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Sample records for acid cleavage structure

  1. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  2. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  3. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  4. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  5. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  6. Mapping nucleic acid structure by hydroxyl radical cleavage.

    PubMed

    Tullius, Thomas D; Greenbaum, Jason A

    2005-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical footprinting is a widely used method for following the folding of RNA molecules in solution. This method has the unique ability to provide experimental information on the solvent accessibility of each nucleotide in an RNA molecule, so that the folding of all domains of the RNA species can be followed simultaneously at single-nucleotide resolution. In recent work, hydroxyl radical footprinting has been used, often in combination with other global measures of structure, to work out detailed folding pathways and three-dimensional structures for increasingly large and complicated RNA molecules. These include synthetic ribozymes, and group I and group II ribozymes, from yeast, the Azoarcus cyanobacterium and Tetrahymena thermophila. Advances have been made in methods for analysis of hydroxyl radical data, so that the large datasets that result from kinetic folding experiments can be analyzed in a semi-automated and quantitative manner.

  7. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  8. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Jeff G; Lyamichev, Victor I; Mast, Andrea L; Brow, Mary Ann D

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  9. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.G.; Lyamichev, V.I.; Mast, A.L.; Brow, M.A.D.

    1999-11-30

    The present invention relates to methods for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  10. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  11. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages 02

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  12. A 1.9 Å Crystal Structure of the HDV Ribozyme Precleavage Suggests both Lewis Acid and General Acid Mechanisms Contribute to Phosphodiester Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jui-Hui; Yajima, Rieko; Chadalavada, Durga M.; Chase, Elaine; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Golden, Barbara L.

    2010-11-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and HDV-like ribozymes are self-cleaving RNAs found throughout all kingdoms of life. These RNAs fold into a double-nested pseudoknot structure and cleave RNA, yielding 2{prime},3{prime}-cyclic phosphate and 5{prime}-hydroxyl termini. The active site nucleotide C75 has a pK{sub a} shifted >2 pH units toward neutrality and has been implicated as a general acid/base in the cleavage reaction. An active site Mg{sup 2+} ion that helps activate the 2{prime}-hydroxyl for nucleophilic attack has been characterized biochemically; however, this ion has not been visualized in any previous structures. To create a snapshot of the ribozyme in a state poised for catalysis, we have crystallized and determined the structure of the HDV ribozyme bound to an inhibitor RNA containing a deoxynucleotide at the cleavage site. This structure includes the wild-type C75 nucleotide and Mg{sup 2+} ions, both of which are required for maximal ribozyme activity. This structure suggests that the position of C75 does not change during the cleavage reaction. A partially hydrated Mg{sup 2+} ion is also found within the active site where it interacts with a newly resolved G {center_dot} U reverse wobble. Although the inhibitor exhibits crystallographic disorder, we modeled the ribozyme-substrate complex using the conformation of the inhibitor strand observed in the hammerhead ribozyme. This model suggests that the pro-RP oxygen of the scissile phosphate and the 2{prime}-hydroxyl nucleophile are inner-sphere ligands to the active site Mg{sup 2+} ion. Thus, the HDV ribozyme may use a combination of metal ion Lewis acid and nucleobase general acid strategies to effect RNA cleavage.

  13. Structural basis of cohesin cleavage by separase

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhonghui; Luo, Xuelian; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation requires timely dissolution of chromosome cohesion after chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle. Separase is absolutely essential for cohesion dissolution in organisms from yeast to man1,2. It cleaves the kleisin subunit of cohesin and opens the cohesin ring to allow chromosome segregation. Cohesin cleavage is spatiotemporally controlled by separase-associated regulatory proteins, including the inhibitory chaperone securin3–6, and by phosphorylation of both the enzyme and substrates7–12. Dysregulation of this process causes chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy, contributing to cancer and birth defects. Despite its essential functions, atomic structures of separase have not been determined. Here, we report crystal structures of the separase protease domain from Chaetomium thermophilum, alone or covalently bound to unphosphorylated and phosphorylated inhibitory peptides derived from a cohesin cleavage site. These structures reveal how separase recognizes cohesin and how cohesin phosphorylation by polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) enhances cleavage. Consistent with a previous cellular study13, mutating two securin residues in a conserved motif that partially matches the separase cleavage consensus converts securin from a separase inhibitor to a substrate. Our study establishes atomic mechanisms of substrate cleavage by separase and suggests competitive inhibition by securin. PMID:27027290

  14. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    PubMed

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-01

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  15. Arginine as a general acid catalyst in serine recombinase-mediated DNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Keenholtz, Ross A; Mouw, Kent W; Boocock, Martin R; Li, Nan-Sheng; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Rice, Phoebe A

    2013-10-01

    Members of the serine family of site-specific DNA recombinases use an unusual constellation of amino acids to catalyze the formation and resolution of a covalent protein-DNA intermediate. A recent high resolution structure of the catalytic domain of Sin, a particularly well characterized family member, provided a detailed view of the catalytic site. To determine how the enzyme might protonate and stabilize the 3'O leaving group in the strand cleavage reaction, we examined how replacing this oxygen with a sulfur affected the cleavage rate by WT and mutant enzymes. To facilitate direct comparison of the cleavage rates, key experiments used suicide substrates that prevented religation after cleavage. The catalytic defect associated with mutation of one of six highly conserved arginine residues, Arg-69 in Sin, was partially rescued by a 3' phosphorothiolate substrate. We conclude that Arg-69 has an important role in stabilizing the 3'O leaving group and is the prime candidate for the general acid that protonates the 3'O, in good agreement with the position it occupies in the high resolution structure of the active site of Sin.

  16. Oxidative cleavage of erucic acid for the synthesis of brassylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah; Pooja Thapliyal; Erica N. Pfarr; Nicholas S. Dusek; Kristofer L. Schiele; James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to synthesize Brassylic Acid (BA) using oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is an industrial oilseed grown in North Dakota. Crambe has potential as an industrial fatty acid feedstock as a source of Erucic acid (EA). It has approximately 50-60 % of EA, a C{sub 22} monounsaturated fatty acid. Oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids derived from oilseeds produces long chain (9, 11, and 13 carbon atoms) dibasic and monobasic acids. These acids are known commercial feedstocks for the preparation of nylons, polyesters, waxes, surfactants, and perfumes. Other sources of EA are Rapeseed seed oil which 50-60 % of EA. Rapeseed is grown outside USA. The oxidative cleavage of EA was done using a high throughput parallel pressure reactor system. Kinetics of the reaction shows that BA yields reach a saturation at 12 hours. H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} was found to be the best catalyst for the oxidative cleavage of EA. High yields of BA were obtained at 80 C with bubbling of O{sub 2} or 10 bar of O{sub 2} for 12 hours.

  17. Surface Structures on Cleaved Silicon by Cleavage Luminescence Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongguang

    This paper reports on further research into the structure and properties of the cleaved surfaces of silicon, using vacuum cleavage luminescence detection methods. Results show resistance partially recovers during the cleavage process through "crack healing". When the elasticity of the parts transmitting the applied stress temporarily absorbs the initial rupture stress, the crack stops and partially re-closes until the applied force "catches up" and reapplies stress. The high resistance created by the two Schottky barriers prevents resistance recovery from mere surfaces re-contact. Instead, resistance recovery from the atom-to-atom re-closure surface healing is more likely, as expected from a Three Bond Scission Model (TBS) silicon surface structure.

  18. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and structural investigation of a new charge transfer complex of 2,6-diaminopyridine with 4-nitrophenylacetic acid: Antimicrobial, DNA binding/cleavage and antioxidant studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, Venkatesan; Saravanabhavan, Munusamy; Sekar, Marimuthu

    2015-08-01

    A new hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer complex (CT) formed by the reaction between donor, 2,6-diaminopyridine and acceptor, 4-nitrophenylacetic acid in methanol at room temperature. The crystal was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR spectroscopic studies and thermal studies. The elemental analysis of CT complex, obtained data revealed that the formation of 1:1 ratio CT complex was proposed. Infrared and NMR studies confirm the chemical constituents and molecular structure of the synthesized complex crystal. The high thermal stability is due to the molecular frame work through H-bonding interactions. Structural investigation indicates that cation and anion are linked through strong N+-H⋯O- type of hydrogen bond. The hydrogen bonded charge transfer crystal was screened for its pharmacology, such as antimicrobial, DNA binding/cleavage and antioxidant studies. The CT complex was screened for its antibacterial and antifungal activity against various bacterial and fungal species, which shows good antimicrobial activity. The DNA binding results indicated that the compound could interact with DNA through intercalation. It should have weak to moderate capacity of scavenging with DPPH.

  19. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and structural investigation of a new charge transfer complex of 2,6-diaminopyridine with 4-nitrophenylacetic acid: Antimicrobial, DNA binding/cleavage and antioxidant studies.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, Venkatesan; Saravanabhavan, Munusamy; Sekar, Marimuthu

    2015-08-01

    A new hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer complex (CT) formed by the reaction between donor, 2,6-diaminopyridine and acceptor, 4-nitrophenylacetic acid in methanol at room temperature. The crystal was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR spectroscopic studies and thermal studies. The elemental analysis of CT complex, obtained data revealed that the formation of 1:1 ratio CT complex was proposed. Infrared and NMR studies confirm the chemical constituents and molecular structure of the synthesized complex crystal. The high thermal stability is due to the molecular frame work through H-bonding interactions. Structural investigation indicates that cation and anion are linked through strong N(+)-H⋯O(-) type of hydrogen bond. The hydrogen bonded charge transfer crystal was screened for its pharmacology, such as antimicrobial, DNA binding/cleavage and antioxidant studies. The CT complex was screened for its antibacterial and antifungal activity against various bacterial and fungal species, which shows good antimicrobial activity. The DNA binding results indicated that the compound could interact with DNA through intercalation. It should have weak to moderate capacity of scavenging with DPPH.

  20. New approach to real-time nucleic acids detection: folding polymerase chain reaction amplicons into a secondary structure to improve cleavage of Forster resonance energy transfer probes in 5'-nuclease assays.

    PubMed

    Kutyavin, Igor V

    2010-03-01

    The article describes a new technology for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of nucleic acids. Similar to Taqman, this new method, named Snake, utilizes the 5'-nuclease activity of Thermus aquaticus (Taq) DNA polymerase that cleaves dual-labeled Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes and generates a fluorescent signal during PCR. However, the mechanism of the probe cleavage in Snake is different. In this assay, PCR amplicons fold into stem-loop secondary structures. Hybridization of FRET probes to one of these structures leads to the formation of optimal substrates for the 5'-nuclease activity of Taq. The stem-loop structures in the Snake amplicons are introduced by the unique design of one of the PCR primers, which carries a special 5'-flap sequence. It was found that at a certain length of these 5'-flap sequences the folded Snake amplicons have very little, if any, effect on PCR yield but benefit many aspects of the detection process, particularly the signal productivity. Unlike Taqman, the Snake system favors the use of short FRET probes with improved fluorescence background. The head-to-head comparison study of Snake and Taqman revealed that these two technologies have more differences than similarities with respect to their responses to changes in PCR protocol, e.g. the variations in primer concentration, annealing time, PCR asymmetry. The optimal PCR protocol for Snake has been identified. The technology's real-time performance was compared to a number of conventional assays including Taqman, 3'-MGB-Taqman, Molecular Beacon and Scorpion primers. The test trial showed that Snake supersedes the conventional assays in the signal productivity and detection of sequence variations as small as single nucleotide polymorphisms. Due to the assay's cost-effectiveness and simplicity of design, the technology is anticipated to quickly replace all known conventional methods currently used for real-time nucleic acid detection.

  1. Leukocyte protease binding to nucleic acids promotes nuclear localization and cleavage of nucleic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marshall P; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron J; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein targets, whereas adding RNA to recombinant RNA binding protein substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Preincubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G. During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps, which bind NE and cathepsin G. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and neutrophil extracellular traps in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high-affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation.

  2. Sequence selective double strand DNA cleavage by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeting using nuclease S1.

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, V; Frank-Kamenetskii, M D; Egholm, M; Buchardt, O; Nielsen, P E

    1993-01-01

    A novel method for sequence specific double strand DNA cleavage using PNA (peptide nucleic acid) targeting is described. Nuclease S1 digestion of double stranded DNA gives rise to double strand cleavage at an occupied PNA strand displacement binding site, and under optimized conditions complete cleavage can be obtained. The efficiency of this cleavage is more than 10 fold enhanced when a tandem PNA site is targeted, and additionally enhanced if this site is in trans rather than in cis orientation. Thus in effect, the PNA targeting makes the single strand specific nuclease S1 behave like a pseudo restriction endonuclease. Images PMID:8502550

  3. Binding and cleavage of nucleic acids by the "hairpin" ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Chowrira, B M; Burke, J M

    1991-09-01

    The "hairpin" ribozyme derived from the minus strand of tobacco ringspot virus satellite RNA [(-)sTRSV] efficiently catalyzes sequence-specific RNA hydrolysis in trans (Feldstein et al., 1989; Hampel & Triz, 1989; Haseloff & Gerlach, 1989). The ribozyme does not cleave DNA. An RNA substrate analogue containing a single deoxyribonucleotide residue 5' to the cleavage site (A-1) binds to the ribozyme efficiently but cannot be cleaved. A DNA substrate analogue with a ribonucleotide at A-1 is cleaved; thus A-1 provides the only 2'-OH required for cleavage. These results support cleavage via a transphosphorylation mechanism initiated by attack of the 2'-OH of A-1 on the scissile phosphodiester. The ribozyme discriminates between DNA and RNA in both binding and cleavage. Results indicate that the 2'-OH of A-1 functions in complex stabilization as well as cleavage. The ribozyme efficiently cleaves a phosphorothioate diester linkage, suggesting that the pro-Rp oxygen at the scissile phosphodiester does not coordinate Mg2+. PMID:1909564

  4. Statistical prediction of protein structural, localization and functional properties by the analysis of its fragment mass distributions after proteolytic cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Bunde, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Structural, localization and functional properties of unknown proteins are often being predicted from their primary polypeptide chains using sequence alignment with already characterized proteins and consequent molecular modeling. Here we suggest an approach to predict various structural and structure-associated properties of proteins directly from the mass distributions of their proteolytic cleavage fragments. For amino-acid-specific cleavages, the distributions of fragment masses are determined by the distributions of inter-amino-acid intervals in the protein, that in turn apparently reflect its structural and structure-related features. Large-scale computer simulations revealed that for transmembrane proteins, either α-helical or β -barrel secondary structure could be predicted with about 90% accuracy after thermolysin cleavage. Moreover, 3/4 intrinsically disordered proteins could be correctly distinguished from proteins with fixed three-dimensional structure belonging to all four SCOP structural classes by combining 3–4 different cleavages. Additionally, in some cases the protein cellular localization (cytosolic or membrane-associated) and its host organism (Firmicute or Proteobacteria) could be predicted with around 80% accuracy. In contrast to cytosolic proteins, for membrane-associated proteins exhibiting specific structural conformations, their monotopic or transmembrane localization and functional group (ATP-binding, transporters, sensors and so on) could be also predicted with high accuracy and particular robustness against missing cleavages. PMID:26924271

  5. Statistical prediction of protein structural, localization and functional properties by the analysis of its fragment mass distributions after proteolytic cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Bunde, Armin

    2016-02-01

    Structural, localization and functional properties of unknown proteins are often being predicted from their primary polypeptide chains using sequence alignment with already characterized proteins and consequent molecular modeling. Here we suggest an approach to predict various structural and structure-associated properties of proteins directly from the mass distributions of their proteolytic cleavage fragments. For amino-acid-specific cleavages, the distributions of fragment masses are determined by the distributions of inter-amino-acid intervals in the protein, that in turn apparently reflect its structural and structure-related features. Large-scale computer simulations revealed that for transmembrane proteins, either α-helical or β -barrel secondary structure could be predicted with about 90% accuracy after thermolysin cleavage. Moreover, 3/4 intrinsically disordered proteins could be correctly distinguished from proteins with fixed three-dimensional structure belonging to all four SCOP structural classes by combining 3–4 different cleavages. Additionally, in some cases the protein cellular localization (cytosolic or membrane-associated) and its host organism (Firmicute or Proteobacteria) could be predicted with around 80% accuracy. In contrast to cytosolic proteins, for membrane-associated proteins exhibiting specific structural conformations, their monotopic or transmembrane localization and functional group (ATP-binding, transporters, sensors and so on) could be also predicted with high accuracy and particular robustness against missing cleavages.

  6. Analysis of mycolic acid cleavage products and cellular fatty acids of Mycobacterium species by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M A; Moss, C W; Silcox, V A; Good, R C

    1986-04-01

    After growth and experimental conditions were established, the mycolic acid cleavage products, constituent fatty acids, and alcohols of representative strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. smegmatis, M. fortuitum complex, M. kansasii, M. gordonae, and M. avium complex were determined by capillary gas chromatography. Reproducible cleavage of mycolic acid methyl esters to tetracosanoic (24:0) or hexacosanoic (26:0) acid methyl esters was achieved by heating the sample in a high-temperature muffle furnace. The major constituent fatty acids in all species were hexadecanoic (16:0) and octadecenoic (18:1 omega 9-c, oleic) acids. With the exception of M. gordonae, 10-methyloctadecanoic acid was found in all species; moreover, M. gordonae was the only species tested which contained 2-methyltetradecanoic acid. M. kansasii was characterized by the presence of 2,4-dimethyltetradecanoic acid, M. avium complex by 2-eicosanol, and M. tuberculosis by 26:0 mycolic acid cleavage product. The mycolic acid cleavage product in the other five species tested was 24:0. Although a limited number of strains and species were tested, preliminary results indicate that this gas chromatographic method can be used to characterize mycobacterial cultures by their mycolic acid cleavage products and constituent fatty acid and alcohol content. PMID:3084554

  7. Structure and anticoagulant activity of fucosylated glycosaminoglycan degraded by deaminative cleavage.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Longyan; Lai, Sensen; Huang, Rong; Wu, Mingyi; Gao, Na; Xu, Li; Qin, Hongbo; Peng, Wenlie; Zhao, Jinhua

    2013-11-01

    Fucosylated glycosaminoglycans (FGs) are complex glycosaminoglycans that exhibit potent anticoagulant activity. To study the relationship between molecular size and biological activity, oligosaccharides with (2,5)-anhydro-D-talose units at new reducing ends were prepared by hydrazine deacetylation and nitrous acid depolymerization. The product chemical structures were analyzed by one- and two-dimensional NMR methods. Additionally, anticoagulant activities were evaluated by clotting assay and chromogenic substrate cleavage. The results demonstrated that under mild deacetylation and deaminative cleavage conditions, both products were relatively homogeneous and sulfated fucose branch types and sulfate substituents remained stable. These depolymerized FGs with different molecular sizes had potent intrinsic anticoagulant activities, which were similar to those that were obtained by free-radical depolymerization with similar molecular weights. Decreasing molecular weight may weaken activity but not significantly affect factor Xase and heparin cofactor II (HCII)-mediated thrombin inhibition.

  8. Transition State Charge Stabilization and Acid-Base Catalysis of mRNA Cleavage by the Endoribonuclease RelE.

    PubMed

    Dunican, Brian F; Hiller, David A; Strobel, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial toxin RelE is a ribosome-dependent endoribonuclease. It is part of a type II toxin-antitoxin system that contributes to antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation. During amino acid starvation, RelE cleaves mRNA in the ribosomal A-site, globally inhibiting protein translation. RelE is structurally similar to microbial RNases that employ general acid-base catalysis to facilitate RNA cleavage. The RelE active site is atypical for acid-base catalysis, in that it is enriched with positively charged residues and lacks the prototypical histidine-glutamate catalytic pair, making the mechanism of mRNA cleavage unclear. In this study, we use a single-turnover kinetic analysis to measure the effect of pH and phosphorothioate substitution on the rate constant for cleavage of mRNA by wild-type RelE and seven active-site mutants. Mutation and thio effects indicate a major role for stabilization of increased negative change in the transition state by arginine 61. The wild-type RelE cleavage rate constant is pH-independent, but the reaction catalyzed by many of the mutants is strongly dependent on pH, suggestive of general acid-base catalysis. pH-rate curves indicate that wild-type RelE operates with the pK(a) of at least one catalytic residue significantly downshifted by the local environment. Mutation of any single active-site residue is sufficient to disrupt this microenvironment and revert the shifted pK(a) back above neutrality. pH-rate curves are consistent with K54 functioning as a general base and R81 as a general acid. The capacity of RelE to effect a large pK(a) shift and facilitate a common catalytic mechanism by uncommon means furthers our understanding of other atypical enzymatic active sites.

  9. Active site specificity profiling of the matrix metalloproteinase family: Proteomic identification of 4300 cleavage sites by nine MMPs explored with structural and synthetic peptide cleavage analyses.

    PubMed

    Eckhard, Ulrich; Huesgen, Pitter F; Schilling, Oliver; Bellac, Caroline L; Butler, Georgina S; Cox, Jennifer H; Dufour, Antoine; Goebeler, Verena; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Keller, Ulrich Auf dem; Klein, Theo; Lange, Philipp F; Marino, Giada; Morrison, Charlotte J; Prudova, Anna; Rodriguez, David; Starr, Amanda E; Wang, Yili; Overall, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Secreted and membrane tethered matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key homeostatic proteases regulating the extracellular signaling and structural matrix environment of cells and tissues. For drug targeting of proteases, selectivity for individual molecules is highly desired and can be met by high yield active site specificity profiling. Using the high throughput Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS) method to simultaneously profile both the prime and non-prime sides of the cleavage sites of nine human MMPs, we identified more than 4300 cleavages from P6 to P6' in biologically diverse human peptide libraries. MMP specificity and kinetic efficiency were mainly guided by aliphatic and aromatic residues in P1' (with a ~32-93% preference for leucine depending on the MMP), and basic and small residues in P2' and P3', respectively. A wide differential preference for the hallmark P3 proline was found between MMPs ranging from 15 to 46%, yet when combined in the same peptide with the universally preferred P1' leucine, an unexpected negative cooperativity emerged. This was not observed in previous studies, probably due to the paucity of approaches that profile both the prime and non-prime sides together, and the masking of subsite cooperativity effects by global heat maps and iceLogos. These caveats make it critical to check for these biologically highly important effects by fixing all 20 amino acids one-by-one in the respective subsites and thorough assessing of the inferred specificity logo changes. Indeed an analysis of bona fide MEROPS physiological substrate cleavage data revealed that of the 37 natural substrates with either a P3-Pro or a P1'-Leu only 5 shared both features, confirming the PICS data. Upon probing with several new quenched-fluorescent peptides, rationally designed on our specificity data, the negative cooperativity was explained by reduced non-prime side flexibility constraining accommodation of the rigidifying P3 proline with

  10. Calculations of Cleavage Processes, Surface Structures and Electronic Structure of Silicon and Germanium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo.

    The cleavage processes, surface and step structures, and electronic structure of Si and Ge (111)2 x 1 surfaces were studied. The ab initio quantum chemistry programs KGNMOL-89 and DMol were used to study the cleavage of silicon and germanium clusters in the diamond structure. It was found that the potential energy of stretching and shearing glide planes increases much faster than for shuffle planes. The cleavage process is discussed and it is shown how glide -plane cleavage can occur, with consequences for surface structure models. The Keating strain-energy method has been applied to estimate the energies of surface and step structures on Si(111)2 x 1. Two minimum strain-energy TBS (Three -Bond Scission) model structures were obtained. Since angular strains are involved which go beyond the applicability limits of the Keating formula, a correction factor is used, derived by comparing Keating-type calculations of particular surface models of Si(111) with the results of more extensive calculations. The use of a simple correction factor gives results that agree with a calculation for the Pandey ( pi-bonded chain) model and one for the TBS model. Using this factor, a model for a 3-substep structure of the (322) step on Si is found to be quite stable, while the 2-substep structures are moderately stable. The surface band structure of the TBS and Pandey models have been computed using an ab initio HF LCAO program CRYSTAL-92. In the case of the TBS model, the results showed valence band dispersion that could be compatible with experiments. For the Pandey model, the calculated valence band dispersion seemed large. The surface band gap for both TBS and Pandey models was greatly overestimated. The significance is discussed. The surface electron density of states was calculated for the TBS model and the valence band generally matched experimental results from STM (scanning tunneling microscopy). The electron charge density of various surface regions was calculated. The

  11. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Copper-Binding Mutant of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB: Insight into the Key Role of the Active Site Aspartic Acid in Hg-Carbon Bond Cleavage and Metal Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Haytham M; Lecoq, Lauriane; Stevenson, Michael; Mansour, Ahmed; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Sygusch, Jurgen; Wilcox, Dean E; Omichinski, James G

    2016-02-23

    In bacterial resistance to mercury, the organomercurial lyase (MerB) plays a key role in the detoxification pathway through its ability to cleave Hg-carbon bonds. Two cysteines (C96 and C159; Escherichia coli MerB numbering) and an aspartic acid (D99) have been identified as the key catalytic residues, and these three residues are conserved in all but four known MerB variants, where the aspartic acid is replaced with a serine. To understand the role of the active site serine, we characterized the structure and metal binding properties of an E. coli MerB mutant with a serine substituted for D99 (MerB D99S) as well as one of the native MerB variants containing a serine residue in the active site (Bacillus megaterium MerB2). Surprisingly, the MerB D99S protein copurified with a bound metal that was determined to be Cu(II) from UV-vis absorption, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies. X-ray structural studies revealed that the Cu(II) is bound to the active site cysteine residues of MerB D99S, but that it is displaced following the addition of either an organomercurial substrate or an ionic mercury product. In contrast, the B. megaterium MerB2 protein does not copurify with copper, but the structure of the B. megaterium MerB2-Hg complex is highly similar to the structure of the MerB D99S-Hg complexes. These results demonstrate that the active site aspartic acid is crucial for both the enzymatic activity and metal binding specificity of MerB proteins and suggest a possible functional relationship between MerB and its only known structural homologue, the copper-binding protein NosL. PMID:26820485

  12. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Copper-Binding Mutant of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB: Insight into the Key Role of the Active Site Aspartic Acid in Hg-Carbon Bond Cleavage and Metal Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Haytham M; Lecoq, Lauriane; Stevenson, Michael; Mansour, Ahmed; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Sygusch, Jurgen; Wilcox, Dean E; Omichinski, James G

    2016-02-23

    In bacterial resistance to mercury, the organomercurial lyase (MerB) plays a key role in the detoxification pathway through its ability to cleave Hg-carbon bonds. Two cysteines (C96 and C159; Escherichia coli MerB numbering) and an aspartic acid (D99) have been identified as the key catalytic residues, and these three residues are conserved in all but four known MerB variants, where the aspartic acid is replaced with a serine. To understand the role of the active site serine, we characterized the structure and metal binding properties of an E. coli MerB mutant with a serine substituted for D99 (MerB D99S) as well as one of the native MerB variants containing a serine residue in the active site (Bacillus megaterium MerB2). Surprisingly, the MerB D99S protein copurified with a bound metal that was determined to be Cu(II) from UV-vis absorption, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies. X-ray structural studies revealed that the Cu(II) is bound to the active site cysteine residues of MerB D99S, but that it is displaced following the addition of either an organomercurial substrate or an ionic mercury product. In contrast, the B. megaterium MerB2 protein does not copurify with copper, but the structure of the B. megaterium MerB2-Hg complex is highly similar to the structure of the MerB D99S-Hg complexes. These results demonstrate that the active site aspartic acid is crucial for both the enzymatic activity and metal binding specificity of MerB proteins and suggest a possible functional relationship between MerB and its only known structural homologue, the copper-binding protein NosL.

  13. Effects of amino acids on development in vitro of cleavage-stage bovine embryos into blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Pinyopummintr, T; Bavister, B D

    1996-01-01

    Effects of amino acids on early bovine embryo development in vitro were examined using a chemically-defined, protein-free culture medium. Bovine embryos produced in vitro were cultured from 18 h to 72 h post insemination in a simple medium containing lactate as the only energy source except for the amino acid treatments. Subsequently, embryos were transferred to TCM-199 supplemented with serum for blastocyst development to substantiate their developmental competence. Treatments were: (1) non-essential amino acids from TCM-199 (NEA); (2) essential amino acids from TCM-199 (EA); (3) NEA+EA; (4) Eagle's minimum essential medium amino acids (MEM AA); (5) 11 amino acids present in HECM-6 (11 AA); and (6) 0.2 mM glutamine (GLN). A higher proportion of embryos (percentage of inseminated ova) cleaved to the > or = 8-cell stage by 72 h post insemination in NEA (56.7%), EA (41.2%), 11 AA (40.3%) and GLN (51.1%) than in either NEA+EA (30.0%) or MEM AA (33.1%). However, after transfer to complex medium, embryos that had developed in EA, as well as those in MEM AA or NEA+EA, produced significantly fewer blastocysts (37.1%, 34.4% and 25.6% respectively) than those in NEA (56.7%), GLN (48.9%) or 11 AA (37.7%). The ability of blastocysts to hatch from their zonae pellucidae was also affected by amino acid treatment during cleavage stages. The present study indicated that the addition of NEA or GLN or 11 AA to a chemically-defined culture medium during the cleavage phase of bovine embryo development increases their subsequent ability to reach the blastocyst stage. These data have implications for understanding the nutritional needs of bovine embryos produced in vitro and for optimizing the composition of culture media to support their development.

  14. Facile cleavage of triethylsilyl (TES) ethers using o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) without affecting tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBS) ethers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yikang; Huang, Jia-Hui; Shen, Xin; Hu, Qi; Tang, Chao-Jun; Li, Liang

    2002-06-27

    [reaction: see text] In DMSO cleavage of triethylsilyl (TES) ethers by o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) was significantly faster than cleavage of tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBS) ethers or further oxidation into carbonyl compounds. In most cases, TES protecting groups could be removed in good to excellent yields within 1 h, whereas similar TBS protecting groups remained intact under the same conditions. The procedure also could be adapted for direct one-pot conversion of TES ethers into carbonyl compounds.

  15. Structural basis for substrate recognition and processive cleavage mechanisms of the trimeric exonuclease PhoExo I

    PubMed Central

    Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Ishino, Sonoko; Tsutsumi, Kanae; Ito, Tomoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Tanokura, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Nucleases play important roles in nucleic acid processes, such as replication, repair and recombination. Recently, we identified a novel single-strand specific 3′-5′ exonuclease, PfuExo I, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which may be involved in the Thermococcales-specific DNA repair system. PfuExo I forms a trimer and cleaves single-stranded DNA at every two nucleotides. Here, we report the structural basis for the cleavage mechanism of this novel exonuclease family. A structural analysis of PhoExo I, the homologous enzyme from P. horikoshii OT3, showed that PhoExo I utilizes an RNase H-like active site and possesses a 3′-OH recognition site ∼9 Å away from the active site, which enables cleavage at every two nucleotides. Analyses of the heterotrimeric and monomeric PhoExo I activities showed that trimerization is indispensable for its processive cleavage mechanism, but only one active site of the trimer is required. PMID:26138487

  16. Proteolytic cleavage of human acid-sensing ion channel 1 by the serine protease matriptase.

    PubMed

    Clark, Edlira B; Jovov, Biljana; Rooj, Arun K; Fuller, Catherine M; Benos, Dale J

    2010-08-27

    Acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1) is a H(+)-gated channel of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC)/degenerin family. ASIC1 is expressed mostly in the central and peripheral nervous system neurons. ENaC and ASIC function is regulated by several serine proteases. The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase activates the prototypical alphabetagammaENaC channel, but we found that matriptase is expressed in glioma cells and its expression is higher in glioma compared with normal astrocytes. Therefore, the goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that matriptase regulates ASIC1 function. Matriptase decreased the acid-activated ASIC1 current as measured by two-electrode voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes and cleaved ASIC1 expressed in oocytes or CHO K1 cells. Inactive S805A matriptase had no effect on either the current or the cleavage of ASIC1. The effect of matriptase on ASIC1 was specific, because it did not affect the function of ASIC2 and no matriptase-specific ASIC2 fragments were detected in oocytes or in CHO cells. Three matriptase recognition sites were identified in ASIC1 (Arg-145, Lys-185, and Lys-384). Site-directed mutagenesis of these sites prevented matriptase cleavage of ASIC1. Our results show that matriptase is expressed in glioma cells and that matriptase specifically cleaves ASIC1 in heterologous expression systems. PMID:20601429

  17. Structural basis for the fast self-cleavage reaction catalyzed by the twister ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Eiler, Daniel; Wang, Jimin; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Twister is a recently discovered RNA motif that is estimated to have one of the fastest known catalytic rates of any naturally occurring small self-cleaving ribozyme. We determined the 4.1-Å resolution crystal structure of a twister sequence from an organism that has not been cultured in isolation, and it shows an ordered scissile phosphate and nucleotide 5′ to the cleavage site. A second crystal structure of twister from Orzyza sativa determined at 3.1-Å resolution exhibits a disordered scissile phosphate and nucleotide 5′ to the cleavage site. The core of twister is stabilized by base pairing, a large network of stacking interactions, and two pseudoknots. We observe three nucleotides that appear to mediate catalysis: a guanosine that we propose deprotonates the 2′-hydroxyl of the nucleotide 5′ to the cleavage site and a conserved adenosine. We suggest the adenosine neutralizes the negative charge on a nonbridging phosphate oxygen atom at the cleavage site. The active site also positions the labile linkage for in-line nucleophilic attack, and thus twister appears to simultaneously use three strategies proposed for small self-cleaving ribozymes. The twister crystal structures (i) show its global structure, (ii) demonstrate the significance of the double pseudoknot fold, (iii) provide a possible hypothesis for enhanced catalysis, and (iv) illuminate the roles of all 10 highly conserved nucleotides of twister that participate in the formation of its small and stable catalytic pocket. PMID:25157168

  18. Structures of exoglucanase from Clostridium cellulovorans: cellotetraose binding and cleavage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li Chu; Amiraslanov, Imamaddin; Chen, Hung Ren; Chen, Yun Wen; Lee, Hsiao Lin; Liang, Po Huang; Liaw, Yen Chywan

    2015-10-01

    Exoglucanase/cellobiohydrolase (EC 3.2.1.176) hydrolyzes a β-1,4-glycosidic bond from the reducing end of cellulose and releases cellobiose as the major product. Three complex crystal structures of the glycosyl hydrolase 48 (GH48) cellobiohydrolase S (ExgS) from Clostridium cellulovorans with cellobiose, cellotetraose and triethylene glycol molecules were solved. The product cellobiose occupies subsites +1 and +2 in the open active-site cleft of the enzyme-cellotetraose complex structure, indicating an enzymatic hydrolysis function. Moreover, three triethylene glycol molecules and one pentaethylene glycol molecule are located at active-site subsites -2 to -6 in the structure of the ExgS-triethylene glycol complex shown here. Modelling of glucose into subsite -1 in the active site of the ExgS-cellobiose structure revealed that Glu50 acts as a proton donor and Asp222 plays a nucleophilic role. PMID:26457517

  19. Multiple nucleic acid cleavage modes in divergent type III CRISPR systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Graham, Shirley; Tello, Agnes; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is an RNA-guided adaptive immune system that protects bacteria and archaea from invading nucleic acids. Type III systems (Cmr, Csm) have been shown to cleave RNA targets in vitro and some are capable of transcription-dependent DNA targeting. The crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has two divergent subtypes of the type III system (Sso-IIID and a Cmr7-containing variant of Sso-IIIB). Here, we report that both the Sso-IIID and Sso-IIIB complexes cleave cognate RNA targets with a ruler mechanism and 6 or 12 nt spacing that relates to the organization of the Cas7 backbone. This backbone-mediated cleavage activity thus appears universal for the type III systems. The Sso-IIIB complex is also known to possess a distinct ‘UA’ cleavage mode. The predominant activity observed in vitro depends on the relative molar concentration of protein and target RNA. The Sso-IIID complex can cleave plasmid DNA targets in vitro, generating linear DNA products with an activity that is dependent on both the cyclase and HD nuclease domains of the Cas10 subunit, suggesting a role for both nuclease active sites in the degradation of double-stranded DNA targets. PMID:26801642

  20. Crystal Structure of the 25 kDa Subunit of Human Cleavage Factor I{m}

    SciTech Connect

    Coseno,M.; Martin, G.; Berger, C.; Gilmartin, G.; Keller, W.; Doublie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Cleavage factor Im is an essential component of the pre-messenger RNA 3'-end processing machinery in higher eukaryotes, participating in both the polyadenylation and cleavage steps. Cleavage factor Im is an oligomer composed of a small 25 kDa subunit (CF Im25) and a variable larger subunit of either 59, 68 or 72 kDa. The small subunit also interacts with RNA, poly(A) polymerase, and the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein. These protein-protein interactions are thought to be facilitated by the Nudix domain of CF Im25, a hydrolase motif with a characteristic {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} fold and a conserved catalytic sequence or Nudix box. We present here the crystal structures of human CF Im25 in its free and diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A) bound forms at 1.85 and 1.80 Angstroms, respectively. CF Im25 crystallizes as a dimer and presents the classical Nudix fold. Results from crystallographic and biochemical experiments suggest that CF Im25 makes use of its Nudix fold to bind but not hydrolyze ATP and Ap4A. The complex and apo protein structures provide insight into the active oligomeric state of CF Im and suggest a possible role of nucleotide binding in either the polyadenylation and/or cleavage steps of pre-messenger RNA 3'-end processing.

  1. Structures of a CRISPR-Cas9 R-loop complex primed for DNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fuguo; Taylor, David W; Chen, Janice S; Kornfeld, Jack E; Zhou, Kaihong; Thompson, Aubri J; Nogales, Eva; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-02-19

    Bacterial adaptive immunity and genome engineering involving the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-associated (Cas) protein Cas9 begin with RNA-guided DNA unwinding to form an RNA-DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand inside the protein. The role of this R-loop structure in positioning each DNA strand for cleavage by the two Cas9 nuclease domains is unknown. We determine molecular structures of the catalytically active Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 R-loop that show the displaced DNA strand located near the RuvC nuclease domain active site. These protein-DNA interactions, in turn, position the HNH nuclease domain adjacent to the target DNA strand cleavage site in a conformation essential for concerted DNA cutting. Cas9 bends the DNA helix by 30°, providing the structural distortion needed for R-loop formation.

  2. Mechanistic Investigation of Acid-Catalyzed Cleavage of Aryl-Ether Linkages: Implications for Lignin Depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, M. R.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-oxygen bonds are the primary inter-monomer linkages lignin polymers in plant cell walls, and as such, catalyst development to cleave these linkages is of paramount importance to deconstruct biomass to its constituent monomers for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. For many decades, acid catalysis has been used to depolymerize lignin. Lignin is a primary component of plant cell walls, which is connected primarily by aryl-ether linkages, and the mechanism of its deconstruction by acid is not well understood, likely due to its heterogeneous and complex nature compared to cellulose. For effective biomass conversion strategies, utilization of lignin is of significant relevance and as such understanding the mechanisms of catalytic lignin deconstruction to constituent monomers and oligomers is of keen interest. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the acid catalysis of a range of dimeric species exhibiting the b-O-4 linkage, the most common inter-monomer linkage in lignin. We demonstrate that the presence of a phenolic species dramatically increases the rate of cleavage in acid at 150 degrees C. Quantum mechanical calculations on dimers with the para-hydroxyl group demonstrate that this acid-catalyzed pathway differs from the nonphenolic dimmers. Importantly, this result implies that depolymerization of native lignin in the plant cell wall will proceed via an unzipping mechanism wherein b-O-4 linkages will be cleaved from the ends of the branched, polymer chains inwards toward the center of the polymer. To test this hypothesis further, we synthesized a homopolymer of b-O-4 with a phenolic hydroxyl group, and demonstrate that it is cleaved in acid from the end containing the phenolic hydroxyl group. This result suggests that genetic modifications to lignin biosynthesis pathways in plants that will enable lower severity processes to fractionate lignin for upgrading and for easier access to the carbohydrate fraction of

  3. NMR structure of the active conformation of the Varkud satellite ribozyme cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Mitchell, G. Thomas; Gendron, Patrick; Major, François; Andersen, Angela A.; Collins, Richard A.; Legault, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    Substrate cleavage by the Neurospora Varkud satellite (VS) ribozyme involves a structural change in the stem-loop I substrate from an inactive to an active conformation. We have determined the NMR solution structure of a mutant stem-loop I that mimics the active conformation of the cleavage site internal loop. This structure shares many similarities, but also significant differences, with the previously determined structures of the inactive internal loop. The active internal loop displays different base-pairing interactions and forms a novel RNA fold composed exclusively of sheared G-A base pairs. From chemical-shift mapping we identified two Mg2+ binding sites in the active internal loop. One of the Mg2+ binding sites forms in the active but not the inactive conformation of the internal loop and is likely important for catalysis. Using the structure comparison program mc-search, we identified the active internal loop fold in other RNA structures. In Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA, this RNA fold is directly involved in a long-range tertiary interaction. An analogous tertiary interaction may form between the active internal loop of the substrate and the catalytic domain of the VS ribozyme. The combination of NMR and bioinformatic approaches presented here has identified a novel RNA fold and provides insights into the structural basis of catalytic function in the Neurospora VS ribozyme. PMID:12782785

  4. Acquisition of a novel eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site confers intracellular cleavage of an H7N7 influenza virus hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Sun, Xiangjie; Chung, Changik; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2012-12-05

    A critical feature of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1 and H7N7) is the efficient intracellular cleavage of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. H7N7 viruses also exist in equine species, and a unique feature of the equine H7N7 HA is the presence of an eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site. Here, we show that three histidine residues within the unique insertion of the equine H7N7 HA are essential for intracellular cleavage. An asparagine residue within the insertion-derived glycosylation site was also found to be essential for intracellular cleavage. The presence of the histidine residues also appear to be involved in triggering fusion, since mutation of the histidine residues resulted in a destabilizing effect. Importantly, the addition of a tetrabasic site and the eleven amino acid insertion conferred efficient intracellular cleavage to the HA of an H7N3 low pathogenicity avian influenza virus. Our studies show that acquisition of the eleven amino acid insertion offers an alternative mechanism for intracellular cleavage of influenza HA.

  5. Homodinuclear lanthanide complexes of phenylthiopropionic acid: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity, DNA cleavage, and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Shiju, C; Arish, D; Kumaresan, S

    2013-03-15

    Lanthanide complexes of La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), and Ho(III) with phenylthiopropionic acid were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, mass, IR, electronic spectra, molar conductance, TGA, and powder XRD. The results show that the lanthanide complexes are homodinuclear in nature. The two lanthanide ions are bridged by eight oxygen atoms from four carboxylate groups. Thermal decomposition profiles are consistent with the proposed formulations. Powder XRD studies show that all the complexes are amorphous in nature. Antimicrobial studies indicate that these complexes exhibit more activity than the ligand itself. The DNA cleavage activity of the ligand and its complexes were assayed on Escherichia coli DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence of H(2)O(2). The result shows that the Pr(III) and Nd(III) complexes have completely cleaved the DNA. The anticancer activities of the complexes have also been studied towards human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and colon cancer cells (HCT116) and it was found that the La(III) and Nd(III) complexes are more active than the corresponding Pr(III), Sm(III), Ho(III) complexes, and the free ligand on both the cancer cells.

  6. Homodinuclear lanthanide complexes of phenylthiopropionic acid: Synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity, DNA cleavage, and antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiju, C.; Arish, D.; Kumaresan, S.

    2013-03-01

    Lanthanide complexes of La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), and Ho(III) with phenylthiopropionic acid were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, mass, IR, electronic spectra, molar conductance, TGA, and powder XRD. The results show that the lanthanide complexes are homodinuclear in nature. The two lanthanide ions are bridged by eight oxygen atoms from four carboxylate groups. Thermal decomposition profiles are consistent with the proposed formulations. Powder XRD studies show that all the complexes are amorphous in nature. Antimicrobial studies indicate that these complexes exhibit more activity than the ligand itself. The DNA cleavage activity of the ligand and its complexes were assayed on Escherichia coli DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence of H2O2. The result shows that the Pr(III) and Nd(III) complexes have completely cleaved the DNA. The anticancer activities of the complexes have also been studied towards human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and colon cancer cells (HCT116) and it was found that the La(III) and Nd(III) complexes are more active than the corresponding Pr(III), Sm(III), Ho(III) complexes, and the free ligand on both the cancer cells.

  7. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array*

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca2+-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10′ of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. The kcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5–1,710 M−1s−1. Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and −2 with a similar kcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5′. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P′-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achieved kcat/Km prediction with r = 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3′, and P4′ sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our

  8. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array.

    PubMed

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10' of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. Thekcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5-1,710 M(-1)s(-1) Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and -2 with a similarkcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5'. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P'-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achievedkcat/Kmprediction withr= 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3', and P4' sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our binary-QSAR model

  9. Synthesis of o-Carboxyarylacrylic Acids by Room Temperature Oxidative Cleavage of Hydroxynaphthalenes and Higher Aromatics with Oxone.

    PubMed

    Parida, Keshaba Nanda; Moorthy, Jarugu Narasimha

    2015-08-21

    A simple procedure for the synthesis of a variety of o-carboxyarylacrylic acids has been developed with Oxone (2KHSO5·KHSO4·K2SO4); the oxidation reaction involves the stirring of methoxy/hydroxy-substituted naphthalenes, phenanthrenes, anthracenes, etc. with Oxone in an acetonitrile-water mixture (1:1, v/v) at rt. Mechanistically, the reaction proceeds via initial oxidation of naphthalene to o-quinone, which undergoes cleavage to the corresponding o-carboxyarylacrylic acid. The higher aromatics are found to yield carboxymethyl lactones derived from the initially formed o-carboxyarylacrylic acids.

  10. Serum Collagen Type II Cleavage Epitope and Serum Hyaluronic Acid as Biomarkers for Treatment Monitoring of Dogs with Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, José M.; Rubio, Mónica; Spinella, Giuseppe; Cuervo, Belén; Sopena, Joaquín; Cugat, Ramón; Garcia-Balletbó, Montserrat; Dominguez, Juan M.; Granados, Maria; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Ceron, José J.; Carrillo, José M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of serum type II collagen cleavage epitope and serum hyaluronic acid as biomarkers for treatment monitoring in osteoarthritic dogs. For this purpose, a treatment model based on mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue combined with plasma rich in growth factors was used. This clinical study included 10 dogs with hip osteoarthritis. Both analytes were measured in serum at baseline, just before applying the treatment, and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. These results were compared with those obtained from force plate analysis using the same animals during the same study period. Levels of type II collagen cleavage epitope decreased and those of hyaluronic acid increased with clinical improvement objectively verified via force plate analysis, suggesting these two biomarkers could be effective as indicators of clinical development of joint disease in dogs. PMID:26886592

  11. Structural basis for DNA cleavage by the potent antiproliferative agent (–)-lomaiviticin A

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Christina M.; Li, Zhenwu; Herzon, Seth B.

    2016-01-01

    (–)-Lomaiviticin A (1) is a complex antiproliferative metabolite that inhibits the growth of many cultured cancer cell lines at low nanomolar–picomolar concentrations. (–)-Lomaiviticin A (1) possesses a C2-symmetric structure that contains two unusual diazotetrahydrobenzo[b]fluorene (diazofluorene) functional groups. Nucleophilic activation of each diazofluorene within 1 produces vinyl radical intermediates that affect hydrogen atom abstraction from DNA, leading to the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Certain DNA DSB repair-deficient cell lines are sensitized toward 1, and 1 is under evaluation in preclinical models of these tumor types. However, the mode of binding of 1 to DNA had not been determined. Here we elucidate the structure of a 1:1 complex between 1 and the duplex d(GCTATAGC)2 by NMR spectroscopy and computational modeling. Unexpectedly, we show that both diazofluorene residues of 1 penetrate the duplex. This binding disrupts base pairing leading to ejection of the central AT bases, while placing the proreactive centers of 1 in close proximity to each strand. DNA binding may also enhance the reactivity of 1 toward nucleophilic activation through steric compression and conformational restriction (an example of shape-dependent catalysis). This study provides a structural basis for the DNA cleavage activity of 1, will guide the design of synthetic DNA-activated DNA cleavage agents, and underscores the utility of natural products to reveal novel modes of small molecule–DNA association. PMID:26929332

  12. Effects of vitamins, coenzymes and amino acids on reactions of homolytic cleavage of the O-glycoside bond in carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Shadyro, O I; Kisel, R M; Vysotskii, V V; Edimecheva, I P

    2006-09-15

    It has been established that vitamins B1, K3 and C, coenzyme Q0 and amino acids cysteine and histidine effectively inhibit reactions of homolytic cleavage of the O-glycoside bond, which are responsible for the destruction of di- and polysaccharides on gamma-irradiation or the action of other reactive radical initiators. This effect was shown to originate from either oxidation or reduction of the radicals of carbohydrates undergoing destruction.

  13. New tools provide a second look at HDV ribozyme structure, dynamics and cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Kapral, Gary J.; Jain, Swati; Noeske, Jonas; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Richardson, David C.; Richardson, Jane S.

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme is a self-cleaving RNA enzyme essential for processing viral transcripts during rolling circle viral replication. The first crystal structure of the cleaved ribozyme was solved in 1998, followed by structures of uncleaved, mutant-inhibited and ion-complexed forms. Recently, methods have been developed that make the task of modeling RNA structure and dynamics significantly easier and more reliable. We have used ERRASER and PHENIX to rebuild and re-refine the cleaved and cis-acting C75U-inhibited structures of the HDV ribozyme. The results correct local conformations and identify alternates for RNA residues, many in functionally important regions, leading to improved R values and model validation statistics for both structures. We compare the rebuilt structures to a higher resolution, trans-acting deoxy-inhibited structure of the ribozyme, and conclude that although both inhibited structures are consistent with the currently accepted hammerhead-like mechanism of cleavage, they do not add direct structural evidence to the biochemical and modeling data. However, the rebuilt structures (PDBs: 4PR6, 4PRF) provide a more robust starting point for research on the dynamics and catalytic mechanism of the HDV ribozyme and demonstrate the power of new techniques to make significant improvements in RNA structures that impact biologically relevant conclusions. PMID:25326328

  14. t-boc synthesis of huwentoxin-i through native chemical ligation incorporating a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid cleavage strategy.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Parashar; Cabalteja, Chino C; Philips, Edwin E; Espiritu, Michael J; Peigneur, Steve; Mille, Bea G; Tytgat, Jan; Cummins, Theodore R; Bingham, Jon-Paul

    2016-09-01

    Tert-butyloxycarbonyl (t-Boc)-based native chemical ligation (NCL) techniques commonly employ hydrogen fluoride (HF) to create the thioester fragment required for the ligation process. Our research aimed to assess the replacement of HF with Trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMSA). Here we examined a 33 amino acid test peptide, Huwentoxin-I (HwTx-I) as a novel candidate for our TFMSA cleavage protocol. Structurally HwTx-I has an X-Cys(16) -Cys(17) -X sequence mid-region, which makes it an ideal candidate for NCL. Experiments determined that the best yields (16.8%) obtained for 50 mg of a thioester support resin were achieved with a TFMSA volume of 100 μL with a 0.5-h incubation on ice, followed by 2.0 h at room temperature. RP-HPLC/UV and mass spectra indicated the appropriate parent mass and retention of the cleaved HwTx-I N-terminal thioester fragment (Ala(1) -Cys(16) ), which was used in preparation for NCL. The resulting chemically ligated HwTx-I was oxidized/folded, purified, and then assessed for pharmacological target selectivity. Native-like HwTx-I produced by this method yielded an EC50 value of 340.5 ± 26.8 nM for Nav 1.2 and an EC50 value of 504.1 ± 81.3 nM for Nav 1.3, this being similar to previous literature results using native material. This article represents the first NCL based synthesis of this potent sodium channel blocker. Our illustrated approach removes potential restrictions in the advancement of NCL as a common peptide laboratory technique with minimal investment, and removes the hazards associated with HF usage. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 737-745, 2016. PMID:27271997

  15. The tertiary structure of the four-way DNA junction affords protection against DNase I cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Murchie, A I; Carter, W A; Portugal, J; Lilley, D M

    1990-01-01

    The accessibility of phosphodiester bonds in the DNA of four-way helical junctions has been probed with the nuclease DNase I. Regions of protection were observed on all four strands of the junctions, that tended to be longer on the strands that are exchanged between the coaxially stacked pairs of helices. The protected regions on the continuous strands of the stacked helices were not located exactly at the junction, but were displaced towards the 3' side of the strand. This is the region of backbone that becomes located in the major groove of the opposed helix in the non-crossed, right-handed structure for the junction, and might therefore be predicted to be protected against cleavage by an enzyme. However, the major grooves of the structure remain accessible to the much smaller probe dimethyl sulphate. Images PMID:2339051

  16. DNA structural alterations induced by bis-netropsins modulate human DNA topoisomerase I cleavage activity and poisoning by camptothecin.

    PubMed

    Sukhanova, Alyona; Grokhovsky, Sergei; Ermishov, Michael; Mochalov, Konstantin; Zhuze, Alexei; Oleinikov, Vladimir; Nabiev, Igor

    2002-07-01

    Bis-netropsins (bis-Nts) are efficient catalytic inhibitors of human DNA topoisomerase I (top I). These DNA minor groove binders are considered to serve as suppressors of top I-linked DNA breaks, which is generally believed to be related to their affinity to DNA. In this study, it was found that bis-Nts exhibit sequence-specificity of suppression of the strong top I-specific DNA cleavage sites and that this sequence-specificity is determined by differential ligand-induced structural alterations of DNA. Raman scattering analysis of bis-Nts interactions with double-stranded oligonucleotides, each containing the site of specific affinity to one of bis-Nts and a distinctly located top I degenerate consensus, demonstrated that bis-Nts induce not only structural changes in duplex DNA at their loading position, but also conformational changes in a distant top I-specific DNA cleavage site. The ability to alter the DNA structure correlates with the anti-top I inhibitory activities of the ligands. In addition, DNA structural alterations induced by bis-Nts were shown to be responsible for modulation of the camptothecin (CPT)-mediated DNA cleavage by top I. This effect is expressed in the bis-Nts-induced enhancement of some of the CPT-dependent DNA cleavage sites as well as in the CPT-induced enhancement of some of the top I-specific DNA cleavage sites suppressed by bis-Nts in the absence of CPT. PMID:12106608

  17. Topoisomerase I-mediated DNA cleavage as a guide to the development of antitumor agents derived from the marine alkaloid lamellarin D: triester derivatives incorporating amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Christelle; Facompré, Michaël; Laine, William; Baldeyrou, Brigitte; García-Gravalos, Dolores; Francesch, Andrés; Mateo, Cristina; Pastor, Alfredo; Jiménez, José A; Manzanares, Ignacio; Cuevas, Carmen; Bailly, Christian

    2004-04-01

    The marine alkaloid lamellarin D (LAM-D) has been recently characterized as a potent poison of human topoisomerase I endowed with remarkable cytotoxic activities against tumor cells. We report here the first structure-activity relationship study in the LAM-D series. Two groups of triester compounds incorporating various substituents on the three phenolic OH at positions 8, 14 and 20 of 6H-[1]benzopyrano[4',3':4,5]pyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinolin-6-one pentacyclic planar chromophore typical of the parent alkaloid were tested as topoisomerase I inhibitors. The non-amino compounds in group A showed no activity against topoisomerase I and were essentially non cytotoxic. In sharp contrast, compounds in group B incorporating amino acid residues strongly promoted DNA cleavage by human topoisomerase I. LAM-D derivatives tri-substituted with leucine, valine, proline, phenylalanine or alanine residues, or a related amino side chain, stabilize topoisomerase I-DNA complexes. The DNA cleavage sites detected at T downward arrow G or C downward arrow G dinucleotides with these molecules were identical to that of LAM-D but slightly different from those seen with camptothecin which stimulates topoisomerase I-mediated cleavage at T downward arrow G only. In the DNA relaxation and cleavage assays, the corresponding Boc-protected compounds and the analogues of the non-planar LAM-501 derivative lacking the 5-6 double bond in the quinoline B-ring showed no effect on topoisomerase I and were considerably less cytotoxic than the corresponding cationic compounds in the LAM-D series. The presence of positive charges on the molecules enhances DNA interaction but melting temperature studies indicate that DNA binding is not correlated with topoisomerase I inhibition or cytotoxicity. Cell growth inhibition by the 41 lamellarin derivatives was evaluated with a panel of tumor cells lines. With prostate (DU-145 and LN-CaP), ovarian (IGROV and IGROV-ET resistant to ecteinascidin-743) and colon (LoVo and

  18. Recovery of Recombinant Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Reveals a Function for Non-structural Glycoproteins Cleavage by Furin.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Zivcec, Marko; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Nichol, Stuart T; Albariño, César G; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2015-05-01

    Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a negative-strand RNA virus of the family Bunyaviridae (genus: Nairovirus). In humans, CCHFV causes fever, hemorrhage, severe thrombocytopenia, and high fatality. A major impediment in precisely determining the basis of CCHFV's high pathogenicity has been the lack of methodology to produce recombinant CCHFV. We developed a reverse genetics system based on transfecting plasmids into BSR-T7/5 and Huh7 cells. In our system, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase produced complementary RNA copies of the viral S, M, and L segments that were encapsidated with the support, in trans, of CCHFV nucleoprotein and L polymerase. The system was optimized to systematically recover high yields of infectious CCHFV. Additionally, we tested the ability of the system to produce specifically designed CCHFV mutants. The M segment encodes a polyprotein that is processed by host proprotein convertases (PCs), including the site-1 protease (S1P) and furin-like PCs. S1P and furin cleavages are necessary for producing the non-structural glycoprotein GP38, while S1P cleavage yields structural Gn. We studied the role of furin cleavage by rescuing a recombinant CCHFV encoding a virus glycoprotein precursor lacking a functional furin cleavage motif (RSKR mutated to ASKA). The ASKA mutation blocked glycoprotein precursor's maturation to GP38, and Gn precursor's maturation to Gn was slightly diminished. Furin cleavage was not essential for replication, as blocking furin cleavage resulted only in transient reduction of CCHFV titers, suggesting that either GP38 and/or decreased Gn maturation accounted for the reduced virion production. Our data demonstrate that nairoviruses can be produced by reverse genetics, and the utility of our system uncovered a function for furin cleavage. This viral rescue system could be further used to study the CCHFV replication cycle and facilitate the development of efficacious vaccines to counter this biological and public

  19. Histidine-Based Lipopeptides Enhance Cleavage of Nucleic Acids: Interactions with DNA and Hydrolytic Properties.

    PubMed

    Bélières, M; Déjugnat, C; Chouini-Lalanne, N

    2015-12-16

    Interaction studies and cleavage activity experiments were carried out between plasmid DNA and a series of histidine-based lipopeptides. Specific fluorescent probes (ethidium bromide, Hoechst 33342, and pyrene) were used to monitor intercalation, minor groove binding, and self-assembly of lipopeptides, respectively. Association between DNA and lipopeptides was thus evidenced, highlighting the importance of both histidine and hydrophobic tail in the interaction process. DNA cleavage in the presence of lipopeptides was then detected by gel electrophoresis and quantified, showing the importance of histidine and the involvement of its side-chain imidazole in the hydrolysis mechanism. These systems could then be developed as synthetic nucleases while raising concern of introducing histidine in the design of lipopeptide-based transfection vectors.

  20. VAMP/synaptobrevin cleavage by tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins is strongly enhanced by acidic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Caccin, Paola; Rossetto, Ornella; Rigoni, Michela; Johnson, Eric; Schiavo, Giampietro; Montecucco, Cesare

    2003-05-01

    Tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins (TeNT and BoNTs) block neuroexocytosis via specific cleavage and inactivation of SNARE proteins. Such activity is exerted by the N-terminal 50 kDa light chain (L) domain, which is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase. TeNT, BoNT/B, /D, /F and /G cleave vesicle associated membrane protein (VAMP), a protein of the neurotransmitter-containing small synaptic vesicles, at different single peptide bonds. Since the proteolytic activity of these metalloproteases is higher on native VAMP inserted in synaptic vesicles than on recombinant VAMP, we have investigated the influence of liposomes of different lipid composition on this activity. We found that the rate of VAMP cleavage with all neurotoxins tested here is strongly enhanced by negatively charged lipid mixtures. This effect is at least partially due to the binding of the metalloprotease to the lipid membranes, with electrostatic interactions playing an important role.

  1. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 2. Major structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Polycarboxylic acid structures that account for the strong-acid characteristics (pKa1 near 2.0) were examined for fulvic acid from the Suwannee River. Studies of model compounds demonstrated that pKa values near 2.0 occur only if the ??-ether or ??-ester groups were in cyclic structures with two to three additional electronegative functional groups (carboxyl, ester, ketone, aromatic groups) at adjacent positions on the ring. Ester linkage removal by alkaline hydrolysis and destruction of ether linkages through cleavage and reduction with hydriodic acid confirmed that the strong carboxyl acidity in fulvic acid was associated with polycarboxylic ??-ether and ??-ester structures. Studies of hypothetical structural models of fulvic acid indicated possible relation of these polycarboxylic structures with the amphiphilic and metal-binding properties of fulvic acid.

  2. Structural Basis of Stereospecificity in the Bacterial Enzymatic Cleavage of β-Aryl Ether Bonds in Lignin.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Kate E; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L; Heins, Richard A; McAndrew, Ryan P; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C; Noguera, Daniel R; Simmons, Blake A; Sale, Kenneth L; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J; Adams, Paul D; Phillips, George N

    2016-03-01

    Lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50-70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.

  3. Structural Basis of Stereospecificity in the Bacterial Enzymatic Cleavage of β-Aryl Ether Bonds in Lignin*

    PubMed Central

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; Heins, Richard A.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J.; Adams, Paul D.; Phillips, George N.

    2016-01-01

    Lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50–70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin. PMID:26637355

  4. Structural basis of stereospecificity in the bacterial enzymatic cleavage of β-aryl ether bonds in lignin

    DOE PAGES

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; Heins, Richard A.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; et al

    2015-12-04

    Here, lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, wemore » present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50–70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.« less

  5. Structural basis of stereospecificity in the bacterial enzymatic cleavage of β-aryl ether bonds in lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; Heins, Richard A.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J.; Adams, Paul D.; Phillips, George N.

    2015-12-04

    Here, lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50–70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.

  6. Cα-C bond cleavage of the peptide backbone in MALDI in-source decay using salicylic acid derivative matrices.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2011-07-01

    The use of 5-formylsalicylic acid (5-FSA) and 5-nitrosalicylic acid (5-NSA) as novel matrices for in-source decay (ISD) of peptides in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is described. The use of 5-FSA and 5-NSA generated a- and x-series ions accompanied by oxidized peptides [M - 2 H + H](+). The preferential formation of a- and x-series ions was found to be dependent on the hydrogen-accepting ability of matrix. The hydrogen-accepting ability estimated from the ratio of signal intensity of oxidized product [M - 2 H + H](+) to that of non-oxidized protonated molecule [M + H](+) of peptide was of the order 5-NSA > 5-FSA > 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) ≒ 2,5-dihydroxyl benzoic acid (2,5-DHB) ≒ 0. The results suggest that the hydrogen transfer reaction from peptide to 5-FSA and 5-NSA occurs during the MALDI-ISD processes. The hydrogen abstraction from peptides results in the formation of oxidized peptides containing a radical site on the amide nitrogen with subsequent radical-induced cleavage at the Cα-C bond, leading to the formation of a- and x-series ions. The most significant feature of MALDI-ISD with 5-FSA and 5-NSA is the specific cleavage of the Cα-C bond of the peptide backbone without degradation of side-chain and post-translational modifications (PTM). The matrix provides a useful complementary method to conventional MALDI-ISD for amino acid sequencing and site localization of PTMs in peptides.

  7. Label-free electrochemical nucleic acid biosensing by tandem polymerization and cleavage-mediated cascade target recycling and DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Gong, Hongwei; Wang, Yanqun; Wang, Li

    2016-03-15

    Owing to the intrinsic importance of nucleic acid as bio-targets, the achievement of its simple and sensitive detection with high confidence is very essential for biological studies and diagnostic purposes. Herein, a label-free, isothermal, and ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of target DNA was developed by using a tandem polymerization and cleavage-mediated cascade target recycling and DNAzyme releasing amplification strategy. Upon sensing of the nucleic acid analyte for the assembled hairpin-like probe DNA on the electrode, the DNA polymerase guided the target recycling and simultaneously triggered the lambda exonuclease cleavage, accompanied by the cascade recycling of the released new complementary strand and the amplified liberation of the G-rich sequence of the HRP-mimicking DNAzyme. The electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2 by the generated hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme was used for the signal readout and further amplification toward target response. Such tandem functional operation by DNA polymerase, lambda exonuclease and DNAzyme endows the developed biosensor with a high sensitivity and also a high confidence. A low detection limit of 5 fM with an excellent selectivity toward target DNA could be achieved. It also exhibits the distinct advantages of simplicity in probe design and biosensor fabrication, and label-free electrochemical detection, thus may offer a promising avenue for the applications in disease diagnosis and clinical biomedicine. PMID:26513289

  8. Label-free electrochemical nucleic acid biosensing by tandem polymerization and cleavage-mediated cascade target recycling and DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Gong, Hongwei; Wang, Yanqun; Wang, Li

    2016-03-15

    Owing to the intrinsic importance of nucleic acid as bio-targets, the achievement of its simple and sensitive detection with high confidence is very essential for biological studies and diagnostic purposes. Herein, a label-free, isothermal, and ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of target DNA was developed by using a tandem polymerization and cleavage-mediated cascade target recycling and DNAzyme releasing amplification strategy. Upon sensing of the nucleic acid analyte for the assembled hairpin-like probe DNA on the electrode, the DNA polymerase guided the target recycling and simultaneously triggered the lambda exonuclease cleavage, accompanied by the cascade recycling of the released new complementary strand and the amplified liberation of the G-rich sequence of the HRP-mimicking DNAzyme. The electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2 by the generated hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme was used for the signal readout and further amplification toward target response. Such tandem functional operation by DNA polymerase, lambda exonuclease and DNAzyme endows the developed biosensor with a high sensitivity and also a high confidence. A low detection limit of 5 fM with an excellent selectivity toward target DNA could be achieved. It also exhibits the distinct advantages of simplicity in probe design and biosensor fabrication, and label-free electrochemical detection, thus may offer a promising avenue for the applications in disease diagnosis and clinical biomedicine.

  9. Effects of S1 Cleavage on the Structure, Surface Export, and Signaling Activity of Human Notch1 and Notch2

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Wendy R.; Vardar-Ulu, Didem; L'Heureux, Sarah; Ashworth, Todd; Malecki, Michael J.; Sanchez-Irizarry, Cheryll; McArthur, Debbie G.; Histen, Gavin; Mitchell, Jennifer L.; Aster, Jon C.; Blacklow, Stephen C.

