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Sample records for acid cleavage structure

  1. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  2. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  3. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  4. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Jeff G; Lyamichev, Victor I; Mast, Andrea L; Brow, Mary Ann D

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  5. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages 02

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  6. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  7. A 1.9 Å Crystal Structure of the HDV Ribozyme Precleavage Suggests both Lewis Acid and General Acid Mechanisms Contribute to Phosphodiester Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jui-Hui; Yajima, Rieko; Chadalavada, Durga M.; Chase, Elaine; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Golden, Barbara L.

    2010-11-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and HDV-like ribozymes are self-cleaving RNAs found throughout all kingdoms of life. These RNAs fold into a double-nested pseudoknot structure and cleave RNA, yielding 2{prime},3{prime}-cyclic phosphate and 5{prime}-hydroxyl termini. The active site nucleotide C75 has a pK{sub a} shifted >2 pH units toward neutrality and has been implicated as a general acid/base in the cleavage reaction. An active site Mg{sup 2+} ion that helps activate the 2{prime}-hydroxyl for nucleophilic attack has been characterized biochemically; however, this ion has not been visualized in any previous structures. To create a snapshot of the ribozyme in a state poised for catalysis, we have crystallized and determined the structure of the HDV ribozyme bound to an inhibitor RNA containing a deoxynucleotide at the cleavage site. This structure includes the wild-type C75 nucleotide and Mg{sup 2+} ions, both of which are required for maximal ribozyme activity. This structure suggests that the position of C75 does not change during the cleavage reaction. A partially hydrated Mg{sup 2+} ion is also found within the active site where it interacts with a newly resolved G {center_dot} U reverse wobble. Although the inhibitor exhibits crystallographic disorder, we modeled the ribozyme-substrate complex using the conformation of the inhibitor strand observed in the hammerhead ribozyme. This model suggests that the pro-RP oxygen of the scissile phosphate and the 2{prime}-hydroxyl nucleophile are inner-sphere ligands to the active site Mg{sup 2+} ion. Thus, the HDV ribozyme may use a combination of metal ion Lewis acid and nucleobase general acid strategies to effect RNA cleavage.

  8. Structural basis of cohesin cleavage by separase

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhonghui; Luo, Xuelian; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation requires timely dissolution of chromosome cohesion after chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle. Separase is absolutely essential for cohesion dissolution in organisms from yeast to man1,2. It cleaves the kleisin subunit of cohesin and opens the cohesin ring to allow chromosome segregation. Cohesin cleavage is spatiotemporally controlled by separase-associated regulatory proteins, including the inhibitory chaperone securin3–6, and by phosphorylation of both the enzyme and substrates7–12. Dysregulation of this process causes chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy, contributing to cancer and birth defects. Despite its essential functions, atomic structures of separase have not been determined. Here, we report crystal structures of the separase protease domain from Chaetomium thermophilum, alone or covalently bound to unphosphorylated and phosphorylated inhibitory peptides derived from a cohesin cleavage site. These structures reveal how separase recognizes cohesin and how cohesin phosphorylation by polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) enhances cleavage. Consistent with a previous cellular study13, mutating two securin residues in a conserved motif that partially matches the separase cleavage consensus converts securin from a separase inhibitor to a substrate. Our study establishes atomic mechanisms of substrate cleavage by separase and suggests competitive inhibition by securin. PMID:27027290

  9. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    PubMed

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-04

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  10. Kinetics of acid-catalyzed cleavage of cumene hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Levin, M E; Gonzales, N O; Zimmerman, L W; Yang, J

    2006-03-17

    The cleavage of cumene hydroperoxide, in the presence of sulfuric acid, to form phenol and acetone has been examined by adiabatic calorimetry. As expected, acid can catalyze cumene hydroperoxide reaction at temperatures below that of thermally-induced decomposition. At elevated acid concentrations, reactivity is also observed at or below room temperature. The exhibited reactivity behavior is complex and is significantly affected by the presence of other species (including the products). Several reaction models have been explored to explain the behavior and these are discussed.

  11. Oxidative cleavage of erucic acid for the synthesis of brassylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah; Pooja Thapliyal; Erica N. Pfarr; Nicholas S. Dusek; Kristofer L. Schiele; James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to synthesize Brassylic Acid (BA) using oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). Crambe (Crambe abyssinica) is an industrial oilseed grown in North Dakota. Crambe has potential as an industrial fatty acid feedstock as a source of Erucic acid (EA). It has approximately 50-60 % of EA, a C{sub 22} monounsaturated fatty acid. Oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids derived from oilseeds produces long chain (9, 11, and 13 carbon atoms) dibasic and monobasic acids. These acids are known commercial feedstocks for the preparation of nylons, polyesters, waxes, surfactants, and perfumes. Other sources of EA are Rapeseed seed oil which 50-60 % of EA. Rapeseed is grown outside USA. The oxidative cleavage of EA was done using a high throughput parallel pressure reactor system. Kinetics of the reaction shows that BA yields reach a saturation at 12 hours. H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} was found to be the best catalyst for the oxidative cleavage of EA. High yields of BA were obtained at 80 C with bubbling of O{sub 2} or 10 bar of O{sub 2} for 12 hours.

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and structural investigation of a new charge transfer complex of 2,6-diaminopyridine with 4-nitrophenylacetic acid: Antimicrobial, DNA binding/cleavage and antioxidant studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, Venkatesan; Saravanabhavan, Munusamy; Sekar, Marimuthu

    2015-08-01

    A new hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer complex (CT) formed by the reaction between donor, 2,6-diaminopyridine and acceptor, 4-nitrophenylacetic acid in methanol at room temperature. The crystal was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR spectroscopic studies and thermal studies. The elemental analysis of CT complex, obtained data revealed that the formation of 1:1 ratio CT complex was proposed. Infrared and NMR studies confirm the chemical constituents and molecular structure of the synthesized complex crystal. The high thermal stability is due to the molecular frame work through H-bonding interactions. Structural investigation indicates that cation and anion are linked through strong N+-H⋯O- type of hydrogen bond. The hydrogen bonded charge transfer crystal was screened for its pharmacology, such as antimicrobial, DNA binding/cleavage and antioxidant studies. The CT complex was screened for its antibacterial and antifungal activity against various bacterial and fungal species, which shows good antimicrobial activity. The DNA binding results indicated that the compound could interact with DNA through intercalation. It should have weak to moderate capacity of scavenging with DPPH.

  13. Leukocyte protease binding to nucleic acids promotes nuclear localization and cleavage of nucleic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marshall P; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron J; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein targets, whereas adding RNA to recombinant RNA binding protein substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Preincubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G. During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps, which bind NE and cathepsin G. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and neutrophil extracellular traps in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high-affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation.

  14. Structural basis for duplex RNA recognition and cleavage by Archaeoglobus fulgidus C3PO

    PubMed Central

    Parizotto, Eneida A; Lowe, Edward D; Parker, James S

    2013-01-01

    Oligomeric complexes of Trax and Translin proteins, known as C3POs, participate in a variety of eukaryotic nucleic acid metabolism pathways including RNAi and tRNA processing. In RNAi in humans and Drosophila, C3PO activates pre-RISC by removing the passenger strand of the siRNA precursor duplex using nuclease activity present in Trax. It is not known how C3POs engage with nucleic acid substrates. Here we identify a single protein from Archaeoglobus fulgidus that assembles into an octamer with striking similarity to human C3PO. The structure in complex with duplex RNA reveals that the octamer entirely encapsulates a single thirteen base-pair RNA duplex inside a large inner cavity. Trax-like subunit catalytic sites target opposite strands of the duplex for cleavage, separated by seven base pairs. The structure provides insight into the mechanism of RNA recognition and cleavage by an archaeal C3PO-like complex. PMID:23353787

  15. Binding and cleavage of nucleic acids by the "hairpin" ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Chowrira, B M; Burke, J M

    1991-09-03

    The "hairpin" ribozyme derived from the minus strand of tobacco ringspot virus satellite RNA [(-)sTRSV] efficiently catalyzes sequence-specific RNA hydrolysis in trans (Feldstein et al., 1989; Hampel & Triz, 1989; Haseloff & Gerlach, 1989). The ribozyme does not cleave DNA. An RNA substrate analogue containing a single deoxyribonucleotide residue 5' to the cleavage site (A-1) binds to the ribozyme efficiently but cannot be cleaved. A DNA substrate analogue with a ribonucleotide at A-1 is cleaved; thus A-1 provides the only 2'-OH required for cleavage. These results support cleavage via a transphosphorylation mechanism initiated by attack of the 2'-OH of A-1 on the scissile phosphodiester. The ribozyme discriminates between DNA and RNA in both binding and cleavage. Results indicate that the 2'-OH of A-1 functions in complex stabilization as well as cleavage. The ribozyme efficiently cleaves a phosphorothioate diester linkage, suggesting that the pro-Rp oxygen at the scissile phosphodiester does not coordinate Mg2+.

  16. Statistical prediction of protein structural, localization and functional properties by the analysis of its fragment mass distributions after proteolytic cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Bunde, Armin

    2016-02-01

    Structural, localization and functional properties of unknown proteins are often being predicted from their primary polypeptide chains using sequence alignment with already characterized proteins and consequent molecular modeling. Here we suggest an approach to predict various structural and structure-associated properties of proteins directly from the mass distributions of their proteolytic cleavage fragments. For amino-acid-specific cleavages, the distributions of fragment masses are determined by the distributions of inter-amino-acid intervals in the protein, that in turn apparently reflect its structural and structure-related features. Large-scale computer simulations revealed that for transmembrane proteins, either α-helical or β -barrel secondary structure could be predicted with about 90% accuracy after thermolysin cleavage. Moreover, 3/4 intrinsically disordered proteins could be correctly distinguished from proteins with fixed three-dimensional structure belonging to all four SCOP structural classes by combining 3–4 different cleavages. Additionally, in some cases the protein cellular localization (cytosolic or membrane-associated) and its host organism (Firmicute or Proteobacteria) could be predicted with around 80% accuracy. In contrast to cytosolic proteins, for membrane-associated proteins exhibiting specific structural conformations, their monotopic or transmembrane localization and functional group (ATP-binding, transporters, sensors and so on) could be also predicted with high accuracy and particular robustness against missing cleavages.

  17. Statistical prediction of protein structural, localization and functional properties by the analysis of its fragment mass distributions after proteolytic cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Bunde, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Structural, localization and functional properties of unknown proteins are often being predicted from their primary polypeptide chains using sequence alignment with already characterized proteins and consequent molecular modeling. Here we suggest an approach to predict various structural and structure-associated properties of proteins directly from the mass distributions of their proteolytic cleavage fragments. For amino-acid-specific cleavages, the distributions of fragment masses are determined by the distributions of inter-amino-acid intervals in the protein, that in turn apparently reflect its structural and structure-related features. Large-scale computer simulations revealed that for transmembrane proteins, either α-helical or β -barrel secondary structure could be predicted with about 90% accuracy after thermolysin cleavage. Moreover, 3/4 intrinsically disordered proteins could be correctly distinguished from proteins with fixed three-dimensional structure belonging to all four SCOP structural classes by combining 3–4 different cleavages. Additionally, in some cases the protein cellular localization (cytosolic or membrane-associated) and its host organism (Firmicute or Proteobacteria) could be predicted with around 80% accuracy. In contrast to cytosolic proteins, for membrane-associated proteins exhibiting specific structural conformations, their monotopic or transmembrane localization and functional group (ATP-binding, transporters, sensors and so on) could be also predicted with high accuracy and particular robustness against missing cleavages. PMID:26924271

  18. Oxidative cleavage with hydrogen peroxide: preparation of polycarboxylic acids from cyclic olefins.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Kango; Mizutani, Toshihiro; Oida, Tatsuo; Kawase, Tokuzo

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative cleavage of carbon-carbon double bonds of cyclic olefins with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of heteropolyacids has been investigated as a clean and environmentally friendly preparation of polycarboxylic acids. In the presence of 12-tungstophospholic acid (H(3)PW(12)O(40)), adipic acid was obtained in 95% yield from cyclohexene in lipophilic phase and hydrogen peroxide in aqueous phase. In addition, 1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid was also obtained in 87% yield from 1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophtharic acid anhydride, while endic acid anhydride did not afford corresponding 2,3,6-cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid but only lactone compound was obtained. In this oxidation process, oxidative cleavage of carbon-carbon double bonds would proceed as the sequential reactions in which the rate determining step is oxidative cleavage of vicinal-diol compounds.

  19. Production of dicarboxylic acids from novel unsaturated fatty acids by laccase-catalyzed oxidative cleavage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Michiki; Kishino, Shigenobu; Park, Si-Bum; Kitamura, Nahoko; Watanabe, Hiroko; Saika, Azusa; Hibi, Makoto; Yokozeki, Kenzo; Ogawa, Jun

    2016-06-27

    The establishment of renewable biofuel and chemical production is desirable because of global warming and the exhaustion of petroleum reserves. Sebacic acid (decanedioic acid), the material of 6,10-nylon, is produced from ricinoleic acid, a carbon-neutral material, but the process is not eco-friendly because of its energy requirements. Laccase-catalyzing oxidative cleavage of fatty acid was applied to the production of dicarboxylic acids using hydroxy and oxo fatty acids involved in the saturation metabolism of unsaturated fatty acids in Lactobacillus plantarum as substrates. Hydroxy or oxo fatty acids with a functional group near the carbon-carbon double bond were cleaved at the carbon-carbon double bond, hydroxy group, or carbonyl group by laccase and transformed into dicarboxylic acids. After 8 h, 0.58 mM of sebacic acid was produced from 1.6 mM of 10-oxo-cis-12,cis-15-octadecadienoic acid (αKetoA) with a conversion rate of 35% (mol/mol). This laccase-catalyzed enzymatic process is a promising method to produce dicarboxylic acids from biomass-derived fatty acids.

  20. Structural determinants of RNA recognition and cleavage by Dicer.

    PubMed

    MacRae, Ian J; Zhou, Kaihong; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2007-10-01

    A hallmark of RNA interference is the production of short double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules 21-28 nucleotides in length by the specialized RNase III protein Dicer. Dicer enzymes uniquely generate RNA products of specific lengths by mechanisms that have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that the PAZ domain responsible for dsRNA end recognition confers this measuring ability through both its structural position and RNA-binding specificity. Point mutations define the dsRNA-binding surface and reveal a protein loop important for cleavage of substrates containing perfect or imperfect base pairing. On the basis of these results, we reengineered Dicer with a U1A RNA-binding domain in place of the PAZ domain to create an enzyme with altered end-recognition specificity and RNA product length. These results explain how Dicer functions as a molecular ruler and provide a structural basis for modifying its activity in cells.

  1. A zwitterionic carbanion frustrated by boranes--dihydrogen cleavage with weak Lewis acids via an "inverse" frustrated Lewis pair approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Aquino, Adelia J A; Cordes, David B; Hung-Low, Fernando; Hase, William L; Krempner, Clemens

    2013-10-30

    The synthesis, structural characterization, and acid-base chemistry of [C(SiMe2OCH2CH2OMe)3]Na (2), a sterically encumbered zwitterionic organosodium compound, is reported. 2 is a strong Brønsted base that forms frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) with a number of boron-containing Lewis acids ranging from weakly Lewis acidic aryl and alkyl boranes to various alkyl borates. These intermolecular FLPs readily cleave H2, which confirms that even poor Lewis acids can engage in FLP-mediated H2 cleavage provided that the present bulky base is of sufficiently high Brønsted basicity.

  2. Site-Specific Pyrolysis Induced Cleavage at Aspartic Acid Residue in Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaofeng; Basile, Franco

    2011-01-01

    A simple and site-specific non-enzymatic method based on pyrolysis has been developed to cleave peptides and proteins. Pyrolytic cleavage was found to be specific and rapid as it induced a cleavage at the C-terminal side of aspartic acid in the temperature range of 220–250 °C in 10 seconds. Electrospray Ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem-MS (MS/MS) were used to characterize and identify pyrolysis cleavage products, confirming that sequence information is conserved after the pyrolysis process in both peptides and protein tested. This suggests that pyrolysis-induced cleavage at aspartyl residues can be used as a rapid protein digestion procedure for the generation of sequence specific protein biomarkers. PMID:17388620

  3. Amino acid substitutions in the poliovirus maturation cleavage site affect assembly and result in accumulation of provirions.

    PubMed Central

    Ansardi, D C; Morrow, C D

    1995-01-01

    The assembly of infectious poliovirus virions requires a proteolytic cleavage between an asparagine-serine amino acid pair (the maturation cleavage site) in VP0 after encapsidation of the genomic RNA. In this study, we have investigated the effects that mutations in the maturation cleavage site have on P1 polyprotein processing, assembly of subviral intermediates, and encapsidation of the viral genomic RNA. We have made mutations in the maturation cleavage site which change the asparagine-serine amino acid pair to either glutamine-glycine or threonine-serine. The mutations were created by site-directed mutagenesis of P1 cDNAs which were recombined into wild-type vaccinia virus to generate recombinant vaccinia viruses. The P1 polyproteins expressed from the recombinant vaccinia viruses were analyzed for proteolytic processing and assembly defects in cells coinfected with a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV-P3) that expresses the poliovirus 3CD protease. A trans complementation system using a defective poliovirus genome was utilized to assess the capacity of the mutant P1 proteins to encapsidate genomic RNA (D. C. Ansardi, D. C. Porter, and C. D. Morrow, J. Virol. 67:3684-3690, 1993). The mutant P1 proteins containing the glutamine-glycine amino acid pair (VP4-QG) and the threonine-serine pair (VP4-TS) were processed by 3CD provided in trans from VV-P3. The processed capsid proteins VP0, VP3, and VP1 derived from the mutant precursor VP4-QG were unstable and failed to assemble into subviral structures in cells coinfected with VV-P3. However, the capsid proteins derived from VP4-QG did assemble into empty-capsid-like structures in the presence of the defective poliovirus genome. In contrast, the capsid proteins derived from processing of the VP4-TS mutant assembled into subviral intermediates both in the presence and in the absence of the defective genome RNA. By a sedimentation analysis, we determined that the capsid proteins derived from the VP4-TS precursor

  4. Transition State Charge Stabilization and Acid-Base Catalysis of mRNA Cleavage by the Endoribonuclease RelE.

    PubMed

    Dunican, Brian F; Hiller, David A; Strobel, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial toxin RelE is a ribosome-dependent endoribonuclease. It is part of a type II toxin-antitoxin system that contributes to antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation. During amino acid starvation, RelE cleaves mRNA in the ribosomal A-site, globally inhibiting protein translation. RelE is structurally similar to microbial RNases that employ general acid-base catalysis to facilitate RNA cleavage. The RelE active site is atypical for acid-base catalysis, in that it is enriched with positively charged residues and lacks the prototypical histidine-glutamate catalytic pair, making the mechanism of mRNA cleavage unclear. In this study, we use a single-turnover kinetic analysis to measure the effect of pH and phosphorothioate substitution on the rate constant for cleavage of mRNA by wild-type RelE and seven active-site mutants. Mutation and thio effects indicate a major role for stabilization of increased negative change in the transition state by arginine 61. The wild-type RelE cleavage rate constant is pH-independent, but the reaction catalyzed by many of the mutants is strongly dependent on pH, suggestive of general acid-base catalysis. pH-rate curves indicate that wild-type RelE operates with the pK(a) of at least one catalytic residue significantly downshifted by the local environment. Mutation of any single active-site residue is sufficient to disrupt this microenvironment and revert the shifted pK(a) back above neutrality. pH-rate curves are consistent with K54 functioning as a general base and R81 as a general acid. The capacity of RelE to effect a large pK(a) shift and facilitate a common catalytic mechanism by uncommon means furthers our understanding of other atypical enzymatic active sites.

  5. Atypical cleavage of protonated N-fatty acyl amino acids derived from aspartic acid evidenced by sequential MS(3) experiments.

    PubMed

    Boukerche, Toufik Taalibi; Alves, Sandra; Le Faouder, Pauline; Warnet, Anna; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Bouchekara, Mohamed; Belbachir, Mohammed; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2016-12-01

    Lipidomics calls for information on detected lipids and conjugates whose structural elucidation by mass spectrometry requires to rationalization of their gas phase dissociations toward collision-induced dissociation (CID) processes. This study focused on activated dissociations of two lipoamino acid (LAA) systems composed of N-palmitoyl acyl coupled with aspartic and glutamic acid mono ethyl esters (as LAA(*D) and LAA(*E)). Although in MS/MS, their CID spectra show similar trends, e.g., release of water and ethanol, the [(LAA(*D/*E)+H)-C2H5OH](+) product ions dissociate via distinct pathways in sequential MS(3) experiments. The formation of all the product ions is rationalized by charge-promoted cleavages often involving stepwise processes with ion isomerization into ion-dipole prior to dissociation. The latter explains the maleic anhydride or ketene neutral losses from N-palmitoyl acyl aspartate and glutamate anhydride fragment ions, respectively. Consequently, protonated palmitoyl acid amide is generated from LAA(*D), whereas LAA(*E) leads to the [*E+H-H2O](+) anhydride. The former releases ammonia to provide acylium, which gives the C n H(2n-1) and C n H(2n-3) carbenium series. This should offer structural information, e.g., to locate either unsaturation(s) or alkyl group branching present on the various fatty acyl moieties of lipo-aspartic acid in further studies based on MS (n) experiments.

  6. Evaluation of microwave-accelerated residue-specific acid cleavage for proteomic applications.

    PubMed

    Swatkoski, Stephen; Gutierrez, Peter; Wynne, Colin; Petrov, Alexey; Dinman, Jonathan D; Edwards, Nathan; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-02-01

    Microwave-accelerated proteolysis using acetic acid has been shown to occur specifically on either or both sides of aspartic acid residues. This chemical cleavage has been applied to ovalbumin and several model peptides to test the effect on some of the more common post-translational modifications. No oxidation of methionine or cysteine was observed; however, hydrolysis of phosphate groups proceeds at a detectable rate. Acid cleavage was also extended to the yeast ribosome model proteome, where it provided information on 74% of that proteome. Aspartic acid occurs across the proteome with approximately half the frequency of the combined occurrence of the trypsin residues lysine and arginine, and implications of this are considered.

  7. 2-Chlorotrityl chloride resin. Studies on anchoring of Fmoc-amino acids and peptide cleavage.

    PubMed

    Barlos, K; Chatzi, O; Gatos, D; Stavropoulos, G

    1991-06-01

    The esterification of 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin with Fmoc-amino acids in the presence of DIEA is studied under various conditions. High esterification yields are obtained using 0.6 equiv. Fmoc-amino acid/mmol resin in DCM or DCE, in 25 min, at room temperature. The reaction proceeds without by product formation even in the case of Fmoc-Asn and Fmoc-Gln. The quantitative and easy cleavage of amino acids and peptides from 2-chlorotrityl resin, by using AcOH/TFE/DCM mixtures, is accomplished within 15-60 min at room temperature, while t-butyl type protecting groups remain unaffected. Under these exceptionally mild conditions 2-chlorotrityl cations generated during the cleavage of amino acids and peptides from resin do not attack the nucleophilic side chains of Trp, Met, and Tyr.

  8. DNA sequence and structure requirements for cleavage of V(D)J recombination signal sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, C A; Mundy, C L; Oettinger, M A

    1996-01-01

    Purified RAG1 and RAG2 proteins can cleave DNA at V(D)J recombination signals. In dissecting the DNA sequence and structural requirements for cleavage, we find that the heptamer and nonamer motifs of the recombination signal sequence can independently direct both steps of the cleavage reaction. Proper helical spacing between these two elements greatly enhances the efficiency of cleavage, whereas improper spacing can lead to interference between the two elements. The signal sequences are surprisingly tolerant of structural variation and function efficiently when nicks, gaps, and mismatched bases are introduced or even when the signal sequence is completely single stranded. Sequence alterations that facilitate unpairing of the bases at the signal/coding border activate the cleavage reaction, suggesting that DNA distortion is critical for V(D)J recombination. PMID:8816481

  9. Endonucleolytic cleavage of RNA at 5' endogenous stem structures by human flap endonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Stevens, A

    1998-10-20

    Structure-specific nucleases called 5' flap endonucleases cleave unannealed 5' arms of template-primer DNA model substrates at the start of the duplex and are involved in Okazaki fragment processing during DNA synthesis. To determine the possible use of the enzymes in RNA structure analysis, the cleavage of synthetic and native RNAs was examined using flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) of HeLa cells. RNAs are cleaved at about 20% of the rate of DNA model substrates, and most of the cleavage sites are within 200 nucleotides of the 5' end. Hydrolysis of MFA2 mRNA of yeast shows that the cleavages are at the start of five possible stem structures of a folded secondary structure predicted on the basis of both chemical and enzymatic structure probing. 16S ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli is cleaved at several 5' stem structures of its phylogenetically predicted folded structure. This type of RNA cleavage specificity may be very useful in secondary structure analysis in the future and also may be used by cells for specific 5' end-geared RNA cleavages.

  10. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Copper-Binding Mutant of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB: Insight into the Key Role of the Active Site Aspartic Acid in Hg-Carbon Bond Cleavage and Metal Binding Specificity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Haytham M; Lecoq, Lauriane; Stevenson, Michael; Mansour, Ahmed; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Sygusch, Jurgen; Wilcox, Dean E; Omichinski, James G

    2016-02-23

    In bacterial resistance to mercury, the organomercurial lyase (MerB) plays a key role in the detoxification pathway through its ability to cleave Hg-carbon bonds. Two cysteines (C96 and C159; Escherichia coli MerB numbering) and an aspartic acid (D99) have been identified as the key catalytic residues, and these three residues are conserved in all but four known MerB variants, where the aspartic acid is replaced with a serine. To understand the role of the active site serine, we characterized the structure and metal binding properties of an E. coli MerB mutant with a serine substituted for D99 (MerB D99S) as well as one of the native MerB variants containing a serine residue in the active site (Bacillus megaterium MerB2). Surprisingly, the MerB D99S protein copurified with a bound metal that was determined to be Cu(II) from UV-vis absorption, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies. X-ray structural studies revealed that the Cu(II) is bound to the active site cysteine residues of MerB D99S, but that it is displaced following the addition of either an organomercurial substrate or an ionic mercury product. In contrast, the B. megaterium MerB2 protein does not copurify with copper, but the structure of the B. megaterium MerB2-Hg complex is highly similar to the structure of the MerB D99S-Hg complexes. These results demonstrate that the active site aspartic acid is crucial for both the enzymatic activity and metal binding specificity of MerB proteins and suggest a possible functional relationship between MerB and its only known structural homologue, the copper-binding protein NosL.

  11. Structural basis for single-stranded RNA recognition and cleavage by C3PO

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Hehua; Yao, Qingqing; Yu, Xiang; Chen, Yiqing; Cui, Ruixue; Wu, Baixing; Zheng, Lina; Zuo, Junjun; Huang, Zhen; Ma, Jinbiao; Gan, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Translin and translin-associated factor-x are highly conserved in eukaroytes; they can form heteromeric complexes (known as C3POs) and participate in various nucleic acid metabolism pathways. In humans and Drosophila, C3POs cleave the fragmented siRNA passenger strands and facilitate the activation of RNA-induced silencing complex, the effector complex of RNA interference (RNAi). Here, we report three crystal structures of Nanoarchaeum equitans (Ne) C3PO. The apo-NeC3PO structure adopts an open form and unravels a potential substrates entryway for the first time. The NeC3PO:ssRNA and NeC3PO:ssDNA complexes fold like closed football with the substrates captured at the inner cavities. The NeC3PO:ssRNA structure represents the only catalytic form C3PO complex available to date; with mutagenesis and in vitro cleavage assays, the structure provides critical insights into the substrate binding and the two-cation-assisted catalytic mechanisms that are shared by eukaryotic C3POs. The work presented here further advances our understanding on the RNAi pathway. PMID:27596600

  12. Lewis Acid Accelerated Aryl Ether Bond Cleavage with Nickel: Orders of Magnitude Rate Enhancement Using AlMe3.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Paul; Edouard, Guy A; Lin, Sibo; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-11-21

    Study of the kinetics of intramolecular aryl ether C-O bond cleavage by Ni was facilitated by access to a family of metal complexes supported by diphosphines with pendant aryl-methyl ethers. The nature of the aryl substituents was found to have little effect on the rate of cleavage. In contrast, soluble Lewis acidic additives accelerate the aryl ether cleavage dramatically. The effect of AlMe3 was studied in detail, and showed an increase in rate by several orders of magnitude. Low temperature NMR spectroscopy studies demonstrate quantitative coordination of ether to Al. From the Lewis acid-bound precursor, the activation parameters for ether cleavage are significantly lower. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for milder catalyst design for the activation of strong bonds.

  13. Clearance and early hydrolysis of atrial natriuretic factor in vivo. Structural analysis of cleavage sites and design of an analogue that inhibits hormone cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Condra, C L; Leidy, E A; Bunting, P; Colton, C D; Nutt, R F; Rosenblatt, M; Jacobs, J W

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the clearance and early hydrolysis of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in vivo. Radiolabeled ANF was cleared from the circulation of the rat with biphasic kinetics; the majority (90%) of ANF cleared with a t1/2 of 15 s, the remaining peptide was cleared with a t1/2 of 5 min. Microsequence analysis of ANF peptides recovered from the circulation of rats revealed five major degradation products of the intact hormone. The first cleavage occurred between amino acids 12 and 13 of the hormone and would inactivate ANF. Over time, additional fragments of the hormone were generated, including fragments of 6, 7, 21, and 24 amino acids in length. Whole body radioautography of rats injected with [123I]-ANF revealed the kidney as a predominant organ involved in clearance of ANF. Subsequent amino acid sequence analyses of radiolabeled ANF exposed to the kidney in vivo indicated that this organ generated four of the five major hydrolysis products observed in circulation, namely, the 6, 7, 16, and 21 amino acid fragments of the hormone. In an attempt to stabilize ANF in vivo, a synthetic analogue of the hormone was prepared that contained the amino acid analogue, aminoisobutyric acid, substituted at position 13. This analogue completely abolished the in vivo cleavage of ANF at this site. These studies demonstrate the usefulness of a protein chemistry approach in characterizing hormone metabolism in vivo and designing analogues with enhanced in vivo stability to cleavage. Images PMID:2966813

  14. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  15. Structural basis for the fast self-cleavage reaction catalyzed by the twister ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Eiler, Daniel; Wang, Jimin; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Twister is a recently discovered RNA motif that is estimated to have one of the fastest known catalytic rates of any naturally occurring small self-cleaving ribozyme. We determined the 4.1-Å resolution crystal structure of a twister sequence from an organism that has not been cultured in isolation, and it shows an ordered scissile phosphate and nucleotide 5′ to the cleavage site. A second crystal structure of twister from Orzyza sativa determined at 3.1-Å resolution exhibits a disordered scissile phosphate and nucleotide 5′ to the cleavage site. The core of twister is stabilized by base pairing, a large network of stacking interactions, and two pseudoknots. We observe three nucleotides that appear to mediate catalysis: a guanosine that we propose deprotonates the 2′-hydroxyl of the nucleotide 5′ to the cleavage site and a conserved adenosine. We suggest the adenosine neutralizes the negative charge on a nonbridging phosphate oxygen atom at the cleavage site. The active site also positions the labile linkage for in-line nucleophilic attack, and thus twister appears to simultaneously use three strategies proposed for small self-cleaving ribozymes. The twister crystal structures (i) show its global structure, (ii) demonstrate the significance of the double pseudoknot fold, (iii) provide a possible hypothesis for enhanced catalysis, and (iv) illuminate the roles of all 10 highly conserved nucleotides of twister that participate in the formation of its small and stable catalytic pocket. PMID:25157168

  16. Structure-function analysis of Staphylococcus aureus amidase reveals the determinants of peptidoglycan recognition and cleavage.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Felix Michael; Zoll, Sebastian; Nega, Mulugeta; Götz, Friedrich; Stehle, Thilo

    2014-04-18

    The bifunctional major autolysin AtlA of Staphylococcus aureus cleaves the bacterium's peptidoglycan network (PGN) at two distinct sites during cell division. Deletion of the enzyme results in large cell clusters with disordered division patterns, indicating that AtlA could be a promising target for the development of new antibiotics. One of the two functions of AtlA is performed by the N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase AmiA, which cleaves the bond between the carbohydrate and the peptide moieties of PGN. To establish the structural requirements of PGN recognition and the enzymatic mechanism of cleavage, we solved the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of AmiA (AmiA-cat) in complex with a peptidoglycan-derived ligand at 1.55 Å resolution. The peptide stem is clearly visible in the structure, forming extensive contacts with protein residues by docking into an elongated groove. Less well defined electron density and the analysis of surface features indicate likely positions of the carbohydrate backbone and the pentaglycine bridge. Substrate specificity analysis supports the importance of the pentaglycine bridge for fitting into the binding cleft of AmiA-cat. PGN of S. aureus with l-lysine tethered with d-alanine via a pentaglycine bridge is completely hydrolyzed, whereas PGN of Bacillus subtilis with meso-diaminopimelic acid directly tethered with d-alanine is not hydrolyzed. An active site mutant, H370A, of AmiA-cat was completely inactive, providing further support for the proposed catalytic mechanism of AmiA. The structure reported here is not only the first of any bacterial amidase in which both the PGN component and the water molecule that carries out the nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon of the scissile bond are present; it is also the first peptidoglycan amidase complex structure of an important human pathogen.

  17. Chlorination and Cleavage of Lignin Structures by Fungal Chloroperoxidases

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Bermúdez, Patricia; Srebotnik, Ewald; Hammel, Kenneth E.

    2003-01-01

    Two fungal chloroperoxidases (CPOs), the heme enzyme from Caldariomyces fumago and the vanadium enzyme from Curvularia inaequalis, chlorinated 1-(4-ethoxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1,3-dihydroxypropane, a dimeric model compound that represents the major nonphenolic structure in lignin. Both enzymes also cleaved this dimer to give 1-chloro-4-ethoxy-3-methoxybenzene and 1,2-dichloro-4-ethoxy-5-methoxybenzene, and they depolymerized a synthetic guaiacyl lignin. Since fungal CPOs occur in soils and the fungi that produce them are common inhabitants of plant debris, CPOs may have roles in the natural production of high-molecular-weight chloroaromatics and in lignin breakdown. PMID:12902304

  18. Chlorination and cleavage of lignin structures by fungal chloroperoxidases.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Bermúdez, Patricia; Srebotnik, Ewald; Hammel, Kenneth E

    2003-08-01

    Two fungal chloroperoxidases (CPOs), the heme enzyme from Caldariomyces fumago and the vanadium enzyme from Curvularia inaequalis, chlorinated 1-(4-ethoxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1,3-dihydroxypropane, a dimeric model compound that represents the major nonphenolic structure in lignin. Both enzymes also cleaved this dimer to give 1-chloro-4-ethoxy-3-methoxybenzene and 1,2-dichloro-4-ethoxy-5-methoxybenzene, and they depolymerized a synthetic guaiacyl lignin. Since fungal CPOs occur in soils and the fungi that produce them are common inhabitants of plant debris, CPOs may have roles in the natural production of high-molecular-weight chloroaromatics and in lignin breakdown.

  19. Multiple nucleic acid cleavage modes in divergent type III CRISPR systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Graham, Shirley; Tello, Agnes; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is an RNA-guided adaptive immune system that protects bacteria and archaea from invading nucleic acids. Type III systems (Cmr, Csm) have been shown to cleave RNA targets in vitro and some are capable of transcription-dependent DNA targeting. The crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has two divergent subtypes of the type III system (Sso-IIID and a Cmr7-containing variant of Sso-IIIB). Here, we report that both the Sso-IIID and Sso-IIIB complexes cleave cognate RNA targets with a ruler mechanism and 6 or 12 nt spacing that relates to the organization of the Cas7 backbone. This backbone-mediated cleavage activity thus appears universal for the type III systems. The Sso-IIIB complex is also known to possess a distinct ‘UA’ cleavage mode. The predominant activity observed in vitro depends on the relative molar concentration of protein and target RNA. The Sso-IIID complex can cleave plasmid DNA targets in vitro, generating linear DNA products with an activity that is dependent on both the cyclase and HD nuclease domains of the Cas10 subunit, suggesting a role for both nuclease active sites in the degradation of double-stranded DNA targets. PMID:26801642

  20. Phosphatidic Acid Binds to Cytosolic Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase and Promotes Its Cleavage in Arabidopsis *

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Chul; Guo, Liang; Wang, Xuemin

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) is a class of lipid messengers involved in a variety of physiological processes. To understand how PA mediates cell functions in plants, we used a PA affinity membrane assay to isolate PA-binding proteins from Camelina sativa followed by mass spectrometric sequencing. A cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC) was identified to bind to PA, and detailed analysis was carried out subsequently using GAPC1 and GAPC1 from Arabidopsis. The PA and GAPC binding was abolished by the cation zinc whereas oxidation of GAPCs promoted the PA binding. PA had little impact on the GAPC catalytic activity in vitro, but the PA treatment of Arabidopsis seedlings induced proteolytic cleavage of GAPC2 and inhibited Arabidopsis seedling growth. The extent of PA inhibition was greater in GAPC-overexpressing than wild-type seedlings, but the greater PA inhibition was abolished by application of zinc to the seedling. The PA treatment also reduced the expression of genes involved in PA synthesis and utilization, and the PA-reduced gene expression was partially recovered by zinc treatment. These data suggest that PA binds to oxidized GAPDH and promotes its cleavage and that the PA and GAPC interaction may provide a signaling link coordinating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. PMID:23504314

  1. Proximity-activated nanoparticles: in vitro performance of specific structural modification by enzymatic cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Adam Smith, R; Sewell, Sarah L; Giorgio, Todd D

    2008-01-01

    The development and in vitro performance of a modular nanoscale system capable of specific structural modification by enzymatic activity is described in this work. Due to its small physical size and adaptable characteristics, this system has the potential for utilization in targeted delivery systems and biosensing. Nanoparticle probes were synthesized containing two distinct fluorescent species including a quantum dot base particle and fluorescently labeled cleavable peptide substrate. Activity of these probes was monitored by gel electrophoresis with quantitative cleavage measurements made by fluorometric analysis. The model proximity-activated nanoparticles studied here exhibit significant susceptibility to cleavage by matrix metalloprotease-7 (MMP-7) at physiologically relevant concentrations, with nearly complete cleavage of available substrate molecules after 24 hours. This response is specific to MMP-7 enzyme activity, as cleavage is completely inhibited with the addition of EDTA. Utilization of enzyme-specific modification is a sensitive approach with broad applications for targeted therapeutics and biosensing. The versatility of this nanoparticle system is highlighted in its modular design, as it has the capability to integrate characteristics for detection, biosensing, targeting, and payload delivery into a single, multifunctional nanoparticle structure. PMID:18488420

  2. Crystal Structure of the 25 kDa Subunit of Human Cleavage Factor I{m}

    SciTech Connect

    Coseno,M.; Martin, G.; Berger, C.; Gilmartin, G.; Keller, W.; Doublie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Cleavage factor Im is an essential component of the pre-messenger RNA 3'-end processing machinery in higher eukaryotes, participating in both the polyadenylation and cleavage steps. Cleavage factor Im is an oligomer composed of a small 25 kDa subunit (CF Im25) and a variable larger subunit of either 59, 68 or 72 kDa. The small subunit also interacts with RNA, poly(A) polymerase, and the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein. These protein-protein interactions are thought to be facilitated by the Nudix domain of CF Im25, a hydrolase motif with a characteristic {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} fold and a conserved catalytic sequence or Nudix box. We present here the crystal structures of human CF Im25 in its free and diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A) bound forms at 1.85 and 1.80 Angstroms, respectively. CF Im25 crystallizes as a dimer and presents the classical Nudix fold. Results from crystallographic and biochemical experiments suggest that CF Im25 makes use of its Nudix fold to bind but not hydrolyze ATP and Ap4A. The complex and apo protein structures provide insight into the active oligomeric state of CF Im and suggest a possible role of nucleotide binding in either the polyadenylation and/or cleavage steps of pre-messenger RNA 3'-end processing.

  3. Facile C(sp(2))-C(sp(2)) bond cleavage in oxalic acid-derived radicals.

    PubMed

    Molt, Robert W; Lecher, Alison M; Clark, Timothy; Bartlett, Rodney J; Richards, Nigel G J

    2015-03-11

    Oxalate decarboxylase (OxDC) catalyzes the Mn-dependent conversion of the oxalate monoanion into CO2 and formate. Many questions remain about the catalytic mechanism of OxDC although it has been proposed that the reaction proceeds via substrate-based radical intermediates. Using coupled cluster theory combined with implicit solvation models we have examined the effects of radical formation on the structure and reactivity of oxalic acid-derived radicals in aqueous solution. Our results show that the calculated solution-phase free-energy barrier for C-C bond cleavage to form CO2 is decreased from 34.2 kcal/mol for oxalic acid to only 9.3 kcal/mol and a maximum of 3.5 kcal/mol for the cationic and neutral oxalic acid-derived radicals, respectively. These studies also show that the C-C σ bonding orbital of the radical cation contains only a single electron, giving rise to an elongated C-C bond distance of 1.7 Å; a similar lengthening of the C-C bond is not observed for the neutral radical. This study provides new chemical insights into the structure and stability of plausible intermediates in the catalytic mechanism of OxDC, and suggests that removal of an electron to form a radical (with or without the concomitant loss of a proton) may be a general strategy for cleaving the unreactive C-C bonds between adjacent sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms.

  4. Structures of a CRISPR-Cas9 R-loop complex primed for DNA cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fuguo; Taylor, David W.; Chen, Janice S.; Kornfeld, Jack E.; Zhou, Kaihong; Thompson, Aubri J.; Nogales, Eva; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptive immunity and genome engineering involving the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)–associated (Cas) protein Cas9 begin with RNA-guided DNA unwinding to form an RNA-DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand inside the protein. The role of this R-loop structure in positioning each DNA strand for cleavage by the two Cas9 nuclease domains is unknown. We determine molecular structures of the catalytically active Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 R-loop that show the displaced DNA strand located near the RuvC nuclease domain active site. These protein-DNA interactions, in turn, position the HNH nuclease domain adjacent to the target DNA strand cleavage site in a conformation essential for concerted DNA cutting. Cas9 bends the DNA helix by 30°, providing the structural distortion needed for R-loop formation. PMID:26841432

  5. Structures of a CRISPR-Cas9 R-loop complex primed for DNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fuguo; Taylor, David W; Chen, Janice S; Kornfeld, Jack E; Zhou, Kaihong; Thompson, Aubri J; Nogales, Eva; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-02-19

    Bacterial adaptive immunity and genome engineering involving the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-associated (Cas) protein Cas9 begin with RNA-guided DNA unwinding to form an RNA-DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand inside the protein. The role of this R-loop structure in positioning each DNA strand for cleavage by the two Cas9 nuclease domains is unknown. We determine molecular structures of the catalytically active Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 R-loop that show the displaced DNA strand located near the RuvC nuclease domain active site. These protein-DNA interactions, in turn, position the HNH nuclease domain adjacent to the target DNA strand cleavage site in a conformation essential for concerted DNA cutting. Cas9 bends the DNA helix by 30°, providing the structural distortion needed for R-loop formation.

  6. Mechanistic Investigation of Acid-Catalyzed Cleavage of Aryl-Ether Linkages: Implications for Lignin Depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, M. R.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-oxygen bonds are the primary inter-monomer linkages lignin polymers in plant cell walls, and as such, catalyst development to cleave these linkages is of paramount importance to deconstruct biomass to its constituent monomers for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. For many decades, acid catalysis has been used to depolymerize lignin. Lignin is a primary component of plant cell walls, which is connected primarily by aryl-ether linkages, and the mechanism of its deconstruction by acid is not well understood, likely due to its heterogeneous and complex nature compared to cellulose. For effective biomass conversion strategies, utilization of lignin is of significant relevance and as such understanding the mechanisms of catalytic lignin deconstruction to constituent monomers and oligomers is of keen interest. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the acid catalysis of a range of dimeric species exhibiting the b-O-4 linkage, the most common inter-monomer linkage in lignin. We demonstrate that the presence of a phenolic species dramatically increases the rate of cleavage in acid at 150 degrees C. Quantum mechanical calculations on dimers with the para-hydroxyl group demonstrate that this acid-catalyzed pathway differs from the nonphenolic dimmers. Importantly, this result implies that depolymerization of native lignin in the plant cell wall will proceed via an unzipping mechanism wherein b-O-4 linkages will be cleaved from the ends of the branched, polymer chains inwards toward the center of the polymer. To test this hypothesis further, we synthesized a homopolymer of b-O-4 with a phenolic hydroxyl group, and demonstrate that it is cleaved in acid from the end containing the phenolic hydroxyl group. This result suggests that genetic modifications to lignin biosynthesis pathways in plants that will enable lower severity processes to fractionate lignin for upgrading and for easier access to the carbohydrate fraction of

  7. Identification of the cleavage sites in the alpha6A integrin subunit: structural requirements for cleavage and functional analysis of the uncleaved alpha6Abeta1 integrin.

    PubMed Central

    Delwel, G O; Kuikman, I; van der Schors, R C; de Melker, A A; Sonnenberg, A

    1997-01-01

    The alpha6A and alpha6B integrin subunits are proteolytically cleaved during biosynthesis into a heavy chain (120 kDa) that is disulphide-linked to one of two light chains (31 or 30 kDa). Analysis of the structure of the alpha6A subunit on the carcinoma cell line T24 and human platelets demonstrated that the two light chains of alpha6 are not differentially glycosylated products of one polypeptide. Rather they possess different polypeptide backbones, which presumably result from proteolytic cleavage at distinct sites in the alpha6 precursor. Mutations were introduced in the codons for the R876KKR879, E883K884, R890K891 and R898K899 sequences, the potential proteolytic cleavage sites, and wild-type and mutant alpha6A cDNAs were transfected into K562 cells. The mutant alpha6A integrin subunits were expressed in association with endogenous beta1 at levels comparable to that of wild-type alpha6Abeta1. A single alpha6 polypeptide chain (150 kDa) was precipitated from transfectants expressing alpha6A with mutations or deletions in the RKKR sequence. Mutations in the EK sequence yielded alpha6A subunits that were cleaved once into a heavy and a light chain, whereas alpha6A subunits with mutations in one of the two RK sequences were, like wild-type alpha6A, cleaved into one heavy and two light chains. Thus a change in the RKKR sequence prevents the cleavage of alpha6. The EK site is the secondary cleavage site, which is used only when the primary site (RKKR) is intact. Microsequencing of the N-termini of the two alpha6A light chains from platelets demonstrated that cleavage occurs after Arg879 and Lys884. Because alpha6(RKKG), alpha6(GKKR) and alpha6(RGGR) subunits were not cleaved it seems that both the arginine residues and the lysine residues are essential for cleavage of RKKR. alpha6A mutants with the RKKR sequence shifted to the EK site, in such a way that the position of the arginine residue after which cleavage occurs corresponds exactly to Lys884, were partly

  8. Structural Basis for Accelerated Cleavage of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI) by Human Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Salameh,M.; Soares, A.; Hockla, A.; Radisky, E.

    2008-01-01

    Human mesotrypsin is an isoform of trypsin that displays unusual resistance to polypeptide trypsin inhibitors and has been observed to cleave several such inhibitors as substrates. Whereas substitution of arginine for the highly conserved glycine 193 in the trypsin active site has been implicated as a critical factor in the inhibitor resistance of mesotrypsin, how this substitution leads to accelerated inhibitor cleavage is not clear. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) forms an extremely stable and cleavage-resistant complex with trypsin, and thus provides a rigorous challenge of mesotrypsin catalytic activity toward polypeptide inhibitors. Here, we report kinetic constants for mesotrypsin and the highly homologous (but inhibitor sensitive) human cationic trypsin, describing inhibition by, and cleavage of BPTI, as well as crystal structures of the mesotrypsin-BPTI and human cationic trypsin-BPTI complexes. We find that mesotrypsin cleaves BPTI with a rate constant accelerated 350-fold over that of human cationic trypsin and 150,000-fold over that of bovine trypsin. From the crystal structures, we see that small conformational adjustments limited to several side chains enable mesotrypsin-BPTI complex formation, surmounting the predicted steric clash introduced by Arg-193. Our results show that the mesotrypsin-BPTI interface favors catalysis through (a) electrostatic repulsion between the closely spaced mesotrypsin Arg-193 and BPTI Arg-17, and (b) elimination of two hydrogen bonds between the enzyme and the amine leaving group portion of BPTI. Our model predicts that these deleterious interactions accelerate leaving group dissociation and deacylation.

  9. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase: structural insights into the mechanism of intermolecular cleavage.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Jutta; Grishkovskaya, Irina; Cencic, Regina; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria A; Skern, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Translation of foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA initiates at one of two start codons leading to the synthesis of two forms of leader proteinase L(pro) (Lab(pro) and Lb(pro)). These forms free themselves from the viral polyprotein by intra- and intermolecular self-processing and subsequently cleave the cellular eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4 G. During infection, Lb(pro) removes six residues from its own C-terminus, generating sLb(pro). We present the structure of sLb(pro) bound to the inhibitor E64-R-P-NH2, illustrating how sLb(pro) can cleave between Lys/Gly and Gly/Arg pairs. In intermolecular cleavage on polyprotein substrates, Lb(pro) was unaffected by P1 or P1' substitutions and processed a substrate containing nine eIF4GI cleavage site residues whereas sLb(pro) failed to cleave the eIF4GI containing substrate and cleaved appreciably more slowly on mutated substrates. Introduction of 70 eIF4GI residues bearing the Lb(pro) binding site restored cleavage. These data imply that Lb(pro) and sLb(pro) may have different functions in infected cells.

  10. Targeting of the transcription factor Max during apoptosis: phosphorylation-regulated cleavage by caspase-5 at an unusual glutamic acid residue in position P1.

    PubMed Central

    Krippner-Heidenreich, A; Talanian, R V; Sekul, R; Kraft, R; Thole, H; Ottleben, H; Lüscher, B

    2001-01-01

    Max is the central component of the Myc/Max/Mad network of transcription factors that regulate growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Whereas the Myc and Mad genes and proteins are highly regulated, Max expression is constitutive and no post-translational regulation is known. We have found that Max is targeted during Fas-induced apoptosis. Max is first dephosphorylated and subsequently cleaved by caspases. Two specific cleavage sites for caspases in Max were identified, one at IEVE(10) decreasing S and one at SAFD(135) decreasing G near the C-terminus, which are cleaved in vitro by caspase-5 and caspase-7 respectively. Mutational analysis indicates that both sites are also used in vivo. Thus Max represents the first caspase-5 substrate. The unusual cleavage after a glutamic acid residue is observed only with full-length, DNA-binding competent Max protein but not with corresponding peptides, suggesting that structural determinants might be important for this activity. Furthermore, cleavage by caspase-5 is inhibited by the protein kinase CK2-mediated phosphorylation of Max at Ser-11, a previously mapped phosphorylation site in vivo. These findings suggest that Fas-mediated dephosphorylation of Max is required for cleavage by caspase-5. The modifications that occur on Max in response to Fas signalling affect the DNA-binding activity of Max/Max homodimers. Taken together, our findings uncover three distinct processes, namely dephosphorylation and cleavage by caspase-5 and caspase-7, that target Max during Fas-mediated apoptosis, suggesting the regulation of the Myc/Max/Mad network through its central component. PMID:11535131

  11. Homodinuclear lanthanide complexes of phenylthiopropionic acid: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity, DNA cleavage, and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Shiju, C; Arish, D; Kumaresan, S

    2013-03-15

    Lanthanide complexes of La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), and Ho(III) with phenylthiopropionic acid were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, mass, IR, electronic spectra, molar conductance, TGA, and powder XRD. The results show that the lanthanide complexes are homodinuclear in nature. The two lanthanide ions are bridged by eight oxygen atoms from four carboxylate groups. Thermal decomposition profiles are consistent with the proposed formulations. Powder XRD studies show that all the complexes are amorphous in nature. Antimicrobial studies indicate that these complexes exhibit more activity than the ligand itself. The DNA cleavage activity of the ligand and its complexes were assayed on Escherichia coli DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence of H(2)O(2). The result shows that the Pr(III) and Nd(III) complexes have completely cleaved the DNA. The anticancer activities of the complexes have also been studied towards human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and colon cancer cells (HCT116) and it was found that the La(III) and Nd(III) complexes are more active than the corresponding Pr(III), Sm(III), Ho(III) complexes, and the free ligand on both the cancer cells.

  12. Acquisition of a novel eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site confers intracellular cleavage of an H7N7 influenza virus hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Sun, Xiangjie; Chung, Changik; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2012-12-05

    A critical feature of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1 and H7N7) is the efficient intracellular cleavage of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. H7N7 viruses also exist in equine species, and a unique feature of the equine H7N7 HA is the presence of an eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site. Here, we show that three histidine residues within the unique insertion of the equine H7N7 HA are essential for intracellular cleavage. An asparagine residue within the insertion-derived glycosylation site was also found to be essential for intracellular cleavage. The presence of the histidine residues also appear to be involved in triggering fusion, since mutation of the histidine residues resulted in a destabilizing effect. Importantly, the addition of a tetrabasic site and the eleven amino acid insertion conferred efficient intracellular cleavage to the HA of an H7N3 low pathogenicity avian influenza virus. Our studies show that acquisition of the eleven amino acid insertion offers an alternative mechanism for intracellular cleavage of influenza HA.

  13. Proteolytic cleavage of the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel α2δ subunit: structural and functional features

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Arturo; Sandoval, Alejandro; Oviedo, Norma; De Waard, Michel; Elias, David; Felix, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    By mediating depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx high voltage-activated (HVA) Ca2+ channels control a variety of cellular events. These heteromultimeric proteins are composed of an ion-conducting (α1) and three auxiliary (α2δ, β and γ) subunits. The α2δ subunit enhances the trafficking of the channel complex to the cell surface and increases channel open probability. To exert these effects, α2δ must undergo important post-translational modifications including a proteolytic cleavage that separates the extracellular α2 from its transmembrane δ domain. After this proteolysis both domains remain linked by disulfide bonds. In spite of its central role in determining the final conformation of the fully mature α2δ almost nothing is known about the physiological implications of this structural modification. In the current report, by using site-directed mutagenesis, the proteolytic site of α2δ was mapped to amino acid residues Arg-941 and Val-946. Substitution of these residues renders the protein insensitive to proteolytic cleavage as evidenced by the lack of molecular weight shift upon treatment with a disulfide reducing agent. Interestingly, these mutations significantly decreased whole-cell patch clamp currents without affecting the voltage-dependence or kinetics of the channels, suggesting a reduction in the number of channels targeted to the plasma membrane. PMID:17408426

  14. Intein-Promoted Cyclization of Aspartic Acid Flanking the Intein Leads to Atypical N-Terminal Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Christopher J; Siegart, Nicolle M; Colelli, Kathryn M; Liu, Xinyue; Linhardt, Robert J; Wang, Chunyu; Gomez, Alvin V; Reitter, Julie N; Mills, Kenneth V

    2017-02-28

    Protein splicing is a post-translational reaction facilitated by an intein, or intervening protein, which involves the removal of the intein and the ligation of the flanking polypeptides, or exteins. A DNA polymerase II intein from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab PolII intein) can promote protein splicing in vitro on incubation at high temperature. Mutation of active site residues Cys1, Gln185, and Cys+1 to Ala results in an inactive intein precursor, which cannot promote the steps of splicing, including cleavage of the peptide bond linking the N-extein and intein (N-terminal cleavage). Surprisingly, coupling the inactivating mutations to a change of the residue at the C-terminus of the N-extein (N-1 residue) from the native Asn to Asp reactivates N-terminal cleavage at pH 5. Similar "aspartic acid effects" have been observed in other proteins and peptides but usually only occur at lower pH values. In this case, however, the unusual N-terminal cleavage is abolished by mutations to catalytic active site residues and unfolding of the intein, indicating that this cleavage effect is mediated by the intein active site and the intein fold. We show via mass spectrometry that the reaction proceeds through cyclization of Asp resulting in anhydride formation coupled to peptide bond cleavage. Our results add to the richness of the understanding of the mechanism of protein splicing and provide insight into the stability of proteins at moderately low pH. The results also explain, and may help practitioners avoid, a side reaction that may complicate intein applications in biotechnology.

  15. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array*

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca2+-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10′ of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. The kcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5–1,710 M−1s−1. Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and −2 with a similar kcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5′. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P′-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achieved kcat/Km prediction with r = 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3′, and P4′ sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our

  16. Structural basis for DNA cleavage by the potent antiproliferative agent (–)-lomaiviticin A

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Christina M.; Li, Zhenwu; Herzon, Seth B.

    2016-01-01

    (–)-Lomaiviticin A (1) is a complex antiproliferative metabolite that inhibits the growth of many cultured cancer cell lines at low nanomolar–picomolar concentrations. (–)-Lomaiviticin A (1) possesses a C2-symmetric structure that contains two unusual diazotetrahydrobenzo[b]fluorene (diazofluorene) functional groups. Nucleophilic activation of each diazofluorene within 1 produces vinyl radical intermediates that affect hydrogen atom abstraction from DNA, leading to the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Certain DNA DSB repair-deficient cell lines are sensitized toward 1, and 1 is under evaluation in preclinical models of these tumor types. However, the mode of binding of 1 to DNA had not been determined. Here we elucidate the structure of a 1:1 complex between 1 and the duplex d(GCTATAGC)2 by NMR spectroscopy and computational modeling. Unexpectedly, we show that both diazofluorene residues of 1 penetrate the duplex. This binding disrupts base pairing leading to ejection of the central AT bases, while placing the proreactive centers of 1 in close proximity to each strand. DNA binding may also enhance the reactivity of 1 toward nucleophilic activation through steric compression and conformational restriction (an example of shape-dependent catalysis). This study provides a structural basis for the DNA cleavage activity of 1, will guide the design of synthetic DNA-activated DNA cleavage agents, and underscores the utility of natural products to reveal novel modes of small molecule–DNA association. PMID:26929332

  17. Serum Collagen Type II Cleavage Epitope and Serum Hyaluronic Acid as Biomarkers for Treatment Monitoring of Dogs with Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, José M.; Rubio, Mónica; Spinella, Giuseppe; Cuervo, Belén; Sopena, Joaquín; Cugat, Ramón; Garcia-Balletbó, Montserrat; Dominguez, Juan M.; Granados, Maria; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Ceron, José J.; Carrillo, José M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of serum type II collagen cleavage epitope and serum hyaluronic acid as biomarkers for treatment monitoring in osteoarthritic dogs. For this purpose, a treatment model based on mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue combined with plasma rich in growth factors was used. This clinical study included 10 dogs with hip osteoarthritis. Both analytes were measured in serum at baseline, just before applying the treatment, and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. These results were compared with those obtained from force plate analysis using the same animals during the same study period. Levels of type II collagen cleavage epitope decreased and those of hyaluronic acid increased with clinical improvement objectively verified via force plate analysis, suggesting these two biomarkers could be effective as indicators of clinical development of joint disease in dogs. PMID:26886592

  18. Serum Collagen Type II Cleavage Epitope and Serum Hyaluronic Acid as Biomarkers for Treatment Monitoring of Dogs with Hip Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vilar, José M; Rubio, Mónica; Spinella, Giuseppe; Cuervo, Belén; Sopena, Joaquín; Cugat, Ramón; Garcia-Balletbó, Montserrat; Dominguez, Juan M; Granados, Maria; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Ceron, José J; Carrillo, José M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of serum type II collagen cleavage epitope and serum hyaluronic acid as biomarkers for treatment monitoring in osteoarthritic dogs. For this purpose, a treatment model based on mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue combined with plasma rich in growth factors was used. This clinical study included 10 dogs with hip osteoarthritis. Both analytes were measured in serum at baseline, just before applying the treatment, and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. These results were compared with those obtained from force plate analysis using the same animals during the same study period. Levels of type II collagen cleavage epitope decreased and those of hyaluronic acid increased with clinical improvement objectively verified via force plate analysis, suggesting these two biomarkers could be effective as indicators of clinical development of joint disease in dogs.

  19. New tools provide a second look at HDV ribozyme structure, dynamics and cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Kapral, Gary J.; Jain, Swati; Noeske, Jonas; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Richardson, David C.; Richardson, Jane S.

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme is a self-cleaving RNA enzyme essential for processing viral transcripts during rolling circle viral replication. The first crystal structure of the cleaved ribozyme was solved in 1998, followed by structures of uncleaved, mutant-inhibited and ion-complexed forms. Recently, methods have been developed that make the task of modeling RNA structure and dynamics significantly easier and more reliable. We have used ERRASER and PHENIX to rebuild and re-refine the cleaved and cis-acting C75U-inhibited structures of the HDV ribozyme. The results correct local conformations and identify alternates for RNA residues, many in functionally important regions, leading to improved R values and model validation statistics for both structures. We compare the rebuilt structures to a higher resolution, trans-acting deoxy-inhibited structure of the ribozyme, and conclude that although both inhibited structures are consistent with the currently accepted hammerhead-like mechanism of cleavage, they do not add direct structural evidence to the biochemical and modeling data. However, the rebuilt structures (PDBs: 4PR6, 4PRF) provide a more robust starting point for research on the dynamics and catalytic mechanism of the HDV ribozyme and demonstrate the power of new techniques to make significant improvements in RNA structures that impact biologically relevant conclusions. PMID:25326328

  20. Design of protease-resistant myelin basic protein-derived peptides by cleavage site directed amino acid substitutions.

    PubMed

    Burster, Timo; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Boehm, Bernhard O; Dunn, Shannon; Rotzschke, Olaf; Falk, Kirsten; Weber, Ekkehard; Verhelst, Steven H L; Kalbacher, Hubert; Driessen, Christoph

    2007-11-15

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is considered to be a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. An attractive strategy to prevent activation of autoaggressive T cells in MS, is the use of altered peptide ligands (APL), which bind to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules. To be of clinical use, APL must be capable of resisting hostile environments including the proteolytic machinery of antigen presenting cells (APC). The current design of APL relies on cost- and labour-intensive strategies. To overcome these major drawbacks, we used a deductive approach which involved modifying proteolytic cleavage sites in APL. Cleavage site-directed amino acid substitution of the autoantigen myelin basic protein (MBP) resulted in lysosomal protease-resistant, high-affinity binding peptides. In addition, these peptides mitigated T cell activation in a similar fashion as conventional APL. The strategy outlined allows the development of protease-resistant APL and provides a universal design strategy to improve peptide-based immunotherapeutics.

  1. Recovery of Recombinant Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Reveals a Function for Non-structural Glycoproteins Cleavage by Furin

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Éric; Zivcec, Marko; Chakrabarti, Ayan K.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Albariño, César G.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.

    2015-01-01

    Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a negative-strand RNA virus of the family Bunyaviridae (genus: Nairovirus). In humans, CCHFV causes fever, hemorrhage, severe thrombocytopenia, and high fatality. A major impediment in precisely determining the basis of CCHFV’s high pathogenicity has been the lack of methodology to produce recombinant CCHFV. We developed a reverse genetics system based on transfecting plasmids into BSR-T7/5 and Huh7 cells. In our system, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase produced complementary RNA copies of the viral S, M, and L segments that were encapsidated with the support, in trans, of CCHFV nucleoprotein and L polymerase. The system was optimized to systematically recover high yields of infectious CCHFV. Additionally, we tested the ability of the system to produce specifically designed CCHFV mutants. The M segment encodes a polyprotein that is processed by host proprotein convertases (PCs), including the site-1 protease (S1P) and furin-like PCs. S1P and furin cleavages are necessary for producing the non-structural glycoprotein GP38, while S1P cleavage yields structural Gn. We studied the role of furin cleavage by rescuing a recombinant CCHFV encoding a virus glycoprotein precursor lacking a functional furin cleavage motif (RSKR mutated to ASKA). The ASKA mutation blocked glycoprotein precursor’s maturation to GP38, and Gn precursor’s maturation to Gn was slightly diminished. Furin cleavage was not essential for replication, as blocking furin cleavage resulted only in transient reduction of CCHFV titers, suggesting that either GP38 and/or decreased Gn maturation accounted for the reduced virion production. Our data demonstrate that nairoviruses can be produced by reverse genetics, and the utility of our system uncovered a function for furin cleavage. This viral rescue system could be further used to study the CCHFV replication cycle and facilitate the development of efficacious vaccines to counter this biological and public

  2. Histidine-Based Lipopeptides Enhance Cleavage of Nucleic Acids: Interactions with DNA and Hydrolytic Properties.

    PubMed

    Bélières, M; Déjugnat, C; Chouini-Lalanne, N

    2015-12-16

    Interaction studies and cleavage activity experiments were carried out between plasmid DNA and a series of histidine-based lipopeptides. Specific fluorescent probes (ethidium bromide, Hoechst 33342, and pyrene) were used to monitor intercalation, minor groove binding, and self-assembly of lipopeptides, respectively. Association between DNA and lipopeptides was thus evidenced, highlighting the importance of both histidine and hydrophobic tail in the interaction process. DNA cleavage in the presence of lipopeptides was then detected by gel electrophoresis and quantified, showing the importance of histidine and the involvement of its side-chain imidazole in the hydrolysis mechanism. These systems could then be developed as synthetic nucleases while raising concern of introducing histidine in the design of lipopeptide-based transfection vectors.

  3. Structural Basis of Stereospecificity in the Bacterial Enzymatic Cleavage of β-Aryl Ether Bonds in Lignin*

    PubMed Central

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; Heins, Richard A.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J.; Adams, Paul D.; Phillips, George N.

    2016-01-01

    Lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50–70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin. PMID:26637355

  4. Structural Basis of Stereospecificity in the Bacterial Enzymatic Cleavage of β-Aryl Ether Bonds in Lignin.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Kate E; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L; Heins, Richard A; McAndrew, Ryan P; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C; Noguera, Daniel R; Simmons, Blake A; Sale, Kenneth L; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J; Adams, Paul D; Phillips, George N

    2016-03-04

    Lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50-70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.

  5. Structural basis of stereospecificity in the bacterial enzymatic cleavage of β-aryl ether bonds in lignin

    DOE PAGES

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; ...

    2015-12-04

    Here, lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, wemore » present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50–70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.« less

  6. Structural basis of stereospecificity in the bacterial enzymatic cleavage of β-aryl ether bonds in lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; Heins, Richard A.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J.; Adams, Paul D.; Phillips, George N.

    2015-12-04

    Here, lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50–70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.

