide the design of synthetic DNA-activated DNA cleavage agents, and underscores the utility of natural products to reveal novel modes of small molecule-DNA association. PMID:26929332

  14. New tools provide a second look at HDV ribozyme structure, dynamics and cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Kapral, Gary J.; Jain, Swati; Noeske, Jonas; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Richardson, David C.; Richardson, Jane S.

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme is a self-cleaving RNA enzyme essential for processing viral transcripts during rolling circle viral replication. The first crystal structure of the cleaved ribozyme was solved in 1998, followed by structures of uncleaved, mutant-inhibited and ion-complexed forms. Recently, methods have been developed that make the task of modeling RNA structure and dynamics significantly easier and more reliable. We have used ERRASER and PHENIX to rebuild and re-refine the cleaved and cis-acting C75U-inhibited structures of the HDV ribozyme. The results correct local conformations and identify alternates for RNA residues, many in functionally important regions, leading to improved R values and model validation statistics for both structures. We compare the rebuilt structures to a higher resolution, trans-acting deoxy-inhibited structure of the ribozyme, and conclude that although both inhibited structures are consistent with the currently accepted hammerhead-like mechanism of cleavage, they do not add direct structural evidence to the biochemical and modeling data. However, the rebuilt structures (PDBs: 4PR6, 4PRF) provide a more robust starting point for research on the dynamics and catalytic mechanism of the HDV ribozyme and demonstrate the power of new techniques to make significant improvements in RNA structures that impact biologically relevant conclusions. PMID:25326328

  15. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 2. Major structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Polycarboxylic acid structures that account for the strong-acid characteristics (pKa1 near 2.0) were examined for fulvic acid from the Suwannee River. Studies of model compounds demonstrated that pKa values near 2.0 occur only if the ??-ether or ??-ester groups were in cyclic structures with two to three additional electronegative functional groups (carboxyl, ester, ketone, aromatic groups) at adjacent positions on the ring. Ester linkage removal by alkaline hydrolysis and destruction of ether linkages through cleavage and reduction with hydriodic acid confirmed that the strong carboxyl acidity in fulvic acid was associated with polycarboxylic ??-ether and ??-ester structures. Studies of hypothetical structural models of fulvic acid indicated possible relation of these polycarboxylic structures with the amphiphilic and metal-binding properties of fulvic acid.

  16. The tertiary structure of the four-way DNA junction affords protection against DNase I cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Murchie, A I; Carter, W A; Portugal, J; Lilley, D M

    1990-01-01

    The accessibility of phosphodiester bonds in the DNA of four-way helical junctions has been probed with the nuclease DNase I. Regions of protection were observed on all four strands of the junctions, that tended to be longer on the strands that are exchanged between the coaxially stacked pairs of helices. The protected regions on the continuous strands of the stacked helices were not located exactly at the junction, but were displaced towards the 3' side of the strand. This is the region of backbone that becomes located in the major groove of the opposed helix in the non-crossed, right-handed structure for the junction, and might therefore be predicted to be protected against cleavage by an enzyme. However, the major grooves of the structure remain accessible to the much smaller probe dimethyl sulphate. Images PMID:2339051

  17. Crystal structure of Bombyx mori arylphorins reveals a 3:3 heterohexamer with multiple papain cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yong; Li, Jianwei; Li, Yi; Dong, Zhaoming; Xia, Qingyou; Yuan, Y Adam

    2014-06-01

    In holometabolous insects, the accumulation and utilization of storage proteins (SPs), including arylphorins and methionine-rich proteins, are critical for the insect metamorphosis. SPs function as amino acids reserves, which are synthesized in fat body, secreted into the larval hemolymph and taken up by fat body shortly before pupation. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms of digestion and utilization of SPs during development are largely unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of Bombyx mori arylphorins at 2.8 Å, which displays a heterohexameric structural arrangement formed by trimerization of dimers comprising two structural similar arylphorins. Our limited proteolysis assay and microarray data strongly suggest that papain-like proteases are the major players for B. mori arylphorins digestion in vitro and in vivo. Consistent with the biochemical data, dozens of papain cleavage sites are mapped on the surface of the heterohexameric structure of B. mori arylphorins. Hence, our results provide the insightful information to understand the metamorphosis of holometabolous insects at molecular level. PMID:24639361

  18. Recovery of Recombinant Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Reveals a Function for Non-structural Glycoproteins Cleavage by Furin

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Éric; Zivcec, Marko; Chakrabarti, Ayan K.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Albariño, César G.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.

    2015-01-01

    Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a negative-strand RNA virus of the family Bunyaviridae (genus: Nairovirus). In humans, CCHFV causes fever, hemorrhage, severe thrombocytopenia, and high fatality. A major impediment in precisely determining the basis of CCHFV’s high pathogenicity has been the lack of methodology to produce recombinant CCHFV. We developed a reverse genetics system based on transfecting plasmids into BSR-T7/5 and Huh7 cells. In our system, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase produced complementary RNA copies of the viral S, M, and L segments that were encapsidated with the support, in trans, of CCHFV nucleoprotein and L polymerase. The system was optimized to systematically recover high yields of infectious CCHFV. Additionally, we tested the ability of the system to produce specifically designed CCHFV mutants. The M segment encodes a polyprotein that is processed by host proprotein convertases (PCs), including the site-1 protease (S1P) and furin-like PCs. S1P and furin cleavages are necessary for producing the non-structural glycoprotein GP38, while S1P cleavage yields structural Gn. We studied the role of furin cleavage by rescuing a recombinant CCHFV encoding a virus glycoprotein precursor lacking a functional furin cleavage motif (RSKR mutated to ASKA). The ASKA mutation blocked glycoprotein precursor’s maturation to GP38, and Gn precursor’s maturation to Gn was slightly diminished. Furin cleavage was not essential for replication, as blocking furin cleavage resulted only in transient reduction of CCHFV titers, suggesting that either GP38 and/or decreased Gn maturation accounted for the reduced virion production. Our data demonstrate that nairoviruses can be produced by reverse genetics, and the utility of our system uncovered a function for furin cleavage. This viral rescue system could be further used to study the CCHFV replication cycle and facilitate the development of efficacious vaccines to counter this biological and public

  19. Groove binding mediated structural modulation and DNA cleavage by quinoline appended chalcone derivative.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Himank; Devaraji, Vinod; Prasath, Rangaraj; Jadhao, Manojkumar; Joshi, Ritika; Bhavana, Purushothaman; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The present study embodies the detail DNA binding interaction of a potential bioactive quinoline appended chalcone derivative (E)-3-(anthracen-10-yl)-1-(6,8-dibromo-2-methylquinolin-3-yl)prop-2-en-1-one (ADMQ) with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) and its consequences by UV-Vis absorption, steady state fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence anisotropy, circular dichromism, helix melting, agarose gel electrophoresis, molecular docking, Induced Fit Docking (IFD) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence study reveal that the molecule undergoes considerable interaction with the nucleic acid. The control KI quenching experiment shows the lesser accessibility of ADMQ molecule to the ionic quencher (I(-)) in presence of ctDNA as compared to the bulk aqueous phase. Insignificant change in helix melting temperature as well as in circular dichromism (CD) spectra points toward non-covalent groove binding interaction. The moderate rotational confinement of this chalcone derivative (anisotropy=0.106) trapped in the nucleic acid environment, the comparative displacement assay with well-known minor groove binder Hoechst 33258 and intercalator Ethidium Bromide establishes the minor groove binding interactions of the probe molecule. Molecular docking, IFD and MD simulation reveal that the DNA undergoes prominent morphological changes in terms of helix unwinding and bending to accommodate ADMQ in a crescent shape at an angle of 110° in a sequence specific manner. During interaction, ADMQ rigidifies and bends the sugar phosphate backbone of the nucleic acid and thereby shortens its overall length by 3.02Å. Agarose gel electrophoresis experiment with plasmid pBR 322 reveals that the groove binded ADMQ result in a concentration dependent cleavage of plasmid DNA into its supercoiled and nicked circular form. The consolidated spectroscopic research described herein provides quantitative insight into the interaction of a heterocyclic chalcone derivative

  20. Label-free electrochemical nucleic acid biosensing by tandem polymerization and cleavage-mediated cascade target recycling and DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Gong, Hongwei; Wang, Yanqun; Wang, Li

    2016-03-15

    Owing to the intrinsic importance of nucleic acid as bio-targets, the achievement of its simple and sensitive detection with high confidence is very essential for biological studies and diagnostic purposes. Herein, a label-free, isothermal, and ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of target DNA was developed by using a tandem polymerization and cleavage-mediated cascade target recycling and DNAzyme releasing amplification strategy. Upon sensing of the nucleic acid analyte for the assembled hairpin-like probe DNA on the electrode, the DNA polymerase guided the target recycling and simultaneously triggered the lambda exonuclease cleavage, accompanied by the cascade recycling of the released new complementary strand and the amplified liberation of the G-rich sequence of the HRP-mimicking DNAzyme. The electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2 by the generated hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme was used for the signal readout and further amplification toward target response. Such tandem functional operation by DNA polymerase, lambda exonuclease and DNAzyme endows the developed biosensor with a high sensitivity and also a high confidence. A low detection limit of 5 fM with an excellent selectivity toward target DNA could be achieved. It also exhibits the distinct advantages of simplicity in probe design and biosensor fabrication, and label-free electrochemical detection, thus may offer a promising avenue for the applications in disease diagnosis and clinical biomedicine. PMID:26513289

  1. Molecular Basis of 1,6-Anhydro Bond Cleavage and Phosphoryl Transfer by Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1,6-Anhydro-N-acetylmuramic Acid Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Bacik, John-Paul; Whitworth, Garrett E.; Stubbs, Keith A.; Yadav, Anuj K.; Martin, Dylan R.; Bailey-Elkin, Ben A.; Vocadlo, David J.; Mark, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    Anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of the Gram-negative peptidoglycan (PG) recycling intermediate 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid (anhMurNAc) to N-acetylmuramic acid-6-phosphate (MurNAc-6-P). Here we present crystal structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AnmK in complex with its natural substrate, anhMurNAc, and a product of the reaction, ADP. AnmK is homodimeric, with each subunit comprised of two subdomains that are separated by a deep active site cleft, which bears similarity to the ATPase core of proteins belonging to the hexokinase-hsp70-actin superfamily of proteins. The conversion of anhMurNAc to MurNAc-6-P involves both cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro ring of anhMurNAc along with addition of a phosphoryl group to O6 of the sugar, and thus represents an unusual enzymatic mechanism involving the formal addition of H3PO4 to anhMurNAc. The structural complexes and NMR analysis of the reaction suggest that a water molecule, activated by Asp-182, attacks the anomeric carbon of anhMurNAc, aiding cleavage of the 1,6-anhydro bond and facilitating the capture of the γ phosphate of ATP by O6 via an in-line phosphoryl transfer. AnmK is active only against anhMurNAc and not the metabolically related 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramyl peptides, suggesting that the cytosolic N-acetyl-anhydromuramyl-l-alanine amidase AmpD must first remove the stem peptide from these PG muropeptide catabolites before anhMurNAc can be acted upon by AnmK. Our studies provide the foundation for a mechanistic model for the dual activities of AnmK as a hydrolase and a kinase of an unusual heterocyclic monosaccharide. PMID:21288904

  2. Structural basis of stereospecificity in the bacterial enzymatic cleavage of β-aryl ether bonds in lignin

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; Heins, Richard A.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; et al

    2015-12-04

    Here, lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, wemore » present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50–70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.« less

  3. Structural Basis of Stereospecificity in the Bacterial Enzymatic Cleavage of β-Aryl Ether Bonds in Lignin*

    PubMed Central

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; Heins, Richard A.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J.; Adams, Paul D.; Phillips, George N.

    2016-01-01

    Lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50–70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin. PMID:26637355

  4. Structural Basis of Stereospecificity in the Bacterial Enzymatic Cleavage of β-Aryl Ether Bonds in Lignin.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Kate E; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L; Heins, Richard A; McAndrew, Ryan P; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C; Noguera, Daniel R; Simmons, Blake A; Sale, Kenneth L; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J; Adams, Paul D; Phillips, George N

    2016-03-01

    Lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50-70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin. PMID:26637355

  5. Structural basis of stereospecificity in the bacterial enzymatic cleavage of β-aryl ether bonds in lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; Heins, Richard A.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J.; Adams, Paul D.; Phillips, George N.

    2015-12-04

    Here, lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50–70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA binding and photo-induced DNA cleavage activity of (S-methyl-L-cysteine)copper(II) complexes of heterocyclic bases.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ashis K; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2007-02-01

    Ternary S-methyl-L-cysteine (SMe-l-cys) copper(II) complexes [Cu(SMe-L-cys)(B)(H(2)O)](X) (1-4), where the heterocyclic base B is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, 1), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, 2), dipyridoquinoxaline (dpq, 3) and dipyridophenazine (dppz, 4), and X is ClO(4)(-) (1-3) or NO(3)(-) (4), are prepared and their DNA binding and cleavage properties studied. Complexes 2 and 4 are structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. Both the crystal structures show distorted square-pyramidal (4+1) CuN(3)O(2) coordination geometry of the complexes in which the N,O-donor S-methyl-L-cysteine and N,N-donor heterocyclic base bind at the basal plane with a water molecule as the axial ligand. In addition, the dppz structure shows the presence of a 1D-chain formed due to covalent linkage of the carboxylate oxygen atom belonging to another molecule at the elongated axial site. The crystal structures show chemically significant non-covalent interactions like hydrogen bonding involving the axial aqua ligand and pi-pi interactions between dppz ligands. The complexes display a d-d band in the range of 605-654 nm in aqueous dimethylformamide (DMF) solution (9:1 v/v). The redox active complexes show quasireversible cyclic voltammetric response near 0.1 V in DMF assignable to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The complexes show good binding affinity to calf thymus (CT) DNA giving the order: 4 (dppz)>3 (dpq)>2 (phen)>1 (bpy). The intrinsic binding constants, obtained from UV-visible spectroscopic studies, are 1.3x10(4) and 2.15 x 10(4) M(-1) for 3 and 4, respectively. Control DNA cleavage experiments using pUC19 supercoiled (SC) DNA and minor groove binder distamycin suggest major groove binding propensity for the dppz complex, while the phen and dpq complexes bind at the minor groove of DNA. Complexes 2-4 show DNA cleavage activity in dark in the presence of a reducing agent 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) via a mechanistic pathway involving formation of hydroxyl radical as the reactive

  7. Structure of the ribozyme substrate hairpin of Neurospora VS RNA: a close look at the cleavage site.

    PubMed Central

    Michiels, P J; Schouten, C H; Hilbers, C W; Heus, H A

    2000-01-01

    The cleavage site of the Neurospora VS RNA ribozyme is located in a separate hairpin domain containing a hexanucleotide internal loop with an A-C mismatch and two adjacent G-A mismatches. The solution structure of the internal loop and helix la of the ribozyme substrate hairpin has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 2 nt in the internal loop, flanking the cleavage site, a guanine and adenine, are involved in two sheared G.A base pairs similar to the magnesium ion-binding site of the hammerhead ribozyme. Adjacent to the tandem G.A base pairs, the adenine and cytidine, which are important for cleavage, form a noncanonical wobble A+-C base pair. The dynamic properties of the internal loop and details of the high-resolution structure support the view that the hairpin structure represents a ground state, which has to undergo a conformational change prior to cleavage. Results of chemical modification and mutagenesis data of the Neurospora VS RNA ribozyme can be explained in context with the present three-dimensional structure. PMID:11142381

  8. Chemical feasibility of the general acid/base mechanism of glmS ribozyme self-cleavage.

    PubMed

    Dubecký, Matúš; Walter, Nils G; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel

    2015-10-01

    In numerous Gram-positive bacteria, the glmS ribozyme or catalytic riboswitch regulates the expression of glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) synthase via site-specific cleavage of its sugar-phosphate backbone in response to GlcN6P ligand binding. Biochemical data have suggested a crucial catalytic role for an active site guanine (G40 in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, G33 in Bacillus anthracis). We used hybrid quantum chemical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations to probe the mechanism where G40 is deprotonated and acts as a general base. The calculations suggest that the deprotonated guanine G40(-) is sufficiently reactive to overcome the thermodynamic penalty arising from its rare protonation state, and thus is able to activate the A-1(2'-OH) group toward nucleophilic attack on the adjacent backbone. Furthermore, deprotonation of A-1(2'-OH) and nucleophilic attack are predicted to occur as separate steps, where activation of A-1(2'-OH) precedes nucleophilic attack. Conversely, the transition state associated with the rate-determining step corresponds to concurrent nucleophilic attack and protonation of the G1(O5') leaving group by the ammonium moiety of the GlcN6P cofactor. Overall, our calculations help to explain the crucial roles of G40 (as a general base) and GlcN6P (as a general acid) during glmS ribozyme self-cleavage. In addition, we show that the QM/MM description of the glmS ribozyme self-cleavage reaction is significantly more sensitive to the size of the QM region and the quality of the QM-MM coupling than that of other small ribozymes. PMID:25858644

  9. Effects of S1 Cleavage on the Structure, Surface Export, and Signaling Activity of Human Notch1 and Notch2

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Wendy R.; Vardar-Ulu, Didem; L'Heureux, Sarah; Ashworth, Todd; Malecki, Michael J.; Sanchez-Irizarry, Cheryll; McArthur, Debbie G.; Histen, Gavin; Mitchell, Jennifer L.; Aster, Jon C.; Blacklow, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Notch receptors are normally cleaved during maturation by a furin-like protease at an extracellular site termed S1, creating a heterodimer of non-covalently associated subunits. The S1 site lies within a key negative regulatory region (NRR) of the receptor, which contains three highly conserved Lin12/Notch repeats and a heterodimerization domain (HD) that interact to prevent premature signaling in the absence of ligands. Because the role of S1 cleavage in Notch signaling remains unresolved, we investigated the effect of S1 cleavage on the structure, surface trafficking and ligand-mediated activation of human Notch1 and Notch2, as well as on ligand-independent activation of Notch1 by mutations found in human leukemia. Principal Findings The X-ray structure of the Notch1 NRR after furin cleavage shows little change when compared with that of an engineered Notch1 NRR lacking the S1-cleavage loop. Likewise, NMR studies of the Notch2 HD domain show that the loop containing the S1 site can be removed or cleaved without causing a substantial change in its structure. However, Notch1 and Notch2 receptors engineered to resist S1 cleavage exhibit unexpected differences in surface delivery and signaling competence: S1-resistant Notch1 receptors exhibit decreased, but detectable, surface expression and ligand-mediated receptor activation, whereas S1-resistant Notch2 receptors are fully competent for cell surface delivery and for activation by ligands. Variable dependence on S1 cleavage also extends to T-ALL-associated NRR mutations, as common class 1 mutations display variable decrements in ligand-independent activation when introduced into furin-resistant receptors, whereas a class 2 mutation exhibits increased signaling activity. Conclusions/Significance S1 cleavage has distinct effects on the surface expression of Notch1 and Notch2, but is not generally required for physiologic or pathophysiologic activation of Notch proteins. These findings are consistent with

  10. Effects of S1 Cleavage on the Structure, Surface Export, and Signaling Activity of Human Notch1 and Notch2

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Wendy R.; Vardar-Ulu, Didem; L'Heureux, Sarah; Ashworth, Todd; Malecki, Michael J.; Sanchez-Irizarry, Cheryll; McArthur, Debbie G.; Histen, Gavin; Mitchell, Jennifer L.; Aster, Jon C.; Blacklow, Stephen C.

    2009-09-25

    Notch receptors are normally cleaved during maturation by a furin-like protease at an extracellular site termed S1, creating a heterodimer of non-covalently associated subunits. The S1 site lies within a key negative regulatory region (NRR) of the receptor, which contains three highly conserved Lin12/Notch repeats and a heterodimerization domain (HD) that interact to prevent premature signaling in the absence of ligands. Because the role of S1 cleavage in Notch signaling remains unresolved, we investigated the effect of S1 cleavage on the structure, surface trafficking and ligand-mediated activation of human Notch1 and Notch2, as well as on ligand-independent activation of Notch1 by mutations found in human leukemia. The X-ray structure of the Notch1 NRR after furin cleavage shows little change when compared with that of an engineered Notch1 NRR lacking the S1-cleavage loop. Likewise, NMR studies of the Notch2 HD domain show that the loop containing the S1 site can be removed or cleaved without causing a substantial change in its structure. However, Notch1 and Notch2 receptors engineered to resist S1 cleavage exhibit unexpected differences in surface delivery and signaling competence: S1-resistant Notch1 receptors exhibit decreased, but detectable, surface expression and ligand-mediated receptor activation, whereas S1-resistant Notch2 receptors are fully competent for cell surface delivery and for activation by ligands. Variable dependence on S1 cleavage also extends to T-ALL-associated NRR mutations, as common class 1 mutations display variable decrements in ligand-independent activation when introduced into furin-resistant receptors, whereas a class 2 mutation exhibits increased signaling activity. S1 cleavage has distinct effects on the surface expression of Notch1 and Notch2, but is not generally required for physiologic or pathophysiologic activation of Notch proteins. These findings are consistent with models for receptor activation in which ligand-binding or

  11. The Structural Basis of [beta]-Peptide-Specific Cleavage by the Serine Protease Cyanophycinase

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Adrienne M.; Lai, Sandy W.S.; Tavares, John; Kimber, Matthew S.

    2010-10-01

    Cyanophycin, or poly-L-Asp-multi-L-Arg, is a non-ribosomally synthesized peptidic polymer that is used for nitrogen storage by cyanobacteria and other select eubacteria. Upon synthesis, it self-associates to form insoluble granules, the degradation of which is uniquely catalyzed by a carboxy-terminal-specific protease, cyanophycinase. We have determined the structure of cyanophycinase from the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 at 1.5-{angstrom} resolution, showing that the structure is dimeric, with individual protomers resembling aspartyl dipeptidase. Kinetic characterization of the enzyme demonstrates that the enzyme displays Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k{sub cat} of 16.5 s{sup -1} and a k{sub cat}/K{sub M} of 7.5 x 10{sup -6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm that cyanophycinase is a serine protease and that Gln101, Asp172, Gln173, Arg178, Arg180 and Arg183, which form a conserved pocket adjacent to the catalytic Ser132, are functionally critical residues. Modeling indicates that cyanophycinase binds the {beta}-Asp-Arg dipeptide residue immediately N-terminal to the scissile bond in an extended conformation in this pocket, primarily recognizing this penultimate {beta}-Asp-Arg residue of the polymeric chain. Because binding and catalysis depend on substrate features unique to {beta}-linked aspartyl peptides, cyanophycinase is able to act within the cytosol without non-specific cleavage events disrupting essential cellular processes.

  12. Structurally diverse low molecular weight activators of the mammalian pre-mRNA 3′ cleavage reaction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min Ting; Nagre, Nagaraja N.; Ryan, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The 3′ end formation of mammalian pre-mRNA contributes to gene expression regulation by setting the downstream boundary of the 3′ untranslated region, which in many genes carries regulatory sequences. A large number of protein cleavage factors participate in this pre-mRNA processing step, but chemical tools to manipulate this process are lacking. Guided by a hypothesis that a PPM1 family phosphatase negatively regulates the 3′ cleavage reaction, we have found a variety of new small molecule activators of the in vitro reconstituted pre-mRNA 3′ cleavage reaction. New activators include a cyclic peptide PPM1D inhibitor, a dipeptide with modifications common to histone tails, abscisic acid and an improved L-arginine β-naphthylamide analog. The minimal concentration required for in vitro cleavage has been improved from 200 μM to the 200 nM-100 μM range. These compounds provide unexpected leads in the search for small molecule tools able to affect pre-mRNA 3′ end formation. PMID:24373842

  13. The Structural Basis for mRNA Recognition and Cleavage by the Ribosome-Dependent Endonuclease RelE

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Cajetan; Gao, Yong-Gui; Andersen, Kasper R.; Dunham, Christine M.; Kelley, Ann C.; Hentschel, Jendrik; Gerdes, Kenn; Ramakrishnan, V.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Translational control is widely used to adjust gene expression levels. During the stringent response in bacteria, mRNA is degraded on the ribosome by the ribosome-dependent endonuclease, RelE. The molecular basis for recognition of the ribosome and mRNA by RelE and the mechanism of cleavage are unknown. Here, we present crystal structures of E. coli RelE in isolation (2.5 Å) and bound to programmed Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosomes before (3.3 Å) and after (3.6 Å) cleavage. RelE occupies the A site and causes cleavage of mRNA after the second nucleotide of the codon by reorienting and activating the mRNA for 2′-OH-induced hydrolysis. Stacking of A site codon bases with conserved residues in RelE and 16S rRNA explains the requirement for the ribosome in catalysis and the subtle sequence specificity of the reaction. These structures provide detailed insight into the translational regulation on the bacterial ribosome by mRNA cleavage. PMID:20005802

  14. RNA structure-dependent uncoupling of substrate recognition and cleavage by Escherichia coli ribonuclease III

    PubMed Central

    Calin-Jageman, Irina; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2003-01-01

    Members of the ribonuclease III superfamily of double-strand-specific endoribonucleases participate in diverse RNA maturation and decay pathways. Ribonuclease III of the gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli processes rRNA and mRNA precursors, and its catalytic action can regulate gene expression by controlling mRNA translation and stability. It has been proposed that E.coli RNase III can function in a non-catalytic manner, by binding RNA without cleaving phosphodiesters. However, there has been no direct evidence for this mode of action. We describe here an RNA, derived from the T7 phage R1.1 RNase III substrate, that is resistant to cleavage in vitro by E.coli RNase III but retains comparable binding affinity. R1.1[CL3B] RNA is recognized by RNase III in the same manner as R1.1 RNA, as revealed by the similar inhibitory effects of a specific mutation in both substrates. Structure-probing assays and Mfold analysis indicate that R1.1[CL3B] RNA possesses a bulge– helix–bulge motif in place of the R1.1 asymmetric internal loop. The presence of both bulges is required for uncoupling. The bulge–helix–bulge motif acts as a ‘catalytic’ antideterminant, which is distinct from recognition antideterminants, which inhibit RNase III binding. PMID:12711683

  15. Manganese-dependent cleavage of nonphenolic lignin structures by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora in the absence of lignin peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, K.A. Jr.; Bao, W.; Kawai, S.

    1996-10-01

    Many ligninolytic fungi appear to lack lignin peroxidase (LiP), the enzyme generally thought to cleave nonphenolic structures in lignin. However, the fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, is able to degrade these nonphenolic structures. Experiments showed wood block cultures and defined liquid medium cultures of C. subvermispora rapidly deploymerized and mineralized a {sup 14}C-labeled, polyethylene glycol-linked, high-molecular-weight {beta}-O-4 lignin model compound (model I) that represents the major nonphenolic structure of lignin. The fungus cleaved model I between C{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {beta}} to release benzylic fragments, which were shown in isotope trapping experiments to be major products of model I metabolism. The C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} cleavage of {beta}-O-4 lignin structures to release benzylic fragments is characteristic of LiP catalysis, but no detectable LiP activity. Three results pointed, instead, to the participation of a different enzyme, manganese peroxidase (MnP), in the degradation of nonphenolic lignin structures by C. subvermispora. (1) The degradation of model I and of exhaustively methylated (nonphenolic), {sup 14}C-labeled, synthetic lignin by the fungus in liquid cultures was almost completely inhibited when the Mn concentration of the medium was decreased from 35 {mu}M to approximately 5 {mu}M. (2) The fungus degraded model I and methylated lignin significantly faster in the presence of Tween 80, a source of unsaturated fatty acids, than it did in the presence of Tween 20, which contains only saturated fatty acids. Previous work has shown that nonphenolic lignin structures are degraded during the MnP-mediated peroxidation of unsaturated lipids. (3) In experiments with MnP, Mn(II), and unsaturated lipid in vitro, this system mimicked intact C. subvermispora cultures in that it cleaved nonphenolic {beta}-O-4 lignin model compounds between C{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {beta}} to release a benzylic fragment. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Differential reaction kinetics, cleavage complex formation, and nonamer binding domain dependence dictate the structure-specific and sequence-specific nuclease activity of RAGs.

    PubMed

    Naik, Abani Kanta; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2012-01-20

    During V(D)J recombination, RAG (recombination-activating gene) complex cleaves DNA based on sequence specificity. Besides its physiological function, RAG has been shown to act as a structure-specific nuclease. Recently, we showed that the presence of cytosine within the single-stranded region of heteroduplex DNA is important when RAGs cleave on DNA structures. In the present study, we report that heteroduplex DNA containing a bubble region can be cleaved efficiently when present along with a recombination signal sequence (RSS) in cis or trans configuration. The sequence of the bubble region influences RAG cleavage at RSS when present in cis. We also find that the kinetics of RAG cleavage differs between RSS and bubble, wherein RSS cleavage reaches maximum efficiency faster than bubble cleavage. In addition, unlike RSS, RAG cleavage at bubbles does not lead to cleavage complex formation. Finally, we show that the "nonamer binding region," which regulates RAG cleavage on RSS, is not important during RAG activity in non-B DNA structures. Therefore, in the current study, we identify the possible mechanism by which RAG cleavage is regulated when it acts as a structure-specific nuclease. PMID:22119487

  17. Distinct oxidative cleavage and modification of bovine [Cu- Zn]-SOD by an ascorbic acid/Cu(II) system: Identification of novel copper binding site on SOD molecule.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Hiroshi; Luo, Shen; Aryal, Baikuntha; Levine, Rodney L; Rao, V Ashutosh

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the combined effect of ascorbate and copper [Asc/Cu(II)] on the integrity of bovine [Cu-Zn]-superoxide dismutase (bSOD1) as a model system to study the metal catalyzed oxidation (MCO) and fragmentation of proteins. We found Asc/Cu(II) mediates specific cleavage of bSOD1 and generates 12.5 and 3.2kDa fragments in addition to oxidation/carbonylation of the protein. The effect of other tested transition metals, a metal chelator, and hydrogen peroxide on the cleavage and oxidation indicated that binding of copper to a previously unknown site on SOD1 is responsible for the Asc/Cu(II) specific cleavage and oxidation. We utilized tandem mass spectrometry to identify the specific cleavage sites of Asc/Cu(II)-treated bSOD1. Analyses of tryptic- and AspN-peptides have demonstrated the cleavage to occur at Gly31 with peptide bond breakage with Thr30 and Ser32 through diamide and α-amidation pathways, respectively. The three-dimensional structure of bSOD1 reveals the imidazole ring of His19 localized within 5Å from the α-carbon of Gly31 providing a structural basis that copper ion, most likely coordinated by His19, catalyzes the specific cleavage reaction. PMID:26872685

  18. Degradation of p-toluenesulphonic acid via sidechain oxidation, desulphonation and meta ring cleavage in Pseudomonas (Comamonas) testosteroni T-2.

    PubMed

    Locher, H H; Leisinger, T; Cook, A M

    1989-07-01

    Pseudomonas (Comamonas) testosteroni T-2 completely converted p-toluenesulphonic acid (TS) or p-sulphobenzoic acid (PSB) to cell material, CO2 and sulphate, with growth yields of about 5 g protein (mol C)-1. PSB and sulphite were excreted as transient intermediates during growth in TS-salts medium. All reactions of a catabolic pathway involving sidechain oxidation and cleavage of the sulphonate moiety as sulphite were measurable in the soluble portion of cell extracts. Degradation of TS and PSB was inducible and apparently involved at least two regulons. TS was converted to p-sulphobenzyl alcohol in a reaction requiring NAD(P)H and 1 mol O2 (mol TS)-1. This alcohol was in an equilibrium (in the presence of NAD+) with p-sulphobenzaldehyde, which was converted to PSB in an NAD(P)+-dependent reaction. PSB was desulphonated to protocatechuic acid in a reaction requiring NAD(P)H and 1 mol O2 (mol PSB)-1. Experiments with 18 O2 confirmed involvement of a dioxygenase, because both atoms of this molecular oxygen were recovered in protocatechuate. Protocatechuate was converted to 2-hydroxy-4-carboxymuconate semialdehyde by a 4.5-dioxygenase. PMID:2614395

  19. Structure sensitivity of hydrogenolytic cleavage of endocyclic and exocyclic C-C bonds in methylcyclohexane over supported iridium particles

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Hui; Gutierrez, Oliver Y.; Haller, Gary L.; Mei, Donghai; Rousseau, Roger J.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2013-01-02

    Structure sensitivities, H2 pressure effects and temperature dependencies for rates and selectivities of endo- and exocyclic C–C bond cleavage in methylcyclohexane were studied over supported Ir catalysts. The rate of endocyclic C–C bond cleavage first decreased and then increased with declining Ir dispersion from 0.65 to 0.035. The ring opening (RO) product distribution remained unchanged with varying H2 pressure on small Ir particles, while further shifting to methylhexanes with increasing H2 pressure on large particles. In contrast, the rate and selectivity of exocyclic C–C bond cleavage decreased monotonically with increasing H2 pressure and decreasing Ir particle size. The distinct dependencies of endocyclic and exocyclic C–C bond cleavage pathways on Ir dispersion and H2 pressure suggest that they are mediated by surface species with different ensemble size requirements. DFT calculations were performed on an Ir50 cluster and an Ir(111) surface, with or without pre-adsorbed hydrogen atoms, to provide insight into the observed effects of particle size and H2 pressure on RO pathways. On small Ir particles, the calculated dehydrogenation enthalpies for all endocyclic bonds were similar and affected to similar extents by H2 pressure; on large particles, the selectivity to n-heptane (via substituted C-C bond cleavage) was even lower than on small particles as a result of the least favorable adsorption and dehydrogenation energetics for hindered bonds. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The computing time is provided by the user project from EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific

  20. A new strategy for selective protein cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, D.; Cho, Ho; Schultz, P.G. )

    1990-04-11

    The ability of proteolytic enzymes and chemical reagents to selectively cleave peptides and proteins at defined sequences has greatly facilitated studies of protein structure and function. Unfortunately, only a limited number of selective peptide cleavage agents exist, in contrast to the wide array of selective nucleases available for analyzing and manipulating nucleic acid structure. The development of strategies for generating site-specific peptidases of any defined sequence would greatly facilitate the mapping of protein structural domains, protein sequencing, the generation of semisynthetic proteins, and would likely lead to the development of new therapeutic agents. The authors report here a new approach to the generation of selective protein cleavage agents that is based on oxidative cleavage of the polypeptide backbone.

  1. Effect of internal cleavage site mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 capsid protein on its structure and function.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Ferenc; Kádas, János; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2016-08-01

    The capsid protein of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been found to be a substrate of the retroviral protease in vitro, and its processing was predicted to be strongly dependent on a pH-induced conformational change. Several protease cleavage sites have been identified within the capsid protein, but the importance of its cleavage by the viral protease at the early phase of infection is controversial. To confirm the relevance of this process, we aimed to design, produce, and characterize mutant capsid proteins, in which the protein susceptibility toward HIV-1 protease is altered without affecting other steps of the viral life cycle. Our results indicate that while the introduced mutations changed the cleavage rate at the mutated sites of the capsid protein by HIV-1 protease, some of them caused only negligible or moderate structural changes (A78V, L189F, and L189I). However, the effects of other mutations (W23A, A77P, and L189P) were dramatic, as assessed by secondary structure determination or cyclophilin A-binding assay. Based on our observations, the L189F mutant capsid remains structurally and functionally unchanged and may therefore be the best candidate for use in studies aimed at better understanding the role of the protease in the early postentry events of viral infection or retrovirus-mediated gene transduction. PMID:27516963

  2. A single amino acid change, Q114R, in the cleavage-site sequence of Newcastle disease virus fusion protein attenuates viral replication and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sweety; Kumar, Sachin; Khattar, Sunil K; Samal, Siba K

    2011-10-01

    A key determinant of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) virulence is the amino acid sequence at the fusion (F) protein cleavage site. The NDV F protein is synthesized as an inactive precursor, F(0), and is activated by proteolytic cleavage between amino acids 116 and 117 to produce two disulfide-linked subunits, F(1) and F(2). The consensus sequence of the F protein cleavage site of virulent [(112)(R/K)-R-Q-(R/K)-R↓F-I(118)] and avirulent [(112)(G/E)-(K/R)-Q-(G/E)-R↓L-I(118)] strains contains a conserved glutamine residue at position 114. Recently, some NDV strains from Africa and Madagascar were isolated from healthy birds and have been reported to contain five basic residues (R-R-R-K-R↓F-I/V or R-R-R-R-R↓F-I/V) at the F protein cleavage site. In this study, we have evaluated the role of this conserved glutamine residue in the replication and pathogenicity of NDV by using the moderately pathogenic Beaudette C strain and by making Q114R, K115R and I118V mutants of the F protein in this strain. Our results showed that changing the glutamine to a basic arginine residue reduced viral replication and attenuated the pathogenicity of the virus in chickens. The pathogenicity was further reduced when the isoleucine at position 118 was substituted for valine. PMID:21677091

  3. Comparative studies of UV-induced DNA cleavage by structural isomers of an iodinated DNA ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.F.; Green, A.; Denison, L.; Pardee, M.; Kelly, D.P.; Roberts, M.; Rose, M.; Reum, M.

    1994-06-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the importance of the position of the halogen atom in iodinated DNA-binding bibenzimidazoles, with respect to sensitization of UV-A-induced DNA breakage. Three analogues of iodoHoechst 33258, denoted ortho-, meta- and paraiodoHoechst, according to the site of iodine substitution, were synthesized. Plasmid DNA (pBR322) was used to assay UV-A-induced DNA single-strand breaks (ssbs). The location of the sites of strand breakage was determined by DNA sequencing gel analysis, using a [sup 32]P-endlabelled oligoDNA with a single binding site for the ligands. A clear trend in decreasing activity of sensitization of UV-induced DNA ssbs was established: Ortho- > meta-, para- > iodoHoechst 33258. The sequencing gel studies showed that orthoiodoHoechst was distinct from the other three compounds, with respect to the sites of DNA strand breakage and the chemistry of the cleavage reaction. The position of iodine substitution in iodinated bibenzimidazoles determines the location of the carbon-centered radical on the ligand in the minor groove of DNA. DNA strand cleavage is mediated by abstraction of a nearby deoxyribosyl H-atom. Hence, the position of the radical species determines: which deoxyribosyl group is attacked (i.e., site of cleavage relative to the ligand binding site); which H-atom is abstracted, more specifically which of the five deoxyribosyl carbons is involved (i.e., the chemistry of the cleavage reaction), and the stereochemistry of the transition state for the H-atom abstraction (and hence the efficiency or extent of strand breakage). The ortho-compound represents the best example to date of iodinated DNA ligands designed as potential radiation sensitizers, as an extension of the well-established sensitization by halogenated DNA precursors. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Vibrational state controlled bond cleavage in the photodissociation of isocyanic acid (HNCO)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.S.; Berghout, H.L.; Crim, F.F.

    1995-06-01

    We report the bond selected photodissociation of isocyanic acid (HNCO). This molecule dissociates from its first excited singlet state, breaking either the N--H bond to form H+NCO ({ital X} {sup 2}{Pi}) or the C--N bond to form NH ({ital a} {sup 1}{Delta})+CO ({sup 1}{summation}{sup +}). The threshold for production of NH lies about 3900 cm{sup {minus}1} above that of NCO, and we detect both of these channels by laser induced fluorescence on either the NH or the NCO fragment. Dissociating the molecule out of a vibrationally excited state on its ground electronic surface containing four quanta of N--H stretch (4{nu}{sub 1}) enhances the efficiency of the NCO channel over the NH channel by a factor of at least 20. We reach this conclusion by comparing the results of such a vibrationally mediated photodissociation experiment to those from a conventional single photon dissociation at the same total energy (about 1000 cm{sup {minus}1} above the threshold for the NH channel). Our estimate of the branching ratio in the one photon dissociation at this energy is roughly {Phi}{sub NCO}/{Phi}{sub NH}{approx}20, and it grows to {Phi}{sub NCO}/{Phi}{sub NH}{ge}400 in the vibrationally mediated photodissociation.

  5. N-Glycosylation Improves the Pepsin Resistance of Histidine Acid Phosphatase Phytases by Enhancing Their Stability at Acidic pHs and Reducing Pepsin's Accessibility to Its Cleavage Sites

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Canfang; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Wang, Yaru; Yang, Peilong

    2015-01-01

    N-Glycosylation can modulate enzyme structure and function. In this study, we identified two pepsin-resistant histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) phytases from Yersinia kristensenii (YkAPPA) and Yersinia rohdei (YrAPPA), each having an N-glycosylation motif, and one pepsin-sensitive HAP phytase from Yersinia enterocolitica (YeAPPA) that lacked an N-glycosylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to construct mutants by altering the N-glycosylation status of each enzyme, and the mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in Pichia pastoris for biochemical characterization. Compared with those of the N-glycosylation site deletion mutants and N-deglycosylated enzymes, all N-glycosylated counterparts exhibited enhanced pepsin resistance. Introduction of the N-glycosylation site into YeAPPA as YkAPPA and YrAPPA conferred pepsin resistance, shifted the pH optimum (0.5 and 1.5 pH units downward, respectively) and improved stability at acidic pH (83.2 and 98.8% residual activities at pH 2.0 for 1 h). Replacing the pepsin cleavage sites L197 and L396 in the immediate vicinity of the N-glycosylation motifs of YkAPPA and YrAPPA with V promoted their resistance to pepsin digestion when produced in Escherichia coli but had no effect on the pepsin resistance of N-glycosylated enzymes produced in P. pastoris. Thus, N-glycosylation may improve pepsin resistance by enhancing the stability at acidic pH and reducing pepsin's accessibility to peptic cleavage sites. This study provides a strategy, namely, the manipulation of N-glycosylation, for improvement of phytase properties for use in animal feed. PMID:26637601

  6. Engineering D-Amino Acid Containing Collagen Like Peptide at the Cleavage Site of Clostridium histolyticum Collagenase for Its Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, Punitha; Jonnalagadda, Raghava Rao; Unni Nair, Balachandran

    2015-01-01

    Collagenase is an important enzyme which plays an important role in degradation of collagen in wound healing, cancer metastasis and even in embryonic development. However, the mechanism of this degradation has not yet been completely understood. In the field of biomedical and protein engineering, the design and development of new peptide based materials is of main concern. In the present work an attempt has been made to study the effect of DAla in collagen like peptide (imino-poor region of type I collagen) on the structure and stability of peptide against enzyme hydrolysis. Effect of replacement of DAla in the collagen like peptide has been studied using circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD). Our findings suggest that, DAla substitution leads to conformational changes in the secondary structure and favours the formation of polyproline II conformation than its L-counterpart in the imino-poor region of collagen like peptides. Change in the chirality of alanine at the cleavage site of collagenase in the imino-poor region inhibits collagenolytic activity. This may find application in design of peptides and peptidomimics for enzyme-substrate interaction, specifically with reference to collagen and other extra cellular matrix proteins. PMID:25973613

  7. Synthesis, spectral, crystal structure, thermal behavior, antimicrobial and DNA cleavage potential of two octahedral cadmium complexes: A supramolecular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazerozohori, M.; Musavi, S. A.; Masoudiasl, A.; Naghiha, A.; Dusek, M.; Kucerakova, M.

    2015-02-01

    Two new cadmium(II) complexes with the formula of CdL2(NCS)2 and CdL2(N3)2 (in which L is 2,2-dimethyl-N,N‧-bis-(3-phenyl-allylidene)-propane-1,3-diamine) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity measurements, FT/IR, UV-Visible, 1H and 13C NMR spectra and X-ray studies. The crystal structure analysis of CdL2(NCS)2 indicated that it crystallizes in orthorhombic system with space group of Pbca. Two Schiff base ligands are bonded to cadmium(II) ion as N2-donor chelate. Coordination geometry around the cadmium ion was found to be partially distorted octahedron. The Cd-Nimine bond distances are found in the range of 2.363(2)-2.427(2) Å while the Cd-Nisothiocyanate bond distances are 2.287(2) Å and 2.310(2) Å. The existence of C-H⋯π and C-H⋯S interactions in the CdL2(NCS)2 crystal leads to a supramolecular structure in its network. Then cadmium complexes were screened in vitro for their antibacterial and antifungal activities against two Gram-negative and two Gram-positive bacteria and also against Candida albicans as a fungus. Moreover, the compounds were subjected for DNA-cleavage potential by gel electrophoresis method. Finally thermo-gravimetric analysis of the complexes was applied for thermal behavior studies and then some thermo-kinetics activation parameters were evaluated.

  8. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  9. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  10. Synthesis, structure, DNA binding and DNA cleavage activity of oxovanadium(IV) N-salicylidene-S-methyldithiocarbazate complexes of phenanthroline bases.

    PubMed

    Sasmal, Pijus K; Patra, Ashis K; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2008-07-01

    Ternary oxovanadium(IV) complexes [VO(salmdtc)(B)] (1-3), where salmdtc is dianionic N-salicylidene-S-methyldithiocarbazate and B is N,N-donor phenanthroline bases like 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, 1), dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, 2) and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz, 3), are prepared, characterized and their DNA binding and DNA cleavage activity studied. Complex 3 is structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The molecular structure shows the presence of a vanadyl group in six-coordinate VN(3)O(2)S coordination geometry. The S-methyldithiocarbazate Schiff base acts as a tridentate NSO-donor ligand in a meridional binding mode. The N,N-donor heterocyclic base displays a chelating mode of binding with an N-donor site trans to the vanadyl oxo-group. The complexes show a d-d band in the range of 675-707 nm in DMF. They exhibit an irreversible oxidative cyclic voltammetric response near 0.9 V due to the V(V)/V(IV) couple and a quasi-reversible reductive V(IV)/V(III) redox couple near -1.0 V vs. SCE in DMF-0.1M TBAP. The complexes show good binding propensity to calf thymus DNA giving binding constant values in the range of 7.4 x 10(4)-2.3 x 10(5)M(-1). The thermal denaturation and viscosity binding data suggest DNA surface and/or groove binding nature of the complexes. The complexes show poor chemical nuclease activity in dark in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) or hydrogen peroxide. The dpq and dppz complexes show efficient DNA cleavage activity in UV-A light of 365 nm via a type-II mechanistic pathway involving formation of singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) as the reactive species. PMID:18279964

  11. Unified view of oxidative C-H bond cleavage and sulfoxidation by a nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complex via Lewis acid-promoted electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyun; Morimoto, Yuma; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2014-04-01

    Oxidative C-H bond cleavage of toluene derivatives and sulfoxidation of thioanisole derivatives by a nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complex, [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) (N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine), were remarkably enhanced by the presence of triflic acid (HOTf) and Sc(OTf)3 in acetonitrile at 298 K. All the logarithms of the observed second-order rate constants of both the oxidative C-H bond cleavage and sulfoxidation reactions exhibit remarkably unified correlations with the driving forces of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and metal ion-coupled electron transfer (MCET) in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer when the differences in the formation constants of precursor complexes between PCET and MCET were taken into account, respectively. Thus, the mechanisms of both the oxidative C-H bond cleavage of toluene derivatives and sulfoxidation of thioanisole derivatives by [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) in the presence of HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 have been unified as the rate-determining electron transfer, which is coupled with binding of [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) by proton (PCET) and Sc(OTf)3 (MCET). There was no deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) on the oxidative C-H bond cleavage of toluene via the PCET pathway, whereas a large KIE value was observed with Sc(OTf)3, which exhibited no acceleration of the oxidative C-H bond cleavage of toluene. When HOTf was replaced by DOTf, an inverse KIE (0.4) was observed for PCET from both toluene and [Ru(II)(bpy)3](2+) (bpy =2,2'-bipyridine) to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+). The PCET and MCET reactivities of [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) with Brønsted acids and various metal triflates have also been unified as a single correlation with a quantitative measure of the Lewis acidity. PMID:24605985

  12. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, Simon A.J.; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Echeverria, Ignacia; Vogel, Jonathan T.; Guan, Jiahn Chou; Tan, Bao Cai; Klee, Harry J.; McCarty, Donald R.; Amzel, L. Mario

    2011-09-06

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  13. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid W

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, S.; Gabelli, S; Echeverria, I; Vogel, J; Guan, J; Tan, B; Klee, H; McCarty, D; Amzela, M

    2010-01-01

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  14. Increasing Rate of Cleavage at Boundary between Non-structural Proteins 4B and 5A Inhibits Replication of Hepatitis C Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Herod, Morgan R.; Jones, Daniel M.; McLauchlan, John; McCormick, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    In hepatitis C virus, non-structural proteins are cleaved from the viral polyprotein by viral encoded proteases. Although proteolytic processing goes to completion, the rate of cleavage differs between different boundaries, primarily due to the sequence at these positions. However, it is not known whether slow cleavage is important for viral replication or a consequence of restrictions on sequences that can be tolerated at the cleaved ends of non-structural proteins. To address this question, mutations were introduced into the NS4B side of the NS4B5A boundary, and their effect on replication and polyprotein processing was examined in the context of a subgenomic replicon. Single mutations that modestly increased the rate of boundary processing were phenotypically silent, but a double mutation, which further increased the rate of boundary cleavage, was lethal. Rescue experiments relying on viral RNA polymerase-induced error failed to identify second site compensatory mutations. Use of a replicon library with codon degeneracy did allow identification of second site compensatory mutations, some of which fell exclusively within the NS5A side of the boundary. These mutations slowed boundary cleavage and only enhanced replication in the context of the original lethal NS4B double mutation. Overall, the data indicate that slow cleavage of the NS4B5A boundary is important and identify a previously unrecognized role for NS4B5A-containing precursors requiring them to exist for a minimum finite period of time. PMID:22084249

  15. The first crystal structure of human RNase 6 reveals a novel substrate-binding and cleavage site arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Prats-Ejarque, Guillem; Arranz-Trullén, Javier; Blanco, Jose A.; Pulido, David; Nogués, M. Victòria; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Boix, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Human RNase 6 is a cationic secreted protein that belongs to the RNase A superfamily. Its expression is induced in neutrophils and monocytes upon bacterial infection, suggesting a role in host defence. We present here the crystal structure of RNase 6 obtained at 1.72 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution, which is the first report for the protein 3D structure and thereby setting the basis for functional studies. The structure shows an overall kidney-shaped globular fold shared with the other known family members. Three sulfate anions bound to RNase 6 were found, interacting with residues at the main active site (His15, His122 and Gln14) and cationic surface-exposed residues (His36, His39, Arg66 and His67). Kinetic characterization, together with prediction of protein–nucleotide complexes by molecular dynamics, was applied to analyse the RNase 6 substrate nitrogenous base and phosphate selectivity. Our results reveal that, although RNase 6 is a moderate catalyst in comparison with the pancreatic RNase type, its structure includes lineage-specific features that facilitate its activity towards polymeric nucleotide substrates. In particular, enzyme interactions at the substrate 5′ end can provide an endonuclease-type cleavage pattern. Interestingly, the RNase 6 crystal structure revealed a novel secondary active site conformed by the His36–His39 dyad that facilitates the polynucleotide substrate catalysis. PMID:27013146

  16. The first crystal structure of human RNase 6 reveals a novel substrate-binding and cleavage site arrangement.

    PubMed

    Prats-Ejarque, Guillem; Arranz-Trullén, Javier; Blanco, Jose A; Pulido, David; Nogués, M Victòria; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Boix, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Human RNase 6 is a cationic secreted protein that belongs to the RNase A superfamily. Its expression is induced in neutrophils and monocytes upon bacterial infection, suggesting a role in host defence. We present here the crystal structure of RNase 6 obtained at 1.72 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution, which is the first report for the protein 3D structure and thereby setting the basis for functional studies. The structure shows an overall kidney-shaped globular fold shared with the other known family members. Three sulfate anions bound to RNase 6 were found, interacting with residues at the main active site (His(15), His(122) and Gln(14)) and cationic surface-exposed residues (His(36), His(39), Arg(66) and His(67)). Kinetic characterization, together with prediction of protein-nucleotide complexes by molecular dynamics, was applied to analyse the RNase 6 substrate nitrogenous base and phosphate selectivity. Our results reveal that, although RNase 6 is a moderate catalyst in comparison with the pancreatic RNase type, its structure includes lineage-specific features that facilitate its activity towards polymeric nucleotide substrates. In particular, enzyme interactions at the substrate 5' end can provide an endonuclease-type cleavage pattern. Interestingly, the RNase 6 crystal structure revealed a novel secondary active site conformed by the His(36)-His(39) dyad that facilitates the polynucleotide substrate catalysis. PMID:27013146

  17. Structural features of lignohumic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, František; Šestauberová, Martina; Hrabal, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The composition and structure of humic acids isolated from lignohumate, which is produced by hydrolytic-oxidative conversion of technical lignosulfonates, were characterized by chemical and spectral methods (UV/VIS, FTIR, and 13C NMR spectroscopy). As comparative samples, humic acids (HA) were isolated also from lignite and organic horizon of mountain spruce forest soil. When compared with other HA studied, the lignohumate humic acids (LHHA) contained relatively few carboxyl groups, whose role is partly fulfilled by sulfonic acid groups. Distinctive 13C NMR signal of methoxyl group carbons, typical for lignin and related humic substances, was found at the shift of 55.9 ppm. Other alkoxy carbons were present in limited quantity, like the aliphatic carbons. Due to the low content of these carbon types, the LHHA has high aromaticity of 60.6%. Comparison with the natural HA has shown that lignohumate obtained by thermal processing of technical lignosulfonate can be regarded as an industrially produced analog of natural humic substances. Based on the chemical and spectral data evaluation, structural features of lignohumate humic acids were clarified and their hypothetical chemical structure proposed, which described typical "average" properties of the isolated fraction.

  18. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  19. Crystal structure of A. aeolicus argonaute, a site-specific DNA-guided endoribonuclease, provides insights into RISC-mediated mRNA cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan,Y.; Pei, Y.; Ma, J.; Kuryavyi, V.; Zhadina, M.; Meister, G.; Chen, H.; Dauter, Z.; Tuschi, T.; Patel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins constitute a key component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). We report the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus Ago (Aa-Ago) together with binding and cleavage studies, which establish this eubacterial Ago as a bona fide guide DNA strand-mediated site-specific RNA endonuclease. We have generated a stereochemically robust model of the complex, where the guide DNA-mRNA duplex is positioned within a basic channel spanning the bilobal interface, such that the 5' phosphate of the guide strand can be anchored in a basic pocket, and the mRNA can be positioned for site-specific cleavage by RNase H-type divalent cation-coordinated catalytic Asp residues of the PIWI domain. Domain swap experiments involving chimeras of human Ago (hAgo1) and cleavage-competent hAgo2 reinforce the role of the PIWI domain in 'slicer' activity. We propose a four-step Ago-mediated catalytic cleavage cycle model, which provides distinct perspectives into the mechanism of guide strand-mediated mRNA cleavage within the RISC.

  20. {{text{C}}_{α }} - {text{C}} Bond Cleavage of the Peptide Backbone in MALDI In-Source Decay Using Salicylic Acid Derivative Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Daiki; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2011-07-01

    The use of 5-formylsalicylic acid (5-FSA) and 5-nitrosalicylic acid (5-NSA) as novel matrices for in-source decay (ISD) of peptides in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is described. The use of 5-FSA and 5-NSA generated a- and x-series ions accompanied by oxidized peptides [M - 2 H + H]+. The preferential formation of a- and x-series ions was found to be dependent on the hydrogen-accepting ability of matrix. The hydrogen-accepting ability estimated from the ratio of signal intensity of oxidized product [M - 2 H + H]+ to that of non-oxidized protonated molecule [M + H]+ of peptide was of the order 5-NSA > 5-FSA > 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) ≒ 2,5-dihydroxyl benzoic acid (2,5-DHB) ≒ 0. The results suggest that the hydrogen transfer reaction from peptide to 5-FSA and 5-NSA occurs during the MALDI-ISD processes. The hydrogen abstraction from peptides results in the formation of oxidized peptides containing a radical site on the amide nitrogen with subsequent radical-induced cleavage at the {{{C}}_{α }} - {{C}} bond, leading to the formation of a- and x-series ions. The most significant feature of MALDI-ISD with 5-FSA and 5-NSA is the specific cleavage of the {{{C}}_{α }} - {{C}} bond of the peptide backbone without degradation of side-chain and post-translational modifications (PTM). The matrix provides a useful complementary method to conventional MALDI-ISD for amino acid sequencing and site localization of PTMs in peptides.

  1. Membrane cholesterol modulates {beta}-amyloid-dependent tau cleavage by inducing changes in the membrane content and localization of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Alexandra M; Methner, D Nicole Riherd; Ferreira, Adriana

    2011-01-14

    We have previously shown that β-amyloid (Aβ) treatment resulted in an age-dependent calpain activation leading to Tau cleavage into a neurotoxic 17-kDa fragment in a cellular model of Alzheimer disease. This detrimental cellular response was mediated by a developmentally regulated increase in membrane cholesterol levels. In this study, we assessed the molecular mechanisms by which cholesterol modulated Aβ-induced Tau cleavage in cultured hippocampal neurons. Our results indicated that these mechanisms did not involve the regulation of the binding of Aβ aggregates to the plasma membrane. On the other hand, experiments using N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor inhibitors suggested that these receptors played an essential role in cholesterol-mediated Aβ-dependent calpain activity and 17-kDa Tau production. Biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses demonstrated that decreasing membrane cholesterol levels in mature neurons resulted in a significant reduction of the NR1 subunit at the membrane as well as an increase in the number of large NR1, NR2A, and NR2B subunit clusters. Moreover, the majority of these larger N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor subunit immunoreactive spots was not juxtaposed to presynaptic sites in cholesterol-reduced neurons. These data suggested that changes at the synaptic level underlie the mechanism by which membrane cholesterol modulates developmental changes in the susceptibility of hippocampal neurons to Aβ-induced toxicity. PMID:21047784

  2. Structural and functional characterization of cleavage and inactivation of human serine protease inhibitors by the bacterial SPATE protease EspPα from enterohemorrhagic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Weiss, André; Joerss, Hanna; Brockmeyer, Jens

    2014-01-01

    EspPα and EspI are serine protease autotransporters found in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. They both belong to the SPATE autotransporter family and are believed to contribute to pathogenicity via proteolytic cleavage and inactivation of different key host proteins during infection. Here, we describe the specific cleavage and functional inactivation of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) by EspPα and compare this activity with the related SPATE EspI. Serpins are structurally related proteins that regulate vital protease cascades, such as blood coagulation and inflammatory host response. For the rapid determination of serpin cleavage sites, we applied direct MALDI-TOF-MS or ESI-FTMS analysis of coincubations of serpins and SPATE proteases and confirmed observed cleavage positions using in-gel-digest of SDS-PAGE-separated degradation products. Activities of both serpin and SPATE protease were assessed in a newly developed photometrical assay using chromogenic peptide substrates. EspPα cleaved the serpins α1-protease inhibitor (α1-PI), α1-antichymotrypsin, angiotensinogen, and α2-antiplasmin. Serpin cleavage led to loss of inhibitory function as demonstrated for α1-PI while EspPα activity was not affected. Notably, EspPα showed pronounced specificity and cleaved procoagulatory serpins such as α2-antiplasmin while the anticoagulatory antithrombin III was not affected. Together with recently published research, this underlines the interference of EspPα with hemostasis or inflammatory responses during infection, while the observed interaction of EspI with serpins is likely to be not physiologically relevant. EspPα-mediated serpin cleavage occurred always in flexible loops, indicating that this structural motif might be required for substrate recognition. PMID:25347319

  3. Structural and Functional Characterization of Cleavage and Inactivation of Human Serine Protease Inhibitors by the Bacterial SPATE Protease EspPα from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, André; Joerss, Hanna; Brockmeyer, Jens

    2014-01-01

    EspPα and EspI are serine protease autotransporters found in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. They both belong to the SPATE autotransporter family and are believed to contribute to pathogenicity via proteolytic cleavage and inactivation of different key host proteins during infection. Here, we describe the specific cleavage and functional inactivation of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) by EspPα and compare this activity with the related SPATE EspI. Serpins are structurally related proteins that regulate vital protease cascades, such as blood coagulation and inflammatory host response. For the rapid determination of serpin cleavage sites, we applied direct MALDI-TOF-MS or ESI-FTMS analysis of coincubations of serpins and SPATE proteases and confirmed observed cleavage positions using in-gel-digest of SDS-PAGE-separated degradation products. Activities of both serpin and SPATE protease were assessed in a newly developed photometrical assay using chromogenic peptide substrates. EspPα cleaved the serpins α1-protease inhibitor (α1-PI), α1-antichymotrypsin, angiotensinogen, and α2-antiplasmin. Serpin cleavage led to loss of inhibitory function as demonstrated for α1-PI while EspPα activity was not affected. Notably, EspPα showed pronounced specificity and cleaved procoagulatory serpins such as α2-antiplasmin while the anticoagulatory antithrombin III was not affected. Together with recently published research, this underlines the interference of EspPα with hemostasis or inflammatory responses during infection, while the observed interaction of EspI with serpins is likely to be not physiologically relevant. EspPα-mediated serpin cleavage occurred always in flexible loops, indicating that this structural motif might be required for substrate recognition. PMID:25347319

  4. The charge redistribution accompanying slip and cleavage: Electronic structure calculations in alloy design

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhart, M.E.; Woodward, C.; Giamei, A.F.

    1999-08-01

    Extracting full information from electronic structure calculations requires the ability to compare differences in bonding between two molecules or solids. Often these comparisons use qualitative models of the chemical bond in an unsuccessful attempt to account for subtle variations in molecular properties. Correlating electronic structure with properties requires an unambiguous and quantifiable description of the chemical bond. Here, the authors show that such a description is contained within the geometric properties of the charge density, which can be obtained from quantum mechanical calculations. This description is used to rationalize the previously unexplained variation in the mechanical properties of a series of ordered intermetallic alloys. The ease with which this description of chemical bonding can be applied to problems, which have defied simple bonding explanations, suggests that it may be useful in accounting for the properties of any molecular system which arise from the making, breaking, or rearrangement of bonds.