    2009-09-25

    Notch receptors are normally cleaved during maturation by a furin-like protease at an extracellular site termed S1, creating a heterodimer of non-covalently associated subunits. The S1 site lies within a key negative regulatory region (NRR) of the receptor, which contains three highly conserved Lin12/Notch repeats and a heterodimerization domain (HD) that interact to prevent premature signaling in the absence of ligands. Because the role of S1 cleavage in Notch signaling remains unresolved, we investigated the effect of S1 cleavage on the structure, surface trafficking and ligand-mediated activation of human Notch1 and Notch2, as well as on ligand-independent activation of Notch1 by mutations found in human leukemia. The X-ray structure of the Notch1 NRR after furin cleavage shows little change when compared with that of an engineered Notch1 NRR lacking the S1-cleavage loop. Likewise, NMR studies of the Notch2 HD domain show that the loop containing the S1 site can be removed or cleaved without causing a substantial change in its structure. However, Notch1 and Notch2 receptors engineered to resist S1 cleavage exhibit unexpected differences in surface delivery and signaling competence: S1-resistant Notch1 receptors exhibit decreased, but detectable, surface expression and ligand-mediated receptor activation, whereas S1-resistant Notch2 receptors are fully competent for cell surface delivery and for activation by ligands. Variable dependence on S1 cleavage also extends to T-ALL-associated NRR mutations, as common class 1 mutations display variable decrements in ligand-independent activation when introduced into furin-resistant receptors, whereas a class 2 mutation exhibits increased signaling activity. S1 cleavage has distinct effects on the surface expression of Notch1 and Notch2, but is not generally required for physiologic or pathophysiologic activation of Notch proteins. These findings are consistent with models for receptor activation in which ligand-binding or

  10. Lead cleavage sites in the core structure of group I intron-RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Streicher, B; von Ahsen, U; Schroeder, R

    1993-01-01

    Self-splicing of group I introns requires divalent metal ions to promote catalysis as well as for the correct folding of the RNA. Lead cleavage has been used to probe the intron RNA for divalent metal ion binding sites. In the conserved core of the intron, only two sites of Pb2+ cleavage have been detected, which are located close to the substrate binding sites in the junction J8/7 and at the bulged nucleotide in the P7 stem. Both lead cleavages can be inhibited by high concentrations of Mg2+ and Mn2+ ions, suggesting that they displace Pb2+ ions from the binding sites. The RNA is protected from lead cleavage by 2'-deoxyGTP, a competitive inhibitor of splicing. The two major lead induced cleavages are both located in the conserved core of the intron and at phosphates, which had independently been demonstrated to interact with magnesium ions and to be essential for splicing. Thus, we suggest that the conditions required for lead cleavage occur mainly at those sites, where divalent ions bind that are functionally involved in catalysis. We propose lead cleavage analysis of functional RNA to be a useful tool for mapping functional magnesium ion binding sites. Images PMID:7680116

  11. Oxidative cleavage of olefins by in situ-generated catalytic 3,4,5,6-tetramethyl-2-iodoxybenzoic acid/oxone.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Jarugu Narasimha; Parida, Keshaba Nanda

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative cleavage of a variety of olefins to the corresponding ketones/carboxylic acids is shown to occur in a facile manner with 3,4,5,6-tetramethyl-2-iodobenzoic acid (TetMe-IA)/oxone. The simple methodology involves mere stirring of the olefin and catalytic amount (10 mol %) of TetMe-IA and oxone in acetonitrile-water mixture (1:1, v/v) at rt. The reaction mechanism involves initial dihydroxylation of the olefin with oxone, oxidative cleavage by the in situ-generated 3,4,5,6-tetramethyl-2-iodoxybenzoic acid (TetMe-IBX), and oxidation of the aldehyde functionality to the corresponding acid with oxone. Differences in the reactivities of electron-rich and electron-poor double bonds have been exploited to demonstrate chemoselective oxidative cleavage in substrates containing two double bonds.

  12. The Structural Basis of [beta]-Peptide-Specific Cleavage by the Serine Protease Cyanophycinase

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Adrienne M.; Lai, Sandy W.S.; Tavares, John; Kimber, Matthew S.

    2010-10-01

    Cyanophycin, or poly-L-Asp-multi-L-Arg, is a non-ribosomally synthesized peptidic polymer that is used for nitrogen storage by cyanobacteria and other select eubacteria. Upon synthesis, it self-associates to form insoluble granules, the degradation of which is uniquely catalyzed by a carboxy-terminal-specific protease, cyanophycinase. We have determined the structure of cyanophycinase from the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 at 1.5-{angstrom} resolution, showing that the structure is dimeric, with individual protomers resembling aspartyl dipeptidase. Kinetic characterization of the enzyme demonstrates that the enzyme displays Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k{sub cat} of 16.5 s{sup -1} and a k{sub cat}/K{sub M} of 7.5 x 10{sup -6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm that cyanophycinase is a serine protease and that Gln101, Asp172, Gln173, Arg178, Arg180 and Arg183, which form a conserved pocket adjacent to the catalytic Ser132, are functionally critical residues. Modeling indicates that cyanophycinase binds the {beta}-Asp-Arg dipeptide residue immediately N-terminal to the scissile bond in an extended conformation in this pocket, primarily recognizing this penultimate {beta}-Asp-Arg residue of the polymeric chain. Because binding and catalysis depend on substrate features unique to {beta}-linked aspartyl peptides, cyanophycinase is able to act within the cytosol without non-specific cleavage events disrupting essential cellular processes.

  13. Structural basis for substrate binding, cleavage and allostery in the tRNA maturase RNase Z.

    PubMed

    Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inés; Pellegrini, Olivier; Condon, Ciarán

    2005-02-10

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are synthesized as part of longer primary transcripts that require processing of both their 3' and 5' extremities in every living organism known. The 5' side is processed (matured) by the ubiquitously conserved endonucleolytic ribozyme, RNase P, whereas removal of the 3' tails can be either exonucleolytic or endonucleolytic. The endonucleolytic pathway is catalysed by an enzyme known as RNase Z, or 3' tRNase. RNase Z cleaves precursor tRNAs immediately after the discriminator base (the unpaired nucleotide 3' to the last base pair of the acceptor stem, used as an identity determinant by many aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases) in most cases, yielding a tRNA primed for addition of the CCA motif by nucleotidyl transferase. Here we report the crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis RNase Z at 2.1 A resolution, and propose a mechanism for tRNA recognition and cleavage. The structure explains the allosteric properties of the enzyme, and also sheds light on the mechanisms of inhibition by the CCA motif and long 5' extensions. Finally, it highlights the extraordinary adaptability of the metallo-hydrolase domain of the beta-lactamase family for the hydrolysis of covalent bonds. PMID:15654328

  14. Chemical Feasibility of the General Acid/Base Mechanism of glmS Ribozyme Self-Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Dubecký, Matúš; Walter, Nils G.; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    In numerous Gram-positive bacteria, the glmS ribozyme or catalytic riboswitch regulates the expression of glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) synthase via site-specific cleavage of its sugar-phosphate backbone in response to GlcN6P ligand binding. Biochemical data have suggested a crucial catalytic role for an active site guanine (G40 in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, G33 in Bacillus anthracis). We used hybrid quantum chemical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations to probe the mechanism where G40 is deprotonated and acts as a general base. The calculations suggest that the deprotonated guanine G40− is sufficiently reactive to overcome the thermodynamic penalty arising from its rare protonation state, and thus is able to activate the A-1(2’-OH) group toward nucleophilic attack on the adjacent backbone. Furthermore, deprotonation of A-1(2’-OH) and nucleophilic attack are predicted to occur as separate steps, where activation of A-1(2’-OH) precedes nucleophilic attack. Conversely, the transition state associated with the rate-determining step corresponds to concurrent nucleophilic attack and protonation of the G1(O5’) leaving group by the ammonium moiety of the GlcN6P cofactor. Overall, our calculations help to explain the crucial roles of G40 (as a general base) and GlcN6P (as a general acid) during glmS ribozyme self-cleavage. In addition, we show that the QM/MM description of the glmS ribozyme self-cleavage reaction is significantly more sensitive to the size of the QM region and the quality of the QM-MM coupling than that of other small ribozymes. PMID:25858644

  15. Chemical feasibility of the general acid/base mechanism of glmS ribozyme self-cleavage.

    PubMed

    Dubecký, Matúš; Walter, Nils G; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel

    2015-10-01

    In numerous Gram-positive bacteria, the glmS ribozyme or catalytic riboswitch regulates the expression of glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) synthase via site-specific cleavage of its sugar-phosphate backbone in response to GlcN6P ligand binding. Biochemical data have suggested a crucial catalytic role for an active site guanine (G40 in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, G33 in Bacillus anthracis). We used hybrid quantum chemical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations to probe the mechanism where G40 is deprotonated and acts as a general base. The calculations suggest that the deprotonated guanine G40(-) is sufficiently reactive to overcome the thermodynamic penalty arising from its rare protonation state, and thus is able to activate the A-1(2'-OH) group toward nucleophilic attack on the adjacent backbone. Furthermore, deprotonation of A-1(2'-OH) and nucleophilic attack are predicted to occur as separate steps, where activation of A-1(2'-OH) precedes nucleophilic attack. Conversely, the transition state associated with the rate-determining step corresponds to concurrent nucleophilic attack and protonation of the G1(O5') leaving group by the ammonium moiety of the GlcN6P cofactor. Overall, our calculations help to explain the crucial roles of G40 (as a general base) and GlcN6P (as a general acid) during glmS ribozyme self-cleavage. In addition, we show that the QM/MM description of the glmS ribozyme self-cleavage reaction is significantly more sensitive to the size of the QM region and the quality of the QM-MM coupling than that of other small ribozymes.

  16. The Structural Basis for mRNA Recognition and Cleavage by the Ribosome-Dependent Endonuclease RelE

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Cajetan; Gao, Yong-Gui; Andersen, Kasper R.; Dunham, Christine M.; Kelley, Ann C.; Hentschel, Jendrik; Gerdes, Kenn; Ramakrishnan, V.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Translational control is widely used to adjust gene expression levels. During the stringent response in bacteria, mRNA is degraded on the ribosome by the ribosome-dependent endonuclease, RelE. The molecular basis for recognition of the ribosome and mRNA by RelE and the mechanism of cleavage are unknown. Here, we present crystal structures of E. coli RelE in isolation (2.5 Å) and bound to programmed Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosomes before (3.3 Å) and after (3.6 Å) cleavage. RelE occupies the A site and causes cleavage of mRNA after the second nucleotide of the codon by reorienting and activating the mRNA for 2′-OH-induced hydrolysis. Stacking of A site codon bases with conserved residues in RelE and 16S rRNA explains the requirement for the ribosome in catalysis and the subtle sequence specificity of the reaction. These structures provide detailed insight into the translational regulation on the bacterial ribosome by mRNA cleavage. PMID:20005802

  17. RNA structure-dependent uncoupling of substrate recognition and cleavage by Escherichia coli ribonuclease III

    PubMed Central

    Calin-Jageman, Irina; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2003-01-01

    Members of the ribonuclease III superfamily of double-strand-specific endoribonucleases participate in diverse RNA maturation and decay pathways. Ribonuclease III of the gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli processes rRNA and mRNA precursors, and its catalytic action can regulate gene expression by controlling mRNA translation and stability. It has been proposed that E.coli RNase III can function in a non-catalytic manner, by binding RNA without cleaving phosphodiesters. However, there has been no direct evidence for this mode of action. We describe here an RNA, derived from the T7 phage R1.1 RNase III substrate, that is resistant to cleavage in vitro by E.coli RNase III but retains comparable binding affinity. R1.1[CL3B] RNA is recognized by RNase III in the same manner as R1.1 RNA, as revealed by the similar inhibitory effects of a specific mutation in both substrates. Structure-probing assays and Mfold analysis indicate that R1.1[CL3B] RNA possesses a bulge– helix–bulge motif in place of the R1.1 asymmetric internal loop. The presence of both bulges is required for uncoupling. The bulge–helix–bulge motif acts as a ‘catalytic’ antideterminant, which is distinct from recognition antideterminants, which inhibit RNase III binding. PMID:12711683

  18. Cleavage of tRNA with imidazole and spermine imidazole constructs: a new approach for probing RNA structure.

    PubMed Central

    Vlassov, V V; Zuber, G; Felden, B; Behr, J P; Giegé, R

    1995-01-01

    Hydrolysis of RNA in imidazole buffer and by spermine-imidazole conjugates has been investigated. The RNA models were yeast tRNA(Asp) and a transcript derived from the 3'-terminal sequence of tobacco mosaic virus RNA representing a minihelix capable of being enzymatically aminoacylated with histidine. Imidazole buffer and spermine-imidazole conjugates in the presence of free imidazole cleave phosphodiester bonds in the folded RNAs in a specific fashion. Imidazole buffer induces cleavages preferentially in single-stranded regions because nucleotides in these regions have more conformational freedom and can assume more easily the geometry needed for formation of the hydrolysis intermediate state. Spermine-imidazole constructs supplemented with free imidazole cleave tRNA(Asp) within single-stranded regions after pyrimidine residues with a marked preference for pyrimidine-A sequences. Hydrolysis patterns suggest a cleavage mechanism involving an attack by the imidazole residue of the electrostatically bound spermine-imidazole and by free imidazole at the most accessible single-stranded regions of the RNA. Cleavages in a viral RNA fragment recapitulating a tRNA-like domain were found in agreement with the model of this molecule that accounts for its functional properties, thus illustrating the potential of the imidazole-derived reagents as structural probes for solution mapping of RNAs. The cleavage reactions are simple to perform, provide information reflecting the state of the ribose-phosphate backbone of RNA and can be used for mapping single- and double-stranded regions in RNAs. Images PMID:7667092

  19. Effect of internal cleavage site mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 capsid protein on its structure and function.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Ferenc; Kádas, János; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2016-08-01

    The capsid protein of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been found to be a substrate of the retroviral protease in vitro, and its processing was predicted to be strongly dependent on a pH-induced conformational change. Several protease cleavage sites have been identified within the capsid protein, but the importance of its cleavage by the viral protease at the early phase of infection is controversial. To confirm the relevance of this process, we aimed to design, produce, and characterize mutant capsid proteins, in which the protein susceptibility toward HIV-1 protease is altered without affecting other steps of the viral life cycle. Our results indicate that while the introduced mutations changed the cleavage rate at the mutated sites of the capsid protein by HIV-1 protease, some of them caused only negligible or moderate structural changes (A78V, L189F, and L189I). However, the effects of other mutations (W23A, A77P, and L189P) were dramatic, as assessed by secondary structure determination or cyclophilin A-binding assay. Based on our observations, the L189F mutant capsid remains structurally and functionally unchanged and may therefore be the best candidate for use in studies aimed at better understanding the role of the protease in the early postentry events of viral infection or retrovirus-mediated gene transduction. PMID:27516963

  20. A cascade of acid-promoted C-O bond cleavage and redox reactions: from oxa-bridged benzazepines to benzazepinones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuewei; Yang, Fengzhi; Zheng, Lianyou; Dang, Qun; Bai, Xu

    2014-12-01

    A sequence of C-O bond cleavage and redox reactions in oxa-bridged azepines was realized under acid promoted conditions. This protocol provides an atom-economical and straightforward approach to access benzo[b]azepin-5(2H)-ones in high yields. The formal synthesis of tolvaptan was achieved by exploiting this new transformation.

  1. Synthesis, spectral, crystal structure, thermal behavior, antimicrobial and DNA cleavage potential of two octahedral cadmium complexes: A supramolecular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazerozohori, M.; Musavi, S. A.; Masoudiasl, A.; Naghiha, A.; Dusek, M.; Kucerakova, M.

    2015-02-01

    Two new cadmium(II) complexes with the formula of CdL2(NCS)2 and CdL2(N3)2 (in which L is 2,2-dimethyl-N,N‧-bis-(3-phenyl-allylidene)-propane-1,3-diamine) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity measurements, FT/IR, UV-Visible, 1H and 13C NMR spectra and X-ray studies. The crystal structure analysis of CdL2(NCS)2 indicated that it crystallizes in orthorhombic system with space group of Pbca. Two Schiff base ligands are bonded to cadmium(II) ion as N2-donor chelate. Coordination geometry around the cadmium ion was found to be partially distorted octahedron. The Cd-Nimine bond distances are found in the range of 2.363(2)-2.427(2) Å while the Cd-Nisothiocyanate bond distances are 2.287(2) Å and 2.310(2) Å. The existence of C-H⋯π and C-H⋯S interactions in the CdL2(NCS)2 crystal leads to a supramolecular structure in its network. Then cadmium complexes were screened in vitro for their antibacterial and antifungal activities against two Gram-negative and two Gram-positive bacteria and also against Candida albicans as a fungus. Moreover, the compounds were subjected for DNA-cleavage potential by gel electrophoresis method. Finally thermo-gravimetric analysis of the complexes was applied for thermal behavior studies and then some thermo-kinetics activation parameters were evaluated.

  2. Synthesis, spectral, crystal structure, thermal behavior, antimicrobial and DNA cleavage potential of two octahedral cadmium complexes: a supramolecular structure.

    PubMed

    Montazerozohori, M; Musavi, S A; Masoudiasl, A; Naghiha, A; Dusek, M; Kucerakova, M

    2015-02-25

    Two new cadmium(II) complexes with the formula of CdL2(NCS)2 and CdL2(N3)2 (in which L is 2,2-dimethyl-N,N'-bis-(3-phenyl-allylidene)-propane-1,3-diamine) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity measurements, FT/IR, UV-Visible, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra and X-ray studies. The crystal structure analysis of CdL2(NCS)2 indicated that it crystallizes in orthorhombic system with space group of Pbca. Two Schiff base ligands are bonded to cadmium(II) ion as N2-donor chelate. Coordination geometry around the cadmium ion was found to be partially distorted octahedron. The Cd-Nimine bond distances are found in the range of 2.363(2)-2.427(2)Å while the Cd-Nisothiocyanate bond distances are 2.287(2)Å and 2.310(2)Å. The existence of C-H⋯π and C-H⋯S interactions in the CdL2(NCS)2 crystal leads to a supramolecular structure in its network. Then cadmium complexes were screened in vitro for their antibacterial and antifungal activities against two Gram-negative and two Gram-positive bacteria and also against Candida albicans as a fungus. Moreover, the compounds were subjected for DNA-cleavage potential by gel electrophoresis method. Finally thermo-gravimetric analysis of the complexes was applied for thermal behavior studies and then some thermo-kinetics activation parameters were evaluated.

  3. Resonance Raman spectroscopy reveals pH-dependent active site structural changes of lactoperoxidase compound 0 and its ferryl heme O-O bond cleavage products.

    PubMed

    Mak, Piotr J; Thammawichai, Warut; Wiedenhoeft, Dennis; Kincaid, James R

    2015-01-14

    The first step in the enzymatic cycle of mammalian peroxidases, including lactoperoxidase (LPO), is binding of hydrogen peroxide to the ferric resting state to form a ferric-hydroperoxo intermediate designated as Compound 0, the residual proton temporarily associating with the distal pocket His109 residue. Upon delivery of this "stored" proton to the hydroperoxo fragment, it rapidly undergoes O-O bond cleavage, thereby thwarting efforts to trap it using rapid mixing methods. Fortunately, as shown herein, both the peroxo and the hydroperoxo (Compound 0) forms of LPO can be trapped by cryoradiolysis, with acquisition of their resonance Raman (rR) spectra now permitting structural characterization of their key Fe-O-O fragments. Studies were conducted under both acidic and alkaline conditions, revealing pH-dependent differences in relative populations of these intermediates. Furthermore, upon annealing, the low pH samples convert to two forms of a ferryl heme O-O bond-cleavage product, whose ν(Fe═O) frequencies reflect substantially different Fe═O bond strengths. In the process of conducting these studies, rR structural characterization of the dioxygen adduct of LPO, commonly called Compound III, has also been completed, demonstrating a substantial difference in the strengths of the Fe-O linkage of the Fe-O-O fragment under acidic and alkaline conditions, an effect most reasonably attributed to a corresponding weakening of the trans-axial histidyl imidazole linkage at lower pH. Collectively, these new results provide important insight into the impact of pH on the disposition of the key Fe-O-O and Fe═O fragments of intermediates that arise in the enzymatic cycles of LPO, other mammalian peroxidases, and related proteins.

  4. Vibrational state controlled bond cleavage in the photodissociation of isocyanic acid (HNCO)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.S.; Berghout, H.L.; Crim, F.F.

    1995-06-01

    We report the bond selected photodissociation of isocyanic acid (HNCO). This molecule dissociates from its first excited singlet state, breaking either the N--H bond to form H+NCO ({ital X} {sup 2}{Pi}) or the C--N bond to form NH ({ital a} {sup 1}{Delta})+CO ({sup 1}{summation}{sup +}). The threshold for production of NH lies about 3900 cm{sup {minus}1} above that of NCO, and we detect both of these channels by laser induced fluorescence on either the NH or the NCO fragment. Dissociating the molecule out of a vibrationally excited state on its ground electronic surface containing four quanta of N--H stretch (4{nu}{sub 1}) enhances the efficiency of the NCO channel over the NH channel by a factor of at least 20. We reach this conclusion by comparing the results of such a vibrationally mediated photodissociation experiment to those from a conventional single photon dissociation at the same total energy (about 1000 cm{sup {minus}1} above the threshold for the NH channel). Our estimate of the branching ratio in the one photon dissociation at this energy is roughly {Phi}{sub NCO}/{Phi}{sub NH}{approx}20, and it grows to {Phi}{sub NCO}/{Phi}{sub NH}{ge}400 in the vibrationally mediated photodissociation.

  5. Engineering D-Amino Acid Containing Collagen Like Peptide at the Cleavage Site of Clostridium histolyticum Collagenase for Its Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, Punitha; Jonnalagadda, Raghava Rao; Unni Nair, Balachandran

    2015-01-01

    Collagenase is an important enzyme which plays an important role in degradation of collagen in wound healing, cancer metastasis and even in embryonic development. However, the mechanism of this degradation has not yet been completely understood. In the field of biomedical and protein engineering, the design and development of new peptide based materials is of main concern. In the present work an attempt has been made to study the effect of DAla in collagen like peptide (imino-poor region of type I collagen) on the structure and stability of peptide against enzyme hydrolysis. Effect of replacement of DAla in the collagen like peptide has been studied using circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD). Our findings suggest that, DAla substitution leads to conformational changes in the secondary structure and favours the formation of polyproline II conformation than its L-counterpart in the imino-poor region of collagen like peptides. Change in the chirality of alanine at the cleavage site of collagenase in the imino-poor region inhibits collagenolytic activity. This may find application in design of peptides and peptidomimics for enzyme-substrate interaction, specifically with reference to collagen and other extra cellular matrix proteins. PMID:25973613

  6. Calf 5' to 3' exo/endonuclease must slide from a 5' end of the substrate to perform structure-specific cleavage.

    PubMed

    Murante, R S; Rust, L; Bambara, R A

    1995-12-22

    Calf 5' to 3' exo/endonuclease, the counterpart of the human FEN-1 and yeast RTH-1 nucleases, performs structure-specific cleavage of both RNA and DNA and is implicated in Okazaki fragment processing and DNA repair. The substrate for endonuclease activity is a primer annealed to a template but with a 5' unannealed tail. The results presented here demonstrate that the nuclease must enter the 5' end of the unannealed tail and then slide to the region of hybridization where the cleavage occurs. The presence of bound protein or a primer at any point on the single-stranded tail prevents cleavage. However, biotinylation of a nucleotide at the 5' end or internal to the tail does not prevent cleavage. The sliding process is bidirectional. If the nuclease slides onto the tail, later binding of a primer to the tail traps the nuclease between the primer binding site and the cleavage site, preventing the nuclease from departing from the 5' end. A model for 5' entry, sliding, and cleavage is presented. The possible role of this unusual mechanism in Okazaki fragment processing, DNA repair, and protection of the replication fork from inappropriate endonucleolytic cleavage is presented. PMID:8530463

  7. The Structural Basis of Asymmetry in DNA Binding and Cleavage as Exhibited by the I-SmaMI LAGLIDADG Meganuclease.

    PubMed

    Shen, Betty W; Lambert, Abigail; Walker, Bradley C; Stoddard, Barry L; Kaiser, Brett K

    2016-01-16

    LAGLIDADG homing endonucleases ("meganucleases") are highly specific DNA cleaving enzymes that are used for genome engineering. Like other enzymes that act on DNA targets, meganucleases often display binding affinities and cleavage activities that are dominated by one protein domain. To decipher the underlying mechanism of asymmetric DNA recognition and catalysis, we identified and characterized a new monomeric meganuclease (I-SmaMI), which belongs to a superfamily of homologous enzymes that recognize divergent DNA sequences. We solved a series of crystal structures of the enzyme-DNA complex representing a progression of sequential reaction states, and we compared the structural rearrangements and surface potential distributions within each protein domain against their relative contribution to binding affinity. We then determined the effects of equivalent point mutations in each of the two enzyme active sites to determine whether asymmetry in DNA recognition is translated into corresponding asymmetry in DNA cleavage activity. These experiments demonstrate the structural basis for "dominance" by one protein domain over the other and provide insights into this enzyme's conformational switch from a nonspecific search mode to a more specific recognition mode.

  8. N-Glycosylation Improves the Pepsin Resistance of Histidine Acid Phosphatase Phytases by Enhancing Their Stability at Acidic pHs and Reducing Pepsin's Accessibility to Its Cleavage Sites.

    PubMed

    Niu, Canfang; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Wang, Yaru; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2015-12-04

    N-Glycosylation can modulate enzyme structure and function. In this study, we identified two pepsin-resistant histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) phytases from Yersinia kristensenii (YkAPPA) and Yersinia rohdei (YrAPPA), each having an N-glycosylation motif, and one pepsin-sensitive HAP phytase from Yersinia enterocolitica (YeAPPA) that lacked an N-glycosylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to construct mutants by altering the N-glycosylation status of each enzyme, and the mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in Pichia pastoris for biochemical characterization. Compared with those of the N-glycosylation site deletion mutants and N-deglycosylated enzymes, all N-glycosylated counterparts exhibited enhanced pepsin resistance. Introduction of the N-glycosylation site into YeAPPA as YkAPPA and YrAPPA conferred pepsin resistance, shifted the pH optimum (0.5 and 1.5 pH units downward, respectively) and improved stability at acidic pH (83.2 and 98.8% residual activities at pH 2.0 for 1 h). Replacing the pepsin cleavage sites L197 and L396 in the immediate vicinity of the N-glycosylation motifs of YkAPPA and YrAPPA with V promoted their resistance to pepsin digestion when produced in Escherichia coli but had no effect on the pepsin resistance of N-glycosylated enzymes produced in P. pastoris. Thus, N-glycosylation may improve pepsin resistance by enhancing the stability at acidic pH and reducing pepsin's accessibility to peptic cleavage sites. This study provides a strategy, namely, the manipulation of N-glycosylation, for improvement of phytase properties for use in animal feed.

  9. N-Glycosylation Improves the Pepsin Resistance of Histidine Acid Phosphatase Phytases by Enhancing Their Stability at Acidic pHs and Reducing Pepsin's Accessibility to Its Cleavage Sites

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Canfang; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Wang, Yaru; Yang, Peilong

    2015-01-01

    N-Glycosylation can modulate enzyme structure and function. In this study, we identified two pepsin-resistant histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) phytases from Yersinia kristensenii (YkAPPA) and Yersinia rohdei (YrAPPA), each having an N-glycosylation motif, and one pepsin-sensitive HAP phytase from Yersinia enterocolitica (YeAPPA) that lacked an N-glycosylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to construct mutants by altering the N-glycosylation status of each enzyme, and the mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in Pichia pastoris for biochemical characterization. Compared with those of the N-glycosylation site deletion mutants and N-deglycosylated enzymes, all N-glycosylated counterparts exhibited enhanced pepsin resistance. Introduction of the N-glycosylation site into YeAPPA as YkAPPA and YrAPPA conferred pepsin resistance, shifted the pH optimum (0.5 and 1.5 pH units downward, respectively) and improved stability at acidic pH (83.2 and 98.8% residual activities at pH 2.0 for 1 h). Replacing the pepsin cleavage sites L197 and L396 in the immediate vicinity of the N-glycosylation motifs of YkAPPA and YrAPPA with V promoted their resistance to pepsin digestion when produced in Escherichia coli but had no effect on the pepsin resistance of N-glycosylated enzymes produced in P. pastoris. Thus, N-glycosylation may improve pepsin resistance by enhancing the stability at acidic pH and reducing pepsin's accessibility to peptic cleavage sites. This study provides a strategy, namely, the manipulation of N-glycosylation, for improvement of phytase properties for use in animal feed. PMID:26637601

  10. Limited proteolysis and sequence analysis of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes from Escherichia coli. Cleavage sites and domains in the dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase components.

    PubMed Central

    Packman, L C; Perham, R N

    1987-01-01

    The structures of the dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (E2) components of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes from Escherichia coli were investigated by limited proteolysis. Trypsin and Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase were used to excise the three lipoyl domains from the E2p component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and the single lipoyl domain from the E2o component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. The principal sites of action of these enzymes on each E2 chain were determined by sequence analysis of the isolated lipoyl fragments and of the truncated E2p and E2o chains. Each of the numerous cleavage sites (12 in E2p, six in E2o) fell within similar segments of the E2 chains, namely stretches of polypeptide rich in alanine, proline and/or charged amino acids. These regions are clearly accessible to proteinases of Mr 24,000-28,000 and, on the basis of n.m.r. spectroscopy, some of them have previously been implicated in facilitating domain movements by virtue of their conformational flexibility. The limited proteolysis data suggest that E2p and E2o possess closer architectural similarities than would be predicted from inspection of their amino acid sequences. As a result of this work, an error was detected in the sequence of E2o inferred from the previously published sequence of the encoding gene, sucB. The relevant peptides from E2o were purified and sequenced by direct means; an amended sequence is presented. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3297046

  11. Efficient synthesis of pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxalines catalyzed by a Brønsted acid through cleavage of C-C bonds.

    PubMed

    Xie, Caixia; Feng, Lei; Li, Wanli; Ma, Xiaojun; Ma, Xinkun; Liu, Yihan; Ma, Chen

    2016-09-28

    An efficient and convenient one-pot domino reaction for the direct synthesis of pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxalines has been developed. This approach utilizes an imine formation reaction, SEAr reaction and cleavage of C-C bonds catalyzed by a Brønsted acid. β-Diketones and β-keto esters are both well tolerated to give the corresponding products in moderate to excellent yields. PMID:27541576

  12. Structure-Function Analysis of Rny1 in tRNA Cleavage and Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Luhtala, Natalie; Parker, Roy

    2012-01-01

    T2 ribonucleases are conserved nucleases that affect a variety of processes in eukaryotic cells including the regulation of self-incompatibility by S-RNases in plants, modulation of host immune cell responses by viral and schistosome T2 enzymes, and neurological development and tumor progression in humans. These roles for RNaseT2’s can be due to catalytic or catalytic-independent functions of the molecule. Despite this broad importance, the features of RNaseT2 proteins that modulate catalytic and catalytic-independent functions are poorly understood. Herein, we analyze the features of Rny1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to determine the requirements for cleaving tRNA in vivo and for inhibiting cellular growth in a catalytic-independent manner. We demonstrate that catalytic-independent inhibition of growth is a combinatorial property of the protein and is affected by a fungal-specific C-terminal extension, the conserved catalytic core, and the presence of a signal peptide. Catalytic functions of Rny1 are independent of the C-terminal extension, are affected by many mutations in the catalytic core, and also require a signal peptide. Biochemical flotation assays reveal that in rny1Δ cells, some tRNA molecules associate with membranes suggesting that cleavage of tRNAs by Rny1 can involve either tRNA association with, or uptake into, membrane compartments. PMID:22829915

  13. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  14. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  15. CASPASE-1 RECOGNIZES EXTENDED CLEAVAGE SITES IN ITS NATURAL SUBSTRATES

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jerry; Yin, Ying; Mai, Jietang; Xiong, Xinyu; Pansuria, Meghana; Liu, Jingshan; Maley, Erin; Saqib, Najam Us; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2010-01-01

    Objective The preferred amino acids in the proteolytic sites have been considered to be similar between caspase-1 and caspase-9, which do not support their differential functions in inflammatory pyroptosis and apoptosis. We attempted to solve this problem. Methods We analyzed the flanking 20 amino acid residues in the cleavage sites in 34 caspase-1 and 11 capase-9 experimentally identified substrates. Results This study has made the following findings: first, we verified that caspase-1 and caspase-9 shared 100% aspartic acid in the P1 position. However, the structures in the cleavage sites of most caspase-1 substrates are different from that of caspase-9 substrates in the following three aspects, a) the amino acid residues with the statistically high frequencies; b) the hydrophobic amino acid occurrence frequencies; and c) the charged amino acid occurrence frequencies; second, the amino acid pairs P1-P1′ are different; third, our identified cleavage site patterns are useful in the prediction for the 91.4% cleavage sites of 35 new caspase-1 substrates. Conclusion Since most caspase-1 substrates are involved in vascular function, inflammation and atherogenesis, our novel structural patterns for the caspases’ substrates are significant in developing new diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:20060974

  16. Structural and functional analyses of an archaeal XPF/Rad1/Mus81 nuclease: asymmetric DNA binding and cleavage mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Tatsuya; Komori, Kayoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2005-08-01

    XPF/Rad1/Mus81/Hef proteins recognize and cleave branched DNA structures. XPF and Rad1 proteins cleave the 5' side of nucleotide excision repair bubble, while Mus81 and Hef cleave similar sites of the nicked Holliday junction, fork, or flap structure. These proteins all function as dimers and consist of catalytic and helix-hairpin-helix DNA binding (HhH) domains. We have determined the crystal structure of the HhH domain of Pyrococcus furiosus Hef nuclease (HefHhH), which revealed the distinct mode of protein dimerization. Our structural and biochemical analyses also showed that each of the catalytic and HhH domains binds to distinct regions within the fork-structured DNA: each HhH domain from two separate subunits asymmetrically binds to the arm region, while the catalytic domain binds near the junction center. Upon binding to DNA, Hef nuclease disrupts base pairs near the cleavage site. It is most likely that this bipartite binding mode is conserved in the XPF/Rad1/Mus81 nuclease family. PMID:16084390

  17. The first crystal structure of human RNase 6 reveals a novel substrate-binding and cleavage site arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Prats-Ejarque, Guillem; Arranz-Trullén, Javier; Blanco, Jose A.; Pulido, David; Nogués, M. Victòria; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Boix, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Human RNase 6 is a cationic secreted protein that belongs to the RNase A superfamily. Its expression is induced in neutrophils and monocytes upon bacterial infection, suggesting a role in host defence. We present here the crystal structure of RNase 6 obtained at 1.72 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution, which is the first report for the protein 3D structure and thereby setting the basis for functional studies. The structure shows an overall kidney-shaped globular fold shared with the other known family members. Three sulfate anions bound to RNase 6 were found, interacting with residues at the main active site (His15, His122 and Gln14) and cationic surface-exposed residues (His36, His39, Arg66 and His67). Kinetic characterization, together with prediction of protein–nucleotide complexes by molecular dynamics, was applied to analyse the RNase 6 substrate nitrogenous base and phosphate selectivity. Our results reveal that, although RNase 6 is a moderate catalyst in comparison with the pancreatic RNase type, its structure includes lineage-specific features that facilitate its activity towards polymeric nucleotide substrates. In particular, enzyme interactions at the substrate 5′ end can provide an endonuclease-type cleavage pattern. Interestingly, the RNase 6 crystal structure revealed a novel secondary active site conformed by the His36–His39 dyad that facilitates the polynucleotide substrate catalysis. PMID:27013146

  18. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, Simon A.J.; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Echeverria, Ignacia; Vogel, Jonathan T.; Guan, Jiahn Chou; Tan, Bao Cai; Klee, Harry J.; McCarty, Donald R.; Amzel, L. Mario

    2011-09-06

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  19. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid W

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, S.; Gabelli, S; Echeverria, I; Vogel, J; Guan, J; Tan, B; Klee, H; McCarty, D; Amzela, M

    2010-01-01

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  20. Structural features underlying the selective cleavage of a novel exo-type maltose-forming amylase from Pyrococcus sp. ST04.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwang-Hyun; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Park, Sung-Goo; Lee, Myeong-Eun; Holden, James F; Park, Cheon-Seok; Woo, Eui-Jeon

    2014-06-01

    A novel maltose-forming α-amylase (PSMA) was recently found in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. ST04. This enzyme shows <13% amino-acid sequence identity to other known α-amylases and displays a unique enzymatic property in that it hydrolyzes both α-1,4-glucosidic and α-1,6-glucosidic linkages of substrates, recognizing only maltose units, in an exo-type manner. Here, the crystal structure of PSMA at a resolution of 1.8 Å is reported, showing a tight ring-shaped tetramer with monomers composed of two domains: an N-domain (amino acids 1-341) with a typical GH57 family (β/α)7-barrel fold and a C-domain (amino acids 342-597) composed of α-helical bundles. A small closed cavity observed in proximity to the catalytic residues Glu153 and Asp253 at the domain interface has the appropriate volume and geometry to bind a maltose unit, accounting for the selective exo-type maltose hydrolysis of the enzyme. A narrow gate at the putative subsite +1 formed by residue Phe218 and Phe452 is essential for specific cleavage of glucosidic bonds. The closed cavity at the active site is connected to a short substrate-binding channel that extends to the central hole of the tetramer, exhibiting a geometry that is significantly different from classical maltogenic amylases or β-amylases. The structural features of this novel exo-type maltose-forming α-amylase provide a molecular basis for its unique enzymatic characteristics and for its potential use in industrial applications and protein engineering.

  1. Crystal Structure of A. aeolicus Argonaute, a Site-Specific DNA-Guided Endoribonuclease, Provides Insights into RISC-Mediated mRNA Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yu-Ren; Pei, Yi; Ma, Jin-Biao; Kuryavyi, Vitaly; Zhadina, Maria; Meister, Gunter; Chen, Hong-Ying; Dauter, Zbigniew; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Argonaute (Ago) proteins constitute a key component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). We report the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus Ago (Aa-Ago) together with binding and cleavage studies, which establish this eubacterial Ago as a bona fide guide DNA strand-mediated site-specific RNA endonuclease. We have generated a stereochemically robust model of the complex, where the guide DNA-mRNA duplex is positioned within a basic channel spanning the bilobal interface, such that the 5′ phosphate of the guide strand can be anchored in a basic pocket, and the mRNA can be positioned for site-specific cleavage by RNase H-type divalent cation-coordinated catalytic Asp residues of the PIWI domain. Domain swap experiments involving chimeras of human Ago (hAgo1) and cleavage-competent hAgo2 reinforce the role of the PIWI domain in “slicer” activity. We propose a four-step Ago-mediated catalytic cleavage cycle model, which provides distinct perspectives into the mechanism of guide strand-mediated mRNA cleavage within the RISC. PMID:16061186

  2. Crystal structure of A. aeolicus argonaute, a site-specific DNA-guided endoribonuclease, provides insights into RISC-mediated mRNA cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan,Y.; Pei, Y.; Ma, J.; Kuryavyi, V.; Zhadina, M.; Meister, G.; Chen, H.; Dauter, Z.; Tuschi, T.; Patel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins constitute a key component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). We report the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus Ago (Aa-Ago) together with binding and cleavage studies, which establish this eubacterial Ago as a bona fide guide DNA strand-mediated site-specific RNA endonuclease. We have generated a stereochemically robust model of the complex, where the guide DNA-mRNA duplex is positioned within a basic channel spanning the bilobal interface, such that the 5' phosphate of the guide strand can be anchored in a basic pocket, and the mRNA can be positioned for site-specific cleavage by RNase H-type divalent cation-coordinated catalytic Asp residues of the PIWI domain. Domain swap experiments involving chimeras of human Ago (hAgo1) and cleavage-competent hAgo2 reinforce the role of the PIWI domain in 'slicer' activity. We propose a four-step Ago-mediated catalytic cleavage cycle model, which provides distinct perspectives into the mechanism of guide strand-mediated mRNA cleavage within the RISC.

  3. Electronic structure of the peroxy intermediate and its correlation to the native intermediate in the multicopper oxidases: insights into the reductive cleavage of the o-o bond.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jungjoo; Solomon, Edward I

    2007-10-31

    The multicopper oxidases (MCOs) utilize a blue type 1 (T1) copper site and a trinuclear Cu cluster composed of a type 2 (T2) and a binuclear type 3 (T3) site that together catalyze the four-electron reduction of O2 to H2O. Reaction of the fully reduced enzyme with O2 proceeds via two sequential two-electron steps generating the peroxy intermediate (PI) and the native intermediate (NI). While a detailed description of the geometric and electronic structure of NI has been developed, this has been more elusive for PI largely due to the diamagnetic nature of its ground state. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to correlate to spectroscopic data to generate a description of the geometric and electronic structure of PI. A highly conserved carboxylate residue near the T2 site is found to play a critical role in stabilizing the PI structure, which induces oxidation of the T2 and one T3 Cu center and strong superexchange stabilization via the peroxide bridge, allowing irreversible binding of O2 at the trinuclear Cu site. Correlation of PI to NI is achieved using a two-dimensional potential energy surface generated to describe the catalytic two-electron reduction of the peroxide O-O bond by the MCOs. It is found that the reaction is thermodynamically driven by the relative stability of NI and the involvement of the simultaneous two-electron-transfer process. A low activation barrier (calculated approximately 5-6 kcal/mol and experimental approximately 3-5 kcal/mol) is produced by the triangular topology of the trinuclear Cu cluster site, as this symmetry provides good donor-acceptor frontier molecular orbital (FMO) overlap. Finally, the O-O bond cleavage in the trinuclear Cu cluster can be achieved via either a proton-assisted or a proton-unassisted process, allowing the MCOs to function over a wide range of pH. It is found that while the proton helps to stabilize the acceptor O22- sigma* orbital in the proton-assisted process for better donor

  4. Checking nucleic acid crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Das, U; Chen, S; Fuxreiter, M; Vaguine, A A; Richelle, J; Berman, H M; Wodak, S J

    2001-06-01

    The program SFCHECK [Vaguine et al. (1999), Acta Cryst. D55, 191-205] is used to survey the quality of the structure-factor data and the agreement of those data with the atomic coordinates in 105 nucleic acid crystal structures for which structure-factor amplitudes have been deposited in the Nucleic Acid Database [NDB; Berman et al. (1992), Biophys. J. 63, 751-759]. Nucleic acid structures present a particular challenge for structure-quality evaluations. The majority of these structures, and DNA molecules in particular, have been solved by molecular replacement of the double-helical motif, whose high degree of symmetry can lead to problems in positioning the molecule in the unit cell. In this paper, the overall quality of each structure was evaluated using parameters such as the R factor, the correlation coefficient and various atomic error estimates. In addition, each structure is characterized by the average values of several local quality indicators, which include the atomic displacement, the density correlation, the B factor and the density index. The latter parameter measures the relative electron-density level at the atomic position. In order to assess the quality of the model in specific regions, the same local quality indicators are also surveyed for individual groups of atoms in each structure. Several of the global quality indicators are found to vary linearly with resolution and less than a dozen structures are found to exhibit values significantly different from the mean for these indicators, showing that the quality of the nucleic acid structures tends to be rather uniform. Analysis of the mutual dependence of the values of different local quality indicators, computed for individual residues and atom groups, reveals that these indicators essentially complement each other and are not redundant with the B factor. Using several of these indicators, it was found that the atomic coordinates of the nucleic acid bases tend to be better defined than those of

  5. Structural features of lignohumic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, František; Šestauberová, Martina; Hrabal, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The composition and structure of humic acids isolated from lignohumate, which is produced by hydrolytic-oxidative conversion of technical lignosulfonates, were characterized by chemical and spectral methods (UV/VIS, FTIR, and 13C NMR spectroscopy). As comparative samples, humic acids (HA) were isolated also from lignite and organic horizon of mountain spruce forest soil. When compared with other HA studied, the lignohumate humic acids (LHHA) contained relatively few carboxyl groups, whose role is partly fulfilled by sulfonic acid groups. Distinctive 13C NMR signal of methoxyl group carbons, typical for lignin and related humic substances, was found at the shift of 55.9 ppm. Other alkoxy carbons were present in limited quantity, like the aliphatic carbons. Due to the low content of these carbon types, the LHHA has high aromaticity of 60.6%. Comparison with the natural HA has shown that lignohumate obtained by thermal processing of technical lignosulfonate can be regarded as an industrially produced analog of natural humic substances. Based on the chemical and spectral data evaluation, structural features of lignohumate humic acids were clarified and their hypothetical chemical structure proposed, which described typical "average" properties of the isolated fraction.

  6. {{text{C}}_{α }} - {text{C}} Bond Cleavage of the Peptide Backbone in MALDI In-Source Decay Using Salicylic Acid Derivative Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Daiki; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2011-07-01

    The use of 5-formylsalicylic acid (5-FSA) and 5-nitrosalicylic acid (5-NSA) as novel matrices for in-source decay (ISD) of peptides in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is described. The use of 5-FSA and 5-NSA generated a- and x-series ions accompanied by oxidized peptides [M - 2 H + H]+. The preferential formation of a- and x-series ions was found to be dependent on the hydrogen-accepting ability of matrix. The hydrogen-accepting ability estimated from the ratio of signal intensity of oxidized product [M - 2 H + H]+ to that of non-oxidized protonated molecule [M + H]+ of peptide was of the order 5-NSA > 5-FSA > 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) ≒ 2,5-dihydroxyl benzoic acid (2,5-DHB) ≒ 0. The results suggest that the hydrogen transfer reaction from peptide to 5-FSA and 5-NSA occurs during the MALDI-ISD processes. The hydrogen abstraction from peptides results in the formation of oxidized peptides containing a radical site on the amide nitrogen with subsequent radical-induced cleavage at the {{{C}}_{α }} - {{C}} bond, leading to the formation of a- and x-series ions. The most significant feature of MALDI-ISD with 5-FSA and 5-NSA is the specific cleavage of the {{{C}}_{α }} - {{C}} bond of the peptide backbone without degradation of side-chain and post-translational modifications (PTM). The matrix provides a useful complementary method to conventional MALDI-ISD for amino acid sequencing and site localization of PTMs in peptides.

  7. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  8. Synthesis, structural characterisation, bio-potential efficiency and DNA cleavage applications of nicotinamide metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surendra Dilip, C.; Siva Kumar, V.; John Venison, S.; Vetha potheher, I.; Rajalaxmi (a) Subahashini, D.

    2013-05-01

    Mixed ligand complexes were synthesised using nicotinamide as the primary ligand and nitrite as the secondary ligand were characterised by FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, TG-DTA-DTG, X-ray powder diffraction and physical analytical studies. From the molar conductance, magnetic moment and electronic spectral data of the synthesised complexes a general formula of [M(ONO)2(NA)2] where M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) and [Cr2(ONO)6(NA)2] with a distorted octahedral structure were proposed. Thermal analyses show that the complexes lose molecules of hydration initially and subsequently expel anionic and organic ligands in continuous steps. The kinetic parameter values, such as, E*, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* illustrate the spontaneous association of the metal and ligands in the formation of the complexes. The antimicrobial efficacy of the ligand and its complexes were examined by in vitro method against various pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains. The metal complexes were found to posses efficient antimicrobial properties compared to nicotinamide and a few of these complexes could turn out to be excellent models for the design of effective antibiotic drug substances. The intercalating interaction of Cu(II) complex with CT-DNA was inspected by absorption spectral and viscosity studies, thermal denaturation and electro-analytical experiments.

  9. Identification of separate structural features that affect rate and cation concentration dependence of self-cleavage by the Neurospora VS ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Poon, Alan H L; Olive, Joan E; McLaren, Meredith; Collins, Richard A

    2006-11-01

    The cleavage site of the Neurospora VS ribozyme is located in an internal loop in a hairpin called stem-loop I. Stem-loop I undergoes a cation-dependent structural change to adopt a conformation, termed shifted, that is required for activity. Using site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analyses, we show here that the insertion of a single-stranded linker between stem-loop I and the rest of the ribozyme increases the observed self-cleavage rate constant by 2 orders of magnitude without affecting the Mg(2+) requirement of the reaction. A distinct set of mutations that favors the formation of the shifted conformation of stem-loop I decreases the Mg(2+) requirement by an order of magnitude with little or no effect on the observed cleavage rate under standard reaction conditions. Similar trends were seen in reactions that contained Li(+) instead of Mg(2+). Mutants with lower ionic requirements also exhibited increased thermostability, providing evidence that the shifted conformation of stem-loop I favors the formation of the active conformation of the RNA. In natural, multimeric VS RNA, where a given ribozyme core is flanked by one copy of stem-loop I immediately upstream and another copy 0.7 kb downstream, cleavage at the downstream site is strongly preferred, providing evidence that separation of stem-loop I from the ribozyme core reflects the naturally evolved organization of the RNA.

  10. cDNA cloning, primary structure and gene expression for H-protein, a component of the glycine-cleavage system (glycine decarboxylase) of pea (Pisum sativum) leaf mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Macherel, D; Lebrun, M; Gagnon, J; Neuburger, M; Douce, R

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized cDNA clones encoding the H-protein of the glycine-cleavage system of pea (Pisum sativum) leaf mitochondria. The deduced primary structure revealed that the 131-amino-acid polypeptide is cytoplasmically synthesized with a 34-amino-acid mitochondrial targeting peptide. The lipoate-binding site was assigned to be lysine-63, as deduced from a sequence comparison with several lipoate-bearing proteins. The expression of the gene encoding H-protein was shown to occur specifically in the leaf tissue, with light exerting an additional effect by increasing the mRNA levels severalfold. Two polyadenylation sites were found in the mRNA, and a single-copy gene encoding the H-protein was detected in pea genome. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2363710

  11. Novel metal-based pharmacologically dynamic agents of transition metal(II) complexes: Designing, synthesis, structural elucidation, DNA binding and photo-induced DNA cleavage activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Jeyamurugan, R.; Sakthivel, A.; Mitu, L.

    2010-01-01

    Novel Schiff base Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been designed and synthesized using the macrocyclic ligand derived from the condensation of diethylphthalate with Schiff base, obtained from benzene-1,2-diamine and 3-benzylidene-pentane-2,4-dione. The ligand and its complexes have been characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. DNA binding properties of these complexes have been investigated by UV-vis, viscosity measurements, cyclic voltammetric and differential pulse voltammogram studies. The intrinsic binding constants for Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes are 1.6 × 10 6, 1.8 × 10 6, 2.0 × 10 6 and 1.5 × 10 6 M -1 respectively which are obtained from electronic absorption experiment. Control DNA cleavage experiments using pUC19 supercoiled (SC) DNA and minor groove binder (distamycin) suggest the major groove binding tendency for the synthesized complexes. In the presence of a reducing agent like 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), the synthesized complexes show chemical nuclease activity under dark reaction condition. The complexes also show efficient photo-induced DNA cleavage activity on irradiation with a monochromatic UV light of 360 nm in the presence of inhibitors. Control experiments show inhibition of cleavage in the presence of singlet oxygen quencher like sodium azide and enhancement of cleavage in D 2O, suggesting the formation of singlet oxygen as a reactive species in a type-II process.

  12. Cleavage fracture and irradiation embrittlement of fusion reactor alloys: mechanisms, multiscale models, toughness measurements and implications to structural integrity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Rathbun, H. J.; He, M. Y.; Hribernik, M. L.; Rensman, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    We describe the highly efficient master curves-shifts (MC-Δ T) method to measure and apply cleavage fracture toughness, KJc ( T), data and show that it is applicable to 9Cr martensitic steels. A reference temperature, T0, indexes the invariant MC shape on an absolute temperature scale. Then, T0 shifts (Δ T) are used to account for various effects of size and geometry, loading rate and irradiation embrittlement (Δ Ti). The paper outlines a multiscale model, relating atomic to structural scale fracture processes, that underpins the MC-Δ T method. At the atomic scale, we propose that the intrinsic microarrest toughness, Kμ( T), of the body-centered cubic ferrite lattice dictates an invariant shape of the macroscopic KJc ( T) curve. KJc ( T) can be modeled in terms of the true stress-strain ( σ- ɛ) constitutive law, σ ( T, ɛ), combined with a temperature-dependent critical local stress, σ*( T) and stressed volume, V*. The local fracture properties, σ*( T)- V*, are governed by coarse-scale brittle trigger particles and Kμ( T). Irradiation (and high strain rate) induced increases in the yield stress, Δ σy, lead to Δ Ti, with typical Δ Ti/Δ σy≈0.6±0.15 °C/MPa. However, Δ Ti associated with decreases in σ* and V* can result from a number of potential non-hardening embrittlement (NHE) mechanisms, including a large amount of He on grain boundaries. Estimates based on available data suggest that this occurs at >500-700 appm bulk He. Hardening and NHE are synergistic, and can lead to very large Δ Ti. NHE is signaled by large (>1 °C/MPa), or even negative, values of Δ Ti/Δ σy (for Δ σy<0), and is often coupled with increasing amounts of intergranular fracture. The measured and effective fracture toughness pertinent to structures almost always depends on the size and geometry of the cracked body, and is typically significantly greater than KJc . Size and geometry effects arise from both weakest link statistics, related to the volume under high

  13. Metal-catalyzed C-C bond cleavage in alkanes: effects of methyl substitution on transition-state structures and stability.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, David W; Hibbitts, David D; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-07-01

    Methyl substituents at C-C bonds influence hydrogenolysis rates and selectivities of acyclic and cyclic C2-C8 alkanes on Ir, Rh, Ru, and Pt catalysts. C-C cleavage transition states form via equilibrated dehydrogenation steps that replace several C-H bonds with C-metal bonds, desorb H atoms (H*) from saturated surfaces, and form λ H2(g) molecules. Activation enthalpies (ΔH(‡)) and entropies (ΔS(‡)) and λ values for (3)C-(x)C cleavage are larger than for (2)C-(2)C or (2)C-(1)C bonds, irrespective of the composition of metal clusters or the cyclic/acyclic structure of the reactants. (3)C-(x)C bonds cleave through α,β,γ- or α,β,γ,δ-bound transition states, as indicated by the agreement between measured activation entropies and those estimated for such structures using statistical mechanics. In contrast, less substituted C-C bonds involve α,β-bound species with each C atom bound to several surface atoms. These α,β configurations weaken C-C bonds through back-donation to antibonding orbitals, but such configurations cannot form with (3)C atoms, which have one C-H bond and thus can form only one C-M bond. (3)C-(x)C cleavage involves attachment of other C atoms, which requires endothermic C-H activation and H* desorption steps that lead to larger ΔH(‡) values but also larger ΔS(‡) values (by forming more H2(g)) than for (2)C-(2)C and (2)C-(1)C bonds, irrespective of alkane size (C2-C8) or cyclic/acyclic structure. These data and their mechanistic interpretation indicate that low temperatures and high H2 pressures favor cleavage of less substituted C-C bonds and form more highly branched products from cyclic and acyclic alkanes. Such interpretations and catalytic consequences of substitution seem also relevant to C-X cleavage (X = S, N, O) in desulfurization, denitrogenation, and deoxygenation reactions.

  14. Crystal structure of Thermoplasma acidophilum XerA recombinase shows large C-shape clamp conformation and cis-cleavage mode for nucleophilic tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Jo, Chang Hwa; Kim, Junsoo; Han, Ah-reum; Park, Sam Yong; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Nam, Ki Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Site-specific Xer recombination plays a pivotal role in reshuffling genetic information. Here, we report the 2.5 Å crystal structure of XerA from the archaean Thermoplasma acidophilum. Crystallographic data reveal a uniquely open conformational state, resulting in a C-shaped clamp with an angle of ~ 48° and a distance of 57 Å between the core-binding and the catalytic domains. The catalytic nucleophile, Tyr264, is positioned in cis-cleavage mode by XerA's C-term tail that interacts with the CAT domain of a neighboring monomer without DNA substrate. Structural comparisons of tyrosine recombinases elucidate the dynamics of Xer recombinase.

  15. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Early and Late Enzymes in the Lignin β-Aryl Ether Cleavage Pathway from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jose Henrique; Heins, Richard A; Gall, Daniel L; McAndrew, Ryan P; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C; Donohue, Timothy J; Noguera, Daniel R; Simmons, Blake A; Sale, Kenneth L; Ralph, John; Adams, Paul D

    2016-05-01

    There has been great progress in the development of technology for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to sugars and subsequent fermentation to fuels. However, plant lignin remains an untapped source of materials for production of fuels or high value chemicals. Biological cleavage of lignin has been well characterized in fungi, in which enzymes that create free radical intermediates are used to degrade this material. In contrast, a catabolic pathway for the stereospecific cleavage of β-aryl ether units that are found in lignin has been identified in Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 bacteria. β-Aryl ether units are typically abundant in lignin, corresponding to 50-70% of all of the intermonomer linkages. Consequently, a comprehensive understanding of enzymatic β-aryl ether (β-ether) cleavage is important for future efforts to biologically process lignin and its breakdown products. The crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenases (LigD, LigO, and LigL) and the glutathione-dependent lyase LigG provide new insights into the early and late enzymes in the β-ether degradation pathway. We present detailed information on the cofactor and substrate binding sites and on the catalytic mechanisms of these enzymes, comparing them with other known members of their respective families. Information on the Lig enzymes provides new insight into their catalysis mechanisms and can inform future strategies for using aromatic oligomers derived from plant lignin as a source of valuable aromatic compounds for biofuels and other bioproducts. PMID:26940872

  16. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Early and Late Enzymes in the Lignin β-Aryl Ether Cleavage Pathway from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jose Henrique; Heins, Richard A.; Gall, Daniel L.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Donohue, Timothy J.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Adams, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    There has been great progress in the development of technology for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to sugars and subsequent fermentation to fuels. However, plant lignin remains an untapped source of materials for production of fuels or high value chemicals. Biological cleavage of lignin has been well characterized in fungi, in which enzymes that create free radical intermediates are used to degrade this material. In contrast, a catabolic pathway for the stereospecific cleavage of β-aryl ether units that are found in lignin has been identified in Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 bacteria. β-Aryl ether units are typically abundant in lignin, corresponding to 50–70% of all of the intermonomer linkages. Consequently, a comprehensive understanding of enzymatic β-aryl ether (β-ether) cleavage is important for future efforts to biologically process lignin and its breakdown products. The crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenases (LigD, LigO, and LigL) and the glutathione-dependent lyase LigG provide new insights into the early and late enzymes in the β-ether degradation pathway. We present detailed information on the cofactor and substrate binding sites and on the catalytic mechanisms of these enzymes, comparing them with other known members of their respective families. Information on the Lig enzymes provides new insight into their catalysis mechanisms and can inform future strategies for using aromatic oligomers derived from plant lignin as a source of valuable aromatic compounds for biofuels and other bioproducts. PMID:26940872

  17. Iron-oxidation-state-dependent O-O bond cleavage of meta-chloroperbenzoic acid to form an iron(IV)-oxo complex

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Kallol; Lee, Sang Mok; Que, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of formation of [FeIV(O)(N4Py)]2+ (2, N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine) from the reaction of [FeII(N4Py)(CH3CN)]2+ (1) with m-chloroperbenzoic acid (mCPBA) in CH2Cl2 at −30 °C has been studied on the basis of the visible spectral changes observed and the reaction stoichiometry. It is shown that the conversion of 1 to 2 in 90% yield requires 1.5 equiv peracid and takes place in two successive one-electron steps via an [FeIII(N4Py)OH]2+(3) intermediate. The first oxidation step uses 0.5 equiv peracid and produces 0.5 equiv 3-chlorobenzoic acid, while the second step uses 1 equiv peracid and affords byproducts derived from chlorophenyl radical. We conclude that the FeII(N4Py) center promotes O-O bond heterolysis, while the FeIII(N4Py) center favors O-O bond homolysis, so the nature of O-O bond cleavage is dependent on the iron oxidation state. PMID:18443654

  18. Structure of acid-stable carmine.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Naoki; Kawasaki, Yoko; Sato, Kyoko; Aoki, Hiromitsu; Ichi, Takahito; Koda, Takatoshi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Maitani, Tamio

    2002-02-01

    Acid-stable carmine has recently been distributed in the U.S. market because of its good acid stability, but it is not permitted in Japan. We analyzed and determined the structure of the major pigment in acid-stable carmine, in order to establish an analytical method for it. Carminic acid was transformed into a different type of pigment, named acid-stable carmine, through amination when heated in ammonia solution. The features of the structure were clarified using a model compound, purpurin, in which the orientation of hydroxyl groups on the A ring of the anthraquinone skeleton is the same as that of carminic acid. By spectroscopic means and the synthesis of acid-stable carmine and purpurin derivatives, the structure of the major pigment in acid-stable carmine was established as 4-aminocarminic acid, a novel compound. PMID:11998314

  19. The role of the plasma membrane and a non-lysosomal compartment in the disulfide cleavage of endocytosed macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Feener, E.P.

    1990-01-01

    The cleavage of disulfide bonds in endocytosed macromolecules was investigated using new disulfide containing macromolecular conjugates. A conjugate, in which ({sup 125}I-tyr) was linked to the nondegradable macromolecular carrier poly D-lysine (PDL) through a disulfide spacer ({sup 125}I-tyr-SS-PDL), was used to monitor disulfide cleavage in adsorptive endocytosis in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Reductive cleavage of this probe released 3-thiopropionyl-{sup 125} {sup 125}I-tyramine, measurable as acid soluble radioactivity. In pulse experiments, reductive cleavage of {sup 125}I-tyr-SS-PDL differed in its kinetics from the proteolysis of {sup 125}I-labeled Poly L-lysine. Proteolytic degradation began after a 15 to 30 min lag, i.e. the time required for transport of poly(lysine) to heavy lysosomes, while reductive cleavage increased linearly between 0 and 15 min. In the first hour of chase, proteolytic and reductive cleavage amounted to 30% and 7% of the total cell bound radioactivity, respectively. The reductive cleavage observed during the first 30 min of chase was inhibited by 80-90% with cell impermeant sulfhydryl reagents (dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and p-chloromercuriphenyl-sulfonate), which indicated that cleavage occurred at the cell surface. In contrast, disulfide cleavage observed after 1 hr chase was not significantly inhibited by these reagents and, therefore, resulted from an intracellular process. Subcellular fractionation demonstrated that lysosomes could be excluded as a site of disulfide cleavage, but that a subcellular fraction characterized by a buoyant density of 1.03g/ml was associated with the cleavage of {sup 125}I-tyr-SS-PDL. Of the relevant structures which constitute this subcellular fraction, early endosomes and plasma membrane could be excluded as the reducing structures on the basis of kinetic considerations.

  20. From polymer to monomer: cleavage and rearrangement of Si-O-Si bonds after oxidation yielded an ordered cyclic crystallized structure.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yujing; Gou, Zhiming; Cao, Jinfeng; Yang, Zhou; Lu, Haifeng; Feng, Shengyu

    2015-07-27

    Polymerization reactions are very common in the chemical industry, however, the reaction in which monomers are obtained from polymers is rarely invesitgated. This work reveals for the first time that oxone can break the Si-O-Si bond and induce further rearrangement to yield an ordered cyclic structure. The oxidation of P1, which is obtained by reaction of 2,2'-1,2-ethanediylbis(oxy)bis(ethanethiol) (DBOET) with 1,3-divinyl-1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane (MM(Vi)), with oxone yielded cyclic crystallized sulfone-siloxane dimer (P1-ox) after unexpected cleavage and rearrangement of the Si-O-Si bond.

  1. Pairwise amino acid secondary structural propensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemmama, Ilan E.; Chapagain, Prem P.; Gerstman, Bernard S.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the propensities for amino acids to form a specific secondary structure when they are paired with other amino acids. Our investigations use molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations, and we compare the results to those from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Proper comparison requires weighting of the MD results in a manner consistent with the relative frequency of appearance in the PDB of each possible pair of amino acids. We find that the propensity for an amino acid to assume a secondary structure varies dramatically depending on the amino acid that is before or after it in the primary sequence. This cooperative effect means that when selecting amino acids to facilitate the formation of a secondary structure in peptide engineering experiments, the adjacent amino acids must be considered. We also examine the preference for a secondary structure in bacterial proteins and compare the results to those of human proteins.

  2. Differential proteomic analysis of lymphocytes treated with mycophenolic acid reveals caspase 3-induced cleavage of rho GDP dissociation inhibitor 2.

    PubMed

    Heller, Tanja; Asif, Abdul R; Petrova, Darinka Todorova; Doncheva, Yuliana; Wieland, E; Oellerich, Michael; Shipkova, Maria; Armstrong, Victor William

    2009-04-01

    The antiproliferative immunosuppressive drug mycophenolic acid (MPA) is an uncompetitive inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in de novo synthesis of purine nucleotides. The latter are not only required for synthesis of DNA and RNA but also are essential for the regulation of numerous cellular signaling pathways modulated by guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins). We undertook an analysis of the influence of MPA on protein expression in a T-lymphoblast cell line (CCRF-CEM), which displays concentration-dependent inhibition of proliferation by MPA to obtain insight into the influence of MPA on the cellular proteome. Cells were stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin and incubated in the presence or absence of MPA. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and densitometric imaging revealed 11 differentially expressed protein spots (P < 0.05) on MPA treatment, 6 with increased and 5 with decreased abundance. After in-gel tryptic digestion, proteins were identified by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Proteins displaying increased abundance after MPA treatment included splicing factor arginine/serine-rich 2, prostaglandin E synthase 3, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A, and deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase. Endoplasmin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, acidic leucine-rich nuclear phosphoprotein 32 family member A, and cofilin 1 showed decreased abundance after MPA treatment. Three separate spots (1 decreased and 2 increased abundance) were identified as Rho guanosine diphosphate dissociation inhibitor 2 (Rho GDI 2) proteins. Western blotting with a monoclonal antibody directed against the Rho GDI 2 site cleaved by caspase 3 demonstrated 1 spot with increased abundance to be the caspase 3-cleaved product of Rho GDI 2 lacking the first 19 amino acids. Rho GDI 2 plays a central regulatory role in the activation of Rho guanosine triphosphatases that function as molecular switches in cell signaling

  3. Site-selective chemical cleavage of peptide bonds.

    PubMed

    Elashal, Hader E; Raj, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Site-selective cleavage of extremely unreactive peptide bonds is a very important chemical modification that provides invaluable information regarding protein sequence, and it acts as a modulator of protein structure and function for therapeutic applications. For controlled and selective cleavage, a daunting task, chemical reagents must selectively recognize or bind to one or more amino acid residues in the peptide chain and selectively cleave a peptide bond. Building on this principle, we have developed an approach that utilizes a chemical reagent to selectively modify the serine residue in a peptide chain and leads to the cleavage of a peptide backbone at the N-terminus of the serine residue. After cleavage, modified residues can be converted back to the original fragments. This method exhibits broad substrate scope and selectively cleaves various bioactive peptides with post-translational modifications (e.g. N-acetylation and -methylation) and mutations (d- and β-amino acids), which are a known cause of age related diseases.

