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Sample records for acid coa ligase

  1. Subcellular relocalization of a long-chain fatty acid CoA ligase by a suppressor mutation alleviates a respiration deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Harington, A; Schwarz, E; Slonimski, P P; Herbert, C J

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated an extragenic suppressor, FAM1-1, which is able to restore respiratory growth to a deletion of the CEM1 gene (mitochondrial beta-keto-acyl synthase). The sequence of the suppressor strongly suggests that it encodes a long-chain fatty acid CoA ligase (fatty-acyl-CoA synthetase). We have also cloned and sequenced the wild-type FAM1 gene, which is devoid of suppressor activity. The comparison of the two sequences shows that the suppressor mutation is an A-->T transversion, which creates a new initiation codon and adds 18 amino acids to the N-terminus of the protein. This extension has all the characteristics of a mitochondrial targeting sequence, whilst the N-terminus of the wild-type protein has none of these characteristics. In vitro mitochondrial import experiments show that the N-terminal half of the suppressor protein, but not of the wild-type, is transported into mitochondria. Thus, we hypothesize that the suppressor acts by changing the subcellular localization of the protein and relocating at least some of the enzyme from the cytosol to the mitochondria. These results support the hypothesis that some form of fatty acid synthesis, specific for the mitochondria, is essential for the function of the organelle. Images PMID:7988550

  2. 4-coumarate: CoA ligase partitions metabolites for eugenol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Shubhra; Kumar, Ritesh; Chanotiya, Chandan S; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan M; Nagegowda, Dinesh A; Shasany, Ajit K

    2013-08-01

    Biosynthesis of eugenol shares its initial steps with that of lignin, involving conversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to their corresponding coenzyme A (CoA) esters by 4-coumarate:CoA ligases (4CLs). In this investigation, a 4CL (OS4CL) was identified from glandular trichome-rich tissue of Ocimum sanctum with high sequence similarity to an isoform (OB4CL_ctg4) from Ocimum basilicum. The levels of OS4CL and OB4CL_ctg4-like transcripts were highest in O. sanctum trichome, followed by leaf, stem and root. The eugenol content in leaf essential oil was positively correlated with the expression of OS4CL in the leaf at different developmental stages. Recombinant OS4CL showed the highest activity with p-coumaric acid, followed by ferulic, caffeic and trans-cinnamic acids. Transient RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of OS4CL in O. sanctum leaves caused a reduction in leaf eugenol content and trichome transcript level, with a considerable increase in endogenous p-coumaric, ferulic, trans-cinnamic and caffeic acids. A significant reduction in the expression levels was observed for OB4CL_ctg4-related transcripts in suppressed trichome compared with transcripts similar to the other four isoforms (OB4CL_ctg1, 2, 3 and 5). Sinapic acid and lignin content were also unaffected in RNAi suppressed leaf samples. Transient expression of OS4CL-green fluorescent protein fusion protein in Arabidopsis protoplasts was associated with the cytosol. These results indicate metabolite channeling of intermediates towards eugenol by a specific 4CL and is the first report demonstrating the involvement of 4CL in creation of virtual compartments through substrate utilization and committing metabolites for eugenol biosynthesis at an early stage of the pathway. PMID:23677922

  3. Cloning and functional characterization of a 4-coumarate CoA ligase from liverwort Plagiochasma appendiculatum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuai; Yu, Hai-Na; Xu, Rui-Xue; Cheng, Ai-Xia; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2015-03-01

    Plant phenylpropanoids represent a large group of secondary metabolites which have played an important role in terrestrial plant life, beginning with the evolution of land plants from primitive green algae. 4-Coumarate: coenzyme A ligase (4CL) is a provider of activated thioester substrates within the phenylpropanoid synthesis pathway. Although 4CLs have been extensively characterized in angiosperm, gymnosperm and moss species, little is known of their functions in liverworts. Here, a 4CL homolog (designated as Pa4CL1) was isolated from the liverwort species Plagiochasma appendiculatum. The full-length cDNA sequence of Pa4CL1 contains 1644bp and is predicted to encode a protein with 547amino acids. The gene products were 40-50% identical with 4CL sequences reported in public databases. The recombinant protein was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and exhibited a high level of 4CL activity, catalyzing formation of hydroxycinnamate-CoA thioesters by a two-step reaction mechanism from corresponding hydroxycinnamic acids. Kinetic analysis indicated that the most favorable substrate for Pa4CL1 is p-coumaric acid. The transcription of Pa4CL1 was induced when P. appendiculatum thallus was treated with either salicylic acid or methyl jasmonate. PMID:25593011

  4. Soraphen A, an inhibitor of acetyl CoA carboxylase activity, interferes with fatty acid elongation

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Donald B.; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises; Olson, L. Karl

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC1 & ACC2) generates malonyl CoA, a substrate for de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and an inhibitor of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO). Malonyl CoA is also a substrate for microsomal fatty acid elongation, an important pathway for saturated (SFA), mono- (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis. Despite the interest in ACC as a target for obesity and cancer therapy, little attention has been given to the role ACC plays in long chain fatty acid synthesis. This report examines the effect of pharmacological inhibition of ACC on DNL & palmitate (16:0) and linoleate (18:2,n-6) metabolism in HepG2 and LnCap cells. The ACC inhibitor, soraphen A, lowers cellular malonyl CoA, attenuates DNL and the formation of fatty acid elongation products derived from exogenous fatty acids, i.e., 16:0 & 18:2,n-6; IC50 ~ 5 nM. Elevated expression of fatty acid elongases (Elovl5, Elovl6) or desaturases (FADS1, FADS2) failed to override the soraphen A effect on SFA, MUFA or PUFA synthesis. Inhibition of fatty acid elongation leads to the accumulation of 16- and 18-carbon unsaturated fatty acids derived from 16:0 and 18:2,n-6, respectively. Pharmacological inhibition of ACC activity will not only attenuate DNL and induce FAO, but will also attenuate the synthesis of very long chain saturated, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:21184748

  5. Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Cecilia R.; Patrick, Wayne M.