  7. Structure of Acid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Araujo, César L; Vihko, Pirkko T

    2013-01-01

    Acid phosphatases are enzymes that have been studied extensively due to the fact that their dysregulation is associated with pathophysiological conditions. This characteristic has been exploited for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic methods. As an example, prostatic acid phosphatase was the first marker for metastatic prostate cancer diagnosis and the dysregulation of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase is associated with abnormal bone resorption linked to osteoporosis. The pioneering crystallization studies on prostatic acid phosphatase and mammalian tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase conformed significant milestones towards the elucidation of the mechanisms followed by these enzymes (Schneider et al., EMBO J 12:2609-2615, 1993). Acid phosphatases are also found in nonmammalian species such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and plants, and most of them share structural similarities with mammalian acid phosphatase enzymes. Acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters following the general equation. Phosphate monoester + H2O -->/<-- alcohol + phosphate. The general classification "acid phosphatase" relies only on the optimum acidic pH for the enzymatic activity in assay conditions using non-physiological substrates. These enzymes accept a wide range of substrates in vitro, ranging from small organic molecules to phosphoproteins, constituting a heterogeneous group of enzymes from the structural point of view. These structural differences account for the divergence in cofactor dependences and behavior against substrates, inhibitors, and activators. In this group only the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase is a metallo-enzyme whereas the other members do not require metal-ion binding for their catalytic activity. In addition, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and erythrocytic acid phosphatase are not inhibited by L-(+)-tartrate ion while the prostatic acid phosphatase is tartrate-sensitive. This is an important

  8. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 2. Major structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Polycarboxylic acid structures that account for the strong-acid characteristics (pKa1 near 2.0) were examined for fulvic acid from the Suwannee River. Studies of model compounds demonstrated that pKa values near 2.0 occur only if the ??-ether or ??-ester groups were in cyclic structures with two to three additional electronegative functional groups (carboxyl, ester, ketone, aromatic groups) at adjacent positions on the ring. Ester linkage removal by alkaline hydrolysis and destruction of ether linkages through cleavage and reduction with hydriodic acid confirmed that the strong carboxyl acidity in fulvic acid was associated with polycarboxylic ??-ether and ??-ester structures. Studies of hypothetical structural models of fulvic acid indicated possible relation of these polycarboxylic structures with the amphiphilic and metal-binding properties of fulvic acid.

  9. Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA binding and photo-induced DNA cleavage activity of (S-methyl-L-cysteine)copper(II) complexes of heterocyclic bases.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ashis K; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2007-02-01

    Ternary S-methyl-L-cysteine (SMe-l-cys) copper(II) complexes [Cu(SMe-L-cys)(B)(H(2)O)](X) (1-4), where the heterocyclic base B is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, 1), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, 2), dipyridoquinoxaline (dpq, 3) and dipyridophenazine (dppz, 4), and X is ClO(4)(-) (1-3) or NO(3)(-) (4), are prepared and their DNA binding and cleavage properties studied. Complexes 2 and 4 are structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. Both the crystal structures show distorted square-pyramidal (4+1) CuN(3)O(2) coordination geometry of the complexes in which the N,O-donor S-methyl-L-cysteine and N,N-donor heterocyclic base bind at the basal plane with a water molecule as the axial ligand. In addition, the dppz structure shows the presence of a 1D-chain formed due to covalent linkage of the carboxylate oxygen atom belonging to another molecule at the elongated axial site. The crystal structures show chemically significant non-covalent interactions like hydrogen bonding involving the axial aqua ligand and pi-pi interactions between dppz ligands. The complexes display a d-d band in the range of 605-654 nm in aqueous dimethylformamide (DMF) solution (9:1 v/v). The redox active complexes show quasireversible cyclic voltammetric response near 0.1 V in DMF assignable to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The complexes show good binding affinity to calf thymus (CT) DNA giving the order: 4 (dppz)>3 (dpq)>2 (phen)>1 (bpy). The intrinsic binding constants, obtained from UV-visible spectroscopic studies, are 1.3x10(4) and 2.15 x 10(4) M(-1) for 3 and 4, respectively. Control DNA cleavage experiments using pUC19 supercoiled (SC) DNA and minor groove binder distamycin suggest major groove binding propensity for the dppz complex, while the phen and dpq complexes bind at the minor groove of DNA. Complexes 2-4 show DNA cleavage activity in dark in the presence of a reducing agent 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) via a mechanistic pathway involving formation of hydroxyl radical as the reactive

  10. Effects of S1 Cleavage on the Structure, Surface Export, and Signaling Activity of Human Notch1 and Notch2

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Wendy R.; Vardar-Ulu, Didem; L'Heureux, Sarah; Ashworth, Todd; Malecki, Michael J.; Sanchez-Irizarry, Cheryll; McArthur, Debbie G.; Histen, Gavin; Mitchell, Jennifer L.; Aster, Jon C.; Blacklow, Stephen C.

    2009-09-25

    Notch receptors are normally cleaved during maturation by a furin-like protease at an extracellular site termed S1, creating a heterodimer of non-covalently associated subunits. The S1 site lies within a key negative regulatory region (NRR) of the receptor, which contains three highly conserved Lin12/Notch repeats and a heterodimerization domain (HD) that interact to prevent premature signaling in the absence of ligands. Because the role of S1 cleavage in Notch signaling remains unresolved, we investigated the effect of S1 cleavage on the structure, surface trafficking and ligand-mediated activation of human Notch1 and Notch2, as well as on ligand-independent activation of Notch1 by mutations found in human leukemia. The X-ray structure of the Notch1 NRR after furin cleavage shows little change when compared with that of an engineered Notch1 NRR lacking the S1-cleavage loop. Likewise, NMR studies of the Notch2 HD domain show that the loop containing the S1 site can be removed or cleaved without causing a substantial change in its structure. However, Notch1 and Notch2 receptors engineered to resist S1 cleavage exhibit unexpected differences in surface delivery and signaling competence: S1-resistant Notch1 receptors exhibit decreased, but detectable, surface expression and ligand-mediated receptor activation, whereas S1-resistant Notch2 receptors are fully competent for cell surface delivery and for activation by ligands. Variable dependence on S1 cleavage also extends to T-ALL-associated NRR mutations, as common class 1 mutations display variable decrements in ligand-independent activation when introduced into furin-resistant receptors, whereas a class 2 mutation exhibits increased signaling activity. S1 cleavage has distinct effects on the surface expression of Notch1 and Notch2, but is not generally required for physiologic or pathophysiologic activation of Notch proteins. These findings are consistent with models for receptor activation in which ligand-binding or

  11. Effects of S1 Cleavage on the Structure, Surface Export, and Signaling Activity of Human Notch1 and Notch2

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Wendy R.; Vardar-Ulu, Didem; L'Heureux, Sarah; Ashworth, Todd; Malecki, Michael J.; Sanchez-Irizarry, Cheryll; McArthur, Debbie G.; Histen, Gavin; Mitchell, Jennifer L.; Aster, Jon C.; Blacklow, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Notch receptors are normally cleaved during maturation by a furin-like protease at an extracellular site termed S1, creating a heterodimer of non-covalently associated subunits. The S1 site lies within a key negative regulatory region (NRR) of the receptor, which contains three highly conserved Lin12/Notch repeats and a heterodimerization domain (HD) that interact to prevent premature signaling in the absence of ligands. Because the role of S1 cleavage in Notch signaling remains unresolved, we investigated the effect of S1 cleavage on the structure, surface trafficking and ligand-mediated activation of human Notch1 and Notch2, as well as on ligand-independent activation of Notch1 by mutations found in human leukemia. Principal Findings The X-ray structure of the Notch1 NRR after furin cleavage shows little change when compared with that of an engineered Notch1 NRR lacking the S1-cleavage loop. Likewise, NMR studies of the Notch2 HD domain show that the loop containing the S1 site can be removed or cleaved without causing a substantial change in its structure. However, Notch1 and Notch2 receptors engineered to resist S1 cleavage exhibit unexpected differences in surface delivery and signaling competence: S1-resistant Notch1 receptors exhibit decreased, but detectable, surface expression and ligand-mediated receptor activation, whereas S1-resistant Notch2 receptors are fully competent for cell surface delivery and for activation by ligands. Variable dependence on S1 cleavage also extends to T-ALL-associated NRR mutations, as common class 1 mutations display variable decrements in ligand-independent activation when introduced into furin-resistant receptors, whereas a class 2 mutation exhibits increased signaling activity. Conclusions/Significance S1 cleavage has distinct effects on the surface expression of Notch1 and Notch2, but is not generally required for physiologic or pathophysiologic activation of Notch proteins. These findings are consistent with

  12. Cα-C bond cleavage of the peptide backbone in MALDI in-source decay using salicylic acid derivative matrices.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2011-07-01

    The use of 5-formylsalicylic acid (5-FSA) and 5-nitrosalicylic acid (5-NSA) as novel matrices for in-source decay (ISD) of peptides in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is described. The use of 5-FSA and 5-NSA generated a- and x-series ions accompanied by oxidized peptides [M - 2 H + H](+). The preferential formation of a- and x-series ions was found to be dependent on the hydrogen-accepting ability of matrix. The hydrogen-accepting ability estimated from the ratio of signal intensity of oxidized product [M - 2 H + H](+) to that of non-oxidized protonated molecule [M + H](+) of peptide was of the order 5-NSA > 5-FSA > 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) ≒ 2,5-dihydroxyl benzoic acid (2,5-DHB) ≒ 0. The results suggest that the hydrogen transfer reaction from peptide to 5-FSA and 5-NSA occurs during the MALDI-ISD processes. The hydrogen abstraction from peptides results in the formation of oxidized peptides containing a radical site on the amide nitrogen with subsequent radical-induced cleavage at the Cα-C bond, leading to the formation of a- and x-series ions. The most significant feature of MALDI-ISD with 5-FSA and 5-NSA is the specific cleavage of the Cα-C bond of the peptide backbone without degradation of side-chain and post-translational modifications (PTM). The matrix provides a useful complementary method to conventional MALDI-ISD for amino acid sequencing and site localization of PTMs in peptides.

  13. The Structural Basis of [beta]-Peptide-Specific Cleavage by the Serine Protease Cyanophycinase

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Adrienne M.; Lai, Sandy W.S.; Tavares, John; Kimber, Matthew S.

    2010-10-01

    Cyanophycin, or poly-L-Asp-multi-L-Arg, is a non-ribosomally synthesized peptidic polymer that is used for nitrogen storage by cyanobacteria and other select eubacteria. Upon synthesis, it self-associates to form insoluble granules, the degradation of which is uniquely catalyzed by a carboxy-terminal-specific protease, cyanophycinase. We have determined the structure of cyanophycinase from the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 at 1.5-{angstrom} resolution, showing that the structure is dimeric, with individual protomers resembling aspartyl dipeptidase. Kinetic characterization of the enzyme demonstrates that the enzyme displays Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k{sub cat} of 16.5 s{sup -1} and a k{sub cat}/K{sub M} of 7.5 x 10{sup -6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm that cyanophycinase is a serine protease and that Gln101, Asp172, Gln173, Arg178, Arg180 and Arg183, which form a conserved pocket adjacent to the catalytic Ser132, are functionally critical residues. Modeling indicates that cyanophycinase binds the {beta}-Asp-Arg dipeptide residue immediately N-terminal to the scissile bond in an extended conformation in this pocket, primarily recognizing this penultimate {beta}-Asp-Arg residue of the polymeric chain. Because binding and catalysis depend on substrate features unique to {beta}-linked aspartyl peptides, cyanophycinase is able to act within the cytosol without non-specific cleavage events disrupting essential cellular processes.

  14. Influence of the amino acid residue downstream of (Asp)4Lys on enterokinase cleavage of a fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Hosfield, T; Lu, Q

    1999-04-10

    We have studied the cleavage efficiency of the protease enterokinase (EK) using the novel vector pESP4. pESP4 is a yeast expression vector equipped with ligation-independent cloning sites, a GST purification tag, and a FLAG epitope tag. EK is used to cleave the FLAG and GST tags leaving the protein of interest without any extraneously added amino acids. We have found that EK is relatively permissive of the amino acid residue downstream of the recognition sequence (the P'1 position). This makes EK an ideal choice to use as a protease to cleave any protein of interest cloned within the pESP4 yeast expression vector.

  15. Naturally Occurring Eccentric Cleavage Products of Provitamin A β-Carotene Function as Antagonists of Retinoic Acid Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Abdulkerim; Hruszkewycz, Damian P.; dela Sena, Carlo; Narayanasamy, Sureshbabu; Riedl, Ken M.; Kopec, Rachel E.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Curley, Robert W.; Harrison, Earl H.

    2012-01-01

    β-Carotene is the major dietary source of provitamin A. Central cleavage of β-carotene catalyzed by β-carotene oxygenase 1 yields two molecules of retinaldehyde. Subsequent oxidation produces all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), which functions as a ligand for a family of nuclear transcription factors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Eccentric cleavage of β-carotene at non-central double bonds is catalyzed by other enzymes and can also occur non-enzymatically. The products of these reactions are β-apocarotenals and β-apocarotenones, whose biological functions in mammals are unknown. We used reporter gene assays to show that none of the β-apocarotenoids significantly activated RARs. Importantly, however, β-apo-14′-carotenal, β-apo-14′-carotenoic acid, and β-apo-13-carotenone antagonized ATRA-induced transactivation of RARs. Competitive radioligand binding assays demonstrated that these putative RAR antagonists compete directly with retinoic acid for high affinity binding to purified receptors. Molecular modeling studies confirmed that β-apo-13-carotenone can interact directly with the ligand binding site of the retinoid receptors. β-Apo-13-carotenone and the β-apo-14′-carotenoids inhibited ATRA-induced expression of retinoid responsive genes in Hep G2 cells. Finally, we developed an LC/MS method and found 3–5 nm β-apo-13-carotenone was present in human plasma. These findings suggest that β-apocarotenoids function as naturally occurring retinoid antagonists. The antagonism of retinoid signaling by these metabolites may have implications for the activities of dietary β-carotene as a provitamin A and as a modulator of risk for cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:22418437

  16. Identification of protein SUMOylation sites by mass spectrometry using combined microwave-assisted aspartic acid cleavage and tryptic digestion

    PubMed Central

    Osula, Omoruyi; Swatkoski, Stephen; Cotter, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMO (Small-Ubiquitin-like MOdifier) is a post-translational modifier of protein substrates at lysine residues that conjugates to proteins in response to various changes in the cell. As a result of SUMO modification, marked changes in transcription regulation, DNA repair, subcellular localization, and mitosis, among other cellular processes, are known to occur. However, while the identification of ubiquitylation sites by mass spectrometry is aided in part by the presence of a small di-amino acid GlyGly “tag” that remains on lysine residues following tryptic digestion, SUMOylation poses a particular challenge as the absence of a basic residue near to the SUMO C-terminus results in a significant 27 or 32 amino acid sequence branch conjugated to the substrate peptide. MS/MS analyses of these branch peptides generally reveal abundant fragment ions resulting from cleavage of the SUMO tail, but which obscure those needed for characterizing the target peptide sequence. Other approaches for identifying SUMO substrates exist and include overexpression of the SUMO isoforms using an N-terminal histidine tag, as well as site-directed mutagenesis of the C-terminal end of the SUMO sequence. Here, we employ combined enzymatic/chemical approaches which serve to shorten the SUMO tag, and thus help to simplify SUMO spectra, making interpretation of mass spectra and location of the SUMOylation site easier. As described in this report, we demonstrate a method for identifying SUMOylation sites using three commercially available SUMO- modified isoforms, and by employing acid-only and acid/trypsin cleavage strategies. These approaches were carried out using MALDI-TOF and LC/MS instrumentation, along with CID and ETD fragmentation. PMID:22576878

  17. Mutational analysis of RAG1 and RAG2 identifies three catalytic amino acids in RAG1 critical for both cleavage steps of V(D)J recombination

    PubMed Central

    Landree, Mark A.; Wibbenmeyer, Jamie A.; Roth, David B.

    1999-01-01

    RAG1 and RAG2 initiate V(D)J recombination, the process of rearranging the antigen-binding domain of immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors, by introducing site-specific double-strand breaks (DSB) in chromosomal DNA during lymphocyte development. These breaks are generated in two steps, nicking of one strand (hydrolysis), followed by hairpin formation (transesterification). The nature and location of the RAG active site(s) have remained unknown. Because acidic amino acids have a critical role in catalyzing DNA cleavage by nucleases and recombinases that require divalent metal ions as cofactors, we hypothesized that acidic active site residues are likewise essential for RAG-mediated DNA cleavage. We altered each conserved acidic amino acid in RAG1 and RAG2 by site-directed mutagenesis, and examined >100 mutants using a combination of in vivo and in vitro analyses. No conserved acidic amino acids in RAG2 were critical for catalysis; three RAG1 mutants retained normal DNA binding, but were catalytically inactive for both nicking and hairpin formation. These data argue that one active site in RAG1 performs both steps of the cleavage reaction. Amino acid substitution experiments that changed the metal ion specificity suggest that at least one of these three residues contacts the metal ion(s) directly. These data suggest that RAG-mediated DNA cleavage involves coordination of divalent metal ion(s) by RAG1. PMID:10601032

  18. Chemical Feasibility of the General Acid/Base Mechanism of glmS Ribozyme Self-Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Dubecký, Matúš; Walter, Nils G.; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    In numerous Gram-positive bacteria, the glmS ribozyme or catalytic riboswitch regulates the expression of glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) synthase via site-specific cleavage of its sugar-phosphate backbone in response to GlcN6P ligand binding. Biochemical data have suggested a crucial catalytic role for an active site guanine (G40 in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, G33 in Bacillus anthracis). We used hybrid quantum chemical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations to probe the mechanism where G40 is deprotonated and acts as a general base. The calculations suggest that the deprotonated guanine G40− is sufficiently reactive to overcome the thermodynamic penalty arising from its rare protonation state, and thus is able to activate the A-1(2’-OH) group toward nucleophilic attack on the adjacent backbone. Furthermore, deprotonation of A-1(2’-OH) and nucleophilic attack are predicted to occur as separate steps, where activation of A-1(2’-OH) precedes nucleophilic attack. Conversely, the transition state associated with the rate-determining step corresponds to concurrent nucleophilic attack and protonation of the G1(O5’) leaving group by the ammonium moiety of the GlcN6P cofactor. Overall, our calculations help to explain the crucial roles of G40 (as a general base) and GlcN6P (as a general acid) during glmS ribozyme self-cleavage. In addition, we show that the QM/MM description of the glmS ribozyme self-cleavage reaction is significantly more sensitive to the size of the QM region and the quality of the QM-MM coupling than that of other small ribozymes. PMID:25858644

  19. RNA structure-dependent uncoupling of substrate recognition and cleavage by Escherichia coli ribonuclease III

    PubMed Central

    Calin-Jageman, Irina; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2003-01-01

    Members of the ribonuclease III superfamily of double-strand-specific endoribonucleases participate in diverse RNA maturation and decay pathways. Ribonuclease III of the gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli processes rRNA and mRNA precursors, and its catalytic action can regulate gene expression by controlling mRNA translation and stability. It has been proposed that E.coli RNase III can function in a non-catalytic manner, by binding RNA without cleaving phosphodiesters. However, there has been no direct evidence for this mode of action. We describe here an RNA, derived from the T7 phage R1.1 RNase III substrate, that is resistant to cleavage in vitro by E.coli RNase III but retains comparable binding affinity. R1.1[CL3B] RNA is recognized by RNase III in the same manner as R1.1 RNA, as revealed by the similar inhibitory effects of a specific mutation in both substrates. Structure-probing assays and Mfold analysis indicate that R1.1[CL3B] RNA possesses a bulge– helix–bulge motif in place of the R1.1 asymmetric internal loop. The presence of both bulges is required for uncoupling. The bulge–helix–bulge motif acts as a ‘catalytic’ antideterminant, which is distinct from recognition antideterminants, which inhibit RNase III binding. PMID:12711683

  20. Determination of the relative positions of amino acids by partial specific cleavages of end-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Jue, R A; Doolittle, R F

    1985-01-01

    We have developed a new method for obtaining information about protein sequences that uses an approach analogous to that used to determine DNA sequences. In essence, three steps are involved. First, a detectable label is attached exclusively to the amino terminus of a polypeptide. Next, the labeled chain is subjected to partial specific cleavage in a way that produces roughly equimolar amounts of fragments of different sizes. Cleavages for methionine, tryptophan, arginine, aspartyl-proline bonds, and asparaginyl-glycine bonds have been employed. Lastly, the labeled fragments are separated according to size by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The distribution of target amino acids along the polypeptide chain can be deduced from the specific pattern of labeled bands by reading the "ladder" in the same way that DNA sequencing gels are read. Although the method can be conducted with a radioactive label, we have chosen to use a fluorescent label. We have applied the method successfully to the three subunit chains of two different fibrinogens.

  1. DNA cleavage in red light promoted by copper(II) complexes of alpha-amino acids and photoactive phenanthroline bases.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ashis K; Bhowmick, Tuhin; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2008-12-28

    Ternary copper(II) complexes [Cu(L-trp)(B)(H(2)O)](NO(3)) (1-3) and [Cu(L-phe)(B)(H(2)O)](NO(3)) (4-6) of L-tryptophan (L-trp) and L-phenylalanine (L-phe) having phenanthroline bases (B), viz. 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, 1 and 4), dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, 2 and 5) and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz, 3 and 6), were prepared and characterized by physico-chemical techniques. Complexes 3 and 6 were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography and show the presence of a square pyramidal (4 + 1) CuN(3)O(2) coordination geometry in which the N,O-donor amino acid (L-trp or L-phe) and N,N-donor phenanthroline base bind at the equatorial plane with an aqua ligand coordinated at the elongated axial site. Complex 3 shows significant distortion from the square pyramidal geometry and a strong intramolecular pi-pi stacking interaction between the pendant indole ring of L-trp and the planar dppz aromatic moiety. All the complexes display good binding propensity to the calf thymus DNA giving an order: 3,6 (dppz) > 2,5 (dpq) > 1,4 (phen). The binding constant (K(b)) values are in the range of 2.1 x 10(4)-1.1 x 10(6) mol(-1) with the binding site size (s) values of 0.17-0.63. The phen and dpq complexes are minor groove binders while the dppz analogues bind at the DNA major groove. Theoretical DNA docking studies on 2 and 3 show the close proximity of two photosensitizers, viz. the indole moiety of L-trp and the quinoxaline/phenazine of the dpq/dppz bases, to the complementary DNA strands. Complexes 2 and 3 show oxidative DNA double strand breaks (dsb) of supercoiled (SC) DNA forming a significant quantity of linear DNA along with the nicked circular (NC) form on photoexposure to UV-A light of 365 nm and red light of 647.1 nm (Ar-Kr laser). Complexes 1,5 and 6 show only single strand breaks (ssb) forming NC DNA. The red light induced DNA cleavage involves metal-assisted photosensitization of L-trp and dpq/dppz base resulting in the formation of a reactive

  2. Insights into cleavage specificity from the crystal structure of foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C protease complexed with a peptide substrate.

    PubMed

    Zunszain, Patricia A; Knox, Stephen R; Sweeney, Trevor R; Yang, Jingjie; Roqué-Rosell, Núria; Belsham, Graham J; Leatherbarrow, Robin J; Curry, Stephen

    2010-01-15

    Picornavirus replication is critically dependent on the correct processing of a polyprotein precursor by 3C protease(s) (3C(pro)) at multiple specific sites with related but non-identical sequences. To investigate the structural basis of its cleavage specificity, we performed the first crystallographic structural analysis of non-covalent complexes of a picornavirus 3C(pro) with peptide substrates. The X-ray crystal structure of the foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C(pro), mutated to replace the catalytic Cys by Ala and bound to a peptide (APAKQ|LLNFD) corresponding to the P5-P5' region of the VP1-2A cleavage junction in the viral polyprotein, was determined up to 2.5 A resolution. Comparison with free enzyme reveals significant conformational changes in 3C(pro) on substrate binding that lead to the formation of an extended interface of contact primarily involving the P4-P2' positions of the peptide. Strikingly, the deep S1' specificity pocket needed to accommodate P1'-Leu only forms when the peptide binds. Substrate specificity was investigated using peptide cleavage assays to show the impact of amino acid substitutions within the P5-P4' region of synthetic substrates. The structure of the enzyme-peptide complex explains the marked substrate preferences for particular P4, P2 and P1 residue types, as well as the relative promiscuity at P3 and on the P' side of the scissile bond. Furthermore, crystallographic analysis of the complex with a modified VP1-2A peptide (APAKE|LLNFD) containing a Gln-to-Glu substitution reveals an identical mode of peptide binding and explains the ability of foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C(pro) to cleave sequences containing either P1-Gln or P1-Glu. Structure-based mutagenesis was used to probe interactions within the S1' specificity pocket and to provide direct evidence of the important contribution made by Asp84 of the Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad to proteolytic activity. Our results provide a new level of detail in our understanding of the

  3. Distinct oxidative cleavage and modification of bovine [Cu- Zn]-SOD by an ascorbic acid/Cu(II) system: Identification of novel copper binding site on SOD molecule.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Hiroshi; Luo, Shen; Aryal, Baikuntha; Levine, Rodney L; Rao, V Ashutosh

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the combined effect of ascorbate and copper [Asc/Cu(II)] on the integrity of bovine [Cu-Zn]-superoxide dismutase (bSOD1) as a model system to study the metal catalyzed oxidation (MCO) and fragmentation of proteins. We found Asc/Cu(II) mediates specific cleavage of bSOD1 and generates 12.5 and 3.2kDa fragments in addition to oxidation/carbonylation of the protein. The effect of other tested transition metals, a metal chelator, and hydrogen peroxide on the cleavage and oxidation indicated that binding of copper to a previously unknown site on SOD1 is responsible for the Asc/Cu(II) specific cleavage and oxidation. We utilized tandem mass spectrometry to identify the specific cleavage sites of Asc/Cu(II)-treated bSOD1. Analyses of tryptic- and AspN-peptides have demonstrated the cleavage to occur at Gly31 with peptide bond breakage with Thr30 and Ser32 through diamide and α-amidation pathways, respectively. The three-dimensional structure of bSOD1 reveals the imidazole ring of His19 localized within 5Å from the α-carbon of Gly31 providing a structural basis that copper ion, most likely coordinated by His19, catalyzes the specific cleavage reaction.

  4. Amino acid-permeable anion channels in early mouse embryos and their possible effects on cleavage.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Momoyo; Okamoto, Fujio; Kajiya, Hiroshi; Inoue, Yoshihito; Honjo, Ko; Sumii, Yoshinari; Kawarabayashi, Tatsuhiko; Okabe, Koji

    2003-03-01

    Effects of several Cl(-) channel blockers on ionic currents in mouse embryos were studied using whole-cell patch-clamp and microelectrode methods. Microelectrode measurements showed that the resting membrane potential of early embryonic cells (1-cell stage) was -23 mV and that reduction of extracellular Cl(-) concentration depolarized the membrane, suggesting that Cl(-) conductance is a major contributor for establishing the resting membrane potential. Membrane currents recorded by whole-cell voltage clamp showed outward rectification and confirmed that a major component of these embryonic currents are carried by Cl(-) ions. A Cl(-) channel blocker, 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), suppressed the outward rectifier current in a voltage- and concentration-dependent manner. Other Cl(-) channel blockers (5-nitro-2-[3-phenylpropyl-amino] benzoic acid and 2-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-anilino] nicotinic acid [niflumic acid]) similarly inhibited this current. Simultaneous application of niflumic acid with DIDS further suppressed the outward rectifier current. Under high osmotic condition, niflumic acid, but not DIDS, inhibited the Cl(-)current, suggesting the presence of two types of Cl(-) channels: a DIDS-sensitive (swelling-activated) channel, and a DIDS-insensitive (niflumic acid-sensitive) Cl(-) channel. Anion permeability of the DIDS-insensitive Cl(-) current differed from that of the compound Cl(-) current: Rank order of anion permeability of the DIDS-sensitive Cl(-) channels was I(-) = Br(-) > Cl(-) > gluconate(-), whereas that of the DIDS-insensitive Cl(-) channel was I(-) = Br(-) > Cl(-) > gluconate(-). These results indicate that early mouse embryos have a Cl(-) channel that is highly permeable to amino acids, which may regulate intracellular amino acid concentration.

  5. High-valent manganese–oxo valence tautomers and the influence of Lewis/Brönsted acids on C–H bond cleavage

    DOE PAGES

    Baglia, Regina A.; Krest, Courtney M.; Yang, Tzuhsiung; ...

    2016-09-30

    The addition of Lewis or Brönsted acids (LA = Zn(OTf)2, B(C6F5)3, HBArF, TFA) to the high-valent manganese–oxo complex MnV(O)(TBP8Cz) results in the stabilization of a valence tautomer MnIV(O-LA)(TBP8Cz•+). The ZnII and B(C6F5)3 complexes were characterized by manganese K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The position of the edge energies and the intensities of the pre-edge (1s to 3d) peaks confirm that the Mn ion is in the +4 oxidation state. Fitting of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) region reveals 4 N/O ligands at Mn–Nave = 1.89 Å and a fifth N/O ligand at 1.61 Å, corresponding to the terminalmore » oxo ligand. This Mn–O bond length is elongated compared to the MnV(O) starting material (Mn–O = 1.55 Å). The reactivity of MnIV(O-LA)(TBP8Cz•+) toward C–H substrates was examined, and it was found that H• abstraction from C–H bonds occurs in a 1:1 stoichiometry, giving a MnIV complex and the dehydrogenated organic product. The rates of C–H cleavage are accelerated for the MnIV(O-LA)(TBP8Cz•+) valence tautomer as compared to the MnV(O) valence tautomer when LA = ZnII, B(C6F5)3, and HBArF, whereas for LA = TFA, the C–H cleavage rate is slightly slower than when compared to MnV(O). A large, nonclassical kinetic isotope effect of kH/kD = 25–27 was observed for LA = B(C6F5)3 and HBArF, indicating that H-atom transfer (HAT) is the rate-limiting step in the C–H cleavage reaction and implicating a potential tunneling mechanism for HAT. Furthermore, the reactivity of MnIV(O-LA)(TBP8Cz•+) toward C–H bonds depends on the strength of the Lewis acid. The HAT reactivity is compared with the analogous corrole complex MnIV(O–H)(tpfc•+) recently reported.« less

  6. Sugar fragmentation in the maillard reaction cascade: isotope labeling studies on the formation of acetic acid by a hydrolytic beta-dicarbonyl cleavage mechanism.

    PubMed

    Davídek, Tomas; Devaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Fabien; Blank, Imre

    2006-09-06

    The formation of acetic acid was elucidated based on volatile reaction products and related nonvolatile key intermediates. The origin and yield of acetic acid were determined under well-controlled conditions (90-120 degrees C, pH 6-8). Experiments with various 13C-labeled glucose isotopomers in the presence of glycine revealed all six carbon atoms being incorporated into acetic acid: C-1/C-2 ( approximately 70%), C-3/C-4 ( approximately 10%), and C-5/C-6 (approximately 20%). Acetic acid is a good marker of the 2,3-enolization pathway since it is almost exclusively formed from 1-deoxy-2,3-diulose intermediates. Depending on the pH, the acetic acid conversion yield reached 85 mol % when using 1-deoxy-2,3-hexodiulose (1) as a precursor. Hydrolytic beta-dicarbonyl cleavage of 1-deoxy-2,4-hexodiuloses was shown to be the major pathway leading to acetic acid from glucose without the intermediacy of any oxidizing agents. The presence of key intermediates was corroborated for the first time, i.e., tetroses and 2-hydroxy-3-oxobutanal, a tautomer of 1-hydroxy-2,3-butanedione, also referred to as 1-deoxy-2,3-tetrodiulose. The hydrolytic beta-dicarbonyl cleavage represents a general pathway to organic acids, which corresponds to an acyloin cleavage or a retro-Claisen type reaction. Although alternative mechanisms must exist, the frequently reported hydrolytic alpha-dicarbonyl cleavage of 1 can be ruled out as a pathway forming carboxylic acids.

  7. Probing the structural dynamics of the CRISPR-Cas9 RNA-guided DNA-cleavage system by coarse-grained modeling.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun

    2017-02-01

    In the adaptive immune systems of many bacteria and archaea, the Cas9 endonuclease forms a complex with specific guide/scaffold RNA to identify and cleave complementary target sequences in foreign DNA. This DNA targeting machinery has been exploited in numerous applications of genome editing and transcription control. However, the molecular mechanism of the Cas9 system is still obscure. Recently, high-resolution structures have been solved for Cas9 in different structural forms (e.g., unbound forms, RNA-bound binary complexes, and RNA-DNA-bound tertiary complexes, corresponding to an inactive state, a pre-target-bound state, and a cleavage-competent or product state), which offered key structural insights to the Cas9 mechanism. To further probe the structural dynamics of Cas9 interacting with RNA and DNA at the amino-acid level of details, we have performed systematic coarse-grained modeling using an elastic network model and related analyses. Our normal mode analysis predicted a few key modes of collective motions that capture the observed conformational changes featuring large domain motions triggered by binding of RNA and DNA. Our flexibility analysis identified specific regions with high or low flexibility that coincide with key functional sites (such as DNA/RNA-binding sites, nuclease cleavage sites, and key hinges). We also identified a small set of hotspot residues that control the energetics of functional motions, which overlap with known functional sites and offer promising targets for future mutagenesis efforts to improve the specificity of Cas9. Finally, we modeled the conformational transitions of Cas9 from the unbound form to the binary complex and then the tertiary complex, and predicted a distinct sequence of domain motions. In sum, our findings have offered rich structural and dynamic details relevant to the Cas9 machinery, and will guide future investigation and engineering of the Cas9 systems. Proteins 2017; 85:342-353. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals

  8. Structure of a Eukaryotic RNase III Post-Cleavage Complex Reveals a Double- Ruler Mechanism for Substrate Selection

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu-He; Lavoie, Mathieu; Comeau, Marc-Andre; Elela, Sherif Abou; Ji, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY RNase III represents a family of dsRNA-specific endoribonucleases required for RNA maturation and gene regulation. The mechanism of action has been well characterized for the bacterial enzyme, but is not clear for eukaryotic RNase IIIs. Here, we describe the structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase III (Rnt1p) post-cleavage complex and explain the basis of its affinity for RNA stems capped with an NGNN tetraloop. The structure shows specific interactions between a new structural motif located at the end of Rnt1p dsRNA-binding domain (dsRBD) and the guanine nucleotide in the second position of the loop. Strikingly, structural and biochemical analyses indicate that the dsRBD and N-terminal domain function as two rulers measuring the distance between the tetraloop and the cleavage site. This unusual mechanism of substrate selectivity represents an example of the evolution of substrate selectivity and provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of action of eukaryotic RNase IIIs. PMID:24703949

  9. Synthesis, spectral, crystal structure, thermal behavior, antimicrobial and DNA cleavage potential of two octahedral cadmium complexes: A supramolecular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazerozohori, M.; Musavi, S. A.; Masoudiasl, A.; Naghiha, A.; Dusek, M.; Kucerakova, M.

    2015-02-01

    Two new cadmium(II) complexes with the formula of CdL2(NCS)2 and CdL2(N3)2 (in which L is 2,2-dimethyl-N,N‧-bis-(3-phenyl-allylidene)-propane-1,3-diamine) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity measurements, FT/IR, UV-Visible, 1H and 13C NMR spectra and X-ray studies. The crystal structure analysis of CdL2(NCS)2 indicated that it crystallizes in orthorhombic system with space group of Pbca. Two Schiff base ligands are bonded to cadmium(II) ion as N2-donor chelate. Coordination geometry around the cadmium ion was found to be partially distorted octahedron. The Cd-Nimine bond distances are found in the range of 2.363(2)-2.427(2) Å while the Cd-Nisothiocyanate bond distances are 2.287(2) Å and 2.310(2) Å. The existence of C-H⋯π and C-H⋯S interactions in the CdL2(NCS)2 crystal leads to a supramolecular structure in its network. Then cadmium complexes were screened in vitro for their antibacterial and antifungal activities against two Gram-negative and two Gram-positive bacteria and also against Candida albicans as a fungus. Moreover, the compounds were subjected for DNA-cleavage potential by gel electrophoresis method. Finally thermo-gravimetric analysis of the complexes was applied for thermal behavior studies and then some thermo-kinetics activation parameters were evaluated.

  10. Resonance Raman spectroscopy reveals pH-dependent active site structural changes of lactoperoxidase compound 0 and its ferryl heme O-O bond cleavage products.

    PubMed

    Mak, Piotr J; Thammawichai, Warut; Wiedenhoeft, Dennis; Kincaid, James R

    2015-01-14

    The first step in the enzymatic cycle of mammalian peroxidases, including lactoperoxidase (LPO), is binding of hydrogen peroxide to the ferric resting state to form a ferric-hydroperoxo intermediate designated as Compound 0, the residual proton temporarily associating with the distal pocket His109 residue. Upon delivery of this "stored" proton to the hydroperoxo fragment, it rapidly undergoes O-O bond cleavage, thereby thwarting efforts to trap it using rapid mixing methods. Fortunately, as shown herein, both the peroxo and the hydroperoxo (Compound 0) forms of LPO can be trapped by cryoradiolysis, with acquisition of their resonance Raman (rR) spectra now permitting structural characterization of their key Fe-O-O fragments. Studies were conducted under both acidic and alkaline conditions, revealing pH-dependent differences in relative populations of these intermediates. Furthermore, upon annealing, the low pH samples convert to two forms of a ferryl heme O-O bond-cleavage product, whose ν(Fe═O) frequencies reflect substantially different Fe═O bond strengths. In the process of conducting these studies, rR structural characterization of the dioxygen adduct of LPO, commonly called Compound III, has also been completed, demonstrating a substantial difference in the strengths of the Fe-O linkage of the Fe-O-O fragment under acidic and alkaline conditions, an effect most reasonably attributed to a corresponding weakening of the trans-axial histidyl imidazole linkage at lower pH. Collectively, these new results provide important insight into the impact of pH on the disposition of the key Fe-O-O and Fe═O fragments of intermediates that arise in the enzymatic cycles of LPO, other mammalian peroxidases, and related proteins.

  11. Engineering D-Amino Acid Containing Collagen Like Peptide at the Cleavage Site of Clostridium histolyticum Collagenase for Its Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, Punitha; Jonnalagadda, Raghava Rao; Unni Nair, Balachandran

    2015-01-01

    Collagenase is an important enzyme which plays an important role in degradation of collagen in wound healing, cancer metastasis and even in embryonic development. However, the mechanism of this degradation has not yet been completely understood. In the field of biomedical and protein engineering, the design and development of new peptide based materials is of main concern. In the present work an attempt has been made to study the effect of DAla in collagen like peptide (imino-poor region of type I collagen) on the structure and stability of peptide against enzyme hydrolysis. Effect of replacement of DAla in the collagen like peptide has been studied using circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD). Our findings suggest that, DAla substitution leads to conformational changes in the secondary structure and favours the formation of polyproline II conformation than its L-counterpart in the imino-poor region of collagen like peptides. Change in the chirality of alanine at the cleavage site of collagenase in the imino-poor region inhibits collagenolytic activity. This may find application in design of peptides and peptidomimics for enzyme-substrate interaction, specifically with reference to collagen and other extra cellular matrix proteins. PMID:25973613

  12. N-Glycosylation Improves the Pepsin Resistance of Histidine Acid Phosphatase Phytases by Enhancing Their Stability at Acidic pHs and Reducing Pepsin's Accessibility to Its Cleavage Sites.

    PubMed

    Niu, Canfang; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Wang, Yaru; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2015-12-04

    N-Glycosylation can modulate enzyme structure and function. In this study, we identified two pepsin-resistant histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) phytases from Yersinia kristensenii (YkAPPA) and Yersinia rohdei (YrAPPA), each having an N-glycosylation motif, and one pepsin-sensitive HAP phytase from Yersinia enterocolitica (YeAPPA) that lacked an N-glycosylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to construct mutants by altering the N-glycosylation status of each enzyme, and the mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in Pichia pastoris for biochemical characterization. Compared with those of the N-glycosylation site deletion mutants and N-deglycosylated enzymes, all N-glycosylated counterparts exhibited enhanced pepsin resistance. Introduction of the N-glycosylation site into YeAPPA as YkAPPA and YrAPPA conferred pepsin resistance, shifted the pH optimum (0.5 and 1.5 pH units downward, respectively) and improved stability at acidic pH (83.2 and 98.8% residual activities at pH 2.0 for 1 h). Replacing the pepsin cleavage sites L197 and L396 in the immediate vicinity of the N-glycosylation motifs of YkAPPA and YrAPPA with V promoted their resistance to pepsin digestion when produced in Escherichia coli but had no effect on the pepsin resistance of N-glycosylated enzymes produced in P. pastoris. Thus, N-glycosylation may improve pepsin resistance by enhancing the stability at acidic pH and reducing pepsin's accessibility to peptic cleavage sites. This study provides a strategy, namely, the manipulation of N-glycosylation, for improvement of phytase properties for use in animal feed.

  13. N-Glycosylation Improves the Pepsin Resistance of Histidine Acid Phosphatase Phytases by Enhancing Their Stability at Acidic pHs and Reducing Pepsin's Accessibility to Its Cleavage Sites

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Canfang; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Wang, Yaru; Yang, Peilong

    2015-01-01

    N-Glycosylation can modulate enzyme structure and function. In this study, we identified two pepsin-resistant histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) phytases from Yersinia kristensenii (YkAPPA) and Yersinia rohdei (YrAPPA), each having an N-glycosylation motif, and one pepsin-sensitive HAP phytase from Yersinia enterocolitica (YeAPPA) that lacked an N-glycosylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to construct mutants by altering the N-glycosylation status of each enzyme, and the mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in Pichia pastoris for biochemical characterization. Compared with those of the N-glycosylation site deletion mutants and N-deglycosylated enzymes, all N-glycosylated counterparts exhibited enhanced pepsin resistance. Introduction of the N-glycosylation site into YeAPPA as YkAPPA and YrAPPA conferred pepsin resistance, shifted the pH optimum (0.5 and 1.5 pH units downward, respectively) and improved stability at acidic pH (83.2 and 98.8% residual activities at pH 2.0 for 1 h). Replacing the pepsin cleavage sites L197 and L396 in the immediate vicinity of the N-glycosylation motifs of YkAPPA and YrAPPA with V promoted their resistance to pepsin digestion when produced in Escherichia coli but had no effect on the pepsin resistance of N-glycosylated enzymes produced in P. pastoris. Thus, N-glycosylation may improve pepsin resistance by enhancing the stability at acidic pH and reducing pepsin's accessibility to peptic cleavage sites. This study provides a strategy, namely, the manipulation of N-glycosylation, for improvement of phytase properties for use in animal feed. PMID:26637601

  14. Limited proteolysis and sequence analysis of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes from Escherichia coli. Cleavage sites and domains in the dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase components.

    PubMed Central

    Packman, L C; Perham, R N

    1987-01-01

    The structures of the dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (E2) components of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes from Escherichia coli were investigated by limited proteolysis. Trypsin and Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase were used to excise the three lipoyl domains from the E2p component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and the single lipoyl domain from the E2o component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. The principal sites of action of these enzymes on each E2 chain were determined by sequence analysis of the isolated lipoyl fragments and of the truncated E2p and E2o chains. Each of the numerous cleavage sites (12 in E2p, six in E2o) fell within similar segments of the E2 chains, namely stretches of polypeptide rich in alanine, proline and/or charged amino acids. These regions are clearly accessible to proteinases of Mr 24,000-28,000 and, on the basis of n.m.r. spectroscopy, some of them have previously been implicated in facilitating domain movements by virtue of their conformational flexibility. The limited proteolysis data suggest that E2p and E2o possess closer architectural similarities than would be predicted from inspection of their amino acid sequences. As a result of this work, an error was detected in the sequence of E2o inferred from the previously published sequence of the encoding gene, sucB. The relevant peptides from E2o were purified and sequenced by direct means; an amended sequence is presented. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3297046

  15. Different structures in the amino-terminal domain of the ornithine transcarbamylase leader peptide are involved in mitochondrial import and carboxyl-terminal cleavage.

    PubMed

    Kraus, J P; Novotný, J; Kalousek, F; Swaroop, M; Rosenberg, L E

    1988-12-01

    The cytoplasmic precursor of mitochondrial ornithine transcarbamylase (carbamoyl-phosphate:L-ornithine carbamoyltransferase, EC 2.1.3.2) contains an amino-terminal leader peptide of 32 amino acids. Secondary structure and helical-wheel analyses predict that the extreme amino-terminal domain (residues 1-15) forms an alpha-helix. To test this thesis, leucine residues at positions 2, 5, 8, and 9 were systematically replaced by either helix-breaking glycine residues or by helix-preserving alanine residues. Triple substitutions of glycine for leucine in positions 2, 5, and 9 or 5, 8, and 9 abolished the uptake of the rat precursor by intact mitochondria, whereas similar alanine substitutions had much less effect. Theoretical computations predicted that the decreased helical stability of the Gly-5,8,9 substitution could be significantly increased by replacing a serine in position with phenylalanine. The introduction of Phe-3, indeed, restored the mitochondrial uptake of the mutant precursor. These results lend strong support to the hypothesis that an alpha-helix is present at the leader's amino terminus during the import of the precursor by mitochondria. Although the precursors with the triply-substituted leaders were impaired with respect to import, they were still cleaved readily by a protease found in a mitochondrial matrix fraction. Substitution of glycine or alanine for all four leucine residues, however, rendered the leader uncleavable at the carboxyl-terminal cleavage site. These results suggest that the structure of the amino-terminal domain is important for recognition of the carboxyl-terminal cleavage sites by the matrix proteases.

  16. High-valent manganese–oxo valence tautomers and the influence of Lewis/Brönsted acids on C–H bond cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Baglia, Regina A.; Krest, Courtney M.; Yang, Tzuhsiung; Leeladee, Pannee; Goldberg, David P.

    2016-09-30

    The addition of Lewis or Brönsted acids (LA = Zn(OTf)2, B(C6F5)3, HBArF, TFA) to the high-valent manganese–oxo complex MnV(O)(TBP8Cz) results in the stabilization of a valence tautomer MnIV(O-LA)(TBP8Cz•+). The ZnII and B(C6F5)3 complexes were characterized by manganese K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The position of the edge energies and the intensities of the pre-edge (1s to 3d) peaks confirm that the Mn ion is in the +4 oxidation state. Fitting of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) region reveals 4 N/O ligands at Mn–Nave = 1.89 Å and a fifth N/O ligand at 1.61 Å, corresponding to the terminal oxo ligand. This Mn–O bond length is elongated compared to the MnV(O) starting material (Mn–O = 1.55 Å). The reactivity of MnIV(O-LA)(TBP8Cz•+) toward C–H substrates was examined, and it was found that H abstraction from C–H bonds occurs in a 1:1 stoichiometry, giving a MnIV complex and the dehydrogenated organic product. The rates of C–H cleavage are accelerated for the MnIV(O-LA)(TBP8Cz•+) valence tautomer as compared to the MnV(O) valence tautomer when LA = ZnII, B(C6F5)3, and HBArF, whereas for LA = TFA, the C–H cleavage rate is slightly slower than when compared to MnV(O). A large, nonclassical kinetic isotope effect of kH/kD = 25–27 was observed for LA = B(C6F5)3 and HBArF, indicating that H-atom transfer (HAT) is the rate-limiting step in the C–H cleavage reaction and implicating a potential tunneling mechanism for HAT. Furthermore, the reactivity of MnIV(O-LA)(TBP8Cz•+) toward C–H bonds

  17. Structural basis for nicotinamide cleavage and ADP-ribose transfer by NAD(+)-dependent Sir2 histone/protein deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kehao; Harshaw, Robyn; Chai, Xiaomei; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2004-06-08

    Sir2 enzymes are broadly conserved from bacteria to humans and have been implicated to play roles in gene silencing, DNA repair, genome stability, longevity, metabolism, and cell physiology. These enzymes bind NAD(+) and acetyllysine within protein targets and generate lysine, 2'-O-acetyl-ADP-ribose, and nicotinamide products. To provide structural insights into the chemistry catalyzed by Sir2 proteins we report the high-resolution ternary structure of yeast Hst2 (homologue of Sir two 2) with an acetyllysine histone H4 peptide and a nonhydrolyzable NAD(+) analogue, carba-NAD(+), as well as an analogous ternary complex with a reaction intermediate analog formed immediately after nicotinamide hydrolysis, ADP-ribose. The ternary complex with carba-NAD(+) reveals that the nicotinamide group makes stabilizing interactions within a binding pocket harboring conserved Sir2 residues. Moreover, an asparagine residue, N116, strictly conserved within Sir2 proteins and shown to be essential for nicotinamide exchange, is in position to stabilize the oxocarbenium intermediate that has been proposed to proceed the hydrolysis of nicotinamide. A comparison of this structure with the ADP-ribose ternary complex and a previously reported ternary complex with the 2'-O-acetyl-ADP-ribose reaction product reveals that the ribose ring of the cofactor and the highly conserved beta1-alpha2 loop of the protein undergo significant structural rearrangements to facilitate the ordered NAD(+) reactions of nicotinamide cleavage and ADP-ribose transfer to acetate. Together, these studies provide insights into the chemistry of NAD(+) cleavage and acetylation by Sir2 proteins and have implications for the design of Sir2-specific regulatory molecules.

  18. Beta-secretase cleavage at amino acid residue 34 in the amyloid beta peptide is dependent upon gamma-secretase activity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Ping; Tugusheva, Katherine; Bruce, James E; Lucka, Adam; Wu, Guo-Xin; Chen-Dodson, Elizabeth; Price, Eric; Li, Yueming; Xu, Min; Huang, Qian; Sardana, Mohinder K; Hazuda, Daria J

    2003-06-06

    The amyloid beta peptides (Abeta) are the major components of the senile plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. Abeta peptides are generated from the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretases. Beta-secretase (BACE), a type-I transmembrane aspartyl protease, cleaves APP first to generate a 99-amino acid membrane-associated fragment (CT99) containing the N terminus of Abeta peptides. Gamma-secretase, a multi-protein complex, then cleaves within the transmembrane region of CT99 to generate the C termini of Abeta peptides. The production of Abeta peptides is, therefore, dependent on the activities of both BACE and gamma-secretase. The cleavage of APP by BACE is believed to be a prerequisite for gamma-secretase-mediated processing. In the present study, we provide evidence both in vitro and in cells that BACE-mediated cleavage between amino acid residues 34 and 35 (Abeta-34 site) in the Abeta region is dependent on gamma-secretase activity. In vitro, the Abeta-34 site is processed specifically by BACE1 and BACE2, but not by cathepsin D, a closely related aspartyl protease. Moreover, the cleavage of the Abeta-34 site by BACE1 or BACE2 occurred only when Abeta 1- 40 peptide, a gamma-secretase cleavage product, was used as substrate, not the non-cleaved CT99. In cells, overexpression of BACE1 or BACE2 dramatically increased the production of the Abeta 1-34 species. More importantly, the cellular production of Abeta 1-34 species induced by overexpression of BACE1 or BACE2 was blocked by a number of known gamma-secretase inhibitors in a concentration-dependent manner. These gamma-secretase inhibitors had no effect on enzymatic activity of BACE1 or BACE2 in vitro. Our data thus suggest that gamma-secretase cleavage of CT99 is a prerequisite for BACE-mediated processing at Abeta-34 site. Therefore, BACE and gamma-secretase activity can be mutually dependent.

  19. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  20. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  1. Structural and functional analyses of an archaeal XPF/Rad1/Mus81 nuclease: asymmetric DNA binding and cleavage mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Tatsuya; Komori, Kayoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2005-08-01

    XPF/Rad1/Mus81/Hef proteins recognize and cleave branched DNA structures. XPF and Rad1 proteins cleave the 5' side of nucleotide excision repair bubble, while Mus81 and Hef cleave similar sites of the nicked Holliday junction, fork, or flap structure. These proteins all function as dimers and consist of catalytic and helix-hairpin-helix DNA binding (HhH) domains. We have determined the crystal structure of the HhH domain of Pyrococcus furiosus Hef nuclease (HefHhH), which revealed the distinct mode of protein dimerization. Our structural and biochemical analyses also showed that each of the catalytic and HhH domains binds to distinct regions within the fork-structured DNA: each HhH domain from two separate subunits asymmetrically binds to the arm region, while the catalytic domain binds near the junction center. Upon binding to DNA, Hef nuclease disrupts base pairs near the cleavage site. It is most likely that this bipartite binding mode is conserved in the XPF/Rad1/Mus81 nuclease family.

  2. The first crystal structure of human RNase 6 reveals a novel substrate-binding and cleavage site arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Prats-Ejarque, Guillem; Arranz-Trullén, Javier; Blanco, Jose A.; Pulido, David; Nogués, M. Victòria; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Boix, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Human RNase 6 is a cationic secreted protein that belongs to the RNase A superfamily. Its expression is induced in neutrophils and monocytes upon bacterial infection, suggesting a role in host defence. We present here the crystal structure of RNase 6 obtained at 1.72 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution, which is the first report for the protein 3D structure and thereby setting the basis for functional studies. The structure shows an overall kidney-shaped globular fold shared with the other known family members. Three sulfate anions bound to RNase 6 were found, interacting with residues at the main active site (His15, His122 and Gln14) and cationic surface-exposed residues (His36, His39, Arg66 and His67). Kinetic characterization, together with prediction of protein–nucleotide complexes by molecular dynamics, was applied to analyse the RNase 6 substrate nitrogenous base and phosphate selectivity. Our results reveal that, although RNase 6 is a moderate catalyst in comparison with the pancreatic RNase type, its structure includes lineage-specific features that facilitate its activity towards polymeric nucleotide substrates. In particular, enzyme interactions at the substrate 5′ end can provide an endonuclease-type cleavage pattern. Interestingly, the RNase 6 crystal structure revealed a novel secondary active site conformed by the His36–His39 dyad that facilitates the polynucleotide substrate catalysis. PMID:27013146

  3. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA, identification of cleavage activation site and amino acid sequence of N-terminus of F1 subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Satake, M; Coligan, J E; Norrby, E; Camargo, E; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein (Fo) was deduced from the sequence of a partial cDNA clone of mRNA and from the 5' mRNA sequence obtained by primer extension and dideoxysequencing. The encoded protein of 574 amino acids is extremely hydrophobic and has a molecular weight of 63371 daltons. The site of proteolytic cleavage within this protein was accurately mapped by determining a partial amino acid sequence of the N-terminus of the larger subunit (F1) purified by radioimmunoprecipitation using monoclonal antibodies. Alignment of the N-terminus of the F1 subunit within the deduced amino acid sequence of Fo permitted us to identify a sequence of lys-lys-arg-lys-arg-arg at the C-terminus of the smaller N-terminal F2 subunit that appears to represent the cleavage/activation domain. Five potential sites of glycosylation, four within the F2 subunit, were also identified. Three extremely hydrophobic domains are present in the protein; a) the N-terminal signal sequence, b) the N-terminus of the F1 subunit that is analogous to the N-terminus of the paramyxovirus F1 subunit and the HA2 subunit of influenza virus hemagglutinin, and c) the putative membrane anchorage domain near the C-terminus of F1. Images PMID:2987829

  4. The histone deacetylase inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agent suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) induces a cell-death pathway characterized by cleavage of Bid and production of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Ruefli, Astrid A.; Ausserlechner, Michael J.; Bernhard, David; Sutton, Vivien R.; Tainton, Kellie M.; Kofler, Reinhard; Smyth, Mark J.; Johnstone, Ricky W.

    2001-01-01

    Many chemotherapeutic agents induce mitochondrial-membrane disruption to initiate apoptosis. However, the upstream events leading to drug-induced mitochondrial perturbation have remained poorly defined. We have used a variety of physiological and pharmacological inhibitors of distinct apoptotic pathways to analyze the manner by which suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a chemotherapeutic agent and histone deacetylase inhibitor, induces cell death. We demonstrate that SAHA initiates cell death by inducing mitochondria-mediated death pathways characterized by cytochrome c release and the production of reactive oxygen species, and does not require the activation of key caspases such as caspase-8 or -3. We provide evidence that mitochondrial disruption is achieved by means of the cleavage of the BH3-only proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bid. SAHA-induced Bid cleavage was not blocked by caspase inhibitors or the overexpression of Bcl-2 but did require the transcriptional regulatory activity of SAHA. These data provide evidence of a mechanism of cell death mediated by transcriptional events that result in the cleavage of Bid, disruption of the mitochondrial membrane, and production of reactive oxygen species to induce cell death. PMID:11535817

  5. Structural features underlying the selective cleavage of a novel exo-type maltose-forming amylase from Pyrococcus sp. ST04.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwang-Hyun; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Park, Sung-Goo; Lee, Myeong-Eun; Holden, James F; Park, Cheon-Seok; Woo, Eui-Jeon

    2014-06-01

    A novel maltose-forming α-amylase (PSMA) was recently found in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus sp. ST04. This enzyme shows <13% amino-acid sequence identity to other known α-amylases and displays a unique enzymatic property in that it hydrolyzes both α-1,4-glucosidic and α-1,6-glucosidic linkages of substrates, recognizing only maltose units, in an exo-type manner. Here, the crystal structure of PSMA at a resolution of 1.8 Å is reported, showing a tight ring-shaped tetramer with monomers composed of two domains: an N-domain (amino acids 1-341) with a typical GH57 family (β/α)7-barrel fold and a C-domain (amino acids 342-597) composed of α-helical bundles. A small closed cavity observed in proximity to the catalytic residues Glu153 and Asp253 at the domain interface has the appropriate volume and geometry to bind a maltose unit, accounting for the selective exo-type maltose hydrolysis of the enzyme. A narrow gate at the putative subsite +1 formed by residue Phe218 and Phe452 is essential for specific cleavage of glucosidic bonds. The closed cavity at the active site is connected to a short substrate-binding channel that extends to the central hole of the tetramer, exhibiting a geometry that is significantly different from classical maltogenic amylases or β-amylases. The structural features of this novel exo-type maltose-forming α-amylase provide a molecular basis for its unique enzymatic characteristics and for its potential use in industrial applications and protein engineering.

  6. Protolytic cleavage of Hg-C bonds induced by 1-methyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazole-2-selone: synthesis and structural characterization of mercury complexes.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Joshua H; Parkin, Gerard

    2015-04-08

    Multinuclear ((1)H, (77)Se, and (199)Hg) NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that 1-methyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazole-2-selone, H(sebenzim(Me)), a structural analogue of the selenoamino acid, selenoneine, binds rapidly and reversibly to the mercury centers of HgX2 (X = Cl, Br, I), while X-ray diffraction studies provide evidence for the existence of adducts of composition [H(sebenzim(Me))]xHgX2 (X = Cl, x = 2, 3, 4; X = I, x = 2) in the solid state. H(sebenzim(Me)) also reacts with methylmercury halides, but the reaction is accompanied by elimination of methane resulting from protolytic cleavage of the Hg-C bond, an observation that is of relevance to the report that selenoneine demethylates CysHgMe, thereby providing a mechanism for mercury detoxification. Interestingly, the structures of [H(sebenzim(Me))]xHgX2 exhibit a variety of different hydrogen bonding patterns resulting from the ability of the N-H groups to form hydrogen bonds with chlorine, iodine, and selenium.

  7. Protolytic Cleavage of Hg–C Bonds Induced by 1-Methyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazole-2-selone: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Mercury Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Multinuclear (1H, 77Se, and 199Hg) NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that 1-methyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazole-2-selone, H(sebenzimMe), a structural analogue of the selenoamino acid, selenoneine, binds rapidly and reversibly to the mercury centers of HgX2 (X = Cl, Br, I), while X-ray diffraction studies provide evidence for the existence of adducts of composition [H(sebenzimMe)]xHgX2 (X = Cl, x = 2, 3, 4; X = I, x = 2) in the solid state. H(sebenzimMe) also reacts with methylmercury halides, but the reaction is accompanied by elimination of methane resulting from protolytic cleavage of the Hg–C bond, an observation that is of relevance to the report that selenoneine demethylates CysHgMe, thereby providing a mechanism for mercury detoxification. Interestingly, the structures of [H(sebenzimMe)]xHgX2 exhibit a variety of different hydrogen bonding patterns resulting from the ability of the N–H groups to form hydrogen bonds with chlorine, iodine, and selenium. PMID:25822075

  8. Crystal structure of A. aeolicus argonaute, a site-specific DNA-guided endoribonuclease, provides insights into RISC-mediated mRNA cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan,Y.; Pei, Y.; Ma, J.; Kuryavyi, V.; Zhadina, M.; Meister, G.; Chen, H.; Dauter, Z.; Tuschi, T.; Patel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins constitute a key component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). We report the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus Ago (Aa-Ago) together with binding and cleavage studies, which establish this eubacterial Ago as a bona fide guide DNA strand-mediated site-specific RNA endonuclease. We have generated a stereochemically robust model of the complex, where the guide DNA-mRNA duplex is positioned within a basic channel spanning the bilobal interface, such that the 5' phosphate of the guide strand can be anchored in a basic pocket, and the mRNA can be positioned for site-specific cleavage by RNase H-type divalent cation-coordinated catalytic Asp residues of the PIWI domain. Domain swap experiments involving chimeras of human Ago (hAgo1) and cleavage-competent hAgo2 reinforce the role of the PIWI domain in 'slicer' activity. We propose a four-step Ago-mediated catalytic cleavage cycle model, which provides distinct perspectives into the mechanism of guide strand-mediated mRNA cleavage within the RISC.

  9. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid W

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, S.; Gabelli, S; Echeverria, I; Vogel, J; Guan, J; Tan, B; Klee, H; McCarty, D; Amzela, M

    2010-01-01

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  10. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, Simon A.J.; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Echeverria, Ignacia; Vogel, Jonathan T.; Guan, Jiahn Chou; Tan, Bao Cai; Klee, Harry J.; McCarty, Donald R.; Amzel, L. Mario

    2011-09-06

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  11. Structural and Functional Characterization of Cleavage and Inactivation of Human Serine Protease Inhibitors by the Bacterial SPATE Protease EspPα from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, André; Joerss, Hanna; Brockmeyer, Jens

    2014-01-01

    EspPα and EspI are serine protease autotransporters found in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. They both belong to the SPATE autotransporter family and are believed to contribute to pathogenicity via proteolytic cleavage and inactivation of different key host proteins during infection. Here, we describe the specific cleavage and functional inactivation of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) by EspPα and compare this activity with the related SPATE EspI. Serpins are structurally related proteins that regulate vital protease cascades, such as blood coagulation and inflammatory host response. For the rapid determination of serpin cleavage sites, we applied direct MALDI-TOF-MS or ESI-FTMS analysis of coincubations of serpins and SPATE proteases and confirmed observed cleavage positions using in-gel-digest of SDS-PAGE-separated degradation products. Activities of both serpin and SPATE protease were assessed in a newly developed photometrical assay using chromogenic peptide substrates. EspPα cleaved the serpins α1-protease inhibitor (α1-PI), α1-antichymotrypsin, angiotensinogen, and α2-antiplasmin. Serpin cleavage led to loss of inhibitory function as demonstrated for α1-PI while EspPα activity was not affected. Notably, EspPα showed pronounced specificity and cleaved procoagulatory serpins such as α2-antiplasmin while the anticoagulatory antithrombin III was not affected. Together with recently published research, this underlines the interference of EspPα with hemostasis or inflammatory responses during infection, while the observed interaction of EspI with serpins is likely to be not physiologically relevant. EspPα-mediated serpin cleavage occurred always in flexible loops, indicating that this structural motif might be required for substrate recognition. PMID:25347319

  12. Chemical reactions in dense monolayers: in situ thermal cleavage of grafted esters for preparation of solid surfaces functionalized with carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Vincent; Chevalier, Yves

    2011-12-06

    The thermodynamics of a chemical reaction confined at a solid surface was investigated through kinetic measurements of a model unimolecular reaction. The thermal cleavage of ester groups grafted at the surface of solid silica was investigated together with complementary physicochemical characterization of the grafted species. The ester molecules were chemically grafted to the silica surface and subsequently cleaved into the carboxylic acids. A grafting process of a reproducible monolayer was designed using the reaction of monofunctional organosilane from its gas phase. The thermal deprotection step of the ester end-group was investigated. The thermal deprotection reaction behaves in quite a specific manner when it is conducted at a surface in a grafted layer. Different organosilane molecules terminated by methyl, isopropyl and tert-butyl ester groups were grafted to silica surface; such functionalized materials were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis, and the thermodynamic parameters of the thermal elimination reaction at the surface were measured. The limiting factor of such thermal ester cleavage reaction is the thermal stability of grafted ester group according to the temperature order: tert-butyl < i-propyl < methyl. Methyl ester groups were not selectively cleaved by temperature. The thermal deprotection of i-propyl ester groups took place at a temperature close to the thermal degradation of the organofunctional tail of the silane. The low thermolysis temperature of the grafted tert-butyl esters allowed their selective cleavage. There is a definite influence of the surface on the reaction. The enthalpy of activation is lower than in the gas phase because of the polarity of the reaction site. The major contribution is entropic; the negative entropy of activation comes from lateral interactions with the neighbor grafted molecules because of the high grafting density. Such reaction is an original strategy

  13. Structural basis for the recognition and cleavage of histone H3 by cathepsin L

    PubMed Central

    Adams-Cioaba, Melanie A.; Krupa, Joanne C.; Xu, Chao; Mort, John S.; Min, Jinrong

    2011-01-01

    Proteolysis of eukaryotic histone tails has emerged as an important factor in the modulation of cell-cycle progression and cellular differentiation. The recruitment of lysosomal cathepsin L to the nucleus where it mediates proteolysis of the mouse histone H3 tail has been described recently. Here, we report the three-dimensional crystal structures of a mature, inactive mutant of human cathepsin L alone and in complex with a peptide derived from histone H3. Canonical substrate–cathepsin L interactions are observed in the complex between the protease and the histone H3 peptide. Systematic analysis of the impact of posttranslational modifications at histone H3 on substrate selectivity suggests cathepsin L to be highly accommodating of all modified peptides. This is the first report of cathepsin L–histone H3 interaction and the first structural description of cathepsin L in complex with a substrate. PMID:21326229

  14. Structural, magnetic, electrochemical, catalytic, DNA binding and cleavage studies of new macrocyclic binuclear copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Anbu, S; Kandaswamy, M; Suthakaran, P; Murugan, V; Varghese, Babu

    2009-03-01

    The macrocyclic symmetrical and a series of unsymmetrical binuclear copper(II) complexes have been synthesized by using mononuclear complex [CuL] [3,3'-((1E,7E)-3,6-dioxa-2,7-diazaocta-1,7-diene-1,8-diyl)bis(3-formyl-5-methyl-2-diolato)copper(II)]. Another compartment of the [CuL] have been condensed with various diamines like 1,2-bis(aminooxy)ethane (L(1)), 1,2-diamino ethane(L(2a)), 1,3-diamino propane(L(2b)), 1,4-diamino butane(L(2c)), 1,2-diamino benzene(L(2d)), 1,8-diamino naphthalene(L(2e)) and characterized by elemental, spectroscopic, and X-ray crystallographic methods. The influence of the coordination geometry and the ring size of the binucleating ligands on the electronic, redox, magnetic, catecholase activity, DNA binding and cleavage properties have been studied. The molecular structures of the symmetrical binuclear complex [Cu(2)L(1)(H(2)O)(2)](ClO(4))(2) (1) and unsymmetrical binuclear complex [Cu(2)L(2b)(ClO(4))(H(2)O)]ClO(4) (2b) were determined by X-ray crystallography. Both of them were discrete binuclear species in which each Cu(II) ions are in distorted square pyramid. The Cu...Cu distances vary from 3.0308 (2b) to 3.0361 A (1). Electrochemical studies evidenced that two quasi-reversible one electron-transfer reduction waves (E(pc)(1)) -0.91 to -1.01 V, (E(pc)(2)) -1.26 to -1.55 V) for binuclear complexes are obtained in the cathodic region. Cryomagnetic investigation of the binuclear complexes reveals a weak antiferromagnetic spin exchange interaction between the Cu(II) ions within the complexes (-2J=104.4-127.5 cm(-1)). The initial rate (V(in)) for the oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol to o-quinone by the binuclear Cu(II)complexes are in the range 3.6 x 10(-5) to 7.3 x 10(-5)Ms(-1). The binuclear Cu(II) complexes are avid binders to calf thymus DNA. The complexes display significant oxidative cleavage of circular plasmid pBR322 DNA in the presence of mercaptoethanol using the singlet oxygen as a reactive species. The aromatic diamine

  15. Structural, electrochemical, phosphate-hydrolysis, DNA binding and cleavage studies of new macrocyclic binuclear nickel(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Anbu, Sellamuthu; Kandaswamy, Muthusamy; Varghese, Babu

    2010-04-28

    New macrocyclic binuclear nickel(ii) complexes have been synthesized by using the bicompartmental mononuclear complex [NiL] [3,30-((1E,7E)-3,6-dioxa-2,7-diazaocta-1,7-diene-1,8-diyl)bis(3-formyl-5-methyl-2-diolato)nickel(II)] with various diamines like 1,2-bis(aminooxy)ethane (L(1)), 1,2-diamino ethane (L(2)), 1,3-diamino propane (L(3)), 1,4-diamino butane (L(4)), 1,2-diamino benzene (L(5)), and 1,8-diamino naphthalene (L(6)). The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The molecular structures of the symmetrical binuclear complex [Ni(2)L(1)(H(2)O)(4)](ClO(4))(2) (1) and unsymmetrical binuclear complex [Ni(2)L(3)(H(2)O)(4)](ClO(4))(2).(H(2)O)(4) (3) were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The geometry around both the nickel(II) ions in each molecule is a slightly distorted octahedral. The distance between the Ni...Ni centers for complex 1 is 3.039 A and for complex 3 is 3.059 A. The influence of the coordination geometry and the ring size of the binucleating ligands on the electronic, redox, phosphate hydrolysis, DNA binding and cleavage properties have been studied. Electrochemical studies of the complexes show two quasi-reversible one electron reduction processes between -0.49 to -1.69 V. The reduction potential of the binuclear Ni(II) complexes shifts towards anodically upon increasing the macrocyclic ring size. The observed first order rate constant values for the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate reaction are in the range from 8.69 x 10(-3) to 1.85 x 10(-2) s(-1). The complexes show good binding propensity to calf thymus DNA giving binding constant values in the range from 1.4 x 10(4) to 17.5 x 10(4) M(-1). The absorption, fluorescence and CD spectral data suggests that the complexes are strongly interacting with DNA. These complexes display hydrolytic cleavage of supercoiled pBR322DNA in the presence of H(2)O(2) at pH 7.2 and 37 degrees C. The hydrolytic cleavage of DNA by the complexes is supported by

  16. Structure and specificity of the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 during DNA interrogation, target binding and cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Josephs, Eric A.; Kocak, D. Dewran; Fitzgibbon, Christopher J.; McMenemy, Joshua; Gersbach, Charles A.; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 cuts DNA at variable target sites designated by a Cas9-bound RNA molecule. Cas9's ability to be directed by single ‘guide RNA’ molecules to target nearly any sequence has been recently exploited for a number of emerging biological and medical applications. Therefore, understanding the nature of Cas9's off-target activity is of paramount importance for its practical use. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we directly resolve individual Cas9 and nuclease-inactive dCas9 proteins as they bind along engineered DNA substrates. High-resolution imaging allows us to determine their relative propensities to bind with different guide RNA variants to targeted or off-target sequences. Mapping the structural properties of Cas9 and dCas9 to their respective binding sites reveals a progressive conformational transformation at DNA sites with increasing sequence similarity to its target. With kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations, these results provide evidence of a ‘conformational gating’ mechanism driven by the interactions between the guide RNA and the 14th–17th nucleotide region of the targeted DNA, the stabilities of which we find correlate significantly with reported off-target cleavage rates. KMC simulations also reveal potential methodologies to engineer guide RNA sequences with improved specificity by considering the invasion of guide RNAs into targeted DNA duplex. PMID:26384421

  17. Selective Cleavage of the Aryl Ether Bonds in Lignin for Depolymerization by Acidic Lithium Bromide Molten Salt Hydrate under Mild Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohui; Li, Ning; Lin, Xuliang; Pan, Xuejun; Zhou, Yonghong

    2016-11-09

    The present study demonstrates that the concentrated lithium bromide (LiBr) solution with acid as catalyst was able to selectively cleave the β-O-4 aryl ether bond and lead to lignin depolymerization under mild conditions (e.g., in 60% LiBr with 0.3 M HCl at 110 °C for 2 h). Four industrial lignins from different pulping and biorefining processes, including softwood kraft lignin (SKL), hardwood kraft lignin (HKL), softwood ethanol organosolv lignin (EOL), and acid corncob lignin (ACL), were treated in the LiBr solution. The molecular weight, functional group, and interunit linkages of the lignins were characterized using GPC, FTIR, and NMR. The results indicated that the β-O-4 aryl ether bonds of the lignins were selectively cleaved, and both LiBr and HCl played crucial roles in catalyzing the cleavage of the ether bonds.