  4. Efficient hammerhead ribozyme-mediated cleavage of the structured hepatitis B virus encapsidation signal in vitro and in cell extracts, but not in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, J; Nassal, M

    1995-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), the causative agent of B-type hepatitis in man, is a small enveloped DNA virus that replicates through reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate, the terminally redundant RNA pregenome. An essential highly conserved cis-element present twice on this RNA is the encapsidation signal epsilon, a stem-loop structure that is critical for pregenome packaging and reverse transcription. Epsilon is hence an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Its structure, however, is a potential obstacle to antivirals whose action depends on hybridization, e.g. ribozymes. Here we demonstrate effective in vitro cleavage inside epsilon by hammerhead ribozymes containing flanking sequences complementary to an adjacent less structured region. Upon co-transfection with a HBV expression construct corresponding ribozymes embedded in a U6 snRNA context led to a significant, though modest, reduction in the steady-state level of HBV pregenomes. Inactive ribozyme mutants revealed that antisense effects contributed substantially to this reduction, however, efficient epsilon cleavage by the intracellularly expressed ribozymes was observed in Mg(2+)-supplemented cell lysates. Artificial HBV pregenomes carrying the ribozymes in cis and model RNAs lacking all HBV sequences except epsilon exhibited essentially the same behaviour. Hence, neither the absence of co-localization of ribozyme and target nor a viral component, but rather a cellular factor(s), is responsible for the strikingly different ribozyme activities inside cells and in cellular extracts. Images PMID:8559651

  5. Pistol ribozyme adopts a pseudoknot fold facilitating site-specific in-line cleavage.

    PubMed

    Ren, Aiming; Vušurović, Nikola; Gebetsberger, Jennifer; Gao, Pu; Juen, Michael; Kreutz, Christoph; Micura, Ronald; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2016-09-01

    The field of small self-cleaving nucleolytic ribozymes has been invigorated by the recent discovery of the twister, twister-sister, pistol and hatchet ribozymes. We report the crystal structure of a pistol ribozyme termed env25, which adopts a compact tertiary architecture stabilized by an embedded pseudoknot fold. The G-U cleavage site adopts a splayed-apart conformation with in-line alignment of the modeled 2'-O of G for attack on the adjacent to-be-cleaved P-O5' bond. Highly conserved residues G40 (N1 position) and A32 (N3 and 2'-OH positions) are aligned to act as a general base and a general acid, respectively, to accelerate cleavage chemistry, with their roles confirmed by cleavage assays on variants, and an increased pKa of 4.7 for A32. Our structure of the pistol ribozyme defined how the overall and local topologies dictate the in-line alignment at the G-U cleavage site, with cleavage assays on variants revealing key residues that participate in acid-base-catalyzed cleavage chemistry. PMID:27398999

  6. Fluorescence Titrations of Bio-relevant Complexes with DNA: Synthesis, Structural Investigation, DNA Binding/Cleavage, Antimicrobial and Molecular Docking Studies.

    PubMed

    Arun, Thesingu Rajan; Subramanian, Ramasamy; Packianathan, Seemon; Raman, Natarajan

    2015-07-01

    In the present work, we attempted to develop new metal complexes (Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II)) of the imine ligand which was synthesized from 9,10-phenanthrenequinone and para-anisidine. With an intention to make the complexes most stable, very special chelating amino acid has been coordinated to the metal centre. The resultant metal complexes have been characterized by variety of techniques including FT-IR, UV-Vis., (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, powder XRD, EPR and mass spectral studies. The interaction of the complexes with DNA has been effectively examined and explored by fluorescence titration, UV-Vis absorption, viscometer titration, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry. Moreover, molecular docking analysis has been performed to understand the nature of binding of the complexes with DNA. These studies prove that CT DNA interaction of the complexes follows intercalation mode. The metal complexes exhibit effective cleavage of pUC19 DNA by an oxidative cleavage mechanism. The antimicrobial screening indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various organisms.

  7. Urea free and more efficient sample preparation method for mass spectrometry based protein identification via combining the formic acid-assisted chemical cleavage and trypsin digestion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuaibin; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2011-10-30

    A formic acid (FA)-assisted sample preparation method was presented for protein identification via mass spectrometry (MS). Detailedly, an aqueous solution containing 2% FA and dithiothreitol was selected to perform protein denaturation, aspartic acid (D) sites cleavage and disulfide linkages reduction simultaneously at 108°C for 2h. Subsequently, FA wiped off via vacuum concentration. Finally, iodoacetamide (IAA) alkylation and trypsin digestion could be performed ordinally. A series of model proteins (BSA, β-lactoglobulin and apo-Transferrin) were treated respectively using such method, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. The identified peptide number was increased by ∼ 80% in comparison with the conventional urea-assisted sample preparation method. Moreover, BSA identification was achieved efficiently down to femtomole (25 ± 0 sequence coverage and 16 ± 1 peptides) via such method. In contrast, there were not peptides identified confidently via the urea-assisted method before desalination via the C18 zip tip. The absence of urea in this sample preparation method was an advantage for the more favorable digestion and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. The performances of two methods for the real sample (rat liver proteome) were also compared, followed by a nanoflow reversed-phase liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry system analysis. As a result, 1335 ± 43 peptides were identified confidently (false discovery rate <1%) via FA-assisted method, corresponding to 295 ± 12 proteins (of top match=1 and requiring 2 unique peptides at least). In contrast, there were only 1107 ± 16 peptides (corresponding to 231 ± 10 proteins) obtained from the conventional urea-assisted method. It was serving as a more efficient protein sample preparation method for researching specific proteomes better, and providing assistance to develop other proteomics analysis methods

  8. Formation of C-terminally truncated version of the Taz1 protein employs cleavage-box structure in mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gunisova, Stanislava; Bartosova, Zdenka; Kramara, Juraj; Nosek, Jozef; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2010-02-12

    When expressed in various hosts the taz1{sup +} gene encoding the fission yeast telomere-binding protein produces two forms of polypeptides: full-length (Taz1p) and truncated (Taz1p{Delta}C) version lacking almost entire Myb-domain. Whereas Taz1p binds telomeric DNA in vitro, Taz1p{Delta}C forms long filaments unable of DNA binding. The formation of Taz1p{Delta}C is a result of neither site-specific proteolysis, nor premature termination of transcription. In silico analysis of the taz1{sup +} RNA transcript revealed a stem-loop structure at the site of cleavage (cleavage box; CB). In order to explore whether it possesses inherent destabilizing effects, we cloned CB sequence into the open reading frame (ORF) of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and observed that when expressed in Escherichia coli the engineered gene produced two forms of the reporter protein. The formation of the truncated version of GST was abolished, when CB was replaced with recoded sequence containing synonymous codons thus indicating that the truncation is based on structural properties of taz1{sup +} mRNA.

  9. Structural analysis of disease-related TDP-43 D169G mutation: linking enhanced stability and caspase cleavage efficiency to protein accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chien-Hao; Grauffel, Cédric; Wu, Lien-Szu; Kuo, Pan-Hsien; Doudeva, Lyudmila G.; Lim, Carmay; Shen, Che-Kun James; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein TDP-43 forms intracellular inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While TDP-43 mutations have been identified in ALS patients, how these mutations are linked to ALS remains unclear. Here we examined the biophysical properties of six ALS-linked TDP-43 mutants and found that one of the mutants, D169G, had higher thermal stability than wild-type TDP-43 and that it was cleaved by caspase 3 more efficiently, producing increased levels of the C-terminal 35 kD fragments (TDP-35) in vitro and in neuroblastoma cells. The crystal structure of the TDP-43 RRM1 domain containing the D169G mutation in complex with DNA along with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the D169G mutation induces a local conformational change in a β turn and increases the hydrophobic interactions in the RRM1 core, thus enhancing the thermal stability of the RRM1 domain. Our results provide the first crystal structure of TDP-43 containing a disease-linked D169G mutation and a disease-related mechanism showing that D169G mutant is more susceptible to proteolytic cleavage by caspase 3 into the pathogenic C-terminal 35-kD fragments due to its increased stability in the RRM1 domain. Modulation of TDP-43 stability and caspase cleavage efficiency could present an avenue for prevention and treatment of TDP-43-linked neurodegeneration. PMID:26883171

  10. Carbon kinetic isotope effects at natural abundances during iron-catalyzed photolytic cleavage of Csbnd C bonds in aqueous phase α,ω-dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irei, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    Carbon kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) at natural abundances during photolysis of Fe3+-oxalato, malonato, and succinato complexes in aqueous solution were studied to identify the Csbnd C bond cleaving mechanism of Fe3+-oxalato complexes under sunlight irradiation. Observed overall KIEs were 5.9‰, 11.5‰, and 8.4‰, respectively. This variation is inconsistent with secondary carbon KIEs for the Fesbnd O bond cleavage, but consistent with primary carbon KIEs for sequential cleavage of Fesbnd O and Csbnd C bonds. Position-specific probability of 13C content estimated KIEs of 5.9‰, 17.2‰, and 17‰ for 12Csbnd 13C bond cleavage, respectively, indicating the different KIEs for carboxyl-carboxyl and methyl-carboxyl cleavage.

  11. Synthesis, Structure-Activity Relationship, and Mechanistic Investigation of Lithocholic Acid Amphiphiles for Colon Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Priyanshu; Singh, Ashima; Motiani, Rajender K.; Shyam, Radhey; Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Sengupta, Sagar; Bajaj, Avinash

    2014-01-01

    We report a structure-activity relationship of lithocholic acid amphiphiles for their anticancer activities against colon cancer. We synthesized ten cationic amphiphiles differing in nature of cationic charged head groups using lithocholic acid. We observed that anticancer activities of these amphiphiles against colon cancer cell lines are contingent on nature of charged head group. Lithocholic acid based amphiphile possessing piperidine head group (LCA-PIP1) is ~10 times more cytotoxic as compared to its precursor. Biochemical studies revealed that enhanced activity of LCA-PIP1 as compared to lithocholic acid is due to greater activation of apoptosis.LCA-PIP1 induces sub G0 arrest and causes cleavage of caspases. A single dose of lithocholic acid-piperidine derivative is enough to reduce the tumor burden by 75% in tumor xenograft model. PMID:25685308

  12. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres.

    PubMed

    Lassalas, Pierrik; Gay, Bryant; Lasfargeas, Caroline; James, Michael J; Tran, Van; Vijayendran, Krishna G; Brunden, Kurt R; Kozlowski, Marisa C; Thomas, Craig J; Smith, Amos B; Huryn, Donna M; Ballatore, Carlo

    2016-04-14

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure-property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group.

  13. Bond cleavage, fragment modification and reassembly in enantioselective three-component reactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan; Zhou, Jun; Xia, Fei; Kang, Zhenghui; Hu, Wenhao

    2015-01-01

    Chemical bond cleavage and reconstruction are common processes in traditional rearrangement reactions. In contrast, the process that involves bond cleavage, fragment modification and then reconstruction of the modified fragment provides an efficient way to build structurally diversified molecules. Here, we report a palladium(II)/chiral phosphoric acid catalysed three-component reaction of aryldiazoacetates, enamines and imines to afford α-amino-δ-oxo pentanoic acid derivatives in good yields with excellent diastereoselectivities and high enantioselectivities. The stereoselective reaction went through a unique process that involves cleavage of a C–N bond, modification of the resulting amino fragment and selective reassembly of the modified fragment. This innovative multi-component process represents a highly efficient way to build structurally diversified polyfunctional molecules in an atom and step economic fashion. A keto-iminium is proposed as a key intermediate and a chiral palladium/phosphate complex is proposed as an active catalyst. PMID:25586817

  14. Structure of a quinolone-stabilized cleavage complex of topoisomerase IV from Klebsiella pneumoniae and comparison with a related Streptococcus pneumoniae complex

    PubMed Central

    Veselkov, Dennis A.; Laponogov, Ivan; Pan, Xiao-Su; Selvarajah, Jogitha; Skamrova, Galyna B.; Branstrom, Arthur; Narasimhan, Jana; Prasad, Josyula V. N. Vara; Fisher, L. Mark; Sanderson, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium that is responsible for a range of common infections, including pulmonary pneumonia, bloodstream infections and meningitis. Certain strains of Klebsiella have become highly resistant to antibiotics. Despite the vast amount of research carried out on this class of bacteria, the molecular structure of its topoisomerase IV, a type II topoisomerase essential for catalysing chromosomal segregation, had remained unknown. In this paper, the structure of its DNA-cleavage complex is reported at 3.35 Å resolution. The complex is comprised of ParC breakage-reunion and ParE TOPRIM domains of K. pneumoniae topoisomerase IV with DNA stabilized by levofloxacin, a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent. This complex is compared with a similar complex from Streptococcus pneumoniae, which has recently been solved. PMID:27050128

  15. Crystal structure of Thermoplasma acidophilum XerA recombinase shows large C-shape clamp conformation and cis-cleavage mode for nucleophilic tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Jo, Chang Hwa; Kim, Junsoo; Han, Ah-reum; Park, Sam Yong; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Nam, Ki Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Site-specific Xer recombination plays a pivotal role in reshuffling genetic information. Here, we report the 2.5 Å crystal structure of XerA from the archaean Thermoplasma acidophilum. Crystallographic data reveal a uniquely open conformational state, resulting in a C-shaped clamp with an angle of ~ 48° and a distance of 57 Å between the core-binding and the catalytic domains. The catalytic nucleophile, Tyr264, is positioned in cis-cleavage mode by XerA's C-term tail that interacts with the CAT domain of a neighboring monomer without DNA substrate. Structural comparisons of tyrosine recombinases elucidate the dynamics of Xer recombinase. PMID:26919387

  16. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  17. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Cleavage of aliphatic organosulfonate carbon to sulfur (C-S) bonds, a critical link in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle, has been identified in Escherichia coli K-12. Enormous quantities of inorganic sulfate are continuously converted (Scheme I) into methanesulfonic acid 1 and acylated 3-(6-sulfo-{alpha}-D-quinovopyranosyl)-L-glycerol 2. Biocatalytic desulfurization (Scheme I) of 1 and 2, which share the structural feature of an aliphatic carbon bonded to a sulfonic acid sulfur, completes the cycle, Discovery of this desulfurization in E. coli provides an invaluable paradigm for study of a biotic process which, via the biogeochemical cycle, significantly influences the atmospheric concentration of sulfur-containing molecules.

  18. The crystal structure of bacillus cereus phosphonoacetaldehyde hydrolase: insight into catalysis of phosphorus bond cleavage and catalytic diversification within the HAD enzyme superfamily.

    PubMed

    Morais, M C; Zhang, W; Baker, A S; Zhang, G; Dunaway-Mariano, D; Allen, K N

    2000-08-29

    activity resulting from Asp12Ala substitution. The similarity of backbone folds observed in phosphonatase and the 2-haloacid dehalogenase of the HAD enzyme superfamily indicated common ancestry. Superposition of the two structures revealed a conserved active-site scaffold having distinct catalytic stations. Analysis of the usage of polar amino acid residues at these stations by the dehalogenases, phosphonatases, phosphatases, and phosphomutases of the HAD superfamily suggests possible ways in which the active site of an ancient enzyme ancestor might have been diversified for catalysis of C-X, P-C, and P-O bond cleavage reactions. PMID:10956028

  19. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure–property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group. PMID:26967507

  20. Reaction of unsaturated uronic acid residues with mercuric salts. Cleavage of the hyaluronic acid disaccharide 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3-O-(beta-D-gluco-4-enepyranosyluronic acid)-D-glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwigs, U; Elgavish, A; Esko, J D; Meezan, E; Rodén, L

    1987-01-01

    Degradation of connective-tissue polysaccharides with bacterial or fungal eliminases and subsequent characterization of the reaction products are now part of standard methodology for the analysis of these compounds. However, the scope of preparative and analytical work based on the use of eliminases has been limited by the lack of procedures for specific removal of the unsaturated uronic acid residues generated in the eliminase reactions. In the present investigation, we have shown that these residues are cleaved by mercuric salts under mild conditions that are not likely to affect other structures in an oligo- or poly-saccharide molecule. Thus the disaccharide generated from hyaluronic acid by digestion with chondroitinase AC or ABC was cleaved into a keto acid and free N-acetylglucosamine within 10 min at room temperature upon exposure to 14 mM-mercuric acetate at pH 5. The reaction of the disaccharide with mercuric salts was used for ready determination of the distribution of radioactivity between the glucuronic acid and N-acetylglucosamine moieties in radioactive hyaluronic acid that had been synthesized by IMR-90 fibroblasts from 3H-labelled monosaccharides. When the precursor was [3H]galactose, over 95% of the incorporated radioactivity was found in the glucuronic acid moiety. In contrast, cells grown in the presence of [3H]glucosamine synthesized a polysaccharide in which almost all of the label was located in the N-acetylglucosamine units. It is apparent from these experiments that the reaction of unsaturated uronic acid residues with mercuric salts provides a new tool with potential for many applications in the study of the structure and metabolism of connective-tissue polysaccharides. PMID:3663191

  1. Vibrational structure of the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and arachidonic acid studied by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Johannes; Noack, Kristina; Bartelmess, Juergen; Walter, Christian; Dörnenburg, Heike; Leipertz, Alfred

    2010-02-01

    The spectroscopic discrimination of the two structurally similar polyunsaturated C 20 fatty acids (PUFAs) 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (arachidonic acid) is shown. For this purpose their vibrational structures are studied by means of attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The fingerprint regions of the recorded spectra are found to be almost identical, while the C-H stretching mode regions around 3000 cm -1 show such significant differences as results of electronic and molecular structure alterations based on the different degree of saturation that both fatty acids can be clearly distinguished from each other.

  2. Microwave structure for the propiolic acid-formic acid complex.

    PubMed

    Kukolich, Stephen G; Mitchell, Erik G; Carey, Spencer J; Sun, Ming; Sargus, Bryan A

    2013-10-01

    New microwave spectra were measured to obtain rotational constants and centrifugal distortion constants for the DCCCOOH···HOOCH and HCCCOOD···DOOCH isotopologues. Rotational transitions were measured in the frequency range of 4.9-15.4 GHz, providing accurate rotational constants, which, combined with previous rotational constants, allowed an improved structural fit for the propiolic acid-formic acid complex. The new structural fit yields reasonably accurate orientations for both the propiolic and formic acid monomers in the complex and more accurate structural parameters describing the hydrogen bonding. The structure is planar, with a positive inertial defect of Δ = 1.33 amu Å(2). The experimental structure exhibits a greater asymmetry for the two hydrogen bond lengths than was obtained from the ab initio mp2 calculations. The best-fit hydrogen bond lengths have an r(O1-H1···O4) of 1.64 Å and an r(O3-H2···O2) of 1.87 Å. The average of the two hydrogen bond lengths is r(av)(exp) = 1.76 Å, in good agreement with r(av)(theory) = 1.72 Å. The center of mass separation of the monomers is R(CM) = 3.864 Å. Other structural parameters from the least-squares fit using the experimental rotational constants are compared with theoretical values. The spectra were obtained using two different pulsed beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometers.

  3. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Voigt, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The data provide information in support of the research article, "The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors" (Janek et al., 2016) [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS) and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans. PMID:27508221

  4. Synthesis of mononuclear copper(II) complexes of acyclic Schiff's base ligands: Spectral, structural, electrochemical, antibacterial, DNA binding and cleavage activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayamani, Arumugam; Thamilarasan, Vijayan; Sengottuvelan, Nallathambi; Manisankar, Paramasivam; Kang, Sung Kwon; Kim, Young-Inn; Ganesan, Vengatesan

    2014-03-01

    The mononuclear copper(II) complexes (1&2) of ligands L1 [N,N";-bis(2-hydroxy-5-methylbenzyl)-1,4-bis(3-iminopropyl)piperazine] or L2 [N,N";-bis(2-hydroxy-5-bromobenzyl)-1,4-bis(3-iminopropyl) piperazine] have been synthesized and characterised. The single crystal X-ray study had shown that ligands L1 and L2 crystallize in a monoclinic crystal system with P21/c space group. The mononuclear copper(II) complexes show one quasireversible cyclic voltammetric response near cathodic region (-0.77 to -0.85 V) in DMF assignable to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. Binding interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) investigated by absorption studies and fluorescence spectral studies show good binding affinity to CT DNA, which imply both the copper(II) complexes can strongly interact with DNA efficiently. The copper(II) complexes showed efficient oxidative cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid as reducing agent through a mechanistic pathway involving formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species. The Schiff bases and their Cu(II) complexes have been screened for antibacterial activities which indicates that the complexes exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than the free ligands.

  5. Characterization of the 4-Carboxy-4-Hydroxy-2-Oxoadipate Aldolase Gene and Operon Structure of the Protocatechuate 4,5-Cleavage Pathway Genes in Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Hirofumi; Masai, Eiji; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    The protocatechuate (PCA) 4,5-cleavage pathway is the essential metabolic route for degradation of low-molecular-weight products derived from lignin by Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6. In the 10.5-kb EcoRI fragment carrying the genes for PCA 4,5-dioxygenase (ligAB), 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate hydrolase (ligI), 4-oxalomesaconate hydratase (ligJ), and a part of 4-carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ligC), we found the ligK gene, which encodes 4-carboxy-4-hydroxy-2-oxoadipate (CHA) aldolase. The ligK gene was located 1,183 bp upstream of ligI and transcribed in the same direction as ligI. We also found the ligR gene encoding a LysR-type transcriptional activator, which was located 174 bp upstream of ligK. The ligK gene consists of a 684-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 24,131 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of ligK showed 57 to 88% identity with those of the corresponding genes recently reported in Sphingomonas sp. strain LB126, Comamonas testosteroni BR6020, Arthrobacter keyseri 12B, and Pseudomonas ochraceae NGJ1. The ligK gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product (LigK) was purified to near homogeneity. Electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry indicated that LigK catalyzes not only the conversion of CHA to pyruvate and oxaloacetate but also that of oxaloacetate to pyruvate and CO2. LigK is a hexamer, and its isoelectric point is 5.1. The Km for CHA and oxaloacetate are 11.2 and 136 μM, respectively. Inactivation of ligK in S. paucimobilis SYK-6 resulted in the growth deficiency of vanillate and syringate, indicating that ligK encodes the essential CHA aldolase for catabolism of these compounds. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the PCA 4,5-cleavage pathway genes of S. paucimobilis SYK-6 consisted of four transcriptional units, including the ligK-orf1-ligI-lsdA cluster, the ligJAB cluster, and the monocistronic ligR and ligC genes. PMID:12486039

  6. Characterization of the 4-carboxy-4-hydroxy-2-oxoadipate aldolase gene and operon structure of the protocatechuate 4,5-cleavage pathway genes in Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hirofumi; Masai, Eiji; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    The protocatechuate (PCA) 4,5-cleavage pathway is the essential metabolic route for degradation of low-molecular-weight products derived from lignin by Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6. In the 10.5-kb EcoRI fragment carrying the genes for PCA 4,5-dioxygenase (ligAB), 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate hydrolase (ligI), 4-oxalomesaconate hydratase (ligJ), and a part of 4-carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ligC), we found the ligK gene, which encodes 4-carboxy-4-hydroxy-2-oxoadipate (CHA) aldolase. The ligK gene was located 1,183 bp upstream of ligI and transcribed in the same direction as ligI. We also found the ligR gene encoding a LysR-type transcriptional activator, which was located 174 bp upstream of ligK. The ligK gene consists of a 684-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 24,131 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of ligK showed 57 to 88% identity with those of the corresponding genes recently reported in Sphingomonas sp. strain LB126, Comamonas testosteroni BR6020, Arthrobacter keyseri 12B, and Pseudomonas ochraceae NGJ1. The ligK gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product (LigK) was purified to near homogeneity. Electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry indicated that LigK catalyzes not only the conversion of CHA to pyruvate and oxaloacetate but also that of oxaloacetate to pyruvate and CO(2). LigK is a hexamer, and its isoelectric point is 5.1. The K(m) for CHA and oxaloacetate are 11.2 and 136 micro M, respectively. Inactivation of ligK in S. paucimobilis SYK-6 resulted in the growth deficiency of vanillate and syringate, indicating that ligK encodes the essential CHA aldolase for catabolism of these compounds. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the PCA 4,5-cleavage pathway genes of S. paucimobilis SYK-6 consisted of four transcriptional units, including the ligK-orf1-ligI-lsdA cluster, the ligJAB cluster, and the monocistronic ligR and ligC genes.

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 cleavage site recognition and binding in full-length human type III collagen.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kim E; Olsen, David R

    2009-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are essential for normal collagen turnover, recovery from fibrosis, and vascular permeability. In fibrillar collagens, MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-13 cleave a specific glycine-isoleucine or glycine-leucine bond, despite the presence of this sequence in other parts of the protein. This cut site specificity has been hypothesized to arise from a unique, relaxed super-secondary structure in this area due to local hydroxyproline poor character. In this study we examined the mechanism of interaction and cleavage of human type III collagen by fibroblast MMP-1 by using a panel of recombinant human type III collagens (rhCIIIs) containing engineered sequences in the vicinity of the cleavage site. Native and recombinant type III collagens had similar biochemical and structural characteristics, as indicated by transmission electron microscopy, circular dichroism spectropolarimetry, melting temperature and hydroxyproline analysis. A single amino acid change at the I785 cleavage site to proline resulted in partial MMP-1 resistance, but cuts were found in novel sites in the original cleavage region. However, the replacement of five Y-position residues by proline in this region, regardless of I785 variation, conferred complete resistance to MMP-1, MMP-8, MMP-13, trypsin, and elastase. MMP-1 had a decreased specific activity towards and reduced cleavage rate of rhCIII I785P but a K(m) similar to wild-type. Despite the reductions in protease sensitivity, MMP-1 bound to all of the engineered rhCIIIs with comparable affinity, indicating that MMP-1 binding is not sufficient for cleavage. The relaxed tertiary structure in the MMP cleavage region may permit local collagen unwinding by MMP-1 that enables site-specific proteolysis.

  8. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 1. Minor structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the strong-acid characteristics (pKa 3.0 or less) of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was conducted. Quantitative determinations were made for amino acid and sulfur-containing acid structures, oxalate half-ester structures, malonic acid structures, keto acid structures, and aromatic carboxyl-group structures. These determinations were made by using a variety of spectrometric (13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and ultraviolet spectrometry) and titrimetric characterizations on fulvic acid or fulvic acid samples that were chemically derivatized to indicate certain functional groups. Only keto acid and aromatic carboxyl-group structures contributed significantly to the strong-acid characteristics of the fulvic acid; these structures accounted for 43% of the strong-acid acidity. The remaining 57% of the strong acids are aliphatic carboxyl groups in unusual and/or complex configurations for which limited model compound data are available.

  9. Dual Functions of Bacteriophage T4D Gene 28 Product: Structural Component of the Viral Tail Baseplate Central Plug and Cleavage Enzyme for Folyl Polyglutamates II. Folate Metabolism and Polyglutamate Cleavage Activity of Uninfected and Infected Escherichia coli Cells and Bacteriophage Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kozloff, Lloyd M.; Lute, M.

    1981-01-01

    We investigated the role of the T4D bacteriophage gene 28 product in folate metabolism in infected Escherichia coli cells by using antifolate drugs and a newly devised assay for folyl polyglutamate cleavage activity. Preincubation of host E. coli cells with various sulfa drugs inhibited phage production by decreasing the burst size when the phage particles produced an altered gene 28 product (i.e., after infection under permissive conditions with T4D 28ts or T4D am28). In addition, we found that another folate analog, pyrimethamine, also inhibited T4D 28ts production and T4D 28am production, but this analog did not inhibit wild-type T4D production. A temperature-resistant revertant of T4D 28ts was not sensitive to either sulfa drugs or pyrimethamine. We developed an assay to measure the enzymatic cleavage of folyl polyglutamates. The high-molecular-weight folyl polyglutamate substrate was isolated from E. coli B cells infected with T4D am28 in the presence of labeled glutamic acid and was characterized as a folate compound containing 12 to 14 labeled glutamate residues. Extracts of uninfected bacteria liberated glutamate residues from this substrate with a pH optimum of 8.4 to 8.5. Extracts of bacteriophage T4D-infected E. coli B cells exhibited an additional new folyl polyglutamate cleavage activity with a pH optimum of about 6.4 to 6.5, which was clearly distinguished from the preexisting activity in the uninfected host cells. This new activity was induced in E. coli B cells by infection with wild-type T4D and T4D amber mutants 29−, 26−, 27−, 51−, and 10−, but it was not induced under nonpermissive conditions by T4D am28 or by T4D 28ts. Mutations in gene 28 affected the properties of the induced cleavage enzyme. Wild-type T4D-induced cleavage activity was not inhibited by pyrimethamine, whereas the T4D 28ts activity induced at a permissive temperature was inhibited by this folate analog. Folyl polyglutamate cleavage activity characteristic of the

  10. Mononuclear dioxomolybdenum(VI) thiosemicarbazonato complexes: Synthesis, characterization, structural illustration, in vitro DNA binding, cleavage, and antitumor properties.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mouayed A; Guan, Teoh S; Haque, Rosenani A; Khadeer Ahamed, Mohamed B; Abdul Majid, Amin M S

    2015-02-01

    Four dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes were synthesized by reacting [MoO2(acac)2] with N-ethyl-2-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (1), N-ethyl-2-(5-allyl-3-methoxy-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (2), N-methyl-2-(3-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (3), and N-ethyl-2-(3-methyl-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (4). The molecular structures of 1, 2, and all the synthesized complexes were determined using single crystal X-ray crystallography. The binding properties of the ligand and complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated via UV, fluorescence titrations, and viscosity measurement. Gel electrophoresis revealed that all the complexes cleave pBR 322 plasmid DNA. The cytotoxicity of the complexes were studied against the HCT 116 human colorectal cell line. All the complexes exhibited more pronounced activity than the standard reference drug 5-fluorouracil (IC50 7.3μM). These studies show that dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes could be potentially useful in chemotherapy.

  11. Mononuclear dioxomolybdenum(VI) thiosemicarbazonato complexes: Synthesis, characterization, structural illustration, in vitro DNA binding, cleavage, and antitumor properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Mouayed A.; Guan, Teoh S.; Haque, Rosenani A.; Khadeer Ahamed, Mohamed B.; Abdul Majid, Amin M. S.

    2015-02-01

    Four dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes were synthesized by reacting [MoO2(acac)2] with N-ethyl-2-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (1), N-ethyl-2-(5-allyl-3-methoxy-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (2), N-methyl-2-(3-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (3), and N-ethyl-2-(3-methyl-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (4). The molecular structures of 1, 2, and all the synthesized complexes were determined using single crystal X-ray crystallography. The binding properties of the ligand and complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated via UV, fluorescence titrations, and viscosity measurement. Gel electrophoresis revealed that all the complexes cleave pBR 322 plasmid DNA. The cytotoxicity of the complexes were studied against the HCT 116 human colorectal cell line. All the complexes exhibited more pronounced activity than the standard reference drug 5-fluorouracil (IC50 7.3 μM). These studies show that dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes could be potentially useful in chemotherapy.

  12. Structural Features of the Pseudomonas fluorescens Biofilm Adhesin LapA Required for LapG-Dependent Cleavage, Biofilm Formation, and Cell Surface Localization

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Chelsea D.; Smith, T. Jarrod; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Newell, Peter D.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2014-01-01

    The localization of the LapA protein to the cell surface is a key step required by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 to irreversibly attach to a surface and form a biofilm. LapA is a member of a diverse family of predicted bacterial adhesins, and although lacking a high degree of sequence similarity, family members do share common predicted domains. Here, using mutational analysis, we determine the significance of each domain feature of LapA in relation to its export and localization to the cell surface and function in biofilm formation. Our previous work showed that the N terminus of LapA is required for cleavage by the periplasmic cysteine protease LapG and release of the adhesin from the cell surface under conditions unfavorable for biofilm formation. We define an additional critical region of the N terminus of LapA required for LapG proteolysis. Furthermore, our results suggest that the domains within the C terminus of LapA are not absolutely required for biofilm formation, export, or localization to the cell surface, with the exception of the type I secretion signal, which is required for LapA export and cell surface localization. In contrast, deletion of the central repetitive region of LapA, consisting of 37 repeats of 100 amino acids, results in an inability to form a biofilm. We also used single-molecule atomic force microscopy to further characterize the role of these domains in biofilm formation on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. These studies represent the first detailed analysis of the domains of the LapA family of biofilm adhesin proteins. PMID:24837291

  13. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.

    2012-05-15

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  14. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  15. Superprotonic solid acids: Structure, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boysen, Dane Andrew

    In this work, the structure and properties of superprotonic MH nXO4-type solid acids (where M = monovalent cation, X = S, Se, P, As, and n = 1, 2) have been investigated and, for the first time, applied in fuel cell devices. Several MH nXO4-type solid acids are known to undergo a "superprotonic" solid-state phase transition upon heating, in which the proton conductivity increases by several orders of magnitude and takes on values of ˜10 -2O-1cm-1. The presence of superprotonic conductivity in fully hydrogen bonded solid acids, such as CsH2PO4, has long been disputed. In these investigations, through the use of pressure, the unequivocal identification of superprotonic behavior in both RbH2PO4 and CsH2PO 4 has been demonstrated, whereas for chemically analogous compounds with smaller cations, such as KH2PO4 and NaH2PO 4, superprotonic conductivity was notably absent. Such observations have led to the adoption of radius ratio rules, in an attempt to identify a critical ion size effect on the presence of superprotonic conductivity in solid acids. It has been found that, while ionic size does play a prominent role in the presence of superprotonic behavior in solid acids, equally important are the effects of ionic and hydrogen bonding. Next, the properties of superprotonic phase transition have been investigated from a thermodynamic standpoint. With contributions from this work, a formulation has been developed that accounts for the entropy resulting from both the disordering of both hydrogen bonds and oxy-anion librations in the superprotonic phase of solid acids. This formulation, fundamentally derived from Linus Pauling's entropy rules for ice, accurately accounts for the change in entropy through a superprotonic phase transition. Lastly, the first proof-of-priniciple fuel cells based upon solid acid electrolytes have been demonstrated. Initial results based upon a sulfate electrolyte, CsHSO4, demonstrated the viability of solid acids, but poor chemical stability

  16. Real-time monitoring of double-stranded DNA cleavage using molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changbei; Tang, Zhiwen; Huo, Xiqin; Yang, Xiaohai; Li, Wei; Tan, Weihong

    2008-07-15

    Traditional methods to assay enzymatic cleavage of DNA are discontinuous, time-consuming and laborious. Here, we report a new approach for real-time monitoring of double-stranded DNA cleavage by restriction endonuclease based on nucleic acid ligation using molecular beacon. Upon cleavage of DNA, the cleavage product can be ligated by DNA ligase, which results in a fluorescence enhancement of the molecular beacon. This method permits real-time monitoring of DNA cleavage and makes it easy to characterize the activity of restriction endonuclease and to study the cleavage reaction kinetics.

  17. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss-Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  18. Probing the structure of nucleic acids with Ni(II) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoying.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of nucleic acids determines their biological function. Interest in the development of novel probes from structures of nucleic acid has led to the discovery of conformation-specific oxidation of guanine sites in DNA and RNA using Ni(II) complexes. The reaction is highly dependent upon the nature of Ni(II) complexes with the most important feature of a strong in-plane ligand field. The unique properties of Ni(II) complexes combining redox and coordination features provide sensitive probes for nucleic acid conformation. One of these nickel complexes, NiCR, has been shown to selectively promote cleavage of DNA at guanine sites held accessible through the formation of unusual secondary structures such as ends, mismatches, bulges and loops. An unique mechanism for the base and conformation-specific oxidation of DNA promoted by Ni(II) complexes is proposed, involving direct ligation of nickel to N-7 of guanine delivering a non-diffusible oxidizing species. NiCR has been proved to be a sensitive and predictable probe for the tertiary structure of RNAs. The specific sites of oxidation of tRNS[sup phe] promoted by NiCR correspond to the most accessible guanine residues determined by theoretic calculations. NiCR has also been successfully applied to probe the tertiary structure of self-splicing Tetrahymena pre-rRNA intron, and has provided important information about the folding of this intron, especially in the region of the catalytic core.

  19. Diffractaic acid: Crystalline structure and physicochemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro Fonseca, Jéssica; de Oliveira, Yara Santiago; Bezerra, Beatriz P.; Ellena, Javier; Honda, Neli Kika; Silva, Camilla V. N. S.; da Silva Santos, Noemia Pereira; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela; Ayala, Alejandro Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Diffractaic acid (DA) is a secondary metabolite of lichens that belongs to the chemical class of depsides, and some relevant pharmacological properties are associated with this natural product, such as antioxidant, antiulcerogenic and gastroprotective effects. Considering the relevant biological activities and taking into account that the activities are intrinsically related to the structure, the main goal of this study was to elucidate the structure of diffractaic acid by single crystal X-ray diffraction as well to characterize its physicochemical properties by powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and vibrational spectroscopy. It was observed that DA belongs to the monoclinic crystal system, crystallizing in the space group P21/c with the following cell parameters: a = 18.535(7) Å, b = 4.0439(18) Å, c = 23.964(6) Å, β = 91.55(3)°. The crystal packing is characterized by difractaic acid dimers, which are reflected in the vibrational spectrum. These observations were supported by quantum mechanical calculations.

  20. Structural elucidation and genomic scrutiny of the C60-C100 mycolic acids of Segniliparus rotundus.

    PubMed

    Lanéelle, Marie-Antoinette; Eynard, Nathalie; Spina, Lucie; Lemassu, Anne; Laval, Françoise; Huc, Emilie; Etienne, Gilles; Marrakchi, Hedia; Daffé, Mamadou

    2013-01-01

    Mycolic acids, very long-chain α-alkyl, β-hydroxylated fatty acids, occur in the members of the order Corynebacteriales where their chain lengths (C(26)-C(88)) and structural features (oxygen functions, cis or trans double bonds, cyclopropane rings and methyl branches) are genus- and species-specific. The molecular composition and structures of the mycolic acids of two species belonging to the genus Segniliparus were determined by a combination of modern analytical chemical techniques, which include MS and NMR. They consist of mono-ethylenic C(62-)C(64) (α'), di-ethylenic C(77)-C(79) (α) and extremely long-chain mycolic acids (α(+)) ranging from 92 to 98 carbon atoms and containing three unsaturations, cis and/or trans double bonds and/or cyclopropanes. The double bonds in each class of mycolic acids were positioned by oxidative cleavage and exhibit locations similar to those of α- and α'-mycolic acids of mycobacteria. For the ultralong chain α-mycolic acids, the three double bonds were located at equally spaced carbon intervals (C(13)-C(16)), with the methyl branches adjacent to the proximal and distal trans double bonds. Examination of the Segniliparus rotundus genome compared with those of other members of the Corynebacteriales indicated two obvious differences in genes encoding the elongation fatty acid (FAS-II) enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of mycolic acids: the organization of 3-ketoacyl-ACP synthases (KasA and KasB) and (3R)-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratases (HadAB/BC), on one hand, and the presence of two copies of the hadB gene encoding the catalytic domain of the latter enzyme type, on the other. This observation is discussed in light of the most recent data accumulated on the biosynthesis of this hallmark of Corynebacteriales. PMID:23154972

  1. Peptidase specificity from the substrate cleavage collection in the MEROPS database and a tool to measure cleavage site conservation

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    One peptidase can usually be distinguished from another biochemically by its action on proteins, peptides and synthetic substrates. Since 1996, the MEROPS database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk) has accumulated a collection of cleavages in substrates that now amounts to 66,615 cleavages. The total number of peptidases for which at least one cleavage is known is 1700 out of a total of 2457 different peptidases. This paper describes how the cleavages are obtained from the scientific literature, how they are annotated and how cleavages in peptides and proteins are cross-referenced to entries in the UniProt protein sequence database. The specificity profiles of 556 peptidases are shown for which ten or more substrate cleavages are known. However, it has been proposed that at least 40 cleavages in disparate proteins are required for specificity analysis to be meaningful, and only 163 peptidases (6.6%) fulfil this criterion. Also described are the various displays shown on the website to aid with the understanding of peptidase specificity, which are derived from the substrate cleavage collection. These displays include a logo, distribution matrix, and tables to summarize which amino acids or groups of amino acids are acceptable (or not acceptable) in each substrate binding pocket. For each protein substrate, there is a display to show how it is processed and degraded. Also described are tools on the website to help with the assessment of the physiological relevance of cleavages in a substrate. These tools rely on the hypothesis that a cleavage site that is conserved in orthologues is likely to be physiologically relevant, and alignments of substrate protein sequences are made utilizing the UniRef50 database, in which in each entry sequences are 50% or more identical. Conservation in this case means substitutions are permitted only if the amino acid is known to occupy the same substrate binding pocket from at least one other substrate cleaved by the same peptidase. PMID

  2. Crystal structure of chemically synthesized HIV-1 protease and a ketomethylene isostere inhibitor based on the p2/NC cleavage site

    SciTech Connect

    Torbeev, Vladimir Yu.; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Terechko, Valentina A.; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2009-09-02

    Here we report the X-ray structures of chemically synthesized HIV-1 protease and the inactive [D25N]HIV-1 protease complexed with the ketomethylene isostere inhibitor Ac-Thr-Ile-Nle{psi}[CO-CH{sub 2}]Nle-Gln-Arg.amide at 1.4 and 1.8 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In complex with the active enzyme, the keto-group was found to be converted into the hydrated gem-diol, while the structure of the complex with the inactive D25N enzyme revealed an intact keto-group. These data support the general acid-general base mechanism for HIV-1 protease catalysis.

  3. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann–Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann–Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  4. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann-Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann-Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  5. Nonspecific cleavage of proteins using graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heeyoung; Tran, Minh-Hai; Jeong, Hae Kyung; Han, Jinwoo; Jang, Sei-Heon; Lee, ChangWoo

    2014-04-15

    In this article, we report the intrinsic catalytic activity of graphene oxide (GO) for the nonspecific cleavage of proteins. We used bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a recombinant esterase (rEstKp) from the cold-adapted bacterium Pseudomonas mandelii as test proteins. Cleavage of BSA and rEstKp was nonspecific regarding amino acid sequence, but it exhibited dependence on temperature, time, and the amount of GO. However, cleavage of the proteins did not result in complete hydrolysis into their constituent amino acids. GO also invoked hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl esters at moderate temperatures lower than those required for peptide hydrolysis regardless of chain length of the fatty acyl esters. Based on the results, the functional groups of GO, including alcohols, phenols, and carboxylates, can be considered as crucial roles in the GO-mediated hydrolysis of peptides and esters via general acid-base catalysis. Our findings provide novel insights into the role of GO as a carbocatalyst with nonspecific endopeptidase activity in biochemical reactions. PMID:24508487

  6. Specific oxidative cleavage of carotenoids by VP14 of maize

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.H.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.; Gage, D.A.; Tan, Bao Cai

    1997-06-20

    The plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA) is formed by the oxidative cleavage of an epoxy-carotenoid. The synthesis of other apocarotenoids, such as vitamin A in animals, may occur by a similar mechanism. In ABA biosynthesis, oxidative cleavage is the first committed reaction and is believed to be the key regulatory step. A new ABA-deficient mutant of maize has been identified and the corresponding gene, Vp14, has been cloned. The recombinant VP14 protein catalyzes the cleavage of 9-cis-epoxy-carotenoids to form C{sub 25} apo-aldehydes and xanthoxin, a precursor of ABA in higher plants.

  7. Metabolism of vertebrate amino sugars with N-glycolyl groups: resistance of α2-8-linked N-glycolylneuraminic acid to enzymatic cleavage.

    PubMed

    Davies, Leela R L; Pearce, Oliver M T; Tessier, Matthew B; Assar, Siavash; Smutova, Victoria; Pajunen, Maria; Sumida, Mizuki; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken; Finne, Jukka; Gagneux, Pascal; Pshezhetsky, Alexey; Woods, Robert; Varki, Ajit

    2012-08-17

    The sialic acid (Sia) N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) and its hydroxylated derivative N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) differ by one oxygen atom. CMP-Neu5Gc is synthesized from CMP-Neu5Ac, with Neu5Gc representing a highly variable fraction of total Sias in various tissues and among different species. The exception may be the brain, where Neu5Ac is abundant and Neu5Gc is reported to be rare. Here, we confirm this unusual pattern and its evolutionary conservation in additional samples from various species, concluding that brain Neu5Gc expression has been maintained at extremely low levels over hundreds of millions of years of vertebrate evolution. Most explanations for this pattern do not require maintaining neural Neu5Gc at such low levels. We hypothesized that resistance of α2-8-linked Neu5Gc to vertebrate sialidases is the detrimental effect requiring the relative absence of Neu5Gc from brain. This linkage is prominent in polysialic acid (polySia), a molecule with critical roles in vertebrate neural development. We show that Neu5Gc is incorporated into neural polySia and does not cause in vitro toxicity. Synthetic polymers of Neu5Ac and Neu5Gc showed that mammalian and bacterial sialidases are much less able to hydrolyze α2-8-linked Neu5Gc at the nonreducing terminus. Notably, this difference was not seen with acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of polySias. Molecular dynamics modeling indicates that differences in the three-dimensional conformation of terminal saccharides may partly explain reduced enzymatic activity. In keeping with this, polymers of N-propionylneuraminic acid are sensitive to sialidases. Resistance of Neu5Gc-containing polySia to sialidases provides a potential explanation for the rarity of Neu5Gc in the vertebrate brain. PMID:22692207

  8. Development of a Simple Adjustable Zinc Acid/Base Hybrid Catalyst for C-C and C-O Bond-Forming and C-C Bond-Cleavage Reactions.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Minami, Kodai; Saito, Yuki; Kobayashi, Shū

    2016-09-01

    A newly designed zinc Lewis acid/base hybrid catalyst was developed. By adjusting the Lewis acidity of the zinc center, aldol-type additions of 2-picolylamine Schiff base to aldehydes proceeded smoothly to afford syn-aldol adduct equivalents, trans-N,O-acetal adducts, in high yields with high selectivities. NMR experiments, including microchanneled cell for synthesis monitoring (MICCS) NMR analysis, revealed that anti-aldol adducts were formed at the initial stage of the reactions under kinetic control, but the final products were the trans-(syn)-N,O-acetal adducts that were produced through a retro-aldol process under thermodynamic control. In the whole reaction process, the zinc catalyst played three important roles: i) promotion of the aldol process (C-C bond formation), ii) cyclization process to the N,O-acetal product (C-O bond formation), and iii) retro-aldol process from the anti-aldol adduct to the syn-aldol adduct (C-C bond cleavage and C-C bond formation).

  9. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage. Technical report, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    Cleavage of aliphatic organosulfonate carbon to sulfur (C-S) bonds, a critical link in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle, has been identified in Escherichia coli K-12. Enormous quantities of inorganic sulfate are continuously converted (Scheme I) into methanesulfonic acid 1 and acylated 3-(6-sulfo-{alpha}-D-quinovopyranosyl)-L-glycerol 2. Biocatalytic desulfurization (Scheme I) of 1 and 2, which share the structural feature of an aliphatic carbon bonded to a sulfonic acid sulfur, completes the cycle, Discovery of this desulfurization in E. coli provides an invaluable paradigm for study of a biotic process which, via the biogeochemical cycle, significantly influences the atmospheric concentration of sulfur-containing molecules.

  10. Control of stability and structure of nucleic acids using cosolutes.

    PubMed

    Tateishi-Karimta, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-05-15

    The stabilities, structures, and functions of nucleic acids are responsive to surrounding conditions. Living cells contain biomolecules, including nucleic acids, proteins, polysaccharides, and other soluble and insoluble low-molecular weight components, that occupy a significant fraction of the cellular volume (up to 40%), resulting in a highly crowded intracellular environment. We have proven that conditions that mimic features of this intra-cellular environment alter the physical properties affect the stability, structure, and function of nucleic acids. The ability to control structure of nucleic acids by mimicking intra-cellular conditions will be useful in nanotechnology applications of nucleic acids. This paper describes methods that can be used to analyze quantitatively the intra-cellular environment effects caused by cosolutes on nucleic acid structures and to regulate properties of nucleic acids using cosolutes.

  11. Cleavage of peptide bonds bearing ionizable amino acids at P{sub 1} by serine proteases with hydrophobic S{sub 1} pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Qasim, Mohammad A.; Song, Jikui; Markley, John L.; Laskowski, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Large pK shifts in ionizable groups when buried in the protein interior. {yields} Substrate dependent shifts in pH optimum for serine proteases. {yields} Lys side chain is a stronger acid in serine protease S{sub 1} pocket than Asp side chain. -- Abstract: Enzymatic hydrolysis of the synthetic substrate succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Xxx-pNA (where Xxx = Leu, Asp or Lys) catalyzed by bovine chymotrypsin (CHYM) or Streptomyces griseus protease B (SGPB) has been studied at different pH values in the pH range 3-11. The pH optima for substrates having Leu, Asp, and Lys have been found to be 7.5-8.0, 5.5-6.0, and {approx}10, respectively. At the normally reported pH optimum (pH 7-8) of CHYM and SGPB, the substrate with Leu at the reactive site is more than 25,000-fold more reactive than that with Asp. However, when fully protonated, Asp is nearly as good a substrate as Leu. The pK values of the side chains of Asp and Lys in the hydrophobic S{sub 1} pocket of CHYM and SGPB have been calculated from pH-dependent hydrolysis data and have been found to be about 9 for Asp and 7.4 and 9.7 for Lys for CHYM and SGPB, respectively. The results presented in this communication suggest a possible application of CHYM like enzymes in cleaving peptide bonds contributed by acidic amino acids between pH 5 and 6.

  12. Molecular characterization of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases and the effect of gibberellin, abscisic acid, and sodium chloride on the expression of genes involved in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway and carotenoid accumulation in the callus of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Pham Anh; Kim, Jae Kwang; Lee, Sanghyun; Chae, Soo Cheon; Park, Sang Un

    2013-06-12

    Three cDNAs encoding carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (SbCCD1, SbCCD4, and SbNCED) were isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis , an important traditional herb in Asia and North America. Amino acid sequence alignments showed that they share high identity and similarity to their orthologs in other plant species. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that SbCCD1 and SbCCD4 were most strongly expressed in flowers, whereas SbNCED was expressed at the highest level in roots. The expression levels of phytoene synthase (SbPSY), phytoene desaturase (SbPDS), ξ-carotene desaturase (SbZDS), β-ring carotene hydroxylase (SbCHXB), zeaxanthin epoxidase (SbZEP), SbCCD1, SbCCD4, and SbNCED in the callus of S. baicalensis varied under different concentrations of gibberellic acid (GA3) and abscisic acid (ABA). Under NaCl treatment, expression levels of all genes increased with increasing NaCl concentrations. Except for zeaxanthin, increasing GA3, ABA, and NaCl concentrations caused higher losses in the total carotenoid content. The total carotenoid content substantially decreased with increasing GA3, ABA, and NaCl concentrations, with the biggest reductions observed in the NaCl treatment. The isolation and characterization of SbCCD1, SbCCD4, and SbNCED together with the study on the effect of GA3, ABA, and NaCl on carotenoid biosynthesis will be helpful to elucidate the carotenoid biosynthesis mechanism in S. baicalensis and may set new trends in metabolic engineering of carotenoids in plants. PMID:23683071

  13. Mechanism of endonuclease cleavage by the HigB toxin.

    PubMed

    Schureck, Marc A; Repack, Adrienne; Miles, Stacey J; Marquez, Jhomar; Dunham, Christine M

    2016-09-19

    Bacteria encode multiple type II toxin-antitoxin modules that cleave ribosome-bound mRNAs in response to stress. All ribosome-dependent toxin family members structurally characterized to date adopt similar microbial RNase architectures despite possessing low sequence identities. Therefore, determining which residues are catalytically important in this specialized RNase family has been a challenge in the field. Structural studies of RelE and YoeB toxins bound to the ribosome provided significant insights but biochemical experiments with RelE were required to clearly demonstrate which residues are critical for acid-base catalysis of mRNA cleavage. Here, we solved an X-ray crystal structure of the wild-type, ribosome-dependent toxin HigB bound to the ribosome revealing potential catalytic residues proximal to the mRNA substrate. Using cell-based and biochemical assays, we further determined that HigB residues His54, Asp90, Tyr91 and His92 are critical for activity in vivo, while HigB H54A and Y91A variants have the largest effect on mRNA cleavage in vitro Comparison of X-ray crystal structures of two catalytically inactive HigB variants with 70S-HigB bound structures reveal that HigB active site residues undergo conformational rearrangements likely required for recognition of its mRNA substrate. These data support the emerging concept that ribosome-dependent toxins have diverse modes of mRNA recognition.

  14. Mechanism of endonuclease cleavage by the HigB toxin

    PubMed Central

    Schureck, Marc A.; Repack, Adrienne; Miles, Stacey J.; Marquez, Jhomar; Dunham, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria encode multiple type II toxin–antitoxin modules that cleave ribosome-bound mRNAs in response to stress. All ribosome-dependent toxin family members structurally characterized to date adopt similar microbial RNase architectures despite possessing low sequence identities. Therefore, determining which residues are catalytically important in this specialized RNase family has been a challenge in the field. Structural studies of RelE and YoeB toxins bound to the ribosome provided significant insights but biochemical experiments with RelE were required to clearly demonstrate which residues are critical for acid-base catalysis of mRNA cleavage. Here, we solved an X-ray crystal structure of the wild-type, ribosome-dependent toxin HigB bound to the ribosome revealing potential catalytic residues proximal to the mRNA substrate. Using cell-based and biochemical assays, we further determined that HigB residues His54, Asp90, Tyr91 and His92 are critical for activity in vivo, while HigB H54A and Y91A variants have the largest effect on mRNA cleavage in vitro. Comparison of X-ray crystal structures of two catalytically inactive HigB variants with 70S-HigB bound structures reveal that HigB active site residues undergo conformational rearrangements likely required for recognition of its mRNA substrate. These data support the emerging concept that ribosome-dependent toxins have diverse modes of mRNA recognition. PMID:27378776

  15. Enzymic Pathways for Formation of Carotenoid Cleavage Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, Peter; Zorn, Holger

    Degraded carotenoids (apocarotenoids, norisoprenoids) have been a subject of intensive research for several decades. From the perspective of human physiology and nutrition, the retinoids, acting as vitamins, signalling molecules, and visual pigments, attracted the greatest attention (Chapters 15 and 16). Plant scientists, however, detected a wealth of different apocarotenoids, presumably derived by the excentric cleavage of carotenoids in various species, the plant hormone abscisic acid (1, Scheme 6) being the best-investigated example. With the onset of fruit ripening, flower opening or senescence of green tissues, carotenoids are degraded oxidatively to smaller, volatile compounds. The natural biological functions of the reaction products are outlined in Chapter 15. As many of these apocarotenoids act as potent flavour compounds, food chemists and flavourists worldwide have investigated meticulously their structural and sensory properties. Many aspects of carotenoid metabolites and breakdown products as aroma compounds are presented in a comprehensive book [1].

  16. Determining the Architecture of a Protein-DNA Complex by Combining FeBABE Cleavage Analyses, 3-D Printed Structures, and the ICM Molsoft Program.

    PubMed

    James, Tamara; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Knipling, Leslie; Hinton, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Determining the structure of a protein-DNA complex can be difficult, particularly if the protein does not bind tightly to the DNA, if there are no homologous proteins from which the DNA binding can be inferred, and/or if only portions of the protein can be crystallized. If the protein comprises just a part of a large multi-subunit complex, other complications can arise such as the complex being too large for NMR studies, or it is not possible to obtain the amounts of protein and nucleic acids needed for crystallographic analyses. Here, we describe a technique we used to map the position of an activator protein relative to the DNA within a large transcription complex. We determined the position of the activator on the DNA from data generated using activator proteins that had been conjugated at specific residues with the chemical cleaving reagent, iron bromoacetamidobenzyl-EDTA (FeBABE). These analyses were combined with 3-D models of the available structures of portions of the activator protein and B-form DNA to obtain a 3-D picture of the protein relative to the DNA. Finally, the Molsoft program was used to refine the position, revealing the architecture of the protein-DNA within the transcription complex. PMID:26404142

  17. Peptide Synthesis through Cell-Free Expression of Fusion Proteins Incorporating Modified Amino Acids as Latent Cleavage Sites for Peptide Release.

    PubMed

    Liutkus, Mantas; Fraser, Samuel A; Caron, Karine; Stigers, Dannon J; Easton, Christopher J

    2016-05-17

    Chlorinated analogues of Leu and Ile are incorporated during cell-free expression of peptides fused to protein, by exploiting the promiscuity of the natural biosynthetic machinery. They then act as sites for clean and efficient release of the peptides simply by brief heat treatment. Dehydro analogues of Leu and Ile are similarly incorporated as latent sites for peptide release through treatment with iodine under cold conditions. These protocols complement enzyme-catalyzed methods and have been used to prepare calcitonin, gastrin-releasing peptide, cholecystokinin-7, and prolactin-releasing peptide prohormones, as well as analogues substituted with unusual amino acids, thus illustrating their practical utility as alternatives to more traditional chemical peptide synthesis. PMID:26918308

  18. Specific cleavage at peptide backbone Cα-C and CO-N bonds during matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay mass spectrometry with 5-nitrosalicylic acid as the matrix.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2011-09-15

    The use of 5-nitrosalicylic acid (5-NSA) as a matrix for in-source decay (ISD) of peptides during matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is described herein. Mechanistically, the decay process is initiated by a hydrogen abstraction from a peptide backbone amide nitrogen by 5-NSA. Hydrogen abstraction results in formation of an oxidized peptide containing a radical amide nitrogen. Subsequently, the C(α)-C bond N-terminal to the peptide bond is cleaved to form an a·/x fragment pair. The C(α)-C bonds C-terminal to Gly residues were less susceptible to cleavage than were those of other residues. C(α)-C bonds N-terminal to Pro and Sar residues were not cleaved by the aforementioned mechanism; instead, after hydrogen abstraction from a Pro or Sar C(α)-H bond, the peptide bond N-terminal to the Pro was cleaved yielding b- and y-series ions. We also show that fragments produced by MALDI 5-NSA-induced ISD were formed independently of the ionization process.

  19. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Revisited: Structure Elucidation and Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases’ many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  20. Fatty acid biosynthesis revisited: structure elucidation and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D John; Burkart, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases' many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  1. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  2. Activation of Shiga toxin type 2d (Stx2d) by elastase involves cleavage of the C-terminal two amino acids of the A2 peptide in the context of the appropriate B pentamer.

    PubMed

    Melton-Celsa, Angela R; Kokai-Kun, John F; O'Brien, Alison D

    2002-01-01

    Shiga toxins (Stx) are potent ribosome-inactivating toxins that are produced by Shigella dysenteriae type 1 or certain strains of Escherichia coli. These toxins are composed of one A subunit that can be nicked and reduced to an enzymatically active A1(approximately 27 kDa) and an A2 peptide (approximately 4 kDa) as well as a pentamer of B subunits (approximately 7 kDa/monomer) that binds the eukaryotic cell. Purified Shiga toxin type 2d is activated 10- to 1000-fold for Vero cell toxicity by preincubation with mouse or human intestinal mucus or purified mouse elastase, whereas Stx2, Stx2c, Stx2e and Stx1 are not activatable. E. coli strains that produce the activatable Stx2d are more virulent in a streptomycin (str)-treated mouse model of infection [lethal dose 50% (LD50) = 101] than are E. coli strains that produce any other type of Stx (LD50 = 1010). To identify the element(s) of Stx2d that are required for mucus-mediated activation, toxin genes were constructed such that the expressed mutant toxins consisted of hybrids of Stx2d and Stx1, Stx2 or Stx2e, contained deletions of up to six amino acids from the C-terminus of the A2 of Stx2d or were altered in one or both of the two amino acids of the A2 of Stx2d that represent the only amino acid differences between the activatable Stx2d and the non-activatable Stx2c. Analysis of these mutant toxins revealed that the A2 portion of Stx2d is required for toxin activation and that activation is abrogated if the Stx1 or Stx2e B subunit is substituted for the Stx2d B polypeptide. Furthermore, mass spectrometry performed on buffer- or elastase-treated Stx2d indicated that the A2 peptide of the activated Stx2d was two amino acids smaller than the A2 peptide from buffer-treated Stx2d. This finding, together with the toxin hybrid results, suggests that activation involves B pentamer-dependent cleavage by elastase of the C-terminal two amino acids from the Stx2d A2 peptide.

  3. Ab initio dynamics trajectory study of the heterolytic cleavage of H2 by a Lewis acid [B(C6F5)3] and a Lewis base [P(tBu)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Maoping; Privalov, Timofei

    2013-04-01

    Activation of H2 by a "frustrated Lewis pair" (FLP) composed of B(C6F5)3 and P(tBu)3 species has been explored with high level direct ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations at finite temperature (T = 300 K) in gas phase. The initial geometrical conditions for the AIMD trajectory calculations, i.e., the near attack conformations of FLP + H2, were devised using the host-guest model in which suitable FLP conformations were obtained from the dynamics of the B(C6F5)3/P(tBu)3 pair in gas phase. AIMD trajectory calculations yielded microscopic insight into effects which originate from nuclear motion in the reacting complex, e.g., the alternating compression/elongation of the boron-phosphorous distance and the change of the pyramidality of boron in B(C6F5)3. The ensemble averaged trajectory analysis has been compared with the minimum energy path (MEP) description of the reaction. Similar to MEP, AIMD shows that an attack of the acid/base pair on the H-H bond gives rise to the polarization of the H2 molecule and as a consequence generates a large dipole moment of the reacting complex. The MEP and AIMD portrayals of the reaction are fundamentally different in terms of the magnitude of the motion of nuclei in B(C6F5)3 and P(tBu)3 during the H2 cleavage. In the AIMD trajectory simulations, geometries of B(C6F5)3 and P(tBu)3 appear as nearly "frozen" on the short time scale of the H2 cleavage. This is contrary to the MEP picture. Several of the concepts which arise from this work, e.g., separation of time scales of nuclear motion and the time-dependence of the donor-acceptor interactions in the reacting complex, are important for the understanding of chemical reactivity and catalysis.

  4. Processing of peptide and hormone precursors at the dibasic cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Rholam, Mohamed; Fahy, Christine

    2009-07-01

    Many functionally important cellular peptides and proteins, including hormones, neuropeptides, and growth factors, are synthesized as inactive precursor polypeptides, which require post-translational proteolytic processing to become biologically active polypeptides. This is achieved by the action of a relatively small number of proteases that belong to a family of seven subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (PCs) including furin. In view of this, this review focuses on the importance of privileged secondary structures and of given amino acid residues around basic cleavage sites in substrate recognition by these endoproteases. In addition to their participation in normal cell functions, PCs are crucial for the initiation and progress of many important diseases. Hence, these proteases constitute potential drug targets in medicine. Accordingly, this review also discusses the approaches used to shed light on the cleavage preference and the substrate specificity of the PCs, a prerequisite to select which PCs are promising drug targets in each disease. PMID:19300906

  5. Processing of peptide and hormone precursors at the dibasic cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Rholam, Mohamed; Fahy, Christine

    2009-07-01

    Many functionally important cellular peptides and proteins, including hormones, neuropeptides, and growth factors, are synthesized as inactive precursor polypeptides, which require post-translational proteolytic processing to become biologically active polypeptides. This is achieved by the action of a relatively small number of proteases that belong to a family of seven subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (PCs) including furin. In view of this, this review focuses on the importance of privileged secondary structures and of given amino acid residues around basic cleavage sites in substrate recognition by these endoproteases. In addition to their participation in normal cell functions, PCs are crucial for the initiation and progress of many important diseases. Hence, these proteases constitute potential drug targets in medicine. Accordingly, this review also discusses the approaches used to shed light on the cleavage preference and the substrate specificity of the PCs, a prerequisite to select which PCs are promising drug targets in each disease.

  6. Development of early composite cleavage in pelites from West Donegal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneilly, A. W.

    In the Portnoo-Rosbeg area of west Donegal the main penetrative cleavage, S2, generally dips to the south with F2 folds facing up to the north. In places the S2 cleavage is cut by a gently SW-dipping crenulation cleavage ( S3) verging and facing south on the long limbs of F2 folds. A series of structural domains have been mapped in which the relationship of S2 and S3 changes from cross-cutting at a large angle (Rosbeg domain) to the development of a composite S {2}/{3} cleavage (Portnoo domain). The relationship between the two phases and the composite cleavage was investigated by mapping out cleavages (megascopic scale), detailed mesoscopic field observations and on a microscopic scale using textural relationships to widespread post D2-pre D3 garnet porphyroblasts. In addition to demonstrating the composite nature of the cleavage, the examples of D2/ D3 interference and the rotation of, and drag patterns around, the garnet porphyroblasts allow discussion of the kinematics of D3. D3 appears to have involved either bulk pure shear or north-directed bulk simple shear, or any intermediate type of deformation history, and was promoted by southerly directed active slip parallel to S2.

  7. Structural and Kinetic Characterization of the 4-Carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate Hydratase from the Gallate and Protocatechuate 4,5-Cleavage Pathways of Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Mazurkewich, Scott; Brott, Ashley S; Kimber, Matthew S; Seah, Stephen Y K

    2016-04-01

    The bacterial catabolism of lignin and its breakdown products is of interest for applications in industrial processing of ligno-biomass. The gallate degradation pathway ofPseudomonas putidaKT2440 requires a 4-carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate (CHM) hydratase (GalB), which has a 12% sequence identity to a previously identified CHM hydratase (LigJ) fromSphingomonassp. SYK-6. The structure of GalB was determined and found to be a member of the PIG-LN-acetylglucosamine deacetylase family; GalB is structurally distinct from the amidohydrolase fold of LigJ. LigJ has the same stereospecificity as GalB, providing an example of convergent evolution for catalytic conversion of a common metabolite in bacterial aromatic degradation pathways. Purified GalB contains a bound Zn(2+)cofactor; however the enzyme is capable of using Fe(2+)and Co(2+)with similar efficiency. The general base aspartate in the PIG-L deacetylases is an alanine in GalB; replacement of the alanine with aspartate decreased the GalB catalytic efficiency for CHM by 9.5 × 10(4)-fold, and the variant enzyme did not have any detectable hydrolase activity. Kinetic analyses and pH dependence studies of the wild type and variant enzymes suggested roles for Glu-48 and His-164 in the catalytic mechanism. A comparison with the PIG-L deacetylases led to a proposed mechanism for GalB wherein Glu-48 positions and activates the metal-ligated water for the hydration reaction and His-164 acts as a catalytic acid. PMID:26867578

  8. Prediction of Protein Cleavage Site with Feature Selection by Random Forest

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bi-Qing; Cai, Yu-Dong; Feng, Kai-Yan; Zhao, Gui-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Proteinases play critical roles in both intra and extracellular processes by binding and cleaving their protein substrates. The cleavage can either be non-specific as part of degradation during protein catabolism or highly specific as part of proteolytic cascades and signal transduction events. Identification of these targets is extremely challenging. Current computational approaches for predicting cleavage sites are very limited since they mainly represent the amino acid sequences as patterns or frequency matrices. In this work, we developed a novel predictor based on Random Forest algorithm (RF) using maximum relevance minimum redundancy (mRMR) method followed by incremental feature selection (IFS). The features of physicochemical/biochemical properties, sequence conservation, residual disorder, amino acid occurrence frequency, secondary structure and solvent accessibility were utilized to represent the peptides concerned. Here, we compared existing prediction tools which are available for predicting possible cleavage sites in candidate substrates with ours. It is shown that our method makes much more reliable predictions in terms of the overall prediction accuracy. In addition, this predictor allows the use of a wide range of proteinases. PMID:23029276

  9. How acidic are monomeric structural units of heparin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan; Broer, Ria; Van Duijnen, Piet Th.

    2013-12-01

    Density functional theory methods with the B3LYP functional have been used to letter the acidity of carboxyl, O-sulfo and N-sulfo groups in six basic monomeric structural units of heparin (1-OMe ΔUA-2S, 1-OMe GlcN-S6S, 1,4-DiOMe GlcA, 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S3S6S, 1,4-DiOMe IdoA-2S, and 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S6S). The predicted gas-phase acidity of the acidic functional groups in the monomeric structural units of heparin is: O-sulfo > N-sulfo > carboxyl. The computed pKa values provide the same order of acidity as was observed in water solution. This implies that hydration does not change ordering of acidity of major acidic groups of monomeric structural units of heparin.