  5. High-resolution structural study of zinc ion incorporation at the calcite cleavage surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L.; Sturchio, N. C.; Woicik, J. C.; Kemner, K. M.; Lyman, P. F.; Bedzyk, M. J.; Northwestern Univ.; NIST

    1998-09-30

    The atomic-scale structure of Zn{sup 2+} incorporated at the CaCO{sub 3} (10{ovr 1}4) surface by adsorption from solution was determined by X-ray standing wave triangulation and surface extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. At low coverage (approximately 0.1 ML), Zn{sup 2+} substitutes for Ca{sup 2+} in the surface layer. Structural relaxation of the adjacent in-plane CO{sup 2-}{sub 3} ions in the host surface is shown by the reduced nearest-neighbor distance of Zn-O relative to Ca-O. Relaxation of the Zn{sup 2+} ion in the out-of-plane direction is shown by the displacement of its lattice position from the ideal Ca{sup 2+} position. These relaxations, resulting in a local lattice buckling feature at the Zn{sup 2+} adsorption site, can be fully explained as the combined effect of the electrostatic relaxation of the nearest-neighbor anions in response to the smaller size of Zn{sup 2+}, and the bonding asymmetry due to surface truncation.

  6. Structure and specificity of the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 during DNA interrogation, target binding and cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Josephs, Eric A.; Kocak, D. Dewran; Fitzgibbon, Christopher J.; McMenemy, Joshua; Gersbach, Charles A.; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 cuts DNA at variable target sites designated by a Cas9-bound RNA molecule. Cas9's ability to be directed by single ‘guide RNA’ molecules to target nearly any sequence has been recently exploited for a number of emerging biological and medical applications. Therefore, understanding the nature of Cas9's off-target activity is of paramount importance for its practical use. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we directly resolve individual Cas9 and nuclease-inactive dCas9 proteins as they bind along engineered DNA substrates. High-resolution imaging allows us to determine their relative propensities to bind with different guide RNA variants to targeted or off-target sequences. Mapping the structural properties of Cas9 and dCas9 to their respective binding sites reveals a progressive conformational transformation at DNA sites with increasing sequence similarity to its target. With kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations, these results provide evidence of a ‘conformational gating’ mechanism driven by the interactions between the guide RNA and the 14th–17th nucleotide region of the targeted DNA, the stabilities of which we find correlate significantly with reported off-target cleavage rates. KMC simulations also reveal potential methodologies to engineer guide RNA sequences with improved specificity by considering the invasion of guide RNAs into targeted DNA duplex. PMID:26384421

  7. Cleavage of highly structured viral RNA molecules by combinatorial libraries of hairpin ribozymes. The most effective ribozymes are not predicted by substrate selection rules.

    PubMed

    Yu, Q; Pecchia, D B; Kingsley, S L; Heckman, J E; Burke, J M

    1998-09-01

    Combinatorial libraries of hairpin ribozymes representing all possible cleavage specificities (>10(5)) were used to evaluate all ribozyme cleavage sites within a large (4.2-kilobase) and highly structured viral mRNA, the 26 S subgenomic RNA of Sindbis virus. The combinatorial approach simultaneously accounts for target site structure and dynamics, together with ribozyme folding, and the sequences that result in a ribozyme-substrate complex with maximal activity. Primer extension was used to map and rank the relative activities of the ribozyme pool against individual sites and revealed two striking findings. First, only a small fraction of potential recognition sites are effectively cleaved (activity-selected sites). Second, nearly all of the most effectively cleaved sites deviated substantially from the established consensus selection rules for the hairpin ribozyme and were not predicted by examining the sequence, or through the use of computer-assisted predictions of RNA secondary structure. In vitro selection methods were used to isolate ribozymes with increased activity against substrates that deviate from the GUC consensus sequence. trans-Acting ribozymes targeting nine of the activity-selected sites were synthesized, together with ribozymes targeting four sites with a perfect match to the cleavage site consensus (sequence-selected sites). Activity-selected ribozymes have much higher cleavage activity against the long, structured RNA molecules than do sequence-selected ribozymes, although the latter are effective in cleaving oligoribonucleotides, as predicted. These results imply that, for Sindbis virus 26 S RNA, designing ribozymes based on matches to the consensus sequence may be an ineffective strategy. PMID:9722591

  8. The Structure of DNA-Bound Human Topoisomerase II Alpha: Conformational Mechanisms for Coordinating Inter-Subunit Interactions with DNA Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Wendorff, Timothy J.; Schmidt, Bryan H.; Heslop, Pauline; Austin, Caroline A.; Berger, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases are required for the management of DNA superhelicity and chromosome segregation, and serve as frontline targets for a variety of small-molecule therapeutics. To better understand how these enzymes act in both contexts, we determined the 2.9-Å-resolution structure of the DNA cleavage core of human topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A) bound to a doubly nicked, 30-bp duplex oligonucleotide. In accord with prior biochemical and structural studies, TOP2A significantly bends its DNA substrate using a bipartite, nucleolytic center formed at an N-terminal dimerization interface of the cleavage core. However, the protein also adopts a global conformation in which the second of its two inter-protomer contact points, one at the C-terminus, has separated. This finding, together with comparative structural analyses, reveals that the principal site of DNA engagement undergoes highly quantized conformational transitions between distinct binding, cleavage, and drug-inhibited states that correlate with the control of subunit–subunit interactions. Additional consideration of our TOP2A model in light of an etoposide-inhibited complex of human topoisomerase IIβ (TOP2B) suggests possible modification points for developing paralog-specific inhibitors to overcome the tendency of topoisomerase II-targeting chemotherapeutics to generate secondary malignancies. PMID:22841979

  9. Molecular modeling of nucleic acid structure

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Bergonzo, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This unit is the first in a series of four units covering the analysis of nucleic acid structure by molecular modeling. This unit provides an overview of computer simulation of nucleic acids. Topics include the static structure model, computational graphics and energy models, generation of an initial model, and characterization of the overall three-dimensional structure. PMID:18428873

  10. The Prion Protein N1 and N2 Cleavage Fragments Bind to Phosphatidylserine and Phosphatidic Acid; Relevance to Stress-Protection Responses

    PubMed Central

    Haigh, Cathryn L.; Tumpach, Carolin; Drew, Simon C.; Collins, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Internal cleavage of the cellular prion protein generates two well characterised N-terminal fragments, N1 and N2. These fragments have been shown to bind to anionic phospholipids at low pH. We sought to investigate binding with other lipid moieties and queried how such interactions could be relevant to the cellular functions of these fragments. Both N1 and N2 bound phosphatidylserine (PS), as previously reported, and a further interaction with phosphatidic acid (PA) was also identified. The specificity of this interaction required the N-terminus, especially the proline motif within the basic amino acids at the N-terminus, together with the copper-binding region (unrelated to copper saturation). Previously, the fragments have been shown to be protective against cellular stresses. In the current study, serum deprivation was used to induce changes in the cellular lipid environment, including externalisation of plasma membrane PS and increased cellular levels of PA. When copper-saturated, N2 could reverse these changes, but N1 could not, suggesting that direct binding of N2 to cellular lipids may be part of the mechanism by which this peptide signals its protective response. PMID:26252007

  11. Iron-oxidation-state-dependent O-O bond cleavage of meta-chloroperbenzoic acid to form an iron(IV)-oxo complex

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Kallol; Lee, Sang Mok; Que, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of formation of [FeIV(O)(N4Py)]2+ (2, N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine) from the reaction of [FeII(N4Py)(CH3CN)]2+ (1) with m-chloroperbenzoic acid (mCPBA) in CH2Cl2 at −30 °C has been studied on the basis of the visible spectral changes observed and the reaction stoichiometry. It is shown that the conversion of 1 to 2 in 90% yield requires 1.5 equiv peracid and takes place in two successive one-electron steps via an [FeIII(N4Py)OH]2+(3) intermediate. The first oxidation step uses 0.5 equiv peracid and produces 0.5 equiv 3-chlorobenzoic acid, while the second step uses 1 equiv peracid and affords byproducts derived from chlorophenyl radical. We conclude that the FeII(N4Py) center promotes O-O bond heterolysis, while the FeIII(N4Py) center favors O-O bond homolysis, so the nature of O-O bond cleavage is dependent on the iron oxidation state. PMID:18443654

  12. Cleavage fracture and irradiation embrittlement of fusion reactor alloys: mechanisms, multiscale models, toughness measurements and implications to structural integrity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Rathbun, H. J.; He, M. Y.; Hribernik, M. L.; Rensman, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    We describe the highly efficient master curves-shifts (MC-Δ T) method to measure and apply cleavage fracture toughness, KJc ( T), data and show that it is applicable to 9Cr martensitic steels. A reference temperature, T0, indexes the invariant MC shape on an absolute temperature scale. Then, T0 shifts (Δ T) are used to account for various effects of size and geometry, loading rate and irradiation embrittlement (Δ Ti). The paper outlines a multiscale model, relating atomic to structural scale fracture processes, that underpins the MC-Δ T method. At the atomic scale, we propose that the intrinsic microarrest toughness, Kμ( T), of the body-centered cubic ferrite lattice dictates an invariant shape of the macroscopic KJc ( T) curve. KJc ( T) can be modeled in terms of the true stress-strain ( σ- ɛ) constitutive law, σ ( T, ɛ), combined with a temperature-dependent critical local stress, σ*( T) and stressed volume, V*. The local fracture properties, σ*( T)- V*, are governed by coarse-scale brittle trigger particles and Kμ( T). Irradiation (and high strain rate) induced increases in the yield stress, Δ σy, lead to Δ Ti, with typical Δ Ti/Δ σy≈0.6±0.15 °C/MPa. However, Δ Ti associated with decreases in σ* and V* can result from a number of potential non-hardening embrittlement (NHE) mechanisms, including a large amount of He on grain boundaries. Estimates based on available data suggest that this occurs at >500-700 appm bulk He. Hardening and NHE are synergistic, and can lead to very large Δ Ti. NHE is signaled by large (>1 °C/MPa), or even negative, values of Δ Ti/Δ σy (for Δ σy<0), and is often coupled with increasing amounts of intergranular fracture. The measured and effective fracture toughness pertinent to structures almost always depends on the size and geometry of the cracked body, and is typically significantly greater than KJc . Size and geometry effects arise from both weakest link statistics, related to the volume under high

  13. Pairwise amino acid secondary structural propensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemmama, Ilan E.; Chapagain, Prem P.; Gerstman, Bernard S.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the propensities for amino acids to form a specific secondary structure when they are paired with other amino acids. Our investigations use molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations, and we compare the results to those from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Proper comparison requires weighting of the MD results in a manner consistent with the relative frequency of appearance in the PDB of each possible pair of amino acids. We find that the propensity for an amino acid to assume a secondary structure varies dramatically depending on the amino acid that is before or after it in the primary sequence. This cooperative effect means that when selecting amino acids to facilitate the formation of a secondary structure in peptide engineering experiments, the adjacent amino acids must be considered. We also examine the preference for a secondary structure in bacterial proteins and compare the results to those of human proteins.

  14. Metal-catalyzed C-C bond cleavage in alkanes: effects of methyl substitution on transition-state structures and stability.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, David W; Hibbitts, David D; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-07-01

    Methyl substituents at C-C bonds influence hydrogenolysis rates and selectivities of acyclic and cyclic C2-C8 alkanes on Ir, Rh, Ru, and Pt catalysts. C-C cleavage transition states form via equilibrated dehydrogenation steps that replace several C-H bonds with C-metal bonds, desorb H atoms (H*) from saturated surfaces, and form λ H2(g) molecules. Activation enthalpies (ΔH(‡)) and entropies (ΔS(‡)) and λ values for (3)C-(x)C cleavage are larger than for (2)C-(2)C or (2)C-(1)C bonds, irrespective of the composition of metal clusters or the cyclic/acyclic structure of the reactants. (3)C-(x)C bonds cleave through α,β,γ- or α,β,γ,δ-bound transition states, as indicated by the agreement between measured activation entropies and those estimated for such structures using statistical mechanics. In contrast, less substituted C-C bonds involve α,β-bound species with each C atom bound to several surface atoms. These α,β configurations weaken C-C bonds through back-donation to antibonding orbitals, but such configurations cannot form with (3)C atoms, which have one C-H bond and thus can form only one C-M bond. (3)C-(x)C cleavage involves attachment of other C atoms, which requires endothermic C-H activation and H* desorption steps that lead to larger ΔH(‡) values but also larger ΔS(‡) values (by forming more H2(g)) than for (2)C-(2)C and (2)C-(1)C bonds, irrespective of alkane size (C2-C8) or cyclic/acyclic structure. These data and their mechanistic interpretation indicate that low temperatures and high H2 pressures favor cleavage of less substituted C-C bonds and form more highly branched products from cyclic and acyclic alkanes. Such interpretations and catalytic consequences of substitution seem also relevant to C-X cleavage (X = S, N, O) in desulfurization, denitrogenation, and deoxygenation reactions. PMID:24961991

  15. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Early and Late Enzymes in the Lignin β-Aryl Ether Cleavage Pathway from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jose Henrique; Heins, Richard A; Gall, Daniel L; McAndrew, Ryan P; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C; Donohue, Timothy J; Noguera, Daniel R; Simmons, Blake A; Sale, Kenneth L; Ralph, John; Adams, Paul D

    2016-05-01

    There has been great progress in the development of technology for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to sugars and subsequent fermentation to fuels. However, plant lignin remains an untapped source of materials for production of fuels or high value chemicals. Biological cleavage of lignin has been well characterized in fungi, in which enzymes that create free radical intermediates are used to degrade this material. In contrast, a catabolic pathway for the stereospecific cleavage of β-aryl ether units that are found in lignin has been identified in Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 bacteria. β-Aryl ether units are typically abundant in lignin, corresponding to 50-70% of all of the intermonomer linkages. Consequently, a comprehensive understanding of enzymatic β-aryl ether (β-ether) cleavage is important for future efforts to biologically process lignin and its breakdown products. The crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenases (LigD, LigO, and LigL) and the glutathione-dependent lyase LigG provide new insights into the early and late enzymes in the β-ether degradation pathway. We present detailed information on the cofactor and substrate binding sites and on the catalytic mechanisms of these enzymes, comparing them with other known members of their respective families. Information on the Lig enzymes provides new insight into their catalysis mechanisms and can inform future strategies for using aromatic oligomers derived from plant lignin as a source of valuable aromatic compounds for biofuels and other bioproducts. PMID:26940872

  16. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Early and Late Enzymes in the Lignin β-Aryl Ether Cleavage Pathway from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jose Henrique; Heins, Richard A.; Gall, Daniel L.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Donohue, Timothy J.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Adams, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    There has been great progress in the development of technology for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to sugars and subsequent fermentation to fuels. However, plant lignin remains an untapped source of materials for production of fuels or high value chemicals. Biological cleavage of lignin has been well characterized in fungi, in which enzymes that create free radical intermediates are used to degrade this material. In contrast, a catabolic pathway for the stereospecific cleavage of β-aryl ether units that are found in lignin has been identified in Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 bacteria. β-Aryl ether units are typically abundant in lignin, corresponding to 50–70% of all of the intermonomer linkages. Consequently, a comprehensive understanding of enzymatic β-aryl ether (β-ether) cleavage is important for future efforts to biologically process lignin and its breakdown products. The crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenases (LigD, LigO, and LigL) and the glutathione-dependent lyase LigG provide new insights into the early and late enzymes in the β-ether degradation pathway. We present detailed information on the cofactor and substrate binding sites and on the catalytic mechanisms of these enzymes, comparing them with other known members of their respective families. Information on the Lig enzymes provides new insight into their catalysis mechanisms and can inform future strategies for using aromatic oligomers derived from plant lignin as a source of valuable aromatic compounds for biofuels and other bioproducts. PMID:26940872

  17. Site-selective chemical cleavage of peptide bonds.

    PubMed

    Elashal, Hader E; Raj, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Site-selective cleavage of extremely unreactive peptide bonds is a very important chemical modification that provides invaluable information regarding protein sequence, and it acts as a modulator of protein structure and function for therapeutic applications. For controlled and selective cleavage, a daunting task, chemical reagents must selectively recognize or bind to one or more amino acid residues in the peptide chain and selectively cleave a peptide bond. Building on this principle, we have developed an approach that utilizes a chemical reagent to selectively modify the serine residue in a peptide chain and leads to the cleavage of a peptide backbone at the N-terminus of the serine residue. After cleavage, modified residues can be converted back to the original fragments. This method exhibits broad substrate scope and selectively cleaves various bioactive peptides with post-translational modifications (e.g. N-acetylation and -methylation) and mutations (d- and β-amino acids), which are a known cause of age related diseases. PMID:27087443

  18. Structural asymmetry in the Thermus thermophilus RuvC dimer suggests a basis for sequential strand cleavages during Holliday junction resolution

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Luan; Shi, Ke; Yin, Zhiqi; Aihara, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Holliday junction (HJ) resolvases are structure-specific endonucleases that cleave four-way DNA junctions (HJs) generated during DNA recombination and repair. Bacterial RuvC, a prototypical HJ resolvase, functions as homodimer and nicks DNA strands precisely across the junction point. To gain insights into the mechanisms underlying symmetrical strand cleavages by RuvC, we performed crystallographic and biochemical analyses of RuvC from Thermus thermophilus (T.th. RuvC). The crystal structure of T.th. RuvC shows an overall protein fold similar to that of Escherichia coli RuvC, but T.th. RuvC has a more tightly associated dimer interface possibly reflecting its thermostability. The binding mode of a HJ-DNA substrate can be inferred from the shape/charge complementarity between the T.th. RuvC dimer and HJ-DNA, as well as positions of sulfate ions bound on the protein surface. Unexpectedly, the structure of T.th. RuvC homodimer refined at 1.28 Å resolution shows distinct asymmetry near the dimer interface, in the region harboring catalytically important aromatic residues. The observation suggests that the T.th. RuvC homodimer interconverts between two asymmetric conformations, with alternating subunits switched on for DNA strand cleavage. This model provides a structural basis for the ‘nick-counter-nick’ mechanism in HJ resolution, a mode of HJ processing shared by prokaryotic and eukaryotic HJ resolvases. PMID:23118486

  19. Pistol ribozyme adopts a pseudoknot fold facilitating site-specific in-line cleavage.

    PubMed

    Ren, Aiming; Vušurović, Nikola; Gebetsberger, Jennifer; Gao, Pu; Juen, Michael; Kreutz, Christoph; Micura, Ronald; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2016-09-01

    The field of small self-cleaving nucleolytic ribozymes has been invigorated by the recent discovery of the twister, twister-sister, pistol and hatchet ribozymes. We report the crystal structure of a pistol ribozyme termed env25, which adopts a compact tertiary architecture stabilized by an embedded pseudoknot fold. The G-U cleavage site adopts a splayed-apart conformation with in-line alignment of the modeled 2'-O of G for attack on the adjacent to-be-cleaved P-O5' bond. Highly conserved residues G40 (N1 position) and A32 (N3 and 2'-OH positions) are aligned to act as a general base and a general acid, respectively, to accelerate cleavage chemistry, with their roles confirmed by cleavage assays on variants, and an increased pKa of 4.7 for A32. Our structure of the pistol ribozyme defined how the overall and local topologies dictate the in-line alignment at the G-U cleavage site, with cleavage assays on variants revealing key residues that participate in acid-base-catalyzed cleavage chemistry. PMID:27398999

  20. From polymer to monomer: cleavage and rearrangement of Si-O-Si bonds after oxidation yielded an ordered cyclic crystallized structure.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yujing; Gou, Zhiming; Cao, Jinfeng; Yang, Zhou; Lu, Haifeng; Feng, Shengyu

    2015-07-27

    Polymerization reactions are very common in the chemical industry, however, the reaction in which monomers are obtained from polymers is rarely invesitgated. This work reveals for the first time that oxone can break the Si-O-Si bond and induce further rearrangement to yield an ordered cyclic structure. The oxidation of P1, which is obtained by reaction of 2,2'-1,2-ethanediylbis(oxy)bis(ethanethiol) (DBOET) with 1,3-divinyl-1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane (MM(Vi)), with oxone yielded cyclic crystallized sulfone-siloxane dimer (P1-ox) after unexpected cleavage and rearrangement of the Si-O-Si bond. PMID:26186500

  1. Synthesis, Structure-Activity Relationship, and Mechanistic Investigation of Lithocholic Acid Amphiphiles for Colon Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Priyanshu; Singh, Ashima; Motiani, Rajender K.; Shyam, Radhey; Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Sengupta, Sagar; Bajaj, Avinash

    2014-01-01

    We report a structure-activity relationship of lithocholic acid amphiphiles for their anticancer activities against colon cancer. We synthesized ten cationic amphiphiles differing in nature of cationic charged head groups using lithocholic acid. We observed that anticancer activities of these amphiphiles against colon cancer cell lines are contingent on nature of charged head group. Lithocholic acid based amphiphile possessing piperidine head group (LCA-PIP1) is ~10 times more cytotoxic as compared to its precursor. Biochemical studies revealed that enhanced activity of LCA-PIP1 as compared to lithocholic acid is due to greater activation of apoptosis.LCA-PIP1 induces sub G0 arrest and causes cleavage of caspases. A single dose of lithocholic acid-piperidine derivative is enough to reduce the tumor burden by 75% in tumor xenograft model. PMID:25685308

  2. Efficient hammerhead ribozyme-mediated cleavage of the structured hepatitis B virus encapsidation signal in vitro and in cell extracts, but not in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, J; Nassal, M

    1995-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), the causative agent of B-type hepatitis in man, is a small enveloped DNA virus that replicates through reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate, the terminally redundant RNA pregenome. An essential highly conserved cis-element present twice on this RNA is the encapsidation signal epsilon, a stem-loop structure that is critical for pregenome packaging and reverse transcription. Epsilon is hence an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Its structure, however, is a potential obstacle to antivirals whose action depends on hybridization, e.g. ribozymes. Here we demonstrate effective in vitro cleavage inside epsilon by hammerhead ribozymes containing flanking sequences complementary to an adjacent less structured region. Upon co-transfection with a HBV expression construct corresponding ribozymes embedded in a U6 snRNA context led to a significant, though modest, reduction in the steady-state level of HBV pregenomes. Inactive ribozyme mutants revealed that antisense effects contributed substantially to this reduction, however, efficient epsilon cleavage by the intracellularly expressed ribozymes was observed in Mg(2+)-supplemented cell lysates. Artificial HBV pregenomes carrying the ribozymes in cis and model RNAs lacking all HBV sequences except epsilon exhibited essentially the same behaviour. Hence, neither the absence of co-localization of ribozyme and target nor a viral component, but rather a cellular factor(s), is responsible for the strikingly different ribozyme activities inside cells and in cellular extracts. Images PMID:8559651

  3. Metal- and Oxidant-Free Synthesis of Quinazolinones from β-Ketoesters with o-Aminobenzamides via Phosphorous Acid-Catalyzed Cyclocondensation and Selective C-C Bond Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongwen; Dong, Jianyu; Chen, Xiuling; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Yongbo; Yin, Shuang-Feng

    2015-10-01

    A general and efficient phosphorous acid-catalyzed cyclocondensation of β-ketoesters with o-aminobenzamides via selective C-C bond cleavage leading to quinazolinones is developed. This reaction proceeds smoothly under metal- and oxidant-free conditions, giving both 2-alkyl- and 2-aryl-substituted quinazolinones in excellent yields. This strategy can also be applied to the synthesis of other N-heterocycles, such as benzimidazoles and benzothiazoles. PMID:26339716

  4. Formation of C-terminally truncated version of the Taz1 protein employs cleavage-box structure in mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gunisova, Stanislava; Bartosova, Zdenka; Kramara, Juraj; Nosek, Jozef; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2010-02-12

    When expressed in various hosts the taz1{sup +} gene encoding the fission yeast telomere-binding protein produces two forms of polypeptides: full-length (Taz1p) and truncated (Taz1p{Delta}C) version lacking almost entire Myb-domain. Whereas Taz1p binds telomeric DNA in vitro, Taz1p{Delta}C forms long filaments unable of DNA binding. The formation of Taz1p{Delta}C is a result of neither site-specific proteolysis, nor premature termination of transcription. In silico analysis of the taz1{sup +} RNA transcript revealed a stem-loop structure at the site of cleavage (cleavage box; CB). In order to explore whether it possesses inherent destabilizing effects, we cloned CB sequence into the open reading frame (ORF) of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and observed that when expressed in Escherichia coli the engineered gene produced two forms of the reporter protein. The formation of the truncated version of GST was abolished, when CB was replaced with recoded sequence containing synonymous codons thus indicating that the truncation is based on structural properties of taz1{sup +} mRNA.

  5. Structural analysis of disease-related TDP-43 D169G mutation: linking enhanced stability and caspase cleavage efficiency to protein accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chien-Hao; Grauffel, Cédric; Wu, Lien-Szu; Kuo, Pan-Hsien; Doudeva, Lyudmila G.; Lim, Carmay; Shen, Che-Kun James; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein TDP-43 forms intracellular inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While TDP-43 mutations have been identified in ALS patients, how these mutations are linked to ALS remains unclear. Here we examined the biophysical properties of six ALS-linked TDP-43 mutants and found that one of the mutants, D169G, had higher thermal stability than wild-type TDP-43 and that it was cleaved by caspase 3 more efficiently, producing increased levels of the C-terminal 35 kD fragments (TDP-35) in vitro and in neuroblastoma cells. The crystal structure of the TDP-43 RRM1 domain containing the D169G mutation in complex with DNA along with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the D169G mutation induces a local conformational change in a β turn and increases the hydrophobic interactions in the RRM1 core, thus enhancing the thermal stability of the RRM1 domain. Our results provide the first crystal structure of TDP-43 containing a disease-linked D169G mutation and a disease-related mechanism showing that D169G mutant is more susceptible to proteolytic cleavage by caspase 3 into the pathogenic C-terminal 35-kD fragments due to its increased stability in the RRM1 domain. Modulation of TDP-43 stability and caspase cleavage efficiency could present an avenue for prevention and treatment of TDP-43-linked neurodegeneration. PMID:26883171

  6. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure–property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group. PMID:26967507

  7. Microstructure and cleavage in lath martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, John W., Jr.; Kinney, Chris; Pytlewski, Ken; Adachi, Y.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the microstructure of lath martensitic steels and the mechanisms by which it controls cleavage fracture. The specific experimental example is a 9Ni (9 wt% Ni) steel annealed to have a large prior austenite grain size, then examined and tested in the as-quenched condition to produce a relatively coarse lath martensite. The microstructure is shown to approximate the recently identified ‘classic’ lath martensite structure: prior austenite grains are divided into packets, packets are subdivided into blocks, and blocks contain interleaved laths whose variants are the two Kurjumov-Sachs relations that share the same Bain axis of the transformation. When the steel is fractured in brittle cleavage, the laths in the block share {100} cleavage planes and cleave as a unit. However, cleavage cracks deflect or blunt at the boundaries between blocks with different Bain axes. It follows that, as predicted, the block size governs the effective grain size for cleavage.

  8. Structure of a quinolone-stabilized cleavage complex of topoisomerase IV from Klebsiella pneumoniae and comparison with a related Streptococcus pneumoniae complex.

    PubMed

    Veselkov, Dennis A; Laponogov, Ivan; Pan, Xiao-Su; Selvarajah, Jogitha; Skamrova, Galyna B; Branstrom, Arthur; Narasimhan, Jana; Prasad, Josyula V N Vara; Fisher, L Mark; Sanderson, Mark R

    2016-04-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium that is responsible for a range of common infections, including pulmonary pneumonia, bloodstream infections and meningitis. Certain strains of Klebsiella have become highly resistant to antibiotics. Despite the vast amount of research carried out on this class of bacteria, the molecular structure of its topoisomerase IV, a type II topoisomerase essential for catalysing chromosomal segregation, had remained unknown. In this paper, the structure of its DNA-cleavage complex is reported at 3.35 Å resolution. The complex is comprised of ParC breakage-reunion and ParE TOPRIM domains of K. pneumoniae topoisomerase IV with DNA stabilized by levofloxacin, a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent. This complex is compared with a similar complex from Streptococcus pneumoniae, which has recently been solved. PMID:27050128

  9. Structure of a quinolone-stabilized cleavage complex of topoisomerase IV from Klebsiella pneumoniae and comparison with a related Streptococcus pneumoniae complex

    PubMed Central

    Veselkov, Dennis A.; Laponogov, Ivan; Pan, Xiao-Su; Selvarajah, Jogitha; Skamrova, Galyna B.; Branstrom, Arthur; Narasimhan, Jana; Prasad, Josyula V. N. Vara; Fisher, L. Mark; Sanderson, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium that is responsible for a range of common infections, including pulmonary pneumonia, bloodstream infections and meningitis. Certain strains of Klebsiella have become highly resistant to antibiotics. Despite the vast amount of research carried out on this class of bacteria, the molecular structure of its topoisomerase IV, a type II topoisomerase essential for catalysing chromosomal segregation, had remained unknown. In this paper, the structure of its DNA-cleavage complex is reported at 3.35 Å resolution. The complex is comprised of ParC breakage-reunion and ParE TOPRIM domains of K. pneumoniae topoisomerase IV with DNA stabilized by levofloxacin, a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent. This complex is compared with a similar complex from Streptococcus pneumoniae, which has recently been solved. PMID:27050128

  10. Crystal structure of Thermoplasma acidophilum XerA recombinase shows large C-shape clamp conformation and cis-cleavage mode for nucleophilic tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Jo, Chang Hwa; Kim, Junsoo; Han, Ah-reum; Park, Sam Yong; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Nam, Ki Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Site-specific Xer recombination plays a pivotal role in reshuffling genetic information. Here, we report the 2.5 Å crystal structure of XerA from the archaean Thermoplasma acidophilum. Crystallographic data reveal a uniquely open conformational state, resulting in a C-shaped clamp with an angle of ~ 48° and a distance of 57 Å between the core-binding and the catalytic domains. The catalytic nucleophile, Tyr264, is positioned in cis-cleavage mode by XerA's C-term tail that interacts with the CAT domain of a neighboring monomer without DNA substrate. Structural comparisons of tyrosine recombinases elucidate the dynamics of Xer recombinase. PMID:26919387

  11. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Cleavage of aliphatic organosulfonate carbon to sulfur (C-S) bonds, a critical link in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle, has been identified in Escherichia coli K-12. Enormous quantities of inorganic sulfate are continuously converted (Scheme I) into methanesulfonic acid 1 and acylated 3-(6-sulfo-{alpha}-D-quinovopyranosyl)-L-glycerol 2. Biocatalytic desulfurization (Scheme I) of 1 and 2, which share the structural feature of an aliphatic carbon bonded to a sulfonic acid sulfur, completes the cycle, Discovery of this desulfurization in E. coli provides an invaluable paradigm for study of a biotic process which, via the biogeochemical cycle, significantly influences the atmospheric concentration of sulfur-containing molecules.

  12. Electron attachment to the N-substituted amino acids N-methylglycine and N-methylalanine: Effective cleavage of the N-Cα bond at sub-excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopyra, Janina

    2012-04-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to gas phase N-methylglycine and N-methylalanine is studied by means of a crossed beams apparatus. Effective cleavage of the N-Cα bond is observed within a low energy resonance peaking at 1.8 eV in both compounds and observable via the appearance of the fragment CH2COOH- from N-methylglycine and CH(CH3)COOH- from N-methylalanine. In glycine and alanine cleavage of the N-Cα bond was only observed as a weak reaction in combination with hydrogen transfer. As for previously studied amino acids, the most dominant anionic fragment is due to the loss of hydrogen atom from the respective target molecule resulting in the formation of the closed shell dehydrogenated parent anion (M-H)-.

  13. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  14. Synthesis, structural characterization, fluorescence, antimicrobial, antioxidant and DNA cleavage studies of Cu(II) complexes of formyl chromone Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, P.; Saritha, M.; Laxma Reddy, K.

    2013-02-01

    Cu(II) complexes have been synthesized from different Schiff bases, such as 3-((2-hydroxy phenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL1), 2-((4-oxo-4H-chromen-3-yl)methylneamino) benzoicacid (HL2), 3-((3-hydroxypyridin-2-ylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL3) and 3-((2-mercaptophenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL4). The complexes were characterized by analytical, molar conductance, IR, electronic, magnetic, ESR, thermal, powder XRD and SEM studies. The analytical data reveal that metal to ligand molar ratio is 1:2 in all the complexes. Molar conductivity data indicates that all the Cu(II) complexes are neutral. On the basis of magnetic and electronic spectral data, distorted octahedral geometry is proposed for all the Cu(II) complexes. Thermal behaviour of the synthesized complexes illustrates the presence of lattice water molecules in the complexes. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that all the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes have triclinic system with different unit cell parameters. Antimicrobial, antioxidant and DNA cleavage activities indicate that metal complexes exhibited greater activity as compared with ligands.

  15. The crystal structure of bacillus cereus phosphonoacetaldehyde hydrolase: insight into catalysis of phosphorus bond cleavage and catalytic diversification within the HAD enzyme superfamily.

    PubMed

    Morais, M C; Zhang, W; Baker, A S; Zhang, G; Dunaway-Mariano, D; Allen, K N

    2000-08-29

    activity resulting from Asp12Ala substitution. The similarity of backbone folds observed in phosphonatase and the 2-haloacid dehalogenase of the HAD enzyme superfamily indicated common ancestry. Superposition of the two structures revealed a conserved active-site scaffold having distinct catalytic stations. Analysis of the usage of polar amino acid residues at these stations by the dehalogenases, phosphonatases, phosphatases, and phosphomutases of the HAD superfamily suggests possible ways in which the active site of an ancient enzyme ancestor might have been diversified for catalysis of C-X, P-C, and P-O bond cleavage reactions. PMID:10956028

  16. Experiments on schistosity and slaty cleavage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, George Ferdinand

    1904-01-01

    Schistosity as a structure is important, and it is a part of the business of geologists to explain its origin. Slaty cleavage has further and greater importance as a possible tectonic feature. Scarcely a great mountain range exists, or has existed, along the course of which belts of slaty rock are not found, the dip of the cleavage usually approaching verticality. Are these slate belts equivalent to minutely distributed step faults of great total throw, or do they indicate compression perpendicular to the cleavage without attendant relative dislocation? Evidently the answer to this question is of first importance in the interpretation of orogenic phenomena.

  17. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 1. Minor structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the strong-acid characteristics (pKa 3.0 or less) of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was conducted. Quantitative determinations were made for amino acid and sulfur-containing acid structures, oxalate half-ester structures, malonic acid structures, keto acid structures, and aromatic carboxyl-group structures. These determinations were made by using a variety of spectrometric (13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and ultraviolet spectrometry) and titrimetric characterizations on fulvic acid or fulvic acid samples that were chemically derivatized to indicate certain functional groups. Only keto acid and aromatic carboxyl-group structures contributed significantly to the strong-acid characteristics of the fulvic acid; these structures accounted for 43% of the strong-acid acidity. The remaining 57% of the strong acids are aliphatic carboxyl groups in unusual and/or complex configurations for which limited model compound data are available.

  18. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Voigt, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The data provide information in support of the research article, "The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors" (Janek et al., 2016) [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS) and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans. PMID:27508221

  19. Synthesis of mononuclear copper(II) complexes of acyclic Schiff's base ligands: Spectral, structural, electrochemical, antibacterial, DNA binding and cleavage activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayamani, Arumugam; Thamilarasan, Vijayan; Sengottuvelan, Nallathambi; Manisankar, Paramasivam; Kang, Sung Kwon; Kim, Young-Inn; Ganesan, Vengatesan

    2014-03-01

    The mononuclear copper(II) complexes (1&2) of ligands L1 [N,N";-bis(2-hydroxy-5-methylbenzyl)-1,4-bis(3-iminopropyl)piperazine] or L2 [N,N";-bis(2-hydroxy-5-bromobenzyl)-1,4-bis(3-iminopropyl) piperazine] have been synthesized and characterised. The single crystal X-ray study had shown that ligands L1 and L2 crystallize in a monoclinic crystal system with P21/c space group. The mononuclear copper(II) complexes show one quasireversible cyclic voltammetric response near cathodic region (-0.77 to -0.85 V) in DMF assignable to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. Binding interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) investigated by absorption studies and fluorescence spectral studies show good binding affinity to CT DNA, which imply both the copper(II) complexes can strongly interact with DNA efficiently. The copper(II) complexes showed efficient oxidative cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid as reducing agent through a mechanistic pathway involving formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species. The Schiff bases and their Cu(II) complexes have been screened for antibacterial activities which indicates that the complexes exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than the free ligands.

  20. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  1. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.

    2012-05-15

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  2. Substrate cleavage pattern, biophysical characterization and low-resolution structure of a novel hyperthermostable arabinanase from Thermotoga petrophila.

    PubMed

    Squina, Fabio M; Santos, Camila R; Ribeiro, Daniela A; Cota, Júnio; de Oliveira, Renata R; Ruller, Roberto; Mort, Andrew; Murakami, Mario T; Prade, Rolf A

    2010-09-01

    Arabinan is a plant structural polysaccharide degraded by two enzymes; alpha-l-arabinofuranosidase and endo-1,5-alpha-l-arabinanase. These enzymes are highly diversified in nature, however, little is known about their biochemical and biophysical properties. We have characterized a novel arabinanase (AbnA) isolated from Thermotoga petrophila with unique thermostable properties such as the insignificant decrease of residual activity after incubation up to 90 degrees C. We determined the AbnA mode of operation through capillary zone electrophoresis, which accumulates arabinotriose and arabinobiose as end products after hydrolysis of arabinan-containing polysaccharides. Spectroscopic analyses by Far-UV circular dichroism and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence emission demonstrated that AbnA is folded and formed mainly by beta-sheet structural elements. In silico molecular modeling showed that the AbnA structure encompasses a five-bladed beta-propeller catalytic core juxtaposed by distorted up-and-down beta-barrel domain. The low-resolution structure determined by small angle X-ray scattering indicated that AbnA is monomeric in solution and its molecular shape is in full agreement with the model. PMID:20678476

  3. Superprotonic solid acids: Structure, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boysen, Dane Andrew

    In this work, the structure and properties of superprotonic MH nXO4-type solid acids (where M = monovalent cation, X = S, Se, P, As, and n = 1, 2) have been investigated and, for the first time, applied in fuel cell devices. Several MH nXO4-type solid acids are known to undergo a "superprotonic" solid-state phase transition upon heating, in which the proton conductivity increases by several orders of magnitude and takes on values of ˜10 -2O-1cm-1. The presence of superprotonic conductivity in fully hydrogen bonded solid acids, such as CsH2PO4, has long been disputed. In these investigations, through the use of pressure, the unequivocal identification of superprotonic behavior in both RbH2PO4 and CsH2PO 4 has been demonstrated, whereas for chemically analogous compounds with smaller cations, such as KH2PO4 and NaH2PO 4, superprotonic conductivity was notably absent. Such observations have led to the adoption of radius ratio rules, in an attempt to identify a critical ion size effect on the presence of superprotonic conductivity in solid acids. It has been found that, while ionic size does play a prominent role in the presence of superprotonic behavior in solid acids, equally important are the effects of ionic and hydrogen bonding. Next, the properties of superprotonic phase transition have been investigated from a thermodynamic standpoint. With contributions from this work, a formulation has been developed that accounts for the entropy resulting from both the disordering of both hydrogen bonds and oxy-anion librations in the superprotonic phase of solid acids. This formulation, fundamentally derived from Linus Pauling's entropy rules for ice, accurately accounts for the change in entropy through a superprotonic phase transition. Lastly, the first proof-of-priniciple fuel cells based upon solid acid electrolytes have been demonstrated. Initial results based upon a sulfate electrolyte, CsHSO4, demonstrated the viability of solid acids, but poor chemical stability

  4. Higher-order structure of nucleic acids in the gas phase: top-down analysis of base-pairing interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fabris, D.; Kellersberger, K.A.; Wilhide, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Non-ergodic as well as ergodic activation methods are capable of maintaining the integrity of base pairs during the top-down analysis of nucleic acids. Here, we investigate the significance of this characteristic in the investigation of higher-order structures of increasing complexity. We show that cognate fragments produced by typical backbone cleavages may not be always detected as separate sequence ions, but rather as individual products that remain associated through mutual pairing contacts. This effect translates into unintended masking of cleavage events that take place in double-stranded regions, thus leading to the preferential detection of fragments originating from unpaired regions. Such effect is determined by the stability of the weak non-covalent association between complementary stretches, which is affected by base composition, length of the double-stranded structure, and charge of the precursor ion selected for analysis. Although such effect may prevent the achievement of full sequence coverage for primary structure determination, it may provide the key to correctly differentiate double- versus single-stranded regions, in what could be defined as gas-phase footprinting experiments. In light of the critical role played by base pairs in defining the higher-order structure of nucleic acids, these approaches will be expected to support an increased utilization of mass spectrometry for the investigation of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. PMID:24027423

  5. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss-Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  6. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss–Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  7. Structural Features of the Pseudomonas fluorescens Biofilm Adhesin LapA Required for LapG-Dependent Cleavage, Biofilm Formation, and Cell Surface Localization

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Chelsea D.; Smith, T. Jarrod; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Newell, Peter D.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2014-01-01

    The localization of the LapA protein to the cell surface is a key step required by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 to irreversibly attach to a surface and form a biofilm. LapA is a member of a diverse family of predicted bacterial adhesins, and although lacking a high degree of sequence similarity, family members do share common predicted domains. Here, using mutational analysis, we determine the significance of each domain feature of LapA in relation to its export and localization to the cell surface and function in biofilm formation. Our previous work showed that the N terminus of LapA is required for cleavage by the periplasmic cysteine protease LapG and release of the adhesin from the cell surface under conditions unfavorable for biofilm formation. We define an additional critical region of the N terminus of LapA required for LapG proteolysis. Furthermore, our results suggest that the domains within the C terminus of LapA are not absolutely required for biofilm formation, export, or localization to the cell surface, with the exception of the type I secretion signal, which is required for LapA export and cell surface localization. In contrast, deletion of the central repetitive region of LapA, consisting of 37 repeats of 100 amino acids, results in an inability to form a biofilm. We also used single-molecule atomic force microscopy to further characterize the role of these domains in biofilm formation on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. These studies represent the first detailed analysis of the domains of the LapA family of biofilm adhesin proteins. PMID:24837291

  8. Diffractaic acid: Crystalline structure and physicochemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro Fonseca, Jéssica; de Oliveira, Yara Santiago; Bezerra, Beatriz P.; Ellena, Javier; Honda, Neli Kika; Silva, Camilla V. N. S.; da Silva Santos, Noemia Pereira; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela; Ayala, Alejandro Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Diffractaic acid (DA) is a secondary metabolite of lichens that belongs to the chemical class of depsides, and some relevant pharmacological properties are associated with this natural product, such as antioxidant, antiulcerogenic and gastroprotective effects. Considering the relevant biological activities and taking into account that the activities are intrinsically related to the structure, the main goal of this study was to elucidate the structure of diffractaic acid by single crystal X-ray diffraction as well to characterize its physicochemical properties by powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and vibrational spectroscopy. It was observed that DA belongs to the monoclinic crystal system, crystallizing in the space group P21/c with the following cell parameters: a = 18.535(7) Å, b = 4.0439(18) Å, c = 23.964(6) Å, β = 91.55(3)°. The crystal packing is characterized by difractaic acid dimers, which are reflected in the vibrational spectrum. These observations were supported by quantum mechanical calculations.

  9. Origin of brittle cleavage in iridium.

    PubMed

    Cawkwell, Marc J; Nguyen-Manh, Duc; Woodward, Christopher; Pettifor, David G; Vitek, Vaclav

    2005-08-12

    Iridium is unique among the face-centered cubic metals in that it undergoes brittle cleavage after a period of plastic deformation under tensile stress. Atomistic simulation using a quantum-mechanically derived bond-order potential shows that in iridium, two core structures for the screw dislocation are possible: a glissile planar core and a metastable nonplanar core. Transformation between the two core structures is athermal and leads to exceptionally high rates of cross slip during plastic deformation. Associated with this athermal cross slip is an exponential increase in the dislocation density and strong work hardening from which brittle cleavage is a natural consequence. PMID:16099981

  10. Mononuclear dioxomolybdenum(VI) thiosemicarbazonato complexes: Synthesis, characterization, structural illustration, in vitro DNA binding, cleavage, and antitumor properties.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mouayed A; Guan, Teoh S; Haque, Rosenani A; Khadeer Ahamed, Mohamed B; Abdul Majid, Amin M S

    2015-02-01

    Four dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes were synthesized by reacting [MoO2(acac)2] with N-ethyl-2-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (1), N-ethyl-2-(5-allyl-3-methoxy-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (2), N-methyl-2-(3-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (3), and N-ethyl-2-(3-methyl-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (4). The molecular structures of 1, 2, and all the synthesized complexes were determined using single crystal X-ray crystallography. The binding properties of the ligand and complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated via UV, fluorescence titrations, and viscosity measurement. Gel electrophoresis revealed that all the complexes cleave pBR 322 plasmid DNA. The cytotoxicity of the complexes were studied against the HCT 116 human colorectal cell line. All the complexes exhibited more pronounced activity than the standard reference drug 5-fluorouracil (IC50 7.3μM). These studies show that dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes could be potentially useful in chemotherapy. PMID:25456676

  11. Mononuclear dioxomolybdenum(VI) thiosemicarbazonato complexes: Synthesis, characterization, structural illustration, in vitro DNA binding, cleavage, and antitumor properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Mouayed A.; Guan, Teoh S.; Haque, Rosenani A.; Khadeer Ahamed, Mohamed B.; Abdul Majid, Amin M. S.

    2015-02-01

    Four dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes were synthesized by reacting [MoO2(acac)2] with N-ethyl-2-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (1), N-ethyl-2-(5-allyl-3-methoxy-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (2), N-methyl-2-(3-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (3), and N-ethyl-2-(3-methyl-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (4). The molecular structures of 1, 2, and all the synthesized complexes were determined using single crystal X-ray crystallography. The binding properties of the ligand and complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated via UV, fluorescence titrations, and viscosity measurement. Gel electrophoresis revealed that all the complexes cleave pBR 322 plasmid DNA. The cytotoxicity of the complexes were studied against the HCT 116 human colorectal cell line. All the complexes exhibited more pronounced activity than the standard reference drug 5-fluorouracil (IC50 7.3 μM). These studies show that dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes could be potentially useful in chemotherapy.

  12. Structural elucidation and genomic scrutiny of the C60-C100 mycolic acids of Segniliparus rotundus.

    PubMed

    Lanéelle, Marie-Antoinette; Eynard, Nathalie; Spina, Lucie; Lemassu, Anne; Laval, Françoise; Huc, Emilie; Etienne, Gilles; Marrakchi, Hedia; Daffé, Mamadou

    2013-01-01

    Mycolic acids, very long-chain α-alkyl, β-hydroxylated fatty acids, occur in the members of the order Corynebacteriales where their chain lengths (C(26)-C(88)) and structural features (oxygen functions, cis or trans double bonds, cyclopropane rings and methyl branches) are genus- and species-specific. The molecular composition and structures of the mycolic acids of two species belonging to the genus Segniliparus were determined by a combination of modern analytical chemical techniques, which include MS and NMR. They consist of mono-ethylenic C(62-)C(64) (α'), di-ethylenic C(77)-C(79) (α) and extremely long-chain mycolic acids (α(+)) ranging from 92 to 98 carbon atoms and containing three unsaturations, cis and/or trans double bonds and/or cyclopropanes. The double bonds in each class of mycolic acids were positioned by oxidative cleavage and exhibit locations similar to those of α- and α'-mycolic acids of mycobacteria. For the ultralong chain α-mycolic acids, the three double bonds were located at equally spaced carbon intervals (C(13)-C(16)), with the methyl branches adjacent to the proximal and distal trans double bonds. Examination of the Segniliparus rotundus genome compared with those of other members of the Corynebacteriales indicated two obvious differences in genes encoding the elongation fatty acid (FAS-II) enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of mycolic acids: the organization of 3-ketoacyl-ACP synthases (KasA and KasB) and (3R)-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratases (HadAB/BC), on one hand, and the presence of two copies of the hadB gene encoding the catalytic domain of the latter enzyme type, on the other. This observation is discussed in light of the most recent data accumulated on the biosynthesis of this hallmark of Corynebacteriales. PMID:23154972

  13. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann-Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann-Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  14. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann–Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann–Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Resistance to the Small Molecule Maturation Inhibitor 3-O-(3′,3′-Dimethylsuccinyl)-Betulinic Acid Is Conferred by a Variety of Single Amino Acid Substitutions at the CA-SP1 Cleavage Site in Gag▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Chen, Chin Ho; Aiken, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The compound 3-O-(3′,3′-dimethylsuccinyl)-betulinic acid (DSB) potently and specifically inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication by delaying the cleavage of the CA-SP1 junction in Gag, leading to impaired maturation of the viral core. In this study, we investigated HIV-1 resistance to DSB by analyzing HIV-1 mutants encoding a variety of individual amino acid substitutions in the CA-SP1 cleavage site. Three of the substitutions were lethal to HIV-1 replication owing to a deleterious effect on particle assembly. The remaining mutants exhibited a range of replication efficiencies; however, each mutant was capable of replicating in the presence of concentrations of DSB that effectively inhibited wild-type HIV-1. Mutations conferring resistance to DSB also led to impaired binding of the compound to immature HIV-1 virions and loss of DSB-mediated inhibition of cleavage of Gag. Surprisingly, two of the DSB-resistant mutants retained an intermediate ability to bind the compound, suggesting that binding of DSB to immature HIV-1 particles may not be sufficient for antiviral activity. Overall, our results indicate that Gag amino acids L363 and A364 are critical for inhibition of HIV-1 replication by DSB and suggest that these residues form key contacts with the drug in the context of the assembling HIV-1 particle. These results have implications for the design of and screening for novel inhibitors of HIV-1 maturation. PMID:17035324

  16. Peptidase specificity from the substrate cleavage collection in the MEROPS database and a tool to measure cleavage site conservation

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    One peptidase can usually be distinguished from another biochemically by its action on proteins, peptides and synthetic substrates. Since 1996, the MEROPS database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk) has accumulated a collection of cleavages in substrates that now amounts to 66,615 cleavages. The total number of peptidases for which at least one cleavage is known is 1700 out of a total of 2457 different peptidases. This paper describes how the cleavages are obtained from the scientific literature, how they are annotated and how cleavages in peptides and proteins are cross-referenced to entries in the UniProt protein sequence database. The specificity profiles of 556 peptidases are shown for which ten or more substrate cleavages are known. However, it has been proposed that at least 40 cleavages in disparate proteins are required for specificity analysis to be meaningful, and only 163 peptidases (6.6%) fulfil this criterion. Also described are the various displays shown on the website to aid with the understanding of peptidase specificity, which are derived from the substrate cleavage collection. These displays include a logo, distribution matrix, and tables to summarize which amino acids or groups of amino acids are acceptable (or not acceptable) in each substrate binding pocket. For each protein substrate, there is a display to show how it is processed and degraded. Also described are tools on the website to help with the assessment of the physiological relevance of cleavages in a substrate. These tools rely on the hypothesis that a cleavage site that is conserved in orthologues is likely to be physiologically relevant, and alignments of substrate protein sequences are made utilizing the UniRef50 database, in which in each entry sequences are 50% or more identical. Conservation in this case means substitutions are permitted only if the amino acid is known to occupy the same substrate binding pocket from at least one other substrate cleaved by the same peptidase. PMID

  17. Si(111) cleavage and the (2 x 1) reconstruction process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, E. M.; Halicioglu, T.; Tiller, W. A.

    1987-01-01

    Using a computer simulation technique with a semiempirical potential, a Si crystal was cleaved along the (111) plane. The pi-bonded chain structural features of the Si(111) cleavage surface are observed and found to be a consequence of the dynamics of this cleavage process and seem not to be influenced by the final energetics.

  18. Coupling caspase cleavage and proteasomal degradation of proteins carrying PEST motif.

    PubMed

    Belizario, José E; Alves, Juliano; Garay-Malpartida, Miguel; Occhiucci, João Marcelo

    2008-06-01

    The degradation is critical to activation and deactivation of regulatory proteins involved in signaling pathways to cell growth, differentiation, stress responses and physiological cell death. Proteins carry domains and sequence motifs that function as prerequisite for their proteolysis by either individual proteases or the 26S multicomplex proteasomes. Two models for entry of substrates into the proteasomes have been considered. In one model, it is proposed that the ubiquitin chain attached to the protein serves as recognition element to drag them into the 19S regulatory particle, which promotes the unfolding required to its access into the 20S catalytic chamber. In second model, it is proposed that an unstructured tail located at amino or carboxyl terminus directly track proteins into the 26S/20S proteasomes. Caspases are cysteinyl aspartate proteases that control diverse signaling pathways, promoting the cleavage at one or two sites of hundreds of structural and regulatory protein substrates. Caspase cleavage sites are commonly found within PEST motifs, which are segments rich in proline (P), glutamic acid (D), aspartic acid (E) and serine (S) or threonine (T) residues. Considering that N- and C- terminal peptide carrying PEST motifs form disordered loops in the globular proteins after caspase cleavage, it is postulated here that these exposed termini serve as unstructured initiation site, coupling caspase cleavage and ubiquitin-proteasome dependent and independent degradation of short-lived proteins. This could explain the inherent susceptibility to proteolysis among proteins containing PEST motif. PMID:18537676

  19. Characterising The Role of Basin Margin Structure On Finite Strain Patterns Across A 'Cleavage' Front From The Variscan Of Southern Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, C.; Meere, P.; Mulchrone, K.; Stevenson, C.

    2009-04-01

    Strain analysis is commonly based on the axial ratio measurements of populations of approximately ellipsoid objects (e.g. sedimentary clasts), based on the assumption that these ‘strain markers' act passively during deformation. However truly passive strain markers are rare due to competency contrasts which can lead to underestimates of strain where the strain markers are more rigid than the deforming host. (Meere et al., 2007). Therefore we have used a combination of traditional strain analysis of sedimentary clasts, field and microstructural observations and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements to quantify and validate the finite strain patterns across the Irish Variscan cleavage front. This region lies at the northern boundary of the European Rhenohercynian. Deformation of a thick (7 km +) Upper Devonian continental clastic sequence and overlying Carboniferous marine carbonate/clast sequence at the end of the Carboniferous consisted of an initial phase of layer parallel shortening, followed by folding, ongoing cleavage development and late stage accommodation thrusting. AMS data can help to quantify weak or subtle fabrics by effectively measuring the preferred orientation of iron bearing minerals (in this case clay minerals). Preliminary AMS results indicate a gradient in deformation intensity within lithologies across the cleavage front from the south to the north. A microstructural comparison from across the cleavage front is used to characterise the strain regime either side of the boundary. Integrating these techniques will refine our current knowledge of spatial distributions of strain in the periphery of orogenic forelands.

  20. Activation of α-secretase cleavage.

    PubMed

    Postina, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Alpha-secretase-mediated cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) releases the neuroprotective APP fragment sαAPP and prevents amyloid β peptide (Aβ) generation. Moreover, α-secretase-like cleavage of the Aβ transporter 'receptor for advanced glycation end products' counteracts the import of blood Aβ into the brain. Assuming that Aβ is responsible for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), activation of α-secretase should be preventive. α-Secretase-mediated APP cleavage can be activated via several G protein-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases. Protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, cAMP and calcium are activators of receptor-induced α-secretase cleavage. Selective targeting of receptor subtypes expressed in brain regions affected by AD appears reasonable. Therefore, the PACAP receptor PAC1 and possibly the serotonin 5-HT(6) receptor subtype are promising targets. Activation of APP α-secretase cleavage also occurs upon blockade of cholesterol synthesis by statins or zaragozic acid A. Under physiological statin concentrations, the brain cholesterol content is not influenced. Statins likely inhibit Aβ production in the blood by α-secretase activation which is possibly sufficient to inhibit AD development. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10) acts as α-secretase on APP. By targeting the nuclear retinoic acid receptor β, the expression of ADAM10 and non-amyloidogenic APP processing can be enhanced. Excessive activation of ADAM10 should be avoided because ADAM10 and also ADAM17 are not APP-specific. Both ADAM proteins cleave various substrates, and therefore have been associated with tumorigenesis and tumor progression. PMID:21883223

  1. Crystal structure of chemically synthesized HIV-1 protease and a ketomethylene isostere inhibitor based on the p2/NC cleavage site

    SciTech Connect

    Torbeev, Vladimir Yu.; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Terechko, Valentina A.; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2009-09-02

    Here we report the X-ray structures of chemically synthesized HIV-1 protease and the inactive [D25N]HIV-1 protease complexed with the ketomethylene isostere inhibitor Ac-Thr-Ile-Nle{psi}[CO-CH{sub 2}]Nle-Gln-Arg.amide at 1.4 and 1.8 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In complex with the active enzyme, the keto-group was found to be converted into the hydrated gem-diol, while the structure of the complex with the inactive D25N enzyme revealed an intact keto-group. These data support the general acid-general base mechanism for HIV-1 protease catalysis.

  2. Nonspecific cleavage of proteins using graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heeyoung; Tran, Minh-Hai; Jeong, Hae Kyung; Han, Jinwoo; Jang, Sei-Heon; Lee, ChangWoo

    2014-04-15

    In this article, we report the intrinsic catalytic activity of graphene oxide (GO) for the nonspecific cleavage of proteins. We used bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a recombinant esterase (rEstKp) from the cold-adapted bacterium Pseudomonas mandelii as test proteins. Cleavage of BSA and rEstKp was nonspecific regarding amino acid sequence, but it exhibited dependence on temperature, time, and the amount of GO. However, cleavage of the proteins did not result in complete hydrolysis into their constituent amino acids. GO also invoked hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl esters at moderate temperatures lower than those required for peptide hydrolysis regardless of chain length of the fatty acyl esters. Based on the results, the functional groups of GO, including alcohols, phenols, and carboxylates, can be considered as crucial roles in the GO-mediated hydrolysis of peptides and esters via general acid-base catalysis. Our findings provide novel insights into the role of GO as a carbocatalyst with nonspecific endopeptidase activity in biochemical reactions. PMID:24508487

  3. PROSPER: an integrated feature-based tool for predicting protease substrate cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiangning; Tan, Hao; Perry, Andrew J; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Webb, Geoffrey I; Whisstock, James C; Pike, Robert N

    2012-01-01

    The ability to catalytically cleave protein substrates after synthesis is fundamental for all forms of life. Accordingly, site-specific proteolysis is one of the most important post-translational modifications. The key to understanding the physiological role of a protease is to identify its natural substrate(s). Knowledge of the substrate specificity of a protease can dramatically improve our ability to predict its target protein substrates, but this information must be utilized in an effective manner in order to efficiently identify protein substrates by in silico approaches. To address this problem, we present PROSPER, an integrated feature-based server for in silico identification of protease substrates and their cleavage sites for twenty-four different proteases. PROSPER utilizes established specificity information for these proteases (derived from the MEROPS database) with a machine learning approach to predict protease cleavage sites by using different, but complementary sequence and structure characteristics. Features used by PROSPER include local amino acid sequence profile, predicted secondary structure, solvent accessibility and predicted native disorder. Thus, for proteases with known amino acid specificity, PROSPER provides a convenient, pre-prepared tool for use in identifying protein substrates for the enzymes. Systematic prediction analysis for the twenty-four proteases thus far included in the database revealed that the features we have included in the tool strongly improve performance in terms of cleavage site prediction, as evidenced by their contribution to performance improvement in terms of identifying known cleavage sites in substrates for these enzymes. In comparison with two state-of-the-art prediction tools, PoPS and SitePrediction, PROSPER achieves greater accuracy and coverage. To our knowledge, PROSPER is the first comprehensive server capable of predicting cleavage sites of multiple proteases within a single substrate sequence using

  4. Differentiation of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and intergenic regions and Mycobacterium tuberculosis katG genes by structure-specific endonuclease cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Brow, M A; Oldenburg, M C; Lyamichev, V; Heisler, L M; Lyamicheva, N; Hall, J G; Eagan, N J; Olive, D M; Smith, L M; Fors, L; Dahlberg, J E

    1996-01-01

    We describe here a new approach for analyzing nucleic acid sequences using a structure-specific endonuclease, Cleavase I. We have applied this technique to the detection and localization of mutations associated with isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for differentiating bacterial genera, species and strains. The technique described here is based on the observation that single strands of DNAs can assume defined conformations, which can be detected and cleaved by structure-specific endonucleases such as Cleavase I. The patterns of fragments produced are characteristic of the sequences responsible for the structure, so that each DNA has its own structural fingerprint. Amplicons, containing either a single 5'-fluorescein or 5'-tetramethyl rhodamine label were generated from a 620-bp segment of the katG gene of isoniazid-resistant and -sensitive M. tuberculosis, the 5' 350 bp of the 16S rRNA genes of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella arizonae, Shigella sonnei, Shigella dysenteriae, Campylobacter jejuni, staphylococcus, hominis, Staphylococcus warneri, and Staphylococcus aureus and an approximately 550-bp DNA segment comprising the intergenic region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes of Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella arizonae, Shigella sonnei, and Shigella dysenteriae serotypes 1, 2, and 8. Changes in the structural fingerprints of DNA fragments derived from the katG genes of isoniazid-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates were clearly identified and could be mapped to the site of the actual mutation relative to the labeled end. Bland patterns which clearly differentiated bacteria to the level of genus and, in some cases, species were generated from the 16S genes. Cleavase I analysis of the intergenic regions of Salmonella and Shigella species differentiated genus, species, and serotypes. Structural fingerprinting by digestion with Cleavase I is a rapid, simple, and sensitive

  5. Cleavage-quasi cleavage in ferritic and martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G.R.; Edsinger, K.V.; Lucas, G.E.