  18. Synthesis, structural characterisation, bio-potential efficiency and DNA cleavage applications of nicotinamide metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surendra Dilip, C.; Siva Kumar, V.; John Venison, S.; Vetha potheher, I.; Rajalaxmi (a) Subahashini, D.

    2013-05-01

    Mixed ligand complexes were synthesised using nicotinamide as the primary ligand and nitrite as the secondary ligand were characterised by FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, TG-DTA-DTG, X-ray powder diffraction and physical analytical studies. From the molar conductance, magnetic moment and electronic spectral data of the synthesised complexes a general formula of [M(ONO)2(NA)2] where M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) and [Cr2(ONO)6(NA)2] with a distorted octahedral structure were proposed. Thermal analyses show that the complexes lose molecules of hydration initially and subsequently expel anionic and organic ligands in continuous steps. The kinetic parameter values, such as, E*, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* illustrate the spontaneous association of the metal and ligands in the formation of the complexes. The antimicrobial efficacy of the ligand and its complexes were examined by in vitro method against various pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains. The metal complexes were found to posses efficient antimicrobial properties compared to nicotinamide and a few of these complexes could turn out to be excellent models for the design of effective antibiotic drug substances. The intercalating interaction of Cu(II) complex with CT-DNA was inspected by absorption spectral and viscosity studies, thermal denaturation and electro-analytical experiments.

  19. Structural Characterization of Monohydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acids and Dihydroxy- and Trihydroxyeicosatrienoic Acids by ESI-FTICR

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lijie; Isbell, Marilyn A.; Chawengsub, Yuttana; Falck, John R.; Campbell, William B.; Nithipatikom, Kasem

    2008-01-01

    The fragmentation characteristics of monohydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids and dihydroxy- and trihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids were investigated by electrospray ionization - Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry using sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD). The fragmentation patterns of these compounds were associated with the number and positions of the hydroxyl substituents. The fragmentation is more complicated with increasing number of the hydroxyl groups of the compounds. In general, the major carbon-carbon cleavage of [M-H]− ions occurred at the α-position to the hydroxyl group, and the carbon-carbon cleavage occurred when there was a double bond at the β-position to the hydroxyl group. SORI-CID and IRMPD produced some common fragmentation patterns; however, each technique provided some unique patterns that are useful for structural identification of these compounds. This study demonstrated the application of FTICR via the identification of regioisomers of trihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids in rabbit aorta samples. PMID:18296063

  20. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  1. New insight into the cleavage reaction of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase in natural and nonnatural carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jinsol; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2013-06-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of carotenoids at a specific double bond to generate apocarotenoids. In this study, we investigated the activity and substrate preferences of NSC3, a CCD of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, in vivo and in vitro using natural and nonnatural carotenoid structures. NSC3 cleaved β-apo-8'-carotenal at 3 positions, C-13 C-14, C-15 C-15', and C-13' C-14', revealing a unique cleavage pattern. NSC3 cleaves the natural structure of carotenoids 4,4'-diaponeurosporene, 4,4'-diaponeurosporen-4'-al, 4,4'-diaponeurosporen-4'-oic acid, 4,4'-diapotorulene, and 4,4'-diapotorulen-4'-al to generate novel cleavage products (apo-14'-diaponeurosporenal, apo-13'-diaponeurosporenal, apo-10'-diaponeurosporenal, apo-14'-diapotorulenal, and apo-10'-diapotorulenal, respectively). The study of carotenoids with natural or nonnatural structures produced by using synthetic modules could provide information valuable for understanding the cleavage reactions or substrate preferences of other CCDs in vivo and in vitro.

  2. New Insight into the Cleavage Reaction of Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120 Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase in Natural and Nonnatural Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jinsol; Kim, Se Hyeuk

    2013-01-01

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of carotenoids at a specific double bond to generate apocarotenoids. In this study, we investigated the activity and substrate preferences of NSC3, a CCD of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120, in vivo and in vitro using natural and nonnatural carotenoid structures. NSC3 cleaved β-apo-8′-carotenal at 3 positions, C-13C-14, C-15C-15′, and C-13′C-14′, revealing a unique cleavage pattern. NSC3 cleaves the natural structure of carotenoids 4,4′-diaponeurosporene, 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4′-al, 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4′-oic acid, 4,4′-diapotorulene, and 4,4′-diapotorulen-4′-al to generate novel cleavage products (apo-14′-diaponeurosporenal, apo-13′-diaponeurosporenal, apo-10′-diaponeurosporenal, apo-14′-diapotorulenal, and apo-10′-diapotorulenal, respectively). The study of carotenoids with natural or nonnatural structures produced by using synthetic modules could provide information valuable for understanding the cleavage reactions or substrate preferences of other CCDs in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23524669

  3. Structure of the NS2B-NS3 protease from Zika virus after self-cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Phoo, Wint Wint; Li, Yan; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Lee, Michelle Yueqi; Loh, Ying Ru; Tan, Yaw Bia; Ng, Elizabeth Yihui; Lescar, Julien; Kang, CongBao; Luo, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infections in the Americas represents a serious threat to the global public health. The viral protease that processes viral polyproteins during infection appears as an attractive drug target. Here we report a crystal structure at 1.84 Å resolution of ZIKV non-structural protein NS2B-NS3 protease with the last four amino acids of the NS2B cofactor bound at the NS3 active site. This structure represents a post-proteolysis state of the enzyme during viral polyprotein processing and provides insights into peptide substrate recognition by the protease. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and protease activity assays unravel the protein dynamics upon binding the protease inhibitor BPTI in solution and confirm this finding. The structural and functional insights of the ZIKV protease presented here should advance our current understanding of flavivirus replication and accelerate structure-based antiviral drug discovery against ZIKV. PMID:27845325

  4. Novel metal-based pharmacologically dynamic agents of transition metal(II) complexes: Designing, synthesis, structural elucidation, DNA binding and photo-induced DNA cleavage activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Jeyamurugan, R.; Sakthivel, A.; Mitu, L.

    2010-01-01

    Novel Schiff base Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been designed and synthesized using the macrocyclic ligand derived from the condensation of diethylphthalate with Schiff base, obtained from benzene-1,2-diamine and 3-benzylidene-pentane-2,4-dione. The ligand and its complexes have been characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. DNA binding properties of these complexes have been investigated by UV-vis, viscosity measurements, cyclic voltammetric and differential pulse voltammogram studies. The intrinsic binding constants for Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes are 1.6 × 10 6, 1.8 × 10 6, 2.0 × 10 6 and 1.5 × 10 6 M -1 respectively which are obtained from electronic absorption experiment. Control DNA cleavage experiments using pUC19 supercoiled (SC) DNA and minor groove binder (distamycin) suggest the major groove binding tendency for the synthesized complexes. In the presence of a reducing agent like 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), the synthesized complexes show chemical nuclease activity under dark reaction condition. The complexes also show efficient photo-induced DNA cleavage activity on irradiation with a monochromatic UV light of 360 nm in the presence of inhibitors. Control experiments show inhibition of cleavage in the presence of singlet oxygen quencher like sodium azide and enhancement of cleavage in D 2O, suggesting the formation of singlet oxygen as a reactive species in a type-II process.

  5. Prediction of porcine blastocyst formation using morphological, kinetic, and amino acid depletion and appearance criteria determined during the early cleavage of in vitro-produced embryos.

    PubMed

    Booth, Paul J; Watson, Terry J; Leese, Henry J

    2007-11-01

    The determination for early cleavage-stage embryos of noninvasive morphologic and metabolic criteria that are predictive of blastocyst development and/or full-term viability remains an important research target. We describe the derivation of a logistic regression model that predicts the probability of porcine blastocyst formation in vitro. Pig zygotes, derived by in vitro maturation and fertilization of slaughterhouse oocytes, were cultured in NCSU-23 medium that was supplemented with a mixture of 20 amino acids (NCSU-23(aa)). On Day 1, at 21, 23, 25, 27, 29 and 31 h postinsemination, cleaving embryos were evaluated morphologically in terms of the: i) number of blastomeres, ii) evenness of division, and iii) degree of fragmentation. These embryos were then placed in 1.5-microl drops of NCSU-23(aa) for 24 h, after which time the three morphologic criteria were re-evaluated and 1.2 microl of spent medium were removed for analysis by HPLC, in order to determine the net rates of amino acid depletion and appearance. Embryos were then cultured singly in NCSU-23(aa) by placing them between the filaments of a woven polyester mesh until Day 6, in order to permit the identification of individual embryos. Of 256 cleaved embryos, 28.7 +/- 6.2% (n = 5 replicates) developed into blastocysts. Discriminant analysis was used to select a subset of amino acids (threonine, valine, lysine, and phenylalanine) that discriminated optimally between embryos that became blastocysts or degenerated. These discriminant scores were entered into the logistic regression. Significant univariate relationships were established between the probability of blastocyst development and amino acid score (odds ratio [OR] 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40-0.69, P < 0.001), cleavage time (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.71-0.87, P < 0.001), degree of fragmentation on Day 1 (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.35-0.84, P = 0.009) and Day 2 (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.35-0.78, P = 0.002), evenness of division on Day 2 (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0

  6. Serine-selective aerobic cleavage of peptides and a protein using a water-soluble copper-organoradical conjugate.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yohei; Tanabe, Kana; Sasaki, Daisuke; Sohma, Youhei; Oisaki, Kounosuke; Kanai, Motomu

    2014-06-16

    The site-specific cleavage of peptide bonds is an important chemical modification of biologically relevant macromolecules. The reaction is not only used for routine structural determination of peptides, but is also a potential artificial modulator of protein function. Realizing the substrate scope beyond the conventional chemical or enzymatic cleavage of peptide bonds is, however, a formidable challenge. Here we report a serine-selective peptide-cleavage protocol that proceeds at room temperature and near neutral pH value, through mild aerobic oxidation promoted by a water-soluble copper-organoradical conjugate. The method is applicable to the site-selective cleavage of polypeptides that possess various functional groups. Peptides comprising D-amino acids or sensitive disulfide pairs are competent substrates. The system is extendable to the site-selective cleavage of a native protein, ubiquitin, which comprises more than 70 amino acid residues.

  7. Metal-catalyzed C-C bond cleavage in alkanes: effects of methyl substitution on transition-state structures and stability.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, David W; Hibbitts, David D; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-07-09

    Methyl substituents at C-C bonds influence hydrogenolysis rates and selectivities of acyclic and cyclic C2-C8 alkanes on Ir, Rh, Ru, and Pt catalysts. C-C cleavage transition states form via equilibrated dehydrogenation steps that replace several C-H bonds with C-metal bonds, desorb H atoms (H*) from saturated surfaces, and form λ H2(g) molecules. Activation enthalpies (ΔH(‡)) and entropies (ΔS(‡)) and λ values for (3)C-(x)C cleavage are larger than for (2)C-(2)C or (2)C-(1)C bonds, irrespective of the composition of metal clusters or the cyclic/acyclic structure of the reactants. (3)C-(x)C bonds cleave through α,β,γ- or α,β,γ,δ-bound transition states, as indicated by the agreement between measured activation entropies and those estimated for such structures using statistical mechanics. In contrast, less substituted C-C bonds involve α,β-bound species with each C atom bound to several surface atoms. These α,β configurations weaken C-C bonds through back-donation to antibonding orbitals, but such configurations cannot form with (3)C atoms, which have one C-H bond and thus can form only one C-M bond. (3)C-(x)C cleavage involves attachment of other C atoms, which requires endothermic C-H activation and H* desorption steps that lead to larger ΔH(‡) values but also larger ΔS(‡) values (by forming more H2(g)) than for (2)C-(2)C and (2)C-(1)C bonds, irrespective of alkane size (C2-C8) or cyclic/acyclic structure. These data and their mechanistic interpretation indicate that low temperatures and high H2 pressures favor cleavage of less substituted C-C bonds and form more highly branched products from cyclic and acyclic alkanes. Such interpretations and catalytic consequences of substitution seem also relevant to C-X cleavage (X = S, N, O) in desulfurization, denitrogenation, and deoxygenation reactions.

  8. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Early and Late Enzymes in the Lignin β-Aryl Ether Cleavage Pathway from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jose Henrique; Heins, Richard A.; Gall, Daniel L.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Donohue, Timothy J.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Adams, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    There has been great progress in the development of technology for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to sugars and subsequent fermentation to fuels. However, plant lignin remains an untapped source of materials for production of fuels or high value chemicals. Biological cleavage of lignin has been well characterized in fungi, in which enzymes that create free radical intermediates are used to degrade this material. In contrast, a catabolic pathway for the stereospecific cleavage of β-aryl ether units that are found in lignin has been identified in Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 bacteria. β-Aryl ether units are typically abundant in lignin, corresponding to 50–70% of all of the intermonomer linkages. Consequently, a comprehensive understanding of enzymatic β-aryl ether (β-ether) cleavage is important for future efforts to biologically process lignin and its breakdown products. The crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenases (LigD, LigO, and LigL) and the glutathione-dependent lyase LigG provide new insights into the early and late enzymes in the β-ether degradation pathway. We present detailed information on the cofactor and substrate binding sites and on the catalytic mechanisms of these enzymes, comparing them with other known members of their respective families. Information on the Lig enzymes provides new insight into their catalysis mechanisms and can inform future strategies for using aromatic oligomers derived from plant lignin as a source of valuable aromatic compounds for biofuels and other bioproducts. PMID:26940872

  9. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Early and Late Enzymes in the Lignin β-Aryl Ether Cleavage Pathway from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jose Henrique; Heins, Richard A; Gall, Daniel L; McAndrew, Ryan P; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C; Donohue, Timothy J; Noguera, Daniel R; Simmons, Blake A; Sale, Kenneth L; Ralph, John; Adams, Paul D

    2016-05-06

    There has been great progress in the development of technology for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to sugars and subsequent fermentation to fuels. However, plant lignin remains an untapped source of materials for production of fuels or high value chemicals. Biological cleavage of lignin has been well characterized in fungi, in which enzymes that create free radical intermediates are used to degrade this material. In contrast, a catabolic pathway for the stereospecific cleavage of β-aryl ether units that are found in lignin has been identified in Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 bacteria. β-Aryl ether units are typically abundant in lignin, corresponding to 50-70% of all of the intermonomer linkages. Consequently, a comprehensive understanding of enzymatic β-aryl ether (β-ether) cleavage is important for future efforts to biologically process lignin and its breakdown products. The crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenases (LigD, LigO, and LigL) and the glutathione-dependent lyase LigG provide new insights into the early and late enzymes in the β-ether degradation pathway. We present detailed information on the cofactor and substrate binding sites and on the catalytic mechanisms of these enzymes, comparing them with other known members of their respective families. Information on the Lig enzymes provides new insight into their catalysis mechanisms and can inform future strategies for using aromatic oligomers derived from plant lignin as a source of valuable aromatic compounds for biofuels and other bioproducts.

  10. Structural aberrations in T-even bacteriophage. VII. In vitro analysis of the canavanine-mediated inhibition of proteolytic cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Bolin, R W; Cummings, D J

    1975-01-01

    Canavanine arrests a critical function in head morphogenesis and the potential for forming giant T-even phage particles termed lollipops is induced. Formation of the particles requires the addition of arginine and the restoration of normal functions. We now report on an investigation into the effects of canavanine on both the T4-induced proteolytic activity and on the substrate proteins. Using an in vitro cleavage assay we have shown that the gene 21-dependent proteolytic activity from canavanine-treated extracts is markedly inhibited, whereas the substrate proteins retain a high susceptibility for cleavage. The proteolytic activity in extracts treated with canavanine followed by arginine is readily detectable, and proteins previously synthesized in the presence of canavanine can be cleaved. Protein synthesis is apparently required for the appearance of the proteolytic activity after the canavanine-arginine treatment. Mixing experiments suggest the requirement for a component of the gene 21-dependent proteolytic activity that is not coded for by gene 21. Images PMID:1185853

  11. A hierarchical research by large-scale and ab initio electronic structure theories—Si and Ge cleavage and stepped (111)-2×1 surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, T.; Tanikawa, M.; Ishii, A.

    2010-09-01

    The ab initio calculation with the density functional theory and plane-wave bases is carried out for stepped Si(1 1 1)-2×1 surfaces that were predicted in a cleavage simulation by the large-scale (order- N) electronic structure theory (T. Hoshi, Y. Iguchi and T. Fujiwara, Phys. Rev. B 72 (2005) 075323). The present ab initio calculation confirms the predicted stepped structure and its bias-dependent STM image. Moreover, two (meta)stable step-edge structures are found and compared. The investigation is carried out also for Ge(1 1 1)-2×1 surfaces, so as to construct a common understanding among elements. The present study demonstrates the general importance of the hierarchical research between large-scale and ab initio electronic structure theories.

  12. Efficient hammerhead ribozyme-mediated cleavage of the structured hepatitis B virus encapsidation signal in vitro and in cell extracts, but not in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, J; Nassal, M

    1995-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), the causative agent of B-type hepatitis in man, is a small enveloped DNA virus that replicates through reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate, the terminally redundant RNA pregenome. An essential highly conserved cis-element present twice on this RNA is the encapsidation signal epsilon, a stem-loop structure that is critical for pregenome packaging and reverse transcription. Epsilon is hence an attractive target for antiviral therapy. Its structure, however, is a potential obstacle to antivirals whose action depends on hybridization, e.g. ribozymes. Here we demonstrate effective in vitro cleavage inside epsilon by hammerhead ribozymes containing flanking sequences complementary to an adjacent less structured region. Upon co-transfection with a HBV expression construct corresponding ribozymes embedded in a U6 snRNA context led to a significant, though modest, reduction in the steady-state level of HBV pregenomes. Inactive ribozyme mutants revealed that antisense effects contributed substantially to this reduction, however, efficient epsilon cleavage by the intracellularly expressed ribozymes was observed in Mg(2+)-supplemented cell lysates. Artificial HBV pregenomes carrying the ribozymes in cis and model RNAs lacking all HBV sequences except epsilon exhibited essentially the same behaviour. Hence, neither the absence of co-localization of ribozyme and target nor a viral component, but rather a cellular factor(s), is responsible for the strikingly different ribozyme activities inside cells and in cellular extracts. Images PMID:8559651

  13. Molecular modeling of nucleic acid structure

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Bergonzo, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This unit is the first in a series of four units covering the analysis of nucleic acid structure by molecular modeling. This unit provides an overview of computer simulation of nucleic acids. Topics include the static structure model, computational graphics and energy models, generation of an initial model, and characterization of the overall three-dimensional structure. PMID:18428873

  14. Site-selective chemical cleavage of peptide bonds.

    PubMed

    Elashal, Hader E; Raj, Monika

    2016-05-07

    Site-selective cleavage of extremely unreactive peptide bonds is a very important chemical modification that provides invaluable information regarding protein sequence, and it acts as a modulator of protein structure and function for therapeutic applications. For controlled and selective cleavage, a daunting task, chemical reagents must selectively recognize or bind to one or more amino acid residues in the peptide chain and selectively cleave a peptide bond. Building on this principle, we have developed an approach that utilizes a chemical reagent to selectively modify the serine residue in a peptide chain and leads to the cleavage of a peptide backbone at the N-terminus of the serine residue. After cleavage, modified residues can be converted back to the original fragments. This method exhibits broad substrate scope and selectively cleaves various bioactive peptides with post-translational modifications (e.g. N-acetylation and -methylation) and mutations (d- and β-amino acids), which are a known cause of age related diseases.

  15. Cleavage of the peptide bond of beta-alanyl-L-histidine (carnosine) induced by a Co(III)-amine complexes: reaction, structure and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Saha, Manas K; Mukhopadhyay, Uday; Bernal, Ivan

    2004-05-07

    Cleavage of the peptide bond occurs when beta]-alanyl-L-histidine (carnosine) reacts with [Co(tren)Cl2]+ (tren = tris(2-aminoethyl)amine) to give [Co(tren)(histidine)](2+) 1 and [Co(tren)(beta-alanine)](2+) 2. [Co(tren)(histidine)](2+) 1 crystallizes in the enantiomorphic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) and 2 crystallizes in the P2(1)/c space group. The mechanism of the cleavage reactions were studied in detail for the precursor [Co(tren)Cl2]+ and [Co(trien)Cl2]+, which convert into [Co(tren)(OH)2]+/[Co(tren)(OH)(OH2)]2+ and [Co(trien)(OH)2]+/[Co(trien)(OH)(OH2)]2+ in water at basic pH (trien = 1,4,7,10-tetraazadecane). At a slightly basic pH, the initial coordination of the substrate (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) is by the carboxylate group for the reaction with [Co(tren)Cl2]+. This is followed by a rate-limiting nucleophilic attack of the hydroxide group at the beta-alanyl-L-histidine carbonyl group. In a strongly basic reaction medium substrate, binding of the metal was through carboxylate and amine terminals. On the other hand, for the reaction between [cis-beta-Co(trien)Cl2]+ and beta-alanyl-L-histidine, the initial coordination of the substrate takes place via an imidazole ring nitrogen, independently, and followed by a nucleophilic attack of the hydroxide group at the beta-alanyl-L-histidine carbonyl group. The circular dichroism spectrum for 1 suggests that a very small extent of racemization of the amino acid (L-histidine) takes place during the cleavage reaction between [Co(tren)Cl2]+ and beta-alanyl-L-histidine. Reaction between [cis-beta-Co(trien)Cl2]+ and beta-alanyl-L-histidine also causes cleavage of the peptide bond, producing a free beta-alanyl molecule and a cationic fragment [cis-alpha-Co(trien)(histidine)](2+) 3 that crystallizes in the optically active space group P2(1)2(1)2(1). Unlike the previous case an appreciable degree of racemization of the L-histidine takes place during the reaction between [cis-beta-Co(trien)Cl2]+ and beta

  16. Substrate and Lewis Acid Coordination Promote O-O Bond Cleavage of an Unreactive L2Cu(II)2(O2(2-)) Species to Form L2Cu(III)2(O)2 Cores with Enhanced Oxidative Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Bosch, Isaac; Cowley, Ryan E; Díaz, Daniel E; Peterson, Ryan L; Solomon, Edward I; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2017-03-01

    Copper-dependent metalloenzymes are widespread throughout metabolic pathways, coupling the reduction of O2 with the oxidation of organic substrates. Small-molecule synthetic analogs are useful platforms to generate L/Cu/O2 species that reproduce the structural, spectroscopic, and reactive properties of some copper-/O2-dependent enzymes. Landmark studies have shown that the conversion between dicopper(II)-peroxo species (L2Cu(II)2(O2(2-)) either side-on peroxo, (S)P, or end-on trans-peroxo, (T)P) and dicopper(III)-bis(μ-oxo) (L2Cu(III)2(O(2-))2: O) can be controlled through ligand design, reaction conditions (temperature, solvent, and counteranion), or substrate coordination. We recently published ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012 , 134 , 8513 , DOI: 10.1021/ja300674m ) the crystal structure of an unusual (S)P species [(MeAN)2Cu(II)2(O2(2-))](2+) ((S)P(MeAN), MeAN: N-methyl-N,N-bis[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]amine) that featured an elongated O-O bond but did not lead to O-O cleavage or reactivity toward external substrates. Herein, we report that (S)P(MeAN) can be activated to generate O(MeAN) and perform the oxidation of external substrates by two complementary strategies: (i) coordination of substituted sodium phenolates to form the substrate-bound O(MeAN)-RPhO(-) species that leads to ortho-hydroxylation in a tyrosinase-like fashion and (ii) addition of stoichiometric amounts (1 or 2 equiv) of Lewis acids (LA's) to form an unprecedented series of O-type species (O(MeAN)-LA) able to oxidize C-H and O-H bonds. Spectroscopic, computational, and mechanistic studies emphasize the unique plasticity of the (S)P(MeAN) core, which combines the assembly of exogenous reagents in the primary (phenolates) and secondary (Lewis acids association to the MeAN ligand) coordination spheres with O-O cleavage. These findings are reminiscent of the strategy followed by several metalloproteins and highlight the possible implication of O-type species in copper-/dioxygen-dependent enzymes such as

  17. Pistol ribozyme adopts a pseudoknot fold facilitating site-specific in-line cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Aiming; Vušurović, Nikola; Gebetsberger, Jennifer; Gao, Pu; Juen, Michael; Kreutz, Christoph; Micura, Ronald; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2016-01-01

    The field of small self-cleaving nucleolytic ribozymes has been invigorated by the recent discovery of the twister, twister-sister, pistol and hatchet ribozymes. We report on the crystal structure of the env25 pistol ribozyme, which adopts a compact tertiary architecture stabilized by an embedded pseudoknot fold. The G-U cleavage site adopts a splayed-apart conformation with in-line alignment of the modeled 2′-O of G for attack on the adjacent to-be-cleaved P-O5′ bond. Highly conserved residues G40 (N1 position) and A32 (N3 and 2′-OH positions) are aligned to act as general base and general acid respectively to accelerate cleavage chemistry, with their roles confirmed from cleavage assays on mutants, and an increased pKa of 4.7 for A32. Our structure of the pistol ribozyme defines how the overall and local topologies dictate the in-line alignment at the G-U cleavage site, with cleavage assays on mutants identifying key residues participating in acid-base catalyzed cleavage chemistry. PMID:27398999

  18. Structural analysis of disease-related TDP-43 D169G mutation: linking enhanced stability and caspase cleavage efficiency to protein accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chien-Hao; Grauffel, Cédric; Wu, Lien-Szu; Kuo, Pan-Hsien; Doudeva, Lyudmila G.; Lim, Carmay; Shen, Che-Kun James; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein TDP-43 forms intracellular inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While TDP-43 mutations have been identified in ALS patients, how these mutations are linked to ALS remains unclear. Here we examined the biophysical properties of six ALS-linked TDP-43 mutants and found that one of the mutants, D169G, had higher thermal stability than wild-type TDP-43 and that it was cleaved by caspase 3 more efficiently, producing increased levels of the C-terminal 35 kD fragments (TDP-35) in vitro and in neuroblastoma cells. The crystal structure of the TDP-43 RRM1 domain containing the D169G mutation in complex with DNA along with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the D169G mutation induces a local conformational change in a β turn and increases the hydrophobic interactions in the RRM1 core, thus enhancing the thermal stability of the RRM1 domain. Our results provide the first crystal structure of TDP-43 containing a disease-linked D169G mutation and a disease-related mechanism showing that D169G mutant is more susceptible to proteolytic cleavage by caspase 3 into the pathogenic C-terminal 35-kD fragments due to its increased stability in the RRM1 domain. Modulation of TDP-43 stability and caspase cleavage efficiency could present an avenue for prevention and treatment of TDP-43-linked neurodegeneration. PMID:26883171

  19. Microstructure and cleavage in lath martensitic steels.

    PubMed

    Morris, John W; Kinney, Chris; Pytlewski, Ken; Adachi, Y

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the microstructure of lath martensitic steels and the mechanisms by which it controls cleavage fracture. The specific experimental example is a 9Ni (9 wt% Ni) steel annealed to have a large prior austenite grain size, then examined and tested in the as-quenched condition to produce a relatively coarse lath martensite. The microstructure is shown to approximate the recently identified 'classic' lath martensite structure: prior austenite grains are divided into packets, packets are subdivided into blocks, and blocks contain interleaved laths whose variants are the two Kurjumov-Sachs relations that share the same Bain axis of the transformation. When the steel is fractured in brittle cleavage, the laths in the block share {100} cleavage planes and cleave as a unit. However, cleavage cracks deflect or blunt at the boundaries between blocks with different Bain axes. It follows that, as predicted, the block size governs the effective grain size for cleavage.

  20. Microstructure and cleavage in lath martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, John W., Jr.; Kinney, Chris; Pytlewski, Ken; Adachi, Y.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the microstructure of lath martensitic steels and the mechanisms by which it controls cleavage fracture. The specific experimental example is a 9Ni (9 wt% Ni) steel annealed to have a large prior austenite grain size, then examined and tested in the as-quenched condition to produce a relatively coarse lath martensite. The microstructure is shown to approximate the recently identified ‘classic’ lath martensite structure: prior austenite grains are divided into packets, packets are subdivided into blocks, and blocks contain interleaved laths whose variants are the two Kurjumov-Sachs relations that share the same Bain axis of the transformation. When the steel is fractured in brittle cleavage, the laths in the block share {100} cleavage planes and cleave as a unit. However, cleavage cracks deflect or blunt at the boundaries between blocks with different Bain axes. It follows that, as predicted, the block size governs the effective grain size for cleavage.

  1. Iron-mediated cleavage of C-C bonds in vicinal tricarbonyl compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Mecinović, Jasmin; Hamed, Refaat B; Schofield, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    Three of a kind: Vicinal tricarbonyl compounds undergo C-C cleavage mediated by ferric ions (see scheme). The observed cleavage of ninhydrin and dehydroascorbic acid has relevance for amino acid detection and the metabolism of vitamin C.

  2. Genetic Predisposition To Acquire a Polybasic Cleavage Site for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Nao, Naganori; Yamagishi, Junya; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Igarashi, Manabu; Manzoor, Rashid; Ohnuma, Aiko; Tsuda, Yoshimi; Furuyama, Wakako; Shigeno, Asako; Kajihara, Masahiro; Kishida, Noriko; Yoshida, Reiko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses with H5 and H7 hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes evolve from low-pathogenic precursors through the acquisition of multiple basic amino acid residues at the HA cleavage site. Although this mechanism has been observed to occur naturally only in these HA subtypes, little is known about the genetic basis for the acquisition of the polybasic HA cleavage site. Here we show that consecutive adenine residues and a stem-loop structure, which are frequently found in the viral RNA region encoding amino acids around the cleavage site of low-pathogenic H5 and H7 viruses isolated from waterfowl reservoirs, are important for nucleotide insertions into this RNA region. A reporter assay to detect nontemplated nucleotide insertions and deep-sequencing analysis of viral RNAs revealed that an increased number of adenine residues and enlarged stem-loop structure in the RNA region accelerated the multiple adenine and/or guanine insertions required to create codons for basic amino acids. Interestingly, nucleotide insertions associated with the HA cleavage site motif were not observed principally in the viral RNA of other subtypes tested (H1, H2, H3, and H4). Our findings suggest that the RNA editing-like activity is the key mechanism for nucleotide insertions, providing a clue as to why the acquisition of the polybasic HA cleavage site is restricted to the particular HA subtypes. PMID:28196963

  3. Synthesis, structural characterization, fluorescence, antimicrobial, antioxidant and DNA cleavage studies of Cu(II) complexes of formyl chromone Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, P; Saritha, M; Laxma Reddy, K

    2013-02-01

    Cu(II) complexes have been synthesized from different Schiff bases, such as 3-((2-hydroxy phenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL(1)), 2-((4-oxo-4H-chromen-3-yl)methylneamino) benzoicacid (HL(2)), 3-((3-hydroxypyridin-2-ylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL(3)) and 3-((2-mercaptophenylimino)methyl)-4H-chromen-4-one (HL(4)). The complexes were characterized by analytical, molar conductance, IR, electronic, magnetic, ESR, thermal, powder XRD and SEM studies. The analytical data reveal that metal to ligand molar ratio is 1:2 in all the complexes. Molar conductivity data indicates that all the Cu(II) complexes are neutral. On the basis of magnetic and electronic spectral data, distorted octahedral geometry is proposed for all the Cu(II) complexes. Thermal behaviour of the synthesized complexes illustrates the presence of lattice water molecules in the complexes. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that all the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes have triclinic system with different unit cell parameters. Antimicrobial, antioxidant and DNA cleavage activities indicate that metal complexes exhibited greater activity as compared with ligands.

  4. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  5. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres.

    PubMed

    Lassalas, Pierrik; Gay, Bryant; Lasfargeas, Caroline; James, Michael J; Tran, Van; Vijayendran, Krishna G; Brunden, Kurt R; Kozlowski, Marisa C; Thomas, Craig J; Smith, Amos B; Huryn, Donna M; Ballatore, Carlo

    2016-04-14

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure-property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group.

  6. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Cleavage of aliphatic organosulfonate carbon to sulfur (C-S) bonds, a critical link in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle, has been identified in Escherichia coli K-12. Enormous quantities of inorganic sulfate are continuously converted (Scheme I) into methanesulfonic acid 1 and acylated 3-(6-sulfo-{alpha}-D-quinovopyranosyl)-L-glycerol 2. Biocatalytic desulfurization (Scheme I) of 1 and 2, which share the structural feature of an aliphatic carbon bonded to a sulfonic acid sulfur, completes the cycle, Discovery of this desulfurization in E. coli provides an invaluable paradigm for study of a biotic process which, via the biogeochemical cycle, significantly influences the atmospheric concentration of sulfur-containing molecules.

  7. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure–property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group. PMID:26967507

  8. Cleavage plane determination in amphibian eggs.

    PubMed

    Sawai, T; Yomota, A

    1990-01-01

    In the present study using eggs of Cynops pyrrhogaster and Xenopus laevis, we examined (1) structural changes in the cytoplasm before the appearance of the cleavage furrow using a cytochemical method, (2) the time of cleavage plane determination depending on the mitotic apparatus (MA), by changing the shape of the eggs, and (3) the time of arrival of the "cleavage stimulus" at the cortex, by injecting colchicine solution or removing cytoplasm. Results were as follows: (1) In amphibian eggs the diastema was formed after development of the MA, appearing between the two asters after the MA had begun to degenerate. (2) The cleavage plane was preliminarily determined by the MA in the meta- to anaphase of karyokinesis. At this time, however, the egg cortex had not yet received the "cleavage stimulus" indispensable for furrow formation. (3) The egg cortex was really prepared to establish the furrow just after the edge of the diastema arrived at the cortex, when the MA had already degenerated. These results imply that the cleavage plane of the amphibian eggs is determined in two steps: the first, depending on the MA, is the determination of the direction of the growth of the diastema, and the second is the arrival of the "cleavage stimulus" at the cortex in association with the diastema.

  9. Structural basis for substrate specificity and mechanism of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid lyase from Pasteurella multocida#

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Nhung; Aye, Aye; Li, Yanhong; Yu, Hai; Cao, Hongzhi; Tiwari, Vinod Kumar; Shin, Don-Wook; Chen, Xi; Fisher, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    N -Acetylneuraminate lyases (NALs) or sialic acid aldolases catalyze the reversible aldol cleavage of N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac, the most common form of sialic acid) to form pyruvate and N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNAc). Although equilibrium favors sialic acid cleavage, these enzymes can be used for high-yield chemoenzymatic synthesis of structurally diverse sialic acids in the presence of excess pyruvate. Engineering these enzymes to synthesize structurally modified natural sialic acids and their non-natural derivatives holds promise in creating novel therapeutic agents. Atomic resolution structures of these enzymes will greatly assist in guiding mutagenic and modeling studies to engineer enzymes with altered substrate specificity. We report here the crystal structures of wild-type Pasteurella multocida N-acetylneuraminate lyase and its K164A mutant. Like other bacterial lyases, it assembles into a homotetramer with each monomer folding into a classic (β/α)8 TIM barrel. Two wild-type structures were determined; in the absence of substrates, and trapped in a Schiff base intermediate between Lys164 and pyruvate, respectively. Three structures of the K164A variant were determined: one in the absence of substrates and two binary complexes with N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), respectively. Both sialic acids bind to the active site in the open-chain ketone form of the monosaccharide. The structures reveal that every hydroxyl group of the linear sugars makes hydrogen bond interactions with the enzyme and the residues that determine specificity were identified. Additionally, the structures lend some clues in explaining the natural discrimination of sialic acid substrates between the P. multocida and E. coli NALs. PMID:24152047

  10. Synthesis, structure, and DNA cleavage properties of copper(II) complexes of 1,4,7-triazacyclononane ligands featuring pairs of guanidine pendants.

    PubMed

    Tjioe, Linda; Joshi, Tanmaya; Brugger, Joël; Graham, Bim; Spiccia, Leone

    2011-01-17

    Two new ligands, L(1) and L(2), have been prepared via N-functionalization of 1,4,7-triazacyclononane (tacn) with pairs of ethyl- or propyl-guanidine pendants, respectively. The X-ray crystal structure of [CuL(1)](ClO4)2 (C1) isolated from basic solution (pH 9) indicates that a secondary amine nitrogen from each guanidine pendants coordinates to the copper(II) center in addition to the nitrogen atoms in the tacn macrocycle, resulting in a five-coordinate complex with intermediate square-pyramidal/trigonal bipyramidal geometry. The guanidines adopt an unusual coordination mode in that their amine nitrogen nearest to the tacn macrocycle binds to the copper(II) center, forming very stable five-membered chelate rings. A spectrophotometric pH titration established the pK(app) for the deprotonation and coordination of each guanidine group to be 3.98 and 5.72, and revealed that [CuL(1)](2+) is the only detectable species present in solution above pH ∼ 8. The solution speciation of the CuL(2) complex (C2) is more complex, with at least 5 deprotonation steps over the pH range 4-12.5, and mononuclear and binuclear complexes coexisting. Analysis of the spectrophotometric data provided apparent deprotonation constants, and suggests that solutions at pH ∼ 7.5 contain the maximum proportion of polynuclear complexes. Complex C1 exhibits virtually no cleavage activity toward the model phosphate diesters, bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate (BNPP) and 2-hydroxypropyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNPP), while C2 exhibits moderate activity. For C2, the respective kobs values measured at pH 7.0 (7.24 (± 0.08) × 10(-5) s(-1) (BNPP at 50 °C) and 3.2 (± 0.3) × 10(-5) s(-1) (HPNPP at 25 °C)) are 40- and 10-times faster than [Cu(tacn)(OH2)2](2+) complex. Both complexes cleave supercoiled pBR 322 plasmid DNA, indicating that the guanidine pendants of [CuL(1)](2+) may have been displaced from the copper coordination sphere to allow for DNA binding and subsequent cleavage. The rate of DNA

  11. The structure of human cleavage factor I(m) hints at functions beyond UGUA-specific RNA binding: a role in alternative polyadenylation and a potential link to 5' capping and splicing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Gilmartin, Gregory M; Doublié, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    3'-end cleavage and subsequent polyadenylation are critical steps in mRNA maturation. The precise location where cleavage occurs (referred to as poly(A) site) is determined by a tripartite mechanism in which a A(A/U)UAAA hexamer, GU rich downstream element and UGUA upstream element are recognized by the cleavage and polyadenylation factor (CPSF), cleavage stimulation factor (CstF) and cleavage factor I(m) (CFI(m)), respectively. CFI(m) is composed of a smaller 25 kDa subunit (CFI(m)25) and a larger 59, 68 or 72 kDa subunit. CFI(m)68 interacts with CFI(m)25 through its N-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM). We recently solved the crystal structures of CFI(m)25 bound to RNA and of a complex of CFI(m)25, the RRM domain of CFI(m)68 and RNA. Our study illustrated the molecular basis for UGUA recognition by the CFI(m) complex, suggested a possible mechanism for CFI(m) mediated alternative polyadenylation, and revealed potential links between CFI(m) and other mRNA processing factors, such as the 20 kDa subunit of the cap binding protein (CBP20), and the splicing regulator U2AF65.

  12. Synthesis of mononuclear copper(II) complexes of acyclic Schiff's base ligands: Spectral, structural, electrochemical, antibacterial, DNA binding and cleavage activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayamani, Arumugam; Thamilarasan, Vijayan; Sengottuvelan, Nallathambi; Manisankar, Paramasivam; Kang, Sung Kwon; Kim, Young-Inn; Ganesan, Vengatesan

    2014-03-01

    The mononuclear copper(II) complexes (1&2) of ligands L1 [N,N";-bis(2-hydroxy-5-methylbenzyl)-1,4-bis(3-iminopropyl)piperazine] or L2 [N,N";-bis(2-hydroxy-5-bromobenzyl)-1,4-bis(3-iminopropyl) piperazine] have been synthesized and characterised. The single crystal X-ray study had shown that ligands L1 and L2 crystallize in a monoclinic crystal system with P21/c space group. The mononuclear copper(II) complexes show one quasireversible cyclic voltammetric response near cathodic region (-0.77 to -0.85 V) in DMF assignable to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. Binding interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) investigated by absorption studies and fluorescence spectral studies show good binding affinity to CT DNA, which imply both the copper(II) complexes can strongly interact with DNA efficiently. The copper(II) complexes showed efficient oxidative cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid as reducing agent through a mechanistic pathway involving formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species. The Schiff bases and their Cu(II) complexes have been screened for antibacterial activities which indicates that the complexes exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than the free ligands.

  13. Synthesis of mononuclear copper(II) complexes of acyclic Schiff's base ligands: spectral, structural, electrochemical, antibacterial, DNA binding and cleavage activity.

    PubMed

    Jayamani, Arumugam; Thamilarasan, Vijayan; Sengottuvelan, Nallathambi; Manisankar, Paramasivam; Kang, Sung Kwon; Kim, Young-Inn; Ganesan, Vengatesan

    2014-03-25

    The mononuclear copper(II) complexes (1&2) of ligands L(1) [N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy-5-methylbenzyl)-1,4-bis(3-iminopropyl)piperazine] or L(2) [N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy-5-bromobenzyl)-1,4-bis(3-iminopropyl) piperazine] have been synthesized and characterised. The single crystal X-ray study had shown that ligands L(1) and L(2) crystallize in a monoclinic crystal system with P21/c space group. The mononuclear copper(II) complexes show one quasireversible cyclic voltammetric response near cathodic region (-0.77 to -0.85 V) in DMF assignable to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. Binding interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) investigated by absorption studies and fluorescence spectral studies show good binding affinity to CT DNA, which imply both the copper(II) complexes can strongly interact with DNA efficiently. The copper(II) complexes showed efficient oxidative cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid as reducing agent through a mechanistic pathway involving formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species. The Schiff bases and their Cu(II) complexes have been screened for antibacterial activities which indicates that the complexes exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than the free ligands.

  14. Graphene oxide. Origin of acidity, its instability in water, and a new dynamic structural model.

    PubMed

    Dimiev, Ayrat M; Alemany, Lawrence B; Tour, James M

    2013-01-22

    The existing structural models of graphene oxide (GO) contradict each other and cannot adequately explain the acidity of its aqueous solutions. Inadequate understanding of chemical structure can lead to a misinterpretation of observed experimental phenomena. Understanding the chemistry and structure of GO should enable new functionalization protocols while explaining GO's limitations due to its water instability. Here we propose an unconventional view of GO chemistry and develop the corresponding "dynamic structural model" (DSM). In contrast to previously proposed models, the DSM considers GO as a system, constantly changing its chemical structure due to interaction with water. Using potentiometric titration, (13)C NMR, FTIR, UV-vis, X-ray photoelectron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy we show that GO does not contain any significant quantity of preexisting acidic functional groups, but gradually generates them through interaction with water. The reaction with water results in C-C bond cleavage, formation of vinylogous carboxylic acids, and the generation of protons. An electrical double layer formed at the GO interface in aqueous solutions plays an important role in the observed GO chemistry. Prolonged exposure to water gradually degrades GO flakes converting them into humic acid-like structures. The proposed DSM provides an explanation for the acidity of GO aqueous solutions and accounts for most of the known spectroscopic and experimental data.

  15. Synthesis and DNA cleavage activities of mononuclear macrocyclic polyamine zinc(II), copper(II), cobalt(II) complexes which linked with uracil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Ji; Li, Kun; Jiang, Ning; Chen, Shan-Yong; Lin, Hong-Hui; Huang, Yu; Ma, Li-Jian; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2006-10-01

    Mononuclear macrocyclic polyamine zinc(II), copper(II), cobalt(II) complexes, which could attach to peptide nucleic acid (PNA), were synthesized as DNA cleavage agents. The structures of these new mononuclear complexes were identified by MS and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The catalytic activities on DNA cleavage of these mononuclear complexes with different central metals were subsequently studied, which showed that copper complex was better catalyst in the DNA cleavage process than zinc and cobalt complexes. The effects of reaction time, concentration of complexes were also investigated. The results indicated that the copper(II) complexes could catalyze the cleavage of supercoiled DNA (pUC 19 plasmid DNA) (Form I) under physiological conditions to produce selectively nicked DNA (Form II, no Form III produced) with high yields. The mechanism of the cleavage process was also studied.

  16. The human otubain2-ubiquitin structure provides insights into the cleavage specificity of poly-ubiquitin-linkages.

    PubMed

    Altun, Mikael; Walter, Thomas S; Kramer, Holger B; Herr, Patrick; Iphöfer, Alexander; Boström, Johan; David, Yael; Komsany, Alia; Ternette, Nicola; Navon, Ami; Stuart, David I; Ren, Jingshan; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian tumor domain containing proteases cleave ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like polypeptides from proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of human otubain 2 (OTUB2) in complex with a ubiquitin-based covalent inhibitor, Ub-Br2. The ubiquitin binding mode is oriented differently to how viral otubains (vOTUs) bind ubiquitin/ISG15, and more similar to yeast and mammalian OTUs. In contrast to OTUB1 which has exclusive specificity towards Lys48 poly-ubiquitin chains, OTUB2 cleaves different poly-Ub linked chains. N-terminal tail swapping experiments between OTUB1 and OTUB2 revealed how the N-terminal structural motifs in OTUB1 contribute to modulating enzyme activity and Ub-chain selectivity, a trait not observed in OTUB2, supporting the notion that OTUB2 may affect a different spectrum of substrates in Ub-dependent pathways.

  17. Proteolytic Cleavage at Twin Arginine Residues Affects Structural and Functional Transitions of Lupin Seed 11S Storage Globulin

    PubMed Central

    Capraro, Jessica; Sessa, Fabio; Magni, Chiara; Scarafoni, Alessio; Maffioli, Elisa; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Croy, Ron R. D.; Duranti, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The 11S storage globulin of white lupin seeds binds to a metal affinity chromatography matrix. Two unusual stretches of contiguous histidine residues, reminiscent of the multiple histidines forming metal binding motifs, at the C-terminal end of 11S globulin acidic chains were hypothesized as candidate elements responsible for the binding capacity. To prove this, the protein was incubated with a lupin seed endopeptidase previously shown to cleave at twin arginine motifs, recurrent in the sequence region of interest. Upon incubation with this enzyme, the loss of metal binding capacity paralleled that of the anti-his-tag reactive polypeptides. The recovered small proteolytic fragment was analyzed by mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing and found to correspond to the 24-mer region cleaved off at twin arginine residues and containing the natural his-tag-like region. Similarly, when lupin seeds were germinated for a few days, the his-tag containing 11S globulin chain was converted to a form devoid of such region, suggesting that this mechanism is a part of the natural degradatory process of the protein. The hypothesis that the ordered and controlled dismantling of storage proteins may generate peptide fragments with potential functional roles in plant ontogenesis is presented and discussed. PMID:25658355

  18. Proteolytic cleavage at twin arginine residues affects structural and functional transitions of lupin seed 11S storage globulin.

    PubMed

    Capraro, Jessica; Sessa, Fabio; Magni, Chiara; Scarafoni, Alessio; Maffioli, Elisa; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Croy, Ron R D; Duranti, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The 11S storage globulin of white lupin seeds binds to a metal affinity chromatography matrix. Two unusual stretches of contiguous histidine residues, reminiscent of the multiple histidines forming metal binding motifs, at the C-terminal end of 11S globulin acidic chains were hypothesized as candidate elements responsible for the binding capacity. To prove this, the protein was incubated with a lupin seed endopeptidase previously shown to cleave at twin arginine motifs, recurrent in the sequence region of interest. Upon incubation with this enzyme, the loss of metal binding capacity paralleled that of the anti-his-tag reactive polypeptides. The recovered small proteolytic fragment was analyzed by mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing and found to correspond to the 24-mer region cleaved off at twin arginine residues and containing the natural his-tag-like region. Similarly, when lupin seeds were germinated for a few days, the his-tag containing 11S globulin chain was converted to a form devoid of such region, suggesting that this mechanism is a part of the natural degradatory process of the protein. The hypothesis that the ordered and controlled dismantling of storage proteins may generate peptide fragments with potential functional roles in plant ontogenesis is presented and discussed.

  19. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 1. Minor structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the strong-acid characteristics (pKa 3.0 or less) of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was conducted. Quantitative determinations were made for amino acid and sulfur-containing acid structures, oxalate half-ester structures, malonic acid structures, keto acid structures, and aromatic carboxyl-group structures. These determinations were made by using a variety of spectrometric (13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and ultraviolet spectrometry) and titrimetric characterizations on fulvic acid or fulvic acid samples that were chemically derivatized to indicate certain functional groups. Only keto acid and aromatic carboxyl-group structures contributed significantly to the strong-acid characteristics of the fulvic acid; these structures accounted for 43% of the strong-acid acidity. The remaining 57% of the strong acids are aliphatic carboxyl groups in unusual and/or complex configurations for which limited model compound data are available.

  20. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structures, and phosphate ester cleavage properties of bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine copper(II) complexes with guanidinium pendant groups.

    PubMed

    Belousoff, Matthew J; Tjioe, Linda; Graham, Bim; Spiccia, Leone

    2008-10-06

    Three new derivatives of bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (DPA) featuring ethylguanidinium (L (1)), propylguanidinium (L (2)), or butylguanidinium (L (3)) pendant groups have been prepared by the reaction of N, N- bis(2-pyridylmethyl)alkane-alpha,omega-diamines with 1 H-pyrazole-1-carboxamidine hydrochloride. The corresponding mononuclear copper(II) complexes were prepared by reacting the ligands with copper(II) nitrate and were isolated as [Cu(LH (+))(OH 2)](ClO 4) 3. xNaClO 4. yH 2O ( C1: L = L (1), x = 2, y = 3; C2: L = L (2), x = 2, y = 4; C3: L = L (3), x = 1, y = 0) following cation exchange purification. Recrystallization yielded crystals of composition [Cu(LH (+))(X)](ClO 4) 3.X ( C1': L = L (1), X = MeOH; C2': L = L (2), X = H 2O; C3': L = L (3), X = H 2O), which were suitable for X-ray crystallography. The crystal structures of C1', C2', and C3' indicate that the DPA moieties of the ligands coordinate to the copper(II) centers in a meridional fashion, with a water or methanol molecule occupying the fourth basal position. Weakly bound perchlorate anions located in the axial positions complete the distorted octahedral coordination spheres. The noncoordinating, monoprotonated guanidinium groups project away from the Cu(II)-DPA units and are involved in extensive charge-assisted hydrogen-bonding interactions with cocrystallized water/methanol molecules and perchlorate anions within the crystal lattices. The copper(II) complexes were tested for their ability to promote the cleavage of two model phosphodiesters, bis( p-nitrophenyl)phosphate (BNPP) and uridine-3'- p-nitrophenylphosphate (UpNP), as well as supercoiled plasmid DNA (pBR 322). While the presence of the guanidine pendants was found to be detrimental to BNPP cleavage efficiency, the functionalized complexes were found to cleave plasmid DNA and, in some cases, the model ribose phosphate diester, UpNP, at a faster rate than the parent copper(II) complex of DPA.

  1. Structure of a novel farnesylated bilin from an insect--formation by α-cleavage of heme A of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidases?

    PubMed

    Kayser, Hartmut; Wray, Victor; Nimtz, Manfred

    2014-05-01

    Biliproteins are present in almost all forms of life, and many of them play vital roles in photobiology. The bilin ligand of a recently characterized 500-kDa biliprotein from an insect has been isolated and its structure elucidated with chemical and spectroscopic techniques (UV-visible, IR, MS, NMR, and CD). This blue pigment, named CV-bilin, represents a unique high molecular mass derivative of biliverdin IXα, with an unusual 10E-configuration and a molecular mass of 852 Da, corresponding to C48H60N4O10. The high mass of this open-chain tetrapyrrole results from the presence of an epoxi-dihydroxyethylfarnesyl substituent at C-18 and a hydroxymethyl substituent at C-13. This substitution pattern exactly reflects that of heme A of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidases with a hydroxyethylfarnesyl chain and a formyl group at corresponding positions of the cyclic tetrapyrrole. As no other natural product is known to show these structural features (heme O, the precursor of heme A, has a methyl group at C-13), this bilin is presumed to be derived from heme A by cleavage of the α-methine bridge and oxidative modifications at C-13 and the hydroxyethylfarnesyl chain. Possibly, a bilin structurally related to this insect bilin is also produced in other organisms as a result of mitochondrial turnover or degradation. As CV-bilin in complex with a specific protein is accumulated at the end of larval life, stored in the pupa, and finally transferred to the oocytes, a possible role of the free or protein-bound pigment in egg or embryonic development is discussed.

  2. Jacaric acid and its octadecatrienoic acid geoisomers induce apoptosis selectively in cancerous human prostate cells: a mechanistic and 3-D structure-activity study.

    PubMed

    Gasmi, Jihane; Thomas Sanderson, J

    2013-06-15

    Plant-derived non-essential fatty acids are important dietary nutrients, and some are purported to have chemopreventive properties against various cancers, including that of the prostate. In this study, we determined the ability of seven dietary C-18 fatty acids to cause cytotoxicity and induce apoptosis in various types of human prostate cancer cells. These fatty acids included jacaric and punicic acid found in jacaranda and pomegranate seed oil, respectively, three octadecatrienoic geometric isomers (alpha- and beta-calendic and catalpic acid) and two mono-unsaturated C-18 fatty acids (trans- and cis-vaccenic acid). Jacaric acid and four of its octadecatrienoic geoisomers selectively induced apoptosis in hormone-dependent (LNCaP) and -independent (PC-3) human prostate cancer cells, whilst not affecting the viability of normal human prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1). Jacaric acid induced concentration- and time-depedent LNCaP cell death through activation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways resulting in cleavage of PARP-1, modulation of pro- and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family of proteins and increased cleavage of caspase-3, -8 and -9. Moreover, activation of a cell death-inducing signalling cascade involving death receptor 5 was observed. Jacaric acid induced apoptosis in PC-3 cells by activation of the intrinsic pathway only. The spatial conformation cis, trans, cis of jacaric and punicic acid was shown to play a key role in the increased potency and efficacy of these two fatty acids in comparison to the five other C-18 fatty acids tested. Three-dimensional conformational analysis using the PubChem Database (http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) showed that the cytotoxic potency of the C-18 fatty acids was related to their degree of conformational similarity to our cytotoxic reference compound, punicic acid, based on optimized shape (ST) and feature (CT) similarity scores, with jacaric acid being most 'biosimilar' (ST(ST-opt)=0.81; CT(CT-opt)=0.45). This 3-D

  3. Mononuclear dioxomolybdenum(VI) thiosemicarbazonato complexes: Synthesis, characterization, structural illustration, in vitro DNA binding, cleavage, and antitumor properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Mouayed A.; Guan, Teoh S.; Haque, Rosenani A.; Khadeer Ahamed, Mohamed B.; Abdul Majid, Amin M. S.

    2015-02-01

    Four dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes were synthesized by reacting [MoO2(acac)2] with N-ethyl-2-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (1), N-ethyl-2-(5-allyl-3-methoxy-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (2), N-methyl-2-(3-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (3), and N-ethyl-2-(3-methyl-2-hydroxybenzylidene) hydrazinecarbothioamide (4). The molecular structures of 1, 2, and all the synthesized complexes were determined using single crystal X-ray crystallography. The binding properties of the ligand and complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated via UV, fluorescence titrations, and viscosity measurement. Gel electrophoresis revealed that all the complexes cleave pBR 322 plasmid DNA. The cytotoxicity of the complexes were studied against the HCT 116 human colorectal cell line. All the complexes exhibited more pronounced activity than the standard reference drug 5-fluorouracil (IC50 7.3 μM). These studies show that dioxomolybdenum(VI) complexes could be potentially useful in chemotherapy.

  4. Proteolysis of SNAP-25 isoforms by botulinum neurotoxin types A, C, and E: domains and amino acid residues controlling the formation of enzyme-substrate complexes and cleavage.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, V V; Yoshino, K; Jahnz, M; Dörries, C; Bade, S; Nauenburg, S; Niemann, H; Binz, T

    1999-01-01

    Tetanus toxin and the seven serologically distinct botulinal neurotoxins (BoNT/A to BoNT/G) abrogate synaptic transmission at nerve endings through the action of their light chains (L chains), which proteolytically cleave VAMP (vesicle-associated membrane protein)/synaptobrevin, SNAP-25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa), or syntaxin. BoNT/C was reported to proteolyze both syntaxin and SNAP-25. Here, we demonstrate that cleavage of SNAP-25 occurs between Arg198 and Ala199, depends on the presence of regions Asn93 to Glu145 and Ile156 to Met202, and requires about 1,000-fold higher L chain concentrations in comparison with BoNT/A and BoNT/E. Analyses of the BoNT/A and BoNT/E cleavage sites revealed that changes in the carboxyl-terminal residues, in contrast with changes in the amino-terminal residues, drastically impair proteolysis. A proteolytically inactive BoNT/A L chain mutant failed to bind to VAMP/synaptobrevin and syntaxin, but formed a stable complex (KD = 1.9 x 10(-7) M) with SNAP-25. The minimal essential domain of SNAP-25 required for cleavage by BoNT/A involves the segment Met146-Gln197, and binding was optimal only with full-length SNAP-25. Proteolysis by BoNT/E required the presence of the domain Ile156-Asp186. Murine SNAP-23 was cleaved by BoNT/E and, to a reduced extent, by BoNT/A, whereas human SNAP-23 was resistant to all clostridial L chains. Lys185Asp or Pro182Arg mutations of human SNAP-23 induced susceptibility toward BoNT/E or toward both BoNT/A and BoNT/E, respectively.

  5. Limited caspase cleavage of human BAP31.

    PubMed

    Määttä, J; Hallikas, O; Welti, S; Hildén, P; Schröder, J; Kuismanen, E

    2000-11-10

    Human BAP31 was cleaved at both of its two identical caspase cleavage sites in two previously reported models of apoptosis. We show here that only the most carboxy-terminal site is cleaved during apoptosis induced in HeLa cells by tunicamycin, tumor necrosis factor and cycloheximide, or staurosporine. Similar results were obtained in HL-60 cells using Fas/APO-1 antibodies, or cycloheximide. This limited cleavage, which is inhibited by several caspase inhibitors, removes eight amino acids from human BAP31 including the KKXX coat protein I binding motif. Ectopic expression of the resulting cleavage product induces redistribution of mannosidase II from the Golgi and prevents endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport of virus glycoproteins.

  6. The first structural characterisation of a group 2 metal alkylperoxide complex: comments on the cleavage of dioxygen by magnesium alkyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Philip J; Coxall, Robert A; Dick, Caroline M; Fabre, Sylvie; Henderson, Louise C; Herber, Christian; Liddle, Stephen T; Loroño-González, Daniel; Parkin, Andrew; Parsons, Simon

    2003-10-06

    A new high-yield synthesis of [(PhCH(2))(2)Mg(thf)(2)] and [[(PhCH(2))CH(3)Mg(thf)](2)] via benzylpotassium has allowed a simple entry into benzylmagnesium coordination chemistry. The syntheses and X-ray crystal structures of both [(eta(2)-Me(2)NCH(2)CH(2)NMe(2))Mg(CH(2)Ph)(2)] and [eta(2)-HC[C(CH(3))NAr'](2)Mg(CH(2)Ph)(thf)] (Ar'=2,6-diisopropylphenyl) are reported. The latter beta-diketiminate complex reacts with dioxygen to provide a 1:2 mixture of dimeric benzylperoxo and benzyloxo complexes. The benzylperoxo complex [[eta(2)-HC[C(CH(3))NAr'](2)Mg(mu-eta(2):eta(1)-OOCH(2)Ph)](2)] is the first example of a structurally characterised Group 2 metal-alkylperoxo complex and contains the benzylperoxo ligands in an unusual mu-eta(2):eta(1)-coordination mode, linking the two five-coordinate magnesium centres. The O[bond]O separation in the benzylperoxo ligands is 1.44(2) A. Reaction of the benzylperoxo/benzyloxo complex mixture with further [eta(2)-HC[C(CH(3))NAr'](2)Mg(CH(2)Ph)(thf)] results in complete conversion of the benzylperoxo species into the benzyloxo complex. This reaction, therefore, establishes the cleavage of dioxygen by this system as a two-step process that involves initial oxygen insertion into the Mg[bond]CH(2)Ph bond followed by O[bond]O/Mg[bond]C sigma-bond metathesis of the resulting benzylperoxo ligand with a second Mg[bond]CH(2)Ph bond. The formation of a 1:2 mixture of the benzylperoxo and benzyloxo species indicates that the rate of the insertion is faster than that of the metathesis, and this is shown to be consistent with a radical mechanism for the insertion process.

  7. New structural motif for carboxylic acid perhydrolases.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Purpero, Vince M; Fujii, Ryota; Jing, Qing; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2013-02-25

    Some serine hydrolases also catalyze a promiscuous reaction--reversible perhydrolysis of carboxylic acids to make peroxycarboxylic acids. Five X-ray crystal structures of these carboxylic acid perhydrolases show a proline in the oxyanion loop. Here, we test whether this proline is essential for high perhydrolysis activity using Pseudomonas fluorescens esterase (PFE). The L29P variant of this esterase catalyzes perhydrolysis 43-fold faster (k(cat) comparison) than the wild type. Surprisingly, saturation mutagenesis at the 29 position of PFE identified six other amino acid substitutions that increase perhydrolysis of acetic acid at least fourfold over the wild type. The best variant, L29I PFE, catalyzed perhydrolysis 83-times faster (k(cat) comparison) than wild-type PFE and twice as fast as L29P PFE. Despite the different amino acid in the oxyanion loop, L29I PFE shows a similar selectivity for hydrogen peroxide over water as L29P PFE (β(0)=170 vs. 160 M(-1)), and a similar fast formation of acetyl-enzyme (140 vs. 62 U mg(-1)). X-ray crystal structures of L29I PFE with and without bound acetate show an unusual mixture of two different oxyanion loop conformations. The type II β-turn conformation resembles the wild-type structure and is unlikely to increase perhydrolysis, but the type I β-turn conformation creates a binding site for a second acetate. Modeling suggests that a previously proposed mechanism for L29P PFE can be extended to include L29I PFE, so that an acetate accepts a hydrogen bond to promote faster formation of the acetyl-enzyme.

  8. The role of the SEA (sea urchin sperm protein, enterokinase and agrin) module in cleavage of membrane-tethered mucins.

    PubMed

    Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Khodabukus, Naila; Kinarsky, Leo; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Sherman, Simon; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Harris, Ann

    2005-06-01

    The membrane-tethered mucins are cell surface-associated dimeric or multimeric molecules with extracellular, transmembrane and cytoplasmic portions, that arise from cleavage of the primary polypeptide chain. Following the first cleavage, which may be cotranslational, the subunits remain closely associated through undefined noncovalent interactions. These mucins all share a common structural motif, the SEA module that is found in many other membrane-associated proteins that are released from the cell surface and has been implicated in both the cleavage events and association of the subunits. Here we examine the SEA modules of three membrane-tethered mucins, MUC1, MUC3 and MUC12, which have significant sequence homology within the SEA domain. We previously identified the primary cleavage site within the MUC1 SEA domain as FRPG/SVVV a sequence that is highly conserved in MUC3 and MUC12. We now show by site-directed mutagenesis that the F, G and S residues are important for the efficiency of the cleavage reaction but not indispensable and that amino acids outside this motif are probably important. These data are consistent with a new model of the MUC1 SEA domain that is based on the solution structure of the MUC16 SEA module, derived by NMR spectroscopy. Further, we demonstrate that cleavage of human MUC3 and MUC12 occurs within the SEA domain. However, the SEA domains of MUC1, MUC3 and MUC12 are not interchangeable, suggesting that either these modules alone are insufficient to mediate efficient cleavage or that the 3D structure of the hybrid molecules does not adequately re-create an accessible cleavage site.