    2015-01-01

    With their ability to catalyse the formation of phosphodiester linkages, DNA ligases and RNA ligases are essential tools for many protocols in molecular biology and biotechnology. Currently, the nucleic acid ligases from bacteriophage T4 are used extensively in these protocols. In this review, we argue that the nucleic acid ligases from Archaea represent a largely untapped pool of enzymes with diverse and potentially favourable properties for new and emerging biotechnological applications. We summarise the current state of knowledge on archaeal DNA and RNA ligases, which makes apparent the relative scarcity of information on in vitro activities that are of most relevance to biotechnologists (such as the ability to join blunt- or cohesive-ended, double-stranded DNA fragments). We highlight the existing biotechnological applications of archaeal DNA ligases and RNA ligases. Finally, we draw attention to recent experiments in which protein engineering was used to modify the activities of the DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus and the RNA ligase from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, thus demonstrating the potential for further work in this area. PMID:26494982

  6. Positive selection drives adaptive diversification of the 4-coumarate: CoA ligase (4CL) gene in angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Haiyan; Guo, Kai; Feng, Shengqiu; Zou, Weihua; Li, Ying; Fan, Chunfen; Peng, Liangcai

    2015-01-01

    Lignin and flavonoids play a vital role in the adaption of plants to a terrestrial environment. 4-Coumarate: coenzyme A ligase (4CL) is a key enzyme of general phenylpropanoid metabolism which provides the precursors for both lignin and flavonoids biosynthesis. However, very little is known about how such essential enzymatic functions evolve and diversify. Here, we analyze 4CL sequence variation patterns in a phylogenetic framework to further identify the evolutionary forces that lead to functional divergence. The results reveal that lignin-biosynthetic 4CLs are under positive selection. The majority of the positively selected sites are located in the substrate-binding pocket and the catalytic center, indicating that nonsynonymous substitutions might contribute to the functional evolution of 4CLs for lignin biosynthesis. The evolution of 4CLs involved in flavonoid biosynthesis is constrained by purifying selection and maintains the ancestral role of the protein in response to biotic and abiotic factors. Overall, our results demonstrate that protein sequence evolution via positive selection is an important evolutionary force driving adaptive diversification in 4CL proteins in angiosperms. This diversification is associated with adaption to a terrestrial environment. PMID:26380674

  7. Monolignol Pathway 4-Coumaric Acid:Coenzyme A Ligases in Populus. trichocarpa: Novel Specificity, Metabolic Regulation, and Simulation of Coenzyme A Ligation Fluxes1[W

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Song, Jina; Williams, Cranos M.; Shuford, Christopher M.; Liu, Jie; Wang, Jack P.; Li, Quanzi; Shi, Rui; Gokce, Emine; Ducoste, Joel; Muddiman, David C.; Sederoff, Ronald R.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    2013-01-01

    4-Coumaric acid:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) is involved in monolignol biosynthesis for lignification in plant cell walls. It ligates coenzyme A (CoA) with hydroxycinnamic acids, such as 4-coumaric and caffeic acids, into hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA thioesters. The ligation ensures the activated state of the acid for reduction into monolignols. In Populus spp., it has long been thought that one monolignol-specific 4CL is involved. Here, we present evidence of two monolignol 4CLs, Ptr4CL3 and Ptr4CL5, in Populus trichocarpa. Ptr4CL3 is the ortholog of the monolignol 4CL reported for many other species. Ptr4CL5 is novel. The two Ptr4CLs exhibited distinct Michaelis-Menten kinetic properties. Inhibition kinetics demonstrated that hydroxycinnamic acid substrates are also inhibitors of 4CL and suggested that Ptr4CL5 is an allosteric enzyme. Experimentally validated flux simulation, incorporating reaction/inhibition kinetics, suggested two CoA ligation paths in vivo: one through 4-coumaric acid and the other through caffeic acid. We previously showed that a membrane protein complex mediated the 3-hydroxylation of 4-coumaric acid to caffeic acid. The demonstration here of two ligation paths requiring these acids supports this 3-hydroxylation function. Ptr4CL3 regulates both CoA ligation paths with similar efficiencies, whereas Ptr4CL5 regulates primarily the caffeic acid path. Both paths can be inhibited by caffeic acid. The Ptr4CL5-catalyzed caffeic acid metabolism, therefore, may also act to mitigate the inhibition by caffeic acid to maintain a proper ligation flux. A high level of caffeic acid was detected in stem-differentiating xylem of P. trichocarpa. Our results suggest that Ptr4CL5 and caffeic acid coordinately modulate the CoA ligation flux for monolignol biosynthesis. PMID:23344904

  8. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  9. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  10. Reconciling Ligase Ribozyme Activity with Fatty Acid Vesicle Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anella, Fabrizio; Danelon, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The “RNA world” and the “Lipid world” theories for the origin of cellular life are often considered incompatible due to the differences in the environmental conditions at which they can emerge. One obstacle resides in the conflicting requirements for divalent metal ions, in particular Mg2+, with respect to optimal ribozyme activity, fatty acid vesicle stability and protection against RNA strand cleavage. Here, we report on the activity of a short L1 ligase ribozyme in the presence of myristoleic acid (MA) vesicles at varying concentrations of Mg2+. The ligation rate is significantly lower at low-Mg2+ conditions. However, the loss of activity is overcompensated by the increased stability of RNA leading to a larger amount of intact ligated substrate after long reaction periods. Combining RNA ligation assays with fatty acid vesicles we found that MA vesicles made of 5 mM amphiphile are stable and do not impair ligase ribozyme activity in the presence of approximately 2 mM Mg2+. These results provide a scenario in which catalytic RNA and primordial membrane assembly can coexist in the same environment. PMID:25513761

  11. Toxicity of Carboxylic Acid-Containing Drugs: The Role of Acyl Migration and CoA Conjugation Investigated.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Toni; Hokkanen, Juho; Aatsinki, Sanna-Mari; Mattila, Sampo; Turpeinen, Miia; Tolonen, Ari

    2015-12-21

    Many carboxylic acid-containing drugs are associated with idiosyncratic drug toxicity (IDT), which may be caused by reactive acyl glucuronide metabolites. The rate of acyl migration has been earlier suggested as a predictor of acyl glucuronide reactivity. Additionally, acyl Coenzyme A (CoA) conjugates are known to be reactive. Here, 13 drugs with a carboxylic acid moiety were incubated with human liver microsomes to produce acyl glucuronide conjugates for the determination of acyl glucuronide half-lives by acyl migration and with HepaRG cells to monitor the formation of acyl CoA conjugates, their further conjugate metabolites, and trans-acylation products with glutathione. Additionally, in vitro cytotoxicity and mitochondrial toxicity experiments were performed with HepaRG cells to compare the predictability of toxicity. Clearly, longer acyl glucuronide half-lives were observed for safe drugs compared to drugs that can cause IDT. Correlation between half-lives and toxicity classification increased when "relative half-lives," taking into account the formation of isomeric AG-forms due to acyl migration and eliminating the effect of hydrolysis, were used instead of plain disappearance of the initial 1-O-β-AG-form. Correlation was improved further when a daily dose of the drug was taken into account. CoA and related conjugates were detected primarily for the drugs that have the capability to cause IDT, although some exceptions to this were observed. Cytotoxicity and mitochondrial toxicity did not correlate to drug safety. On the basis of the results, the short relative half-life of the acyl glucuronide (high acyl migration rate), high daily dose and detection of acyl CoA conjugates, or further metabolites derived from acyl CoA together seem to indicate that carboxylic acid-containing drugs have a higher probability to cause drug-induced liver injury (DILI). PMID:26558897

  12. 3-Hydroxybenzoate:coenzyme A ligase and 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase from cultured cells of Centaurium erythraea.