  10. 3C-like protease of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus: identification of cleavage sites in the ORF1 polyprotein and analysis of cleavage specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Wirblich, C; Sibilia, M; Boniotti, M B; Rossi, C; Thiel, H J; Meyers, G

    1995-01-01

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus, a positive-stranded RNA virus of the family Caliciviridae, encodes a trypsin-like cysteine protease as part of a large polyprotein. Upon expression in Escherichia coli, the protease releases itself from larger precursors by proteolytic cleavages at its N and C termini. Both cleavage sites were determined by N-terminal sequence analysis of the cleavage products. Cleavage at the N terminus of the protease occurred with high efficiency at an EG dipeptide at positions 1108 and 1109. Cleavage at the C terminus of the protease occurred with low efficiency at an ET dipeptide at positions 1251 and 1252. To study the cleavage specificity of the protease, amino acid substitutions were introduced at the P2, P1, and P1' positions at the cleavage site at the N-terminal boundary of the protease. This analysis showed that the amino acid at the P1 position is the most important determinant for substrate recognition. Only glutamic acid, glutamine, and aspartic acid were tolerated at this position. At the P1' position, glycine, serine, and alanine were the preferred substrates of the protease, but a number of amino acids with larger side chains were also tolerated. Substitutions at the P2 position had only little effect on the cleavage efficiency. Cell-free expression of the C-terminal half of the ORF1 polyprotein showed that the protease catalyzes cleavage at the junction of the RNA polymerase and the capsid protein. An EG dipeptide at positions 1767 and 1768 was identified as the putative cleavage site. Our data show that rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus encodes a trypsin-like cysteine protease that is similar to 3C proteases with regard to function and specificity but is more similar to 2A proteases with regard to size. PMID:7474137

  11. Aliphatic structure of humic acids; a clue to their origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Maciel, G.E.; Dennis, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (both 1H and 13C) of humic acids from diverse depositional environments indicate the presence of aromatic chemical structures, most likely derived from lignin of vascular plants, and complex, paraffinic structures, most likely derived from algal or microbial sources. The latter components account for a major fraction of humic acid structures in both terrestrial and aquatic environments, suggesting that algae or microbes play a large role in humification of organic remains from both systems. ?? 1981.

  12. Computation of statistical secondary structure of nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K; Kitamura, Y; Yoshikura, H

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a computer analysis of statistical secondary structure of nucleic acids. For a given single stranded nucleic acid, we generated "structure map" which included all the annealing structures in the sequence. The map was transformed into "energy map" by rough approximation; here, the energy level of every pairing structure consisting of more than 2 successive nucleic acid pairs was calculated. By using the "energy map", the probability of occurrence of each annealed structure was computed, i.e., the structure was computed statistically. The basis of computation was the 8-queen problem in the chess game. The validity of our computer programme was checked by computing tRNA structure which has been well established. Successful application of this programme to small nuclear RNAs of various origins is demonstrated. PMID:6198622

  13. Identification and Characterization of a Cleavage Site in the Proteolysis of Orf Virus 086 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoping; Xiao, Bin; Zhang, Jiafeng; Chen, Daxiang; Li, Wei; Li, Ming; Hao, Wenbo; Luo, Shuhong

    2016-01-01

    The orf virus (ORFV) is among the parapoxvirus genus of the poxviridae family, but little is known about the proteolytic pathways of ORFV encoding proteins. By contrast, the proteolysis mechanism of the vaccinia virus (VV) has been extensively explored. Vaccinia virus core protein P4a undergoes a proteolytic process that takes place at a conserved cleavage site Ala-Gly-X (where X is any amino acid) and participates in virus assembly. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that an ORFV encoding protein, ORFV086, has a similar structure to the vaccinia virus P4a core protein. In this study, we focus on the kinetic analysis and proteolysis mechanism of ORFV086. We found, via kinetic analysis, that ORFV086 is a late gene that starts to express at 8 h post infection at mRNA level and 12–24 h post infection at the protein level. The ORFV086 precursor and a 21 kDa fragment can be observed in mature ORFV virions. The same bands were detected at only 3 h post infection, suggesting that both the ORFV086 precursor and the 21 kDa fragment are viral structural proteins. ORFV086 was cleaved from 12 to 24 h post infection. The cleavage took place at different sites, resulting in seven bands with differing molecular weights. Sequence alignment revealed that five putative cleavage sites were predicted at C-terminal and internal regions of ORFV086. To investigate whether those cleavage sites are involved in proteolytic processing, full length and several deletion mutant ORFV086 recombinant proteins were expressed and probed. The GGS site that produced a 21 kDa cleavage fragment was confirmed by identification of N/C-terminal FLAG epitope recombinant proteins, site-directed mutagenesis and pulse-chase analysis. Interestingly, chase results demonstrated that, at late times, ORFV086 is partially cleaved. Taken together, we concluded that GGS is a cleavage site in ORFV086 and produces a 21 kDa fragment post infection. Both ORFV086 precursor and the 21 kDa fragment are structural proteins of

  14. Cleavage of INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID INDUCIBLE28 mRNA by microRNA847 upregulates auxin signaling to modulate cell proliferation and lateral organ growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2015-03-01

    MicroRNAs function in a range of developmental processes. Here, we demonstrate that miR847 targets the mRNA of the auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) repressor-encoding gene IAA28 for cleavage. The rapidly increased accumulation of miR847 in Arabidopsis thaliana coincided with reduced IAA28 mRNA levels upon auxin treatment. This induction of miR847 by auxin was abolished in auxin receptor tir1-1 and auxin-resistant axr1-3 mutants. Further analysis demonstrates that miR847 functions as a positive regulator of auxin-mediated lateral organ development by cleaving IAA28 mRNA. Importantly, the ectopic expression of miR847 increases the expression of cell cycle genes as well as the neoplastic activity of leaf cells, prolonging later-stage rosette leaf growth and producing leaves with serrated margins. Moreover, both miR847 and IAA28 mRNAs are specifically expressed in marginal meristems of rosette leaves and lateral root initiation sites. Our data indicate that auxin-dependent induction of miR847 positively regulates meristematic competence by clearing IAA28 mRNA to upregulate auxin signaling, thereby determining the duration of cell proliferation and lateral organ growth in Arabidopsis. IAA28 mRNA encodes an Aux/IAA repressor protein, which is degraded through the proteasome in response to auxin. Altered signal sensitization to IAA28 mRNA levels, together with targeted IAA28 degradation, ensures a robust signal derepression.

  15. Small molecule activators of pre-mRNA 3′ cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Kevin; Khleborodova, Asya; Pan, Jingyi; Ryan, Xiaozhou P.

    2009-01-01

    3′ Cleavage and polyadenylation are obligatory steps in the biogenesis of most mammalian pre-mRNAs. In vitro reconstitution of the 3′ cleavage reaction from human cleavage factors requires high concentrations of creatine phosphate (CP), though how CP activates cleavage is not known. Previously, we proposed that CP might work by competitively inhibiting a cleavage-suppressing serine/threonine (S/T) phosphatase. Here we show that fluoride/EDTA, a general S/T phosphatase inhibitor, activates in vitro cleavage in place of CP. Subsequent testing of inhibitors specific for different S/T phosphatases showed that inhibitors of the PPM family of S/T phosphatases, which includes PP2C, but not the PPP family, which includes PP1, PP2A, and PP2B, activated 3′ cleavage in vitro. In particular, NCI 83633, an inhibitor of PP2C, activated extensive 3′ cleavage at a concentration 50-fold below that required by fluoride or CP. The testing of structural analogs led to the identification of a more potent compound that activated 3′ cleavage at 200 μM. While testing CP analogs to understand the origin of its cleavage activation effect, we found phosphocholine to be a more effective activator than CP. The minimal structural determinants of 3′ cleavage activation by phosphocholine were identified. Our results describe a much improved small molecule activator of in vitro pre-mRNA cleavage, identify the molecular determinants of cleavage activation by phosphoamines such as phosphocholine, and suggest that a PPM family phosphatase is involved in the negative regulation of mammalian pre-mRNA 3′ cleavage. PMID:19155323

  16. Chemical and physical structures of proteinoids and related polyamino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Hajime; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Nomoto, Shinya

    Studies of polyamino acid formation pathways in the prebiotic condition are important for the study of the origins of life. Several pathways of prebiotic polyamino acid formation have been reported. Heating of monoammonium malate [1] and heating of amino acids in molten urea [2] are important pathways of the prebiotic peptide formation. The former case, globular structure called proteinoid microsphere is formed in aqueous conditions. The later case, polyamino acids are formed from unrestricted amino acid species. Heating of aqueous aspargine is also interesting pathway for the prebiotic polyamino acid formation, because polyamino acid formation proceeds in aqueous condition [3]. In this study, we analyzed the chemical structure of the proteinoids and related polyamino acids formed in the above three pathways using with mass spectrometer. In addition, their physical structures are analyzed by the electron and optical microscopes, in order to determine the self-organization abilities. We discuss the relation between the chemical and the physical structures for the origins of life. References [1] Harada, K., J. Org. Chem., 24, 1662 (1959), Fox, S. W., Harada, K., and Kendrick, J., Science, 129, 1221 (1959). [2] Terasaki, M., Nomoto, S., Mita, H., and Shimoyama, A., Chem. Lett., 480 (2002), Mita, H., Nomoto, S., Terasaki, M., Shimoyama, A., and Yamamoto, Y., Int. J. Astrobiol., 4, 145 (2005). [3] Kovacs, K and Nagy, H., Nature, 190, 531 (1961), Munegumi, T., Tanikawa, N., Mita, H. and Harada, K., Viva Origino, 22, 109 (1994).

  17. The Chemical Structure and Acid Deterioration of Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollinger, William K., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the chemical structure of paper, including subatomic particles, atoms and molecules, and the forces that bond atoms into molecules, molecules into chains, chains into sheets, and sheets into layers. Acid is defined, and the deleterious role of acid in breaking the forces that bond atoms into molecules is detailed. (EJS)

  18. Interactive Hangman teaches amino acid structures and abbreviations.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Britney O; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying structures, hints to the answers were written in "amino acid sentences" for the students to translate. Students were required to draw the structure of the corresponding letter they wished to guess on a whiteboard. Each student received a reference sheet of the structures and abbreviations, but was required to draw from memory when guessing a letter. Preassessments and postassessments revealed a drastic improvement in the students' ability to recognize and draw structures from memory. This activity provides a fun, educational game to play in biochemistry discussion sections or during long incubations in biochemistry laboratories.

  19. Internal guide RNA interactions interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage.

    PubMed

    Thyme, Summer B; Akhmetova, Laila; Montague, Tessa G; Valen, Eivind; Schier, Alexander F

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas system uses guide RNAs (gRNAs) to direct sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Not every gRNA elicits cleavage and the mechanisms that govern gRNA activity have not been resolved. Low activity could result from either failure to form a functional Cas9-gRNA complex or inability to recognize targets in vivo. Here we show that both phenomena influence Cas9 activity by comparing mutagenesis rates in zebrafish embryos with in vitro cleavage assays. In vivo, our results suggest that genomic factors such as CTCF inhibit mutagenesis. Comparing near-identical gRNA sequences with different in vitro activities reveals that internal gRNA interactions reduce cleavage. Even though gRNAs containing these structures do not yield cleavage-competent complexes, they can compete with active gRNAs for binding to Cas9. These results reveal that both genomic context and internal gRNA interactions can interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage and illuminate previously uncharacterized features of Cas9-gRNA complex formation. PMID:27282953

  20. Internal guide RNA interactions interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Thyme, Summer B.; Akhmetova, Laila; Montague, Tessa G.; Valen, Eivind; Schier, Alexander F.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas system uses guide RNAs (gRNAs) to direct sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Not every gRNA elicits cleavage and the mechanisms that govern gRNA activity have not been resolved. Low activity could result from either failure to form a functional Cas9–gRNA complex or inability to recognize targets in vivo. Here we show that both phenomena influence Cas9 activity by comparing mutagenesis rates in zebrafish embryos with in vitro cleavage assays. In vivo, our results suggest that genomic factors such as CTCF inhibit mutagenesis. Comparing near-identical gRNA sequences with different in vitro activities reveals that internal gRNA interactions reduce cleavage. Even though gRNAs containing these structures do not yield cleavage-competent complexes, they can compete with active gRNAs for binding to Cas9. These results reveal that both genomic context and internal gRNA interactions can interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage and illuminate previously uncharacterized features of Cas9–gRNA complex formation. PMID:27282953

  1. Mapping protein and nucleic acid structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakov, I. V.; Zrelov, P. V.; Ivanov, V. V.; Polozov, R. V.; Sivozhelezov, V. S.; Stepanenko, V. A.; Chirgadze, Yu. N.

    2013-09-01

    Methods and algorithms to analyze surfaces of globular and fibrillar proteins, DNA, and RNA have been developed. These methods for the construction of maps of fragments of these objects in the original cylindrical projection developed herein essentially broaden the possibilities for studying the distribution of charges and surface topography of biological structures. This approach significantly supplements the qualitative characteristics of methods of visualizing biopolymer structures.

  2. Structural characteristics of fulvic acids from Continental Shelf sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Breger, I.A.; Mattingly, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Fulvic acids are those components of soil organic matter that remain soluble after a dilute alkaline extract of the soil is acidified to pH 2 (refs 1, 2). This extraction procedure has been applied to marine sediments, and the organic compounds so recovered have been called marine sedimentary fulvic acids. These fulvic acids are thought to form more complex humic substances in marine sediments by condensation reactions3. However, the chemical structural compositions of marine fulvic acids have not been defined sufficiently to allow this precursor relationship to be made. Here NMR spectroscopy is used to identify more clearly the chemical structural components of some marine sedimentary fulvic acids, thus enabling a more useful examination of their relationship to more complex humic substances. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  3. Residues in the human corticosteroid-binding globulin reactive center loop that influence steroid binding before and after elastase cleavage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai-Yan; Underhill, Caroline; Gardill, Bernd R; Muller, Yves A; Hammond, Geoffrey L

    2009-01-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is a non-inhibitory serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) that transports cortisol and progesterone in blood. Crystal structures of rat CBG and a thrombin-cleaved human CBG:anti-trypsin (Pittsburgh) chimera show how structural transitions after proteolytic cleavage of the CBG reactive center loop (RCL) could disrupt steroid binding. This ligand release mechanism is assumed to involve insertion of the cleaved RCL into the beta-sheet A of the serpin structure. We have, therefore, examined how amino acid substitutions in the human CBG RCL influence steroid binding before and after its cleavage by neutrophil elastase. Elastase-cleaved wild-type CBG or variants with substitutions at P15 and/or P16 (E334G/G335N or E334A) lost steroid binding completely, whereas deletion of Glu-334 resulted in no loss of steroid binding after RCL cleavage, presumably because this prevents its insertion into beta-sheet A. Similarly, the steroid binding properties of CBG variants with substitutions at P15 (G335P), P14 (V336R), or P12 (T338P) in the RCL hinge were largely unaffected after elastase cleavage, most likely because the re-orientation and/or insertion of the cleaved RCL was blocked. Substitutions at P10 (G340P, G340S) or P8 (T342P, T342N) resulted in a partial loss of steroid binding after proteolysis which we attribute to incomplete insertion of the cleaved RCL. Remarkably, several substitutions (E334A, V336R, G340S, and T342P) increased the steroid binding affinities of human CBG even before elastase cleavage, consistent with the concept that CBG normally toggles between a high affinity ligand binding state where the RCL is fully exposed and a lower affinity state in which the RCL is partly inserted into beta-sheet A.

  4. Community structure description in amino acid interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Gaci, Omar

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we represent proteins by amino acid interaction networks. This is a graph whose vertices are the protein's amino acids and whose edges are the interactions between them. We begin by identifying the main topological properties of these interaction networks using graph theory measures. We observe that the amino acids interact specifically, according to their structural role, and depending on whether they participate or not in the secondary structure. Thus, certain amino acids tend to group together to form local clouds. Then, we study the formation of node aggregations through community structure detections. We observe that the composition of organizations confirms a specific aggregation between loops around a core composed of secondary.

  5. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  6. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27324649

  7. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl- N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints.

  8. D-β-aspartyl residue exhibiting uncommon high resistance to spontaneous peptide bond cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Aki, Kenzo; Okamura, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Although L-amino acids were selected as main constituents of peptides and proteins during chemical evolution, D-aspartyl (Asp) residue is found in a variety of living tissues. In particular, D-β-Asp is thought to be stable than any other Asp isomers, and this could be a reason for gradual accumulation in abnormal proteins and peptides to modify their structures and functions. It is predicted that D-β-Asp shows high resistance to biomolecular reactions. For instance, less reactivity of D-β-Asp is expected to bond cleavage, although such information has not been provided yet. In this work, the spontaneous peptide bond cleavage was compared between Asp isomers, by applying real-time solution-state NMR to eye lens αΑ-crystallin 51–60 fragment, S51LFRTVLD58SG60 and αΒ-crystallin 61–67 analog, F61D62TGLSG67 consisting of L-α- and D-β-Asp 58 and 62, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed how tough the uncommon D-β-Asp residue was against the peptide bond cleavage as compared to natural L-α-Asp. Differences in pKa and conformation between L-α- and D-β-Asp side chains were plausible factors to determine reactivity of Asp isomers. The present study, for the first time, provides a rationale to explain less reactivity of D-β-Asp to allow abnormal accumulation. PMID:26876027

  9. D-β-aspartyl residue exhibiting uncommon high resistance to spontaneous peptide bond cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aki, Kenzo; Okamura, Emiko

    2016-02-01

    Although L-amino acids were selected as main constituents of peptides and proteins during chemical evolution, D-aspartyl (Asp) residue is found in a variety of living tissues. In particular, D-β-Asp is thought to be stable than any other Asp isomers, and this could be a reason for gradual accumulation in abnormal proteins and peptides to modify their structures and functions. It is predicted that D-β-Asp shows high resistance to biomolecular reactions. For instance, less reactivity of D-β-Asp is expected to bond cleavage, although such information has not been provided yet. In this work, the spontaneous peptide bond cleavage was compared between Asp isomers, by applying real-time solution-state NMR to eye lens αΑ-crystallin 51-60 fragment, S51LFRTVLD58SG60 and αΒ-crystallin 61-67 analog, F61D62TGLSG67 consisting of L-α- and D-β-Asp 58 and 62, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed how tough the uncommon D-β-Asp residue was against the peptide bond cleavage as compared to natural L-α-Asp. Differences in pKa and conformation between L-α- and D-β-Asp side chains were plausible factors to determine reactivity of Asp isomers. The present study, for the first time, provides a rationale to explain less reactivity of D-β-Asp to allow abnormal accumulation.

  10. Structure of seven organic salts assembled from 2,6-diaminopyridine with monocarboxylic acids, dicarboxylic acids, and tetracarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xingjun; Zhang, Huan; Wen, Xianhong; Liu, Bin; Jin, Shouwen; Wang, Daqi

    2015-08-01

    Studies concentrating on non-covalent interactions between the organic base of 2,6-diaminopyridine, and carboxylic acids have led to an increased understanding of the role 2,6-diaminopyridine in binding with carboxylic acid derivatives. Here anhydrous and hydrated multi-component organic acid-base salts of 2,6-diaminopyridine have been prepared with the carboxylic acids as nicotinic acid, o-chlorobenzoic acid, 1,3-benzodioxole-5-carboxylic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, 4-nitro-phthalic acid, 1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, and butane-1,2,3,4-tetracarboxylic acid. The seven crystalline compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared (IR), melting point (mp), and elemental analysis. All structures adopted the hetero R22(8) supramolecular synthons. The supramolecular architectures bear extensive Nsbnd H⋯N, Osbnd H⋯N, Osbnd H⋯O, Nsbnd H⋯O, and CH⋯O associations as well as other nonbonding contacts as CHsbnd N, CH2sbnd O, π-π, C-π, O-π, Cl-π, Clsbnd O, and Osbnd O interactions. The role of weak and strong hydrogen bonding in the crystal packing is ascertained.

  11. (Structure and stability of nucleic acids)

    SciTech Connect

    Tinoco, I. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the conformations of DNA and RNA oligonucleotides in order to relate their structures to their biological roles. We have discovered a novel conformation for a guanine-rich sequence which occurs in telomeres. This finding of one biologically relevant non-Watson-Crick base pair suggests that other non-standard pairs may be important. We have continued a systematic study of the thermodynamics of base pair formation in double stranded DNA. We have established the conformation and thermodynamics of a 3 in. viral RNA structural element. We have made a direct comparison between the thermodynamic stability of mismatched bases and the kinetics of misincorporation of bases by DNA polymerase. Drosophila spermatogenesis and sickle hemoglobin polymerization have been studied with the differential polarization microscope, which was invented and developed in this laboratory. Left-handed Z-RNA, discovered in this laboratory in 1984, has been characterized by NMR, circular dichroism and Raman scattering. (MHB)

  12. (Structure and stability of nucleic acids)

    SciTech Connect

    Tinoco, I. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    We study the conformations of DNA and RNA oligonucleotides in order to understand their biological roles. We have determined the structure of the most common type of hairpin loop found in ribosomal RNA--the extra-stable tetraloop. It is actually a biloop with the other two bases in the loop forming a non-Watson-Crick base pair. This is the highest resolution structure reported for an RNA molecule in solution so far. We have obtained structures of pseudoknots and we have deduced general rules for their formation. We are presently studying a pseudoknot which is necessary for the replication of a retrovirus. The research done in the laboratory has been reported in 24 publications, plus 7 manuscripts in press or submitted. The research was done by 14 graduate students and 7 postdoctoral fellows. Five graduate students have received their Ph.D.s and 4 postdoctorals have finished their stay here. There are presently 9 graduate students and 3 postdoctorals working on the project; 2 new postdoctorals are expected this summer. One undergraduate student usually participates in the research during the year; this summer two undergraduates are working on the project. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Performance of structured lipids incorporating selected phenolic and ascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Gruczynska, Eliza; Przybylski, Roman; Aladedunye, Felix

    2015-04-15

    Conditions applied during frying require antioxidant which is stable at these conditions and provides protection for frying oil and fried food. Novel structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants were formed by enzymatic transesterification, exploring canola oil and naturally occurring antioxidants such as ascorbic and selected phenolic acids as substrates. Lipozyme RM IM lipase from Rhizomucor miehei was used as biocatalyst. Frying performance and oxidative stability of the final transesterification products were evaluated. The novel lipids showed significantly improved frying performance compared to canola oil. Oxidative stability assessment of the structured lipids showed significant improvement in resistance to oxidative deterioration compared to original canola oil. Interestingly, the presence of ascorbic acid in an acylglycerol structure protected α-tocopherol against thermal degradation, which was not observed for the phenolic acids. Developed structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants may directly affect nutritional properties of lipids also offering nutraceutical ingredients for food formulation.

  14. Geometric and Electronic Structure of [{Cu(MeAN)}2(μ-η2:η2(O22−))]2+ with an Unusually Long O–O Bond: O–O Bond Weakening vs Activation for Reductive Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga Young; Qayyum, Munzarin F.; Woertink, Julia; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Narducci Sarjeant, Amy A.; Solomon, Edward I.; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Certain side-on peroxo dicopper(II) species with particularly low υO–O (710–730 cm−1) have been found in equilibrium with their bis-μ-oxo dicopper(III) isomer. An issue is whether such side-on peroxo bridges are further activated for O–O cleavage. In a previous study (Liang, H.-C., et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 4170–4171), we showed that oxygenation of the three-coordinate complex [CuI(MeAN)]+ (MeAN=N-methyl-N,N-bis[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]amine) leads to a low-temperature stable [{CuII(MeAN)}2(μ-η2:η2-O22−)]2+ peroxo species with low υO–O (721 cm−1), as characterized by UV-Vis absorption and resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopies. Here, this complex has been crystallized as its SbF6− salt and an X-ray structure indicates the presence of an unusually long O–O bond (1.540(5) Å) consistent with the low υO–O. EXAFS and rR spectroscopic and reactivity studies indicate the exclusive formation of [{CuII(MeAN)}2(μ-η2:η2-O22−)]2+ without any bis-μ-oxo-dicopper(III) isomer present. This is the first structure of a side-on peroxo dicopper(II) species with a significantly long and weak O–O bond. DFT calculations show that the weak O–O bond results from strong σ donation from the MeAN ligand to Cu that is compensated by a decrease in the extent of peroxo to Cu charge transfer. Importantly, the weak O–O bond does not reflect an increase in backbonding into the σ* orbital of the peroxide. Thus, although the O–O bond is unusually weak, this structure is not further activated for reductive cleavage to form a reactive bis-μ-oxo-dicopper(III) species. These results highlight the necessity of understanding electronic structure changes associated with spectral changes for correlations to reactivity. PMID:22571744

  15. Unique structural features of red kidney bean purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Cashikar, A G; Rao, M N

    1995-06-01

    Purple acid phosphatase from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) has been purified to homogeneity and characterized. The enzyme is a homodimer of 60 kDa subunits each containing one atom of zinc and iron in the active site. Circular dichroism spectral studies on the purified enzyme reveals that a large portion of the peptide backbone is in the unordered and beta-turn conformation. A unique feature of the red kidney bean acid phosphatase, which we have found, is that one of the two cysteines of each subunit is involved in the formation of an inter-subunit disulphide. The thiol group of the other cysteine is not necessary for the activity of the enzyme. Western blot analysis with antibodies raised against kidney bean acid phosphatase could not recognize acid phosphatases from other sources except from potato. This paper emphasizes the fact that acid phosphatases are functionally, but not structurally, conserved enzymes. PMID:7590853

  16. Crystal structure of (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid.

    PubMed

    Sonneck, Marcel; Peppel, Tim; Spannenberg, Anke; Wohlrab, Sebastian

    2015-07-01

    The crystal structure of (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid, C12H22O2, an α,β-unsaturated carb-oxy-lic acid with a melting point (295 K) near room temperature, is characterized by carb-oxy-lic acid inversion dimers linked by pairs of O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The carb-oxy-lic acid group and the following three carbon atoms of the chain of the (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid mol-ecule lie almost in one plane (r.m.s. deviation for the four C atoms and two O atoms = 0.012 Å), whereas the remaining carbon atoms of the hydro-carbon chain adopt a nearly fully staggered conformation [moduli of torsion angles vary from 174.01 (13) to 179.97 (13)°]. PMID:26279945

  17. Centralspindlin in Rappaport's cleavage signaling.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Masanori

    2016-05-01

    Cleavage furrow in animal cell cytokinesis is formed by cortical constriction driven by contraction of an actomyosin network activated by Rho GTPase. Although the role of the mitotic apparatus in furrow induction has been well established, there remain discussions about the detailed molecular mechanisms of the cleavage signaling. While experiments in large echinoderm embryos highlighted the role of astral microtubules, data in smaller cells indicate the role of central spindle. Centralspindlin is a constitutive heterotetramer of MKLP1 kinesin and the non-motor CYK4 subunit and plays crucial roles in formation of the central spindle and recruitment of the downstream cytokinesis factors including ECT2, the major activator of Rho during cytokinesis, to the site of division. Recent reports have revealed a role of this centralspindlin-ECT2 pathway in furrow induction both by the central spindle and by the astral microtubules. Here, a unified view of the stimulation of cortical contractility by this pathway is discussed. Cytokinesis, the division of the whole cytoplasm, is an essential process for cell proliferation and embryonic development. In animal cells, cytokinesis is executed using a contractile network of actin filaments driven by a myosin-II motor that constricts the cell cortex (cleavage furrow ingression) into a narrow channel between the two daughter cells, which is resolved by scission (abscission) [1-3]. The anaphase-specific organization of the mitotic apparatus (MA, spindle with chromosomes plus asters) positions the cleavage furrow and plays a major role in spatial coupling between mitosis and cytokinesis [4-6]. The nucleus and chromosomes are dispensable for furrow specification [7-10], although they contribute to persistent furrowing and robust completion in some cell types [11,12]. Likewise, centrosomes are not essential for cytokinesis, but they contribute to the general fidelity of cell division [10,13-15]. Here, classical models of cleavage furrow

  18. Structural insights into the role of iron-histidine bond cleavage in nitric oxide-induced activation of H-NOX gas sensor proteins.

    PubMed

    Herzik, Mark A; Jonnalagadda, Rohan; Kuriyan, John; Marletta, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Heme-nitric oxide/oxygen (H-NOX) binding domains are a recently discovered family of heme-based gas sensor proteins that are conserved across eukaryotes and bacteria. Nitric oxide (NO) binding to the heme cofactor of H-NOX proteins has been implicated as a regulatory mechanism for processes ranging from vasodilation in mammals to communal behavior in bacteria. A key molecular event during NO-dependent activation of H-NOX proteins is rupture of the heme-histidine bond and formation of a five-coordinate nitrosyl complex. Although extensive biochemical studies have provided insight into the NO activation mechanism, precise molecular-level details have remained elusive. In the present study, high-resolution crystal structures of the H-NOX protein from Shewanella oneidensis in the unligated, intermediate six-coordinate and activated five-coordinate, NO-bound states are reported. From these structures, it is evident that several structural features in the heme pocket of the unligated protein function to maintain the heme distorted from planarity. NO-induced scission of the iron-histidine bond triggers structural rearrangements in the heme pocket that permit the heme to relax toward planarity, yielding the signaling-competent NO-bound conformation. Here, we also provide characterization of a nonheme metal coordination site occupied by zinc in an H-NOX protein.

  19. Structural insights into the role of iron–histidine bond cleavage in nitric oxide-induced activation of H-NOX gas sensor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herzik, Mark A.; Jonnalagadda, Rohan; Kuriyan, John; Marletta, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Heme-nitric oxide/oxygen (H-NOX) binding domains are a recently discovered family of heme-based gas sensor proteins that are conserved across eukaryotes and bacteria. Nitric oxide (NO) binding to the heme cofactor of H-NOX proteins has been implicated as a regulatory mechanism for processes ranging from vasodilation in mammals to communal behavior in bacteria. A key molecular event during NO-dependent activation of H-NOX proteins is rupture of the heme–histidine bond and formation of a five-coordinate nitrosyl complex. Although extensive biochemical studies have provided insight into the NO activation mechanism, precise molecular-level details have remained elusive. In the present study, high-resolution crystal structures of the H-NOX protein from Shewanella oneidensis in the unligated, intermediate six-coordinate and activated five-coordinate, NO-bound states are reported. From these structures, it is evident that several structural features in the heme pocket of the unligated protein function to maintain the heme distorted from planarity. NO-induced scission of the iron–histidine bond triggers structural rearrangements in the heme pocket that permit the heme to relax toward planarity, yielding the signaling-competent NO-bound conformation. Here, we also provide characterization of a nonheme metal coordination site occupied by zinc in an H-NOX protein. PMID:25253889

  20. Activity dependent CAM cleavage and neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Conant, Katherine; Allen, Megan; Lim, Seung T.

    2015-01-01

    Spatially localized proteolysis represents an elegant means by which neuronal activity dependent changes in synaptic structure, and thus experience dependent learning and memory, can be achieved. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that matrix metalloproteinase and adamalysin activity is concentrated at the cell surface, and emerging evidence suggests that increased peri-synaptic expression, release and/or activation of these proteinases occurs with enhanced excitatory neurotransmission. Synaptically expressed cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) could therefore represent important targets for neuronal activity-dependent proteolysis. Several CAM subtypes are expressed at the synapse, and their cleavage can influence the efficacy of synaptic transmission through a variety of non-mutually exclusive mechanisms. In the following review, we discuss mechanisms that regulate neuronal activity-dependent synaptic CAM shedding, including those that may be calcium dependent. We also highlight CAM targets of activity-dependent proteolysis including neuroligin and intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5). We include discussion focused on potential consequences of synaptic CAM shedding, with an emphasis on interactions between soluble CAM cleavage products and specific pre- and post-synaptic receptors. PMID:26321910

  1. Solution structure of the squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI) and mutational analysis of pepsin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Headey, Stephen J; Macaskill, Ursula K; Wright, Michele A; Claridge, Jolyon K; Edwards, Patrick J B; Farley, Peter C; Christeller, John T; Laing, William A; Pascal, Steven M

    2010-08-27

    The squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI), a proteinaceous proteinase inhibitor from squash, is an effective inhibitor of a range of aspartic proteinases. Proteinaceous aspartic proteinase inhibitors are rare in nature. The only other example in plants probably evolved from a precursor serine proteinase inhibitor. Earlier work based on sequence homology modeling suggested SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin. In this work, we determined the solution structure of SQAPI using NMR and show that SQAPI shares the same fold as a plant cystatin. The structure is characterized by a four-strand anti-parallel beta-sheet gripping an alpha-helix in an analogous manner to fingers of a hand gripping a tennis racquet. Truncation and site-specific mutagenesis revealed that the unstructured N terminus and the loop connecting beta-strands 1 and 2 are important for pepsin inhibition, but the loop connecting strands 3 and 4 is not. Using ambiguous restraints based on the mutagenesis results, SQAPI was then docked computationally to pepsin. The resulting model places the N-terminal strand of SQAPI in the S' side of the substrate binding cleft, whereas the first SQAPI loop binds on the S side of the cleft. The backbone of SQAPI does not interact with the pepsin catalytic Asp(32)-Asp(215) diad, thus avoiding cleavage. The data show that SQAPI does share homologous structural elements with cystatin and appears to retain a similar protease inhibitory mechanism despite its different target. This strongly supports our hypothesis that SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin.

  2. Unraveling the Structural Modifications in Lignin of Arundo donax Linn. during Acid-Enhanced Ionic Liquid Pretreatment.

    PubMed

    You, Tingting; Zhang, Liming; Guo, Siqin; Shao, Lupeng; Xu, Feng

    2015-12-23

    Solid acid-enhanced ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment is of paramount importance for boosting the yield of sugars from biomass cost-effectively and environmentally friendly. To unravel the chemical and supramolecular structural changes of lignin after pretreatment, IL-acid lignin (ILAL) and subsequent residual cellulolytic enzyme lignin (RCEL) were isolated from Arundo donax Linn. The structural features were compared with those of the corresponding milled wood lignin (MWL). Results indicated that the pretreatment caused loss of β-O-4', β-β', β-1' linkages and formation of condensed structures in lignin. A preferential breakdown of G-type lignin may have occurred, evidenced by an increased S/G ratio revealed by 2D HSQC NMR analysis. It was determined that the depolymerization of β-O-4' linkage, lignin recondensation, and cleavage of ferulate-lignin ether linkages took place. Moreover, a simulation module was first developed to define morphological changes in lignin based on AFM and TEM analyses. Briefly, tree branch like aggregates was destroyed to monodisperse particles. PMID:26621450

  3. Temperature dependent structural variation from 2D supramolecular network to 3D interpenetrated metal–organic framework: In situ cleavage of S–S and C–S bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Ugale, Bharat; Singh, Divyendu; Nagaraja, C.M.

    2015-03-15

    Two new Zn(II)–organic compounds, [Zn(muco)(dbds){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] (1) and [Zn(muco)(dbs)] (2) (where, muco=trans, trans-muconate dianion, dbds=4,4′-dipyridyldisulfide and dbs=4,4′-dipyridylsulfide) have been synthesized from same precursors but at two different temperatures. Both the compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and photoluminescence studies. Compound 1 prepared at room temperature possesses a molecular structure extended to 2D supramolecular network through (H–O…H) hydrogen-bonding interactions. Compound 2, obtained at high temperature (100 °C) shows a 3-fold interpenetrating 3D framework constituted by an in situ generated dbs linker by the cleavage of S–S and C–S bonds of dbds linker. Thus, the influence of reaction temperature on the formation of two structural phases has been demonstrated. Both 1 and 2 exhibit ligand based luminescence emission owing to n→π⁎ and π→π⁎ transitions and also high thermal stabilities. - Graphical abstract: The influence of temperature on the formation of two structural phases, a 2D supramolecular network and a 3D 3-fold interpenetrating framework has been demonstrated and their luminescence emission is measured. - Highlights: • Two new Zn(II)–organic compounds were synthesized by tuning reaction temperatures. • Temperature induced in situ generation of dbs linker has been observed. • The compounds exhibit high thermal stability and luminescence emission properties. • The effect of temperature on structure, dimension and topology has been presented.

  4. Structural equation modeling for analyzing erythrocyte fatty acids in Framingham.

    PubMed

    Pottala, James V; Djira, Gemechis D; Espeland, Mark A; Ye, Jun; Larson, Martin G; Harris, William S

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that several types of erythrocyte fatty acids (i.e., omega-3, omega-6, and trans) are associated with risk for cardiovascular diseases. However, there are complex metabolic and dietary relations among fatty acids, which induce correlations that are typically ignored when using them as risk predictors. A latent variable approach could summarize these complex relations into a few latent variable scores for use in statistical models. Twenty-two red blood cell (RBC) fatty acids were measured in Framingham (N = 3196). The correlation matrix of the fatty acids was modeled using structural equation modeling; the model was tested for goodness-of-fit and gender invariance. Thirteen fatty acids were summarized by three latent variables, and gender invariance was rejected so separate models were developed for men and women. A score was developed for the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) latent variable, which explained about 30% of the variance in the data. The PUFA score included loadings in opposing directions among three omega-3 and three omega-6 fatty acids, and incorporated the biosynthetic and dietary relations among them. Whether the PUFA factor score can improve the performance of risk prediction in cardiovascular diseases remains to be tested.

  5. Characterization of an extensin-modifying metalloprotease: N-terminal processing and substrate cleavage pattern of Pectobacterium carotovorum Prt1.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tao; Nyffenegger, Christian; Højrup, Peter; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Yan, Kok-Phen; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Meyer, Anne S; Kirpekar, Finn; Willats, William G; Mikkelsen, Jørn D

    2014-12-01

    Compared to other plant cell wall-degrading enzymes, proteases are less well understood. In this study, the extracellular metalloprotease Prt1 from Pectobacterium carotovorum (formerly Erwinia carotovora) was expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized with respect to N-terminal processing, thermal stability, substrate targets, and cleavage patterns. Prt1 is an autoprocessing protease with an N-terminal signal pre-peptide and a pro-peptide which has to be removed in order to activate the protease. The sequential cleavage of the N-terminus was confirmed by mass spectrometry (MS) fingerprinting and N-terminus analysis. The optimal reaction conditions for the activity of Prt1 on azocasein were at pH 6.0, 50 °C. At these reaction conditions, K M was 1.81 mg/mL and k cat was 1.82 × 10(7) U M(-1). The enzyme was relatively stable at 50 °C with a half-life of 20 min. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment abolished activity; Zn(2+) addition caused regain of the activity, but Zn(2+)addition decreased the thermal stability of the Prt1 enzyme presumably as a result of increased proteolytic autolysis. In addition to casein, the enzyme catalyzed degradation of collagen, potato lectin, and plant extensin. Analysis of the cleavage pattern of different substrates after treatment with Prt1 indicated that the protease had a substrate cleavage preference for proline in substrate residue position P1 followed by a hydrophobic residue in residue position P1' at the cleavage point. The activity of Prt1 against plant cell wall structural proteins suggests that this enzyme might become an important new addition to the toolbox of cell-wall-degrading enzymes for biomass processing.

  6. Heterogeneous OH Oxidation of Two Structure Isomers of Dimethylsuccinic Acid Aerosol: Reactivity and Oxidation Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. N.; Cheng, C. T.; Wilson, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Organic aerosol contribute a significant mass fraction of ambient aerosol carbon and can continuously undergo oxidation by colliding with gas phase OH radicals. Although heterogeneous oxidation plays a significant role in the chemical transformation of organic aerosol, the effect of molecular structure on the reactivity and oxidation products remains unclear. We investigate the effect of branched methyl groups on the reactivity of two dimethylsuccinic acids (2,2-dimethylsuccinic acid (2,2-DMSA) and 2,3-dimethylsuccinic acid (2,3-DMSA)) toward gas phase OH radicals in an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube reactor. The oxidation products formed upon oxidation is characterized in real time by the Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART), an ambient soft ionization source. The 2,2-DMSA and 2,3-DMSA are structural isomers with the same oxidation state (OSC = -0.33) and carbon number (NC = 6), but different branching characteristics (2,2-DMSA has one secondary carbon and 2,3-DMSA has two tertiary carbons). The difference in molecular distribution of oxidation products observed in these two structural isomers would allow one to assess the sensitivity of kinetics and chemistry to the position of branched methyl group in the DMSA upon oxidation. We observe that the reactivity of 2,3-DMSA toward OH radicals is about 2 times faster than that of 2,2-DMSA. This difference in OH reactivity may attribute to the stability of the carbon-centered radical generated after hydrogen abstraction because an alkyl radical formed from the hydrogen abstraction on a tertiary carbon in 2,3-DMSA is more stable than on a secondary carbon in 2,2-DMSA. For both 2,2-DMSA and 2,3-DMSA, the molecular distribution and evolution of oxidation products is characterized by a predominance of functionalization products at the early oxidation stages. When the oxidation further proceeds, the fragmentation becomes more favorable and the oxidation mainly leads to the reduction of the carbon chain length through

  7. Structure and function of the PWI motif: a novel nucleic acid-binding domain that facilitates pre-mRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Szymczyna, Blair R.; Bowman, John; McCracken, Susan; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Lu, Ying; Cox, Brian; Lambermon, Mark; Graveley, Brenton R.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Blencowe, Benjamin J.

    2003-01-01

    The PWI motif is a highly conserved domain of unknown function in the SRm160 splicing and 3′-end cleavage-stimulatory factor, as well as in several other known or putative pre-mRNA processing components. We show here that the PWI motif is a new type of RNA/DNA-binding domain that has an equal preference for single- and double-stranded nucleic acids. Deletion of the motif prevents SRm160 from binding RNA and stimulating 3′-end cleavage, and its substitution with a heterologous RNA-binding domain restores these functions. The NMR solution structure of the SRm160-PWI motif reveals a novel, four-helix bundle and represents the first example of an α-helical fold that can bind single-stranded (ss)RNA. Structure-guided mutagenesis indicates that the same surface is involved in RNA and DNA binding and requires the cooperative action of a highly conserved, adjacent basic region. Thus, the PWI motif is a novel type of nucleic acid-binding domain that likely has multiple important functions in pre-mRNA processing, including SRm160-dependent stimulation of 3′-end formation. PMID:12600940

  8. Structural delineation of a quaternary, cleavage-dependent epitope at the gp41-gp120 interface on intact HIV-1 Env trimers

    PubMed Central

    Blattner, Claudia; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Sliepen, Kwinten; Derking, Ronald; Falkowska, Emilia; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Cupo, Albert; Julien, Jean-Philippe; van Gils, Marit; Lee, Peter S.; Peng, Wenjie; Paulson, James C.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary All previously characterized broadly neutralizing antibodies to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) target one of four major sites of vulnerability. Here, we define and structurally characterize a unique epitope on Env that is recognized by a recently discovered family of human monoclonal antibodies (PGT151-158). The PGT151 epitope is comprised of residues and glycans at the interface of gp41 and gp120 within a single protomer and glycans from both subunits of a second protomer and represents a neutralizing epitope that is dependent on both gp120 and gp41. As PGT151 binds only to properly formed, cleaved trimers, this distinctive property, and its ability to stabilize Env trimers, has enabled the successful purification of mature, cleaved Env trimers from the cell surface as a complex with PGT151. Here we compare the structural and functional properties of membrane-extracted Env trimers from several clades with those of the soluble, cleaved SOSIP gp140 trimer. PMID:24768348

  9. Engineering a ribozyme cleavage-induced split fluorescent aptamer complementation assay

    PubMed Central

    Ausländer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Hürlemann, Samuel; Ausländer, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Hammerhead ribozymes are self-cleaving RNA molecules capable of regulating gene expression in living cells. Their cleavage performance is strongly influenced by intra-molecular loop–loop interactions, a feature not readily accessible through modern prediction algorithms. Ribozyme engineering and efficient implementation of ribozyme-based genetic switches requires detailed knowledge of individual self-cleavage performances. By rational design, we devised fluorescent aptamer-ribozyme RNA architectures that allow for the real-time measurement of ribozyme self-cleavage activity in vitro. The engineered nucleic acid molecules implement a split Spinach aptamer sequence that is made accessible for strand displacement upon ribozyme self-cleavage, thereby complementing the fluorescent Spinach aptamer. This fully RNA-based ribozyme performance assay correlates ribozyme cleavage activity with Spinach fluorescence to provide a rapid and straightforward technology for the validation of loop–loop interactions in hammerhead ribozymes. PMID:26939886

  10. Antibacterial studies, DNA oxidative cleavage, and crystal structures of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes with two quinolone family members, ciprofloxacin and enoxacin.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Garrido, N; Perelló, L; Ortiz, R; Alzuet, G; González-Alvarez, M; Cantón, E; Liu-González, M; García-Granda, S; Pérez-Priede, M

    2005-03-01

    Nine coordination compounds of Cu(II) and Co(II) with Ciprofloxacin (HCp) and Enoxacin (HEx) as ligands have been prepared and characterized. Single crystal structural determinations of [Cu(HCp)2(ClO4)2].6H2O (1) and [Co(HEx)2(Ex)]Cl.2CH(3)OH.12H2O (4) are reported. The crystal of 1 is composed of [Cu(HCp)2(ClO4)2] units with the two perchlorate anions semicoordinated, and uncoordinated water molecules. The copper ion, at a crystallographic inversion centre, is in a tetragonally distorted octahedral environment. The structure of 4 consists of cationic monomeric [Co(HEx)2(Ex)]+ units, chloride anions, and uncoordinated methanol and water molecules. The complex is six-coordinate, with a slightly distorted octahedral environment around the metal centre. Some complexes of ciprofloxacin and enoxacin were screened for their activity against several bacteria, showing activity similar to that of the corresponding free ligands. All compounds tested were more active against Gram-negative bacteria than against Gram-positive bacteria. Ciprofloxacin hydrochloride and its complexes were more active than enoxacin and its complexes. In addition, the bactericidal studies against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 reveal that one complex exhibits the "paradoxical effect" (diminution in the number of bacteria killed at high drug concentration), which has been described and related to the mechanism of action of quinolones, but three other complexes do not, suggesting different mechanisms of bactericidal action. The ability of Cu(HCp)2(NO3)2.6H2O to cleave DNA has been determined. The results show that the complex behaves as an efficient chemical nuclease with ascorbate/hydrogen peroxide activation. Mechanistic studies using different inhibiting reagents reveal that hydroxyl radicals are involved in the DNA scission process mediated by this compound.

  11. Molecular insight into bacterial cleavage of oceanic dimethylsulfoniopropionate into dimethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Yang; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Sheng-Hui; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Peng; Xie, Bin-Bin; Su, Hai-Nan; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Yu, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Yang, Gui-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    The microbial cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) generates volatile DMS through the action of DMSP lyases and is important in the global sulfur and carbon cycles. When released into the atmosphere from the oceans, DMS is oxidized, forming cloud condensation nuclei that may influence weather and climate. Six different DMSP lyase genes are found in taxonomically diverse microorganisms, and dddQ is among the most abundant in marine metagenomes. Here, we examine the molecular mechanism of DMSP cleavage by the DMSP lyase, DddQ, from Ruegeria lacuscaerulensis ITI_1157. The structures of DddQ bound to an inhibitory molecule 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid and of DddQ inactivated by a Tyr131Ala mutation and bound to DMSP were solved. DddQ adopts a β-barrel fold structure and contains a Zn2+ ion and six highly conserved hydrophilic residues (Tyr120, His123, His125, Glu129, Tyr131, and His163) in the active site. Mutational and biochemical analyses indicate that these hydrophilic residues are essential to catalysis. In particular, Tyr131 undergoes a conformational change during catalysis, acting as a base to initiate the β-elimination reaction in DMSP lysis. Moreover, structural analyses and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that two loops over the substrate-binding pocket of DddQ can alternate between "open" and "closed" states, serving as a gate for DMSP entry. We also propose a molecular mechanism for DMS production through DMSP cleavage. Our study provides important insight into the mechanism involved in the conversion of DMSP into DMS, which should lead to a better understanding of this globally important biogeochemical reaction.

  12. Specificity of hammerhead ribozyme cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, K J; Herschlag, D; Uhlenbeck, O C

    1996-01-01

    To be effective in gene inactivation, the hammerhead ribozyme must cleave a complementary RNA target without deleterious effects from cleaving non-target RNAs that contain mismatches and shorter stretches of complementarity. The specificity of hammerhead cleavage was evaluated using HH16, a well-characterized ribozyme designed to cleave a target of 17 residues. Under standard reaction conditions, HH16 is unable to discriminate between its full-length substrate and 3'-truncated substrates, even when six fewer base pairs are formed between HH16 and the substrate. This striking lack of specificity arises because all the substrates bind to the ribozyme with sufficient affinity so that cleavage occurs before their affinity differences are manifested. In contrast, HH16 does exhibit high specificity towards certain 3'-truncated versions of altered substrates that either also contain a single base mismatch or are shortened at the 5' end. In addition, the specificity of HH16 is improved in the presence of p7 nucleocapsid protein from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, which accelerates the association and dissociation of RNA helices. These results support the view that the hammerhead has an intrinsic ability to discriminate against incorrect bases, but emphasizes that the high specificity is only observed in a certain range of helix lengths. Images PMID:8670879

  13. Characterization of helical cleavages in type II collagen generated by matrixins.

    PubMed Central

    Vankemmelbeke, M; Dekeyser, P M; Hollander, A P; Buttle, D J; Demeester, J

    1998-01-01

    Several vertebrate collagenases have been reported to cleave type II collagen, leading to irreversible tissue destruction in osteoarthritis. We have investigated the action of MMP-1 and MMP-13 on type II collagen by use of neoepitope antibodies and N-terminal sequencing. Previous studies have suggested that the initial cleavage of type II collagen by MMP-13 is followed by a second cleavage, three amino acids carboxy-terminal to the primary cleavage site. We show here that this cleavage is also produced by APMA-activated MMP-1 in combination with MMP-3 (i.e. fully activated MMP-1). The use of a selective inhibitor of MMP-3 has shown that it is this enzyme, rather than interstitial collagenase which had been exposed to MMP-3, which makes the second cleavage. In addition we have identified, through N-terminal sequencing, a third cleavage site, three residues carboxy-terminal to the secondary site. Since MMP-2 is thought to be responsible for gelatinolytic action on type II collagen we have investigated the effect of MMP-2 after the initial helical cleavage made by either MMP-1 or MMP-13. A combination of MMPs-1, -2 and -3 results in both the second and third cleavage sites; adding MMP-2 to MMP-13 did not alter the cleavage pattern produced by MMP-13 on its own. We conclude that none of the three cleavage sites will provide information about the specific identity of the collagenolytic enzymes involved in collagen cleavage in situ. Staining of cartilage sections of osteoarthritis patients with the neoepitope antibodies revealed type II collagen degradation starting at or near the articular surface and extending into the mid and deep zones with increasing degeneration of the cartilage. PMID:9480869

  14. Synthesis and structural characterisation of amides from picolinic acid and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Prarthana; Barry, Sarah M.; Houlihan, Kate M.; Murphy, Michael J.; Turner, Peter; Jensen, Paul; Rutledge, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Coupling picolinic acid (pyridine-2-carboxylic acid) and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid with N-alkylanilines affords a range of mono- and bis-amides in good to moderate yields. These amides are of interest for potential applications in catalysis, coordination chemistry and molecular devices. The reaction of picolinic acid with thionyl chloride to generate the acid chloride in situ leads not only to the N-alkyl-N-phenylpicolinamides as expected but also the corresponding 4-chloro-N-alkyl-N-phenylpicolinamides in the one pot. The two products are readily separated by column chromatography. Chlorinated products are not observed from the corresponding reactions of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid. X-Ray crystal structures for six of these compounds are described. These structures reveal a general preference for cis amide geometry in which the aromatic groups (N-phenyl and pyridyl) are cis to each other and the pyridine nitrogen anti to the carbonyl oxygen. Variable temperature 1H NMR experiments provide a window on amide bond isomerisation in solution. PMID:25954918

  15. Properties and structure of raised bog peat humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-10-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic components of soil, peat and natural waters, and their structure and properties differ very much depending on their source. The aims of this study are to characterize humic acids (HAs) from raised bog peat, to evaluate the homogeneity of peat HAs within peat profiles, and to study peat humification impact on properties of HAs. A major impact on the structure of peat HAs have lignin-free raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin). On diagenesis scale, peat HAs have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter, and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, while thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge as a result of abiotic synthesis. However, in comparison with soil, aquatic and other HAs, aromaticity of peat HAs is much lower. Comparatively, the raised bog peat HAs are at the beginning of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups change depending on the peat age and decomposition degree from where HAs have been isolated, and carboxylic acidity of peat HAs increases with peat depth and humification degree.

  16. Structural Requirements for the Procoagulant Activity of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gansler, Julia; Jaax, Miriam; Leiting, Silke; Appel, Bettina; Greinacher, Andreas; Fischer, Silvia; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids, especially extracellular RNA, are exposed following tissue- or vessel damage and have previously been shown to activate the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway in vitro and in vivo. Yet, no information on structural requirements for the procoagulant activity of nucleic acids is available. A comparison of linear and hairpin-forming RNA- and DNA-oligomers revealed that all tested oligomers forming a stable hairpin structure were protected from degradation in human plasma. In contrast to linear nucleic acids, hairpin forming compounds demonstrated highest procoagulant activities based on the analysis of clotting time in human plasma and in a prekallikrein activation assay. Moreover, the procoagulant activities of the DNA-oligomers correlated well with their binding affinity to high molecular weight kininogen, whereas the binding affinity of all tested oligomers to prekallikrein was low. Furthermore, four DNA-aptamers directed against thrombin, activated protein C, vascular endothelial growth factor and nucleolin as well as the naturally occurring small nucleolar RNA U6snRNA were identified as effective cofactors for prekallikrein auto-activation. Together, we conclude that hairpin-forming nucleic acids are most effective in promoting procoagulant activities, largely mediated by their specific binding to kininogen. Thus, in vivo application of therapeutic nucleic acids like aptamers might have undesired prothrombotic or proinflammatory side effects. PMID:23226277

  17. Crystal structure of rat heme oxygenase-1 in complex with biliverdin-iron chelate. Conformational change of the distal helix during the heme cleavage reaction.

    PubMed

    Sugishima, Masakazu; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Noguchi, Masato; Fukuyama, Keiichi

    2003-08-22

    The crystal structure of rat heme oxygenase-1 in complex with biliverdin-iron chelate (biliverdin(Fe)-HO-1), the immediate precursor of the final product, biliverdin, has been determined at a 2.4-A resolution. The electron density in the heme pocket clearly showed that the tetrapyrrole ring of heme is cleaved at the alpha-meso edge. Like the heme bound to HO-1, biliverdin-iron chelate is located between the distal and proximal helices, but its accommodation state seems to be less stable in light of the disordering of the solvent-exposed propionate and vinyl groups. The middle of the distal helix is shifted away from the center of the active site in biliverdin(Fe)-HO-1, increasing the size of the heme pocket. The hydrogen-bonding interaction between Glu-29 and Gln-38, considered to restrain the orientation of the proximal helix in the heme-HO-1 complex, was lost in biliverdin(Fe)-HO-1, leading to relaxation of the helix. Biliverdin has a distorted helical conformation; the lactam oxygen atom of its pyrrole ring-A interacted with Asp-140 through a hydrogen-bonding solvent network. Because of the absence of a distal water ligand, the iron atom is five-coordinated with His-25 and four pyrrole nitrogen atoms. The coordination geometry deviates considerably from a square pyramid, suggesting that the iron may be readily dissociated. We speculate that the opened conformation of the heme pocket facilitates sequential product release, first iron then biliverdin, and that because of biliverdin's increased flexibility, iron release triggers its slow dissociation. PMID:12794075

  18. Molecular structural studies of lichen substances II: atranorin, gyrophoric acid, fumarprotocetraric acid, rhizocarpic acid, calycin, pulvinic dilactone and usnic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Newton, Emma M.; Wynn-Williams, David D.

    2003-06-01

    The FT-Raman and infrared vibrational spectra of some important lichen compounds from two metabolic pathways are characterised. Key biomolecular marker bands have been suggested for the spectroscopic identification of atranorin, gyrophoric acid, fumarprotocetraric acid rhizocarpic acid, calycin, pulvinic dilactone and usnic acid. A spectroscopic protocol has been defined for the detection of these molecules in organisms subjected to environmental stresses such as UV-radiation exposure, desiccation and low temperatures. Use of the protocol will be made for the assessment of survival strategies used by stress-tolerant lichens in Antarctic cold deserts.

  19. Computational redesign of endonuclease DNA binding and cleavage specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, Justin; Havranek, James J.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Sussman, Django; Monnat, Raymond J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Baker, David

    2006-06-01

    The reprogramming of DNA-binding specificity is an important challenge for computational protein design that tests current understanding of protein-DNA recognition, and has considerable practical relevance for biotechnology and medicine. Here we describe the computational redesign of the cleavage specificity of the intron-encoded homing endonuclease I-MsoI using a physically realistic atomic-level forcefield. Using an in silico screen, we identified single base-pair substitutions predicted to disrupt binding by the wild-type enzyme, and then optimized the identities and conformations of clusters of amino acids around each of these unfavourable substitutions using Monte Carlo sampling. A redesigned enzyme that was predicted to display altered target site specificity, while maintaining wild-type binding affinity, was experimentally characterized. The redesigned enzyme binds and cleaves the redesigned recognition site ~10,000 times more effectively than does the wild-type enzyme, with a level of target discrimination comparable to the original endonuclease. Determination of the structure of the redesigned nuclease-recognition site complex by X-ray crystallography confirms the accuracy of the computationally predicted interface. These results suggest that computational protein design methods can have an important role in the creation of novel highly specific endonucleases for gene therapy and other applications.

  20. Structure of nicotinic acid mononucleotide adenylyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.; Smith, C.; Yang, Z.; Pruett, P.; Nagy, L.; McCombs, D; DeLucas, L.; Brouillette, W.; Brouillette, C.

    2008-11-25

    Nicotinic acid mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NaMNAT; EC 2.7.7.18) is the penultimate enzyme in the biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} and catalyzes the adenylation of nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) by ATP to form nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD). This enzyme is regarded as a suitable candidate for antibacterial drug development; as such, Bacillus anthracis NaMNAT (BA NaMNAT) was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli for the purpose of inhibitor discovery and crystallography. The crystal structure of BA NaMNAT was determined by molecular replacement, revealing two dimers per asymmetric unit, and was refined to an R factor and R{sub free} of 0.228 and 0.263, respectively, at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. The structure is very similar to that of B. subtilis NaMNAT (BS NaMNAT), which is also a dimer, and another independently solved structure of BA NaMNAT recently released from the PDB along with two ligated forms. Comparison of these and other less related bacterial NaMNAT structures support the presence of considerable conformational heterogeneity and flexibility in three loops surrounding the substrate-binding area.

  1. Computing Nonequilibrium Conformational Dynamics of Structured Nucleic Acid Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Sedeh, Reza Sharifi; Pan, Keyao; Adendorff, Matthew Ralph; Hallatschek, Oskar; Bathe, Klaus-Jürgen; Bathe, Mark

    2016-01-12

    Synthetic nucleic acids can be programmed to form precise three-dimensional structures on the nanometer-scale. These thermodynamically stable complexes can serve as structural scaffolds to spatially organize functional molecules including multiple enzymes, chromophores, and force-sensing elements with internal dynamics that include substrate reaction-diffusion, excitonic energy transfer, and force-displacement response that often depend critically on both the local and global conformational dynamics of the nucleic acid assembly. However, high molecular weight assemblies exhibit long time-scale and large length-scale motions that cannot easily be sampled using all-atom computational procedures such as molecular dynamics. As an alternative, here we present a computational framework to compute the overdamped conformational dynamics of structured nucleic acid assemblies and apply it to a DNA-based tweezer, a nine-layer DNA origami ring, and a pointer-shaped DNA origami object, which consist of 204, 3,600, and over 7,000 basepairs, respectively. The framework employs a mechanical finite element model for the DNA nanostructure combined with an implicit solvent model to either simulate the Brownian dynamics of the assembly or alternatively compute its Brownian modes. Computational results are compared with an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the DNA-based tweezer. Several hundred microseconds of Brownian dynamics are simulated for the nine-layer ring origami object to reveal its long time-scale conformational dynamics, and the first ten Brownian modes of the pointer-shaped structure are predicted. PMID:26636351

  2. Structure, stability and behaviour of nucleic acids in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-08-01

    Nucleic acids have become a powerful tool in nanotechnology because of their conformational polymorphism. However, lack of a medium in which nucleic acid structures exhibit long-term stability has been a bottleneck. Ionic liquids (ILs) are potential solvents in the nanotechnology field. Hydrated ILs, such as choline dihydrogen phosphate (choline dhp) and deep eutectic solvent (DES) prepared from choline chloride and urea, are 'green' solvents that ensure long-term stability of biomolecules. An understanding of the behaviour of nucleic acids in hydrated ILs is necessary for developing DNA materials. We here review current knowledge about the structures and stabilities of nucleic acids in choline dhp and DES. Interestingly, in choline dhp, A-T base pairs are more stable than G-C base pairs, the reverse of the situation in buffered NaCl solution. Moreover, DNA triplex formation is markedly stabilized in hydrated ILs compared with aqueous solution. In choline dhp, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs is comparable to that of Watson-Crick base pairs. Moreover, the parallel form of the G-quadruplex is stabilized in DES compared with aqueous solution. The behaviours of various DNA molecules in ILs detailed here should be useful for designing oligonucleotides for the development of nanomaterials and nanodevices.

  3. Structure, stability and behaviour of nucleic acids in ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids have become a powerful tool in nanotechnology because of their conformational polymorphism. However, lack of a medium in which nucleic acid structures exhibit long-term stability has been a bottleneck. Ionic liquids (ILs) are potential solvents in the nanotechnology field. Hydrated ILs, such as choline dihydrogen phosphate (choline dhp) and deep eutectic solvent (DES) prepared from choline chloride and urea, are ‘green’ solvents that ensure long-term stability of biomolecules. An understanding of the behaviour of nucleic acids in hydrated ILs is necessary for developing DNA materials. We here review current knowledge about the structures and stabilities of nucleic acids in choline dhp and DES. Interestingly, in choline dhp, A–T base pairs are more stable than G–C base pairs, the reverse of the situation in buffered NaCl solution. Moreover, DNA triplex formation is markedly stabilized in hydrated ILs compared with aqueous solution. In choline dhp, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs is comparable to that of Watson–Crick base pairs. Moreover, the parallel form of the G-quadruplex is stabilized in DES compared with aqueous solution. The behaviours of various DNA molecules in ILs detailed here should be useful for designing oligonucleotides for the development of nanomaterials and nanodevices. PMID:25013178

  4. Structure, stability and behaviour of nucleic acids in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-08-01

    Nucleic acids have become a powerful tool in nanotechnology because of their conformational polymorphism. However, lack of a medium in which nucleic acid structures exhibit long-term stability has been a bottleneck. Ionic liquids (ILs) are potential solvents in the nanotechnology field. Hydrated ILs, such as choline dihydrogen phosphate (choline dhp) and deep eutectic solvent (DES) prepared from choline chloride and urea, are 'green' solvents that ensure long-term stability of biomolecules. An understanding of the behaviour of nucleic acids in hydrated ILs is necessary for developing DNA materials. We here review current knowledge about the structures and stabilities of nucleic acids in choline dhp and DES. Interestingly, in choline dhp, A-T base pairs are more stable than G-C base pairs, the reverse of the situation in buffered NaCl solution. Moreover, DNA triplex formation is markedly stabilized in hydrated ILs compared with aqueous solution. In choline dhp, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs is comparable to that of Watson-Crick base pairs. Moreover, the parallel form of the G-quadruplex is stabilized in DES compared with aqueous solution. The behaviours of various DNA molecules in ILs detailed here should be useful for designing oligonucleotides for the development of nanomaterials and nanodevices. PMID:25013178

  5. An investigation into the role of ATP in the mammalian pre-mRNA 3' cleavage reaction.

    PubMed

    Khleborodova, Asya; Pan, Xiaozhou; Nagre, Nagaraja N; Ryan, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    RNA Polymerase II transcribes beyond what later becomes the 3' end of a mature messenger RNA (mRNA). The formation of most mRNA 3' ends results from pre-mRNA cleavage followed by polyadenylation. In vitro studies have shown that low concentrations of ATP stimulate the 3' cleavage reaction while high concentrations inhibit it, but the origin of these ATP effects is unknown. ATP might enable a cleavage factor kinase or activate a cleavage factor directly. To distinguish between these possibilities, we tested several ATP structural analogs in a pre-mRNA 3' cleavage reaction reconstituted from DEAE-fractionated cleavage factors. We found that adenosine 5'-(β,γ-methylene)triphosphate (AMP-PCP) is an effective in vitro 3' cleavage inhibitor with an IC50 of ∼300 μM, but that most other ATP analogs, including adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate, which cannot serve as a protein kinase substrate, promoted 3' cleavage but less efficiently than ATP. In combination with previous literature data, our results do not support ATP stimulation of 3' cleavage through cleavage factor phosphorylation in vitro. Instead, the more likely mechanism is that ATP stimulates cleavage factor activity through direct cleavage factor binding. The mammalian 3' cleavage factors known to bind ATP include the cleavage factor II (CF IIm) Clp1 subunit, the CF Im25 subunit and poly(A) polymerase alpha (PAP). The yeast homolog of the CF IIm complex also binds ATP through yClp1. To investigate the mammalian complex, we used a cell-line expressing FLAG-tagged Clp1 to co-immunoprecipitate Pcf11 as a function of ATP concentration. FLAG-Clp1 co-precipitated Pcf11 with or without ATP and the complex was not affected by AMP-PCP. Diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), an ATP analog that binds the Nudix domain of the CF Im25 subunit with higher affinity than ATP, neither stimulated 3' cleavage in place of ATP nor antagonized ATP-stimulated 3' cleavage. The ATP-binding site of PAP was disrupted by site

  6. Structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  7. Structure and function analysis of protein–nucleic acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein–nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  8. Progressive deformation of slaty cleavage in the Broken Bow uplift, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qingming; Nielsen, K.C. )

    1992-01-01

    The oldest rocks of the Ouachita Mountains are exposed in the Broken Bow uplift of OK. These low grade metasedimentary rocks reveal a polyphase deformational history in which folded cleavages are recorded. On a microscopic scale, zones of pressure solution residuals (PSR) consisting of mica, iron oxides, and other insoluble opaque materials are aligned parallel to the cleavage traces. Evaluation of the PSR has revealed two distinct morphologies: one high frequency spacing of narrow PSR and one low frequency spacing of broader PSR. Age relationships are difficult to establish; however, the low frequency spacing may be younger based on a few cross cutting relations. The slaty cleavage is folded and is rotated from regional northerly dip to a local southerly dip. These synforms are coaxial with the first generation folds and commonly are truncated by reverse faults on the south dipping limbs. Flattening on these south dipping limbs is apparent in the recumbent buckles; slip on favorable oriented PSR; and the development of local subhorizontal rough cleavage in the sandstones and siltstones as well as pencil structures in the finer grained rocks. Using the SEM, weakly developed fabrics can be seen in these fragments: the original bedding, slaty cleavage (1--3[mu]m PSR), and a third fabric oriented 15--20[degree] to the slaty cleavage. This flattening fabric appears to modify the slaty cleavage by reorienting the micaceous minerals in the PSR and locally truncating and reorienting the PSR. As a result, field observations of cleavage orientation reveal an upper limit to the southerly dipping slaty cleavage of 50--60[degree]. Subsequently, the slaty cleavage is poorly developed, but has a more gentle dip approaching that of the rough cleavage.