  9. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  10. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.

    2012-05-15

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  11. Amino acid sequence and structural comparison of BACE1 and BACE2 using evolutionary trace method.

    PubMed

    Mirsafian, Hoda; Mat Ripen, Adiratna; Merican, Amir Feisal; Bin Mohamad, Saharuddin

    2014-01-01

    Beta-amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme 1 (BACE1) and beta-amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme 2 (BACE2), members of aspartyl protease family, are close homologues and have high similarity in their protein crystal structures. However, their enzymatic properties differ leading to disparate clinical consequences. In order to identify the residues that are responsible for such differences, we used evolutionary trace (ET) method to compare the amino acid conservation patterns of BACE1 and BACE2 in several mammalian species. We found that, in BACE1 and BACE2 structures, most of the ligand binding sites are conserved which indicate their enzymatic property of aspartyl protease family members. The other conserved residues are more or less randomly localized in other parts of the structures. Four group-specific residues were identified at the ligand binding site of BACE1 and BACE2. We postulated that these residues would be essential for selectivity of BACE1 and BACE2 biological functions and could be sites of interest for the design of selective inhibitors targeting either BACE1 or BACE2.

  12. Genetic Predisposition To Acquire a Polybasic Cleavage Site for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Nao, Naganori; Yamagishi, Junya; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Igarashi, Manabu; Manzoor, Rashid; Ohnuma, Aiko; Tsuda, Yoshimi; Furuyama, Wakako; Shigeno, Asako; Kajihara, Masahiro; Kishida, Noriko; Yoshida, Reiko; Takada, Ayato

    2017-02-14

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses with H5 and H7 hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes evolve from low-pathogenic precursors through the acquisition of multiple basic amino acid residues at the HA cleavage site. Although this mechanism has been observed to occur naturally only in these HA subtypes, little is known about the genetic basis for the acquisition of the polybasic HA cleavage site. Here we show that consecutive adenine residues and a stem-loop structure, which are frequently found in the viral RNA region encoding amino acids around the cleavage site of low-pathogenic H5 and H7 viruses isolated from waterfowl reservoirs, are important for nucleotide insertions into this RNA region. A reporter assay to detect nontemplated nucleotide insertions and deep-sequencing analysis of viral RNAs revealed that an increased number of adenine residues and enlarged stem-loop structure in the RNA region accelerated the multiple adenine and/or guanine insertions required to create codons for basic amino acids. Interestingly, nucleotide insertions associated with the HA cleavage site motif were not observed principally in the viral RNA of other subtypes tested (H1, H2, H3, and H4). Our findings suggest that the RNA editing-like activity is the key mechanism for nucleotide insertions, providing a clue as to why the acquisition of the polybasic HA cleavage site is restricted to the particular HA subtypes.IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses are divided into subtypes based on the antigenicity of the viral surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase. Of the 16 HA subtypes (H1 to -16) maintained in waterfowl reservoirs of influenza A viruses, H5 and H7 viruses often become highly pathogenic through the acquisition of multiple basic amino acid residues at the HA cleavage site. Although this mechanism has been known since the 1980s, the genetic basis for nucleotide insertions has remained unclear. This study shows the potential role of the viral RNA secondary structure for

  13. Superprotonic solid acids: Structure, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boysen, Dane Andrew

    In this work, the structure and properties of superprotonic MH nXO4-type solid acids (where M = monovalent cation, X = S, Se, P, As, and n = 1, 2) have been investigated and, for the first time, applied in fuel cell devices. Several MH nXO4-type solid acids are known to undergo a "superprotonic" solid-state phase transition upon heating, in which the proton conductivity increases by several orders of magnitude and takes on values of ˜10 -2O-1cm-1. The presence of superprotonic conductivity in fully hydrogen bonded solid acids, such as CsH2PO4, has long been disputed. In these investigations, through the use of pressure, the unequivocal identification of superprotonic behavior in both RbH2PO4 and CsH2PO 4 has been demonstrated, whereas for chemically analogous compounds with smaller cations, such as KH2PO4 and NaH2PO 4, superprotonic conductivity was notably absent. Such observations have led to the adoption of radius ratio rules, in an attempt to identify a critical ion size effect on the presence of superprotonic conductivity in solid acids. It has been found that, while ionic size does play a prominent role in the presence of superprotonic behavior in solid acids, equally important are the effects of ionic and hydrogen bonding. Next, the properties of superprotonic phase transition have been investigated from a thermodynamic standpoint. With contributions from this work, a formulation has been developed that accounts for the entropy resulting from both the disordering of both hydrogen bonds and oxy-anion librations in the superprotonic phase of solid acids. This formulation, fundamentally derived from Linus Pauling's entropy rules for ice, accurately accounts for the change in entropy through a superprotonic phase transition. Lastly, the first proof-of-priniciple fuel cells based upon solid acid electrolytes have been demonstrated. Initial results based upon a sulfate electrolyte, CsHSO4, demonstrated the viability of solid acids, but poor chemical stability

  14. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss-Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent.

  15. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss–Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  16. Characterising The Role of Basin Margin Structure On Finite Strain Patterns Across A 'Cleavage' Front From The Variscan Of Southern Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, C.; Meere, P.; Mulchrone, K.; Stevenson, C.

    2009-04-01

    Strain analysis is commonly based on the axial ratio measurements of populations of approximately ellipsoid objects (e.g. sedimentary clasts), based on the assumption that these ‘strain markers' act passively during deformation. However truly passive strain markers are rare due to competency contrasts which can lead to underestimates of strain where the strain markers are more rigid than the deforming host. (Meere et al., 2007). Therefore we have used a combination of traditional strain analysis of sedimentary clasts, field and microstructural observations and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements to quantify and validate the finite strain patterns across the Irish Variscan cleavage front. This region lies at the northern boundary of the European Rhenohercynian. Deformation of a thick (7 km +) Upper Devonian continental clastic sequence and overlying Carboniferous marine carbonate/clast sequence at the end of the Carboniferous consisted of an initial phase of layer parallel shortening, followed by folding, ongoing cleavage development and late stage accommodation thrusting. AMS data can help to quantify weak or subtle fabrics by effectively measuring the preferred orientation of iron bearing minerals (in this case clay minerals). Preliminary AMS results indicate a gradient in deformation intensity within lithologies across the cleavage front from the south to the north. A microstructural comparison from across the cleavage front is used to characterise the strain regime either side of the boundary. Integrating these techniques will refine our current knowledge of spatial distributions of strain in the periphery of orogenic forelands.

  17. Structural analysis by reductive cleavage with LiAlH4 of an allyl ether choline-phospholipid, archaetidylcholine, from the hyperthermophilic methanoarchaeon Methanopyrus kandleri

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Masateru; Morii, Hiroyuki; Matsuno, Koji; Ohga, Mami; Stetter, Karl O.; Koga, Yosuke

    2002-01-01

    A choline-containing phospholipid (PL-4) in Methanopyrus kandleri cells was identified as archaetidylcholine, which has been described by Sprott et al. (1997). The PL-4 consisted of a variety of molecular species differing in hydrocarbon composition. Most of the PL-4 was acid-labile because of its allyl ether bond. The identity of PL-4 was confirmed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) followed by positive staining with Dragendorff-reagent and fast-atom bombardment–mass spectrometry. A new method of LiAlH4 hydrogenolysis was developed to cleave allyl ether bonds and recover the corresponding hydrocarbons. We confirmed the validity of the LiAlH4 method in a study of the model compound synthetic unsaturated archaetidic acid (2,3-di-O-geranylgeranyl-sn-glycerol-1-phosphate). Saturated ether bonds were not cleaved by the LiAlH4 method. The hydrocarbons formed following LiAlH4 hydrogenolysis of PL-4 were identified by gas–liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Four kinds of hydrocarbons with one to four double bonds were detected: 47% of the hydrocarbons had four double bonds; 11% had three double bonds; 14% had two double bonds; 7% had one double bond; and 6% were saturated species. The molecular species composition of PL-4 was also estimated based on acid lability: 77% of the molecular species had two acid-labile hydrocarbons; 11% had one acid-labile and one acid-stable hydrocarbon; and 11% had two acid-stable hydrocarbons. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a specific chemical degradation method for the structural analysis of allyl ether phospholipid in archaea. PMID:15803650

  18. Peptidase specificity from the substrate cleavage collection in the MEROPS database and a tool to measure cleavage site conservation

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    One peptidase can usually be distinguished from another biochemically by its action on proteins, peptides and synthetic substrates. Since 1996, the MEROPS database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk) has accumulated a collection of cleavages in substrates that now amounts to 66,615 cleavages. The total number of peptidases for which at least one cleavage is known is 1700 out of a total of 2457 different peptidases. This paper describes how the cleavages are obtained from the scientific literature, how they are annotated and how cleavages in peptides and proteins are cross-referenced to entries in the UniProt protein sequence database. The specificity profiles of 556 peptidases are shown for which ten or more substrate cleavages are known. However, it has been proposed that at least 40 cleavages in disparate proteins are required for specificity analysis to be meaningful, and only 163 peptidases (6.6%) fulfil this criterion. Also described are the various displays shown on the website to aid with the understanding of peptidase specificity, which are derived from the substrate cleavage collection. These displays include a logo, distribution matrix, and tables to summarize which amino acids or groups of amino acids are acceptable (or not acceptable) in each substrate binding pocket. For each protein substrate, there is a display to show how it is processed and degraded. Also described are tools on the website to help with the assessment of the physiological relevance of cleavages in a substrate. These tools rely on the hypothesis that a cleavage site that is conserved in orthologues is likely to be physiologically relevant, and alignments of substrate protein sequences are made utilizing the UniRef50 database, in which in each entry sequences are 50% or more identical. Conservation in this case means substitutions are permitted only if the amino acid is known to occupy the same substrate binding pocket from at least one other substrate cleaved by the same peptidase. PMID

  19. Diffractaic acid: Crystalline structure and physicochemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro Fonseca, Jéssica; de Oliveira, Yara Santiago; Bezerra, Beatriz P.; Ellena, Javier; Honda, Neli Kika; Silva, Camilla V. N. S.; da Silva Santos, Noemia Pereira; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela; Ayala, Alejandro Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Diffractaic acid (DA) is a secondary metabolite of lichens that belongs to the chemical class of depsides, and some relevant pharmacological properties are associated with this natural product, such as antioxidant, antiulcerogenic and gastroprotective effects. Considering the relevant biological activities and taking into account that the activities are intrinsically related to the structure, the main goal of this study was to elucidate the structure of diffractaic acid by single crystal X-ray diffraction as well to characterize its physicochemical properties by powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and vibrational spectroscopy. It was observed that DA belongs to the monoclinic crystal system, crystallizing in the space group P21/c with the following cell parameters: a = 18.535(7) Å, b = 4.0439(18) Å, c = 23.964(6) Å, β = 91.55(3)°. The crystal packing is characterized by difractaic acid dimers, which are reflected in the vibrational spectrum. These observations were supported by quantum mechanical calculations.

  20. Enhancing the specificity of the enterokinase cleavage reaction to promote efficient cleavage of a fusion tag.

    PubMed

    Shahravan, S Hesam; Qu, Xuanlu; Chan, I-San; Shin, Jumi A

    2008-06-01

    In our work with designed minimalist proteins based on the bZIP motif, we have found our His-tagged proteins to be prone to inclusion body formation and aggregation; we suspect this problem is largely due to the His tag, known to promote aggregation. Using AhR6-C/EBP, a hybrid of the AhR basic region and C/EBP leucine zipper, as representative of our bZIP-like protein family, we attempted removal of the His tag with enterokinase (EK) but obtained the desired cleavage product in very small yield. EK is known for proteolysis at noncanonical sites, and most cleavage occurred at unintended sites. We manipulated experimental conditions to improve specificity of proteolysis and analyzed the cleavage products; no effect was observed after changing pH, temperature, or the amount of EK. We then suspected the accessibility of the EK site was impeded due to protein aggregation. We found that the easily implemented strategy of addition of urea (1-4 M) greatly improved EK cleavage specificity at the canonical site and reduced adventitious cleavage. We believe that this enhancement in specificity is due to a more "open" protein structure, in which the now accessible canonical target can compete effectively with adventitious cleavage sites of related sequence.

  1. Site specificity of DSP-PP cleavage by BMP1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Robert T; Lim, Glendale L; Yee, Colin T; Fuller, Robert S; Ritchie, Helena H

    2014-08-01

    Bone morphogenic protein 1 (BMP1), a metalloproteinase, is known to cleave a wide variety of extracellular matrix proteins, suggesting that a consensus substrate cleavage amino acid sequence might exist. However, while such a consensus sequence has been proposed based on P4 to P4' (i.e. the four amino acids flanking either side of the BMP1 cleavage site; P4P3P2P1|P1'P2'P3'P4') sequence homologies between two BMP1 substrates, dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin sialoprotein phosphophoryn (DSP-PP) (i.e. xMQx|DDP), no direct testing has so far been attempted. Using an Sf9 cell expression system, we have been able to produce large amounts of uncleaved DSP-PP. Point mutations introduced into this recombinant DSP-PP were then tested for their effects on DSP-PP cleavage by either Sf9 endogenous tolloid-related protein 1 (TLR-1) or by its human homolog, BMP1. Here, we have measured DSP-PP cleavage efficiencies after modifications based on P4-P4' sequence comparisons with dentin matrix protein 1, as well as for prolysyl oxidase and chordin, two other BMP1 substrates. Our results demonstrate that any mutations within or outside of the DSP-PP P4 to P4' cleavage site can block, impair or accelerate DSP-PP cleavage, and suggest that its BMP1 cleavage site is highly conserved in order to regulate its cleavage efficiency, possibly with additional assistance from its conserved exosites. Thus, BMP1 cleavage cannot be based on a consensus substrate cleavage site.

  2. Structure and genetics of the O-antigen of Enterobacter cloacae G3054 containing di-N-acetylpseudaminic acid.

    PubMed

    Perepelov, Andrei V; Wang, Min; Filatov, Andrei V; Guo, Xi; Shashkov, Alexander S; Wang, Lei; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2015-04-30

    Mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of Enterobacter cloacae G3054 resulted in the cleavage of the O-polysaccharide at the linkage of residues of 5,7-diacetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-L-glycero-L-manno-non-2-ulosonic acid (di-N-acetylpseudaminic acid, Pse5Ac7Ac) in the main chain. The resultant oligosaccharide and an alkali-treated lipopolysaccharide were studied by sugar analysis along with (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and the following structure of the branched pentasaccharide O-unit of the O-polysaccharide was established: [structure: see text] The O-antigen gene cluster of E. cloacae G3054 between conserved genes galF and gnd was sequenced. Most genes necessary for the O-antigen synthesis were found in the cluster and their functions were tentatively assigned by comparison with sequences in the available databases.

  3. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann–Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann–Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  4. PROSPER: An Integrated Feature-Based Tool for Predicting Protease Substrate Cleavage Sites

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Andrew J.; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Webb, Geoffrey I.; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to catalytically cleave protein substrates after synthesis is fundamental for all forms of life. Accordingly, site-specific proteolysis is one of the most important post-translational modifications. The key to understanding the physiological role of a protease is to identify its natural substrate(s). Knowledge of the substrate specificity of a protease can dramatically improve our ability to predict its target protein substrates, but this information must be utilized in an effective manner in order to efficiently identify protein substrates by in silico approaches. To address this problem, we present PROSPER, an integrated feature-based server for in silico identification of protease substrates and their cleavage sites for twenty-four different proteases. PROSPER utilizes established specificity information for these proteases (derived from the MEROPS database) with a machine learning approach to predict protease cleavage sites by using different, but complementary sequence and structure characteristics. Features used by PROSPER include local amino acid sequence profile, predicted secondary structure, solvent accessibility and predicted native disorder. Thus, for proteases with known amino acid specificity, PROSPER provides a convenient, pre-prepared tool for use in identifying protein substrates for the enzymes. Systematic prediction analysis for the twenty-four proteases thus far included in the database revealed that the features we have included in the tool strongly improve performance in terms of cleavage site prediction, as evidenced by their contribution to performance improvement in terms of identifying known cleavage sites in substrates for these enzymes. In comparison with two state-of-the-art prediction tools, PoPS and SitePrediction, PROSPER achieves greater accuracy and coverage. To our knowledge, PROSPER is the first comprehensive server capable of predicting cleavage sites of multiple proteases within a single substrate sequence using

  5. Specific oxidative cleavage of carotenoids by VP14 of maize

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.H.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.; Gage, D.A.; Tan, Bao Cai

    1997-06-20

    The plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA) is formed by the oxidative cleavage of an epoxy-carotenoid. The synthesis of other apocarotenoids, such as vitamin A in animals, may occur by a similar mechanism. In ABA biosynthesis, oxidative cleavage is the first committed reaction and is believed to be the key regulatory step. A new ABA-deficient mutant of maize has been identified and the corresponding gene, Vp14, has been cloned. The recombinant VP14 protein catalyzes the cleavage of 9-cis-epoxy-carotenoids to form C{sub 25} apo-aldehydes and xanthoxin, a precursor of ABA in higher plants.

  6. Dimeric Fe (II, III) complex of quinoneoxime as functional model of PAP enzyme: Mössbauer, magneto-structural and DNA cleavage studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salunke-Gawali, Sunita; Ahmed, Khursheed; Varret, François; Linares, Jorge; Zaware, Santosh; Date, Sadgopal; Rane, Sandhya

    2008-07-01

    Purple acid phosphatase, ( PAP), is known to contain dinuclear Fe2 + 2, + 3 site with characteristic Fe + 3 ← Tyr ligand to metal charge transfer in coordination. Phthiocoloxime (3-methyl-2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone-1-oxime) ligand L, mimics (His/Tyr) ligation with controlled and unique charge transfers resulting in valence tautomeric coordination with mixed valent diiron site in model compound Fe-1: [μ-OH-Fe2 + 2, + 3 ( o-NQCH3ox) ( o-NSQCH3ox)2 (CAT) H2O]. Fe-2: [Fe + 3( o-NQCH3ox) ( p-NQCH3ox)2]2 a molecularly associated dimer of phthiocoloxime synthesized for comparison of charge transfer. 57Fe Mössbauer studies was used to quantitize unusual valences due to ligand in dimeric Fe-1 and Fe-2 complexes which are supported by EPR and SQUID studies. 57Fe Mössbauer spectra for Fe-1 at 300 K indicates the presence of two quadrupole split asymmetric doublets due to the differences in local coordination geometries of [Fe + 3]A and [Fe + 2]B sites. The hyperfine interaction parameters are δ A = 0.152, (Δ E Q)A = 0.598 mm/s with overlapping doublet at δ B = 0.410 and (Δ E Q)B = 0.468 mm/s. Due to molecular association tendency of ligand, dimer Fe-2 possesses 100% Fe + 3(h.s.) hexacoordinated configuration with isomer shift δ = 0.408 mm/s. Slightly distorted octahedral symmetry created by NQCH3ox ligand surrounding Fe + 3(h.s.) state generates small field gradient indicated by quadrupole split Δ E Q = 0.213 mm/s. Decrease of isomer shifts together with variation of quadrupole splits with temperature in Fe-1 dimer compared to Fe-2 is result of charge transfers in [Fe2 + 2, + 3 SQ] complexes. EPR spectrum of Fe-1 shows two strong signals at g 1 = 4.17 and g 2 = 2.01 indicative of S = 3/2 spin state with an intermediate spin of Fe + 3(h.s.) configuration. SQUID data of χ _m^{corr} .T were best fitted by using HDVV spin pair model S = 2, 3/2 resulting in antiferromagnetic exchange ( J = -13.5 cm - 1 with an agreement factor of R = 1.89 × 10 - 5). The lower J

  7. Enantiomeric in vitro DNA binding, pBR322 DNA cleavage and molecular docking studies of chiral L- and D-ternary copper(II) complexes of histidine and picolinic acid.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Shazia; Arjmand, Farukh; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2014-01-05

    Novel chiral ternary Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes of l/d-histidine and picolinic acid, 1 and 2(a and b) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance and spectroscopic data (IR, NMR, EPR, UV-vis). In vitro DNA binding profile of both Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes have been investigated by UV-vis titrations, while fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism and viscosity measurements were carried out for Cu(II) complexes 1(a and b). Both the enantiomers of 1 and 2(a and b) bind to CT DNA via electrostatic interactions and the intrinsic binding constant, Kb values for complexes 1 and 2(a and b) were found to be 5.6×10(4), 9.8×10(3), 8.2×10(3) and 6.7×10(3)M(-1), respectively suggesting greater binding propensity of l-form of Cu(II) complex 1a. The DNA cleavage activity of complexes 1(a and b), investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis suggested an oxidative pathway for DNA cleavage. Further, the molecular docking studies of complexes 1(a and b) were carried out with B-DNA revealing that the complexes bind to the adenine-thymine residues in the minor groove of the DNA. The resulting binding energies of docked metal complexes 1(a and b) were found to be -265.1 and -218.9KJmol(-1), respectively. Furthermore, enantiomeric complexes 1 and 2(a and b) were screened for in vitro antimicrobial activity.

  8. Cleavage of a specific bond in troponin C by thrombin.

    PubMed

    Leavis, P C; Rosenfeld, S; Lu, R C

    1978-08-21

    Limited proteolysis of rabbit skeletal troponin C with bovine thrombin yielded two fragments, TH1 (Mr = 11000) containing Ca2+ binding regions I--III and TH2 (Mr = 6000) containing region IV. Determination of the partial sequences of the fragments established the site of cleavage at Arg120-Ala121. Secondary cleavage by thrombin at other arginyl or lysyl residues in troponin C was ruled out by the sequence data and by the amino acid compositions of the two fragments.

  9. Development of a Simple Adjustable Zinc Acid/Base Hybrid Catalyst for C-C and C-O Bond-Forming and C-C Bond-Cleavage Reactions.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Minami, Kodai; Saito, Yuki; Kobayashi, Shū

    2016-09-06

    A newly designed zinc Lewis acid/base hybrid catalyst was developed. By adjusting the Lewis acidity of the zinc center, aldol-type additions of 2-picolylamine Schiff base to aldehydes proceeded smoothly to afford syn-aldol adduct equivalents, trans-N,O-acetal adducts, in high yields with high selectivities. NMR experiments, including microchanneled cell for synthesis monitoring (MICCS) NMR analysis, revealed that anti-aldol adducts were formed at the initial stage of the reactions under kinetic control, but the final products were the trans-(syn)-N,O-acetal adducts that were produced through a retro-aldol process under thermodynamic control. In the whole reaction process, the zinc catalyst played three important roles: i) promotion of the aldol process (C-C bond formation), ii) cyclization process to the N,O-acetal product (C-O bond formation), and iii) retro-aldol process from the anti-aldol adduct to the syn-aldol adduct (C-C bond cleavage and C-C bond formation).

  10. Iron-dependent oxidative inactivation with affinity cleavage of pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Keiko; Tsubouchi, Ryoko; Fukayama, Minoru; Qiao, Shanlou; Yoshino, Masataka

    2009-07-01

    Treatment of rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase with iron/ascorbate caused an inactivation with the cleavage of peptide bond. The inactivation or fragmentation of the enzyme was prevented by addition of Mg2+, catalase, and mannitol, but ADP and PEP the substrates did not show any effect. Protective effect of catalase and mannitol suggests that hydroxyl radical produced through the ferrous ion-dependent reduction of oxygen is responsible for the inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme. SDS-PAGE and TOF-MS analysis confirmed five pairs of fragments, which were determined to result from the cleavage of the Lys114-Gly115, Glu117-Ile118, Asp177-Gly178, Gly207-Val208, and Phe243-Ile244 bonds of the enzyme by amino-terminal sequencing analysis. Protection of the enzyme by Mg2+ implies the identical binding sites of Fe2+ and Mg2+, but the cleavage sites were discriminated from the cofactor Mg2+-binding sites. Considering amino acid residues interacting with metal ions and tertiary structure, Fe2+ ion may bind to Asp177 neighboring to Gly207 and Glu117 neighboring to Lys114 and Phe243, causing the peptide cleavage by hydroxyl radical. Iron-dependent oxidative inactivation/fragmentation of pyruvate kinase can explain the decreased glycolytic flux under aerobic conditions. Intracellular free Mg2+ concentrations are responsible for the control of cellular respiration and glycolysis.

  11. On the mechanism of RNA phosphodiester backbone cleavage in the absence of solvent

    PubMed Central

    Riml, Christian; Glasner, Heidelinde; Rodgers, M. T.; Micura, Ronald; Breuker, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) modifications play an important role in the regulation of gene expression and the development of RNA-based therapeutics, but their identification, localization and relative quantitation by conventional biochemical methods can be quite challenging. As a promising alternative, mass spectrometry (MS) based approaches that involve RNA dissociation in ‘top-down’ strategies are currently being developed. For this purpose, it is essential to understand the dissociation mechanisms of unmodified and posttranscriptionally or synthetically modified RNA. Here, we have studied the effect of select nucleobase, ribose and backbone modifications on phosphodiester bond cleavage in collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) of positively and negatively charged RNA. We found that CAD of RNA is a stepwise reaction that is facilitated by, but does not require, the presence of positive charge. Preferred backbone cleavage next to adenosine and guanosine in CAD of (M+nH)n+ and (M−nH)n− ions, respectively, is based on hydrogen bonding between nucleobase and phosphodiester moieties. Moreover, CAD of RNA involves an intermediate that is sufficiently stable to survive extension of the RNA structure and intramolecular proton redistribution according to simple Coulombic repulsion prior to backbone cleavage into c and y ions from phosphodiester bond cleavage. PMID:25904631

  12. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage. Technical report, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    Cleavage of aliphatic organosulfonate carbon to sulfur (C-S) bonds, a critical link in the global biogeochemical sulfur cycle, has been identified in Escherichia coli K-12. Enormous quantities of inorganic sulfate are continuously converted (Scheme I) into methanesulfonic acid 1 and acylated 3-(6-sulfo-{alpha}-D-quinovopyranosyl)-L-glycerol 2. Biocatalytic desulfurization (Scheme I) of 1 and 2, which share the structural feature of an aliphatic carbon bonded to a sulfonic acid sulfur, completes the cycle, Discovery of this desulfurization in E. coli provides an invaluable paradigm for study of a biotic process which, via the biogeochemical cycle, significantly influences the atmospheric concentration of sulfur-containing molecules.

  13. Structural and Catalytic Properties of S1 Nuclease from Aspergillus oryzae Responsible for Substrate Recognition, Cleavage, Non–Specificity, and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kovaľ, Tomáš; Østergaard, Lars H.; Lehmbeck, Jan; Nørgaard, Allan; Lipovová, Petra; Dušková, Jarmila; Skálová, Tereza; Trundová, Mária; Kolenko, Petr; Fejfarová, Karla; Stránský, Jan; Švecová, Leona; Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The single–strand–specific S1 nuclease from Aspergillus oryzae is an archetypal enzyme of the S1–P1 family of nucleases with a widespread use for biochemical analyses of nucleic acids. We present the first X–ray structure of this nuclease along with a thorough analysis of the reaction and inhibition mechanisms and of its properties responsible for identification and binding of ligands. Seven structures of S1 nuclease, six of which are complexes with products and inhibitors, and characterization of catalytic properties of a wild type and mutants reveal unknown attributes of the S1–P1 family. The active site can bind phosphate, nucleosides, and nucleotides in several distinguished ways. The nucleoside binding site accepts bases in two binding modes–shallow and deep. It can also undergo remodeling and so adapt to different ligands. The amino acid residue Asp65 is critical for activity while Asn154 secures interaction with the sugar moiety, and Lys68 is involved in interactions with the phosphate and sugar moieties of ligands. An additional nucleobase binding site was identified on the surface, which explains the absence of the Tyr site known from P1 nuclease. For the first time ternary complexes with ligands enable modeling of ssDNA binding in the active site cleft. Interpretation of the results in the context of the whole S1–P1 nuclease family significantly broadens our knowledge regarding ligand interaction modes and the strategies of adjustment of the enzyme surface and binding sites to achieve particular specificity. PMID:28036383

  14. Cleavage of peptide bonds bearing ionizable amino acids at P{sub 1} by serine proteases with hydrophobic S{sub 1} pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Qasim, Mohammad A.; Song, Jikui; Markley, John L.; Laskowski, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Large pK shifts in ionizable groups when buried in the protein interior. {yields} Substrate dependent shifts in pH optimum for serine proteases. {yields} Lys side chain is a stronger acid in serine protease S{sub 1} pocket than Asp side chain. -- Abstract: Enzymatic hydrolysis of the synthetic substrate succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Xxx-pNA (where Xxx = Leu, Asp or Lys) catalyzed by bovine chymotrypsin (CHYM) or Streptomyces griseus protease B (SGPB) has been studied at different pH values in the pH range 3-11. The pH optima for substrates having Leu, Asp, and Lys have been found to be 7.5-8.0, 5.5-6.0, and {approx}10, respectively. At the normally reported pH optimum (pH 7-8) of CHYM and SGPB, the substrate with Leu at the reactive site is more than 25,000-fold more reactive than that with Asp. However, when fully protonated, Asp is nearly as good a substrate as Leu. The pK values of the side chains of Asp and Lys in the hydrophobic S{sub 1} pocket of CHYM and SGPB have been calculated from pH-dependent hydrolysis data and have been found to be about 9 for Asp and 7.4 and 9.7 for Lys for CHYM and SGPB, respectively. The results presented in this communication suggest a possible application of CHYM like enzymes in cleaving peptide bonds contributed by acidic amino acids between pH 5 and 6.

  15. Mechanism of endonuclease cleavage by the HigB toxin

    PubMed Central

    Schureck, Marc A.; Repack, Adrienne; Miles, Stacey J.; Marquez, Jhomar; Dunham, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria encode multiple type II toxin–antitoxin modules that cleave ribosome-bound mRNAs in response to stress. All ribosome-dependent toxin family members structurally characterized to date adopt similar microbial RNase architectures despite possessing low sequence identities. Therefore, determining which residues are catalytically important in this specialized RNase family has been a challenge in the field. Structural studies of RelE and YoeB toxins bound to the ribosome provided significant insights but biochemical experiments with RelE were required to clearly demonstrate which residues are critical for acid-base catalysis of mRNA cleavage. Here, we solved an X-ray crystal structure of the wild-type, ribosome-dependent toxin HigB bound to the ribosome revealing potential catalytic residues proximal to the mRNA substrate. Using cell-based and biochemical assays, we further determined that HigB residues His54, Asp90, Tyr91 and His92 are critical for activity in vivo, while HigB H54A and Y91A variants have the largest effect on mRNA cleavage in vitro. Comparison of X-ray crystal structures of two catalytically inactive HigB variants with 70S-HigB bound structures reveal that HigB active site residues undergo conformational rearrangements likely required for recognition of its mRNA substrate. These data support the emerging concept that ribosome-dependent toxins have diverse modes of mRNA recognition. PMID:27378776

  16. Heterolytic OO bond cleavage: Functional role of Glu113 during bis-Fe(IV) formation in MauG.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jiafeng; Huo, Lu; Liu, Aimin

    2017-02-01

    The diheme enzyme MauG utilizes H2O2 to perform oxidative posttranslational modification on a protein substrate. A bis-Fe(IV) species of MauG was previously identified as a key intermediate in this reaction. Heterolytic cleavage of the OO bond of H2O2 drives the formation of the bis-Fe(IV) intermediate. In this work, we tested a hypothesis that a glutamate residue, Glu113 in the distal pocket of the pentacoordinate heme of MauG, facilitates heterolytic OO bond cleavage, thereby leading to bis-Fe(IV) formation. This hypothesis was proposed based on sequence alignment and structural comparison with other H2O2-utilizing hemoenzymes, especially those from the diheme enzyme superfamily that MauG belongs to. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) characterization of the reaction between MauG and H2O2 revealed that mutation of Glu113 inhibited heterolytic OO bond cleavage, in agreement with our hypothesis. This result was further confirmed by the HPLC study in which an analog of H2O2, cumene hydroperoxide, was used to probe the pattern of OO bond cleavage. Together, our data suggest that Glu113 functions as an acid-base catalyst to assist heterolytic OO bond cleavage during the early stage of the catalytic reaction. This work advances our mechanistic understanding of the H2O2-activation process during bis-Fe(IV) formation in MauG.

  17. Enzymic Pathways for Formation of Carotenoid Cleavage Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, Peter; Zorn, Holger

    Degraded carotenoids (apocarotenoids, norisoprenoids) have been a subject of intensive research for several decades. From the perspective of human physiology and nutrition, the retinoids, acting as vitamins, signalling molecules, and visual pigments, attracted the greatest attention (Chapters 15 and 16). Plant scientists, however, detected a wealth of different apocarotenoids, presumably derived by the excentric cleavage of carotenoids in various species, the plant hormone abscisic acid (1, Scheme 6) being the best-investigated example. With the onset of fruit ripening, flower opening or senescence of green tissues, carotenoids are degraded oxidatively to smaller, volatile compounds. The natural biological functions of the reaction products are outlined in Chapter 15. As many of these apocarotenoids act as potent flavour compounds, food chemists and flavourists worldwide have investigated meticulously their structural and sensory properties. Many aspects of carotenoid metabolites and breakdown products as aroma compounds are presented in a comprehensive book [1].

  18. Control of stability and structure of nucleic acids using cosolutes.

    PubMed

    Tateishi-Karimta, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-05-15

    The stabilities, structures, and functions of nucleic acids are responsive to surrounding conditions. Living cells contain biomolecules, including nucleic acids, proteins, polysaccharides, and other soluble and insoluble low-molecular weight components, that occupy a significant fraction of the cellular volume (up to 40%), resulting in a highly crowded intracellular environment. We have proven that conditions that mimic features of this intra-cellular environment alter the physical properties affect the stability, structure, and function of nucleic acids. The ability to control structure of nucleic acids by mimicking intra-cellular conditions will be useful in nanotechnology applications of nucleic acids. This paper describes methods that can be used to analyze quantitatively the intra-cellular environment effects caused by cosolutes on nucleic acid structures and to regulate properties of nucleic acids using cosolutes.

  19. Structure of the acidic O-specific polysaccharide from Proteus vulgaris O39 containing 5,7-diacetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-L-glycero-L-manno-non-2-ulosonic acid.

    PubMed

    Kondakova, A N; Perepelov, A V; Bartodziejska, B; Shashkov, A S; Senchenkova, S N; Wykrota, M; Knirel, Y A; Rozalski, A

    2001-07-12

    The O-specific polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O39 was found to contain a new acidic component of Proteus lipopolysaccharides, 5,7-diacetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-L-glycero-L-manno-non-2-ulosonic acid (di-N-acetylpseudaminic acid, Pse5Ac7Ac). The following structure of the polysaccharide was determined by NMR spectroscopy, including 2D 1H,(1)H COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, and 1H,(13)C HMQC experiments, along with selective cleavage of the polysaccharide by solvolysis with anhydrous trifluoromethanesulfonic (triflic) acid: -->8)-beta-Psep5Ac7Ac-(2-->3)-alpha-L-FucpNAc-(1-->3)-alpha-D-GlcpNAc-(1--> The structure established is unique among the O-specific polysaccharides, which is in accordance with classification of the strain studied into a separate Proteus serogroup.

  20. Structure and energy study of choleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglio, E.

    The crystal packings of hexagonal,tetragonal and orthorhombic choleic acids, which are inclusion compounds of the deoxycholic acid with some guest components, are described. Van der Waals energy calculations permit both to predict the allowed conformations of the deoxycholic acid side-chain and to locate some guest molecules inserted in the deoxycholic acid host lattices when the application of the standard X-ray methods fails. Moreover,the crystal packing of the deoxycholic acid molecules in the orthorhombic phases and the size of the molecules which may be occluded can be approximately foreseen,once the cell dimensions were known,on the basis of potential energy calculations. The enthalpy change associated to the releasing of the guest component from the styrene and naphthalene choleic acid crystals and the heat of formation of these crystals have been measured by vapour pressure measurements in order to estimate the host-guest interaction energy.

  1. Comparison of the electron work function, hole concentration and exciton diffusion length for P3HT and PT prepared by thermal or acid cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toušek, J.; Toušková, J.; Ludvík, J.; Liška, A.; Remeš, Z.; Kylián, O.; Kousal, J.; Chomutová, R.; Heckler, I. M.; Bundgaard, E.; Krebs, F. C.

    2016-02-01

    The electron work function, hole concentration and diffusion length were compared for poly(3-hexylthiophene) polymer (P3HT) that is commonly used for construction of solar cells, and two types of native polythiophene (PT) samples which are prospective candidates for this purpose. The polythiophene samples were prepared from 2 different precursors by thermal or chemical treatment at room temperature. Cyclic voltammetry and work function measurements were used for estimating the concentration of holes. The measured data were evaluated assuming the validity of band theory based on the tight-binding model. Published data on the valence bandwidth were used for calculating the value of the overlap integral which is related to the hole effective mass. Energy band diagrams were constructed for all 3 materials. Finally, the exciton diffusion length, which is a critical parameter for the application of conjugated polymer materials in solar cells, was measured by a modified surface photovoltage method. The approach allowed us to identify the differences in the material properties related to the processing method. Morphology of the samples determined by AFM was another tool showing these differences. It is stated that a native polythiophene prepared by treatment with acids is a prospective material for solar cells and shows a similar quality as that produced by a thermal process.

  2. Fatty acid biosynthesis revisited: structure elucidation and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D John; Burkart, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases' many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field.

  3. Fatty acid biosynthesis revisited: Structure elucidation and metabolic engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-10-20

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases' many intricate structural and regulatory elements. Lastly, in this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field.

  4. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Revisited: Structure Elucidation and Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understanding of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases’ many intricate structural and regulatory elements. In this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25360565

  5. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  6. 3C-like protease of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus: identification of cleavage sites in the ORF1 polyprotein and analysis of cleavage specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Wirblich, C; Sibilia, M; Boniotti, M B; Rossi, C; Thiel, H J; Meyers, G

    1995-01-01

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus, a positive-stranded RNA virus of the family Caliciviridae, encodes a trypsin-like cysteine protease as part of a large polyprotein. Upon expression in Escherichia coli, the protease releases itself from larger precursors by proteolytic cleavages at its N and C termini. Both cleavage sites were determined by N-terminal sequence analysis of the cleavage products. Cleavage at the N terminus of the protease occurred with high efficiency at an EG dipeptide at positions 1108 and 1109. Cleavage at the C terminus of the protease occurred with low efficiency at an ET dipeptide at positions 1251 and 1252. To study the cleavage specificity of the protease, amino acid substitutions were introduced at the P2, P1, and P1' positions at the cleavage site at the N-terminal boundary of the protease. This analysis showed that the amino acid at the P1 position is the most important determinant for substrate recognition. Only glutamic acid, glutamine, and aspartic acid were tolerated at this position. At the P1' position, glycine, serine, and alanine were the preferred substrates of the protease, but a number of amino acids with larger side chains were also tolerated. Substitutions at the P2 position had only little effect on the cleavage efficiency. Cell-free expression of the C-terminal half of the ORF1 polyprotein showed that the protease catalyzes cleavage at the junction of the RNA polymerase and the capsid protein. An EG dipeptide at positions 1767 and 1768 was identified as the putative cleavage site. Our data show that rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus encodes a trypsin-like cysteine protease that is similar to 3C proteases with regard to function and specificity but is more similar to 2A proteases with regard to size. PMID:7474137

  7. Distinct OGT-Binding Sites Promote HCF-1 Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, Tanja; Waridel, Patrice; Kapuria, Vaibhav; Zoete, Vincent; Herr, Winship

    2015-01-01

    Human HCF-1 (also referred to as HCFC-1) is a transcriptional co-regulator that undergoes a complex maturation process involving extensive O-GlcNAcylation and site-specific proteolysis. HCF-1 proteolysis results in two active, noncovalently associated HCF-1N and HCF-1C subunits that regulate distinct phases of the cell-division cycle. HCF-1 O-GlcNAcylation and site-specific proteolysis are both catalyzed by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), which thus displays an unusual dual enzymatic activity. OGT cleaves HCF-1 at six highly conserved 26 amino acid repeat sequences called HCF-1PRO repeats. Here we characterize the substrate requirements for OGT cleavage of HCF-1. We show that the HCF-1PRO-repeat cleavage signal possesses particular OGT-binding properties. The glutamate residue at the cleavage site that is intimately involved in the cleavage reaction specifically inhibits association with OGT and its bound cofactor UDP-GlcNAc. Further, we identify a novel OGT-binding sequence nearby the first HCF-1PRO-repeat cleavage signal that enhances cleavage. These results demonstrate that distinct OGT-binding sites in HCF-1 promote proteolysis, and provide novel insights into the mechanism of this unusual protease activity. PMID:26305326

  8. Stoichiometric expression of mtHsp40 and mtHsp70 modulates mitochondrial morphology and cristae structure via Opa1L cleavage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoungchun; Ahn, Younghee; Kang, Sung-Myung; Park, Youngjin; Jeon, You-Jin; Rho, Jong M; Kim, Sung-Woo

    2015-06-15

    Deregulation of mitochondrial heat-shock protein 40 (mtHsp40) and dysfunction of mtHsp70 are associated with mitochondrial fragmentation, suggesting that mtHsp40 and mtHsp70 may play roles in modulating mitochondrial morphology. However, the mechanism of mitochondrial fragmentation induced by mtHsp40 deregulation and mtHsp70 dysfunction remains unclear. In addition, the functional link between mitochondrial morphology change upon deregulated mtHsp40/mtHsp70 and mitochondrial function has been unexplored. Our coimmunoprecipitation and protein aggregation analysis showed that both overexpression and depletion of mtHsp40 accumulated aggregated proteins in fragmented mitochondria. Moreover, mtHsp70 loss and expression of a mtHsp70 mutant lacking the client-binding domain caused mitochondrial fragmentation. Together the data suggest that the molecular ratio of mtHsp40 to mtHsp70 is important for their chaperone function and mitochondrial morphology. Whereas mitochondrial translocation of Drp1 was not altered, optic atrophy 1 (Opa1) short isoform accumulated in fragmented mitochondria, suggesting that mitochondrial fragmentation in this study results from aberration of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion. Finally, we found that fragmented mitochondria were defective in cristae development, OXPHOS, and ATP production. Taken together, our data suggest that impaired stoichiometry between mtHsp40 and mtHsp70 promotes Opa1L cleavage, leading to cristae opening, decreased OXPHOS, and triggering of mitochondrial fragmentation after reduction in their chaperone function.

  9. How acidic are monomeric structural units of heparin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan; Broer, Ria; Van Duijnen, Piet Th.

    2013-12-01

    Density functional theory methods with the B3LYP functional have been used to letter the acidity of carboxyl, O-sulfo and N-sulfo groups in six basic monomeric structural units of heparin (1-OMe ΔUA-2S, 1-OMe GlcN-S6S, 1,4-DiOMe GlcA, 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S3S6S, 1,4-DiOMe IdoA-2S, and 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S6S). The predicted gas-phase acidity of the acidic functional groups in the monomeric structural units of heparin is: O-sulfo > N-sulfo > carboxyl. The computed pKa values provide the same order of acidity as was observed in water solution. This implies that hydration does not change ordering of acidity of major acidic groups of monomeric structural units of heparin.

  10. Aliphatic structure of humic acids; a clue to their origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Maciel, G.E.; Dennis, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (both 1H and 13C) of humic acids from diverse depositional environments indicate the presence of aromatic chemical structures, most likely derived from lignin of vascular plants, and complex, paraffinic structures, most likely derived from algal or microbial sources. The latter components account for a major fraction of humic acid structures in both terrestrial and aquatic environments, suggesting that algae or microbes play a large role in humification of organic remains from both systems. ?? 1981.

  11. An RNA-induced conformational change required for CRISPR RNA cleavage by the endoribonuclease Cse3.

    PubMed

    Sashital, Dipali G; Jinek, Martin; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2011-06-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) chromosomal loci found in prokaryotes provide an adaptive immune system against bacteriophages and plasmids. CRISPR-specific endoRNases produce short RNA molecules (crRNAs) from CRISPR transcripts, which harbor sequences complementary to invasive nucleic acid elements and ensure their selective targeting by CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins. The extreme sequence divergence of CRISPR-specific endoRNases and their RNA substrates has obscured homology-based comparison of RNA recognition and cleavage mechanisms. Here, we show that Cse3 type CRISPR-specific endoRNases bind a hairpin structure and residues downstream of the cleavage site within the repetitive segment of cognate CRISPR RNA. Cocrystal structures of Cse3-RNA complexes reveal an RNA-induced conformational change in the enzyme active site that aligns the RNA strand for site-specific cleavage. These studies provide insight into a catalytically essential RNA recognition mechanism by a large class of CRISPR-related endoRNases.

  12. Cleavage of INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID INDUCIBLE28 mRNA by microRNA847 upregulates auxin signaling to modulate cell proliferation and lateral organ growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2015-03-01

    MicroRNAs function in a range of developmental processes. Here, we demonstrate that miR847 targets the mRNA of the auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) repressor-encoding gene IAA28 for cleavage. The rapidly increased accumulation of miR847 in Arabidopsis thaliana coincided with reduced IAA28 mRNA levels upon auxin treatment. This induction of miR847 by auxin was abolished in auxin receptor tir1-1 and auxin-resistant axr1-3 mutants. Further analysis demonstrates that miR847 functions as a positive regulator of auxin-mediated lateral organ development by cleaving IAA28 mRNA. Importantly, the ectopic expression of miR847 increases the expression of cell cycle genes as well as the neoplastic activity of leaf cells, prolonging later-stage rosette leaf growth and producing leaves with serrated margins. Moreover, both miR847 and IAA28 mRNAs are specifically expressed in marginal meristems of rosette leaves and lateral root initiation sites. Our data indicate that auxin-dependent induction of miR847 positively regulates meristematic competence by clearing IAA28 mRNA to upregulate auxin signaling, thereby determining the duration of cell proliferation and lateral organ growth in Arabidopsis. IAA28 mRNA encodes an Aux/IAA repressor protein, which is degraded through the proteasome in response to auxin. Altered signal sensitization to IAA28 mRNA levels, together with targeted IAA28 degradation, ensures a robust signal derepression.

  13. Structure and expression of the guinea pig preproenkephalin gene: site-specific cleavage in the 3' untranslated region yields truncated mRNA transcripts in specific brain regions.

    PubMed Central

    LaForge, K S; Unterwald, E M; Kreek, M J

    1995-01-01

    We isolated the guinea pig preproenkephalin gene from a genomic library by hybridization to a rat cDNA probe. The entire nucleotide sequence of the gene was determined. Genomic Southern blot hybridization demonstrated that the gene exists in a single copy within the genome. On the basis of RNase protection transcript mapping and homology comparisons with known preproenkephalin sequences from other species and assuming a poly(A) tail length of 100 residues, we predicted an mRNA transcript of approximately 1,400 nucleotides encoded by three exons. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of total RNA from several brain regions showed high levels of preproenkephalin mRNA in the caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, and hypothalamus, with detectable levels in the amygdala, ventral tegmental area, and central gray and also in the pituitary. Unexpectedly, in several brain regions, the mRNA appeared not only in the 1,400-nucleotide length but also in a shorter length of approximately 1,130 bases. Significant amounts of the shorter mRNA were found in the caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala. The longer, but not the shorter, transcripts from the caudate putamen were found to be polyadenylated, but the difference in size was not due solely to the presence of poly(A) tails. Northern gel analysis of total RNA from the caudate putamen with probes from each exon, together with RNase protection mapping of the 3' end of the mRNA demonstrated that the 1,400-base preproenkephalin mRNA transcripts are cleaved in a site-specific manner in some brain regions, yielding a 1,130-base transcript and a 165-base polyadenylated fragment derived from the terminal end of the 3' untranslated region of the mRNA. This cleavage may serve as a preliminary step in RNA degradation and provide a mechanism for control of preproenkephalin mRNA abundance through selective degradation. PMID:7891703

  14. Quantitative structure-activity relationship for the cleavage of C3/C4-substituted catechols by a prototypal extradiol catechol dioxygenase with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Horiike, Kihachiro

    2004-06-01

    Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase [EC 1.13.11.2] from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 (Mpc) catalyzes the extradiol cleavage of catechol to produce 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde. The K(m) values for the catecholic substrate (K(mA)) and O(2) (K(mO2)), and catalytic constants (k(cat)) were kinetically determined for eight C3/C4-substituted catechols at 25 degrees C and pH 6.5 or 7.5. The first pK(a) values (pK(1)) were determined for eleven catechols (pK(1) = 7.26-9.47), correlated with Hammett substituent constants, and electron-withdrawing substituents significantly stabilized the monoanionic species of free catechols. Mpc preferred catechols with non-ionic substituents at the C3 or C4 position. 3-Phenylcatechol, a biphenyl, was cleaved, while 4-tert-butylcatechol was not. The logarithm of k(cat)/K(mA) (substrate specificity constant) exhibited a good linear correlation with pK(1), with the exception of those for 4-halocatechols. The logarithm of k(cat)/K(mO2) showed a good linear correlation with pK(1), with the exception of that of 3-phenylcatechol. These results demonstrate that catechol binding to the Mpc active site, the following O(2) binding, and the activation of the bound O(2) are all sensitive to electronic effects of the substituents. However, k(cat) did not correlate significantly with pK(1). The present study distinguishes clearly between the electronic and the steric effects of catecholic substrates in the reactivity of Mpc, and provides important insight into the mechanistic basis for a vast range of substrate specificities of extradiol dioxygenases.

  15. Interactive Hangman teaches amino acid structures and abbreviations.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Britney O; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying structures, hints to the answers were written in "amino acid sentences" for the students to translate. Students were required to draw the structure of the corresponding letter they wished to guess on a whiteboard. Each student received a reference sheet of the structures and abbreviations, but was required to draw from memory when guessing a letter. Preassessments and postassessments revealed a drastic improvement in the students' ability to recognize and draw structures from memory. This activity provides a fun, educational game to play in biochemistry discussion sections or during long incubations in biochemistry laboratories.

  16. The Chemical Structure and Acid Deterioration of Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollinger, William K., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the chemical structure of paper, including subatomic particles, atoms and molecules, and the forces that bond atoms into molecules, molecules into chains, chains into sheets, and sheets into layers. Acid is defined, and the deleterious role of acid in breaking the forces that bond atoms into molecules is detailed. (EJS)

  17. Chemical and physical structures of proteinoids and related polyamino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Hajime; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Nomoto, Shinya

    Studies of polyamino acid formation pathways in the prebiotic condition are important for the study of the origins of life. Several pathways of prebiotic polyamino acid formation have been reported. Heating of monoammonium malate [1] and heating of amino acids in molten urea [2] are important pathways of the prebiotic peptide formation. The former case, globular structure called proteinoid microsphere is formed in aqueous conditions. The later case, polyamino acids are formed from unrestricted amino acid species. Heating of aqueous aspargine is also interesting pathway for the prebiotic polyamino acid formation, because polyamino acid formation proceeds in aqueous condition [3]. In this study, we analyzed the chemical structure of the proteinoids and related polyamino acids formed in the above three pathways using with mass spectrometer. In addition, their physical structures are analyzed by the electron and optical microscopes, in order to determine the self-organization abilities. We discuss the relation between the chemical and the physical structures for the origins of life. References [1] Harada, K., J. Org. Chem., 24, 1662 (1959), Fox, S. W., Harada, K., and Kendrick, J., Science, 129, 1221 (1959). [2] Terasaki, M., Nomoto, S., Mita, H., and Shimoyama, A., Chem. Lett., 480 (2002), Mita, H., Nomoto, S., Terasaki, M., Shimoyama, A., and Yamamoto, Y., Int. J. Astrobiol., 4, 145 (2005). [3] Kovacs, K and Nagy, H., Nature, 190, 531 (1961), Munegumi, T., Tanikawa, N., Mita, H. and Harada, K., Viva Origino, 22, 109 (1994).

  18. D-β-aspartyl residue exhibiting uncommon high resistance to spontaneous peptide bond cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aki, Kenzo; Okamura, Emiko

    2016-02-01

    Although L-amino acids were selected as main constituents of peptides and proteins during chemical evolution, D-aspartyl (Asp) residue is found in a variety of living tissues. In particular, D-β-Asp is thought to be stable than any other Asp isomers, and this could be a reason for gradual accumulation in abnormal proteins and peptides to modify their structures and functions. It is predicted that D-β-Asp shows high resistance to biomolecular reactions. For instance, less reactivity of D-β-Asp is expected to bond cleavage, although such information has not been provided yet. In this work, the spontaneous peptide bond cleavage was compared between Asp isomers, by applying real-time solution-state NMR to eye lens αΑ-crystallin 51–60 fragment, S51LFRTVLD58SG60 and αΒ-crystallin 61–67 analog, F61D62TGLSG67 consisting of L-α- and D-β-Asp 58 and 62, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed how tough the uncommon D-β-Asp residue was against the peptide bond cleavage as compared to natural L-α-Asp. Differences in pKa and conformation between L-α- and D-β-Asp side chains were plausible factors to determine reactivity of Asp isomers. The present study, for the first time, provides a rationale to explain less reactivity of D-β-Asp to allow abnormal accumulation.

  19. Structural characteristics of fulvic acids from Continental Shelf sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Breger, I.A.; Mattingly, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Fulvic acids are those components of soil organic matter that remain soluble after a dilute alkaline extract of the soil is acidified to pH 2 (refs 1, 2). This extraction procedure has been applied to marine sediments, and the organic compounds so recovered have been called marine sedimentary fulvic acids. These fulvic acids are thought to form more complex humic substances in marine sediments by condensation reactions3. However, the chemical structural compositions of marine fulvic acids have not been defined sufficiently to allow this precursor relationship to be made. Here NMR spectroscopy is used to identify more clearly the chemical structural components of some marine sedimentary fulvic acids, thus enabling a more useful examination of their relationship to more complex humic substances. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  20. Metal Ion Interactions in the DNA Cleavage/Ligation Active Site of Human Topoisomerase IIα†

    PubMed Central

    Deweese, Joseph E.; Guengerich, F. Peter; Burgin, Alex B.; Osheroff, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Human topoisomerase IIα utilizes a two-metal-ion mechanism for DNA cleavage. One of the metal ions (M12+) is believed to make a critical interaction with the 3′-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate, while the other (M22+) is believed to interact with a non-bridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate. Based on structural and mutagenesis studies of prokaryotic nucleic acid enzymes, it has been proposed that the active site divalent metal ions interact with type II topoisomerases through a series of conserved acidic amino acid residues. The homologous residues in human topoisomerase IIα are E461, D541, D543, and D545. To address the validity of these assignments and to delineate interactions between individual amino acids and M12+ and M22+, we individually mutated each of these acidic amino acid residues in topoisomerase IIα to either cysteine or alanine. Mutant enzymes displayed a marked loss of catalytic and DNA cleavage activity as well as a reduced affinity for divalent metal ions. Additional experiments determined the ability of wild-type and mutant topoisomerase IIα enzymes to cleave an oligonucleotide substrate that contained a sulfur atom in place of the 3′-bridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, or Ca2+. Based on the results of these studies, we conclude that the four acidic amino acid residues interact with metal ions in the DNA cleavage/ligation active site of topoisomerase IIα. Furthermore, we propose that M12+ interacts with E461, D543, and D545 and M22+ interacts with E461 and D541. PMID:19697956

  1. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  2. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl- N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints.

  3. (Structure and stability of nucleic acids)

    SciTech Connect

    Tinoco, I. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the conformations of DNA and RNA oligonucleotides in order to relate their structures to their biological roles. We have discovered a novel conformation for a guanine-rich sequence which occurs in telomeres. This finding of one biologically relevant non-Watson-Crick base pair suggests that other non-standard pairs may be important. We have continued a systematic study of the thermodynamics of base pair formation in double stranded DNA. We have established the conformation and thermodynamics of a 3 in. viral RNA structural element. We have made a direct comparison between the thermodynamic stability of mismatched bases and the kinetics of misincorporation of bases by DNA polymerase. Drosophila spermatogenesis and sickle hemoglobin polymerization have been studied with the differential polarization microscope, which was invented and developed in this laboratory. Left-handed Z-RNA, discovered in this laboratory in 1984, has been characterized by NMR, circular dichroism and Raman scattering. (MHB)

  4. A simple, rapid micromethod for the determination of the structure of unsaturated fatty acids via ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Nickell, E C; Privett, O S

    1966-05-01

    A micromethod for the localization of double bonds in unsaturated fatty acids via ozonolysis employing pyrolytic cleavage of ozonides in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst is described. Cleavage of the ozonides is carried out in a gasliquid chromatographie instrument in a small glass tube, containing the catalyst, inserted in the top of the column opposite the in input heaters at 225C. Ozonides of methyl esters of straight chain unsaturated fatty acids are cleaved through the action of the catalyst to aldehyde fragments which are swept simultaneously into the column for analysis.The double bond positions are deduced from the chain length of the fragments. The method is demonstrated on methyl oleate, linoleate, linolenate and arachidonate.

  5. (Structure and stability of nucleic acids)

    SciTech Connect

    Tinoco, I. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    We study the conformations of DNA and RNA oligonucleotides in order to understand their biological roles. We have determined the structure of the most common type of hairpin loop found in ribosomal RNA--the extra-stable tetraloop. It is actually a biloop with the other two bases in the loop forming a non-Watson-Crick base pair. This is the highest resolution structure reported for an RNA molecule in solution so far. We have obtained structures of pseudoknots and we have deduced general rules for their formation. We are presently studying a pseudoknot which is necessary for the replication of a retrovirus. The research done in the laboratory has been reported in 24 publications, plus 7 manuscripts in press or submitted. The research was done by 14 graduate students and 7 postdoctoral fellows. Five graduate students have received their Ph.D.s and 4 postdoctorals have finished their stay here. There are presently 9 graduate students and 3 postdoctorals working on the project; 2 new postdoctorals are expected this summer. One undergraduate student usually participates in the research during the year; this summer two undergraduates are working on the project. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Performance of structured lipids incorporating selected phenolic and ascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Gruczynska, Eliza; Przybylski, Roman; Aladedunye, Felix

    2015-04-15

    Conditions applied during frying require antioxidant which is stable at these conditions and provides protection for frying oil and fried food. Novel structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants were formed by enzymatic transesterification, exploring canola oil and naturally occurring antioxidants such as ascorbic and selected phenolic acids as substrates. Lipozyme RM IM lipase from Rhizomucor miehei was used as biocatalyst. Frying performance and oxidative stability of the final transesterification products were evaluated. The novel lipids showed significantly improved frying performance compared to canola oil. Oxidative stability assessment of the structured lipids showed significant improvement in resistance to oxidative deterioration compared to original canola oil. Interestingly, the presence of ascorbic acid in an acylglycerol structure protected α-tocopherol against thermal degradation, which was not observed for the phenolic acids. Developed structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants may directly affect nutritional properties of lipids also offering nutraceutical ingredients for food formulation.

  7. Fatty acid biosynthesis revisited: Structure elucidation and metabolic engineering

    DOE PAGES

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-10-20

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. During recent years, strained petroleum supplies have driven interest in engineering organisms to either produce more fatty acids or specific high value products. Such efforts require a fundamental understandingmore » of the enzymatic activities and regulation of fatty acid synthases. Despite more than one hundred years of research, we continue to learn new lessons about fatty acid synthases' many intricate structural and regulatory elements. Lastly, in this review, we summarize each enzymatic domain and discuss efforts to engineer fatty acid synthases, providing some clues to important challenges and opportunities in the field.« less

  8. Determinants of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 p15NC-RNA interaction that affect enhanced cleavage by the viral protease.

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, N; Pettit, S C; Tritch, R J; Ozturk, D H; Rayner, M M; Swanstrom, R; Erickson-Viitanen, S

    1997-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virion assembly, cleavage of the Gag precursor by the viral protease results in the transient appearance of a nucleocapsid-p1-p6 intermediate product designated p15NC. Utilizing the p15NC precursor protein produced with an in vitro transcription-translation system or purified after expression in Escherichia coli, we have demonstrated that RNA is required for efficient cleavage of HIV p15NC. Gel mobility shift and nitrocellulose filter binding experiments indicate that purified p15NC protein specifically binds its corresponding mRNA with an estimated Kd of 1.5 nM. Binding was not affected by the presence or absence of zinc or EDTA. Moreover, mutagenesis of the cysteine residues within either of the two Cys-His arrays had no effect on RNA binding or on RNA-dependent cleavage by the viral protease. In contrast, decreased binding of RNA and diminished susceptibility to cleavage in vitro were observed with p15NC-containing mutations in one or more residues within the triplet of basic amino acids present in the region between the two zinc fingers. In addition, we found that 21- to 24-base DNA and RNA oligonucleotides of a particular sequence and secondary structure could substitute for p15 RNA in the enhancement of p15NC cleavage. Virus particles carrying a mutation in the triplet of NC basic residues (P3BE) show delayed cleavage of p15NC and a defect in core formation despite the eventual appearance of fully processed virion protein. These results define determinants of the p15NC-RNA interaction that lead to enhanced protease-mediated cleavage and demonstrate the importance of the triplet of basic residues in formation of the virus core. PMID:9223458

  9. Structure for the Propiolic Acid - Formic Acid Complex from Microwave Spectra for Multiple Isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukolich, Stephen G.; Mitchell, Erik G.; Carey, Spencer J.; Sun, Ming; Sargus, Bryan M.

    2013-06-01

    New microwave spectra were measured to obtain rotational constants and centrifugal distortion constants for the DCCCOOH---HOOCH and HCCCOOD---DOOCH isotopologues. Transitions were measured in the 4.9-15.4 GHz range, providing accurate rotational constants which, combined with previous rotational constants allowed an improved structural fit for the propiolic acid - formic acid complex. The new structural fit yields orientations for both the propiolic and formic acid monomers in the complex and more accurate structural parameters describing the hydrogen bonding. The structure is planar, with a positive inertial defect of Δ = 1.33 amu Å^2.The experimental structure exhibits a greater asymmetry for the two hydrogen bond lengths than was obtained from the ab initio mp2 calculations.The average of the two hydrogen bond lengths is R(exp) = 1.76 Å, in good agreement with R(theory) = 1.72 Å.

  10. A mild and selective method for cleavage of O-acetyl groups with dibutyltin oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Min; Yan, Xuebin; Li, Wen; Huang, Conghai

    2002-10-11

    A mild and efficient neutral method for the cleavage of O-acetyl groups with dibutyltin oxide has been developed. This method is especially useful in the synthesis of glycosides containing base- or acid-sensitive multifunctional groups.

  11. Structural insights into the role of iron–histidine bond cleavage in nitric oxide-induced activation of H-NOX gas sensor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herzik, Mark A.; Jonnalagadda, Rohan; Kuriyan, John; Marletta, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Heme-nitric oxide/oxygen (H-NOX) binding domains are a recently discovered family of heme-based gas sensor proteins that are conserved across eukaryotes and bacteria. Nitric oxide (NO) binding to the heme cofactor of H-NOX proteins has been implicated as a regulatory mechanism for processes ranging from vasodilation in mammals to communal behavior in bacteria. A key molecular event during NO-dependent activation of H-NOX proteins is rupture of the heme–histidine bond and formation of a five-coordinate nitrosyl complex. Although extensive biochemical studies have provided insight into the NO activation mechanism, precise molecular-level details have remained elusive. In the present study, high-resolution crystal structures of the H-NOX protein from Shewanella oneidensis in the unligated, intermediate six-coordinate and activated five-coordinate, NO-bound states are reported. From these structures, it is evident that several structural features in the heme pocket of the unligated protein function to maintain the heme distorted from planarity. NO-induced scission of the iron–histidine bond triggers structural rearrangements in the heme pocket that permit the heme to relax toward planarity, yielding the signaling-competent NO-bound conformation. Here, we also provide characterization of a nonheme metal coordination site occupied by zinc in an H-NOX protein. PMID:25253889

  12. Crystal structure of (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Sonneck, Marcel; Peppel, Tim; Spannenberg, Anke; Wohlrab, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid, C12H22O2, an α,β-unsaturated carb­oxy­lic acid with a melting point (295 K) near room temperature, is characterized by carb­oxy­lic acid inversion dimers linked by pairs of O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The carb­oxy­lic acid group and the following three carbon atoms of the chain of the (E)-dodec-2-enoic acid mol­ecule lie almost in one plane (r.m.s. deviation for the four C atoms and two O atoms = 0.012 Å), whereas the remaining carbon atoms of the hydro­carbon chain adopt a nearly fully staggered conformation [moduli of torsion angles vary from 174.01 (13) to 179.97 (13)°]. PMID:26279945

  13. Activity dependent CAM cleavage and neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Conant, Katherine; Allen, Megan; Lim, Seung T.

    2015-01-01

    Spatially localized proteolysis represents an elegant means by which neuronal activity dependent changes in synaptic structure, and thus experience dependent learning and memory, can be achieved. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that matrix metalloproteinase and adamalysin activity is concentrated at the cell surface, and emerging evidence suggests that increased peri-synaptic expression, release and/or activation of these proteinases occurs with enhanced excitatory neurotransmission. Synaptically expressed cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) could therefore represent important targets for neuronal activity-dependent proteolysis. Several CAM subtypes are expressed at the synapse, and their cleavage can influence the efficacy of synaptic transmission through a variety of non-mutually exclusive mechanisms. In the following review, we discuss mechanisms that regulate neuronal activity-dependent synaptic CAM shedding, including those that may be calcium dependent. We also highlight CAM targets of activity-dependent proteolysis including neuroligin and intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM-5). We include discussion focused on potential consequences of synaptic CAM shedding, with an emphasis on interactions between soluble CAM cleavage products and specific pre- and post-synaptic receptors. PMID:26321910

  14. Cleavage Entropy as Quantitative Measure of Protease Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Julian E.; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Huber, Roland G.; Margreiter, Michael A.; Spitzer, Gudrun M.; Wallnoefer, Hannes G.; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2013-01-01

    A purely information theory-guided approach to quantitatively characterize protease specificity is established. We calculate an entropy value for each protease subpocket based on sequences of cleaved substrates extracted from the MEROPS database. We compare our results with known subpocket specificity profiles for individual proteases and protease groups (e.g. serine proteases, metallo proteases) and reflect them quantitatively. Summation of subpocket-wise cleavage entropy contributions yields a measure for overall protease substrate specificity. This total cleavage entropy allows ranking of different proteases with respect to their specificity, separating unspecific digestive enzymes showing high total cleavage entropy from specific proteases involved in signaling cascades. The development of a quantitative cleavage entropy score allows an unbiased comparison of subpocket-wise and overall protease specificity. Thus, it enables assessment of relative importance of physicochemical and structural descriptors in protease recognition. We present an exemplary application of cleavage entropy in tracing substrate specificity in protease evolution. This highlights the wide range of substrate promiscuity within homologue proteases and hence the heavy impact of a limited number of mutations on individual substrate specificity. PMID:23637583

  15. Cleavage entropy as quantitative measure of protease specificity.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julian E; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Huber, Roland G; Margreiter, Michael A; Spitzer, Gudrun M; Wallnoefer, Hannes G; Liedl, Klaus R

    2013-04-01

    A purely information theory-guided approach to quantitatively characterize protease specificity is established. We calculate an entropy value for each protease subpocket based on sequences of cleaved substrates extracted from the MEROPS database. We compare our results with known subpocket specificity profiles for individual proteases and protease groups (e.g. serine proteases, metallo proteases) and reflect them quantitatively. Summation of subpocket-wise cleavage entropy contributions yields a measure for overall protease substrate specificity. This total cleavage entropy allows ranking of different proteases with respect to their specificity, separating unspecific digestive enzymes showing high total cleavage entropy from specific proteases involved in signaling cascades. The development of a quantitative cleavage entropy score allows an unbiased comparison of subpocket-wise and overall protease specificity. Thus, it enables assessment of relative importance of physicochemical and structural descriptors in protease recognition. We present an exemplary application of cleavage entropy in tracing substrate specificity in protease evolution. This highlights the wide range of substrate promiscuity within homologue proteases and hence the heavy impact of a limited number of mutations on individual substrate specificity.