    PubMed

    Barillas, W; Beerhues, L

    1997-01-01

    3-Hydroxybenzoate:coenzyme A ligase, an enzyme involved in xanthone biosynthesis, was detected in cell-free extracts from cultured cells of Centaurium erythraea Rafn. The enzyme was separated from 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase by fractionated ammonium sulphate precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The CoA ligases exhibited different substrate specificities. 3-Hydroxybenzoate:coenzyme A ligase activated 3-hydroxybenzoic acid most efficiently and lacked affinity for cinnamic acids. In contrast, 4-coumarate:CoA ligase mainly catalyzed the activation of 4-coumaric acid but did not act on benzoic acids. The two enzymes were similar with respect to their relative molecular weight, their pH and temperature optima, their specific activity and the changes in their activity during cell culture growth. PMID:9177055

  13. Broad substrate specificity of phosphotransbutyrylase from Listeria monocytogenes: A potential participant in an alternative pathway for provision of acyl CoA precursors for fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sirobhushanam, Sirisha; Galva, Charitha; Sen, Suranjana; Wilkinson, Brian J; Gatto, Craig

    2016-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, the causative organism of the serious food-borne disease listeriosis, has a membrane abundant in branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs). BCFAs are normally biosynthesized from branched-chain amino acids via the activity of branched chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (Bkd), and disruption of this pathway results in reduced BCFA content in the membrane. Short branched-chain carboxylic acids (BCCAs) added as media supplements result in incorporation of BCFAs arising from the supplemented BCCAs in the membrane of L. monocytogenes bkd mutant MOR401. High concentrations of the supplements also effect similar changes in the membrane of the wild type organism with intact bkd. Such carboxylic acids clearly act as fatty acid precursors, and there must be an alternative pathway resulting in the formation of their CoA thioester derivatives. Candidates for this are the enzymes phosphotransbutyrylase (Ptb) and butyrate kinase (Buk), the products of the first two genes of the bkd operon. Ptb from L. monocytogenes exhibited broad substrate specificity, a strong preference for branched-chain substrates, a lack of activity with acetyl CoA and hexanoyl CoA, and strict chain length preference (C3-C5). Ptb catalysis involved ternary complex formation. Additionally, Ptb could utilize unnatural branched-chain substrates such as 2-ethylbutyryl CoA, albeit with lower efficiency, consistent with a potential involvement of this enzyme in the conversion of the carboxylic acid additives into CoA primers for BCFA biosynthesis. PMID:27320015

  14. Role of CoA and acetyl-CoA in regulating cardiac fatty acid and glucose oxidation.

    PubMed

    Abo Alrob, Osama; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2014-08-01

    CoA (coenzyme A) and its derivatives have a critical role in regulating cardiac energy metabolism. This includes a key role as a substrate and product in the energy metabolic pathways, as well as serving as an allosteric regulator of cardiac energy metabolism. In addition, the CoA ester malonyl-CoA has an important role in regulating fatty acid oxidation, secondary to inhibiting CPT (carnitine palmitoyltransferase) 1, a key enzyme involved in mitochondrial fatty acid uptake. Alterations in malonyl-CoA synthesis by ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and degradation by MCD (malonyl-CoA decarboxylase) are important contributors to the high cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates seen in ischaemic heart disease, heart failure, obesity and diabetes. Additional control of fatty acid oxidation may also occur at the level of acetyl-CoA involvement in acetylation of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidative enzymes. We find that acetylation of the fatty acid β-oxidative enzymes, LCAD (long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase) and β-HAD (β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) is associated with an increase in activity and fatty acid oxidation in heart from obese mice with heart failure. This is associated with decreased SIRT3 (sirtuin 3) activity, an important mitochondrial deacetylase. In support of this, cardiac SIRT3 deletion increases acetylation of LCAD and β-HAD, and increases cardiac fatty acid oxidation. Acetylation of MCD is also associated with increased activity, decreases malonyl-CoA levels and an increase in fatty acid oxidation. Combined, these data suggest that malonyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA have an important role in mediating the alterations in fatty acid oxidation seen in heart failure. PMID:25110000

  15. Studies of Human 2,4-Dienoyl CoA Reductase Shed New Light on Peroxisomal β-Oxidation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Tian; Wu, Dong; Ding, Wei; Wang, Jiangyun; Shaw, Neil; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2012-10-15

    Peroxisomes play an essential role in maintaining fatty acid homeostasis. Although mitochondria are also known to participate in the catabolism of fatty acids via β-oxidation, differences exist between the peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation. Only peroxisomes, but not mitochondrion, can shorten very long chain fatty acids. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a ternary complex of peroxisomal 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductases (pDCR) with hexadienoyl CoA and NADP, as a prototype for comparison with the mitochondrial 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductase (mDCR) to shed light on the differences between the enzymes from the two organelles at the molecular level. Unexpectedly, the structure of pDCR refined to 1.84 Å resolution reveals the absence of the tyrosine-serine pair seen in the active site of mDCR, which together with a lysine and an asparagine have been deemed a hallmark of the SDR family of enzymes. Instead, aspartate hydrogen-bonded to the Cα hydroxyl via a water molecule seems to perturb the water molecule for protonation of the substrate. Our studies provide the first structural evidence for participation of water in the DCR-catalyzed reactions. Biochemical studies and structural analysis suggest that pDCRs can catalyze the shortening of six-carbon-long substrates in vitro. However, the Km values of pDCR for short chain acyl CoAs are at least 6-fold higher than those for substrates with 10 or more aliphatic carbons. Unlike mDCR, hinge movements permit pDCR to process very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  16. Yeast display evolution of a kinetically efficient 13-amino acid substrate for lipoic acid ligase

    PubMed Central

    Puthenveetil, Sujiet; Liu, Daniel S.; White, Katharine A.; Thompson, Samuel; Ting, Alice Y.