    1997-12-31

    Confocal microscopy-fracture reconstruction and SEM were used to characterize the sequence-of-events leading to cleavage in a low alloy pressure vessel steel and two 8--12 Cr martensitic steels as a function of temperature. While differences between the steels were observed, they shared some common characteristics that differ from the conventional view of cleavage. Most notably cleavage does not occur as a single weakest link event; rather it is the consequence of a critical condition when a previously nucleated dispersion of microcracks suddenly coalesce to form a large, rapidly propagating macroscopic crack. It is argued that the critical event can be treated as a bridging instability. The stabilizing effect of the ductile ligaments separating the cleavage facets increases with increasing temperature. Indeed, even in the ductile tearing regime cleavage facets form a significant fraction of nuclei for larger microvoids.

  6. Metabolism of vertebrate amino sugars with N-glycolyl groups: resistance of α2-8-linked N-glycolylneuraminic acid to enzymatic cleavage.

    PubMed

    Davies, Leela R L; Pearce, Oliver M T; Tessier, Matthew B; Assar, Siavash; Smutova, Victoria; Pajunen, Maria; Sumida, Mizuki; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken; Finne, Jukka; Gagneux, Pascal; Pshezhetsky, Alexey; Woods, Robert; Varki, Ajit

    2012-08-17

    The sialic acid (Sia) N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) and its hydroxylated derivative N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) differ by one oxygen atom. CMP-Neu5Gc is synthesized from CMP-Neu5Ac, with Neu5Gc representing a highly variable fraction of total Sias in various tissues and among different species. The exception may be the brain, where Neu5Ac is abundant and Neu5Gc is reported to be rare. Here, we confirm this unusual pattern and its evolutionary conservation in additional samples from various species, concluding that brain Neu5Gc expression has been maintained at extremely low levels over hundreds of millions of years of vertebrate evolution. Most explanations for this pattern do not require maintaining neural Neu5Gc at such low levels. We hypothesized that resistance of α2-8-linked Neu5Gc to vertebrate sialidases is the detrimental effect requiring the relative absence of Neu5Gc from brain. This linkage is prominent in polysialic acid (polySia), a molecule with critical roles in vertebrate neural development. We show that Neu5Gc is incorporated into neural polySia and does not cause in vitro toxicity. Synthetic polymers of Neu5Ac and Neu5Gc showed that mammalian and bacterial sialidases are much less able to hydrolyze α2-8-linked Neu5Gc at the nonreducing terminus. Notably, this difference was not seen with acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of polySias. Molecular dynamics modeling indicates that differences in the three-dimensional conformation of terminal saccharides may partly explain reduced enzymatic activity. In keeping with this, polymers of N-propionylneuraminic acid are sensitive to sialidases. Resistance of Neu5Gc-containing polySia to sialidases provides a potential explanation for the rarity of Neu5Gc in the vertebrate brain. PMID:22692207

  7. Dimeric Fe (II, III) complex of quinoneoxime as functional model of PAP enzyme: Mössbauer, magneto-structural and DNA cleavage studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salunke-Gawali, Sunita; Ahmed, Khursheed; Varret, François; Linares, Jorge; Zaware, Santosh; Date, Sadgopal; Rane, Sandhya

    2008-07-01

    Purple acid phosphatase, ( PAP), is known to contain dinuclear Fe2 + 2, + 3 site with characteristic Fe + 3 ← Tyr ligand to metal charge transfer in coordination. Phthiocoloxime (3-methyl-2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone-1-oxime) ligand L, mimics (His/Tyr) ligation with controlled and unique charge transfers resulting in valence tautomeric coordination with mixed valent diiron site in model compound Fe-1: [μ-OH-Fe2 + 2, + 3 ( o-NQCH3ox) ( o-NSQCH3ox)2 (CAT) H2O]. Fe-2: [Fe + 3( o-NQCH3ox) ( p-NQCH3ox)2]2 a molecularly associated dimer of phthiocoloxime synthesized for comparison of charge transfer. 57Fe Mössbauer studies was used to quantitize unusual valences due to ligand in dimeric Fe-1 and Fe-2 complexes which are supported by EPR and SQUID studies. 57Fe Mössbauer spectra for Fe-1 at 300 K indicates the presence of two quadrupole split asymmetric doublets due to the differences in local coordination geometries of [Fe + 3]A and [Fe + 2]B sites. The hyperfine interaction parameters are δ A = 0.152, (Δ E Q)A = 0.598 mm/s with overlapping doublet at δ B = 0.410 and (Δ E Q)B = 0.468 mm/s. Due to molecular association tendency of ligand, dimer Fe-2 possesses 100% Fe + 3(h.s.) hexacoordinated configuration with isomer shift δ = 0.408 mm/s. Slightly distorted octahedral symmetry created by NQCH3ox ligand surrounding Fe + 3(h.s.) state generates small field gradient indicated by quadrupole split Δ E Q = 0.213 mm/s. Decrease of isomer shifts together with variation of quadrupole splits with temperature in Fe-1 dimer compared to Fe-2 is result of charge transfers in [Fe2 + 2, + 3 SQ] complexes. EPR spectrum of Fe-1 shows two strong signals at g 1 = 4.17 and g 2 = 2.01 indicative of S = 3/2 spin state with an intermediate spin of Fe + 3(h.s.) configuration. SQUID data of χ _m^{corr} .T were best fitted by using HDVV spin pair model S = 2, 3/2 resulting in antiferromagnetic exchange ( J = -13.5 cm - 1 with an agreement factor of R = 1.89 × 10 - 5). The lower J

  8. Carbon-hydrogen vs. carbon-carbon bond cleavage of 1,2-diarylethane radical cations in acetonitrile-water

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, D.M.; Franz, J.A.

    1984-05-04

    Radical cations of 1,2-diarylethanes and 1-phenyl-2-arylethanes (Ar = phenyl, p-tolyl, p-anisyl) were generated in acidic 70% acetonitrile-water by Cu/sup 2 +/-catalyzed peroxydisulfate oxidation. The radical cations fragment mainly by loss of benzylic protons (C-H cleavage) rather than by alkyl C-C bond cleavage. The 1,2-diarylethanol products undergo further selective oxidation to aryl aldehydes and arylmethanols via rapid equilibration of diarylethane and diarylethanol radical cations. The radical cation of 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-diphenylbutane fragments efficiently by C-C cleavage, forming cumyl radical and cumyl cation. Oxidations of bibenzyl-bicumyl mixtures show selective oxidation of bicumyl dependent on total substrate concentration, providing evidence of equilibrating radical cations and showing that bicumyl fragments faster than bibenzyl loses protons. The effects of reaction conditions and substrate structure on reactivity are discussed.

  9. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage. Technical report, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    Cleavage of aliphatic organosulfonate carbon to sulfur (C-S) bonds, a critical link in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle, has been identified in Escherichia coli K-12. Enormous quantities of inorganic sulfate are continuously converted (Scheme I) into methanesulfonic acid 1 and acylated 3-(6-sulfo-{alpha}-D-quinovopyranosyl)-L-glycerol 2. Biocatalytic desulfurization (Scheme I) of 1 and 2, which share the structural feature of an aliphatic carbon bonded to a sulfonic acid sulfur, completes the cycle, Discovery of this desulfurization in E. coli provides an invaluable paradigm for study of a biotic process which, via the biogeochemical cycle, significantly influences the atmospheric concentration of sulfur-containing molecules.

  10. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Revisited: Structure Elucidation and Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases’ many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  11. Fatty acid biosynthesis revisited: structure elucidation and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D John; Burkart, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases' many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  12. Molecular characterization of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases and the effect of gibberellin, abscisic acid, and sodium chloride on the expression of genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway and carotenoid accumulation in the callus of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Pham Anh; Kim, Jae Kwang; Lee, Sanghyun; Chae, Soo Cheon; Park, Sang Un

    2013-06-12

    Three cDNAs encoding carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (SbCCD1, SbCCD4, and SbNCED) were isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis , an important traditional herb in Asia and North America. Amino acid sequence alignments showed that they share high identity and similarity to their orthologs in other plant species. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that SbCCD1 and SbCCD4 were most strongly expressed in flowers, whereas SbNCED was expressed at the highest level in roots. The expression levels of phytoene synthase (SbPSY), phytoene desaturase (SbPDS), ξ-carotene desaturase (SbZDS), β-ring carotene hydroxylase (SbCHXB), zeaxanthin epoxidase (SbZEP), SbCCD1, SbCCD4, and SbNCED in the callus of S. baicalensis varied under different concentrations of gibberellic acid (GA3) and abscisic acid (ABA). Under NaCl treatment, expression levels of all genes increased with increasing NaCl concentrations. Except for zeaxanthin, increasing GA3, ABA, and NaCl concentrations caused higher losses in the total carotenoid content. The total carotenoid content substantially decreased with increasing GA3, ABA, and NaCl concentrations, with the biggest reductions observed in the NaCl treatment. The isolation and characterization of SbCCD1, SbCCD4, and SbNCED together with the study on the effect of GA3, ABA, and NaCl on carotenoid biosynthesis will be helpful to elucidate the carotenoid biosynthesis mechanism in S. baicalensis and may set new trends in metabolic engineering of carotenoids in plants. PMID:23683071

  13. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  14. Cleavage of peptide bonds bearing ionizable amino acids at P{sub 1} by serine proteases with hydrophobic S{sub 1} pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Qasim, Mohammad A.; Song, Jikui; Markley, John L.; Laskowski, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Large pK shifts in ionizable groups when buried in the protein interior. {yields} Substrate dependent shifts in pH optimum for serine proteases. {yields} Lys side chain is a stronger acid in serine protease S{sub 1} pocket than Asp side chain. -- Abstract: Enzymatic hydrolysis of the synthetic substrate succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Xxx-pNA (where Xxx = Leu, Asp or Lys) catalyzed by bovine chymotrypsin (CHYM) or Streptomyces griseus protease B (SGPB) has been studied at different pH values in the pH range 3-11. The pH optima for substrates having Leu, Asp, and Lys have been found to be 7.5-8.0, 5.5-6.0, and {approx}10, respectively. At the normally reported pH optimum (pH 7-8) of CHYM and SGPB, the substrate with Leu at the reactive site is more than 25,000-fold more reactive than that with Asp. However, when fully protonated, Asp is nearly as good a substrate as Leu. The pK values of the side chains of Asp and Lys in the hydrophobic S{sub 1} pocket of CHYM and SGPB have been calculated from pH-dependent hydrolysis data and have been found to be about 9 for Asp and 7.4 and 9.7 for Lys for CHYM and SGPB, respectively. The results presented in this communication suggest a possible application of CHYM like enzymes in cleaving peptide bonds contributed by acidic amino acids between pH 5 and 6.

  15. Regulation of SulA cleavage by Lon protease by the C-terminal amino acid of SulA, histidine.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Y; Amano, F

    2001-09-01

    SulA protein, a cell division inhibitor in Escherichia coli, is degraded by Lon protease. The C-terminal eight residues of SulA have been shown to be recognized by Lon; however, it remains to be elucidated which amino acid in the C-terminus of SulA is critical for the recognition of SulA by Lon. To clarify this point, we constructed mutants of SulA with changes in the C-terminal residues, and examined the accumulation and stability of the resulting mutant SulA proteins in vivo. Substitution of the extreme C-terminal histidine residue with another amino acid led to marked accumulation and high stability of SulA in lon(+) cells. A SulA mutant in which the C-terminal eight residues were deleted (SulAC161) showed high accumulation and stability, but the addition of histidine to the C-terminus of SulAC161 (SulAC161+H) made it labile. Similarly, SulAC161+H fused to maltose-binding protein (MBP-SulAC161+H) formed a tight complex with and was degraded rapidly by Lon in vitro. Histidine competitively inhibited the degradation of MBP-SulA by Lon, while other amino acids did not. These results suggest that the histidine residue at the extreme C-terminus of SulA is recognized specifically by Lon, leading to a high-affinity interaction between SulA and Lon. PMID:11513747

  16. Superprotonic Solid Acids Thermochemistry, Structure, and Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Ayako

    In this work, in order to investigate the thermochemistry and property of the superprotonic solid acid compounds, the measurement methods were established for in situ observation, because superprotonic phases are neither stable at room temperature nor freezable to room temperature. A humidity-controlled TG, DSC and AC impedance measurement system, and high temperature stage for XRD were built for thermal analysis and characterization of the solid acid compounds. The thermodynamic and kinetics of the dehydration and hydration of CsH 2PO4 is investigated by TG, DSC, and XRD analysis. By making use of the enhanced kinetics afforded by SiO2, the phase boundary between CsH2PO4, CsPO3, and dehydrated liquid was precisely determined. The stability of CsH2PO4 and the liquid dehydrate, CsH2(1-x)PO4-x(l), were confirmed by the complete reversal of dehydration to recover these phases in the appropriate temperature and water partial pressure ranges. Rehydration and conversion of CsPO3(s) to CsH2PO4(s) occurs over a period of several hours, depending on temperature, water partial pressure, and morphology of the metaphosphate. High and small particles favor rapid dehydration, whereas the temperature dependence of the rehydration kinetics is nonmonotonic, reaching its fastest rate in the vicinity of the superprotonic transition. Doping Rb and K into CDP was examined and the stable region of Cs 1-xRbxH2PO4 and Cs1-xKxH2PO 4 are determined by in situ XRD and DSC measurement. Then the effects of doping to the structure and conductivity are discussed. It was found that Rb has whole-range solubility for both cubic and monoclinic CDP. Ts increases and Td decrease with Rb content. K has 27% solubility for cubic CDP, T s and Td decrease with K content. The eutectic temperature is 208 +/- 2°C. The lattice size of Rb- or K- doped CDP depends on the averaged cation size. Conductivity linearly decreases by dopant concentration. The impact of K doping is deeper than that of Rb for the

  17. Peptide Synthesis through Cell-Free Expression of Fusion Proteins Incorporating Modified Amino Acids as Latent Cleavage Sites for Peptide Release.

    PubMed

    Liutkus, Mantas; Fraser, Samuel A; Caron, Karine; Stigers, Dannon J; Easton, Christopher J

    2016-05-17

    Chlorinated analogues of Leu and Ile are incorporated during cell-free expression of peptides fused to protein, by exploiting the promiscuity of the natural biosynthetic machinery. They then act as sites for clean and efficient release of the peptides simply by brief heat treatment. Dehydro analogues of Leu and Ile are similarly incorporated as latent sites for peptide release through treatment with iodine under cold conditions. These protocols complement enzyme-catalyzed methods and have been used to prepare calcitonin, gastrin-releasing peptide, cholecystokinin-7, and prolactin-releasing peptide prohormones, as well as analogues substituted with unusual amino acids, thus illustrating their practical utility as alternatives to more traditional chemical peptide synthesis. PMID:26918308

  18. Differential inhibition of restriction enzyme cleavage by chromophore-modified analogues of the antitumour antibiotics mithramycin and chromomycin reveals structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, Sylvia; Garcia-Ferrer, Irene; Méndez, Carmen; Salas, José A; Portugal, José

    2010-05-15

    Differential cleavage at three restriction enzyme sites was used to determine the specific binding to DNA of the antitumour antibiotics mithramycin A (MTA), chromomycin A(3) (CRO) and six chromophore-modified analogues bearing shorter side chains attached at C-3, instead of the pentyl chain. All these antibiotics were obtained through combinatorial biosynthesis in the producer organisms. MTA, CRO and their six analogues showed differences in their capacity for inhibiting the rate of cleavage by restriction enzymes that recognize C/G-rich tracts. Changes in DNA melting temperature produced by these molecules were also analyzed, as well as their antiproliferative activities against a panel of colon, ovarian and prostate human carcinoma cell lines. Moreover, the cellular uptake of several analogues was examined to identify whether intracellular retention was related to cytotoxicity. These experimental approaches provided mutually consistent evidence of a seeming correlation between the strength of binding to DNA and the antiproliferative activity of the chromophore-modified molecules. Four of the analogues (mithramycin SK, mithramycin SDK, chromomycin SK and chromomycin SDK) showed promising biological profiles. PMID:20093108

  19. How acidic are monomeric structural units of heparin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan; Broer, Ria; Van Duijnen, Piet Th.

    2013-12-01

    Density functional theory methods with the B3LYP functional have been used to letter the acidity of carboxyl, O-sulfo and N-sulfo groups in six basic monomeric structural units of heparin (1-OMe ΔUA-2S, 1-OMe GlcN-S6S, 1,4-DiOMe GlcA, 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S3S6S, 1,4-DiOMe IdoA-2S, and 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S6S). The predicted gas-phase acidity of the acidic functional groups in the monomeric structural units of heparin is: O-sulfo > N-sulfo > carboxyl. The computed pKa values provide the same order of acidity as was observed in water solution. This implies that hydration does not change ordering of acidity of major acidic groups of monomeric structural units of heparin.

  20. Enzymic Pathways for Formation of Carotenoid Cleavage Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, Peter; Zorn, Holger

    Degraded carotenoids (apocarotenoids, norisoprenoids) have been a subject of intensive research for several decades. From the perspective of human physiology and nutrition, the retinoids, acting as vitamins, signalling molecules, and visual pigments, attracted the greatest attention (Chapters 15 and 16). Plant scientists, however, detected a wealth of different apocarotenoids, presumably derived by the excentric cleavage of carotenoids in various species, the plant hormone abscisic acid (1, Scheme 6) being the best-investigated example. With the onset of fruit ripening, flower opening or senescence of green tissues, carotenoids are degraded oxidatively to smaller, volatile compounds. The natural biological functions of the reaction products are outlined in Chapter 15. As many of these apocarotenoids act as potent flavour compounds, food chemists and flavourists worldwide have investigated meticulously their structural and sensory properties. Many aspects of carotenoid metabolites and breakdown products as aroma compounds are presented in a comprehensive book [1].

  1. Aliphatic structure of humic acids; a clue to their origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Maciel, G.E.; Dennis, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (both 1H and 13C) of humic acids from diverse depositional environments indicate the presence of aromatic chemical structures, most likely derived from lignin of vascular plants, and complex, paraffinic structures, most likely derived from algal or microbial sources. The latter components account for a major fraction of humic acid structures in both terrestrial and aquatic environments, suggesting that algae or microbes play a large role in humification of organic remains from both systems. ?? 1981.

  2. Ab initio dynamics trajectory study of the heterolytic cleavage of H2 by a Lewis acid [B(C6F5)3] and a Lewis base [P(tBu)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Maoping; Privalov, Timofei

    2013-04-01

    Activation of H2 by a "frustrated Lewis pair" (FLP) composed of B(C6F5)3 and P(tBu)3 species has been explored with high level direct ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations at finite temperature (T = 300 K) in gas phase. The initial geometrical conditions for the AIMD trajectory calculations, i.e., the near attack conformations of FLP + H2, were devised using the host-guest model in which suitable FLP conformations were obtained from the dynamics of the B(C6F5)3/P(tBu)3 pair in gas phase. AIMD trajectory calculations yielded microscopic insight into effects which originate from nuclear motion in the reacting complex, e.g., the alternating compression/elongation of the boron-phosphorous distance and the change of the pyramidality of boron in B(C6F5)3. The ensemble averaged trajectory analysis has been compared with the minimum energy path (MEP) description of the reaction. Similar to MEP, AIMD shows that an attack of the acid/base pair on the H-H bond gives rise to the polarization of the H2 molecule and as a consequence generates a large dipole moment of the reacting complex. The MEP and AIMD portrayals of the reaction are fundamentally different in terms of the magnitude of the motion of nuclei in B(C6F5)3 and P(tBu)3 during the H2 cleavage. In the AIMD trajectory simulations, geometries of B(C6F5)3 and P(tBu)3 appear as nearly "frozen" on the short time scale of the H2 cleavage. This is contrary to the MEP picture. Several of the concepts which arise from this work, e.g., separation of time scales of nuclear motion and the time-dependence of the donor-acceptor interactions in the reacting complex, are important for the understanding of chemical reactivity and catalysis.

  3. Iridium porphyrins in CD3OD: reduction of Ir(III), CD3-OD bond cleavage, Ir-D acid dissociation and alkene reactions.

    PubMed

    Bhagan, Salome; Imler, Gregory H; Wayland, Bradford B

    2013-04-15

    Methanol solutions of iridium(III) tetra(p-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin [(TSPP)Ir(III)] form an equilibrium distribution of methanol and methoxide complexes ([(TSPP)Ir(III)(CD3OD)(2-n)(OCD3)n]((3+n)-)). Reaction of [(TSPP)Ir(III) with dihydrogen (D2) in methanol produces an iridium hydride [(TSPP)Ir(III)-D(CD3OD)](4-) in equilibrium with an iridium(I) complex ([(TSPP)Ir(I)(CD3OD)](5-)). The acid dissociation constant of the iridium hydride (Ir-D) in methanol at 298 K is 3.5 × 10(-12). The iridium(I) complex ([(TSPP)Ir(I)(CD3OD)](5-)) catalyzes reaction of [(TSPP)Ir(III)-D(CD3OD)](4-) with CD3-OD to produce an iridium methyl complex [(TSPP)Ir(III)-CD3(CD3OD)](4-) and D2O. Reactions of the iridium hydride with ethene and propene produce iridium alkyl complexes, but the Ir-D complex fails to give observable addition with acetaldehyde and carbon monoxide in methanol. Reaction of the iridium hydride with propene forms both the isopropyl and propyl complexes with free energy changes (ΔG° 298 K) of -1.3 and -0.4 kcal mol(-1) respectively. Equilibrium thermodynamics and reactivity studies are used in discussing relative Ir-D, Ir-OCD3 and Ir-CD2- bond energetics in methanol. PMID:23540797

  4. Processing of peptide and hormone precursors at the dibasic cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Rholam, Mohamed; Fahy, Christine

    2009-07-01

    Many functionally important cellular peptides and proteins, including hormones, neuropeptides, and growth factors, are synthesized as inactive precursor polypeptides, which require post-translational proteolytic processing to become biologically active polypeptides. This is achieved by the action of a relatively small number of proteases that belong to a family of seven subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (PCs) including furin. In view of this, this review focuses on the importance of privileged secondary structures and of given amino acid residues around basic cleavage sites in substrate recognition by these endoproteases. In addition to their participation in normal cell functions, PCs are crucial for the initiation and progress of many important diseases. Hence, these proteases constitute potential drug targets in medicine. Accordingly, this review also discusses the approaches used to shed light on the cleavage preference and the substrate specificity of the PCs, a prerequisite to select which PCs are promising drug targets in each disease. PMID:19300906

  5. Minor dehydrogenated and cleavaged dammarane-type saponins from the steamed roots of Panax notoginseng.

    PubMed

    Gu, Cheng-Zhen; Lv, Jun-Jiang; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Yan, Hui; Zhu, Hong-Tao; Luo, Huai-Rong; Wang, Dong; Yang, Chong-Ren; Xu, Min; Zhang, Ying-Jun

    2015-06-01

    Nine new minor dehydrogenated and cleavaged dammarane-type triterpenoid saponins, namely notoginsenosides ST6-ST14 (1-9) were isolated from the steamed roots of Panax notoginseng, together with 14 known ones. Among them, 5-7 and 21-22 were protopanaxadiol type and the left 18 compounds, including 1-4, 8-20, and 23 were protopanaxatriol type saponins. Their structures were identified by extensive analysis of MS, 1D and 2D NMR spectra, and acidic hydrolysis. Resulted from the side chain cleavage, the new saponins 1 and 2 featured in a ketone group at C-25, and 3-5 had an aldehyde unit at C-23. The known saponins 12, 16 and 18 displayed the enhancing potential of neurite outgrowth of NGF-mediated PC12 cells at a concentration of 10 μM, while 20 exhibited acetyl cholinesterase inhibitory activity, with IC50 value of 13.97 μM. PMID:25797537

  6. Determining the Architecture of a Protein-DNA Complex by Combining FeBABE Cleavage Analyses, 3-D Printed Structures, and the ICM Molsoft Program.

    PubMed

    James, Tamara; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Knipling, Leslie; Hinton, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Determining the structure of a protein-DNA complex can be difficult, particularly if the protein does not bind tightly to the DNA, if there are no homologous proteins from which the DNA binding can be inferred, and/or if only portions of the protein can be crystallized. If the protein comprises just a part of a large multi-subunit complex, other complications can arise such as the complex being too large for NMR studies, or it is not possible to obtain the amounts of protein and nucleic acids needed for crystallographic analyses. Here, we describe a technique we used to map the position of an activator protein relative to the DNA within a large transcription complex. We determined the position of the activator on the DNA from data generated using activator proteins that had been conjugated at specific residues with the chemical cleaving reagent, iron bromoacetamidobenzyl-EDTA (FeBABE). These analyses were combined with 3-D models of the available structures of portions of the activator protein and B-form DNA to obtain a 3-D picture of the protein relative to the DNA. Finally, the Molsoft program was used to refine the position, revealing the architecture of the protein-DNA within the transcription complex. PMID:26404142

  7. Lipoteichoic Acid in Streptomyces hygroscopicus: Structural Model and Immunomodulatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cot, Marlène; Ray, Aurélie; Gilleron, Martine; Vercellone, Alain; Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Armau, Elise; Gauthier, Sophie; Tiraby, Gérard; Puzo, Germain; Nigou, Jérôme

    2011-01-01

    Gram positive bacteria produce cell envelope macroamphiphile glycopolymers, i.e. lipoteichoic acids or lipoglycans, whose functions and biosynthesis are not yet fully understood. We report for the first time a detailed structure of lipoteichoic acid isolated from a Streptomyces species, i.e. Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. hygroscopicus NRRL 2387T. Chemical, MS and NMR analyses revealed a polyglycerolphosphate backbone substituted with α-glucosaminyl and α-N-acetyl-glucosaminyl residues but devoid of any amino-acid substituent. This structure is very close, if not identical, to that of the wall teichoic acid of this organism. These data not only contribute to the growing recognition that lipoteichoic acid is a cell envelope component of Gram positive Actinobacteria but also strongly support the recently proposed hypothesis of an overlap between the pathways of lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid synthesis in these bacteria. S. hygroscopicus lipoteichoic acid induced signalling by human innate immune receptor TLR2, confirming its role as a microbe-associated molecular pattern. Its activity was partially dependant on TLR1, TLR6 and CD14. Moreover, it stimulated TNF-α and IL-6 production by a human macrophage cell line to an extent similar to that of Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid. These results provide new clues on lipoteichoic acid structure/function relationships, most particularly on the role of the polyglycerolphosphate backbone substituents. PMID:22028855

  8. Computation of statistical secondary structure of nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K; Kitamura, Y; Yoshikura, H

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a computer analysis of statistical secondary structure of nucleic acids. For a given single stranded nucleic acid, we generated "structure map" which included all the annealing structures in the sequence. The map was transformed into "energy map" by rough approximation; here, the energy level of every pairing structure consisting of more than 2 successive nucleic acid pairs was calculated. By using the "energy map", the probability of occurrence of each annealed structure was computed, i.e., the structure was computed statistically. The basis of computation was the 8-queen problem in the chess game. The validity of our computer programme was checked by computing tRNA structure which has been well established. Successful application of this programme to small nuclear RNAs of various origins is demonstrated. PMID:6198622

  9. The Chemical Structure and Acid Deterioration of Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollinger, William K., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the chemical structure of paper, including subatomic particles, atoms and molecules, and the forces that bond atoms into molecules, molecules into chains, chains into sheets, and sheets into layers. Acid is defined, and the deleterious role of acid in breaking the forces that bond atoms into molecules is detailed. (EJS)

  10. Synthesis and structure of dicopper(II) complexes bridged by N-(5-chloro-2-hydroxyphenyl)-N'-[3-(methy lamino)propyl]oxamide: evaluation of DNA/protein binding, DNA cleavage, and in vitro anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Wen; Li, Xue-Jie; Zhu, Ling; Li, Yan-Tuan; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Yan, Cui-Wei

    2015-06-01

    Three new dicopper(II) complexes bridged by N-(5-chloro-2-hydroxyphenyl)-N'-[3-(methylamino)-propyl]oxamide (H3chmpoxd) and end-capped with 1,10-phenanthroline (phen); 2,2'-diamino-4,4'-bithiazole (dabt); and 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), namely [Cu2(chmpoxd)(H2O)(phen)](ClO4)⋅CH3CN (1), [Cu2(chmpoxd)(dabt)(C2H5OH)](NO3) (2) and [Cu2(chmpoxd)(H2O)(bpy)](NO3)⋅CH3CN (3), were synthesized and structurally characterized. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that both the copper(II) ions bridged by the cis-chmpoxd(3-) ligands in the three complexes are in square-planar and square-pyramidal environments, respectively. The reactivity towards herring sperm DNA (HS-DNA) and protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) indicated that these copper(II) complexes can interact with the DNA in the mode of intercalation, and bind to BSA responsible for quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by the static quenching mechanism. The cytotoxicity and DNA cleavage suggested that all the dicopper(II) complexes are active against the selected tumor cell lines, and the complex 1 exhibits the cleavage capacity for plasmid DNA. PMID:25837411

  11. Structural and Kinetic Characterization of the 4-Carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate Hydratase from the Gallate and Protocatechuate 4,5-Cleavage Pathways of Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Mazurkewich, Scott; Brott, Ashley S; Kimber, Matthew S; Seah, Stephen Y K

    2016-04-01

    The bacterial catabolism of lignin and its breakdown products is of interest for applications in industrial processing of ligno-biomass. The gallate degradation pathway ofPseudomonas putidaKT2440 requires a 4-carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate (CHM) hydratase (GalB), which has a 12% sequence identity to a previously identified CHM hydratase (LigJ) fromSphingomonassp. SYK-6. The structure of GalB was determined and found to be a member of the PIG-LN-acetylglucosamine deacetylase family; GalB is structurally distinct from the amidohydrolase fold of LigJ. LigJ has the same stereospecificity as GalB, providing an example of convergent evolution for catalytic conversion of a common metabolite in bacterial aromatic degradation pathways. Purified GalB contains a bound Zn(2+)cofactor; however the enzyme is capable of using Fe(2+)and Co(2+)with similar efficiency. The general base aspartate in the PIG-L deacetylases is an alanine in GalB; replacement of the alanine with aspartate decreased the GalB catalytic efficiency for CHM by 9.5 × 10(4)-fold, and the variant enzyme did not have any detectable hydrolase activity. Kinetic analyses and pH dependence studies of the wild type and variant enzymes suggested roles for Glu-48 and His-164 in the catalytic mechanism. A comparison with the PIG-L deacetylases led to a proposed mechanism for GalB wherein Glu-48 positions and activates the metal-ligated water for the hydration reaction and His-164 acts as a catalytic acid. PMID:26867578

  12. Cleavage of INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID INDUCIBLE28 mRNA by MicroRNA847 Upregulates Auxin Signaling to Modulate Cell Proliferation and Lateral Organ Growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs function in a range of developmental processes. Here, we demonstrate that miR847 targets the mRNA of the auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) repressor-encoding gene IAA28 for cleavage. The rapidly increased accumulation of miR847 in Arabidopsis thaliana coincided with reduced IAA28 mRNA levels upon auxin treatment. This induction of miR847 by auxin was abolished in auxin receptor tir1-1 and auxin-resistant axr1-3 mutants. Further analysis demonstrates that miR847 functions as a positive regulator of auxin-mediated lateral organ development by cleaving IAA28 mRNA. Importantly, the ectopic expression of miR847 increases the expression of cell cycle genes as well as the neoplastic activity of leaf cells, prolonging later-stage rosette leaf growth and producing leaves with serrated margins. Moreover, both miR847 and IAA28 mRNAs are specifically expressed in marginal meristems of rosette leaves and lateral root initiation sites. Our data indicate that auxin-dependent induction of miR847 positively regulates meristematic competence by clearing IAA28 mRNA to upregulate auxin signaling, thereby determining the duration of cell proliferation and lateral organ growth in Arabidopsis. IAA28 mRNA encodes an Aux/IAA repressor protein, which is degraded through the proteasome in response to auxin. Altered signal sensitization to IAA28 mRNA levels, together with targeted IAA28 degradation, ensures a robust signal derepression. PMID:25794935

  13. Cleavage of INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID INDUCIBLE28 mRNA by microRNA847 upregulates auxin signaling to modulate cell proliferation and lateral organ growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2015-03-01

    MicroRNAs function in a range of developmental processes. Here, we demonstrate that miR847 targets the mRNA of the auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) repressor-encoding gene IAA28 for cleavage. The rapidly increased accumulation of miR847 in Arabidopsis thaliana coincided with reduced IAA28 mRNA levels upon auxin treatment. This induction of miR847 by auxin was abolished in auxin receptor tir1-1 and auxin-resistant axr1-3 mutants. Further analysis demonstrates that miR847 functions as a positive regulator of auxin-mediated lateral organ development by cleaving IAA28 mRNA. Importantly, the ectopic expression of miR847 increases the expression of cell cycle genes as well as the neoplastic activity of leaf cells, prolonging later-stage rosette leaf growth and producing leaves with serrated margins. Moreover, both miR847 and IAA28 mRNAs are specifically expressed in marginal meristems of rosette leaves and lateral root initiation sites. Our data indicate that auxin-dependent induction of miR847 positively regulates meristematic competence by clearing IAA28 mRNA to upregulate auxin signaling, thereby determining the duration of cell proliferation and lateral organ growth in Arabidopsis. IAA28 mRNA encodes an Aux/IAA repressor protein, which is degraded through the proteasome in response to auxin. Altered signal sensitization to IAA28 mRNA levels, together with targeted IAA28 degradation, ensures a robust signal derepression. PMID:25794935

  14. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl transferase binds acidic and basic amino acid substrates.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Aman; Clifton, Ian J; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Ivison, David; Domene, Carmen; Schofield, Christopher J

    2011-09-21

    Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl-transferases catalyse the reversible transfer of an acetyl-group from a basic (ornithine) to an acidic (glutamate) amino acid by employing a common mechanism involving an acetyl-enzyme intermediate but using different side chain binding modes. PMID:21796301

  15. Structure of seven organic salts assembled from 2,6-diaminopyridine with monocarboxylic acids, dicarboxylic acids, and tetracarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xingjun; Zhang, Huan; Wen, Xianhong; Liu, Bin; Jin, Shouwen; Wang, Daqi

    2015-08-01

    Studies concentrating on non-covalent interactions between the organic base of 2,6-diaminopyridine, and carboxylic acids have led to an increased understanding of the role 2,6-diaminopyridine in binding with carboxylic acid derivatives. Here anhydrous and hydrated multi-component organic acid-base salts of 2,6-diaminopyridine have been prepared with the carboxylic acids as nicotinic acid, o-chlorobenzoic acid, 1,3-benzodioxole-5-carboxylic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, 4-nitro-phthalic acid, 1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, and butane-1,2,3,4-tetracarboxylic acid. The seven crystalline compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared (IR), melting point (mp), and elemental analysis. All structures adopted the hetero R22(8) supramolecular synthons. The supramolecular architectures bear extensive Nsbnd H⋯N, Osbnd H⋯N, Osbnd H⋯O, Nsbnd H⋯O, and CH⋯O associations as well as other nonbonding contacts as CHsbnd N, CH2sbnd O, π-π, C-π, O-π, Cl-π, Clsbnd O, and Osbnd O interactions. The role of weak and strong hydrogen bonding in the crystal packing is ascertained.

  16. Identification and Characterization of a Cleavage Site in the Proteolysis of Orf Virus 086 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoping; Xiao, Bin; Zhang, Jiafeng; Chen, Daxiang; Li, Wei; Li, Ming; Hao, Wenbo; Luo, Shuhong

    2016-01-01

    The orf virus (ORFV) is among the parapoxvirus genus of the poxviridae family, but little is known about the proteolytic pathways of ORFV encoding proteins. By contrast, the proteolysis mechanism of the vaccinia virus (VV) has been extensively explored. Vaccinia virus core protein P4a undergoes a proteolytic process that takes place at a conserved cleavage site Ala-Gly-X (where X is any amino acid) and participates in virus assembly. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that an ORFV encoding protein, ORFV086, has a similar structure to the vaccinia virus P4a core protein. In this study, we focus on the kinetic analysis and proteolysis mechanism of ORFV086. We found, via kinetic analysis, that ORFV086 is a late gene that starts to express at 8 h post infection at mRNA level and 12–24 h post infection at the protein level. The ORFV086 precursor and a 21 kDa fragment can be observed in mature ORFV virions. The same bands were detected at only 3 h post infection, suggesting that both the ORFV086 precursor and the 21 kDa fragment are viral structural proteins. ORFV086 was cleaved from 12 to 24 h post infection. The cleavage took place at different sites, resulting in seven bands with differing molecular weights. Sequence alignment revealed that five putative cleavage sites were predicted at C-terminal and internal regions of ORFV086. To investigate whether those cleavage sites are involved in proteolytic processing, full length and several deletion mutant ORFV086 recombinant proteins were expressed and probed. The GGS site that produced a 21 kDa cleavage fragment was confirmed by identification of N/C-terminal FLAG epitope recombinant proteins, site-directed mutagenesis and pulse-chase analysis. Interestingly, chase results demonstrated that, at late times, ORFV086 is partially cleaved. Taken together, we concluded that GGS is a cleavage site in ORFV086 and produces a 21 kDa fragment post infection. Both ORFV086 precursor and the 21 kDa fragment are structural proteins of

  17. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27324649

  18. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl- N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints.

  19. Small molecule activators of pre-mRNA 3′ cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Kevin; Khleborodova, Asya; Pan, Jingyi; Ryan, Xiaozhou P.

    2009-01-01

    3′ Cleavage and polyadenylation are obligatory steps in the biogenesis of most mammalian pre-mRNAs. In vitro reconstitution of the 3′ cleavage reaction from human cleavage factors requires high concentrations of creatine phosphate (CP), though how CP activates cleavage is not known. Previously, we proposed that CP might work by competitively inhibiting a cleavage-suppressing serine/threonine (S/T) phosphatase. Here we show that fluoride/EDTA, a general S/T phosphatase inhibitor, activates in vitro cleavage in place of CP. Subsequent testing of inhibitors specific for different S/T phosphatases showed that inhibitors of the PPM family of S/T phosphatases, which includes PP2C, but not the PPP family, which includes PP1, PP2A, and PP2B, activated 3′ cleavage in vitro. In particular, NCI 83633, an inhibitor of PP2C, activated extensive 3′ cleavage at a concentration 50-fold below that required by fluoride or CP. The testing of structural analogs led to the identification of a more potent compound that activated 3′ cleavage at 200 μM. While testing CP analogs to understand the origin of its cleavage activation effect, we found phosphocholine to be a more effective activator than CP. The minimal structural determinants of 3′ cleavage activation by phosphocholine were identified. Our results describe a much improved small molecule activator of in vitro pre-mRNA cleavage, identify the molecular determinants of cleavage activation by phosphoamines such as phosphocholine, and suggest that a PPM family phosphatase is involved in the negative regulation of mammalian pre-mRNA 3′ cleavage. PMID:19155323

  20. Performance of structured lipids incorporating selected phenolic and ascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Gruczynska, Eliza; Przybylski, Roman; Aladedunye, Felix

    2015-04-15

    Conditions applied during frying require antioxidant which is stable at these conditions and provides protection for frying oil and fried food. Novel structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants were formed by enzymatic transesterification, exploring canola oil and naturally occurring antioxidants such as ascorbic and selected phenolic acids as substrates. Lipozyme RM IM lipase from Rhizomucor miehei was used as biocatalyst. Frying performance and oxidative stability of the final transesterification products were evaluated. The novel lipids showed significantly improved frying performance compared to canola oil. Oxidative stability assessment of the structured lipids showed significant improvement in resistance to oxidative deterioration compared to original canola oil. Interestingly, the presence of ascorbic acid in an acylglycerol structure protected α-tocopherol against thermal degradation, which was not observed for the phenolic acids. Developed structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants may directly affect nutritional properties of lipids also offering nutraceutical ingredients for food formulation. PMID:25466089

  1. (Structure and stability of nucleic acids)

    SciTech Connect

    Tinoco, I. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    We study the conformations of DNA and RNA oligonucleotides in order to understand their biological roles. We have determined the structure of the most common type of hairpin loop found in ribosomal RNA--the extra-stable tetraloop. It is actually a biloop with the other two bases in the loop forming a non-Watson-Crick base pair. This is the highest resolution structure reported for an RNA molecule in solution so far. We have obtained structures of pseudoknots and we have deduced general rules for their formation. We are presently studying a pseudoknot which is necessary for the replication of a retrovirus. The research done in the laboratory has been reported in 24 publications, plus 7 manuscripts in press or submitted. The research was done by 14 graduate students and 7 postdoctoral fellows. Five graduate students have received their Ph.D.s and 4 postdoctorals have finished their stay here. There are presently 9 graduate students and 3 postdoctorals working on the project; 2 new postdoctorals are expected this summer. One undergraduate student usually participates in the research during the year; this summer two undergraduates are working on the project. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Synthesis, crystal structures and characterization of late first row transition metal complexes derived from benzothiazole core: anti-tuberculosis activity and special emphasis on DNA binding and cleavage property.

    PubMed

    Netalkar, Priya P; Netalkar, Sandeep P; Budagumpi, Srinivasa; Revankar, Vidyanand K

    2014-05-22

    Air and moisture stable coordination compounds of late first row transition metals, viz. Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II), with a newly designed ligand, 2-(2-benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)hydrazono)propan-1-ol (LH), were prepared and successfully characterized using various spectro-analytical techniques. The molecular structures of the ligand and nickel complex were unambiguously determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction method. The [Ni(LH)2]Cl2.3H2O complex is stabilized by intermolecular CH⋯π stacking interactions between the methyl hydrogen and the C18 atom of the phenyl ring (C11-H11B⋯C18) forming 1D zig-zag chain structure. Both, the ligand and its copper complex, were electrochemically active in the working potential range, showing quasi-reversible redox system. The interactions of all the compounds with calf thymus DNA have been comprehensively investigated using electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity, electrochemistry and thermal denaturation studies. The cleavage reaction on pBR322 DNA has been monitored by agarose gel electrophoresis. The results showed that the ligand can bind to CT-DNA through partial intercalation, whereas the complexes bind electrostatically. Further, [Ni(LH)2]Cl2.3H2O and [CuLCl(H2O)2] complexes in the series have high binding and cleavage affinity towards pBR322 DNA. Additionally, all the compounds were screened for anti-tuberculosis activity. All the complexes revealed an MIC value of 0.8 μg/mL, which is almost 8 times active than standard used (Streptomycin, 6.25 μg/mL). PMID:24721314

  3. Internal guide RNA interactions interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage.

    PubMed

    Thyme, Summer B; Akhmetova, Laila; Montague, Tessa G; Valen, Eivind; Schier, Alexander F

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas system uses guide RNAs (gRNAs) to direct sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Not every gRNA elicits cleavage and the mechanisms that govern gRNA activity have not been resolved. Low activity could result from either failure to form a functional Cas9-gRNA complex or inability to recognize targets in vivo. Here we show that both phenomena influence Cas9 activity by comparing mutagenesis rates in zebrafish embryos with in vitro cleavage assays. In vivo, our results suggest that genomic factors such as CTCF inhibit mutagenesis. Comparing near-identical gRNA sequences with different in vitro activities reveals that internal gRNA interactions reduce cleavage. Even though gRNAs containing these structures do not yield cleavage-competent complexes, they can compete with active gRNAs for binding to Cas9. These results reveal that both genomic context and internal gRNA interactions can interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage and illuminate previously uncharacterized features of Cas9-gRNA complex formation. PMID:27282953

  4. Internal guide RNA interactions interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Thyme, Summer B.; Akhmetova, Laila; Montague, Tessa G.; Valen, Eivind; Schier, Alexander F.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas system uses guide RNAs (gRNAs) to direct sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Not every gRNA elicits cleavage and the mechanisms that govern gRNA activity have not been resolved. Low activity could result from either failure to form a functional Cas9–gRNA complex or inability to recognize targets in vivo. Here we show that both phenomena influence Cas9 activity by comparing mutagenesis rates in zebrafish embryos with in vitro cleavage assays. In vivo, our results suggest that genomic factors such as CTCF inhibit mutagenesis. Comparing near-identical gRNA sequences with different in vitro activities reveals that internal gRNA interactions reduce cleavage. Even though gRNAs containing these structures do not yield cleavage-competent complexes, they can compete with active gRNAs for binding to Cas9. These results reveal that both genomic context and internal gRNA interactions can interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage and illuminate previously uncharacterized features of Cas9–gRNA complex formation. PMID:27282953

  5. Unique structural features of red kidney bean purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Cashikar, A G; Rao, M N

    1995-06-01

    Purple acid phosphatase from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) has been purified to homogeneity and characterized. The enzyme is a homodimer of 60 kDa subunits each containing one atom of zinc and iron in the active site. Circular dichroism spectral studies on the purified enzyme reveals that a large portion of the peptide backbone is in the unordered and beta-turn conformation. A unique feature of the red kidney bean acid phosphatase, which we have found, is that one of the two cysteines of each subunit is involved in the formation of an inter-subunit disulphide. The thiol group of the other cysteine is not necessary for the activity of the enzyme. Western blot analysis with antibodies raised against kidney bean acid phosphatase could not recognize acid phosphatases from other sources except from potato. This paper emphasizes the fact that acid phosphatases are functionally, but not structurally, conserved enzymes. PMID:7590853

  6. Crystal structure of (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid.

    PubMed

    Sonneck, Marcel; Peppel, Tim; Spannenberg, Anke; Wohlrab, Sebastian

    2015-07-01

    The crystal structure of (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid, C12H22O2, an α,β-unsaturated carb-oxy-lic acid with a melting point (295 K) near room temperature, is characterized by carb-oxy-lic acid inversion dimers linked by pairs of O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The carb-oxy-lic acid group and the following three carbon atoms of the chain of the (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid mol-ecule lie almost in one plane (r.m.s. deviation for the four C atoms and two O atoms = 0.012 Å), whereas the remaining carbon atoms of the hydro-carbon chain adopt a nearly fully staggered conformation [moduli of torsion angles vary from 174.01 (13) to 179.97 (13)°]. PMID:26279945

  7. Crystal structure of (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Sonneck, Marcel; Peppel, Tim; Spannenberg, Anke; Wohlrab, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid, C12H22O2, an α,β-unsaturated carb­oxy­lic acid with a melting point (295 K) near room temperature, is characterized by carb­oxy­lic acid inversion dimers linked by pairs of O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The carb­oxy­lic acid group and the following three carbon atoms of the chain of the (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid mol­ecule lie almost in one plane (r.m.s. deviation for the four C atoms and two O atoms = 0.012 Å), whereas the remaining carbon atoms of the hydro­carbon chain adopt a nearly fully staggered conformation [moduli of torsion angles vary from 174.01 (13) to 179.97 (13)°]. PMID:26279945

  8. Deglycosylation of glycoproteins with trifluoromethanesulphonic acid: elucidation of molecular structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Edge, Albert S B

    2003-01-01

    The alteration of proteins by post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, sulphation, processing by proteolysis, lipid attachment and glycosylation, gives rise to a broad range of molecules that can have an identical underlying protein core. An understanding of glycosylation of proteins is important in clarifying the nature of the numerous variants observed and in determining the biological roles of these modifications. Deglycosylation with TFMS (trifluoromethanesulphonic acid) [Edge, Faltynek, Hof, Reichert, and Weber, (1981) Anal. Biochem. 118, 131-137] has been used extensively to remove carbohydrate from glycoproteins, while leaving the protein backbone intact. Glycosylated proteins from animals, plants, fungi and bacteria have been deglycosylated with TFMS, and the most extensively studied types of carbohydrate chains in mammals, the N-linked, O-linked and glycosaminoglycan chains, are all removed by this procedure. The method is based on the finding that linkages between sugars are sensitive to cleavage by TFMS, whereas the peptide bond is stable and is not broken, even with prolonged deglycosylation. The relative susceptibility of individual sugars in glycosidic linkage varies with the substituents at C-2 and the occurrence of amido and acetyl groups, but even the most stable sugars are removed under conditions that are sufficiently mild to prevent scission of peptide bonds. The post-translational modifications of proteins have been shown to be required for diverse biological functions, and selective procedures to remove these modifications play an important role in the elucidation of protein structure and function. PMID:12974674

  9. The discovery and early structural studies of arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sarah A; Brash, Alan R; Murphy, Robert C

    2016-07-01

    Arachidonic acid and esterified arachidonate are ubiquitous components of every mammalian cell. This polyunsaturated fatty acid serves very important biochemical roles, including being the direct precursor of bioactive lipid mediators such as prostaglandin and leukotrienes. This 20 carbon fatty acid with four double bonds was first isolated and identified from mammalian tissues in 1909 by Percival Hartley. This was accomplished prior to the advent of chromatography or any spectroscopic methodology (MS, infrared, UV, or NMR). The name, arachidonic, was suggested in 1913 based on its relationship to the well-known arachidic acid (C20:0). It took until 1940 before the positions of the four double bonds were defined at 5,8,11,14 of the 20-carbon chain. Total synthesis was reported in 1961 and, finally, the configuration of the double bonds was confirmed as all-cis-5,8,11,14. By the 1930s, the relationship of arachidonic acid within the family of essential fatty acids helped cue an understanding of its structure and the biosynthetic pathway. Herein, we review the findings leading up to the discovery of arachidonic acid and the progress toward its complete structural elucidation. PMID:27142391

  10. D-β-aspartyl residue exhibiting uncommon high resistance to spontaneous peptide bond cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Aki, Kenzo; Okamura, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Although L-amino acids were selected as main constituents of peptides and proteins during chemical evolution, D-aspartyl (Asp) residue is found in a variety of living tissues. In particular, D-β-Asp is thought to be stable than any other Asp isomers, and this could be a reason for gradual accumulation in abnormal proteins and peptides to modify their structures and functions. It is predicted that D-β-Asp shows high resistance to biomolecular reactions. For instance, less reactivity of D-β-Asp is expected to bond cleavage, although such information has not been provided yet. In this work, the spontaneous peptide bond cleavage was compared between Asp isomers, by applying real-time solution-state NMR to eye lens αΑ-crystallin 51–60 fragment, S51LFRTVLD58SG60 and αΒ-crystallin 61–67 analog, F61D62TGLSG67 consisting of L-α- and D-β-Asp 58 and 62, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed how tough the uncommon D-β-Asp residue was against the peptide bond cleavage as compared to natural L-α-Asp. Differences in pKa and conformation between L-α- and D-β-Asp side chains were plausible factors to determine reactivity of Asp isomers. The present study, for the first time, provides a rationale to explain less reactivity of D-β-Asp to allow abnormal accumulation. PMID:26876027

  11. D-β-aspartyl residue exhibiting uncommon high resistance to spontaneous peptide bond cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aki, Kenzo; Okamura, Emiko

    2016-02-01

    Although L-amino acids were selected as main constituents of peptides and proteins during chemical evolution, D-aspartyl (Asp) residue is found in a variety of living tissues. In particular, D-β-Asp is thought to be stable than any other Asp isomers, and this could be a reason for gradual accumulation in abnormal proteins and peptides to modify their structures and functions. It is predicted that D-β-Asp shows high resistance to biomolecular reactions. For instance, less reactivity of D-β-Asp is expected to bond cleavage, although such information has not been provided yet. In this work, the spontaneous peptide bond cleavage was compared between Asp isomers, by applying real-time solution-state NMR to eye lens αΑ-crystallin 51-60 fragment, S51LFRTVLD58SG60 and αΒ-crystallin 61-67 analog, F61D62TGLSG67 consisting of L-α- and D-β-Asp 58 and 62, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed how tough the uncommon D-β-Asp residue was against the peptide bond cleavage as compared to natural L-α-Asp. Differences in pKa and conformation between L-α- and D-β-Asp side chains were plausible factors to determine reactivity of Asp isomers. The present study, for the first time, provides a rationale to explain less reactivity of D-β-Asp to allow abnormal accumulation.

  12. CONSERVED SEQUENCE IN THE AGGRECAN INTERGLOBULAR DOMAIN MODULATES CLEAVAGE BY ADAMTS-4 AND ADAMTS-5

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Hazuki E; Gerken, Thomas A; Huynh, Tru D; Duesler, Lori R; Cotter, Meghan; Hering, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Cleavage of aggrecan by ADAMTS proteinases at specific sites within highly conserved regions may be important to normal physiological enzyme functions, as well as pathological degradation. Methods To examine ADAMTS selectivity, we assayed ADAMTS-4 and -5 cleavage of recombinant bovine aggrecan mutated at amino acids N-terminal or C-terminal to the interglobular domain cleavage site. Results Mutations of conserved amino acids from P18 to P12 to increase hydrophilicity resulted in ADAMTS-4 cleavage inhibition. Mutation of Thr, but not Asn within the conserved N-glycosylation motif Asn-Ile-Thr from P6 to P4 enhanced cleavage. Mutation of conserved Thr residues from P22 to P17 to increase hydrophobicity enhanced ADAMTS-4 cleavage. A P4′ Ser377Gln mutant inhibited cleavage by ADAMTS-4 and -5, while a neutral Ser377Ala mutant and species mimicking mutants Ser377Thr, Ser377Asn, and Arg375Leu were cleaved normally by ADAMTS-4. The Ser377Thr mutant, however, was resistant to cleavage by ADAMTS-5. Conclusion We have identified multiple conserved amino acids within regions N- and C-terminal to the site of scission that may influence enzyme-substrate recognition, and may interact with exosites on ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5. General Significance Inhibition of the binding of ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 exosites to aggrecan should be explored as a therapeutic intervention for osteoarthritis. PMID:19101611

  13. Thiosemicarbazone Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as potential anticancer agents: syntheses, crystal structure, DNA cleavage, cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction activity.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jia; Ma, Zhong-Ying; Li, Ang; Liu, Ya-Hong; Xie, Cheng-Zhi; Qiang, Zhao-Yan; Xu, Jing-Yuan

    2014-07-01

    Four novel thiosemicarbazone metal complexes, [Cu(Am4M)(OAc)]·H2O (1), [Zn(HAm4M)Cl2] (2), [Zn2(Am4M)2Br2] (3) and [Zn2(Am4M)2(OAc)2]·2MeOH (4) [HAm4M=(Z)-2-(amino(pyridin-2-yl)methylene)-N-methylhydrazinecarbothioamide], have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, elemental analysis, ESI-MS and IR. X-ray analysis revealed that complexes 1 and 2 are mononuclear, which possess residual coordination sites for Cu(II) ion in 1 and good leaving groups (Cl(-)) for Zn(II) ion in 2. Both 3 and 4 displayed dinuclear units, in which the metal atoms are doubly bridged by S atoms of two Am4M(-) ligands in 3 and by two acetate ions in bi- and mono-dentate forms, respectively, in 4. Their antiproliferative activities on human epithelial cervical cancer cell line (HeLa), human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG-2) and human gastric cancer cell line (SGC-7901) were screened. Inspiringly, IC50 value (11.2±0.9 μM) of complex 1 against HepG-2 cells was nearly 0.5 fold of that against human hepatic cell lines LO2, showing a lower toxicity to human liver cells. Additionally, it displayed a stronger inhibition on the viability of HepG-2 cells than cisplatin (IC50=25±3.1 μM), suggesting complex 1 might be a potential high efficient antitumor agent. Furthermore, fluorescence microscopic observation and flow cytometric analysis revealed that complex 1 could significantly suppress HepG-2 cell viability and induce apoptosis. Several indexes, such as DNA cleavage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, comet assay and cell cycle analysis indicated that the antitumor mechanism of complex 1 on HepG-2 cells might be via ROS-triggered apoptosis pathway. PMID:24690556

  14. Characterization of the hepatitis C virus-encoded serine proteinase: determination of proteinase-dependent polyprotein cleavage sites.

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, A; McCourt, D W; Wychowski, C; Feinstone, S M; Rice, C M

    1993-01-01

    Processing of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) H strain polyprotein yields at least nine distinct cleavage products: NH2-C-E1-E2-NS2-NS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5A-NS5B-CO OH. As described in this report, site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression analyses were used to study the role of a putative serine proteinase domain, located in the N-terminal one-third of the NS3 protein, in proteolytic processing of HCV polyproteins. All four cleavages which occur C terminal to the proteinase domain (3/4A, 4A/4B, 4B/5A, and 5A/5B) were abolished by substitution of alanine for either of two predicted residues (His-1083 and Ser-1165) in the proteinase catalytic triad. However, such substitutions have no observable effect on cleavages in the structural region or at the 2/3 site. Deletion analyses suggest that the structural and NS2 regions of the polyprotein are not required for the HCV NS3 proteinase activity. NS3 proteinase-dependent cleavage sites were localized by N-terminal sequence analysis of NS4A, NS4B, NS5A, and NS5B. Sequence comparison of the residues flanking these cleavage sites for all sequenced HCV strains reveals conserved residues which may play a role in determining HCV NS3 proteinase substrate specificity. These features include an acidic residue (Asp or Glu) at the P6 position, a Cys or Thr residue at the P1 position, and a Ser or Ala residue at the P1' position. Images PMID:8386278

  15. Structural Determinants for Transport Across the Intestinal Bile Acid Transporter Using C-24 Bile Acid Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Rana; Acharya, Chayan; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Polli, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The human apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT) re-absorbs gram quantities of bile acid daily and is a potential prodrug target to increase oral drug absorption. In the absence of a high resolution hASBT crystal structure, 3D-QSAR modeling may prove beneficial in designing prodrug targets to hASBT. The objective was to derive a conformationally sampled pharmacophore 3D–QSAR (CSP-SAR) model for the uptake of bile acid conjugates by hASBT. A series of bile acid conjugates of glutamyl chenodeoxycholate were evaluated in terms of Km and normalized Vmax(normVmax) using hASBT-MDCK cells. All mono-anionic conjugates were potent substrates. Dianions, cations and zwitterions, which bound with a high affinity, were not substrates. CSP-SAR models were derived using structural and physicochemical descriptors, and evaluated via cross-validation. The best CSP-SAR model for Km included two structural and two physiochemical descriptors, where substrate hydrophobicity enhanced affinity. A best CSP-SAR model for Km/normVmax employed one structural and three physicochemical descriptors, also indicating hydrophobicity enhanced efficiency. Overall, the bile acid C-24 region accommodated a range of substituted anilines, provided a single negative charge was present near C-24. In comparing uptake findings to prior inhibition results, increased hydrophobicity enhanced activity, with dianions and zwitterions hindering activity. PMID:20939504

  16. Geometric and Electronic Structure of [{Cu(MeAN)}2(μ-η2:η2(O22−))]2+ with an Unusually Long O–O Bond: O–O Bond Weakening vs Activation for Reductive Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga Young; Qayyum, Munzarin F.; Woertink, Julia; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Narducci Sarjeant, Amy A.; Solomon, Edward I.; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Certain side-on peroxo dicopper(II) species with particularly low υO–O (710–730 cm−1) have been found in equilibrium with their bis-μ-oxo dicopper(III) isomer. An issue is whether such side-on peroxo bridges are further activated for O–O cleavage. In a previous study (Liang, H.-C., et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 4170–4171), we showed that oxygenation of the three-coordinate complex [CuI(MeAN)]+ (MeAN=N-methyl-N,N-bis[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]amine) leads to a low-temperature stable [{CuII(MeAN)}2(μ-η2:η2-O22−)]2+ peroxo species with low υO–O (721 cm−1), as characterized by UV-Vis absorption and resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopies. Here, this complex has been crystallized as its SbF6− salt and an X-ray structure indicates the presence of an unusually long O–O bond (1.540(5) Å) consistent with the low υO–O. EXAFS and rR spectroscopic and reactivity studies indicate the exclusive formation of [{CuII(MeAN)}2(μ-η2:η2-O22−)]2+ without any bis-μ-oxo-dicopper(III) isomer present. This is the first structure of a side-on peroxo dicopper(II) species with a significantly long and weak O–O bond. DFT calculations show that the weak O–O bond results from strong σ donation from the MeAN ligand to Cu that is compensated by a decrease in the extent of peroxo to Cu charge transfer. Importantly, the weak O–O bond does not reflect an increase in backbonding into the σ* orbital of the peroxide. Thus, although the O–O bond is unusually weak, this structure is not further activated for reductive cleavage to form a reactive bis-μ-oxo-dicopper(III) species. These results highlight the necessity of understanding electronic structure changes associated with spectral changes for correlations to reactivity. PMID:22571744

  17. Unraveling the Structural Modifications in Lignin of Arundo donax Linn. during Acid-Enhanced Ionic Liquid Pretreatment.