  16. Selective cleavage of protonated penetratin and its substitutes under low-energy collision-induced dissociation condition.

    PubMed

    Peng, Juan; Zu, Lily; Fang, Weihai; Huang, Lingyun; Wang, Yaru; He, Dacheng

    2010-06-01

    An understanding of the dissociation of penetratin is important for improving its metabolic stability and cargo-delivery efficiency. In this study, we describe the selective cleavage of the K15-K16 amide bond of penetratin under the low-energy collision-induced dissociation condition in mass spectrometry. A variety of penetratin substitutes have been studied in which key basic amino acids have been substituted within the sequence. The calculated structure indicates that an alpha-helix structure prevents the fragmentation of the central peptide domain and the side chain of lysine is involved in the proton translocation process.

  17. Crystal Structures of YkuI and Its Complex with Second Messenger Cyclic Di-GMP Suggest Catalytic Mechanism of Phosphodiester Bond Cleavage by EAL Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Minasov, George; Padavattan, Sivaraman; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Miller, Darcie J.; Baslé, Arnaud; Massa, Claudia; Collart, Frank R.; Schirmer, Tilman; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger that is involved in the regulation of cell surface-associated traits and the persistence of infections. Omnipresent GGDEF and EAL domains, which occur in various combinations with regulatory domains, catalyze c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation, respectively. The crystal structure of full-length YkuI from Bacillus subtilis, composed of an EAL domain and a C-terminal PAS-like domain, has been determined in its native form and in complex with c-di-GMP and Ca2+. The EAL domain exhibits a triose-phosphate isomerase-barrel fold with one antiparallel β-strand. The complex with c-di-GMP-Ca2+ defines the active site of the putative phosphodiesterase located at the C-terminal end of the β-barrel. The EAL motif is part of the active site with Glu-33 of the motif being involved in cation coordination. The structure of the complex allows the proposal of a phosphodiesterase mechanism, in which the divalent cation and the general base Glu-209 activate a catalytic water molecule for nucleophilic in-line attack on the phosphorus. The C-terminal domain closely resembles the PAS-fold. Its pocket-like structure could accommodate a yet unknown ligand. YkuI forms a tight dimer via EAL-EAL and trans EAL-PAS-like domain association. The possible regulatory significance of the EAL-EAL interface and a mechanism for signal transduction between sensory and catalytic domains of c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases are discussed. PMID:19244251

  18. Cystatin. Amino acid sequence and possible secondary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Schwabe, C; Anastasi, A; Crow, H; McDonald, J K; Barrett, A J

    1984-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of cystatin, the protein from chicken egg-white that is a tight-binding inhibitor of many cysteine proteinases, is reported. Cystatin is composed of 116 amino acid residues, and the Mr is calculated to be 13 143. No striking similarity to any other known sequence has been detected. The results of computer analysis of the sequence and c.d. spectrometry indicate that the secondary structure includes relatively little alpha-helix (about 20%) and that the remainder is mainly beta-structure. PMID:6712597

  19. A broken-symmetry density functional study of structures, energies, and protonation states along the catalytic O-O bond cleavage pathway in ba3 cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Han Du, Wen-Ge; Götz, Andreas W; Yang, Longhua; Walker, Ross C; Noodleman, Louis

    2016-08-21

    Broken-symmetry density functional calculations have been performed on the [Fea3, CuB] dinuclear center (DNC) of ba3 cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus in the states of [Fea3(3+)-(HO2)(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237(-)] and [Fea3(4+)[double bond, length as m-dash]O(2-), OH(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237˙], using both PW91-D3 and OLYP-D3 functionals. Tyr237 is a special tyrosine cross-linked to His233, a ligand of CuB. The calculations have shown that the DNC in these states strongly favors the protonation of His376, which is above propionate-A, but not of the carboxylate group of propionate-A. The energies of the structures obtained by constrained geometry optimizations along the O-O bond cleavage pathway between [Fea3(3+)-(O-OH)(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237(-)] and [Fea3(4+)[double bond, length as m-dash]O(2-)HO(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237˙] have also been calculated. The transition of [Fea3(3+)-(O-OH)(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237(-)] → [Fea3(4+)[double bond, length as m-dash]O(2-)HO(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237˙] shows a very small barrier, which is less than 3.0/2.0 kcal mol(-1) in PW91-D3/OLYP-D3 calculations. The protonation state of His376 does not affect this O-O cleavage barrier. The rate limiting step of the transition from state A (in which O2 binds to Fea3(2+)) to state PM ([Fea3(4+)[double bond, length as m-dash]O(2-), OH(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237˙], where the O-O bond is cleaved) in the catalytic cycle is, therefore, the proton transfer originating from Tyr237 to O-O to form the hydroperoxo [Fea3(3+)-(O-OH)(-)-CuB(2+), Tyr237(-)] state. The importance of His376 in proton uptake and the function of propionate-A/neutral-Asp372 as a gate to prevent the proton from back-flowing to the DNC are also shown.

  20. Crystal structure of a human cleavage factor CFI(m)25/CFI(m)68/RNA complex provides an insight into poly(A) site recognition and RNA looping.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Coseno, Molly; Gilmartin, Gregory M; Doublié, Sylvie

    2011-03-09

    Cleavage factor I(m) (CFI(m)) is a highly conserved component of the eukaryotic mRNA 3' processing machinery that functions in sequence-specific poly(A) site recognition through the collaboration of a 25 kDa subunit containing a Nudix domain and a larger subunit of 59, 68, or 72 kDa containing an RNA recognition motif (RRM). Our previous work demonstrated that CFI(m)25 is both necessary and sufficient for sequence-specific binding of the poly(A) site upstream element UGUA. Here, we report the crystal structure of CFI(m)25 complexed with the RRM domain of CFI(m)68 and RNA. The CFI(m)25 dimer is clasped on opposite sides by two CFI(m)68 RRM domains. Each CFI(m)25 subunit binds one UGUA element specifically. Biochemical analysis indicates that the CFI(m)68 RRMs serve to enhance RNA binding and facilitate RNA looping. The intrinsic ability of CFI(m) to direct RNA looping may provide a mechanism for its function in the regulation of alternative poly(A) site selection.

  1. Solution structure of the squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI) and mutational analysis of pepsin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Headey, Stephen J; Macaskill, Ursula K; Wright, Michele A; Claridge, Jolyon K; Edwards, Patrick J B; Farley, Peter C; Christeller, John T; Laing, William A; Pascal, Steven M

    2010-08-27

    The squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI), a proteinaceous proteinase inhibitor from squash, is an effective inhibitor of a range of aspartic proteinases. Proteinaceous aspartic proteinase inhibitors are rare in nature. The only other example in plants probably evolved from a precursor serine proteinase inhibitor. Earlier work based on sequence homology modeling suggested SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin. In this work, we determined the solution structure of SQAPI using NMR and show that SQAPI shares the same fold as a plant cystatin. The structure is characterized by a four-strand anti-parallel beta-sheet gripping an alpha-helix in an analogous manner to fingers of a hand gripping a tennis racquet. Truncation and site-specific mutagenesis revealed that the unstructured N terminus and the loop connecting beta-strands 1 and 2 are important for pepsin inhibition, but the loop connecting strands 3 and 4 is not. Using ambiguous restraints based on the mutagenesis results, SQAPI was then docked computationally to pepsin. The resulting model places the N-terminal strand of SQAPI in the S' side of the substrate binding cleft, whereas the first SQAPI loop binds on the S side of the cleft. The backbone of SQAPI does not interact with the pepsin catalytic Asp(32)-Asp(215) diad, thus avoiding cleavage. The data show that SQAPI does share homologous structural elements with cystatin and appears to retain a similar protease inhibitory mechanism despite its different target. This strongly supports our hypothesis that SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin.

  2. Solution Structure of the Squash Aspartic Acid Proteinase Inhibitor (SQAPI) and Mutational Analysis of Pepsin Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Headey, Stephen J.; MacAskill, Ursula K.; Wright, Michele A.; Claridge, Jolyon K.; Edwards, Patrick J. B.; Farley, Peter C.; Christeller, John T.; Laing, William A.; Pascal, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    The squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI), a proteinaceous proteinase inhibitor from squash, is an effective inhibitor of a range of aspartic proteinases. Proteinaceous aspartic proteinase inhibitors are rare in nature. The only other example in plants probably evolved from a precursor serine proteinase inhibitor. Earlier work based on sequence homology modeling suggested SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin. In this work, we determined the solution structure of SQAPI using NMR and show that SQAPI shares the same fold as a plant cystatin. The structure is characterized by a four-strand anti-parallel β-sheet gripping an α-helix in an analogous manner to fingers of a hand gripping a tennis racquet. Truncation and site-specific mutagenesis revealed that the unstructured N terminus and the loop connecting β-strands 1 and 2 are important for pepsin inhibition, but the loop connecting strands 3 and 4 is not. Using ambiguous restraints based on the mutagenesis results, SQAPI was then docked computationally to pepsin. The resulting model places the N-terminal strand of SQAPI in the S′ side of the substrate binding cleft, whereas the first SQAPI loop binds on the S side of the cleft. The backbone of SQAPI does not interact with the pepsin catalytic Asp32–Asp215 diad, thus avoiding cleavage. The data show that SQAPI does share homologous structural elements with cystatin and appears to retain a similar protease inhibitory mechanism despite its different target. This strongly supports our hypothesis that SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin. PMID:20538608

  3. Specificity of hammerhead ribozyme cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, K J; Herschlag, D; Uhlenbeck, O C

    1996-01-01

    To be effective in gene inactivation, the hammerhead ribozyme must cleave a complementary RNA target without deleterious effects from cleaving non-target RNAs that contain mismatches and shorter stretches of complementarity. The specificity of hammerhead cleavage was evaluated using HH16, a well-characterized ribozyme designed to cleave a target of 17 residues. Under standard reaction conditions, HH16 is unable to discriminate between its full-length substrate and 3'-truncated substrates, even when six fewer base pairs are formed between HH16 and the substrate. This striking lack of specificity arises because all the substrates bind to the ribozyme with sufficient affinity so that cleavage occurs before their affinity differences are manifested. In contrast, HH16 does exhibit high specificity towards certain 3'-truncated versions of altered substrates that either also contain a single base mismatch or are shortened at the 5' end. In addition, the specificity of HH16 is improved in the presence of p7 nucleocapsid protein from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, which accelerates the association and dissociation of RNA helices. These results support the view that the hammerhead has an intrinsic ability to discriminate against incorrect bases, but emphasizes that the high specificity is only observed in a certain range of helix lengths. Images PMID:8670879

  4. Unraveling the Structural Modifications in Lignin of Arundo donax Linn. during Acid-Enhanced Ionic Liquid Pretreatment.

    PubMed

    You, Tingting; Zhang, Liming; Guo, Siqin; Shao, Lupeng; Xu, Feng

    2015-12-23

    Solid acid-enhanced ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment is of paramount importance for boosting the yield of sugars from biomass cost-effectively and environmentally friendly. To unravel the chemical and supramolecular structural changes of lignin after pretreatment, IL-acid lignin (ILAL) and subsequent residual cellulolytic enzyme lignin (RCEL) were isolated from Arundo donax Linn. The structural features were compared with those of the corresponding milled wood lignin (MWL). Results indicated that the pretreatment caused loss of β-O-4', β-β', β-1' linkages and formation of condensed structures in lignin. A preferential breakdown of G-type lignin may have occurred, evidenced by an increased S/G ratio revealed by 2D HSQC NMR analysis. It was determined that the depolymerization of β-O-4' linkage, lignin recondensation, and cleavage of ferulate-lignin ether linkages took place. Moreover, a simulation module was first developed to define morphological changes in lignin based on AFM and TEM analyses. Briefly, tree branch like aggregates was destroyed to monodisperse particles.

  5. Engineering a ribozyme cleavage-induced split fluorescent aptamer complementation assay

    PubMed Central

    Ausländer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Hürlemann, Samuel; Ausländer, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Hammerhead ribozymes are self-cleaving RNA molecules capable of regulating gene expression in living cells. Their cleavage performance is strongly influenced by intra-molecular loop–loop interactions, a feature not readily accessible through modern prediction algorithms. Ribozyme engineering and efficient implementation of ribozyme-based genetic switches requires detailed knowledge of individual self-cleavage performances. By rational design, we devised fluorescent aptamer-ribozyme RNA architectures that allow for the real-time measurement of ribozyme self-cleavage activity in vitro. The engineered nucleic acid molecules implement a split Spinach aptamer sequence that is made accessible for strand displacement upon ribozyme self-cleavage, thereby complementing the fluorescent Spinach aptamer. This fully RNA-based ribozyme performance assay correlates ribozyme cleavage activity with Spinach fluorescence to provide a rapid and straightforward technology for the validation of loop–loop interactions in hammerhead ribozymes. PMID:26939886

  6. Metal-promoted synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and RNA cleavage ability of 2,6-diacetylpyridine bis(2-aminobenzoylhydrazone) lanthanide complexes.

    PubMed

    Kozłowski, Michał; Kierzek, Ryszard; Kubicki, Maciej; Radecka-Paryzek, Wanda

    2013-09-01

    New 2,6-diacetylpyridine bis(2-aminobenzoylhydrazone) lanthanide complexes were formed in the metal-induced one-step [1+2] condensation reaction between 2,6-diacetylpyridine and 2-aminobenzoylhydrazide in the presence of lanthanide (La(3+), Pr(3+), Nd(3+), Sm(3+), Eu(3+), Gd(3+), Tb(3+), Dy(3+), Ho(3+), Er(3+), Tm(3+) or Yb(3+)) nitrates as template agents. The analytical and spectral characterizations of all the compounds were correlated with the single crystal X-ray structural determination of Eu(3+), Gd(3+), Tb(3+), Dy(3+) and Er(3+) nitrate complexes. The Eu(3+), Gd(3+), Tb(3+)and Dy(3+) complexes of pentadentate 2,6-diacetylpyridine bis(2-aminobenzoylhydrazone) with the N3O2 set of donor atoms display a high and relatively rare coordination number of 11, whereas the Er(3+) ion complex is 9-coordinated, which is consistent with the lanthanide contraction phenomenon. The scission of 21-mer RNA was assessed for Eu(3+), Gd(3+) and Tb(3+) nitrate complexes. Lanthanide complexes not covalently attached to the oligonucleotide are able to cleave RNA at the target site in a sequence-selective or non-selective manner depending on the presence of protecting 12-mer 2'OMe RNA.

  7. Structural Determinants for Transport Across the Intestinal Bile Acid Transporter Using C-24 Bile Acid Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Rana; Acharya, Chayan; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Polli, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The human apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT) re-absorbs gram quantities of bile acid daily and is a potential prodrug target to increase oral drug absorption. In the absence of a high resolution hASBT crystal structure, 3D-QSAR modeling may prove beneficial in designing prodrug targets to hASBT. The objective was to derive a conformationally sampled pharmacophore 3D–QSAR (CSP-SAR) model for the uptake of bile acid conjugates by hASBT. A series of bile acid conjugates of glutamyl chenodeoxycholate were evaluated in terms of Km and normalized Vmax(normVmax) using hASBT-MDCK cells. All mono-anionic conjugates were potent substrates. Dianions, cations and zwitterions, which bound with a high affinity, were not substrates. CSP-SAR models were derived using structural and physicochemical descriptors, and evaluated via cross-validation. The best CSP-SAR model for Km included two structural and two physiochemical descriptors, where substrate hydrophobicity enhanced affinity. A best CSP-SAR model for Km/normVmax employed one structural and three physicochemical descriptors, also indicating hydrophobicity enhanced efficiency. Overall, the bile acid C-24 region accommodated a range of substituted anilines, provided a single negative charge was present near C-24. In comparing uptake findings to prior inhibition results, increased hydrophobicity enhanced activity, with dianions and zwitterions hindering activity. PMID:20939504

  8. Molecular insight into bacterial cleavage of oceanic dimethylsulfoniopropionate into dimethyl sulfide.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Yang; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Sheng-Hui; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Peng; Xie, Bin-Bin; Su, Hai-Nan; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Yu, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Yang, Gui-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-01-21

    The microbial cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) generates volatile DMS through the action of DMSP lyases and is important in the global sulfur and carbon cycles. When released into the atmosphere from the oceans, DMS is oxidized, forming cloud condensation nuclei that may influence weather and climate. Six different DMSP lyase genes are found in taxonomically diverse microorganisms, and dddQ is among the most abundant in marine metagenomes. Here, we examine the molecular mechanism of DMSP cleavage by the DMSP lyase, DddQ, from Ruegeria lacuscaerulensis ITI_1157. The structures of DddQ bound to an inhibitory molecule 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid and of DddQ inactivated by a Tyr131Ala mutation and bound to DMSP were solved. DddQ adopts a β-barrel fold structure and contains a Zn(2+) ion and six highly conserved hydrophilic residues (Tyr120, His123, His125, Glu129, Tyr131, and His163) in the active site. Mutational and biochemical analyses indicate that these hydrophilic residues are essential to catalysis. In particular, Tyr131 undergoes a conformational change during catalysis, acting as a base to initiate the β-elimination reaction in DMSP lysis. Moreover, structural analyses and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that two loops over the substrate-binding pocket of DddQ can alternate between "open" and "closed" states, serving as a gate for DMSP entry. We also propose a molecular mechanism for DMS production through DMSP cleavage. Our study provides important insight into the mechanism involved in the conversion of DMSP into DMS, which should lead to a better understanding of this globally important biogeochemical reaction.

  9. Molecular insight into bacterial cleavage of oceanic dimethylsulfoniopropionate into dimethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Yang; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Sheng-Hui; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Peng; Xie, Bin-Bin; Su, Hai-Nan; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Yu, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Yang, Gui-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    The microbial cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) generates volatile DMS through the action of DMSP lyases and is important in the global sulfur and carbon cycles. When released into the atmosphere from the oceans, DMS is oxidized, forming cloud condensation nuclei that may influence weather and climate. Six different DMSP lyase genes are found in taxonomically diverse microorganisms, and dddQ is among the most abundant in marine metagenomes. Here, we examine the molecular mechanism of DMSP cleavage by the DMSP lyase, DddQ, from Ruegeria lacuscaerulensis ITI_1157. The structures of DddQ bound to an inhibitory molecule 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid and of DddQ inactivated by a Tyr131Ala mutation and bound to DMSP were solved. DddQ adopts a β-barrel fold structure and contains a Zn2+ ion and six highly conserved hydrophilic residues (Tyr120, His123, His125, Glu129, Tyr131, and His163) in the active site. Mutational and biochemical analyses indicate that these hydrophilic residues are essential to catalysis. In particular, Tyr131 undergoes a conformational change during catalysis, acting as a base to initiate the β-elimination reaction in DMSP lysis. Moreover, structural analyses and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that two loops over the substrate-binding pocket of DddQ can alternate between "open" and "closed" states, serving as a gate for DMSP entry. We also propose a molecular mechanism for DMS production through DMSP cleavage. Our study provides important insight into the mechanism involved in the conversion of DMSP into DMS, which should lead to a better understanding of this globally important biogeochemical reaction.

  10. Heterogeneous OH Oxidation of Two Structure Isomers of Dimethylsuccinic Acid Aerosol: Reactivity and Oxidation Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M. N.; Cheng, C. T.; Wilson, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Organic aerosol contribute a significant mass fraction of ambient aerosol carbon and can continuously undergo oxidation by colliding with gas phase OH radicals. Although heterogeneous oxidation plays a significant role in the chemical transformation of organic aerosol, the effect of molecular structure on the reactivity and oxidation products remains unclear. We investigate the effect of branched methyl groups on the reactivity of two dimethylsuccinic acids (2,2-dimethylsuccinic acid (2,2-DMSA) and 2,3-dimethylsuccinic acid (2,3-DMSA)) toward gas phase OH radicals in an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube reactor. The oxidation products formed upon oxidation is characterized in real time by the Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART), an ambient soft ionization source. The 2,2-DMSA and 2,3-DMSA are structural isomers with the same oxidation state (OSC = -0.33) and carbon number (NC = 6), but different branching characteristics (2,2-DMSA has one secondary carbon and 2,3-DMSA has two tertiary carbons). The difference in molecular distribution of oxidation products observed in these two structural isomers would allow one to assess the sensitivity of kinetics and chemistry to the position of branched methyl group in the DMSA upon oxidation. We observe that the reactivity of 2,3-DMSA toward OH radicals is about 2 times faster than that of 2,2-DMSA. This difference in OH reactivity may attribute to the stability of the carbon-centered radical generated after hydrogen abstraction because an alkyl radical formed from the hydrogen abstraction on a tertiary carbon in 2,3-DMSA is more stable than on a secondary carbon in 2,2-DMSA. For both 2,2-DMSA and 2,3-DMSA, the molecular distribution and evolution of oxidation products is characterized by a predominance of functionalization products at the early oxidation stages. When the oxidation further proceeds, the fragmentation becomes more favorable and the oxidation mainly leads to the reduction of the carbon chain length through

  11. Site Specificity of Cleavage of DSP-PP by BMP1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Robert T.; Lim, Glendale L.; Yee, Colin T.; Fuller, Robert S.; Ritchie, Helena H.

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenic protein 1 (BMP1), a metalloproteinase, is known to cleave a wide variety of extracellular matrix proteins, suggesting that a consensus substrate cleavage amino acid sequence might exist. However, while such a consensus sequence has been proposed based on P4 to P4′ (i.e., the four amino acids flanking either side of the BMP1 cleavage site; P4P3P2P1|P1′P2′P3′P4′) sequence homologies between two BMP1 substrates, dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin sialoprotein phosphophoryn (DSP-PP) (i.e., xMQx | DDP), no direct testing has so far been attempted. Using an Sf9 cell expression system, we have been able to produce large amounts of uncleaved DSP-PP,. Point mutations introduced into this recombinant DSP-PP were then tested for their affects on DSP-PP cleavage by either Sf9 endogenous tolloid-related protein 1 (TLR-1) or by its human homolog, BMP1. Here we have measured DSP-PP cleavage efficiencies after modifications based on P4-P4′ sequence comparisons with dentin matrix protein 1, as well as for prolysyl oxidase and chordin, two other BMP1 substrates. Our results demonstrate that any mutations within or outside of the DSP-PP P4 to P4′ cleavage site can block, impair or accelerate DSP-PP cleavage, and suggest that its BMP1 cleavage site is highly conserved in order to regulate its cleavage efficiency, possibly with additional assistance from its conserved exosites. Thus, BMP1 cleavage cannot be based on a consensus substrate cleavage site. PMID:25158199

  12. Cleavage sites within the poliovirus capsid protein precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, G.R.; Anderson, C.W.; Dorner, A.J.; Semler, B.L.; Wimmer, E.

    1982-01-01

    Partial amino-terminal sequence analysis was performed on radiolabeled poliovirus capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3. A computer-assisted comparison of the amino acid sequences obtained with that predicted by the nucleotide sequence of the poliovirus genome allows assignment of the amino terminus of each capsid protein to a unique position within the virus polyprotein. Sequence analysis of trypsin-digested VP4, which has a blocked amino terminus, demonstrates that VP4 is encoded at or very near to the amino terminus of the polyprotein. The gene order of the capsid proteins is VP4-VP2-VP3-VP1. Cleavage of VP0 to VP4 and VP2 is shown to occur between asparagine and serine, whereas the cleavages that separate VP2/VP3 and VP3/VP1 occur between glutamine and glycine residues. This finding supports the hypothesis that the cleavage of VP0, which occurs during virion morphogenesis, is distinct from the cleavages that separate functional regions of the polyprotein.

  13. Stimulation of cleavage of membrane proteins by calmodulin inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Rodríguez, E; Esparís-Ogando, A; Montero, J C; Yuste, L; Pandiella, A

    2000-01-01

    The ectodomain of several membrane-bound proteins can be shed by proteolytic cleavage. The activity of the proteases involved in shedding is highly regulated by several intracellular second messenger pathways, such as protein kinase C (PKC) and intracellular Ca(2+). Recently, the shedding of the adhesion molecule L-selectin has been shown to be regulated by the interaction of calmodulin (CaM) with the cytosolic tail of L-selectin. Prevention of CaM-L-selectin interaction by CaM inhibitors or mutation of a CaM binding site in L-selectin induced L-selectin ectodomain shedding. Whether this action of CaM inhibitors also affects other membrane-bound proteins is not known. In the present paper we show that CaM inhibitors also stimulate the cleavage of several other transmembrane proteins, such as the membrane-bound growth factor precursors pro-transforming growth factor-alpha and pro-neuregulin-alpha2c, the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkA, and the beta-amyloid precursor protein. Cleavage induced by CaM inhibitors was a rapid event, and resulted from the activation of a mechanism that was independent of PKC or intracellular Ca(2+) increases, but was highly sensitive to hydroxamic acid-based metalloprotease inhibitors. Mutational analysis of the intracellular domain of the TrkA receptor indicated that CaM inhibitors may stimulate membrane-protein ectodomain cleavage by mechanisms independent of CaM-substrate interaction. PMID:10677354

  14. Computational redesign of endonuclease DNA binding and cleavage specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, Justin; Havranek, James J.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Sussman, Django; Monnat, Raymond J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Baker, David

    2006-06-01

    The reprogramming of DNA-binding specificity is an important challenge for computational protein design that tests current understanding of protein-DNA recognition, and has considerable practical relevance for biotechnology and medicine. Here we describe the computational redesign of the cleavage specificity of the intron-encoded homing endonuclease I-MsoI using a physically realistic atomic-level forcefield. Using an in silico screen, we identified single base-pair substitutions predicted to disrupt binding by the wild-type enzyme, and then optimized the identities and conformations of clusters of amino acids around each of these unfavourable substitutions using Monte Carlo sampling. A redesigned enzyme that was predicted to display altered target site specificity, while maintaining wild-type binding affinity, was experimentally characterized. The redesigned enzyme binds and cleaves the redesigned recognition site ~10,000 times more effectively than does the wild-type enzyme, with a level of target discrimination comparable to the original endonuclease. Determination of the structure of the redesigned nuclease-recognition site complex by X-ray crystallography confirms the accuracy of the computationally predicted interface. These results suggest that computational protein design methods can have an important role in the creation of novel highly specific endonucleases for gene therapy and other applications.

  15. Properties and structure of raised bog peat humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-10-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic components of soil, peat and natural waters, and their structure and properties differ very much depending on their source. The aims of this study are to characterize humic acids (HAs) from raised bog peat, to evaluate the homogeneity of peat HAs within peat profiles, and to study peat humification impact on properties of HAs. A major impact on the structure of peat HAs have lignin-free raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin). On diagenesis scale, peat HAs have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter, and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, while thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge as a result of abiotic synthesis. However, in comparison with soil, aquatic and other HAs, aromaticity of peat HAs is much lower. Comparatively, the raised bog peat HAs are at the beginning of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups change depending on the peat age and decomposition degree from where HAs have been isolated, and carboxylic acidity of peat HAs increases with peat depth and humification degree.

  16. Synthesis and structural characterisation of amides from picolinic acid and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Prarthana; Barry, Sarah M.; Houlihan, Kate M.; Murphy, Michael J.; Turner, Peter; Jensen, Paul; Rutledge, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Coupling picolinic acid (pyridine-2-carboxylic acid) and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid with N-alkylanilines affords a range of mono- and bis-amides in good to moderate yields. These amides are of interest for potential applications in catalysis, coordination chemistry and molecular devices. The reaction of picolinic acid with thionyl chloride to generate the acid chloride in situ leads not only to the N-alkyl-N-phenylpicolinamides as expected but also the corresponding 4-chloro-N-alkyl-N-phenylpicolinamides in the one pot. The two products are readily separated by column chromatography. Chlorinated products are not observed from the corresponding reactions of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid. X-Ray crystal structures for six of these compounds are described. These structures reveal a general preference for cis amide geometry in which the aromatic groups (N-phenyl and pyridyl) are cis to each other and the pyridine nitrogen anti to the carbonyl oxygen. Variable temperature 1H NMR experiments provide a window on amide bond isomerisation in solution. PMID:25954918

  17. Structure, dynamics, and energetics of lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) isomers.

    PubMed

    Goursot, A; Mineva, T; Bissig, C; Gruenberg, J; Salahub, D R

    2010-12-02

    Lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), or bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate, is a very interesting lipid, that is mainly found in late endosomes. It has several intriguing characteristics, which differ from those of other animal glycerophospholipids, that may be related to its specific functions, particularly in the metabolism of cholesterol. Its phosphodiester group is bonded at the sn-1 (sn-1') positions of the glycerols rather than at sn-3 (sn-3'); the position of the two fatty acid chains is still under debate but, increasingly, arguments favor the sn-2, sn-2' position in the native molecule, whereas isolation procedures or acidic conditions lead to the thermodynamically more stable sn-3, sn-3' structure. Because of these peculiar features, it can be expected that LBPA shape and interactions with membrane lipids and proteins are related to its structure at the molecular level. We applied quantum mechanical methods to study the structures and stabilities of the 2,2' and 3,3' LBPA isomers, using a step-by-step procedure from glycerol to precursors (in vitro syntheses) and to the final isoforms. The structures of the two positional LBPA isomers are substantially different, showing that the binding positions of the fatty acid chains on the glycerol backbone determine the shape of the LBPA molecule and thus, possibly, its functions. The 3,3' LBPA structures obtained are more stable with respect to the 2,2' form, as expected from experiment. If one argues that the in vivo synthesis starts from the present glycerol conformers and considering the most stable bis(glycero)phosphate structures, the 2,2' isoform should be the most probable isomer.

  18. Chiral acidic amino acids induce chiral hierarchical structure in calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenge; Pacella, Michael S; Athanasiadou, Dimitra; Nelea, Valentin; Vali, Hojatollah; Hazen, Robert M; Gray, Jeffrey J; McKee, Marc D

    2017-04-13

    Chirality is ubiquitous in biology, including in biomineralization, where it is found in many hardened structures of invertebrate marine and terrestrial organisms (for example, spiralling gastropod shells). Here we show that chiral, hierarchically organized architectures for calcium carbonate (vaterite) can be controlled simply by adding chiral acidic amino acids (Asp and Glu). Chiral, vaterite toroidal suprastructure having a 'right-handed' (counterclockwise) spiralling morphology is induced by L-enantiomers of Asp and Glu, whereas 'left-handed' (clockwise) morphology is induced by D-enantiomers, and sequentially switching between amino-acid enantiomers causes a switch in chirality. Nanoparticle tilting after binding of chiral amino acids is proposed as a chiral growth mechanism, where a 'mother' subunit nanoparticle spawns a slightly tilted, consequential 'daughter' nanoparticle, which by amplification over various length scales creates oriented mineral platelets and chiral vaterite suprastructures. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for how biomineralization-related enantiomers might exert hierarchical control to form extended chiral suprastructures.

  19. Proteolytic Characteristics of Cathepsin D Related to the Recognition and Cleavage of Its Target Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Huiying; Lou, Xiaomin; Shan, Qiang; Zhang, Ju; Zhu, Xu; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Yang; Xie, Yingying; Xu, Ningzhi; Liu, Siqi

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin D (CD) plays an important role in both biological and pathological processes, although the cleavage characteristics and substrate selection of CD have yet to be fully explored. We employed liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to identify the CD cleavage sites in bovine serum albumin (BSA). We found that the hydrophobic residues at P1 were not only a preferential factor for CD cleavage but that the hydrophobicity at P1’ also contributed to CD recognition. The concept of hydrophobic scores of neighbors (HSN) was proposed to describe the hydrophobic microenvironment of CD recognition sites. The survey of CD cleavage characteristics in several proteins suggested that the HSN was a sensitive indicator for judging the favorable sites in peptides for CD cleavage, with HSN values of 0.5–1.0 representing a likely threshold. Ovalbumin (OVA), a protein resistant to CD cleavage in its native state, was easily cleaved by CD after denaturation, and the features of the cleaved peptides were quite similar to those found in BSA, where a higher HSN value indicated greater cleavability. We further conducted two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) to find more proteins that were insensitive to CD cleavage in CD-knockdown cells. Based on an analysis of secondary and three-dimensional structures, we postulated that intact proteins with a structure consisting of all α-helices would be relatively accessible to CD cleavage. PMID:23840360

  20. (±)-2,2-Dimethyl-5-oxotetrahydrofuran-3-carboxylic acid (terebic acid): a racemic layered structure.

    PubMed

    Santos, L M; Legendre, A O; Villis, P C M; Viegas, C; Doriguetto, A C

    2012-08-01

    A racemic crystalline form of terebic acid, C(7)H(10)O(4), which is an important industrial chemical compound, is reported for the first time. The crystal structure is stabilized by O-H···O and C-H···O hydrogen bonds which form racemic double layers parallel to (001).

  1. Repositioning the catalytic triad aspartic acid of haloalkane dehalogenase: effects on stability, kinetics, and structure.

    PubMed

    Krooshof, G H; Kwant, E M; Damborský, J; Koca, J; Janssen, D B

    1997-08-05

    Haloalkane dehalogenase (DhlA) catalyzes the hydrolysis of haloalkanes via an alkyl-enzyme intermediate. The covalent intermediate, which is formed by nucleophilic substitution with Asp124, is hydrolyzed by a water molecule that is activated by His289. The role of Asp260, which is the third member of the catalytic triad, was studied by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of Asp260 to asparagine resulted in a catalytically inactive D260N mutant, which demonstrates that the triad acid Asp260 is essential for dehalogenase activity. Furthermore, Asp260 has an important structural role, since the D260N enzyme accumulated mainly in inclusion bodies during expression, and neither substrate nor product could bind in the active-site cavity. Activity for brominated substrates was restored to D260N by replacing Asn148 with an aspartic or glutamic acid. Both double mutants D260N+N148D and D260N+N148E had a 10-fold reduced kcat and 40-fold higher Km values for 1,2-dibromoethane compared to the wild-type enzyme. Pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of the D260N+N148E double mutant showed that the decrease in kcat was mainly caused by a 220-fold reduction of the rate of carbon-bromine bond cleavage and a 10-fold decrease in the rate of hydrolysis of the alkyl-enzyme intermediate. On the other hand, bromide was released 12-fold faster and via a different pathway than in the wild-type enzyme. Molecular modeling of the mutant showed that Glu148 indeed could take over the interaction with His289 and that there was a change in charge distribution in the tunnel region that connects the active site with the solvent. On the basis of primary structure similarity between DhlA and other alpha/beta-hydrolase fold dehalogenases, we propose that a conserved acidic residue at the equivalent position of Asn148 in DhlA is the third catalytic triad residue in the latter enzymes.

  2. von Willebrand factor storage requires intact prosequence cleavage site.

    PubMed

    Journet, A M; Saffaripour, S; Cramer, E M; Tenza, D; Wagner, D D

    1993-02-01

    Large multimers of the adhesive glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (vWf) are stored in endothelial cells in rod-shaped granules called Weibel-Palade bodies, while small multimers are secreted constitutively. Expression of pro-vWf in other cells with a regulated pathway of secretion, results in formation of vWf-containing storage granules that have a morphology similar to Weibel-Palade bodies. vWf expressed without its prosequence is not stored. To evaluate the importance of prosequence cleavage in vWf storage, the Arg at position -1, known to be necessary for cleavage, was mutated to Gly. Transfection of this cleavage mutant into two cell lines with a regulated pathway of secretion (RIN 5F and AtT-20 cells) led to the formation of large multimers. However, treatment of the cell lysates by the enzyme endoglycosidase H (Endo-H) did not reveal significant amounts of intracellular Endo-H-resistant vWf, which indicates the absence of a pool of stored processed vWf. In addition, no Weibel-Palade body-like structure was detected in these cells by immunofluorescence labeling with anti-vWf antiserum. Electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry of RIN 5F cells expressing the pro-vWf mutant confirmed the absence of Weibel-Palade body-like structures. In addition, anti-vWf-linked gold particles were found in the ER, occasionally in rounded granules and particularly in lysosomal structures which were abundant. We conclude that the formation of large aggregates is not sufficient to induce efficient vWf storage, and that the lack of cleavage of the prosequence may direct the mutant pro-vWf molecule to a degradative pathway. Therefore, the prosequence cleavage is a requirement for vWf storage.

  3. Metal-organic frameworks with phosphotungstate incorporated for hydrolytic cleavage of a DNA-model phosphodiester.

    PubMed

    Han, Qiuxia; Zhang, Lejie; He, Cheng; Niu, Jiangyang; Duan, Chunying

    2012-05-07

    Five phosphotungstate-incorporated metal-organic frameworks {[Eu(4)(dpdo)(9)(H(2)O)(16)PW(12)O(40)]}(PW(12)O(40))(2)·(dpdo)(3)·Cl(3) (1); {ZnNa(2)(μ-OH)(dpdo)(4)(H(2)O)(4)[PW(12)O(40)]}·3H(2)O (2); {Zn(3)(dpdo)(7)}[PW(12)O(40)](2)·3H(2)O (3); and [Ln(2)H(μ-O)(2)(dpdo)(4)(H(2)O)(2)][PW(12)O(40)]·3H(2)O (Ln = Ho for 4 and Yb for 5) (dpdo = 4,4'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide) have been synthesized through a one-step hydrothermal reaction and characterized by elemental analyses, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structural analyses indicate that 1-5 display diversity structure from one-dimensional (1D) to three-dimensional (3D) series of hybrids. Kinetic experiments for the hydrolytic cleavage of DNA-model phosphodiester BNPP (bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate) were followed spectrophotometrically for the absorbance increase at 400 nm in EPPS (4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-propane sulfonic acid) buffer solution, because of the formation of p-nitrophenoxide with 1-5 under conditions of pH 4.0 and 50 °C. Ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy indicate that the cleavage of the phosphodiester bond proceeds with the pseudo-first-order rate constant in the range of 10(-7)-10(-6) s(-1), giving an inorganic phosphate and p-nitrophenol as the final products of hydrolysis. The results demonstrate that 1-5 have good catalytic activity and reusability for hydrolytic cleavage of BNPP.

  4. Structure of nicotinic acid mononucleotide adenylyltransferase from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.; Smith, C.; Yang, Z.; Pruett, P.; Nagy, L.; McCombs, D; DeLucas, L.; Brouillette, W.; Brouillette, C.

    2008-11-25

    Nicotinic acid mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NaMNAT; EC 2.7.7.18) is the penultimate enzyme in the biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} and catalyzes the adenylation of nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) by ATP to form nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD). This enzyme is regarded as a suitable candidate for antibacterial drug development; as such, Bacillus anthracis NaMNAT (BA NaMNAT) was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli for the purpose of inhibitor discovery and crystallography. The crystal structure of BA NaMNAT was determined by molecular replacement, revealing two dimers per asymmetric unit, and was refined to an R factor and R{sub free} of 0.228 and 0.263, respectively, at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. The structure is very similar to that of B. subtilis NaMNAT (BS NaMNAT), which is also a dimer, and another independently solved structure of BA NaMNAT recently released from the PDB along with two ligated forms. Comparison of these and other less related bacterial NaMNAT structures support the presence of considerable conformational heterogeneity and flexibility in three loops surrounding the substrate-binding area.

  5. Synthesis, crystal structure and computational studies of 4-nitrobenzylphosphonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, Magdalena; Jarzembska, Katarzyna N.; Janczak, Jan; Hoffmann, Józef; Videnova-Adrabinska, Veneta

    2014-09-01

    4-Nitrobenzylphosphonic acid (1a) has been synthesized and structurally characterized by vibrational spectroscopy (IR and Raman) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Additionally, Hirshfeld surface analysis and computational methods have been used to compare the intermolecular interactions in the crystal structures of 1a and its carboxylic analogue, 4-nitrobenzylcarboxylic acid (4-NBCA). The crystal structure analysis of 1a has revealed that the acid molecules are extended into helical chains along the b axis using one of the hydrogen bonds established between phosphonic groups. The second (P)Osbnd H⋯O(P) hydrogen bond cross-links the inversion-related chains to form a thick monolayer with phosphonic groups arranged inwards and aromatic rings outwards. The nitro groups serve to link the neighbouring monolayers by weak Csbnd H⋯O(N) hydrogen bonds. Computations have confirmed the great contribution of electrostatic interactions for the crystal lattice stability. The cohesive energy, computed for the crystal structure of 1a exceeds 200 kJ mol-1 in magnitude and is nearly twice as large as that of 4-NBCA. The calculated cohesive energy values have been further related to the results of thermal analyses.

  6. Enzymology of the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases: reaction mechanisms, inhibition and biochemical roles.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Peter J; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2014-02-15

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are a large family of non-heme iron (II) dependent enzymes. CCDs catalyse the selective oxidative cleavage of carotenoids to produce apocarotenoids. Apocarotenoid derived molecules form important signalling molecules in plants in the form of abscisic acid and strigolactone and in mammals in the form of retinal. Very little is known biochemically about the CCDs and only a handful of CCDs have been biochemically characterised. Mechanistically, debate surrounds whether CCDs utilise a mono or dioxygenase mechanism. Here, we review the biochemical roles of CCDs, discuss the mechanisms by which CCD cleavage is proposed to occur, and discuss recent reports of selective CCD enzyme inhibitors.

  7. OH cleavage from tyrosine: debunking a myth

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Charles S.; Carmichael, Ian; Garman, Elspeth F

    2017-01-01

    During macromolecular X-ray crystallography experiments, protein crystals held at 100 K have been widely reported to exhibit reproducible bond scission events at doses on the order of several MGy. With the objective to mitigate the impact of radiation damage events on valid structure determination, it is essential to correctly understand the radiation chemistry mechanisms at play. OH-cleavage from tyrosine residues is regularly cited as amongst the most available damage pathways in protein crystals at 100 K, despite a lack of widespread reports of this phenomenon in protein crystal radiation damage studies. Furthermore, no clear mechanism for phenolic C—O bond cleavage in tyrosine has been reported, with the tyrosyl radical known to be relatively robust and long-lived in both aqueous solutions and the solid state. Here, the initial findings of Tyr –OH group damage in a myrosinase protein crystal have been reviewed. Consistent with that study, at increasing doses, clear electron density loss was detectable local to Tyr –OH groups. A systematic investigation performed on a range of protein crystal damage series deposited in the Protein Data Bank has established that Tyr –OH electron density loss is not generally a dominant damage pathway in protein crystals at 100 K. Full Tyr aromatic ring displacement is here proposed to account for instances of observable Tyr –OH electron density loss, with the original myrosinase data shown to be consistent with such a damage model. Systematic analysis of the effects of other environmental factors, including solvent accessibility and proximity to di­sulfide bonds or hydrogen bond interactions, is also presented. Residues in known active sites showed enhanced sensitivity to radiation-induced disordering, as has previously been reported. PMID:28009542

  8. Nucleic-acid structural deformability deduced from anisotropic displacement parameters.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Heather E; Olson, Wilma K

    2011-04-01

    The growing numbers of very well resolved nucleic-acid crystal structures with anisotropic displacement parameters provide an unprecedented opportunity to learn about the natural motions of DNA and RNA. Here we report a new Monte-Carlo approach that takes direct account of this information to extract the distortions of covalent structure, base pairing, and dinucleotide geometry intrinsic to regularly organized double-helical molecules. We present new methods to test the validity of the anisotropic parameters and examine the apparent deformability of a variety of structures, including several A, B, and Z DNA duplexes, an AB helical intermediate, an RNA, a ligand-DNA complex, and an enzyme-bound DNA. The rigid-body parameters characterizing the positions of the bases in the structures mirror the mean parameters found when atomic motion is taken into account. The base-pair fluctuations intrinsic to a single structure, however, differ from those extracted from collections of nucleic-acid structures, although selected base-pair steps undergo conformational excursions along routes suggested by the ensembles. The computations reveal surprising new molecular insights, such as the stiffening of DNA and concomitant separation of motions of contacted nucleotides on opposite strands by the binding of Escherichia coli endonuclease VIII, which suggest how the protein may direct enzymatic action.

  9. Structure, stability and behaviour of nucleic acids in ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids have become a powerful tool in nanotechnology because of their conformational polymorphism. However, lack of a medium in which nucleic acid structures exhibit long-term stability has been a bottleneck. Ionic liquids (ILs) are potential solvents in the nanotechnology field. Hydrated ILs, such as choline dihydrogen phosphate (choline dhp) and deep eutectic solvent (DES) prepared from choline chloride and urea, are ‘green’ solvents that ensure long-term stability of biomolecules. An understanding of the behaviour of nucleic acids in hydrated ILs is necessary for developing DNA materials. We here review current knowledge about the structures and stabilities of nucleic acids in choline dhp and DES. Interestingly, in choline dhp, A–T base pairs are more stable than G–C base pairs, the reverse of the situation in buffered NaCl solution. Moreover, DNA triplex formation is markedly stabilized in hydrated ILs compared with aqueous solution. In choline dhp, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs is comparable to that of Watson–Crick base pairs. Moreover, the parallel form of the G-quadruplex is stabilized in DES compared with aqueous solution. The behaviours of various DNA molecules in ILs detailed here should be useful for designing oligonucleotides for the development of nanomaterials and nanodevices. PMID:25013178

  10. Structure and function of eukaryotic fatty acid synthases.

    PubMed

    Maier, Timm; Leibundgut, Marc; Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad

    2010-08-01

    In all organisms, fatty acid synthesis is achieved in variations of a common cyclic reaction pathway by stepwise, iterative elongation of precursors with two-carbon extender units. In bacteria, all individual reaction steps are carried out by monofunctional dissociated enzymes, whereas in eukaryotes the fatty acid synthases (FASs) have evolved into large multifunctional enzymes that integrate the whole process of fatty acid synthesis. During the last few years, important advances in understanding the structural and functional organization of eukaryotic FASs have been made through a combination of biochemical, electron microscopic and X-ray crystallographic approaches. They have revealed the strikingly different architectures of the two distinct types of eukaryotic FASs, the fungal and the animal enzyme system. Fungal FAS is a 2·6 MDa α₆β₆ heterododecamer with a barrel shape enclosing two large chambers, each containing three sets of active sites separated by a central wheel-like structure. It represents a highly specialized micro-compartment strictly optimized for the production of saturated fatty acids. In contrast, the animal FAS is a 540 kDa X-shaped homodimer with two lateral reaction clefts characterized by a modular domain architecture and large extent of conformational flexibility that appears to contribute to catalytic efficiency.

  11. NMR structure of the human Mediator MED25 ACID domain.

    PubMed

    Bontems, François; Verger, Alexis; Dewitte, Frédérique; Lens, Zoé; Baert, Jean-Luc; Ferreira, Elisabeth; de Launoit, Yvan; Sizun, Christina; Guittet, Eric; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2011-04-01

    MED25 (ARC92/ACID1) is a 747 residues subunit specific to higher eukaryote Mediator complex, an essential component of the RNA polymerase II general transcriptional machinery. MED25 is a target of the Herpes simplex virus transactivator protein VP16. MED25 interacts with VP16 through a central MED25 PTOV (Prostate tumour overexpressed)/ACID (Activator interacting domain) domain of unknown structure. As a first step towards understanding the mechanism of recruitment of transactivation domains by MED25, we report here the NMR structure of the MED25 ACID domain. The domain architecture consists of a closed β-barrel with seven strands (Β1-Β7) and three α-helices (H1-H3), an architecture showing similarities to that of the SPOC (Spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal domain) domain-like superfamily. Preliminary NMR chemical shift mapping showed that VP16 H2 (VP16C) interacts with MED25 ACID through one face of the β-barrel, defined by strands B4-B7-B6.

  12. Long-range RNA interaction of two sequence elements required for endonucleolytic cleavage of human insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Scheper, W; Meinsma, D; Holthuizen, P E; Sussenbach, J S

    1995-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNAs are subject to site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region, leading to an unstable 5' cleavage product containing the IGF-II coding region and a very stable 3' cleavage product of 1.8 kb. This endonucleolytic cleavage is most probably the first and rate-limiting step in degradation of IGF-II mRNAs. Two sequence elements within the 3' untranslated region are required for cleavage: element I, located approximately 2 kb upstream of the cleavage site, and element II, encompassing the cleavage site itself. We have identified a stable double-stranded RNA stem structure (delta G = -100 kcal/mol [418.4 kJ/mol]) that can be formed between element I and a region downstream of the cleavage site in element II. This structure is conserved among human, rat, and mouse mRNAs. Detailed analysis of the requirements for cleavage shows that the relative position of the elements is not essential for cleavage. Furthermore, the distance between the coding region and the cleavage site does not affect the cleavage reaction. Mutational analysis of the long-range RNA-RNA interaction shows that not only the double-stranded character but also the sequence of the stable RNA stem is important for cleavage. PMID:7799930

  13. Specific cleavage of DJ-1 under an oxidative condition.

    PubMed

    Ooe, Hiromasa; Maita, Chinatsu; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2006-10-09

    DJ-1 was initially identified by us as a novel oncogene and has recently been found to be a causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease (PD) PARK7. DJ-1 plays roles in transcriptional regulation and in oxidative stress function, and its oxidative state at cysteine residues determines activities of DJ-1. In this study, we found that recombinant DJ-1 expressed in and purified from E. coli was specifically cleaved between glycine and proline at amino acid numbers 157 and 158, respectively, by treatment of DJ-1 with H2O2. A substitution mutant of DJ-1 from cysteine to serine at amino acid number 106, a major oxidation site of DJ-1, was found not to be cleaved under an oxidative condition, suggesting oxidation-dependent cleavage of DJ-1. Cleavage of DJ-1 was also observed in human SH-SY5Y cells that had been treated with H2O2. These results suggest that oxidative stress-induced cleavage of DJ-1 regulates functions of DJ-1.

  14. Structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  15. The crystalline structures of carboxylic acid monolayers adsorbed on graphite.

    PubMed

    Bickerstaffe, A K; Cheah, N P; Clarke, S M; Parker, J E; Perdigon, A; Messe, L; Inaba, A

    2006-03-23

    X-ray and neutron diffraction have been used to investigate the formation of solid crystalline monolayers of all of the linear carboxylic acids from C(6) to C(14) at submonolayer coverage and from C(8) to C(14) at multilayer coverages, and to characterize their structures. X-rays and neutrons highlight different aspects of the monolayer structures, and their combination is therefore important in structural determination. For all of the acids with an odd number of carbon atoms, the unit cell is rectangular of plane group pgg containing four molecules. The members of the homologous series with an even number of carbon atoms have an oblique unit cell with two molecules per unit cell and plane group p2. This odd-even variation in crystal structure provides an explanation for the odd-even variation observed in monolayer melting points and mixing behavior. In all cases, the molecules are arranged in strongly hydrogen-bonded dimers with their extended axes parallel to the surface and the plane of the carbon skeleton essentially parallel to the graphite surface. The monolayer crystal structures have unit cell dimensions similar to certain close-packed planes of the bulk crystals, but the molecular arrangements are different. There is a 1-3% compression on increasing the coverage over a monolayer.

  16. Hydrolytic cleavage of DNA by quercetin zinc(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Jun, Tan; Bochu, Wang; Liancai, Zhu

    2007-03-01

    Quercetin zinc(II) complex was investigated focusing on its hydrolytic activity toward DNA. The complex successfully promotes the cleavage of plasmid DNA, producing single and double DNA strand breaks. The amount of conversion of supercoiled form (SC) of plasmid to the nicked circular form (NC) depends on the concentration of the complex as well as the duration of incubation of the complex with DNA. The rate of conversion of SC to NC is 1.68x10(-4) s(-1) at pH 7.2 in the presence of 100 microM of the complex. The hydrolytic cleavage of DNA by the complex is supported by the evidence from free radical quenching, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) assay, and T4 ligase ligation.

  17. Hydrolytic cleavage of DNA by quercetin manganese(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Jun, Tan; Bochu, Wang; Liancai, Zhu

    2007-04-01

    Quercetin manganese(II) complexes were investigated focusing on its DNA hydrolytic activity. The complexes successfully promote the cleavage of plasmid DNA, producing single and double DNA strand breaks. The amount of conversion of supercoiled form (SC) of plasmid DNA to the nicked circular form (NC) depends on the concentration of the complex as well as the duration of incubation of the complexes with DNA. The maximum rate of conversion of the supercoiled form to the nicked circular form at pH 7.2 in the presence of 100 microM of the complexes is found to be 1.32 x 10(-4) s(-1). The hydrolytic cleavage of DNA by the complexes was supported by the evidence from free radical quenching, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) assay and T4 ligase ligation.

  18. Crystal and molecular structure of eight organic acid-base adducts from 2-methylquinoline and different acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Jin, Shouwen; Tao, Lin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Daqi

    2014-08-01

    Eight supramolecular complexes with 2-methylquinoline and acidic components as 4-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, salicylic acid, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, malic acid, sebacic acid, and 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid were synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. All of the complexes are organic salts except compound 2. All supramolecular architectures of 1-8 involve extensive classical hydrogen bonds as well as other noncovalent interactions. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the classical hydrogen bonds (ionic or neutral) between acidic components and 2-methylquinoline are sufficient to bring about the formation of binary organic acid-base adducts. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These weak interactions combined, the complexes 1-8 displayed 2D-3D framework structure.

  19. An amino acid code for β-sheet packing structure.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyun; Tsai, Jerry

    2014-09-01

    To understand the relationship between protein sequence and structure, this work extends the knob-socket model in an investigation of β-sheet packing. Over a comprehensive set of β-sheet folds, the contacts between residues were used to identify packing cliques: sets of residues that all contact each other. These packing cliques were then classified based on size and contact order. From this analysis, the two types of four-residue packing cliques necessary to describe β-sheet packing were characterized. Both occur between two adjacent hydrogen bonded β-strands. First, defining the secondary structure packing within β-sheets, the combined socket or XY:HG pocket consists of four residues i, i+2 on one strand and j, j+2 on the other. Second, characterizing the tertiary packing between β-sheets, the knob-socket XY:H+B consists of a three-residue XY:H socket (i, i+2 on one strand and j on the other) packed against a knob B residue (residue k distant in sequence). Depending on the packing depth of the knob B residue, two types of knob-sockets are found: side-chain and main-chain sockets. The amino acid composition of the pockets and knob-sockets reveal the sequence specificity of β-sheet packing. For β-sheet formation, the XY:HG pocket clearly shows sequence specificity of amino acids. For tertiary packing, the XY:H+B side-chain and main-chain sockets exhibit distinct amino acid preferences at each position. These relationships define an amino acid code for β-sheet structure and provide an intuitive topological mapping of β-sheet packing.

  20. Oligomeric structure of proclavaminic acid amidino hydrolase: evolution of a hydrolytic enzyme in clavulanic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Jonathan M; Clifton, Ian J; Hernández, Helena; Doan, Linh X; Robinson, Carol V; Schofield, Christopher J; Hewitson, Kirsty S

    2002-01-01

    During biosynthesis of the clinically used beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid, one of the three steps catalysed by clavaminic acid synthase is separated from the other two by a step catalysed by proclavaminic acid amidino hydrolase (PAH), in which the guanidino group of an intermediate is hydrolysed to give proclavaminic acid and urea. PAH shows considerable sequence homology with the primary metabolic arginases, which hydrolyse arginine to ornithine and urea, but does not accept arginine as a substrate. Like other members of the bacterial sub-family of arginases, PAH is hexameric in solution and requires Mn2+ ions for activity. Other metal ions, including Co2+, can substitute for Mn2+. Two new substrates for PAH were identified, N-acetyl-(L)-arginine and (3R)-hydroxy-N-acetyl-(L)-arginine. Crystal structures of PAH from Streptomyces clavuligerus (at 1.75 A and 2.45 A resolution, where 1 A=0.1 nm) imply how it binds beta-lactams rather than the amino acid substrate of the arginases from which it evolved. The structures also suggest how PAH selects for a particular alcohol intermediate in the clavam biosynthesis pathway. As observed for the arginases, each PAH monomer consists of a core of beta-strands surrounded by alpha-helices, and its active site contains a di-Mn2+ centre with a bridging water molecule responsible for hydrolytic attack on to the guanidino group of the substrate. Comparison of structures obtained under different conditions reveals different conformations of a flexible loop, which must move to allow substrate binding. PMID:12020346

  1. Structurally intact (78-kDa) forms of maternal lactoferrin purified from urine of preterm infants fed human milk: identification of a trypsin-like proteolytic cleavage event in vivo that does not result in fragment dissociation.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchens, T W; Henry, J F; Yip, T T

    1991-01-01

    Two forms of lactoferrin, an intact lactoferrin and a "nicked" but apparently intact (i.e., 78-kDa) form, have been isolated from the urine of preterm infants fed human milk. These two forms of lactoferrin, demonstrated to be entirely of maternal origin, were copurified using affinity columns of immobilized single-stranded DNA-agarose. The relative concentrations of the intact lactoferrin and the "nicked" lactoferrin were determined after denaturation and separation by reverse-phase HPLC. N-terminal sequence analyses showed that the intact 78-kDa form had lost two residues from its N terminus. The nicked 78-kDa form was composed of only two fragments; one fragment was identified as the N terminus of the N-lobe (residues 3-283). The other fragment started with Ser-284 and included the alpha-helical structures at the C terminus of the N-lobe, as well as the entire C-lobe. Although no disulfide bonds connect these two fragments, they were tightly associated in vivo and were not separated in vitro except under denaturing conditions. Limited in vitro digestion of human milk lactoferrin with trypsin produced a nicked, but stable (78-kDa), form of DNA-binding lactoferrin nearly indistinguishable from the isolated urinary lactoferrin, except for the absence of one additional arginine residue at the N terminus of the N-lobe. Residues involved in the stable molecular interaction between fragments were evaluated using data obtained from the high-resolution crystal structure of hololactoferrin. Two features, entirely within the N-lobe, account for the lack of fragment dissociation after cleavage at residue 283 in vivo: an extensive interface at the hinge region behind the iron-binding cleft and an "anchor" sequence traversing the remainder of the N-lobe at 90 degrees relative to the fragment interface. These results document the remarkably limited degradation of absorbed lactoferrin in vivo and suggest that iron-binding activity, receptor-binding properties, and postulated

  2. Crystal structure and packing energy calculations of (+)-6-aminopenicillanic acid.

    PubMed

    Saouane, Sofiane; Buth, Gernot; Fabbiani, Francesca P A

    2013-11-01

    The X-ray single-crystal structure of (2S,5R,6R)-6-amino-3,3-dimethyl-7-oxo-4-thia-1-azabicyclo[3.2.0]heptane-2-carboxylic acid, commonly known as (+)-6-aminopenicillanic acid (C8H12N2O3S) and a precursor of a variety of semi-synthetic penicillins, has been determined from synchrotron data at 150 K. The structure represents an ordered zwitterion and the crystals are nonmerohedrally twinned. The crystal structure is composed of a three-dimensional network built by three charge-assisted hydrogen bonds between the ammonium and carboxylate groups. The complementary analysis of the crystal packing by the PIXEL method brings to light the nature and ranking of the energetically most stabilizing intermolecular interaction energies. In accordance with the zwitterionic nature of the structure, PIXEL lattice energy calculations confirm the predominance of the Coulombic term (-379.1 kJ mol(-1)) ahead of the polarization (-141.4 kJ mol(-1)), dispersion (-133.7 kJ mol(-1)) and repulsion (266.3 kJ mol(-1)) contributions.

  3. Reprint of "Crystal structure of chemically synthesized HIV-1 protease and a ketomethylene isostere inhibitor based on the p2/NC cleavage site" [Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 18 (2008) 4554-4557].

    PubMed

    Torbeev, Vladimir Yu; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Terechko, Valentina A; Kent, Stephen B H

    2008-11-15

    Here we report the X-ray structures of chemically synthesized HIV-1 protease and the inactive [D25N]HIV-1 protease complexed with the ketomethylene isostere inhibitor Ac-Thr-Ile-Nlepsi[CO-CH(2)]Nle-Gln-Arg.amide at 1.4 and 1.8A resolution, respectively. In complex with the active enzyme, the keto-group was found to be converted into the hydrated gem-diol, while the structure of the complex with the inactive D25N enzyme revealed an intact keto-group. These data support the general acid-general base mechanism for HIV-1 protease catalysis.

  4. Morphology and Structure of Amino-fatty Acid Intercalated Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Larry; Sumera, Florentino

    2015-04-01

    Natural clays and its modified forms have been studied for their wide range of applications, including polymer-layered silicate, catalysts and adsorbents. For nanocomposite production, montmorillonite (MMT) clays are often modified with organic surfactants to favor its intermixing with the polymer matrix. In the present study, Na+-montmorillonite (Na+-MMT) was subjected to organo-modification with a protonated 12-aminolauric acid (12-ALA). The amount of amino fatty acid surfactants loaded was 25, 50, 100 and 200% the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of Na+-MMT (25CEC-AMMT, 50CEC-AMMT, 100CEC-AMMT and 200CEC-AMMT). Fatty acid-derived surfactants are an attractive resource of intercalating agents for clays due to their renewability and abundance. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) were performed to determine the occurrence of intercalation of 12-ALA and their molecular structure in the clay's silicates. XRD analysis revealed that the interlayer spacing between the alumino-silicate layers increased from 1.25 nm to 1.82 nm with increasing ALA content. The amino fatty acid chains were considered to be in a flat monolayer structure at low surfactant loading, and a bilayered to a pseudotrilayered structure at high surfactant loading. On the other hand, FTIR revealed that the alkyl chains adopt a gauche conformation, indicating their disordered state based on their CH2symmetric and asymmetric vibrations. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) allows the determination of the moisture and organic content in clays. Here, TGA revealed that the surfactant in the clay was thermally stable, with Td ranging from 353° C to 417° C. The difference in the melting behavior of the pristine amino fatty acids and confined fatty acids in the interlayer galleries of the clay were evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimerty (DSC). The melting temperatures (Tm) of the amino fatty acid in the clay were initially found to be higher than those of the free

  5. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermannová, Lada Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  6. Cleavage Site Localization Differentially Controls Interleukin-6 Receptor Proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17

    PubMed Central

    Riethmueller, Steffen; Ehlers, Johanna C.; Lokau, Juliane; Düsterhöft, Stefan; Knittler, Katharina; Dombrowsky, Gregor; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rabe, Björn; Rose-John, Stefan; Garbers, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of the Interleukin-6 Receptor (IL-6R) leads to the release of the IL-6R ectodomain. Binding of the cytokine IL-6 to the soluble IL-6R (sIL-6R) results in an agonistic IL-6/sIL-6R complex, which activates cells via gp130 irrespective of whether the cells express the IL-6R itself. This signaling pathway has been termed trans-signaling and is thought to mainly account for the pro-inflammatory properties of IL-6. A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) and ADAM17 are the major proteases that cleave the IL-6R. We have previously shown that deletion of a ten amino acid long stretch within the stalk region including the cleavage site prevents ADAM17-mediated cleavage, whereas the receptor retained its full biological activity. In the present study, we show that deletion of a triple serine (3S) motif (Ser-359 to Ser-361) adjacent to the cleavage site is sufficient to prevent IL-6R cleavage by ADAM17, but not ADAM10. We find that the impaired shedding is caused by the reduced distance between the cleavage site and the plasma membrane. Positioning of the cleavage site in greater distance towards the plasma membrane abrogates ADAM17-mediated shedding and reveals a novel cleavage site of ADAM10. Our findings underline functional differences in IL-6R proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17. PMID:27151651

  7. Crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, V. P.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-05-01

    In structural materials with both brittle and ductile phases, cracks often initiate within the brittle phase and propagate dynamically towards the ductile phase. The macroscale, quasistatic toughness of the material thus depends on the outcome of this microscale, dynamic process. Indeed, dynamics has been hypothesized to suppress dislocation emission, which may explain the occurrence of brittle transgranular fracture in mild steels at low temperatures (Lin et al., 1987). Here, crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions are explored using continuum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations. The focus is on two questions: (1) whether dynamics can affect the energy barriers for dislocation emission and cleavage, and (2) what happens in the dynamic "overloaded" situation, in which both processes are energetically possible. In either case, dynamics may shift the balance between brittle cleavage and ductile blunting, thereby affecting the intrinsic ductility of the material. To explore these effects in simulation, a novel interatomic potential is used for which the intrinsic ductility is tunable, and a novel simulation technique is employed, termed as a "dynamic cleavage test", in which cracks can be run dynamically at a prescribed energy release rate into a material. Both theory and simulation reveal, however, that the intrinsic ductility of a material is unaffected by dynamics. The energy barrier to dislocation emission appears to be identical in quasi-static and dynamic conditions, and, in the overloaded situation, ductile crack tip behavior ultimately prevails since a single emission event can blunt and arrest the crack, preventing further cleavage. Thus, dynamics cannot embrittle a ductile material, and the origin of brittle failure in certain alloys (e.g., mild steels) appears unrelated to dynamic effects at the crack tip.

  8. Cyanuric acid hydrolase: evolutionary innovation by structural concatenation

    PubMed Central

    Peat, Thomas S; Balotra, Sahil; Wilding, Matthew; French, Nigel G; Briggs, Lyndall J; Panjikar, Santosh; Cowieson, Nathan; Newman, Janet; Scott, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The cyanuric acid hydrolase, AtzD, is the founding member of a newly identified family of ring-opening amidases. We report the first X-ray structure for this family, which is a novel fold (termed the ‘Toblerone’ fold) that likely evolved via the concatenation of monomers of the trimeric YjgF superfamily and the acquisition of a metal binding site. Structures of AtzD with bound substrate (cyanuric acid) and inhibitors (phosphate, barbituric acid and melamine), along with mutagenesis studies, allowed the identification of the active site. The AtzD monomer, active site and substrate all possess threefold rotational symmetry, to the extent that the active site possesses three potential Ser–Lys catalytic dyads. A single catalytic dyad (Ser85–Lys42) is hypothesized, based on biochemical evidence and crystallographic data. A plausible catalytic mechanism based on these observations is also presented. A comparison with a homology model of the related barbiturase, Bar, was used to infer the active-site residues responsible for substrate specificity, and the phylogeny of the 68 AtzD-like enzymes in the database were analysed in light of this structure–function relationship. PMID:23651355

  9. Adsorption structure and bonding of trimesic acid on Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanninen, L.; Jokinen, N.; Ali-Löytty, H.; Jussila, P.; Lahtonen, K.; Hirsimäki, M.; Valden, M.; Kuzmin, M.; Pärna, R.; Nõmmiste, E.