    2009-01-01

    E. coli lipoic acid ligase (LplA) catalyzes ATP-dependent covalent ligation of lipoic acid onto specific lysine sidechains of three acceptor proteins involved in oxidative metabolism. Our lab has shown that LplA and engineered mutants can ligate useful small-molecule probes such as alkyl azides (Nat. Biotechnol. 2007, 25, 1483–1487) and photocrosslinkers (Angew. Chem Int. Ed Engl. 2008, 47, 7018–7021) in place of lipoic acid, facilitating imaging and proteomic studies. Both to further our understanding of lipoic acid metabolism, and to improve LplA’s utility as a biotechnological platform, we have engineered a novel 13-amino acid peptide substrate for LplA. LplA’s natural protein substrates have a conserved β-hairpin structure, a conformation that is difficult to recapitulate in a peptide, and thus we performed in vitro evolution to engineer the LplA peptide substrate, called “LplA Acceptor Peptide” (LAP). A ~107 library of LAP variants was displayed on the surface of yeast cells, labeled by LplA with either lipoic acid or bromoalkanoic acid, and the most efficiently labeled LAP clones were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting. Four rounds of evolution followed by additional rational mutagenesis produced a “LAP2” sequence with a kcat/Km of 0.99 μM−1min−1, >70-fold better than our previous rationally-designed 22-amino acid LAP1 sequence (Nat. Biotechnol. 2007, 25, 1483–1487), and only 8-fold worse than the kcat/Km values of natural lipoate and biotin acceptor proteins. The kinetic improvement over LAP1 allowed us to rapidly label cell surface peptide-fused receptors with quantum dots. PMID:19863063

  17. [The protective effect of pantothenic acid derivatives and changes in the system of acetyl CoA metabolism in acute ethanol poisoning].

    PubMed

    Moiseenok, A G; Dorofeev, B F; Omel'ianchik, S N

    1988-01-01

    Calcium pantothenate (CaP), calcium 4'-phosphopantothenate (CaPP), pantethine, panthenol, sulfopantetheine and CoA decrease acute toxicity of acetaldehyde in mice. All studied compounds diminish duration of the narcotic action of ethanol--ET (3.5 g/kg intraperitoneally) in mice and rats. In the latter this effect is realized at the expense of "long sleeping" and "middle sleeping" animals. CaP (150 mg/kg subcutaneously) and CaPP (100 mg/kg subcutaneously) prevent hypothermia and a decrease of oxygen consumption in rats induced by ET administration. Combined administration of ET, CaP and CaPP leads to a characteristic increase of acid-soluble CoA fractions in the rat liver and a relative decrease of acetyl CoA synthetase and N-acetyltransferase reactions. The antitoxic effect of preparations of pantothenic acid is not mediated by CoA-dependent reactions of detoxication, but most probably is due to intensification of ET oxidation and perhaps to its elimination from the organism. PMID:2905277

  18. Transient Induction of Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase and 4-Coumarate: CoA Ligase mRNAs in Potato Leaves Infected with Virulent or Avirulent Races of Phytophthora infestans1

    PubMed Central

    Fritzemeier, Karl-Heinrich; Cretin, Claude; Kombrink, Erich; Rohwer, Frauke; Taylor, Janet; Scheel, Dierk; Hahlbrock, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    Infection of potato leaves with the fungal pathogen Phytophthora infestans (Pi) resulted in the rapid stimulation of phenylpropanoid metabolism. Increases in the activities of several mRNAs, including those encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), were detectable within a few hours postinoculation, as demonstrated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins synthesized in vitro. This effect was closely mimicked by application of Pi culture filtrate through cut leaf stems. PAL and 4CL mRNA activities were also rapidly and transiently induced in potato cell suspension cultures by treatments with Pi culture filtrate or arachidonic acid. This induction was exploited to generate cDNA probes complementary to PAL and 4CL mRNAs. Blot hybridizations using these probes revealed almost immediate, transient and coordinate increases in the transcription rates and subsequent changes in the amounts of PAL and 4CL mRNAs in leaves treated with Pi culture filtrate. Similar changes in the mRNA amounts were found in infected leaves of potato cultivars carrying resistance genes R1 (cv Datura) or R4 (cv Isola), independent of whether a virulent or an avirulent Pi pathotype was used for inoculation. These results are discussed in relation to recent cytological observations with the same potato cultivars and Pi pathotypes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:16665678

  19. Effective production of Pro-Gly by mutagenesis of l-amino acid ligase.

    PubMed

    Kino, Haruka; Nakajima, Shota; Arai, Toshinobu; Kino, Kuniki

    2016-08-01

    l-Amino acid ligase (Lal) catalyzes dipeptide synthesis from unprotected l-amino acids by hydrolysis ATP to ADP. Each Lal displays unique substrate specificity, and many different dipeptides can be synthesized by selecting suitable Lal. We have already successfully synthesized Met-Gly selectively by replacing the Pro85 residues of Lal from Bacillus licheniformis (BL00235). From these results, we deduced that the amino acid residue at position 85 had a key role in enzyme activity, and applied these findings to other Lals. When Pro and Gly were used as substrates, TabS from Pseudomonas syringae, synthesized the salt taste enhancing dipeptide Pro-Gly and other three dipeptides (Gly-Pro, Pro-Pro, and Gly-Gly) was hardly synthesized from its substrate specificity. However, the amount of Pro-Gly was low. Therefore, to alter the substrate specificity and increase the amount of Pro-Gly, we selected amino acid residues that might affect the enzyme activity, Ser85 corresponding to Pro85 of BL00235, and His294 on the results from previous studies and the predicted structure of TabS. These residues were replaced with 20 proteogenic amino acids, and Pro-Gly synthesizing reactions were conducted. The S85T and the H294D mutants synthesized more Pro-Gly than wild-type. Furthermore, the S85T/H294D double mutant synthesized considerably more Pro-Gly than the single mutant did. These results showed that the amino acid position 85 of TabS affect the enzyme activity similarly to BL00235. In addition, replacing the amino acid residue positioning around the N-terminal substrate and constructing the double mutant led to increase the amount of Pro-Gly. PMID:27017332

  20. Site-Specific Radiofluorination of Biomolecules with 8-[(18)F]-Fluorooctanoic Acid Catalyzed by Lipoic Acid Ligase.

    PubMed

    Drake, Christopher R; Sevillano, Natalia; Truillet, Charles; Craik, Charles S; VanBrocklin, Henry F; Evans, Michael J

    2016-06-17

    New methodologies for site-specifically radiolabeling proteins with (18)F are required to generate high quality radiotracers for preclinical and clinical applications with positron emission tomography. Herein, we report an approach by which we use lipoic acid ligase (LplA) to conjugate [(18)F]-fluorooctanoic acid to an antibody fragment bearing the peptide substrate of LplA. The mild conditions of the reaction preserve antibody immunoreactivity, and the efficiency of LplA allows for >90% yield even with very small amounts of peptidic precursor (1-10 nmol). These features are advantageous compared to the current gold standard in the field. Moreover, the methodology introduces a new application for an important tool in chemical biology. PMID:27008570

  1. The substrate specificity-determining amino acid code of 4-coumarate:CoA ligase.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Katja; Hövel, Klaus; Witzel, Kilian; Hamberger, Björn; Schomburg, Dietmar; Kombrink, Erich; Stuible, Hans-Peter