    PubMed

    You, Tingting; Zhang, Liming; Guo, Siqin; Shao, Lupeng; Xu, Feng

    2015-12-23

    Solid acid-enhanced ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment is of paramount importance for boosting the yield of sugars from biomass cost-effectively and environmentally friendly. To unravel the chemical and supramolecular structural changes of lignin after pretreatment, IL-acid lignin (ILAL) and subsequent residual cellulolytic enzyme lignin (RCEL) were isolated from Arundo donax Linn. The structural features were compared with those of the corresponding milled wood lignin (MWL). Results indicated that the pretreatment caused loss of β-O-4', β-β', β-1' linkages and formation of condensed structures in lignin. A preferential breakdown of G-type lignin may have occurred, evidenced by an increased S/G ratio revealed by 2D HSQC NMR analysis. It was determined that the depolymerization of β-O-4' linkage, lignin recondensation, and cleavage of ferulate-lignin ether linkages took place. Moreover, a simulation module was first developed to define morphological changes in lignin based on AFM and TEM analyses. Briefly, tree branch like aggregates was destroyed to monodisperse particles. PMID:26621450

  18. Prospects for using self-assembled nucleic acid structures.

    PubMed

    Rudchenko, M N; Zamyatnin, A A

    2015-04-01

    According to the central dogma in molecular biology, nucleic acids are assigned with key functions on storing and executing genetic information in any living cell. However, features of nucleic acids are not limited only with properties providing template-dependent biosynthetic processes. Studies of DNA and RNA unveiled unique features of these polymers able to make various self-assembled three-dimensional structures that, among other things, use the complementarity principle. Here, we review various self-assembled nucleic acid structures as well as application of DNA and RNA to develop nanomaterials, molecular automata, and nanodevices. It can be expected that in the near future results of these developments will allow designing novel next-generation diagnostic systems and medicinal drugs. PMID:25869355

  19. Extracellular Nucleic Acids in Urine: Sources, Structure, Diagnostic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Bryzgunova, O. E.; Laktionov, P. P.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free nucleic acids (cfNA) may reach the urine through cell necrosis or apoptosis, active secretion of nucleic acids by healthy and tumor cells of the urinary tract, and transport of circulating nucleic acids (cir- NA) from the blood into primary urine. Even though urinary DNA and RNA are fragmented, they can be used to detect marker sequences. MicroRNAs are also of interest as diagnostic probes. The stability of cfNA in the urine is determined by their structure and packaging into supramolecular complexes and by nuclease activity in the urine. This review summarizes current data on the sources of urinary cfNA, their structural features, diagnostic potential and factors affecting their stability. PMID:26483959

  20. Diastereoselective DNA Cleavage Recognition by Ni(II)•Gly-Gly-His Derived Metallopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ya-Yin; Claussen, Craig A.; Lipkowitz, Kenny B.; Long, Eric C.

    2008-01-01

    Site-selective DNA cleavage by diastereoisomers of Ni(II)•Gly-Gly-His-derived metallopeptides was investigated through high-resolution gel analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Ni(II)•L-Arg-Gly-His and Ni(II)•D-Arg-Gly-His (and their respective Lys analogues) targeted A/T-rich regions; however, the L-isomers consistently modified a sub-set of available nucleotides within a given minor groove site while the D-isomers differed in both their sites of preference and ability to target individual nucleotides within some sites. In comparison, Ni(II)•L-Pro-Gly-His and Ni(II)•D-Pro-Gly-His were unable to exhibit a similar diastereoselectivity. Simulations of the above systems, along with Ni(II)•Gly-Gly-His, indicated that the stereochemistry of the amino-terminal amino acid produces either an isohelical metallopeptide that associates stably at individual DNA sites (L-Arg or L-Lys) or, with D-Arg and D-Lys, a non-complementary metallopeptide structure that cannot fully employ its side chain nor amino-terminal amine as a positional stabilizing moiety. In contrast, amino-terminal Pro-containing metallopeptides of either stereochemistry, lacking an extended side chain directed toward the minor groove, did not exhibit a similar diastereoselectivity. While the identity and stereochemistry of amino acids located in the amino-terminal peptide position influenced DNA cleavage, metallopeptide diastereoisomers containing L- and D-Arg (or Lys) within the second peptide position did not exhibit diastereoselective DNA cleavage patterns; simulations indicated that a positively-charged amino acid in this location alters the interaction of the metallopeptide equatorial plane and the minor groove leading to an interaction similar to Ni(II)•Gly-Gly-His. PMID:16522100

  1. Cleavage mechanism in vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G.R.; Donahue, E.; Lucas, G.E.

    1997-12-31

    The effect specimen geometry, loading rate and irradiation on the ductile-to-brittle transition in a V-4Ti-4Cr alloy were evaluated and modeled. Confocal microscopy-fracture reconstruction and SEM were used to characterize the sequence-of-events leading to cleavage, as well as the CTOD at fracture initiation. This alloy undergoes normal stress-controlled transgranular cleavage below a transition temperature that depends primarily on the tensile properties and constraint. Thus an equivalent yield stress model is in good agreement with observed effects of loading rate and irradiation hardening. Predicted effects of specimen geometry based on a critical stress-area criteria and FEM simulations of crack tip fields were also found to be in agreement with experiment. Some interesting characteristics of the fracture process are also described.

  2. Structural studies on colanic acid, the common exopolysaccharide found in the Enterobacteriaceae, by partial acid hydrolysis. Oligosaccharides from colanic acid

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, I. W.

    1969-01-01

    The exopolysaccharide slime colanic acid has been isolated from representative strains of Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Aerobacter cloacae. Analysis showed that each polymer contained glucose, galactose, fucose and glucuronic acid, together with acetate and pyruvate. The molar proportions of these components were 1:1·8:1·9:1:1:1 approximately. On the basis of periodate oxidation of the natural and deacetylated polysaccharide, glucose is proposed as the site of the acetyl groups. The pyruvate is attached to galactose. Three neutral oligosaccharides and ten electrophoretically mobile oligosaccharides were isolated and partially characterized. Four of the fragments were esters of pyruvic acid. Most oligosaccharides were isolated from all three polysaccharide preparations. Three further oligosaccharides were isolated from carboxyl-reduced colanic acid and sodium borotritide was used to label the glucose derived from glucuronic acid in these fragments. One trisaccharide was obtained from periodate-oxidized polysaccharide. On the basis of these oligosaccharides a repeating hexasaccharide unit of the following structure is proposed: [Formula: see text] The significance of this structure in colanic acid biosynthesis is discussed. PMID:4311825

  3. Structural Basis of Fatty Acid Substrate Binding to Cyclooxygenase-2*

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Alex J.; Simmons, Danielle M.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    The cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) are membrane-associated heme-containing homodimers that generate prostaglandin H2 from arachidonic acid (AA). Although AA is the preferred substrate, other fatty acids are oxygenated by these enzymes with varying efficiencies. We determined the crystal structures of AA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) bound to Co3+-protoporphyrin IX-reconstituted murine COX-2 to 2.1, 2.4, and 2.65 Å, respectively. AA, EPA, and docosahexaenoic acid bind in different conformations in each monomer constituting the homodimer in their respective structures such that one monomer exhibits nonproductive binding and the other productive binding of the substrate in the cyclooxygenase channel. The interactions identified between protein and substrate when bound to COX-1 are conserved in our COX-2 structures, with the only notable difference being the lack of interaction of the carboxylate of AA and EPA with the side chain of Arg-120. Leu-531 exhibits a different side chain conformation when the nonproductive and productive binding modes of AA are compared. Unlike COX-1, mutating this residue to Ala, Phe, Pro, or Thr did not result in a significant loss of activity or substrate binding affinity. Determination of the L531F:AA crystal structure resulted in AA binding in the same global conformation in each monomer. We speculate that the mobility of the Leu-531 side chain increases the volume available at the opening of the cyclooxygenase channel and contributes to the observed ability of COX-2 to oxygenate a broad spectrum of fatty acid and fatty ester substrates. PMID:20463020

  4. Synthesis and structural characterisation of amides from picolinic acid and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Prarthana; Barry, Sarah M.; Houlihan, Kate M.; Murphy, Michael J.; Turner, Peter; Jensen, Paul; Rutledge, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Coupling picolinic acid (pyridine-2-carboxylic acid) and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid with N-alkylanilines affords a range of mono- and bis-amides in good to moderate yields. These amides are of interest for potential applications in catalysis, coordination chemistry and molecular devices. The reaction of picolinic acid with thionyl chloride to generate the acid chloride in situ leads not only to the N-alkyl-N-phenylpicolinamides as expected but also the corresponding 4-chloro-N-alkyl-N-phenylpicolinamides in the one pot. The two products are readily separated by column chromatography. Chlorinated products are not observed from the corresponding reactions of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid. X-Ray crystal structures for six of these compounds are described. These structures reveal a general preference for cis amide geometry in which the aromatic groups (N-phenyl and pyridyl) are cis to each other and the pyridine nitrogen anti to the carbonyl oxygen. Variable temperature 1H NMR experiments provide a window on amide bond isomerisation in solution. PMID:25954918

  5. Dynamical dimer structure and liquid structure of fatty acids in their binary liquid mixture: dodecanoic and 3-phenylpropionic acids system.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, Makio; Takebayashi, Shintaro; Umehara, Atsushi; Kasahara, Yasutoshi; Minami, Hideyuki; Matsuzawa, Hideyo; Inoue, Tohru; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2004-05-01

    Dimer structure and liquid structure of fatty acids in the binary liquid mixture of dodecanoic (LA) and 3-phenylpropionic acids (PPA) were studied through the measurements of DSC, self-diffusion coefficient (D), density, viscosity, 13C NMR spin-lattice relaxation time, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The phase diagram of LA/PPA mixture exhibited a typical eutectic pattern, which means that LA and PPA are completely immiscible in solid phase. In the liquid phase of the LA/PPA mixture, D of LA always differed from that of PPA irrespective of their compositions. This exhibited that, in the liquid phase of the binary mixture of fatty acids giving a complete eutectic in the solid phase, the fatty acid dimers are composed of the same fatty acid species irrespective of their compositions. The liquid structure of the LA/PPA mixture was clarified through the SAXS and also the SANS measurements. PMID:15081860

  6. Structural analysis of DNA interaction with retinol and retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, J S; N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Neault, J F; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2010-06-01

    Dietary constituents of fresh fruits and vegetables may play a relevant role in DNA adduct formation by inhibiting enzymatic activities. Studies have shown the important role of antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E in the protection against cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The antioxidant activity of vitamin A and beta-carotene may consist of scavenging oxygen radicals and preventing DNA damage. This study was designed to examine the interaction of calf-thymus DNA with retinol and retinoic acid in aqueous solution at physiological conditions using a constant DNA concentration and various retinoid contents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence spectroscopic methods were used to determine retinoid binding mode, the binding constant, and the effects of retinol and retinoic acid complexation on DNA conformation and aggregation. Structural analysis showed that retinol and retinoic acid bind DNA via G-C and A-T base pairs and the backbone phosphate groups with overall binding constants of Kret = 3.0 (+/-0.50) x 10(3) (mol.L(-1))(-1) and Kretac = 1.0 (+/-0.20) x 10(4) (mol.L(-1))(-1). The number of bound retinoids per DNA were 0.84 for retinol and 1.3 for retinoic acid. Hydrophobic interactions were also observed at high retinol and retinoic acid contents. At a high retinoid concentration, major DNA aggregation occurred, while DNA remained in the B-family structure. PMID:20555389

  7. Structural Requirements for the Procoagulant Activity of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gansler, Julia; Jaax, Miriam; Leiting, Silke; Appel, Bettina; Greinacher, Andreas; Fischer, Silvia; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids, especially extracellular RNA, are exposed following tissue- or vessel damage and have previously been shown to activate the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway in vitro and in vivo. Yet, no information on structural requirements for the procoagulant activity of nucleic acids is available. A comparison of linear and hairpin-forming RNA- and DNA-oligomers revealed that all tested oligomers forming a stable hairpin structure were protected from degradation in human plasma. In contrast to linear nucleic acids, hairpin forming compounds demonstrated highest procoagulant activities based on the analysis of clotting time in human plasma and in a prekallikrein activation assay. Moreover, the procoagulant activities of the DNA-oligomers correlated well with their binding affinity to high molecular weight kininogen, whereas the binding affinity of all tested oligomers to prekallikrein was low. Furthermore, four DNA-aptamers directed against thrombin, activated protein C, vascular endothelial growth factor and nucleolin as well as the naturally occurring small nucleolar RNA U6snRNA were identified as effective cofactors for prekallikrein auto-activation. Together, we conclude that hairpin-forming nucleic acids are most effective in promoting procoagulant activities, largely mediated by their specific binding to kininogen. Thus, in vivo application of therapeutic nucleic acids like aptamers might have undesired prothrombotic or proinflammatory side effects. PMID:23226277

  8. Centralspindlin in Rappaport's cleavage signaling.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Masanori

    2016-05-01

    Cleavage furrow in animal cell cytokinesis is formed by cortical constriction driven by contraction of an actomyosin network activated by Rho GTPase. Although the role of the mitotic apparatus in furrow induction has been well established, there remain discussions about the detailed molecular mechanisms of the cleavage signaling. While experiments in large echinoderm embryos highlighted the role of astral microtubules, data in smaller cells indicate the role of central spindle. Centralspindlin is a constitutive heterotetramer of MKLP1 kinesin and the non-motor CYK4 subunit and plays crucial roles in formation of the central spindle and recruitment of the downstream cytokinesis factors including ECT2, the major activator of Rho during cytokinesis, to the site of division. Recent reports have revealed a role of this centralspindlin-ECT2 pathway in furrow induction both by the central spindle and by the astral microtubules. Here, a unified view of the stimulation of cortical contractility by this pathway is discussed. Cytokinesis, the division of the whole cytoplasm, is an essential process for cell proliferation and embryonic development. In animal cells, cytokinesis is executed using a contractile network of actin filaments driven by a myosin-II motor that constricts the cell cortex (cleavage furrow ingression) into a narrow channel between the two daughter cells, which is resolved by scission (abscission) [1-3]. The anaphase-specific organization of the mitotic apparatus (MA, spindle with chromosomes plus asters) positions the cleavage furrow and plays a major role in spatial coupling between mitosis and cytokinesis [4-6]. The nucleus and chromosomes are dispensable for furrow specification [7-10], although they contribute to persistent furrowing and robust completion in some cell types [11,12]. Likewise, centrosomes are not essential for cytokinesis, but they contribute to the general fidelity of cell division [10,13-15]. Here, classical models of cleavage furrow

  9. Properties and structure of raised bog peat humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-10-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic components of soil, peat and natural waters, and their structure and properties differ very much depending on their source. The aims of this study are to characterize humic acids (HAs) from raised bog peat, to evaluate the homogeneity of peat HAs within peat profiles, and to study peat humification impact on properties of HAs. A major impact on the structure of peat HAs have lignin-free raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin). On diagenesis scale, peat HAs have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter, and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, while thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge as a result of abiotic synthesis. However, in comparison with soil, aquatic and other HAs, aromaticity of peat HAs is much lower. Comparatively, the raised bog peat HAs are at the beginning of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups change depending on the peat age and decomposition degree from where HAs have been isolated, and carboxylic acidity of peat HAs increases with peat depth and humification degree.

  10. Identification of proteolytic cleavage sites within the gag-analogue protein of Ty1 virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Martin-Rendon, E; Hurd, D W; Marfany, G; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-12-01

    Like retroviruses, the yeast retrotransposon Ty1 produces its proteins as precursors that are subsequently cleaved by a protease encoded by the element. These cleavage events are essential for transposition as they release the active reverse transcriptase and integrase and they modify the structure of the virus-like particles in a way that is analogous to the morphological changes that occur during retrovirus core maturation. Using a combination of epitope tagging, amino acid analysis and mutagenesis, we have identified the major cleavage sites for the Ty1 protease within the particle-forming protein, p1, at 407S/408N. In addition, we present evidence indicating that the Ty1 protease may be a 17 kDa protein. PMID:8971723

  11. Structure, dynamics, and energetics of lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) isomers.

    PubMed

    Goursot, A; Mineva, T; Bissig, C; Gruenberg, J; Salahub, D R

    2010-12-01

    Lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), or bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate, is a very interesting lipid, that is mainly found in late endosomes. It has several intriguing characteristics, which differ from those of other animal glycerophospholipids, that may be related to its specific functions, particularly in the metabolism of cholesterol. Its phosphodiester group is bonded at the sn-1 (sn-1') positions of the glycerols rather than at sn-3 (sn-3'); the position of the two fatty acid chains is still under debate but, increasingly, arguments favor the sn-2, sn-2' position in the native molecule, whereas isolation procedures or acidic conditions lead to the thermodynamically more stable sn-3, sn-3' structure. Because of these peculiar features, it can be expected that LBPA shape and interactions with membrane lipids and proteins are related to its structure at the molecular level. We applied quantum mechanical methods to study the structures and stabilities of the 2,2' and 3,3' LBPA isomers, using a step-by-step procedure from glycerol to precursors (in vitro syntheses) and to the final isoforms. The structures of the two positional LBPA isomers are substantially different, showing that the binding positions of the fatty acid chains on the glycerol backbone determine the shape of the LBPA molecule and thus, possibly, its functions. The 3,3' LBPA structures obtained are more stable with respect to the 2,2' form, as expected from experiment. If one argues that the in vivo synthesis starts from the present glycerol conformers and considering the most stable bis(glycero)phosphate structures, the 2,2' isoform should be the most probable isomer. PMID:21053942

  12. The hammerhead cleavage reaction in monovalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, E A; Bartel, D P

    2001-01-01

    Recently, Murray et al. (Chem Biol, 1998, 5:587-595) found that the hammerhead ribozyme does not require divalent metal ions for activity if incubated in high (> or =1 M) concentrations of monovalent ions. We further characterized the hammerhead cleavage reaction in the absence of divalent metal. The hammerhead is active in a wide range of monovalent ions, and the rate enhancement in 4 M Li+ is only 20-fold less than that in 10 mM Mg2+. Among the Group I monovalent metals, rate correlates in a log-linear manner with ionic radius. The pH dependence of the reaction is similar in 10 mM Mg2+, 4 M Li+, and 4 M Na+. The exchange-inert metal complex Co(NH3)3+ also supports substantial hammerhead activity. These results suggest that a metal ion does not act as a base in the reaction, and that the effects of different metal ions on hammerhead cleavage rates primarily reflect structural contributions to catalysis. PMID:11345433

  13. On the Origin of the Methyl Radical Loss from Deprotonated Ferulic and Isoferulic Acids: Electronic Excitation of a Transient Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Li, Fei; Lv, Huiqing; Wu, Yanqing; Bian, Gaofeng; Jiang, Kezhi

    2013-06-01

    Formation of radical fragments from even-electron ions is an exception to the "even-electron rule". In this work, ferulic acid (FA) and isoferulic acid (IFA) were used as the model compounds to probe the fragmentation mechanisms and the isomeric effects on homolytic cleavage. Elimination of methyl radical and CO2 are the two competing reactions observed in the CID-MS of [FA - H]- and [IFA - H]-, of which losing methyl radical violates the "even-electron rule". The relative intensity of their product ions is significantly different, and thereby the two isomeric compounds can be differentiated by tandem MS. Theoretical calculations indicate that both the singlet-triplet gap and the excitation energy decrease in the transient structures, as the breaking C-O bond is lengthened. The methyl radical elimination has been rationalized as the intramolecular electronic excitation of a transient structure with an elongating C-O bond. The potential energy diagrams, completed by the addition of the energy barrier of the radical elimination, have provided a reasonable explanation of the different CID-MS behaviors of [FA - H]- and [IFA - H]-.

  14. Structural insights into the role of iron–histidine bond cleavage in nitric oxide-induced activation of H-NOX gas sensor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herzik, Mark A.; Jonnalagadda, Rohan; Kuriyan, John; Marletta, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Heme-nitric oxide/oxygen (H-NOX) binding domains are a recently discovered family of heme-based gas sensor proteins that are conserved across eukaryotes and bacteria. Nitric oxide (NO) binding to the heme cofactor of H-NOX proteins has been implicated as a regulatory mechanism for processes ranging from vasodilation in mammals to communal behavior in bacteria. A key molecular event during NO-dependent activation of H-NOX proteins is rupture of the heme–histidine bond and formation of a five-coordinate nitrosyl complex. Although extensive biochemical studies have provided insight into the NO activation mechanism, precise molecular-level details have remained elusive. In the present study, high-resolution crystal structures of the H-NOX protein from Shewanella oneidensis in the unligated, intermediate six-coordinate and activated five-coordinate, NO-bound states are reported. From these structures, it is evident that several structural features in the heme pocket of the unligated protein function to maintain the heme distorted from planarity. NO-induced scission of the iron–histidine bond triggers structural rearrangements in the heme pocket that permit the heme to relax toward planarity, yielding the signaling-competent NO-bound conformation. Here, we also provide characterization of a nonheme metal coordination site occupied by zinc in an H-NOX protein. PMID:25253889

  15. Computing Nonequilibrium Conformational Dynamics of Structured Nucleic Acid Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Sedeh, Reza Sharifi; Pan, Keyao; Adendorff, Matthew Ralph; Hallatschek, Oskar; Bathe, Klaus-Jürgen; Bathe, Mark

    2016-01-12

    Synthetic nucleic acids can be programmed to form precise three-dimensional structures on the nanometer-scale. These thermodynamically stable complexes can serve as structural scaffolds to spatially organize functional molecules including multiple enzymes, chromophores, and force-sensing elements with internal dynamics that include substrate reaction-diffusion, excitonic energy transfer, and force-displacement response that often depend critically on both the local and global conformational dynamics of the nucleic acid assembly. However, high molecular weight assemblies exhibit long time-scale and large length-scale motions that cannot easily be sampled using all-atom computational procedures such as molecular dynamics. As an alternative, here we present a computational framework to compute the overdamped conformational dynamics of structured nucleic acid assemblies and apply it to a DNA-based tweezer, a nine-layer DNA origami ring, and a pointer-shaped DNA origami object, which consist of 204, 3,600, and over 7,000 basepairs, respectively. The framework employs a mechanical finite element model for the DNA nanostructure combined with an implicit solvent model to either simulate the Brownian dynamics of the assembly or alternatively compute its Brownian modes. Computational results are compared with an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the DNA-based tweezer. Several hundred microseconds of Brownian dynamics are simulated for the nine-layer ring origami object to reveal its long time-scale conformational dynamics, and the first ten Brownian modes of the pointer-shaped structure are predicted. PMID:26636351

  16. Structure of nicotinic acid mononucleotide adenylyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.; Smith, C.; Yang, Z.; Pruett, P.; Nagy, L.; McCombs, D; DeLucas, L.; Brouillette, W.; Brouillette, C.

    2008-11-25

    Nicotinic acid mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NaMNAT; EC 2.7.7.18) is the penultimate enzyme in the biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} and catalyzes the adenylation of nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) by ATP to form nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD). This enzyme is regarded as a suitable candidate for antibacterial drug development; as such, Bacillus anthracis NaMNAT (BA NaMNAT) was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli for the purpose of inhibitor discovery and crystallography. The crystal structure of BA NaMNAT was determined by molecular replacement, revealing two dimers per asymmetric unit, and was refined to an R factor and R{sub free} of 0.228 and 0.263, respectively, at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. The structure is very similar to that of B. subtilis NaMNAT (BS NaMNAT), which is also a dimer, and another independently solved structure of BA NaMNAT recently released from the PDB along with two ligated forms. Comparison of these and other less related bacterial NaMNAT structures support the presence of considerable conformational heterogeneity and flexibility in three loops surrounding the substrate-binding area.

  17. Structure of nicotinic acid mononucleotide adenylyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shanyun; Smith, Craig D.; Yang, Zhengrong; Pruett, Pamela S.; Nagy, Lisa; McCombs, Deborah; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Brouillette, Wayne J.; Brouillette, Christie G.

    2008-01-01

    Nicotinic acid mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NaMNAT; EC 2.7.7.18) is the penultimate enzyme in the biosynthesis of NAD+ and catalyzes the adenylation of nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) by ATP to form nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD). This enzyme is regarded as a suitable candidate for antibacterial drug development; as such, Bacillus anthracis NaMNAT (BA NaMNAT) was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli for the purpose of inhibitor discovery and crystallography. The crystal structure of BA NaMNAT was determined by molecular replacement, revealing two dimers per asymmetric unit, and was refined to an R factor and R free of 0.228 and 0.263, respectively, at 2.3 Å resolution. The structure is very similar to that of B. subtilis NaMNAT (BS NaMNAT), which is also a dimer, and another independently solved structure of BA NaMNAT recently released from the PDB along with two ligated forms. Comparison of these and other less related bacterial NaMNAT structures support the presence of considerable conformational heterogeneity and flexibility in three loops surrounding the substrate-binding area. PMID:18931430

  18. Temperature dependent structural variation from 2D supramolecular network to 3D interpenetrated metal–organic framework: In situ cleavage of S–S and C–S bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Ugale, Bharat; Singh, Divyendu; Nagaraja, C.M.

    2015-03-15

    Two new Zn(II)–organic compounds, [Zn(muco)(dbds){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] (1) and [Zn(muco)(dbs)] (2) (where, muco=trans, trans-muconate dianion, dbds=4,4′-dipyridyldisulfide and dbs=4,4′-dipyridylsulfide) have been synthesized from same precursors but at two different temperatures. Both the compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and photoluminescence studies. Compound 1 prepared at room temperature possesses a molecular structure extended to 2D supramolecular network through (H–O…H) hydrogen-bonding interactions. Compound 2, obtained at high temperature (100 °C) shows a 3-fold interpenetrating 3D framework constituted by an in situ generated dbs linker by the cleavage of S–S and C–S bonds of dbds linker. Thus, the influence of reaction temperature on the formation of two structural phases has been demonstrated. Both 1 and 2 exhibit ligand based luminescence emission owing to n→π⁎ and π→π⁎ transitions and also high thermal stabilities. - Graphical abstract: The influence of temperature on the formation of two structural phases, a 2D supramolecular network and a 3D 3-fold interpenetrating framework has been demonstrated and their luminescence emission is measured. - Highlights: • Two new Zn(II)–organic compounds were synthesized by tuning reaction temperatures. • Temperature induced in situ generation of dbs linker has been observed. • The compounds exhibit high thermal stability and luminescence emission properties. • The effect of temperature on structure, dimension and topology has been presented.

  19. Engineering a ribozyme cleavage-induced split fluorescent aptamer complementation assay

    PubMed Central

    Ausländer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Hürlemann, Samuel; Ausländer, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Hammerhead ribozymes are self-cleaving RNA molecules capable of regulating gene expression in living cells. Their cleavage performance is strongly influenced by intra-molecular loop–loop interactions, a feature not readily accessible through modern prediction algorithms. Ribozyme engineering and efficient implementation of ribozyme-based genetic switches requires detailed knowledge of individual self-cleavage performances. By rational design, we devised fluorescent aptamer-ribozyme RNA architectures that allow for the real-time measurement of ribozyme self-cleavage activity in vitro. The engineered nucleic acid molecules implement a split Spinach aptamer sequence that is made accessible for strand displacement upon ribozyme self-cleavage, thereby complementing the fluorescent Spinach aptamer. This fully RNA-based ribozyme performance assay correlates ribozyme cleavage activity with Spinach fluorescence to provide a rapid and straightforward technology for the validation of loop–loop interactions in hammerhead ribozymes. PMID:26939886

  20. Engineering a ribozyme cleavage-induced split fluorescent aptamer complementation assay.

    PubMed

    Ausländer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Hürlemann, Samuel; Ausländer, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Hammerhead ribozymes are self-cleaving RNA molecules capable of regulating gene expression in living cells. Their cleavage performance is strongly influenced by intra-molecular loop-loop interactions, a feature not readily accessible through modern prediction algorithms. Ribozyme engineering and efficient implementation of ribozyme-based genetic switches requires detailed knowledge of individual self-cleavage performances. By rational design, we devised fluorescent aptamer-ribozyme RNA architectures that allow for the real-time measurement of ribozyme self-cleavage activity in vitro The engineered nucleic acid molecules implement a split Spinach aptamer sequence that is made accessible for strand displacement upon ribozyme self-cleavage, thereby complementing the fluorescent Spinach aptamer. This fully RNA-based ribozyme performance assay correlates ribozyme cleavage activity with Spinach fluorescence to provide a rapid and straightforward technology for the validation of loop-loop interactions in hammerhead ribozymes. PMID:26939886

  1. Targeting DNA G-Quadruplex Structures with Peptide Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Panyutin, Igor G.; Onyshchenko, Mykola I.; Englund, Ethan A.; Appella, Daniel H.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of genetic functions based on targeting DNA or RNA sequences with complementary oligonucleotides is especially attractive in the post-genome era. Oligonucleotides can be rationally designed to bind their targets based on simple nucleic acid base pairing rules. However, the use of natural DNA and RNA oligonucleotides as targeting probes can cause numerous off-target effects. In addition, natural nucleic acids are prone to degradation in vivo by various nucleases. To address these problems, nucleic acid mimics such as peptide nucleic acids (PNA) have been developed. They are more stable, show less off-target effects, and, in general, have better binding affinity to their targets. However, their high affinity to DNA can reduce their sequence-specificity. The formation of alternative DNA secondary structures, such as the G-quadruplex, provides an extra level of specificity as targets for PNA oligomers. PNA probes can target the loops of G-quadruplex, invade the core by forming PNA-DNA guanine-tetrads, or bind to the open bases on the complementary cytosine-rich strand. Not only could the development of such G-quadruplex-specific probes allow regulation of gene expression, but it will also provide a means to clarify the biological roles G-quadruplex structures may possess. PMID:22376112

  2. Structure, stability and behaviour of nucleic acids in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-08-01

    Nucleic acids have become a powerful tool in nanotechnology because of their conformational polymorphism. However, lack of a medium in which nucleic acid structures exhibit long-term stability has been a bottleneck. Ionic liquids (ILs) are potential solvents in the nanotechnology field. Hydrated ILs, such as choline dihydrogen phosphate (choline dhp) and deep eutectic solvent (DES) prepared from choline chloride and urea, are 'green' solvents that ensure long-term stability of biomolecules. An understanding of the behaviour of nucleic acids in hydrated ILs is necessary for developing DNA materials. We here review current knowledge about the structures and stabilities of nucleic acids in choline dhp and DES. Interestingly, in choline dhp, A-T base pairs are more stable than G-C base pairs, the reverse of the situation in buffered NaCl solution. Moreover, DNA triplex formation is markedly stabilized in hydrated ILs compared with aqueous solution. In choline dhp, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs is comparable to that of Watson-Crick base pairs. Moreover, the parallel form of the G-quadruplex is stabilized in DES compared with aqueous solution. The behaviours of various DNA molecules in ILs detailed here should be useful for designing oligonucleotides for the development of nanomaterials and nanodevices. PMID:25013178

  3. Structure, stability and behaviour of nucleic acids in ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids have become a powerful tool in nanotechnology because of their conformational polymorphism. However, lack of a medium in which nucleic acid structures exhibit long-term stability has been a bottleneck. Ionic liquids (ILs) are potential solvents in the nanotechnology field. Hydrated ILs, such as choline dihydrogen phosphate (choline dhp) and deep eutectic solvent (DES) prepared from choline chloride and urea, are ‘green’ solvents that ensure long-term stability of biomolecules. An understanding of the behaviour of nucleic acids in hydrated ILs is necessary for developing DNA materials. We here review current knowledge about the structures and stabilities of nucleic acids in choline dhp and DES. Interestingly, in choline dhp, A–T base pairs are more stable than G–C base pairs, the reverse of the situation in buffered NaCl solution. Moreover, DNA triplex formation is markedly stabilized in hydrated ILs compared with aqueous solution. In choline dhp, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs is comparable to that of Watson–Crick base pairs. Moreover, the parallel form of the G-quadruplex is stabilized in DES compared with aqueous solution. The behaviours of various DNA molecules in ILs detailed here should be useful for designing oligonucleotides for the development of nanomaterials and nanodevices. PMID:25013178

  4. Molecular insight into bacterial cleavage of oceanic dimethylsulfoniopropionate into dimethyl sulfide.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Yang; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Sheng-Hui; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Peng; Xie, Bin-Bin; Su, Hai-Nan; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Yu, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Yang, Gui-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-01-21

    The microbial cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) generates volatile DMS through the action of DMSP lyases and is important in the global sulfur and carbon cycles. When released into the atmosphere from the oceans, DMS is oxidized, forming cloud condensation nuclei that may influence weather and climate. Six different DMSP lyase genes are found in taxonomically diverse microorganisms, and dddQ is among the most abundant in marine metagenomes. Here, we examine the molecular mechanism of DMSP cleavage by the DMSP lyase, DddQ, from Ruegeria lacuscaerulensis ITI_1157. The structures of DddQ bound to an inhibitory molecule 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid and of DddQ inactivated by a Tyr131Ala mutation and bound to DMSP were solved. DddQ adopts a β-barrel fold structure and contains a Zn(2+) ion and six highly conserved hydrophilic residues (Tyr120, His123, His125, Glu129, Tyr131, and His163) in the active site. Mutational and biochemical analyses indicate that these hydrophilic residues are essential to catalysis. In particular, Tyr131 undergoes a conformational change during catalysis, acting as a base to initiate the β-elimination reaction in DMSP lysis. Moreover, structural analyses and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that two loops over the substrate-binding pocket of DddQ can alternate between "open" and "closed" states, serving as a gate for DMSP entry. We also propose a molecular mechanism for DMS production through DMSP cleavage. Our study provides important insight into the mechanism involved in the conversion of DMSP into DMS, which should lead to a better understanding of this globally important biogeochemical reaction. PMID:24395783

  5. Molecular insight into bacterial cleavage of oceanic dimethylsulfoniopropionate into dimethyl sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Yang; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Sheng-Hui; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Peng; Xie, Bin-Bin; Su, Hai-Nan; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Yu, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Yang, Gui-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    The microbial cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) generates volatile DMS through the action of DMSP lyases and is important in the global sulfur and carbon cycles. When released into the atmosphere from the oceans, DMS is oxidized, forming cloud condensation nuclei that may influence weather and climate. Six different DMSP lyase genes are found in taxonomically diverse microorganisms, and dddQ is among the most abundant in marine metagenomes. Here, we examine the molecular mechanism of DMSP cleavage by the DMSP lyase, DddQ, from Ruegeria lacuscaerulensis ITI_1157. The structures of DddQ bound to an inhibitory molecule 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid and of DddQ inactivated by a Tyr131Ala mutation and bound to DMSP were solved. DddQ adopts a β-barrel fold structure and contains a Zn2+ ion and six highly conserved hydrophilic residues (Tyr120, His123, His125, Glu129, Tyr131, and His163) in the active site. Mutational and biochemical analyses indicate that these hydrophilic residues are essential to catalysis. In particular, Tyr131 undergoes a conformational change during catalysis, acting as a base to initiate the β-elimination reaction in DMSP lysis. Moreover, structural analyses and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that two loops over the substrate-binding pocket of DddQ can alternate between “open” and “closed” states, serving as a gate for DMSP entry. We also propose a molecular mechanism for DMS production through DMSP cleavage. Our study provides important insight into the mechanism involved in the conversion of DMSP into DMS, which should lead to a better understanding of this globally important biogeochemical reaction. PMID:24395783

  6. Molecular insight into bacterial cleavage of oceanic dimethylsulfoniopropionate into dimethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Yang; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Sheng-Hui; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Peng; Xie, Bin-Bin; Su, Hai-Nan; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Yu, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Yang, Gui-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    The microbial cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) generates volatile DMS through the action of DMSP lyases and is important in the global sulfur and carbon cycles. When released into the atmosphere from the oceans, DMS is oxidized, forming cloud condensation nuclei that may influence weather and climate. Six different DMSP lyase genes are found in taxonomically diverse microorganisms, and dddQ is among the most abundant in marine metagenomes. Here, we examine the molecular mechanism of DMSP cleavage by the DMSP lyase, DddQ, from Ruegeria lacuscaerulensis ITI_1157. The structures of DddQ bound to an inhibitory molecule 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid and of DddQ inactivated by a Tyr131Ala mutation and bound to DMSP were solved. DddQ adopts a β-barrel fold structure and contains a Zn2+ ion and six highly conserved hydrophilic residues (Tyr120, His123, His125, Glu129, Tyr131, and His163) in the active site. Mutational and biochemical analyses indicate that these hydrophilic residues are essential to catalysis. In particular, Tyr131 undergoes a conformational change during catalysis, acting as a base to initiate the β-elimination reaction in DMSP lysis. Moreover, structural analyses and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that two loops over the substrate-binding pocket of DddQ can alternate between "open" and "closed" states, serving as a gate for DMSP entry. We also propose a molecular mechanism for DMS production through DMSP cleavage. Our study provides important insight into the mechanism involved in the conversion of DMSP into DMS, which should lead to a better understanding of this globally important biogeochemical reaction.

  7. A broken-symmetry density functional study of structures, energies, and protonation states along the catalytic O-O bond cleavage pathway in ba3 cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Han Du, Wen-Ge; Götz, Andreas W; Yang, Longhua; Walker, Ross C; Noodleman, Louis

    2016-08-21

    Broken-symmetry density functional calculations have been performed on the [Fea3, CuB] dinuclear center (DNC) of ba3 cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus in the states of [Fea3(3+)-(HO2)(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237(-)] and [Fea3(4+)[double bond, length as m-dash]O(2-), OH(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237˙], using both PW91-D3 and OLYP-D3 functionals. Tyr237 is a special tyrosine cross-linked to His233, a ligand of CuB. The calculations have shown that the DNC in these states strongly favors the protonation of His376, which is above propionate-A, but not of the carboxylate group of propionate-A. The energies of the structures obtained by constrained geometry optimizations along the O-O bond cleavage pathway between [Fea3(3+)-(O-OH)(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237(-)] and [Fea3(4+)[double bond, length as m-dash]O(2-)HO(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237˙] have also been calculated. The transition of [Fea3(3+)-(O-OH)(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237(-)] → [Fea3(4+)[double bond, length as m-dash]O(2-)HO(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237˙] shows a very small barrier, which is less than 3.0/2.0 kcal mol(-1) in PW91-D3/OLYP-D3 calculations. The protonation state of His376 does not affect this O-O cleavage barrier. The rate limiting step of the transition from state A (in which O2 binds to Fea3(2+)) to state PM ([Fea3(4+)[double bond, length as m-dash]O(2-), OH(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237˙], where the O-O bond is cleaved) in the catalytic cycle is, therefore, the proton transfer originating from Tyr237 to O-O to form the hydroperoxo [Fea3(3+)-(O-OH)(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237(-)] state. The importance of His376 in proton uptake and the function of propionate-A/neutral-Asp372 as a gate to prevent the proton from back-flowing to the DNC are also shown. PMID:27094074

  8. Crystal and molecular structure of eight organic acid-base adducts from 2-methylquinoline and different acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Jin, Shouwen; Tao, Lin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Daqi

    2014-08-01

    Eight supramolecular complexes with 2-methylquinoline and acidic components as 4-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, malic acid, sebacic acid, and 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid were synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. All of the complexes are organic salts except compound 2. All supramolecular architectures of 1-8 involve extensive classical hydrogen bonds as well as other noncovalent interactions. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the classical hydrogen bonds (ionic or neutral) between acidic components and 2-methylquinoline are sufficient to bring about the formation of binary organic acid-base adducts. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These weak interactions combined, the complexes 1-8 displayed 2D-3D framework structure.

  9. Catalytic mechanism of RNA backbone cleavage by ribonuclease H from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-06-15

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA-cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ∼15 kcal mol(-1), encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ∼1-100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The nonmonotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton-transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA-cleavage reaction. PMID:21539371

  10. Catalytic Mechanism of RNA Backbone Cleavage by Ribonuclease H from QM/MM Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ~15 kcal mol−1, encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ~1–100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The non-monotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA cleavage reaction. PMID:21539371

  11. Effects of 2′-O-Methyl Nucleotide Substitution on EcoRI Endonuclease Cleavage Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guojie; Zhao, Bin; Tong, Zhaoxue; Mu, Runqing; Guan, Yifu

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of sugar pucker conformation on DNA-protein interactions, we used 2′-O-methyl nucleotide (2′-OMeN) to modify the EcoRI recognition sequence -TGAATTCT-, and monitored the enzymatic cleavage process using FRET method. The 2′-O-methyl nucleotide has a C3′-endo sugar pucker conformation different from the C2′-endo sugar pucker conformation of native DNA nucleotides. The initial reaction velocities were measured and the kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax were derived using Michaelis-Menten equation. Experimental results showed that 2′-OMeN substitutions for the EcoRI recognition sequence decreased the cleavage efficiency for A2, A3 and T4 substitutions significantly, and 2′-OMeN substitution for T5 residue inhibited the enzymatic activity completely. In contrast, substitutions for G1 and C6 could maintain the original activity. 2′-fluoro nucleic acid (2′-FNA) and locked nucleic acid (LNA) having similar C3′-endo sugar pucker conformation also demonstrated similar enzymatic results. This position-dependent enzymatic cleavage property might be attributed to the phosphate backbone distortion caused by the switch from C2′-endo to C3′-endo sugar pucker conformation, and was interpreted on the basis of the DNA-EcoRI structure. These 2′-modified nucleotides could behave as a regulatory element to modulate the enzymatic activity in vitro, and this property will have potential applications in genetic engineering and biomedicine. PMID:24194862

  12. The Importance of Exosite Interactions for Substrate Cleavage by Human Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Gurdeep; Thorpe, Michael; Hellman, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Thrombin is a serine protease of the chymotrypsin family that acts both as a procoagulant and as an anticoagulant by cleaving either factor VIII, factor V and fibrinogen or protein C, respectively. Numerous previous studies have shown that electropositive regions at a distance from the active site, so called exosites, are of major importance for the cleavage by human thrombin. Upstream of all the known major cleavage sites for thrombin in factor VIII, factor V and fibrinogen are clusters of negatively charged amino acids. To study the importance of these sites for the interaction with the exosites and thereby the cleavage by thrombin, we have developed a new type of recombinant substrate. We have compared the cleavage rate of the minimal cleavage site, involving only 8-9 amino acids (typically the P4-P4’ positions) surrounding the cleavage site, with the substrates also containing the negatively charged regions upstream of the cleavage sites. The results showed that addition of these regions enhanced the cleavage rate by more than fifty fold. However, the enhancement was highly dependent on the sequence of the actual cleavage site. A minimal site that showed poor activity by itself could be cleaved as efficiently as an optimal cleavage site when presented together with these negatively charged regions. Whereas sites conforming closely to the optimal site were only minimally enhanced by the addition of these regions. The possibility to mimic this interaction for the sites in factor V and factor VIII by recombinant substrates, which do not have the same folding as the full size target, indicates that the enhancement was primarily dependent on a relatively simple electrostatic interaction. However, the situation was very different for fibrinogen and protein C where other factors than only charge is of major importance. PMID:26110612

  13. Structural delineation of a quaternary, cleavage-dependent epitope at the gp41-gp120 interface on intact HIV-1 Env trimers

    PubMed Central

    Blattner, Claudia; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Sliepen, Kwinten; Derking, Ronald; Falkowska, Emilia; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Cupo, Albert; Julien, Jean-Philippe; van Gils, Marit; Lee, Peter S.; Peng, Wenjie; Paulson, James C.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary All previously characterized broadly neutralizing antibodies to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) target one of four major sites of vulnerability. Here, we define and structurally characterize a unique epitope on Env that is recognized by a recently discovered family of human monoclonal antibodies (PGT151-158). The PGT151 epitope is comprised of residues and glycans at the interface of gp41 and gp120 within a single protomer and glycans from both subunits of a second protomer and represents a neutralizing epitope that is dependent on both gp120 and gp41. As PGT151 binds only to properly formed, cleaved trimers, this distinctive property, and its ability to stabilize Env trimers, has enabled the successful purification of mature, cleaved Env trimers from the cell surface as a complex with PGT151. Here we compare the structural and functional properties of membrane-extracted Env trimers from several clades with those of the soluble, cleaved SOSIP gp140 trimer. PMID:24768348

  14. Structure and function analysis of protein–nucleic acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein–nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  15. Oligomeric structure of proclavaminic acid amidino hydrolase: evolution of a hydrolytic enzyme in clavulanic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Jonathan M; Clifton, Ian J; Hernández, Helena; Doan, Linh X; Robinson, Carol V; Schofield, Christopher J; Hewitson, Kirsty S

    2002-01-01

    During biosynthesis of the clinically used beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid, one of the three steps catalysed by clavaminic acid synthase is separated from the other two by a step catalysed by proclavaminic acid amidino hydrolase (PAH), in which the guanidino group of an intermediate is hydrolysed to give proclavaminic acid and urea. PAH shows considerable sequence homology with the primary metabolic arginases, which hydrolyse arginine to ornithine and urea, but does not accept arginine as a substrate. Like other members of the bacterial sub-family of arginases, PAH is hexameric in solution and requires Mn2+ ions for activity. Other metal ions, including Co2+, can substitute for Mn2+. Two new substrates for PAH were identified, N-acetyl-(L)-arginine and (3R)-hydroxy-N-acetyl-(L)-arginine. Crystal structures of PAH from Streptomyces clavuligerus (at 1.75 A and 2.45 A resolution, where 1 A=0.1 nm) imply how it binds beta-lactams rather than the amino acid substrate of the arginases from which it evolved. The structures also suggest how PAH selects for a particular alcohol intermediate in the clavam biosynthesis pathway. As observed for the arginases, each PAH monomer consists of a core of beta-strands surrounded by alpha-helices, and its active site contains a di-Mn2+ centre with a bridging water molecule responsible for hydrolytic attack on to the guanidino group of the substrate. Comparison of structures obtained under different conditions reveals different conformations of a flexible loop, which must move to allow substrate binding. PMID:12020346

  16. Selective cleavage enhanced by acetylating the side chain of lysine.

    PubMed

    Fu, Leixiaomeng; Chen, Tingting; Xue, Gaiqing; Zu, Lily; Fang, Weihai

    2013-01-01

    Selective cleavage is of great interest in mass spectrometry studies as it can help sequence identification by promoting simple fragmentation pattern of peptides and proteins. In this work, the collision-induced dissociation of peptides containing internal lysine and acetylated lysine residues were studied. The experimental and computational results revealed that multiple fragmentation pathways coexisted when the lysine residue was two amino acid residues away from N-terminal of the peptide. After acetylation of the lysine side-chain, b(n)+ ions were the most abundant primary fragment products and the Lys(Ac)-Gly amide bond became the dominant cleavage site via an oxazolone pathway. Acetylating the side-chain of lysine promoted the selective cleavage of Lys-Xxx amide bond and generated much more information of the peptide backbone sequence. The results re-evaluate the selective cleavage due to the lysine basic side-chain and provide information for studying the post-translational modification of proteins and other bio-molecules containing Lys residues. PMID:23303756

  17. Specificity of hammerhead ribozyme cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, K J; Herschlag, D; Uhlenbeck, O C

    1996-01-01

    To be effective in gene inactivation, the hammerhead ribozyme must cleave a complementary RNA target without deleterious effects from cleaving non-target RNAs that contain mismatches and shorter stretches of complementarity. The specificity of hammerhead cleavage was evaluated using HH16, a well-characterized ribozyme designed to cleave a target of 17 residues. Under standard reaction conditions, HH16 is unable to discriminate between its full-length substrate and 3'-truncated substrates, even when six fewer base pairs are formed between HH16 and the substrate. This striking lack of specificity arises because all the substrates bind to the ribozyme with sufficient affinity so that cleavage occurs before their affinity differences are manifested. In contrast, HH16 does exhibit high specificity towards certain 3'-truncated versions of altered substrates that either also contain a single base mismatch or are shortened at the 5' end. In addition, the specificity of HH16 is improved in the presence of p7 nucleocapsid protein from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, which accelerates the association and dissociation of RNA helices. These results support the view that the hammerhead has an intrinsic ability to discriminate against incorrect bases, but emphasizes that the high specificity is only observed in a certain range of helix lengths. Images PMID:8670879

  18. Computational redesign of endonuclease DNA binding and cleavage specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, Justin; Havranek, James J.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Sussman, Django; Monnat, Raymond J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Baker, David

    2006-06-01

    The reprogramming of DNA-binding specificity is an important challenge for computational protein design that tests current understanding of protein-DNA recognition, and has considerable practical relevance for biotechnology and medicine. Here we describe the computational redesign of the cleavage specificity of the intron-encoded homing endonuclease I-MsoI using a physically realistic atomic-level forcefield. Using an in silico screen, we identified single base-pair substitutions predicted to disrupt binding by the wild-type enzyme, and then optimized the identities and conformations of clusters of amino acids around each of these unfavourable substitutions using Monte Carlo sampling. A redesigned enzyme that was predicted to display altered target site specificity, while maintaining wild-type binding affinity, was experimentally characterized. The redesigned enzyme binds and cleaves the redesigned recognition site ~10,000 times more effectively than does the wild-type enzyme, with a level of target discrimination comparable to the original endonuclease. Determination of the structure of the redesigned nuclease-recognition site complex by X-ray crystallography confirms the accuracy of the computationally predicted interface. These results suggest that computational protein design methods can have an important role in the creation of novel highly specific endonucleases for gene therapy and other applications.

  19. Morphology and Structure of Amino-fatty Acid Intercalated Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Larry; Sumera, Florentino

    2015-04-01

    Natural clays and its modified forms have been studied for their wide range of applications, including polymer-layered silicate, catalysts and adsorbents. For nanocomposite production, montmorillonite (MMT) clays are often modified with organic surfactants to favor its intermixing with the polymer matrix. In the present study, Na+-montmorillonite (Na+-MMT) was subjected to organo-modification with a protonated 12-aminolauric acid (12-ALA). The amount of amino fatty acid surfactants loaded was 25, 50, 100 and 200% the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of Na+-MMT (25CEC-AMMT, 50CEC-AMMT, 100CEC-AMMT and 200CEC-AMMT). Fatty acid-derived surfactants are an attractive resource of intercalating agents for clays due to their renewability and abundance. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) were performed to determine the occurrence of intercalation of 12-ALA and their molecular structure in the clay's silicates. XRD analysis revealed that the interlayer spacing between the alumino-silicate layers increased from 1.25 nm to 1.82 nm with increasing ALA content. The amino fatty acid chains were considered to be in a flat monolayer structure at low surfactant loading, and a bilayered to a pseudotrilayered structure at high surfactant loading. On the other hand, FTIR revealed that the alkyl chains adopt a gauche conformation, indicating their disordered state based on their CH2symmetric and asymmetric vibrations. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) allows the determination of the moisture and organic content in clays. Here, TGA revealed that the surfactant in the clay was thermally stable, with Td ranging from 353° C to 417° C. The difference in the melting behavior of the pristine amino fatty acids and confined fatty acids in the interlayer galleries of the clay were evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimerty (DSC). The melting temperatures (Tm) of the amino fatty acid in the clay were initially found to be higher than those of the free

  20. Structural and Functional Diversity of Acidic Scorpion Potassium Channel Toxins

    PubMed Central

    He, Ya-Wen; Pan, Na; Ding, Jiu-Ping; Cao, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Mai-Li; Li, Wen-Xin; Yi, Hong; Jiang, Ling; Wu, Ying-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the basic scorpion K+ channel toxins (KTxs) are well-known pharmacological tools and potential drug candidates, characterization the acidic KTxs still has the great significance for their potential selectivity towards different K+ channel subtypes. Unfortunately, research on the acidic KTxs has been ignored for several years and progressed slowly. Principal Findings Here, we describe the identification of nine new acidic KTxs by cDNA cloning and bioinformatic analyses. Seven of these toxins belong to three new α-KTx subfamilies (α-KTx28, α-KTx29, and α-KTx30), and two are new members of the known κ-KTx2 subfamily. ImKTx104 containing three disulfide bridges, the first member of the α-KTx28 subfamily, has a low sequence homology with other known KTxs, and its NMR structure suggests ImKTx104 adopts a modified cystine-stabilized α-helix-loop-β-sheet (CS-α/β) fold motif that has no apparent α-helixs and β-sheets, but still stabilized by three disulfide bridges. These newly described acidic KTxs exhibit differential pharmacological effects on potassium channels. Acidic scorpion toxin ImKTx104 was the first peptide inhibitor found to affect KCNQ1 channel, which is insensitive to the basic KTxs and is strongly associated with human cardiac abnormalities. ImKTx104 selectively inhibited KCNQ1 channel with a Kd of 11.69 µM, but was less effective against the basic KTxs-sensitive potassium channels. In addition to the ImKTx104 toxin, HeTx204 peptide, containing a cystine-stabilized α-helix-loop-helix (CS-α/α) fold scaffold motif, blocked both Kv1.3 and KCNQ1 channels. StKTx23 toxin, with a cystine-stabilized α-helix-loop-β-sheet (CS-α/β) fold motif, could inhibit Kv1.3 channel, but not the KCNQ1 channel. Conclusions/Significance These findings characterize the structural and functional diversity of acidic KTxs, and could accelerate the development and clinical use of acidic KTxs as pharmacological tools and potential drugs. PMID

  1. Molecular Modeling of Nucleic Acid Structure: Electrostatics and Solvation

    PubMed Central

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand the structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as means to sample conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. From this discussion, the major limitations with modeling, in general, were highlighted. These are the difficult issues in sampling conformational space effectively—the multiple minima or conformational sampling problems—and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:18428877

  2. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:25631536

  3. Cyanuric acid hydrolase: evolutionary innovation by structural concatenation

    PubMed Central

    Peat, Thomas S; Balotra, Sahil; Wilding, Matthew; French, Nigel G; Briggs, Lyndall J; Panjikar, Santosh; Cowieson, Nathan; Newman, Janet; Scott, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The cyanuric acid hydrolase, AtzD, is the founding member of a newly identified family of ring-opening amidases. We report the first X-ray structure for this family, which is a novel fold (termed the ‘Toblerone’ fold) that likely evolved via the concatenation of monomers of the trimeric YjgF superfamily and the acquisition of a metal binding site. Structures of AtzD with bound substrate (cyanuric acid) and inhibitors (phosphate, barbituric acid and melamine), along with mutagenesis studies, allowed the identification of the active site. The AtzD monomer, active site and substrate all possess threefold rotational symmetry, to the extent that the active site possesses three potential Ser–Lys catalytic dyads. A single catalytic dyad (Ser85–Lys42) is hypothesized, based on biochemical evidence and crystallographic data. A plausible catalytic mechanism based on these observations is also presented. A comparison with a homology model of the related barbiturase, Bar, was used to infer the active-site residues responsible for substrate specificity, and the phylogeny of the 68 AtzD-like enzymes in the database were analysed in light of this structure–function relationship. PMID:23651355

  4. Adsorption structure and bonding of trimesic acid on Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanninen, L.; Jokinen, N.; Ali-Löytty, H.; Jussila, P.; Lahtonen, K.; Hirsimäki, M.; Valden, M.; Kuzmin, M.; Pärna, R.; Nõmmiste, E.

    2011-12-01

    Combining scanning tunneling microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation, we have studied the adsorption and growth of trimesic acid (TMA, 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, C6H3(COOH)3) on Cu(100) in a wide range of coverages (from submonolayer to multilayer ones) at room temperature and after subsequent annealing. A series of coverage-dependent TMA structures, transitions between these structures, and their properties are characterized, demonstrating the interplay between the bonding, orientation, and deprotonation reaction of adsorbed species. In particular, it is shown that the degree of deprotonation in TMA overlayers depends on the amount of deposited molecules non-monotonously, and that such behavior is well consistent with the formation mechanism proposed for the TMA/Cu(100) system. The results provide a good platform for further understanding of non-covalent interactions and self-assembly phenomena underlying the growth of supramolecular nanoassemblies of aromatic carboxylic (benzenecarboxylic) acids on metallic substrates.

  5. Amino acid repeats and the structure and evolution of proteins.

    PubMed

    Albà, M M; Tompa, P; Veitia, R A

    2007-01-01

    Many proteins have repeats or runs of single amino acids. The pathogenicity of some repeat expansions has fueled proteomic, genomic and structural explorations of homopolymeric runs not only in human but in a wide variety of other organisms. Other types of amino acid repetitive structures exhibit more complex patterns than homopeptides. Irrespective of their precise organization, repetitive sequences are defined as low complexity or simple sequences, as one or a few residues are particularly abundant. Prokaryotes show a relatively low frequency of simple sequences compared to eukaryotes. In the latter the percentage of proteins containing homopolymeric runs varies greatly from one group to another. For instance, within vertebrates, amino acid repeat frequency is much higher in mammals than in amphibians, birds or fishes. For some repeats, this is correlated with the GC-richness of the regions containing the corresponding genes. Homopeptides tend to occur in disordered regions of transcription factors or developmental proteins. They can trigger the formation of protein aggregates, particularly in 'disease' proteins. Simple sequences seem to evolve more rapidly than the rest of the protein/gene and may have a functional impact. Therefore, they are good candidates to promote rapid evolutionary changes. All these diverse facets of homopolymeric runs are explored in this review. PMID:18753788

  6. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  7. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Kulakauskas, Saulius

    2014-08-29

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  8. Crystal Structure of Antagonist Bound Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Roth, Christopher B.; Terakado, Masahiko; Kurata, Haruto; Omi, Rie; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Warshaviak, Dora; Nakade, Shinji; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo; Mileni, Mauro; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Griffith, Mark T.; Rodgers, Caroline; Han, Gye Won; Velasquez, Jeffrey; Chun, Jerold; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid biology continues to emerge as an area of significant therapeutic interest, particularly as the result of an enhanced understanding of the wealth of signaling molecules with diverse physiological properties. This growth in knowledge is epitomized by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which functions through interactions with six cognate G protein-coupled receptors. Herein we present three crystal structures of LPA1 in complex with antagonist tool compounds selected and designed through structural and stability analysis. Structural analysis combined with molecular dynamics identified a basis for ligand access to the LPA1 binding pocket from the extracellular space contrasting with the proposed access for the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor. Characteristics of the LPA1 binding pocket raise the possibility of promiscuous ligand recognition of phosphorylated endocannabinoids. Cell-based assays confirmed this hypothesis, linking the distinct receptor systems through metabolically related ligands with potential functional and therapeutic implications for treatment of disease. PMID:26091040

  9. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermannová, Lada Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  10. Innovations in host and microbial sialic acid biosynthesis revealed by phylogenomic prediction of nonulosonic acid structure

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda L.; Desa, Nolan; Hansen, Elizabeth E.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Gagneux, Pascal; Nizet, Victor; Varki, Ajit

    2009-01-01

    Sialic acids (Sias) are nonulosonic acid (NulO) sugars prominently displayed on vertebrate cells and occasionally mimicked by bacterial pathogens using homologous biosynthetic pathways. It has been suggested that Sias were an animal innovation and later emerged in pathogens by convergent evolution or horizontal gene transfer. To better illuminate the evolutionary processes underlying the phenomenon of Sia molecular mimicry, we performed phylogenomic analyses of biosynthetic pathways for Sias and related higher sugars derived from 5,7-diamino-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxynon-2-ulosonic acids. Examination of ≈1,000 sequenced microbial genomes indicated that such biosynthetic pathways are far more widely distributed than previously realized. Phylogenetic analysis, validated by targeted biochemistry, was used to predict NulO types (i.e., neuraminic, legionaminic, or pseudaminic acids) expressed by various organisms. This approach uncovered previously unreported occurrences of Sia pathways in pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria and identified at least one instance in which a human archaeal symbiont tentatively reported to express Sias in fact expressed the related pseudaminic acid structure. Evaluation of targeted phylogenies and protein domain organization revealed that the “unique” Sia biosynthetic pathway of animals was instead a much more ancient innovation. Pathway phylogenies suggest that bacterial pathogens may have acquired Sia expression via adaptation of pathways for legionaminic acid biosynthesis, one of at least 3 evolutionary paths for de novo Sia synthesis. Together, these data indicate that some of the long-standing paradigms in Sia biology should be reconsidered in a wider evolutionary context of the extended family of NulO sugars. PMID:19666579

  11. An investigation into the role of ATP in the mammalian pre-mRNA 3' cleavage reaction.

    PubMed

    Khleborodova, Asya; Pan, Xiaozhou; Nagre, Nagaraja N; Ryan, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    RNA Polymerase II transcribes beyond what later becomes the 3' end of a mature messenger RNA (mRNA). The formation of most mRNA 3' ends results from pre-mRNA cleavage followed by polyadenylation. In vitro studies have shown that low concentrations of ATP stimulate the 3' cleavage reaction while high concentrations inhibit it, but the origin of these ATP effects is unknown. ATP might enable a cleavage factor kinase or activate a cleavage factor directly. To distinguish between these possibilities, we tested several ATP structural analogs in a pre-mRNA 3' cleavage reaction reconstituted from DEAE-fractionated cleavage factors. We found that adenosine 5'-(β,γ-methylene)triphosphate (AMP-PCP) is an effective in vitro 3' cleavage inhibitor with an IC50 of ∼300 μM, but that most other ATP analogs, including adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate, which cannot serve as a protein kinase substrate, promoted 3' cleavage but less efficiently than ATP. In combination with previous literature data, our results do not support ATP stimulation of 3' cleavage through cleavage factor phosphorylation in vitro. Instead, the more likely mechanism is that ATP stimulates cleavage factor activity through direct cleavage factor binding. The mammalian 3' cleavage factors known to bind ATP include the cleavage factor II (CF IIm) Clp1 subunit, the CF Im25 subunit and poly(A) polymerase alpha (PAP). The yeast homolog of the CF IIm complex also binds ATP through yClp1. To investigate the mammalian complex, we used a cell-line expressing FLAG-tagged Clp1 to co-immunoprecipitate Pcf11 as a function of ATP concentration. FLAG-Clp1 co-precipitated Pcf11 with or without ATP and the complex was not affected by AMP-PCP. Diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), an ATP analog that binds the Nudix domain of the CF Im25 subunit with higher affinity than ATP, neither stimulated 3' cleavage in place of ATP nor antagonized ATP-stimulated 3' cleavage. The ATP-binding site of PAP was disrupted by site

  12. Gas Phase Structure of Amino Acids: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, I. Pena S.; Sanz, M. E.; Vaquero, V.; Cabezas, C.; Perez, C.; Blanco, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2009-06-01

    Recent improvements in our laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectrometer such as using Laval-type nozzles and picoseconds Nd:YAG lasers (30 to 150 ps) have allowed a major step forward in the capabilities of this experimental technique as demonstrated by the last results in serine cysteine and threonine^a for which seven, six and seven conformers have been respectively identified. Taking advantage of these improvements we have investigated the natural amino acids metionine, aspartic and glutamic acids and the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the aim of identify and characterize their lower energy conformers. Searches in the rotational spectra have lead to the identification of seven conformers of metionine, six and five of aspartic and glutamic acids, respectively, and seven for the γ-aminobutyric. These conformers have been unambiguously identified by their spectroscopic constants. In particular the ^{14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, that depend heavily on the orientation of the amino group with respect to the principal inertial axes of the molecule, prove to be a unique tool to distinguish unambigously between conformations with similar rotational constants. For the γ-aminobutyric acid two of the seven observed structures are stablized by an intramolecular interaction n-π*. Two new conformers of proline have been identified together with the two previously observed. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys.Chem.Chem.Phys., 2009, 11, 617. D. B. Atkinson, M. A. Smith, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 1995, 66, 4434 S. Blanco, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA2007, 104, 20183. M. E. Sanz, S. Blanco, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.,2008, 120, 6312. A. Lesarri, S. Mata, E. J. Cocinero, S. Blanco, J.C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. , 2002, 41, 4673

  13. Conversion of levulinate into succinate through catalytic oxidative carbon-carbon bond cleavage with dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junxia; Du, Zhongtian; Lu, Tianliang; Xu, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Grand Cleft Oxo: Levulinate, available from biomass, is oxidized into succinate through manganese(III)-catalyzed selective cleavage of CC bonds with molecular oxygen. In addition to levulinate, a wide range of aliphatic methyl ketones also undergo oxidative CC bond cleavage at the carbonyl group. This procedure offers a route to valuable dicarboxylic acids from biomass resources by nonfermentive approaches. PMID:23922234

  14. Mutation detection by chemical cleavage.

    PubMed

    Cotton, R G

    1999-02-01

    Detection and amplification of mutations in genes in a cheap, 100% effective manner is a major objective in modern molecular genetics. This ideal is some way away and many methods are used each of which have their own particular advantages and disadvantages. Sequencing is often thought of as the 'gold standard' for mutation detection. This perception is distorted due to the fact that this is the ONLY method of mutation identification but this does not mean it is the best for mutation detection. The fact that many scanning methods detect 5-10% of mutant molecules in a wild type environment immediately indicates these methods are advantageous over sequencing. One such method, the Chemical Cleavage method, is able to cut the costs of detecting a mutation on order of magnitude and guarantees mutation detection as evidenced by track record and the fact that each mutation has two chances of being detected. PMID:10084109

  15. Acidic Properties and Structure-Activity Correlations of Solid Acid Catalysts Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Li, Shenhui; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2016-04-19

    Solid acid materials with tunable structural and acidic properties are promising heterogeneous catalysts for manipulating and/or emulating the activity and selectivity of industrially important catalytic reactions. On the other hand, the performances of acid-catalyzed reactions are mostly dictated by the acidic features, namely, type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount, strength, and local environment of acid sites. The latter is relevant to their location (intra- vs extracrystalline), and possible confinement and Brønsted-Lewis acid synergy effects that may strongly affect the host-guest interactions, reaction mechanism, and shape selectivity of the catalytic system. This account aims to highlight some important applications of state-of-the-art solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for exploring the structural and acidic properties of solid acid catalysts as well as their catalytic performances and relevant reaction pathway invoked. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations may be exploited in conjunction with experimental SSNMR studies to verify the structure-activity correlations of the catalytic system at a microscopic scale. We describe in this Account the developments and applications of advanced ex situ and/or in situ SSNMR techniques, such as two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum magic-angle spinning (DQ MAS) homonuclear correlation spectroscopy for structural investigation of solid acids as well as study of their acidic properties. Moreover, the energies and electronic structures of the catalysts and detailed catalytic reaction processes, including the identification of reaction species, elucidation of reaction mechanism, and verification of structure-activity correlations, made available by DFT theoretical calculations were also discussed. Relevant discussions will focus primarily on results obtained from our laboratories in the past decade, including (i) quantitative and qualitative acidity characterization utilizing assorted probe molecules

  16. Long-range RNA interaction of two sequence elements required for endonucleolytic cleavage of human insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Scheper, W; Meinsma, D; Holthuizen, P E; Sussenbach, J S

    1995-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNAs are subject to site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region, leading to an unstable 5' cleavage product containing the IGF-II coding region and a very stable 3' cleavage product of 1.8 kb. This endonucleolytic cleavage is most probably the first and rate-limiting step in degradation of IGF-II mRNAs. Two sequence elements within the 3' untranslated region are required for cleavage: element I, located approximately 2 kb upstream of the cleavage site, and element II, encompassing the cleavage site itself. We have identified a stable double-stranded RNA stem structure (delta G = -100 kcal/mol [418.4 kJ/mol]) that can be formed between element I and a region downstream of the cleavage site in element II. This structure is conserved among human, rat, and mouse mRNAs. Detailed analysis of the requirements for cleavage shows that the relative position of the elements is not essential for cleavage. Furthermore, the distance between the coding region and the cleavage site does not affect the cleavage reaction. Mutational analysis of the long-range RNA-RNA interaction shows that not only the double-stranded character but also the sequence of the stable RNA stem is important for cleavage. PMID:7799930

  17. trans-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 Shares Structural and Mechanistic Similarities with 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase

    PubMed Central

    Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Saunier, Raymond; Janssen, Dick B.