    2011-12-01

    Combining scanning tunneling microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation, we have studied the adsorption and growth of trimesic acid (TMA, 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, C6H3(COOH)3) on Cu(100) in a wide range of coverages (from submonolayer to multilayer ones) at room temperature and after subsequent annealing. A series of coverage-dependent TMA structures, transitions between these structures, and their properties are characterized, demonstrating the interplay between the bonding, orientation, and deprotonation reaction of adsorbed species. In particular, it is shown that the degree of deprotonation in TMA overlayers depends on the amount of deposited molecules non-monotonously, and that such behavior is well consistent with the formation mechanism proposed for the TMA/Cu(100) system. The results provide a good platform for further understanding of non-covalent interactions and self-assembly phenomena underlying the growth of supramolecular nanoassemblies of aromatic carboxylic (benzenecarboxylic) acids on metallic substrates.

  10. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  11. Context-Dependent Cleavage of the Capsid Protein by the West Nile Virus Protease Modulates the Efficiency of Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    VanBlargan, Laura A.; Davis, Kaitlin A.; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Akey, David L.; Smith, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The molecular mechanisms that define the specificity of flavivirus RNA encapsulation are poorly understood. Virions composed of the structural proteins of one flavivirus and the genomic RNA of a heterologous strain can be assembled and have been developed as live attenuated vaccine candidates for several flaviviruses. In this study, we discovered that not all combinations of flavivirus components are possible. While a West Nile virus (WNV) subgenomic RNA could readily be packaged by structural proteins of the DENV2 strain 16681, production of infectious virions with DENV2 strain New Guinea C (NGC) structural proteins was not possible, despite the very high amino acid identity between these viruses. Mutagenesis studies identified a single residue (position 101) of the DENV capsid (C) protein as the determinant for heterologous virus production. C101 is located at the P1′ position of the NS2B/3 protease cleavage site at the carboxy terminus of the C protein. WNV NS2B/3 cleavage of the DENV structural polyprotein was possible when a threonine (Thr101 in strain 16681) but not a serine (Ser101 in strain NGC) occupied the P1′ position, a finding not predicted by in vitro protease specificity studies. Critically, both serine and threonine were tolerated at the P1′ position of WNV capsid. More extensive mutagenesis revealed the importance of flanking residues within the polyprotein in defining the cleavage specificity of the WNV protease. A more detailed understanding of the context dependence of viral protease specificity may aid the development of new protease inhibitors and provide insight into associated patterns of drug resistance. IMPORTANCE West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause considerable morbidity and mortality in humans. No specific antiflavivirus therapeutics are available for treatment of infection. Proteolytic processing of the flavivirus polyprotein is an essential step in the replication

  12. Copper- and Vanadium-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Lignin using Dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Mottweiler, Jakob; Puche, Marta; Räuber, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas; Concepción, Patricia; Corma, Avelino; Bolm, Carsten

    2015-06-22

    Transition-metal-containing hydrotalcites (HTc) and V(acac)3 /Cu(NO3 )2 ⋅3 H2 O (acac=acetylacetonate) mixtures were tested for their catalytic activity in the cleavage of the lignin model compound erythro-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-l,3-propanediol (1) with molecular oxygen as oxidant. Both catalytic systems displayed high activity and good selectivity and afforded veratric acid as the main product. The catalyst behavior was studied by EPR spectroscopy, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. After the catalysts were established for the model system, lignin depolymerization studies were performed with various organsolv and kraft lignin sources. The oxidative depolymerization and lignin bond cleavage were monitored by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), MALDI MS, and 2D-NMR (HSQC). Irrespective of the lignin pretreatment, both HTc-Cu-V and V(acac)3 /Cu(NO3 )2 ⋅3 H2 O were able to cleave the β-O-4 linkages and the resinol structures to form dimeric and trimeric products.

  13. Catalysis of poliovirus VP0 maturation cleavage is not mediated by serine 10 of VP2.

    PubMed Central

    Harber, J J; Bradley, J; Anderson, C W; Wimmer, E

    1991-01-01

    The maturation of the poliovirus capsid occurs as the result of a single unexplained proteolytic event during which 58 to 59 copies of the 60 VP0 capsid protein precursors are cleaved. An autocatalytic mechanism for cleavage of VP0 to VP4 and VP2 was proposed by Arnold et al. (E. Arnold, M. Luo, G. Vriend, M. G. Rossman, A. C. Palmenberg, G. D. Parks, M. J. Nicklin, and E. Wimmer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:21-25, 1987) in which serine 10 of VP2 is activated by virion RNA to catalyze VP4-VP2 processing. The hypothesis rests on the observation that a hydrogen bond was observed between serine 10 of VP2 (S2010) and the carboxyl terminus of VP4 in three mature picornaviral atomic structures: rhinovirus 14, mengovirus, and poliovirus type 1 (Mahoney). We constructed mutant viruses with cysteine (S2010C) or alanine (S2010A) replacing serine 10 of VP2; these exhibited normal proteolytic processing of VP0. While our results do not exclude an autocatalytic mechanism for the maturation cleavage, they do eliminate the conserved S2010 residue as the catalytic amino acid. Images PMID:1845893

  14. Gas Phase Structure of Amino Acids: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, I. Pena S.; Sanz, M. E.; Vaquero, V.; Cabezas, C.; Perez, C.; Blanco, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2009-06-01

    Recent improvements in our laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectrometer such as using Laval-type nozzles and picoseconds Nd:YAG lasers (30 to 150 ps) have allowed a major step forward in the capabilities of this experimental technique as demonstrated by the last results in serine cysteine and threonine^a for which seven, six and seven conformers have been respectively identified. Taking advantage of these improvements we have investigated the natural amino acids metionine, aspartic and glutamic acids and the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the aim of identify and characterize their lower energy conformers. Searches in the rotational spectra have lead to the identification of seven conformers of metionine, six and five of aspartic and glutamic acids, respectively, and seven for the γ-aminobutyric. These conformers have been unambiguously identified by their spectroscopic constants. In particular the ^{14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, that depend heavily on the orientation of the amino group with respect to the principal inertial axes of the molecule, prove to be a unique tool to distinguish unambigously between conformations with similar rotational constants. For the γ-aminobutyric acid two of the seven observed structures are stablized by an intramolecular interaction n-π*. Two new conformers of proline have been identified together with the two previously observed. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys.Chem.Chem.Phys., 2009, 11, 617. D. B. Atkinson, M. A. Smith, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 1995, 66, 4434 S. Blanco, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA2007, 104, 20183. M. E. Sanz, S. Blanco, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.,2008, 120, 6312. A. Lesarri, S. Mata, E. J. Cocinero, S. Blanco, J.C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. , 2002, 41, 4673

  15. Hard and soft acids and bases: structure and process.

    PubMed

    Reed, James L

    2012-07-05

    Under investigation is the structure and process that gives rise to hard-soft behavior in simple anionic atomic bases. That for simple atomic bases the chemical hardness is expected to be the only extrinsic component of acid-base strength, has been substantiated in the current study. A thermochemically based operational scale of chemical hardness was used to identify the structure within anionic atomic bases that is responsible for chemical hardness. The base's responding electrons have been identified as the structure, and the relaxation that occurs during charge transfer has been identified as the process giving rise to hard-soft behavior. This is in contrast the commonly accepted explanations that attribute hard-soft behavior to varying degrees of electrostatic and covalent contributions to the acid-base interaction. The ability of the atomic ion's responding electrons to cause hard-soft behavior has been assessed by examining the correlation of the estimated relaxation energies of the responding electrons with the operational chemical hardness. It has been demonstrated that the responding electrons are able to give rise to hard-soft behavior in simple anionic bases.

  16. Primary structure of rat secretory acid phosphatase and comparison to other acid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Roiko, K; Jänne, O A; Vihko, P

    1990-05-14

    Overlapping cDNA clones encoding rat prostatic acid phosphatase (rPAP) were isolated by using two human prostatic acid phosphatase (hPAP)-encoding cDNAs to screen rat prostatic cDNA libraries. The isolated cDNAs encompassed a total of 1626 nucleotides (nt), of which 1143 nt corresponded to the protein coding sequence encoding a mature polypeptide of 350 amino acids (aa) and a 31-aa long signal peptide-like sequence. The deduced Mr of the mature rPAP was 40,599. RNA blot analysis indicated the presence of three mRNA species (4.9, 2.3 and 1.5 kb in size) in the rat prostate. The deduced aa sequences of rPAP and hPAP show 75% identity, whereas the similarity between rPAP and human lysosomal acid phosphatase (hLAP) is only 45%. Furthermore, the sequence similarity between rPAP and rat lysosomal acid phosphatase (rLAP) is 46% at the aa level. Similar to hPAP, but unlike hLAP and rLAP, the rPAP sequence lacks a membrane-anchoring domain indicating the secretory character of this phosphatase. All six cysteines present in the overlapping areas of the mature rPAP, hPAP, rLAP and hLAP proteins are positionally conserved, suggesting that these residues are important for the tertiary structure of acid phosphatases (APs). The previously reported active site residues, two arginines and one histidine, are also conserved in these APs.

  17. Innovations in host and microbial sialic acid biosynthesis revealed by phylogenomic prediction of nonulosonic acid structure

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda L.; Desa, Nolan; Hansen, Elizabeth E.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Gagneux, Pascal; Nizet, Victor; Varki, Ajit

    2009-01-01

    Sialic acids (Sias) are nonulosonic acid (NulO) sugars prominently displayed on vertebrate cells and occasionally mimicked by bacterial pathogens using homologous biosynthetic pathways. It has been suggested that Sias were an animal innovation and later emerged in pathogens by convergent evolution or horizontal gene transfer. To better illuminate the evolutionary processes underlying the phenomenon of Sia molecular mimicry, we performed phylogenomic analyses of biosynthetic pathways for Sias and related higher sugars derived from 5,7-diamino-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxynon-2-ulosonic acids. Examination of ≈1,000 sequenced microbial genomes indicated that such biosynthetic pathways are far more widely distributed than previously realized. Phylogenetic analysis, validated by targeted biochemistry, was used to predict NulO types (i.e., neuraminic, legionaminic, or pseudaminic acids) expressed by various organisms. This approach uncovered previously unreported occurrences of Sia pathways in pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria and identified at least one instance in which a human archaeal symbiont tentatively reported to express Sias in fact expressed the related pseudaminic acid structure. Evaluation of targeted phylogenies and protein domain organization revealed that the “unique” Sia biosynthetic pathway of animals was instead a much more ancient innovation. Pathway phylogenies suggest that bacterial pathogens may have acquired Sia expression via adaptation of pathways for legionaminic acid biosynthesis, one of at least 3 evolutionary paths for de novo Sia synthesis. Together, these data indicate that some of the long-standing paradigms in Sia biology should be reconsidered in a wider evolutionary context of the extended family of NulO sugars. PMID:19666579

  18. DNA cleavage on photoexposure at the d-d band in ternary copper(II) complexes using red-light laser.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Shanta; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2006-12-25

    Ternary copper(II) complexes [Cu(L1)B](ClO4) (1, 2) and [Cu(L2)B](ClO4) (3, 4), where HL1 and HL2 are tridentate NSO- and ONO-donor Schiff bases and B is a heterocyclic base, viz. dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, 1 and 3) or dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz, 2 and 4), were prepared and their DNA binding and photoinduced DNA cleavage activity studied. Complex 1, structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography, shows an axially elongated square-pyramidal (4 + 1) coordination geometry in which the monoanionic L1 binds at the equatorial plane. The NN-donor dpq ligand exhibits an axial-equatorial binding mode. The complexes display good binding propensity to calf thymus DNA, giving a relative order 2 (NSO-dppz) > 4 (ONO-dppz) > 1 (NSO-dpq) > 3 (ONO-dpq). They cleave supercoiled pUC19 DNA to its nicked circular form when treated with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) by formation of hydroxyl radicals as the cleavage active species under dark reaction conditions. The photoinduced DNA cleavage activity of the complexes was investigated using UV radiation of 365 nm and red light of 633, 647.1, and 676.4 nm (CW He-Ne and Ar-Kr mixed gas ion laser sources) in the absence of MPA. Complexes 1 and 2, having photoactive NSO-donor Schiff base and dpq/dppz ligands, show dual photosensitizing effects involving both the photoactive ligands in the ternary structure with significantly better cleavage properties when compared to those of 3 and 4, having only photoactive dpq/dppz ligands. Involvement of singlet oxygen in the light-induced DNA cleavage reactions is proposed. A significant enhancement of the red-light-induced DNA cleavage activity is observed for the dpq and dppz complexes containing the sulfur ligand when compared to their earlier reported phen (1,10-phenanthroline) analogue. Enhancement of the cleavage activity on photoexposure at the d-d band indicates the occurrence of metal-assisted photosensitization processes involving the LMCT and d

  19. Carbon-Carbon Bond Cleavage in Activation of the Prodrug Nabumetone

    PubMed Central

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N. A.; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L.; De Voss, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs. PMID:24584631

  20. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage in activation of the prodrug nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Varfaj, Fatbardha; Zulkifli, Siti N A; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Challinor, Victoria L; De Voss, James J; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions are catalyzed by, among others, lanosterol 14-demethylase (CYP51), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11), sterol 17β-lyase (CYP17), and aromatase (CYP19). Because of the high substrate specificities of these enzymes and the complex nature of their substrates, these reactions have been difficult to characterize. A CYP1A2-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction is required for conversion of the prodrug nabumetone to its active form, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA). Despite worldwide use of nabumetone as an anti-inflammatory agent, the mechanism of its carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction remains obscure. With the help of authentic synthetic standards, we report here that the reaction involves 3-hydroxylation, carbon-carbon cleavage to the aldehyde, and oxidation of the aldehyde to the acid, all catalyzed by CYP1A2 or, less effectively, by other P450 enzymes. The data indicate that the carbon-carbon bond cleavage is mediated by the ferric peroxo anion rather than the ferryl species in the P450 catalytic cycle. CYP1A2 also catalyzes O-demethylation and alcohol to ketone transformations of nabumetone and its analogs.

  1. Structural and catalytic effects of an invariant purine substitution in the hammerhead ribozyme: implications for the mechanism of acid-base catalysis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Eric P; Vasquez, Ernesto E; Scott, William G

    2014-09-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme catalyzes RNA cleavage via acid-base catalysis. Whether it does so by general acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA itself donates and abstracts protons in the transition state, as is typically assumed, or by specific acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA plays a structural role and proton transfer is mediated by active-site water molecules, is unknown. Previous biochemical and crystallographic experiments implicate an invariant purine in the active site, G12, as the general base. However, G12 may play a structural role consistent with specific base catalysis. To better understand the role of G12 in the mechanism of hammerhead catalysis, a 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni with a purine substituted for G12 in the active site of the ribozyme was obtained. Comparison of this structure (PDB entry 3zd4), in which A12 is substituted for G, with three previously determined structures that now serve as important experimental controls, allows the identification of structural perturbations that are owing to the purine substitution itself. Kinetic measurements for G12 purine-substituted schistosomal hammerheads confirm a previously observed dependence of rate on the pK(a) of the substituted purine; in both cases inosine, which is similar to G in pK(a) and hydrogen-bonding properties, is unexpectedly inactive. Structural comparisons indicate that this may primarily be owing to the lack of the exocyclic 2-amino group in the G12A and G12I substitutions and its structural effect upon both the nucleotide base and phosphate of A9. The latter involves the perturbation of a previously identified and well characterized metal ion-binding site known to be catalytically important in both minimal and full-length hammerhead ribozyme sequences. The results permit it to be suggested that G12 plays an important role in stabilizing the active-site structure. This result, although not inconsistent with the potential

  2. Perpetuating the homing endonuclease life cycle: identification of mutations that modulate and change I-TevI cleavage preference

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Alexander C.; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Edgell, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are sequence-tolerant DNA endonucleases that act as mobile genetic elements. The ability of homing endonucleases to cleave substrates with multiple nucleotide substitutions suggests a high degree of adaptability in that changing or modulating cleavage preference would require relatively few amino acid substitutions. Here, using directed evolution experiments with the GIY-YIG homing endonuclease I-TevI that targets the thymidylate synthase gene of phage T4, we readily isolated variants that dramatically broadened I-TevI cleavage preference, as well as variants that fine-tuned cleavage preference. By combining substitutions, we observed an ∼10 000-fold improvement in cleavage on some substrates not cleaved by the wild-type enzyme, correlating with a decrease in readout of information content at the cleavage site. Strikingly, we were able to change the cleavage preference of I-TevI to that of the isoschizomer I-BmoI which targets a different cleavage site in the thymidylate synthase gene, recapitulating the evolution of cleavage preference in this family of homing endonucleases. Our results define a strategy to isolate GIY-YIG nuclease domains with distinct cleavage preferences, and provide insight into how homing endonucleases may escape a dead-end life cycle in a population of saturated target sites by promoting transposition to different target sites. PMID:27387281

  3. Structural characterization of a poly(methacrylic acid)-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Giordanengo, Rémi; Viel, Stéphane; Hidalgo, Manuel; Allard-Breton, Béatrice; Thévand, André; Charles, Laurence

    2009-11-03

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been combined to achieve the complete microstructural characterization of a poly(methacrylic acid)-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMAA-PMMA) copolymer synthesized by nitroxide-mediated polymerization. Various PMAA-PMMA species could be identified which mainly differ in terms of terminaisons. 1H and 13C NMR experiments revealed the structure of the end-groups as well as the proportion of each co-monomer in the copolymers. These end-group masses were further confirmed from m/z values of doubly charged copolymer anions detected in the single stage mass spectrum. In contrast, copolymer composition derived from MS data was not consistent with NMR results, obviously due to strong mass bias well known to occur during electrospray ionization of these polymeric species. Tandem mass spectrometry could reveal the random nature of the copolymer based on typical dissociation reactions, i.e., water elimination occurred from any two contiguous MAA units while MAA-MMA pairs gave rise to the loss of a methanol molecule. Polymer backbone cleavages were also observed to occur and gave low abundance fragment ions which allowed the structure of the initiating end-group to be confirmed.

  4. Acidic Properties and Structure-Activity Correlations of Solid Acid Catalysts Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Li, Shenhui; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2016-04-19

    Solid acid materials with tunable structural and acidic properties are promising heterogeneous catalysts for manipulating and/or emulating the activity and selectivity of industrially important catalytic reactions. On the other hand, the performances of acid-catalyzed reactions are mostly dictated by the acidic features, namely, type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount, strength, and local environment of acid sites. The latter is relevant to their location (intra- vs extracrystalline), and possible confinement and Brønsted-Lewis acid synergy effects that may strongly affect the host-guest interactions, reaction mechanism, and shape selectivity of the catalytic system. This account aims to highlight some important applications of state-of-the-art solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for exploring the structural and acidic properties of solid acid catalysts as well as their catalytic performances and relevant reaction pathway invoked. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations may be exploited in conjunction with experimental SSNMR studies to verify the structure-activity correlations of the catalytic system at a microscopic scale. We describe in this Account the developments and applications of advanced ex situ and/or in situ SSNMR techniques, such as two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum magic-angle spinning (DQ MAS) homonuclear correlation spectroscopy for structural investigation of solid acids as well as study of their acidic properties. Moreover, the energies and electronic structures of the catalysts and detailed catalytic reaction processes, including the identification of reaction species, elucidation of reaction mechanism, and verification of structure-activity correlations, made available by DFT theoretical calculations were also discussed. Relevant discussions will focus primarily on results obtained from our laboratories in the past decade, including (i) quantitative and qualitative acidity characterization utilizing assorted probe molecules

  5. DNA photoreacts by nucleobase ring cleavage to form labile isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Buschhaus, Laura; Rolf, Josefin; Kleinermanns, Karl

    2013-11-14

    Differential infrared absorption spectroscopy was used to study the formation of isocyanates and further photo-products in the oligonucleotides dG10, dC10 and dT10 and in their mononucleosides by ultraviolet light at 266 nm. We find that α-cleavage takes place in oligonucleotides and mononucleosides both in films and in solution. The very intense and spectrally isolated isocyanate (N=C=O) asymmetric stretch vibration at 2277 cm(-1) is used as a spectroscopic marker for detection of the photo-product. The band disappears upon reaction with small amounts of water vapour as expected for isocyanates. Quantum yields for isocyanate formation by nucleobase ring cleavage in the α-position to the carbonyl group are ∼5 × 10(-5) in the mononucleosides and up to 5 × 10(-4) in the oligonucleotides. In the mixed oligonucleotides dG10/dC10 and dA10/dT10 the quantum yield of α-cleavage drops by a factor of 10 compared to the single oligonucleotides. Implications for DNA repair and photo-induced DNA-protein cross-linking via isocyanate reaction with NH2 groups of amino acids are discussed.

  6. Cleavage at Arg-1689 influences heavy chain cleavages during thrombin-catalyzed activation of factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Newell, Jennifer L; Fay, Philip J

    2009-04-24

    The procofactor, factor VIII, is activated by thrombin or factor Xa-catalyzed cleavage at three P1 residues: Arg-372, Arg-740, and Arg-1689. The catalytic efficiency for thrombin cleavage at Arg-740 is greater than at either Arg-1689 or Arg-372 and influences reaction rates at these sites. Because cleavage at Arg-372 appears rate-limiting and dependent upon initial cleavage at Arg-740, we investigated whether cleavage at Arg-1689 influences catalysis at this step. Recombinant B-domainless factor VIII mutants, R1689H and R1689Q were prepared and stably expressed to slow and eliminate cleavage, respectively. Specific activity values for the His and Gln mutations were approximately 50 and approximately 10%, respectively, that of wild type. Thrombin activation of the R1689H variant showed an approximately 340-fold reduction in the rate of Arg-1689 cleavage, whereas the R1689Q variant was resistant to thrombin cleavage at this site. Examination of heavy chain cleavages showed approximately 4- and 11-fold reductions in A2 subunit generation and approximately 3- and 7-fold reductions in A1 subunit generation for the R1689H and R1689Q mutants, respectively. These results suggest a linkage between light chain cleavage and cleavages in heavy chain. Results obtained evaluating proteolysis of the factor VIII mutants by factor Xa revealed modest rate reductions (<5-fold) in generating A2 and A1 subunits and in cleaving light chain at Arg-1721 from either variant, suggesting little dependence upon prior cleavage at residue 1689 as compared with thrombin. Overall, these results are consistent with a competition between heavy and light chains for thrombin exosite binding and subsequent proteolysis with binding of the former chain preferred.

  7. Primary structure of the A chain of human complement-classical-pathway enzyme C1r. N-terminal sequences and alignment of autolytic fragments and CNBr-cleavage peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, J; Arlaud, G J

    1985-01-01

    Activated human complement-classical-pathway enzyme C1r has previously been shown to undergo autolytic cleavages occurring in the A chain [Arlaud, Villiers, Chesne & Colomb (1980) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 616, 116-129]. Chemical analysis of the autolytic products confirms that the A chain undergoes two major cleavages, generating three fragments, which have now been isolated and characterized. The N-terminal alpha fragment (approx. 210 residues long) has a blocked N-terminus, as does the whole A chain, whereas N-terminal sequences of fragments beta and gamma (approx. 66 and 176 residues long respectively) do not, and their N-terminal sequences were determined. Fragments alpha, beta and gamma, which are not interconnected by disulphide bridges, are located in this order within C1r A chain. Fragment gamma is disulphide-linked to the B chain of C1r, which is C-terminal in the single polypeptide chain of precursor C1r. CNBr cleavage of C1r A chain yields seven major peptides, CN1b, CN4a, CN2a, CN1a, CN3, CN4b and CN2b, which were positioned in that order, on the basis of N-terminal sequences of the methionine-containing peptides generated from tryptic cleavage of the succinylated (3-carboxypropionylated) C1r A chain. About 60% of the sequence of C1r A chain (440-460 residues long) was determined, including the complete sequence of the C-terminal 95 residues. This region shows homology with the corresponding parts of plasminogen and chymotrypsinogen and, more surprisingly, with the alpha 1 chain of human haptoglobin 1-1, a serine proteinase homologue. PMID:2983658

  8. cis-Apa: a practical linker for the microwave-assisted preparation of cyclic pseudopeptides via RCM cyclative cleavage.

    PubMed

    Baron, Alice; Verdié, Pascal; Martinez, Jean; Lamaty, Frédéric

    2011-02-04

    A new linker cis-5-aminopent-3-enoic acid (cis-Apa) was prepared for the synthesis of cyclic pseudopeptides by cyclization-cleavage by using ring-closing methatesis (RCM). We developed a new synthetic pathway for the preparation of the cis-Apa linker that was tested in the cyclization-cleavage process of different RGD peptide sequences. Different macrocyclic peptidomimetics were prepared by using this integrated microwave-assisted method, showing that the readily available cis-Apa amino acid is well adapted as a linker in the cyclization-cleavage process.

  9. 3-Keto-5-aminohexanoate Cleavage Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Bellinzoni, Marco; Bastard, Karine; Perret, Alain; Zaparucha, Anne; Perchat, Nadia; Vergne, Carine; Wagner, Tristan; de Melo-Minardi, Raquel C.; Artiguenave, François; Cohen, Georges N.; Weissenbach, Jean; Salanoubat, Marcel; Alzari, Pedro M.

    2011-01-01

    The exponential increase in genome sequencing output has led to the accumulation of thousands of predicted genes lacking a proper functional annotation. Among this mass of hypothetical proteins, enzymes catalyzing new reactions or using novel ways to catalyze already known reactions might still wait to be identified. Here, we provide a structural and biochemical characterization of the 3-keto-5-aminohexanoate cleavage enzyme (Kce), an enzymatic activity long known as being involved in the anaerobic fermentation of lysine but whose catalytic mechanism has remained elusive so far. Although the enzyme shows the ubiquitous triose phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold and a Zn2+ cation reminiscent of metal-dependent class II aldolases, our results based on a combination of x-ray snapshots and molecular modeling point to an unprecedented mechanism that proceeds through deprotonation of the 3-keto-5-aminohexanoate substrate, nucleophilic addition onto an incoming acetyl-CoA, intramolecular transfer of the CoA moiety, and final retro-Claisen reaction leading to acetoacetate and 3-aminobutyryl-CoA. This model also accounts for earlier observations showing the origin of carbon atoms in the products, as well as the absence of detection of any covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate. Kce is the first representative of a large family of prokaryotic hypothetical proteins, currently annotated as the “domain of unknown function” DUF849. PMID:21632536

  10. Rotational Spectrum and Carbon Atom Structure of Dihydroartemisinic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelisti, Luca; Seifert, Nathan A.; Spada, Lorenzo; Pate, Brooks

    2016-06-01

    Dihydroartemisinic acid (DHAA, C15H24O2, five chiral centers) is a precursor in proposed low-cost synthetic routes to the antimalarial drug artemisinin. In one reaction process being considered in pharmaceutical production, DHAA is formed from an enantiopure sample of artemisinic acid through hydrogenation of the alkene. This reaction needs to properly set the stereochemistry of the asymmetric carbon for the synthesis to produce artemisinin. A recrystallization process can purify the diastereomer mixture of the hydrogenation reaction if the unwanted epimer is produced in less than 10% abundance. There is a need in the process analytical chemistry to rapidly (less than 1 min) measure the diastereomer excess and current solutions, such a HPLC, lack the needed measurement speed. The rotational spectrum of DHAA has been measured at 300:1 signal-to-noise ratio in a chirped-pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectrometer operating from 2-8 GHz using simple heating of the compound. The 13C isotope analysis provides a carbon atom structure that confirms the diastereomer. This structure is in excellent agreement with quantum chemistry calculations at the B2PLYPD3/ 6-311++G** level of theory. The DHAA spectrum is expected to be fully resolved from the unwanted diastereomer raising the potential for fast diastereomer excess measurement by rotational spectroscopy in the pharmaceutical production process.

  11. Impact of fatty acids on brain circulation, structure and function.

    PubMed

    Haast, Roy A M; Kiliaan, Amanda J

    2015-01-01

    The use of dietary intervention has evolved into a promising approach to prevent the onset and progression of brain diseases. The positive relationship between intake of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-LCPUFAs) and decreased onset of disease- and aging-related deterioration of brain health is increasingly endorsed across epidemiological and diet-interventional studies. Promising results are found regarding to the protection of proper brain circulation, structure and functionality in healthy and diseased humans and animal models. These include enhanced cerebral blood flow (CBF), white and gray matter integrity, and improved cognitive functioning, and are possibly mediated through increased neurovascular coupling, neuroprotection and neuronal plasticity, respectively. Contrary, studies investigating diets high in saturated fats provide opposite results, which may eventually lead to irreversible damage. Studies like these are of great importance given the high incidence of obesity caused by the increased and decreased consumption of respectively saturated fats and ω3-LCPUFAs in the Western civilization. This paper will review in vivo research conducted on the effects of ω3-LCPUFAs and saturated fatty acids on integrity (circulation, structure and function) of the young, aging and diseased brain.

  12. Interfacial structures and acidity of edge surfaces of ferruginous smectites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiandong; Cheng, Jun; Sprik, Michiel; Lu, Xiancai; Wang, Rucheng

    2015-11-01

    We report an FPMD (first-principles molecular dynamics) study of the interfacial structures and acidity constants of the edge surfaces of ferruginous smectites. To understand the effects of Fe oxidation states on the interfacial properties, we investigated both the oxidized and reduced states of the (0 1 0)-type edges of two clay models with different Fe contents. The coordination states of edge Fe atoms are determined from the free energy curves for the desorption of the H2O ligands. The results of both clay models show that for Fe(III), only the 6-coordinate states are stable, whereas for Fe(II), both the 6- and 5-coordinate states are stable. Using the FPMD-based vertical energy gap technique, the pKa values of the edge sites are evaluated for both oxidation states. The results indicate that for both clay models, both the octahedral and tetrahedral sites become much less acidic upon Fe reduction. Therefore, the comparison reveals that the interfacial structures and protonation states are strongly dependent on the Fe oxidation states. Using the calculated results, we have derived the pH-dependent surface complexing mechanisms of ferruginous smectites.

  13. Proteolytic Cleavage of the Immunodominant Outer Membrane Protein rOmpA in Rickettsia rickettsii.

    PubMed

    Noriea, Nicholas F; Clark, Tina R; Mead, David; Hackstadt, Ted

    2017-03-15

    Rickettsia rickettsii, the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, contains two immunodominant proteins, rOmpA and rOmpB, in the outer membrane. Both rOmpA and rOmpB are conserved throughout spotted fever group rickettsiae as members of a family of autotransporter proteins. Previously, it was demonstrated that rOmpB is proteolytically processed, with the cleavage site residing near the autotransporter domain at the carboxy-terminal end of the protein, cleaving the 168-kDa precursor into apparent 120-kDa and 32-kDa fragments. The 120- and 32-kDa fragments remain noncovalently associated on the surface of the bacterium, with implications that the 32-kDa fragment functions as the membrane anchor domain. Here we present evidence for a similar posttranslational processing of rOmpA. rOmpA is expressed as a predicted 224-kDa precursor yet is observed on SDS-PAGE as a 190-kDa protein. A small rOmpA fragment of ∼32 kDa was discovered during surface proteome analysis and identified as the carboxy-terminal end of the protein. A rabbit polyclonal antibody was generated to the autotransporter region of rOmpA and confirmed a 32-kDa fragment corresponding to the calculated mass of a proteolytically cleaved rOmpA autotransporter region. N-terminal amino acid sequencing revealed a cleavage site on the carboxy-terminal side of Ser-1958 in rOmpA. An avirulent strain of R. rickettsii Iowa deficient in rOmpB processing was also defective in the processing of rOmpA. The similarities of the cleavage sites and the failure of R. rickettsii Iowa to process either rOmpA or rOmpB suggest that a single enzyme may be responsible for both processing events.IMPORTANCE Members of the spotted fever group of rickettsiae, including R. rickettsii, the etiologic agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, express at least four autotransporter proteins that are protective antigens or putative virulence determinants. One member of this class of proteins, rOmpB, is proteolytically processed to a

  14. Assessing the Chemical Accuracy of Protein Structures via Peptide Acidity

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Janet S.; Hernández, Griselda; LeMaster, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Although the protein native state is a Boltzmann conformational ensemble, practical applications often require a representative model from the most populated region of that distribution. The acidity of the backbone amides, as reflected in hydrogen exchange rates, is exquisitely sensitive to the surrounding charge and dielectric volume distribution. For each of four proteins, three independently determined X-ray structures of differing crystallographic resolution were used to predict exchange for the static solvent-exposed amide hydrogens. The average correlation coefficients range from 0.74 for ubiquitin to 0.93 for Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin, reflecting the larger range of experimental exchange rates exhibited by the latter protein. The exchange prediction errors modestly correlate with the crystallographic resolution. MODELLER 9v6-derived homology models at ~60% sequence identity (36% identity for chymotrypsin inhibitor CI2) yielded correlation coefficients that are ~0.1 smaller than for the cognate X-ray structures. The most recently deposited NOE-based ubiquitin structure and the original NMR structure of CI2 fail to provide statistically significant predictions of hydrogen exchange. However, the more recent RECOORD refinement study of CI2 yielded predictions comparable to the X-ray and homology model-based analyses. PMID:23182463

  15. Chiral and structural discrimination in binding of polypeptides with condensed nucleic acid structures.

    PubMed

    Reich, Z; Ittah, Y; Weinberger, S; Minsky, A

    1990-04-05

    In biological systems nucleic acids are invariably found in highly compact forms. These rather intricate forms raise questions of basic importance which are related to the various factors involved in the condensation processes, the chemical, physical, and structural features revealed by the packed species, and the effects of the extremely tight packaging upon interactions of the DNA molecules with proteins and drugs. A means for addressing these questions on a molecular level is provided by various procedures known to induce in vitro condensation of DNA molecules into highly compact species which, in turn, may serve as a model for the in vivo physical organization of nucleic acids. A study of the optical properties of the tightly packed DNA molecules indicates that the interactions of these species with polypeptides are characterized by distinct, hitherto unobserved, chiral and structural discrimination. Specifically, the polypeptides found to be selected against are composed of those amino acids that are not normally used in protein biosynthesis, such as D-lysine or ornithine. These findings provide new clues to long debated topics such as the specific universal chirality of amino acids in proteins or the correlation between conformational flexibility of polypeptides and their ability to form stable compact complexes with nucleic acids.

  16. Single-chain structure of human ceruloplasmin: the complete amino acid sequence of the whole molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, N; Ortel, T L; Putnam, F W

    1984-01-01

    We have determined the amino acid sequence of the amino-terminal 67,000-dalton (67-kDa) fragment of human ceruloplasmin and have established overlapping sequences between the 67-kDa and 50-kDa fragments and between the 50-kDa and 19-kDa fragments. The 67-kDa fragment contains 480 amino acid residues and three glucosamine oligosaccharides. These results together with our previous sequence data for the 50-kDa and 19-kDa fragments complete the amino acid sequence of human ceruloplasmin. The polypeptide chain has a total of 1,046 amino acid residues (Mr 120,085) and has attachment sites for four glucosamine oligosaccharides; together these account for the total molecular mass of human ceruloplasmin (132 kDa). The sequence analysis of the peptides overlapping the fragments showed that one additional amino acid, arginine, is present between the 67-kDa and 50-kDa fragments, and another, lysine, is between the 50-kDa and 19-kDa fragments. Only two apparent sites of amino acid interchange have been identified in the polypeptide chain. Both involve a single-point interchange of glycine and lysine that would result in a difference in charge. The results of the complete sequence analysis verified that human ceruloplasmin is composed of a single polypeptide chain and that the subunit-like fragments are produced by proteolytic cleavage during purification (and possibly also in vivo). PMID:6582496

  17. KM+, a mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia: amino acid sequence, predicted tertiary structure, carbohydrate recognition, and analysis of the beta-prism fold.

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, J. C.; De Oliveira, P. S.; Garratt, R.; Beltramini, L.; Resing, K.; Roque-Barreira, M. C.; Greene, L. J.

    1999-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit), which contains 149 residues/mol, is reported and compared to those of other members of the Moraceae family, particularly that of jacalin, also from jackfruit, with which it shares 52% sequence identity. KM+ presents an acetyl-blocked N-terminus and is not posttranslationally modified by proteolytic cleavage as is the case for jacalin. Rather, it possesses a short, glycine-rich linker that unites the regions homologous to the alpha- and beta-chains of jacalin. The results of homology modeling implicate the linker sequence in sterically impeding rotation of the side chain of Asp141 within the binding site pocket. As a consequence, the aspartic acid is locked into a conformation adequate only for the recognition of equatorial hydroxyl groups on the C4 epimeric center (alpha-D-mannose, alpha-D-glucose, and their derivatives). In contrast, the internal cleavage of the jacalin chain permits free rotation of the homologous aspartic acid, rendering it capable of accepting hydrogen bonds from both possible hydroxyl configurations on C4. We suggest that, together with direct recognition of epimeric hydroxyls and the steric exclusion of disfavored ligands, conformational restriction of the lectin should be considered to be a new mechanism by which selectivity may be built into carbohydrate binding sites. Jacalin and KM+ adopt the beta-prism fold already observed in two unrelated protein families. Despite presenting little or no sequence similarity, an analysis of the beta-prism reveals a canonical feature repeatedly present in all such structures, which is based on six largely hydrophobic residues within a beta-hairpin containing two classic-type beta-bulges. We suggest the term beta-prism motif to describe this feature. PMID:10210179

  18. Does Cleavage Work at Work? Men, but Not Women, Falsely Believe Cleavage Sells a Weak Product

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Peter; Chrislock, Karyna; Petersik, Korinne; Vijay, Madhuri; Turek, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    We examined whether men, but not women, would be distracted by a female sales representative's exposed cleavage, leading to greater perceived efficacy for a weak, but not for a strong product. A community sample of 88 men and 97 women viewed a video of a female pharmaceutical sales representative who (a) had exposed cleavage or dressed modestly…

  19. Selective cleavage of pepsin by molybdenum metallopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Yenjai, Sudarat; Malaikaew, Pinpinat; Liwporncharoenvong, Teerayuth; Buranaprapuk, Apinya

    2012-03-02

    Graphical abstract: Molybdenum metallopeptidase: the Mo(VI) cluster with six molybdenum cations has the ability to cleave protein under mild conditions (37 Degree-Sign C, pH 7) without reducing agents. The reaction required only low concentration of ammonium heptamolybdatetetrahydrate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) (0.125 mM). The reaction undergoes possibly via a hydrolytic mechanism. This is the first demonstration of protein cleavage by a molybdenum cluster. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first demonstration of protein cleavage by a Mo(VI) cluster with six molybdenum cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cleavage reaction undergoes at mild conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No need of reducing agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only low concentration of Mo(VI) cluster and short time of incubation are needed. -- Abstract: In this study, the cleavage of protein by molybdenum cluster is reported for the first time. The protein target used is porcine pepsin. The data presented in this study show that pepsin is cleaved to at least three fragments with molecular weights of {approx}23, {approx}19 and {approx}16 kDa when the mixture of the protein and ammonium heptamolybdate tetrahydrate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) was incubated at 37 Degree-Sign C for 24 h. No self cleavage of pepsin occurs at 37 Degree-Sign C, 24 h indicating that the reaction is mediated by the metal ions. N-terminal sequencing of the peptide fragments indicated three cleavage sites of pepsin between Leu 112-Tyr 113, Leu 166-Leu 167 and Leu 178-Asn 179. The cleavage reaction occurs after incubation of the mixture of pepsin and (NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) only for 2 h. However, the specificity of the cleavage decreases when incubation time is longer than 48 h. The mechanism for cleavage of pepsin is expected to be hydrolytic chemistry of the amide bonds in the protein

  20. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Biedermannová, Lada; Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-11-01

    Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon-donor hydrogen bonds, OH-π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  1. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Biedermannová, Lada; Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations. PMID:26527137

  2. Microwave spectra and structure of the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid-formic acid dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Lin, Wei; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2015-09-01

    The rotational spectrum of the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid-formic acid doubly hydrogen bonded dimer has been measured in the 4-11 GHz region using a Flygare-Balle type pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent, four unique singly substituted 13C isotopologues, and a singly deuterated isotopologue. Splittings due to a possible concerted double proton tunneling motion were not observed. Rotational constants (A, B, and C) and centrifugal distortion constants (DJ and DJK) were determined from the measured transitions for the dimer. The values of the rotational (in MHz) and centrifugal distortion constants (in kHz) for the parent isotopologue are A = 4045.4193(16), B = 740.583 80(14), C = 658.567 60(23), DJ = 0.0499(16), and DJK = 0.108(14). A partial gas phase structure of the dimer was derived from the rotational constants of the measured isotopologues, previous structural work on each monomer units and results of the calculations.

  3. Structural insights into the regulation of aromatic amino acid hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-12-01

    The aromatic amino acid hydroxylases phenylalanine hydroxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and tryptophan hydroxylase are homotetramers, with each subunit containing a homologous catalytic domain and a divergent regulatory domain. The solution structure of the regulatory domain of tyrosine hydroxylase establishes that it contains a core ACT domain similar to that in phenylalanine hydroxylase. The isolated regulatory domain of tyrosine hydroxylase forms a stable dimer, while that of phenylalanine hydroxylase undergoes a monomer-dimer equilibrium, with phenylalanine stabilizing the dimer. These solution properties are consistent with the regulatory mechanisms of the two enzymes, in that phenylalanine hydroxylase is activated by phenylalanine binding to an allosteric site, while tyrosine hydroxylase is regulated by binding of catecholamines in the active site.

  4. Polyacrylic acids-bovine serum albumin complexation: Structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Othman, Mohamed; Aschi, Adel; Gharbi, Abdelhafidh

    2016-01-01

    The study of the mixture of BSA with polyacrylic acids at different masses versus pH allowed highlighting the existence of two regimes of weak and strong complexation. These complexes were studied in diluted regime concentration, by turbidimetry, dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta-potential measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We have followed the pH effect on the structure and properties of the complex. This allowed refining the interpretation of the phase diagram and understanding the observed phenomena. The NMR measurements allowed probing the dynamics of the constituents versus the pH. The computational method was used to precisely determine the electrostatic potential of BSA and how the polyelectrolyte binds to it at different pH.

  5. Galectin-3 Cleavage Alters Bone Remodeling: Different Outcomes in Breast and Prostate Cancer Skeletal Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kosei; Kho, Dhong Hyo; Yanagawa, Takashi; Harazono, Yosuke; Hogan, Victor; Chen, Wei; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mehra, Rohit; Raz, Avraham

    2016-03-15

    Management of bone metastasis remains clinically challenging and requires the identification of new molecular target(s) that can be therapeutically exploited to improve patient outcome. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) has been implicated as a secreted factor that alters the bone microenvironment. Proteolytic cleavage of Gal-3 may also contribute to malignant cellular behaviors, but has not been addressed in cancer metastasis. Here, we report that Gal-3 modulates the osteolytic bone tumor microenvironment in the presence of RANKL. Gal-3 was localized on the osteoclast cell surface, and its suppression by RNAi or a specific antagonist markedly inhibited osteoclast differentiation markers, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and reduced the number of mature osteoclasts. Structurally, the 158-175 amino acid sequence in the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of Gal-3 was responsible for augmented osteoclastogenesis. During osteoclast maturation, Gal-3 interacted and colocalized with myosin-2A along the surface of cell-cell fusion. Pathologically, bone metastatic cancers expressed and released an intact form of Gal-3, mainly detected in breast cancer bone metastases, as well as a cleaved form, more abundant in prostate cancer bone metastases. Secreted intact Gal-3 interacted with myosin-2A, leading to osteoclastogenesis, whereas a shift to cleaved Gal-3 attenuated the enhancement in osteoclast differentiation. Thus, our studies demonstrate that Gal-3 shapes the bone tumor microenvironment through distinct roles contingent on its cleavage status, and highlight Gal-3 targeting through the CRD as a potential therapeutic strategy for mitigating osteolytic bone remodeling in the metastatic niche.

  6. Enhanced RNA cleavage within bulge-loops by an artificial ribonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Irina L.; Zenkova, Marina A.; Gross, Hans J.; Vlassov, Valentin V.

    2005-01-01

    Cleavage of phosphodiester bonds by small ribonuclease mimics within different bulge-loops of RNA was investigated. Bulge-loops of different size (1–7 nt) and sequence composition were formed in a 3′ terminal fragment of influenza virus M2 RNA (96 nt) by hybridization of complementary oligodeoxynucleotides. Small bulges (up to 4 nt) were readily formed upon oligonucleotide hybridization, whereas hybridization of the RNA to the oligonucleotides designed to produce larger bulges resulted in formation of several alternative structures. A synthetic ribonuclease mimic displaying Pyr–Pu cleavage specificity cleaved CpA motifs located within bulges faster than similar motifs within the rest of the RNA. In the presence of 10 mM MgCl2, 75% of the cleavage products resulted from the attack of this motif. Thus, selective RNA cleavage at a single target phosphodiester bond was achieved by using bulge forming oligonucleotides and a small ribonuclease A mimic. PMID:15731340

  7. Surface chain cleavage behavior of PBIA fiber induced by direct fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zheng; Wu, Peng; Li, Baoyin; Chen, Teng; Liu, Yang; Ren, Mengmeng; Wang, Zaoming; Lai, Wenchuan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-10-01

    The surface chain cleavage behavior of PBIA fiber induced by direct fluorination was reported based on the analysis of physical and chemical changes on the fiber surface. The chain cleavage product was obtained to evaluate the chemical reaction during the fluorination process, and its impact on composites performance was also involved. DSC, FTIR spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra and H1NMR were utilized to analyze the chemical structure and composition of the chain cleavage product. The results show gaseous fluorine is most likely to attack the benzimidazole and amide bond in PBIA unit, which was also demonstrated by molecular simulation. Owing to the polar groups contained in chain cleavage products, the wettability of epoxy resin to fiber has been improved, leading to an 11.5% increase of adhesive strength of fiber-epoxy composite.

  8. Identification of cleavage of NS5A of C-strain classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jinxin; Guo, Huancheng; Gong, Wenjie; Jiang, Daliang; Zhang, Li; Jia, Junjie; Tu, Changchun

    2017-02-01

    NS5A is a multifunctional non-structural protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) that plays an important role in viral replication, but how it exerts its functions is unknown. Here, we report the cleavage of NS5A of the vaccine C-strain, resulting in two truncated forms (b and c). Further experiments using calpain- and caspase-family-specific inhibitors, followed by a caspase-6-specific shRNAs and inhibitor, showed that the cleavage of C-strain NS5A to produce truncated form c is mediated by caspase-6, mapping to (272)DTTD(275), while the cleavage producing truncated form b is probably mediated by another unknown protease. shRNA-mediated downregulation of caspase-6 and blocking of enzyme activity in ST cells significantly impaired genome replication and virus production, indicating that NS5A cleavage is required for CSFV replication.

  9. Observation of Cleavage Fracture after Substantial Dimple Rupture in ASTM A710 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, Walter Graham; Lloyd, Wilson Randolph

    2000-07-01

    A major concern often arising in structural integrity predictions is the possibility that low-energy brittle fracture could result as a consequence of cleavage either under normal operating or design accident conditions. This can be especially troublesome when the leak-before-break (LBB) approach shows an additional safety margin of the design. For LBB to be applicable, the fracture process must remain ductile (dimple rupture), and not change to cleavage. The American Society for Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Code) provides guidelines for avoiding cleavage fracture for Code-accepted materials. Experimental results for a non-Code steel are provided, and show that cleavage may occur for a thickness under16 mm (where the code suggests it will not) after stable crack growth (∆a) of up to 20 mm. This work is still in progress; test results are provided along with possible reasons for the mode transition, but complete explanations are still being developed.

  10. Facile P-C/C-H Bond-Cleavage Reactivity of Nickel Bis(diphosphine) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoguang; Li, Haixia; Appel, Aaron M; Hall, Michael B; Bullock, R Morris

    2016-07-04

    Unusual cleavage of P-C and C-H bonds of the P2 N2 ligand, in heteroleptic [Ni(P2 N2 )(diphosphine)](2+) complexes under mild conditions, results in the formation of an iminium formyl nickelate featuring a C,P,P-tridentate coordination mode. The structures of both the heteroleptic [Ni(P2 N2 )(diphosphine)](2+) complexes and the resulting iminium formyl nickelate have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to investigate the mechanism of the P-C/C-H bond cleavage, which involves C-H bond cleavage, hydride rotation, Ni-C/P-H bond formation, and P-C bond cleavage.

  11. Nanomechanical cleavage of molybdenum disulphide atomic layers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Kvashnin, Dmitry G; Najmaei, Sina; Bando, Yoshio; Kimoto, Koji; Koskinen, Pekka; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Yakobson, Boris I; Sorokin, Pavel B; Lou, Jun; Golberg, Dmitri

    2014-04-03

    The discovery of two-dimensional materials became possible due to the mechanical cleavage technique. Despite its simplicity, the as-cleaved materials demonstrated surprising macro-continuity, high crystalline quality and extraordinary mechanical and electrical properties that triggered global research interest. Here such cleavage processes and associated mechanical behaviours are investigated by a direct in situ transmission electron microscopy probing technique, using atomically thin molybdenum disulphide layers as a model material. Our technique demonstrates layer number selective cleavage, from a monolayer to double layer and up to 23 atomic layers. In situ observations combined with molecular dynamics simulations reveal unique layer-dependent bending behaviours, from spontaneous rippling (<5 atomic layers) to homogeneous curving (~ 10 layers) and finally to kinking (20 or more layers), depending on the competition of strain energy and interfacial energy.

  12. Nanomechanical cleavage of molybdenum disulphide atomic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Kvashnin, Dmitry G.; Najmaei, Sina; Bando, Yoshio; Kimoto, Koji; Koskinen, Pekka; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Sorokin, Pavel B.; Lou, Jun; Golberg, Dmitri

    2014-04-01

    The discovery of two-dimensional materials became possible due to the mechanical cleavage technique. Despite its simplicity, the as-cleaved materials demonstrated surprising macro-continuity, high crystalline quality and extraordinary mechanical and electrical properties that triggered global research interest. Here such cleavage processes and associated mechanical behaviours are investigated by a direct in situ transmission electron microscopy probing technique, using atomically thin molybdenum disulphide layers as a model material. Our technique demonstrates layer number selective cleavage, from a monolayer to double layer and up to 23 atomic layers. In situ observations combined with molecular dynamics simulations reveal unique layer-dependent bending behaviours, from spontaneous rippling (<5 atomic layers) to homogeneous curving (~ 10 layers) and finally to kinking (20 or more layers), depending on the competition of strain energy and interfacial energy.

  13. Cleavage fracture in bainitic and martensitic microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.Z.; Knott, J.F.

    1999-09-29

    This paper addresses the mechanisms of cleavage fracture in the pressure-vessel steel A533B. Microstructures of single bainite microstructures exhibit a higher propensity for brittle cleavage fracture than do those of auto-tempered martensites. The K{sub 1c} values of mixed microstructures are determined by the statistical distribution of the two phases and the range of the values is bounded by limits set by those for the single-phase microstructures. The results are explained in terms of the RKR model, which involves a local cleavage stress {sigma}*{sub F} and a distance ahead of the macrocrack tip, X, as two critical parameters. It is found that the carbides or carbide colonies act as critical microcrack nuclei, and hence play a key role in determining the fracture toughness, although packet boundaries in bainite may give rise to pop-in arrests in displacement-controlled tests.

  14. Systematic study of the structures of potassiated tertiary amino acids: salt bridge structures dominate.

    PubMed

    Drayss, Miriam K; Blunk, Dirk; Oomens, Jos; Gao, Bing; Wyttenbach, Thomas; Bowers, Michael T; Schäfer, Mathias

    2009-08-27

    The gas-phase structures of a series of potassiated tertiary amino acids have been systematically investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and computational modeling. The examined analytes comprise a set of five linear N,N-dimethyl amino acids derived from N,N-dimethyl glycine and three cyclic N-methyl amino acids including N-methyl proline. The number of methylene groups in either the alkyl chain of the linear members or in the ring of the cyclic members of the series is gradually varied. The spectra of the cyclic potassiated molecular ions are similar and well resolved, whereas the clear signals in the respective spectra of the linear analytes increasingly overlap with longer alkyl chains. Measured IRMPD spectra are compared to spectra calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level of theory to identify the structures present in the experimental studies. On the basis of these experiments and calculations, all potassiated molecular ions of this series adopt salt bridge structures in the gas phase, involving bidentate coordination of the potassium cation to the carboxylate moiety. The assigned salt bridge structures are predicted to be the global minima on the potential energy surfaces. IMS cross-section measurements of the potassiated systems show a monotonic increase with growing system size, suggesting that the precursor ions adopt the same type of structure and comparisons between experimental and theoretical cross sections are consistent with salt bridge structures and the IRMPD results.

  15. Molecular structure of cyclic deoxydiadenylic acid at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Frederick, C A; Coll, M; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Wang, A H

    1988-11-01

    The molecular structure of a small cyclic nucleotide, cyclic deoxydiadenylic acid, has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and refined to an R factor of 7.8% at 1.0-A resolution. The crystals are in the monoclinic space group C2 with unit cell dimensions of a = 24.511 (3) A, b = 24.785 (3) A, c = 13.743 (3) A, and beta = 94.02 (2) degrees. The structure was solved by the direct methods program SHELXS-86. There are 2 independent cyclic d(ApAp) molecules, 2 hydrated magnesium ions, and 26 water molecules in the asymmetric unit of the unit cell. The two cyclic d(ApAp) molecules have similar conformations within their 12-membered sugar-phosphate backbone ring, but they have quite different appearances due to the different glycosyl torsion angles that make one molecule more compact and the other extended and open. Three of the four deoxyribose rings are in the less common C3'-endo conformation. All four phosphate groups have their phosphodiester torsion angles alpha/zeta in the gauche(+)/gauche(+) conformation. One of the cyclic d(ApAp) molecules associates with another symmetry-related molecule to form a self-intercalated dimer that is a stable structure in solution, as observed in NMR studies. Many interesting intermolecular interactions, including base-base stacking, ribose-base stacking, base pairing, base-phosphate hydrogen bonding, and metal ion-phosphate interactions, are found in the crystal lattice. This structure may be relevant for understanding the conformational potentiality of an endogenous biological regulator of cellulose synthesis, cyclic (GpGp).

  16. Deformation-dependent enzyme mechanokinetic cleavage of type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Karla E-K; Bourne, Jonathan W; Torzilli, Peter A

    2009-05-01

    Collagen is a key structural protein in the extracellular matrix of many tissues. It provides biological tissues with tensile mechanical strength and is enzymatically cleaved by a class of matrix metalloproteinases known as collagenases. Collagen enzymatic kinetics has been well characterized in solubilized, gel, and reconstituted forms. However, limited information exists on enzyme degradation of structurally intact collagen fibers and, more importantly, on the effect of mechanical deformation on collagen cleavage. We studied the degradation of native rat tail tendon fibers by collagenase after the fibers were mechanically elongated to strains of epsilon=1-10%. After the fibers were elongated and the stress was allowed to relax, the fiber was immersed in Clostridium histolyticum collagenase and the decrease in stress (sigma) was monitored as a means of calculating the rate of enzyme cleavage of the fiber. An enzyme mechanokinetic (EMK) relaxation function T(E)(epsilon) in s(-1) was calculated from the linear stress-time response during fiber cleavage, where T(E)(epsilon) corresponds to the zero order Michaelis-Menten enzyme-substrate kinetic response. The EMK relaxation function T(E)(epsilon) was found to decrease with applied strain at a rate of approximately 9% per percent strain, with complete inhibition of collagen cleavage predicted to occur at a strain of approximately 11%. However, comparison of the EMK response (T(E) versus epsilon) to collagen's stress-strain response (sigma versus epsilon) suggested the possibility of three different EMK responses: (1) constant T(E)(epsilon) within the toe region (epsilon<3%), (2) a rapid decrease ( approximately 50%) in the transition of the toe-to-heel region (epsilon congruent with3%) followed by (3) a constant value throughout the heel (epsilon=3-5%) and linear (epsilon=5-10%) regions. This observation suggests that the mechanism for the strain-dependent inhibition of enzyme cleavage of the collagen triple helix may

  17. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  18. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2003-12-09

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  19. Synthesis and crystal structure elucidation of new copper(II)-based chemotherapeutic agent coupled with 1,2-DACH and orthovanillin: Validated by in vitro DNA/HSA binding profile and pBR322 cleavage pathway.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Mehvash; Afzal, Mohd; Ahmad, Musheer; Tabassum, Sartaj

    2016-08-01

    New copper(II)-based complex (1) was synthesized and characterized by analytical, spectroscopic and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The in vitro binding studies of complex 1 with CT DNA and HSA have been investigated by employing biophysical techniques to examine the binding propensity of 1 towards DNA and HSA. The results showed that 1 avidly binds to CT DNA via electrostatic mode along with the hydrogen bonding interaction of NH2 and CN groups of Schiff base ligand with the base pairs of DNA helix, leads to partial unwinding and destabilization of the DNA double helix. Moreover, the CD spectral studies revealed that complex 1 binds through groove binding interaction that stabilizes the right-handed B-form of DNA. Complex 1 showed an impressive photoinduced nuclease activity generating single-strand breaks in comparison with the DNA cleavage activity in presence of visible light. The mechanistic investigation revealed the efficiency of 1 to cleave DNA strands by involving the generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, the time dependent DNA cleavage activity showed that there was gradual increase in the amount of NC DNA on increasing the photoexposure time. However, the interaction of 1 and HSA showed that the change of intrinsic fluorescence intensity of HSA was induced by the microenvironment of Trp residue.

  20. Characterization of a Non-Canonical Signal Peptidase Cleavage Site in a Replication Protein from Tomato Ringspot Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ting; Chisholm, Joan

    2016-01-01

    The NTB-VPg polyprotein from tomato ringspot virus is an integral membrane replication protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes. A signal peptidase (SPase) cleavage was previously detected in the C-terminal region of NTB-VPg downstream of a 14 amino acid (aa)-long hydrophobic region (termed TM2). However, the exact location of the cleavage site was not determined. Using in vitro translation assays, we show that the SPase cleavage site is conserved in the NTB-VPg protein from various ToRSV isolates, although the rate of cleavage varies from one isolate to another. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage sites of two ToRSV isolates allowed the identification of sequences that affect cleavage efficiency. We also present evidence that SPase cleavage in the ToRSV-Rasp2 isolate occurs within a GAAGG sequence likely after the AAG (GAAG/G). Mutation of a downstream MAAV sequence to AAAV resulted in SPase cleavage at both the natural GAAG/G and the mutated AAA/V sequences. Given that there is a distance of seven aa between the two cleavage sites, this indicates that there is flexibility in the positioning of the cleavage sites relative to the inner surface of the membrane and the SPase active site. SPase cleavage sites are typically located 3–7 aa downstream of the hydrophobic region. However, the NTB-VPg GAAG/G cleavage site is located 17 aa downstream of the TM2 hydrophobic region, highlighting unusual features of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage site. A putative 11 aa-long amphipathic helix was identified immediately downstream of the TM2 region and five aa upstream of the GAAG/G cleavage site. Based on these results, we present an updated topology model in which the hydrophobic and amphipathic domains form a long tilted helix or a bent helix in the membrane lipid bilayer, with the downstream cleavage site(s) oriented parallel to the membrane inner surface. PMID:27589230

  1. Understanding In-line Probing Experiments by Modeling Cleavage of Non-reactive RNA Nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Mlynsky, Vojtech; Bussi, Giovanni

    2017-02-15

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is involved in many regulatory and catalytic processes in the cell. The function of any RNA molecule is intimately related with its structure. In-line probing experiments provide valuable structural datasets for a variety of RNAs and are used to characterize conformational changes in riboswitches. However, the structural determinants that lead to differential reactivities in unpaired nucleotides have not been investigated yet. In this work we used a combination of theoretical approaches, i.e., classical molecular dynamics simulations, multiscale quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations, and enhanced sampling techniques in order to compute and interpret the differential reactivity of individual residues in several RNA motifs including members of the most important GNRA and UNCG tetraloop families. Simulations on the multi ns timescale are required to converge the related free-energy landscapes. The results for uGAAAg and cUUCGg tetraloops and double helices are compared with available data from in-line probing experiments and show that the introduced technique is able to distinguish between nucleotides of the uGAAAg tetraloop based on their structural predispositions towards phosphodiester backbone cleavage. For the cUUCGg tetraloop, more advanced ab initio calculations would be required. This study is the first attempt to computationally classify chemical probing experiments and paves the way for an identification of tertiary structures based on the measured reactivity of non-reactive nucleotides.

  2. Ectodomain cleavage of the EGF ligands HB-EGF, neuregulin1-beta, and TGF-alpha is specifically triggered by different stimuli and involves different PKC isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Herrlich, Andreas; Klinman, Eva; Fu, Jonathan; Sadegh, Cameron; Lodish, Harvey

    2008-12-01

    Metalloproteinase cleavage of transmembrane proteins (ectodomain cleavage), including the epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligands heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), neuregulin (NRG), and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), is important in many cellular signaling pathways and is disregulated in many diseases. It is largely unknown how physiological stimuli of ectodomain cleavage--hypertonic stress, phorbol ester, or activation of G-protein-coupled receptors [e.g., by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)]--are molecularly connected to metalloproteinase activation. To study this question, we developed a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)- based assay that measures cleavage of EGF ligands in single living cells. EGF ligands expressed in mouse lung epithelial cells are differentially and specifically cleaved depending on the stimulus. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes or metalloproteinase inhibition by batimastat (BB94) showed that different regulatory signals are used by different stimuli and EGF substrates, suggesting differential effects that act on the substrate, the metalloproteinase, or both. For example, hypertonic stress led to strong cleavage of HB-EGF and NRG but only moderate cleavage of TGF-alpha. HB-EGF, NRG, and TGF-alpha cleavage was not dependent on PKC, and only HB-EGF and NRG cleavage were inhibited by BB94. In contrast, phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (TPA) -induced cleavage of HB-EGF, NRG, and TGF-alpha was dependent on PKC and sensitive to BB94 inhibition. LPA led to significant cleavage of only NRG and TGF-alpha and was inhibited by BB94; only LPA-induced NRG cleavage required PKC. Surprisingly, specific inhibition of atypical PKCs zeta and iota [not activated by diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium] significantly enhanced TPA-induced NRG cleavage. Employed in a high-throughput cloning strategy, our cleavage assay should allow the identification of candidate proteins involved in signal transduction of different

  3. Structure and dynamics of cholic acid and dodecylphosphocholine-cholic acid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sayyed-Ahmad, Abdallah; Lichtenberger, Lenard M; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2010-08-17

    Bile acids are powerful detergents that emulsify and solubilize lipids, vitamins, cholesterol and other molecules in the biliary tract and intestines. It has long been known that bile acids form soluble mixed micelles with lipids. However, the detailed thermodynamic and structural properties of these micelles are not fully understood. This study sheds light on this issue based on results from multiple molecular dynamics simulations of cholic acid (CA) and dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) mixed micelles. We found that CA molecules form aggregates of up to 12 monomers with a mean size of 5-6. In agreement with several previous simulations and earlier predictions, the overall shape of these CA clusters is oblate disk-like such that the methyl groups point toward the core of the aggregate and the hydroxyl groups point away from it. The self-aggregation behavior of the CA clusters in the DPC-CA mixture is similar to the pure CA. Furthermore, the sizes and aggregation numbers of the DPC-CA mixed micelles are linearly dependent on CA molarity. In agreement with the radial shell model of Nichols and Ozarowski [Nichols, J. W.; Ozarowski, J. Biochemistry 1990, 29, 4600], our results demonstrate that CA molecules form a wedge between the DPC molecules with their hydroxyl and carboxyl groups facing the aqueous phase while their methyl groups are buried in and face the hydrocarbon core of the DPC micelle. The DPC-CA micelles simulated here tend to be spherical to prolate in shape, with the deviation from spherical geometry significantly increasing with increasing CA:DPC ratio.

  4. Catalytic Hydrolytic Cleavage and Oxy-Cleavage of Lignin Linkages

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Guanguang; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2014-07-26

    In this work, new strategies involving organic bases were evaluated to depolymerize lignin to reduced molecular fragments in aqueous medium. NaOH as an inorganic base was also investigated as a reference. Full nature lignin samples are used for the study. As research tools to unravel the complexity of the macro lignin structure and bulky molecular size under this study, size exclusion chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometric analysis, typically used for protein characterizations, were used to follow the progress of lignin depolymerisation by measuring the molecular weight distribution of the products and determining the key molecular fingerprints, respectively. The results show that sodium phenoxide and guanidine carbonate are effective catalysts for lignin depolymerization. It is observed that there exists a synergism between H2O2 and the organic base, which is strongest with guanidine carbonate.

  5. Characterization and Modeling of the Collision Induced Dissociation Patterns of Deprotonated Glycosphingolipids: Cleavage of the Glycosidic Bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rožman, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Glycosphingolipid fragmentation behavior was investigated by combining results from analysis of a series of negative ion tandem mass spectra and molecular modeling. Fragmentation patterns extracted from 75 tandem mass spectra of mainly acidic glycosphingolipid species (gangliosides) suggest prominent cleavage of the glycosidic bonds with retention of the glycosidic oxygen atom by the species formed from the reducing end (B and Y ion formation). Dominant product ions arise from dissociation of sialic acids glycosidic bonds whereas product ions resulting from cleavage of other glycosidic bonds are less abundant. Potential energy surfaces and unimolecular reaction rates of several low-energy fragmentation pathways leading to cleavage of glycosidic bonds were estimated in order to explain observed dissociation patterns. Glycosidic bond cleavage in both neutral (unsubstituted glycosyl group) and acidic glycosphingolipids was the outcome of the charge-directed intramolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) mechanism. According to the suggested mechanism, the nucleophile in a form of carboxylate or oxyanion attacks the carbon at position one of the sugar ring, simultaneously breaking the glycosidic bond and yielding an epoxide. For gangliosides, unimolecular reaction rates suggest that dominant product ions related to the cleavage of sialic acid glycosidic bonds are formed via direct dissociation channels. On the other hand, low abundant product ions related to the dissociation of other glycosidic bonds are more likely to be the result of sequential dissociation. Although results from this study mainly contribute to the understanding of glycosphingolipid fragmentation chemistry, some mechanistic findings regarding cleavage of the glycosidic bond may be applicable to other glycoconjugates.

  6. (S) 2-phenyl-2-(p-tolylsulfonylamino)acetic acid. Structure, acidity and its alkali carboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte-Hernández, Angélica M.; Contreras, Rosalinda; Suárez-Moreno, Galdina V.; Montes-Tolentino, Pedro; Ramos-García, Iris; González, Felipe J.; Flores-Parra, Angelina

    2015-03-01

    The structure and the preferred conformers of (S) 2-phenyl-2-(p-tolylsulfonylamino)acetic acid (1) are reported. Compound 1 is a derivative of the unnatural aminoacid the (S) phenyl glycine. The X-ray diffraction analyses of the complexes of 1 with water, methanol, pyridine and its own anion are discussed. In order to add information about the acidity of the COOH and NH protons in compound 1, its pKa in DMSO and those of N-benzyl-p-tolylsulfonamide and (S) N-methylbenzyl-p-tolylsulfonamide were determined by cyclic voltammetry. Data improved the scarce information about pKa in DMSO values of sulfonamides. The products of the reactions of compound 1 with one and two equivalents of LiOH, NaOH and KOH in methanol were analyzed. Crystals of the lithium (2) and sodium (3) carboxylates and the dipotassium sulfonylamide acetate (7) were obtained, they are coordination polymers. In compound 2, the lithium is bound to four oxygen atoms with short bond lengths. The coordination of the lithium atom to two carboxylates gives an infinite ribbon by formation of fused six membered rings. In the crystal of compound 3, two pentacoordinated sodium atoms are bridged by three oxygen atoms, one from a water molecule and two from DMSO. The short distance between the sodium atoms (3.123 Å), implies a metal-metal interaction. The sodium couples are linked by two carboxylate groups, forming a planar ribbon of fused twelve membered rings. A notable discovery was a water molecule quenched in the middle of the ring, with a tetra coordinated oxygen atom in a square planar geometry. In compound 7, the carboxylate and the amide are bound to heptacoordinated potassium atoms. The 2D polymer of 7 has a sandwich structure, with the carboxylate and potassium atoms in the inner layer covered by the aromatic rings.