    2003-07-01

    To reveal the structural principles determining substrate specificity of 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), the crystal structure of the phenylalanine activation domain of gramicidin S synthetase was used as a template for homology modeling. According to our model, 12 amino acid residues lining the Arabidopsis 4CL isoform 2 (At4CL2) substrate binding pocket (SBP) function as a signature motif generally determining 4CL substrate specificity. We used this substrate specificity code to create At4CL2 gain-of-function mutants. By increasing the space within the SBP we generated ferulic- and sinapic acid-activating At4CL2 variants. Increasing the hydrophobicity of the SBP resulted in At4CL2 variants with strongly enhanced conversion of cinnamic acid. These enzyme variants are suitable tools for investigating and influencing metabolic channeling mediated by 4CL. Knowledge of the 4CL specificity code will facilitate the prediction of substrate preference of numerous, still uncharacterized 4CL-like proteins. PMID:12819348

  2. A propionate CoA-transferase of Ralstonia eutropha H16 with broad substrate specificity catalyzing the CoA thioester formation of various carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Lindenkamp, Nicole; Schürmann, Marc; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated a propionate CoA-transferase (Pct) homologue encoded in the genome of Ralstonia eutropha H16. The corresponding gene has been cloned into the vector pET-19b to yield a histidine-tagged enzyme which was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). After purification, high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) analyses revealed that the enzyme exhibits a broad substrate specificity for carboxylic acids. The formation of the corresponding CoA-thioesters of acetate using propionyl-CoA as CoA donor, and of propionate, butyrate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxypropionate, crotonate, acrylate, lactate, succinate and 4-hydroxybutyrate using acetyl-CoA as CoA donor could be shown. According to the substrate specificity, the enzyme can be allocated in the family I of CoA-transferases. The apparent molecular masses as determined by gel filtration and detected by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were 228 and 64 kDa, respectively, and point to a quaternary structure of the native enzyme (α4). The enzyme exhibited similarities in sequence and structure to the well investigated Pct of Clostridium propionicum. It does not contain the typical conserved (S)ENG motif, but the derived motif sequence EXG with glutamate 342 to be, most likely, the catalytic residue. Due to the homo-oligomeric structure and the sequence differences with the subclasses IA-C of family I CoA-transferases, a fourth subclass of family I is proposed, comprising - amongst others - the Pcts of R. eutropha H16 and C. propionicum. A markerless precise-deletion mutant R. eutropha H16∆pct was generated. The growth and accumulation behaviour of this mutant on gluconate, gluconate plus 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP), acetate and propionate was investigated but resulted in no observable phenotype. Both, the wild type and the mutant showed the same growth and storage behaviour with these carbon sources. It is probable that R. eutropha H16 is upregulating

  3. [Coa biosynthesis and the structure of its reserve in the liver in mice with diabetes (db/db) after administration of pantothenic acid derivatives].

    PubMed

    Moiseenok, A G; Efimov, A S; Sheĭbak, V M; Obrosova, I G; Gurinovich, V A

    1987-01-01

    In the liver of genetically diabetic mice (db/db) a rise of CoA and alterations in the structure of its moiety (an increase in CoA/short-chain fatty acyl-CoA and CoA/long-chain fatty acyl-CoA ratios) were found being one of the hyperlipogenesis-providing factors. A rise of the content of CoA in diabetes was caused by the activation of its biosynthesis from vitamin-containing precursors; an increase in the deposition of the latter in panthotenate-protein complexes was also noted. Panthetine and 4'-phosphopanthotenate administration to diabetic animals returned to normal the level of total and free CoA and the ratios of separate components in the structure of coenzyme moiety, and the content of CoA precursors (phosphopantheteine and dephospho-CoA) in the liver. PMID:3438267

  4. Quantum dot targeting with lipoic acid ligase and HaloTag for single-molecule imaging on living cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daniel S; Phipps, William S; Loh, Ken H; Howarth, Mark; Ting, Alice Y

    2012-12-21

    We present a methodology for targeting quantum dots to specific proteins on living cells in two steps. In the first step, Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase (LplA) site-specifically attaches 10-bromodecanoic acid onto a 13 amino acid recognition sequence that is genetically fused to a protein of interest. In the second step, quantum dots derivatized with HaloTag, a modified haloalkane dehalogenase, react with the ligated bromodecanoic acid to form a covalent adduct. We found this targeting method to be specific, fast, and fully orthogonal to a previously reported and analogous quantum dot targeting method using E. coli biotin ligase and streptavidin. We used these two methods in combination for two-color quantum dot visualization of different proteins expressed on the same cell or on neighboring cells. Both methods were also used to track single molecules of neurexin, a synaptic adhesion protein, to measure its lateral diffusion in the presence of neuroligin, its trans-synaptic adhesion partner. PMID:23181687

  5. The effect of charge reversal mutations in the alpha-helical region of liver fatty acid binding protein on the binding of fatty-acyl CoAs, lysophospholipids and bile acids.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Robert M; Davies, Joanna K; Wilton, David C

    2002-10-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) is unique among the various types of FABPs in that it can bind a variety of ligands in addition to fatty acids. LFABP is able to bind long chain fatty acids with a 2:1 stoichiometry and the crystal structure has identified two fatty acid binding sites in the binding cavity. The presumed primary site (site 1) involves the fatty acid binding with the carboxylate group buried in the cavity whereas the fatty acid at site 2 has the carboxylate group solvent-exposed within the ligand portal region and in the vicinity of alpha-helix II. The alpha-helical region contains three cationic residues, K20, K31, K33 and modelling studies suggest that K31 on alpha-helix II could make an electrostatic contribution to anionic ligands binding to site 2. The preparation of three charge reversal mutants of LFABP, K20E, K31E and K33E has allowed an investigation of the role of site 2 in ligand binding, particularly those ligands with a bulky anionic head group. The binding of oleoyl CoA, lysophosphatidic acid, lysophosphatidylcholine, lithocholic acid and taurolithocholate 3-sulphate to LFABP has been studied using the alpha-helical mutants. The results support the concept that such ligands bind at site 2 of LFABP where solvent exposure allows the accommodation of their bulky anionic group. PMID:12479568

  6. Inactivation of SAG E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Blocks Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation and Sensitizes Leukemia Cells to Retinoid Acid