    2001-01-01

    The genes (caaD1 and caaD2) encoding the trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD) of the 1,3-dichloropropene-utilizing bacterium Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas sp. strain GJ1. CaaD is a protein of 50 kDa that is composed of α-subunits of 75 amino acid residues and β-subunits of 70 residues. It catalyzes the hydrolytic cleavage of the β-vinylic carbon-chlorine bond in trans-3-chloroacrylic acid with a turnover number of 6.4 s−1. On the basis of sequence similarity, oligomeric structure, and subunit size, CaaD appears to be related to 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT). This tautomerase consists of six identical subunits of 62 amino acid residues and catalyzes the isomerization of 2-oxo-4-hexene-1,6-dioate, via hydroxymuconate, to yield 2-oxo-3-hexene-1,6-dioate. In view of the oligomeric architecture of 4-OT, a trimer of homodimers, CaaD is postulated to be a hexameric protein that functions as a trimer of αβ-dimers. The sequence conservation between CaaD and 4-OT and site-directed mutagenesis experiments suggested that Pro-1 of the β-subunit and Arg-11 of the α-subunit are active-site residues in CaaD. Pro-1 could act as the proton acceptor/donor, and Arg-11 is probably involved in carboxylate binding. Based on these findings, a novel dehalogenation mechanism is proposed for the CaaD-catalyzed reaction which does not involve the formation of a covalent enzyme-substrate intermediate. PMID:11418568

  18. Dynamical dimer structure and liquid structure of fatty acids in their binary liquid mixture: decanoic/octadecanoic acid and decanoic/dodecanoic acid systems.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, Makio; Takebayashi, Shintaro; Taguchi, Masakazu; Kasahara, Yasutoshi; Minami, Hideyuki; Matsuzawa, Hideyo

    2005-02-01

    Dimer structure and liquid structure of fatty acids in their binary mixtures such as decanoic acid (DA)/octadecanoic acid (SA) and DA/dodecanoic acid (LA) were studied through the measurements of self-diffusion coefficient (D), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), density and viscosity. The obtained phase diagrams showed that DA and SA form a eutectic in the solid state but partly a solid solution in the SA-rich region; DA and LA form an incongruent-melting compound which forms a eutectic with DA. In the liquid mixture of DA and SA, the D of DA is larger than that of SA over the entire range of compositions and tends to approach the D of SA with increasing SA-mole fraction; the D of DA in the DA/LA system is also larger than that of LA especially in the LA-poor region and steeply approaches that of LA with increasing LA-mole fraction. These D values and phase diagrams were compared with those for the binary mixtures of n-alkanes (C14/C20, C19/C20 and C20/C24); it is concluded that the two kinds of fatty acids always form their individual homodimers in their liquid mixtures regardless of their compositions and temperatures. PMID:15642581

  19. The structure of liquid fluorosulfuric acid investigated by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLain, S. E.; Benmore, C. J.; Turner, J. F. C.

    2002-08-01

    The results of an investigation into the liquid structure of fluorosulfuric acid measured using neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution are reported. The first-order neutron difference function is extracted from data recorded at 300 and 193 K from isotopically labeled FSO3H and FSO3D. Analysis of the derived radial distribution functions shows that unique, multisite hydrogen bonding is present in the liquid. These results suggest hydrogen bonding between the hydrogen and fluorine as well as oxygen occurs in the liquid. The fraction of molecules that is hydrogen bound in each way varies with temperature, with the 193 K data showing a more tightly bound system.

  20. Conformational steering in dicarboxy acids: the native structure of succinic acid.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Michaela K; Méndez, Estibaliz; Rajappan Nair, K P; Godfrey, Peter D; McNaughton, Don; Écija, Patricia; Basterretxea, Francisco J; Cocinero, Emilio J; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2015-08-14

    Succinic acid, a dicarboxylic acid molecule, has been investigated spectroscopically with computational support to elucidate the complex aspects of its conformational composition. Due to the torsional freedom of the carbon backbone and hydroxy groups, a large number of potentially plausible conformers can be generated with an indication that the gauche conformer is favored over the trans form. The microwave and millimeter wave spectra have been analyzed and accurate spectroscopic constants have been derived that correlate best with those of the lowest energy gauche conformer. For an unambiguous conformational identification measurements were extended to the monosubstituted isotopologues, precisely determining the structural properties. Besides bond distances and angles, particularly the dihedral angle has been determined to be 67.76(11)°, confirming the anomalous tendency of the methylene units to favor gauche conformers when a short aliphatic segment is placed between two carbonyl groups. PMID:25767836

  1. Expression and identification of hepatitis C virus polyprotein cleavage products.

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, A; Wychowski, C; Lin, C; Feinstone, S M; Rice, C M

    1993-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major cause of transfusion-acquired non-A, non-B hepatitis. HCV is an enveloped positive-sense RNA virus which has been classified as a new genus in the flavivirus family. Like the other two genera in this family, the flaviviruses and the pestiviruses, HCV polypeptides appear to be produced by translation of a long open reading frame and subsequent proteolytic processing of this polyprotein. In this study, a cDNA clone encompassing the long open reading frame of the HCV H strain (3,011 amino acid residues) has been assembled and sequenced. This clone and various truncated derivatives were used in vaccinia virus transient-expression assays to map HCV-encoded polypeptides and to study HCV polyprotein processing. HCV polyproteins and cleavage products were identified by using convalescent human sera and a panel of region-specific polyclonal rabbit antisera. Similar results were obtained for several mammalian cell lines examined, including the human HepG2 hepatoma line. The data indicate that at least nine polypeptides are produced by cleavage of the HCV H strain polyprotein. Putative structural proteins, located in the N-terminal one-fourth of the polyprotein, include the capsid protein C (21 kDa) followed by two possible virion envelope proteins, E1 (31 kDa) and E2 (70 kDa), which are heavily modified by N-linked glycosylation. The remainder of the polyprotein probably encodes nonstructural proteins including NS2 (23 kDa), NS3 (70 kDa), NS4A (8 kDa), NS4B (27 kDa), NS5A (58 kDa), and NS5B (68 kDa). An 82- to 88-kDa glycoprotein which reacted with both E2 and NS2-specific HCV antisera was also identified (called E2-NS2). Preliminary results suggest that a fraction of E1 is associated with E2 and E2-NS2 via disulfide linkages. Images PMID:7679746

  2. Structural and catalytic effects of an invariant purine substitution in the hammerhead ribozyme: implications for the mechanism of acid-base catalysis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Eric P; Vasquez, Ernesto E; Scott, William G

    2014-09-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme catalyzes RNA cleavage via acid-base catalysis. Whether it does so by general acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA itself donates and abstracts protons in the transition state, as is typically assumed, or by specific acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA plays a structural role and proton transfer is mediated by active-site water molecules, is unknown. Previous biochemical and crystallographic experiments implicate an invariant purine in the active site, G12, as the general base. However, G12 may play a structural role consistent with specific base catalysis. To better understand the role of G12 in the mechanism of hammerhead catalysis, a 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni with a purine substituted for G12 in the active site of the ribozyme was obtained. Comparison of this structure (PDB entry 3zd4), in which A12 is substituted for G, with three previously determined structures that now serve as important experimental controls, allows the identification of structural perturbations that are owing to the purine substitution itself. Kinetic measurements for G12 purine-substituted schistosomal hammerheads confirm a previously observed dependence of rate on the pK(a) of the substituted purine; in both cases inosine, which is similar to G in pK(a) and hydrogen-bonding properties, is unexpectedly inactive. Structural comparisons indicate that this may primarily be owing to the lack of the exocyclic 2-amino group in the G12A and G12I substitutions and its structural effect upon both the nucleotide base and phosphate of A9. The latter involves the perturbation of a previously identified and well characterized metal ion-binding site known to be catalytically important in both minimal and full-length hammerhead ribozyme sequences. The results permit it to be suggested that G12 plays an important role in stabilizing the active-site structure. This result, although not inconsistent with the potential

  3. Cleavage of chromatin with methidiumpropyl-EDTA . iron(II).

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, I L; Hertzberg, R P; Dervan, P B; Elgin, S C

    1983-01-01

    Methidiumpropyl-EDTA . iron(II) [MPE . Fe (II)] cleaves double-helical DNA with considerably lower sequence specificity than micrococcal nuclease. Moreover, digestions with MPE . Fe(II) can be performed in the presence of certain metal chelators, which will minimize the action of many endogenous nucleases. Because of these properties MPE . Fe(II) would appear to be a superior tool for probing chromatin structure. We have compared the patterns generated from the 1.688 g/cm3 complex satellite, 5S ribosomal RNA, and histone gene sequences of Drosophila melanogaster chromatin and protein-free DNA by MPE . Fe(II) and micrococcal nuclease cleavage. MPE . Fe(II) at low concentrations recognizes the nucleosome array, efficiently introducing a regular series of single-stranded (and some double-stranded) cleavages in chromatin DNA. Subsequent S1 nuclease digestion of the purified DNA produces a typical extended oligonucleosome pattern, with a repeating unit of ca. 190 base pairs. Under suitable conditions, relatively little other nicking is observed. Unlike micrococcal nuclease, which has a noticeable sequence preference in introducing cleavages, MPE . Fe(II) cleaves protein-free tandemly repetitive satellite and 5S DNA sequences in a near-random fashion. The spacing of cleavage sites in chromatin, however, bears a direct relationship to the length of the respective sequence repeats. In the case of the histone gene sequences a faint, but detectable, MPE . Fe(II) cleavage pattern is observed on DNA, in some regions similar to and in some regions different from the strong chromatin-specified pattern. The results indicate that MPE . Fe(II) will be very useful in the analysis of chromatin structure. Images PMID:6407008

  4. Cleavage of supercoiled circular double-stranded DNA induced by a eukaryotic cambialistic superoxide dismutase from Cinnamomum camphora.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Zhong; Wei, Xu-Bin; Liu, Wang-Yi

    2004-09-01

    A eukaryotic cambialistic superoxide dismutase (SOD) has been purified to homogeneity from mature seeds of the disease- and insect-resistant camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora). Besides the known role of this SOD in protecting cells against oxidative stress, it can induce the cleavage of supercoiled double-stranded DNA into nicked and linear DNA. It can not cleave linear DNA or RNA, demonstrating there is no DNase or RNase in the purified cambialistic SOD. Furthermore, the SOD can linearize circular pGEM-4Z DNA that is relaxed by topoisomerase I. This result indicates that the DNA-cleaving activity requires substrates being topologically constrained. The supercoiled DNA-cleaving activity of the cambialistic SOD can be inhibited by either SOD inhibitor (azide) or catalase and hydroxyl radical scavengers (ethanol and mannitol). The chelator of iron, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), also inhibits the supercoiled DNA-cleaving activity. These results show that the dismutation activity is crucial for the supercoiled DNA cleavage. The modification of tryptophan residue of the cambialistic SOD with N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) shows that these two activities are structurally correlative. The reaction mechanism is proposed that the hydroxyl radical formed in a transition-metal-catalyzing Fenton-type reaction contributes to the DNA-cleaving activity. In addition, the cleavage sites in supercoiled pGEM-4Z DNA are random. PMID:15346198

  5. Theoretical studies on Si-C bond cleavage in organosilane precursors during polycondensation to organosilica hybrids.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Soichi; Goto, Yasutomo; Mizoshita, Norihiro; Ohashi, Masataka; Tani, Takao; Shimada, Toyoshi; Hyodo, Shi-aki; Inagaki, Shinji

    2010-05-20

    Molecular orbital theory calculations were carried out to predict the occurrence of Si-C bond cleavage in various organosilane precursors during polycondensation to organosilica hybrids under acidic and basic conditions. On the basis of proposed mechanisms for cleavage of the Si-C bonds, the proton affinity (PA) of the carbon atom at the ipso-position and the PA of the carbanion generated after Si-C cleavage were chosen as indices for Si-C bond stability under acidic and basic conditions, respectively. The indices were calculated using a density functional theory (DFT) method for model compounds of organosilane precursors (R-Si(OH)(3)) having organic groups (R) of benzene (Ph), biphenyl (Bp), terphenyl (Tph), naphthalene (Nph), N-methylcarbazole (MCz), and anthracene (Ant). The orders for the predicted stability of the Si-C bond were Ph > Nph > Bp > Ant > Tph > MCz for acidic conditions and Ph > MCz > Bp > Nph > Tph > Ant for basic conditions. These behaviors were primarily in agreement with experimental results where cleavage of the Si-C bonds occurred for Tph (both acidic and basic), MCz (acidic), and Ant (basic). The Si-C bond cleavage of organosilane precursors during polycondensation is qualitatively predicted from these indices based on our theoretical approach. PMID:20429568

  6. Xylonucleic acid: synthesis, structure, and orthogonal pairing properties

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Mohitosh; Maiti, Munmun; Knies, Christine; Dumbre, Shrinivas; Lescrinier, Eveline; Rosemeyer, Helmut; Ceulemans, Arnout; Herdewijn, Piet

    2015-01-01

    There is a common interest for studying xeno-nucleic acid systems in the fields of synthetic biology and the origin of life, in particular, those with an engineered backbone and possessing novel properties. Along this line, we have investigated xylonucleic acid (XyloNA) containing a potentially prebiotic xylose sugar (a 3′-epimer of ribose) in its backbone. Herein, we report for the first time the synthesis of four XyloNA nucleotide building blocks and the assembly of XyloNA oligonucleotides containing all the natural nucleobases. A detailed investigation of pairing and structural properties of XyloNAs in comparison to DNA/RNA has been performed by thermal UV-melting, CD, and solution state NMR spectroscopic studies. XyloNA has been shown to be an orthogonal self-pairing system which adopts a slightly right-handed extended helical geometry. Our study on one hand, provides understanding for superior structure-function (-pairing) properties of DNA/RNA over XyloNA for selection as an informational polymer in the prebiotic context, while on the other hand, finds potential of XyloNA as an orthogonal genetic system for application in synthetic biology. PMID:26175047

  7. Impact of fatty acids on brain circulation, structure and function.

    PubMed

    Haast, Roy A M; Kiliaan, Amanda J

    2015-01-01

    The use of dietary intervention has evolved into a promising approach to prevent the onset and progression of brain diseases. The positive relationship between intake of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-LCPUFAs) and decreased onset of disease- and aging-related deterioration of brain health is increasingly endorsed across epidemiological and diet-interventional studies. Promising results are found regarding to the protection of proper brain circulation, structure and functionality in healthy and diseased humans and animal models. These include enhanced cerebral blood flow (CBF), white and gray matter integrity, and improved cognitive functioning, and are possibly mediated through increased neurovascular coupling, neuroprotection and neuronal plasticity, respectively. Contrary, studies investigating diets high in saturated fats provide opposite results, which may eventually lead to irreversible damage. Studies like these are of great importance given the high incidence of obesity caused by the increased and decreased consumption of respectively saturated fats and ω3-LCPUFAs in the Western civilization. This paper will review in vivo research conducted on the effects of ω3-LCPUFAs and saturated fatty acids on integrity (circulation, structure and function) of the young, aging and diseased brain. PMID:24485516

  8. Cleavage Site Localization Differentially Controls Interleukin-6 Receptor Proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17

    PubMed Central

    Riethmueller, Steffen; Ehlers, Johanna C.; Lokau, Juliane; Düsterhöft, Stefan; Knittler, Katharina; Dombrowsky, Gregor; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rabe, Björn; Rose-John, Stefan; Garbers, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of the Interleukin-6 Receptor (IL-6R) leads to the release of the IL-6R ectodomain. Binding of the cytokine IL-6 to the soluble IL-6R (sIL-6R) results in an agonistic IL-6/sIL-6R complex, which activates cells via gp130 irrespective of whether the cells express the IL-6R itself. This signaling pathway has been termed trans-signaling and is thought to mainly account for the pro-inflammatory properties of IL-6. A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) and ADAM17 are the major proteases that cleave the IL-6R. We have previously shown that deletion of a ten amino acid long stretch within the stalk region including the cleavage site prevents ADAM17-mediated cleavage, whereas the receptor retained its full biological activity. In the present study, we show that deletion of a triple serine (3S) motif (Ser-359 to Ser-361) adjacent to the cleavage site is sufficient to prevent IL-6R cleavage by ADAM17, but not ADAM10. We find that the impaired shedding is caused by the reduced distance between the cleavage site and the plasma membrane. Positioning of the cleavage site in greater distance towards the plasma membrane abrogates ADAM17-mediated shedding and reveals a novel cleavage site of ADAM10. Our findings underline functional differences in IL-6R proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17. PMID:27151651

  9. Gene Sequence and Properties of an s-Triazine Ring-Cleavage Enzyme from Pseudomonas sp. Strain NRRLB-12227

    PubMed Central

    Karns, Jeffrey S.

    1999-01-01

    Pesticides based on the s-triazine ring structure are widely used in cultivation of food crops. Cleavage of the s-triazine ring is an important step in the mineralization of s-triazine compounds and hence in their complete removal from the environment. Cyanuric acid amidohydrolase cleaves cyanuric acid (2,4,6-trihydroxy-s-triazine), which yields carbon dioxide and biuret; the biuret is subject to further metabolism, which yields CO2 and ammonia. The trzD gene encoding cyanuric acid amidohydrolase was cloned into pMMB277 from Pseudomonas sp. strain NRRLB-12227, a strain that is capable of utilizing s-triazines as nitrogen sources. Hydrolysis of cyanuric acid was detected in crude extracts of Escherichia coli containing the cloned gene by monitoring the disappearance of cyanuric acid and the appearance of biuret by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). DEAE and hydrophobic interaction HPLC were used to purify cyanuric acid amidohydrolase to homogeneity, and a spectrophotometric assay for the purified enzyme was developed. The purified enzyme had an apparent Km of 0.05 mM for cyanuric acid at pH 8.0. The enzyme did not cleave any other s-triazine or hydroxypyrimidine compound, although barbituric acid (2,4,6-trihydroxypyrimidine) was found to be a strong competitive inhibitor. Neither the nucleotide sequence of trzD nor the amino acid sequence of the gene product exhibited a significant level of similarity to any known gene or protein. PMID:10427042

  10. Reduction pathway of end-on terminally coordinated dinitrogen. IV. Geometric, electronic, and vibrational structure of a W(IV) dialkylhydrazido complex and its two-electron-reduced derivative undergoing N-N cleavage upon protonation.

    PubMed

    Horn, Kay H; Böres, Natascha; Lehnert, Nicolai; Mersmann, Klaus; Näther, Christian; Peters, Gerhard; Tuczek, Felix

    2005-05-01

    The molybdenum and tungsten dialkylhydrazido complexes [M(dppe)2 (NNC5H10)]2+ (M = Mo, W; compounds A(Mo) and A(W)) and their two-electron-reduced counterparts [M(dppe)2 (NNC5H10)] (compounds B(Mo) and B(W)) are characterized structurally and spectroscopically. The crystal structure of B(W) indicates a geometry between square pyramidal and trigonal bipyramidal with the NNC5H10 group in the apical position and in the trigonal plane of the complex, respectively. Temperature-dependent 31P NMR spectra of B(Mo) show that this geometry is present in solution as well. At room temperature, rapid Berry pseudorotation between the "axial" and "equatorial" ligand positions gives rise to a singlet in the 31P NMR spectrum. This exchange process is slowed at low temperature, leading to a doublet. The N-N distance of B(W) is 1.388 A, and the W-N distance is 1.781 A. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy applied to A(W), B(W), and their 15N isotopomers reveals extensive mixing between the N-N and W-N vibrations of the metal-N-N core with the modes of the piperidine ring. The N-N force constant of A(W) is determined to be 6.95 mdyn/A, which is close to the values of the Mo and W NNH2 complexes. In B(W), the N-N force constant decreases to 6.4 mdyn/A, which is between the values found for the Mo/W NNH3 and NNH2 complexes. This allows us to attribute N-N double bond character to A(W) and intermediate character between the double and single bonds for the N-N bond of B(W). These findings are supported by DFT calculations. More importantly, the HOMO of B(W) corresponds to a linear combination of the metal d(sigma) orbital with a ligand orbital having N-N sigma* character, inducing a weakening of the N-N bond. This contributes to the cleavage of the N-N bond taking place upon protonation of B(W) at the Nbeta atom of the NNC5H10 group. PMID:15847406

  11. Copper- and Vanadium-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Lignin using Dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Mottweiler, Jakob; Puche, Marta; Räuber, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas; Concepción, Patricia; Corma, Avelino; Bolm, Carsten

    2015-06-22

    Transition-metal-containing hydrotalcites (HTc) and V(acac)3 /Cu(NO3 )2 ⋅3 H2 O (acac=acetylacetonate) mixtures were tested for their catalytic activity in the cleavage of the lignin model compound erythro-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-l,3-propanediol (1) with molecular oxygen as oxidant. Both catalytic systems displayed high activity and good selectivity and afforded veratric acid as the main product. The catalyst behavior was studied by EPR spectroscopy, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. After the catalysts were established for the model system, lignin depolymerization studies were performed with various organsolv and kraft lignin sources. The oxidative depolymerization and lignin bond cleavage were monitored by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), MALDI MS, and 2D-NMR (HSQC). Irrespective of the lignin pretreatment, both HTc-Cu-V and V(acac)3 /Cu(NO3 )2 ⋅3 H2 O were able to cleave the β-O-4 linkages and the resinol structures to form dimeric and trimeric products. PMID:26013592

  12. Crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, V. P.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-05-01

    In structural materials with both brittle and ductile phases, cracks often initiate within the brittle phase and propagate dynamically towards the ductile phase. The macroscale, quasistatic toughness of the material thus depends on the outcome of this microscale, dynamic process. Indeed, dynamics has been hypothesized to suppress dislocation emission, which may explain the occurrence of brittle transgranular fracture in mild steels at low temperatures (Lin et al., 1987). Here, crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions are explored using continuum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations. The focus is on two questions: (1) whether dynamics can affect the energy barriers for dislocation emission and cleavage, and (2) what happens in the dynamic "overloaded" situation, in which both processes are energetically possible. In either case, dynamics may shift the balance between brittle cleavage and ductile blunting, thereby affecting the intrinsic ductility of the material. To explore these effects in simulation, a novel interatomic potential is used for which the intrinsic ductility is tunable, and a novel simulation technique is employed, termed as a "dynamic cleavage test", in which cracks can be run dynamically at a prescribed energy release rate into a material. Both theory and simulation reveal, however, that the intrinsic ductility of a material is unaffected by dynamics. The energy barrier to dislocation emission appears to be identical in quasi-static and dynamic conditions, and, in the overloaded situation, ductile crack tip behavior ultimately prevails since a single emission event can blunt and arrest the crack, preventing further cleavage. Thus, dynamics cannot embrittle a ductile material, and the origin of brittle failure in certain alloys (e.g., mild steels) appears unrelated to dynamic effects at the crack tip.

  13. Microwave spectra and structure of the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid-formic acid dimer.

    PubMed

    Pejlovas, Aaron M; Lin, Wei; Kukolich, Stephen G

    2015-09-28

    The rotational spectrum of the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid-formic acid doubly hydrogen bonded dimer has been measured in the 4-11 GHz region using a Flygare-Balle type pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent, four unique singly substituted (13)C isotopologues, and a singly deuterated isotopologue. Splittings due to a possible concerted double proton tunneling motion were not observed. Rotational constants (A, B, and C) and centrifugal distortion constants (DJ and DJK) were determined from the measured transitions for the dimer. The values of the rotational (in MHz) and centrifugal distortion constants (in kHz) for the parent isotopologue are A = 4045.4193(16), B = 740.583 80(14), C = 658.567 60(23), DJ = 0.0499(16), and DJK = 0.108(14). A partial gas phase structure of the dimer was derived from the rotational constants of the measured isotopologues, previous structural work on each monomer units and results of the calculations. PMID:26429015

  14. Microwave spectra and structure of the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid-formic acid dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Lin, Wei; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2015-09-01

    The rotational spectrum of the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid-formic acid doubly hydrogen bonded dimer has been measured in the 4-11 GHz region using a Flygare-Balle type pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent, four unique singly substituted 13C isotopologues, and a singly deuterated isotopologue. Splittings due to a possible concerted double proton tunneling motion were not observed. Rotational constants (A, B, and C) and centrifugal distortion constants (DJ and DJK) were determined from the measured transitions for the dimer. The values of the rotational (in MHz) and centrifugal distortion constants (in kHz) for the parent isotopologue are A = 4045.4193(16), B = 740.583 80(14), C = 658.567 60(23), DJ = 0.0499(16), and DJK = 0.108(14). A partial gas phase structure of the dimer was derived from the rotational constants of the measured isotopologues, previous structural work on each monomer units and results of the calculations.

  15. Structure of aldobiouronic acid and glucuronic acid from Agathis australis degraded gum polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Singh, R B

    2007-04-01

    Agathis australis gum on acid hydrolysis with sulphuric acid yielded L-arabinose and D-galactose in 1:4 molar ratio with traces of L-fucose. The components of aldobiouronic acid and glucuronic acid were obtained by graded hydrolysis of degraded gum polysaccharide. The derivatives of aldobiouronic acid was obtained as methyl ester methyl glycoside. PMID:17915743

  16. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage in activation of the prodrug nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N A; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L; De Voss, James J; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs. PMID:24584631

  17. Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage in Activation of the Prodrug Nabumetone

    PubMed Central

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N. A.; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L.; De Voss, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs. PMID:24584631

  18. kuzbanian-mediated cleavage of Drosophila Notch

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Toby; Kidd, Simon; Young, Michael W.

    2002-01-01

    Loss of Kuzbanian, a member of the ADAM family of metalloproteases, produces neurogenic phenotypes in Drosophila. It has been suggested that this results from a requirement for kuzbanian-mediated cleavage of the Notch ligand Delta. Using transgenic Drosophila expressing transmembrane Notch proteins, we show that kuzbanian, independent of any role in Delta processing, is required for the cleavage of Notch. We show that Kuzbanian can physically associate with Notch and that removal of kuzbanian activity by RNA-mediated interference in Drosophila tissue culture cells eliminates processing of ligand-independent transmembrane Notch molecules. Our data suggest that in Drosophila, kuzbanian can mediate S2 cleavage of Notch. PMID:11799064

  19. Endonucleolytic RNA cleavage by a eukaryotic exosome.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, Alice; Tomecki, Rafal; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2008-12-18

    The exosome is a major eukaryotic nuclease located in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm that contributes to the processing, quality control and/or turnover of a large number of cellular RNAs. This large macromolecular assembly has been described as a 3'-->5' exonuclease and shown to contain a nine-subunit ring structure evolutionarily related to archaeal exosome-like complexes and bacterial polynucleotide phosphorylases. Recent results have shown that, unlike its prokaryotic counterparts, the yeast and human ring structures are catalytically inactive. In contrast, the exonucleolytic activity of the yeast exosome core was shown to be mediated by the RNB domain of the eukaryote-specific Dis3 subunit. Here we show, using in vitro assays, that yeast Dis3 has an additional endoribonuclease activity mediated by the PIN domain located at the amino terminus of this multidomain protein. Simultaneous inactivation of the endonucleolytic and exonucleolytic activities of the exosome core generates a synthetic growth phenotype in vivo, supporting a physiological function for the PIN domain. This activity is responsible for the cleavage of some natural exosome substrates, independently of exonucleolytic degradation. In contrast with current models, our results show that eukaryotic exosome cores have both endonucleolytic and exonucleolytic activities, mediated by two distinct domains of the Dis3 subunit. The mode of action of eukaryotic exosome cores in RNA processing and degradation should be reconsidered, taking into account the cooperation between its multiple ribonucleolytic activities. PMID:19060886

  20. A cleavage toughness master curve model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odette, G. R.; He, M. Y.

    2000-12-01

    Development of fusion power will require a fracture toughness database, derived largely from small specimen tests, closely integrated with methods to assess first wall and blanket structural integrities. A master curve-shift (MC-ΔT) method has been proposed as an engineering expedient to treat the effects of structural geometry, irradiation, loading rates and safety margins. However, a number of issues related to the MC-ΔT method remain to be resolved, including the universality of MC shapes. A new micromechanical model of fracture toughness in the cleavage transition regime is proposed that combines analytical representations of finite element analysis simulations of crack-tip stress fields with a local critical stress-critical stressed area (σ∗-A∗) fracture criterion. This model, has been successful in predicting geometry effects, as well as high loading rate and irradiation hardening-induced Charpy shifts. By incorporating a modest temperature dependence in σ∗(T), an inconsistency between model predictions and an observed universal-type MC shape is resolved.

  1. Perpetuating the homing endonuclease life cycle: identification of mutations that modulate and change I-TevI cleavage preference

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Alexander C.; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Edgell, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are sequence-tolerant DNA endonucleases that act as mobile genetic elements. The ability of homing endonucleases to cleave substrates with multiple nucleotide substitutions suggests a high degree of adaptability in that changing or modulating cleavage preference would require relatively few amino acid substitutions. Here, using directed evolution experiments with the GIY-YIG homing endonuclease I-TevI that targets the thymidylate synthase gene of phage T4, we readily isolated variants that dramatically broadened I-TevI cleavage preference, as well as variants that fine-tuned cleavage preference. By combining substitutions, we observed an ∼10 000-fold improvement in cleavage on some substrates not cleaved by the wild-type enzyme, correlating with a decrease in readout of information content at the cleavage site. Strikingly, we were able to change the cleavage preference of I-TevI to that of the isoschizomer I-BmoI which targets a different cleavage site in the thymidylate synthase gene, recapitulating the evolution of cleavage preference in this family of homing endonucleases. Our results define a strategy to isolate GIY-YIG nuclease domains with distinct cleavage preferences, and provide insight into how homing endonucleases may escape a dead-end life cycle in a population of saturated target sites by promoting transposition to different target sites. PMID:27387281

  2. Structure and activity of the acid-sensing ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Thomas W.; Frey, Erin N.

    2012-01-01

    The acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are a family of proton-sensing channels expressed throughout the nervous system. Their activity is linked to a variety of complex behaviors including fear, anxiety, pain, depression, learning, and memory. ASICs have also been implicated in neuronal degeneration accompanying ischemia and multiple sclerosis. As a whole, ASICs represent novel therapeutic targets for several clinically important disorders. An understanding of the correlation between ASIC structure and function will help to elucidate their mechanism of action and identify potential therapeutics that specifically target these ion channels. Despite the seemingly simple nature of proton binding, multiple studies have shown that proton-dependent gating of ASICs is quite complex, leading to activation and desensitization through distinct structural components. This review will focus on the structural aspects of ASIC gating in response to both protons and the newly discovered activators GMQ and MitTx. ASIC modulatory compounds and their action on proton-dependent gating will also be discussed. This review is dedicated to the memory of Dale Benos, who made a substantial contribution to our understanding of ASIC activity. PMID:22843794

  3. Polyacrylic acids-bovine serum albumin complexation: Structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Othman, Mohamed; Aschi, Adel; Gharbi, Abdelhafidh

    2016-01-01

    The study of the mixture of BSA with polyacrylic acids at different masses versus pH allowed highlighting the existence of two regimes of weak and strong complexation. These complexes were studied in diluted regime concentration, by turbidimetry, dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta-potential measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We have followed the pH effect on the structure and properties of the complex. This allowed refining the interpretation of the phase diagram and understanding the observed phenomena. The NMR measurements allowed probing the dynamics of the constituents versus the pH. The computational method was used to precisely determine the electrostatic potential of BSA and how the polyelectrolyte binds to it at different pH. PMID:26478316

  4. Enhancement of neutrophil-mediated killing of Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood forms by fatty acids: importance of fatty acid structure.

    PubMed Central

    Kumaratilake, L M; Ferrante, A; Robinson, B S; Jaeger, T; Poulos, A

    1997-01-01

    Effects of fatty acids on human neutrophil-mediated killing of Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood forms were investigated by using a quantitative radiometric assay. The results showed that the antiparasitic activity of neutrophils can be greatly increased (>threefold) by short-term treatment with fatty acids with 20 to 24 carbon atoms and at least three double bonds. In particular, the n-3 polyenoic fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, and the n-6 fatty acid, arachidonic acid, significantly enhanced neutrophil antiparasitic activity. This effect was >1.5-fold higher than that induced by an optical concentration of the known agonist cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). At suboptimal concentrations, the combination of arachidonic acid and TNF-alpha caused a synergistic increase in neutrophil-mediated parasite killing. The fatty acid-induced effect was independent of the availability of serum opsonins but dependent on the structure of the fatty acids. The length of the carbon chain, degree of unsaturation, and availability of a free carboxyl group were important determinants of fatty acid activity. The fatty acids which increased neutrophil-mediated killing primed the enhanced superoxide radical generation of neutrophils in response to P. falciparum as detected by chemiluminescence. Scavengers of oxygen radicals significantly reduced the fatty acid-enhanced parasite killing, but cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors had no effect. These findings have identified a new class of immunoenhancers that could be exploited to increase resistance against Plasmodium species. PMID:9317021

  5. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  6. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2003-12-09

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  7. "Inosaminoacids": novel inositol-amino acid hybrid structures accessed by microbial arene oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pilgrim, Sarah; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Lloyd, Matthew D; Lewis, Simon E

    2011-04-28

    Microbial 1,2-dihydroxylation of sodium benzoate permits the rapid construction of novel inositol-amino acid hybrid structures. Both β- and γ-amino acids are accessible by means of an acylnitroso Diels-Alder cycloaddition. PMID:21409268

  8. Structure of human NAPE-PLD: regulation of fatty-acid ethanolamide biosynthesis by bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Magotti, Paola; Bauer, Inga; Igarashi, Miki; Babagoli, Masih; Marotta, Roberto; Piomelli, Daniele; Garau, Gianpiero

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The fatty-acid ethanolamides (FAEs) are lipid mediators present in all organisms and involved in highly conserved biological functions such as innate immunity, energy balance and stress control. They are produced from membrane N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines (NAPEs) and include agonists for G protein-coupled receptors (e.g. cannabinoid receptors) and nuclear receptors (e.g. PPAR-α). Here we report the crystal structure of human NAPE-hydrolyzing phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) at 2.65 Å resolution, a membrane enzyme that catalyzes FAE formation in mammals. NAPE-PLD forms homodimers partly separated by an internal ~9 Å-wide channel and uniquely adapted to associate with phospholipids. A hydrophobic cavity provides an entryway for NAPE into the active site, where a binuclear Zn2+ center orchestrates its hydrolysis. Bile acids bind with high affinity to selective pockets in this cavity, enhancing dimer assembly and enabling catalysis. These elements offer multiple targets for the design of small-molecule NAPE-PLD modulators with potential applications in inflammation and metabolic disorders. PMID:25684574

  9. (S) 2-phenyl-2-(p-tolylsulfonylamino)acetic acid. Structure, acidity and its alkali carboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte-Hernández, Angélica M.; Contreras, Rosalinda; Suárez-Moreno, Galdina V.; Montes-Tolentino, Pedro; Ramos-García, Iris; González, Felipe J.; Flores-Parra, Angelina

    2015-03-01

    The structure and the preferred conformers of (S) 2-phenyl-2-(p-tolylsulfonylamino)acetic acid (1) are reported. Compound 1 is a derivative of the unnatural aminoacid the (S) phenyl glycine. The X-ray diffraction analyses of the complexes of 1 with water, methanol, pyridine and its own anion are discussed. In order to add information about the acidity of the COOH and NH protons in compound 1, its pKa in DMSO and those of N-benzyl-p-tolylsulfonamide and (S) N-methylbenzyl-p-tolylsulfonamide were determined by cyclic voltammetry. Data improved the scarce information about pKa in DMSO values of sulfonamides. The products of the reactions of compound 1 with one and two equivalents of LiOH, NaOH and KOH in methanol were analyzed. Crystals of the lithium (2) and sodium (3) carboxylates and the dipotassium sulfonylamide acetate (7) were obtained, they are coordination polymers. In compound 2, the lithium is bound to four oxygen atoms with short bond lengths. The coordination of the lithium atom to two carboxylates gives an infinite ribbon by formation of fused six membered rings. In the crystal of compound 3, two pentacoordinated sodium atoms are bridged by three oxygen atoms, one from a water molecule and two from DMSO. The short distance between the sodium atoms (3.123 Å), implies a metal-metal interaction. The sodium couples are linked by two carboxylate groups, forming a planar ribbon of fused twelve membered rings. A notable discovery was a water molecule quenched in the middle of the ring, with a tetra coordinated oxygen atom in a square planar geometry. In compound 7, the carboxylate and the amide are bound to heptacoordinated potassium atoms. The 2D polymer of 7 has a sandwich structure, with the carboxylate and potassium atoms in the inner layer covered by the aromatic rings.

  10. Structural analysis of colanic acid from Escherichia coli by using methylation and base-catalysed fragmentation. Comparison with polysaccharides from other bacterial sources

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, C. J.; McCleary, C. W.; Nakada, Henry I.; Rees, D. A.; Sutherland, I. W.; Wilkinson, J. F.

    1969-01-01

    Essentially the same methanolysis products were obtained after methylation of the slime and capsular polysaccharides from Escherichia coli K12 (S53 and S53C sub-strains) and the slime polysaccharides from E. coli K12 (S61), Aerobacter cloacae N.C.T.C. 5290 and Salmonella typhimurium SL1543. These were the methyl glycosides of 2-O-methyl-l-fucose, 2,3-di-O-methyl-l-fucose, 2,3-di-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid methyl ester, 2,4,6-tri-O-methyl-d-glucose, 2,4,6-tri-O-methyl-d-galactose and the pyruvic acid ketal, 4,6-O-(1′-methoxycarbonylethylidene)-2,3-O-methyl-d-galactose. All were identified as crystalline derivatives from an E. coli polysaccharide. The structure of the ketal was proved by proton-magnetic-resonance and mass spectrometry, and by cleavage to pyruvic acid and 2,3-di-O-methyl-d-galactose. All these polysaccharides are therefore regarded as variants on the same fundamental structure for which the name colanic acid is adopted. Although containing the same sugar residues, quite different methanolysis products were obtained after methylation of the extracellular polysaccharide from Klebsiella aerogenes (1.2 strain). The hydroxypropyl ester of E. coli polysaccharide, when treated with base under anhydrous conditions, underwent β-elimination at the uronate residues with release of a 4,6-O-(1′-alkoxycarbonylethylidene)-d-galactose. Together with the identification of 3-O-(d-glucopyranosyluronic acid)-d-galactose as a partial hydrolysis product, this establishes the nature of most, if not all, of the side chains as O-[4,6-O-(1′-carboxyethylidene)-d-galactopyranosyl]-(1→4)-O-(d-glucopyranosyluronic acid)-(1→3)-d-galactopyranosyl... PMID:4902692

  11. Structure and friction of stearic acid and oleic acid films adsorbed on iron oxide surfaces in squalane.

    PubMed

    Doig, Michael; Warrens, Chris P; Camp, Philip J

    2014-01-14

    The structure and friction of fatty acid surfactant films adsorbed on iron oxide surfaces lubricated by squalane are examined using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. The structures of stearic acid and oleic acid films under static and shear conditions, and at various surface coverages, are described in detail, and the effects of unsaturation in the tail group are highlighted. At high surface coverage, the measured properties of stearic acid and oleic acid films are seen to be very similar. At low and intermediate surface coverages, the presence of a double bond, as in oleic acid, is seen to give rise to less penetration of lubricant in to the surfactant film and less layering of the lubricant near to the film. The kinetic friction coefficient is measured as a function of shear rate within the hydrodynamic (high shear rate) lubrication regime. Lubricant penetration and layering are observed to be correlated with friction coefficient. The friction coefficient with oleic acid depends only weakly on surface coverage, while stearic acid admits more lubricant penetration, and its friction coefficient increases significantly with decreasing surface coverage. Connections between film structure and friction are discussed. PMID:24364665

  12. Reduction pathway of end-on terminally coordinated dinitrogen. V. N-N bond cleavage in Mo/W hydrazidium complexes with diphosphine coligands. Comparison with triamidoamine systems.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, Klaus; Horn, Kay H; Böres, Natascha; Lehnert, Nicolai; Studt, Felix; Paulat, Florian; Peters, Gerhard; Ivanovic-Burmazovic, Ivana; van Eldik, Rudi; Tuczek, Felix

    2005-05-01

    N-N cleavage of the dialkylhydrazido complex [W(dppe)2(NNC5H10)] (B(W)) upon treatment with acid, leading to the nitrido/imido complex and piperidine, is investigated experimentally and theoretically. In acetonitrile and at room temperature, B(W) reacts orders of magnitude more rapidly with HNEt3BPh4 than its Mo analogue, [Mo(dppe)2(NNC5H10)] (B(Mo)). A stopped-flow experiment performed for the reaction of B(W) with HNEt3BPh4 in propionitrile at -70 degrees C indicates that protonation of B(W) is completed within the dead time of the stopped-flow apparatus, leading to the primary protonated intermediate B(W)H+. Propionitrile coordination to this species proceeds with a rate constant k(obs(1)) of 1.5 +/- 0.4 s(-1), generating intermediate RCN-B(W)H+ (R = Et) that rapidly adds a further proton at Nbeta and then mediates N-N bond splitting in a slower reaction (k(obs(2)) = 0.35 +/- 0.08 s(-1), 6 equiv of acid). k(obs(1)) and k(obs(2)) are found to be independent of the acid concentration. The experimentally observed reactivities of B(Mo) or B(W) with acids in nitrile solvents are reproduced by DFT calculations. In particular, geometry optimization of models of solvent-coordinated, Nbeta-protonated intermediates is found to lead spontaneously to separation into the nitrido/imido complexes and piperidine/piperidinium, corresponding to activationless heterolytic N-N bond cleavage processes. Moreover, DFT indicates a spontaneous cleavage of nonsolvated B(W) protonated at Nbeta. In the second part of this article, a theoretical analysis of the N-N cleavage reaction in the Mo(III) triamidoamine complex [HIPTN3N]Mo(N2) is presented (HIPTN3N = hexaisopropylterphenyltriamidoamine). To this end, DFT calculations of the Mo(III)N2)triamidoamine complex and its protonated and reduced derivatives are performed. Calculated structural and spectroscopic parameters are compared to available experimental data. N-N cleavage most likely proceeds by one-electron reduction of the Mo

  13. Microwave spectra and structure of the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid-formic acid dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Kukolich, Stephen G.; Lin, Wei

    2015-09-28

    The rotational spectrum of the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid–formic acid doubly hydrogen bonded dimer has been measured in the 4-11 GHz region using a Flygare-Balle type pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent, four unique singly substituted {sup 13}C isotopologues, and a singly deuterated isotopologue. Splittings due to a possible concerted double proton tunneling motion were not observed. Rotational constants (A, B, and C) and centrifugal distortion constants (D{sub J} and D{sub JK}) were determined from the measured transitions for the dimer. The values of the rotational (in MHz) and centrifugal distortion constants (in kHz) for the parent isotopologue are A = 4045.4193(16), B = 740.583 80(14), C = 658.567 60(23), D{sub J} = 0.0499(16), and D{sub JK} = 0.108(14). A partial gas phase structure of the dimer was derived from the rotational constants of the measured isotopologues, previous structural work on each monomer units and results of the calculations.

  14. Structure and functional characterization of a bile acid 7α dehydratase BaiE in secondary bile acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Shiva; Chiu, Hsien-Po; Jones, David H; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Miller, Mitchell D; Xu, Qingping; Farr, Carol L; Ridlon, Jason M; Wells, James E; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A; Hylemon, Phillip B; Lesley, Scott A

    2016-03-01

    Conversion of the primary bile acids cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) to the secondary bile acids deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA) is performed by a few species of intestinal bacteria in the genus Clostridium through a multistep biochemical pathway that removes a 7α-hydroxyl group. The rate-determining enzyme in this pathway is bile acid 7α-dehydratase (baiE). In this study, crystal structures of apo-BaiE and its putative product-bound [3-oxo-Δ(4,6) -lithocholyl-Coenzyme A (CoA)] complex are reported. BaiE is a trimer with a twisted α + β barrel fold with similarity to the Nuclear Transport Factor 2 (NTF2) superfamily. Tyr30, Asp35, and His83 form a catalytic triad that is conserved across this family. Site-directed mutagenesis of BaiE from Clostridium scindens VPI 12708 confirm that these residues are essential for catalysis and also the importance of other conserved residues, Tyr54 and Arg146, which are involved in substrate binding and affect catalytic turnover. Steady-state kinetic studies reveal that the BaiE homologs are able to turn over 3-oxo-Δ(4) -bile acid and CoA-conjugated 3-oxo-Δ(4) -bile acid substrates with comparable efficiency questioning the role of CoA-conjugation in the bile acid metabolism pathway. PMID:26650892

  15. Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Bausch, M.

    1991-01-01

    Removal of the organic sulfur in coal constitutes one of the major challenges facing fossil fuel scientists today. A cost--effective of desulfurizing Illinois coal is non-existent at the present time. Research in our group aims to develop a simple protocol for sulfur removal by gaining understanding of how various additives can enhance the rates of C-S bond cleavage in Illinois coal and coal model compounds, relative to fragmentation of the coal macromolecule via C-C, C-O, and C-N bond cleavage. During this funding period, we plan to carry out examinations of: (a) the effects of various reaction conditions on radical-initiated and Lewis acid-catalyzed C-S bond cleavages; (b) the effects of caustic impregnation and subsequent alcoholic reflux on C-S bond cleavage strategies; (c) the reactions of coal model compounds with electron-deficient substrates; (d) examinations of photooxidative C-S bond cleavage reactions; (e) the effects of moderate (300--400{degrees}C) temperatures and pressures as well as ultrasonic radiation on (a) - (c). Also planned are differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) examinations of selected C-S bond cleavage protocols, including those on Illinois coals that possess varying amounts of organic and inorganic sulfur.

  16. The short transcript of Leishmania RNA virus is generated by RNA cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    MacBeth, K J; Patterson, J L

    1995-01-01

    Leishmania RNA virus 1 produces a short viral RNA transcript corresponding to the 5' end of positive-sense single-stranded RNAs both in virally infected cells and in in vitro polymerase assays. We hypothesized that this short transcript was generated via cleavage of full-length positive-sense single-stranded RNA. A putative cleavage site was mapped by primer extension analysis to nucleotide 320 of the viral genome. To address the hypothesis that the short transcript is generated via cleavage at this site, two substrate RNAs that possessed viral sequence encompassing the putative cleavage site were created. When incubated with sucrose-purified viral particles, these substrate RNAs were site-specifically cleaved. The cleavage site of the in vitro-processed RNAs also mapped to viral nucleotide 320. The short-transcript-generating activity could be specifically abolished by proteinase K treatment of sucrose-purified viral particles and high concentrations of EGTA [ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid], suggesting that the activity requires a proteinaceous factor and possibly intact viral particles. The cleavage activity is directly associated with short-transcript-generating activity, since only viral particle preparations which were capable of generating the short transcript in polymerase assays were also active in the cleavage assay. Furthermore, the short-transcript-generating activity is independent of the viral polymerase's transcriptase and replicase activities. We present a working model whereby cleavage of Leishmaniavirus RNA transcripts functions in the maintenance of a low-level persistent infection. PMID:7745692

  17. Analysis of cleavage site mutations between the NC and PR Gag domains of Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, G; Pichova, I; Vogt, V M

    1997-01-01

    In retroviruses, the viral protease (PR) is released as a mature protein by cleavage of Gag, Gag-Pro, or Gag-Pro-Pol precursor polypeptides. In avian sarcoma and leukemia viruses (ASLV), PR forms the C-terminal domain of Gag. Based on the properties of a mutation (cs22) in the cleavage site between the upstream NC domain and the PR domain, the proteolytic liberation of PR previously was inferred to be essential for processing of Gag and Pol proteins. To study this process in more detail, we have analyzed the effects that several mutations at the NC-PR cleavage site have on proteolytic processing in virus-like particles expressed in COS and quail cells. Mutant Gag proteins carrying the same mutations also were synthesized in vitro and tested for processing with purified PR. In both types of studies, N-terminal sequencing of the liberated PR domain was carried out to exactly identify the site of cleavage. Finally, synthetic peptides corresponding to the mutant proteins were assessed for the ability to act as substrates for PR. The results were all consistent and led to the following conclusions. (i) In vivo, if normal processing between NC and PR is prevented by mutations, limited cleavage occurs at a previously unrecognized alternative site three amino acids downstream, i.e., in PR. This N-terminally truncated PR is inactive as an enzyme, as inferred from the global processing defect in cs22 and a similar mutant. (ii) In Gag proteins translated in vitro, purified PR cleaves this alternative site as rapidly as it does the wild-type site. (iii) Contrary to previously accepted rules describing retroviral cleavage sites, an isoleucine residue placed at the P1 position of the NC-PR cleavage site does not hinder normal processing. (iv) A proline residue placed at the P2 position in this cleavage site blocks normal processing. PMID:8985369

  18. Abscisic acid perception and signaling: structural mechanisms and applications

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ley Moy; Melcher, Karsten; Teh, Bin Tean; Xu, H Eric

    2014-01-01

    Adverse environmental conditions are a threat to agricultural yield and therefore exert a global effect on livelihood, health and the economy. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a vital plant hormone that regulates abiotic stress tolerance, thereby allowing plants to cope with environmental stresses. Previously, attempts to develop a complete understanding of the mechanisms underlying ABA signaling have been hindered by difficulties in the identification of bona fide ABA receptors. The discovery of the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of ABA receptors therefore represented a major milestone in the effort to overcome these roadblocks; since then, many structural and functional studies have provided detailed insights into processes ranging from ABA perception to the activation of ABA-responsive gene transcription. This understanding of the mechanisms of ABA perception and signaling has served as the basis for recent, preliminary developments in the genetic engineering of stress-resistant crops as well as in the design of new synthetic ABA agonists, which hold great promise for the agricultural enhancement of stress tolerance. PMID:24786231

  19. Abscisic Acid: Hidden Architect of Root System Structure

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Plants modulate root growth in response to changes in the local environment, guided by intrinsic developmental genetic programs. The hormone Abscisic Acid (ABA) mediates responses to different environmental factors, such as the presence of nitrate in the soil, water stress and salt, shaping the structure of the root system by regulating the production of lateral roots as well as controlling root elongation by modulating cell division and elongation. Curiously, ABA controls different aspects of root architecture in different plant species, perhaps providing some insight into the great diversity of root architecture in different plants, both from different taxa and from different environments. ABA is an ancient signaling pathway, acquired well before the diversification of land plants. Nonetheless, how this ancient signaling module is implemented or interacts within a larger signaling network appears to vary in different species. This review will examine the role of ABA in the control of root architecture, focusing on the regulation of lateral root formation in three plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, Medicago truncatula and Oryza sativa. We will consider how the implementation of the ABA signaling module might be a target of natural selection, to help contribute to the diversity of root architecture in nature. PMID:27135341

  20. Abscisic Acid: Hidden Architect of Root System Structure.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jeanne M

    2015-01-01

    Plants modulate root growth in response to changes in the local environment, guided by intrinsic developmental genetic programs. The hormone Abscisic Acid (ABA) mediates responses to different environmental factors, such as the presence of nitrate in the soil, water stress and salt, shaping the structure of the root system by regulating the production of lateral roots as well as controlling root elongation by modulating cell division and elongation. Curiously, ABA controls different aspects of root architecture in different plant species, perhaps providing some insight into the great diversity of root architecture in different plants, both from different taxa and from different environments. ABA is an ancient signaling pathway, acquired well before the diversification of land plants. Nonetheless, how this ancient signaling module is implemented or interacts within a larger signaling network appears to vary in different species. This review will examine the role of ABA in the control of root architecture, focusing on the regulation of lateral root formation in three plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, Medicago truncatula and Oryza sativa. We will consider how the implementation of the ABA signaling module might be a target of natural selection, to help contribute to the diversity of root architecture in nature. PMID:27135341

  1. Structural basis and functions of abscisic acid receptors PYLs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing L.; Jiang, Lun; Xin, Qi; Liu, Yang; Tan, Jian X.; Chen, Zhong Z.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in many developmental processes and responses to adaptive stresses in plants. Recently, a new family of nucleocytoplasmic PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYLs) has been identified as bona fide ABA receptors. PYLs together with protein phosphatases type-2C (PP2Cs), Snf1 (Sucrose-non-fermentation 1)-related kinases subfamily 2 (SnRK2s) and downstream substrates constitute the core ABA signaling network. Generally, PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s kinases by physical interaction and direct dephosphorylation. Upon ABA binding, PYLs change their conformations and then contact and inhibit PP2Cs, thus activating SnRK2s. Here, we reviewed the recent progress in research regarding the structures of the core signaling pathways of ABA, including the (+)-ABA, (−)-ABA and ABA analogs pyrabactin as well as 6AS perception by PYLs, SnRK2s mimicking PYLs in binding PP2Cs. PYLs inhibited PP2Cs in both the presence and absence of ABA and activated SnRK2s. The present review elucidates multiple ABA signal perception and transduction by PYLs, which might shed light on how to design small chemical compounds for improving plant performance in the future. PMID:25745428

  2. Structure of six organic acid-base adducts from 6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine and acidic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Daqi; Tao, Lin; Zhou, Mengjian; Shen, Yinyan; Chen, Quan; Lin, Zhanghui; Gao, Xingjun

    2014-05-01

    Six anhydrous organic acid-base adducts of 6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine were prepared with organic acids as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, salicylic acid, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, malonic acid and sebacic acid. The compounds 1-6 were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, and elemental analysis. The melting points of all the adducts were given. Of the six adducts, 1, 3, 4, and 5 are organic salts, while 2, and 6 are cocrystals. The supramolecular arrangement in the crystals 2-6 is based on the R22(8) synthon. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-6 suggests that there are strong NH⋯O, OH⋯N, and OH⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between acid and base components in the supramolecular assemblies. When the hydroxyl group is present in the ortho position of the carboxy, the intramolecular S6 synthon is present, as expected. Besides the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, other noncovalent interactions also play important roles in structure extension. Due to the synergetic effect of these weak interactions, compounds 1-6 display 1D-3D framework structure.

  3. Does Cleavage Work at Work? Men, but Not Women, Falsely Believe Cleavage Sells a Weak Product

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Peter; Chrislock, Karyna; Petersik, Korinne; Vijay, Madhuri; Turek, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    We examined whether men, but not women, would be distracted by a female sales representative's exposed cleavage, leading to greater perceived efficacy for a weak, but not for a strong product. A community sample of 88 men and 97 women viewed a video of a female pharmaceutical sales representative who (a) had exposed cleavage or dressed modestly…

  4. Production and applications of rosmarinic acid and structurally related compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Dong; Park, Yong Seek; Jin, Young-Ho; Park, Cheung-Seog

    2015-03-01

    Rosmarinic acid (α-o-caffeoyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenyllactic acid; RA) is a naturally occurring hydroxylated compound commonly found in species of the subfamily Nepetoideae of the Lamiaceae and Boraginaceae, such as Rosmarinus officinalis, Salvia officinalis, and Perilla frutescens. RA is biosynthesized from the amino acids L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine by eight enzymes that include phenylalanine ammonia lyase and cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase. RA can also be chemically produced by the esterification of caffeic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenyllactic acid. RA and its numerous derivatives containing one or two RA with other aromatic moieties are well known and include lithospermic acid, yunnaneic acid, salvianolic acid, and melitric acid. Recently, RA and its derivatives have attracted interest for their biological activities, which include anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-angiogenic, anti-tumor, and anti-microbial functions. Clinically, RA attenuates T cell receptor-mediated signaling, attenuates allergic diseases like allergic rhinitis and asthma, and 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis-like symptoms, protects from neurotoxicity, and slows the development of Alzheimer's disease. These attributes have increased the demand for the biotechnological production and application of RA and its derivatives. The present review discusses the function and application of RA and its derivatives including the molecular mechanisms underlying clinical efficacy. PMID:25620368

  5. Selective cleavage of pepsin by molybdenum metallopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Yenjai, Sudarat; Malaikaew, Pinpinat; Liwporncharoenvong, Teerayuth; Buranaprapuk, Apinya

    2012-03-02

    Graphical abstract: Molybdenum metallopeptidase: the Mo(VI) cluster with six molybdenum cations has the ability to cleave protein under mild conditions (37 Degree-Sign C, pH 7) without reducing agents. The reaction required only low concentration of ammonium heptamolybdatetetrahydrate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) (0.125 mM). The reaction undergoes possibly via a hydrolytic mechanism. This is the first demonstration of protein cleavage by a molybdenum cluster. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first demonstration of protein cleavage by a Mo(VI) cluster with six molybdenum cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cleavage reaction undergoes at mild conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No need of reducing agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only low concentration of Mo(VI) cluster and short time of incubation are needed. -- Abstract: In this study, the cleavage of protein by molybdenum cluster is reported for the first time. The protein target used is porcine pepsin. The data presented in this study show that pepsin is cleaved to at least three fragments with molecular weights of {approx}23, {approx}19 and {approx}16 kDa when the mixture of the protein and ammonium heptamolybdate tetrahydrate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) was incubated at 37 Degree-Sign C for 24 h. No self cleavage of pepsin occurs at 37 Degree-Sign C, 24 h indicating that the reaction is mediated by the metal ions. N-terminal sequencing of the peptide fragments indicated three cleavage sites of pepsin between Leu 112-Tyr 113, Leu 166-Leu 167 and Leu 178-Asn 179. The cleavage reaction occurs after incubation of the mixture of pepsin and (NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) only for 2 h. However, the specificity of the cleavage decreases when incubation time is longer than 48 h. The mechanism for cleavage of pepsin is expected to be hydrolytic chemistry of the amide bonds in the protein

  6. Observation of Cleavage Fracture after Substantial Dimple Rupture in ASTM A710 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, Walter Graham; Lloyd, Wilson Randolph

    2000-07-01

    A major concern often arising in structural integrity predictions is the possibility that low-energy brittle fracture could result as a consequence of cleavage either under normal operating or design accident conditions. This can be especially troublesome when the leak-before-break (LBB) approach shows an additional safety margin of the design. For LBB to be applicable, the fracture process must remain ductile (dimple rupture), and not change to cleavage. The American Society for Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Code) provides guidelines for avoiding cleavage fracture for Code-accepted materials. Experimental results for a non-Code steel are provided, and show that cleavage may occur for a thickness under16 mm (where the code suggests it will not) after stable crack growth (∆a) of up to 20 mm. This work is still in progress; test results are provided along with possible reasons for the mode transition, but complete explanations are still being developed.