  9. Understanding the transition states of phosphodiester bond cleavage: insights from heavy atom isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Cassano, Adam G; Anderson, Vernon E; Harris, Michael E

    2004-01-01

    The nucleotides of DNA and RNA are joined by phosphodiester linkages whose synthesis and hydrolysis are catalyzed by numerous essential enzymes. Two prominent mechanisms have been proposed for RNA and protein enzyme catalyzed cleavage of phosphodiester bonds in RNA: (a) intramolecular nucleophilic attack by the 2'-hydroxyl group adjacent to the reactive phosphate; and (b) intermolecular nucleophilic attack by hydroxide, or other oxyanion. The general features of these two mechanisms have been established by physical organic chemical analyses; however, a more detailed understanding of the transition states of these reactions is emerging from recent kinetic isotope effect (KIE) studies. The recent data show interesting differences between the chemical mechanisms and transition state structures of the inter- and intramolecular reactions, as well as provide information on the impact of metal ion, acid, and base catalysis on these mechanisms. Importantly, recent nonenzymatic model studies show that interactions with divalent metal ions, an important feature of many phosphodiesterase active sites, can influence both the mechanism and transition state structure of nonenzymatic phosphodiester cleavage. Such detailed investigations are important because they mimic catalytic strategies employed by both RNA and protein phosphodiesterases, and so set the stage for explorations of enzyme-catalyzed transition states. Application of KIE analyses for this class of enzymes is just beginning, and several important technical challenges remain to be overcome. Nonetheless, such studies hold great promise since they will provide novel insights into the role of metal ions and other active site interactions.

  10. Biotransformation of biphenyl by Paecilomyces lilacinus and characterization of ring cleavage products.

    PubMed

    Gesell, M; Hammer, E; Specht, M; Francke, W; Schauer, F

    2001-04-01

    We examined the pathway by which the fungicide biphenyl is metabolized in the imperfect fungus Paecilomyces lilacinus. The initial oxidation yielded the three monohydroxylated biphenyls. Further hydroxylation occurred on the first and the second aromatic ring systems, resulting in the formation of five di- and trihydroxylated metabolites. The fungus could cleave the aromatic structures, resulting in the transformation of biphenyl via ortho-substituted dihydroxybiphenyl to six-ring fission products. All compounds were characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. These compounds include 2-hydroxy-4-phenylmuconic acid and 2-hydroxy-4-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)-muconic acid, which were produced from 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl and further transformed to the corresponding lactones 4-phenyl-2-pyrone-6-carboxylic acid and 4-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)-2-pyrone-6-carboxylic acid, which accumulated in large amounts. Two additional ring cleavage products were identified as (5-oxo-3-phenyl-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-yl)-acetic acid and [5-oxo-3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-yl]-acetic acid. We found that P. lilacinus has a high transformation capacity for biphenyl, which could explain this organism's tolerance to this fungicide.

  11. Conversion of levulinate into succinate through catalytic oxidative carbon-carbon bond cleavage with dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junxia; Du, Zhongtian; Lu, Tianliang; Xu, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Grand Cleft Oxo: Levulinate, available from biomass, is oxidized into succinate through manganese(III)-catalyzed selective cleavage of CC bonds with molecular oxygen. In addition to levulinate, a wide range of aliphatic methyl ketones also undergo oxidative CC bond cleavage at the carbonyl group. This procedure offers a route to valuable dicarboxylic acids from biomass resources by nonfermentive approaches. PMID:23922234

  12. Crystal and molecular structure of eight organic acid-base adducts from 2-methylquinoline and different acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Jin, Shouwen; Tao, Lin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Daqi

    2014-08-01

    Eight supramolecular complexes with 2-methylquinoline and acidic components as 4-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, malic acid, sebacic acid, and 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid were synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. All of the complexes are organic salts except compound 2. All supramolecular architectures of 1-8 involve extensive classical hydrogen bonds as well as other noncovalent interactions. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the classical hydrogen bonds (ionic or neutral) between acidic components and 2-methylquinoline are sufficient to bring about the formation of binary organic acid-base adducts. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These weak interactions combined, the complexes 1-8 displayed 2D-3D framework structure.

  13. Iridium-catalyzed reductive carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction on a curved pyridylcorannulene skeleton.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Shohei; Yamada, Mihoko; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2015-04-27

    The cleavage of CC bonds in π-conjugated systems is an important method for controlling their shape and coplanarity. An efficient way for the cleavage of an aromatic CC bond in a typical buckybowl corannulene skeleton is reported. The reaction of 2-pyridylcorannulene with a catalytic amount of IrCl3 ⋅n H2 O in ethylene glycol at 250 °C resulted in a structural transformation from the curved corannulene skeleton to a strain-free flat benzo[ghi]fluoranthene skeleton through a site-selective CC cleavage reaction. This cleavage reaction was found to be driven by both the coordination of the 2-pyridyl substituent to iridium and the relief of strain in the curved corannulene skeleton. This finding should facilitate the design of carbon nanomaterials based on CC bond cleavage reactions.

  14. Oligomeric structure of proclavaminic acid amidino hydrolase: evolution of a hydrolytic enzyme in clavulanic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Jonathan M; Clifton, Ian J; Hernández, Helena; Doan, Linh X; Robinson, Carol V; Schofield, Christopher J; Hewitson, Kirsty S

    2002-01-01

    During biosynthesis of the clinically used beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid, one of the three steps catalysed by clavaminic acid synthase is separated from the other two by a step catalysed by proclavaminic acid amidino hydrolase (PAH), in which the guanidino group of an intermediate is hydrolysed to give proclavaminic acid and urea. PAH shows considerable sequence homology with the primary metabolic arginases, which hydrolyse arginine to ornithine and urea, but does not accept arginine as a substrate. Like other members of the bacterial sub-family of arginases, PAH is hexameric in solution and requires Mn2+ ions for activity. Other metal ions, including Co2+, can substitute for Mn2+. Two new substrates for PAH were identified, N-acetyl-(L)-arginine and (3R)-hydroxy-N-acetyl-(L)-arginine. Crystal structures of PAH from Streptomyces clavuligerus (at 1.75 A and 2.45 A resolution, where 1 A=0.1 nm) imply how it binds beta-lactams rather than the amino acid substrate of the arginases from which it evolved. The structures also suggest how PAH selects for a particular alcohol intermediate in the clavam biosynthesis pathway. As observed for the arginases, each PAH monomer consists of a core of beta-strands surrounded by alpha-helices, and its active site contains a di-Mn2+ centre with a bridging water molecule responsible for hydrolytic attack on to the guanidino group of the substrate. Comparison of structures obtained under different conditions reveals different conformations of a flexible loop, which must move to allow substrate binding. PMID:12020346

  15. Morphology and Structure of Amino-fatty Acid Intercalated Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Larry; Sumera, Florentino

    2015-04-01

    Natural clays and its modified forms have been studied for their wide range of applications, including polymer-layered silicate, catalysts and adsorbents. For nanocomposite production, montmorillonite (MMT) clays are often modified with organic surfactants to favor its intermixing with the polymer matrix. In the present study, Na+-montmorillonite (Na+-MMT) was subjected to organo-modification with a protonated 12-aminolauric acid (12-ALA). The amount of amino fatty acid surfactants loaded was 25, 50, 100 and 200% the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of Na+-MMT (25CEC-AMMT, 50CEC-AMMT, 100CEC-AMMT and 200CEC-AMMT). Fatty acid-derived surfactants are an attractive resource of intercalating agents for clays due to their renewability and abundance. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) were performed to determine the occurrence of intercalation of 12-ALA and their molecular structure in the clay's silicates. XRD analysis revealed that the interlayer spacing between the alumino-silicate layers increased from 1.25 nm to 1.82 nm with increasing ALA content. The amino fatty acid chains were considered to be in a flat monolayer structure at low surfactant loading, and a bilayered to a pseudotrilayered structure at high surfactant loading. On the other hand, FTIR revealed that the alkyl chains adopt a gauche conformation, indicating their disordered state based on their CH2symmetric and asymmetric vibrations. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) allows the determination of the moisture and organic content in clays. Here, TGA revealed that the surfactant in the clay was thermally stable, with Td ranging from 353° C to 417° C. The difference in the melting behavior of the pristine amino fatty acids and confined fatty acids in the interlayer galleries of the clay were evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimerty (DSC). The melting temperatures (Tm) of the amino fatty acid in the clay were initially found to be higher than those of the free

  16. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermannová, Lada Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  17. Adsorption structure and bonding of trimesic acid on Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanninen, L.; Jokinen, N.; Ali-Löytty, H.; Jussila, P.; Lahtonen, K.; Hirsimäki, M.; Valden, M.; Kuzmin, M.; Pärna, R.; Nõmmiste, E.

    2011-12-01

    Combining scanning tunneling microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation, we have studied the adsorption and growth of trimesic acid (TMA, 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, C6H3(COOH)3) on Cu(100) in a wide range of coverages (from submonolayer to multilayer ones) at room temperature and after subsequent annealing. A series of coverage-dependent TMA structures, transitions between these structures, and their properties are characterized, demonstrating the interplay between the bonding, orientation, and deprotonation reaction of adsorbed species. In particular, it is shown that the degree of deprotonation in TMA overlayers depends on the amount of deposited molecules non-monotonously, and that such behavior is well consistent with the formation mechanism proposed for the TMA/Cu(100) system. The results provide a good platform for further understanding of non-covalent interactions and self-assembly phenomena underlying the growth of supramolecular nanoassemblies of aromatic carboxylic (benzenecarboxylic) acids on metallic substrates.

  18. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:25631536

  19. Cyanuric acid hydrolase: evolutionary innovation by structural concatenation

    PubMed Central

    Peat, Thomas S; Balotra, Sahil; Wilding, Matthew; French, Nigel G; Briggs, Lyndall J; Panjikar, Santosh; Cowieson, Nathan; Newman, Janet; Scott, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The cyanuric acid hydrolase, AtzD, is the founding member of a newly identified family of ring-opening amidases. We report the first X-ray structure for this family, which is a novel fold (termed the ‘Toblerone’ fold) that likely evolved via the concatenation of monomers of the trimeric YjgF superfamily and the acquisition of a metal binding site. Structures of AtzD with bound substrate (cyanuric acid) and inhibitors (phosphate, barbituric acid and melamine), along with mutagenesis studies, allowed the identification of the active site. The AtzD monomer, active site and substrate all possess threefold rotational symmetry, to the extent that the active site possesses three potential Ser–Lys catalytic dyads. A single catalytic dyad (Ser85–Lys42) is hypothesized, based on biochemical evidence and crystallographic data. A plausible catalytic mechanism based on these observations is also presented. A comparison with a homology model of the related barbiturase, Bar, was used to infer the active-site residues responsible for substrate specificity, and the phylogeny of the 68 AtzD-like enzymes in the database were analysed in light of this structure–function relationship. PMID:23651355

  20. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  1. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of neutral and acidic oligosaccharides with collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Mechref, Y; Baker, A G; Novotny, M V

    1998-12-15

    Using ribonuclease B and human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) as model glycoproteins, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation (CID) is validated here as an effective tool for oligosaccharide sequencing. The spectra acquired for high-mannose and complex oligosaccharide structures show characteristic fragments resulting from cleavages of the glycosidic bonds and a few cross-ring cleavages. Esterification of the sialic acid residues is essential in stabilizing the acidic N-linked oligosaccharides. An important analytical feature observed in all acquired spectra is the occurrence of cleavages on the same antenna up to the branching point, as deduced from the absence of fragmentation due to the simultaneous cleavages on two or more antennas.

  2. Substituent-controlled selective synthesis of N-acyl 2-aminothiazoles by intramolecular Zwitterion-mediated C-N bond cleavage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhao, Fei; Chi, Yue; Zhang, Wen-Xiong; Xi, Zhenfeng

    2014-11-21

    The cleavage of C-N bonds is an interesting and challenging subject in modern organic synthesis. We have achieved the first zwitterion-controlled C-N bond cleavage in the MCR reaction among lithium alkynethiolates, bulky carbodiimides, and acid chlorides to construct N-acyl 2-aminothiazoles. This is a simple, highly efficient, and general method for the preparation of N-acyl 2-aminothiazoles with a broad range of substituents. The selective synthesis of N-acyl 2-aminothiazoles significantly depends on the steric hindrance of carbodiimides. The result is in striking contrast with our previous convergent reaction giving 5-acyl-2-iminothiazolines via 1,5-acyl migration. It is indeed interesting that the slight change of the substituents on the carbodiimides can completely switch the product structure. Experimental and theoretical results demonstrate the reason why the C-N bond cleavage in the present system is prior to the acyl migration. The intramolecular hydrogen relay via unprecedented Hofmann-type elimination is essential for this totally new zwitterion-controlled C-N bond cleavage.

  3. Cleavage Site Localization Differentially Controls Interleukin-6 Receptor Proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17

    PubMed Central

    Riethmueller, Steffen; Ehlers, Johanna C.; Lokau, Juliane; Düsterhöft, Stefan; Knittler, Katharina; Dombrowsky, Gregor; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rabe, Björn; Rose-John, Stefan; Garbers, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of the Interleukin-6 Receptor (IL-6R) leads to the release of the IL-6R ectodomain. Binding of the cytokine IL-6 to the soluble IL-6R (sIL-6R) results in an agonistic IL-6/sIL-6R complex, which activates cells via gp130 irrespective of whether the cells express the IL-6R itself. This signaling pathway has been termed trans-signaling and is thought to mainly account for the pro-inflammatory properties of IL-6. A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) and ADAM17 are the major proteases that cleave the IL-6R. We have previously shown that deletion of a ten amino acid long stretch within the stalk region including the cleavage site prevents ADAM17-mediated cleavage, whereas the receptor retained its full biological activity. In the present study, we show that deletion of a triple serine (3S) motif (Ser-359 to Ser-361) adjacent to the cleavage site is sufficient to prevent IL-6R cleavage by ADAM17, but not ADAM10. We find that the impaired shedding is caused by the reduced distance between the cleavage site and the plasma membrane. Positioning of the cleavage site in greater distance towards the plasma membrane abrogates ADAM17-mediated shedding and reveals a novel cleavage site of ADAM10. Our findings underline functional differences in IL-6R proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17. PMID:27151651

  4. Gas Phase Structure of Amino Acids: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, I. Pena S.; Sanz, M. E.; Vaquero, V.; Cabezas, C.; Perez, C.; Blanco, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2009-06-01

    Recent improvements in our laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectrometer such as using Laval-type nozzles and picoseconds Nd:YAG lasers (30 to 150 ps) have allowed a major step forward in the capabilities of this experimental technique as demonstrated by the last results in serine cysteine and threonine^a for which seven, six and seven conformers have been respectively identified. Taking advantage of these improvements we have investigated the natural amino acids metionine, aspartic and glutamic acids and the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the aim of identify and characterize their lower energy conformers. Searches in the rotational spectra have lead to the identification of seven conformers of metionine, six and five of aspartic and glutamic acids, respectively, and seven for the γ-aminobutyric. These conformers have been unambiguously identified by their spectroscopic constants. In particular the ^{14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, that depend heavily on the orientation of the amino group with respect to the principal inertial axes of the molecule, prove to be a unique tool to distinguish unambigously between conformations with similar rotational constants. For the γ-aminobutyric acid two of the seven observed structures are stablized by an intramolecular interaction n-π*. Two new conformers of proline have been identified together with the two previously observed. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys.Chem.Chem.Phys., 2009, 11, 617. D. B. Atkinson, M. A. Smith, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 1995, 66, 4434 S. Blanco, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA2007, 104, 20183. M. E. Sanz, S. Blanco, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.,2008, 120, 6312. A. Lesarri, S. Mata, E. J. Cocinero, S. Blanco, J.C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. , 2002, 41, 4673

  5. Structural and functional organization of the animal fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stuart; Witkowski, Andrzej; Joshi, Anil K

    2003-07-01

    The entire pathway of palmitate synthesis from malonyl-CoA in mammals is catalyzed by a single, homodimeric, multifunctional protein, the fatty acid synthase. Each subunit contains three N-terminal domains, the beta-ketoacyl synthase, malonyl/acetyl transferase and dehydrase separated by a structural core from four C-terminal domains, the enoyl reductase, beta-ketoacyl reductase, acyl carrier protein and thiosterase. The kinetics and specificities of the substrate loading reaction catalyzed by the malonyl/acetyl transferase, the condensation reaction catalyzed by beta-ketoacyl synthase and chain-terminating reaction catalyzed by the thioesterase ensure that intermediates do not leak off the enzyme, saturated chains exclusively are elongated and palmitate is released as the major product. Only in the fatty acid synthase dimer do the subunits adopt conformations that facilitate productive coupling of the individual reactions for fatty acid synthesis at the two acyl carrier protein centers. Introduction of a double tagging and dual affinity chromatographic procedure has permitted the engineering and isolation of heterodimeric fatty acid synthases carrying different mutations on each subunit. Characterization of these heterodimers, by activity assays and chemical cross-linking, has been exploited to map the functional topology of the protein. The results reveal that the two acyl carrier protein domains engage in substrate loading and condensation reactions catalyzed by the malonyl/acetyl transferase and beta-ketoacyl synthase domains of either subunit. In contrast, the reactions involved in processing of the beta-carbon atom, following each chain elongation step, together with the release of palmitate, are catalyzed by the cooperation of the acyl carrier protein with catalytic domains of the same subunit. These findings suggest a revised model for the fatty acid synthase in which the two polypeptides are oriented such that head-to-tail contacts are formed both between

  6. Hard and soft acids and bases: structure and process.

    PubMed

    Reed, James L

    2012-07-01

    Under investigation is the structure and process that gives rise to hard-soft behavior in simple anionic atomic bases. That for simple atomic bases the chemical hardness is expected to be the only extrinsic component of acid-base strength, has been substantiated in the current study. A thermochemically based operational scale of chemical hardness was used to identify the structure within anionic atomic bases that is responsible for chemical hardness. The base's responding electrons have been identified as the structure, and the relaxation that occurs during charge transfer has been identified as the process giving rise to hard-soft behavior. This is in contrast the commonly accepted explanations that attribute hard-soft behavior to varying degrees of electrostatic and covalent contributions to the acid-base interaction. The ability of the atomic ion's responding electrons to cause hard-soft behavior has been assessed by examining the correlation of the estimated relaxation energies of the responding electrons with the operational chemical hardness. It has been demonstrated that the responding electrons are able to give rise to hard-soft behavior in simple anionic bases.

  7. Crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, V. P.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-05-01

    In structural materials with both brittle and ductile phases, cracks often initiate within the brittle phase and propagate dynamically towards the ductile phase. The macroscale, quasistatic toughness of the material thus depends on the outcome of this microscale, dynamic process. Indeed, dynamics has been hypothesized to suppress dislocation emission, which may explain the occurrence of brittle transgranular fracture in mild steels at low temperatures (Lin et al., 1987). Here, crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions are explored using continuum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations. The focus is on two questions: (1) whether dynamics can affect the energy barriers for dislocation emission and cleavage, and (2) what happens in the dynamic "overloaded" situation, in which both processes are energetically possible. In either case, dynamics may shift the balance between brittle cleavage and ductile blunting, thereby affecting the intrinsic ductility of the material. To explore these effects in simulation, a novel interatomic potential is used for which the intrinsic ductility is tunable, and a novel simulation technique is employed, termed as a "dynamic cleavage test", in which cracks can be run dynamically at a prescribed energy release rate into a material. Both theory and simulation reveal, however, that the intrinsic ductility of a material is unaffected by dynamics. The energy barrier to dislocation emission appears to be identical in quasi-static and dynamic conditions, and, in the overloaded situation, ductile crack tip behavior ultimately prevails since a single emission event can blunt and arrest the crack, preventing further cleavage. Thus, dynamics cannot embrittle a ductile material, and the origin of brittle failure in certain alloys (e.g., mild steels) appears unrelated to dynamic effects at the crack tip.

  8. Structural and catalytic effects of an invariant purine substitution in the hammerhead ribozyme: implications for the mechanism of acid-base catalysis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Eric P; Vasquez, Ernesto E; Scott, William G

    2014-09-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme catalyzes RNA cleavage via acid-base catalysis. Whether it does so by general acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA itself donates and abstracts protons in the transition state, as is typically assumed, or by specific acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA plays a structural role and proton transfer is mediated by active-site water molecules, is unknown. Previous biochemical and crystallographic experiments implicate an invariant purine in the active site, G12, as the general base. However, G12 may play a structural role consistent with specific base catalysis. To better understand the role of G12 in the mechanism of hammerhead catalysis, a 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni with a purine substituted for G12 in the active site of the ribozyme was obtained. Comparison of this structure (PDB entry 3zd4), in which A12 is substituted for G, with three previously determined structures that now serve as important experimental controls, allows the identification of structural perturbations that are owing to the purine substitution itself. Kinetic measurements for G12 purine-substituted schistosomal hammerheads confirm a previously observed dependence of rate on the pK(a) of the substituted purine; in both cases inosine, which is similar to G in pK(a) and hydrogen-bonding properties, is unexpectedly inactive. Structural comparisons indicate that this may primarily be owing to the lack of the exocyclic 2-amino group in the G12A and G12I substitutions and its structural effect upon both the nucleotide base and phosphate of A9. The latter involves the perturbation of a previously identified and well characterized metal ion-binding site known to be catalytically important in both minimal and full-length hammerhead ribozyme sequences. The results permit it to be suggested that G12 plays an important role in stabilizing the active-site structure. This result, although not inconsistent with the potential

  9. Acidic Properties and Structure-Activity Correlations of Solid Acid Catalysts Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Li, Shenhui; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2016-04-19

    Solid acid materials with tunable structural and acidic properties are promising heterogeneous catalysts for manipulating and/or emulating the activity and selectivity of industrially important catalytic reactions. On the other hand, the performances of acid-catalyzed reactions are mostly dictated by the acidic features, namely, type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount, strength, and local environment of acid sites. The latter is relevant to their location (intra- vs extracrystalline), and possible confinement and Brønsted-Lewis acid synergy effects that may strongly affect the host-guest interactions, reaction mechanism, and shape selectivity of the catalytic system. This account aims to highlight some important applications of state-of-the-art solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for exploring the structural and acidic properties of solid acid catalysts as well as their catalytic performances and relevant reaction pathway invoked. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations may be exploited in conjunction with experimental SSNMR studies to verify the structure-activity correlations of the catalytic system at a microscopic scale. We describe in this Account the developments and applications of advanced ex situ and/or in situ SSNMR techniques, such as two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum magic-angle spinning (DQ MAS) homonuclear correlation spectroscopy for structural investigation of solid acids as well as study of their acidic properties. Moreover, the energies and electronic structures of the catalysts and detailed catalytic reaction processes, including the identification of reaction species, elucidation of reaction mechanism, and verification of structure-activity correlations, made available by DFT theoretical calculations were also discussed. Relevant discussions will focus primarily on results obtained from our laboratories in the past decade, including (i) quantitative and qualitative acidity characterization utilizing assorted probe molecules

  10. Copper- and Vanadium-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Lignin using Dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Mottweiler, Jakob; Puche, Marta; Räuber, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas; Concepción, Patricia; Corma, Avelino; Bolm, Carsten

    2015-06-22

    Transition-metal-containing hydrotalcites (HTc) and V(acac)3 /Cu(NO3 )2 ⋅3 H2 O (acac=acetylacetonate) mixtures were tested for their catalytic activity in the cleavage of the lignin model compound erythro-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-l,3-propanediol (1) with molecular oxygen as oxidant. Both catalytic systems displayed high activity and good selectivity and afforded veratric acid as the main product. The catalyst behavior was studied by EPR spectroscopy, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. After the catalysts were established for the model system, lignin depolymerization studies were performed with various organsolv and kraft lignin sources. The oxidative depolymerization and lignin bond cleavage were monitored by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), MALDI MS, and 2D-NMR (HSQC). Irrespective of the lignin pretreatment, both HTc-Cu-V and V(acac)3 /Cu(NO3 )2 ⋅3 H2 O were able to cleave the β-O-4 linkages and the resinol structures to form dimeric and trimeric products. PMID:26013592

  11. Copper- and Vanadium-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Lignin using Dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Mottweiler, Jakob; Puche, Marta; Räuber, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas; Concepción, Patricia; Corma, Avelino; Bolm, Carsten

    2015-06-22

    Transition-metal-containing hydrotalcites (HTc) and V(acac)3 /Cu(NO3 )2 ⋅3 H2 O (acac=acetylacetonate) mixtures were tested for their catalytic activity in the cleavage of the lignin model compound erythro-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-l,3-propanediol (1) with molecular oxygen as oxidant. Both catalytic systems displayed high activity and good selectivity and afforded veratric acid as the main product. The catalyst behavior was studied by EPR spectroscopy, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. After the catalysts were established for the model system, lignin depolymerization studies were performed with various organsolv and kraft lignin sources. The oxidative depolymerization and lignin bond cleavage were monitored by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), MALDI MS, and 2D-NMR (HSQC). Irrespective of the lignin pretreatment, both HTc-Cu-V and V(acac)3 /Cu(NO3 )2 ⋅3 H2 O were able to cleave the β-O-4 linkages and the resinol structures to form dimeric and trimeric products.

  12. Structure of the Ribonucleic Acid Bacteriophage R17

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Cesar; Granboulan, Nicole; Franklin, Richard M.

    1966-01-01

    Vasquez, Cesar (Institut de Recherches sur le Cancer, Villejuif, Seine, France), Nicole Granboulan, and Richard M. Franklin. Structure of the ribonucleic acid bacteriophage R17. J. Bacteriol. 92:1779–1786. 1966.—The morphology of bacteriophage R17 was studied by electron microscopy of negatively stained virions. The hexagonal shape, the presence of a maximum of 10 units at the periphery, and especially the observation of central fivefold points of symmetry with neighboring five and six coordinated units indicated icosahedral symmetry with 32 morphological units. Although the exact shape of the polyhedron could not be specified, the number of morphological units agreed with the chemically estimated number of structural units. Images PMID:5958109

  13. Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage in Activation of the Prodrug Nabumetone

    PubMed Central

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N. A.; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L.; De Voss, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs. PMID:24584631

  14. Dinitrogen cleavage and functionalization by carbon monoxide promoted by a hafnium complex.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Donald J; Lobkovsky, Emil; Chirik, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Molecular nitrogen (N(2)) and carbon monoxide (CO) have the two strongest bonds in chemistry and present significant challenges in developing new transformations that exploit these two abundant feedstocks. At the core of this objective is the discovery of transition-metal compounds that promote the six-electron reductive cleavage of N(2) at ambient temperature and pressure and also promote new nitrogen-element bond formation. Here we show that an organometallic hafnium compound induces N(2) cleavage on the addition of CO, with a simultaneous assembly of new nitrogen-carbon and carbon-carbon bonds. Subsequent addition of a weak acid liberates oxamide, which demonstrates that an important agrochemical can be synthesized directly from N(2) and CO. These studies introduce an alternative paradigm for N(2) cleavage and functionalization in which the six-electron reductive cleavage is promoted by both the transition metal and the incoming ligand, CO, used for the new bond formations.

  15. Perpetuating the homing endonuclease life cycle: identification of mutations that modulate and change I-TevI cleavage preference

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Alexander C.; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Edgell, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are sequence-tolerant DNA endonucleases that act as mobile genetic elements. The ability of homing endonucleases to cleave substrates with multiple nucleotide substitutions suggests a high degree of adaptability in that changing or modulating cleavage preference would require relatively few amino acid substitutions. Here, using directed evolution experiments with the GIY-YIG homing endonuclease I-TevI that targets the thymidylate synthase gene of phage T4, we readily isolated variants that dramatically broadened I-TevI cleavage preference, as well as variants that fine-tuned cleavage preference. By combining substitutions, we observed an ∼10 000-fold improvement in cleavage on some substrates not cleaved by the wild-type enzyme, correlating with a decrease in readout of information content at the cleavage site. Strikingly, we were able to change the cleavage preference of I-TevI to that of the isoschizomer I-BmoI which targets a different cleavage site in the thymidylate synthase gene, recapitulating the evolution of cleavage preference in this family of homing endonucleases. Our results define a strategy to isolate GIY-YIG nuclease domains with distinct cleavage preferences, and provide insight into how homing endonucleases may escape a dead-end life cycle in a population of saturated target sites by promoting transposition to different target sites. PMID:27387281

  16. Cleavage kinetics and anchor linked intermediates in solid phase peptide amide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dürr, H; Beck-Sickinger, A G; Schnorrenberg, G; Rapp, W; Jung, G

    1991-08-01

    Kinetics and cleavage conditions of peptide amide synthesis were studied using the anchor molecules 5-(4'-aminomethyl-3',5'-dimethoxyphenoxy)valeric acid (4-ADPV-OH) and 5-(2'-aminomethyl-3'-5'-dimethoxyphenoxy) valeric acid (2-ADPV-OH). Unexpectedly the anchor amide alanyl-4-ADPV-NH2 was isolated and characterized as an intermediate during the cleavage with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) of alanyl-4-ADPV-alanyl-aminomethyl-polystyrene to yield the alanine amide. As a matter of fact the NH--CH alpha bond of the alanyl spacer has to be cleaved to form this intermediate. Using TFA-dichloromethane (1:9) alanyl-4-ADPV-NH2 was obtained as a cleavage product in 50% yield within 60 min, whereas the isomeric alanyl-2-ADPV-NH2 was formed more slowly under these mild conditions. At high TFA concentration no difference between the 2- and 4-ADPV anchor was observed in the rate of formation of the free alanine amide. The presence of tryptophan amide in the cleavage mixture resulted in an anchor alkylated tryptophan amide, which remains stable in acidic solution but disappears rapidly in the presence of the resin. A low TFA/high TFA cleavage procedure is recommended for peptide amid synthesis applying the ADPV anchor.

  17. Structural organization of the multifunctional animal fatty-acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, A; Rangan, V S; Randhawa, Z I; Amy, C M; Smith, S

    1991-06-15

    The amino acid sequence of the multifunctional fatty-acid synthase has been examined to investigate the exact location of the seven functional domains. Good agreement in predicting the location of interdomain boundaries was obtained using three independent methods. First, the sites of limited proteolytic attack that give rise to relatively stable, large polypeptide fragments were identified; cryptic sites for protease attack at the subunit interface were unmasked by first dissociating the dimer into its component subunits. Second, polypeptide regions exhibiting higher-than-average rates of non-conservative mutation were identified. Third, the sizes of putative functional domains were compared with those of related monofunctional proteins that exhibit similar primary or secondary structure. Residues 1-406 were assigned to the oxoacyl synthase, residues 430-802 to the malonyl/acetyl transferase, residues 1630-1850 to the enoyl reductase, residues 1870-2100 to the oxyreductase, residues 2114-2190 to the acyl-carrier protein and residues 2200-2505 to the thioesterase. The 47-kDa transferase and 8-kDa acyl-carrier-protein domains, which are situated at opposite ends of the multifunctional subunit, were nevertheless isolated from tryptic digests as a non-covalently associated complex. Furthermore, a centrally located domain encompassing residues 1160-1545 was isolated as a nicked dimer. These findings, indicating that interactions between the head-to-tail juxtaposed subunits occur in both the polar and equatorial regions, are consistent with previously derived electron-micrograph images that show subunit contacts in these areas. The data permit refinement of the model for the fatty-acid synthase dimer and suggest that the malonyl/acetyl transferase and oxoacyl synthase of one subunit cooperate with the reductases, acyl carrier protein and thioesterase of the companion subunit in the formation of a center for fatty-acid synthesis.

  18. Rotational Spectrum and Carbon Atom Structure of Dihydroartemisinic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelisti, Luca; Seifert, Nathan A.; Spada, Lorenzo; Pate, Brooks

    2016-06-01

    Dihydroartemisinic acid (DHAA, C15H24O2, five chiral centers) is a precursor in proposed low-cost synthetic routes to the antimalarial drug artemisinin. In one reaction process being considered in pharmaceutical production, DHAA is formed from an enantiopure sample of artemisinic acid through hydrogenation of the alkene. This reaction needs to properly set the stereochemistry of the asymmetric carbon for the synthesis to produce artemisinin. A recrystallization process can purify the diastereomer mixture of the hydrogenation reaction if the unwanted epimer is produced in less than 10% abundance. There is a need in the process analytical chemistry to rapidly (less than 1 min) measure the diastereomer excess and current solutions, such a HPLC, lack the needed measurement speed. The rotational spectrum of DHAA has been measured at 300:1 signal-to-noise ratio in a chirped-pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectrometer operating from 2-8 GHz using simple heating of the compound. The 13C isotope analysis provides a carbon atom structure that confirms the diastereomer. This structure is in excellent agreement with quantum chemistry calculations at the B2PLYPD3/ 6-311++G** level of theory. The DHAA spectrum is expected to be fully resolved from the unwanted diastereomer raising the potential for fast diastereomer excess measurement by rotational spectroscopy in the pharmaceutical production process.

  19. Xylonucleic acid: synthesis, structure, and orthogonal pairing properties

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Mohitosh; Maiti, Munmun; Knies, Christine; Dumbre, Shrinivas; Lescrinier, Eveline; Rosemeyer, Helmut; Ceulemans, Arnout; Herdewijn, Piet

    2015-01-01

    There is a common interest for studying xeno-nucleic acid systems in the fields of synthetic biology and the origin of life, in particular, those with an engineered backbone and possessing novel properties. Along this line, we have investigated xylonucleic acid (XyloNA) containing a potentially prebiotic xylose sugar (a 3′-epimer of ribose) in its backbone. Herein, we report for the first time the synthesis of four XyloNA nucleotide building blocks and the assembly of XyloNA oligonucleotides containing all the natural nucleobases. A detailed investigation of pairing and structural properties of XyloNAs in comparison to DNA/RNA has been performed by thermal UV-melting, CD, and solution state NMR spectroscopic studies. XyloNA has been shown to be an orthogonal self-pairing system which adopts a slightly right-handed extended helical geometry. Our study on one hand, provides understanding for superior structure-function (-pairing) properties of DNA/RNA over XyloNA for selection as an informational polymer in the prebiotic context, while on the other hand, finds potential of XyloNA as an orthogonal genetic system for application in synthetic biology. PMID:26175047

  20. Impact of fatty acids on brain circulation, structure and function.

    PubMed

    Haast, Roy A M; Kiliaan, Amanda J

    2015-01-01

    The use of dietary intervention has evolved into a promising approach to prevent the onset and progression of brain diseases. The positive relationship between intake of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-LCPUFAs) and decreased onset of disease- and aging-related deterioration of brain health is increasingly endorsed across epidemiological and diet-interventional studies. Promising results are found regarding to the protection of proper brain circulation, structure and functionality in healthy and diseased humans and animal models. These include enhanced cerebral blood flow (CBF), white and gray matter integrity, and improved cognitive functioning, and are possibly mediated through increased neurovascular coupling, neuroprotection and neuronal plasticity, respectively. Contrary, studies investigating diets high in saturated fats provide opposite results, which may eventually lead to irreversible damage. Studies like these are of great importance given the high incidence of obesity caused by the increased and decreased consumption of respectively saturated fats and ω3-LCPUFAs in the Western civilization. This paper will review in vivo research conducted on the effects of ω3-LCPUFAs and saturated fatty acids on integrity (circulation, structure and function) of the young, aging and diseased brain.

  1. Photochemical cleavage of leader peptides†‡

    PubMed Central

    Bindman, Noah; Merkx, Remco; Koehler, Robert; Herrman, Nicholas; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a photolabile linker compatible with Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis and Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne–azide cycloaddition that allows photochemical cleavage to afford a C-terminal peptide fragment with a native amino terminus. PMID:21046030

  2. Two metal-binding peptides from the insect Orchesella cincta (Collembola) as a result of metallothionein cleavage.

    PubMed

    Hensbergen, P J; Donker, M H; Hunziker, P E; van der Schors, R C; van Straalen, N M

    2001-10-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is an ubiquitous heavy metal-binding protein which has been identified in animals, plants, protists, fungi and bacteria. In insects, primary structures of MTs are known only for Drosophila and the collembolan, Orchesella cincta. The MT cDNA from O. cincta encodes a 77 amino acid protein with 19 cysteines. Isolations of the protein itself have demonstrated the presence of two smaller metal-binding peptides, whose amino acid sequences correspond to parts of the cDNA, and which apparently result from cleavage of the native protein. The present study was undertaken to complete the picture of cleavage sites within the MT protein by applying protein isolation techniques in combination with mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequence analysis. Further, recombinant expression allowed us to study the intrinsic stability of the MT and to perform in vitro cleavage studies. The results show that the MT from O. cincta is specifically cleaved at two sites, both after the amino acid sequence Thr-Gln (TQ). One of these sites is located in the N-terminal region and the other in the linker region between two putative metal-binding clusters. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant O. cincta MT can be isolated in an uncleaved form; however, this protein can be cleaved in vitro by the proteolytic activity of O. cincta. In combination with other studies, the results suggest that the length of the linker region is important for the stability of MT as a two domain metal-binding protein.

  3. cis-Apa: a practical linker for the microwave-assisted preparation of cyclic pseudopeptides via RCM cyclative cleavage.

    PubMed

    Baron, Alice; Verdié, Pascal; Martinez, Jean; Lamaty, Frédéric

    2011-02-01

    A new linker cis-5-aminopent-3-enoic acid (cis-Apa) was prepared for the synthesis of cyclic pseudopeptides by cyclization-cleavage by using ring-closing methatesis (RCM). We developed a new synthetic pathway for the preparation of the cis-Apa linker that was tested in the cyclization-cleavage process of different RGD peptide sequences. Different macrocyclic peptidomimetics were prepared by using this integrated microwave-assisted method, showing that the readily available cis-Apa amino acid is well adapted as a linker in the cyclization-cleavage process.

  4. DNA photoreacts by nucleobase ring cleavage to form labile isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Buschhaus, Laura; Rolf, Josefin; Kleinermanns, Karl

    2013-11-14

    Differential infrared absorption spectroscopy was used to study the formation of isocyanates and further photo-products in the oligonucleotides dG10, dC10 and dT10 and in their mononucleosides by ultraviolet light at 266 nm. We find that α-cleavage takes place in oligonucleotides and mononucleosides both in films and in solution. The very intense and spectrally isolated isocyanate (N=C=O) asymmetric stretch vibration at 2277 cm(-1) is used as a spectroscopic marker for detection of the photo-product. The band disappears upon reaction with small amounts of water vapour as expected for isocyanates. Quantum yields for isocyanate formation by nucleobase ring cleavage in the α-position to the carbonyl group are ∼5 × 10(-5) in the mononucleosides and up to 5 × 10(-4) in the oligonucleotides. In the mixed oligonucleotides dG10/dC10 and dA10/dT10 the quantum yield of α-cleavage drops by a factor of 10 compared to the single oligonucleotides. Implications for DNA repair and photo-induced DNA-protein cross-linking via isocyanate reaction with NH2 groups of amino acids are discussed.

  5. Antiviral agent based on the non-structural protein targeting the maturation process of HIV-1: expression and susceptibility of chimeric Vpr as a substrate for cleavage by HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Serio, D; Singh, S P; Cartas, M A; Weber, I T; Harrison, R W; Louis, J M; Srinivasan, A

    2000-06-01

    The processing of precursor proteins (Gag and Gag-pol) by the viral protease is absolutely required in order to generate infectious particles. This prompted us to consider novel strategies that target viral maturation. Towards this end, we have engineered an HIV-1 virion associated protein, Vpr, to contain protease cleavage signal sequences from Gag and Gag-pol precursor proteins. We previously reported that virus particles derived from HIV-1 proviral DNA, encoding chimeric Vpr, showed a lack of infectivity, depending on the fusion partner. As an extension of that work, the potential of chimeric Vpr as a substrate for HIV-1 protease was tested utilizing an epitope-based assay. Chimeric Vpr molecules were modified such that the Flag epitope is removed following cleavage, thus allowing us to determine the efficiency of protease cleavage. Following incubation with the protease, the resultant products were analyzed by radioimmunoprecipitation using antibodies directed against the Flag epitope. Densitometric analysis of the autoradiograms showed processing to be both rapid and specific. Further, the analysis of virus particles containing chimeric Vpr by immunoblot showed reactivities to antibodies against the Flag epitope similar to the data observed in vitro. These results suggest that the pseudosubstrate approach may provide another avenue for developing antiviral agents.

  6. 4-Dimethylaminoazobenzenes: carcinogenicities and reductive cleavage by microsomal azo reductase.

    PubMed

    Lambooy, J P; Koffman, B M

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four 4-dimethylaminoazobenzenes (DABs) in which systematic structural modifications have been made in the prime ring have been studied for substrate specificity for microsomal azo reductase. The DABs were also evaluated for carcinogenicity and it was found that there was no correlation between carcinogenicity and extent of azo bond cleavage by azo reductase. While any substituent in the prime ring reduces the rate of cleavage of the azo bond relative to the unsubstituted dye, there is a correlation between substituent size and susceptibility to the enzyme. Substituent size was also found to be a significant factor in the induction of hepatomas by the dyes. Preliminary studies have shown that there appears to be a positive correlation between microsomal riboflavin content and the activity of the azo reductase.

  7. KM+, a mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia: amino acid sequence, predicted tertiary structure, carbohydrate recognition, and analysis of the beta-prism fold.

    PubMed

    Rosa, J C; De Oliveira, P S; Garratt, R; Beltramini, L; Resing, K; Roque-Barreira, M C; Greene, L J

    1999-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit), which contains 149 residues/mol, is reported and compared to those of other members of the Moraceae family, particularly that of jacalin, also from jackfruit, with which it shares 52% sequence identity. KM+ presents an acetyl-blocked N-terminus and is not posttranslationally modified by proteolytic cleavage as is the case for jacalin. Rather, it possesses a short, glycine-rich linker that unites the regions homologous to the alpha- and beta-chains of jacalin. The results of homology modeling implicate the linker sequence in sterically impeding rotation of the side chain of Asp141 within the binding site pocket. As a consequence, the aspartic acid is locked into a conformation adequate only for the recognition of equatorial hydroxyl groups on the C4 epimeric center (alpha-D-mannose, alpha-D-glucose, and their derivatives). In contrast, the internal cleavage of the jacalin chain permits free rotation of the homologous aspartic acid, rendering it capable of accepting hydrogen bonds from both possible hydroxyl configurations on C4. We suggest that, together with direct recognition of epimeric hydroxyls and the steric exclusion of disfavored ligands, conformational restriction of the lectin should be considered to be a new mechanism by which selectivity may be built into carbohydrate binding sites. Jacalin and KM+ adopt the beta-prism fold already observed in two unrelated protein families. Despite presenting little or no sequence similarity, an analysis of the beta-prism reveals a canonical feature repeatedly present in all such structures, which is based on six largely hydrophobic residues within a beta-hairpin containing two classic-type beta-bulges. We suggest the term beta-prism motif to describe this feature.

  8. Kinetic characteristics of Escherichia coli RNase H1: cleavage of various antisense oligonucleotide-RNA duplexes.

    PubMed Central

    Crooke, S T; Lemonidis, K M; Neilson, L; Griffey, R; Lesnik, E A; Monia, B P

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of variations in substrates on the kinetic properties of Escherichia coli RNase H were studied using antisense oligonucleotides of various types hybridized to complementary oligoribonucleotides. The enzyme displayed minimal sequence preference, initiated cleavage through an endonucleolytic mechanism near the 3' terminus of the RNA in a DNA-RNA chimera and then was processively exonucleolytic. Phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides hybridized to RNA supported cleavage more effectively than phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotides. Oligonucleotides comprised of 2'-methoxy-, 2'-fluoro- or 2'-propoxy-nucleosides did not support RNase H1 activity. 2. The Km and Vmax. of cleavage of RNA duplexes with full phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides were compared with methoxy-deoxy 'gapmers', i.e.; oligonucleotides with 2'-methoxy wings surrounding a deoxynucleotide centre. Such structural modifications resulted in substantial increases in affinity, but significant reductions in cleavage efficiency. The initial rates of cleavage increased as the deoxynucleotide gap size was increased. Multiple deoxynucleotide gaps increased the Vmax. but had little effect on Km. 3. The effects of several base modifications on the site of initial cleavage, processivity and initial rate of cleavage were also studied. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8526876

  9. Microwave spectra and structure of the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid-formic acid dimer.

    PubMed

    Pejlovas, Aaron M; Lin, Wei; Kukolich, Stephen G

    2015-09-28

    The rotational spectrum of the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid-formic acid doubly hydrogen bonded dimer has been measured in the 4-11 GHz region using a Flygare-Balle type pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent, four unique singly substituted (13)C isotopologues, and a singly deuterated isotopologue. Splittings due to a possible concerted double proton tunneling motion were not observed. Rotational constants (A, B, and C) and centrifugal distortion constants (DJ and DJK) were determined from the measured transitions for the dimer. The values of the rotational (in MHz) and centrifugal distortion constants (in kHz) for the parent isotopologue are A = 4045.4193(16), B = 740.583 80(14), C = 658.567 60(23), DJ = 0.0499(16), and DJK = 0.108(14). A partial gas phase structure of the dimer was derived from the rotational constants of the measured isotopologues, previous structural work on each monomer units and results of the calculations.

  10. Supramolecular structure of 5-aminosalycilic acid/halloysite composites.

    PubMed

    Viseras, Maria-Teresa; Aguzzi, Carola; Cerezo, Pilar; Cultrone, Giuseppe; Viseras, Cesar

    2009-05-01

    This paper assesses the supramolecular structure of nanocomposites prepared by including the anti-inflammatory drug 5-aminosalycilic acid in halloysite nanotubes. Halloysite tubes have sub-micron individual lengths with outer diameters ∼0.1 µm, as observed by FESEM. The mercury intrusion plots showed bimodal profiles with pore dimensions ∼10 and 0.06 µm. X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric results revealed changes in the hydration form of the clay after the interaction. The groups associated to the interaction were studied by FTIR. The location of the drug in the composites was determined after uranium staining of its amino groups by X-EDS microanalysis coupled with HREM. The drug was located both inside and on the surface of the halloysite nanotubes. These results confirm the occurrence of two concomitant interaction mechanisms: rapid adsorption of 5-ASA at the external halloysite surface followed by slow adsorption of the drug inside the tubes.

  11. Structural and optical properties of poly lactic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, J.; Asahi, T.; Ichiki, M.; Oikawa, A.; Suzuki, H.; Watanabe, T.; Fukada, E.; Shikinami, Y.

    1995-04-01

    Fibrous and crystal structures of a helical polymer, poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), were analyzed by using x-ray diffraction experiments. It was confirmed that the molecular residues were arranged on a nonintegral 10/3 helix as De Santis and Kovacs [Biopolymers 6, 299 (1968)] reported. The atomic positions in a monomeric unit, which were proposed by Hoogsteen, Postema, Pennings, ten Brinke, and Zugenmaier [Macromolecules 23, 634 (1990)], were validated. However, the previous reports on the positions of the two helical chains were found to be in error. The correct positions were determined. The second helical chain shifts from the base center by 0.45, 0.25, and 0.61 Å along a, b, and c axes. Besides, the second chain rotates by 2.46° with respect to the first. Distribution function of the crystallites in various drawn fibers were determined as a function of spiral angle. Optical gyrations of PLLA and poly-D-lactic acid fibers were successfully measured by using high accuracy universal polarimeter, as functions of temperature and drawing ratio. By using x-ray data of the change of the fibrous structure by drawing treatments, the gyration tensor components of PLLA could be calculated. It is of great interest that gyration tensor component g33 along the helical axis is extremely large, ˜(3.85±0.69)×10-2, which corresponds to a rotatory power of (9.2±1.7)×103°/mm, about two orders of magnitude larger than those of ordinary crystals. This is the first experimental evidence that helical polymers will produce enormous optical activity in the solid state. Helical polymers will be important for the elucidation of gyro-optical properties of solids and promising for new optical applications utilizing their large optical activity.

  12. Does Cleavage Work at Work? Men, but Not Women, Falsely Believe Cleavage Sells a Weak Product

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Peter; Chrislock, Karyna; Petersik, Korinne; Vijay, Madhuri; Turek, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    We examined whether men, but not women, would be distracted by a female sales representative's exposed cleavage, leading to greater perceived efficacy for a weak, but not for a strong product. A community sample of 88 men and 97 women viewed a video of a female pharmaceutical sales representative who (a) had exposed cleavage or dressed modestly…

  13. Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Bausch, M.

    1991-01-01

    Removal of the organic sulfur in coal constitutes one of the major challenges facing fossil fuel scientists today. A cost--effective of desulfurizing Illinois coal is non-existent at the present time. Research in our group aims to develop a simple protocol for sulfur removal by gaining understanding of how various additives can enhance the rates of C-S bond cleavage in Illinois coal and coal model compounds, relative to fragmentation of the coal macromolecule via C-C, C-O, and C-N bond cleavage. During this funding period, we plan to carry out examinations of: (a) the effects of various reaction conditions on radical-initiated and Lewis acid-catalyzed C-S bond cleavages; (b) the effects of caustic impregnation and subsequent alcoholic reflux on C-S bond cleavage strategies; (c) the reactions of coal model compounds with electron-deficient substrates; (d) examinations of photooxidative C-S bond cleavage reactions; (e) the effects of moderate (300--400{degrees}C) temperatures and pressures as well as ultrasonic radiation on (a) - (c). Also planned are differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) examinations of selected C-S bond cleavage protocols, including those on Illinois coals that possess varying amounts of organic and inorganic sulfur.

  14. The formic acid-nitric acid complex: microwave spectrum, structure, and proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Rebecca B; Dewberry, Christopher T; Leopold, Kenneth R

    2014-09-11

    Rotational spectra are reported for seven isotopologues of the complex HCOOH-HNO3 in a supersonic jet. The system is planar and bound by a pair of hydrogen bonds, much like the more widely studied carboxylic acid dimers. Double proton exchange interconverts the system between a pair of equivalent structures, as revealed by a splitting of the a-type spectrum that disappears when one of the hydrogen bonding protons is replaced by deuterium. The observation of relative intensities that are consistent with nuclear spin statistics in a symmetric and antisymmetric pair of tunneling states provides additional evidence for such a motion. The observed splittings in the pure rotational spectrum are 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than those recently reported in the pure rotational spectra of several related carboxylic acid dimers. This is a curious difference, although we note that because the observed spectra do not cross the tunneling doublet, the splittings are a measure of the difference in effective rotational constants for the two states, not the tunneling frequency itself. The observed rotational constants have been used to determine an accurate vibrationally averaged structure for the complex. The two hydrogen bond lengths, 1.686(17) Å and 1.813(10) Å for the hydrogen bonds involving the HNO3 and HCOOH protons, respectively, differ by 0.127(27) Å. Likewise, the associated oxygen-oxygen distances determined for the parent species, 2.631 and 2.794 Å, differ by 0.163 Å. These results suggest that the double proton transfer is necessarily accompanied by substantial motion of the heavy atom frame, and thus this system, in principle, provides an excellent prototype for multidimensional tunneling processes. Ab initio calculations of the binding energy and the barrier height are presented. Excellent agreement between the calculated equilibrium structure and the experimental, vibrationally averaged structure suggests that the vibrational wave function is not highly

  15. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2003-12-09

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  16. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  17. "Inosaminoacids": novel inositol-amino acid hybrid structures accessed by microbial arene oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pilgrim, Sarah; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Lloyd, Matthew D; Lewis, Simon E

    2011-04-28

    Microbial 1,2-dihydroxylation of sodium benzoate permits the rapid construction of novel inositol-amino acid hybrid structures. Both β- and γ-amino acids are accessible by means of an acylnitroso Diels-Alder cycloaddition.

  18. Analysis of cleavage site mutations between the NC and PR Gag domains of Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, G; Pichova, I; Vogt, V M

    1997-01-01

    In retroviruses, the viral protease (PR) is released as a mature protein by cleavage of Gag, Gag-Pro, or Gag-Pro-Pol precursor polypeptides. In avian sarcoma and leukemia viruses (ASLV), PR forms the C-terminal domain of Gag. Based on the properties of a mutation (cs22) in the cleavage site between the upstream NC domain and the PR domain, the proteolytic liberation of PR previously was inferred to be essential for processing of Gag and Pol proteins. To study this process in more detail, we have analyzed the effects that several mutations at the NC-PR cleavage site have on proteolytic processing in virus-like particles expressed in COS and quail cells. Mutant Gag proteins carrying the same mutations also were synthesized in vitro and tested for processing with purified PR. In both types of studies, N-terminal sequencing of the liberated PR domain was carried out to exactly identify the site of cleavage. Finally, synthetic peptides corresponding to the mutant proteins were assessed for the ability to act as substrates for PR. The results were all consistent and led to the following conclusions. (i) In vivo, if normal processing between NC and PR is prevented by mutations, limited cleavage occurs at a previously unrecognized alternative site three amino acids downstream, i.e., in PR. This N-terminally truncated PR is inactive as an enzyme, as inferred from the global processing defect in cs22 and a similar mutant. (ii) In Gag proteins translated in vitro, purified PR cleaves this alternative site as rapidly as it does the wild-type site. (iii) Contrary to previously accepted rules describing retroviral cleavage sites, an isoleucine residue placed at the P1 position of the NC-PR cleavage site does not hinder normal processing. (iv) A proline residue placed at the P2 position in this cleavage site blocks normal processing. PMID:8985369

  19. Galectin-3 Cleavage Alters Bone Remodeling: Different Outcomes in Breast and Prostate Cancer Skeletal Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kosei; Kho, Dhong Hyo; Yanagawa, Takashi; Harazono, Yosuke; Hogan, Victor; Chen, Wei; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mehra, Rohit; Raz, Avraham

    2016-03-15

    Management of bone metastasis remains clinically challenging and requires the identification of new molecular target(s) that can be therapeutically exploited to improve patient outcome. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) has been implicated as a secreted factor that alters the bone microenvironment. Proteolytic cleavage of Gal-3 may also contribute to malignant cellular behaviors, but has not been addressed in cancer metastasis. Here, we report that Gal-3 modulates the osteolytic bone tumor microenvironment in the presence of RANKL. Gal-3 was localized on the osteoclast cell surface, and its suppression by RNAi or a specific antagonist markedly inhibited osteoclast differentiation markers, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and reduced the number of mature osteoclasts. Structurally, the 158-175 amino acid sequence in the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of Gal-3 was responsible for augmented osteoclastogenesis. During osteoclast maturation, Gal-3 interacted and colocalized with myosin-2A along the surface of cell-cell fusion. Pathologically, bone metastatic cancers expressed and released an intact form of Gal-3, mainly detected in breast cancer bone metastases, as well as a cleaved form, more abundant in prostate cancer bone metastases. Secreted intact Gal-3 interacted with myosin-2A, leading to osteoclastogenesis, whereas a shift to cleaved Gal-3 attenuated the enhancement in osteoclast differentiation. Thus, our studies demonstrate that Gal-3 shapes the bone tumor microenvironment through distinct roles contingent on its cleavage status, and highlight Gal-3 targeting through the CRD as a potential therapeutic strategy for mitigating osteolytic bone remodeling in the metastatic niche.

  20. Facile P-C/C-H Bond-Cleavage Reactivity of Nickel Bis(diphosphine) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoguang; Li, Haixia; Appel, Aaron M; Hall, Michael B; Bullock, R Morris

    2016-07-01

    Unusual cleavage of P-C and C-H bonds of the P2 N2 ligand, in heteroleptic [Ni(P2 N2 )(diphosphine)](2+) complexes under mild conditions, results in the formation of an iminium formyl nickelate featuring a C,P,P-tridentate coordination mode. The structures of both the heteroleptic [Ni(P2 N2 )(diphosphine)](2+) complexes and the resulting iminium formyl nickelate have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to investigate the mechanism of the P-C/C-H bond cleavage, which involves C-H bond cleavage, hydride rotation, Ni-C/P-H bond formation, and P-C bond cleavage. PMID:27189413

  1. Enhanced RNA cleavage within bulge-loops by an artificial ribonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Irina L.; Zenkova, Marina A.; Gross, Hans J.; Vlassov, Valentin V.

    2005-01-01

    Cleavage of phosphodiester bonds by small ribonuclease mimics within different bulge-loops of RNA was investigated. Bulge-loops of different size (1–7 nt) and sequence composition were formed in a 3′ terminal fragment of influenza virus M2 RNA (96 nt) by hybridization of complementary oligodeoxynucleotides. Small bulges (up to 4 nt) were readily formed upon oligonucleotide hybridization, whereas hybridization of the RNA to the oligonucleotides designed to produce larger bulges resulted in formation of several alternative structures. A synthetic ribonuclease mimic displaying Pyr–Pu cleavage specificity cleaved CpA motifs located within bulges faster than similar motifs within the rest of the RNA. In the presence of 10 mM MgCl2, 75% of the cleavage products resulted from the attack of this motif. Thus, selective RNA cleavage at a single target phosphodiester bond was achieved by using bulge forming oligonucleotides and a small ribonuclease A mimic. PMID:15731340

  2. Surface chain cleavage behavior of PBIA fiber induced by direct fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zheng; Wu, Peng; Li, Baoyin; Chen, Teng; Liu, Yang; Ren, Mengmeng; Wang, Zaoming; Lai, Wenchuan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-10-01

    The surface chain cleavage behavior of PBIA fiber induced by direct fluorination was reported based on the analysis of physical and chemical changes on the fiber surface. The chain cleavage product was obtained to evaluate the chemical reaction during the fluorination process, and its impact on composites performance was also involved. DSC, FTIR spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra and H1NMR were utilized to analyze the chemical structure and composition of the chain cleavage product. The results show gaseous fluorine is most likely to attack the benzimidazole and amide bond in PBIA unit, which was also demonstrated by molecular simulation. Owing to the polar groups contained in chain cleavage products, the wettability of epoxy resin to fiber has been improved, leading to an 11.5% increase of adhesive strength of fiber-epoxy composite.

  3. (S) 2-phenyl-2-(p-tolylsulfonylamino)acetic acid. Structure, acidity and its alkali carboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte-Hernández, Angélica M.; Contreras, Rosalinda; Suárez-Moreno, Galdina V.; Montes-Tolentino, Pedro; Ramos-García, Iris; González, Felipe J.; Flores-Parra, Angelina

    2015-03-01

    The structure and the preferred conformers of (S) 2-phenyl-2-(p-tolylsulfonylamino)acetic acid (1) are reported. Compound 1 is a derivative of the unnatural aminoacid the (S) phenyl glycine. The X-ray diffraction analyses of the complexes of 1 with water, methanol, pyridine and its own anion are discussed. In order to add information about the acidity of the COOH and NH protons in compound 1, its pKa in DMSO and those of N-benzyl-p-tolylsulfonamide and (S) N-methylbenzyl-p-tolylsulfonamide were determined by cyclic voltammetry. Data improved the scarce information about pKa in DMSO values of sulfonamides. The products of the reactions of compound 1 with one and two equivalents of LiOH, NaOH and KOH in methanol were analyzed. Crystals of the lithium (2) and sodium (3) carboxylates and the dipotassium sulfonylamide acetate (7) were obtained, they are coordination polymers. In compound 2, the lithium is bound to four oxygen atoms with short bond lengths. The coordination of the lithium atom to two carboxylates gives an infinite ribbon by formation of fused six membered rings. In the crystal of compound 3, two pentacoordinated sodium atoms are bridged by three oxygen atoms, one from a water molecule and two from DMSO. The short distance between the sodium atoms (3.123 Å), implies a metal-metal interaction. The sodium couples are linked by two carboxylate groups, forming a planar ribbon of fused twelve membered rings. A notable discovery was a water molecule quenched in the middle of the ring, with a tetra coordinated oxygen atom in a square planar geometry. In compound 7, the carboxylate and the amide are bound to heptacoordinated potassium atoms. The 2D polymer of 7 has a sandwich structure, with the carboxylate and potassium atoms in the inner layer covered by the aromatic rings.

  4. Characterization of a Non-Canonical Signal Peptidase Cleavage Site in a Replication Protein from Tomato Ringspot Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ting; Chisholm, Joan

    2016-01-01

    The NTB-VPg polyprotein from tomato ringspot virus is an integral membrane replication protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes. A signal peptidase (SPase) cleavage was previously detected in the C-terminal region of NTB-VPg downstream of a 14 amino acid (aa)-long hydrophobic region (termed TM2). However, the exact location of the cleavage site was not determined. Using in vitro translation assays, we show that the SPase cleavage site is conserved in the NTB-VPg protein from various ToRSV isolates, although the rate of cleavage varies from one isolate to another. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage sites of two ToRSV isolates allowed the identification of sequences that affect cleavage efficiency. We also present evidence that SPase cleavage in the ToRSV-Rasp2 isolate occurs within a GAAGG sequence likely after the AAG (GAAG/G). Mutation of a downstream MAAV sequence to AAAV resulted in SPase cleavage at both the natural GAAG/G and the mutated AAA/V sequences. Given that there is a distance of seven aa between the two cleavage sites, this indicates that there is flexibility in the positioning of the cleavage sites relative to the inner surface of the membrane and the SPase active site. SPase cleavage sites are typically located 3–7 aa downstream of the hydrophobic region. However, the NTB-VPg GAAG/G cleavage site is located 17 aa downstream of the TM2 hydrophobic region, highlighting unusual features of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage site. A putative 11 aa-long amphipathic helix was identified immediately downstream of the TM2 region and five aa upstream of the GAAG/G cleavage site. Based on these results, we present an updated topology model in which the hydrophobic and amphipathic domains form a long tilted helix or a bent helix in the membrane lipid bilayer, with the downstream cleavage site(s) oriented parallel to the membrane inner surface. PMID:27589230

  5. Characterization of a Non-Canonical Signal Peptidase Cleavage Site in a Replication Protein from Tomato Ringspot Virus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ting; Chisholm, Joan; Sanfaçon, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The NTB-VPg polyprotein from tomato ringspot virus is an integral membrane replication protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes. A signal peptidase (SPase) cleavage was previously detected in the C-terminal region of NTB-VPg downstream of a 14 amino acid (aa)-long hydrophobic region (termed TM2). However, the exact location of the cleavage site was not determined. Using in vitro translation assays, we show that the SPase cleavage site is conserved in the NTB-VPg protein from various ToRSV isolates, although the rate of cleavage varies from one isolate to another. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage sites of two ToRSV isolates allowed the identification of sequences that affect cleavage efficiency. We also present evidence that SPase cleavage in the ToRSV-Rasp2 isolate occurs within a GAAGG sequence likely after the AAG (GAAG/G). Mutation of a downstream MAAV sequence to AAAV resulted in SPase cleavage at both the natural GAAG/G and the mutated AAA/V sequences. Given that there is a distance of seven aa between the two cleavage sites, this indicates that there is flexibility in the positioning of the cleavage sites relative to the inner surface of the membrane and the SPase active site. SPase cleavage sites are typically located 3-7 aa downstream of the hydrophobic region. However, the NTB-VPg GAAG/G cleavage site is located 17 aa downstream of the TM2 hydrophobic region, highlighting unusual features of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage site. A putative 11 aa-long amphipathic helix was identified immediately downstream of the TM2 region and five aa upstream of the GAAG/G cleavage site. Based on these results, we present an updated topology model in which the hydrophobic and amphipathic domains form a long tilted helix or a bent helix in the membrane lipid bilayer, with the downstream cleavage site(s) oriented parallel to the membrane inner surface. PMID:27589230

  6. Ectodomain cleavage of the EGF ligands HB-EGF, neuregulin1-beta, and TGF-alpha is specifically triggered by different stimuli and involves different PKC isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Herrlich, Andreas; Klinman, Eva; Fu, Jonathan; Sadegh, Cameron; Lodish, Harvey

    2008-12-01

    Metalloproteinase cleavage of transmembrane proteins (ectodomain cleavage), including the epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligands heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), neuregulin (NRG), and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), is important in many cellular signaling pathways and is disregulated in many diseases. It is largely unknown how physiological stimuli of ectodomain cleavage--hypertonic stress, phorbol ester, or activation of G-protein-coupled receptors [e.g., by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)]--are molecularly connected to metalloproteinase activation. To study this question, we developed a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)- based assay that measures cleavage of EGF ligands in single living cells. EGF ligands expressed in mouse lung epithelial cells are differentially and specifically cleaved depending on the stimulus. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes or metalloproteinase inhibition by batimastat (BB94) showed that different regulatory signals are used by different stimuli and EGF substrates, suggesting differential effects that act on the substrate, the metalloproteinase, or both. For example, hypertonic stress led to strong cleavage of HB-EGF and NRG but only moderate cleavage of TGF-alpha. HB-EGF, NRG, and TGF-alpha cleavage was not dependent on PKC, and only HB-EGF and NRG cleavage were inhibited by BB94. In contrast, phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (TPA) -induced cleavage of HB-EGF, NRG, and TGF-alpha was dependent on PKC and sensitive to BB94 inhibition. LPA led to significant cleavage of only NRG and TGF-alpha and was inhibited by BB94; only LPA-induced NRG cleavage required PKC. Surprisingly, specific inhibition of atypical PKCs zeta and iota [not activated by diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium] significantly enhanced TPA-induced NRG cleavage. Employed in a high-throughput cloning strategy, our cleavage assay should allow the identification of candidate proteins involved in signal transduction of different

  7. Quantitative Analysis of PMLA Nanoconjugate Components after Backbone Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hui; Patil, Rameshwar; Portilla-Arias, Jose; Black, Keith L.; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Holler, Eggehard

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional polymer nanoconjugates containing multiple components show great promise in cancer therapy, but in most cases complete analysis of each component is difficult. Polymalic acid (PMLA) based nanoconjugates have demonstrated successful brain and breast cancer treatment. They consist of multiple components including targeting antibodies, Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (AONs), and endosome escape moieties. The component analysis of PMLA nanoconjugates is extremely difficult using conventional spectrometry and HPLC method. Taking advantage of the nature of polyester of PMLA, which can be cleaved by ammonium hydroxide, we describe a method to analyze the content of antibody and AON within nanoconjugates simultaneously using SEC-HPLC by selectively cleaving the PMLA backbone. The selected cleavage conditions only degrade PMLA without affecting the integrity and biological activity of the antibody. Although the amount of antibody could also be determined using the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) method, our selective cleavage method gives more reliable results and is more powerful. Our approach provides a new direction for the component analysis of polymer nanoconjugates and nanoparticles. PMID:25894227

  8. Expression of Viola cyclotides by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing of intercysteine loops after introduction of charges and cleavage sites by aminoethylation.

    PubMed

    Göransson, Ulf; Broussalis, Adriana M; Claeson, Per

    2003-07-01

    The expression of cyclotides-macrocyclic plant peptides-was profiled in six violets, Viola cotyledon, V. biflora, V. arvensis, V. tricolor, V. riviniana, and V. odorata, by LC-MS. All were found to express notably complex mixtures, with single species containing >50 cyclotides. To facilitate their sequencing by MS-MS, an analytical strategy is presented involving aminoethylation of cysteines. This overcomes a number of problems intimately associated with the cyclotide core structure-that is, their joined N and C termini, disulfide knot, and low or clustered content of positively charged amino acids and enzymatic cleavage sites. As a result, charges as well as cleavage sites are introduced at the most conserved part of their sequence, the cysteines. Combined with tryptic digestion, all intercysteine loops are then of suitable size and charge for MS-MS sequencing. The utility of this strategy is shown by the sequencing of two novel cyclotides isolated from V. cotyledon; vico A (cyclo-(AESCVYIPCFTGIAGCSCKNKVCYYNGSIPC)) and vico B (cyclo-(AESCVYIPCITGIAGCSCKNKVCYYNGSIPC)); their complete sequence could be determined by nanospray MS-MS. The strategy for converting conserved cysteines to enzymatic cleavage sites might also benefit the study of other peptides and proteins displaying similar structural problems for MS analysis.