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruiguo; Xi, Ning; Sun, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Sensitive to Apoptosis Gene (SAG), also known as RBX2 (RING box protein-2), is the RING component of SCF (SKP1, Cullin, and F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Our previous studies have demonstrated that SAG is an anti-apoptotic protein and an attractive anti-cancer target. We also found recently that Sag knockout sensitized mouse embryonic stem cells (mES) to radiation and blocked mES cells to undergo endothelial differentiation. Here, we reported that compared to wild-type mES cells, the Sag−/− mES cells were much more sensitive to all-trans retinoic acid (RA)-induced suppression of cell proliferation and survival. While wild-type mES cells underwent differentiation upon exposure to RA, Sag−/− mES cells were induced to death via apoptosis instead. The cell fate change, reflected by cellular stiffness, can be detected as early as 12 hrs post RA exposure by AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). We then extended this novel finding to RA differentiation therapy of leukemia, in which the resistance often develops, by testing our hypothesis that SAG inhibition would sensitize leukemia to RA. Indeed, we found a direct correlation between SAG overexpression and RA resistance in multiple leukemia lines. By using MLN4924, a small molecule inhibitor of NEDD8-Activating Enzyme (NAE), that inactivates SAG-SCF E3 ligase by blocking cullin neddylation, we were able to sensitize two otherwise resistant leukemia cell lines, HL-60 and KG-1 to RA. Mechanistically, RA sensitization by MLN4924 was mediated via enhanced apoptosis, likely through accumulation of pro-apoptotic proteins NOXA and c-JUN, two well-known substrates of SAG-SCF E3 ligase. Taken together, our study provides the proof-of-concept evidence for effective treatment of leukemia patients by RA-MLN4924 combination. PMID:22110742

  7. Recent NASA Dryden COA Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation concerns the experience that Dryden has had with Certificate of Authorization (COA) in reference to unmanned aerial systems (UAS). It reviews recent Certificate of Authorization UAS's i.e., 2005 Altair NOAA Mission, 2006 Altair Western States Fire Mission, and 2007 Ikhana. The priorities for the safety process is reviewed, as are typical UAS hazards. Slides also review the common COA provisions, best practices and lessons learned, the 2005 NOAA/NASA Science Demonstration Flights and the use of the UAS systems during fire emergencies.

  8. Arabidopsis BPM Proteins Function as Substrate Adaptors to a CULLIN3-Based E3 Ligase to Affect Fatty Acid Metabolism in Plants[W

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liyuan; Lee, Joo Hyun; Weber, Henriette; Tohge, Takayuki; Witt, Sandra; Roje, Sanja; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Hellmann, Hanjo

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of transcriptional processes is a critical mechanism that enables efficient coordination of the synthesis of required proteins in response to environmental and cellular changes. Transcription factors require accurate activity regulation because they play a critical role as key mediators assuring specific expression of target genes. In this work, we show that CULLIN3-based E3 ligases have the potential to interact with a broad range of ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (ERF)/APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factors, mediated by MATH-BTB/POZ (for Meprin and TRAF [tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor] homolog)-Broad complex, Tramtrack, Bric-a-brac/Pox virus and Zinc finger) proteins. The assembly with an E3 ligase causes degradation of their substrates via the 26S proteasome, as demonstrated for the WRINKLED1 ERF/AP2 protein. Furthermore, loss of MATH-BTB/POZ proteins widely affects plant development and causes altered fatty acid contents in mutant seeds. Overall, this work demonstrates a link between fatty acid metabolism and E3 ligase activities in plants and establishes CUL3-based E3 ligases as key regulators in transcriptional processes that involve ERF/AP2 family members. PMID:23792371

  9. L-amino acid ligase from Pseudomonas syringae producing tabtoxin can be used for enzymatic synthesis of various functional peptides.

    PubMed

    Arai, Toshinobu; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Ishikura, Shun; Kino, Kuniki

    2013-08-01

    Functional peptides are expected to be beneficial compounds that improve our quality of life. To address the growing need for functional peptides, we have examined peptide synthesis by using microbial enzymes. l-Amino acid ligase (Lal) catalyzes the condensation of unprotected amino acids in an ATP-dependent manner and is applicable to fermentative production. Hence, Lal is a promising enzyme to achieve cost-effective synthesis. To obtain a Lal with novel substrate specificity, we focused on the putative Lal involved in the biosynthesis of the dipeptidic phytotoxin designated tabtoxin. The tabS gene was cloned from Pseudomonas syringae NBRC14081 and overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells. The recombinant TabS protein produced showed the broadest substrate specificity of any known Lal; it detected 136 of 231 combinations of amino acid substrates when dipeptide synthesis was examined. In addition, some new substrate specificities were identified and unusual amino acids, e.g., l-pipecolic acid, hydroxy-l-proline, and β-alanine, were found to be acceptable substrates. Furthermore, kinetic analysis and monitoring of the reactions over a short time revealed that TabS showed distinct substrate selectivity at the N and C termini, which made it possible to specifically synthesize a peptide without by-products such as homopeptides and heteropeptides with the reverse sequence. TabS specifically synthesized the following functional peptides, including their precursors: l-arginyl-l-phenylalanine (antihypertensive effect; yield, 62%), l-leucyl-l-isoleucine (antidepressive effect; yield, 77%), l-glutaminyl-l-tryptophan (precursor of l-glutamyl-l-tryptophan, which has antiangiogenic activity; yield, 54%), l-leucyl-l-serine (enhances saltiness; yield, 83%), and l-glutaminyl-l-threonine (precursor of l-glutamyl-l-threonine, which enhances saltiness; yield, 96%). Furthermore, our results also provide new insights into tabtoxin biosynthesis. PMID:23770908

  10. The E3 ubiquitin protein ligase MDM2 dictates all-trans retinoic acid-induced osteoblastic differentiation of osteosarcoma cells by modulating the degradation of RARα.

    PubMed

    Ying, M; Zhang, L; Zhou, Q; Shao, X; Cao, J; Zhang, N; Li, W; Zhu, H; Yang, B; He, Q

    2016-08-18

    Retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) has a critical role in the differentiation process of osteosarcoma cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, degradation of RARα through ubiquitin proteasome pathway weakens the differentiation efficiency of osteosarcoma cells. In this study, we discover that murine double minute-2 (MDM2) acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase to target RARα for degradation. We observe that MDM2 is required for RARα polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation because downregulation of MDM2 by short hairpin RNA results in the accumulation of RARα, and MDM2 overexpression promotes the degradation of RARα. We also demonstrate that the N-terminal domain of MDM2 (amino acids 1-109) is the major RARα-binding site. Importantly, endogenous MDM2 levels are not only upregulated in human primary osteosarcoma blasts but are also inversely correlated with the level of osteopontin, which is a marker of bone differentiation. Moreover, MDM2 impairs the ATRA-induced osteoblastic differentiation of osteosarcoma cells, whereas an inhibitor of the MDM2 ubiquitin ligase synergizes with ATRA to enhance the differentiation of osteosarcoma cells and primary osteosarcoma blasts. Therefore, our study indicates that MDM2 serves as an E3 ubiquitin ligase to regulate the degradation of RARα and suggests that MDM2 is a novel therapeutic target for ATRA-based differentiation therapeutic approaches in osteosarcoma. PMID:26776160