  7. Facile P-C/C-H Bond-Cleavage Reactivity of Nickel Bis(diphosphine) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoguang; Li, Haixia; Appel, Aaron M; Hall, Michael B; Bullock, R Morris

    2016-07-01

    Unusual cleavage of P-C and C-H bonds of the P2 N2 ligand, in heteroleptic [Ni(P2 N2 )(diphosphine)](2+) complexes under mild conditions, results in the formation of an iminium formyl nickelate featuring a C,P,P-tridentate coordination mode. The structures of both the heteroleptic [Ni(P2 N2 )(diphosphine)](2+) complexes and the resulting iminium formyl nickelate have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to investigate the mechanism of the P-C/C-H bond cleavage, which involves C-H bond cleavage, hydride rotation, Ni-C/P-H bond formation, and P-C bond cleavage. PMID:27189413

  8. Enhanced RNA cleavage within bulge-loops by an artificial ribonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Irina L.; Zenkova, Marina A.; Gross, Hans J.; Vlassov, Valentin V.

    2005-01-01

    Cleavage of phosphodiester bonds by small ribonuclease mimics within different bulge-loops of RNA was investigated. Bulge-loops of different size (1–7 nt) and sequence composition were formed in a 3′ terminal fragment of influenza virus M2 RNA (96 nt) by hybridization of complementary oligodeoxynucleotides. Small bulges (up to 4 nt) were readily formed upon oligonucleotide hybridization, whereas hybridization of the RNA to the oligonucleotides designed to produce larger bulges resulted in formation of several alternative structures. A synthetic ribonuclease mimic displaying Pyr–Pu cleavage specificity cleaved CpA motifs located within bulges faster than similar motifs within the rest of the RNA. In the presence of 10 mM MgCl2, 75% of the cleavage products resulted from the attack of this motif. Thus, selective RNA cleavage at a single target phosphodiester bond was achieved by using bulge forming oligonucleotides and a small ribonuclease A mimic. PMID:15731340

  9. Structural organization of fatty acid desaturase loci in linseed lines with contrasting linolenic acid contents.

    PubMed

    Thambugala, Dinushika; Ragupathy, Raja; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2016-07-01

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), the richest crop source of omega-3 fatty acids (FAs), is a diploid plant with an estimated genome size of ~370 Mb and is well suited for studying genomic organization of agronomically important traits. In this study, 12 bacterial artificial chromosome clones harbouring the six FA desaturase loci sad1, sad2, fad2a, fad2b, fad3a and fad3b from the conventional variety CDC Bethune and the high linolenic acid line M5791 were sequenced, analysed and compared to determine the structural organization of these loci and to gain insights into the genetic mechanisms underlying FA composition in flax. With one gene every 3.2-4.6 kb, the desaturase loci have a higher gene density than the genome's average of one gene per 7.8-8.2 kb. The gene order and orientation across the two genotypes were generally conserved with the exception of the sad1 locus that was predicted to have additional genes in CDC Bethune. High sequence conservation in both genic and intergenic regions of the sad and fad2b loci contrasted with the significant level of variation of the fad2a and fad3 loci, with SNPs being the most frequently observed mutation type. The fad2a locus had 297 SNPs and 36 indels over ~95 kb contrasting with the fad2b locus that had a mere seven SNPs and four indels in ~110 kb. Annotation of the gene-rich loci revealed other genes of known role in lipid or carbohydrate metabolic/catabolic pathways. The organization of the fad2b locus was particularly complex with seven copies of the fad2b gene in both genotypes. The presence of Gypsy, Copia, MITE, Mutator, hAT and other novel repeat elements at the desaturase loci was similar to that of the whole genome. This structural genomic analysis provided some insights into the genomic organization and composition of the main desaturase loci of linseed and of their complex evolution through both tandem and whole genome duplications. PMID:27142663

  10. α-Cleavage of cellular prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jingjing; Kong, Qingzhong

    2012-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) is subjected to various processing under physiological and pathological conditions, of which the α-cleavage within the central hydrophobic domain not only disrupts a region critical for both PrP toxicity and PrPC to PrPSc conversion but also produces the N1 fragment that is neuroprotective and the C1 fragment that enhances the pro-apoptotic effect of staurosporine in one report and inhibits prion in another. The proteases responsible for the α-cleavage of PrPC are controversial. The effect of ADAM10, ADAM17, and ADAM9 on N1 secretion clearly indicates their involvement in the α-cleavage of PrPC, but there has been no report of direct PrPC α-cleavage activity with any of the three ADAMs in a purified protein form. We demonstrated that, in muscle cells, ADAM8 is the primary protease for the α-cleavage of PrPC, but another unidentified protease(s) must also play a minor role. We also found that PrPC regulates ADAM8 expression, suggesting that a close examination on the relationships between PrPC and its processing enzymes may reveal novel roles and underlying mechanisms for PrPC in non-prion diseases such as asthma and cancer. PMID:23052041

  11. Characterization of a Non-Canonical Signal Peptidase Cleavage Site in a Replication Protein from Tomato Ringspot Virus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ting; Chisholm, Joan; Sanfaçon, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The NTB-VPg polyprotein from tomato ringspot virus is an integral membrane replication protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes. A signal peptidase (SPase) cleavage was previously detected in the C-terminal region of NTB-VPg downstream of a 14 amino acid (aa)-long hydrophobic region (termed TM2). However, the exact location of the cleavage site was not determined. Using in vitro translation assays, we show that the SPase cleavage site is conserved in the NTB-VPg protein from various ToRSV isolates, although the rate of cleavage varies from one isolate to another. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage sites of two ToRSV isolates allowed the identification of sequences that affect cleavage efficiency. We also present evidence that SPase cleavage in the ToRSV-Rasp2 isolate occurs within a GAAGG sequence likely after the AAG (GAAG/G). Mutation of a downstream MAAV sequence to AAAV resulted in SPase cleavage at both the natural GAAG/G and the mutated AAA/V sequences. Given that there is a distance of seven aa between the two cleavage sites, this indicates that there is flexibility in the positioning of the cleavage sites relative to the inner surface of the membrane and the SPase active site. SPase cleavage sites are typically located 3-7 aa downstream of the hydrophobic region. However, the NTB-VPg GAAG/G cleavage site is located 17 aa downstream of the TM2 hydrophobic region, highlighting unusual features of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage site. A putative 11 aa-long amphipathic helix was identified immediately downstream of the TM2 region and five aa upstream of the GAAG/G cleavage site. Based on these results, we present an updated topology model in which the hydrophobic and amphipathic domains form a long tilted helix or a bent helix in the membrane lipid bilayer, with the downstream cleavage site(s) oriented parallel to the membrane inner surface. PMID:27589230

  12. Cation-dependent cleavage of the duplex form of the subtype-B HIV-1 RNA dimerization initiation site.

    PubMed

    Ennifar, Eric; Walter, Philippe; Dumas, Philippe

    2010-09-01

    The crystal structure of subtype-B HIV-1 genomic RNA Dimerization Initiation Site duplex revealed chain cleavage at a specific position resulting in 3'-phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl termini. A crystallographic analysis showed that Ba(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+) and Zn(2+) bind specifically on a guanine base close to the cleaved position. The crystal structures also point to a necessary conformational change to induce an 'in-line' geometry at the cleavage site. In solution, divalent cations increased the rate of cleavage with pH/pKa compensation, indicating that a cation-bound hydroxide anion is responsible for the cleavage. We propose a 'Trojan horse' mechanism, possibly of general interest, wherein a doubly charged cation hosted near the cleavage site as a 'harmless' species is further transformed in situ into an 'aggressive' species carrying a hydroxide anion. PMID:20460458

  13. Cation-dependent cleavage of the duplex form of the subtype-B HIV-1 RNA dimerization initiation site

    PubMed Central

    Ennifar, Eric; Walter, Philippe; Dumas, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of subtype-B HIV-1 genomic RNA Dimerization Initiation Site duplex revealed chain cleavage at a specific position resulting in 3′-phosphate and 5′-hydroxyl termini. A crystallographic analysis showed that Ba2+, Mn2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ bind specifically on a guanine base close to the cleaved position. The crystal structures also point to a necessary conformational change to induce an ‘in-line’ geometry at the cleavage site. In solution, divalent cations increased the rate of cleavage with pH/pKa compensation, indicating that a cation-bound hydroxide anion is responsible for the cleavage. We propose a ‘Trojan horse’ mechanism, possibly of general interest, wherein a doubly charged cation hosted near the cleavage site as a ‘harmless’ species is further transformed in situ into an ‘aggressive’ species carrying a hydroxide anion. PMID:20460458

  14. Structure of Replicating Simian Virus 40 Deoxyribonucleic Acid Molecules 1

    PubMed Central

    Sebring, E. D.; Kelly, T. J.; Thoren, M. M.; Salzman, N. P.

    1971-01-01

    Properties of replicating simian virus 40 (SV40) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) have been examined by sedimentation analysis and by direct observation during a lytic cycle of infection of African green monkey kidney cells. Two types of replicating DNA molecules were observed in the electron microscope. One was an open structure containing two branch points, three branches, and no free ends whose length measurements were consistent with those expected for replicating SV40 DNA molecules. A second species had the same features as the open structure, but in addition it contained a superhelix in the unreplicated portion of the molecule. Eighty to ninety per cent of the replicative intermediates (RI) were in this latter configuration, and length measurements of these molecules also were consistent with replicating SV40 DNA. Replicating DNA molecules with this configuration have not been described previously. RI, when examined in ethidium bromide-cesium chloride (EB-CsCl) isopycnic gradients, banded in a heterogeneous manner. A fraction of the RI banded at the same density as circular SV40 DNA containing one or more single-strand nicks (component II). The remaining radioactive RI banded at densities higher than that of component II, and material was present at all densities between that of supercoiled double-stranded DNA (component I) and component II. When RI that banded at different densities in EB-CsCl were examined in alkaline gradients, cosedimentation of parental DNA and newly replicated DNA did not occur. All newly replicated DNA sedimented more slowly than did intact single-stranded SV40 DNA, a finding that is inconsistent with the rolling circle model of DNA replication. An inverse correlation exists between the extent of replication of the SV40 DNA and the banding density in EB-CsCl. Under alkaline conditions, the parental DNA strands that were contained in the RI sedimented as covalently closed structures. The sedimentation rates in alkali of the covalently closed

  15. Characterization and Modeling of the Collision Induced Dissociation Patterns of Deprotonated Glycosphingolipids: Cleavage of the Glycosidic Bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rožman, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Glycosphingolipid fragmentation behavior was investigated by combining results from analysis of a series of negative ion tandem mass spectra and molecular modeling. Fragmentation patterns extracted from 75 tandem mass spectra of mainly acidic glycosphingolipid species (gangliosides) suggest prominent cleavage of the glycosidic bonds with retention of the glycosidic oxygen atom by the species formed from the reducing end (B and Y ion formation). Dominant product ions arise from dissociation of sialic acids glycosidic bonds whereas product ions resulting from cleavage of other glycosidic bonds are less abundant. Potential energy surfaces and unimolecular reaction rates of several low-energy fragmentation pathways leading to cleavage of glycosidic bonds were estimated in order to explain observed dissociation patterns. Glycosidic bond cleavage in both neutral (unsubstituted glycosyl group) and acidic glycosphingolipids was the outcome of the charge-directed intramolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) mechanism. According to the suggested mechanism, the nucleophile in a form of carboxylate or oxyanion attacks the carbon at position one of the sugar ring, simultaneously breaking the glycosidic bond and yielding an epoxide. For gangliosides, unimolecular reaction rates suggest that dominant product ions related to the cleavage of sialic acid glycosidic bonds are formed via direct dissociation channels. On the other hand, low abundant product ions related to the dissociation of other glycosidic bonds are more likely to be the result of sequential dissociation. Although results from this study mainly contribute to the understanding of glycosphingolipid fragmentation chemistry, some mechanistic findings regarding cleavage of the glycosidic bond may be applicable to other glycoconjugates.

  16. Modeling nucleic acid structure in the presence of single-stranded binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forties, Robert; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2009-03-01

    There are many important proteins which bind single-stranded nucleic acids, such as the nucleocapsid protein in HIV, the RecA DNA repair protein in bacteria, and all proteins involved in mRNA splicing and translation. We extend the Vienna Package for quantitatively modeling the secondary structure of nucleic acids to include proteins which bind to unpaired portions of the nucleic acid. All parameters needed to model nucleic acid secondary structures in the absence of proteins have been previously measured. This leaves the footprint and sequence dependent binding affinity of the protein as adjustable parameters of our model. Using this model we are able to predict the probability of the protein binding at any position in the nucleic acid sequence, the impact of the protein on nucleic acid base pairing, the end-to-end distance distribution for the nucleic acid, and FRET distributions for fluorophores attached to the nucleic acid.

  17. Study on the effect of different acids on the structure and photocatalytic activity of mesoporous titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Yanhui; Xu, Jingjing; Fu, Degang

    2009-10-01

    Nanocrystalline mesoporous titania was synthesized via a combined sol-gel process with surfactant-assisted templating method using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as the structure-directing agent. The process was catalyzed by different acid (hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, or phosphoric acid). The prepared samples were characterized by XRD, TEM, BET and FT-IR. The photocatalytic activity of the samples was determined by degradation of phenol in aqueous solution. Results showed that different acid had different effect on the structure and crystal phase of the samples. The sample adjusted by phosphoric acid showed highest surface area and photocatalytic activity. The formation mechanism of the samples catalyzed by different acid was also discussed.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of PMLA Nanoconjugate Components after Backbone Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hui; Patil, Rameshwar; Portilla-Arias, Jose; Black, Keith L.; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Holler, Eggehard

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional polymer nanoconjugates containing multiple components show great promise in cancer therapy, but in most cases complete analysis of each component is difficult. Polymalic acid (PMLA) based nanoconjugates have demonstrated successful brain and breast cancer treatment. They consist of multiple components including targeting antibodies, Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AONs), and endosome escape moieties. The component analysis of PMLA nanoconjugates is extremely difficult using conventional spectrometry and HPLC method. Taking advantage of the nature of polyester of PMLA, which can be cleaved by ammonium hydroxide, we describe a method to analyze the content of antibody and AON within nanoconjugates simultaneously using SEC-HPLC by selectively cleaving the PMLA backbone. The selected cleavage conditions only degrade PMLA without affecting the integrity and biological activity of the antibody. Although the amount of antibody could also be determined using the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) method, our selective cleavage method gives more reliable results and is more powerful. Our approach provides a new direction for the component analysis of polymer nanoconjugates and nanoparticles. PMID:25894227

  19. Parahydrogen-induced polarization of carboxylic acids: a pilot study of valproic acid and related structures.

    PubMed

    Lego, Denise; Plaumann, Markus; Trantzschel, Thomas; Bargon, Joachim; Scheich, Henning; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Gutmann, Torsten; Sauer, Grit; Bernarding, Johannes; Bommerich, Ute

    2014-07-01

    Parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) is a promising new tool for medical applications of MR, including MRI. The PHIP technique can be used to transfer high non-Boltzmann polarization, derived from parahydrogen, to isotopes with a low natural abundance or low gyromagnetic ratio (e.g. (13)C), thus improving the signal-to-noise ratio by several orders of magnitude. A few molecules acting as metabolic sensors have already been hyperpolarized with PHIP, but the direct hyperpolarization of drugs used to treat neurological disorders has not been accomplished until now. Here, we report on the first successful hyperpolarization of valproate (valproic acid, VPA), an important and commonly used antiepileptic drug. Hyperpolarization was confirmed by detecting the corresponding signal patterns in the (1)H NMR spectrum. To identify the optimal experimental conditions for the conversion of an appropriate VPA precursor, structurally related molecules with different side chains were analyzed in different solvents using various catalytic systems. The presented results include hyperpolarized (13)C NMR spectra and proton images of related systems, confirming their applicability for MR studies. PHIP-based polarization enhancement may provide a new MR technique to monitor the spatial distribution of valproate in brain tissue and to analyze metabolic pathways after valproate administration. PMID:24812006

  20. Phosphate acceptor amino acid residues in structural proteins of rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Tan, K B; McFalls, M L; Madore, P

    1974-07-01

    Partial acid hydrolysates of the [(32)P]phosphate- or [(3)H]serine-labeled proteins of purified vesicular stomatitis, rabies, Lagos bat, Mokola, or spring viremia of carp virions and of purified intracellular nucleocapsids of these viruses have been analyzed by paper electrophoresis for the presence of phosphorylated amino acids. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, with the former predominant, were present in virion and nucleocapsid preparations that contained phosphoproteins. An exception was the fish rhabdovirus, which contained only phosphoserine. When vesicular stomatitis or rabies virus proteins were phosphorylated in a cell-free system by the virion-associated protein kinase and analyzed for the presence of phosphorylated amino acid residues, phosphoserine was again found to be more abundant than phosphothreonine. After in vitro protein phosphorylation, another phospho-compound, possibly a third phosphoamino acid, was detected in the partial acid hydrolysates of these viruses. PMID:4365328

  1. Rhodium-Catalyzed ipso-Borylation of Alkylthioarenes via C-S Bond Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Uetake, Yuta; Niwa, Takashi; Hosoya, Takamitsu

    2016-06-01

    Rhodium-catalyzed transformation of alkyl aryl sulfides into arylboronic acid pinacol esters via C-S bond cleavage is reported. In combination with transition-metal-catalyzed sulfanyl group-guided regioselective C-H borylation reactions of alkylthioarenes, this method allows the synthesis of a diverse range of multisubstituted arenes. PMID:27210907

  2. Salts of phenylacetic acid and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid with Cinchona alkaloids: Crystal structures, thermal analysis and FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amombo Noa, Francoise M.; Jacobs, Ayesha

    2016-06-01

    Seven salts were formed with phenylacetic acid (PAA), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPAA) and the Cinchona alkaloids; cinchonidine (CIND), quinidine (QUID) and quinine (QUIN). For all the structures the proton was transferred from the carboxylic acid of the PAA/HPAA to the quinuclidine nitrogen of the respective Cinchona alkaloid. For six of the salts, water was included in the crystal structures with one of these also incorporating an isopropanol solvent molecule. However HPAA co-crystallised with quinine to form an anhydrous salt, (HPAA-)(QUIN+). The thermal stability of the salts were determined and differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the (HPAA-)(QUIN+) salt had the highest thermal stability compared to the other salt hydrates. The salts were also characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. (PAA-)(QUID+)·H2O and (PAA-)(QUIN+)·H2O are isostructural and Hirshfeld surface analysis was completed to compare the intermolecular interactions in these two structures.

  3. Synthesis and crystal structure elucidation of new copper(II)-based chemotherapeutic agent coupled with 1,2-DACH and orthovanillin: Validated by in vitro DNA/HSA binding profile and pBR322 cleavage pathway.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Mehvash; Afzal, Mohd; Ahmad, Musheer; Tabassum, Sartaj

    2016-08-01

    New copper(II)-based complex (1) was synthesized and characterized by analytical, spectroscopic and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The in vitro binding studies of complex 1 with CT DNA and HSA have been investigated by employing biophysical techniques to examine the binding propensity of 1 towards DNA and HSA. The results showed that 1 avidly binds to CT DNA via electrostatic mode along with the hydrogen bonding interaction of NH2 and CN groups of Schiff base ligand with the base pairs of DNA helix, leads to partial unwinding and destabilization of the DNA double helix. Moreover, the CD spectral studies revealed that complex 1 binds through groove binding interaction that stabilizes the right-handed B-form of DNA. Complex 1 showed an impressive photoinduced nuclease activity generating single-strand breaks in comparison with the DNA cleavage activity in presence of visible light. The mechanistic investigation revealed the efficiency of 1 to cleave DNA strands by involving the generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, the time dependent DNA cleavage activity showed that there was gradual increase in the amount of NC DNA on increasing the photoexposure time. However, the interaction of 1 and HSA showed that the change of intrinsic fluorescence intensity of HSA was induced by the microenvironment of Trp residue. PMID:27289445

  4. Cleavage of cytoplasm within the oligonucleate zoosporangia of allomyces macrogynus.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yunjeong; Song, Youngsun; Kim, Namhun; Youn, Hyunjoo; Kang, Minkook; Song, Yurim; Cho, Chungwon

    2014-01-01

    Allomyces macrogynus produces zoosporangia that discharge uninucleate zoospores after cleavage of multinucleate cytoplasm. Cleavage of cytoplasm within the oligonucleate zoosporangia of A. macrogynus was visualized by constructing three-dimensional models based on electron micrographs and confocal images. In oligonucleate zoosporangia, three adjacent nuclei can form three cleavage planes with a line of intersection of the planes. The position and boundary of the cleavage planes are thought to be determined by the relative positions of the nuclei. The establishment of three cleavage planes by cleavage membranes occurred sequentially, and the nuclear axis connecting the centers of two nuclei affected the development of cleavage membranes on each cleavage plane. In multinucleate zoosporangia, groups of three neighboring nuclei near the cell cortex may initiate the sequential establishment of cleavage planes and then may interact with the nuclei further from the cortex until the interactions of nuclei are propagated to the central region of the cytoplasm. PMID:24871589

  5. Intramolecular Aminocyanation of Alkenes via N–CN Bond Cleavage**

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhongda; Pound, Sarah M.; Rondla, Naveen R.; Douglas, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    A metal-free, Lewis acid-promoted intramolecular aminocyanation of alkenes was developed. B(C6F5)3 activates N-sulfonyl cyanamides, leading an formal cleavage of the N-CN bonds in conjunction with vicinal addition of sulfonamide and nitrile groups across an alkene. This method enables atom-economical access to indolines and tetrahydroquinolines in excellent yields, and provides a complementary strategy for regioselective alkene difunctionalizations with sulfonamide and nitrile groups. Labeling experiments with 13C suggest a fully intramolecular cyclization pattern due to lack of label scrambling in double crossover experiments. Catalysis with Lewis acid is realized and the reaction can be conducted under air. PMID:24719371

  6. Crystal structure of 3-ethynyl-benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Venturini, Chiara; Ratel-Ramond, Nicolas; Gourdon, Andre

    2015-10-01

    In the title compound, C9H6O2, the carb-oxy-lic acid group is almost in the plane of the benzene ring, making a dihedral angle of 2.49 (18)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by pairs of O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming classical acid-acid inversion dimers, with an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif. The dimers are linked by pairs of C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds forming chains, enclosing R 2 (2)(16) ring motifs, propagating along the c-axis direction. PMID:26594457

  7. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1981-11-12

    The objective of this project is to determine the structure of bituminous coal by determining the proportions of the various kinds of connecting bonds and how they can best be broken. Results obtained during the past quarter are presented for the following tasks: (1) extractions and fractionations of coal products which covers pyridine extraction, fractionation of TIPS fractions, EDA extraction of Illinois No. 6 coal and swelling ratios of coal samples; (2) experiments on breakable single bonds which cover reactions of ethylenediamine and model ethers, reaction of pyridine-extracted coal with Me/sub 3/SiI, Baeyer-Villiger oxidations, reaction to diphenylmethane with 15% HNO/sub 3/, cleavage of TIPS with ZnI/sub 2/, and cleavage of black acids; and (3) oxygen oxidation No. 18. Some of the highlights of these studies are: (1) some model ethers are not cleaved by EDA under extraction conditions; (2) oxidation of diaryl ketones with m-chloroperbenzoic acid and saponification of the resulting esters in promising for identifying ketones, (3) treatment of a black acid with pyridine hydroiodide reduced the acid's molecular weight and increased its solubility in pyridine, but treatment with ZnI/sub 2/ was ineffective; (4) in comparison with 0.1 M K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/, 0.01 M persulfate is relatively ineffective in accelerating oxidation of BnNH/sub 2/-extracted coal in water suspension. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Brønsted acids in ionic liquids: how acidity depends on the liquid structure.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jade A; He, Peizhao; Petkovic, Marina; Coleman, Fergal; Estager, Julien; Holbrey, John D; Seddon, Kenneth R; Swadźba-Kwaśny, Małgorzata

    2014-11-14

    Gutmann Acceptor Number (AN) values have been determined for Brønsted acid-ionic liquid mixtures, over a wide compositional range. Four systems of general formula [C2mim][A]-HA (A(-) = bistriflamide, [NTf2](-); triflate, [OTf](-); mesylate, [OMs](-); or acetate, [OAc](-), [C2mim](+) = 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation) were studied. A library of Brønsted acidic systems of varying acidity was constructed and the AN parameter was found to be a convenient approach for quantifying their acidity. HOAc, HOMs and HOTf, when dissolved in ionic liquids, were found to associate with the respective anions to form hydrogen-bonded anionic clusters, [A(HA)x](-). In contrast, HNTf2 was solubilised as a discrete, undissociated molecule. AN values were sensitive to the presence of anionic clusters; acidity could be buffered to a particular AN by binding the solubilised acid in the anionic cluster form. Overall, a simple way to manipulate and quantify the Brønsted acidity of acid-ionic liquid mixtures was demonstrated, and measured AN values were related to liquid speciation. PMID:25254612

  9. Dietary bioflavonoids induce cleavage in the MLL gene and may contribute to infant leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Strick, Reiner; Strissel, Pamela L.; Borgers, Susanne; Smith, Steve L.; Rowley, Janet D.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the MLL gene occur in about 80% of infant leukemia. In the search for possible agents inducing infant leukemia, we identified bioflavonoids, natural substances in food as well as in dietary supplements, that cause site-specific DNA cleavage in the MLL breakpoint cluster region (BCR) in vivo. The MLL BCR DNA cleavage was shown in primary progenitor hematopoietic cells from healthy newborns and adults as well as in cell lines; it colocalized with the MLL BCR cleavage site induced by chemotherapeutic agents, such as etoposide (VP16) and doxorubicin (Dox). Both in vivo and additional in vitro experiments demonstrated topoisomerase II (topo II) as the target of bioflavonoids similar to VP16 and Dox. Based on 20 bioflavonoids tested, we identified a common structure essential for topo II-induced DNA cleavage. Reversibility experiments demonstrated a religation of the bioflavonoid as well as the VP16-induced MLL cleavage site. Our observations support a two-stage model of cellular processing of topo II inhibitors: The first and reversible stage of topo II-induced DNA cleavage results in DNA repair, but also rarely in chromosome translocations; whereas the second, nonreversible stage leads to cell death because of an accumulation of DNA damage. These results suggest that maternal ingestion of bioflavonoids may induce MLL breaks and potentially translocations in utero leading to infant and early childhood leukemia. PMID:10758153

  10. Structural and Electrical Characterization of Protonic Acid Doped Polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaktawat, Vinodini; Saxena, Narendra S.; Sharma, Kananbala; Sharma, Thaneshwar P.

    2008-04-01

    Polyaniline doped with different protonic acids were chemically synthesized using ammonium persulfate (APS) as an oxidant. These samples were characterized through X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, which confirms the amorphous nature and acid doping, respectively. Electrical conduction in these samples has been studied through the measurement of I-V characteristics at room temperature as well as in the temperature range from 313 K to 413 K. So obtained characteristic curves were found to be nonlinear. The conductivity of phosphoric acid doped polyaniline sample is higher as compared to HCl doped polyaniline and pure polyaniline. Temperature dependence of conductivity suggests a semiconducting nature with increase in temperature. Activation energies have been found to be 50.86, 25.74 and 21.05 meV for pure polyaniline (base), polyaniline doped with hydrochloric, phosphoric acid, respectively.

  11. Catalytic Hydrolytic Cleavage and Oxy-Cleavage of Lignin Linkages

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Guanguang; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2014-07-26

    In this work, new strategies involving organic bases were evaluated to depolymerize lignin to reduced molecular fragments in aqueous medium. NaOH as an inorganic base was also investigated as a reference. Full nature lignin samples are used for the study. As research tools to unravel the complexity of the macro lignin structure and bulky molecular size under this study, size exclusion chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometric analysis, typically used for protein characterizations, were used to follow the progress of lignin depolymerisation by measuring the molecular weight distribution of the products and determining the key molecular fingerprints, respectively. The results show that sodium phenoxide and guanidine carbonate are effective catalysts for lignin depolymerization. It is observed that there exists a synergism between H2O2 and the organic base, which is strongest with guanidine carbonate.

  12. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: setup and analysis.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Bergonzo, Christina; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    The last in a set of units by the same authors, this unit addresses some important remaining questions about molecular modeling of nucleic acids. The unit describes how to choose an appropriate molecular mechanics force field; how to set up and equilibrate the system for accurate simulation of a nucleic acid in an explicit solvent by molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulation; and how to analyze molecular dynamics trajectories. PMID:25606980

  13. ω3 fatty acid desaturases from microorganisms: structure, function, evolution, and biotechnological use

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingxuan; Chen, Haiqin; Gu, Zhennan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei; Chen, Yong Q.

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthesis of very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids involves an alternating process of fatty acid desaturation and elongation catalyzed by complex series of enzymes. ω3 desaturase plays an important role in converting ω6 fatty acids into ω3 fatty acids. Genes for this desaturase have been identified and characterized in a wide range of microorganisms, including cyanobacteria, yeasts, molds, and microalgae. Like all fatty acid desaturases, ω3 desaturase is structurally characterized by the presence of three highly conserved histidine-rich motifs; however, unlike some desaturases, it lacks a cytochrome b5-like domain. Understanding the structure, function, and evolution of ω3 desaturases, particularly their substrate specificities in the biosynthesis of very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, lays the foundation for potential production of various ω3 fatty acids in transgenic microorganisms. PMID:24177732

  14. Solving nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement: examples from group II intron studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marcia, Marco Humphris-Narayanan, Elisabeth; Keating, Kevin S.; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-11-01

    Strategies for phasing nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement, using both experimental and de novo designed models, are discussed. Structured RNA molecules are key players in ensuring cellular viability. It is now emerging that, like proteins, the functions of many nucleic acids are dictated by their tertiary folds. At the same time, the number of known crystal structures of nucleic acids is also increasing rapidly. In this context, molecular replacement will become an increasingly useful technique for phasing nucleic acid crystallographic data in the near future. Here, strategies to select, create and refine molecular-replacement search models for nucleic acids are discussed. Using examples taken primarily from research on group II introns, it is shown that nucleic acids are amenable to different and potentially more flexible and sophisticated molecular-replacement searches than proteins. These observations specifically aim to encourage future crystallographic studies on the newly discovered repertoire of noncoding transcripts.

  15. Structure of eight molecular salts assembled from noncovalent bonding between carboxylic acids, imidazole, and benzimidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Hui; Wen, Xianhong; Li, Minghui; Wang, Daqi

    2015-09-01

    Eight organic salts of imidazole/benzimidazole have been prepared with carboxylic acids as 2-methyl-2-phenoxypropanoic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, 5-nitrosalicylic acid, isophthalic acid, 4-nitro-phthalic acid, and 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. The eight crystalline forms reported are proton-transfer compounds of which the crystals and compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. These structures adopted hetero supramolecular synthons, with the most common R22(7) motif observed at salts 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-8 suggests that there are extensive strong Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between acid and imidazolyl components in all of the salts. Except the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, the secondary propagating interactions also play important roles in structure extension. This variety, coupled with the varying geometries and number of acidic groups of the acids utilized, has led to the creation of eight supramolecular arrays with 1D-3D structure. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is analyzed. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds between acids and imidazole/benzimidazole are sufficient to bring about the formation of organic salts.

  16. High-Throughput Multiplexed Peptide-Centric Profiling Illustrates Both Substrate Cleavage Redundancy and Specificity in the MMP Family.

    PubMed

    Kukreja, Muskan; Shiryaev, Sergey A; Cieplak, Piotr; Muranaka, Norihito; Routenberg, David A; Chernov, Andrei V; Kumar, Sonu; Remacle, Albert G; Smith, Jeffrey W; Kozlov, Igor A; Strongin, Alex Y

    2015-08-20

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play incompletely understood roles in health and disease. Knowing the MMP cleavage preferences is essential for a better understanding of the MMP functions and design of selective inhibitors. To elucidate the cleavage preferences of MMPs, we employed a high-throughput multiplexed peptide-centric profiling technology involving the cleavage of 18,583 peptides by 18 proteinases from the main sub-groups of the MMP family. Our results enabled comparison of the MMP substrates on a global scale, leading to the most efficient and selective substrates. The data validated the accuracy of our cleavage prediction software. This software allows us and others to locate, with nearly 100% accuracy, the MMP cleavage sites in the peptide sequences. In addition to increasing our understanding of both the selectivity and the redundancy of the MMP family, our study generated a roadmap for the subsequent MMP structural-functional studies and efficient substrate and inhibitor design. PMID:26256476

  17. Activation of the furin endoprotease is a multiple-step process: requirements for acidification and internal propeptide cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, E D; VanSlyke, J K; Thulin, C D; Jean, F; Thomas, G

    1997-01-01

    Activation of furin requires autoproteolytic cleavage of its 83-amino acid propeptide at the consensus furin site, Arg-Thr-Lys-Arg107/. This RER-localized cleavage is necessary, but not sufficient, for enzyme activation. Rather, full activation of furin requires exposure to, and correct routing within, the TGN/endosomal system. Here, we identify the steps in addition to the initial propeptide cleavage necessary for activation of furin. Exposure of membrane preparations containing an inactive RER-localized soluble furin construct to either: (i) an acidic and calcium-containing environment characteristic of the TGN; or (ii) mild trypsinization at neutral pH, resulted in the activation of the endoprotease. Taken together, these results suggest that the pH drop facilitates the removal of a furin inhibitor. Consistent with these findings, following cleavage in the RER, the furin propeptide remains associated with the enzyme and functions as a potent inhibitor of the endoprotease. Co-immunoprecipitation studies coupled with analysis by mass spectrometry show that release of the propeptide at acidic pH, and hence activation of furin, requires a second cleavage within the autoinhibitory domain at a site containing a P6 arginine (-Arg70-Gly-Val-Thr-Lys-Arg75/-). The significance of this cleavage in regulating the compartment-specific activation of furin, and the relationship of the furin activation pathway to those of other serine endoproteases are discussed. PMID:9130696

  18. Production of Structured Triacylglycerols Containing Palmitic Acids at sn-2 Position and Docosahexaenoic Acids at sn-1, 3 Positions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjun; Guo, Yongli; Sun, Zhaomin; Jie, Xu; Li, Zhaojie; Wang, Jingfeng; Wang, Yuming; Xue, Changhu

    2015-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation has been shown well-established health benefits that justify their use as functional ingredients in healthy foods and nutraceutical products. Structured triacylglycerols rich in 1,3-docosahexenoyl-2-palmitoyl-sn-glycerol were produced from algal oil (Schizochytrium sp) which was prepared by a two-step process. Novozym 435 lipase was used to produce tripalmitin. Tripalmitin was then used to produce the final structured triacylglycerol (STAG) through interesterification reactions using Lipozyme RM IM. The optimum conditions for the enzymatic reaction were a mole ratio of tripalmitin/fatty acid ethyl esters 1:9, 60°C, 10% enzyme load (wt % of substrates), 10 h; the enzymatic product contained 51.6% palmitic acid (PA), 30.13% docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3) and 5.33% docosapentanoic acid (DPA, C22:5 n-3), 12.15% oleic acid (OLA). This STAG can be used as a functional ingredient in dietary supplementation to provide the benefits of DHA. PMID:26521813

  19. Reductive cleavage of the peptide bond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holian, J.; Garrison, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    In many biological research efforts, long chain organic molecules are studied by breaking large molecules into smaller components. Cleavage technique of recent interest is the use of solvated electrons. These are formed when aqueous solutions are bombarded with gamma radiation. Solvated electron is very reactive and can reduce most any species present, even to form free radicals.

  20. Influence of nitric acid treatment in different media on X-ray structural parameters of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sudip Maity; Ashim Choudhury

    2008-11-15

    The treatment of coal with nitric acid in aqueous and non-aqueous media introduces changes in the chemical and spatial structure of the organic mass. Four coals of different rank have been treated with nitric acid in aqueous and glacial acetic acid media for assessing the changes in the structural parameters by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Slow-scan XRD has been performed for the raw and treated coals, and X-ray structural parameters (d002, Lc, and Nc) and aromaticity (fa) have been determined by profile-fitting software. Considerable variation of the structural parameters has been observed with respect to the raw coals. The d002 values have decreased in aqueous medium but increased in acetic acid medium; however, Lc, Nc, and fa values have increased in aqueous medium but decreased in acetic acid medium. It is also observed that considerable oxidation takes place during nitric acid treatment in aqueous medium, but nitration is the predominant phenomenon in acetic acid medium. Disordering of the coal structure increases in acetic acid medium, but a reverse trend is observed in the aqueous medium. As a result, structurally modified coals (SMCs) are derived as new coal-derived substances. 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Cleavage of neuregulin-1 by BACE1 or ADAM10 protein produces differential effects on myelination.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoyang; Prior, Marguerite; He, Wanxia; Hu, Xiangyou; Tang, Xiaoying; Shen, Weizhen; Yadav, Satya; Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Miller, Robert; Trapp, Bruce D; Yan, Riqiang

    2011-07-01

    Neuregulin-1 (Nrg1) is encoded by a single gene and exists in naturally secreted and transmembrane isoforms. Nrg1 exerts its signaling activity through interaction with its cognate ErbB receptors. Multiple membrane-anchored Nrg1 isoforms, present in six different membrane topologies, must be processed by a protease to initiate a signaling cascade. Here, we demonstrate that BACE1 and ADAM10 can process type I and III Nrg1 at two adjacent sites. Our cleavage site mapping experiments showed that the BACE1 cleavage site is located eight amino acids downstream of the ADAM10 cleavage site, and this order of cleavage is the opposite of amyloid precursor protein cleavage by these two enzymes. Cleavages were further confirmed via optimized electrophoresis. Cleavage of type I or III Nrg1 by ADAM10 and BACE1 released a signaling-capable N-terminal fragment (ntf), either Nrg1-ntfα or Nrg1-ntfβ, which could similarly activate an ErbB receptor as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, two downstream signaling molecules. Although both Nrg1-ntfα and Nrg1-ntfβ could initiate a common signaling cascade, inhibition or down-regulation of ADAM10 alone in a co-culture system did not affect normal myelination, whereas specific inhibition of BACE1 impaired normal myelination. Thus, processing of Nrg1 by BACE1 appears to be more critical for regulating myelination. Our results imply that a significant inhibition of BACE1 could potentially impair Nrg1 signaling activity in vivo. PMID:21576249

  2. Chemical cleavage of fucoxanthin from Undaria pinnatifida and formation of apo-fucoxanthinones and apo-fucoxanthinals identified using LC-DAD-APCI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junxiang; Sun, Xiaowen; Chen, Xiaoli; Wang, Shuhui; Wang, Dongfeng

    2016-11-15

    As the most abundant carotenoid in nature, fucoxanthin is susceptible to oxidation under some conditions, forming cleavage products that possibly exhibit both positive and negative health effects in vitro and in vivo. Thus, to produce relatively high amounts of cleavage products, chemical oxidation of fucoxanthin was performed. Kinetic models for oxidation were probed and reaction products were identified. The results indicated that both potassium permanganate (KMnO4) and hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite (HClO/ClO(-)) treatment fitted a first-order kinetic model, while oxidation promoted by hydroxyl radical (OH) followed second-order kinetics. With the help of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, a total of 14 apo-fucoxanthins were detected as predominant cleavage products, with structural and geometric isomers identified among them. Three apo-fucoxanthinones and eleven apo-fucoxanthinals, of which five were cis-apo-fucoxanthinals, were detected upon oxidation by the three oxidizing agents (KMnO4, HClO/ClO(-), and OH). PMID:27283644

  3. Carbon–carbon bond cleavage for Cu-mediated aromatic trifluoromethylations and pentafluoroethylations

    PubMed Central

    Sugiishi, Tsuyuka; Aikawa, Kohsuke

    2015-01-01

    Summary This short review highlights the copper-mediated fluoroalkylation using perfluoroalkylated carboxylic acid derivatives. Carbon–carbon bond cleavage of perfluoroalkylated carboxylic acid derivatives takes place in fluoroalkylation reactions at high temperature (150–200 °C) or under basic conditions to generate fluoroalkyl anion sources for the formation of fluoroalkylcopper species. The fluoroalkylation reactions, which proceed through decarboxylation or tetrahedral intermediates, are useful protocols for the synthesis of fluoroalkylated aromatics. PMID:26734112

  4. Isolation and chemical structure of aklanonic acid, an early intermediate in the biosynthesis of anthracyclines.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, K; Tresselt, D; Schumann, G; Ihn, W; Wagner, C

    1985-08-01

    The fermentation, isolation and structure elucidation of aklanonic acid are described. The compound was isolated from fermentations of Streptomyces strain ZIMET 43,717. Aklanonic acid is a yellow-orange crystalline substance, melting at 203-204 degrees C (dec), having the molecular formula C21H16O8, and possessing UV maxima at 258, 282 (sh) and 438 nm (CHCl3). In dimethyl sulfoxide or pyridine aklanonic acid is unstable and a new compound (aklanone) is formed as a conversion product. The elucidation of the structures has shown that aklanonic acid and aklanone are derivatives of 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone. PMID:3862658

  5. Comparative structure analysis of non-polar organic ferrofluids stabilized by saturated mono-carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Avdeev, M V; Bica, D; Vékás, L; Aksenov, V L; Feoktystov, A V; Marinica, O; Rosta, L; Garamus, V M; Willumeit, R

    2009-06-01

    The structure of ferrofluids (magnetite in decahydronaphtalene) stabilized with saturated mono-carboxylic acids of different chain lengths (lauric, myristic, palmitic and stearic acids) is studied by means of magnetization analysis and small-angle neutron scattering. It is shown that in case of saturated acid surfactants, magnetite nanoparticles are dispersed in the carrier approximately with the same size distribution whose mean value and width are significantly less as compared to the classical stabilization with non-saturated oleic acid. The found thickness of the surfactant shell around magnetite is analyzed with respect to stabilizing properties of mono-carboxylic acids. PMID:19376524

  6. Nucleic acid-based nanoengineering: novel structures for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanying; LaBean, Thomas H.; Leong, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoengineering exploits the interactions of materials at the nanometre scale to create functional nanostructures. It relies on the precise organization of nanomaterials to achieve unique functionality. There are no interactions more elegant than those governing nucleic acids via Watson–Crick base-pairing rules. The infinite combinations of DNA/RNA base pairs and their remarkable molecular recognition capability can give rise to interesting nanostructures that are only limited by our imagination. Over the past years, creative assembly of nucleic acids has fashioned a plethora of two-dimensional and three-dimensional nanostructures with precisely controlled size, shape and spatial functionalization. These nanostructures have been precisely patterned with molecules, proteins and gold nanoparticles for the observation of chemical reactions at the single molecule level, activation of enzymatic cascade and novel modality of photonic detection, respectively. Recently, they have also been engineered to encapsulate and release bioactive agents in a stimulus-responsive manner for therapeutic applications. The future of nucleic acid-based nanoengineering is bright and exciting. In this review, we will discuss the strategies to control the assembly of nucleic acids and highlight the recent efforts to build functional nucleic acid nanodevices for nanomedicine. PMID:23050076

  7. Energetics and structure of hydroxynicotinic acids. Crystal structures of 2-, 4-, 6-hydroxynicotinic and 5-chloro-6-hydroxynicotinic acids.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rui C; Figueira, Rita M B B M; Piedade, M Fátima M; Diogo, Hermínio P; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E

    2009-10-29

    The relationship between energetics and structure in 2-, 4-, 5-, and 6-hydroxynicotinic and 5-chloro-6-hydroxynicotinic acids (2HNA, 4HNA, 5HNA, 6HNA, and 5Cl6HNA, respectively) was investigated in the solid and gaseous phases by means of a variety of experimental and computational chemistry techniques. The molecular and crystal structures of the 2HNA, 4HNA, 6HNA, and 5Cl6HNA solid forms used in this study were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction at 293 +/- 2 K. The 2HNA, 4HNA, and 5Cl6HNA samples were monoclinic (space groups: P2(1)/n for 2HNA and P2(1)/c for 4HNA and 5Cl6HNA), and that of 6HNA was found to be triclinic (space group: P1). The 2HNA sample investigated corresponds to a new polymorphic form of this compound. The 2HNA, 4HNA, 6HNA, and 5Cl6HNA molecules crystallize as oxo tautomers exhibiting N-H and Cring=O bonds. This is also supported by the observation of bands typical of N-H and Cring=O stretching frequencies in the corresponding FT-IR spectra. The absence of these bands in the spectrum of 5HNA indicates that a hydroxy tautomer with an unprotonated N heteroatom and a Cring-OH bond is likely to be present in this case. Results of theoretical calculations carried out at the G3MP2 and CBS-QB3 levels of theory suggest that in the ideal gas phase, at 298.15 K, 2HNA favors the oxo form, 4HNA prefers the hydroxy form, and no strong dominance of one of the two tautomers exists in the case of 6HNA and 5Cl6HNA. The standard molar enthalpies of formation of 2HNA, 4HNA, 5HNA, 6HNA, and 5Cl6HNA in the crystalline state, at 298.15 K, Delta(f)H(m)(o)(cr), were determined by micro combustion calorimetry. The corresponding enthalpies of sublimation, Delta(sub)H(m)(o), were also derived from vapor pressure versus temperature measurements by the Knudsen effusion method. The obtained Delta(f)H(m)(o)(cr) and Delta(sub)H(m)(o) values led to the enthalpies of formation of 2HNA, 4HNA, 5HNA, 6HNA, and 5Cl6HNA in the gaseous phase. These were discussed together

  8. Site-specific cleavage of acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase by legumain.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Shinya; Inoue, Daiki; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Li, Chuan; Imai, Masahiko; Takahashi, Noriko; Fukui, Tetsuya

    2016-06-01

    Acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase (AACS) is a ketone body-utilizing enzyme and is responsible for the synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids. We have previously shown that AACS is cleaved by legumain, a lysosomal asparaginyl endopeptidase. In this study, we attempted to determine the cleavage site of AACS. Mutagenesis analysis of AACS revealed that Asn547 is the specific cleavage site of AACS in mouse livers. The cleaved form of AACS (1-547) lost the ability to convert acetoacetate to acetoacetyl-CoA. Moreover, hydrodynamics-based gene transduction showed that overexpression of AACS (1-547) increases the protein expression of caveolin-1, the principal component of the caveolae. These results suggest that cleavage of AACS by legumain is critical for the regulation of enzymatic activity and results in gain-of-function changes. PMID:27129883

  9. Anti-AIDS agents. 30. Anti-HIV activity of oleanolic acid, pomolic acid, and structurally related triterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Kashiwada, Y; Wang, H K; Nagao, T; Kitanaka, S; Yasuda, I; Fujioka, T; Yamagishi, T; Cosentino, L M; Kozuka, M; Okabe, H; Ikeshiro, Y; Hu, C Q; Yeh, E; Lee, K H

    1998-09-01

    Oleanolic acid (1) was identified as an anti-HIV principle from several plants, including Rosa woodsii (leaves), Prosopis glandulosa (leaves and twigs), Phoradendron juniperinum (whole plant), Syzygium claviflorum (leaves), Hyptis capitata (whole plant), and Ternstromia gymnanthera (aerial part). It inhibited HIV-1 replication in acutely infected H9 cells with an EC50 value of 1.7 microg/mL, and inhibited H9 cell growth with an IC50 value of 21.8 microg/mL [therapeutic index (T. I.) 12.8]. Pomolic acid, isolated from R. woodsii and H. capitata, was also identified as an anti-HIV agent (EC50 1.4 microg/mL, T. I. 16.6). Although ursolic acid did show anti-HIV activity (EC50 2.0 microg/mL), it was slightly toxic (IC50 6.5 microg/mL, T. I. 3.3). A new triterpene (11) was also isolated from the CHCl3-soluble fraction of R. woodsii, though it showed no anti-HIV activity. The structure of 11 was determined to be 1beta-hydroxy-2-oxopomolic acid by spectral examination. Based on these results, we examined the anti-HIV activity of oleanolic acid- or pomolic acid-related triterpenes isolated from several plants. In addition, we previously demonstrated that derivatives of betulinic acid, isolated from the leaves of S. claviflorum as an anti-HIV principle, exhibited extremely potent anti-HIV activity. Accordingly, we prepared derivatives of oleanolic acid and evaluated their anti-HIV activity. Among the oleanolic acid derivatives, 18 demonstrated most potent anti-HIV activity, with an EC50 value of 0. 0005 microg/mL and a T. I. value of 22 400. PMID:9748372

  10. Structural basis of the alternating-access mechanism in a bile acid transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Levin, Elena J.; Pan, Yaping; McCoy, Jason G.; Sharma, Ruchika; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in hepatocytes and secreted through the biliary tract into the small intestine, where they aid in absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Through a process known as enterohepatic recirculation, more than 90% of secreted bile acids are then retrieved from the intestine and returned to the liver for resecretion. In humans, there are two Na+-dependent bile acid transporters involved in enterohepatic recirculation, the Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP; also known as SLC10A1) expressed in hepatocytes, and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; also known as SLC10A2) expressed on enterocytes in the terminal ileum. In recent years, ASBT has attracted much interest as a potential drug target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, because inhibition of ASBT reduces reabsorption of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. However, a lack of three-dimensional structures of bile acid transporters hampers our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and transport, and to interpret the wealth of existing functional data. The crystal structure of an ASBT homologue from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) in detergent was reported recently, showing the protein in an inward-open conformation bound to two Na+ and a taurocholic acid. However, the structural changes that bring bile acid and Na+ across the membrane are difficult to infer from a single structure. To understand the structural changes associated with the coupled transport of Na+ and bile acids, here we solved two structures of an ASBT homologue from Yersinia frederiksenii (ASBTYf) in a lipid environment, which reveal that a large rigid-body rotation of a substrate-binding domain gives the conserved `crossover' region, where two discontinuous helices cross each other, alternating accessibility from either side of the cell membrane. This result has implications

  11. Molecular Dynamic Simulations Reveal the Structural Determinants of Fatty Acid Binding to Oxy-Myoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Chintapalli, Sree V.; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Patel, Reema; Shah, Natasha; Patterson, Randen L.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Anishkin, Andriy; Adams, Sean H.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which fatty acids are sequestered and transported in muscle have not been fully elucidated. A potential key player in this process is the protein myoglobin (Mb). Indeed, there is a catalogue of empirical evidence supporting direct interaction of globins with fatty acid metabolites; however, the binding pocket and regulation of the interaction remains to be established. In this study, we employed a computational strategy to elucidate the structural determinants of fatty acids (palmitic & oleic acid) binding to Mb. Sequence analysis and docking simulations with a horse (Equus caballus) structural Mb reference reveals a fatty acid-binding site in the hydrophobic cleft near the heme region in Mb. Both palmitic acid and oleic acid attain a “U” shaped structure similar to their conformation in pockets of other fatty acid-binding proteins. Specifically, we found that the carboxyl head group of palmitic acid coordinates with the amino group of Lys45, whereas the carboxyl group of oleic acid coordinates with both the amino groups of Lys45 and Lys63. The alkyl tails of both fatty acids are supported by surrounding hydrophobic residues Leu29, Leu32, Phe33, Phe43, Phe46, Val67, Val68 and Ile107. In the saturated palmitic acid, the hydrophobic tail moves freely and occasionally penetrates deeper inside the hydrophobic cleft, making additional contacts with Val28, Leu69, Leu72 and Ile111. Our simulations reveal a dynamic and stable binding pocket in which the oxygen molecule and heme group in Mb are required for additional hydrophobic interactions. Taken together, these findings support a mechanism in which Mb acts as a muscle transporter for fatty acid when it is in the oxygenated state and releases fatty acid when Mb converts to deoxygenated state. PMID:26030763

  12. Molecular dynamic simulations reveal the structural determinants of Fatty Acid binding to oxy-myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Chintapalli, Sree V; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Patel, Reema; Shah, Natasha; Patterson, Randen L; van Rossum, Damian B; Anishkin, Andriy; Adams, Sean H

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which fatty acids are sequestered and transported in muscle have not been fully elucidated. A potential key player in this process is the protein myoglobin (Mb). Indeed, there is a catalogue of empirical evidence supporting direct interaction of globins with fatty acid metabolites; however, the binding pocket and regulation of the interaction remains to be established. In this study, we employed a computational strategy to elucidate the structural determinants of fatty acids (palmitic & oleic acid) binding to Mb. Sequence analysis and docking simulations with a horse (Equus caballus) structural Mb reference reveals a fatty acid-binding site in the hydrophobic cleft near the heme region in Mb. Both palmitic acid and oleic acid attain a "U" shaped structure similar to their conformation in pockets of other fatty acid-binding proteins. Specifically, we found that the carboxyl head group of palmitic acid coordinates with the amino group of Lys45, whereas the carboxyl group of oleic acid coordinates with both the amino groups of Lys45 and Lys63. The alkyl tails of both fatty acids are supported by surrounding hydrophobic residues Leu29, Leu32, Phe33, Phe43, Phe46, Val67, Val68 and Ile107. In the saturated palmitic acid, the hydrophobic tail moves freely and occasionally penetrates deeper inside the hydrophobic cleft, making additional contacts with Val28, Leu69, Leu72 and Ile111. Our simulations reveal a dynamic and stable binding pocket in which the oxygen molecule and heme group in Mb are required for additional hydrophobic interactions. Taken together, these findings support a mechanism in which Mb acts as a muscle transporter for fatty acid when it is in the oxygenated state and releases fatty acid when Mb converts to deoxygenated state. PMID:26030763

  13. Cleavage of influenza A virus H1 hemagglutinin by swine respiratory bacterial proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Callan, R J; Hartmann, F A; West, S E; Hinshaw, V S

    1997-01-01

    Cleavage of influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) is required for expression of fusion activity and virus entry into cells. Extracellular proteases are responsible for the proteolytic cleavage activation of avirulent avian and mammalian influenza viruses and contribute to pathogenicity and tissue tropism. The relative contributions of host and microbial proteases to cleavage activation in natural infection remain to be established. We examined 23 respiratory bacterial pathogens and 150 aerobic bacterial isolates cultured from the nasal cavities of pigs for proteolytic activity. No evidence of secreted proteases was found for the bacterial pathogens, including Haemophilus parasuis, Pasteurella multocida, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Bordetella bronchiseptica, and Streptococcus suis. Proteolytic bacteria were isolated from 7 of 11 swine nasal samples and included Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus hyicus, Aeromonas caviae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Enterococcus sp. Only P. aeruginosa secreted a protease, elastase, that cleaved influenza virus HA. However, compared to trypsin, the site of cleavage by elastase was shifted one amino acid in the carboxy-terminal direction and resulted in inactivation of the virus. Under the conditions of this study, we identified several bacterial isolates from the respiratory tracts of pigs that secrete proteases in vitro. However, none of these proteolytic isolates demonstrated direct cleavage activation of influenza virus HA. PMID:9311838

  14. Cleavage oxygenases for the biosynthesis of trisporoids and other apocarotenoids in Phycomyces.

    PubMed

    Medina, Humberto R; Cerdá-Olmedo, Enrique; Al-Babili, Salim

    2011-10-01

    Mixed cultures of strains of opposite sex of the Mucorales produce trisporic acids and other compounds arising from cleavage of β-carotene, some of which act as signals in the mating process. The genome of Phycomyces blakesleeanus contains five sequences akin to those of verified carotenoid cleavage oxygenases. All five are transcribed, three of them have the sequence traits that are considered essential for activity, and we have discovered the reactions catalysed by the products of two of them, genes carS and acaA. The transcripts of carS became more abundant in the course of mating, and its expression in β-carotene-producing Escherichia coli cells led to the formation of β-apo-12'-carotenal, a C₂₅ cleavage product of β-carotene. Joint expression of both genes in the same in vivo system resulted in the production of β-apo-13-carotenone, a C₁₈ fragment. In vitro, AcaA cleaved β-apo-12'-carotenal into β-apo-13-carotenone and was active on other apocarotenoid substrates. According to these and other results, the first reactions in the apocarotenoid pathway of Phycomyces are the cleavage of β-carotene at its C11'-C12' double bond by CarS and the cleavage of the resulting C₂₅-fragment at its C13-14 double bond by AcaA. PMID:21854466

  15. Crystal structure of febuxostat-acetic acid (1/1).

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Hu, Xiu-Rong; Gu, Jian-Ming; Tang, Gu-Ping

    2015-05-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound [systematic name: 2-(3-cyano-4-iso-butyl-oxyphen-yl)-4-methyl-thia-zole-5-carb-oxy-lic acid-acetic acid (1/1)], C16H16N2O3S·CH3COOH, contains a febuxostat mol-ecule and an acetic acid mol-ecule. In the febuxostat mol-ecule, the thia-zole ring is nearly coplanar with the benzene ring [dihedral angle = 3.24 (2)°]. In the crystal, the febuxostat and acetic acid mol-ecules are linked by O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds and weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming supra-molecular chains propagating along the b-axis direction. π-π stacking is observed between nearly parallel thia-zole and benzene rings of adjacent mol-ecules; the centroid-to-centroid distances are 3.8064 (17) and 3.9296 (17) Å. PMID:25995912

  16. Structural stability and prebiotic properties of resistant starch type 3 increase bile acid turnover and lower secondary bile acid formation.

    PubMed

    Dongowski, Gerhard; Jacobasch, Gisela; Schmiedl, Detlef

    2005-11-16

    Microbial metabolism is essential in maintaining a healthy mucosa in the large bowel, preferentially through butyrate specific mechanisms. This system depends on starch supply. Two structurally different resistant starches type 3 (RS3) have been investigated with respect to their resistance to digestion, fermentability, and their effects on the composition and turnover of bile acids in rats. RSA (a mixture of retrograded maltodextrins and branched high molecular weight polymers), which is more resistant than RSB (a retrograded potato starch), increased the rate of fermentation accompanied by a decrease of pH in cecum, colon, and feces. Because they were bound to RS3, less bile acids were reabsorbed, resulting in a higher turnover through the large bowel. Because of the rise of volume, the bile acid level was unchanged and the formation of secondary bile acids was partly suppressed. The results proved a strong relation between RS3, short chain fatty acid production, and microflora. However, butyrate specific benefits are only achieved by an intake of RS3 that result in good fermentation properties, which depend on the kind of the resistant starch structures. PMID:16277431

  17. Introduction of structural affinity handles as a tool in selective nucleic acid separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, III, Richard Coale (Inventor); Cano, Luis Antonio (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The method is used for separating nucleic acids and other similar constructs. It involves selective introduction, enhancement, or stabilization of affinity handles such as single-strandedness in the undesired (or desired) nucleic acids as compared to the usual structure (e.g., double-strandedness) of the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids. The undesired (or desired) nucleic acids are separated from the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids due to capture by methods including but not limited to immobilized metal affinity chromatography, immobilized single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) protein, and immobilized oligonucleotides. The invention is useful to: remove contaminating genomic DNA from plasmid DNA; remove genomic DNA from plasmids, BACs, and similar constructs; selectively separate oligonucleotides and similar DNA fragments from their partner strands; purification of aptamers, (deoxy)-ribozymes and other highly structured nucleic acids; Separation of restriction fragments without using agarose gels; manufacture recombinant Taq polymerase or similar products that are sensitive to host genomic DNA contamination; and other applications.

  18. Cleavage of DAP5 by coxsackievirus B3 2A protease facilitates viral replication and enhances apoptosis by altering translation of IRES-containing genes.