  7. Motualevic Acids and Analogs: Synthesis and Antimicrobial Structure Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Cheruku, Pradeep; Keffer, Jessica L.; Dogo-Isonagie, Cajetan; Bewley, Carole A.

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of the marine natural products motualevic acids A, E, and analogs in which modifications have been made to the ω-brominated lipid (E)-14,14-dibromotetra-deca-2,13-dienoic acid or amino acid unit are reported, together with antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Enterococcus faecium, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. PMID:20538459

  8. Structural diversity and biological significance of lipoteichoic acid in Gram-positive bacteria: focusing on beneficial probiotic lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Yokota, Shinichi; Fukiya, Satoru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell surface molecules are at the forefront of host-bacterium interactions. Teichoic acids are observed only in Gram-positive bacteria, and they are one of the main cell surface components. Teichoic acids play important physiological roles and contribute to the bacterial interaction with their host. In particular, lipoteichoic acid (LTA) anchored to the cell membrane has attracted attention as a host immunomodulator. Chemical and biological characteristics of LTA from various bacteria have been described. However, most of the information concerns pathogenic bacteria, and information on beneficial bacteria, including probiotic lactic acid bacteria, is insufficient. LTA is structurally diverse. Strain-level structural diversity of LTA is suggested to underpin its immunomodulatory activities. Thus, the structural information on LTA in probiotics, in particular strain-associated diversity, is important for understanding its beneficial roles associated with the modulation of immune response. Continued accumulation of structural information is necessary to elucidate the detailed physiological roles and significance of LTA. In this review article, we summarize the current state of knowledge on LTA structure, in particular the structure of LTA from lactic acid bacteria. We also describe the significance of structural diversity and biological roles of LTA.

  9. Structural diversity and biological significance of lipoteichoic acid in Gram-positive bacteria: focusing on beneficial probiotic lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    SHIRAISHI, Tsukasa; YOKOTA, Shinichi; FUKIYA, Satoru; YOKOTA, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell surface molecules are at the forefront of host-bacterium interactions. Teichoic acids are observed only in Gram-positive bacteria, and they are one of the main cell surface components. Teichoic acids play important physiological roles and contribute to the bacterial interaction with their host. In particular, lipoteichoic acid (LTA) anchored to the cell membrane has attracted attention as a host immunomodulator. Chemical and biological characteristics of LTA from various bacteria have been described. However, most of the information concerns pathogenic bacteria, and information on beneficial bacteria, including probiotic lactic acid bacteria, is insufficient. LTA is structurally diverse. Strain-level structural diversity of LTA is suggested to underpin its immunomodulatory activities. Thus, the structural information on LTA in probiotics, in particular strain-associated diversity, is important for understanding its beneficial roles associated with the modulation of immune response. Continued accumulation of structural information is necessary to elucidate the detailed physiological roles and significance of LTA. In this review article, we summarize the current state of knowledge on LTA structure, in particular the structure of LTA from lactic acid bacteria. We also describe the significance of structural diversity and biological roles of LTA. PMID:27867802

  10. Effect of acid hydrolysis on starch structure and functionality: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Copeland, Les

    2015-01-01

    Acid hydrolysis is an important chemical modification that can significantly change the structural and functional properties of starch without disrupting its granular morphology. A deep understanding of the effect of acid hydrolysis on starch structure and functionality is of great importance for starch scientific research and its industrial applications. During acid hydrolysis, amorphous regions are hydrolyzed preferentially, which enhances the crystallinity and double helical content of acid hydrolyzed starch. This review discusses current understanding of the effect of acid hydrolysis on starch structure and functionality. The effects of acid hydrolysis on amylose content, chain length distribution of amylopectin molecules, molecular and crystalline organization (including lamellar structure) and granular morphology are considered. Functional properties discussed include swelling power, gelatinization, retrogradation, pasting, gel texture, and in vitro enzyme digestibility. The paper also highlights some promising applications of acid hydrolyzed starch (starch nanocrystals) in the preparation of biodegradable nanocomposites, bio-hydrogen, and slowly digestible starch-based healthy foods.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinases - From the cleavage data to the prediction tools and beyond.

    PubMed

    Cieplak, Piotr; Strongin, Alex Y

    2017-03-24

    Understanding the physiological role of any protease requires identification of both its cleavage substrates and their relative cleavage efficacy as compared with other substrates and other proteinases. Our review manuscript is focused on the cleavage preferences of the individual matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the cleavage similarity and distinction that exist in the human MMP family. The recent in-depth analysis of MMPs by us and many others greatly increased knowledge of the MMP biology and structural-functional relationships among this protease family members. A better knowledge of cleavage preferences of MMPs has led us to the development of the prediction tools that are now capable of the high throughput reliable prediction and ranking the MMP cleavage sites in the peptide sequences in silico. Our software unifies and consolidates volumes of the pre-existing data. Now this prediction-ranking in silico tool is ready to be used by others. The software we developed may facilitate both the identification of the novel proteolytic regulatory pathways and the discovery of the previously uncharacterized substrates of the individual MMPs. Because now the MMP research may be based on the mathematical probability parameters rather than on either random luck or common sense alone, the researchers armed with this novel in silico tool will be better equipped to fine-tune or, at least, to sharply focus their wet chemistry experiments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Matrix Metalloproteinases edited by Rafael Fridman.

  12. Microwave spectra and structure of the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid-formic acid dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Kukolich, Stephen G.; Lin, Wei

    2015-09-28

    The rotational spectrum of the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid–formic acid doubly hydrogen bonded dimer has been measured in the 4-11 GHz region using a Flygare-Balle type pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent, four unique singly substituted {sup 13}C isotopologues, and a singly deuterated isotopologue. Splittings due to a possible concerted double proton tunneling motion were not observed. Rotational constants (A, B, and C) and centrifugal distortion constants (D{sub J} and D{sub JK}) were determined from the measured transitions for the dimer. The values of the rotational (in MHz) and centrifugal distortion constants (in kHz) for the parent isotopologue are A = 4045.4193(16), B = 740.583 80(14), C = 658.567 60(23), D{sub J} = 0.0499(16), and D{sub JK} = 0.108(14). A partial gas phase structure of the dimer was derived from the rotational constants of the measured isotopologues, previous structural work on each monomer units and results of the calculations.

  13. Structural basis and functions of abscisic acid receptors PYLs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing L.; Jiang, Lun; Xin, Qi; Liu, Yang; Tan, Jian X.; Chen, Zhong Z.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a key role in many developmental processes and responses to adaptive stresses in plants. Recently, a new family of nucleocytoplasmic PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYLs) has been identified as bona fide ABA receptors. PYLs together with protein phosphatases type-2C (PP2Cs), Snf1 (Sucrose-non-fermentation 1)-related kinases subfamily 2 (SnRK2s) and downstream substrates constitute the core ABA signaling network. Generally, PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s kinases by physical interaction and direct dephosphorylation. Upon ABA binding, PYLs change their conformations and then contact and inhibit PP2Cs, thus activating SnRK2s. Here, we reviewed the recent progress in research regarding the structures of the core signaling pathways of ABA, including the (+)-ABA, (−)-ABA and ABA analogs pyrabactin as well as 6AS perception by PYLs, SnRK2s mimicking PYLs in binding PP2Cs. PYLs inhibited PP2Cs in both the presence and absence of ABA and activated SnRK2s. The present review elucidates multiple ABA signal perception and transduction by PYLs, which might shed light on how to design small chemical compounds for improving plant performance in the future. PMID:25745428

  14. Structure and Functional Characterization of a Bile Acid 7α Dehydratase BaiE in Secondary Bile Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, Shiva; Chiu, Hsien-Po; Jones, David H.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Miller, Mitchell D.; Xu, Qingping; Farr, Carol L.; Ridlon, Jason M.; Wells, James E.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of the primary bile acids cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) to the secondary bile acids deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA) is performed by a few species of intestinal bacteria in the genus Clostridium through a multistep biochemical pathway that removes a 7α-hydroxyl group. The rate-determining enzyme in this pathway is bile acid 7α-dehydratase (baiE). In this study, we report crystal structures of apo-BaiE and its putative product-bound (3-oxo-Δ4,6- lithocholyl-Coenzyme A (CoA)) complex. BaiE is a trimer with a twisted α+β barrel fold with similarity to the Nuclear Transport Factor 2 (NTF2) superfamily. Tyr30, Asp35 and His83 form a catalytic triad that is conserved across this family. Site-directed mutagenesis of BaiE from Clostridium scindens VPI 12708 confirmed that these residues are essential for catalysis and also confirmed the importance of other conserved residues, Tyr54 and Arg146, which are involved in substrate binding and affect catalytic turnover. Steady state kinetic studies revealed that the BaiE homologs are able to turn over 3-oxo-Δ4-bile acid and CoA-conjugated 3-oxo-Δ4-bile acid substrates with comparable efficiency questioning the role of CoA-conjugation in the bile acid metabolism pathway. PMID:26650892

  15. Yeast ribonuclease III uses a network of multiple hydrogen bonds for RNA binding and cleavage.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Mathieu; Abou Elela, Sherif

    2008-08-19

    Members of the bacterial RNase III family recognize a variety of short structured RNAs with few common features. It is not clear how this group of enzymes supports high cleavage fidelity while maintaining a broad base of substrates. Here we show that the yeast orthologue of RNase III (Rnt1p) uses a network of 2'-OH-dependent interactions to recognize substrates with different structures. We designed a series of bipartite substrates permitting the distinction between binding and cleavage defects. Each substrate was engineered to carry a single or multiple 2'- O-methyl or 2'-fluoro ribonucleotide substitutions to prevent the formation of hydrogen bonds with a specific nucleotide or group of nucleotides. Interestingly, introduction of 2'- O-methyl ribonucleotides near the cleavage site increased the rate of catalysis, indicating that 2'-OH are not required for cleavage. Substitution of nucleotides in known Rnt1p binding site with 2'- O-methyl ribonucleotides inhibited cleavage while single 2'-fluoro ribonucleotide substitutions did not. This indicates that while no single 2'-OH is essential for Rnt1p cleavage, small changes in the substrate structure are not tolerated. Strikingly, several nucleotide substitutions greatly increased the substrate dissociation constant with little or no effect on the Michaelis-Menten constant or rate of catalysis. Together, the results indicate that Rnt1p uses a network of nucleotide interactions to identify its substrate and support two distinct modes of binding. One mode is primarily mediated by the dsRNA binding domain and leads to the formation of stable RNA/protein complex, while the other requires the presence of the nuclease and N-terminal domains and leads to RNA cleavage.

  16. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1981-11-12

    The objective of this project is to determine the structure of bituminous coal by determining the proportions of the various kinds of connecting bonds and how they can best be broken. Results obtained during the past quarter are presented for the following tasks: (1) extractions and fractionations of coal products which covers pyridine extraction, fractionation of TIPS fractions, EDA extraction of Illinois No. 6 coal and swelling ratios of coal samples; (2) experiments on breakable single bonds which cover reactions of ethylenediamine and model ethers, reaction of pyridine-extracted coal with Me/sub 3/SiI, Baeyer-Villiger oxidations, reaction to diphenylmethane with 15% HNO/sub 3/, cleavage of TIPS with ZnI/sub 2/, and cleavage of black acids; and (3) oxygen oxidation No. 18. Some of the highlights of these studies are: (1) some model ethers are not cleaved by EDA under extraction conditions; (2) oxidation of diaryl ketones with m-chloroperbenzoic acid and saponification of the resulting esters in promising for identifying ketones, (3) treatment of a black acid with pyridine hydroiodide reduced the acid's molecular weight and increased its solubility in pyridine, but treatment with ZnI/sub 2/ was ineffective; (4) in comparison with 0.1 M K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/, 0.01 M persulfate is relatively ineffective in accelerating oxidation of BnNH/sub 2/-extracted coal in water suspension. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  17. 4-Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA hydratase/lyase, an enzyme of phenylpropanoid cleavage from Pseudomonas, causes formation of C(6)-C(1) acid and alcohol glucose conjugates when expressed in hairy roots of Datura stramonium L.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Adinpunya; Mayer, Melinda J; Mellon, Fred A; Michael, Anthony J; Narbad, Arjan; Parr, Adrian J; Waldron, Keith W; Walton, Nicholas J

    2002-05-01

    4-Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA hydratase/lyase (HCHL), a crotonase homologue of phenylpropanoid catabolism from Pseudomonas fluorescens strain AN103, led to the formation of 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde metabolites when expressed in hairy root cultures of Datura stramonium L. established by transformation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes. The principal new compounds observed were the glucoside and glucose ester of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, together with 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol- O-beta- D-glucoside. In lines actively expressing HCHL, these together amounted to around 0.5% of tissue fresh mass. No protocatechuic derivatives were found, although a trace of vanillic acid-beta- D-glucoside was detected. There was no accumulation of 4-hydroxybenzaldehydes, whether free or in the form of their glucose conjugates. There was some evidence suggesting a diminished availability of feruloyl-CoA for the production of feruloyl putrescine and coniferyl alcohol. The findings are discussed in the context of a diversion of phenylpropanoid metabolism, and the ability of plants and plant cultures to conjugate phenolic compounds.

  18. Dynamic nature of cleavage bodies and their spatial relationship to DDX1 bodies, Cajal bodies, and gems.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Roy, Ken; Katyal, Sachin; Sun, Xuejun; Bléoo, Stacey; Godbout, Roseline

    2006-03-01

    DDX1 bodies, cleavage bodies, Cajal bodies (CBs), and gems are nuclear suborganelles that contain factors involved in RNA transcription and/or processing. Although all four nuclear bodies can exist as distinct entities, they often colocalize or overlap with each other. To better understand the relationship between these four nuclear bodies, we examined their spatial distribution as a function of the cell cycle. Here, we report that whereas DDX1 bodies, CBs and gems are present throughout interphase, CPSF-100-containing cleavage bodies are predominantly found during S and G2 phases, whereas CstF-64-containing cleavage bodies are primarily observed during S phase. All four nuclear bodies associate with each other during S phase, with cleavage bodies colocalizing with DDX1 bodies, and cleavage bodies/DDX1 bodies residing adjacent to gems and CBs. Although inhibitors of RNA transcription had no effect on DDX1 bodies or cleavage bodies, inhibitors of DNA replication resulted in loss of CstF-64-containing cleavage bodies. A striking effect on nuclear structures was observed with latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, resulting in the formation of needlelike nuclear spicules made up of CstF-64, CPSF-100, RNA, and RNA polymerase II. Our results suggest that cleavage body components are highly dynamic in nature.

  19. Dynamic Nature of Cleavage Bodies and Their Spatial Relationship to DDX1 Bodies, Cajal Bodies, and Gems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Roy, Ken; Katyal, Sachin; Sun, Xuejun; Bléoo, Stacey; Godbout, Roseline

    2006-01-01

    DDX1 bodies, cleavage bodies, Cajal bodies (CBs), and gems are nuclear suborganelles that contain factors involved in RNA transcription and/or processing. Although all four nuclear bodies can exist as distinct entities, they often colocalize or overlap with each other. To better understand the relationship between these four nuclear bodies, we examined their spatial distribution as a function of the cell cycle. Here, we report that whereas DDX1 bodies, CBs and gems are present throughout interphase, CPSF-100-containing cleavage bodies are predominantly found during S and G2 phases, whereas CstF-64-containing cleavage bodies are primarily observed during S phase. All four nuclear bodies associate with each other during S phase, with cleavage bodies colocalizing with DDX1 bodies, and cleavage bodies/DDX1 bodies residing adjacent to gems and CBs. Although inhibitors of RNA transcription had no effect on DDX1 bodies or cleavage bodies, inhibitors of DNA replication resulted in loss of CstF-64-containing cleavage bodies. A striking effect on nuclear structures was observed with latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, resulting in the formation of needlelike nuclear spicules made up of CstF-64, CPSF-100, RNA, and RNA polymerase II. Our results suggest that cleavage body components are highly dynamic in nature. PMID:16371507

  20. Structure of six organic acid-base adducts from 6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine and acidic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Daqi; Tao, Lin; Zhou, Mengjian; Shen, Yinyan; Chen, Quan; Lin, Zhanghui; Gao, Xingjun

    2014-05-01

    Six anhydrous organic acid-base adducts of 6-bromobenzo[d]thiazol-2-amine were prepared with organic acids as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, salicylic acid, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid, malonic acid and sebacic acid. The compounds 1-6 were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, and elemental analysis. The melting points of all the adducts were given. Of the six adducts, 1, 3, 4, and 5 are organic salts, while 2, and 6 are cocrystals. The supramolecular arrangement in the crystals 2-6 is based on the R22(8) synthon. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-6 suggests that there are strong NH⋯O, OH⋯N, and OH⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between acid and base components in the supramolecular assemblies. When the hydroxyl group is present in the ortho position of the carboxy, the intramolecular S6 synthon is present, as expected. Besides the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, other noncovalent interactions also play important roles in structure extension. Due to the synergetic effect of these weak interactions, compounds 1-6 display 1D-3D framework structure.

  1. Angiopoietin-like protein 3 inhibits lipoprotein lipase activity through enhancing its cleavage by proprotein convertases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Afroza, Huq; Rader, Daniel J; Jin, Weijun

    2010-09-03

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-mediated lipolysis of triglycerides is the first and rate-limiting step in chylomicron/very low density lipoprotein clearance at the luminal surface of the capillaries. Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) is shown to inhibit LPL activity and plays important roles in modulating lipoprotein metabolism in vivo. However, the mechanism by which it inhibits LPL activity remains poorly understood. Using cell-based analysis of the interaction between ANGPTL3, furin, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 5 (PCSK5), paired amino acid converting enzyme-4 (PACE4), and LPL, we demonstrated that the cleavage of LPL by proprotein convertases is an inactivation process, similar to that seen for endothelial lipase cleavage. At physiological concentrations and in the presence of cells, ANGPTL3 is a potent inhibitor of LPL. This action is due to the fact that ANGPTL3 can enhance LPL cleavage by endogenous furin and PACE4 but not by PCSK5. This effect is specific to LPL but not endothelial lipase. Both N- and C-terminal domains of LPL are required for ANGPTL3-enhanced cleavage, and the N-terminal domain of ANGPTL3 is sufficient to exert its effect on LPL cleavage. Moreover, ANGPTL3 enhances LPL cleavage in the presence of either heparan sulfate proteoglycans or glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1). By enhancing LPL cleavage, ANGPTL3 dissociates LPL from the cell surface, inhibiting both the catalytic and noncatalytic functions of LPL. Taken together, our data provide a molecular connection between ANGPTL3, LPL, and proprotein convertases, which may represent a rapid signal communication among different metabolically active tissues to maintain energy homeostasis. These novel findings provide a new paradigm of specific protease-substrate interaction and further improve our knowledge of LPL biology.

  2. The Dps protein of Agrobacterium tumefaciens does not bind to DNA but protects it toward oxidative cleavage: x-ray crystal structure, iron binding, and hydroxyl-radical scavenging properties.

    PubMed

    Ceci, Pierpaolo; Ilari, Andrea; Falvo, Elisabetta; Chiancone, Emilia

    2003-05-30

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens Dps (DNA-binding proteins from starved cells), encoded by the dps gene located on the circular chromosome of this plant pathogen, was cloned, and its structural and functional properties were determined in vitro. In Escherichia coli Dps, the family prototype, the DNA binding properties are thought to be associated with the presence of the lysine-containing N-terminal tail that extends from the protein surface into the solvent. The x-ray crystal structure of A. tumefaciens Dps shows that the positively charged N-terminal tail, which is 11 amino acids shorter than in the E. coli protein, is blocked onto the protein surface. This feature accounts for the lack of interaction with DNA. The intersubunit ferroxidase center characteristic of Dps proteins is conserved and confers to the A. tumefaciens protein a ferritin-like activity that manifests itself in the capacity to oxidize and incorporate iron in the internal cavity and to release it after reduction. In turn, sequestration of Fe(II) correlates with the capacity of A. tumefaciens Dps to reduce the production of hydroxyl radicals from H2O2 through Fenton chemistry. These data demonstrate conclusively that DNA protection from oxidative damage in vitro does not require formation of a Dps-DNA complex. In vivo, the hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of A. tumefaciens Dps may be envisaged to act in concert with catalase A to counteract the toxic effect of H2O2, the major component of the plant defense system when challenged by the bacterium.

  3. Carbon–carbon bond cleavage for Cu-mediated aromatic trifluoromethylations and pentafluoroethylations

    PubMed Central

    Sugiishi, Tsuyuka; Aikawa, Kohsuke

    2015-01-01

    Summary This short review highlights the copper-mediated fluoroalkylation using perfluoroalkylated carboxylic acid derivatives. Carbon–carbon bond cleavage of perfluoroalkylated carboxylic acid derivatives takes place in fluoroalkylation reactions at high temperature (150–200 °C) or under basic conditions to generate fluoroalkyl anion sources for the formation of fluoroalkylcopper species. The fluoroalkylation reactions, which proceed through decarboxylation or tetrahedral intermediates, are useful protocols for the synthesis of fluoroalkylated aromatics. PMID:26734112

  4. Copper coordination polymers constructed from thiazole-5-carboxylic acid: Synthesis, crystal structures, and structural transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meundaeng, Natthaya; Rujiwatra, Apinpus; Prior, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    We have successfully prepared crystals of thiazole-5-carboxylic acid (5-Htza) (L) and three new thiazole-5-carboxylate-based Cu2+ coordination polymers with different dimensionality, namely, 1D [Cu2(5-tza)2(1,10-phenanthroline)2(NO3)2] (1), 2D [Cu(5-tza)2(MeOH)2] (2), and 3D [Cu(5-tza)2]·H2O (3). These have been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry. Interestingly, the 2D network structure of 2 can directly transform into the 3D framework of 3 upon removal of methanol molecules at room temperature. 2 can also undergo structural transformation to produce the same 2D network present in the known [Cu(5-tza)2]·1.5H2O upon heat treatment for 2 h. This 2D network can adsorb water and convert to 3 upon exposure to air.

  5. Tmem27 dimerization, deglycosylation, plasma membrane depletion, and the extracellular Phe-Phe motif are negative regulators of cleavage by Bace2.

    PubMed

    Esterházy, Daria; Akpinar, Pinar; Stoffel, Markus

    2012-05-01

    The pancreatic β-cell surface protein Tmem27 is promotes the preservation of functional β-cell mass. It is a selective substrate of the protease Bace2, yet the intramolecular features of Tmem27 that regulate its processing by this sheddase have not been characterized. In particular, the importance of homodimerization, glycosylation, trafficking to the plasma membrane (PM), the existence of multiple cleavage sites, and the amino acid residues that govern these features are currently unknown. Using Tmem27 mutational analysis and multiple biochemical approaches, we here show that Tmem27 dimerization is a dynamic process mediated by its intracellular cysteine residue and that prevents Tmem27 cleavage, that extracellular asparagine glycosylation is essential for Tmem27 trafficking to the PM and its processing by Bace2, that the amount of Tmem27 at the PM is proportional to its total cell levels upon glucose stimulation and Bace2 inhibition, and that the double phenylalanine motif in the Tmem27 cleavage site is an intramolecular Bace2 inhibitor. These findings define structural properties of Tmem27 that affect the susceptibility to its protease Bace2 and have implications for the efficiency with which Tmem27 and other Bace2 substrates are cleaved in normal and disease states.

  6. Chemical cleavage of fucoxanthin from Undaria pinnatifida and formation of apo-fucoxanthinones and apo-fucoxanthinals identified using LC-DAD-APCI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junxiang; Sun, Xiaowen; Chen, Xiaoli; Wang, Shuhui; Wang, Dongfeng

    2016-11-15

    As the most abundant carotenoid in nature, fucoxanthin is susceptible to oxidation under some conditions, forming cleavage products that possibly exhibit both positive and negative health effects in vitro and in vivo. Thus, to produce relatively high amounts of cleavage products, chemical oxidation of fucoxanthin was performed. Kinetic models for oxidation were probed and reaction products were identified. The results indicated that both potassium permanganate (KMnO4) and hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite (HClO/ClO(-)) treatment fitted a first-order kinetic model, while oxidation promoted by hydroxyl radical (OH) followed second-order kinetics. With the help of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, a total of 14 apo-fucoxanthins were detected as predominant cleavage products, with structural and geometric isomers identified among them. Three apo-fucoxanthinones and eleven apo-fucoxanthinals, of which five were cis-apo-fucoxanthinals, were detected upon oxidation by the three oxidizing agents (KMnO4, HClO/ClO(-), and OH).

  7. RNA Sequencing Identifies New RNase III Cleavage Sites in Escherichia coli and Reveals Increased Regulation of mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Gina C.; Cameron, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ribonucleases facilitate rapid turnover of RNA, providing cells with another mechanism to adjust transcript and protein levels in response to environmental conditions. While many examples have been documented, a comprehensive list of RNase targets is not available. To address this knowledge gap, we compared levels of RNA sequencing coverage of Escherichia coli and a corresponding RNase III mutant to expand the list of known RNase III targets. RNase III is a widespread endoribonuclease that binds and cleaves double-stranded RNA in many critical transcripts. RNase III cleavage at novel sites found in aceEF, proP, tnaC, dctA, pheM, sdhC, yhhQ, glpT, aceK, and gluQ accelerated RNA decay, consistent with previously described targets wherein RNase III cleavage initiates rapid degradation of secondary messages by other RNases. In contrast, cleavage at three novel sites in the ahpF, pflB, and yajQ transcripts led to stabilized secondary transcripts. Two other novel sites in hisL and pheM overlapped with transcriptional attenuators that likely serve to ensure turnover of these highly structured RNAs. Many of the new RNase III target sites are located on transcripts encoding metabolic enzymes. For instance, two novel RNase III sites are located within transcripts encoding enzymes near a key metabolic node connecting glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was increased in an rnc deletion mutant compared to the wild-type (WT) strain in early stationary phase, confirming the novel link between RNA turnover and regulation of pathway activity. Identification of these novel sites suggests that mRNA turnover may be an underappreciated mode of regulating metabolism. PMID:28351917

  8. Benzenepolycarboxylic acids with potential anti-hemorrhagic properties and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Aung, Hnin Thanda; Nikai, Toshiaki; Niwa, Masatake; Takaya, Yoshiaki

    2011-12-01

    Previously, we reported the structural requirements of the cinnamic acid relatives for inhibition of snake venom hemorrhagic action. In the present study, we examined the effect of benzenepolycarboxylic acids and substituted benzoic acids against Protobothropsflavoviridis venom-induced hemorrhage. Pyromellitic acid (1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid) was found to be a potent inhibitor of hemorrhage, with an IC(50) value of 0.035 μM. In addition, most of the antihemorrhagic activity of compounds tested in this experiment showed good correlation to acidity.

  9. Gleevec shifts APP processing from a β-cleavage to a nonamyloidogenic cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Netzer, William J.; Bettayeb, Karima; Sinha, Subhash C.; Flajolet, Marc; Bustos, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Neurotoxic amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) are major drivers of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and are formed by sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase (BACE) and γ-secretase. Our previous study showed that the anticancer drug Gleevec lowers Aβ levels through indirect inhibition of γ-secretase activity. Here we report that Gleevec also achieves its Aβ-lowering effects through an additional cellular mechanism. It renders APP less susceptible to proteolysis by BACE without inhibiting BACE enzymatic activity or the processing of other BACE substrates. This effect closely mimics the phenotype of APP A673T, a recently discovered mutation that protects carriers against AD and age-related cognitive decline. In addition, Gleevec induces formation of a specific set of APP C-terminal fragments, also observed in cells expressing the APP protective mutation and in cells exposed to a conventional BACE inhibitor. These Gleevec phenotypes require an intracellular acidic pH and are independent of tyrosine kinase inhibition, given that a related compound lacking tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity, DV2-103, exerts similar effects on APP metabolism. In addition, DV2-103 accumulates at high concentrations in the rodent brain, where it rapidly lowers Aβ levels. This study suggests that long-term treatment with drugs that indirectly modulate BACE processing of APP but spare other BACE substrates and achieve therapeutic concentrations in the brain might be effective in preventing or delaying the onset of AD and could be safer than nonselective BACE inhibitor drugs. PMID:28115709

  10. Unexpected Trypsin Cleavage at Ubiquitinated Lysines

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Unexpected tryptic cleavage has been characterized at modified K48 residues in polyubiquitins. In particular, the tryptic products of all seven of the lysine-linked dimers of ubiquitin and of three trimers—linear Ub–48Ub–48Ub, linear Ub–63Ub–63Ub, and the branched trimer [Ub]2–6,48Ub—have been analyzed. In addition to the peptide products expected under commonly used tryptic conditions, we observe that peptides are formed with an unexpected ε-glycinylglycinyl-Lys carboxyl terminus when the site of linkage is Lys48. Trypsin from three different commercial sources exhibited this aberration. Initial cleavage at R74 is proposed in a distal ubiquitin to produce a glycinylglycinyl-lysine residue which is bound by trypsin. PMID:26182167

  11. RNA Sequencing Identifies New RNase III Cleavage Sites in Escherichia coli and Reveals Increased Regulation of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Gina C; Cameron, Jeffrey C; Pfleger, Brian F

    2017-03-28

    Ribonucleases facilitate rapid turnover of RNA, providing cells with another mechanism to adjust transcript and protein levels in response to environmental conditions. While many examples have been documented, a comprehensive list of RNase targets is not available. To address this knowledge gap, we compared levels of RNA sequencing coverage of Escherichia coli and a corresponding RNase III mutant to expand the list of known RNase III targets. RNase III is a widespread endoribonuclease that binds and cleaves double-stranded RNA in many critical transcripts. RNase III cleavage at novel sites found in aceEF, proP, tnaC, dctA, pheM, sdhC, yhhQ, glpT, aceK, and gluQ accelerated RNA decay, consistent with previously described targets wherein RNase III cleavage initiates rapid degradation of secondary messages by other RNases. In contrast, cleavage at three novel sites in the ahpF, pflB, and yajQ transcripts led to stabilized secondary transcripts. Two other novel sites in hisL and pheM overlapped with transcriptional attenuators that likely serve to ensure turnover of these highly structured RNAs. Many of the new RNase III target sites are located on transcripts encoding metabolic enzymes. For instance, two novel RNase III sites are located within transcripts encoding enzymes near a key metabolic node connecting glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was increased in an rnc deletion mutant compared to the wild-type (WT) strain in early stationary phase, confirming the novel link between RNA turnover and regulation of pathway activity. Identification of these novel sites suggests that mRNA turnover may be an underappreciated mode of regulating metabolism.IMPORTANCE The concerted action and overlapping functions of endoribonucleases, exoribonucleases, and RNA processing enzymes complicate the study of global RNA turnover and recycling of specific transcripts. More information about RNase specificity and activity is needed to make

  12. Competitive fragmentation pathways of acetic acid dimer explored by synchrotron VUV photoionization mass spectrometry and electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jiwen; Hu, Yongjun; Zou, Hao; Cao, Lanlan; Liu, Fuyi; Shan, Xiaobin; Sheng, Liusi

    2012-09-01

    In present study, photoionization and dissociation of acetic acid dimers have been studied with the synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry and theoretical calculations. Besides the intense signal corresponding to protonated cluster ions (CH3COOH)n.H+, the feature related to the fragment ions (CH3COOH)H+.COO (105 amu) via β-carbon-carbon bond cleavage is observed. By scanning photoionization efficiency spectra, appearance energies of the fragments (CH3COOH).H+ and (CH3COOH)H+.COO are obtained. With the aid of theoretical calculations, seven fragmentation channels of acetic acid dimer cations were discussed, where five cation isomers of acetic acid dimer are involved. While four of them are found to generate the protonated species, only one of them can dissociate into a C-C bond cleavage product (CH3COOH)H+.COO. After surmounting the methyl hydrogen-transfer barrier 10.84 ± 0.05 eV, the opening of dissociative channel to produce ions (CH3COOH)+ becomes the most competitive path. When photon energy increases to 12.4 eV, we also found dimer cations can be fragmented and generate new cations (CH3COOH).CH3CO+. Kinetics, thermodynamics, and entropy factors for these competitive dissociation pathways are discussed. The present report provides a clear picture of the photoionization and dissociation processes of the acetic acid dimer in the range of the photon energy 9-15 eV.

  13. Salts of phenylacetic acid and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid with Cinchona alkaloids: Crystal structures, thermal analysis and FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amombo Noa, Francoise M.; Jacobs, Ayesha

    2016-06-01

    Seven salts were formed with phenylacetic acid (PAA), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPAA) and the Cinchona alkaloids; cinchonidine (CIND), quinidine (QUID) and quinine (QUIN). For all the structures the proton was transferred from the carboxylic acid of the PAA/HPAA to the quinuclidine nitrogen of the respective Cinchona alkaloid. For six of the salts, water was included in the crystal structures with one of these also incorporating an isopropanol solvent molecule. However HPAA co-crystallised with quinine to form an anhydrous salt, (HPAA-)(QUIN+). The thermal stability of the salts were determined and differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the (HPAA-)(QUIN+) salt had the highest thermal stability compared to the other salt hydrates. The salts were also characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. (PAA-)(QUID+)·H2O and (PAA-)(QUIN+)·H2O are isostructural and Hirshfeld surface analysis was completed to compare the intermolecular interactions in these two structures.

  14. Cleavage and Cell Adhesion Properties of Human Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (HEPCAM)*

    PubMed Central

    Tsaktanis, Thanos; Kremling, Heidi; Pavšič, Miha; von Stackelberg, Ricarda; Mack, Brigitte; Fukumori, Akio; Steiner, Harald; Vielmuth, Franziska; Spindler, Volker; Huang, Zhe; Jakubowski, Jasmine; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Luxenburger, Elke; Lauber, Kirsten; Lenarčič, Brigita; Gires, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Human epithelial cell adhesion molecule (HEPCAM) is a tumor-associated antigen frequently expressed in carcinomas, which promotes proliferation after regulated intramembrane proteolysis. Here, we describe extracellular shedding of HEPCAM at two α-sites through a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) and at one β-site through BACE1. Transmembrane cleavage by γ-secretase occurs at three γ-sites to generate extracellular Aβ-like fragments and at two ϵ-sites to release human EPCAM intracellular domain HEPICD, which is efficiently degraded by the proteasome. Mapping of cleavage sites onto three-dimensional structures of HEPEX cis-dimer predicted conditional availability of α- and β-sites. Endocytosis of HEPCAM warrants acidification in cytoplasmic vesicles to dissociate protein cis-dimers required for cleavage by BACE1 at low pH values. Intramembrane cleavage sites are accessible and not part of the structurally important transmembrane helix dimer crossing region. Surprisingly, neither chemical inhibition of cleavage nor cellular knock-out of HEPCAM using CRISPR-Cas9 technology impacted the adhesion of carcinoma cell lines. Hence, a direct function of HEPCAM as an adhesion molecule in carcinoma cells is not supported and appears to be questionable. PMID:26292218

  15. Sequence-specific cleavage of dsRNA by Mini-III RNase.

    PubMed

    Głów, Dawid; Pianka, Dariusz; Sulej, Agata A; Kozłowski, Łukasz P; Czarnecka, Justyna; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Skowronek, Krzysztof J; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2015-03-11

    Ribonucleases (RNases) play a critical role in RNA processing and degradation by hydrolyzing phosphodiester bonds (exo- or endonucleolytically). Many RNases that cut RNA internally exhibit substrate specificity, but their target sites are usually limited to one or a few specific nucleotides in single-stranded RNA and often in a context of a particular three-dimensional structure of the substrate. Thus far, no RNase counterparts of restriction enzymes have been identified which could cleave double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in a sequence-specific manner. Here, we present evidence for a sequence-dependent cleavage of long dsRNA by RNase Mini-III from Bacillus subtilis (BsMiniIII). Analysis of the sites cleaved by this enzyme in limited digest of bacteriophage Φ6 dsRNA led to the identification of a consensus target sequence. We defined nucleotide residues within the preferred cleavage site that affected the efficiency of the cleavage and were essential for the discrimination of cleavable versus non-cleavable dsRNA sequences. We have also determined that the loop α5b-α6, a distinctive structural element in Mini-III RNases, is crucial for the specific cleavage, but not for dsRNA binding. Our results suggest that BsMiniIII may serve as a prototype of a sequence-specific dsRNase that could possibly be used for targeted cleavage of dsRNA.

  16. Global identification of target recognition and cleavage by the Microprocessor in human ES cells.

    PubMed

    Seong, Youngmo; Lim, Do-Hwan; Kim, Augustine; Seo, Jae Hong; Lee, Young Sik; Song, Hoseok; Kwon, Young-Soo

    2014-11-10

    The Microprocessor plays an essential role in canonical miRNA biogenesis by facilitating cleavage of stem-loop structures in primary transcripts to yield pre-miRNAs. Although miRNA biogenesis has been extensively studied through biochemical and molecular genetic approaches, it has yet to be addressed to what extent the current miRNA biogenesis models hold true in intact cells. To address the issues of in vivo recognition and cleavage by the Microprocessor, we investigate RNAs that are associated with DGCR8 and Drosha by using immunoprecipitation coupled with next-generation sequencing. Here, we present global protein-RNA interactions with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. Our data indicate that precursors of canonical miRNAs and miRNA-like hairpins are the major substrates of the Microprocessor. As a result of specific enrichment of nascent cleavage products, we are able to pinpoint the Microprocessor-mediated cleavage sites per se at single-nucleotide resolution. Unexpectedly, a 2-nt 3' overhang invariably exists at the ends of cleaved bases instead of nascent pre-miRNAs. Besides canonical miRNA precursors, we find that two novel miRNA-like structures embedded in mRNAs are cleaved to yield pre-miRNA-like hairpins, uncoupled from miRNA maturation. Our data provide a framework for in vivo Microprocessor-mediated cleavage and a foundation for experimental and computational studies on miRNA biogenesis in living cells.

  17. Zinc-dependent cleavage in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme: evidence for a pH-dependent conformational change

    PubMed Central

    Borda, Emily J.; Markley, John C.; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th.

    2003-01-01

    We have characterized a novel Zn2+-catalyzed cleavage site between nucleotides C3 and U4 in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme. In contrast to previously described divalent metal-ion-dependent cleavage of RNA, U4 cleavage is only observed in the presence of Zn2+. This new cleavage site has an unusual pH dependence, in that U4 cleavage products are only observed above pH 7.9 and reach a maximum yield at about pH 8.5. These data, together with the fact that no metal ion-binding site is observed in proximity to the U4 cleavage site in either of the crystal structures, point toward a pH-dependent conformational change in the hammerhead ribozyme. We have described previously Zn2+-dependent cleavage between G8 and A9 in the hammerhead ribozyme and have discovered that U4 cleavage occurs only after A9 cleavage. To our knowledge, this is the first example of sequential cleavage events as a possible regulatory mechanism in ribozymes. PMID:12736309

  18. Kinetic analysis of the cleavage of natural and synthetic substrates by the Serratia nuclease.

    PubMed

    Friedhoff, P; Meiss, G; Kolmes, B; Pieper, U; Gimadutdinow, O; Urbanke, C; Pingoud, A

    1996-10-15

    The extracellular nuclease from Serratia marcescens is a non-specific endonuclease that hydrolyzes double-stranded and single-stranded DNA and RNA with high specific activity. Steady-state and presteady-state kinetic cleavage experiments were performed with natural and synthetic DNA and RNA substrates to understand the mechanism of action of the Serratia nuclease. Most of the natural substrates are cleaved with similar Kcat and K(m) values, the Kcat/K(m) ratios being comparable to that of staphylococcal nuclease. Substrates with extreme structural features, like poly(dA).poly(dT) or poly(dG).poly(dC), are cleaved by the Serratia nuclease with a 50 times higher or 10 times lower K(m), respectively, as salmon testis DNA. Neither with natural DNA or RNA nor synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide substrates did we observe substrate inhibition for the Serratia nuclease as reported recently. Experiments with short oligodeoxynucleotides confirmed previous results that for moderately good cleavage activity the substrate should contain at least five phosphate residues. Shorter substrates are still cleaved by the Serratia nuclease, albeit at a rate reduced by a factor of more than 100. Cleavage experiments with oligodeoxynucleotides substituted by a single phosphorothioate group showed that the negative charge of the pro-Rp-oxygen of the phosphate group 3' adjacent to the scissile phosphodiester bond is essential for cleavage, as only the Rp-phosphorothioate supports cleavage at the 5' adjacent phosphodiester bond. Furthermore, the modified bond itself is only cleaved in the Rp-diastereomer, albeit 1000 times more slowly than the corresponding unmodified phosphodiester bond, which offers the possibility to determine the stereochemical outcome of cleavage. Pre-steady-state cleavage experiments demonstrate that it is not dissociation of products but association of enzyme and substrate or the cleavage of the phosphodiester bond that is the rate-limiting step of the reaction. Finally

  19. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Quarterly report No. 13, October 1-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1982-02-26

    Bituminous coal is assumed to consist mostly of aggregates of condensed aromatic and aliphatic rings which are connected and made soluble by crosslinks containing single bonds. The objective of this project is to determine the structure of bituminous coal with emphasis on the crosslinks and breakable single bonds. During this past quarter the following studies were conducted on Illinois No. 6 coal: extraction with benzylamine (BnH/sub 2/), ethanolamine, ethylenediamine (EDA), pyridine; saponification of some toluene-insoluble, pyridine-soluble (TIPS) fraction; cleavages by amines; oxidation with aqueous NaOCl of butylated and methylated pyridine-extracted coal; decarboxylation on black acids. The investigations dealt with two kinds of connecting links in coal, which are designated as ester and ether groups. The ester groups are cleaved by strongly basic amines (to give amides) at 25/sup 0/C and by alcoholic KOH at 100/sup 0/C (to give salts and alcohols or phenols). Both esters and ethers are cleaved by HI or ZnCL/sub 2/ in pyridine at or below 50/sup 0/C. The ethers are also cleaved by BnNH/sub 2/, EDA, and EDA/DMSO to nearly the same extent on several days heating at 100/sup 0/C. Although a cleavage of model ethers by amines were not established, the parallel easy reactions of HI and ZnCl/sub 2/ and the slow 100/sup 0/C reactions of amines on coal lead the authors to designate the non-ester cleavages as ether cleavages. (ATT)

  20. Alpha and omega of carotenoid cleavage.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, M R

    2004-01-01

    In early 1900s, based on indirect evidence, Steenbock and Morton independently predicted that beta-carotene could be the biological precursor of vitamin A, although this notion was contested by others. In the 1930s, Thomas Moore showed the in vivo formation of vitamin A from beta-carotene. But it was not until Jim Olson and DeWitt Goodman independently showed in 1965 the formation of retinal, the aldehyde form of vitamin A from beta-carotene in cell-free extracts of liver and intestine, that this vital pathway of beta-carotene was recognized. Despite compelling evidence in several experimental systems for the central cleavage of beta-carotene to retinal by many investigators, there were some careful independent studies by Glover et al., Ganguly et al., Hansen and Meret and Krinsky et al. showing the eccentric cleavage of beta-carotene resulting in the formation of apocarotenoids both in vivo and in vitro. In an attempt to resolve this controversial issue, we revisited this problem in 1989 and showed beyond doubt the formation of retinal as the sole enzymatic product of a cytosolic enzyme from rabbit and rat intestinal mucosa by mass spectrometry and tracer analysis of the crystallized product. This was confirmed in 1996 by Nagao using the pig intestinal extract. Yeum et al. confirmed in 2000 that retinal is the sole product of beta-carotene cleavage in the presence of alpha-tocopherol, and that the observed formation of apocarotenoids occurs only in the absence of an antioxidant like alpha-tocopherol. In the same year, Barua and Olson also concluded from their in vivo studies in rats that central cleavage is by far the major pathway for the formation of vitamin A from beta-carotene. Beta, beta-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.21) is the key enzyme that cleaves beta-carotene into two molecules of retinal. It is a cytosolic enzyme primarily localized in the duodenal mucosa although it has been found in liver. It is a 66 kDa sulfhydryl protein, requires

  1. Amino acids assisted hydrothermal synthesis of hierarchically structured ZnO with enhanced photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanxia; Lin, Siwen; Li, Xuan; Liu, Yuping

    2016-10-01

    Novel hierarchically structured ZnO, including rose-like, dandelion-like and flower-like, have been synthesized through a simple hydrothermal process using different amino acids (glutamine, histidine and glycine) as structure-directing agents and urea as deposition agent, followed by subsequent calcination. Amino acids played a crucial role in the formation of hierarchically structured ZnO, and different amino acids could induce different exquisite shapes and assembly ways, as well as more oxygen defects. The prepared hierarchically structured ZnO exhibited excellent photocatalytic activities for the photodegradation of Rhodamine B, which was associated with their special hierarchical structures, large BET surface area and the existence of more oxygen defects. Amino acid-assisted growth mechanism of hierarchically structured ZnO was also discussed.

  2. Carbobenzoxy amino acids: Structural requirements for cholecystokinin receptor antagonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Sutliff, V.E.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    The authors used dispersed acini prepared from guinea pig pancreas to examine 28 carbobenzoxy (CBZ) amino acids for their abilities to function as cholecystokinin receptor antagonists. All amino acid derivatives tested, except for CBZ-alanine, CBZ-glycine, and N alpha-CBZ- lysine, were able to inhibit the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin. In general, there was a good correlation between the ability of a carbobenzoxy amino acid to inhibit stimulated amylase secretion and the ability of the amino acid derivative to inhibit binding of /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin. The inhibition of cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase secretion was competitive, fully reversible, and specific for those secretagogues that interact with the cholecystokinin receptor. The potencies with which the various carbobenzoxy amino acids inhibited the action of cholecystokinin varied 100-fold and CBZ-cystine was the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist. This variation in potency was primarily but not exclusively a function of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chain.

  3. Solving nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement: examples from group II intron studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marcia, Marco Humphris-Narayanan, Elisabeth; Keating, Kevin S.; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-11-01

    Strategies for phasing nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement, using both experimental and de novo designed models, are discussed. Structured RNA molecules are key players in ensuring cellular viability. It is now emerging that, like proteins, the functions of many nucleic acids are dictated by their tertiary folds. At the same time, the number of known crystal structures of nucleic acids is also increasing rapidly. In this context, molecular replacement will become an increasingly useful technique for phasing nucleic acid crystallographic data in the near future. Here, strategies to select, create and refine molecular-replacement search models for nucleic acids are discussed. Using examples taken primarily from research on group II introns, it is shown that nucleic acids are amenable to different and potentially more flexible and sophisticated molecular-replacement searches than proteins. These observations specifically aim to encourage future crystallographic studies on the newly discovered repertoire of noncoding transcripts.

  4. Investigating acid-induced structural transitions of lysozyme in an electrospray ionization source.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Wha; Kim, Hugh I

    2015-01-21

    The effect of acids on the structure of lysozyme (Lyz) during electrospray ionization (ESI) was studied by comparing the solution and gas-phase structures of Lyz. Investigation using circular dichroism spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering demonstrated that the folded conformation of Lyz was maintained in pH 2.2 solutions containing different acids. On the other hand, analysis of the charge state distributions and ion mobility (IM) distributions, combined with molecular dynamics simulations, demonstrated that the gas phase structures of Lyz depend on the pKa of the acid used to acidify the protein solution. Formic acid and acetic acid, which are weak acids (pKa > 3.5), induce unfolding of Lyz during ESI, presumably because the undissociated weak acids provide protons to maintain the acidic groups within Lyz protonated and prevent the formation of salt bridges. However, HCl suppressed the formation of the unfolded conformers because the acid is already dissociated in solution, and chloride anions within the ESI droplet can interact with Lyz to reduce the intramolecular electrostatic repulsion. These trends in the IM distributions are observed for all charge states, demonstrating the significance of the acid effect on the structure of Lyz during ESI.

  5. Structure of eight molecular salts assembled from noncovalent bonding between carboxylic acids, imidazole, and benzimidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Hui; Wen, Xianhong; Li, Minghui; Wang, Daqi

    2015-09-01

    Eight organic salts of imidazole/benzimidazole have been prepared with carboxylic acids as 2-methyl-2-phenoxypropanoic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, 5-nitrosalicylic acid, isophthalic acid, 4-nitro-phthalic acid, and 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. The eight crystalline forms reported are proton-transfer compounds of which the crystals and compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. These structures adopted hetero supramolecular synthons, with the most common R22(7) motif observed at salts 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-8 suggests that there are extensive strong Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between acid and imidazolyl components in all of the salts. Except the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, the secondary propagating interactions also play important roles in structure extension. This variety, coupled with the varying geometries and number of acidic groups of the acids utilized, has led to the creation of eight supramolecular arrays with 1D-3D structure. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is analyzed. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the Nsbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds between acids and imidazole/benzimidazole are sufficient to bring about the formation of organic salts.

  6. Structural Conservation of Ligand Binding Reveals a Bile Acid-like Signaling Pathway in Nematodes*

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xiaoyong; Zhou, X. Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Motola, Daniel L.; Gelmedin, Verena; Hawdon, John; Kliewer, Steven A.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Xu, H. Eric

    2012-01-01

    Bile acid-like molecules named dafachronic acids (DAs) control the dauer formation program in Caenorhabditis elegans through the nuclear receptor DAF-12. This mechanism is conserved in parasitic nematodes to regulate their dauer-like infective larval stage, and as such, the DAF-12 ligand binding domain has been identified as an important therapeutic target in human parasitic hookworm species that infect more than 600 million people worldwide. Here, we report two x-ray crystal structures of the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum DAF-12 ligand binding domain in complex with DA and cholestenoic acid (a bile acid-like metabolite), respectively. Structure analysis and functional studies reveal key residues responsible for species-specific ligand responses of DAF-12. Furthermore, DA binds to DAF-12 mechanistically and is structurally similar to bile acids binding to the mammalian bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor. Activation of DAF-12 by cholestenoic acid and the cholestenoic acid complex structure suggest that bile acid-like signaling pathways have been conserved in nematodes and mammals. Together, these results reveal the molecular mechanism for the interplay between parasite and host, provide a structural framework for DAF-12 as a promising target in treating nematode parasitism, and provide insight into the evolution of gut parasite hormone-signaling pathways. PMID:22170062

  7. Structure of four acidic oligosaccharides from the jelly coat surrounding the eggs of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Plancke, Y; Wieruszeski, J M; Alonso, C; Boilly, B; Strecker, G

    1995-07-15

    Novel acidic oligosaccharides were released by reductive beta-elimination from the jelly coat eggs of the Anuran Xenopus laevis. According to the structural analysis of these oligosaccharide-alditols, the following structures are proposed: [sequence: see text] where Kdn, 3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galactononulosonic acid. These results confirm the species specificity of the glycanic structures present in the secretion of amphibian oviducts, and may form the basis of a specific egg-sperm recognition process.

  8. Influence of nitric acid treatment in different media on X-ray structural parameters of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sudip Maity; Ashim Choudhury

    2008-11-15

    The treatment of coal with nitric acid in aqueous and non-aqueous media introduces changes in the chemical and spatial structure of the organic mass. Four coals of different rank have been treated with nitric acid in aqueous and glacial acetic acid media for assessing the changes in the structural parameters by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Slow-scan XRD has been performed for the raw and treated coals, and X-ray structural parameters (d002, Lc, and Nc) and aromaticity (fa) have been determined by profile-fitting software. Considerable variation of the structural parameters has been observed with respect to the raw coals. The d002 values have decreased in aqueous medium but increased in acetic acid medium; however, Lc, Nc, and fa values have increased in aqueous medium but decreased in acetic acid medium. It is also observed that considerable oxidation takes place during nitric acid treatment in aqueous medium, but nitration is the predominant phenomenon in acetic acid medium. Disordering of the coal structure increases in acetic acid medium, but a reverse trend is observed in the aqueous medium. As a result, structurally modified coals (SMCs) are derived as new coal-derived substances. 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Production of Structured Triacylglycerols Containing Palmitic Acids at sn-2 Position and Docosahexaenoic Acids at sn-1, 3 Positions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjun; Guo, Yongli; Sun, Zhaomin; Jie, Xu; Li, Zhaojie; Wang, Jingfeng; Wang, Yuming; Xue, Changhu

    2015-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation has been shown well-established health benefits that justify their use as functional ingredients in healthy foods and nutraceutical products. Structured triacylglycerols rich in 1,3-docosahexenoyl-2-palmitoyl-sn-glycerol were produced from algal oil (Schizochytrium sp) which was prepared by a two-step process. Novozym 435 lipase was used to produce tripalmitin. Tripalmitin was then used to produce the final structured triacylglycerol (STAG) through interesterification reactions using Lipozyme RM IM. The optimum conditions for the enzymatic reaction were a mole ratio of tripalmitin/fatty acid ethyl esters 1:9, 60°C, 10% enzyme load (wt % of substrates), 10 h; the enzymatic product contained 51.6% palmitic acid (PA), 30.13% docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 n-3) and 5.33% docosapentanoic acid (DPA, C22:5 n-3), 12.15% oleic acid (OLA). This STAG can be used as a functional ingredient in dietary supplementation to provide the benefits of DHA.

  10. Crystal structure of anti-polysialic acid antibody single chain Fv fragment complexed with octasialic acid: insight into the binding preference for polysialic acid.

    PubMed

    Nagae, Masamichi; Ikeda, Akemi; Hane, Masaya; Hanashima, Shinya; Kitajima, Ken; Sato, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2013-11-22

    Polysialic acid is a linear homopolymer of α2-8-linked sialic acids attached mainly onto glycoproteins. Cell surface polysialic acid plays roles in cell adhesion and differentiation events in a manner that is often dependent on the degree of polymerization (DP). Anti-oligo/polysialic acid antibodies have DP-dependent antigenic specificity, and such antibodies are widely utilized in biological studies for detecting and distinguishing between different oligo/polysialic acids. A murine monoclonal antibody mAb735 has a unique preference for longer polymers of polysialic acid (DP >10), yet the mechanism of recognition at the atomic level remains unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of mAb735 single chain variable fragment (scFv735) in complex with octasialic acid at 1.8 Å resolution. In the asymmetric unit, two scFv735 molecules associate with one octasialic acid. In both complexes of the unit, all the complementarity-determining regions except for L3 interact with three consecutive sialic acid residues out of the eight. A striking feature of the complex is that 11 ordered water molecules bridge the gap between antibody and ligand, whereas the direct antibody-ligand interaction is less extensive. The dihedral angles of the trisialic acid unit directly interacting with scFv735 are not uniform, indicating that mAb735 does not strictly favor the previously proposed helical conformation. Importantly, both reducing and nonreducing ends of the bound ligand are completely exposed to solvent. We suggest that mAb735 gains its apparent high affinity for a longer polysialic acid chain by recognizing every three sialic acid units in a paired manner.

  11. Energetics and structure of hydroxynicotinic acids. Crystal structures of 2-, 4-, 6-hydroxynicotinic and 5-chloro-6-hydroxynicotinic acids.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rui C; Figueira, Rita M B B M; Piedade, M Fátima M; Diogo, Hermínio P; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E

    2009-10-29

    The relationship between energetics and structure in 2-, 4-, 5-, and 6-hydroxynicotinic and 5-chloro-6-hydroxynicotinic acids (2HNA, 4HNA, 5HNA, 6HNA, and 5Cl6HNA, respectively) was investigated in the solid and gaseous phases by means of a variety of experimental and computational chemistry techniques. The molecular and crystal structures of the 2HNA, 4HNA, 6HNA, and 5Cl6HNA solid forms used in this study were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction at 293 +/- 2 K. The 2HNA, 4HNA, and 5Cl6HNA samples were monoclinic (space groups: P2(1)/n for 2HNA and P2(1)/c for 4HNA and 5Cl6HNA), and that of 6HNA was found to be triclinic (space group: P1). The 2HNA sample investigated corresponds to a new polymorphic form of this compound. The 2HNA, 4HNA, 6HNA, and 5Cl6HNA molecules crystallize as oxo tautomers exhibiting N-H and Cring=O bonds. This is also supported by the observation of bands typical of N-H and Cring=O stretching frequencies in the corresponding FT-IR spectra. The absence of these bands in the spectrum of 5HNA indicates that a hydroxy tautomer with an unprotonated N heteroatom and a Cring-OH bond is likely to be present in this case. Results of theoretical calculations carried out at the G3MP2 and CBS-QB3 levels of theory suggest that in the ideal gas phase, at 298.15 K, 2HNA favors the oxo form, 4HNA prefers the hydroxy form, and no strong dominance of one of the two tautomers exists in the case of 6HNA and 5Cl6HNA. The standard molar enthalpies of formation of 2HNA, 4HNA, 5HNA, 6HNA, and 5Cl6HNA in the crystalline state, at 298.15 K, Delta(f)H(m)(o)(cr), were determined by micro combustion calorimetry. The corresponding enthalpies of sublimation, Delta(sub)H(m)(o), were also derived from vapor pressure versus temperature measurements by the Knudsen effusion method. The obtained Delta(f)H(m)(o)(cr) and Delta(sub)H(m)(o) values led to the enthalpies of formation of 2HNA, 4HNA, 5HNA, 6HNA, and 5Cl6HNA in the gaseous phase. These were discussed together

  12. Structure and oxidation capacity of amino acid chloramine derivatives and their effects on platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Murina, M A; Chudina, N A; Roshchupkin, D I; Belakina, N S; Sergienko, V I

    2004-12-01

    Comparison of antiaggregation capacity of N-chloramine acids with different position of the chloramine group in the molecule showed that in the most efficient compounds the distance between the chloramine and carboxyl groups was 3-5 carbon atoms. This feature of antiaggregation activity was not related to the difference in oxidation capacity of N-chloramine acids. It was hypothesized that the revealed structural dependence of antiaggregation activity of N-chloramine acids is determined by the structure of platelet membrane, in particular, the presence of a negatively charged group near the site of interaction between N-chloramine acids and platelet membrane.

  13. Nucleic acid-based nanoengineering: novel structures for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanying; LaBean, Thomas H.; Leong, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoengineering exploits the interactions of materials at the nanometre scale to create functional nanostructures. It relies on the precise organization of nanomaterials to achieve unique functionality. There are no interactions more elegant than those governing nucleic acids via Watson–Crick base-pairing rules. The infinite combinations of DNA/RNA base pairs and their remarkable molecular recognition capability can give rise to interesting nanostructures that are only limited by our imagination. Over the past years, creative assembly of nucleic acids has fashioned a plethora of two-dimensional and three-dimensional nanostructures with precisely controlled size, shape and spatial functionalization. These nanostructures have been precisely patterned with molecules, proteins and gold nanoparticles for the observation of chemical reactions at the single molecule level, activation of enzymatic cascade and novel modality of photonic detection, respectively. Recently, they have also been engineered to encapsulate and release bioactive agents in a stimulus-responsive manner for therapeutic applications. The future of nucleic acid-based nanoengineering is bright and exciting. In this review, we will discuss the strategies to control the assembly of nucleic acids and highlight the recent efforts to build functional nucleic acid nanodevices for nanomedicine. PMID:23050076

  14. Photosensitized cleavage of dynein heavy chains. Cleavage at the V1 site by irradiation at 365 nm in the presence of ATP and vanadate

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, I.R.; Lee-Eiford, A.; Mocz, G.; Phillipson, C.A.; Tang, W.J.; Gibbons, B.H.

    1987-02-25

    Irradiation of soluble dynein 1 from sea urchin sperm flagella at 365 nm in the presence of MgATP and 0.05-50 microM vanadate (Vi) cleaves the alpha and beta heavy chains (Mr 428,000) at their V1 sites to give peptides of Mr 228,000 and 200,000, without the nonspecific side effects produced by irradiation at 254 nm as described earlier. The decrease in intact heavy chain material is biphasic; in 10 microM Vi, approximately 80% occurs with a half-time of 7 min and the remainder with a half-time of about 90 min, and the yield of cleavage peptides is better than 90%. Loss of dynein ATPase activity appears to be a direct result of the cleavage process and is not significantly affected by the presence of up to 0.1 M cysteamine (CA, 60-23-1) or 2-aminoethyl carbamimidothioic acid dihydrobromide (CA, 56-10-0) as free radical trapping agents. The concentration of Vi required for 50% maximal initial cleavage rate is 4.5 microM, while that for 50% ATPase inhibition is 0.8 microM, both in a 0.6 M NaCl medium. In the presence of 20 microM Vi, CTP and UTP support cleavage at about half the rate of ATP, whereas GTP and ITP support cleavage only if the Vi concentration is raised to about 200 microM. Substitution of any of the transition metal cations Cr2+, Mn2+, Fe2+, or Co2+ for the usual Mg2+ suppresses the photocleavage, presumably by quenching the excited chromophore prior to scission of the heavy chain. The photocleaved dynein 1 binds to dynein-depleted flagella similarly to intact dynein 1, but upon reactivation of the flagella with 1 mM ATP their motility is partially inhibited, rather than being augmented as with intact dynein.

  15. Brønsted Acid Catalysis-Structural Preferences and Mobility in Imine/Phosphoric Acid Complexes.

    PubMed

    Greindl, Julian; Hioe, Johnny; Sorgenfrei, Nils; Morana, Fabio; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2016-12-14

    Despite the huge success of enantioselective Brønsted acid catalysis, experimental data about structures and activation modes of substrate/catalyst complexes in solution are very rare. Here, for the first time, detailed insights into the structures of imine/Brønsted acid catalyst complexes are presented on the basis of NMR data and underpinned by theoretical calculations. The chiral Brønsted acid catalyst R-TRIP (3,3'-bis(2,4,6-triisopropylphenyl)-1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diyl hydrogen phosphate) was investigated together with six aromatic imines. For each investigated system, an E-imine/R-TRIP complex and a Z-imine/R-TRIP complex were observed. Each of these complexes consists of two structures, which are in fast exchange on the NMR time scale; i.e., overall four structures were found. Both identified E-imine/R-TRIP structures feature a strong hydrogen bond but differ in the orientation of the imine relative to the catalyst. The exchange occurs by tilting the imine inside the complex and thereby switching the oxygen that constitutes the hydrogen bond. A similar situation is observed for all investigated Z-imine/R-TRIP complexes. Here, an additional exchange pathway is opened via rotation of the imine. For all investigated imine/R-TRIP complexes, the four core structures are highly preserved. Thus, these core structures are independent of electron density and substituent modulations of the aromatic imines. Overall, this study reveals that the absolute structural space of binary imine/TRIP complexes is large and the variations of the four core structures are small. The high mobility is supposed to promote reactivity, while the preservation of the core structures in conjunction with extensive π-π and CH-π interactions leads to high enantioselectivities and tolerance of different substrates.

  16. Brønsted Acid Catalysis—Structural Preferences and Mobility in Imine/Phosphoric Acid Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the huge success of enantioselective Brønsted acid catalysis, experimental data about structures and activation modes of substrate/catalyst complexes in solution are very rare. Here, for the first time, detailed insights into the structures of imine/Brønsted acid catalyst complexes are presented on the basis of NMR data and underpinned by theoretical calculations. The chiral Brønsted acid catalyst R-TRIP (3,3′-bis(2,4,6-triisopropylphenyl)-1,1′-binaphthyl-2,2′-diyl hydrogen phosphate) was investigated together with six aromatic imines. For each investigated system, an E-imine/R-TRIP complex and a Z-imine/R-TRIP complex were observed. Each of these complexes consists of two structures, which are in fast exchange on the NMR time scale; i.e., overall four structures were found. Both identified E-imine/R-TRIP structures feature a strong hydrogen bond but differ in the orientation of the imine relative to the catalyst. The exchange occurs by tilting the imine inside the complex and thereby switching the oxygen that constitutes the hydrogen bond. A similar situation is observed for all investigated Z-imine/R-TRIP complexes. Here, an additional exchange pathway is opened via rotation of the imine. For all investigated imine/R-TRIP complexes, the four core structures are highly preserved. Thus, these core structures are independent of electron density and substituent modulations of the aromatic imines. Overall, this study reveals that the absolute structural space of binary imine/TRIP complexes is large and the variations of the four core structures are small. The high mobility is supposed to promote reactivity, while the preservation of the core structures in conjunction with extensive π–π and CH−π interactions leads to high enantioselectivities and tolerance of different substrates. PMID:27960345

  17. Crystal structure of 3-ethynyl­benzoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Venturini, Chiara; Ratel-Ramond, Nicolas; Gourdon, Andre

    2015-01-01

    In the title compound, C9H6O2, the carb­oxy­lic acid group is almost in the plane of the benzene ring, making a dihedral angle of 2.49 (18)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by pairs of O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming classical acid–acid inversion dimers, with an R 2 2(8) ring motif. The dimers are linked by pairs of C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds forming chains, enclosing R 2 2(16) ring motifs, propagating along the c-axis direction. PMID:26594457

  18. New insights into structural alteration of enamel apatite induced by citric acid and sodium fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojie; Klocke, Arndt; Mihailova, Boriana; Tosheva, Lubomira; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2008-07-24

    Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and complementary scanning electron microscopy were applied to analyze the surface structure of enamel apatite exposed to citric acid and to investigate the protective potential of fluorine-containing reagents against citric acid-induced erosion. Enamel and, for comparison, geological hydroxylapatite samples were treated with aqueous solutions of citric acid and sodium fluoride of different concentrations, ranging from 0.01 to 0.5 mol/L for citric acid solutions and from 0.5 to 2.0% for fluoride solutions. The two solutions were applied either simultaneously or consecutively. The citric acid-induced structural modification of apatite increases with the increase in the citric acid concentration and the number of treatments. The application of sodium fluoride alone does not suppress the atomic level changes in apatite exposed to acidic agents. The addition of sodium fluoride to citric acid solutions leads to formation of surface CaF2 and considerably reduces the changes in the apatite P-O-Ca framework. However, the CaF2 globules deposited on the enamel surface seem to be insufficient to prevent the alteration of the apatite structure upon further exposure to acidic agents. No evidence for fluorine-induced recovery of the apatite structure was found.

  19. NIAS-Server: Neighbors Influence of Amino acids and Secondary Structures in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Borguesan, Bruno; Inostroza-Ponta, Mario; Dorn, Márcio

    2017-03-01

    The exponential growth in the number of experimentally determined three-dimensional protein structures provide a new and relevant knowledge about the conformation of amino acids in proteins. Only a few of probability densities of amino acids are publicly available for use in structure validation and prediction methods. NIAS (Neighbors Influence of Amino acids and Secondary structures) is a web-based tool used to extract information about conformational preferences of amino acid residues and secondary structures in experimental-determined protein templates. This information is useful, for example, to characterize folds and local motifs in proteins, molecular folding, and can help the solution of complex problems such as protein structure prediction, protein design, among others. The NIAS-Server and supplementary data are available at http://sbcb.inf.ufrgs.br/nias .