  9. Structure and friction of stearic acid and oleic acid films adsorbed on iron oxide surfaces in squalane.

    PubMed

    Doig, Michael; Warrens, Chris P; Camp, Philip J

    2014-01-14

    The structure and friction of fatty acid surfactant films adsorbed on iron oxide surfaces lubricated by squalane are examined using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. The structures of stearic acid and oleic acid films under static and shear conditions, and at various surface coverages, are described in detail, and the effects of unsaturation in the tail group are highlighted. At high surface coverage, the measured properties of stearic acid and oleic acid films are seen to be very similar. At low and intermediate surface coverages, the presence of a double bond, as in oleic acid, is seen to give rise to less penetration of lubricant in to the surfactant film and less layering of the lubricant near to the film. The kinetic friction coefficient is measured as a function of shear rate within the hydrodynamic (high shear rate) lubrication regime. Lubricant penetration and layering are observed to be correlated with friction coefficient. The friction coefficient with oleic acid depends only weakly on surface coverage, while stearic acid admits more lubricant penetration, and its friction coefficient increases significantly with decreasing surface coverage. Connections between film structure and friction are discussed.

  10. Quantitative structure-property relationship studies on amino acid conjugates of jasmonic acid as defense signaling molecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Zu-Guang; Chen, Ke-Xian; Xie, Hai-Ying; Gao, Jian-Rong

    2009-06-01

    Jasmonates and related compounds, including amino acid conjugates of jasmonic acid, have regulatory functions in the signaling pathway for plant developmental processes and responses to the complex equilibrium of biotic and abiotic stress. But the molecular details of the signaling mechanism are still poorly understood. Statistically significant quantitative structure-property relationship models (r(2) > 0.990) constructed by genetic function approximation and molecular field analysis were generated for the purpose of deriving structural requirements for lipophilicity of amino acid conjugates of jasmonic acid. The best models derived in the present study provide some valuable academic information in terms of the 2/3D-descriptors influencing the lipophilicity, which may contribute to further understanding the mechanism of exogenous application of jasmonates in their signaling pathway and designing novel analogs of jasmonic acid as ecological pesticides.

  11. Membrane proximal ectodomain cleavage of MUC16 occurs in the acidifying Golgi/post-Golgi compartments

    PubMed Central

    Das, Srustidhar; Majhi, Prabin D.; Al-Mugotir, Mona H.; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Sorgen, Paul; Batra, Surinder K.

    2015-01-01

    MUC16, precursor of the most widely used ovarian cancer biomarker CA125, is up regulated in multiple malignancies and is associated with poor prognosis. While the pro-tumorigenic and metastatic roles of MUC16 are ascribed to the cell-associated carboxyl-terminal MUC16 (MUC16-Cter), the exact biochemical nature of MUC16 cleavage generating MUC16-Cter has remained unknown. Using different lengths of dual-epitope (N-terminal FLAG- and C-terminal HA-Tag) tagged C-terminal MUC16 fragments, we demonstrate that MUC16 cleavage takes place in the juxta-membrane ectodomain stretch of twelve amino acids that generates a ~17 kDa cleaved product and is distinct from the predicted sites. This was further corroborated by domain swapping experiment. Further, the cleavage of MUC16 was found to take place in the Golgi/post-Golgi compartments and is dependent on the acidic pH in the secretory pathway. A similar pattern of ~17 kDa cleaved MUC16 was observed in multiple cell types eliminating the possibility of cell type specific phenomenon. MUC16-Cter translocates to the nucleus in a cleavage dependent manner and binds to the chromatin suggesting its involvement in regulation of gene expression. Taken together, we demonstrate for the first time the oft-predicted cleavage of MUC16 that is critical in designing successful therapeutic interventions based on MUC16. PMID:26044153

  12. Characterization and Modeling of the Collision Induced Dissociation Patterns of Deprotonated Glycosphingolipids: Cleavage of the Glycosidic Bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rožman, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Glycosphingolipid fragmentation behavior was investigated by combining results from analysis of a series of negative ion tandem mass spectra and molecular modeling. Fragmentation patterns extracted from 75 tandem mass spectra of mainly acidic glycosphingolipid species (gangliosides) suggest prominent cleavage of the glycosidic bonds with retention of the glycosidic oxygen atom by the species formed from the reducing end (B and Y ion formation). Dominant product ions arise from dissociation of sialic acids glycosidic bonds whereas product ions resulting from cleavage of other glycosidic bonds are less abundant. Potential energy surfaces and unimolecular reaction rates of several low-energy fragmentation pathways leading to cleavage of glycosidic bonds were estimated in order to explain observed dissociation patterns. Glycosidic bond cleavage in both neutral (unsubstituted glycosyl group) and acidic glycosphingolipids was the outcome of the charge-directed intramolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) mechanism. According to the suggested mechanism, the nucleophile in a form of carboxylate or oxyanion attacks the carbon at position one of the sugar ring, simultaneously breaking the glycosidic bond and yielding an epoxide. For gangliosides, unimolecular reaction rates suggest that dominant product ions related to the cleavage of sialic acid glycosidic bonds are formed via direct dissociation channels. On the other hand, low abundant product ions related to the dissociation of other glycosidic bonds are more likely to be the result of sequential dissociation. Although results from this study mainly contribute to the understanding of glycosphingolipid fragmentation chemistry, some mechanistic findings regarding cleavage of the glycosidic bond may be applicable to other glycoconjugates.

  13. Microwave spectra and structure of the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid-formic acid dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Kukolich, Stephen G.; Lin, Wei

    2015-09-28

    The rotational spectrum of the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid–formic acid doubly hydrogen bonded dimer has been measured in the 4-11 GHz region using a Flygare-Balle type pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent, four unique singly substituted {sup 13}C isotopologues, and a singly deuterated isotopologue. Splittings due to a possible concerted double proton tunneling motion were not observed. Rotational constants (A, B, and C) and centrifugal distortion constants (D{sub J} and D{sub JK}) were determined from the measured transitions for the dimer. The values of the rotational (in MHz) and centrifugal distortion constants (in kHz) for the parent isotopologue are A = 4045.4193(16), B = 740.583 80(14), C = 658.567 60(23), D{sub J} = 0.0499(16), and D{sub JK} = 0.108(14). A partial gas phase structure of the dimer was derived from the rotational constants of the measured isotopologues, previous structural work on each monomer units and results of the calculations.

  14. Effect of acid hydrolysis on starch structure and functionality: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Copeland, Les

    2015-01-01

    Acid hydrolysis is an important chemical modification that can significantly change the structural and functional properties of starch without disrupting its granular morphology. A deep understanding of the effect of acid hydrolysis on starch structure and functionality is of great importance for starch scientific research and its industrial applications. During acid hydrolysis, amorphous regions are hydrolyzed preferentially, which enhances the crystallinity and double helical content of acid hydrolyzed starch. This review discusses current understanding of the effect of acid hydrolysis on starch structure and functionality. The effects of acid hydrolysis on amylose content, chain length distribution of amylopectin molecules, molecular and crystalline organization (including lamellar structure) and granular morphology are considered. Functional properties discussed include swelling power, gelatinization, retrogradation, pasting, gel texture, and in vitro enzyme digestibility. The paper also highlights some promising applications of acid hydrolyzed starch (starch nanocrystals) in the preparation of biodegradable nanocomposites, bio-hydrogen, and slowly digestible starch-based healthy foods.

  15. Catalytic Hydrolytic Cleavage and Oxy-Cleavage of Lignin Linkages

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Guanguang; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2014-07-26

    In this work, new strategies involving organic bases were evaluated to depolymerize lignin to reduced molecular fragments in aqueous medium. NaOH as an inorganic base was also investigated as a reference. Full nature lignin samples are used for the study. As research tools to unravel the complexity of the macro lignin structure and bulky molecular size under this study, size exclusion chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometric analysis, typically used for protein characterizations, were used to follow the progress of lignin depolymerisation by measuring the molecular weight distribution of the products and determining the key molecular fingerprints, respectively. The results show that sodium phenoxide and guanidine carbonate are effective catalysts for lignin depolymerization. It is observed that there exists a synergism between H2O2 and the organic base, which is strongest with guanidine carbonate.

  16. Intramolecular Aminocyanation of Alkenes via N–CN Bond Cleavage**

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhongda; Pound, Sarah M.; Rondla, Naveen R.; Douglas, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    A metal-free, Lewis acid-promoted intramolecular aminocyanation of alkenes was developed. B(C6F5)3 activates N-sulfonyl cyanamides, leading an formal cleavage of the N-CN bonds in conjunction with vicinal addition of sulfonamide and nitrile groups across an alkene. This method enables atom-economical access to indolines and tetrahydroquinolines in excellent yields, and provides a complementary strategy for regioselective alkene difunctionalizations with sulfonamide and nitrile groups. Labeling experiments with 13C suggest a fully intramolecular cyclization pattern due to lack of label scrambling in double crossover experiments. Catalysis with Lewis acid is realized and the reaction can be conducted under air. PMID:24719371

  17. Abscisic acid perception and signaling: structural mechanisms and applications

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ley Moy; Melcher, Karsten; Teh, Bin Tean; Xu, H Eric

    2014-01-01

    Adverse environmental conditions are a threat to agricultural yield and therefore exert a global effect on livelihood, health and the economy. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a vital plant hormone that regulates abiotic stress tolerance, thereby allowing plants to cope with environmental stresses. Previously, attempts to develop a complete understanding of the mechanisms underlying ABA signaling have been hindered by difficulties in the identification of bona fide ABA receptors. The discovery of the PYR/PYL/RCAR family of ABA receptors therefore represented a major milestone in the effort to overcome these roadblocks; since then, many structural and functional studies have provided detailed insights into processes ranging from ABA perception to the activation of ABA-responsive gene transcription. This understanding of the mechanisms of ABA perception and signaling has served as the basis for recent, preliminary developments in the genetic engineering of stress-resistant crops as well as in the design of new synthetic ABA agonists, which hold great promise for the agricultural enhancement of stress tolerance. PMID:24786231

  18. Structural basis and functions of abscisic acid receptors PYLs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing L.; Jiang, Lun; Xin, Qi; Liu, Yang; Tan, Jian X.; Chen, Zhong Z.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in many developmental processes and responses to adaptive stresses in plants. Recently, a new family of nucleocytoplasmic PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYLs) has been identified as bona fide ABA receptors. PYLs together with protein phosphatases type-2C (PP2Cs), Snf1 (Sucrose-non-fermentation 1)-related kinases subfamily 2 (SnRK2s) and downstream substrates constitute the core ABA signaling network. Generally, PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s kinases by physical interaction and direct dephosphorylation. Upon ABA binding, PYLs change their conformations and then contact and inhibit PP2Cs, thus activating SnRK2s. Here, we reviewed the recent progress in research regarding the structures of the core signaling pathways of ABA, including the (+)-ABA, (−)-ABA and ABA analogs pyrabactin as well as 6AS perception by PYLs, SnRK2s mimicking PYLs in binding PP2Cs. PYLs inhibited PP2Cs in both the presence and absence of ABA and activated SnRK2s. The present review elucidates multiple ABA signal perception and transduction by PYLs, which might shed light on how to design small chemical compounds for improving plant performance in the future. PMID:25745428

  19. Abscisic Acid: Hidden Architect of Root System Structure

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Plants modulate root growth in response to changes in the local environment, guided by intrinsic developmental genetic programs. The hormone Abscisic Acid (ABA) mediates responses to different environmental factors, such as the presence of nitrate in the soil, water stress and salt, shaping the structure of the root system by regulating the production of lateral roots as well as controlling root elongation by modulating cell division and elongation. Curiously, ABA controls different aspects of root architecture in different plant species, perhaps providing some insight into the great diversity of root architecture in different plants, both from different taxa and from different environments. ABA is an ancient signaling pathway, acquired well before the diversification of land plants. Nonetheless, how this ancient signaling module is implemented or interacts within a larger signaling network appears to vary in different species. This review will examine the role of ABA in the control of root architecture, focusing on the regulation of lateral root formation in three plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, Medicago truncatula and Oryza sativa. We will consider how the implementation of the ABA signaling module might be a target of natural selection, to help contribute to the diversity of root architecture in nature. PMID:27135341

  20. Structure and functional characterization of a bile acid 7α dehydratase BaiE in secondary bile acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Shiva; Chiu, Hsien-Po; Jones, David H; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Miller, Mitchell D; Xu, Qingping; Farr, Carol L; Ridlon, Jason M; Wells, James E; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A; Hylemon, Phillip B; Lesley, Scott A

    2016-03-01

    Conversion of the primary bile acids cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) to the secondary bile acids deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA) is performed by a few species of intestinal bacteria in the genus Clostridium through a multistep biochemical pathway that removes a 7α-hydroxyl group. The rate-determining enzyme in this pathway is bile acid 7α-dehydratase (baiE). In this study, crystal structures of apo-BaiE and its putative product-bound [3-oxo-Δ(4,6) -lithocholyl-Coenzyme A (CoA)] complex are reported. BaiE is a trimer with a twisted α + β barrel fold with similarity to the Nuclear Transport Factor 2 (NTF2) superfamily. Tyr30, Asp35, and His83 form a catalytic triad that is conserved across this family. Site-directed mutagenesis of BaiE from Clostridium scindens VPI 12708 confirm that these residues are essential for catalysis and also the importance of other conserved residues, Tyr54 and Arg146, which are involved in substrate binding and affect catalytic turnover. Steady-state kinetic studies reveal that the BaiE homologs are able to turn over 3-oxo-Δ(4) -bile acid and CoA-conjugated 3-oxo-Δ(4) -bile acid substrates with comparable efficiency questioning the role of CoA-conjugation in the bile acid metabolism pathway. PMID:26650892

  1. [Recent knowledge about intestinal absorption and cleavage of carotenoids].

    PubMed

    Borel, P; Drai, J; Faure, H; Fayol, V; Galabert, C; Laromiguière, M; Le Moël, G

    2005-01-01

    Our knowledge about intestinal absorption and cleavage of carotenoids has rapidly grown during the last years. New facts about carotenoid absorption have emerged while some controversies about cleavage are close to end. The knowledge of the absorption and conversion processes is indispensable to understand and interpret the perturbations that can occur in the metabolism of carotenoids and vitamin A. Recently, it has been shown that the absorption of certain carotenoids is not passive - as believed for a long time - but is a facilitated process that requires, at least for lutein, the class B-type 1 scavenger receptor (SR-B1). Various epidemiological and clinical studies have shown wide variations in carotenoid absorption from one subject to another, such differences are now explained by the structure of the concerned carotenoid, by the nature of the food that is absorbed with the carotenoid, by diverse exogenous factors like the intake of medicines or interfering components, by diet factors, by genetic factors, and by the nutritional status of the subject. Recently, the precise mechanism of beta-carotene cleavage by betabeta-carotene 15,15' monooxygenase (EC 1.14.99.36) - formerly called beta-carotene 15,15' dioxygenase (ex EC 1.13.11.21) - has been discovered, and a second enzyme which cleaves asymmetrically the beta-carotene molecule has been found. beta-carotene 15,15' monooxygenase only acts on the 15,15' bond, thus forming two molecules of retinal from one molecule of beta-carotene by central cleavage. Even though the betabeta-carotene 15,15' monooxygenase is much more active on the beta-carotene molecule, a study has shown that it can act on all carotenoids. Searchers now agree that other enzymes that can catalyse an eccentric cleavage of carotenoids probably exist, but under physiological conditions the betabeta-carotene 15,15' monooxygenase is by far the most active, and it is mainly effective in the small bowel mucosa and in the liver. However the

  2. Structure of Replicating Simian Virus 40 Deoxyribonucleic Acid Molecules 1

    PubMed Central

    Sebring, E. D.; Kelly, T. J.; Thoren, M. M.; Salzman, N. P.

    1971-01-01

    Properties of replicating simian virus 40 (SV40) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) have been examined by sedimentation analysis and by direct observation during a lytic cycle of infection of African green monkey kidney cells. Two types of replicating DNA molecules were observed in the electron microscope. One was an open structure containing two branch points, three branches, and no free ends whose length measurements were consistent with those expected for replicating SV40 DNA molecules. A second species had the same features as the open structure, but in addition it contained a superhelix in the unreplicated portion of the molecule. Eighty to ninety per cent of the replicative intermediates (RI) were in this latter configuration, and length measurements of these molecules also were consistent with replicating SV40 DNA. Replicating DNA molecules with this configuration have not been described previously. RI, when examined in ethidium bromide-cesium chloride (EB-CsCl) isopycnic gradients, banded in a heterogeneous manner. A fraction of the RI banded at the same density as circular SV40 DNA containing one or more single-strand nicks (component II). The remaining radioactive RI banded at densities higher than that of component II, and material was present at all densities between that of supercoiled double-stranded DNA (component I) and component II. When RI that banded at different densities in EB-CsCl were examined in alkaline gradients, cosedimentation of parental DNA and newly replicated DNA did not occur. All newly replicated DNA sedimented more slowly than did intact single-stranded SV40 DNA, a finding that is inconsistent with the rolling circle model of DNA replication. An inverse correlation exists between the extent of replication of the SV40 DNA and the banding density in EB-CsCl. Under alkaline conditions, the parental DNA strands that were contained in the RI sedimented as covalently closed structures. The sedimentation rates in alkali of the covalently closed

  3. Cleavage oriented iron single crystal fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hribernik, Michael Louis

    Fundamental understanding of atomic level mechanisms controlling cleavage fracture in bcc metals, and the corresponding brittle to ductile transition (BDT) has been a long sought, 'grand challenge' of science. This is particularly true for the BDT in Fe, which is among vital elements that underpin our technological civilization. A key obstacle to developing an understanding of the BDT in Fe is the absence of a reliable database on the temperature dependence of toughness in Fe. In ferritic alloys, the micro-arrest toughness of ferrite, Kmu(T), is hypothesized to control macroscopic cleavage. As a surrogate for Kmu(T), special techniques were developed to measure the arrest toughness, Ka(T), for cleavage oriented, Fe single crystals. Further, the mechanisms controlling cleavage and the BDT should be reflected in the loading rate dependence of static-dynamic initiation toughness, K Ic and KId. Thus KIc/d(T) were also measured for K-rate from 10-1 to 104 MPa√m/s. These studies led to the following conclusions: (1) Ka is semi-brittle, increasing from an average of ≈ 3.5 MPa√m at -196°C to ≈ 9 MPa√m at 0°C. (2) The (100) Ka are similar in the [010] and [011] and orientations, but cleavage does not occur on (110) planes. (3) The Ka for unalloyed Fe is about 150°C lower than that for Fe-3wt%Si, suggesting that equivalent Ka may occur at equivalent lattice sigmay. (4) Higher K-rate shift K Ic/d(T) curves to higher T. (5) The shifts of the KIc/d(T) and Ka(T) curves can be understood and modeled based on dislocation dynamics concepts for the glide of screw dislocations with a stress (and T) controlled activation energy, Ea, with a maximum value of about ≈ 0.5 eV. (6) This Ea is consistent with a double kink nucleation mechanism. Etch pit, slip trace and ledge patterns on side, fracture and sectioned surfaces of the crystals were characterized to study dislocation activity associated with cleavage and the BDT. The results showed extensive dislocation activity on

  4. Structure of six organic acid-base adducts from 6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine and acidic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Daqi; Tao, Lin; Zhou, Mengjian; Shen, Yinyan; Chen, Quan; Lin, Zhanghui; Gao, Xingjun

    2014-05-01

    Six anhydrous organic acid-base adducts of 6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine were prepared with organic acids as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, salicylic acid, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, malonic acid and sebacic acid. The compounds 1-6 were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, and elemental analysis. The melting points of all the adducts were given. Of the six adducts, 1, 3, 4, and 5 are organic salts, while 2, and 6 are cocrystals. The supramolecular arrangement in the crystals 2-6 is based on the R22(8) synthon. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-6 suggests that there are strong NH⋯O, OH⋯N, and OH⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between acid and base components in the supramolecular assemblies. When the hydroxyl group is present in the ortho position of the carboxy, the intramolecular S6 synthon is present, as expected. Besides the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, other noncovalent interactions also play important roles in structure extension. Due to the synergetic effect of these weak interactions, compounds 1-6 display 1D-3D framework structure.

  5. Structural organization of fatty acid desaturase loci in linseed lines with contrasting linolenic acid contents.

    PubMed

    Thambugala, Dinushika; Ragupathy, Raja; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2016-07-01

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), the richest crop source of omega-3 fatty acids (FAs), is a diploid plant with an estimated genome size of ~370 Mb and is well suited for studying genomic organization of agronomically important traits. In this study, 12 bacterial artificial chromosome clones harbouring the six FA desaturase loci sad1, sad2, fad2a, fad2b, fad3a and fad3b from the conventional variety CDC Bethune and the high linolenic acid line M5791 were sequenced, analysed and compared to determine the structural organization of these loci and to gain insights into the genetic mechanisms underlying FA composition in flax. With one gene every 3.2-4.6 kb, the desaturase loci have a higher gene density than the genome's average of one gene per 7.8-8.2 kb. The gene order and orientation across the two genotypes were generally conserved with the exception of the sad1 locus that was predicted to have additional genes in CDC Bethune. High sequence conservation in both genic and intergenic regions of the sad and fad2b loci contrasted with the significant level of variation of the fad2a and fad3 loci, with SNPs being the most frequently observed mutation type. The fad2a locus had 297 SNPs and 36 indels over ~95 kb contrasting with the fad2b locus that had a mere seven SNPs and four indels in ~110 kb. Annotation of the gene-rich loci revealed other genes of known role in lipid or carbohydrate metabolic/catabolic pathways. The organization of the fad2b locus was particularly complex with seven copies of the fad2b gene in both genotypes. The presence of Gypsy, Copia, MITE, Mutator, hAT and other novel repeat elements at the desaturase loci was similar to that of the whole genome. This structural genomic analysis provided some insights into the genomic organization and composition of the main desaturase loci of linseed and of their complex evolution through both tandem and whole genome duplications. PMID:27142663

  6. Amphiphilic association structures in a model skin lotion with hydroxy acids.

    PubMed

    Al-Bawab, A; Friberg, S E

    2004-06-01

    The phase diagrams were determined of lactic and isohexanoic hydroxy acids as well as salicylic acid with water, a non-ionic surfactant and a paraffinic oil to outline the influence of the hydroxy acids on the structure in a model for a skin lotion. The results showed the influence of the acid to be similar to that of the oil, but that the difference in chain length between the two alpha acids had only insignificant influence. The results are discussed from two aspects: the structures involved in the lotion as applied and the action of the lotion residue on the skin after the evaporation of the water.

  7. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1981-11-12

    The objective of this project is to determine the structure of bituminous coal by determining the proportions of the various kinds of connecting bonds and how they can best be broken. Results obtained during the past quarter are presented for the following tasks: (1) extractions and fractionations of coal products which covers pyridine extraction, fractionation of TIPS fractions, EDA extraction of Illinois No. 6 coal and swelling ratios of coal samples; (2) experiments on breakable single bonds which cover reactions of ethylenediamine and model ethers, reaction of pyridine-extracted coal with Me/sub 3/SiI, Baeyer-Villiger oxidations, reaction to diphenylmethane with 15% HNO/sub 3/, cleavage of TIPS with ZnI/sub 2/, and cleavage of black acids; and (3) oxygen oxidation No. 18. Some of the highlights of these studies are: (1) some model ethers are not cleaved by EDA under extraction conditions; (2) oxidation of diaryl ketones with m-chloroperbenzoic acid and saponification of the resulting esters in promising for identifying ketones, (3) treatment of a black acid with pyridine hydroiodide reduced the acid's molecular weight and increased its solubility in pyridine, but treatment with ZnI/sub 2/ was ineffective; (4) in comparison with 0.1 M K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/, 0.01 M persulfate is relatively ineffective in accelerating oxidation of BnNH/sub 2/-extracted coal in water suspension. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Enhanced protease cleavage efficiency on the glucagon-fused interleukin-2 by the addition of synthetic oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Woo; Kim, Jae-Bum; Lee, Weon Sup; Jung, Woo-Hyuk; Ryu, Ji-Myung; Jang, Hyung-Wook; Jo, Young-Bae; Jung, Joon-Ki; Kim, Jung-Hoe

    2007-09-01

    Human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) was produced as a recombinant fusion protein (G3.IL-2/HF) consisting of three tandem-arranged human glucagon molecules (G3) and hIL-2. For the recovery of hIL-2, a factor Xa (FXa) cleavage sequence was introduced next to the N-terminus of hIL-2. Cleavage efficiency on this recombinant protein construct was very low because its recognition sequence was sterically hindered within the G3.IL-2/HF molecule and hence FXa access to the cleavage site was insufficient. We therefore introduced various synthetic oligopeptides upstream from the FXa cleavage site as a means to change substrate conformation and thereby increase cleavage efficiency. Among these oligopeptides, acidic or nucleophilic constructs were the most effective for the FXa-mediated cleavage of the fusion protein. In addition, insertion of various oligopeptides into the G3.IL-2/HF molecule varied the solubility of each construct depending on their physical properties. Consequently, the G3.IL-2/DF construct showed the highest final hIL-2 yields via FXa-mediated removal of the fusion partner. Lastly, we confirmed that cleavage efficiency was greatly increased but native hIL-2 was cleaved internally by non-specific cleavage when the acidic oligopeptide D4 (DDDD) was introduced upstream of the EK cleavage site within G3.IL-2/HE molecule. The G3.IL-2/HE molecule was shown to be an inefficient substrate to EK in a previous report (Biotechnol. Bioprocess Eng. (2000) 5, 13-16).

  9. Targeted site-specific cleavage of HIV-1 viral Rev responsive element by copper aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Sreedhara, A; Cowan, J A

    2001-02-01

    Site-specific cleavage of the HIV-1 viral Rev responsive element by copper aminoglycosides is reported under physiological conditions. This bubble and stem-loop RNA structure is efficiently targeted at micromolar concentrations of complex. The specificity of cleavage of structured viral RNA relative to a non-cognate tRNAPhe of well-defined secondary and tertiary structure is demonstrated. Cleavage products from simpler substrates [diribonucleotide (ApA) and 2',3'-cyclic monophosphate ester (cAMP)] were analyzed by 31P NMR and demonstrate a hydrolytic mechanism in the absence of external redox agents. These results demonstrate copper aminoglycosides to be highly efficient chemical nucleases with a targeting capability for viral RNA and suggest a novel methodology to counter RNA viruses.

  10. Choleretic effect of structural analogs of valproic acid in the rat.

    PubMed

    Watkins, J B; Klaassen, C D

    1983-03-01

    A comparison of structure-choleretic activity relationship has been made for several branched- and straight-chain carboxylic acids including valproic acid. Cumulative bile flow was 13.8, 23.8, 29.4 and 14.9 ml/4hr/kg body weight for dimethyl-, diethyl-, dipropyl- (valproic acid), and dibutyl-acetic acid, respectively, after iv administration of approximately equimolar doses (1100 mumoles/kg). Except for dibutylacetic acid, maximal bile flow increased from control rates of 50-60 to 120-140 microliters/min/kg. Administration of higher doses of 2,2-dimethylbutanoic acid and 2-ethylbutanoic acid did not increase maximal bile flow above 125-140 microliters/min/kg but did prolong the duration of choleresis. Maximal and cumulative bile flows increased with length of carboxylic acid chain for 2,2-dimethyl substituted acids (2,2-dimethylacetic acid to 2,2-dimethylbutanoic acid). If the two methyl groups were on C-3 (3-methylbutanoic acid), no change in bile flow was observed. Straight-chain acids from C-5 to C-11 and pent-4-enoic acid did not alter bile flow. Thus, the effectiveness of several branched-chain carboxylic acids as choleretics parallel their ability as anticonvulsants. In contrast, the straight-chain acids which cause central nervous system depression have no choleretic activity.

  11. 4-Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA hydratase/lyase, an enzyme of phenylpropanoid cleavage from Pseudomonas, causes formation of C(6)-C(1) acid and alcohol glucose conjugates when expressed in hairy roots of Datura stramonium L.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Adinpunya; Mayer, Melinda J; Mellon, Fred A; Michael, Anthony J; Narbad, Arjan; Parr, Adrian J; Waldron, Keith W; Walton, Nicholas J

    2002-05-01

    4-Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA hydratase/lyase (HCHL), a crotonase homologue of phenylpropanoid catabolism from Pseudomonas fluorescens strain AN103, led to the formation of 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde metabolites when expressed in hairy root cultures of Datura stramonium L. established by transformation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes. The principal new compounds observed were the glucoside and glucose ester of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, together with 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol- O-beta- D-glucoside. In lines actively expressing HCHL, these together amounted to around 0.5% of tissue fresh mass. No protocatechuic derivatives were found, although a trace of vanillic acid-beta- D-glucoside was detected. There was no accumulation of 4-hydroxybenzaldehydes, whether free or in the form of their glucose conjugates. There was some evidence suggesting a diminished availability of feruloyl-CoA for the production of feruloyl putrescine and coniferyl alcohol. The findings are discussed in the context of a diversion of phenylpropanoid metabolism, and the ability of plants and plant cultures to conjugate phenolic compounds.

  12. Alternative mechanism of activation of the epithelial na+ channel by cleavage.

    PubMed

    Hu, John Cong; Bengrine, Abderrahmane; Lis, Agnieszka; Awayda, Mouhamed S

    2009-12-25

    We examined activation of the human epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by cleavage. We focused on cleavage of alphaENaC using the serine protease subtilisin. Trimeric channels formed with alphaFM, a construct with point mutations in both furin cleavage sites (R178A/R204A), exhibited marked reduction in spontaneous cleavage and an approximately 10-fold decrease in amiloride-sensitive whole cell conductance as compared with alphaWT (2.2 versus 21.2 microsiemens (microS)). Both alphaWT and alphaFM were activated to similar levels by subtilisin cleavage. Channels formed with alphaFD, a construct that deleted the segment between the two furin sites (Delta175-204), exhibited an intermediate conductance of 13.2 microS. More importantly, alphaFD retained the ability to be activated by subtilisin to 108.8 +/- 20.9 microS, a level not significantly different from that of subtilisin activated alphaWT (125.6 +/- 23.9). Therefore, removal of the tract between the two furin sites is not the main mechanism of channel activation. In these experiments the levels of the cleaved 22-kDa N-terminal fragment of alpha was low and did not match those of the C-terminal 65-kDa fragment. This indicated that cleavage may activate ENaC by the loss of the smaller fragment and the first transmembrane domain. This was confirmed in channels formed with alphaLD, a construct that extended the deleted sequence of alphaFD by 17 amino acids (Delta175-221). Channels with alphaLD were uncleaved, exhibited low baseline activity (4.1 microS), and were insensitive to subtilisin. Collectively, these data support an alternative hypothesis of ENaC activation by cleavage that may involve the loss of the first transmembrane domain from the channel complex. PMID:19858199

  13. Phosphate acceptor amino acid residues in structural proteins of rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Tan, K B; McFalls, M L; Madore, P

    1974-07-01

    Partial acid hydrolysates of the [(32)P]phosphate- or [(3)H]serine-labeled proteins of purified vesicular stomatitis, rabies, Lagos bat, Mokola, or spring viremia of carp virions and of purified intracellular nucleocapsids of these viruses have been analyzed by paper electrophoresis for the presence of phosphorylated amino acids. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, with the former predominant, were present in virion and nucleocapsid preparations that contained phosphoproteins. An exception was the fish rhabdovirus, which contained only phosphoserine. When vesicular stomatitis or rabies virus proteins were phosphorylated in a cell-free system by the virion-associated protein kinase and analyzed for the presence of phosphorylated amino acid residues, phosphoserine was again found to be more abundant than phosphothreonine. After in vitro protein phosphorylation, another phospho-compound, possibly a third phosphoamino acid, was detected in the partial acid hydrolysates of these viruses. PMID:4365328

  14. Primary structures of three highly acidic ribosomal proteins S6, S12 and S15 from the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui.

    PubMed

    Kimura, J; Arndt, E; Kimura, M

    1987-11-16

    The amino acid sequences of three extremely acidic ribosomal proteins, S6, S12, and S15, from Halobacterium marismortui have been determined. The sequences were obtained by the sequence analysis of peptides derived by enzymatic digestion with trypsin. Stapylococcus aureus protease and chymotrypsin, as well as by cleavage with dilute HCl. The proteins, S6, S12 and S15, consist of 116, 147 and 102 amino acid residues, and have molecular masses of 12,251, 16,440 and 11,747 Da, respectively. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of these proteins with ribosomal protein sequences of other organisms revealed that halobacterial protein S12 has homology with the eukaryotic protein S16A from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while S15 is significantly related to the Xenopus laevis S19 protein. No homology was found between these halobacterial proteins and any eubacterial ribosomal proteins.

  15. Structure Study of Formic Acid Clusters by Chirped-Pulse Ftmw Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski, Daniel P.; Neill, Justin L.; Muckle, Matt T.; Steber, Amanda L.; Pate, Brooks H.; Douglass, Kevin O.

    2011-06-01

    The large bandwidths and high sensitivity afforded by chirped-pulse FTMW spectrometers allow for the detection of large molecules (10+ heavy atoms) and their isotopomers in natural abundance. With the isotopic information, an experimental structure can be obtained by using Kraitchman's equations. Clusters of carboxylic acids are of interest because of the different possibilities for hydrogen bonding that lead to the formation of larger clusters. The first study of formic acid clusters by microwave spectroscopy was presented by Bauder and the formic acid dimer with one water molecule complexed was identified. Previously the formic acid trimer cluster was reported where the third formic acid attaches itself to the already formed formic acid dimer. Here we present the full heavy atom and partial deuterium Kraitchman substitution structure of formic acid trimer. In addition we have identified two new nonplanar formic acid clusters - formic acid pentamer and the cluster of formic acid trimer with one water molecule attached. For the latter, two tunneling states with an energy splitting of 178 MHz are observed for the normal species and 13C isotopomers. Candidate structures and the difficulty of modeling these clusters by electronic structure theory will be discussed. Dominque Priem, Tae-Kyu Ha, and Alfred Bauder. J. Chem. Phys. 113, 1, (2000), 169-175. Conformational Studies in Formic Acid Oligimers. Richard D. Suenram, Pam L. Crum, Kevin O. Douglass, and Brooks H. Pate. The Ohio State 59th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy.

  16. Carbon–carbon bond cleavage for Cu-mediated aromatic trifluoromethylations and pentafluoroethylations

    PubMed Central

    Sugiishi, Tsuyuka; Aikawa, Kohsuke

    2015-01-01

    Summary This short review highlights the copper-mediated fluoroalkylation using perfluoroalkylated carboxylic acid derivatives. Carbon–carbon bond cleavage of perfluoroalkylated carboxylic acid derivatives takes place in fluoroalkylation reactions at high temperature (150–200 °C) or under basic conditions to generate fluoroalkyl anion sources for the formation of fluoroalkylcopper species. The fluoroalkylation reactions, which proceed through decarboxylation or tetrahedral intermediates, are useful protocols for the synthesis of fluoroalkylated aromatics. PMID:26734112

  17. Unexpected cleavage of 2-azido-2-(hydroxymethyl)oxetanes: conformation determines reaction pathway?

    PubMed

    Farber, Elisa; Herget, Jackson; Gascón, José A; Howell, Amy R

    2010-11-19

    An unanticipated cleavage of 2-azido-2-(hydroxymethyl)oxetanes is reported. In attempts to oxidize the title oxetanyl alcohols to the corresponding carboxylic acids with RuO4, cleaved nitriles were formed as the sole isolable products, while a closely related tetrahydrofuran gave solely the expected carboxylic acid. Quantum chemical calculations suggest that the divergent outcomes are governed by conformational differences in the azidoalcohols.

  18. Salts of phenylacetic acid and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid with Cinchona alkaloids: Crystal structures, thermal analysis and FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amombo Noa, Francoise M.; Jacobs, Ayesha

    2016-06-01

    Seven salts were formed with phenylacetic acid (PAA), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPAA) and the Cinchona alkaloids; cinchonidine (CIND), quinidine (QUID) and quinine (QUIN). For all the structures the proton was transferred from the carboxylic acid of the PAA/HPAA to the quinuclidine nitrogen of the respective Cinchona alkaloid. For six of the salts, water was included in the crystal structures with one of these also incorporating an isopropanol solvent molecule. However HPAA co-crystallised with quinine to form an anhydrous salt, (HPAA-)(QUIN+). The thermal stability of the salts were determined and differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the (HPAA-)(QUIN+) salt had the highest thermal stability compared to the other salt hydrates. The salts were also characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. (PAA-)(QUID+)·H2O and (PAA-)(QUIN+)·H2O are isostructural and Hirshfeld surface analysis was completed to compare the intermolecular interactions in these two structures.

  19. Cleavage oxygenases for the biosynthesis of trisporoids and other apocarotenoids in Phycomyces.

    PubMed

    Medina, Humberto R; Cerdá-Olmedo, Enrique; Al-Babili, Salim

    2011-10-01

    Mixed cultures of strains of opposite sex of the Mucorales produce trisporic acids and other compounds arising from cleavage of β-carotene, some of which act as signals in the mating process. The genome of Phycomyces blakesleeanus contains five sequences akin to those of verified carotenoid cleavage oxygenases. All five are transcribed, three of them have the sequence traits that are considered essential for activity, and we have discovered the reactions catalysed by the products of two of them, genes carS and acaA. The transcripts of carS became more abundant in the course of mating, and its expression in β-carotene-producing Escherichia coli cells led to the formation of β-apo-12'-carotenal, a C₂₅ cleavage product of β-carotene. Joint expression of both genes in the same in vivo system resulted in the production of β-apo-13-carotenone, a C₁₈ fragment. In vitro, AcaA cleaved β-apo-12'-carotenal into β-apo-13-carotenone and was active on other apocarotenoid substrates. According to these and other results, the first reactions in the apocarotenoid pathway of Phycomyces are the cleavage of β-carotene at its C11'-C12' double bond by CarS and the cleavage of the resulting C₂₅-fragment at its C13-14 double bond by AcaA. PMID:21854466

  20. Identification of cleavage sites and substrate proteins for two mitochondrial intermediate peptidases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Carrie, Chris; Venne, A. Saskia; Zahedi, René P.; Soll, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Most mitochondrial proteins contain an N-terminal targeting signal that is removed by specific proteases following import. In plant mitochondria, only mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP) has been characterized to date. Therefore, we sought to determine the substrates and cleavage sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana homologues to the yeast Icp55 and Oct1 proteins, using the newly developed ChaFRADIC method for N-terminal protein sequencing. We identified 88 and seven putative substrates for Arabidopsis ICP55 and OCT1, respectively. It was determined that the Arabidopsis ICP55 contains an almost identical cleavage site to that of Icp55 from yeast. However, it can also remove a far greater range of amino acids. The OCT1 substrates from Arabidopsis displayed no consensus cleavage motif, and do not contain the classical –10R motif identified in other eukaryotes. Arabidopsis OCT1 can also cleave presequences independently, without the prior cleavage of MPP. It was concluded that while both OCT1 and ICP55 were probably acquired early on in the evolution of mitochondria, their substrate profiles and cleavage sites have either remained very similar or diverged completely. PMID:25732537

  1. Crystal structure of 3-ethynyl-benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Venturini, Chiara; Ratel-Ramond, Nicolas; Gourdon, Andre

    2015-10-01

    In the title compound, C9H6O2, the carb-oxy-lic acid group is almost in the plane of the benzene ring, making a dihedral angle of 2.49 (18)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by pairs of O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming classical acid-acid inversion dimers, with an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif. The dimers are linked by pairs of C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds forming chains, enclosing R 2 (2)(16) ring motifs, propagating along the c-axis direction. PMID:26594457

  2. Structure and behaviour of the free radicals generated in gamma irradiated amino acid and iminodiacetic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Osmanoğlu, Semsettin; Aydın, Murat; Osmanoğlu, Y Emre; Dicle, I Yeşim; Başkan, M Halim

    2011-05-01

    An EPR study has been carried out to investigate the structure and behaviour of the free radical formed γ-irradiated l-alaninamide hydrochloride, dl-glutamic acid monohydrate and N-(2-carboxyethyl) iminodiacetic acid powders at room temperature. The observed paramagnetic species have been attributed to the CH(3)ĊHCONH(2), HOOCCH(2)CH(2)ĊHCOOH and HOOCCH(2)CH(2)NĊHCH(2)(COOH)(2) radicals, respectively. Some spectroscopic properties and suggestions concerning possible structure of the radicals were also discussed in this study. PMID:21393055

  3. Spectroscopic structural studies of salicylic acid, salicylamide and aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shahawy, Anwar S.

    The electronic absorption spectra of the salicylic acid and the salicylamide molecules have been studied using SCF—CL calculations. The singlet and the triplet electronic transition energies have been calculated. The state functions of eight excited states for these molecules have been calculated in addition to the oscillator strengths, charge densities, ionization potentials and electron affinities. Our calculations lead to the presence of salicylic acid and salicylamide in the β-forms in which the carboxylic hydroxyl group or the amino group is directed toward the enolic hydroxyl group. The salicylic acid and the salicylamide molecules have the Cs point group symmetry, but the aspirin molecule has the C1 point group symmetry, in which the acetyl group does not lie in the plane of the salicylic acid molecule.

  4. Structural and Electrical Characterization of Protonic Acid Doped Polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaktawat, Vinodini; Saxena, Narendra S.; Sharma, Kananbala; Sharma, Thaneshwar P.

    2008-04-01

    Polyaniline doped with different protonic acids were chemically synthesized using ammonium persulfate (APS) as an oxidant. These samples were characterized through X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, which confirms the amorphous nature and acid doping, respectively. Electrical conduction in these samples has been studied through the measurement of I-V characteristics at room temperature as well as in the temperature range from 313 K to 413 K. So obtained characteristic curves were found to be nonlinear. The conductivity of phosphoric acid doped polyaniline sample is higher as compared to HCl doped polyaniline and pure polyaniline. Temperature dependence of conductivity suggests a semiconducting nature with increase in temperature. Activation energies have been found to be 50.86, 25.74 and 21.05 meV for pure polyaniline (base), polyaniline doped with hydrochloric, phosphoric acid, respectively.

  5. Carbobenzoxy amino acids: Structural requirements for cholecystokinin receptor antagonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Sutliff, V.E.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    The authors used dispersed acini prepared from guinea pig pancreas to examine 28 carbobenzoxy (CBZ) amino acids for their abilities to function as cholecystokinin receptor antagonists. All amino acid derivatives tested, except for CBZ-alanine, CBZ-glycine, and N alpha-CBZ- lysine, were able to inhibit the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin. In general, there was a good correlation between the ability of a carbobenzoxy amino acid to inhibit stimulated amylase secretion and the ability of the amino acid derivative to inhibit binding of /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin. The inhibition of cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase secretion was competitive, fully reversible, and specific for those secretagogues that interact with the cholecystokinin receptor. The potencies with which the various carbobenzoxy amino acids inhibited the action of cholecystokinin varied 100-fold and CBZ-cystine was the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist. This variation in potency was primarily but not exclusively a function of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chain.

  6. Cleavage of DAP5 by coxsackievirus B3 2A protease facilitates viral replication and enhances apoptosis by altering translation of IRES-containing genes.

    PubMed

    Hanson, P J; Ye, X; Qiu, Y; Zhang, H M; Hemida, M G; Wang, F; Lim, T; Gu, A; Cho, B; Kim, H; Fung, G; Granville, D J; Yang, D

    2016-05-01

    Cleavage of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) by enterovirus proteases during infection leads to the shutoff of cellular cap-dependent translation, but does not affect the initiation of cap-independent translation of mRNAs containing an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Death-associated protein 5 (DAP5), a structural homolog of eIF4G, is a translation initiation factor specific for IRES-containing mRNAs. Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a positive single-stranded RNA virus and a primary causal agent of human myocarditis. Its RNA genome harbors an IRES within the 5'-untranslated region and is translated by a cap-independent, IRES-driven mechanism. Previously, we have shown that DAP5 is cleaved during CVB3 infection. However, the protease responsible for cleavage, cleavage site and effects on the translation of target genes during CVB3 infection have not been investigated. In the present study, we demonstrated that viral protease 2A but not 3C is responsible for DAP5 cleavage, generating 45- and 52-kDa N- (DAP5-N) and C-terminal (DAP5-C) fragments, respectively. By site-directed mutagenesis, we found that DAP5 is cleaved at amino acid G434. Upon cleavage, DAP5-N largely translocated to the nucleus at the later time points of infection, whereas the DAP5-C largely remained in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of these DAP5 truncates demonstrated that DAP5-N retained the capability of initiating IRES-driven translation of apoptosis-associated p53, but not the prosurvival Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) when compared with the full-length DAP5. Similarly, DAP5-N expression promoted CVB3 replication and progeny release; on the other hand, DAP5-C exerted a dominant-negative effect on cap-dependent translation. Taken together, viral protease 2A-mediated cleavage of DAP5 results in the production of two truncates that exert differential effects on protein translation of the IRES-containing genes, leading to enhanced host cell death.

  7. The silent point mutations at the cleavage site of 2A/2B have no effect on the self-cleavage activity of 2A of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zong-liang; Zhou, Jian-hua; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Yao-zhong; Liu, Yong-sheng

    2014-12-01

    The 2A region of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) polyprotein is 18 amino acids in length, and 2A self-cleavage site (2A/2B) contains a conserved amino acid motif G2A/P2B. To investigate the synonymous codon usage for Glycine at the 2A/2B cleavage site of FMDV, 66 2A/2B1 nucleotide sequences were aligned and found that the synonymous codon usage of G2A is conserved and GGG was the most frequently used. To examine the role of synonymous codons for G2A in self-cleavage efficiency of 2A/2B, recombinant constructs which contains the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase protein (CAT) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) linked by the FMDV 2A sequence with four synonymous codons for G2A were produced. The activities of all the F2As based plasmids were determined in CHO cells. The results showed that the synonymous codon usage patterns for G2A at the cleavage site (2A/2B) have no effect on the cleavage efficiency. This suggests that the synonymous codon usage of 2A peptide has no effect on the cleavage efficiency of FMDV 2A element. PMID:25152485

  8. Solving nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement: examples from group II intron studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marcia, Marco Humphris-Narayanan, Elisabeth; Keating, Kevin S.; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-11-01

    Strategies for phasing nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement, using both experimental and de novo designed models, are discussed. Structured RNA molecules are key players in ensuring cellular viability. It is now emerging that, like proteins, the functions of many nucleic acids are dictated by their tertiary folds. At the same time, the number of known crystal structures of nucleic acids is also increasing rapidly. In this context, molecular replacement will become an increasingly useful technique for phasing nucleic acid crystallographic data in the near future. Here, strategies to select, create and refine molecular-replacement search models for nucleic acids are discussed. Using examples taken primarily from research on group II introns, it is shown that nucleic acids are amenable to different and potentially more flexible and sophisticated molecular-replacement searches than proteins. These observations specifically aim to encourage future crystallographic studies on the newly discovered repertoire of noncoding transcripts.

  9. Brønsted acids in ionic liquids: how acidity depends on the liquid structure.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jade A; He, Peizhao; Petkovic, Marina; Coleman, Fergal; Estager, Julien; Holbrey, John D; Seddon, Kenneth R; Swadźba-Kwaśny, Małgorzata

    2014-11-14

    Gutmann Acceptor Number (AN) values have been determined for Brønsted acid-ionic liquid mixtures, over a wide compositional range. Four systems of general formula [C2mim][A]-HA (A(-) = bistriflamide, [NTf2](-); triflate, [OTf](-); mesylate, [OMs](-); or acetate, [OAc](-), [C2mim](+) = 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation) were studied. A library of Brønsted acidic systems of varying acidity was constructed and the AN parameter was found to be a convenient approach for quantifying their acidity. HOAc, HOMs and HOTf, when dissolved in ionic liquids, were found to associate with the respective anions to form hydrogen-bonded anionic clusters, [A(HA)x](-). In contrast, HNTf2 was solubilised as a discrete, undissociated molecule. AN values were sensitive to the presence of anionic clusters; acidity could be buffered to a particular AN by binding the solubilised acid in the anionic cluster form. Overall, a simple way to manipulate and quantify the Brønsted acidity of acid-ionic liquid mixtures was demonstrated, and measured AN values were related to liquid speciation. PMID:25254612

  10. ω3 fatty acid desaturases from microorganisms: structure, function, evolution, and biotechnological use

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingxuan; Chen, Haiqin; Gu, Zhennan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei; Chen, Yong Q.

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthesis of very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids involves an alternating process of fatty acid desaturation and elongation catalyzed by complex series of enzymes. ω3 desaturase plays an important role in converting ω6 fatty acids into ω3 fatty acids. Genes for this desaturase have been identified and characterized in a wide range of microorganisms, including cyanobacteria, yeasts, molds, and microalgae. Like all fatty acid desaturases, ω3 desaturase is structurally characterized by the presence of three highly conserved histidine-rich motifs; however, unlike some desaturases, it lacks a cytochrome b5-like domain. Understanding the structure, function, and evolution of ω3 desaturases, particularly their substrate specificities in the biosynthesis of very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, lays the foundation for potential production of various ω3 fatty acids in transgenic microorganisms. PMID:24177732

  11. Amino acids assisted hydrothermal synthesis of hierarchically structured ZnO with enhanced photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanxia; Lin, Siwen; Li, Xuan; Liu, Yuping

    2016-10-01

    Novel hierarchically structured ZnO, including rose-like, dandelion-like and flower-like, have been synthesized through a simple hydrothermal process using different amino acids (glutamine, histidine and glycine) as structure-directing agents and urea as deposition agent, followed by subsequent calcination. Amino acids played a crucial role in the formation of hierarchically structured ZnO, and different amino acids could induce different exquisite shapes and assembly ways, as well as more oxygen defects. The prepared hierarchically structured ZnO exhibited excellent photocatalytic activities for the photodegradation of Rhodamine B, which was associated with their special hierarchical structures, large BET surface area and the existence of more oxygen defects. Amino acid-assisted growth mechanism of hierarchically structured ZnO was also discussed.

  12. Structure of eight molecular salts assembled from noncovalent bonding between carboxylic acids, imidazole, and benzimidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Hui; Wen, Xianhong; Li, Minghui; Wang, Daqi

    2015-09-01

    Eight organic salts of imidazole/benzimidazole have been prepared with carboxylic acids as 2-methyl-2-phenoxypropanoic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, 5-nitrosalicylic acid, isophthalic acid, 4-nitro-phthalic acid, and 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. The eight crystalline forms reported are proton-transfer compounds of which the crystals and compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. These structures adopted hetero supramolecular synthons, with the most common R22(7) motif observed at salts 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-8 suggests that there are extensive strong Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between acid and imidazolyl components in all of the salts. Except the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, the secondary propagating interactions also play important roles in structure extension. This variety, coupled with the varying geometries and number of acidic groups of the acids utilized, has led to the creation of eight supramolecular arrays with 1D-3D structure. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is analyzed. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds between acids and imidazole/benzimidazole are sufficient to bring about the formation of organic salts.

  13. Zinc-dependent cleavage in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme: evidence for a pH-dependent conformational change

    PubMed Central

    Borda, Emily J.; Markley, John C.; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th.

    2003-01-01

    We have characterized a novel Zn2+-catalyzed cleavage site between nucleotides C3 and U4 in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme. In contrast to previously described divalent metal-ion-dependent cleavage of RNA, U4 cleavage is only observed in the presence of Zn2+. This new cleavage site has an unusual pH dependence, in that U4 cleavage products are only observed above pH 7.9 and reach a maximum yield at about pH 8.5. These data, together with the fact that no metal ion-binding site is observed in proximity to the U4 cleavage site in either of the crystal structures, point toward a pH-dependent conformational change in the hammerhead ribozyme. We have described previously Zn2+-dependent cleavage between G8 and A9 in the hammerhead ribozyme and have discovered that U4 cleavage occurs only after A9 cleavage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of sequential cleavage events as a possible regulatory mechanism in ribozymes. PMID:12736309

  14. Utilization of Dioxygen by Carotenoid Cleavage Oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xuewu; Golczak, Marcin; Zhang, Jianye; Kleinberg, Katie A; von Lintig, Johannes; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kiser, Philip D

    2015-12-18

    Carotenoid cleavage oxygenases (CCOs) are non-heme, Fe(II)-dependent enzymes that participate in biologically important metabolic pathways involving carotenoids and apocarotenoids, including retinoids, stilbenes, and related compounds. CCOs typically catalyze the cleavage of non-aromatic double bonds by dioxygen (O2) to form aldehyde or ketone products. Expressed only in vertebrates, the RPE65 sub-group of CCOs catalyzes a non-canonical reaction consisting of concerted ester cleavage and trans-cis isomerization of all-trans-retinyl esters. It remains unclear whether the former group of CCOs functions as mono- or di-oxygenases. Additionally, a potential role for O2 in catalysis by the RPE65 group of CCOs has not been evaluated to date. Here, we investigated the pattern of oxygen incorporation into apocarotenoid products of Synechocystis apocarotenoid oxygenase. Reactions performed in the presence of (18)O-labeled water and (18)O2 revealed an unambiguous dioxygenase pattern of O2 incorporation into the reaction products. Substitution of Ala for Thr at position 136 of apocarotenoid oxygenase, a site predicted to govern the mono- versus dioxygenase tendency of CCOs, greatly reduced enzymatic activity without altering the dioxygenase labeling pattern. Reevaluation of the oxygen-labeling pattern of the resveratrol-cleaving CCO, NOV2, previously reported to be a monooxygenase, using a purified enzyme sample revealed that it too is a dioxygenase. We also demonstrated that bovine RPE65 is not dependent on O2 for its cleavage/isomerase activity. In conjunction with prior research, the results of this study resolve key issues regarding the utilization of O2 by CCOs and indicate that dioxygenase activity is a feature common among double bond-cleaving CCOs.

  15. Global identification of target recognition and cleavage by the Microprocessor in human ES cells.

    PubMed

    Seong, Youngmo; Lim, Do-Hwan; Kim, Augustine; Seo, Jae Hong; Lee, Young Sik; Song, Hoseok; Kwon, Young-Soo

    2014-11-10

    The Microprocessor plays an essential role in canonical miRNA biogenesis by facilitating cleavage of stem-loop structures in primary transcripts to yield pre-miRNAs. Although miRNA biogenesis has been extensively studied through biochemical and molecular genetic approaches, it has yet to be addressed to what extent the current miRNA biogenesis models hold true in intact cells. To address the issues of in vivo recognition and cleavage by the Microprocessor, we investigate RNAs that are associated with DGCR8 and Drosha by using immunoprecipitation coupled with next-generation sequencing. Here, we present global protein-RNA interactions with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. Our data indicate that precursors of canonical miRNAs and miRNA-like hairpins are the major substrates of the Microprocessor. As a result of specific enrichment of nascent cleavage products, we are able to pinpoint the Microprocessor-mediated cleavage sites per se at single-nucleotide resolution. Unexpectedly, a 2-nt 3' overhang invariably exists at the ends of cleaved bases instead of nascent pre-miRNAs. Besides canonical miRNA precursors, we find that two novel miRNA-like structures embedded in mRNAs are cleaved to yield pre-miRNA-like hairpins, uncoupled from miRNA maturation. Our data provide a framework for in vivo Microprocessor-mediated cleavage and a foundation for experimental and computational studies on miRNA biogenesis in living cells.

  16. Sequence-specific cleavage of dsRNA by Mini-III RNase

    PubMed Central

    Głów, Dawid; Pianka, Dariusz; Sulej, Agata A.; Kozłowski, Łukasz P.; Czarnecka, Justyna; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Skowronek, Krzysztof J.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleases (RNases) play a critical role in RNA processing and degradation by hydrolyzing phosphodiester bonds (exo- or endonucleolytically). Many RNases that cut RNA internally exhibit substrate specificity, but their target sites are usually limited to one or a few specific nucleotides in single-stranded RNA and often in a context of a particular three-dimensional structure of the substrate. Thus far, no RNase counterparts of restriction enzymes have been identified which could cleave double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in a sequence-specific manner. Here, we present evidence for a sequence-dependent cleavage of long dsRNA by RNase Mini-III from Bacillus subtilis (BsMiniIII). Analysis of the sites cleaved by this enzyme in limited digest of bacteriophage Φ6 dsRNA led to the identification of a consensus target sequence. We defined nucleotide residues within the preferred cleavage site that affected the efficiency of the cleavage and were essential for the discrimination of cleavable versus non-cleavable dsRNA sequences. We have also determined that the loop α5b-α6, a distinctive structural element in Mini-III RNases, is crucial for the specific cleavage, but not for dsRNA binding. Our results suggest that BsMiniIII may serve as a prototype of a sequence-specific dsRNase that could possibly be used for targeted cleavage of dsRNA. PMID:25634891

  17. KLEAT: CLEAVAGE SITE ANALYSIS OF TRANSCRIPTOMES*

    PubMed Central

    Birol, Inanç; Raymond, Anthony; Chiu, Readman; Nip, Ka Ming; Jackman, Shaun D; Kreitzman, Maayan; Docking, T Roderick; Ennis, Catherine A; Robertson, A Gordon; Karsan, Aly

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, alternative cleavage of 3’ untranslated regions (UTRs) can affect transcript stability, transport and translation. For polyadenylated (poly(A)) transcripts, cleavage sites can be characterized with short-read sequencing using specialized library construction methods. However, for large-scale cohort studies as well as for clinical sequencing applications, it is desirable to characterize such events using RNA-seq data, as the latter are already widely applied to identify other relevant information, such as mutations, alternative splicing and chimeric transcripts. Here we describe KLEAT, an analysis tool that uses de novo assembly of RNA-seq data to characterize cleavage sites on 3’ UTRs. We demonstrate the performance of KLEAT on three cell line RNA-seq libraries constructed and sequenced by the ENCODE project, and assembled using Trans-ABySS. Validating the KLEAT predictions with matched ENCODE RNA-seq and RNA-PET libraries, we show that the tool has over 90% positive predictive value when there are at least three RNA-seq reads supporting a poly(A) tail and requiring at least three RNA-PET reads mapping within 100 nucleotides as validation. We also compare the performance of KLEAT with other popular RNA-seq analysis pipelines that reconstruct 3’ UTR ends, and show that it performs favourably, based on an ROC-like curve. PMID:25592595

  18. Influence of nitric acid treatment in different media on X-ray structural parameters of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sudip Maity; Ashim Choudhury

    2008-11-15

    The treatment of coal with nitric acid in aqueous and non-aqueous media introduces changes in the chemical and spatial structure of the organic mass. Four coals of different rank have been treated with nitric acid in aqueous and glacial acetic acid media for assessing the changes in the structural parameters by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Slow-scan XRD has been performed for the raw and treated coals, and X-ray structural parameters (d002, Lc, and Nc) and aromaticity (fa) have been determined by profile-fitting software. Considerable variation of the structural parameters has been observed with respect to the raw coals. The d002 values have decreased in aqueous medium but increased in acetic acid medium; however, Lc, Nc, and fa values have increased in aqueous medium but decreased in acetic acid medium. It is also observed that considerable oxidation takes place during nitric acid treatment in aqueous medium, but nitration is the predominant phenomenon in acetic acid medium. Disordering of the coal structure increases in acetic acid medium, but a reverse trend is observed in the aqueous medium. As a result, structurally modified coals (SMCs) are derived as new coal-derived substances. 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Quarterly report No. 13, October 1-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1982-02-26

    Bituminous coal is assumed to consist mostly of aggregates of condensed aromatic and aliphatic rings which are connected and made soluble by crosslinks containing single bonds. The objective of this project is to determine the structure of bituminous coal with emphasis on the crosslinks and breakable single bonds. During this past quarter the following studies were conducted on Illinois No. 6 coal: extraction with benzylamine (BnH/sub 2/), ethanolamine, ethylenediamine (EDA), pyridine; saponification of some toluene-insoluble, pyridine-soluble (TIPS) fraction; cleavages by amines; oxidation with aqueous NaOCl of butylated and methylated pyridine-extracted coal; decarboxylation on black acids. The investigations dealt with two kinds of connecting links in coal, which are designated as ester and ether groups. The ester groups are cleaved by strongly basic amines (to give amides) at 25/sup 0/C and by alcoholic KOH at 100/sup 0/C (to give salts and alcohols or phenols). Both esters and ethers are cleaved by HI or ZnCL/sub 2/ in pyridine at or below 50/sup 0/C. The ethers are also cleaved by BnNH/sub 2/, EDA, and EDA/DMSO to nearly the same extent on several days heating at 100/sup 0/C. Although a cleavage of model ethers by amines were not established, the parallel easy reactions of HI and ZnCl/sub 2/ and the slow 100/sup 0/C reactions of amines on coal lead the authors to designate the non-ester cleavages as ether cleavages. (ATT)

  20. Isolation and chemical structure of aklanonic acid, an early intermediate in the biosynthesis of anthracyclines.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, K; Tresselt, D; Schumann, G; Ihn, W; Wagner, C

    1985-08-01

    The fermentation, isolation and structure elucidation of aklanonic acid are described. The compound was isolated from fermentations of Streptomyces strain ZIMET 43,717. Aklanonic acid is a yellow-orange crystalline substance, melting at 203-204 degrees C (dec), having the molecular formula C21H16O8, and possessing UV maxima at 258, 282 (sh) and 438 nm (CHCl3). In dimethyl sulfoxide or pyridine aklanonic acid is unstable and a new compound (aklanone) is formed as a conversion product. The elucidation of the structures has shown that aklanonic acid and aklanone are derivatives of 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone. PMID:3862658

  1. Nucleic acid-based nanoengineering: novel structures for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanying; LaBean, Thomas H.; Leong, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoengineering exploits the interactions of materials at the nanometre scale to create functional nanostructures. It relies on the precise organization of nanomaterials to achieve unique functionality. There are no interactions more elegant than those governing nucleic acids via Watson–Crick base-pairing rules. The infinite combinations of DNA/RNA base pairs and their remarkable molecular recognition capability can give rise to interesting nanostructures that are only limited by our imagination. Over the past years, creative assembly of nucleic acids has fashioned a plethora of two-dimensional and three-dimensional nanostructures with precisely controlled size, shape and spatial functionalization. These nanostructures have been precisely patterned with molecules, proteins and gold nanoparticles for the observation of chemical reactions at the single molecule level, activation of enzymatic cascade and novel modality of photonic detection, respectively. Recently, they have also been engineered to encapsulate and release bioactive agents in a stimulus-responsive manner for therapeutic applications. The future of nucleic acid-based nanoengineering is bright and exciting. In this review, we will discuss the strategies to control the assembly of nucleic acids and highlight the recent efforts to build functional nucleic acid nanodevices for nanomedicine. PMID:23050076

  2. Hydrogen cleavage by solid-phase frustrated Lewis pairs.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jun-Yi; Buffet, Jean-Charles; Rees, Nicholas H; Nørby, Peter; O'Hare, Dermot

    2016-08-18

    We report the direct synthesis of a solid-phase frustrated Lewis pair (s-FLP) by combining a silica-supported Lewis acid ([triple bond, length as m-dash]SiOB(C6F5)2, s-BCF) with a Lewis base (tri-tert-butylphosphine, (t)Bu3P) to give [[triple bond, length as m-dash]SiOB(C6F5)2][(t)Bu3P]. Reaction of this s-FLP with H2 under mild conditions led to heterolytic H-H bond cleavage and the formation of [[triple bond, length as m-dash]SiOB(H)(C6F5)2][(t)Bu3PH].

  3. Top-down characterization of nucleic acids modified by structural probes using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry and automated data interpretation.

    PubMed

    Kellersberger, Katherine A; Yu, Eizadora; Kruppa, Gary H; Young, Malin M; Fabris, Daniele

    2004-05-01

    A top-down approach based on sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) has been implemented on an electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform mass spectrometer (FTMS) to characterize nucleic acid substrates modified by structural probes. Solvent accessibility reagents, such as dimethyl sulfate (DMS), 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide metho-p-toluenesulfonate (CMCT), and beta-ethoxy-alpha-ketobutyraldehyde (kethoxal, KT) are widely employed to reveal the position of single- vs double-stranded regions and obtain the footprint of bound proteins onto nucleic acids structures. Established methods require end-labeling of the nucleic acid constructs, probe-specific chemistry to produce strand cleavage at the modified nucleotides, and analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the position of the susceptible sites. However, these labor-intensive procedures can be avoided when mass spectrometry is used to identify the probe-induced modifications from their characteristic mass signatures. In particular, ESI-FTMS can be directly employed to monitor the conditions of probe application to avoid excessive alkylation, which could induce unwanted distortion or defolding of the substrate of interest. The sequence position of the covalent modifications can be subsequently obtained from classic tandem techniques, which allow for the analysis of individual target adducts present in complex reaction mixtures with no need for separation techniques. Selection and activation by SORI-CID has been employed to reveal the position of adducts in nucleic acid substrates in excess of 6 kDa. The stability of the different covalent modifications under SORI-CID conditions was investigated. Multiple stages of isolation and activation were employed in MS(n)() experiments to obtain the desired sequence information whenever the adduct stability was not particularly favorable, and SORI-CID induced the facile loss of the modified base

  4. Solvent influence on cellulose 1,4-β-glycosidic bond cleavage: a molecular dynamics and metadynamics study.

    PubMed

    Loerbroks, Claudia; Boulanger, Eliot; Thiel, Walter

    2015-03-27

    We explore the influence of two solvents, namely water and the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EmimAc), on the conformations of two cellulose models (cellobiose and a chain of 40 glucose units) and the solvent impact on glycosidic bond cleavage by acid hydrolysis by using molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. We investigate the rotation around the glycosidic bond and ring puckering, as well as the anomeric effect and hydrogen bonds, in order to gauge the effect on the hydrolysis mechanism. We find that EmimAc eases hydrolysis through stronger solvent-cellulose interactions, which break structural and electronic barriers to hydrolysis. Our results indicate that hydrolysis in cellulose chains should start from the ends and not in the centre of the chain, which is less accessible to solvent. PMID:25689773

  5. Crystal structure of 3-ethynyl­benzoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Venturini, Chiara; Ratel-Ramond, Nicolas; Gourdon, Andre

    2015-01-01

    In the title compound, C9H6O2, the carb­oxy­lic acid group is almost in the plane of the benzene ring, making a dihedral angle of 2.49 (18)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by pairs of O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming classical acid–acid inversion dimers, with an R 2 2(8) ring motif. The dimers are linked by pairs of C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds forming chains, enclosing R 2 2(16) ring motifs, propagating along the c-axis direction. PMID:26594457

  6. Crystal structure of (E)-undec-2-enoic acid.

    PubMed

    Sonneck, Marcel; Peppel, Tim; Spannenberg, Anke; Wohlrab, Sebastian

    2015-06-01

    In the mol-ecule of the title low-melting α,β-unsaturated carb-oxy-lic acid, C11H20O2, the least-squares mean line through the octyl chain forms an angle of 60.10 (13)° with the normal to plane of the acrylic acid fragment (r.m.s. deviation = 0.008 Å). In the crystal, centrosymmetrically related mol-ecules are linked by pairs of O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into dimers, forming layers parallel to the (041) plane. PMID:26090206

  7. Pyrolysis of amino acids - Mechanistic considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliff, M. A., Jr.; Medley, E. E.; Simmonds, P. G.

    1974-01-01

    Pyrolysis of several structurally different amino acids in a column at 500 C showed differences in the mechanisms and final products. The aliphatic protein amino acids decompose mainly by simple decarboxylation and condensation reactions, while the beta amino acids undergo deamination to unsaturated acids. Alpha amino acids with alpha alkyl substituents undergo an unusual intramolecular SN1 reaction with the formation of an intermediate alpha lactone which decomposes to yield a ketone. The alpha alkyl substituents appear to stabilize the developing negative charge formed by partial heterolytic cleavage of the alpha carbon - NH3 bond. The gamma and delta amino acids give 2-pyrrolidinone and 2-piperidone respectively, while the epsilon acids yield mixed products.