    PubMed

    Hanson, P J; Ye, X; Qiu, Y; Zhang, H M; Hemida, M G; Wang, F; Lim, T; Gu, A; Cho, B; Kim, H; Fung, G; Granville, D J; Yang, D

    2016-05-01

    Cleavage of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) by enterovirus proteases during infection leads to the shutoff of cellular cap-dependent translation, but does not affect the initiation of cap-independent translation of mRNAs containing an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Death-associated protein 5 (DAP5), a structural homolog of eIF4G, is a translation initiation factor specific for IRES-containing mRNAs. Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a positive single-stranded RNA virus and a primary causal agent of human myocarditis. Its RNA genome harbors an IRES within the 5'-untranslated region and is translated by a cap-independent, IRES-driven mechanism. Previously, we have shown that DAP5 is cleaved during CVB3 infection. However, the protease responsible for cleavage, cleavage site and effects on the translation of target genes during CVB3 infection have not been investigated. In the present study, we demonstrated that viral protease 2A but not 3C is responsible for DAP5 cleavage, generating 45- and 52-kDa N- (DAP5-N) and C-terminal (DAP5-C) fragments, respectively. By site-directed mutagenesis, we found that DAP5 is cleaved at amino acid G434. Upon cleavage, DAP5-N largely translocated to the nucleus at the later time points of infection, whereas the DAP5-C largely remained in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of these DAP5 truncates demonstrated that DAP5-N retained the capability of initiating IRES-driven translation of apoptosis-associated p53, but not the prosurvival Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) when compared with the full-length DAP5. Similarly, DAP5-N expression promoted CVB3 replication and progeny release; on the other hand, DAP5-C exerted a dominant-negative effect on cap-dependent translation. Taken together, viral protease 2A-mediated cleavage of DAP5 results in the production of two truncates that exert differential effects on protein translation of the IRES-containing genes, leading to enhanced host cell death. PMID:26586572

  19. Molecular structures of benzoic acid and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, obtained by gas-phase electron diffraction and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Aarset, Kirsten; Page, Elizabeth M; Rice, David A

    2006-07-20

    The structures of benzoic acid (C6H5COOH) and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (C6H4OHCOOH) have been determined in the gas phase by electron diffraction using results from quantum chemical calculations to inform restraints used on the structural parameters. Theoretical methods (HF and MP2/6-311+G(d,p)) predict two conformers for benzoic acid, one which is 25.0 kJ mol(-1) (MP2) lower in energy than the other. In the low-energy form, the carboxyl group is coplanar with the phenyl ring and the O-H group eclipses the C=O bond. Theoretical calculations (HF and MP2/6-311+G(d,p)) carried out for 2-hydroxybenzoic acid gave evidence for seven stable conformers but one low-energy form (11.7 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy (MP2)) which again has the carboxyl group coplanar with the phenyl ring, the O-H of the carboxyl group eclipsing the C=O bond and the C=O of the carboxyl group oriented toward the O-H group of the phenyl ring. The effects of internal hydrogen bonding in 2-hydroxybenzoic acid can be clearly observed by comparison of pertinent structural parameters between the two compounds. These differences for 2-hydroxybenzoic acid include a shorter exocyclic C-C bond, a lengthening of the ring C-C bond between the substituents, and a shortening of the carboxylic single C-O bond. PMID:16836466

  20. Anhydride formation is not a valid mechanism for peptide cleavage by carboxypeptidase-A: a semiempirical reaction pathway study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Shoham, Gil; Goldblum, Amiram

    The mechanism of action of zinc metalloproteinases has been studied by following the direct nucleophilic pathway, which has been frequently suggested but not yet examined by computational methods, and comparing it to other pathways. We computed the reaction enthalpies for the direct nucleophilic attack by Glu270 in the active site model of carboxypeptidase-A on a model substrate's peptide carbonyl and followed this pathway through mixed anhydride formation and subsequent anhydride cleavage by water. The starting molecular coordinates originate in our own high-resolution crystal structure and the computations have been conducted with the minimal neglect of differential overlap (MNDO) Hamiltonian, modified to include the d-orbitals of zinc and the effects of multiple hydrogen bonding, thus labelled MNDO/d/H. Compared to our recent results for two other candidate pathways for this mechanism, both of the General-Acid-General-Base type, we conclude that the direct nucleophilic or 'anhydride' pathway has a much higher energy barrier at the rate determining step, which is a proton transfer, than previously calculated paths. We argue that the 'anhydride' pathway is thus not a valid one for the cleavage of peptides by carboxypeptidase-A.

  1. Zinc-dependent cleavage in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme: evidence for a pH-dependent conformational change

    PubMed Central

    Borda, Emily J.; Markley, John C.; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th.

    2003-01-01

    We have characterized a novel Zn2+-catalyzed cleavage site between nucleotides C3 and U4 in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme. In contrast to previously described divalent metal-ion-dependent cleavage of RNA, U4 cleavage is only observed in the presence of Zn2+. This new cleavage site has an unusual pH dependence, in that U4 cleavage products are only observed above pH 7.9 and reach a maximum yield at about pH 8.5. These data, together with the fact that no metal ion-binding site is observed in proximity to the U4 cleavage site in either of the crystal structures, point toward a pH-dependent conformational change in the hammerhead ribozyme. We have described previously Zn2+-dependent cleavage between G8 and A9 in the hammerhead ribozyme and have discovered that U4 cleavage occurs only after A9 cleavage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of sequential cleavage events as a possible regulatory mechanism in ribozymes. PMID:12736309

  2. Maleic Acid – but Not Structurally Related Methylmalonic Acid – Interrupts Energy Metabolism by Impaired Calcium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei-Tzu; Okun, Jürgen Günther; Kölker, Stefan; Morath, Marina Alexandra; Sauer, Sven Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Maleic acid (MA) has been shown to induce Fanconi syndrome via disturbance of renal energy homeostasis, though the underlying pathomechanism is still under debate. Our study aimed to examine the pathomechanism underlying maleic acid-induced nephrotoxicity. Methylmalonic acid (MMA) is structurally similar to MA and accumulates in patients affected with methymalonic aciduria, a defect in the degradation of branched-chain amino acids, odd-chain fatty acids and cholesterol, which is associated with the development of tubulointerstitial nephritis resulting in chronic renal failure. We therefore used MMA application as a control experiment in our study and stressed hPTECs with MA and MMA to further validate the specificity of our findings. MMA did not show any toxic effects on proximal tubule cells, whereas maleic acid induced concentration-dependent and time-dependent cell death shown by increased lactate dehydrogenase release as well as ethidium homodimer and calcein acetoxymethyl ester staining. The toxic effect of MA was blocked by administration of single amino acids, in particular L-alanine and L-glutamate. MA application further resulted in severe impairment of cellular energy homeostasis on the level of glycolysis, respiratory chain, and citric acid cycle resulting in ATP depletion. As underlying mechanism we could identify disturbance of calcium homeostasis. MA toxicity was critically dependent on calcium levels in culture medium and blocked by the extra- and intracellular calcium chelators EGTA and BAPTA-AM respectively. Moreover, MA-induced cell death was associated with activation of calcium-dependent calpain proteases. In summary, our study shows a comprehensive pathomechanistic concept for MA-induced dysfunction and damage of human proximal tubule cells. PMID:26086473

  3. Effect of A Long Chain Carboxylate Acid on Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Micelle Structure: A SANS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriati, Arum; Giri Rachman Putra, Edy; Seok Seong, Baek

    2010-01-01

    The effect of a different hydrocarbon chain length of carboxylate acid, i.e. dodecanoic acid, CH3(CH)10COOH or lauric acid and hexadecanoic acid, CH3(CH2)14COOH or palmitic acid as a co-surfactant in the 0.3 M sodium dedecyl sulfate, SDS micellar solution has been studied using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The present of lauric acid has induced the SDS structural micelles. The ellipsoid micelles structures changed significantly in length (major axis) from 22.6 Å to 37.1 Å at a fixed minor axis of 16.7 Å in the present of 0.005 M to 0.1 M lauric acid. Nevertheless, this effect did not occur in the present of palmitic acid with the same concentration range. The present of palmitic acid molecules performed insignificant effect on the SDS micelles growth where the major axis of the micelle was elongated from 22.9 Å to 25.3 Å only. It showed that the appropriate hydrocarbon chain length between surfactant and co-surfactant molecules emerged as one of the determining factors in forming a mixed micelles structure.

  4. Sequence-specific cleavage of dsRNA by Mini-III RNase

    PubMed Central

    Głów, Dawid; Pianka, Dariusz; Sulej, Agata A.; Kozłowski, Łukasz P.; Czarnecka, Justyna; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Skowronek, Krzysztof J.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleases (RNases) play a critical role in RNA processing and degradation by hydrolyzing phosphodiester bonds (exo- or endonucleolytically). Many RNases that cut RNA internally exhibit substrate specificity, but their target sites are usually limited to one or a few specific nucleotides in single-stranded RNA and often in a context of a particular three-dimensional structure of the substrate. Thus far, no RNase counterparts of restriction enzymes have been identified which could cleave double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in a sequence-specific manner. Here, we present evidence for a sequence-dependent cleavage of long dsRNA by RNase Mini-III from Bacillus subtilis (BsMiniIII). Analysis of the sites cleaved by this enzyme in limited digest of bacteriophage Φ6 dsRNA led to the identification of a consensus target sequence. We defined nucleotide residues within the preferred cleavage site that affected the efficiency of the cleavage and were essential for the discrimination of cleavable versus non-cleavable dsRNA sequences. We have also determined that the loop α5b-α6, a distinctive structural element in Mini-III RNases, is crucial for the specific cleavage, but not for dsRNA binding. Our results suggest that BsMiniIII may serve as a prototype of a sequence-specific dsRNase that could possibly be used for targeted cleavage of dsRNA. PMID:25634891

  5. TURBOLYTIK: a peptide cleavage program for personal computers.

    PubMed

    Pillay, T S

    1988-01-01

    A microcomputer program that simulates the cleavage of polypeptides by various chemical and enzymic means is described. The program is written in Turbo Basic, a new dialect of Basic, and is compiled to run on personal computers using the MS-DOS operating system. The program generates all the possible cleavage fragments that can arise when a protein of known primary structure is cleaved at susceptible sites. The output also provides the estimation of the molecular weights, the charge per molecule at a given pH and a prediction of the isoelectric point. The program is designed to facilitate the easy selection of suitable proteolytic methods in protein chemistry, identification of peptides on a peptide map generated by conventional means or in mass spectra obtained from mass spectrometry. The program will find use in laboratories attempting to define posttranslational covalent modifications on protein molecules or exclude frame-shift errors in the deductions of primary structures from cDNA clones. PMID:3410575

  6. Selective exchange of divalent transition metal ions in cryptomelane-type manganic acid with tunnel structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, M. ); Komarneni, S. )

    1993-03-01

    The ion-exchange selectivity of divalent transition metal ions on cryptomelane-type manganic acid (CMA) with tunnel structure has been studied using the distribution coefficients ([ital K][sub [ital d

  7. Solvent influence on cellulose 1,4-β-glycosidic bond cleavage: a molecular dynamics and metadynamics study.

    PubMed

    Loerbroks, Claudia; Boulanger, Eliot; Thiel, Walter

    2015-03-27

    We explore the influence of two solvents, namely water and the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EmimAc), on the conformations of two cellulose models (cellobiose and a chain of 40 glucose units) and the solvent impact on glycosidic bond cleavage by acid hydrolysis by using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. We investigate the rotation around the glycosidic bond and ring puckering, as well as the anomeric effect and hydrogen bonds, in order to gauge the effect on the hydrolysis mechanism. We find that EmimAc eases hydrolysis through stronger solvent-cellulose interactions, which break structural and electronic barriers to hydrolysis. Our results indicate that hydrolysis in cellulose chains should start from the ends and not in the centre of the chain, which is less accessible to solvent. PMID:25689773

  8. Utilization of Dioxygen by Carotenoid Cleavage Oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xuewu; Golczak, Marcin; Zhang, Jianye; Kleinberg, Katie A; von Lintig, Johannes; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kiser, Philip D

    2015-12-18

    Carotenoid cleavage oxygenases (CCOs) are non-heme, Fe(II)-dependent enzymes that participate in biologically important metabolic pathways involving carotenoids and apocarotenoids, including retinoids, stilbenes, and related compounds. CCOs typically catalyze the cleavage of non-aromatic double bonds by dioxygen (O2) to form aldehyde or ketone products. Expressed only in vertebrates, the RPE65 sub-group of CCOs catalyzes a non-canonical reaction consisting of concerted ester cleavage and trans-cis isomerization of all-trans-retinyl esters. It remains unclear whether the former group of CCOs functions as mono- or di-oxygenases. Additionally, a potential role for O2 in catalysis by the RPE65 group of CCOs has not been evaluated to date. Here, we investigated the pattern of oxygen incorporation into apocarotenoid products of Synechocystis apocarotenoid oxygenase. Reactions performed in the presence of (18)O-labeled water and (18)O2 revealed an unambiguous dioxygenase pattern of O2 incorporation into the reaction products. Substitution of Ala for Thr at position 136 of apocarotenoid oxygenase, a site predicted to govern the mono- versus dioxygenase tendency of CCOs, greatly reduced enzymatic activity without altering the dioxygenase labeling pattern. Reevaluation of the oxygen-labeling pattern of the resveratrol-cleaving CCO, NOV2, previously reported to be a monooxygenase, using a purified enzyme sample revealed that it too is a dioxygenase. We also demonstrated that bovine RPE65 is not dependent on O2 for its cleavage/isomerase activity. In conjunction with prior research, the results of this study resolve key issues regarding the utilization of O2 by CCOs and indicate that dioxygenase activity is a feature common among double bond-cleaving CCOs. PMID:26499794

  9. Intracellular RNA cleavage by the hairpin ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Seyhan, A A; Amaral, J; Burke, J M

    1998-01-01

    Studies involving ribozyme-directed inactivation of targeted RNA molecules have met with mixed success, making clear the importance of methods to measure and optimize ribozyme activity within cells. The interpretation of biochemical assays for determining ribozyme activity in the cellular environment have been complicated by recent results indicating that hammerhead and hairpin ribozymes can cleave RNA following cellular lysis. Here, we report the results of experiments in which the catalytic activity of hairpin ribozymes is monitored following expression in mammalian cells, and in which post-lysis cleavage is rigorously excluded through a series of biochemical and genetic controls. Following transient transfection, self-processing transcripts containing active and inactive hairpin ribozymes together with cleavable and non-cleavable substrates were generated within the cytoplasm of mouse OST7-1 cells using T7 RNA polymerase. Unprocessed RNA and products ofintracellular cleavage were detected and analyzed using a primer-extension assay. Ribozyme-containing transcripts accumulated to a level of 4 x 10(4) copies per cell, and self-processing proceeded to an extent of >75% within cells. Cellular RNA processing was blocked by mutations within the ribozyme (G8A, G21U) or substrate (DeltaA-1) that, in vitro , eliminate cleavage without affecting substrate binding. In addition to self-processing activity, trans -cleavage reactions were supported by the ribozyme-containing product of the self-processing reaction, and by the ribozyme linked to the non-cleavable substrate analog. Ribozyme activity was present in extracts of cells expressing constructs with active ribozyme domains. These results provide direct biochemical evidence for the catalytic activity of the hairpin ribozyme in a cellular environment, and indicate that self-processing ribozyme transcripts may be well suited for cellular RNA-inactivation experiments. PMID:9671810

  10. Properties and structure of peat humic acids depending on humification and precursor biota in bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-04-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic component of soil, peat and natural waters, but their structure and properties very much differs depending on their source. The aim of this study is to characterize humic acids from raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the homogeneity of humic acids isolated from the bog bodies and study peat humification impact on properties of humic acids. A major impact on the structure of peat humic acids have raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin) void of lignin. For characterization of peat humic acids their elemental (CHNOS), functional (-COOH, phenolic OH) analysis, spectroscopic characterization (UV, fluorescence, FTIR, 1H NMR, CP/MAS 13C NMR, ESR) and degradation studies (Py-GC/MS) were done. Peat humic acids (HA) have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, but thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge. Comparatively, the studied peat HAs are at the start of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups changes depending on the depth of peat from which HAs have been isolated: and carboxylic acidity is increasing with depth of peat location and the humification degree. The ability to influence the surface tension of peat humic acids isolated from a well-characterized bog profile demonstrates dependence on age and humification degree. With increase of the humification degree and age of humic acids, their molecular complexity and ability to influence surface tension decreases; even so, the impact of the biological precursor (peat-forming bryophytes and plants) can be identified.

  11. Nucleic Acid i-Motif Structures in Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alba, Joan Josep; Sadurní, Anna; Gargallo, Raimundo

    2016-09-01

    Under the appropriate experimental conditions of pH and temperature, cytosine-rich segments in DNA or RNA sequences may produce a characteristic folded structure known as an i-motif. Besides its potential role in vivo, which is still under investigation, this structure has attracted increasing interest in other fields due to its sharp, fast and reversible pH-driven conformational changes. This "on/off" switch at molecular level is being used in nanotechnology and analytical chemistry to develop nanomachines and sensors, respectively. This paper presents a review of the latest applications of this structure in the field of chemical analysis. PMID:26939549

  12. Site specific incorporation of heavy atom-containing unnatural amino acids into proteins for structure determination

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Jianming; Wang, Lei; Wu, Ning; Schultz, Peter G.

    2008-07-15

    Translation systems and other compositions including orthogonal aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases that preferentially charge an orthogonal tRNA with an iodinated or brominated amino acid are provided. Nucleic acids encoding such synthetases are also described, as are methods and kits for producing proteins including heavy atom-containing amino acids, e.g., brominated or iodinated amino acids. Methods of determining the structure of a protein, e.g., a protein into which a heavy atom has been site-specifically incorporated through use of an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase pair, are also described.

  13. Optical Absorption, Stability and Structure of NpO2+ Complexeswith Dicarboxylic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Tian; Linfeng Rao

    2006-01-04

    Complexation of NpO2+ with oxalic acid (OX),2,2'-oxydiacetic acid (ODA), 2,2'-iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and 2,2'-thiodiacetic acid (TDA), has been studied using spectrophotometry in1 M NaClO4. Both the position and the intensity of the absorption band of NpO2+ at 980 nm are affected by the formation of NpO2+/dicarboxylate complexes, providing useful information on the complexation strength, the coordination mode and the structure of the complexes.

  14. Crystal and molecular structures of twelve salts from isopropylamine and different organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xianhong; Zhang, Huan; Xu, Kai; Sun, JiaHui; Ye, Jiaying; Jin, Shouwen; Wang, Daqi

    2015-08-01

    Twelve isopropylamine derived supramolecular complexes isopropylamine: (m-toluic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (mtua-), mtua- = m-toluate] (1), isopropylamine: (p-toluic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (ptua-), ptua- = p-toluate] (2), isopropylamine: (p-methoxybenzoic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (pmba-), pmba- = p-methoxybenzoate] (3), (isopropylamine): (3,4-methylenedioxybenzoic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (mba)-, mba = 3,4-methylenedioxybenzoate] (4), (isopropylamine): (2-methyl-2-phenoxypropanoic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (mpa-), mpa- = 2-methyl-2-phenoxypropionate] (5), (isopropylamine): (4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (cpa-), cpa- = 4-chlorophenoxyacetate] (6), (isopropylamine): (3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (dnba-), dnba- = 3,5-dinitrobenzoate] (7), (isopropylamine): (2-furoic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (fura-), fura- = 2-furoate] (8), (isopropylamine): (1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (hna), hna = 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate] (9), (isopropylamine): (4-nitrophthalic acid) [(Hipa)2+ ṡ (npa2-), npa2- = 4-nitrophthalate] (10), (isopropylamine)2: (2,5-bis-isopropylcarbamoyl-terephthalic acid): 2H2O [(Hipa)2+ ṡ (bta2-) ṡ 2H2O, bta2- = 2,5-bis-isopropylcarbamoyl-terephthalate] (11), and (isopropylamine)2: (1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid) [(Hipa)2+ ṡ (nds2-), nds2- = 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonate] (12) were synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. All supramolecular architectures of 1-12 involve extensive classical hydrogen bonds as well as other non-covalent interactions. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the Nsbnd H⋯O, Osbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯S hydrogen bonds between the acidic components and isopropylamine are sufficient to bring about the formation of binary organic salts. The role of weak and strong non-covalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These weak interactions combined, the complexes 1-12 displayed 1D-3D framework structure.

  15. Structure-property relationships in halogenbenzoic acids: Thermodynamics of sublimation, fusion, vaporization and solubility.

    PubMed

    Zherikova, Kseniya V; Svetlov, Aleksey A; Kuratieva, Natalia V; Verevkin, Sergey P

    2016-10-01

    Temperature dependences of vapor pressures for 2-, 3-, and 4-bromobenzoic acid, as well as for five isomeric bromo-methylbenzoic acids were studied by the transpiration method. Melting temperatures and enthalpies of fusion for all isomeric bromo-methylbenzoic acids and 4-bromobenzoic acid were measured with a DSC. The molar enthalpies of sublimation and vaporization were derived. These data together with results available in the literature were collected and checked for internal consistency using a group-additivity procedure and results from X-ray structural diffraction studies. Specific (hydrogen bonding) interactions in the liquid and in the crystal phase of halogenbenzoic acids were quantified based on experimental values of vaporization and sublimation enthalpies. Structure-property correlations of solubilities of halogenobenzoic acids with sublimation pressures and sublimation enthalpies were developed and solubilities of bromo-benzoic acids were estimated. These new results resolve much of the ambiguity in the available thermochemical and solubility data on bromobenzoic acids. The approach based on structure property correlations can be applied for the assessment of water solubility of sparingly soluble drugs. PMID:27424058

  16. Morphology and Composition of Structured, Phase-Separated Behenic Acid-Perfluorotetradecanoic Acid Monolayer Films.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Jeveria; Araghi, Hessamaddin Younesi; He, Anqiang; Paige, Matthew F

    2016-05-31

    The phase separation of immiscible surfactants in mixed monolayer films provides an approach to physically manipulate important properties of thin films, including surface morphology, microscale composition, and mechanical properties. In this work, we predict, based upon existing miscibility studies and their thermodynamic underpinnings described in the literature, the miscibility and film morphology of mixed monolayers comprised of behenic acid (C21H43COOH) and perfluorotetradecanoic acid (C13F27COOH) in various molar ratios. Predictions are tested using a combination of experimental surface characterization methods for probing miscibility and film morphology at the solid/air and air/water interfaces. Film components were immiscible and phase-separated into chemically well-defined domains under a variety of experimental conditions, with monolayer morphology consistent with initial predictions. The extensibility of these basic predictions to other systems is discussed in the context of using these works for different perfluorinated surfactant molecules. PMID:27163482

  17. Cleavage crystallography of liquid metal embrittled aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Stoner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The crystallography of liquid metal-induced transgranular cleavage in six aluminum alloys having a variety of microstructures has been determined via Laue X-ray back reflection. The cleavage crystallography was independent of alloy microstructure, and the cleavage plane was 100-plane oriented in all cases. It was further determined that the cleavage crystallography was not influenced by alloy texture. Examination of the fracture surface indicated that there was not a unique direction of crack propagation. In addition, the existence of 100-plane cleavage on alloy 2024 fracture surfaces was inferred by comparison of secondary cleavage crack intersection geometry on the 2024 surfaces with the geometry of secondary cleavage crack intersections on the test alloys.

  18. Specific domain structures control abscisic acid-, salicylic acid-, and stress-mediated SIZ1 phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Mi Sun; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Hong, Mi Ju; Lee, Jiyoung; Choi, Wonkyun; Jin, Jing Bo; Bohnert, Hans J; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bressan, Ray A; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2009-12-01

    SIZ1 (for yeast SAP and MIZ1) encodes the sole ortholog of mammalian PIAS (for protein inhibitor of activated STAT) and yeast SIZ SUMO (for small ubiquitin-related modifier) E3 ligases in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Four conserved motifs in SIZ1 include SAP (for scaffold attachment factor A/B/acinus/PIAS domain), PINIT (for proline-isoleucine-asparagine-isoleucine-threonine), SP-RING (for SIZ/PIAS-RING), and SXS (for serine-X-serine, where X is any amino acid) motifs. SIZ1 contains, in addition, a PHD (for plant homeodomain) typical of plant PIAS proteins. We determined phenotypes of siz1-2 knockout mutants transformed with SIZ1 alleles carrying point mutations in the predicted domains. Domain SP-RING is required for SUMO conjugation activity and nuclear localization of SIZ1. Salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and SA-dependent phenotypes of siz1-2, such as diminished plant size, heightened innate immunity, and abscisic acid inhibition of cotyledon greening, as well as SA-independent basal thermotolerance were not complemented by the altered SP-RING allele of SIZ1. The SXS domain also controlled SA accumulation and was involved in greening and expansion of cotyledons of seedlings germinated in the presence of abscisic acid. Mutations of the PHD zinc finger domain and the PINIT motif affected in vivo SUMOylation. Expression of the PHD and/or PINIT domain mutant alleles of SIZ1 in siz1-2 promoted hypocotyl elongation in response to sugar and light. The various domains of SIZ1 make unique contributions to the plant's ability to cope with its environment. PMID:19837819

  19. Structural and electronic features of a Broensted acid site in H-ZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, S.J.; Chakraborty, A.K.; Bell, A.T.; Theodorou, D.N. Univ. of California, Berkeley )

    1993-06-24

    The authors report the results of local density functional theory calculations on a Broensted acid site of the zeolite H-ZSM-5. They have investigated the structural and electronic properties of the site. Comparison is made between their results and existing experimental data. It is shown that structural relaxation around an acid site must be performed to obtain accurate energetics for substitution of aluminum into the zeolite framework. The effects of cluster termination are studied by comparing results obtained for both isolated clusters and clusters embedded in a Madelung field generated by the zeolite framework. The properties of the electron density distribution in the region around an acidic proton indicate that the acidic moiety may be characterized as a rather soft acid. 47 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Effect of the structure of gallic acid and its derivatives on their interaction with plant ferritin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qunqun; Zhou, Kai; Ning, Yong; Zhao, Guanghua

    2016-12-15

    Gallic acid and its derivatives co-exist with protein components in foodstuffs, but there is few report on their interaction with proteins. On the other hand, plant ferritin represents not only a novel class of iron supplement, but also a new nanocarrier for encapsulation of bioactive nutrients. However, plant ferritin is easy to be degraded by pepsin in the stomach, thereby limiting its application. Herein, we investigated the interaction of gallic acid and its derivatives with recombinant soybean seed H-2 ferritin (rH-2). We found that these phenolic acids interacted with rH-2 in a structure-dependent manner; namely, gallic acid (GA), methyl gallate (MEGA) and propyl gallate (PG) having three HO groups can bind to rH-2, while their analogues with two HO groups cannot. Consequently, such binding largely inhibited ferritin degradation by pepsin. These findings advance our understanding of the relationship between the structure and function of phenolic acids. PMID:27451180

  1. A comprehensive classification of nucleic acid structural families based on strand direction and base pairing.

    PubMed Central

    Lavery, R; Zakrzewska, K; Sun, J S; Harvey, S C

    1992-01-01

    We propose a classification of DNA structures formed from 1 to 4 strands, based only on relative strand directions, base to strand orientation and base pairing geometries. This classification and its associated notation enable all nucleic acids to be grouped into structural families and bring to light possible structures which have not yet been observed experimentally. It also helps in understanding transitions between families and can assist in the design of multistrand structures. PMID:1383936

  2. Photosensitized cleavage of dynein heavy chains. Cleavage at the V1 site by irradiation at 365 nm in the presence of ATP and vanadate

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, I.R.; Lee-Eiford, A.; Mocz, G.; Phillipson, C.A.; Tang, W.J.; Gibbons, B.H.

    1987-02-25

    Irradiation of soluble dynein 1 from sea urchin sperm flagella at 365 nm in the presence of MgATP and 0.05-50 microM vanadate (Vi) cleaves the alpha and beta heavy chains (Mr 428,000) at their V1 sites to give peptides of Mr 228,000 and 200,000, without the nonspecific side effects produced by irradiation at 254 nm as described earlier. The decrease in intact heavy chain material is biphasic; in 10 microM Vi, approximately 80% occurs with a half-time of 7 min and the remainder with a half-time of about 90 min, and the yield of cleavage peptides is better than 90%. Loss of dynein ATPase activity appears to be a direct result of the cleavage process and is not significantly affected by the presence of up to 0.1 M cysteamine (CA, 60-23-1) or 2-aminoethyl carbamimidothioic acid dihydrobromide (CA, 56-10-0) as free radical trapping agents. The concentration of Vi required for 50% maximal initial cleavage rate is 4.5 microM, while that for 50% ATPase inhibition is 0.8 microM, both in a 0.6 M NaCl medium. In the presence of 20 microM Vi, CTP and UTP support cleavage at about half the rate of ATP, whereas GTP and ITP support cleavage only if the Vi concentration is raised to about 200 microM. Substitution of any of the transition metal cations Cr2+, Mn2+, Fe2+, or Co2+ for the usual Mg2+ suppresses the photocleavage, presumably by quenching the excited chromophore prior to scission of the heavy chain. The photocleaved dynein 1 binds to dynein-depleted flagella similarly to intact dynein 1, but upon reactivation of the flagella with 1 mM ATP their motility is partially inhibited, rather than being augmented as with intact dynein.

  3. Probing Protein Structure by Amino Acid-Specific Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Vanessa Leah; Vachet, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, amino acid-specific covalent labeling has been a valuable tool to study protein structure and protein interactions, especially for systems that are difficult to study by other means. These covalent labeling methods typically map protein structure and interactions by measuring the differential reactivity of amino acid side chains. The reactivity of amino acids in proteins generally depends on the accessibility of the side chain to the reagent, the inherent reactivity of the label and the reactivity of the amino acid side chain. Peptide mass mapping with ESI- or MALDI-MS and peptide sequencing with tandem MS are typically employed to identify modification sites to provide site-specific structural information. In this review, we describe the reagents that are most commonly used in these residue-specific modification reactions, details about the proper use of these covalent labeling reagents, and information about the specific biochemical problems that have been addressed with covalent labeling strategies. PMID:19016300

  4. [Structural nucleic acid nanotechnology: liquid-crystalline approach].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The properties of the particles of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions formed by double-stranded DNA molecules obtained as a result of phase exclusion of these molecules from water-salt polymer-containing solutions are briefly described. Physicochemical properties of quasinematic layers of dispersion particles and double-stranded DNA molecules in their content are taken into account in the course of developing fundamental background of the liquid-crystalline approach to the DNA structural nanotechnology. According to different versions of this approach, which is based on intraparticle gelation of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions, spatial structures (DNA nanoconstructions, "rigid" DNA particles) with unique properties, are created. By means of atomic force microscopy images of "rigid" DNA particles of different type are registered. Specific properties of metallic nanoparticles (in particular, gold nanoparticles) are considered while developing the other approach to DNA structural nanotechnology, which provides the basis for "metallized" DNA nanoconstructions. PMID:25508888

  5. [Structural nucleic acid nanotechnology: liquid-crystalline approach].

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, Iu M; Salianov, V I; Kats, E I; Skuridin, S G

    2013-01-01

    The properties of the particles of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions formed by double-stranded DNA molecules obtained as a result of phase exclusion of these molecules from water-salt polymer-containing solutions are briefly described. Physicochemical properties of quasinematic layers of dispersion particles and double-stranded DNA molecules in their content are taken into account in the course of developing fundamental background of the liquid-crystalline approach to the DNA structural nanotechnology. According to different versions of this approach, which is based on intraparticle gelation of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions, spatial structures (DNA nanoconstructions, "rigid" DNA particles) with unique properties, are created. By means of atomic force microscopy images of "rigid" DNA particles of different type are registered. Specific properties of metallic nanoparticles (in particular, gold nanoparticles) are considered while developing the other approach to DNA structural nanotechnology, which provides the basis for "metallized" DNA nanoconstructions. PMID:25486757

  6. Efficiency of Fatty Acids as Chemical Penetration Enhancers: Mechanisms and Structure Enhancement Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Sarah A.; Li, S. Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The present study evaluated the effects of fatty acids commonly present in cosmetic and topical formulations on permeation enhancement across human epidermal membrane (HEM) lipoidal pathway when the fatty acids saturated the SC lipid domain without cosolvents (Emax). Methods HEM was treated with neat fatty acids or fatty acid suspensions to determine Emax. A volatile solvent system was used to deposit fatty acids on HEM surface to compare fatty acid enhancer efficiency in topical volatile formulations with Emax. To elucidate permeation enhancement mechanism(s), estradiol (E2β) uptake into fatty acid-treated SC lipid domain was determined. Results Emax of fatty acids was shown to increase with their octanol solubilities and decrease with their lipophilicities, similar to our previous findings with other enhancers. Emax of solid fatty acids was shown to depend on their melting points, an important parameter to the effectiveness of the enhancers. The E2β uptake results suggest that enhancer-induced permeation enhancement across HEM is related to enhanced permeant partitioning into the SC lipid domain. Conclusions The results suggest Emax as a model for studying the permeation enhancement effect of the fatty acids and their structure enhancement relationship. PMID:19911256

  7. 3-D structural modeling of humic acids through experimental characterization, computer assisted structure elucidation and atomistic simulations 1. Chelsea soil humic acid.

    SciTech Connect

    Gassman, Paul; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Simpson, Andre; Goddard, William A., III; Diallo, Mamadou S.; Johnson, James H. Jr.

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes an integrated experimental and computational framework for developing 3-D structural models for humic acids (HAs). This approach combines experimental characterization, computer assisted structure elucidation (CASE), and atomistic simulations to generate all 3-D structural models or a representative sample of these models consistent with the analytical data and bulk thermodynamic/structural properties of HAs. To illustrate this methodology, structural data derived from elemental analysis, diffuse reflectance FT-IR spectroscopy, 1-D/2-D {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C solution NMR spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI QqTOF MS) are employed as input to the CASE program SIGNATURE to generate all 3-D structural models for Chelsea soil humic acid (HA). These models are subsequently used as starting 3-D structures to carry out constant temperature-constant pressure molecular dynamics simulations to estimate their bulk densities and Hildebrand solubility parameters. Surprisingly, only a few model isomers are found to exhibit molecular compositions and bulk thermodynamic properties consistent with the experimental data. The simulated {sup 13}C NMR spectrum of an equimolar mixture of these model isomers compares favorably with the measured spectrum of Chelsea soil HA.

  8. Crystal structure of 7,8-benzocoumarin-4-acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, R. Ranga; Gowda, Ramakrishna; Gowda, K. V. Arjuna; Basanagouda, Mahantesha

    2015-01-01

    The fused-ring system in the title compound [systematic name: 2-(2-oxo-2H-benzo[h]chromen-4-yl)acetic acid], C15H10O4, is almost planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.031 Å) and the Car—C—C=O (ar = aromatic) torsion angle for the side chain is −134.4 (3)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, generating [100] C(8) chains, where the acceptor atom is the exocyclic O atom of the fused-ring system. The packing is consolidated by a very weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bond to the same acceptor atom. Together, these inter­actions lead to undulating (001) layers in the crystal. PMID:26396827

  9. Do enantiomers of benzenesulfonic acid exist? Electron diffraction and quantum chemical study of molecular structure of benzenesulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giricheva, Nina I.; Girichev, Georgiy V.; Medvedeva, Yulia S.; Ivanov, Sergey N.; Petrov, Vyacheslav M.; Fedorov, Mikhail S.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular structure of benzenesulfonic acid was studied by gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical (B3LYP/cc-pVTZ, МР2/cc-pVDZ, МР2/cc-pVTZ) methods. On the base of mass spectrometric analysis it was found that saturated vapor at Т = 396(9) K is represented by only molecular species, monomeric benzenesulfonic acid. Theoretical calculations showed that the molecule has two mirror conformers of C1 symmetry which can invert to each other via transition state of Cs symmetry by rotation of OH-group around Ssbnd O(H) bond. Both computational methods, B3LYP and MP2, resulted in the same structure of enantiomers; the MP2/cc-pVDZ calculations denoted a over-barrier transition between enantiomers at the temperature of electron diffraction experiment, while B3LYP and MP2 calculations with cc-pVTZ basis set estimated the barrier height to be comparable with the thermal energy value. Two geometric models of C1 and Cs symmetry were examined in gas electron diffraction structural analysis. It was established that the structure of C1 symmetry (Rf = 3.3%) demonstrated the best fit with GED data in comparison with Cs structure (Rf = 3.8%). In conformer of C1 symmetry an ordinary bond Ssbnd O(Н) is located almost orthogonal to benzene ring plane, and an Osbnd H bond practically eclipses one of Sdbnd O bonds of SO3H fragment. The following internuclear distances (Å) in benzenesulfonic acid were determined: rh1(Csbnd H)av = 1.116(6), rh1(Csbnd C)ср = 1.402(4), rh1(Csbnd S) = 1.770(5), rh1(Sdbnd O)av = 1.438(4), rh1(Ssbnd O) = 1.623(4), rh1(Osbnd H) = 0.870(17). Calculations of internal rotation potential functions and NBO-analysis of electron density distribution in a conformer and transition states between enantiomers were performed to establish the reasons of stability of the found asymmetric structure of the studied molecule. The structure of free molecule of benzenesulfonic acid was compared with that of molecular form in crystal.

  10. Models of metal binding structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Leenheer, J.A.; Brown, G.K.; Cabaniss, S.E.; MacCarthy, P.

    1998-08-15

    Fulvic acid, isolated from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was assessed for its ability to bind Ca{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} ions at pH 6 before and after extensive fractionation that was designed to reveal the nature of metal binding functional groups. The binding constant for Ca{sup 2+} ion had the greatest increase of all the ions in a metal binding fraction that was selected for intensive characterization for the purpose of building quantitative average model structures. The metal binding fraction was characterized by quantitative {sup 13}C NMR, {sup 1}H NMR, and FT-IR spectrometry and elemental, titrimetric, and molecular weight determinations. The characterization data revealed that carboxyl groups were clustered in short-chain aliphatic dibasic acid structures. The Ca{sup 2+} binding data suggested that ether-substituted oxysuccinic acid structures are good models for the metal binding sites at pH 6. Structural models were derived based upon oxidation and photolytic rearrangements of cutin, lignin, and tannin precursors. These structural models rich in substituted dibasic acid structures revealed polydentate binding sites with the potential for both inner-sphere and outer-sphere type binding. The majority of the fulvic acid molecule was involved with metal binding rather than a small substructural unit.

  11. Competitive fragmentation pathways of acetic acid dimer explored by synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectrometry and electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Jiwen; Hu Yongjun; Zou Hao; Cao Lanlan; Liu Fuyi; Shan Xiaobin; Sheng Liusi

    2012-09-28

    In present study, photoionization and dissociation of acetic acid dimers have been studied with the synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry and theoretical calculations. Besides the intense signal corresponding to protonated cluster ions (CH{sub 3}COOH){sub n}{center_dot}H{sup +}, the feature related to the fragment ions (CH{sub 3}COOH)H{sup +}{center_dot}COO (105 amu) via {beta}-carbon-carbon bond cleavage is observed. By scanning photoionization efficiency spectra, appearance energies of the fragments (CH{sub 3}COOH){center_dot}H{sup +} and (CH{sub 3}COOH)H{sup +}{center_dot}COO are obtained. With the aid of theoretical calculations, seven fragmentation channels of acetic acid dimer cations were discussed, where five cation isomers of acetic acid dimer are involved. While four of them are found to generate the protonated species, only one of them can dissociate into a C-C bond cleavage product (CH{sub 3}COOH)H{sup +}{center_dot}COO. After surmounting the methyl hydrogen-transfer barrier 10.84 {+-} 0.05 eV, the opening of dissociative channel to produce ions (CH{sub 3}COOH){sup +} becomes the most competitive path. When photon energy increases to 12.4 eV, we also found dimer cations can be fragmented and generate new cations (CH{sub 3}COOH){center_dot}CH{sub 3}CO{sup +}. Kinetics, thermodynamics, and entropy factors for these competitive dissociation pathways are discussed. The present report provides a clear picture of the photoionization and dissociation processes of the acetic acid dimer in the range of the photon energy 9-15 eV.

  12. Structural changes of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) after fungal and phosphoric acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Isroi; Ishola, Mofoluwake M; Millati, Ria; Syamsiah, Siti; Cahyanto, Muhammad N; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2012-01-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) was pretreated using white-rot fungus Pleurotus floridanus, phosphoric acid or their combination, and the results were evaluated based on the biomass components, and its structural and morphological changes. The carbohydrate losses after fungal, phosphoric acid, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments were 7.89%, 35.65%, and 33.77%, respectively. The pretreatments changed the hydrogen bonds of cellulose and linkages between lignin and carbohydrate, which is associated with crystallinity of cellulose of OPEFB. Lateral Order Index (LOI) of OPEFB with no pretreatment, with fungal, phosphoric acid, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments were 2.77, 1.42, 0.67, and 0.60, respectively. Phosphoric acid pretreatment showed morphological changes of OPEFB, indicated by the damage of fibre structure into smaller particle size. The fungal-, phosphoric acid-, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments have improved the digestibility of OPEFB's cellulose by 4, 6.3, and 7.4 folds, respectively. PMID:23247371

  13. Structure of the photoactive yellow protein reconstituted with caffeic acid at 1.16 A resolution.

    PubMed

    van Aalten, Daan M F; Crielaard, Wim; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2002-04-01

    A structural study is described of the photoactive yellow protein (PYP) reconstituted with the chromophore derivative 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid. The crystal structure of PYP reconstituted with this chromophore at 1.16 A resolution is reported in space group P6(5). This is the first high-resolution structure of a photoreceptor containing a modified chromophore. The introduction of an extra hydroxyl group in the native chromophore (i.e. p-coumaric acid) appears to perturb the structure of the hybrid yellow protein only slightly. The chromophore is bound by the protein in two different conformations, separated by a rotation of 180 degrees of the catechol ring. In combination with available spectroscopic data, it is concluded that the caffeic acid chromophore binds to the protein in a strained conformation, which leads to a faster ejection from the chromophore-binding pocket upon pB formation. PMID:11914481

  14. Structure of bound water and refinement of acid metmyoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Raghaven, N.V.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1982-06-01

    The structure of myoglobin has been determined by x-ray diffraction for the acidmet, deoxy, and the oxy forms. Neutron diffraction work, done in this laboratory, has demonstrated that hydrogen and deuterium positions can be located. In addition to the localization of H and D, neutron diffraction provides a unique method for studying the water structure because of the strong scattering ability of D/sub 2/O. The scattering factor of deuterium is nearly twice as large as that of hydrogen, and it increases the visibility of water molecules in Fourier maps, so that in a neutron map a water molecule appears about three times as strong as in an equivalent electron-density map. (DT)

  15. Liquid structure of acetic acid-water and trifluoroacetic acid-water mixtures studied by large-angle X-ray scattering and NMR.

    PubMed

    Takamuku, Toshiyuki; Kyoshoin, Yasuhiro; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Kusano, Shoji; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2007-08-01

    The structures of acetic acid (AA), trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), and their aqueous mixtures over the entire range of acid mole fraction xA have been investigated by using large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and NMR techniques. The results from the LAXS experiments have shown that acetic acid molecules mainly form a chain structure via hydrogen bonding in the pure liquid. In acetic acid-water mixtures hydrogen bonds of acetic acid-water and water-water gradually increase with decreasing xA, while the chain structure of acetic acid molecules is moderately ruptured. Hydrogen bonds among water molecules are remarkably formed in acetic acid-water mixtures at xAstructure but cyclic dimers through hydrogen bonding in the pure liquid. In TFA-water mixtures O...O hydrogen bonds among water molecules gradually increase when xA decreases, and hydrogen bonds among water molecules are significantly formed in the mixtures at xAacid and TFA molecules for acetic acid-water and TFA-water mixtures have indicated strong relationships between a structural change of the mixtures and the acid mole fraction. On the basis of both LAXS and NMR results, the structural changes of acetic acid-water and TFA-water mixtures with decreasing acid mole fraction and the effects of fluorination of the methyl group on the structure are discussed at the molecular level. PMID:17628099

  16. An ab initio study of some structural features and the rotational barriers in performic acid, formic acid and hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Charles W.; George, Philip; Trachtman, Mendel

    1981-02-01

    Calculations on performic acid at the 4-31G level, with and without bond functions with complete geometry optimization, and at the (9, 5) level, with and without polarization functions and rigid rotation, all give no sign of a well in the potential energy curve for rotation about the O/O bond axis in the region of 50° - 90° ; and all but the unaugmented 4-31G basis set find the cis- cis planar conformer to be the most stable form. Calculations at the (9,5) level with rigid rotation find the energies of the other planar conformers, relative to the cis- cis conformer, to be 0.94, 1.50 and 14.80 kcal mol -1 for the trans- trans, cis- trans and trans- cis structures respectively. These energies and also that for the barrier separating the cis- cis and cis- trans conformers, 1-2 kcal mol -1, are discussed in relation to corresponding data for formic acid, hydrogen peroxide and several planar four heavy-atom molecules. Dipole moment calculations using the same basis sets would seem to favor a skew conformation as the most stable for performic acid, but comparisons between calculated and experimental values for formic acid and for hydrogen peroxide cast doubt on the validity of such results.

  17. Effect of Transition Metals on Polysialic Acid Structure and Functions.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Raghavendra Vasudeva; Bharate, Priya; Gade, Madhuri; Sangabathuni, Sivakoti; Kikkeri, Raghavendra

    2016-04-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA) is one of the most abundant glycopolymer present in embryonic brain, and it is known to be involved in key roles such as plasticity in the central nervous system, cell adhesion, migration and localization of neurotrophins. However, in adult brain, its expression is quite low. The exception to this is in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, where significantly increased levels of polysilylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) have been reported. Here, we confirm the role of PSA as a metal chelator, allowing it to decrease cytotoxicity caused by high levels of transition metals, commonly found in AD brain, and as a regulator of cell behavior. UV-visible (UV-vis) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) techniques were used to investigate the assembly of PSA-metals complexes. These PSA-metal complexes exhibited less toxicity compared to free metal ions, and in particular, the PSA-Cu(2+) complex synergistically promoted neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. PMID:26990355

  18. Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase: Structure, Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Muniyan, Sakthivel; Chaturvedi, Nagendra K.; Dwyer, Jennifer G.; LaGrange, Chad A.; Chaney, William G.; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2013-01-01

    Human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAcP) is a 100 kDa glycoprotein composed of two subunits. Recent advances demonstrate that cellular PAcP (cPAcP) functions as a protein tyrosine phosphatase by dephosphorylating ErbB-2/Neu/HER-2 at the phosphotyrosine residues in prostate cancer (PCa) cells, which results in reduced tumorigenicity. Further, the interaction of cPAcP and ErbB-2 regulates androgen sensitivity of PCa cells. Knockdown of cPAcP expression allows androgen-sensitive PCa cells to develop the castration-resistant phenotype, where cells proliferate under an androgen-reduced condition. Thus, cPAcP has a significant influence on PCa cell growth. Interestingly, promoter analysis suggests that PAcP expression can be regulated by NF-κB, via a novel binding sequence in an androgen-independent manner. Further understanding of PAcP function and regulation of expression will have a significant impact on understanding PCa progression and therapy. PMID:23698773

  19. Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal. Quarterly report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bausch, M.

    1991-12-31

    Removal of the organic sulfur in coal constitutes one of the major challenges facing fossil fuel scientists today. A cost--effective of desulfurizing Illinois coal is non-existent at the present time. Research in our group aims to develop a simple protocol for sulfur removal by gaining understanding of how various additives can enhance the rates of C-S bond cleavage in Illinois coal and coal model compounds, relative to fragmentation of the coal macromolecule via C-C, C-O, and C-N bond cleavage. During this funding period, we plan to carry out examinations of: (a) the effects of various reaction conditions on radical-initiated and Lewis acid-catalyzed C-S bond cleavages; (b) the effects of caustic impregnation and subsequent alcoholic reflux on C-S bond cleavage strategies; (c) the reactions of coal model compounds with electron-deficient substrates; (d) examinations of photooxidative C-S bond cleavage reactions; (e) the effects of moderate (300--400{degrees}C) temperatures and pressures as well as ultrasonic radiation on (a) - (c). Also planned are differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) examinations of selected C-S bond cleavage protocols, including those on Illinois coals that possess varying amounts of organic and inorganic sulfur.

  20. Structurally divergent lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferases with high selectivity for saturated medium chain fatty acids from Cuphea seeds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Jin; Silva, Jillian E; Iskandarov, Umidjon; Andersson, Mariette; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-12-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAT) catalyzes acylation of the sn-2 position on lysophosphatidic acid by an acyl CoA substrate to produce the phosphatidic acid precursor of polar glycerolipids and triacylglycerols (TAGs). In the case of TAGs, this reaction is typically catalyzed by an LPAT2 from microsomal LPAT class A that has high specificity for C18 fatty acids containing Δ9 unsaturation. Because of this specificity, the occurrence of saturated fatty acids in the TAG sn-2 position is infrequent in seed oils. To identify LPATs with variant substrate specificities, deep transcriptomic mining was performed on seeds of two Cuphea species producing TAGs that are highly enriched in saturated C8 and C10 fatty acids. From these analyses, cDNAs for seven previously unreported LPATs were identified, including cDNAs from Cuphea viscosissima (CvLPAT2) and Cuphea avigera var. pulcherrima (CpuLPAT2a) encoding microsomal, seed-specific class A LPAT2s and a cDNA from C. avigera var. pulcherrima (CpuLPATB) encoding a microsomal, seed-specific LPAT from the bacterial-type class B. The activities of these enzymes were characterized in Camelina sativa by seed-specific co-expression with cDNAs for various Cuphea FatB acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (FatB) that produce a variety of saturated medium-chain fatty acids. CvLPAT2 and CpuLPAT2a expression resulted in accumulation of 10:0 fatty acids in the Camelina sativa TAG sn-2 position, indicating a 10:0 CoA specificity that has not been previously described for plant LPATs. CpuLPATB expression generated TAGs with 14:0 at the sn-2 position, but not 10:0. Identification of these LPATs provides tools for understanding the structural basis of LPAT substrate specificity and for generating altered oil functionalities. PMID:26505880

  1. Processing of the yellow fever virus nonstructural polyprotein: a catalytically active NS3 proteinase domain and NS2B are required for cleavages at dibasic sites.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, T J; Grakoui, A; Rice, C M

    1991-01-01

    The vaccinia virus-T7 transient expression system was used to further examine the role of the NS3 proteinase in processing of the yellow fever (YF) virus nonstructural polyprotein in BHK cells. YF virus-specific polyproteins and cleavage products were identified by immunoprecipitation with region-specific antisera, by size, and by comparison with authentic YF virus polypeptides. A YF virus polyprotein initiating with a signal sequence derived from the E protein fused to the N terminus of NS2A and extending through the N-terminal 356 amino acids of NS5 exhibited processing at the 2A-2B, 2B-3, 3-4A, 4A-4B, and 4B-5 cleavage sites. Similar results were obtained with polyproteins whose N termini began within NS2A (position 110) or with NS2B. When the NS3 proteinase domain was inactivated by replacing the proposed catalytic Ser-138 with Ala, processing at all sites was abolished. The results suggest that an active NS3 proteinase domain is necessary for cleavage at the diabasic nonstructural cleavage sites and that cleavage at the proposed 4A-4B signalase site requires prior cleavage at the 4B-5 site. Cleavages were not observed with a polyprotein whose N terminus began with NS3, but cleavage at the 4B-5 site could be restored by supplying the the NS2B protein in trans. Several experimental results suggested that trans cleavage at the 4B-5 site requires association of NS2B and the NS3 proteinase domain. Coexpression of different proteinases and catalytically inactive polyprotein substrates revealed that trans cleavage at the 2B-3 and 4B-5 sites was relatively efficient when compared with trans cleavage at the 2A-2B and 3-4A sites. Images PMID:1833562

  2. Bilayer Structure and Lipid Dynamics in a Model Stratum Corneum with Oleic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopes, Matthew I.; Noro, Massimo G.; Longo, Marjorie L.; Faller, Roland

    2011-03-31

    The stratum corneum is the uppermost layer of the skin and acts as a barrier to keep out contaminants and retain moisture. Understanding the molecular structure and behavior of this layer will provide guidance for optimizing its biological function. In this study we use a model mixture comprised of equimolar portions of ceramide NS (24:0), lignoceric acid, and cholesterol to model the effect of the addition of small amounts of oleic acid to the bilayer at 300 and 340 K. Five systems at each temperature have been simulated with concentrations between 0 and 0.1 mol % oleic acid. Our major finding is that subdiffusive behavior over the 200 ns time scale is evident in systems at 340 K, with cholesterol diffusion being enhanced with increased oleic acid. Importantly, cholesterol and other species diffuse faster when radial densities indicate nearest neighbors include more cholesterol. We also find that, with the addition of oleic acid, the bilayer midplane and interfacial densities are reduced and there is a 3% decrease in total thickness occurring mostly near the hydrophilic interface at 300 K with reduced overall density at 340 K. Increased interdigitation occurs independent of oleic acid with a temperature increase. Slight ordering of the long non-hydroxy fatty acid of the ceramide occurs near the hydrophilic interface as a function of the oleic acid concentration, but no significant impact on hydrogen bonding is seen in the chosen oleic acid concentrations.

  3. Structural analysis of Bacillus pumilus phenolic acid decarboxylase, a lipocalin-fold enzyme.

    PubMed

    Matte, Allan; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Abokitse, Kofi; Lau, Peter C K

    2010-11-01

    The decarboxylation of phenolic acids, including ferulic and p-coumaric acids, to their corresponding vinyl derivatives is of importance in the flavouring and polymer industries. Here, the crystal structure of phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) from Bacillus pumilus strain UI-670 is reported. The enzyme is a 161-residue polypeptide that forms dimers both in the crystal and in solution. The structure of PAD as determined by X-ray crystallography revealed a β-barrel structure and two α-helices, with a cleft formed at one edge of the barrel. The PAD structure resembles those of the lipocalin-fold proteins, which often bind hydrophobic ligands. Superposition of structurally related proteins bound to their cognate ligands shows that they and PAD bind their ligands in a conserved location within the β-barrel. Analysis of the residue-conservation pattern for PAD-related sequences mapped onto the PAD structure reveals that the conservation mainly includes residues found within the hydrophobic core of the protein, defining a common lipocalin-like fold for this enzyme family. A narrow cleft containing several conserved amino acids was observed as a structural feature and a potential ligand-binding site. PMID:21045284

  4. Structural analysis of Bacillus pumilus phenolic acid decarboxylase, a lipocalin-fold enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Matte, Allan; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Abokitse, Kofi; Lau, Peter C.K.

    2012-04-30

    The decarboxylation of phenolic acids, including ferulic and p-coumaric acids, to their corresponding vinyl derivatives is of importance in the flavoring and polymer industries. Here, the crystal structure of phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) from Bacillus pumilus strain UI-670 is reported. The enzyme is a 161-residue polypeptide that forms dimers both in the crystal and in solution. The structure of PAD as determined by X-ray crystallography revealed a -barrel structure and two -helices, with a cleft formed at one edge of the barrel. The PAD structure resembles those of the lipocalin-fold proteins, which often bind hydrophobic ligands. Superposition of structurally related proteins bound to their cognate ligands shows that they and PAD bind their ligands in a conserved location within the -barrel. Analysis of the residue-conservation pattern for PAD-related sequences mapped onto the PAD structure reveals that the conservation mainly includes residues found within the hydrophobic core of the protein, defining a common lipocalin-like fold for this enzyme family. A narrow cleft containing several conserved amino acids was observed as a structural feature and a potential ligand-binding site.

  5. Structural insight into the oxidation of sinapic acid by CotA laccase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tian; Liu, Zhongchuan; Liu, Qian; Wang, Ganggang

    2015-05-01

    Laccases can oxidize plenty of substrates by use of molecular oxygen as the final electron acceptor. The broad substrate spectrum is further expanded by using redox mediators in so-called laccase-mediator systems, but the structural studies on interactions between laccases and natural mediators are still absent. In this study, the crystal structure of CotA/sinapic acid complex is solved, structural comparison has revealed a novel substrate binding mode. The residue of His419 instead of His497 is bonding to the sinapic acid (SA) as the primary electron acceptor. Moreover, the binding of SA leads to 10° rotation on Arg416, our mutagenesis data exhibits that the residue Arg416 is crucial in the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) and syringaldazine (SGZ). Furthermore, oxidation of several phenolic acids and one non-phenolic acid by CotA was investigated. By analyzing interactions between CotA and SA, it is indicated that the presence of methoxy groups in the ortho-position of the phenolic structure is crucial for the substrate recognition by CotA laccase. This work establishes structure-function relationships for laccase-natural mediator system. PMID:25799944

  6. Beyond terrestrial biology: charting the chemical universe of α-amino acid structures.

    PubMed

    Meringer, Markus; Cleaves, H James; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-11-25

    α-Amino acids are fundamental to biochemistry as the monomeric building blocks with which cells construct proteins according to genetic instructions. However, the 20 amino acids of the standard genetic code represent a tiny fraction of the number of α-amino acid chemical structures that could plausibly play such a role, both from the perspective of natural processes by which life emerged and evolved, and from the perspective of human-engineered genetically coded proteins. Until now, efforts to describe the structures comprising this broader set, or even estimate their number, have been hampered by the complex combinatorial properties of organic molecules. Here, we use computer software based on graph theory and constructive combinatorics in order to conduct an efficient and exhaustive search of the chemical structures implied by two careful and precise definitions of the α-amino acids relevant to coded biological proteins. Our results include two virtual libraries of α-amino acid structures corresponding to these different approaches, comprising 121 044 and 3 846 structures, respectively, and suggest a simple approach to exploring much larger, as yet uncomputed, libraries of interest. PMID:24152173

  7. Crystal structure of beta-cyclodextrin-benzoic acid inclusion complex.

    PubMed

    Aree, Thammarat; Chaichit, Narongsak

    2003-02-14

    The inclusion complex of beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) with benzoic acid (BA) has been characterized crystallographically. Two beta-CDs cocrystallize with two BAs, 0.7 ethanol and 20.65 water molecules [2(C(6)H(10)O(5))(7).2(C(7)H(6)O(2)).0.7(C(2)H(6)O).20.65H(2)O] in the triclinic space group P1 with unit cell constants: a=15.210(1), b=15.678(1), c=15.687(1) A, alpha=89.13(1), beta=74.64(1), gamma=76.40(1) degrees. The anisotropic refinement of 1840 atomic parameters against 16,201 X-ray diffraction data converged at R=0.078. In the crystal lattice, beta-CD forms dimers stabilized by direct O-2(m)_1/O-3(m)_1...O-2(n)_2/O-3(n)_2 hydrogen bonds (intradimer) and by indirect O-6(m)_1...,O-6(n)_2 hydrogen bonds with one or two bridging water molecules joined in between (interdimer). These dimers are stacked like coins in a roll constructing endless channels where the guest molecules are included. The BA molecules protrude with their COOH groups at the beta-CD O-6-sides and are maintained in positions by hydrogen bonding to the surrounding O-6-H groups and water molecules. Water molecules (20.65) are distributed over 30 positions in the interstices between beta-CD molecules, except the water sites W-1, W-2 that are located in the channel of the beta-CD dimer. Water site W-2 is hydrogen bonded to the disordered ethanol molecule (occupancy 0.7). PMID:12559746

  8. Species specific amino acid sequence-protein local structure relationships: An analysis in the light of a structural alphabet.

    PubMed

    de Brevern, Alexandre G; Joseph, Agnel Praveen

    2011-05-01

    Protein structure analysis and prediction methods are based on non-redundant data extracted from the available protein structures, regardless of the species from which the protein originates. Hence, these datasets represent the global knowledge on protein folds, which constitutes a generic distribution of amino acid sequence-protein structure (AAS-PS) relationships. In this study, we try to elucidate whether the AAS-PS relationship could possess specificities depending on the specie. For this purpose, we have chosen three different species: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Plasmodium falciparum and Arabidopsis thaliana. We analyzed the AAS-PS behaviors of the proteins from these three species and compared it to the "expected" distribution of a classical non-redundant databank. With the classical secondary structure description, only slight differences in amino acid preferences could be observed. With a more precise description of local protein structures (Protein Blocks), significant changes could be highlighted. S. cerevisiae's AAS-PS relationship is close to the general distribution, while striking differences are observed in the case of A. thaliana. P. falciparum is the most distant one. This study presents some interesting view-points on AAS-PS relationship. Certain species exhibit unique preferences for amino acids to be associated with protein local structural elements. Thus, AAS-PS relationships are species dependent. These results can give useful insights for improving prediction methodologies which take the species specific information into account. PMID:21333657

  9. Structure of an Amino Acid-Decorated Exopolysaccharide Secreted by a Vibrio alginolyticus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Drouillard, Sophie; Jeacomine, Isabelle; Buon, Laurine; Boisset, Claire; Courtois, Anthony; Thollas, Bertrand; Morvan, Pierre-Yves; Vallée, Romuald; Helbert, William

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus (CNCM I-4994) secretes an exopolysaccharide that can be used as an ingredient in cosmetic applications. The structure was resolved using chromatography and one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments. The results show that the carbohydrate backbone is made of two residues: d-galacturonic acid and N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNac), which together constitute a tetrasaccharide repetition unit: [→3)-α-d-GalA-(1→4)-α-d-GalA-(1→3)-α-d-GalA-(1→3)-β-GlcNAc(1→]. Two amino acids, alanine and serine, are linked to GalA residues via amido linkages. The position and the distribution of the amino acids were characterized by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a structure for a marine exopolysaccharide decorated with an amino acid. PMID:26528992

  10. Structural, thermal and quantum chemical studies of p-coumaric and caffeic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Pruthi, Vikas; Goel, Nidhi

    2015-04-01

    Two hydroxycinnamic acids viz., p-coumaric, and caffeic acids have been extracted and purified from Parthenium hysterophorus, subsequently characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, NMR, single crystal X-ray crystallography. The optimized structures of these acids were calculated in terms of density functional theory by Gaussian 09. The validation of experimental and theoretically obtained data for structural parameters such as bond lengths and bond angles has have been carried out to analyze the statistical significance by curve fitting analysis and the values of correlation coefficient found to be 0.985, 0.992, and 0.984, 0.975 in p-coumaric, and caffeic acids, respectively. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show the eventual charge transfer interaction within the molecule. Thermal studies were also carried out by thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermogravimetric analysis (DTA), and derivative thermogravimetry (DTG).