  20. Structural basis of the alternating-access mechanism in a bile acid transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Levin, Elena J.; Pan, Yaping; McCoy, Jason G.; Sharma, Ruchika; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in hepatocytes and secreted through the biliary tract into the small intestine, where they aid in absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Through a process known as enterohepatic recirculation, more than 90% of secreted bile acids are then retrieved from the intestine and returned to the liver for resecretion. In humans, there are two Na+-dependent bile acid transporters involved in enterohepatic recirculation, the Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP; also known as SLC10A1) expressed in hepatocytes, and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; also known as SLC10A2) expressed on enterocytes in the terminal ileum. In recent years, ASBT has attracted much interest as a potential drug target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, because inhibition of ASBT reduces reabsorption of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. However, a lack of three-dimensional structures of bile acid transporters hampers our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and transport, and to interpret the wealth of existing functional data. The crystal structure of an ASBT homologue from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) in detergent was reported recently, showing the protein in an inward-open conformation bound to two Na+ and a taurocholic acid. However, the structural changes that bring bile acid and Na+ across the membrane are difficult to infer from a single structure. To understand the structural changes associated with the coupled transport of Na+ and bile acids, here we solved two structures of an ASBT homologue from Yersinia frederiksenii (ASBTYf) in a lipid environment, which reveal that a large rigid-body rotation of a substrate-binding domain gives the conserved `crossover' region, where two discontinuous helices cross each other, alternating accessibility from either side of the cell membrane. This result has implications

  1. Determinants of chymotrypsin C cleavage specificity in the calcium binding loop of human cationic trypsinogen

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, András; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The pancreatic serine protease chymotrypsin C (CTRC) cleaves the Leu81-Glu82 peptide bond in the calcium binding loop of human cationic trypsinogen and thereby promotes its degradation. This serves as a protective mechanism against ectopic trypsinogen activation in the pancreas. In the present study we demonstrate that cleavage of the Leu81-Glu82 peptide bond by CTRC is highly specific and other human pancreatic chymotrypsins (CTRB1, CTRB2, CTRL1) and elastases (ELA2A, ELA3A, ELA3B) do not catalyze this reaction. To elucidate the mechanistic basis for CTRC specificity, we surveyed the primary (P1) cleavage preference of these pancreatic proteases on peptide substrates. We found that CTRC cleaved after a P1 Leu with at least 10-fold higher catalytic efficiency than other enzymes tested. To assess extended subsite interactions, we introduced Ala-mutations into human cationic trypsinogen at the P3, P1' P3' and P4' amino-acid positions, where P1-P1' corresponds to Leu81-Glu82. Interestingly, CTRC mediated cleavage was stimulated 3-fold by mutation E82A and unaffected by mutations E79A and N84A, but all three mutations compromised specificity and resulted in increased cleavage by ELA2A. Mutation E85A decreased CTRC cleavage by 2-fold. Remarkably, other chymotrypsins and elastases did not cleave human cationic trypsinogen even with the L81F or L81A mutations, which introduced favorable P1 residues for these enzymes. We conclude that specific cleavage of the Leu81-Glu82 peptide bond in human cationic trypsinogen by CTRC is primarily determined by its distinctively high activity on leucyl peptide bonds, whereas the P1' Glu82, P3' Asn84 and P4' Glu85 residues serve as additional specificity determinants. PMID:23035638

  2. Molecular Dynamic Simulations Reveal the Structural Determinants of Fatty Acid Binding to Oxy-Myoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Chintapalli, Sree V.; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Patel, Reema; Shah, Natasha; Patterson, Randen L.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Anishkin, Andriy; Adams, Sean H.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which fatty acids are sequestered and transported in muscle have not been fully elucidated. A potential key player in this process is the protein myoglobin (Mb). Indeed, there is a catalogue of empirical evidence supporting direct interaction of globins with fatty acid metabolites; however, the binding pocket and regulation of the interaction remains to be established. In this study, we employed a computational strategy to elucidate the structural determinants of fatty acids (palmitic & oleic acid) binding to Mb. Sequence analysis and docking simulations with a horse (Equus caballus) structural Mb reference reveals a fatty acid-binding site in the hydrophobic cleft near the heme region in Mb. Both palmitic acid and oleic acid attain a “U” shaped structure similar to their conformation in pockets of other fatty acid-binding proteins. Specifically, we found that the carboxyl head group of palmitic acid coordinates with the amino group of Lys45, whereas the carboxyl group of oleic acid coordinates with both the amino groups of Lys45 and Lys63. The alkyl tails of both fatty acids are supported by surrounding hydrophobic residues Leu29, Leu32, Phe33, Phe43, Phe46, Val67, Val68 and Ile107. In the saturated palmitic acid, the hydrophobic tail moves freely and occasionally penetrates deeper inside the hydrophobic cleft, making additional contacts with Val28, Leu69, Leu72 and Ile111. Our simulations reveal a dynamic and stable binding pocket in which the oxygen molecule and heme group in Mb are required for additional hydrophobic interactions. Taken together, these findings support a mechanism in which Mb acts as a muscle transporter for fatty acid when it is in the oxygenated state and releases fatty acid when Mb converts to deoxygenated state. PMID:26030763

  3. The large terminase DNA packaging motor grips DNA with its ATPase domain for cleavage by the flexible nuclease domain.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Brendan J; Hayes, Janelle A; Stone, Nicholas P; Xu, Rui-Gang; Kelch, Brian A

    2017-01-12

    Many viruses use a powerful terminase motor to pump their genome inside an empty procapsid shell during virus maturation. The large terminase (TerL) protein contains both enzymatic activities necessary for packaging in such viruses: the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) that powers DNA translocation and an endonuclease that cleaves the concatemeric genome at both initiation and completion of genome packaging. However, how TerL binds DNA during translocation and cleavage remains mysterious. Here we investigate DNA binding and cleavage using TerL from the thermophilic phage P74-26. We report the structure of the P74-26 TerL nuclease domain, which allows us to model DNA binding in the nuclease active site. We screened a large panel of TerL variants for defects in binding and DNA cleavage, revealing that the ATPase domain is the primary site for DNA binding, and is required for nuclease activity. The nuclease domain is dispensable for DNA binding but residues lining the active site guide DNA for cleavage. Kinetic analysis of DNA cleavage suggests flexible tethering of the nuclease domains during DNA cleavage. We propose that interactions with the procapsid during DNA translocation conformationally restrict the nuclease domain, inhibiting cleavage; TerL release from the capsid upon completion of packaging unlocks the nuclease domains to cleave DNA.

  4. Scandium(iii) triflate-promoted serine/threonine-selective peptide bond cleavage.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jizhi; Sohma, Youhei; Kanai, Motomu

    2017-02-01

    The site-selective cleavage of peptide bonds is an important chemical modification that is useful not only for the structural determination of peptides, but also as an artificial modulator of peptide/protein function and properties. Here we report site-selective hydrolysis of peptide bonds at the Ser and Thr positions with a high conversion yield. This chemical cleavage relies on Sc(iii)-promoted N,O-acyl rearrangement and subsequent hydrolysis. The method is applicable to a broad scope of polypeptides with various functional groups, including a post-translationally modified peptide that is unsuitable for enzymatic hydrolysis. The system was further extended to site-selective cleavage of a native protein, Aβ1-42, which is closely related to the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Pressure modulates the self-cleavage step of the hairpin ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Schuabb, Caroline; Kumar, Narendra; Pataraia, Salome; Marx, Dominik; Winter, Roland

    2017-03-30

    The ability of certain RNAs, denoted as ribozymes, to not only store genetic information but also catalyse chemical reactions gave support to the RNA world hypothesis as a putative step in the development of early life on Earth. This, however, might have evolved under extreme environmental conditions, including the deep sea with pressures in the kbar regime. Here we study pressure-induced effects on the self-cleavage of hairpin ribozyme by following structural changes in real-time. Our results suggest that compression of the ribozyme leads to an accelerated transesterification reaction, being the self-cleavage step, although the overall process is retarded in the high-pressure regime. The results reveal that favourable interactions between the reaction site and neighbouring nucleobases are strengthened under pressure, resulting therefore in an accelerated self-cleavage step upon compression. These results suggest that properly engineered ribozymes may also act as piezophilic biocatalysts in addition to their hitherto known properties.

  6. Indirect DNA Sequence Recognition and Its Impact on Nuclease Cleavage Activity.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Abigail R; Hallinan, Jazmine P; Shen, Betty W; Chik, Jennifer K; Bolduc, Jill M; Kulshina, Nadia; Robins, Lori I; Kaiser, Brett K; Jarjour, Jordan; Havens, Kyle; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Stoddard, Barry L

    2016-06-07

    LAGLIDADG meganucleases are DNA cleaving enzymes used for genome engineering. While their cleavage specificity can be altered using several protein engineering and selection strategies, their overall targetability is limited by highly specific indirect recognition of the central four base pairs within their recognition sites. In order to examine the physical basis of indirect sequence recognition and to expand the number of such nucleases available for genome engineering, we have determined the target sites, DNA-bound structures, and central four cleavage fidelities of nine related enzymes. Subsequent crystallographic analyses of a meganuclease bound to two noncleavable target sites, each containing a single inactivating base pair substitution at its center, indicates that a localized slip of the mutated base pair causes a small change in the DNA backbone conformation that results in a loss of metal occupancy at one binding site, eliminating cleavage activity.

  7. Pressure modulates the self-cleavage step of the hairpin ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Schuabb, Caroline; Kumar, Narendra; Pataraia, Salome; Marx, Dominik; Winter, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The ability of certain RNAs, denoted as ribozymes, to not only store genetic information but also catalyse chemical reactions gave support to the RNA world hypothesis as a putative step in the development of early life on Earth. This, however, might have evolved under extreme environmental conditions, including the deep sea with pressures in the kbar regime. Here we study pressure-induced effects on the self-cleavage of hairpin ribozyme by following structural changes in real-time. Our results suggest that compression of the ribozyme leads to an accelerated transesterification reaction, being the self-cleavage step, although the overall process is retarded in the high-pressure regime. The results reveal that favourable interactions between the reaction site and neighbouring nucleobases are strengthened under pressure, resulting therefore in an accelerated self-cleavage step upon compression. These results suggest that properly engineered ribozymes may also act as piezophilic biocatalysts in addition to their hitherto known properties. PMID:28358002

  8. Crystal structure of febuxostat-acetic acid (1/1).

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Hu, Xiu-Rong; Gu, Jian-Ming; Tang, Gu-Ping

    2015-05-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound [systematic name: 2-(3-cyano-4-iso-butyl-oxyphen-yl)-4-methyl-thia-zole-5-carb-oxy-lic acid-acetic acid (1/1)], C16H16N2O3S·CH3COOH, contains a febuxostat mol-ecule and an acetic acid mol-ecule. In the febuxostat mol-ecule, the thia-zole ring is nearly coplanar with the benzene ring [dihedral angle = 3.24 (2)°]. In the crystal, the febuxostat and acetic acid mol-ecules are linked by O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds and weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming supra-molecular chains propagating along the b-axis direction. π-π stacking is observed between nearly parallel thia-zole and benzene rings of adjacent mol-ecules; the centroid-to-centroid distances are 3.8064 (17) and 3.9296 (17) Å.

  9. [Polycationic catalysts for phosphodiester bond cleavage on the basis of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane].

    PubMed

    Burakova, E A; Kovalev, N A; Kuznetsova, I L; Zenkova, M A; Vlasov, V V; Sil'nikov, V N

    2007-01-01

    A number of tetracationic compounds capable of phosphodiester bond cleavage within a 21 -membered ribooligonucleotide were designed and synthesized. The artificial ribonucleases represent two residues of quaternized 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane bearing alkyl substituents of various lengths and connected with a rigid linker. The efficiency of cleavage of phosphodiester bonds in an RNA target depends on the linker structure and the length of alkyl substituent.

  10. Unusual nickel-mediated C-S cleavage of alkyl and aryl sulfoxides.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Thomas; Backes, Marc; Radius, Udo

    2007-05-28

    The first examples of transition metal mediated C-S cleavage of sulfoxides containing sp2- and sp3-hybridized carbon bonds attached to the sulfur atom and the first example of a structurally characterized complex featuring an oxygen-bound sulfinyl ligand are presented.

  11. Introduction of structural affinity handles as a tool in selective nucleic acid separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, III, Richard Coale (Inventor); Cano, Luis Antonio (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The method is used for separating nucleic acids and other similar constructs. It involves selective introduction, enhancement, or stabilization of affinity handles such as single-strandedness in the undesired (or desired) nucleic acids as compared to the usual structure (e.g., double-strandedness) of the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids. The undesired (or desired) nucleic acids are separated from the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids due to capture by methods including but not limited to immobilized metal affinity chromatography, immobilized single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) protein, and immobilized oligonucleotides. The invention is useful to: remove contaminating genomic DNA from plasmid DNA; remove genomic DNA from plasmids, BACs, and similar constructs; selectively separate oligonucleotides and similar DNA fragments from their partner strands; purification of aptamers, (deoxy)-ribozymes and other highly structured nucleic acids; Separation of restriction fragments without using agarose gels; manufacture recombinant Taq polymerase or similar products that are sensitive to host genomic DNA contamination; and other applications.

  12. Exploring the role of polymer structure on intracellular nucleic acid delivery via polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Corey J; Kozielski, Kristen L; Green, Jordan J

    2015-12-10

    Intracellular nucleic acid delivery has the potential to treat many genetically-based diseases, however, gene delivery safety and efficacy remains a challenging obstacle. One promising approach is the use of polymers to form polymeric nanoparticles with nucleic acids that have led to exciting advances in non-viral gene delivery. Understanding the successes and failures of gene delivery polymers and structures is the key to engineering optimal polymers for gene delivery in the future. This article discusses the polymer structural features that enable effective intracellular delivery of DNA and RNA, including protection of nucleic acid cargo, cellular uptake, endosomal escape, vector unpacking, and delivery to the intracellular site of activity. The chemical properties that aid in each step of intracellular nucleic acid delivery are described and specific structures of note are highlighted. Understanding the chemical design parameters of polymeric nucleic acid delivery nanoparticles is important to achieving the goal of safe and effective non-viral genetic nanomedicine.

  13. Acid-induced structural modifications of unsaturated Fatty acids and phenolic olive oil constituents by nitrite ions: a chemical assessment.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Alessandra; Panzella, Lucia; Savarese, Maria; Sacchi, Raffaele; Giudicianni, Italo; Paolillo, Livio; d'Ischia, Marco

    2004-10-01

    The structural modifications of the unsaturated fatty acid components of triglycerides in extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) following exposure to nitrite ions in acidic media were determined by two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy, aided by (15)N labeling and GC analysis, allowing investigation of the matrix without fractionation steps. In the presence of excess nitrite ions in a 1% sulfuric acid/oil biphasic system, extensive double bond isomerization of the oleic/linoleic acid components of triglycerides was observed associated with nitration/oxidation processes. Structurally modified species were identified as E/Z-nitroalkene, 1,2-nitrohydroxy, and 3-nitro-1-alkene(1,5-diene) derivatives based on (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N 2D NMR analysis in comparison with model compounds. Minor constituents of EVOO, including phenolic compounds and tocopherols, were also substantially modified by nitrite-derived nitrating species, even under milder reaction conditions relevant to those occurring in the gastric compartments. Novel nitrated derivatives of tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, and oleuropein (6-8) were identified by LC/MS analysis of the polar fraction of EVOO and by comparison with synthetic samples. Overall, these results provide the first systematic description at the chemical level of the consequences of exposing EVOO to nitrite ions at acidic pH and offer an improved basis for further investigations in the field of toxic nitrosation/nitration reactions and dietary antinitrosating agents.

  14. Regulation by retinoids of luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor, cholesterol side-chain cleavage cytochrome P-450, 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta (5-4)-isomerase and 17 alpha-hydroxylase/C17-20 lyase cytochrome P-450 messenger ribonucleic acid levels in the K9 mouse Leydig cell line.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, A; Rogier, E; Astraudo, C; Duquenne, C; Finaz, C

    1994-12-01

    Vitamin A is a potent regulator of testicular function. We have reported that retinol (R) and retinoic acid (RA) induced a down regulation of luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (LH/CG) binding sites in K9 Leydig cells. In the present study we evaluated the effect of R and RA on LH/CG receptors, cholesterol side-chain cleavage cytochrome P-450 (P-450 scc), 17 alpha-hydroxylase/C17-20 lyase (P-450 17 alpha) and 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta HSD) mRNA levels in K9 mouse Leydig cells. To validate K9 cells as a model for studying Leydig cell steroidogenesis at the molecular level, we first investigated the effect of hCG on mRNA levels of the steroidogenic enzymes. P-450 scc, 3 beta HSD and P-450 17 alpha were expressed constitutively. The addition of 10 ng/ml hCG enhanced mRNA levels for the three genes within 2 h. Maximal accumulation of P-450 scc, P-450 17 alpha and 3 beta HSD mRNA in treated cells represents a 2.5-, 8.5- and 4-fold increase over control values, respectively. P-450 17 alpha expression reached a maximum by 4 h and then declined rapidly to return to control value by 24 h. The pattern of LH/CG receptor mRNAs in K9 cells was very similar to that of MA10 Leydig cells and showed six transcripts of 1.1, 1.6, 1.9, 2.6, 4.2 and 7.0 kb. Treatment of cells with R or RA resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in all six species.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Identification of TMPRSS6 cleavage sites of hemojuvelin

    PubMed Central

    Rausa, Marco; Ghitti, Michela; Pagani, Alessia; Nai, Antonella; Campanella, Alessandro; Musco, Giovanna; Camaschella, Clara; Silvestri, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Hemojuvelin (HJV), the coreceptor of the BMP-SMAD pathway that up-regulates hepcidin transcription, is a repulsive guidance molecule (RGMc) which undergoes a complex intracellular processing. Following autoproteolysis, it is exported to the cell surface both as a full-length and a heterodimeric protein. In vitro membrane HJV (m-HJV) is cleaved by the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS6 to attenuate signalling and to inhibit hepcidin expression. In this study, we investigated the number and position of HJV cleavage sites by mutagenizing arginine residues (R), potential TMPRSS6 targets, to alanine (A). We analysed translation and membrane expression of HJV R mutants and the pattern of fragments they release in the culture media in the presence of TMPRSS6. Abnormal fragments were observed for mutants at arginine 121, 176, 218, 288 and 326. Considering that all variants, except HJVR121A, lack autoproteolytic activity and some (HJVR176A and HJVR288A) are expressed at reduced levels on cell surface, we identified the fragments originating from either full-length or heterodimeric proteins and defined the residues 121 and 326 as the TMPRSS6 cleavage sites in both isoforms. Using the N-terminal FLAG-tagged HJV, we showed that residue 121 is critical also in the rearrangement of the N-terminal heterodimeric HJV. Exploiting the recently reported RGMb crystallographic structure, we generated a model of HJV that was used as input structure for all-atoms molecular dynamics simulation in explicit solvent. As assessed by in silico studies, we concluded that some arginines in the von Willebrand domain appear TMPRSS6 insensitive, likely because of partial protein structure destabilization. PMID:25704252

  16. Effect of A Long Chain Carboxylate Acid on Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Micelle Structure: A SANS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriati, Arum; Giri Rachman Putra, Edy; Seok Seong, Baek

    2010-01-01

    The effect of a different hydrocarbon chain length of carboxylate acid, i.e. dodecanoic acid, CH3(CH)10COOH or lauric acid and hexadecanoic acid, CH3(CH2)14COOH or palmitic acid as a co-surfactant in the 0.3 M sodium dedecyl sulfate, SDS micellar solution has been studied using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The present of lauric acid has induced the SDS structural micelles. The ellipsoid micelles structures changed significantly in length (major axis) from 22.6 Å to 37.1 Å at a fixed minor axis of 16.7 Å in the present of 0.005 M to 0.1 M lauric acid. Nevertheless, this effect did not occur in the present of palmitic acid with the same concentration range. The present of palmitic acid molecules performed insignificant effect on the SDS micelles growth where the major axis of the micelle was elongated from 22.9 Å to 25.3 Å only. It showed that the appropriate hydrocarbon chain length between surfactant and co-surfactant molecules emerged as one of the determining factors in forming a mixed micelles structure.

  17. The structural biology of patellamide biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathways for patellamide and related natural products have recently been studied by structural biology. These pathways produce molecules that have a complex framework and exhibit a diverse array of activity due to the variability of the amino acids that are found in them. As these molecules are difficult to synthesize chemically, exploitation of their properties has been modest. The patellamide pathway involves amino acid heterocyclization, peptide cleavage, peptide macrocyclization, heterocycle oxidation and epimerization; closely related products are also prenylated. Enzyme activities have been identified for all these transformations except epimerization, which may be spontaneous. This review highlights the recent structural and mechanistic work on amino acid heterocyclization, peptide cleavage and peptide macrocyclization. This work should help in using the enzymes to produce novel analogs of the natural products enabling an exploitation of their properties. PMID:25460274

  18. Structural changes of corn stover lignin during acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Moxley, Geoffrey; Gaspar, Armindo Ribeiro; Higgins, Don; Xu, Hui

    2012-09-01

    In this study, raw corn stover was subjected to dilute acid pretreatments over a range of severities under conditions similar to those identified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their techno-economic analysis of biochemical conversion of corn stover to ethanol. The pretreated corn stover then underwent enzymatic hydrolysis with yields above 70 % at moderate enzyme loading conditions. The enzyme exhausted lignin residues were characterized by ³¹P NMR spectroscopy and functional moieties quantified and correlated to enzymatic hydrolysis yields. Results from this study indicated that both xylan solubilization and lignin degradation are important for improving the enzyme accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. At lower pretreatment temperatures, there is a good correlation between xylan solubilization and cellulose accessibility. At higher pretreatment temperatures, lignin degradation correlated better with cellulose accessibility, represented by the increase in phenolic groups. During acid pretreatment, the ratio of syringyl/guaiacyl functional groups also gradually changed from less than 1 to greater than 1 with the increase in pretreatment temperature. This implies that more syringyl units are released from lignin depolymerization of aryl ether linkages than guaiacyl units. The condensed phenolic units are also correlated with the increase in pretreatment temperature up to 180 °C, beyond which point condensation reactions may overtake the hydrolysis of aryl ether linkages as the dominant reactions of lignin, thus leading to decreased cellulose accessibility.

  19. Structurally divergent lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferases with high selectivity for saturated medium chain fatty acids from Cuphea seeds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Jin; Silva, Jillian E; Iskandarov, Umidjon; Andersson, Mariette; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-12-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAT) catalyzes acylation of the sn-2 position on lysophosphatidic acid by an acyl CoA substrate to produce the phosphatidic acid precursor of polar glycerolipids and triacylglycerols (TAGs). In the case of TAGs, this reaction is typically catalyzed by an LPAT2 from microsomal LPAT class A that has high specificity for C18 fatty acids containing Δ9 unsaturation. Because of this specificity, the occurrence of saturated fatty acids in the TAG sn-2 position is infrequent in seed oils. To identify LPATs with variant substrate specificities, deep transcriptomic mining was performed on seeds of two Cuphea species producing TAGs that are highly enriched in saturated C8 and C10 fatty acids. From these analyses, cDNAs for seven previously unreported LPATs were identified, including cDNAs from Cuphea viscosissima (CvLPAT2) and Cuphea avigera var. pulcherrima (CpuLPAT2a) encoding microsomal, seed-specific class A LPAT2s and a cDNA from C. avigera var. pulcherrima (CpuLPATB) encoding a microsomal, seed-specific LPAT from the bacterial-type class B. The activities of these enzymes were characterized in Camelina sativa by seed-specific co-expression with cDNAs for various Cuphea FatB acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (FatB) that produce a variety of saturated medium-chain fatty acids. CvLPAT2 and CpuLPAT2a expression resulted in accumulation of 10:0 fatty acids in the Camelina sativa TAG sn-2 position, indicating a 10:0 CoA specificity that has not been previously described for plant LPATs. CpuLPATB expression generated TAGs with 14:0 at the sn-2 position, but not 10:0. Identification of these LPATs provides tools for understanding the structural basis of LPAT substrate specificity and for generating altered oil functionalities.

  20. Novel insights into the fungal oxidation of monoaromatic and biarylic environmental pollutants by characterization of two new ring cleavage enzymes.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, Rabea; Lippmann, Ramona; Hammer, Elke; Gesell Salazar, Manuela; Schauer, Frieder

    2013-06-01

    The phenol-degrading yeast Trichosporon mucoides can oxidize and detoxify biarylic environmental pollutants such as dibenzofuran, diphenyl ether and biphenyl by ring cleavage. The degradation pathways are well investigated, but the enzymes involved are not. The high similarity of hydroxylated biphenyl derivatives and phenol raised the question if the enzymes of the phenol degradation are involved in ring cleavage or whether specific enzymes are necessary. Purification of enzymes from T. mucoides with catechol cleavage activity demonstrated the existence of three different enzymes: a classical catechol-1,2-dioxygenase (CDO), not able to cleave the aromatic ring system of 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl, and two novel enzymes with a high affinity towards 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl. The comparison of the biochemical characteristics and mass spectrometric sequence data of these three enzymes demonstrated that they have different substrate specificities. CDO catalyzes the ortho-cleavage of dihydroxylated monoaromatic compounds, while the two novel enzymes carry out a similar reaction on biphenyl derivatives. The ring fission of 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl by the purified enzymes results in the formation of (5-oxo-3-phenyl-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-yl)acetic acid. These results suggest that the ring cleavage enzymes catalyzing phenol degradation are not involved in the ring cleavage of biarylic compounds by this yeast, although some intermediates of the phenol metabolism may function as inducers.

  1. Nucleic Acid i-Motif Structures in Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alba, Joan Josep; Sadurní, Anna; Gargallo, Raimundo

    2016-09-02

    Under the appropriate experimental conditions of pH and temperature, cytosine-rich segments in DNA or RNA sequences may produce a characteristic folded structure known as an i-motif. Besides its potential role in vivo, which is still under investigation, this structure has attracted increasing interest in other fields due to its sharp, fast and reversible pH-driven conformational changes. This "on/off" switch at molecular level is being used in nanotechnology and analytical chemistry to develop nanomachines and sensors, respectively. This paper presents a review of the latest applications of this structure in the field of chemical analysis.

  2. Models of metal binding structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Brown, G.K.; MacCarthy, P.; Cabaniss, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    Fulvic acid, isolated from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was assessed for its ability to bind Ca2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ ions at pH 6 before and after extensive fractionation that was designed to reveal the nature of metal binding functional groups. The binding constant for Ca2+ ion had the greatest increase of all the ions in a metal binding fraction that was selected for intensive characterization for the purpose of building quantitative average model structures. The 'metal binding' fraction was characterized by quantitative 13C NMR, 1H NMR, and FT-1R spectrometry and elemental, titrimetric, and molecular weight determinations. The characterization data revealed that carboxyl groups were clustered in short- chain aliphatic dibasic acid structures. The Ca2+ binding data suggested that ether-substituted oxysuccinic acid structures are good models for the metal binding sites at pH 6. Structural models were derived based upon oxidation and photolytic rearrangements of cutin, lignin, and tannin precursors. These structural models rich in substituted dibasic acid structures revealed polydentate binding sites with the potential for both inner-sphere and outer-sphere type binding. The majority of the fulvic acid molecule was involved with metal binding rather than a small substructural unit.Fulvic acid, isolated from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was assessed for its ability to bind Ca2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ ions at pH 6 before and after extensive fractionation that was designed to reveal the nature of metal binding functional groups. The binding constant for Ca2+ ion had the greatest increase of all the ions in a metal binding fraction that was selected for intensive characterization for the purpose of building quantitative average model structures. The `metal binding' fraction was characterized by quantitative 13C NMR, 1H NMR, and FT-IR spectrometry and elemental, titrimetric, and molecular weight determinations. The characterization data revealed that

  3. Properties and structure of peat humic acids depending on humification and precursor biota in bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-04-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic component of soil, peat and natural waters, but their structure and properties very much differs depending on their source. The aim of this study is to characterize humic acids from raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the homogeneity of humic acids isolated from the bog bodies and study peat humification impact on properties of humic acids. A major impact on the structure of peat humic acids have raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin) void of lignin. For characterization of peat humic acids their elemental (CHNOS), functional (-COOH, phenolic OH) analysis, spectroscopic characterization (UV, fluorescence, FTIR, 1H NMR, CP/MAS 13C NMR, ESR) and degradation studies (Py-GC/MS) were done. Peat humic acids (HA) have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, but thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge. Comparatively, the studied peat HAs are at the start of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups changes depending on the depth of peat from which HAs have been isolated: and carboxylic acidity is increasing with depth of peat location and the humification degree. The ability to influence the surface tension of peat humic acids isolated from a well-characterized bog profile demonstrates dependence on age and humification degree. With increase of the humification degree and age of humic acids, their molecular complexity and ability to influence surface tension decreases; even so, the impact of the biological precursor (peat-forming bryophytes and plants) can be identified.

  4. Cleavage fracture of austenite induced by nitrogen supersaturation

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, J.B.; Messai, A.; Foct, J. . Lab. de Metallurgie Physique)

    1994-09-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and more generally FCC structure materials are good candidates for cryogenic applications because they remain ductile at low temperatures. In some cases, brittleness may occasionally occur in severe and specific conditions such as hydrogen embrittlement or during stress corrosion cracking at low strain rates. The present study shows that the brittleness observed in the P900 austenitic stainless steel is associated with the presence of a high amount of nitrogen atoms. Brittle fracture occurs both intergranularly and transgranularly. Cleavage mostly on [111] planes is associated with marked slip but with the absence of rivers. The occurrence of a DBTT is explained by the converse variations of brittle rupture stress and flow stress against nitrogen content. The flow stress increases and is mainly controlled by a short range which leads the stress for brittle rupture to be reached before the plastic flow stress.

  5. Catalysts of DNA Strand Cleavage at Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Minko, Irina G.; Jacobs, Aaron C.; de Leon, Arnie R.; Gruppi, Francesca; Donley, Nathan; Harris, Thomas M.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; McCullough, Amanda K.; Lloyd, R. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are constantly formed in cellular DNA due to instability of the glycosidic bond, particularly at purines and various oxidized, alkylated, or otherwise damaged nucleobases. AP sites are also generated by DNA glycosylases that initiate DNA base excision repair. These lesions represent a significant block to DNA replication and are extremely mutagenic. Some DNA glycosylases possess AP lyase activities that nick the DNA strand at the deoxyribose moiety via a β- or β,δ-elimination reaction. Various amines can incise AP sites via a similar mechanism, but this non-enzymatic cleavage typically requires high reagent concentrations. Herein, we describe a new class of small molecules that function at low micromolar concentrations as both β- and β,δ-elimination catalysts at AP sites. Structure-activity relationships have established several characteristics that appear to be necessary for the formation of an iminium ion intermediate that self-catalyzes the elimination at the deoxyribose ring. PMID:27363485

  6. Synthesis of structured triacylglycerols enriched in n-3 fatty acids by immobilized microbial lipase.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Maria Elisa Melo Branco de; Campos, Paula Renata Bueno; Alberto, Thiago Grando; Contesini, Fabiano Jares; Carvalho, Patrícia de Oliveira

    The search for new biocatalysts has aroused great interest due to the variety of micro-organisms and their role as enzyme producers. Native lipases from Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus javanicus were used to enrich the n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids content in the triacylglycerols of soybean oil by acidolysis with free fatty acids from sardine oil in solvent-free media. For the immobilization process, the best lipase/support ratios were 1:3 (w/w) for Aspergillus niger lipase and 1:5 (w/w) for Rhizopus javanicus lipase using Amberlite MB-1. Both lipases maintained constant activity for 6 months at 4°C. Reaction time, sardine-free fatty acids:soybean oil mole ratio and initial water content of the lipase were investigated to determine their effects on n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids incorporation into soybean oil. Structured triacylglycerols with 11.7 and 7.2% of eicosapentaenoic acid+docosahexaenoic acid were obtained using Aspergillus niger lipase and Rhizopus javanicus lipase, decreasing the n-6/n-3 fatty acids ratio of soybean oil (11:1 to 3.5:1 and 4.7:1, respectively). The best reaction conditions were: initial water content of lipase of 0.86% (w/w), sardine-free faty acids:soybean oil mole ratio of 3:1 and reaction time of 36h, at 40°C. The significant factors for the acidolysis reaction were the sardine-free fatty acids:soybean oil mole ratio and reaction time. The characterization of structured triacylglycerols was obtained using easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry. The enzymatic reaction led to the formation of many structured triacylglycerols containing eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid or both polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  7. [On the Features of Embryonic Cleavage in Diverse Fish Species].

    PubMed

    Desnitskiy, A G

    2015-01-01

    Literature on the earliest steps of fish embryogenesis (including a number of "non-model" species) has been considered. The main attention has been paid to the loss of cleavage division synchrony and the first latitudinal cleavage furrow. In teleostean embryos, the features of their meroblastic cleavage are not rigidly associated with egg size. The midblastula transition (in a form clearly enough) occurs in some chondrostean and teleostean fishes, but it has not been detected in the representatives of sarcopterygian and chondrichthyan fishes.

  8. Early cleavage in Phoronis muelleri (Phoronida) displays spiral features.

    PubMed

    Pennerstorfer, Markus; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The view that early cleavage in Phoronida follows a radial pattern is widely accepted. However, data supporting this characterization are ambiguous. Studies have been repeatedly reporting variation between individual embryos, and the occurrence of embryos exhibiting oblique divisions or nonradial cell arrangements. Such embryos were often considered to represent variation within radial cleavage, or artificial appearances. Cleavage in Phoronis muelleri was previously characterized as "derived radial," but also oblique spindles and cell elongations, and shifted cell arrangements were observed. We studied the early cleavage in P. muelleri applying 4D microscopy, fluorescent staining, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. To deal with the problem of variation we provide statistical evaluations of our data. These show that oblique divisions do not represent variational abnormalities. In fact, they reveal that most cells divide obliquely from the third cleavage onwards. What is more, in almost all cells the axis of the third cleavage is inclined dextrally. The fourth cleavage is even stronger sinistrally pronounced. Subsequently, the pattern of alternating cleavage orientation is largely restricted to animal and vegetal blastomeres. As a result of the obliqueness of divisions, four cells encircle the poles in most embryos. Cross furrows are occasionally present. We found no indications for radial cleavage in P. muelleri. In contrast, the observed cleavage displays several characters consistent with the pattern of spiral cleavage. A close relation of phoronid and spiralian cleavage is also suggested by molecular phylogenies, allying both groups in the Lophotrochozoa. We suggest our findings to represent morphological support for this lophotrochozoan/spiralian affinity of Phoronida.

  9. Simian sarcoma virus-encoded gag-related protein: in vitro cleavage by Friend leukemia virus-associated proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Hafenrichter, R; Thiel, H J

    1985-05-01

    The simian sarcoma virus (SSV) encodes a gag-related 65,000-Da protein (SSV p65) which is not processed in SSV nonproducer cells (SSV-NP cells) (H.-J. Thiel, T. J. Matthews, E. M. Broughton, K. J. Weinhold, D. P. Bolognesi, T. Graf, and H. Beug (1981a), Virology 114, 124-131). In order to cleave SSV p65, retroviral particles containing this antigen were incubated with extracts from the heterologous helper virus Friend leukemia virus (FLV). Superinfection of SSV-NP cells by FLV has been previously shown to result in processing of SSV p65 in vivo (H.-J. Thiel, F. Weiland, R. Hafenrichter, T. J. Matthews, and K. J. Weinhold (1982), Virology 123, 229-234). In vitro cleavage was most efficient in the presence of a nonionic detergent (greater than 0.1% Nonidet-P40) and a reducing agent (greater than 5 mM dithiothreitol) at a pH of 7.0. The products, termed SSV p55 (p15, p12, p30), SSV p30, SSV p25 (p15, p12), and SSV p10, were characterized by (1) molecular weight, (2) kinetics experiments, (3) incorporation of different radiolabeled amino acids, and (4) comparison with SSAV structural proteins. Kinetics experiments with two amino acids ([3H]leucine, [35S]cysteine) revealed that initial processing of SSV p65 produced SSV p55 and SSV p10, with subsequent processing of SSV p55 occurring thereafter. In contrast to the Moloney system, the major intermediate p40 (p30, p10) could not be clearly demonstrated. A direct comparison of SSAV p10 and the cleavage product SSV p10 by SDS-PAGE suggests that SSAV pr65gag and SSV p65 differ slightly by molecular weight.

  10. Crystal structure of 4-acetamido-benzoic acid monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wen-Juan; Chi, Shao-Ming; Kou, Jun-Feng; Liu, Feng-Yi

    2014-11-01

    In the title compound, C9H9NO3·H2O, the plane of the acetamide group is oriented at 20.52 (8)° with respect to the benzene ring, whereas the plane of the carb-oxy-lic acid group is essentially coplanar with the benzene ring [maximum deviation = 0.033 (1) Å]. In the crystal, classical O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the organic mol-ecules and water mol-ecules of crystallization into a three-dimensional supra-molecular architecture.

  11. Optical Absorption, Stability and Structure of NpO2+ Complexeswith Dicarboxylic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Tian; Linfeng Rao

    2006-01-04

    Complexation of NpO2+ with oxalic acid (OX),2,2'-oxydiacetic acid (ODA), 2,2'-iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and 2,2'-thiodiacetic acid (TDA), has been studied using spectrophotometry in1 M NaClO4. Both the position and the intensity of the absorption band of NpO2+ at 980 nm are affected by the formation of NpO2+/dicarboxylate complexes, providing useful information on the complexation strength, the coordination mode and the structure of the complexes.

  12. Site specific incorporation of heavy atom-containing unnatural amino acids into proteins for structure determination

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Jianming; Wang, Lei; Wu, Ning; Schultz, Peter G.

    2008-07-15

    Translation systems and other compositions including orthogonal aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases that preferentially charge an orthogonal tRNA with an iodinated or brominated amino acid are provided. Nucleic acids encoding such synthetases are also described, as are methods and kits for producing proteins including heavy atom-containing amino acids, e.g., brominated or iodinated amino acids. Methods of determining the structure of a protein, e.g., a protein into which a heavy atom has been site-specifically incorporated through use of an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase pair, are also described.

  13. Application of immobilized bovine enterokinase in repetitive fusion protein cleavage for the production of mucin 1.

    PubMed

    Kubitzki, Tina; Minör, Daniel; Mackfeld, Ursula; Oldiges, Marco; Noll, Thomas; Lütz, Stephan

    2009-11-01

    Bovine enterokinase is a serine protease that catalyzes the hydrolysis of peptide bonds and plays a key role in mammalian metabolism. Because of its high specificity towards the amino acid sequence (Asp)(4)-Lys, enterokinase is a potential tool for the cleavage of fusion proteins, which are gaining more importance in biopharmaceutical production. A candidate for adaptive cancer immunotherapy is mucin 1, which is produced recombinantly as a fusion protein in CHO cells. Here, we present the first repetitive application of immobilized enterokinase for the cleavage of the mucin fusion protein. The immobilization enables a facile biocatalytic process due to simplified separation of the biocatalyst and the target protein. Immobilized enterokinase was applied in a maximum of 18 repetitive reactions. The enzyme utilization (total turnover number) was increased significantly 419-fold compared to unbound enzyme by both immobilization and optimization of process conditions. Slight enzyme inactivation throughout the reaction cycles was observed, but was compensated by adjusting the process time accordingly. Thus, complete fusion protein cleavage was achieved. Furthermore, we obtained isolated mucin 1 with a purity of more than 90% by applying a simple and efficient purification process. The presented results demonstrate enterokinase to be an attractive tool for fusion protein cleavage.

  14. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping as a strategy to reduce proteolytic cleavage of ataxin-3

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Lodewijk J. A.; Schmidt, Iris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S.; van Attikum, Haico; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA3) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 protein. Cleavage of mutant ataxin-3 by proteolytic enzymes yields ataxin-3 fragments containing the polyglutamine stretch. These shorter ataxin-3 fragments are thought to be involved in SCA3 pathogenesis due to their increased cellular toxicity and their involvement in formation of the characteristic neuronal aggregates. As a strategy to prevent formation of toxic cleavage fragments, we investigated an antisense oligonucleotide-mediated modification of the ataxin-3 pre-mRNA through exon skipping of exon 8 and 9, resulting in the removal of a central 88 amino acid region of the ataxin-3 protein. This removed protein region contains several predicted cleavage sites and two ubiquitin-interacting motifs. In contrast to unmodified mutant ataxin-3, the internally truncated ataxin-3 protein did not give rise to potentially toxic cleavage fragments when incubated with caspases. In vitro experiments did not show cellular toxicity of the modified ataxin-3 protein. However, the modified protein was incapable of binding poly-ubiquitin chains, which may interfere with its normal deubiquitinating function. Low exon skipping efficiencies combined with reduction in important ataxin-3 protein functions suggest that skipping of exon 8 and 9 is not a viable therapeutic option for SCA3. PMID:27731380

  15. Effects of retroviral envelope-protein cleavage upon trafficking, incorporation, and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Swapna; Sanders, David Avram

    2010-09-15

    Retroviral envelope glycoproteins undergo proteolytic processing by cellular subtilisin-like proprotein convertases at a polybasic amino-acid site in order to produce the two functional subunits, SU and TM. Most previous studies have indicated that envelope-protein cleavage is required for rendering the protein competent for promoting membrane fusion and for virus infectivity. We have investigated the role of proteolytic processing of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope-protein through site-directed mutagenesis of the residues near the SU-TM cleavage site and have established that uncleaved glycoprotein is unable either to be incorporated into virus particles efficiently or to induce membrane fusion. Additionally, the results suggest that cleavage of the envelope protein plays an important role in intracellular trafficking of protein via the cellular secretory pathway. Based on our results it was concluded that a positively charged residue located at either P2 or P4 along with the arginine at P1 is essential for cleavage.

  16. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping as a strategy to reduce proteolytic cleavage of ataxin-3.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Lodewijk J A; Schmidt, Iris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S; van Attikum, Haico; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2016-10-12

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA3) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 protein. Cleavage of mutant ataxin-3 by proteolytic enzymes yields ataxin-3 fragments containing the polyglutamine stretch. These shorter ataxin-3 fragments are thought to be involved in SCA3 pathogenesis due to their increased cellular toxicity and their involvement in formation of the characteristic neuronal aggregates. As a strategy to prevent formation of toxic cleavage fragments, we investigated an antisense oligonucleotide-mediated modification of the ataxin-3 pre-mRNA through exon skipping of exon 8 and 9, resulting in the removal of a central 88 amino acid region of the ataxin-3 protein. This removed protein region contains several predicted cleavage sites and two ubiquitin-interacting motifs. In contrast to unmodified mutant ataxin-3, the internally truncated ataxin-3 protein did not give rise to potentially toxic cleavage fragments when incubated with caspases. In vitro experiments did not show cellular toxicity of the modified ataxin-3 protein. However, the modified protein was incapable of binding poly-ubiquitin chains, which may interfere with its normal deubiquitinating function. Low exon skipping efficiencies combined with reduction in important ataxin-3 protein functions suggest that skipping of exon 8 and 9 is not a viable therapeutic option for SCA3.

  17. Developmentally regulated cleavage of tRNAs in the bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Haiser, Henry J.; Karginov, Fedor V.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Elliot, Marie A.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to sense and respond to environmental and physiological signals is critical for the survival of the soil-dwelling Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. Nutrient deprivation triggers the onset of a complex morphological differentiation process that involves the raising of aerial hyphae and formation of spore chains, and coincides with the production of a diverse array of clinically relevant antibiotics and other secondary metabolites. These processes are tightly regulated; however, the genes and signals involved have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report a novel tRNA cleavage event that follows the same temporal regulation as morphological and physiological differentiation, and is growth medium dependent. All tRNAs appear to be susceptible to cleavage; however, there appears to be a bias towards increased cleavage of those tRNAs that specify highly utilized codons. In contrast to what has been observed in eukaryotes, accumulation of tRNA halves in S. coelicolor is not significantly affected by amino acid starvation, and is also not affected by induction of the stringent response or inhibition of ribosome function. Mutants defective in aerial development and antibiotic production exhibit altered tRNA cleavage profiles relative to wild-type strains. PMID:18084030

  18. Activation of human prolegumain by cleavage at a C-terminal asparagine residue.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J M; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    2000-01-01

    The processing and activation of prolegumain were studied using the recombinant protein synthesized by cells that had been stably transfected with a human legumain cDNA construct. A cell line termed C13 was selected for the high-level expression of prolegumain. C13 cells produced primarily 56 kDa prolegumain. The 56 kDa form was enzymically inactive but stable at neutral pH, unlike the 35 kDa mature pig legumain; it could be converted into a 46 kDa active form by incubation at pH 4.5. The 56 kDa pro-form and the 46 kDa active form were found to have the same N-terminal amino acid sequence, indicating that cleavage at the N-terminus was not necessary for prolegumain activation, and that the decrease in molecular mass was due to a C-terminal cleavage. The C-terminal processing site was identified as Asn(323). Replacement of Asn(323) at the cleavage site with aspartate, serine, alanine or glutamate abolished the processing and activation of prolegumain. In contrast, mutation of other asparagine and aspartate residues near the cleavage site had no effect. These results demonstrate that Asn(323) is essential for prolegumain activation. PMID:11085925

  19. Activation of human prolegumain by cleavage at a C-terminal asparagine residue.

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    2000-12-01

    The processing and activation of prolegumain were studied using the recombinant protein synthesized by cells that had been stably transfected with a human legumain cDNA construct. A cell line termed C13 was selected for the high-level expression of prolegumain. C13 cells produced primarily 56 kDa prolegumain. The 56 kDa form was enzymically inactive but stable at neutral pH, unlike the 35 kDa mature pig legumain; it could be converted into a 46 kDa active form by incubation at pH 4.5. The 56 kDa pro-form and the 46 kDa active form were found to have the same N-terminal amino acid sequence, indicating that cleavage at the N-terminus was not necessary for prolegumain activation, and that the decrease in molecular mass was due to a C-terminal cleavage. The C-terminal processing site was identified as Asn(323). Replacement of Asn(323) at the cleavage site with aspartate, serine, alanine or glutamate abolished the processing and activation of prolegumain. In contrast, mutation of other asparagine and aspartate residues near the cleavage site had no effect. These results demonstrate that Asn(323) is essential for prolegumain activation.

  20. Signal peptide prediction based on analysis of experimentally verified cleavage sites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zemin; Henzel, William J.

    2004-01-01

    A number of computational tools are available for detecting signal peptides, but their abilities to locate the signal peptide cleavage sites vary significantly and are often less than satisfactory. We characterized a set of 270 secreted recombinant human proteins by automated Edman analysis and used the verified cleavage sites to evaluate the success rate of a number of computational prediction programs. An examination of the frequency of amino acid in the N-terminal region of the data set showed a preference of proline and glutamine but a bias against tyrosine. The data set was compared to the SWISS-PROT database and revealed a high percentage of discrepancies with cleavage site annotations that were computationally generated. The best program for predicting signal sequences was found to be SignalP 2.0-NN with an accuracy of 78.1% for cleavage site recognition. The new data set can be utilized for refining prediction algorithms, and we have built an improved version of profile hidden Markov model for signal peptides based on the new data. PMID:15340161

  1. Enantioselective cleavage of supercoiled plasmid DNA catalyzed by chiral macrocyclic lanthanide(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Krężel, Artur; Lisowski, Jerzy

    2012-02-01

    The enantiomers of the Sm (III), Eu (III) and Yb (III) complexes [LnL(NO(3))(2)](NO(3)) of a chiral hexaazamacrocycle were tested as catalysts for the hydrolytic cleavage of supercoiled plasmid DNA. The catalytic activity was remarkably enantioselective; while the [LnL(SSSS)(NO(3))(2)](NO(3)) enantiomers promoted the cleavage of plasmid pBR322 from the supercoiled form (SC) to the nicked form (NC), the [LnL(RRRR)(NO(3))(2)](NO(3)) enantiomers were inactive. Kinetics of plasmid DNA hydrolysis was also investigated by agarose electrophoresis and it indicated typical single-exponential cleavage reaction. The hydrolytic mechanism of DNA cleavage was confirmed by the successful ligation of hydrolysis product by T4 ligase. The NMR study of the solutions of the complexes in various buffers indicated that the complexes exist as monomeric cationic complexes [LnL(H(2)O)(3)](3+) in slightly acidic solutions and as dimeric cationic complexes [Ln(2)L(2)(μ-OH)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](4+) in slightly basic 8mM solutions, with the latter form being a possible catalyst for hydrolysis of phosphodiester bonds.

  2. Crystal and molecular structures of twelve salts from isopropylamine and different organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xianhong; Zhang, Huan; Xu, Kai; Sun, JiaHui; Ye, Jiaying; Jin, Shouwen; Wang, Daqi

    2015-08-01

    Twelve isopropylamine derived supramolecular complexes isopropylamine: (m-toluic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (mtua-), mtua- = m-toluate] (1), isopropylamine: (p-toluic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (ptua-), ptua- = p-toluate] (2), isopropylamine: (p-methoxybenzoic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (pmba-), pmba- = p-methoxybenzoate] (3), (isopropylamine): (3,4-methylenedioxybenzoic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (mba)-, mba = 3,4-methylenedioxybenzoate] (4), (isopropylamine): (2-methyl-2-phenoxypropanoic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (mpa-), mpa- = 2-methyl-2-phenoxypropionate] (5), (isopropylamine): (4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (cpa-), cpa- = 4-chlorophenoxyacetate] (6), (isopropylamine): (3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (dnba-), dnba- = 3,5-dinitrobenzoate] (7), (isopropylamine): (2-furoic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (fura-), fura- = 2-furoate] (8), (isopropylamine): (1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid) [(Hipa)+ ṡ (hna), hna = 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoate] (9), (isopropylamine): (4-nitrophthalic acid) [(Hipa)2+ ṡ (npa2-), npa2- = 4-nitrophthalate] (10), (isopropylamine)2: (2,5-bis-isopropylcarbamoyl-terephthalic acid): 2H2O [(Hipa)2+ ṡ (bta2-) ṡ 2H2O, bta2- = 2,5-bis-isopropylcarbamoyl-terephthalate] (11), and (isopropylamine)2: (1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid) [(Hipa)2+ ṡ (nds2-), nds2- = 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonate] (12) were synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. All supramolecular architectures of 1-12 involve extensive classical hydrogen bonds as well as other non-covalent interactions. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the Nsbnd H⋯O, Osbnd H⋯O, and Osbnd H⋯S hydrogen bonds between the acidic components and isopropylamine are sufficient to bring about the formation of binary organic salts. The role of weak and strong non-covalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These weak interactions combined, the complexes 1-12 displayed 1D-3D framework structure.

  3. Efficient structural characterization of poly(methacrylic acid) by activated-electron photodetachment dissociation.

    PubMed

    Girod, Marion; Brunet, Claire; Antoine, Rodolphe; Lemoine, Jérôme; Dugourd, Philippe; Charles, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of end-groups in poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) was achieved using tandem mass spectrometry after activated-electron photodetachment dissociation (activated-EPD). In this technique, multiply deprotonated PMAA oligomers produced in the negative-ion mode of electrospray ionization were oxidized into radical anions upon electron photodetachment using a 220 nm laser wavelength, and further activated by collision. In contrast to conventional collision induced dissociation of negatively charged PMAA, which mainly consists of multiple dehydration steps, fragmentation of odd-electron species is shown to proceed via a radical-induced decarboxylation, followed by reactions involving backbone bond cleavages, giving rise to product ions containing one or the other oligomer termination. A single radical-induced mechanism accounts for the four main fragment series observed in MS/MS. The relative position of the radical and of the anionic center in distonic precursor ions determines the nature of the reaction products. Experiments performed using PMAA sodium salts allowed us to account for relative abundances of product ions in series obtained from PMAA, revealing that ion stability is ensured by hydrogen bonds within pairs of MAA units.

  4. DNA binding, DNA cleavage, and cytotoxicity studies of two new copper (II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Kashanian, Soheila; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Roshanfekr, Hamideh; Shahabadi, Nahid; Rezvani, Alireza; Mansouri, Ghobad

    2011-05-01

    The DNA binding behavior of [Cu(phen)(phen-dione)Cl]Cl (1) and [Cu(bpy)(phen-dione)Cl]Cl (2) was studied with a series of techniques including UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and viscometric methods. Cytotoxicity effect and DNA unwinding properties were also investigated. The results indicate that the Cu(II) complexes interact with calf-thymus DNA by both partially intercalative and hydrogen binding. These findings have been further substantiated by the determination of intrinsic binding constants spectrophotometrically, 12.5 × 10(5) and 5 × 10(5) for 1 and 2, respectively. Our findings suggest that the type of ligands and structure of complexes have marked effect on the binding affinity of complexes involving CT-DNA. Circular dichroism results show that complex 1 causes considerable increase in base stacking of DNA, whereas 2 decreases the base stacking, which is related to more extended aromatic area of 1,10-phenanthroline in 1 rather than bipyridine in 2. Slow decrease in DNA viscosity indicates partially intercalative binding in addition to hydrogen binding on the surface of DNA. The second binding mode was also confirmed by additional tests: interaction in denaturation condition and acidic pH. Also, these new complexes induced cleavage in pUC18 plasmid DNA as indicated in gel electrophoresis and showed excellent antitumor activity against K562 (human chronic myeloid leukemia) cells.

  5. An unusual carbon-carbon bond cleavage reaction during phosphinothricin biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cicchillo, Robert M; Zhang, Houjin; Blodgett, Joshua A.V.; Whitteck, John T; Li, Gongyong; Nair, Satish K; van derDonk, Wilfred A; Metcalf, William W

    2010-01-12

    Natural products containing phosphorus-carbon bonds have found widespread use in medicine and agriculture. One such compound, phosphinothricin tripeptide, contains the unusual amino acid phosphinothricin attached to two alanine residues. Synthetic phosphinothricin (glufosinate) is a component of two top-selling herbicides (Basta and Liberty), and is widely used with resistant transgenic crops including corn, cotton and canola. Recent genetic and biochemical studies showed that during phosphinothricin tripeptide biosynthesis 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate (HEP) is converted to hydroxymethylphosphonate (HMP). Here we report the in vitro reconstitution of this unprecedented C(sp{sup 3})-C(sp{sup 3}) bond cleavage reaction and X-ray crystal structures of the enzyme. The protein is a mononuclear non-haem iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that converts HEP to HMP and formate. In contrast to most other members of this family, the oxidative consumption of HEP does not require additional cofactors or the input of exogenous electrons. The current study expands the scope of reactions catalysed by the 2-His-1-carboxylate mononuclear non-haem iron family of enzymes.

  6. Solving nucleic acid structures by molecular replacement: examples from group II intron studies

    PubMed Central

    Marcia, Marco; Humphris-Narayanan, Elisabeth; Keating, Kevin S.; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-01-01

    Structured RNA molecules are key players in ensuring cellular viability. It is now emerging that, like proteins, the functions of many nucleic acids are dictated by their tertiary folds. At the same time, the number of known crystal structures of nucleic acids is also increasing rapidly. In this context, molecular replacement will become an increasingly useful technique for phasing nucleic acid crystallographic data in the near future. Here, strategies to select, create and refine molecular-replacement search models for nucleic acids are discussed. Using examples taken primarily from research on group II introns, it is shown that nucleic acids are amenable to different and potentially more flexible and sophisticated molecular-replacement searches than proteins. These observations specifically aim to encourage future crystallographic studies on the newly discovered repertoire of noncoding transcripts. PMID:24189228

  7. Reactive Extraction of Lactic Acid by Using Tri-n-octylamine: Structure of the Ionic Phase.

    PubMed

    Aimer, Matthias; Klemm, Elias; Langanke, Bernd; Gehrke, Helmut; Stubenrauch, Cosima

    2016-03-01

    Lactic acid is a promising biogenic platform chemical which can be produced by fermentation of cellulose and hemicellulose. However, separating lactic acid from the fermentation broth is extremely costly and technically complex. We therefore investigated whether liquid/liquid extraction of lactic acid with tri-n-octylamine is a cost-effective alternative to the existing downstream processing method. In order to find an answer to this question, the structure of the middle phase of the occurring three-phase region, which is enriched with up to 20 wt. % lactic acid, was explored. The results of our IR, small-angle X-ray scattering and NMR measurements show that this phase is ionic and has a bicontinuous structure. Due to the analogy with bicontinuous microemulsions, it should be possible to further enrich the lactic acid, which could lead to a rethink regarding the design of extraction processes.

  8. Crystal structure of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) liver bile acid-binding protein bound to cholic and oleic acid.

    PubMed

    Capaldi, Stefano; Guariento, Mara; Perduca, Massimiliano; Di Pietro, Santiago M; Santomé, José A; Monaco, Hugo L

    2006-07-01

    The family of the liver bile acid-binding proteins (L-BABPs), formerly called liver basic fatty acid-binding proteins (Lb-FABPs) shares fold and sequence similarity with the paralogous liver fatty acid-binding proteins (L-FABPs) but has a different stoichiometry and specificity of ligand binding. This article describes the first X-ray structure of a member of the L-BABP family, axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) L-BABP, bound to two different ligands: cholic and oleic acid. The protein binds one molecule of oleic acid in a position that is significantly different from that of either of the two molecules that bind to rat liver FABP. The stoichiometry of binding of cholate is of two ligands per protein molecule, as observed in chicken L-BABP. The cholate molecule that binds buried most deeply into the internal cavity overlaps well with the analogous bound to chicken L-BABP, whereas the second molecule, which interacts with the first only through hydrophobic contacts, is more external and exposed to the solvent.

  9. Cleavage Specificity Analysis of Six Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases (TTSPs) Using PICS with Proteome-Derived Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, François; Leduc, Richard; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are a family of cell membrane tethered serine proteases with unclear roles as their cleavage site specificities and substrate degradomes have not been fully elucidated. Indeed just 52 cleavage sites are annotated in MEROPS, the database of proteases, their substrates and inhibitors. Methodology/Principal Finding To profile the active site specificities of the TTSPs, we applied Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS). Human proteome-derived database searchable peptide libraries were assayed with six human TTSPs (matriptase, matriptase-2, matriptase-3, HAT, DESC and hepsin) to simultaneously determine sequence preferences on the N-terminal non-prime (P) and C-terminal prime (P’) sides of the scissile bond. Prime-side cleavage products were isolated following biotinylation and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding non-prime side sequences were derived from human proteome databases using bioinformatics. Sequencing of 2,405 individual cleaved peptides allowed for the development of the family consensus protease cleavage site specificity revealing a strong specificity for arginine in the P1 position and surprisingly a lysine in P1′ position. TTSP cleavage between R↓K was confirmed using synthetic peptides. By parsing through known substrates and known structures of TTSP catalytic domains, and by modeling the remainder, structural explanations for this strong specificity were derived. Conclusions Degradomics analysis of 2,405 cleavage sites revealed a similar and characteristic TTSP family specificity at the P1 and P1′ positions for arginine and lysine in unfolded peptides. The prime side is important for cleavage specificity, thus making these proteases unusual within the tryptic-enzyme class that generally has overriding non-prime side specificity. PMID:25211023

  10. Structure and property of multiple amino acids assembled on the surface of a CNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cuihong; Yang, Guangwu; Jiang, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Amino acids were placed with maximal filling on the surface of a CNT via hydrogen bonding and H/π interactions. The interaction structures and properties of assembled complexes were investigated via the density functional tight-binding method. The structural parameters and interaction energies were analyzed to identify the weak interaction strengths. We found that the H/π interactions between amino acids and CNTs play more important roles than the hydrogen bonds between amino acids in stabilizing the complex structures. The effect of CNT chirality and amino acid type were also studied. Furthermore, the HOMOs and LUMOs of the representative complexes were also studied to illustrate the interactions. Our data is helpful in the modification of CNTs by biomolecules.

  11. Probing Protein Structure by Amino Acid-Specific Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Vanessa Leah; Vachet, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, amino acid-specific covalent labeling has been a valuable tool to study protein structure and protein interactions, especially for systems that are difficult to study by other means. These covalent labeling methods typically map protein structure and interactions by measuring the differential reactivity of amino acid side chains. The reactivity of amino acids in proteins generally depends on the accessibility of the side chain to the reagent, the inherent reactivity of the label and the reactivity of the amino acid side chain. Peptide mass mapping with ESI- or MALDI-MS and peptide sequencing with tandem MS are typically employed to identify modification sites to provide site-specific structural information. In this review, we describe the reagents that are most commonly used in these residue-specific modification reactions, details about the proper use of these covalent labeling reagents, and information about the specific biochemical problems that have been addressed with covalent labeling strategies. PMID:19016300

  12. Glycine cleavage enzyme complex: molecular cloning and expression of the H-protein cDNA from cultured human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zay, Agnes; Choy, Francis Y M; Patrick, Chelsea; Sinclair, Graham

    2011-06-01

    The human H-protein is one of four essential components (H-, L-, P-, and T-proteins) of the mammalian glycine cleavage enzyme complex and its function is involved in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of glycine encephalopathy. A transcript corresponding to the glycine cleavage H-protein functional gene was isolated from cultured human skin fibroblasts along with a transcript for a putative processed pseudogene on chromosome 2q33.3. Sequence analysis of the fibroblast H-protein functional gene transcript showed complete identity to that reported from human liver. The H-protein cDNA was subsequently cloned with a hexahistidine affinity tag in the Pichia pastoris plasmid vector pPICZαA and recombined into the yeast genome downstream of the alcohol oxidase promoter for methanol-induced expression. The recombinant H-protein was secreted into the culture medium and purified to homogeneity using a one-step nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid resin column. Approximately 4 mg of homogeneous H-protein was obtained from 1 L of culture medium. Since the attachment of a lipoic acid prosthetic group is required for H-protein function, we have expressed and purified E. coli lipoate protein ligase and succeeded in lipoylating H-protein, converting the apo-H-protein to the functional holo-H-protein. A lipoamide dehydrogenase assay was performed to confirm that the apo-H-protein was inactive, whereas the holo-H-protein was approximately 2.3-fold more active than free lipoic acid as a hydrogen donor in driving the reaction. The availability of copious amounts of human recombinant H-protein by using Pichia pastoris expression and affinity purification will facilitate the elucidation of the structure and function of the H-protein and its relationship to the P-, T-, and L-proteins in the glycine cleavage enzyme complex. In view of the fact that there is no detectable glycine cleavage enzyme activity in human skin fibroblasts, we speculate that a plausible function of the H-protein is to

  13. Are the Crystal Structures of Enantiopure and Racemic Mandelic Acids Determined by Kinetics or Thermodynamics?

    PubMed

    Hylton, Rebecca K; Tizzard, Graham J; Threlfall, Terence L; Ellis, Amy L; Coles, Simon J; Seaton, Colin C; Schulze, Eric; Lorenz, Heike; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Stein, Matthias; Price, Sarah L

    2015-09-02

    Mandelic acids are prototypic chiral molecules where the sensitivity of crystallized forms (enantiopure/racemic compound/polymorphs) to both conditions and substituents provides a new insight into the factors that may allow chiral separation by crystallization. The determination of a significant number of single crystal structures allows the analysis of 13 enantiopure and 30 racemic crystal structures of 21 (F/Cl/Br/CH3/CH3O) substituted mandelic acid derivatives. There are some common phenyl packing motifs between some groups of racemic and enantiopure structures, although they show very different hydrogen-bonding motifs. The computed crystal energy landscape of 3-chloromandelic acid, which has at least two enantiopure and three racemic crystal polymorphs, reveals that there are many more possible structures, some of which are predicted to be thermodynamically more favorable as well as slightly denser than the known forms. Simulations of mandelic acid dimers in isolation, water, and toluene do not differentiate between racemic and enantiopure dimers and also suggest that the phenyl ring interactions play a major role in the crystallization mechanism. The observed crystallization behavior of mandelic acids does not correspond to any simple "crystal engineering rules" as there is a range of thermodynamically feasible structures with no distinction between the enantiopure and racemic forms. Nucleation and crystallization appear to be determined by the kinetics of crystal growth with a statistical bias, but the diversity of the mandelic acid crystallization behavior demonstrates that the factors that influence the kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth are not yet adequately understood.

  14. Structural gene and complete amino acid sequence of Vibrio alginolyticus collagenase.

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, H; Shibano, Y; Morihara, K; Fukushima, J; Inami, S; Keil, B; Gilles, A M; Kawamoto, S; Okuda, K

    1992-01-01

    The DNA encoding the collagenase of Vibrio alginolyticus was cloned, and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. When the cloned gene was ligated to pUC18, the Escherichia coli expression vector, bacteria carrying the gene exhibited both collagenase antigen and collagenase activity. The open reading frame from the ATG initiation codon was 2442 bp in length for the collagenase structural gene. The amino acid sequence, deduced from the nucleotide sequence, revealed that the mature collagenase consists of 739 amino acids with an Mr of 81875. The amino acid sequences of 20 polypeptide fragments were completely identical with the deduced amino acid sequences of the collagenase gene. The amino acid composition predicted from the DNA sequence was similar to the chemically determined composition of purified collagenase reported previously. The analyses of both the DNA and amino acid sequences of the collagenase gene were rigorously performed, but we could not detect any significant sequence similarity to other collagenases. Images Fig. 2. PMID:1311172

  15. Brittle to ductile transition in cleavage fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Argon, A.S.; Berg, Q.

    1992-09-30

    The problem of interpretation of fracture transition from brittle to ductile or vice versa is the subject of study. An instrumented tapered double cantilever beam (TDCB) has been developed as a definitive tool in the study of the intrinsic mechanism in single crystalline samples. In this experiment, the crack velocity is directly proportional to actuator velocity. In experiments performed on TDCB shaped Si single crystals, oriented for cleavage on either [l brace]111[r brace] or [l brace]110[r brace] planes, a number of troubling features of jerky carck extension were encountered. Evidence suggests that nucleation of dislocation loops from crack tip is easier than moving these dislocations away from crack tip. 14 refs, 1 fig.

  16. Crystal structure of 7,8-benzocoumarin-4-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Swamy, R Ranga; Gowda, Ramakrishna; Gowda, K V Arjuna; Basanagouda, Mahantesha

    2015-08-01

    The fused-ring system in the title compound [systematic name: 2-(2-oxo-2H-benzo[h]chromen-4-yl)acetic acid], C15H10O4, is almost planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.031 Å) and the Car-C-C=O (ar = aromatic) torsion angle for the side chain is -134.4 (3)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, generating [100] C(8) chains, where the acceptor atom is the exocyclic O atom of the fused-ring system. The packing is consolidated by a very weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bond to the same acceptor atom. Together, these inter-actions lead to undulating (001) layers in the crystal.

  17. Nucleotide sequence of miRNA precursor contributes to cleavage site selection by Dicer.

    PubMed

    Starega-Roslan, Julia; Galka-Marciniak, Paulina; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2015-12-15

    The ribonuclease Dicer excises mature miRNAs from a diverse group of precursors (pre-miRNAs), most of which contain various secondary structure motifs in their hairpin stem. In this study, we analyzed Dicer cleavage in hairpin substrates deprived of such motifs. We searched for the factors other than the secondary structure, which may influence the length diversity and heterogeneity of miRNAs. We found that the nucleotide sequence at the Dicer cleavage site influences both of these miRNA characteristics. With regard to cleavage mechanism, we demonstrate that the Dicer RNase IIIA domain that cleaves within the 3' arm of the pre-miRNA is more sensitive to the nucleotide sequence of its substrate than is the RNase IIIB domain. The RNase IIIA domain avoids releasing miRNAs with G nucleotide and prefers to generate miRNAs with a U nucleotide at the 5' end. We also propose that the sequence restrictions at the Dicer cleavage site might be the factor that contributes to the generation of miRNA duplexes with 3' overhangs of atypical lengths. This finding implies that the two RNase III domains forming the single processing center of Dicer may exhibit some degree of flexibility, which allows for the formation of these non-standard 3' overhangs.

  18. Nucleotide sequence of miRNA precursor contributes to cleavage site selection by Dicer

    PubMed Central