  11. Targeted Degradation of Abscisic Acid Receptors Is Mediated by the Ubiquitin Ligase Substrate Adaptor DDA1 in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Irigoyen, María Luisa; Iniesto, Elisa; Rodriguez, Lesia; Puga, María Isabel; Yanagawa, Yuki; Pick, Elah; Strickland, Elizabeth; Paz-Ares, Javier; Wei, Ning; De Jaeger, Geert; Rodriguez, Pedro L.; Deng, Xing Wang; Rubio, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    CULLIN4-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRL4s) regulate key developmental and stress responses in eukaryotes. Studies in both animals and plants have led to the identification of many CRL4 targets as well as specific regulatory mechanisms that modulate their function. The latter involve COP10-DET1-DDB1 (CDD)–related complexes, which have been proposed to facilitate target recognition by CRL4, although the molecular basis for this activity remains largely unknown. Here, we provide evidence that Arabidopsis thaliana DET1-, DDB1-ASSOCIATED1 (DDA1), as part of the CDD complex, provides substrate specificity for CRL4 by interacting with ubiquitination targets. Thus, we show that DDA1 binds to the abscisic acid (ABA) receptor PYL8, as well as PYL4 and PYL9, in vivo and facilitates its proteasomal degradation. Accordingly, we found that DDA1 negatively regulates ABA-mediated developmental responses, including inhibition of seed germination, seedling establishment, and root growth. All other CDD components displayed a similar regulatory function, although they did not directly interact with PYL8. Interestingly, DDA1-mediated destabilization of PYL8 is counteracted by ABA, which protects PYL8 by limiting its polyubiquitination. Altogether, our data establish a function for DDA1 as a substrate receptor for CRL4-CDD complexes and uncover a mechanism for the desensitization of ABA signaling based on the regulation of ABA receptor stability. PMID:24563205

  12. Cinnamate:CoA Ligase Initiates the Biosynthesis of a Benzoate-Derived Xanthone Phytoalexin in Hypericum calycinum Cell Cultures1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Gaid, Mariam M.; Sircar, Debabrata; Müller, Andreas; Beuerle, Till; Liu, Benye; Ernst, Ludger; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2012-01-01

    Although a number of plant natural products are derived from benzoic acid, the biosynthesis of this structurally simple precursor is poorly understood. Hypericum calycinum cell cultures accumulate a benzoic acid-derived xanthone phytoalexin, hyperxanthone E, in response to elicitor treatment. Using a subtracted complementary DNA (cDNA) library and sequence information about conserved coenzyme A (CoA) ligase motifs, a cDNA encoding cinnamate:CoA ligase (CNL) was isolated. This enzyme channels metabolic flux from the general phenylpropanoid pathway into benzenoid metabolism. HcCNL preferred cinnamic acid as a substrate but failed to activate benzoic acid. Enzyme activity was strictly dependent on the presence of Mg2+ and K+ at optimum concentrations of 2.5 and 100 mm, respectively. Coordinated increases in the Phe ammonia-lyase and HcCNL transcript levels preceded the accumulation of hyperxanthone E in cell cultures of H. calycinum after the addition of the elicitor. HcCNL contained a carboxyl-terminal type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal made up by the tripeptide Ser-Arg-Leu, which directed an amino-terminal reporter fusion to the peroxisomes. Masking the targeting signal by carboxyl-terminal reporter fusion led to cytoplasmic localization. A phylogenetic tree consisted of two evolutionarily distinct clusters. One cluster was formed by CoA ligases related to benzenoid metabolism, including HcCNL. The other cluster comprised 4-coumarate:CoA ligases from spermatophytes, ferns, and mosses, indicating divergence of the two clades prior to the divergence of the higher plant lineages. PMID:22992510

  13. Upregulation of capacity for glutathione synthesis in response to amino acid deprivation: regulation of glutamate-cysteine ligase subunits.

    PubMed

    Sikalidis, Angelos K; Mazor, Kevin M; Lee, Jeong-In; Roman, Heather B; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2014-05-01

    Using HepG2/C3A cells and MEFs, we investigated whether induction of GSH synthesis in response to sulfur amino acid deficiency is mediated by the decrease in cysteine levels or whether it requires a decrease in GSH levels per se. Both the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) and modifier (GCLM) subunit mRNA levels were upregulated in response to a lack of cysteine or other essential amino acids, independent of GSH levels. This upregulation did not occur in MEFs lacking GCN2 (general control non-derepressible 2, also known as eIF2α kinase 4) or in cells expressing mutant eIF2α lacking the eIF2α kinase Ser(51) phosphorylation site, indicating that expression of both GCLC and GCLM was mediated by the GCN2/ATF4 stress response pathway. Only the increase in GCLM mRNA level, however, was accompanied by a parallel increase in protein expression, suggesting that the enhanced capacity for GSH synthesis depended largely on increased association of GCLC with its regulatory subunit. Upregulation of both GCLC and GLCM mRNA levels in response to cysteine deprivation was dependent on new protein synthesis, which is consistent with expression of GCLC and GCLM being mediated by proteins whose synthesis depends on activation of the GCN2/ATF4 pathway. Our data suggest that the regulation of GCLC expression may be mediated by changes in the abundance of transcriptional regulators, whereas the regulation of GCLM expression may be mediated by changes in the abundance of mRNA stabilizing or destabilizing proteins. Upregulation of GCLM levels in response to low cysteine levels may serve to protect the cell in the face of a future stress requiring GSH as an antioxidant or conjugating/detoxifying agent. PMID:24557597

  14. Upregulation of capacity for glutathione synthesis in response to amino acid deprivation: regulation of glutamate-cysteine ligase subunits

    PubMed Central

    Sikalidis, Angelos K.; Mazor, Kevin M.; Lee, Jeong-In; Roman, Heather B.; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.; Stipanuk, Martha H.

    2014-01-01

    Using HepG2/C3A cells and MEFs, we investigated whether induction of GSH synthesis in response to sulfur amino acid deficiency is mediated by the decrease in cysteine levels or whether it requires a decrease in GSH levels per se. Both the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) and modifier (GCLM) subunit mRNA levels were upregulated in response to a lack of cysteine or other essential amino acids, independent of GSH levels. This upregulation did not occur in MEFs lacking GCN2 (general control non-derepressible 2, also known as eIF2α kinase 4) or in cells expressing mutant eIF2α lacking the eIF2α kinase Ser51 phosphorylation site, indicating that expression of both GCLC and GCLM was mediated by the GCN2/ATF4 stress response pathway. Only the increase in GCLM mRNA level, however, was accompanied by a parallel increase in protein expression, suggesting that the enhanced capacity for GSH synthesis depended largely on increased association of GCLC with its regulatory subunit. Upregulation of both GCLC and GLCM mRNA levels in response to cysteine deprivation was dependent on new protein synthesis, which is consistent with expression of GCLC and GCLM being mediated by proteins whose synthesis depends on activation of the GCN2/ATF4 pathway. Our data suggest that the regulation of GCLC expression may be mediated by changes in the abundance of transcriptional regulators, whereas the regulation of GCLM expression may be mediated by changes in the abundance of mRNA stabilizing or destabilizing proteins. Upregulation of GCLM levels in response to low cysteine levels may serve to protect the cell in the face of a future stress requiring GSH as an antioxidant or conjugating/detoxifying agent. PMID:24557597

  15. [Phosphoprotein phosphatase nonspecifically hydrolyzes CoA].