  8. New insights into structural alteration of enamel apatite induced by citric acid and sodium fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojie; Klocke, Arndt; Mihailova, Boriana; Tosheva, Lubomira; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2008-07-24

    Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and complementary scanning electron microscopy were applied to analyze the surface structure of enamel apatite exposed to citric acid and to investigate the protective potential of fluorine-containing reagents against citric acid-induced erosion. Enamel and, for comparison, geological hydroxylapatite samples were treated with aqueous solutions of citric acid and sodium fluoride of different concentrations, ranging from 0.01 to 0.5 mol/L for citric acid solutions and from 0.5 to 2.0% for fluoride solutions. The two solutions were applied either simultaneously or consecutively. The citric acid-induced structural modification of apatite increases with the increase in the citric acid concentration and the number of treatments. The application of sodium fluoride alone does not suppress the atomic level changes in apatite exposed to acidic agents. The addition of sodium fluoride to citric acid solutions leads to formation of surface CaF2 and considerably reduces the changes in the apatite P-O-Ca framework. However, the CaF2 globules deposited on the enamel surface seem to be insufficient to prevent the alteration of the apatite structure upon further exposure to acidic agents. No evidence for fluorine-induced recovery of the apatite structure was found.

  9. Structural basis of the alternating-access mechanism in a bile acid transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Levin, Elena J.; Pan, Yaping; McCoy, Jason G.; Sharma, Ruchika; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in hepatocytes and secreted through the biliary tract into the small intestine, where they aid in absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Through a process known as enterohepatic recirculation, more than 90% of secreted bile acids are then retrieved from the intestine and returned to the liver for resecretion. In humans, there are two Na+-dependent bile acid transporters involved in enterohepatic recirculation, the Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP; also known as SLC10A1) expressed in hepatocytes, and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; also known as SLC10A2) expressed on enterocytes in the terminal ileum. In recent years, ASBT has attracted much interest as a potential drug target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, because inhibition of ASBT reduces reabsorption of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. However, a lack of three-dimensional structures of bile acid transporters hampers our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and transport, and to interpret the wealth of existing functional data. The crystal structure of an ASBT homologue from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) in detergent was reported recently, showing the protein in an inward-open conformation bound to two Na+ and a taurocholic acid. However, the structural changes that bring bile acid and Na+ across the membrane are difficult to infer from a single structure. To understand the structural changes associated with the coupled transport of Na+ and bile acids, here we solved two structures of an ASBT homologue from Yersinia frederiksenii (ASBTYf) in a lipid environment, which reveal that a large rigid-body rotation of a substrate-binding domain gives the conserved `crossover' region, where two discontinuous helices cross each other, alternating accessibility from either side of the cell membrane. This result has implications

  10. Identification of a novel system L amino acid transporter structurally distinct from heterodimeric amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Babu, Ellappan; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Chairoungdua, Arthit; Kim, Do Kyung; Iribe, Yuji; Tangtrongsup, Sahatchai; Jutabha, Promsuk; Li, Yuewei; Ahmed, Nesar; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Anzai, Naohiko; Nagamori, Seishi; Endou, Hitoshi

    2003-10-31

    A cDNA that encodes a novel Na+-independent neutral amino acid transporter was isolated from FLC4 human hepatocarcinoma cells by expression cloning. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, the encoded protein designated LAT3 (L-type amino acid transporter 3) transported neutral amino acids such as l-leucine, l-isoleucine, l-valine, and l-phenylalanine. The LAT3-mediated transport was Na+-independent and inhibited by 2-aminobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid, consistent with the properties of system L. Distinct from already known system L transporters LAT1 and LAT2, which form heterodimeric complex with 4F2 heavy chain, LAT3 was functional by itself in Xenopus oocytes. The deduced amino acid sequence of LAT3 was identical to the gene product of POV1 reported as a prostate cancer-up-regulated gene whose function was not determined, whereas it did not exhibit significant similarity to already identified transporters. The Eadie-Hofstee plots of LAT3-mediated transport were curvilinear, whereas the low affinity component is predominant at physiological plasma amino acid concentration. In addition to amino acid substrates, LAT3 recognized amino acid alcohols. The transport of l-leucine was electroneutral and mediated by a facilitated diffusion. In contrast, l-leucinol, l-valinol, and l-phenylalaninol, which have a net positive charge induced inward currents under voltage clamp, suggesting these compounds are transported by LAT3. LAT3-mediated transport was inhibited by the pretreatment with N-ethylmaleimide, consistent with the property of system L2 originally characterized in hepatocyte primary culture. Based on the substrate selectivity, affinity, and N-ethylmaleimide sensitivity, LAT3 is proposed to be a transporter subserving system L2. LAT3 should denote a new family of organic solute transporters. PMID:12930836

  11. Cleavage crystallography of liquid metal embrittled aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Stoner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The crystallography of liquid metal-induced transgranular cleavage in six aluminum alloys having a variety of microstructures has been determined via Laue X-ray back reflection. The cleavage crystallography was independent of alloy microstructure, and the cleavage plane was 100-plane oriented in all cases. It was further determined that the cleavage crystallography was not influenced by alloy texture. Examination of the fracture surface indicated that there was not a unique direction of crack propagation. In addition, the existence of 100-plane cleavage on alloy 2024 fracture surfaces was inferred by comparison of secondary cleavage crack intersection geometry on the 2024 surfaces with the geometry of secondary cleavage crack intersections on the test alloys.

  12. The action of the bacterial toxin microcin B17. Insight into the cleavage-religation reaction of DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Pierrat, Olivier A; Maxwell, Anthony

    2003-09-12

    We have examined the effects of the bacterial toxin microcin B17 (MccB17) on the reactions of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase. MccB17 slows down but does not completely inhibit the DNA supercoiling and relaxation reactions of gyrase. A kinetic analysis of the cleavage-religation equilibrium of gyrase was performed to determine the effect of the toxin on the forward (cleavage) and reverse (religation) reactions. A simple mechanism of two consecutive reversible reactions with a nicked DNA intermediate was used to simulate the kinetics of cleavage and religation. The action of MccB17 on the kinetics of cleavage and religation was compared with that of the quinolones ciprofloxacin and oxolinic acid. With relaxed DNA as substrate, only a small amount of gyrase cleavage complex is observed with MccB17 in the absence of ATP, whereas the presence of the nucleotide significantly enhances the effect of the toxin on both the cleavage and religation reactions. In contrast, ciprofloxacin, oxolinic acid, and Ca2+ show lesser dependence on ATP to stabilize the cleavage complex. MccB17 enhances the overall rate of DNA cleavage by increasing the forward rate constant (k2) of the second equilibrium. In contrast, ciprofloxacin increases the amount of cleaved DNA by a combined effect on the forward and reverse rate constants of both equilibria. Based on these results and on the observations that MccB17 only slowly inhibits the supercoiling and relaxation reactions, we suggest a model of the interaction of MccB17 with gyrase.

  13. Molecular Dynamic Simulations Reveal the Structural Determinants of Fatty Acid Binding to Oxy-Myoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Chintapalli, Sree V.; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Patel, Reema; Shah, Natasha; Patterson, Randen L.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Anishkin, Andriy; Adams, Sean H.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which fatty acids are sequestered and transported in muscle have not been fully elucidated. A potential key player in this process is the protein myoglobin (Mb). Indeed, there is a catalogue of empirical evidence supporting direct interaction of globins with fatty acid metabolites; however, the binding pocket and regulation of the interaction remains to be established. In this study, we employed a computational strategy to elucidate the structural determinants of fatty acids (palmitic & oleic acid) binding to Mb. Sequence analysis and docking simulations with a horse (Equus caballus) structural Mb reference reveals a fatty acid-binding site in the hydrophobic cleft near the heme region in Mb. Both palmitic acid and oleic acid attain a “U” shaped structure similar to their conformation in pockets of other fatty acid-binding proteins. Specifically, we found that the carboxyl head group of palmitic acid coordinates with the amino group of Lys45, whereas the carboxyl group of oleic acid coordinates with both the amino groups of Lys45 and Lys63. The alkyl tails of both fatty acids are supported by surrounding hydrophobic residues Leu29, Leu32, Phe33, Phe43, Phe46, Val67, Val68 and Ile107. In the saturated palmitic acid, the hydrophobic tail moves freely and occasionally penetrates deeper inside the hydrophobic cleft, making additional contacts with Val28, Leu69, Leu72 and Ile111. Our simulations reveal a dynamic and stable binding pocket in which the oxygen molecule and heme group in Mb are required for additional hydrophobic interactions. Taken together, these findings support a mechanism in which Mb acts as a muscle transporter for fatty acid when it is in the oxygenated state and releases fatty acid when Mb converts to deoxygenated state. PMID:26030763

  14. Structurally modified fatty acids - clinical potential as tracers of metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dudczak, R.; Schmoliner, R.; Angelberger, P.; Knapp, F.F.; Goodman, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recently 15-p-iodophenyl-betamethyl-pentadecanoic acid (BMPPA) was proposed for myocardial scintigraphy, as possible probe of metabolic processes other than ..beta..-oxidation. In 19 patients myocardial scintigraphy was done after i.v. BMPPA (2 to 4 mCi). Data were collected (LAO 45/sup 0//14; anterior/5) for 100 minutes in the fasted patients. From heart (H) and liver (L) organ to background (BG) ratios were calculated, and the elimination (E) behavior was analyzed from BG (V. cava region) corrected time activity curves. In 10 patients plasma and urine were examined. By CHCl/sub 3//MeOH extraction of plasma samples (90 min. pi) both in water and in organic medium soluble catabolites were found. TLC fractionation showed that those were co-migrating, compared to standards, with benzoic acid, BMPPA and triglycerides. In urine (0 to 2h pi: 4.1% dose) hippuric acid was found. It is concluded that BMPPA is a useful agent for myocardial scintigraphy. Its longer retention in the heart compared to unbranched radioiodinated fatty acids may facilitate SPECT studies. Rate of elimination and plasma analysis indicate the metabolic breakdown of BMPPA. Yet, the complexity of the supposed mechanism may impede curve interpretation in terms of specific metabolic pathways. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. Crystal structure of (E)-pent-2-enoic acid.

    PubMed

    Peppel, Tim; Sonneck, Marcel; Spannenberg, Anke; Wohlrab, Sebastian

    2015-05-01

    The mol-ecule of the title compound, C5H8O2, a low-melting α,β-unsaturated carb-oxy-lic acid, is essentially planar [maximum displacement = 0.0239 (13) Å]. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked into centrosymmetric dimers via pairs of O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:25995924

  16. Introduction of structural affinity handles as a tool in selective nucleic acid separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, III, Richard Coale (Inventor); Cano, Luis Antonio (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The method is used for separating nucleic acids and other similar constructs. It involves selective introduction, enhancement, or stabilization of affinity handles such as single-strandedness in the undesired (or desired) nucleic acids as compared to the usual structure (e.g., double-strandedness) of the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids. The undesired (or desired) nucleic acids are separated from the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids due to capture by methods including but not limited to immobilized metal affinity chromatography, immobilized single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) protein, and immobilized oligonucleotides. The invention is useful to: remove contaminating genomic DNA from plasmid DNA; remove genomic DNA from plasmids, BACs, and similar constructs; selectively separate oligonucleotides and similar DNA fragments from their partner strands; purification of aptamers, (deoxy)-ribozymes and other highly structured nucleic acids; Separation of restriction fragments without using agarose gels; manufacture recombinant Taq polymerase or similar products that are sensitive to host genomic DNA contamination; and other applications.

  17. Photosensitized cleavage of dynein heavy chains. Cleavage at the V1 site by irradiation at 365 nm in the presence of ATP and vanadate

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, I.R.; Lee-Eiford, A.; Mocz, G.; Phillipson, C.A.; Tang, W.J.; Gibbons, B.H.

    1987-02-25

    Irradiation of soluble dynein 1 from sea urchin sperm flagella at 365 nm in the presence of MgATP and 0.05-50 microM vanadate (Vi) cleaves the alpha and beta heavy chains (Mr 428,000) at their V1 sites to give peptides of Mr 228,000 and 200,000, without the nonspecific side effects produced by irradiation at 254 nm as described earlier. The decrease in intact heavy chain material is biphasic; in 10 microM Vi, approximately 80% occurs with a half-time of 7 min and the remainder with a half-time of about 90 min, and the yield of cleavage peptides is better than 90%. Loss of dynein ATPase activity appears to be a direct result of the cleavage process and is not significantly affected by the presence of up to 0.1 M cysteamine (CA, 60-23-1) or 2-aminoethyl carbamimidothioic acid dihydrobromide (CA, 56-10-0) as free radical trapping agents. The concentration of Vi required for 50% maximal initial cleavage rate is 4.5 microM, while that for 50% ATPase inhibition is 0.8 microM, both in a 0.6 M NaCl medium. In the presence of 20 microM Vi, CTP and UTP support cleavage at about half the rate of ATP, whereas GTP and ITP support cleavage only if the Vi concentration is raised to about 200 microM. Substitution of any of the transition metal cations Cr2+, Mn2+, Fe2+, or Co2+ for the usual Mg2+ suppresses the photocleavage, presumably by quenching the excited chromophore prior to scission of the heavy chain. The photocleaved dynein 1 binds to dynein-depleted flagella similarly to intact dynein 1, but upon reactivation of the flagella with 1 mM ATP their motility is partially inhibited, rather than being augmented as with intact dynein.

  18. Mutations altering the cleavage specificity of a homing endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Lenny M.; Chisholm, Karen M.; Chevalier, Brett S.; Chadsey, Meggen S.; Edwards, Samuel T.; Savage, Jeremiah H.; Veillet, Adeline L.

    2002-01-01

    The homing endonuclease I-CreI recognizes and cleaves a particular 22 bp DNA sequence. The crystal structure of I-CreI bound to homing site DNA has previously been determined, leading to a number of predictions about specific protein–DNA contacts. We test these predictions by analyzing a set of endonuclease mutants and a complementary set of homing site mutants. We find evidence that all structurally predicted I-CreI/DNA contacts contribute to DNA recognition and show that these contacts differ greatly in terms of their relative importance. We also describe the isolation of a collection of altered specificity I-CreI derivatives. The in vitro DNA-binding and cleavage properties of two such endonucleases demonstrate that our genetic approach is effective in identifying homing endonucleases that recognize and cleave novel target sequences. PMID:12202772

  19. Exploring the role of polymer structure on intracellular nucleic acid delivery via polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Corey J; Kozielski, Kristen L; Green, Jordan J

    2015-12-10

    Intracellular nucleic acid delivery has the potential to treat many genetically-based diseases, however, gene delivery safety and efficacy remains a challenging obstacle. One promising approach is the use of polymers to form polymeric nanoparticles with nucleic acids that have led to exciting advances in non-viral gene delivery. Understanding the successes and failures of gene delivery polymers and structures is the key to engineering optimal polymers for gene delivery in the future. This article discusses the polymer structural features that enable effective intracellular delivery of DNA and RNA, including protection of nucleic acid cargo, cellular uptake, endosomal escape, vector unpacking, and delivery to the intracellular site of activity. The chemical properties that aid in each step of intracellular nucleic acid delivery are described and specific structures of note are highlighted. Understanding the chemical design parameters of polymeric nucleic acid delivery nanoparticles is important to achieving the goal of safe and effective non-viral genetic nanomedicine.

  20. [Separation, purification and structural characterization of acidic polysaccharide from Microcystic aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xida; Wu, Guorong; Chen, Jingyao; Wang, Jian'an

    2003-12-01

    Acidic polysccharide was extracted by boiling water from Microcystic aeruginosa, isolated and purified by DEAE-52 gel column. IR, UV, HPLC and 13C-NMR were used for the structural analysis. Results showed that MAAP was a new acidic polysaccharide, it's molecular weigh was 2.0028 x 10(5), and it's chain was composed of a-glycoside linkage. The component of MAAP was identified as rhamnose, xylose, arabinose, galactose and galacturonic acid.

  1. Molecular structures of benzoic acid and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, obtained by gas-phase electron diffraction and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Aarset, Kirsten; Page, Elizabeth M; Rice, David A

    2006-07-20

    The structures of benzoic acid (C6H5COOH) and 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (C6H4OHCOOH) have been determined in the gas phase by electron diffraction using results from quantum chemical calculations to inform restraints used on the structural parameters. Theoretical methods (HF and MP2/6-311+G(d,p)) predict two conformers for benzoic acid, one which is 25.0 kJ mol(-1) (MP2) lower in energy than the other. In the low-energy form, the carboxyl group is coplanar with the phenyl ring and the O-H group eclipses the C=O bond. Theoretical calculations (HF and MP2/6-311+G(d,p)) carried out for 2-hydroxybenzoic acid gave evidence for seven stable conformers but one low-energy form (11.7 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy (MP2)) which again has the carboxyl group coplanar with the phenyl ring, the O-H of the carboxyl group eclipsing the C=O bond and the C=O of the carboxyl group oriented toward the O-H group of the phenyl ring. The effects of internal hydrogen bonding in 2-hydroxybenzoic acid can be clearly observed by comparison of pertinent structural parameters between the two compounds. These differences for 2-hydroxybenzoic acid include a shorter exocyclic C-C bond, a lengthening of the ring C-C bond between the substituents, and a shortening of the carboxylic single C-O bond. PMID:16836466

  2. Cleavage of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) by CPP32 during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Zelenski, N G; Yang, J; Sakai, J; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1996-01-01

    Cellular cholesterol homeostasis is controlled by sterol-regulated proteolysis of membrane-bound transcription factors called sterol-regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs). CPP32, a cysteine protease, was shown previously to cleave SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 in vitro at an aspartic acid between the basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper domain and the first trans-membrane domain, liberating a transcriptionally active fragment. Here, we show that CPP32 exists in an inactive 32 kDa form in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. When apoptosis was induced with the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, CPP32 was cleaved to subunits of 20 and 10 kDa to form the active protease. Under these conditions membrane-bound SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 were both cleaved, and the transcriptionally active N-terminal fragments were found in nuclear extracts. Similar results were obtained in human U937 cells induced to undergo apoptosis by anti-Fas and etoposide. The apoptosis-induced cleavage of SREBPs was not suppressed by sterols, indicating that apoptosis-induced cleavage and sterol-regulated cleavage are mediated by different proteases. CHO cells expressing a mutant SREBP-2 with an Asp--> Ala mutation at the CPP32 cleavage site showed sterol-regulated cleavage but no apoptosis-induced cleavage. These data are consistent with the emerging concept that CPP32 is a central mediator in apoptosis. They also indicate that SREBPs, like poly (ADP) ribose polymerase, are cleaved by CPP32 during programmed cell death. Images PMID:8605870

  3. Kinetics and quantitative structure-activity relationship study on the degradation reaction from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Niu, Junfeng

    2014-08-14

    Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure-activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure-activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure-activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1-C2 (RC1-C2 and EC1-C2) are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V), the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE), and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2) are negatively correlated.

  4. Effect of A Long Chain Carboxylate Acid on Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Micelle Structure: A SANS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriati, Arum; Giri Rachman Putra, Edy; Seok Seong, Baek

    2010-01-01

    The effect of a different hydrocarbon chain length of carboxylate acid, i.e. dodecanoic acid, CH3(CH)10COOH or lauric acid and hexadecanoic acid, CH3(CH2)14COOH or palmitic acid as a co-surfactant in the 0.3 M sodium dedecyl sulfate, SDS micellar solution has been studied using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The present of lauric acid has induced the SDS structural micelles. The ellipsoid micelles structures changed significantly in length (major axis) from 22.6 Å to 37.1 Å at a fixed minor axis of 16.7 Å in the present of 0.005 M to 0.1 M lauric acid. Nevertheless, this effect did not occur in the present of palmitic acid with the same concentration range. The present of palmitic acid molecules performed insignificant effect on the SDS micelles growth where the major axis of the micelle was elongated from 22.9 Å to 25.3 Å only. It showed that the appropriate hydrocarbon chain length between surfactant and co-surfactant molecules emerged as one of the determining factors in forming a mixed micelles structure.

  5. Adsorption of monomers on microspherical structures of thermal heterocomplex molecules from amino ACIDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Hajime; Sakurazawa, Shigeru; Dekikimura, H.; Imai, Eiichi; Matsuno, Koichiro

    1995-10-01

    The surface of a microspherical structure formed in the aqueous suspension of thermal heterocomplex molecules made by heating aspartic acid and proline can adsorb basic amino acids such as histidine, lysine and arginine. It can also adsorb adenine, cytosine, adenosine and cytidine. Electrostatic interactions acting between those monomers to be adsorbed and the adsorbing surface are responsible for the adsorption.

  6. [Polycationic catalysts for phosphodiester bond cleavage on the basis of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane].

    PubMed

    Burakova, E A; Kovalev, N A; Kuznetsova, I L; Zenkova, M A; Vlasov, V V; Sil'nikov, V N

    2007-01-01

    A number of tetracationic compounds capable of phosphodiester bond cleavage within a 21 -membered ribooligonucleotide were designed and synthesized. The artificial ribonucleases represent two residues of quaternized 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane bearing alkyl substituents of various lengths and connected with a rigid linker. The efficiency of cleavage of phosphodiester bonds in an RNA target depends on the linker structure and the length of alkyl substituent.

  7. Structural changes of corn stover lignin during acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Moxley, Geoffrey; Gaspar, Armindo Ribeiro; Higgins, Don; Xu, Hui

    2012-09-01

    In this study, raw corn stover was subjected to dilute acid pretreatments over a range of severities under conditions similar to those identified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their techno-economic analysis of biochemical conversion of corn stover to ethanol. The pretreated corn stover then underwent enzymatic hydrolysis with yields above 70 % at moderate enzyme loading conditions. The enzyme exhausted lignin residues were characterized by ³¹P NMR spectroscopy and functional moieties quantified and correlated to enzymatic hydrolysis yields. Results from this study indicated that both xylan solubilization and lignin degradation are important for improving the enzyme accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. At lower pretreatment temperatures, there is a good correlation between xylan solubilization and cellulose accessibility. At higher pretreatment temperatures, lignin degradation correlated better with cellulose accessibility, represented by the increase in phenolic groups. During acid pretreatment, the ratio of syringyl/guaiacyl functional groups also gradually changed from less than 1 to greater than 1 with the increase in pretreatment temperature. This implies that more syringyl units are released from lignin depolymerization of aryl ether linkages than guaiacyl units. The condensed phenolic units are also correlated with the increase in pretreatment temperature up to 180 °C, beyond which point condensation reactions may overtake the hydrolysis of aryl ether linkages as the dominant reactions of lignin, thus leading to decreased cellulose accessibility.

  8. Deglycobleomycin: solid-phase synthesis and DNA cleavage by the resin-bound ligand.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth L; Tao, Zhi-Fu; Hashimoto, Shigeki; Leitheiser, Christopher J; Wu, Xihan; Hecht, Sidney M

    2002-04-01

    [structure: see text] A greatly improved solid-phase synthesis of deglycobleomycin using a Dde-based linker is reported. The resin-bound deglycobleomycin could be completely deblocked and assayed for DNA plasmid relaxation, sequence-selective DNA cleavage, and light production from a molecular beacon.

  9. Isolation and structural analysis of the cyclic fatty acid monomers formed from eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids during fish oil deodorization.

    PubMed

    Berdeaux, Olivier; Fournier, Véronique; Lambelet, Pierre; Dionisi, Fabiola; Sébédio, Jean Louis; Destaillats, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) present in fish oils are thermolabile molecules. Among the degradation reactions encountered, thermal cyclization occurs during refining or other heat treatments. Numerous studies have been carried out in the past to quantify and determine the structures of cyclic fatty acid monomers (CFAMs) formed from oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids in heated vegetable oils. Recently, much attention have been given to LC-PUFAs due to their potential health benefits. However, data on quantification of CFAMs formed from these fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, cis-5, cis-8, cis-11, cis-14, cis-17 20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, cis-4, cis-7, cis-10, cis-13, cis-16, cis-19 22:6), the two main LC-PUFAs in fish oils, are scarce. In the present study, structural analyses of CFAMs formed from EPA and DHA during the deodorization of fish oil are presented. Fish oil sample was deodorized at 250 degrees C for 3 h under a pressure of 1.5 mbar in a laboratory deodorizer. The CFAMs formed during heat treatment of fish oil were isolated by a combination of saponification, esterification, urea fractionations and column chromatography. Structural analyses of C20- and C22-CFAMs were achieved by gas-chromatography electronic-ionization mass-spectrometry (GC-EI-MS) of their 4,4-dimethyloxazoline (DMOX) derivatives. We identified seven out of 13 possible structures of hydrogenated CFAMs formed from EPA, and nine out of 16 possible structures of CFAM formed from DHA. Major CFAMs from both EPA and DHA were cyclohexyl isomers. All possible cyclohexyl isomers were found but only nine out of 18 of the cyclopentyl isomers were present in concentration sufficient for identification. Chemical mechanisms involved in the formation of polyunsaturated LC-PUFAs have been investigated. The results have shown that general principle involved in the cyclization of LC-PUFAs is same as that for the thermal cyclization of oleic, linoleic and alpha

  10. Cleavage of rotavirus VP4 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ludert, J E; Krishnaney, A A; Burns, J W; Vo, P T; Greenberg, H B

    1996-03-01

    The infectivity of rotavirus particles is dependent on proteolytic cleavage of the outer capsid protein, VP4, at a specific site. This cleavage event yields two fragments, identified as VP5* and VP8*. It has been hypothesized that the particle is more stable, but non-infectious, when VP4 is in the uncleaved state. Uncleaved VP4 and the resultant increased stability might be advantageous for the virus to resist environmental degradation until it infects a susceptible host. When VP4 is cleaved in the lumen of the host's gastrointestinal tract, the virus particle would become less stable but more infectious. To test this hypothesis, a series of experiments was undertaken to analyse the cleavage state of VP4 on virus shed by an infected host into the environment. Immunoblots of intestinal wash solutions derived from infant and adult BALB/c mice infected with a virulent cell culture-adapted variant of the EDIM virus (EW) or wild-type murine rotavirus EDIM-Cambridge were analysed. Virtually all of the VP4 in these samples was in the cleaved form. Moreover, cell culture titration of trypsin-treated and untreated intestinal contents from pups infected with EW indicated that excreted virus is fully activated prior to trypsin addition. It was also observed that trypsin-activated virus has no disadvantage in initiating infection in naive animals over virions containing an intact VP4. These studies indicate that VP4 is cleaved upon release from the intestinal cell and that virus shed into the environment does not have an intact VP4.

  11. Maleic Acid--but Not Structurally Related Methylmalonic Acid--Interrupts Energy Metabolism by Impaired Calcium Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Ali Tunç; Ruppert, Thorsten; Wang, Bei-Tzu; Okun, Jürgen Günther; Kölker, Stefan; Morath, Marina Alexandra; Sauer, Sven Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Maleic acid (MA) has been shown to induce Fanconi syndrome via disturbance of renal energy homeostasis, though the underlying pathomechanism is still under debate. Our study aimed to examine the pathomechanism underlying maleic acid-induced nephrotoxicity. Methylmalonic acid (MMA) is structurally similar to MA and accumulates in patients affected with methymalonic aciduria, a defect in the degradation of branched-chain amino acids, odd-chain fatty acids and cholesterol, which is associated with the development of tubulointerstitial nephritis resulting in chronic renal failure. We therefore used MMA application as a control experiment in our study and stressed hPTECs with MA and MMA to further validate the specificity of our findings. MMA did not show any toxic effects on proximal tubule cells, whereas maleic acid induced concentration-dependent and time-dependent cell death shown by increased lactate dehydrogenase release as well as ethidium homodimer and calcein acetoxymethyl ester staining. The toxic effect of MA was blocked by administration of single amino acids, in particular L-alanine and L-glutamate. MA application further resulted in severe impairment of cellular energy homeostasis on the level of glycolysis, respiratory chain, and citric acid cycle resulting in ATP depletion. As underlying mechanism we could identify disturbance of calcium homeostasis. MA toxicity was critically dependent on calcium levels in culture medium and blocked by the extra- and intracellular calcium chelators EGTA and BAPTA-AM respectively. Moreover, MA-induced cell death was associated with activation of calcium-dependent calpain proteases. In summary, our study shows a comprehensive pathomechanistic concept for MA-induced dysfunction and damage of human proximal tubule cells. PMID:26086473

  12. Structurally divergent lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferases with high selectivity for saturated medium chain fatty acids from Cuphea seeds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Jin; Silva, Jillian E; Iskandarov, Umidjon; Andersson, Mariette; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-12-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAT) catalyzes acylation of the sn-2 position on lysophosphatidic acid by an acyl CoA substrate to produce the phosphatidic acid precursor of polar glycerolipids and triacylglycerols (TAGs). In the case of TAGs, this reaction is typically catalyzed by an LPAT2 from microsomal LPAT class A that has high specificity for C18 fatty acids containing Δ9 unsaturation. Because of this specificity, the occurrence of saturated fatty acids in the TAG sn-2 position is infrequent in seed oils. To identify LPATs with variant substrate specificities, deep transcriptomic mining was performed on seeds of two Cuphea species producing TAGs that are highly enriched in saturated C8 and C10 fatty acids. From these analyses, cDNAs for seven previously unreported LPATs were identified, including cDNAs from Cuphea viscosissima (CvLPAT2) and Cuphea avigera var. pulcherrima (CpuLPAT2a) encoding microsomal, seed-specific class A LPAT2s and a cDNA from C. avigera var. pulcherrima (CpuLPATB) encoding a microsomal, seed-specific LPAT from the bacterial-type class B. The activities of these enzymes were characterized in Camelina sativa by seed-specific co-expression with cDNAs for various Cuphea FatB acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (FatB) that produce a variety of saturated medium-chain fatty acids. CvLPAT2 and CpuLPAT2a expression resulted in accumulation of 10:0 fatty acids in the Camelina sativa TAG sn-2 position, indicating a 10:0 CoA specificity that has not been previously described for plant LPATs. CpuLPATB expression generated TAGs with 14:0 at the sn-2 position, but not 10:0. Identification of these LPATs provides tools for understanding the structural basis of LPAT substrate specificity and for generating altered oil functionalities.

  13. Pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 variants with polybasic F protein cleavage site but strikingly different pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Heiden, Sandra; Grund, Christian; Höper, Dirk; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Römer-Oberdörfer, Angela

    2014-12-01

    Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) isolated from pigeons (pigeon paramyxovirus type 1; PPMV-1) are mostly of mesogenic pathotype and characterized by a polybasic amino acid sequence motif at the fusion protein (F) cleavage site. This feature also applies to isolate R75/98 from Germany. Its genome consists of 15,192 nucleotides and it specifies an intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI) of 1.1, as is typical for mesogenic NDV. Recombinant R75/98 (rR75/98) derived by reverse genetics also possesses a polybasic F protein cleavage site but exhibits ICPI of 0.28, indicating a lentogenic virus. While ten virus passages of rR75/98 on embryonated chicken eggs did not result in any alteration of virus characteristics, virus which had been re-isolated from the brain of an intracerebrally inoculated chicken showed an increase in virulence, characterized by an ICPI of 0.93. Comparison of whole genome sequences of rR75/98 and re-isolated rR75/98 (RrR75/98) demonstrated only two amino acid differences, one in the F protein (N472 K) and one in the polymerase protein (K2168R). This result indicates that only very few amino acid alterations are sufficient to modulate virus virulence in the presence of a polybasic amino acid sequence at the proteolytic F protein cleavage site.

  14. Occurrence and chemical structure of nonmethylene-interrupted dienoic fatty acids in American oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Paradis, M; Ackman, R G

    1975-01-01

    The American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, was found to contain structurally homologous nonmethylene-interrupted dienoic (NMID) fatty acids. The major C20 and C22 nonmethylene-interrupted dienoic fatty acid isomers were shown to occur as two pairs of homologues 5,13-20:2 with 7,15-22:2 and 5,11-20:2 with 7,13-22:2. A combination of analytical procedures was required for conclusive structure determination.

  15. Nucleic Acid i-Motif Structures in Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alba, Joan Josep; Sadurní, Anna; Gargallo, Raimundo

    2016-09-01

    Under the appropriate experimental conditions of pH and temperature, cytosine-rich segments in DNA or RNA sequences may produce a characteristic folded structure known as an i-motif. Besides its potential role in vivo, which is still under investigation, this structure has attracted increasing interest in other fields due to its sharp, fast and reversible pH-driven conformational changes. This "on/off" switch at molecular level is being used in nanotechnology and analytical chemistry to develop nanomachines and sensors, respectively. This paper presents a review of the latest applications of this structure in the field of chemical analysis.

  16. Models of metal binding structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Brown, G.K.; MacCarthy, P.; Cabaniss, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    Fulvic acid, isolated from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was assessed for its ability to bind Ca2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ ions at pH 6 before and after extensive fractionation that was designed to reveal the nature of metal binding functional groups. The binding constant for Ca2+ ion had the greatest increase of all the ions in a metal binding fraction that was selected for intensive characterization for the purpose of building quantitative average model structures. The 'metal binding' fraction was characterized by quantitative 13C NMR, 1H NMR, and FT-1R spectrometry and elemental, titrimetric, and molecular weight determinations. The characterization data revealed that carboxyl groups were clustered in short- chain aliphatic dibasic acid structures. The Ca2+ binding data suggested that ether-substituted oxysuccinic acid structures are good models for the metal binding sites at pH 6. Structural models were derived based upon oxidation and photolytic rearrangements of cutin, lignin, and tannin precursors. These structural models rich in substituted dibasic acid structures revealed polydentate binding sites with the potential for both inner-sphere and outer-sphere type binding. The majority of the fulvic acid molecule was involved with metal binding rather than a small substructural unit.Fulvic acid, isolated from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was assessed for its ability to bind Ca2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ ions at pH 6 before and after extensive fractionation that was designed to reveal the nature of metal binding functional groups. The binding constant for Ca2+ ion had the greatest increase of all the ions in a metal binding fraction that was selected for intensive characterization for the purpose of building quantitative average model structures. The `metal binding' fraction was characterized by quantitative 13C NMR, 1H NMR, and FT-IR spectrometry and elemental, titrimetric, and molecular weight determinations. The characterization data revealed that

  17. Properties and structure of peat humic acids depending on humification and precursor biota in bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-04-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic component of soil, peat and natural waters, but their structure and properties very much differs depending on their source. The aim of this study is to characterize humic acids from raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the homogeneity of humic acids isolated from the bog bodies and study peat humification impact on properties of humic acids. A major impact on the structure of peat humic acids have raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin) void of lignin. For characterization of peat humic acids their elemental (CHNOS), functional (-COOH, phenolic OH) analysis, spectroscopic characterization (UV, fluorescence, FTIR, 1H NMR, CP/MAS 13C NMR, ESR) and degradation studies (Py-GC/MS) were done. Peat humic acids (HA) have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, but thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge. Comparatively, the studied peat HAs are at the start of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups changes depending on the depth of peat from which HAs have been isolated: and carboxylic acidity is increasing with depth of peat location and the humification degree. The ability to influence the surface tension of peat humic acids isolated from a well-characterized bog profile demonstrates dependence on age and humification degree. With increase of the humification degree and age of humic acids, their molecular complexity and ability to influence surface tension decreases; even so, the impact of the biological precursor (peat-forming bryophytes and plants) can be identified.

  18. Crystal structure of 2,2-dimethyl succinic acid.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Yusuf; Osmanoğlu, Semsettin; Ide, Semra

    2003-08-01

    The title compound crystallizes triclinically in space group of P1. The C2-COOH and C3-COOH molecular groups are planar. The crystal structure is stabilized by the formation of intermolecular (O-HO) hydrogen bonds. PMID:12945684

  19. Optical Absorption, Stability and Structure of NpO2+ Complexeswith Dicarboxylic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Tian; Linfeng Rao

    2006-01-04

    Complexation of NpO2+ with oxalic acid (OX),2,2'-oxydiacetic acid (ODA), 2,2'-iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and 2,2'-thiodiacetic acid (TDA), has been studied using spectrophotometry in1 M NaClO4. Both the position and the intensity of the absorption band of NpO2+ at 980 nm are affected by the formation of NpO2+/dicarboxylate complexes, providing useful information on the complexation strength, the coordination mode and the structure of the complexes.

  20. Site specific incorporation of heavy atom-containing unnatural amino acids into proteins for structure determination

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Jianming; Wang, Lei; Wu, Ning; Schultz, Peter G.

    2008-07-15

    Translation systems and other compositions including orthogonal aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases that preferentially charge an orthogonal tRNA with an iodinated or brominated amino acid are provided. Nucleic acids encoding such synthetases are also described, as are methods and kits for producing proteins including heavy atom-containing amino acids, e.g., brominated or iodinated amino acids. Methods of determining the structure of a protein, e.g., a protein into which a heavy atom has been site-specifically incorporated through use of an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase pair, are also described.

  1. A comprehensive classification of nucleic acid structural families based on strand direction and base pairing.

    PubMed Central

    Lavery, R; Zakrzewska, K; Sun, J S; Harvey, S C

    1992-01-01

    We propose a classification of DNA structures formed from 1 to 4 strands, based only on relative strand directions, base to strand orientation and base pairing geometries. This classification and its associated notation enable all nucleic acids to be grouped into structural families and bring to light possible structures which have not yet been observed experimentally. It also helps in understanding transitions between families and can assist in the design of multistrand structures. PMID:1383936

  2. Novel insights into the fungal oxidation of monoaromatic and biarylic environmental pollutants by characterization of two new ring cleavage enzymes.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, Rabea; Lippmann, Ramona; Hammer, Elke; Gesell Salazar, Manuela; Schauer, Frieder

    2013-06-01

    The phenol-degrading yeast Trichosporon mucoides can oxidize and detoxify biarylic environmental pollutants such as dibenzofuran, diphenyl ether and biphenyl by ring cleavage. The degradation pathways are well investigated, but the enzymes involved are not. The high similarity of hydroxylated biphenyl derivatives and phenol raised the question if the enzymes of the phenol degradation are involved in ring cleavage or whether specific enzymes are necessary. Purification of enzymes from T. mucoides with catechol cleavage activity demonstrated the existence of three different enzymes: a classical catechol-1,2-dioxygenase (CDO), not able to cleave the aromatic ring system of 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl, and two novel enzymes with a high affinity towards 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl. The comparison of the biochemical characteristics and mass spectrometric sequence data of these three enzymes demonstrated that they have different substrate specificities. CDO catalyzes the ortho-cleavage of dihydroxylated monoaromatic compounds, while the two novel enzymes carry out a similar reaction on biphenyl derivatives. The ring fission of 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl by the purified enzymes results in the formation of (5-oxo-3-phenyl-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-yl)acetic acid. These results suggest that the ring cleavage enzymes catalyzing phenol degradation are not involved in the ring cleavage of biarylic compounds by this yeast, although some intermediates of the phenol metabolism may function as inducers.

  3. Protocols for the selective cleavage of carbon-sulfur bonds in coal. Quarterly report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bausch, M.

    1991-12-31

    Removal of the organic sulfur in coal constitutes one of the major challenges facing fossil fuel scientists today. A cost--effective of desulfurizing Illinois coal is non-existent at the present time. Research in our group aims to develop a simple protocol for sulfur removal by gaining understanding of how various additives can enhance the rates of C-S bond cleavage in Illinois coal and coal model compounds, relative to fragmentation of the coal macromolecule via C-C, C-O, and C-N bond cleavage. During this funding period, we plan to carry out examinations of: (a) the effects of various reaction conditions on radical-initiated and Lewis acid-catalyzed C-S bond cleavages; (b) the effects of caustic impregnation and subsequent alcoholic reflux on C-S bond cleavage strategies; (c) the reactions of coal model compounds with electron-deficient substrates; (d) examinations of photooxidative C-S bond cleavage reactions; (e) the effects of moderate (300--400{degrees}C) temperatures and pressures as well as ultrasonic radiation on (a) - (c). Also planned are differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) examinations of selected C-S bond cleavage protocols, including those on Illinois coals that possess varying amounts of organic and inorganic sulfur.

  4. Structure-property relationships in halogenbenzoic acids: Thermodynamics of sublimation, fusion, vaporization and solubility.

    PubMed

    Zherikova, Kseniya V; Svetlov, Aleksey A; Kuratieva, Natalia V; Verevkin, Sergey P

    2016-10-01

    Temperature dependences of vapor pressures for 2-, 3-, and 4-bromobenzoic acid, as well as for five isomeric bromo-methylbenzoic acids were studied by the transpiration method. Melting temperatures and enthalpies of fusion for all isomeric bromo-methylbenzoic acids and 4-bromobenzoic acid were measured with a DSC. The molar enthalpies of sublimation and vaporization were derived. These data together with results available in the literature were collected and checked for internal consistency using a group-additivity procedure and results from X-ray structural diffraction studies. Specific (hydrogen bonding) interactions in the liquid and in the crystal phase of halogenbenzoic acids were quantified based on experimental values of vaporization and sublimation enthalpies. Structure-property correlations of solubilities of halogenobenzoic acids with sublimation pressures and sublimation enthalpies were developed and solubilities of bromo-benzoic acids were estimated. These new results resolve much of the ambiguity in the available thermochemical and solubility data on bromobenzoic acids. The approach based on structure property correlations can be applied for the assessment of water solubility of sparingly soluble drugs. PMID:27424058

  5. Solving nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement: examples from group II intron studies

    PubMed Central

    Marcia, Marco; Humphris-Narayanan, Elisabeth; Keating, Kevin S.; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-01-01

    Structured RNA molecules are key players in ensuring cellular viability. It is now emerging that, like proteins, the functions of many nucleic acids are dictated by their tertiary folds. At the same time, the number of known crystal structures of nucleic acids is also increasing rapidly. In this context, molecular replacement will become an increasingly useful technique for phasing nucleic acid crystallographic data in the near future. Here, strategies to select, create and refine molecular-replacement search models for nucleic acids are discussed. Using examples taken primarily from research on group II introns, it is shown that nucleic acids are amenable to different and potentially more flexible and sophisticated molecular-replacement searches than proteins. These observations specifically aim to encourage future crystallographic studies on the newly discovered repertoire of noncoding transcripts. PMID:24189228

  6. Effect of the structure of gallic acid and its derivatives on their interaction with plant ferritin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qunqun; Zhou, Kai; Ning, Yong; Zhao, Guanghua

    2016-12-15

    Gallic acid and its derivatives co-exist with protein components in foodstuffs, but there is few report on their interaction with proteins. On the other hand, plant ferritin represents not only a novel class of iron supplement, but also a new nanocarrier for encapsulation of bioactive nutrients. However, plant ferritin is easy to be degraded by pepsin in the stomach, thereby limiting its application. Herein, we investigated the interaction of gallic acid and its derivatives with recombinant soybean seed H-2 ferritin (rH-2). We found that these phenolic acids interacted with rH-2 in a structure-dependent manner; namely, gallic acid (GA), methyl gallate (MEGA) and propyl gallate (PG) having three HO groups can bind to rH-2, while their analogues with two HO groups cannot. Consequently, such binding largely inhibited ferritin degradation by pepsin. These findings advance our understanding of the relationship between the structure and function of phenolic acids.

  7. Morphology and Composition of Structured, Phase-Separated Behenic Acid-Perfluorotetradecanoic Acid Monolayer Films.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Jeveria; Araghi, Hessamaddin Younesi; He, Anqiang; Paige, Matthew F

    2016-05-31

    The phase separation of immiscible surfactants in mixed monolayer films provides an approach to physically manipulate important properties of thin films, including surface morphology, microscale composition, and mechanical properties. In this work, we predict, based upon existing miscibility studies and their thermodynamic underpinnings described in the literature, the miscibility and film morphology of mixed monolayers comprised of behenic acid (C21H43COOH) and perfluorotetradecanoic acid (C13F27COOH) in various molar ratios. Predictions are tested using a combination of experimental surface characterization methods for probing miscibility and film morphology at the solid/air and air/water interfaces. Film components were immiscible and phase-separated into chemically well-defined domains under a variety of experimental conditions, with monolayer morphology consistent with initial predictions. The extensibility of these basic predictions to other systems is discussed in the context of using these works for different perfluorinated surfactant molecules. PMID:27163482

  8. Structure-dependent effects of pyridine derivatives on mechanisms of intestinal fatty acid uptake: regulation of nicotinic acid receptor and fatty acid transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Annett; Lang, Roman; Rohm, Barbara; Rubach, Malte; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-07-01

    Pyridines are widely distributed in foods. Nicotinic acid (NA), a carboxylated pyridine derivative, inhibits lipolysis in adipocytes by activation of the orphan NA receptor (HM74A) and is applied to treat hyperlipidemia. However, knowledge on the impact of pyridine derivatives on intestinal lipid metabolism is scarce. This study was performed to identify the structural determinants of pyridines for their effects on fatty acid uptake in enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and to elucidate the mechanisms of action. The impact of 17 pyridine derivatives on fatty acid uptake was tested. Multiple regression analysis revealed the presence of a methyl group to be the structural determinant at 0.1 mM, whereas at 1 mM, the presence of a carboxylic group and the N-methylation presented further structural characteristics to affect the fatty acid uptake. NA, showing a stimulating effect on FA uptake, and N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP), inhibiting FA uptake, were selected for mechanistic studies. Gene expression of the fatty acid transporters CD36, FATP2 and FATP4, and the lipid metabolism regulating transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and PPARγ was up-regulated upon NA treatment. Caco-2 cells were demonstrated to express the low-affinity NA receptor HM74 of which the gene expression was up-regulated upon NA treatment. We hypothesize that the NA-induced fatty acid uptake might result from NA receptor activation and related intracellular signaling cascades. In contrast, MPP increased transepithelial electrical resistance. We therefore conclude that NA and MPP, both sharing the pyridine motif core, exhibit their contrary effects on intestinal FA uptake by activation of different mechanisms.

  9. Structure-dependent effects of pyridine derivatives on mechanisms of intestinal fatty acid uptake: regulation of nicotinic acid receptor and fatty acid transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Annett; Lang, Roman; Rohm, Barbara; Rubach, Malte; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-07-01

    Pyridines are widely distributed in foods. Nicotinic acid (NA), a carboxylated pyridine derivative, inhibits lipolysis in adipocytes by activation of the orphan NA receptor (HM74A) and is applied to treat hyperlipidemia. However, knowledge on the impact of pyridine derivatives on intestinal lipid metabolism is scarce. This study was performed to identify the structural determinants of pyridines for their effects on fatty acid uptake in enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells and to elucidate the mechanisms of action. The impact of 17 pyridine derivatives on fatty acid uptake was tested. Multiple regression analysis revealed the presence of a methyl group to be the structural determinant at 0.1 mM, whereas at 1 mM, the presence of a carboxylic group and the N-methylation presented further structural characteristics to affect the fatty acid uptake. NA, showing a stimulating effect on FA uptake, and N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP), inhibiting FA uptake, were selected for mechanistic studies. Gene expression of the fatty acid transporters CD36, FATP2 and FATP4, and the lipid metabolism regulating transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and PPARγ was up-regulated upon NA treatment. Caco-2 cells were demonstrated to express the low-affinity NA receptor HM74 of which the gene expression was up-regulated upon NA treatment. We hypothesize that the NA-induced fatty acid uptake might result from NA receptor activation and related intracellular signaling cascades. In contrast, MPP increased transepithelial electrical resistance. We therefore conclude that NA and MPP, both sharing the pyridine motif core, exhibit their contrary effects on intestinal FA uptake by activation of different mechanisms. PMID:24767308

  10. Probing Protein Structure by Amino Acid-Specific Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Vanessa Leah; Vachet, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, amino acid-specific covalent labeling has been a valuable tool to study protein structure and protein interactions, especially for systems that are difficult to study by other means. These covalent labeling methods typically map protein structure and interactions by measuring the differential reactivity of amino acid side chains. The reactivity of amino acids in proteins generally depends on the accessibility of the side chain to the reagent, the inherent reactivity of the label and the reactivity of the amino acid side chain. Peptide mass mapping with ESI- or MALDI-MS and peptide sequencing with tandem MS are typically employed to identify modification sites to provide site-specific structural information. In this review, we describe the reagents that are most commonly used in these residue-specific modification reactions, details about the proper use of these covalent labeling reagents, and information about the specific biochemical problems that have been addressed with covalent labeling strategies. PMID:19016300

  11. Are the Crystal Structures of Enantiopure and Racemic Mandelic Acids Determined by Kinetics or Thermodynamics?

    PubMed

    Hylton, Rebecca K; Tizzard, Graham J; Threlfall, Terence L; Ellis, Amy L; Coles, Simon J; Seaton, Colin C; Schulze, Eric; Lorenz, Heike; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Stein, Matthias; Price, Sarah L

    2015-09-01

    Mandelic acids are prototypic chiral molecules where the sensitivity of crystallized forms (enantiopure/racemic compound/polymorphs) to both conditions and substituents provides a new insight into the factors that may allow chiral separation by crystallization. The determination of a significant number of single crystal structures allows the analysis of 13 enantiopure and 30 racemic crystal structures of 21 (F/Cl/Br/CH3/CH3O) substituted mandelic acid derivatives. There are some common phenyl packing motifs between some groups of racemic and enantiopure structures, although they show very different hydrogen-bonding motifs. The computed crystal energy landscape of 3-chloromandelic acid, which has at least two enantiopure and three racemic crystal polymorphs, reveals that there are many more possible structures, some of which are predicted to be thermodynamically more favorable as well as slightly denser than the known forms. Simulations of mandelic acid dimers in isolation, water, and toluene do not differentiate between racemic and enantiopure dimers and also suggest that the phenyl ring interactions play a major role in the crystallization mechanism. The observed crystallization behavior of mandelic acids does not correspond to any simple "crystal engineering rules" as there is a range of thermodynamically feasible structures with no distinction between the enantiopure and racemic forms. Nucleation and crystallization appear to be determined by the kinetics of crystal growth with a statistical bias, but the diversity of the mandelic acid crystallization behavior demonstrates that the factors that influence the kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth are not yet adequately understood.

  12. 3-D structural modeling of humic acids through experimental characterization, computer assisted structure elucidation and atomistic simulations 1. Chelsea soil humic acid.

    SciTech Connect

    Gassman, Paul; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Simpson, Andre; Goddard, William A., III; Diallo, Mamadou S.; Johnson, James H. Jr.

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes an integrated experimental and computational framework for developing 3-D structural models for humic acids (HAs). This approach combines experimental characterization, computer assisted structure elucidation (CASE), and atomistic simulations to generate all 3-D structural models or a representative sample of these models consistent with the analytical data and bulk thermodynamic/structural properties of HAs. To illustrate this methodology, structural data derived from elemental analysis, diffuse reflectance FT-IR spectroscopy, 1-D/2-D {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C solution NMR spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI QqTOF MS) are employed as input to the CASE program SIGNATURE to generate all 3-D structural models for Chelsea soil humic acid (HA). These models are subsequently used as starting 3-D structures to carry out constant temperature-constant pressure molecular dynamics simulations to estimate their bulk densities and Hildebrand solubility parameters. Surprisingly, only a few model isomers are found to exhibit molecular compositions and bulk thermodynamic properties consistent with the experimental data. The simulated {sup 13}C NMR spectrum of an equimolar mixture of these model isomers compares favorably with the measured spectrum of Chelsea soil HA.

  13. Characterization of MazF-Mediated Sequence-Specific RNA Cleavage in Pseudomonas putida Using Massive Parallel Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Tatsuki; Kato, Yuka; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Noda, Naohiro

    2016-01-01

    Under environmental stress, microbes are known to alter their translation patterns using sequence-specific endoribonucleases that we call RNA interferases. However, there has been limited insight regarding which RNAs are specifically cleaved by these RNA interferases, hence their physiological functions remain unknown. In the current study, we developed a novel method to effectively identify cleavage specificities with massive parallel sequencing. This approach uses artificially designed RNAs composed of diverse sequences, which do not form extensive secondary structures, and it correctly identified the cleavage sequence of a well-characterized Escherichia coli RNA interferase, MazF, as ACA. In addition, we also determined that an uncharacterized MazF homologue isolated from Pseudomonas putida specifically recognizes the unique triplet, UAC. Using a real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay, the UAC triplet was further proved to be essential for cleavage in P. putida MazF. These results highlight an effective method to determine cleavage specificity of RNA interferases.

  14. Mapping Homing Endonuclease Cleavage Sites Using In Vitro Generated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Belfort, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the precise position of endonucleolytic cleavage sites is a fundamental experimental technique used to describe the function of a homing endonuclease. However, these proteins are often recalcitrant to cloning and over-expression in biological systems because of toxicity induced by spurious DNA cleavage events. In this chapter we outline the steps to successfully express a homing endonuclease in vitro and use this product in nucleotide-resolution cleavage assays. PMID:24510259

  15. Catalysts of DNA Strand Cleavage at Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Minko, Irina G.; Jacobs, Aaron C.; de Leon, Arnie R.; Gruppi, Francesca; Donley, Nathan; Harris, Thomas M.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; McCullough, Amanda K.; Lloyd, R. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are constantly formed in cellular DNA due to instability of the glycosidic bond, particularly at purines and various oxidized, alkylated, or otherwise damaged nucleobases. AP sites are also generated by DNA glycosylases that initiate DNA base excision repair. These lesions represent a significant block to DNA replication and are extremely mutagenic. Some DNA glycosylases possess AP lyase activities that nick the DNA strand at the deoxyribose moiety via a β- or β,δ-elimination reaction. Various amines can incise AP sites via a similar mechanism, but this non-enzymatic cleavage typically requires high reagent concentrations. Herein, we describe a new class of small molecules that function at low micromolar concentrations as both β- and β,δ-elimination catalysts at AP sites. Structure-activity relationships have established several characteristics that appear to be necessary for the formation of an iminium ion intermediate that self-catalyzes the elimination at the deoxyribose ring. PMID:27363485

  16. Catalysts of DNA Strand Cleavage at Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites.

    PubMed

    Minko, Irina G; Jacobs, Aaron C; de Leon, Arnie R; Gruppi, Francesca; Donley, Nathan; Harris, Thomas M; Rizzo, Carmelo J; McCullough, Amanda K; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are constantly formed in cellular DNA due to instability of the glycosidic bond, particularly at purines and various oxidized, alkylated, or otherwise damaged nucleobases. AP sites are also generated by DNA glycosylases that initiate DNA base excision repair. These lesions represent a significant block to DNA replication and are extremely mutagenic. Some DNA glycosylases possess AP lyase activities that nick the DNA strand at the deoxyribose moiety via a β- or β,δ-elimination reaction. Various amines can incise AP sites via a similar mechanism, but this non-enzymatic cleavage typically requires high reagent concentrations. Herein, we describe a new class of small molecules that function at low micromolar concentrations as both β- and β,δ-elimination catalysts at AP sites. Structure-activity relationships have established several characteristics that appear to be necessary for the formation of an iminium ion intermediate that self-catalyzes the elimination at the deoxyribose ring. PMID:27363485

  17. Effects of retroviral envelope-protein cleavage upon trafficking, incorporation, and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Swapna; Sanders, David Avram

    2010-09-15

    Retroviral envelope glycoproteins undergo proteolytic processing by cellular subtilisin-like proprotein convertases at a polybasic amino-acid site in order to produce the two functional subunits, SU and TM. Most previous studies have indicated that envelope-protein cleavage is required for rendering the protein competent for promoting membrane fusion and for virus infectivity. We have investigated the role of proteolytic processing of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope-protein through site-directed mutagenesis of the residues near the SU-TM cleavage site and have established that uncleaved glycoprotein is unable either to be incorporated into virus particles efficiently or to induce membrane fusion. Additionally, the results suggest that cleavage of the envelope protein plays an important role in intracellular trafficking of protein via the cellular secretory pathway. Based on our results it was concluded that a positively charged residue located at either P2 or P4 along with the arginine at P1 is essential for cleavage.

  18. Intracellular Toll-like receptor recruitment and cleavage in endosomal/lysosomal organelles.

    PubMed

    Tohmé, Mira; Manoury, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    Microbial pathogens are recognized through multiple, distinct receptors such as intracellular Toll-like receptors (TLRs 3, 7, 8, 9, and 13) which reside in the endosomes and lysosomes. TLRs are sensitive to chloroquine, a lysomotropic agent that neutralizes acidic compartments indicating a role for endo/lysosomal proteases for their signaling. Indeed, upon stimulation, full-length TLR7 and 9 are cleaved into a C-terminal fragment and this processing is highly dependent on a cysteine protease named asparagine endopeptidase (AEP) in dendritic cells. A recruitment and a boost in AEP activity, which was induced shortly after TLR7 and 9 stimulation, are shown to promote TLR7 and 9 cleavage and correlate with an increased acidification in endosomes and lysosomes. Moreover, mutating a putative AEP cleavage site in TLR7 or 9 strongly decreases their signaling in DCs, suggesting perhaps a direct cleavage of TLR7 and 9 by AEP. These results demonstrate that TLR7 and 9 require a proteolytic cleavage for their signaling and identified a key endocytic protease playing a critical role in this process. PMID:24377922

  19. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping as a strategy to reduce proteolytic cleavage of ataxin-3

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Lodewijk J. A.; Schmidt, Iris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; van Attikum, Haico; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA3) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 protein. Cleavage of mutant ataxin-3 by proteolytic enzymes yields ataxin-3 fragments containing the polyglutamine stretch. These shorter ataxin-3 fragments are thought to be involved in SCA3 pathogenesis due to their increased cellular toxicity and their involvement in formation of the characteristic neuronal aggregates. As a strategy to prevent formation of toxic cleavage fragments, we investigated an antisense oligonucleotide-mediated modification of the ataxin-3 pre-mRNA through exon skipping of exon 8 and 9, resulting in the removal of a central 88 amino acid region of the ataxin-3 protein. This removed protein region contains several predicted cleavage sites and two ubiquitin-interacting motifs. In contrast to unmodified mutant ataxin-3, the internally truncated ataxin-3 protein did not give rise to potentially toxic cleavage fragments when incubated with caspases. In vitro experiments did not show cellular toxicity of the modified ataxin-3 protein. However, the modified protein was incapable of binding poly-ubiquitin chains, which may interfere with its normal deubiquitinating function. Low exon skipping efficiencies combined with reduction in important ataxin-3 protein functions suggest that skipping of exon 8 and 9 is not a viable therapeutic option for SCA3. PMID:27731380

  20. Developmentally regulated cleavage of tRNAs in the bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Haiser, Henry J.; Karginov, Fedor V.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Elliot, Marie A.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to sense and respond to environmental and physiological signals is critical for the survival of the soil-dwelling Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. Nutrient deprivation triggers the onset of a complex morphological differentiation process that involves the raising of aerial hyphae and formation of spore chains, and coincides with the production of a diverse array of clinically relevant antibiotics and other secondary metabolites. These processes are tightly regulated; however, the genes and signals involved have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report a novel tRNA cleavage event that follows the same temporal regulation as morphological and physiological differentiation, and is growth medium dependent. All tRNAs appear to be susceptible to cleavage; however, there appears to be a bias towards increased cleavage of those tRNAs that specify highly utilized codons. In contrast to what has been observed in eukaryotes, accumulation of tRNA halves in S. coelicolor is not significantly affected by amino acid starvation, and is also not affected by induction of the stringent response or inhibition of ribosome function. Mutants defective in aerial development and antibiotic production exhibit altered tRNA cleavage profiles relative to wild-type strains. PMID:18084030

  1. Mechanism and cleavage specificity of the H-N-H endonuclease colicin E9.

    PubMed

    Pommer, A J; Cal, S; Keeble, A H; Walker, D; Evans, S J; Kühlmann, U C; Cooper, A; Connolly, B A; Hemmings, A M; Moore, G R; James, R; Kleanthous, C

    2001-12-01

    Colicin endonucleases and the H-N-H family of homing enzymes share a common active site structural motif that has similarities to the active sites of a variety of other nucleases such as the non-specific endonuclease from Serratia and the sequence-specific His-Cys box homing enzyme I-PpoI. In contrast to these latter enzymes, however, it remains unclear how H-N-H enzymes cleave nucleic acid substrates. Here, we show that the H-N-H enzyme from colicin E9 (the E9 DNase) shares many of the same basic enzymological characteristics as sequence-specific H-N-H enzymes including a dependence for high concentrations of Mg2+ or Ca2+ with double-stranded substrates, a high pH optimum (pH 8-9) and inhibition by monovalent cations. We also show that this seemingly non-specific enzyme preferentially nicks double-stranded DNA at thymine bases producing 3'-hydroxy and 5'-phosphate termini, and that the enzyme does not cleave small substrates, such as dinucleotides or nucleotide analogues, which has implications for its mode of inhibition in bacteria by immunity proteins. The E9 DNase will also bind single-stranded DNA above a certain length and in a sequence-independent manner, with transition metals such as Ni2+ optimal for cleavage but Mg2+ a poor cofactor. Ironically, the H-N-H motif of the E9 DNase although resembling the zinc binding site of a metalloenzyme does not support zinc-mediated hydrolysis of any DNA substrate. Finally, we demonstrate that the E9 DNase also degrades RNA in the absence of metal ions. In the context of current structural information, our data show that the H-N-H motif is an adaptable catalytic centre able to hydrolyse nucleic acid by different mechanisms depending on the substrate and metal ion regime.

  2. An unusual carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction during phosphinothricin biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cicchillo, Robert M; Zhang, Houjin; Blodgett, Joshua A.V.; Whitteck, John T; Li, Gongyong; Nair, Satish K; van derDonk, Wilfred A; Metcalf, William W

    2010-01-12

    Natural products containing phosphorus-carbon bonds have found widespread use in medicine and agriculture. One such compound, phosphinothricin tripeptide, contains the unusual amino acid phosphinothricin attached to two alanine residues. Synthetic phosphinothricin (glufosinate) is a component of two top-selling herbicides (Basta and Liberty), and is widely used with resistant transgenic crops including corn, cotton and canola. Recent genetic and biochemical studies showed that during phosphinothricin tripeptide biosynthesis 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate (HEP) is converted to hydroxymethylphosphonate (HMP). Here we report the in vitro reconstitution of this unprecedented C(sp{sup 3})-C(sp{sup 3}) bond cleavage reaction and X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme. The protein is a mononuclear non-haem iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that converts HEP to HMP and formate. In contrast to most other members of this family, the oxidative consumption of HEP does not require additional cofactors or the input of exogenous electrons. The current study expands the scope of reactions catalysed by the 2-His-1-carboxylate mononuclear non-haem iron family of enzymes.

  3. Competitive fragmentation pathways of acetic acid dimer explored by synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectrometry and electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Jiwen; Hu Yongjun; Zou Hao; Cao Lanlan; Liu Fuyi; Shan Xiaobin; Sheng Liusi

    2012-09-28

    In present study, photoionization and dissociation of acetic acid dimers have been studied with the synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry and theoretical calculations. Besides the intense signal corresponding to protonated cluster ions (CH{sub 3}COOH){sub n}{center_dot}H{sup +}, the feature related to the fragment ions (CH{sub 3}COOH)H{sup +}{center_dot}COO (105 amu) via {beta}-carbon-carbon bond cleavage is observed. By scanning photoionization efficiency spectra, appearance energies of the fragments (CH{sub 3}COOH){center_dot}H{sup +} and (CH{sub 3}COOH)H{sup +}{center_dot}COO are obtained. With the aid of theoretical calculations, seven fragmentation channels of acetic acid dimer cations were discussed, where five cation isomers of acetic acid dimer are involved. While four of them are found to generate the protonated species, only one of them can dissociate into a C-C bond cleavage product (CH{sub 3}COOH)H{sup +}{center_dot}COO. After surmounting the methyl hydrogen-transfer barrier 10.84 {+-} 0.05 eV, the opening of dissociative channel to produce ions (CH{sub 3}COOH){sup +} becomes the most competitive path. When photon energy increases to 12.4 eV, we also found dimer cations can be fragmented and generate new cations (CH{sub 3}COOH){center_dot}CH{sub 3}CO{sup +}. Kinetics, thermodynamics, and entropy factors for these competitive dissociation pathways are discussed. The present report provides a clear picture of the photoionization and dissociation processes of the acetic acid dimer in the range of the photon energy 9-15 eV.

  4. Do enantiomers of benzenesulfonic acid exist? Electron diffraction and quantum chemical study of molecular structure of benzenesulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giricheva, Nina I.; Girichev, Georgiy V.; Medvedeva, Yulia S.; Ivanov, Sergey N.; Petrov, Vyacheslav M.; Fedorov, Mikhail S.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular structure of benzenesulfonic acid was studied by gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical (B3LYP/cc-pVTZ, МР2/cc-pVDZ, МР2/cc-pVTZ) methods. On the base of mass spectrometric analysis it was found that saturated vapor at Т = 396(9) K is represented by only molecular species, monomeric benzenesulfonic acid. Theoretical calculations showed that the molecule has two mirror conformers of C1 symmetry which can invert to each other via transition state of Cs symmetry by rotation of OH-group around Ssbnd O(H) bond. Both computational methods, B3LYP and MP2, resulted in the same structure of enantiomers; the MP2/cc-pVDZ calculations denoted a over-barrier transition between enantiomers at the temperature of electron diffraction experiment, while B3LYP and MP2 calculations with cc-pVTZ basis set estimated the barrier height to be comparable with the thermal energy value. Two geometric models of C1 and Cs symmetry were examined in gas electron diffraction structural analysis. It was established that the structure of C1 symmetry (Rf = 3.3%) demonstrated the best fit with GED data in comparison with Cs structure (Rf = 3.8%). In conformer of C1 symmetry an ordinary bond Ssbnd O(Н) is located almost orthogonal to benzene ring plane, and an Osbnd H bond practically eclipses one of Sdbnd O bonds of SO3H fragment. The following internuclear distances (Å) in benzenesulfonic acid were determined: rh1(Csbnd H)av = 1.116(6), rh1(Csbnd C)ср = 1.402(4), rh1(Csbnd S) = 1.770(5), rh1(Sdbnd O)av = 1.438(4), rh1(Ssbnd O) = 1.623(4), rh1(Osbnd H) = 0.870(17). Calculations of internal rotation potential functions and NBO-analysis of electron density distribution in a conformer and transition states between enantiomers were performed to establish the reasons of stability of the found asymmetric structure of the studied molecule. The structure of free molecule of benzenesulfonic acid was compared with that of molecular form in crystal.

  5. Cleavage Specificity Analysis of Six Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases (TTSPs) Using PICS with Proteome-Derived Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, François; Leduc, Richard; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are a family of cell membrane tethered serine proteases with unclear roles as their cleavage site specificities and substrate degradomes have not been fully elucidated. Indeed just 52 cleavage sites are annotated in MEROPS, the database of proteases, their substrates and inhibitors. Methodology/Principal Finding To profile the active site specificities of the TTSPs, we applied Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS). Human proteome-derived database searchable peptide libraries were assayed with six human TTSPs (matriptase, matriptase-2, matriptase-3, HAT, DESC and hepsin) to simultaneously determine sequence preferences on the N-terminal non-prime (P) and C-terminal prime (P’) sides of the scissile bond. Prime-side cleavage products were isolated following biotinylation and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding non-prime side sequences were derived from human proteome databases using bioinformatics. Sequencing of 2,405 individual cleaved peptides allowed for the development of the family consensus protease cleavage site specificity revealing a strong specificity for arginine in the P1 position and surprisingly a lysine in P1′ position. TTSP cleavage between R↓K was confirmed using synthetic peptides. By parsing through known substrates and known structures of TTSP catalytic domains, and by modeling the remainder, structural explanations for this strong specificity were derived. Conclusions Degradomics analysis of 2,405 cleavage sites revealed a similar and characteristic TTSP family specificity at the P1 and P1′ positions for arginine and lysine in unfolded peptides. The prime side is important for cleavage specificity, thus making these proteases unusual within the tryptic-enzyme class that generally has overriding non-prime side specificity. PMID:25211023

  6. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Labudde, D; Leitner, D; Krüger, M; Oschkinat, H

    2003-01-01

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  7. Human fatty acid synthase: Structure and substrate selectivity of the thioesterase domain

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Bornali; Gu, Ziwei; Chirala, Subrahmanyam S.; Wakil, Salih J.; Quiocho, Florante A.