  11. Steroidal aromatic 'naphthenic acids' in oil sands process-affected water: structural comparisons with environmental estrogens.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Steven J; West, Charles E; Jones, David; Scarlett, Alan G; Frank, Richard A; Hewitt, L Mark

    2011-11-15

    The large volumes, acute toxicity, estrogenicity, and antiandrogenicity of process-affected waters accruing in tailings ponds from the operations of the Alberta oil sands industries pose a significant task for environmental reclamation. Synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) suggest that oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) may contain aromatic carboxylic acids, which are among the potentially environmentally important toxicants, but no such acids have yet been identified, limiting interpretations of the results of estrogenicity and other assays. Here we show that multidimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) of methyl esters of acids in an OSPW sample produces mass spectra consistent with their assignment as C(19) and C(20) C-ring monoaromatic hydroxy steroid acids, D-ring opened hydroxy and nonhydroxy polyhydrophenanthroic acids with one aromatic and two alicyclic rings and A-ring opened steroidal keto acids. High resolution MS data support the assignment of several of the so-called 'O3' species. When fractions of distilled, esterified, OSPW acid-extractable organics were examined, the putative aromatics were mainly present in a high boiling fraction; when examined by argentation thin layer chromatography, some were present in a fraction with a retardation factor between that of the methyl esters of synthetic monoalicyclic and monoaromatic acids. Ultraviolet absorption spectra of these fractions indicated the presence of benzenoid moieties. SFS of model octahydro- and tetrahydrophenanthroic acids produced emissions at the characteristic excitation wavelengths observed in some OSPW extracts, consistent with the postulations from ultraviolet spectroscopy and mass spectrometry data. We suggest the acids originate from extensive biodegradation of C-ring monoaromatic steroid hydrocarbons and offer a means of differentiating residues at different biodegradation stages in tailings ponds. Structural similarities with estrone and

  12. The primary structure of fatty-acid-binding protein from nurse shark liver. Structural and evolutionary relationship to the mammalian fatty-acid-binding protein family.

    PubMed

    Medzihradszky, K F; Gibson, B W; Kaur, S; Yu, Z H; Medzihradszky, D; Burlingame, A L; Bass, N M

    1992-02-01

    The primary structure of a fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) isolated from the liver of the nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) was determined by high-performance tandem mass spectrometry (employing multichannel array detection) and Edman degradation. Shark liver FABP consists of 132 amino acids with an acetylated N-terminal valine. The chemical molecular mass of the intact protein determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (Mr = 15124 +/- 2.5) was in good agreement with that calculated from the amino acid sequence (Mr = 15121.3). The amino acid sequence of shark liver FABP displays significantly greater similarity to the FABP expressed in mammalian heart, peripheral nerve myelin and adipose tissue (61-53% sequence similarity) than to the FABP expressed in mammalian liver (22% similarity). Phylogenetic trees derived from the comparison of the shark liver FABP amino acid sequence with the members of the mammalian fatty-acid/retinoid-binding protein gene family indicate the initial divergence of an ancestral gene into two major subfamilies: one comprising the genes for mammalian liver FABP and gastrotropin, the other comprising the genes for mammalian cellular retinol-binding proteins I and II, cellular retinoic-acid-binding protein myelin P2 protein, adipocyte FABP, heart FABP and shark liver FABP, the latter having diverged from the ancestral gene that ultimately gave rise to the present day mammalian heart-FABP, adipocyte FABP and myelin P2 protein sequences. The sequence for intestinal FABP from the rat could be assigned to either subfamily, depending on the approach used for phylogenetic tree construction, but clearly diverged at a relatively early evolutionary time point. Indeed, sequences proximately ancestral or closely related to mammalian intestinal FABP, liver FABP, gastrotropin and the retinoid-binding group of proteins appear to have arisen prior to the divergence of shark liver FABP and should therefore also be present in elasmobranchs

  13. Metal ion cooperativity in ribozyme cleavage of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Brännvall, Mathias; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2001-01-01

    Combinations of chemical and genetic approaches were used to study the function of divalent metal ions in cleavage of RNA by the ribozyme RNase P RNA. We show that different divalent metal ions have differential effects on cleavage site recognition and rescue of cleavage activity by mixing divalent metal ions that do not promote cleavage by themselves. We conclude that efficient and correct cleavage is the result of cooperativity between divalent metal ions bound at different sites in the RNase P RNA-substrate complex. Complementation of a mutant RNase P RNA phenotype as a result of divalent metal ion replacement is demonstrated also. This finding together with other data indicate that one of the metal ions involved in this cooperativity is positioned near the cleavage site. The possibility that the Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio might regulate the activity of biocatalysts that depend on RNA for activity is discussed. PMID:11606743

  14. Effects of retroviral envelope-protein cleavage upon trafficking, incorporation, and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Swapna; Sanders, David Avram

    2010-09-15

    Retroviral envelope glycoproteins undergo proteolytic processing by cellular subtilisin-like proprotein convertases at a polybasic amino-acid site in order to produce the two functional subunits, SU and TM. Most previous studies have indicated that envelope-protein cleavage is required for rendering the protein competent for promoting membrane fusion and for virus infectivity. We have investigated the role of proteolytic processing of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope-protein through site-directed mutagenesis of the residues near the SU-TM cleavage site and have established that uncleaved glycoprotein is unable either to be incorporated into virus particles efficiently or to induce membrane fusion. Additionally, the results suggest that cleavage of the envelope protein plays an important role in intracellular trafficking of protein via the cellular secretory pathway. Based on our results it was concluded that a positively charged residue located at either P2 or P4 along with the arginine at P1 is essential for cleavage.

  15. Cleavage by signal peptide peptidase is required for the degradation of selected tail-anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boname, Jessica M.; Bloor, Stuart; Wandel, Michal P.; Nathan, James A.; Antrobus, Robin; Dingwell, Kevin S.; Thurston, Teresa L.; Smith, Duncan L.; Smith, James C.; Randow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The regulated turnover of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–resident membrane proteins requires their extraction from the membrane lipid bilayer and subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation. Cleavage within the transmembrane domain provides an attractive mechanism to facilitate protein dislocation but has never been shown for endogenous substrates. To determine whether intramembrane proteolysis, specifically cleavage by the intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl protease signal peptide peptidase (SPP), is involved in this pathway, we generated an SPP-specific somatic cell knockout. In a stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture–based proteomics screen, we identified HO-1 (heme oxygenase-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to biliverdin, as a novel SPP substrate. Intramembrane cleavage by catalytically active SPP provided the primary proteolytic step required for the extraction and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of HO-1, an ER-resident tail-anchored protein. SPP-mediated proteolysis was not limited to HO-1 but was required for the dislocation and degradation of additional tail-anchored ER-resident proteins. Our study identifies tail-anchored proteins as novel SPP substrates and a specific requirement for SPP-mediated intramembrane cleavage in protein turnover. PMID:24958774

  16. Hydrocarbon formation in the reductive cleavage of hydroperoxides by cytochrome P-450.

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, A D; Coon, M J

    1987-01-01

    Evidence is presented that cytochrome P-450 catalyzes the reductive cleavage of hydroperoxides. For example, in a reconstituted system containing rabbit liver microsomal P-450 form 2, NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase, and NADPH, cumyl hydroperoxide yields acetophenone and methane, but no cumyl alcohol is formed. The stoichiometry of the reaction and similar results with alpha-methylbenzyl, benzyl, and t-butyl hydroperoxides are in accord with the following general equation, in which X represents an alkyl group and R and R' are either alkyl groups or hydrogen atoms in the starting peroxide: XRR'C-OOH + NADPH + H+----XRCO + R'H + H2O + NADP+. Because 13-hydroperoxy-9,11-octadecadienoic acid yields pentane under these conditions, we propose that the known formation of alkanes and aldehydes in membrane lipid peroxidation involves reductive cleavage by P-450 to give the products predicted by the above equation. The cleavage reaction is thought to involve stepwise one-electron transfer, resulting in homolysis of the peroxide oxygen-oxygen bond and generation of an alkoxy radical, with beta-scission of the latter followed by reduction of the secondary radical to the hydrocarbon. In accordance with this scheme, when the cleavage reaction with cumyl hydroperoxide was done in 2H2O, deuteromethane was formed. PMID:3103131

  17. Developmentally regulated cleavage of tRNAs in the bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Haiser, Henry J.; Karginov, Fedor V.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Elliot, Marie A.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to sense and respond to environmental and physiological signals is critical for the survival of the soil-dwelling Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. Nutrient deprivation triggers the onset of a complex morphological differentiation process that involves the raising of aerial hyphae and formation of spore chains, and coincides with the production of a diverse array of clinically relevant antibiotics and other secondary metabolites. These processes are tightly regulated; however, the genes and signals involved have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report a novel tRNA cleavage event that follows the same temporal regulation as morphological and physiological differentiation, and is growth medium dependent. All tRNAs appear to be susceptible to cleavage; however, there appears to be a bias towards increased cleavage of those tRNAs that specify highly utilized codons. In contrast to what has been observed in eukaryotes, accumulation of tRNA halves in S. coelicolor is not significantly affected by amino acid starvation, and is also not affected by induction of the stringent response or inhibition of ribosome function. Mutants defective in aerial development and antibiotic production exhibit altered tRNA cleavage profiles relative to wild-type strains. PMID:18084030

  18. Intracellular Toll-like receptor recruitment and cleavage in endosomal/lysosomal organelles.

    PubMed

    Tohmé, Mira; Manoury, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    Microbial pathogens are recognized through multiple, distinct receptors such as intracellular Toll-like receptors (TLRs 3, 7, 8, 9, and 13) which reside in the endosomes and lysosomes. TLRs are sensitive to chloroquine, a lysomotropic agent that neutralizes acidic compartments indicating a role for endo/lysosomal proteases for their signaling. Indeed, upon stimulation, full-length TLR7 and 9 are cleaved into a C-terminal fragment and this processing is highly dependent on a cysteine protease named asparagine endopeptidase (AEP) in dendritic cells. A recruitment and a boost in AEP activity, which was induced shortly after TLR7 and 9 stimulation, are shown to promote TLR7 and 9 cleavage and correlate with an increased acidification in endosomes and lysosomes. Moreover, mutating a putative AEP cleavage site in TLR7 or 9 strongly decreases their signaling in DCs, suggesting perhaps a direct cleavage of TLR7 and 9 by AEP. These results demonstrate that TLR7 and 9 require a proteolytic cleavage for their signaling and identified a key endocytic protease playing a critical role in this process. PMID:24377922

  19. Degradation of 4-Chlorophenol via the meta Cleavage Pathway by Comamonas testosteroni JH5

    PubMed Central

    Hollender, J.; Hopp, J.; Dott, W.

    1997-01-01

    Comamonas testosteroni JH5 used 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) as its sole source of energy and carbon up to a concentration of 1.8 mM, accompanied by the stoichiometric release of chloride. The degradation of 4-CP mixed with the isomeric 2-CP by resting cells led to the accumulation of 3-chlorocatechol (3-CC), which inactivated the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase. As a result, further 4-CP breakdown was inhibited and 4-CC accumulated as a metabolite. In the crude extract of 4-CP-grown cells, catechol 1,2-dioxygenase and muconate cycloisomerase activities were not detected, whereas the activities of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde hydrolase, and 2-oxopent-4-enoate hydratase were detected. These enzymes of the meta cleavage pathway showed activity with 4-CC and with 5-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. The activities of the dioxygenase and semialdehyde dehydrogenase were constitutive. Two key metabolites of the meta cleavage pathway, the meta cleavage product (5-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde) and 5-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic acid, were detected. Thus, our previous postulation that C. testosteroni JH5 uses the meta cleavage pathway for the complete mineralization of 4-CP was confirmed. PMID:16535738

  20. ARTEMIS nuclease facilitates apoptotic chromatin cleavage.

    PubMed

    Britton, Sébastien; Frit, Philippe; Biard, Denis; Salles, Bernard; Calsou, Patrick

    2009-10-15

    One hallmark of apoptosis is DNA degradation that first appears as high molecular weight fragments followed by extensive internucleosomal fragmentation. During apoptosis, the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is activated. DNA-PK is involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and its catalytic subunit is associated with the nuclease ARTEMIS. Here, we report that, on initiation of apoptosis in human cells by agents causing DNA DSB or by staurosporine or other agents, ARTEMIS binds to apoptotic chromatin together with DNA-PK and other DSB repair proteins. ARTEMIS recruitment to chromatin showed a time and dose dependency. It required DNA-PK protein kinase activity and was blocked by antagonizing the onset of apoptosis with a pan-caspase inhibitor or on overexpression of the antiapoptotic BCL2 protein. In the absence of ARTEMIS, no defect in caspase-3, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, and XRCC4 cleavage or in H2AX phosphorylation was observed and DNA-PK catalytic subunit was still phosphorylated on S2056 in response to staurosporine. However, DNA fragmentation including high molecular weight fragmentation was delayed in ARTEMIS-deficient cells compared with cells expressing ARTEMIS. In addition, ARTEMIS enhanced the kinetics of MLL gene cleavage at a breakage cluster breakpoint that is frequently translocated in acute or therapy-related leukemias. These results show a facilitating role for ARTEMIS at least in early, site-specific chromosome breakage during apoptosis. PMID:19808974

  1. Characterization and Modeling of the Collision Induced Dissociation Patterns of Deprotonated Glycosphingolipids: Cleavage of the Glycosidic Bond.

    PubMed

    Rožman, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Glycosphingolipid fragmentation behavior was investigated by combining results from analysis of a series of negative ion tandem mass spectra and molecular modeling. Fragmentation patterns extracted from 75 tandem mass spectra of mainly acidic glycosphingolipid species (gangliosides) suggest prominent cleavage of the glycosidic bonds with retention of the glycosidic oxygen atom by the species formed from the reducing end (B and Y ion formation). Dominant product ions arise from dissociation of sialic acids glycosidic bonds whereas product ions resulting from cleavage of other glycosidic bonds are less abundant. Potential energy surfaces and unimolecular reaction rates of several low-energy fragmentation pathways leading to cleavage of glycosidic bonds were estimated in order to explain observed dissociation patterns. Glycosidic bond cleavage in both neutral (unsubstituted glycosyl group) and acidic glycosphingolipids was the outcome of the charge-directed intramolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) mechanism. According to the suggested mechanism, the nucleophile in a form of carboxylate or oxyanion attacks the carbon at position one of the sugar ring, simultaneously breaking the glycosidic bond and yielding an epoxide. For gangliosides, unimolecular reaction rates suggest that dominant product ions related to the cleavage of sialic acid glycosidic bonds are formed via direct dissociation channels. On the other hand, low abundant product ions related to the dissociation of other glycosidic bonds are more likely to be the result of sequential dissociation. Although results from this study mainly contribute to the understanding of glycosphingolipid fragmentation chemistry, some mechanistic findings regarding cleavage of the glycosidic bond may be applicable to other glycoconjugates. PMID:26297186

  2. Evaluation of structure effects on the pharmacological behavior of radioiodinated phenylpentadecanoic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.; Machulla, H.J.; Knust, E.J.; Kartje, M.; Vyska, K.

    1986-01-01

    For studying the pharmacokinetic behaviour of fatty acids with different chemical structures four STI-labelled compounds, i.e., the ortho and para STI-isomers of 15-phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) and 3-methyl-15-phenylpentadecanoic acid were prepared and the organ distribution determined in mice. The results show a significant decrease of the maximal heart uptake for the two ortho compounds. Further, the hypothesis of a blocked metabolism as an effect of the US -methylation could not be confirmed. Both US -methylated compounds show a biexponential elimination behavior from the heart. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  3. On human disease-causing amino acid variants: statistical study of sequence and structural patterns

    PubMed Central

    Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Statistical analysis was carried out on large set of naturally occurring human amino acid variations and it was demonstrated that there is a preference for some amino acid substitutions to be associated with diseases. At an amino acid sequence level, it was shown that the disease-causing variants frequently involve drastic changes of amino acid physico-chemical properties of proteins such as charge, hydrophobicity and geometry. Structural analysis of variants involved in diseases and being frequently observed in human population showed similar trends: disease-causing variants tend to cause more changes of hydrogen bond network and salt bridges as compared with harmless amino acid mutations. Analysis of thermodynamics data reported in literature, both experimental and computational, indicated that disease-causing variants tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions, which prompted us to investigate the effects of amino acid mutations on large databases of experimentally measured energy changes in unrelated proteins. Although the experimental datasets were linked neither to diseases nor exclusory to human proteins, the observed trends were the same: amino acid mutations tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions. Having in mind that structural and thermodynamics properties are interrelated, it is pointed out that any large change of any of them is anticipated to cause a disease. PMID:25689729

  4. Humic acids: Structural properties and multiple functionalities for novel technological developments.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Bruna Alice Gomes; Motta, Fernanda Lopes; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade

    2016-05-01

    Humic acids (HAs) are macromolecules that comprise humic substances (HS), which are organic matter distributed in terrestrial soil, natural water, and sediment. HAs differ from the other HS fractions (fulvic acid and humins) in that they are soluble in alkaline media, partially soluble in water, and insoluble in acidic media. Due to their amphiphilic character, HAs form micelle-like structures in neutral to acidic conditions, which are useful in agriculture, pollution remediation, medicine and pharmaceuticals. HAs have undefined compositions that vary according to the origin, process of obtainment, and functional groups present in their structures, such as quinones, phenols, and carboxylic acids. Quinones are responsible for the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HAs, which are useful for wound healing and have fungicidal/bactericidal properties. Phenols and carboxylic acids deprotonate in neutral and alkaline media and are responsible for various other functions, such as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of HAs. In particular, the presence of phenolic groups in HAs provides antioxidant properties due to their free radical scavenging capacity. This paper describes the main multifunctionalities of HAs associated with their structures and properties, focusing on human health applications, and we note perspectives that may lead to novel technological developments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review to address this topic from this approach. PMID:26952503

  5. An Unusual Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage Reaction During Phosphinothricin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cicchillo, Robert M.; Zhang, Houjin; Blodgett, Joshua A.V.; Whitteck, John T.; Li, Gongyong; Nair, Satish K.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Metcalf, William W.

    2010-01-01

    Natural products containing phosphorus-carbon bonds have found widespread use in medicine and agriculture1. One such compound, phosphinothricin tripeptide (PTT), contains the unusual amino acid phosphinothricin (PT) attached to two alanine residues (Fig. 1). Synthetic PT (glufosinate) is a component of two top-selling herbicides (Basta® and Liberty®), and is widely used with resistant transgenic crops including corn, cotton and canola. Recent genetic and biochemical studies showed that during PTT biosynthesis 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate (HEP) is converted to hydroxymethylphosphonate (HMP) (Fig. 1)2. Reported here are the in vitro reconstitution of this unprecedented C(sp3)-C(sp3) bond cleavage reaction and X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme. The protein is a mononuclear non-heme iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that converts HEP to HMP and formate. In contrast to most other members of this family, the oxidative consumption of HEP does not require additional cofactors or the input of exogenous electrons. The current study expands the scope of reactions catalyzed by the 2-His-1-carboxylate mononuclear non-heme iron family of enzymes. PMID:19516340

  6. An unusual carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction during phosphinothricin biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cicchillo, Robert M; Zhang, Houjin; Blodgett, Joshua A.V.; Whitteck, John T; Li, Gongyong; Nair, Satish K; van derDonk, Wilfred A; Metcalf, William W

    2010-01-12

    Natural products containing phosphorus-carbon bonds have found widespread use in medicine and agriculture. One such compound, phosphinothricin tripeptide, contains the unusual amino acid phosphinothricin attached to two alanine residues. Synthetic phosphinothricin (glufosinate) is a component of two top-selling herbicides (Basta and Liberty), and is widely used with resistant transgenic crops including corn, cotton and canola. Recent genetic and biochemical studies showed that during phosphinothricin tripeptide biosynthesis 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate (HEP) is converted to hydroxymethylphosphonate (HMP). Here we report the in vitro reconstitution of this unprecedented C(sp{sup 3})-C(sp{sup 3}) bond cleavage reaction and X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme. The protein is a mononuclear non-haem iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that converts HEP to HMP and formate. In contrast to most other members of this family, the oxidative consumption of HEP does not require additional cofactors or the input of exogenous electrons. The current study expands the scope of reactions catalysed by the 2-His-1-carboxylate mononuclear non-haem iron family of enzymes.

  7. Cleavage of Nidogen-1 by Cathepsin S Impairs Its Binding to Basement Membrane Partners

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Juliette; Leblanc-Noblesse, Emmanuelle; Nizard, Carine; Sasaki, Takako; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Perrier, Eric; Kurfurst, Robin; Brömme, Dieter; Lalmanach, Gilles; Lecaille, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    Cathepsin S (catS), which is expressed in normal human keratinocytes and localized close to the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) degrades some of major basement membrane (BM) constituents. Among them, catS readily hydrolyzed in a time and dose dependent manner human nidogen-1 (nid-1) and nidogen-2, which are key proteins in the BM structure. CatS preferentially cleaved nid-1 at both acid and neutral pH. Hydrolysis of nid-1 was hampered in murine ctss−/− spleen lysates pretreated with inhibitors of other classes of proteases. Nid-1 was cleaved within its G2 and G3 globular domains that are both involved in interactions with other BM components. Binding assays with soluble and immobilized ligands indicated that catS altered the formation of complexes between nid-1 and other BM components. Assuming that the cleavage of nid-1 impairs its ability to crosslink with BM partners and perturbs the viscoelastic properties of BM matrix, these data indicate that catS may participate in BM proteolysis, in addition to already identified proteases. PMID:22952693

  8. Distributions of amino acids suggest that certain residue types more effectively determine protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Saraswathi, S; Fernández-Martínez, J L; Koliński, A; Jernigan, R L; Kloczkowski, A

    2013-10-01

    Exponential growth in the number of available protein sequences is unmatched by the slower growth in the number of structures. As a result, the development of efficient and fast protein secondary structure prediction methods is essential for the broad comprehension of protein structures. Computational methods that can efficiently determine secondary structure can in turn facilitate protein tertiary structure prediction, since most methods rely initially on secondary structure predictions. Recently, we have developed a fast learning optimized prediction methodology (FLOPRED) for predicting protein secondary structure (Saraswathi et al. in JMM 18:4275, 2012). Data are generated by using knowledge-based potentials combined with structure information from the CATH database. A neural network-based extreme learning machine (ELM) and advanced particle swarm optimization (PSO) are used with this data to obtain better and faster convergence to more accurate secondary structure predicted results. A five-fold cross-validated testing accuracy of 83.8 % and a segment overlap (SOV) score of 78.3 % are obtained in this study. Secondary structure predictions and their accuracy are usually presented for three secondary structure elements: α-helix, β-strand and coil but rarely have the results been analyzed with respect to their constituent amino acids. In this paper, we use the results obtained with FLOPRED to provide detailed behaviors for different amino acid types in the secondary structure prediction. We investigate the influence of the composition, physico-chemical properties and position specific occurrence preferences of amino acids within secondary structure elements. In addition, we identify the correlation between these properties and prediction accuracy. The present detailed results suggest several important ways that secondary structure predictions can be improved in the future that might lead to improved protein design and engineering. PMID:23907551

  9. Mapping Homing Endonuclease Cleavage Sites Using In Vitro Generated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Belfort, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the precise position of endonucleolytic cleavage sites is a fundamental experimental technique used to describe the function of a homing endonuclease. However, these proteins are often recalcitrant to cloning and over-expression in biological systems because of toxicity induced by spurious DNA cleavage events. In this chapter we outline the steps to successfully express a homing endonuclease in vitro and use this product in nucleotide-resolution cleavage assays. PMID:24510259

  10. Structure-forming units of amino acid maleates. Case study of L-valinium hydrogen maleate.

    PubMed

    Rychkov, Denis; Arkhipov, Sergey; Boldyreva, Elena

    2016-02-01

    A new salt of L-valinium hydrogen maleate was used as an example to study structure-forming units in amino acid maleates. This compound was crystallized, its structure solved from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, and the phase purity of the bulk powder sample confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction and FT-IR spectra. The stability of the new salt was analyzed using density functional theory and PIXEL calculations with focus on the C(2)2(12) structure-forming crystallographic motif. This motif was of particular interest as it is common for almost all maleates. The exceptionally high ability of maleic acid to form salts with various amino acids was rationalized. PMID:26830808

  11. Catalysts of DNA Strand Cleavage at Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites.

    PubMed

    Minko, Irina G; Jacobs, Aaron C; de Leon, Arnie R; Gruppi, Francesca; Donley, Nathan; Harris, Thomas M; Rizzo, Carmelo J; McCullough, Amanda K; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are constantly formed in cellular DNA due to instability of the glycosidic bond, particularly at purines and various oxidized, alkylated, or otherwise damaged nucleobases. AP sites are also generated by DNA glycosylases that initiate DNA base excision repair. These lesions represent a significant block to DNA replication and are extremely mutagenic. Some DNA glycosylases possess AP lyase activities that nick the DNA strand at the deoxyribose moiety via a β- or β,δ-elimination reaction. Various amines can incise AP sites via a similar mechanism, but this non-enzymatic cleavage typically requires high reagent concentrations. Herein, we describe a new class of small molecules that function at low micromolar concentrations as both β- and β,δ-elimination catalysts at AP sites. Structure-activity relationships have established several characteristics that appear to be necessary for the formation of an iminium ion intermediate that self-catalyzes the elimination at the deoxyribose ring. PMID:27363485

  12. Catalysts of DNA Strand Cleavage at Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Minko, Irina G.; Jacobs, Aaron C.; de Leon, Arnie R.; Gruppi, Francesca; Donley, Nathan; Harris, Thomas M.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; McCullough, Amanda K.; Lloyd, R. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are constantly formed in cellular DNA due to instability of the glycosidic bond, particularly at purines and various oxidized, alkylated, or otherwise damaged nucleobases. AP sites are also generated by DNA glycosylases that initiate DNA base excision repair. These lesions represent a significant block to DNA replication and are extremely mutagenic. Some DNA glycosylases possess AP lyase activities that nick the DNA strand at the deoxyribose moiety via a β- or β,δ-elimination reaction. Various amines can incise AP sites via a similar mechanism, but this non-enzymatic cleavage typically requires high reagent concentrations. Herein, we describe a new class of small molecules that function at low micromolar concentrations as both β- and β,δ-elimination catalysts at AP sites. Structure-activity relationships have established several characteristics that appear to be necessary for the formation of an iminium ion intermediate that self-catalyzes the elimination at the deoxyribose ring. PMID:27363485

  13. O2 Protonation Controls Threshold Behavior for N-Glycosidic Bond Cleavage of Protonated Cytosine Nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Wu, R R; Rodgers, M T

    2016-06-01

    IRMPD action spectroscopy studies of protonated 2'-deoxycytidine and cytidine, [dCyd+H](+) and [Cyd+H](+), have established that both N3 and O2 protonated conformers coexist in the gas phase. Threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) of [dCyd+H](+) and [Cyd+H](+) is investigated here using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry techniques to elucidate the mechanisms and energetics for N-glycosidic bond cleavage. N-Glycosidic bond cleavage is observed as the major dissociation pathways resulting in competitive elimination of either protonated or neutral cytosine for both protonated cytosine nucleosides. Electronic structure calculations are performed to map the potential energy surfaces (PESs) for both N-glycosidic bond cleavage pathways observed. The molecular parameters derived from theoretical calculations are employed for thermochemical analysis of the energy-dependent CID data to determine the minimum energies required to cleave the N-glycosidic bond along each pathway. B3LYP and MP2(full) computed activation energies for N-glycosidic bond cleavage associated with elimination of protonated and neutral cytosine, respectively, are compared to measured values to evaluate the efficacy of these theoretical methods in describing the dissociation mechanisms and PESs for N-glycosidic bond cleavage. The 2'-hydroxyl of [Cyd+H](+) is found to enhance the stability of the N-glycosidic bond vs that of [dCyd+H](+). O2 protonation is found to control the threshold energies for N-glycosidic bond cleavage as loss of neutral cytosine from the O2 protonated conformers is found to require ∼25 kJ/mol less energy than the N3 protonated analogues, and the activation energies and reaction enthalpies computed using B3LYP exhibit excellent agreement with the measured thresholds for the O2 protonated conformers. PMID:27159774

  14. Cleavage Specificity Analysis of Six Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases (TTSPs) Using PICS with Proteome-Derived Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, François; Leduc, Richard; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are a family of cell membrane tethered serine proteases with unclear roles as their cleavage site specificities and substrate degradomes have not been fully elucidated. Indeed just 52 cleavage sites are annotated in MEROPS, the database of proteases, their substrates and inhibitors. Methodology/Principal Finding To profile the active site specificities of the TTSPs, we applied Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS). Human proteome-derived database searchable peptide libraries were assayed with six human TTSPs (matriptase, matriptase-2, matriptase-3, HAT, DESC and hepsin) to simultaneously determine sequence preferences on the N-terminal non-prime (P) and C-terminal prime (P’) sides of the scissile bond. Prime-side cleavage products were isolated following biotinylation and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding non-prime side sequences were derived from human proteome databases using bioinformatics. Sequencing of 2,405 individual cleaved peptides allowed for the development of the family consensus protease cleavage site specificity revealing a strong specificity for arginine in the P1 position and surprisingly a lysine in P1′ position. TTSP cleavage between R↓K was confirmed using synthetic peptides. By parsing through known substrates and known structures of TTSP catalytic domains, and by modeling the remainder, structural explanations for this strong specificity were derived. Conclusions Degradomics analysis of 2,405 cleavage sites revealed a similar and characteristic TTSP family specificity at the P1 and P1′ positions for arginine and lysine in unfolded peptides. The prime side is important for cleavage specificity, thus making these proteases unusual within the tryptic-enzyme class that generally has overriding non-prime side specificity. PMID:25211023

  15. Interfacial structures of acidic and basic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, C.; Ji, N.; Waychunas, G.; Shen, Y.R.

    2008-10-20

    Phase-sensitive sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was used to study water/vapor interfaces of HCl, HI, and NaOH solutions. The measured imaginary part of the surface spectral responses provided direct characterization of OH stretch vibrations and information about net polar orientations of water species contributing to different regions of the spectrum. We found clear evidence that hydronium ions prefer to emerge at interfaces. Their OH stretches contribute to the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum. Their charges create a positive surface field that tends to reorient water molecules more loosely bonded to the topmost water layer with oxygen toward the interface, and thus enhances significantly the 'liquid-like' band in the spectrum. Iodine ions in solution also like to appear at the interface and alter the positive surface field by forming a narrow double-charge layer with hydronium ions. In NaOH solution, the observed weak change of the 'liquid-like' band and disappearance of the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum indicates that OH{sup -} ions must also have excess at the interface. How they are incorporated in the interfacial water structure is however not clear.

  16. Differences in hydration structure near hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Head-Gordon, T; Sorenson, J M; Pertsemlidis, A; Glaeser, R M

    1997-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics to simulate recent neutron scattering experiments on aqueous solutions of N-acetyl-leucine-amide and N-acetyl-glutamine-amide, and break down the total scattering function into contributions from solute-solute, solute-water, water-water, and intramolecular correlations. We show that the shift of the main diffraction peak to smaller angle that is observed for leucine, but not for glutamine, is attributable primarily to alterations in water-water correlations relative to bulk. The perturbation of the water hydrogen-bonded network extends roughly two solvation layers from the hydrophobic side chain surface, and is characterized by a distribution of hydrogen bonded ring sizes that are more planar and are dominated by pentagons in particular than those near the hydrophilic side chain. The different structural organization of water near the hydrophobic solute that gives rise to the inward shift in the main neutron diffraction peak under ambient conditions may also provide insight into the same directional shift for pure liquid water as it is cooled and supercooled. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:9336206

  17. Site-specific cleavage of the host poly(A) binding protein by the encephalomyocarditis virus 3C proteinase stimulates viral replication.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Arias, Carolina; Garabedian, Alexandra; Palmenberg, Ann C; Mohr, Ian

    2012-10-01

    Although picornavirus RNA genomes contain a 3'-terminal poly(A) tract that is critical for their replication, the impact of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) infection on the host poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) remains unknown. Here, we establish that EMCV infection stimulates site-specific PABP proteolysis, resulting in accumulation of a 45-kDa N-terminal PABP fragment in virus-infected cells. Expression of a functional EMCV 3C proteinase was necessary and sufficient to stimulate PABP cleavage in uninfected cells, and bacterially expressed 3C cleaved recombinant PABP in vitro in the absence of any virus-encoded or eukaryotic cellular cofactors. N-terminal sequencing of the resulting C-terminal PABP fragment identified a 3C(pro) cleavage site on PABP between amino acids Q437 and G438, severing the C-terminal protein-interacting domain from the N-terminal RNA binding fragment. Single amino acid substitution mutants with changes at Q437 were resistant to 3C(pro) cleavage in vitro and in vivo, validating that this is the sole detectable PABP cleavage site. Finally, while ongoing protein synthesis was not detectably altered in EMCV-infected cells expressing a cleavage-resistant PABP variant, viral RNA synthesis and infectious virus production were both reduced. Together, these results establish that the EMCV 3C proteinase mediates site-specific PABP cleavage and demonstrate that PABP cleavage by 3C regulates EMCV replication. PMID:22837200

  18. New method of peptide cleavage based on Edman degradation.

    PubMed

    Bąchor, Remigiusz; Kluczyk, Alicja; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2013-08-01

    A straightforward cleavage method for N- acylated peptides based on the phenylthiohydantoin (PTH) formation is presented. The procedure could be applied to acid-stable resins, such as TentaGel HL-NH[Formula: see text]. We designed a cleavable linker that consists of a lysine residue with the [Formula: see text]-amino group blocked by Boc, whereas the [Formula: see text]-amino group is used for peptide synthesis. After the peptide assembly is completed, the protecting groups in peptide side chains are removed using trifluoroacetic acid, thus liberating also the [Formula: see text]-amino group of the lysine in the linker. Then the reaction with phenyl isothiocyanate followed by acidolysis causes an efficient peptide release from the resin as a stable PTH derivative. Furthermore, the application of a fixed charge tag in the form of 2-(4-aza-1-azoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octylammonium)acetyl group increases ionization efficiency and reduces the detection limit, allowing ESI-MS/MS sequencing of peptides in the subfemtomolar range. The proposed strategy is compatible with standard conditions during one-bead-one-compound peptide library synthesis. The applicability of the developed strategy in combinatorial chemistry was confirmed using a small training library of [Formula: see text]-chymotrypsin substrates. PMID:23690169

  19. Structural, spectroscopic, and computational studies of [2,2‧-bithiophene]-5-carboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einkauf, Jeffrey D.; Mathivathanan, Logesh; de Lill, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure of [2,2‧-bithiophene]-5-carboxylic acid was obtained from in-situ decarboxylation of [2,2‧-bithiophene]-5,5‧-dicarboxylic acid during solvothermal treatment. UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies were conducted in solution and solid-state on these two molecules as well as the precursor, 2,2‧-bithiophene. These molecules were modeled using DFT level of theory to explain the observed structural features and spectroscopy.

  20. New charge-bearing amino acid residues that promote β-sheet secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Stacy J; Almeida, Aaron M; Yoshimi, Yasuharu; Gellman, Samuel H

    2014-11-26

    Proteinogenic amino acid residues that promote β-sheet secondary structure are hydrophobic (e.g., Ile or Val) or only moderately polar (e.g., Thr). The design of peptides intended to display β-sheet secondary structure in water typically requires one set of residues to ensure conformational stability and an orthogonal set, with charged side chains, to ensure aqueous solubility and discourage self-association. Here we describe new amino acids that manifest substantial β-sheet propensity, by virtue of β-branching, and also bear an ionizable group in the side chain. PMID:25393077

  1. Crystal Structures of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB in Its Free and Mercury-Bound Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Lafrance-Vanasse, J.; Lefebvre, M; Di Lello, P; Sygusch, J; Omichinski, J

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria resistant to methylmercury utilize two enzymes (MerA and MerB) to degrade methylmercury to the less toxic elemental mercury. The crucial step is the cleavage of the carbon-mercury bond of methylmercury by the organomercurial lyase (MerB). In this study, we determined high resolution crystal structures of MerB in both the free (1.76-{angstrom} resolution) and mercury-bound (1.64-{angstrom} resolution) states. The crystal structure of free MerB is very similar to theNMRstructure, but important differences are observed when comparing the two structures. In the crystal structure, an amino-terminal-helix that is not present in the NMR structure makes contact with the core region adjacent to the catalytic site. This interaction between the amino-terminal helix and the core serves to bury the active site of MerB. The crystal structures also provide detailed insights into the mechanism of carbon-mercury bond cleavage by MerB. The structures demonstrate that two conserved cysteines (Cys-96 and Cys-159) play a role in substrate binding, carbon-mercury bond cleavage, and controlled product (ionic mercury) release. In addition, the structures establish that an aspartic acid (Asp-99) in the active site plays a crucial role in the proton transfer step required for the cleavage of the carbon-mercury bond. These findings are an important step in understanding the mechanism of carbon-mercury bond cleavage by MerB.

  2. 3-D Structural Modeling of Humic Acids through Experimental Characterization, Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation and Atomistic Simulations. 1. Chelsea Soil Humic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, Mamadou S.; Simpson, Andre; Gassman, Paul L.; Faulon, Jean Loup; Johnson, Jr., James H.; Goddard, III, William A.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2003-05-01

    This paper describes an integrated experimental and computational framework for developing 3-D structural models for humic acids (HAs). This approach combines experimental characterization, computer assisted structure elucidation (CASE), and atomistic simulations to generate all 3-D structural models or a representative sample of these models consistent with the analytical data and bulk thermodynamic/structural properties of HAs. To illustrate this methodology, structural data derived from elemental analysis, diffuse reflectance FT-IR spectroscopy, 1-D/2-D | 1H and 13C solution NMR spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI QqTOF MS) are employed as input to the CASE program SIGNATURE to generate all 3-D structural models for Chelsea soil humic acid (HA). These models are subsequently used as starting 3-D structures to carry out constant temperature-constant pressure molecular dynamics simulations to estimate their bulk densities and Hildebrand solubility parameters. Surprisingly, only a few model isomers are found to exhibit molecular compositions and bulk thermodynamic properties consistent with the experimental data. The simulated 13C NMR spectrum of * Corresponding author phone: (626)395-2730; fax: (626)585-0918; e-mail: diallo@wag.caltech.edu and mdiallo@howard.edu. Present address: Materials and Process Simulation Center,BeckmanInstitute 139-74, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125. † California Institute of Technology. ‡ Howard University. § University of Toronto. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. ^ Sandia National Laboratories. # The Ohio State University. ã xxxx American Chemical Society PAGE EST: 11 10.1021/es0259638 CCC: $25.00 Published on Web 00/00/0000 an equimolar mixture of these model isomers compares favorably with the measured spectrum of Chelsea soil HA.

  3. Structure-spectroscopic relationship of co-crystals between a rare chromone structure type of barakol and some organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimsook, T.; Teerawatananond, T.; Ngamrojnavanich, N.; Chaichit, N.; Kongsaeree, P.; Muangsin, N.

    2013-12-01

    Barakol, extracted from Cassia siamea Lamk. having an anxiolytic property, consists of a rare chromone core structure, therefore, in this work we investigate relation between the X-ray crystallography and physical properties such as spectroscopic data and the intermolecular interactions of the keto-enol forms based on the CSD search, especially e.g. hydrogen bonding, π-π interactions, ionic interactions and acid-base interactions and clarifies their ambiguous spectroscopic properties. The 1:1 molecular complexes of barakol and carboxylic acid (phthalic acid and 3-hydroxybenzoic acid) were prepared and the X-ray crystallographic studies revealed that the barakol-phthalate complex exists in an ion-pair complex. The formation of barakol-phthalate ion-pair complex is stabilized by the complementary of ion-ion interactions, π-π interactions and hydrogen bonding. The barakol-3-hydroxybenzoic acid complex is a π-π molecular complex. The co-crystallization of barakol-3-hydroxybenzoic acid complex is solely stabilized by π-π interactions. The spectroscopic studies including IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR are consistent with the results from the X-ray analysis. The 1H NMR spectrum of the barakol and phthalic acid complex in a mixture of CDCl3-CD3OD showed a dramatic spectral changes with downfield shifts of the ortho-protons of phthalic acid (ΔδH(ppm) = 0.37), and the proton resonances of barakol (ΔδH(ppm) = 0.31 for proton H3, 0.53 for proton H4, 0.57 for proton H6 and 0.33 for proton H9).

  4. Structure and Mechanism of Ferulic Acid Decarboxylase (FDC1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bhuiya, Mohammad Wadud; Lee, Soon Goo; Jez, Joseph M; Yu, Oliver

    2015-06-15

    The nonoxidative decarboxylation of aromatic acids occurs in a range of microbes and is of interest for bioprocessing and metabolic engineering. Although phenolic acid decarboxylases provide useful tools for bioindustrial applications, the molecular bases for how these enzymes function are only beginning to be examined. Here we present the 2.35-Å-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the ferulic acid decarboxylase (FDC1; UbiD) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. FDC1 shares structural similarity with the UbiD family of enzymes that are involved in ubiquinone biosynthesis. The position of 4-vinylphenol, the product of p-coumaric acid decarboxylation, in the structure identifies a large hydrophobic cavity as the active site. Differences in the β2e-α5 loop of chains in the crystal structure suggest that the conformational flexibility of this loop allows access to the active site. The structure also implicates Glu285 as the general base in the nonoxidative decarboxylation reaction catalyzed by FDC1. Biochemical analysis showed a loss of enzymatic activity in the E285A mutant. Modeling of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-5-decaprenylbenzoate, a partial structure of the physiological UbiD substrate, in the binding site suggests that an ∼30-Å-long pocket adjacent to the catalytic site may accommodate the isoprenoid tail of the substrate needed for ubiquinone biosynthesis in yeast. The three-dimensional structure of yeast FDC1 provides a template for guiding protein engineering studies aimed at optimizing the efficiency of aromatic acid decarboxylation reactions in bioindustrial applications. PMID:25862228

  5. Structure and Mechanism of Ferulic Acid Decarboxylase (FDC1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiya, Mohammad Wadud; Lee, Soon Goo

    2015-01-01

    The nonoxidative decarboxylation of aromatic acids occurs in a range of microbes and is of interest for bioprocessing and metabolic engineering. Although phenolic acid decarboxylases provide useful tools for bioindustrial applications, the molecular bases for how these enzymes function are only beginning to be examined. Here we present the 2.35-Å-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the ferulic acid decarboxylase (FDC1; UbiD) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. FDC1 shares structural similarity with the UbiD family of enzymes that are involved in ubiquinone biosynthesis. The position of 4-vinylphenol, the product of p-coumaric acid decarboxylation, in the structure identifies a large hydrophobic cavity as the active site. Differences in the β2e-α5 loop of chains in the crystal structure suggest that the conformational flexibility of this loop allows access to the active site. The structure also implicates Glu285 as the general base in the nonoxidative decarboxylation reaction catalyzed by FDC1. Biochemical analysis showed a loss of enzymatic activity in the E285A mutant. Modeling of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-5-decaprenylbenzoate, a partial structure of the physiological UbiD substrate, in the binding site suggests that an ∼30-Å-long pocket adjacent to the catalytic site may accommodate the isoprenoid tail of the substrate needed for ubiquinone biosynthesis in yeast. The three-dimensional structure of yeast FDC1 provides a template for guiding protein engineering studies aimed at optimizing the efficiency of aromatic acid decarboxylation reactions in bioindustrial applications. PMID:25862228

  6. Structural consequences of amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kazuki; Saito, Seiji; Sugawara, Kanako; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2008-08-01

    To determine the structural changes in the alpha-subunit of beta-hexosaminidase due to amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease, we built structural models of mutant alpha-subunits resulting from 33 missense mutations (24 infantile and 9 late-onset), and analyzed the influence of each amino acid replacement on the structure by calculating the number of atoms affected and determining the solvent-accessible surface area of the corresponding amino acid residue in the wild-type alpha-subunit. In the infantile Tay-Sachs group, the number of atoms influenced by a mutation was generally larger than that in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group in both the main chain and the side chain, and residues associated with the mutations found in the infantile Tay-Sachs group tended to be less solvent-accessible than those in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group. Furthermore, color imaging determined the distribution and degree of the structural changes caused by representative amino acid substitutions, and that there were also differences between the infantile and late-onset Tay-Sachs disease groups. Structural study is useful for elucidating the basis of Tay-Sachs disease. PMID:18490185

  7. Molecular structure and vibrational assignments of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid herbicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.

    2010-09-01

    The structural stability of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was investigated by the DFT-B3LYP and the ab initio MP2 calculations with the 6-311G** basis set. From the calculations at both levels of theory the Cgcpp structure was predicted to be the lowest energy minimum for the acid. The DFT and the MP2 levels disagreed about the nature of the second stable structure of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. At the DFT-B3LYP level of calculation the planar Tttp ( transoid O dbnd C sbnd O sbnd H) and the non-planar Tgcpp ( cisoid O dbnd C sbnd O sbnd H) forms were predicted to be 0.7 and 1.5 kcal/mol, respectively higher in energy than the Cgcpp conformation. At the MP2 level the two high energy Tttp and Tgcpp forms were predicted to be 2.7 and 1.4 kcal/mol, respectively higher in energy than the ground state Cgcpp structure. The Tgcpp form was adopted as the second possible structure of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid on the basis of the fact that the Møller-Plesset calculations account better than the DFT ones for the non-bonding O⋯H interactions. The vibrational frequencies of the lowest energy Cgcpp conformer were computed at the B3LYP level of theory and tentative vibrational assignments were provided on the basis of normal coordinate analysis and experimental infrared and Raman data.

  8. Avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 strains of low virulence with unusual fusion protein cleavage sites isolated from poultry species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian paramyxo-serotype-1 viruses (APMV1) with fusion cleavage sites containing two basic amino acids and a phenylalanine (F) at position 117 have been isolated from poultry species in two states from 2007-2009. The intracerebral pathogenicity indices for these viruses are of low virulence at 0.00 ...

  9. Shape matters: size-exclusion HPLC for the study of nucleic acid structural polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Largy, Eric; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of reports have been focused on the structure and biological role of non-canonical nucleic acid secondary structures. Many of these studies involve the use of oligonucleotides that can often adopt a variety of structures depending on the experimental conditions, and hence change the outcome of an assay. The knowledge of the structure(s) formed by oligonucleotides is thus critical to correctly interpret the results, and gain insight into the biological role of these particular sequences. Herein we demonstrate that size-exclusion HPLC (SE-HPLC) is a simple yet surprisingly powerful tool to quickly and effortlessly assess the secondary structure(s) formed by oligonucleotides. For the first time, an extensive calibration and validation of the use of SE-HPLC to confidently detect the presence of different species displaying various structure and/or molecularity, involving >110 oligonucleotides forming a variety of secondary structures (antiparallel, parallel, A-tract bent and mismatched duplexes, triplexes, G-quadruplexes and i-motifs, RNA stem loops), is performed. Moreover, we introduce simple metrics that allow the use of SE-HPLC without the need for a tedious calibration work. We show that the remarkable versatility of the method allows to quickly establish the influence of a number of experimental parameters on nucleic acid structuration and to operate on a wide range of oligonucleotide concentrations. Case studies are provided to clearly illustrate the all-terrain capabilities of SE-HPLC for oligonucleotide secondary structure analysis. Finally, this manuscript features a number of important observations contributing to a better understanding of nucleic acid structural polymorphism. PMID:25143531

  10. Are the Crystal Structures of Enantiopure and Racemic Mandelic Acids Determined by Kinetics or Thermodynamics?

    PubMed

    Hylton, Rebecca K; Tizzard, Graham J; Threlfall, Terence L; Ellis, Amy L; Coles, Simon J; Seaton, Colin C; Schulze, Eric; Lorenz, Heike; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Stein, Matthias; Price, Sarah L

    2015-09-01

    Mandelic acids are prototypic chiral molecules where the sensitivity of crystallized forms (enantiopure/racemic compound/polymorphs) to both conditions and substituents provides a new insight into the factors that may allow chiral separation by crystallization. The determination of a significant number of single crystal structures allows the analysis of 13 enantiopure and 30 racemic crystal structures of 21 (F/Cl/Br/CH3/CH3O) substituted mandelic acid derivatives. There are some common phenyl packing motifs between some groups of racemic and enantiopure structures, although they show very different hydrogen-bonding motifs. The computed crystal energy landscape of 3-chloromandelic acid, which has at least two enantiopure and three racemic crystal polymorphs, reveals that there are many more possible structures, some of which are predicted to be thermodynamically more favorable as well as slightly denser than the known forms. Simulations of mandelic acid dimers in isolation, water, and toluene do not differentiate between racemic and enantiopure dimers and also suggest that the phenyl ring interactions play a major role in the crystallization mechanism. The observed crystallization behavior of mandelic acids does not correspond to any simple "crystal engineering rules" as there is a range of thermodynamically feasible structures with no distinction between the enantiopure and racemic forms. Nucleation and crystallization appear to be determined by the kinetics of crystal growth with a statistical bias, but the diversity of the mandelic acid crystallization behavior demonstrates that the factors that influence the kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth are not yet adequately understood. PMID:26244445

  11. Signal peptide discrimination and cleavage site identification using SVM and NN.

    PubMed

    Kazemian, H B; Yusuf, S A; White, K

    2014-02-01

    About 15% of all proteins in a genome contain a signal peptide (SP) sequence, at the N-terminus, that targets the protein to intracellular secretory pathways. Once the protein is targeted correctly in the cell, the SP is cleaved, releasing the mature protein. Accurate prediction of the presence of these short amino-acid SP chains is crucial for modelling the topology of membrane proteins, since SP sequences can be confused with transmembrane domains due to similar composition of hydrophobic amino acids. This paper presents a cascaded Support Vector Machine (SVM)-Neural Network (NN) classification methodology for SP discrimination and cleavage site identification. The proposed method utilises a dual phase classification approach using SVM as a primary classifier to discriminate SP sequences from Non-SP. The methodology further employs NNs to predict the most suitable cleavage site candidates. In phase one, a SVM classification utilises hydrophobic propensities as a primary feature vector extraction using symmetric sliding window amino-acid sequence analysis for discrimination of SP and Non-SP. In phase two, a NN classification uses asymmetric sliding window sequence analysis for prediction of cleavage site identification. The proposed SVM-NN method was tested using Uni-Prot non-redundant datasets of eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins with SP and Non-SP N-termini. Computer simulation results demonstrate an overall accuracy of 0.90 for SP and Non-SP discrimination based on Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) tests using SVM. For SP cleavage site prediction, the overall accuracy is 91.5% based on cross-validation tests using the novel SVM-NN model. PMID:24480169

  12. Meniscal Repair of Degenerative Horizontal Cleavage Tears Using Fibrin Clots

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Tamiko; Kimura, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Presently, the treatment options available for patients with horizontal degenerative cleavage tears of the meniscus are limited. These tears are considered an indication for partial or subtotal meniscectomy because when the tear is located within an avascular area, it is difficult to induce healing. However, meniscectomy is not ideal because it disrupts the normal anatomical structure and function of the meniscus. Purpose: To examine the clinical and arthroscopic outcomes following meniscal repair of degenerative horizontal cleavage tears using fibrin clots. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Vertical sutures were placed in the meniscal tear, and the cleft was filled with fibrin clots before the sutures were tightened. We repaired 18 menisci in 18 consecutive eligible patients using a previously described technique. Three patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury who underwent simultaneous ACL reconstruction and 5 patients who did not undergo follow-up arthroscopy within 12 months were excluded. The remaining 10 menisci in 10 patients were evaluated in this study. The mean age of the patients was 35.8 ± 16.5 years, and the mean postoperative follow-up time was 40.8 ± 5.4 months. Pre- and postoperative Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective scores, and Tegner activity levels were compared. The arthroscopy findings were evaluated at a mean postoperative time of 6.7 ± 2.9 months. Results: The mean Lysholm score improved significantly from 69.3 ± 16.3 points preoperatively to 95.4 ± 3.6 points postoperatively (P < .005). The mean IKDC subjective score also improved significantly from 26.5% ± 19.0% preoperatively to 87.8% ± 7.5% postoperatively (P < .001). The Tegner activity level recovered to the preinjury level in 6 patients and to 1 level below the preinjury level in 4 patients. The follow-up arthroscopies showed complete healing in 7 patients (70%) and incomplete healing in

  13. Copper.Lys-Gly-His-Lys mediated cleavage of tRNA(Phe): studies of reaction mechanism and cleavage specificity.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Seth; Kawarasaki, Yuta; Cowan, J A

    2009-06-01

    The reactivity of [Cu2+.Lys-Gly-His-Lys-NH2]2+ and [Cu2+.Lys-Gly-His-Lys]+ toward tRNA(Phe) has been evaluated. The amidated and carboxylate forms of the copper peptides display complex binding behavior with strong and weak sites evident (K(D1)(app) approximately 71 microM, K(D2)(app) approximately 211 microM for the amide form; and K(D1)(app) approximately 34 microM, K(D2)(app) approximately 240 microM for the carboxylate form), while Cu2+(aq) yielded K(D1)(app) approximately 81 microM and K(D2)(app) approximately 136 microM. The time-dependence of the reaction of [Cu2+.Lys-Gly-His-Lys]+ and [Cu2+.Lys-Gly-His-Lys-NH2]2+ with tRNA(Phe) yielded k(obs) approximately 0.075 h(-1) for both complexes. HPLC analysis of the reaction products demonstrated guanine as the sole base product. Mass spectrometric data shows a limited number of cleavage fragments with product peak masses consistent with chemistry occurring at a discrete site defined by the structurally contiguous D and TPsiC loops, and in a domain where high affinity magnesium centers have previously been observed to promote hydrolysis of the tRNA(Phe) backbone. This cleavage pattern is more selective than that previously observed by Long and coworkers for nickel complexes of a series of C-terminally amidated peptides (Gly-Gly-His, Lys-Gly-His, and Arg-Gly-His), and may reflect variations in structural recognition and a distinct reaction path by the nickel derivatives. The data emphasizes the optimal positioning of the metal-associated reactive oxygen species, relative to scissile bonds, as a major criterion for development of efficient catalytic nucleases or therapeutics. PMID:19386364

  14. Red-light photosensitized cleavage of DNA by (l-lysine)(phenanthroline base)copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ashis K; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2005-08-21

    Ternary copper(II) complexes [Cu(l-lys)B(ClO4)](ClO4)(1-4), where B is a heterocyclic base, viz. 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, 1), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, 2), dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, 3) and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazene (dppz, 4), are prepared and their DNA binding and photo-induced DNA cleavage activity studied (l-lys =l-lysine). Complex 2, structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography, shows a square-pyramidal (4 + 1) coordination geometry in which the N,O-donor l-lysine and N,N-donor heterocyclic base bind at the basal plane and the perchlorate ligand is bonded at the elongated axial site. The crystal structure shows the presence of a pendant cationic amine moiety -(CH2)4NH3+ of l-lysine. The one-electron paramagnetic complexes display a d-d band in the range of 598-762 nm in DMF and exhibit cyclic voltammetric response due to Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple in the range of 0.07 to -0.20 V vs. SCE in DMF-Tris-HCl buffer. The complexes having phenanthroline bases display good binding propensity to the calf thymus DNA giving an order: 4 (dppz) > 3 (dpq) > 2 (phen)> 1 (bpy). Control cleavage experiments using pUC19 supercoiled DNA and distamycin suggest major groove binding for the dppz and minor groove binding for the other complexes. Complexes 2-4 show efficient DNA cleavage activity on UV (365 nm) or visible light (694 nm ruby laser) irradiation via a mechanistic pathway involving formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species. The amino acid l-lysine bound to the metal shows photosensitizing effect at red light, while the heterocyclic bases are primarily DNA groove binders. The dpq and dppz ligands display red light-induced photosensitizing effects in copper-bound form. PMID:16075123

  15. Statistical and constraint factors in cleavage initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G.R.; Edsinger, K.V.; Lucas, G.E.

    1997-12-31

    The size dependence of effective cleavage initiation toughness K{sub e}(T) (defined by the load-displacement conditions at initiation) of steels are mediated by both statistical and constraint factors. Statistical effects are controlled by the total high stress volume even under plane strain, small scale yielding, e.g., K{sub Ic} {proportional_to} 1/B{sup {minus}1/4}. Constraint loss and reductions in the stress fields occurs for shallow cracks, large scale yielding and deviations from plane strain. The interplay between these factors is examined by analyzing the observed K{sub e}(T) behavior for specimens with different W, B and a/W using FEM simulations of the crack tip fields and confocal microscopy, fracture reconstruction and SEM characterization of the sequence-of-fracture-events. Observed versus actual sequences and complications such as crack tip strain, the transition to ductile tearing and ultimate loss of specimen capacity are discussed.

  16. Structure and simulation of a Zundel ion stabilized by 8-hydroxyquinoline-5, 7 disulphonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, Hasthi Annapurna; Venkatakrishnan, Ramaseshan; Pennathur, Anuj Krishnasundar; Pennathur, Gautam

    2016-07-01

    8-hydroxyquinoline-5, 7 disulphonic was synthesized and recrystallized in methanol to strip away molecules of water. The structure of the molecule revealed that Zundel ion was stabilized in the crystal. Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulation was then carried out to understand the dynamics of proton hopping in this complex. During the course of simulation, the Zundel ion coordinates with a water molecule to form an open H7O3+ structure. This transition state structure de-solvated rapidly forming Zundel ion facilitating proton hopping in the first solvation shell. One of the sulphonic acid groups in the 5 or 7 position of the 8-hydroxyquinoline 5,7 disulphonic acid bonds with the Zundel ion favoring the proton to be transferred to the nearby water molecule through the formation of proton defects. The simulation results support the structural diffusion mechanism and that charged complex migrates through the hydrogen bond network.

  17. Preparation of silver-poly(acrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) composite microspheres with patterned surface structures.

    PubMed

    Xia, Huiyun; Zhang, Ying; Peng, Junxia; Fang, Yu; Gu, Zhongze

    2006-01-01

    Acrylamide (AM) and methacrylic acid (MAA) copolymer microgels were prepared by a reverse suspension polymerization technique. The microgels were used as templates for the preparation of silver-poly(acrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) [Ag-P(AM-co-MAA)] composite microspheres. The surface structures of the microspheres prepared in this way are characterized by zigzag-like structures. It was found that the composition of the microgels, the nature and dosage of surfactants, the quantity of the metal, and even the reduction methods employed have a significant effect upon the surface structures of the microspheres. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that Ag formed during the process is in a crystal state of a face-centered cubic structure. PMID:24058232

  18. Cytoplasmic translocation, aggregation, and cleavage of TDP-43 by enteroviral proteases modulate viral pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fung, G; Shi, J; Deng, H; Hou, J; Wang, C; Hong, A; Zhang, J; Jia, W; Luo, H

    2015-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that infection by coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a positive-stranded RNA enterovirus, results in the accumulation of insoluble ubiquitin-protein aggregates, which resembles the common feature of neurodegenerative diseases. The importance of protein aggregation in viral pathogenesis has been recognized; however, the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain ill-defined. Transactive response DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) is an RNA-binding protein that has an essential role in regulating RNA metabolism at multiple levels. Cleavage and cytoplasmic aggregation of TDP-43 serves as a major molecular marker for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration and contributes significantly to disease progression. In this study, we reported that TDP-43 is translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm during CVB3 infection through the activity of viral protease 2A, followed by the cleavage mediated by viral protease 3C. Cytoplasmic translocation of TDP-43 is accompanied by reduced solubility and increased formation of protein aggregates. The cleavage takes place at amino-acid 327 between glutamine and alanine, resulting in the generation of an N- and C-terminal cleavage fragment of ~35 and ~8 kDa, respectively. The C-terminal product of TDP-43 is unstable and quickly degraded through the proteasome degradation pathway, whereas the N-terminal truncation of TDP-43 acts as a dominant-negative mutant that inhibits the function of native TDP-43 in alternative RNA splicing. Lastly, we demonstrated that knockdown of TDP-43 results in an increase in viral titers, suggesting a protective role for TDP-43 in CVB3 infection. Taken together, our findings suggest a novel model by which cytoplasmic redistribution and cleavage of TDP-43 as a consequence of CVB3 infection disrupts the solubility and transcriptional activity of TDP-43. Our results also reveal a mechanism evolved by enteroviruses to support efficient viral infection. PMID

  19. The influence of the crystal structure on aggregation-induced luminescence of derivatives of aminobenzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosova, D. A.; Zarochentseva, E. P.; Vysotskaya, S. O.; Klemesheva, N. A.; Korotkov, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    The luminescence of three derivatives of 2-(phenylamino)-benzoic acid (N-phenylanthranilic, mefenamic, and niflumic acids) in benzene solution, in the polycrystalline state, and in the hexamethylbenzene matrix is studied. In the crystalline state, these compounds exhibit intense aggregation-induced luminescence. An increase in luminescence is also observed in the impurity crystal. The hexamethylbenzene crystal lattice restricts the mobility of molecules, thus ensuring the rigidity of the molecular structure of acids, which decreases the efficiency of nonradiative electron energy degradation. The main reason for the increase in the luminescence intensity in the case of fixation in a crystalline matrix is the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and dimers of acid molecules.

  20. Physical and structural characterisation of starch/polyester blends with tartaric acid.

    PubMed

    Olivato, J B; Müller, C M O; Carvalho, G M; Yamashita, F; Grossmann, M V E

    2014-06-01

    Starch/PBAT blends were produced by reactive extrusion with tartaric acid (TA) as an additive. The effects of TA, glycerol and starch+PBAT on the mechanical, optical and structural properties of the films were evaluated, with formulations based in a constrained mixture design. Tartaric acid acts as a compatibiliser and promotes the acid hydrolysis of starch chains. These two functions explain the observed film resistance and opacity. TA reduced the weight loss in water. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that TA reduces the interfacial tension between the polymeric phases, resulting in more homogeneous films. Nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C CPMAS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) suggest that tartaric acid is able to react with the hydroxyl groups of the starch by esterification/transesterification reactions, confirming its role as a compatibiliser. The addition of TA results in materials with better properties that are suitable for use in food packaging. PMID:24863194