    2004-01-01

    Human fatty acid synthase is a large homodimeric multifunctional enzyme that synthesizes palmitic acid. The unique carboxyl terminal thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase hydrolyzes the growing fatty acid chain and plays a critical role in regulating the chain length of fatty acid released. Also, the up-regulation of human fatty acid synthase in a variety of cancer makes the thioesterase a candidate target for therapeutic treatment. The 2.6-Å resolution structure of human fatty acid synthase thioesterase domain reported here is comprised of two dissimilar subdomains, A and B. The smaller subdomain B is composed entirely of α-helices arranged in an atypical fold, whereas the A subdomain is a variation of the α/β hydrolase fold. The structure revealed the presence of a hydrophobic groove with a distal pocket at the interface of the two subdomains, which constitutes the candidate substrate binding site. The length and largely hydrophobic nature of the groove and pocket are consistent with the high selectivity of the thioesterase for palmitoyl acyl substrate. The structure also set the identity of the Asp residue of the catalytic triad of Ser, His, and Asp located in subdomain A at the proximal end of the groove. PMID:15507492

  8. The fifth solvatomorph of gallic acid with a supramolecular channel structure: Structural complexity and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sajesh P.; Kaur, Ramanpreet; Kaur, Jassjot; Sankolli, Ravish; Nayak, Susanta K.; Guru Row, Tayur N.

    2013-01-01

    A new solvatomorph of gallic acid was generated using chiral additive technique and characterized by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, C-13 NMR, IR spectroscopic techniques and thermal analysis. The supramolecular channels formed by hexameric motifs of gallic acid and solvent molecules contain highly disordered solvent molecules with fractional occupancies.

  9. Structural changes of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) after fungal and phosphoric acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Isroi; Ishola, Mofoluwake M; Millati, Ria; Syamsiah, Siti; Cahyanto, Muhammad N; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2012-01-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) was pretreated using white-rot fungus Pleurotus floridanus, phosphoric acid or their combination, and the results were evaluated based on the biomass components, and its structural and morphological changes. The carbohydrate losses after fungal, phosphoric acid, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments were 7.89%, 35.65%, and 33.77%, respectively. The pretreatments changed the hydrogen bonds of cellulose and linkages between lignin and carbohydrate, which is associated with crystallinity of cellulose of OPEFB. Lateral Order Index (LOI) of OPEFB with no pretreatment, with fungal, phosphoric acid, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments were 2.77, 1.42, 0.67, and 0.60, respectively. Phosphoric acid pretreatment showed morphological changes of OPEFB, indicated by the damage of fibre structure into smaller particle size. The fungal-, phosphoric acid-, and fungal followed by phosphoric acid pretreatments have improved the digestibility of OPEFB's cellulose by 4, 6.3, and 7.4 folds, respectively. PMID:23247371

  10. Structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids and T cell cycle blockade.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; DeLoose, Annick; Valentine, Jimmie L; Fifer, E Kim

    2006-04-01

    This study was designed to examine the potential structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids, histone acetylation and T cell cycle blockade. Toward this goal a series of structural homologues of the short-chain carboxylic acid n-butyrate were studied for their ability to block the IL-2-stimulated proliferation of cloned CD4+ T cells. The carboxylic acids were also tested for their ability to inhibit histone deacetylation. In addition, Western blotting was used to examine the relative capacity of the carboxlic acids to upregulate the cyclin kinase-dependent inhibitor p21cip1 in T cells. As shown earlier n-butyrate effectively inhibited histone deacetylation. The increased acetylation induced by n-butyrate was associated with the upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21cip1 and the cell cycle blockade of CD4+ T cells. Of the other carboxylic acids studied, the short chain acids, C3-C5, without branching were the best inhibitors of histone deacetylase. This inhibition correlated with increased expression of the cell cycle blocker p21cip1, and the associated suppression of CD4+ T cell proliferation. The branched-chain carboxylic acids tested were ineffective in all the assays. These results underline the relationship between the ability of a carboxylic acid to inhibit histone deacetylation, and their ability to block T cell proliferation, and suggests that branching inhibits these effects.

  11. Solution structures of europium(III) complexes of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Latva, M.; Kankara, J.; Haapakka, K.

    1996-04-01

    Coordination of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) with europium(III) has been studied at different concentrations in solution using {sup 7}F{sub 0}{yields}{sup 5}D{sub 0} excitation spectroscopy and excited-state lifetime measurements. EDTA forms with Eu(III) ion three different species in equimolar solutions at room temperature. At low pH values EuEDTAH is formed and at higher pH values than 1.5 two EuEDTA{sup -} complexes, which differ from each other with one water molecule in the first coordination sphere of the Eu(III) ion, total coordination number and coordination geometry, are also formed. When the concentration of EDTA is higher than the concentration of Eu(III), an EuEDTA(EDTAH){sup 4-} species where the second EDTA is weakly coordinated to EuEDTA{sup -}, is formed. If the concentration of Eu(III) ion is higher than EDTA, the extra Eu(III) ions associate with EuEDTA{sup -} and link to one of the carboxylate groups of EDTA thus causing a shortening of the excited-state lifetime of the EuEDTA{sup -} complex.

  12. Crystal structures and spectroscopic properties of ester amide and diamide of squaric acid with prolinamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, Tsonko; Seidel, Rüdiger W.; Mayer-Figge, Heike; Spiteller, Michael; Sheldrick, William S.; Koleva, Bojidarka B.

    2009-04-01

    We report the synthesis, spectroscopic and structural elucidation of two prolinamide derivatives of squaric acid, i.e. prolinamide ester amide of squaric acid ethyl ester ( 1) and prolinamide diamide of squaric acid dihydrate ( 2). Both compounds crystallize in non-centrosymmetric space groups, monoclinic P2 1 ( 1) and orthorhombic P2 12 12 1 ( 2), respectively. For first time in the literature the crystal structure of homodiamide of amino acid amide of squaric acid is reported. The data for heterodiamides is also absent. Supramolecular zig-zag chains by hydrogen bonds of H 2N-C dbnd O⋯HNH (3.020 Å) and HNH⋯O dbnd C (Sq) (2.972 Å) types with the participation of amide and squaric acid (Sq) fragments, -C dbnd O-NH 2 and O dbnd C (Sq) are refined in ( 1). A helix supramolecular structure is formed in ( 2) by moderate intermolecular HNH⋯O dbnd C(NH 2) hydrogen bond with length of 2.947 Å. The two crystallographical non-equivalent water molecules stabilized the helix by interactions of types HOH⋯O dbnd C (Sq) (2.917 Å), HOH⋯O dbnd C(NH 2) (2.899 Å), H 2O⋯NH 2(C dbnd O) (2.972 Å), respectively. Optical and magnetic properties are investigated with a view to explain the correlation structure-properties of the newly synthesized molecules.

  13. Calcium waves along the cleavage furrows in cleavage-stage Xenopus embryos and its inhibition by heparin

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Calcium signaling is known to be associated with cytokinesis; however, the detailed spatio-temporal pattern of calcium dynamics has remained unclear. We have studied changes of intracellular free calcium in cleavage-stage Xenopus embryos using fluorescent calcium indicator dyes, mainly Calcium Green-1. Cleavage formation was followed by calcium transients that localized to cleavage furrows and propagated along the furrows as calcium waves. The calcium transients at the cleavage furrows were observed at each cleavage furrow at least until blastula stage. The velocity of the calcium waves at the first cleavage furrow was approximately 3 microns/s, which was much slower than that associated with fertilization/egg activation. These calcium waves traveled only along the cleavage furrows and not in the direction orthogonal to the furrows. These observations imply that there exists an intracellular calcium-releasing activity specifically associated with cleavage furrows. The calcium waves occurred in the absence of extracellular calcium and were inhibited in embryos injected with heparin an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor antagonist. These results suggest that InsP3 receptor-mediated calcium mobilization plays an essential role in calcium wave formation at the cleavage furrows. PMID:8858172

  14. Copper.Lys-Gly-His-Lys mediated cleavage of tRNA(Phe): studies of reaction mechanism and cleavage specificity.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Seth; Kawarasaki, Yuta; Cowan, J A

    2009-06-01

    The reactivity of [Cu2+.Lys-Gly-His-Lys-NH2]2+ and [Cu2+.Lys-Gly-His-Lys]+ toward tRNA(Phe) has been evaluated. The amidated and carboxylate forms of the copper peptides display complex binding behavior with strong and weak sites evident (K(D1)(app) approximately 71 microM, K(D2)(app) approximately 211 microM for the amide form; and K(D1)(app) approximately 34 microM, K(D2)(app) approximately 240 microM for the carboxylate form), while Cu2+(aq) yielded K(D1)(app) approximately 81 microM and K(D2)(app) approximately 136 microM. The time-dependence of the reaction of [Cu2+.Lys-Gly-His-Lys]+ and [Cu2+.Lys-Gly-His-Lys-NH2]2+ with tRNA(Phe) yielded k(obs) approximately 0.075 h(-1) for both complexes. HPLC analysis of the reaction products demonstrated guanine as the sole base product. Mass spectrometric data shows a limited number of cleavage fragments with product peak masses consistent with chemistry occurring at a discrete site defined by the structurally contiguous D and TPsiC loops, and in a domain where high affinity magnesium centers have previously been observed to promote hydrolysis of the tRNA(Phe) backbone. This cleavage pattern is more selective than that previously observed by Long and coworkers for nickel complexes of a series of C-terminally amidated peptides (Gly-Gly-His, Lys-Gly-His, and Arg-Gly-His), and may reflect variations in structural recognition and a distinct reaction path by the nickel derivatives. The data emphasizes the optimal positioning of the metal-associated reactive oxygen species, relative to scissile bonds, as a major criterion for development of efficient catalytic nucleases or therapeutics. PMID:19386364

  15. Structural and functional analysis of fatty acid-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Judith; McDermott, Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian FA-binding proteins (FABPs) bind long-chain FA with high affinity. The large number of FABP types is suggestive of distinct functions in specific tissues. Multiple experimental approaches have shown that individual FABPs possess both unique and overlapping functions, some of which are based on specific elements in the protein structure. Although FA binding affinities for all FABPs tend to correlate directly with FA hydrophobicity, structure-function studies indicate that subtle three-dimensional changes that occur upon ligand binding may promote specific protein-protein or protein-membrane interactions that ultimately determine the function of each FABP. The conformational changes are focused in the FABP helical/portal domain, a region that was identified by in vitro studies to be vital for the FA transport properties of the FABPs. Thus, the FABPs modulate intracellular lipid homeostasis by regulating FA transport in the nuclear and extra-nuclear compartments of the cell; in so doing, they also impact systemic energy homeostasis. PMID:19017610

  16. Binding modes of aromatic ligands to mammalian heme peroxidases with associated functional implications: crystal structures of lactoperoxidase complexes with acetylsalicylic acid, salicylhydroxamic acid, and benzylhydroxamic acid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit K; Singh, Nagendra; Sinha, Mau; Bhushan, Asha; Kaur, Punit; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2009-07-24

    The binding and structural studies of bovine lactoperoxidase with three aromatic ligands, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), salicylhydoxamic acid (SHA), and benzylhydroxamic acid (BHA) show that all the three compounds bind to lactoperoxidase at the substrate binding site on the distal heme side. The binding of ASA occurs without perturbing the position of conserved heme water molecule W-1, whereas both SHA and BHA displace it by the hydroxyl group of their hydroxamic acid moieties. The acetyl group carbonyl oxygen atom of ASA forms a hydrogen bond with W-1, which in turn makes three other hydrogen-bonds, one each with heme iron, His-109 N(epsilon2), and Gln-105 N(epsilon2). In contrast, in the complexes of SHA and BHA, the OH group of hydroxamic acid moiety in both complexes interacts with heme iron directly with Fe-OH distances of 3.0 and 3.2A respectively. The OH is also hydrogen bonded to His-109 N(epsilon2) and Gln-105N(epsilon2). The plane of benzene ring of ASA is inclined at 70.7 degrees from the plane of heme moiety, whereas the aromatic planes of SHA and BHA are nearly parallel to the heme plane with inclinations of 15.7 and 6.2 degrees , respectively. The mode of ASA binding provides the information about the mechanism of action of aromatic substrates, whereas the binding characteristics of SHA and BHA indicate the mode of inhibitor binding.

  17. Beyond terrestrial biology: charting the chemical universe of α-amino acid structures.

    PubMed

    Meringer, Markus; Cleaves, H James; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-11-25

    α-Amino acids are fundamental to biochemistry as the monomeric building blocks with which cells construct proteins according to genetic instructions. However, the 20 amino acids of the standard genetic code represent a tiny fraction of the number of α-amino acid chemical structures that could plausibly play such a role, both from the perspective of natural processes by which life emerged and evolved, and from the perspective of human-engineered genetically coded proteins. Until now, efforts to describe the structures comprising this broader set, or even estimate their number, have been hampered by the complex combinatorial properties of organic molecules. Here, we use computer software based on graph theory and constructive combinatorics in order to conduct an efficient and exhaustive search of the chemical structures implied by two careful and precise definitions of the α-amino acids relevant to coded biological proteins. Our results include two virtual libraries of α-amino acid structures corresponding to these different approaches, comprising 121 044 and 3 846 structures, respectively, and suggest a simple approach to exploring much larger, as yet uncomputed, libraries of interest. PMID:24152173

  18. Beyond terrestrial biology: charting the chemical universe of α-amino acid structures.

    PubMed

    Meringer, Markus; Cleaves, H James; Freeland, Stephen J

    2013-11-25

    α-Amino acids are fundamental to biochemistry as the monomeric building blocks with which cells construct proteins according to genetic instructions. However, the 20 amino acids of the standard genetic code represent a tiny fraction of the number of α-amino acid chemical structures that could plausibly play such a role, both from the perspective of natural processes by which life emerged and evolved, and from the perspective of human-engineered genetically coded proteins. Until now, efforts to describe the structures comprising this broader set, or even estimate their number, have been hampered by the complex combinatorial properties of organic molecules. Here, we use computer software based on graph theory and constructive combinatorics in order to conduct an efficient and exhaustive search of the chemical structures implied by two careful and precise definitions of the α-amino acids relevant to coded biological proteins. Our results include two virtual libraries of α-amino acid structures corresponding to these different approaches, comprising 121 044 and 3 846 structures, respectively, and suggest a simple approach to exploring much larger, as yet uncomputed, libraries of interest.

  19. Bilayer Structure and Lipid Dynamics in a Model Stratum Corneum with Oleic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopes, Matthew I.; Noro, Massimo G.; Longo, Marjorie L.; Faller, Roland

    2011-03-31

    The stratum corneum is the uppermost layer of the skin and acts as a barrier to keep out contaminants and retain moisture. Understanding the molecular structure and behavior of this layer will provide guidance for optimizing its biological function. In this study we use a model mixture comprised of equimolar portions of ceramide NS (24:0), lignoceric acid, and cholesterol to model the effect of the addition of small amounts of oleic acid to the bilayer at 300 and 340 K. Five systems at each temperature have been simulated with concentrations between 0 and 0.1 mol % oleic acid. Our major finding is that subdiffusive behavior over the 200 ns time scale is evident in systems at 340 K, with cholesterol diffusion being enhanced with increased oleic acid. Importantly, cholesterol and other species diffuse faster when radial densities indicate nearest neighbors include more cholesterol. We also find that, with the addition of oleic acid, the bilayer midplane and interfacial densities are reduced and there is a 3% decrease in total thickness occurring mostly near the hydrophilic interface at 300 K with reduced overall density at 340 K. Increased interdigitation occurs independent of oleic acid with a temperature increase. Slight ordering of the long non-hydroxy fatty acid of the ceramide occurs near the hydrophilic interface as a function of the oleic acid concentration, but no significant impact on hydrogen bonding is seen in the chosen oleic acid concentrations.

  20. The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors.

    PubMed

    Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Voigt, Jürgen

    2016-11-15

    Particular peptides generated from the vicilin-class(7S) globulin of the cocoa beans by acid-induced proteolysis during cocoa fermentation are essential precursors of the cocoa-specific aroma notes. As revealed by in vitro studies, the formation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors depends on the particular cleavage specificity of the cocoa aspartic protease, which cannot be substituted by pepsin. Therefore, we have investigated the effects of aspartic protease inhibitors on both enzymes and comparatively studied their cleavage specificities using different protein substrates and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analyses of the generated oligopeptides. Three classes of cleavage sites have been identified and characterized: (I) sequences exclusively cleaved by the cocoa enzyme, (II) sequences cleaved by both pepsin and the cocoa enzyme, and (III) those cleaved exclusively by pepsin. In contrast to most aspartic proteases from other origins, basic amino acid residues, particularly lysine, were found to be abundant in the specific cleavage sites of the cocoa enzyme.

  1. Structure of an Amino Acid-Decorated Exopolysaccharide Secreted by a Vibrio alginolyticus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Drouillard, Sophie; Jeacomine, Isabelle; Buon, Laurine; Boisset, Claire; Courtois, Anthony; Thollas, Bertrand; Morvan, Pierre-Yves; Vallée, Romuald; Helbert, William

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus (CNCM I-4994) secretes an exopolysaccharide that can be used as an ingredient in cosmetic applications. The structure was resolved using chromatography and one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments. The results show that the carbohydrate backbone is made of two residues: d-galacturonic acid and N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNac), which together constitute a tetrasaccharide repetition unit: [→3)-α-d-GalA-(1→4)-α-d-GalA-(1→3)-α-d-GalA-(1→3)-β-GlcNAc(1→]. Two amino acids, alanine and serine, are linked to GalA residues via amido linkages. The position and the distribution of the amino acids were characterized by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a structure for a marine exopolysaccharide decorated with an amino acid. PMID:26528992

  2. Crystal Structures of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB in Its Free and Mercury-Bound Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Lafrance-Vanasse, J.; Lefebvre, M; Di Lello, P; Sygusch, J; Omichinski, J

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria resistant to methylmercury utilize two enzymes (MerA and MerB) to degrade methylmercury to the less toxic elemental mercury. The crucial step is the cleavage of the carbon-mercury bond of methylmercury by the organomercurial lyase (MerB). In this study, we determined high resolution crystal structures of MerB in both the free (1.76-{angstrom} resolution) and mercury-bound (1.64-{angstrom} resolution) states. The crystal structure of free MerB is very similar to theNMRstructure, but important differences are observed when comparing the two structures. In the crystal structure, an amino-terminal-helix that is not present in the NMR structure makes contact with the core region adjacent to the catalytic site. This interaction between the amino-terminal helix and the core serves to bury the active site of MerB. The crystal structures also provide detailed insights into the mechanism of carbon-mercury bond cleavage by MerB. The structures demonstrate that two conserved cysteines (Cys-96 and Cys-159) play a role in substrate binding, carbon-mercury bond cleavage, and controlled product (ionic mercury) release. In addition, the structures establish that an aspartic acid (Asp-99) in the active site plays a crucial role in the proton transfer step required for the cleavage of the carbon-mercury bond. These findings are an important step in understanding the mechanism of carbon-mercury bond cleavage by MerB.

  3. Avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 strains of low virulence with unusual fusion protein cleavage sites isolated from poultry species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian paramyxo-serotype-1 viruses (APMV1) with fusion cleavage sites containing two basic amino acids and a phenylalanine (F) at position 117 have been isolated from poultry species in two states from 2007-2009. The intracerebral pathogenicity indices for these viruses are of low virulence at 0.00 ...

  4. Steroidal aromatic 'naphthenic acids' in oil sands process-affected water: structural comparisons with environmental estrogens.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Steven J; West, Charles E; Jones, David; Scarlett, Alan G; Frank, Richard A; Hewitt, L Mark

    2011-11-15

    The large volumes, acute toxicity, estrogenicity, and antiandrogenicity of process-affected waters accruing in tailings ponds from the operations of the Alberta oil sands industries pose a significant task for environmental reclamation. Synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) suggest that oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) may contain aromatic carboxylic acids, which are among the potentially environmentally important toxicants, but no such acids have yet been identified, limiting interpretations of the results of estrogenicity and other assays. Here we show that multidimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) of methyl esters of acids in an OSPW sample produces mass spectra consistent with their assignment as C(19) and C(20) C-ring monoaromatic hydroxy steroid acids, D-ring opened hydroxy and nonhydroxy polyhydrophenanthroic acids with one aromatic and two alicyclic rings and A-ring opened steroidal keto acids. High resolution MS data support the assignment of several of the so-called 'O3' species. When fractions of distilled, esterified, OSPW acid-extractable organics were examined, the putative aromatics were mainly present in a high boiling fraction; when examined by argentation thin layer chromatography, some were present in a fraction with a retardation factor between that of the methyl esters of synthetic monoalicyclic and monoaromatic acids. Ultraviolet absorption spectra of these fractions indicated the presence of benzenoid moieties. SFS of model octahydro- and tetrahydrophenanthroic acids produced emissions at the characteristic excitation wavelengths observed in some OSPW extracts, consistent with the postulations from ultraviolet spectroscopy and mass spectrometry data. We suggest the acids originate from extensive biodegradation of C-ring monoaromatic steroid hydrocarbons and offer a means of differentiating residues at different biodegradation stages in tailings ponds. Structural similarities with estrone and

  5. Structure and energy of formation of β- and γ-cyclodextrin complexes with amino acid enantiomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Yu. A.; Kiselev, S. S.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between cyclodextrins (CyD), β-CyD, and γ-CyD, and the L- and D-optical isomers of several amino acids (Ala, Leu, His, Phe) are calculated using DFT. It is found that the L-forms of the investigated amino acids bond more strongly to CyD, due to the different numbers of hydrogen bonds that form. The structures of the resulting complexes are analyzed.

  6. Cleavage of galectin-3 by matrix metalloproteases induces angiogenesis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Wang, Yi; Raz, Tirza; Tait, Larry; Balan, Vitaly; Hogan, Victor; Raz, Avraham

    2012-01-01

    Galectin-3 cleavage is related to progression of human breast and prostate cancer and is partly responsible for tumor growth, angiogenesis and apoptosis resistance in mouse models. A functional polymorphism in galectin-3 gene, determining its susceptibility to cleavage by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2/-9 is related to racial disparity in breast cancer incidence in Asian and Caucasian women. The purpose of our study is to evaluate (i) if cleavage of galectin-3 could be related to angiogenesis during the progression of human breast cancer, (ii) the role of cleaved galectin-3 in induction of angiogenesis and (iii) determination of the galectin-3 domain responsible for induction of angiogenic response. Galectin-3 null breast cancer cells BT-459 were transfected with either cleavable full-length galectin-3 or its fragmented peptides. Chemotaxis, chemoinvasion, heterotypic aggregation, epithelial-endothelial cell interactions and angiogenesis were compared to noncleavable galectin-3. BT-549-H64 cells harboring cleavable galectin-3 exhibited increased chemotaxis, invasion and interactions with endothelial cells resulting in angiogenesis and 3D morphogenesis compared to BT-549-P64 cells harboring noncleavable galectin-3. BT-549-H64 cells induced increased migration and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase in migrating endothelial cells. Endothelial cells cocultured with BT-549 cells transfected with galectin-3 peptides indicate that amino acids 1–62 and 33–250 stimulate migration and morphogenesis of endothelial cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of blood vessel density and galectin-3 cleavage in a breast cancer progression tissue array support the in vitro findings. We conclude that the cleavage of the N terminus of galectin-3 followed by its release in the tumor microenvironment in part leads to breast cancer angiogenesis and progression. PMID:20162566

  7. Purification of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) for structural and functional studies.

    PubMed

    Herrala, Annakaisa M; Quintero, Ileana B; Vihko, Pirkko T

    2013-01-01

    High-scale purification methods are required for several protein studies such as crystallography, mass spectrometry, circular dichroism, and function. Here we describe a purification method for PAP based on anion exchange, L-(+)-tartrate affinity, and gel filtration chromatographies. Acid phosphatase activity and protein concentration were measured for each purification step, and to collect the fractions with the highest acid phosphatase activity the p-nitrophenyl phosphate method was used. The purified protein obtained by the procedure described here was used for the determination of the first reported three-dimensional structure of prostatic acid phosphatase.

  8. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Mechanisms for cleavage of RCH{sub 2}-S bonds catalyzed by Escherichia coli can best be categorized by whether an alcohol RCH{sub 2}OH or an aldehyde RCHO are the products of the degradation. A study of the chemical processes involved has been used to establish the best formulation of carbon to sulfur bond cleavage. 2 figs.

  9. DNA Methylation Reduces Binding and Cleavage by Bleomycin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In a recent study, we described the enhanced double-strand cleavage of hairpin DNAs by Fe·bleomycin (Fe·BLM) that accompanies increasingly strong binding of this antitumor agent and suggested that this effect may be relevant to the mechanism by which BLM mediates its antitumor effects. Because the DNA in tumor cells is known to be hypomethylated on cytidine relative to that in normal cells, it seemed of interest to study the possible effects of methylation status on BLM-induced double-strand DNA cleavage. Three hairpin DNAs found to bind strongly to bleomycin, and their methylated counterparts, were used to study the effect of methylation on bleomycin-induced DNA degradation. Under conditions of limited DNA cleavage, there was a significant overall decrease in the cleavage of methylated hairpin DNAs. Cytidine methylation was found to result in decreased BLM-induced cleavage at the site of methylation and to result in enhanced cleavage at adjacent nonmethylated sites. For two of the three hairpin DNAs studied, methylation was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in the binding affinity for Fe·BLM, suggesting the likelihood of diminished double-strand cleavage. The source of the persistent binding of BLM by the third hairpin DNA was identified. Also identified was the probable molecular mechanism for diminished binding and cleavage of the methylated DNAs by BLM. The possible implications of these findings for the antitumor selectivity of bleomycin are discussed. PMID:25187079

  10. Humic acids: Structural properties and multiple functionalities for novel technological developments.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Bruna Alice Gomes; Motta, Fernanda Lopes; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade

    2016-05-01

    Humic acids (HAs) are macromolecules that comprise humic substances (HS), which are organic matter distributed in terrestrial soil, natural water, and sediment. HAs differ from the other HS fractions (fulvic acid and humins) in that they are soluble in alkaline media, partially soluble in water, and insoluble in acidic media. Due to their amphiphilic character, HAs form micelle-like structures in neutral to acidic conditions, which are useful in agriculture, pollution remediation, medicine and pharmaceuticals. HAs have undefined compositions that vary according to the origin, process of obtainment, and functional groups present in their structures, such as quinones, phenols, and carboxylic acids. Quinones are responsible for the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HAs, which are useful for wound healing and have fungicidal/bactericidal properties. Phenols and carboxylic acids deprotonate in neutral and alkaline media and are responsible for various other functions, such as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of HAs. In particular, the presence of phenolic groups in HAs provides antioxidant properties due to their free radical scavenging capacity. This paper describes the main multifunctionalities of HAs associated with their structures and properties, focusing on human health applications, and we note perspectives that may lead to novel technological developments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review to address this topic from this approach. PMID:26952503

  11. On human disease-causing amino acid variants: statistical study of sequence and structural patterns

    PubMed Central

    Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Statistical analysis was carried out on large set of naturally occurring human amino acid variations and it was demonstrated that there is a preference for some amino acid substitutions to be associated with diseases. At an amino acid sequence level, it was shown that the disease-causing variants frequently involve drastic changes of amino acid physico-chemical properties of proteins such as charge, hydrophobicity and geometry. Structural analysis of variants involved in diseases and being frequently observed in human population showed similar trends: disease-causing variants tend to cause more changes of hydrogen bond network and salt bridges as compared with harmless amino acid mutations. Analysis of thermodynamics data reported in literature, both experimental and computational, indicated that disease-causing variants tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions, which prompted us to investigate the effects of amino acid mutations on large databases of experimentally measured energy changes in unrelated proteins. Although the experimental datasets were linked neither to diseases nor exclusory to human proteins, the observed trends were the same: amino acid mutations tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions. Having in mind that structural and thermodynamics properties are interrelated, it is pointed out that any large change of any of them is anticipated to cause a disease. PMID:25689729

  12. In-line alignment and Mg2+ coordination at the cleavage site of the env22 twister ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Aiming; Košutić, Marija; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Frener, Marina; Santner, Tobias; Westhof, Eric; Micura, Ronald; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Small self-cleaving nucleolytic ribozymes contain catalytic domains that accelerate site-specific cleavage/ligation of phosphodiester backbones. We report on the 2.9-Å crystal structure of the env22 twister ribozyme, which adopts a compact tertiary fold stabilized by co-helical stacking, double-pseudoknot formation and long-range pairing interactions. The U-A cleavage site adopts a splayed-apart conformation with the modeled 2′-O of U positioned for in-line attack on the adjacent to-be-cleaved P-O5′ bond. Both an invariant guanosine and a Mg2+ are directly coordinated to the non-bridging phosphate oxygens at the U-A cleavage step, with the former positioned to contribute to catalysis and the latter to structural integrity. The impact of key mutations on cleavage activity identified an invariant guanosine that contributes to catalysis. Our structure of the in-line aligned env22 twister ribozyme is compared with two recently-reported twister ribozymes structures, which adopt similar global folds, but differ in conformational features around the cleavage site. PMID:25410397

  13. Thermodynamic Strategies for C-O Bond Formation and Cleavage via Tandem Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Tracy L; Li, Zhi; Marks, Tobin J

    2016-05-17

    To reduce global reliance on fossil fuels, new renewable sources of energy that can be used with the current infrastructure are required. Biomass represents a major source of renewable carbon based fuel; however, the high oxygen content (∼40%) limits its use as a conventional fuel. To utilize biomass as an energy source, not only with current infrastructure, but for maximum energy return, the oxygen content must be reduced. One method to achieve this is to develop selective catalytic methods to cleave C-O bonds commonly found in biomass (aliphatic and aromatic ethers and esters) for the eventual removal of oxygen in the form of volatile H2O or carboxylic acids. Once selective methods of C-O cleavage are understood and perfected, application to processing real biomass feedstocks such as lignin can be undertaken. This Laboratory previously reported that recyclable "green" lanthanide triflates are excellent catalysts for C-O bond-forming hydroalkoxylation reactions. Based on the virtues of microscopic reversibility, the same lanthanide triflate catalyst should catalyze the reverse C-O cleavage process, retrohydroalkoxylation, to yield an alcohol and an alkene. However, ether C-O bond-forming (retrohydroalkoxylation) to form an alcohol and alkene is endothermic. Guided by quantum chemical analysis, our strategy is to couple endothermic, in tandem, ether C-O bond cleavage with exothermic alkene hydrogenation, thereby leveraging the combined catalytic cycles thermodynamically to form an overall energetically favorable C-O cleavage reaction. This Account reviews recent developments on thermodynamically leveraged tandem catalysis for ether and more recently, ester C-O bond cleavage undertaken at Northwestern University. First, the fundamentals of lanthanide-catalyzed hydroelementation are reviewed, with particular focus on ether C-O bond formation (hydroalkoxylation). Next, the reverse C-O cleavage/retrohydroalkoxylation processes enabled by tandem catalysis are

  14. Thermodynamic Strategies for C-O Bond Formation and Cleavage via Tandem Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Tracy L; Li, Zhi; Marks, Tobin J

    2016-05-17

    To reduce global reliance on fossil fuels, new renewable sources of energy that can be used with the current infrastructure are required. Biomass represents a major source of renewable carbon based fuel; however, the high oxygen content (∼40%) limits its use as a conventional fuel. To utilize biomass as an energy source, not only with current infrastructure, but for maximum energy return, the oxygen content must be reduced. One method to achieve this is to develop selective catalytic methods to cleave C-O bonds commonly found in biomass (aliphatic and aromatic ethers and esters) for the eventual removal of oxygen in the form of volatile H2O or carboxylic acids. Once selective methods of C-O cleavage are understood and perfected, application to processing real biomass feedstocks such as lignin can be undertaken. This Laboratory previously reported that recyclable "green" lanthanide triflates are excellent catalysts for C-O bond-forming hydroalkoxylation reactions. Based on the virtues of microscopic reversibility, the same lanthanide triflate catalyst should catalyze the reverse C-O cleavage process, retrohydroalkoxylation, to yield an alcohol and an alkene. However, ether C-O bond-forming (retrohydroalkoxylation) to form an alcohol and alkene is endothermic. Guided by quantum chemical analysis, our strategy is to couple endothermic, in tandem, ether C-O bond cleavage with exothermic alkene hydrogenation, thereby leveraging the combined catalytic cycles thermodynamically to form an overall energetically favorable C-O cleavage reaction. This Account reviews recent developments on thermodynamically leveraged tandem catalysis for ether and more recently, ester C-O bond cleavage undertaken at Northwestern University. First, the fundamentals of lanthanide-catalyzed hydroelementation are reviewed, with particular focus on ether C-O bond formation (hydroalkoxylation). Next, the reverse C-O cleavage/retrohydroalkoxylation processes enabled by tandem catalysis are

  15. Structure-forming units of amino acid maleates. Case study of L-valinium hydrogen maleate.

    PubMed

    Rychkov, Denis; Arkhipov, Sergey; Boldyreva, Elena

    2016-02-01

    A new salt of L-valinium hydrogen maleate was used as an example to study structure-forming units in amino acid maleates. This compound was crystallized, its structure solved from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, and the phase purity of the bulk powder sample confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction and FT-IR spectra. The stability of the new salt was analyzed using density functional theory and PIXEL calculations with focus on the C(2)2(12) structure-forming crystallographic motif. This motif was of particular interest as it is common for almost all maleates. The exceptionally high ability of maleic acid to form salts with various amino acids was rationalized. PMID:26830808

  16. ConSurf 2010: calculating evolutionary conservation in sequence and structure of proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazy, Haim; Erez, Elana; Martz, Eric; Pupko, Tal; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2010-07-01

    It is informative to detect highly conserved positions in proteins and nucleic acid sequence/structure since they are often indicative of structural and/or functional importance. ConSurf (http://consurf.tau.ac.il) and ConSeq (http://conseq.tau.ac.il) are two well-established web servers for calculating the evolutionary conservation of amino acid positions in proteins using an empirical Bayesian inference, starting from protein structure and sequence, respectively. Here, we present the new version of the ConSurf web server that combines the two independent servers, providing an easier and more intuitive step-by-step interface, while offering the user more flexibility during the process. In addition, the new version of ConSurf calculates the evolutionary rates for nucleic acid sequences. The new version is freely available at: http://consurf.tau.ac.il/.

  17. Interfacial structures of acidic and basic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, C.; Ji, N.; Waychunas, G.; Shen, Y.R.

    2008-10-20

    Phase-sensitive sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was used to study water/vapor interfaces of HCl, HI, and NaOH solutions. The measured imaginary part of the surface spectral responses provided direct characterization of OH stretch vibrations and information about net polar orientations of water species contributing to different regions of the spectrum. We found clear evidence that hydronium ions prefer to emerge at interfaces. Their OH stretches contribute to the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum. Their charges create a positive surface field that tends to reorient water molecules more loosely bonded to the topmost water layer with oxygen toward the interface, and thus enhances significantly the 'liquid-like' band in the spectrum. Iodine ions in solution also like to appear at the interface and alter the positive surface field by forming a narrow double-charge layer with hydronium ions. In NaOH solution, the observed weak change of the 'liquid-like' band and disappearance of the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum indicates that OH{sup -} ions must also have excess at the interface. How they are incorporated in the interfacial water structure is however not clear.

  18. Cleavage factor Im (CFIm) as a regulator of alternative polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Jessica G; Norbury, Chris J

    2016-08-15

    Most mammalian protein coding genes are subject to alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA), which can generate distinct mRNA 3'UTRs with differing regulatory potential. Although this process has been intensely studied in recent years, it remains unclear how and to what extent cleavage site selection is regulated under different physiological conditions. The cleavage factor Im (CFIm) complex is a core component of the mammalian cleavage machinery, and the observation that its depletion causes transcriptome-wide changes in cleavage site use makes it a key candidate regulator of APA. This review aims to summarize current knowledge of the CFIm complex, and explores the evidence surrounding its potential contribution to regulation of APA. PMID:27528751

  19. Structure-activity relationship of caffeoylquinic acids on the accelerating activity on ATP production.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yusaku; Kurisu, Manami; Han, Junkyu; Isoda, Hiroko; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2011-01-01

    Caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) is one of the phenylpropanoids which have various bioactivities such as antioxidant, antibacterial, anticancer, antihistamic, and other biological effects. We previously reported that 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid inhibited amyloid β(1-42)-induced cellular toxicity on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and increased the mRNA expression level of glycolytic enzymes and the intracellular ATP level. To investigate structure-activity relationship on the accelerating activity on ATP production, we synthesized 1,4,5-tri-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,4,5-tri-O-caffeoylquinic acid, and other derivatives. Additionally, we evaluated intracellular ATP level in SH-SY5Y treated with each CQA derivative. As a result, 3,4,5-tri-O-caffeoylquinic acid showed the highest accelerating activity on ATP production among tested compounds. It was suggested that caffeoyl groups bound to quinic acid are important for activity and the more caffeoyl groups are bound to quinic acid, the higher accelerating activity on ATP production exhibits.

  20. 3-D Structural Modeling of Humic Acids through Experimental Characterization, Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation and Atomistic Simulations. 1. Chelsea Soil Humic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, Mamadou S.; Simpson, Andre; Gassman, Paul L.; Faulon, Jean Loup; Johnson, Jr., James H.; Goddard, III, William A.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2003-05-01

    This paper describes an integrated experimental and computational framework for developing 3-D structural models for humic acids (HAs). This approach combines experimental characterization, computer assisted structure elucidation (CASE), and atomistic simulations to generate all 3-D structural models or a representative sample of these models consistent with the analytical data and bulk thermodynamic/structural properties of HAs. To illustrate this methodology, structural data derived from elemental analysis, diffuse reflectance FT-IR spectroscopy, 1-D/2-D | 1H and 13C solution NMR spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI QqTOF MS) are employed as input to the CASE program SIGNATURE to generate all 3-D structural models for Chelsea soil humic acid (HA). These models are subsequently used as starting 3-D structures to carry out constant temperature-constant pressure molecular dynamics simulations to estimate their bulk densities and Hildebrand solubility parameters. Surprisingly, only a few model isomers are found to exhibit molecular compositions and bulk thermodynamic properties consistent with the experimental data. The simulated 13C NMR spectrum of * Corresponding author phone: (626)395-2730; fax: (626)585-0918; e-mail: diallo@wag.caltech.edu and mdiallo@howard.edu. Present address: Materials and Process Simulation Center,BeckmanInstitute 139-74, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125. † California Institute of Technology. ‡ Howard University. § University of Toronto. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. ^ Sandia National Laboratories. # The Ohio State University. ã xxxx American Chemical Society PAGE EST: 11 10.1021/es0259638 CCC: $25.00 Published on Web 00/00/0000 an equimolar mixture of these model isomers compares favorably with the measured spectrum of Chelsea soil HA.

  1. Exploring Regioselective Bond Cleavage and Cross-Coupling Reactions using a Low-Valent Nickel Complex.

    PubMed

    Desnoyer, Addison N; Friese, Florian W; Chiu, Weiling; Drover, Marcus W; Patrick, Brian O; Love, Jennifer A

    2016-03-14

    Recently, esters have received much attention as transmetalation partners for cross-coupling reactions. Herein, we report a systematic study of the reactivity of a series of esters and thioesters with [{(dtbpe)Ni}2(μ-η(2):η(2)-C6H6)] (dtbpe=1,2-bis(di-tert-butyl)phosphinoethane), which is a source of (dtbpe)nickel(0). Trifluoromethylthioesters were found to form η(2)-carbonyl complexes. In contrast, acetylthioesters underwent rapid Cacyl-S bond cleavage followed by decarbonylation to generate methylnickel complexes. This decarbonylation could be pushed backwards by the addition of CO, allowing for regeneration of the thioester. Most of the thioester complexes were found to undergo stoichiometric cross-coupling with phenylboronic acid to yield sulfides. While ethyl trifluoroacetate was also found to form an η(2)-carbonyl complex, phenyl esters were found to predominantly undergo Caryl-O bond cleavage to yield arylnickel complexes. These could also undergo transmetalation to yield biaryls. Attempts to render the reactions catalytic were hindered by ligand scrambling to yield nickel bis(acetate) complexes, the formation of which was supported by independent syntheses. Finally, 2-naphthyl acetate was also found to undergo clean Caryl-O bond cleavage, and although stoichiometric cross-coupling with phenylboronic acid proceeded with good yield, catalytic turnover has so far proven elusive.

  2. Activation of NMDA receptors promotes dendritic spine development through MMP-mediated ICAM-5 cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Li; Stefanidakis, Michael; Ning, Lin; Van Lint, Philippe; Nyman-Huttunen, Henrietta; Libert, Claude; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Mishina, Masayoshi; Rauvala, Heikki; Gahmberg, Carl G.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 are pivotal in remodeling many tissues. However, their functions and candidate substrates for brain development are poorly characterized. Intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5; Telencephalin) is a neuronal adhesion molecule that regulates dendritic elongation and spine maturation. We find that ICAM-5 is cleaved from hippocampal neurons when the cells are treated with N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA). The cleavage is blocked by MMP-2 and -9 inhibitors and small interfering RNAs. Newborn MMP-2– and MMP-9–deficient mice brains contain more full-length ICAM-5 than wild-type mice. NMDA receptor activation disrupts the actin cytoskeletal association of ICAM-5, which promotes its cleavage. ICAM-5 is mainly located in dendritic filopodia and immature thin spines. MMP inhibitors block the NMDA-induced cleavage of ICAM-5 more efficiently in dendritic shafts than in thin spines. ICAM-5 deficiency causes retraction of thin spine heads in response to NMDA stimulation. Soluble ICAM-5 promotes elongation of dendritic filopodia from wild-type neurons, but not from ICAM-5–deficient neurons. Thus, MMPs are important for ICAM-5–mediated dendritic spine development. PMID:17682049

  3. Exploring Regioselective Bond Cleavage and Cross-Coupling Reactions using a Low-Valent Nickel Complex.

    PubMed

    Desnoyer, Addison N; Friese, Florian W; Chiu, Weiling; Drover, Marcus W; Patrick, Brian O; Love, Jennifer A

    2016-03-14

    Recently, esters have received much attention as transmetalation partners for cross-coupling reactions. Herein, we report a systematic study of the reactivity of a series of esters and thioesters with [{(dtbpe)Ni}2(μ-η(2):η(2)-C6H6)] (dtbpe=1,2-bis(di-tert-butyl)phosphinoethane), which is a source of (dtbpe)nickel(0). Trifluoromethylthioesters were found to form η(2)-carbonyl complexes. In contrast, acetylthioesters underwent rapid Cacyl-S bond cleavage followed by decarbonylation to generate methylnickel complexes. This decarbonylation could be pushed backwards by the addition of CO, allowing for regeneration of the thioester. Most of the thioester complexes were found to undergo stoichiometric cross-coupling with phenylboronic acid to yield sulfides. While ethyl trifluoroacetate was also found to form an η(2)-carbonyl complex, phenyl esters were found to predominantly undergo Caryl-O bond cleavage to yield arylnickel complexes. These could also undergo transmetalation to yield biaryls. Attempts to render the reactions catalytic were hindered by ligand scrambling to yield nickel bis(acetate) complexes, the formation of which was supported by independent syntheses. Finally, 2-naphthyl acetate was also found to undergo clean Caryl-O bond cleavage, and although stoichiometric cross-coupling with phenylboronic acid proceeded with good yield, catalytic turnover has so far proven elusive. PMID:26879766

  4. New charge-bearing amino acid residues that promote β-sheet secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Stacy J; Almeida, Aaron M; Yoshimi, Yasuharu; Gellman, Samuel H

    2014-11-26

    Proteinogenic amino acid residues that promote β-sheet secondary structure are hydrophobic (e.g., Ile or Val) or only moderately polar (e.g., Thr). The design of peptides intended to display β-sheet secondary structure in water typically requires one set of residues to ensure conformational stability and an orthogonal set, with charged side chains, to ensure aqueous solubility and discourage self-association. Here we describe new amino acids that manifest substantial β-sheet propensity, by virtue of β-branching, and also bear an ionizable group in the side chain. PMID:25393077

  5. A fungal anticodon nuclease ribotoxin exploits a secondary cleavage site to evade tRNA repair.

    PubMed

    Meineke, Birthe; Kast, Alene; Schwer, Beate; Meinhardt, Friedhelm; Shuman, Stewart; Klassen, Roland

    2012-09-01

    PaOrf2 and γ-toxin subunits of Pichia acaciae toxin (PaT) and Kluyveromyces lactis zymocin are tRNA anticodon nucleases. These secreted ribotoxins are assimilated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, wherein they arrest growth by depleting specific tRNAs. Toxicity can be recapitulated by induced intracellular expression of PaOrf2 or γ-toxin in S. cerevisiae. Mutational analysis of γ-toxin has identified amino acids required for ribotoxicity in vivo and RNA transesterification in vitro. Here, we report that PaOrf2 residues Glu9 and His287 (putative counterparts of γ-toxin Glu9 and His209) are essential for toxicity. Our results suggest a similar basis for RNA transesterification by PaOrf2 and γ-toxin, despite their dissimilar primary structures and distinctive tRNA target specificities. PaOrf2 makes two sequential incisions in tRNA, the first of which occurs 3' from the mcm(5)s(2)U wobble nucleoside and depends on mcm(5). A second incision two nucleotides upstream results in the net excision of a di-nucleotide. Expression of phage and plant tRNA repair systems can relieve PaOrf2 toxicity when tRNA cleavage is restricted to the secondary site in elp3 cells that lack the mcm(5) wobble U modification. Whereas the endogenous yeast tRNA ligase Trl1 can heal tRNA halves produced by PaOrf2 cleavage in elp3 cells, its RNA sealing activity is inadequate to complete the repair. Compatible sealing activity can be provided in trans by plant tRNA ligase. The damage-rescuing ability of tRNA repair systems is lost when PaOrf2 can break tRNA at both sites. These results highlight the logic of a two-incision mechanism of tRNA anticodon damage that evades productive repair by tRNA ligases. PMID:22836353

  6. Metabolic Engineering to Develop a Pathway for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Nitrogen Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    John J. Kilbane II

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the project is to develop a biochemical pathway for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. Specifically a novel biochemical pathway will be developed for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in carbazole. The cleavage of the first C-N bond in carbazole is accomplished by the enzyme carbazole dioxygenase, that catalyzes the conversion of carbazole to 2-aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol. The genes encoding carbazole dioxygenase were cloned from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 and from Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10. The selective cleavage of the second C-N bond has been challenging, and efforts to overcome that challenge have been the focus of recent research in this project. Enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating bacterial cultures that can metabolize 2-aminobiphenyl, but no enzyme capable of selectively cleaving the C-N bond in 2-aminobiphenyl has been identified. Aniline is very similar to the structure of 2-aminobiphenyl and aniline dioxygenase catalyzes the conversion of aniline to catechol and ammonia. For the remainder of the project the emphasis of research will be to simultaneously express the genes for carbazole dioxygenase and for aniline dioxygenase in the same bacterial host and then to select for derivative cultures capable of using carbazole as the sole source of nitrogen.

  7. Sequence features associated with the cleavage efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Homma, Ayaka; Sayadi, Jamasb; Yang, Shu; Ohashi, Jun; Takumi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 system has recently emerged as a versatile tool for biological and medical research. In this system, a single guide RNA (sgRNA) directs the endonuclease Cas9 to a targeted DNA sequence for site-specific manipulation. In addition to this targeting function, the sgRNA has also been shown to play a role in activating the endonuclease activity of Cas9. This dual function of the sgRNA likely underlies observations that different sgRNAs have varying on-target activities. Currently, our understanding of the relationship between sequence features of sgRNAs and their on-target cleavage efficiencies remains limited, largely due to difficulties in assessing the cleavage capacity of a large number of sgRNAs. In this study, we evaluated the cleavage activities of 218 sgRNAs using in vitro Surveyor assays. We found that nucleotides at both PAM-distal and PAM-proximal regions of the sgRNA are significantly correlated with on-target efficiency. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that the genomic context of the targeted DNA, the GC percentage, and the secondary structure of sgRNA are critical factors contributing to cleavage efficiency. In summary, our study reveals important parameters for the design of sgRNAs with high on-target efficiencies, especially in the context of high throughput applications. PMID:26813419

  8. The N-terminal domain allosterically regulates cleavage and activation of the epithelial sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Kota, Pradeep; Buchner, Ginka; Chakraborty, Hirak; Dang, Yan L; He, Hong; Garcia, Guilherme J M; Kubelka, Jan; Gentzsch, Martina; Stutts, M Jackson; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2014-08-15

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is activated upon endoproteolytic cleavage of specific segments in the extracellular domains of the α- and γ-subunits. Cleavage is accomplished by intracellular proteases prior to membrane insertion and by surface-expressed or extracellular soluble proteases once ENaC resides at the cell surface. These cleavage events are partially regulated by intracellular signaling through an unknown allosteric mechanism. Here, using a combination of computational and experimental techniques, we show that the intracellular N terminus of γ-ENaC undergoes secondary structural transitions upon interaction with phosphoinositides. From ab initio folding simulations of the N termini in the presence and absence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), we found that PIP2 increases α-helical propensity in the N terminus of γ-ENaC. Electrophysiology and mutation experiments revealed that a highly conserved cluster of lysines in the γ-ENaC N terminus regulates accessibility of extracellular cleavage sites in γ-ENaC. We also show that conditions that decrease PIP2 or enhance ubiquitination sharply limit access of the γ-ENaC extracellular domain to proteases. Further, the efficiency of allosteric control of ENaC proteolysis is dependent on Tyr(370) in γ-ENaC. Our findings provide an allosteric mechanism for ENaC activation regulated by the N termini and sheds light on a potential general mechanism of channel and receptor activation.

  9. The N-terminal Domain Allosterically Regulates Cleavage and Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Pradeep; Buchner, Ginka; Chakraborty, Hirak; Dang, Yan L.; He, Hong; Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Kubelka, Jan; Gentzsch, Martina; Stutts, M. Jackson; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is activated upon endoproteolytic cleavage of specific segments in the extracellular domains of the α- and γ-subunits. Cleavage is accomplished by intracellular proteases prior to membrane insertion and by surface-expressed or extracellular soluble proteases once ENaC resides at the cell surface. These cleavage events are partially regulated by intracellular signaling through an unknown allosteric mechanism. Here, using a combination of computational and experimental techniques, we show that the intracellular N terminus of γ-ENaC undergoes secondary structural transitions upon interaction with phosphoinositides. From ab initio folding simulations of the N termini in the presence and absence of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), we found that PIP2 increases α-helical propensity in the N terminus of γ-ENaC. Electrophysiology and mutation experiments revealed that a highly conserved cluster of lysines in the γ-ENaC N terminus regulates accessibility of extracellular cleavage sites in γ-ENaC. We also show that conditions that decrease PIP2 or enhance ubiquitination sharply limit access of the γ-ENaC extracellular domain to proteases. Further, the efficiency of allosteric control of ENaC proteolysis is dependent on Tyr370 in γ-ENaC. Our findings provide an allosteric mechanism for ENaC activation regulated by the N termini and sheds light on a potential general mechanism of channel and receptor activation. PMID:24973914

  10. Molecular Basis for the Recognition and Cleavages of IGF-II, TGF-[alpha], and Amylin by Human Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Qing; Manolopoulou, Marika; Bian, Yao; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2010-02-11

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is involved in the clearance of many bioactive peptide substrates, including insulin and amyloid-{beta}, peptides vital to the development of diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. IDE can also rapidly degrade hormones that are held together by intramolecular disulfide bond(s) without their reduction. Furthermore, IDE exhibits a remarkable ability to preferentially degrade structurally similar peptides such as the selective degradation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II and transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF-{alpha}) over IGF-I and epidermal growth factor, respectively. Here, we used high-accuracy mass spectrometry to identify the cleavage sites of human IGF-II, TGF-{alpha}, amylin, reduced amylin, and amyloid-{beta} by human IDE. We also determined the structures of human IDE-IGF-II and IDE-TGF-{alpha} at 2.3 {angstrom} and IDE-amylin at 2.9 {angstrom}. We found that IDE cleaves its substrates at multiple sites in a biased stochastic manner. Furthermore, the presence of a disulfide bond in amylin allows IDE to cut at an additional site in the middle of the peptide (amino acids 18-19). Our amylin-bound IDE structure offers insight into how the structural constraint from a disulfide bond in amylin can alter IDE cleavage sites. Together with NMR structures of amylin and the IGF and epidermal growth factor families, our work also reveals the structural basis of how the high dipole moment of substrates complements the charge distribution of the IDE catalytic chamber for the substrate selectivity. In addition, we show how the ability of substrates to properly anchor their N-terminus to the exosite of IDE and undergo a conformational switch upon binding to the catalytic chamber of IDE can also contribute to the selective degradation of structurally related growth factors.

  11. Crystal Structures of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB in Its Free and Mercury-bound Forms: INSIGHTS INTO THE MECHANISM OF METHYLMERCURY DEGRADATION

    SciTech Connect

    Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Lefebvre, Maryse; Lello, Paola Di; Sygusch, Jurgen; Omichinski, James G. )

    2009-01-27

    Bacteria resistant to methylmercury utilize two enzymes (MerA and MerB) to degrade methylmercury to the less toxic elemental mercury. The crucial step is the cleavage of the carbon-mercury bond of methylmercury by the organomercurial lyase (MerB). In this study, we determined high resolution crystal structures of MerB in both the free (1.76-{angstrom} resolution) and mercury-bound (1.64-{angstrom} resolution) states. The crystal structure of free MerB is very similar to the NMR structure, but important differences are observed when comparing the two structures. In the crystal structure, an amino-terminal {alpha}-helix that is not present in the NMR structure makes contact with the core region adjacent to the catalytic site. This interaction between the amino-terminal helix and the core serves to bury the active site of MerB. The crystal structures also provide detailed insights into the mechanism of carbon-mercury bond cleavage by MerB. The structures demonstrate that two conserved cysteines (Cys-96 and Cys-159) play a role in substrate binding, carbon-mercury bond cleavage, and controlled product (ionic mercury) release. In addition, the structures establish that an aspartic acid (Asp-99) in the active site plays a crucial role in the proton transfer step required for the cleavage of the carbon-mercury bond. These findings are an important step in understanding the mechanism of carbon-mercury bond cleavage by MerB.

  12. Global analyses of endonucleolytic cleavage in mammals reveal expanded repertoires of cleavage-inducing small RNAs and their targets

    PubMed Central

    Cass, Ashley A.; Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Greer, Christopher; Lin, Xianzhi; Kim, Yong; Hsiao, Yun-Hua Esther; Xiao, Xinshu

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, small RNAs are important players in post-transcriptional gene regulation. While their roles in mRNA destabilization and translational repression are well appreciated, their involvement in endonucleolytic cleavage of target RNAs is poorly understood. Very few microRNAs are known to guide RNA cleavage. Endogenous small interfering RNAs are expected to induce target cleavage, but their target genes remain largely unknown. We report a systematic study of small RNA-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage in mouse through integrative analysis of small RNA and degradome sequencing data without imposing any bias toward known small RNAs. Hundreds of small cleavage-inducing RNAs and their cognate target genes were identified, significantly expanding the repertoire of known small RNA-guided cleavage events. Strikingly, both small RNAs and their target sites demonstrated significant overlap with retrotransposons, providing evidence for the long-standing speculation that retrotransposable elements in mRNAs are leveraged as signals for gene targeting. Furthermore, our analysis showed that the RNA cleavage pathway is also present in human cells but affecting a different repertoire of retrotransposons. These results show that small RNA-guided cleavage is more widespread than previously appreciated. Their impact on retrotransposons in non-coding regions shed light on important aspects of mammalian gene regulation. PMID:26975654

  13. Shape matters: size-exclusion HPLC for the study of nucleic acid structural polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Largy, Eric; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of reports have been focused on the structure and biological role of non-canonical nucleic acid secondary structures. Many of these studies involve the use of oligonucleotides that can often adopt a variety of structures depending on the experimental conditions, and hence change the outcome of an assay. The knowledge of the structure(s) formed by oligonucleotides is thus critical to correctly interpret the results, and gain insight into the biological role of these particular sequences. Herein we demonstrate that size-exclusion HPLC (SE-HPLC) is a simple yet surprisingly powerful tool to quickly and effortlessly assess the secondary structure(s) formed by oligonucleotides. For the first time, an extensive calibration and validation of the use of SE-HPLC to confidently detect the presence of different species displaying various structure and/or molecularity, involving >110 oligonucleotides forming a variety of secondary structures (antiparallel, parallel, A-tract bent and mismatched duplexes, triplexes, G-quadruplexes and i-motifs, RNA stem loops), is performed. Moreover, we introduce simple metrics that allow the use of SE-HPLC without the need for a tedious calibration work. We show that the remarkable versatility of the method allows to quickly establish the influence of a number of experimental parameters on nucleic acid structuration and to operate on a wide range of oligonucleotide concentrations. Case studies are provided to clearly illustrate the all-terrain capabilities of SE-HPLC for oligonucleotide secondary structure analysis. Finally, this manuscript features a number of important observations contributing to a better understanding of nucleic acid structural polymorphism. PMID:25143531

  14. Structure and Mechanism of Ferulic Acid Decarboxylase (FDC1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiya, Mohammad Wadud; Lee, Soon Goo

    2015-01-01

    The nonoxidative decarboxylation of aromatic acids occurs in a range of microbes and is of interest for bioprocessing and metabolic engineering. Although phenolic acid decarboxylases provide useful tools for bioindustrial applications, the molecular bases for how these enzymes function are only beginning to be examined. Here we present the 2.35-Å-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the ferulic acid decarboxylase (FDC1; UbiD) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. FDC1 shares structural similarity with the UbiD family of enzymes that are involved in ubiquinone biosynthesis. The position of 4-vinylphenol, the product of p-coumaric acid decarboxylation, in the structure identifies a large hydrophobic cavity as the active site. Differences in the β2e-α5 loop of chains in the crystal structure suggest that the conformational flexibility of this loop allows access to the active site. The structure also implicates Glu285 as the general base in the nonoxidative decarboxylation reaction catalyzed by FDC1. Biochemical analysis showed a loss of enzymatic activity in the E285A mutant. Modeling of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-5-decaprenylbenzoate, a partial structure of the physiological UbiD substrate, in the binding site suggests that an ∼30-Å-long pocket adjacent to the catalytic site may accommodate the isoprenoid tail of the substrate needed for ubiquinone biosynthesis in yeast. The three-dimensional structure of yeast FDC1 provides a template for guiding protein engineering studies aimed at optimizing the efficiency of aromatic acid decarboxylation reactions in bioindustrial applications. PMID:25862228

  15. Structural consequences of amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kazuki; Saito, Seiji; Sugawara, Kanako; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2008-08-01

    To determine the structural changes in the alpha-subunit of beta-hexosaminidase due to amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease, we built structural models of mutant alpha-subunits resulting from 33 missense mutations (24 infantile and 9 late-onset), and analyzed the influence of each amino acid replacement on the structure by calculating the number of atoms affected and determining the solvent-accessible surface area of the corresponding amino acid residue in the wild-type alpha-subunit. In the infantile Tay-Sachs group, the number of atoms influenced by a mutation was generally larger than that in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group in both the main chain and the side chain, and residues associated with the mutations found in the infantile Tay-Sachs group tended to be less solvent-accessible than those in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group. Furthermore, color imaging determined the distribution and degree of the structural changes caused by representative amino acid substitutions, and that there were also differences between the infantile and late-onset Tay-Sachs disease groups. Structural study is useful for elucidating the basis of Tay-Sachs disease.

  16. Structural consequences of amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kazuki; Saito, Seiji; Sugawara, Kanako; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2008-08-01

    To determine the structural changes in the alpha-subunit of beta-hexosaminidase due to amino acid substitutions causing Tay-Sachs disease, we built structural models of mutant alpha-subunits resulting from 33 missense mutations (24 infantile and 9 late-onset), and analyzed the influence of each amino acid replacement on the structure by calculating the number of atoms affected and determining the solvent-accessible surface area of the corresponding amino acid residue in the wild-type alpha-subunit. In the infantile Tay-Sachs group, the number of atoms influenced by a mutation was generally larger than that in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group in both the main chain and the side chain, and residues associated with the mutations found in the infantile Tay-Sachs group tended to be less solvent-accessible than those in the late-onset Tay-Sachs group. Furthermore, color imaging determined the distribution and degree of the structural changes caused by representative amino acid substitutions, and that there were also differences between the infantile and late-onset Tay-Sachs disease groups. Structural study is useful for elucidating the basis of Tay-Sachs disease. PMID:18490185

  17. 3-d structure-based amino acid sequence alignment of esterases, lipases and related proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, M.K.; Doctor, B.P.; Cygler, M.; Schrag, J.D.; Sussman, J.L.

    1993-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, enzymes with potential as pretreatment drugs for organophosphate toxicity, are members of a larger family of homologous proteins that includes carboxylesterases, cholesterol esterases, lipases, and several nonhydrolytic proteins. A computer-generated alignment of 18 of the proteins, the acetylcholinesases, butyrylcholinesterases, carboxylesterases, some esterases, and the nonenzymatic proteins has been previously presented. More recently, the three-dimensional structures of two enzymes enzymes in this group, acetylcholinesterase from Torpedo californica and lipase from Geotrichum candidum, have been determined. Based on the x-ray structures and the superposition of these two enzymes, it was possible to obtain an improved amino acid sequence alignment of 32 members of this family of proteins. Examination of this alignment reveals that 24 amino acids are invariant in all of the hydrolytic proteins, and an additional 49 are well conserved. Conserved amino acids include those of the active site, the disulfide bridges, the salt bridges, in the core of the proteins, and at the edges of secondary structural elements. Comparison of the three-dimensional structures makes it possible to find a well-defined structural basis for the conservation of many of these amino acids.

  18. General access to taiwaniaquinoids based on a hypothetical abietane C7-C8 cleavage biogenetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Rubén; Guardia, Juan J; Alvarez, Esteban; Haidöur, Ali; Ramos, Jose M; Alvarez-Manzaneda, Ramón; Chahboun, Rachid; Alvarez-Manzaneda, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    A new strategy for synthesizing taiwaniaquinoids, a group of terpenoids with an unusual rearranged 5(6→7) or 6-nor-5(6→7)abeo-abietane skeleton, which exhibit promising biological activities, is reported. The procedure, based on the cleavage of the C7-C8 double bond of abietane diterpenes, is the only one yet reported for synthesizing C(20) taiwaniaquinoids bearing a carbon function on the cyclopentane B ring; it is also applicable to the synthesis of the wide variety of existing taiwaniaquinoids. Utilizing this, (-)-taiwaniaquinone A, F, G, and H, (-)-taiwaniaquinol B, and (-)-dichroanone have been synthesized from (+)-abietic acid. The versatility of this strategy allows us to propose the abietane C7-C8 cleavage as a possible biosynthetic pathway to this type of rearranged diterpenes; this proposal seems to be supported by phytochemical evidence.

  19. Mercury Detoxification by Bacteria: Simulations of Transcription Activation and Mercury-Carbon Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hao-Bo; Parks, Jerry M; Johs, Alexander; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, we summarize recent work from our laboratory and provide new perspective on two important aspects of bacterial mercury resistance: the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MerR, and the enzymatic cleavage of the Hg-C bond in methylmercury by the organomercurial lyase, MerB. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of MerR reveal an opening-and-closing dynamics, which may be involved in initiating transcription of mercury resistance genes upon Hg(II) binding. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on an active-site model of the enzyme reveal how MerB catalyzes the Hg-C bond cleavage using cysteine coordination and acid-base chemistry. These studies provide insight into the detailed mechanisms of microbial gene regulation and defense against mercury toxicity.

  20. Engineering of TM1459 from Thermotoga maritima for Increased Oxidative Alkene Cleavage Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Matthias; Trunk, Sarah; Hall, Mélanie; Schwab, Helmut; Steiner, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative cleavage of alkenes is a widely employed process allowing oxyfunctionalization to corresponding carbonyl compounds. Recently, a novel biocatalytic oxidative alkene cleavage activity on styrene derivatives was identified in TM1459 from Thermotoga maritima. In this work we engineered the enzyme by site-saturation mutagenesis of active site amino acids to increase its activity and to broaden its substrate scope. A high-throughput assay for the detection of the ketone products was successfully developed. Several variants with up to twofold improved conversion level of styrene derivatives were successfully identified. Especially, changes in or removal of the C-terminus of TM1459 increased the activity most significantly. These best variants also displayed a slightly enlarged substrate scope. PMID:27713741

  1. Molecular mechanism of photosensitization. XI. Membrane damage and DNA cleavage photoinduced by enoxacin.

    PubMed

    Sortino, S; Condorelli, G; De Guidi, G; Giuffrida, S

    1998-11-01

    The photosensitizing activity of enoxacin, 1-ethyl-6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-7-(1-piperazinyl)- 1,8-naphthyridine-3-carboxilic acid (ENX), toward membranes and DNA has been studied, taking into account human erythrocyte photohemolysis, unilamellar liposome alterations and plasmid pBR322 DNA photocleavage. Hydroxyl radicals and an aromatic carbene generated from ENX photodefluorination seem to be the active intermediates involved in the photosensitization process. The steady-state photolysis products do not participate in the process. The mechanism of photosensitization responsible for the membrane damage depends on the oxygen concentration and follows a different path with respect to that operative for DNA cleavage. Between oxygenated radicals, the hydroxyl seems the species mainly responsible for membrane damage, whereas DNA cleavage is mainly produced by the carbene intermediate. A molecular mechanism of the photosensitization induced by ENX is proposed.

  2. The cleavage preference of the proteasome governs the yield of antigenic peptides

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Proteasomes degrade endogenous proteins in the cytosol. The potential contribution of the proteasome to the effect of flanking sequences on the presentation of an antigenic epitope presented by the major histocompatibility complex class I allele Ld was studied. Peptides generated in cells from minigenes coding for peptides of 17- and 19- amino acid length were compared with the in vitro 20S proteasome degradation products of the respective synthetic peptides. The quality of generated peptides was independent of ubiquitination. In vivo and in vitro processing products were indistinguishable with respect to peptide size and abundance. Altering the neighboring sequence substantially improved the yield of the final antigenic nonapeptide by 20S proteasome cleavage. These results suggest that, in addition to the presence of major histocompatibility complex class I allelic motifs, the cleavage preference of the proteasome can define the antigenic potential of a protein. PMID:7500032

  3. Pyranosides with 2,3-trans carbamate groups: exocyclic or endocyclic cleavage reaction?

    PubMed

    Manabe, Shino; Ito, Yukishige

    2014-06-01

    Pyranosides with 2,3-trans carbamate groups exhibit high 1,2-cis selectivity in glycosylation reactions. Using glycosyl donors with N-benzyl 2,3-trans carbamate groups, an anti-Helicobacter pylori oligosaccharide was synthesized in an efficient manner. Moreover, pyranosides with 2,3-trans carbamate groups readil