    PubMed

    Reziapkin, V I; Moiseenok, A G

    1988-01-01

    CoA hydrolysis was studied by a homogenous phosphoprotein phosphatase (EC 3.1 3.16) preparation from bovine spleen nuclei at pH 5.8. Phosphoprotein phosphatase catalyzed hydrolysis of the CoA 3'-phosphoester bond to form dephospho-CoA and Pi. The Km value for phosphoprotein phosphatase with CoA as substrate was 3.7 mM, the specific activity - 0.26 mmol Pi.min-1.mg-1. Phosphoprotein phosphatase did not essentially catalyze the calcium pantothenate hydrolysis (not more than 2% as compared with the CoA hydrolysis rate). PMID:2849829

  16. Characterization of the formation of branched short-chain fatty acid:CoAs for bitter acid biosynthesis in hop glandular trichomes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiyang; Zhang, Fengxia; Liu, Baoxiu; Huhman, David V; Sumner, Lloyd W; Dixon, Richard A; Wang, Guodong

    2013-07-01

    Bitter acids, known for their use as beer flavoring and for their diverse biological activities, are predominantly formed in hop (Humulus lupulus) glandular trichomes. Branched short-chain acyl-CoAs (e.g. isobutyryl-CoA, isovaleryl-CoA and 2-methylbutyryl-CoA), derived from the degradation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), are essential building blocks for the biosynthesis of bitter acids in hops. However, little is known regarding what components are needed to produce and maintain the pool of branched short-chain acyl-CoAs in hop trichomes. Here, we present several lines of evidence that both CoA ligases and thioesterases are likely involved in bitter acid biosynthesis. Recombinant HlCCL2 (carboxyl CoA ligase) protein had high specific activity for isovaleric acid as a substrate (K cat /K m = 4100 s(-1) M(-1)), whereas recombinant HlCCL4 specifically utilized isobutyric acid (Kcat/K m = 1800 s(-1) M(-1)) and 2-methylbutyric acid (Kcat/K m = 6900 s(-1) M(-1)) as substrates. Both HlCCLs, like hop valerophenone synthase (HlVPS), were expressed strongly in glandular trichomes and localized to the cytoplasm. Co-expression of HlCCL2 and HlCCL4 with HlVPS in yeast led to significant production of acylphloroglucinols (the direct precursors for bitter acid biosynthesis), which further confirmed the biochemical function of these two HlCCLs in vivo. Functional identification of a thioesterase that catalyzed the reverse reaction of CCLs in mitochondria, together with the comprehensive analysis of genes involved BCAA catabolism, supported the idea that cytosolic CoA ligases are required for linking BCAA degradation and bitter acid biosynthesis in glandular trichomes. The evolution and other possible physiological roles of branched short-chain fatty acid:CoA ligases in planta are also discussed. PMID:23300257

  17. Characterization of a long-chain fatty acid-CoA ligase 1 gene and association between its SNPs and growth traits in the clam Meretrix meretrix.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ping; Huan, Pin; Wang, Hongxia; Lu, Xia; Liu, Baozhong

    2015-07-25

    Long-chain fatty acid-CoA ligases (ACSLs) play crucial roles in fatty acid (FA) metabolism. They convert free long-chain FA into acyl-CoAs, which are key intermediates in both anabolic and catabolic pathways. A long-chain fatty acid-CoA ligase gene was cloned in the clam Meretrix meretrix (MmeACSL1), with a full-length cDNA of 1865 bp encoding 475 amino acids. Its expression was only detected in hepatopancreas by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Expression level of MmeACSL1 exhibited a significant increase in a starvation experiment (P<0.05). This indicates that MmeACSL1 plays an important role in normal metabolism of M. meretrix and may be involved in energy supply and storage. Two exon SNPs and six intron SNPs were developed in this gene by direct sequencing. A marker-trait association analysis showed that five of these SNPs were significantly associated with growth traits (P<0.05). Also, haplotypes comprised of the five SNPs were revealed to be significantly growth-related (P<0.05), which further corroborates the relationship of this gene to growth traits of M. meretrix. PMID:25900031

  18. Structural and mutational analysis of archaeal ATP-dependent RNA ligase identifies amino acids required for RNA binding and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huiqiong; Yoshinari, Shigeo; Ghosh, Raka; Ignatochkina, Anna V.; Gollnick, Paul D.; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.; Ho, C. Kiong

    2016-01-01

    An ATP-dependent RNA ligase from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum (MthRnl) catalyzes intramolecular ligation of single-stranded RNA to form a closed circular RNA via covalent ligase-AMP and RNA-adenylylate intermediate. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of an MthRnl•ATP complex as well as the covalent MthRnl–AMP intermediate. We also performed structure-guided mutational analysis to survey the functions of 36 residues in three component steps of the ligation pathway including ligase-adenylylation (step 1), RNA adenylylation (step 2) and phosphodiester bond synthesis (step 3). Kinetic analysis underscored the importance of motif 1a loop structure in promoting phosphodiester bond synthesis. Alanine substitutions of Thr117 or Arg118 favor the reverse step 2 reaction to deadenylate the 5′-AMP from the RNA-adenylate, thereby inhibiting step 3 reaction. Tyr159, Phe281 and Glu285, which are conserved among archaeal ATP-dependent RNA ligases and are situated on the surface of the enzyme, are required for RNA binding. We propose an RNA binding interface of the MthRnl based on the mutational studies and two sulfate ions that co-crystallized at the active site cleft in the MthRnl–AMP complex. PMID:26896806

  19. Biotin protein ligase from Corynebacterium glutamicum: role for growth and L: -lysine production.

    PubMed

    Peters-Wendisch, P; Stansen, K C; Götker, S; Wendisch, V F

    2012-03-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is a biotin auxotrophic Gram-positive bacterium that is used for large-scale production of amino acids, especially of L-glutamate and L-lysine. It is known that biotin limitation triggers L-glutamate production and that L-lysine production can be increased by enhancing the activity of pyruvate carboxylase, one of two biotin-dependent proteins of C. glutamicum. The gene cg0814 (accession number YP_225000) has been annotated to code for putative biotin protein ligase BirA, but the protein has not yet been characterized. A discontinuous enzyme assay of biotin protein ligase activity was established using a 105aa peptide corresponding to the carboxyterminus of the biotin carboxylase/biotin carboxyl carrier protein subunit AccBC of the acetyl CoA carboxylase from C. glutamicum as acceptor substrate. Biotinylation of this biotin acceptor peptide was revealed with crude extracts of a strain overexpressing the birA gene and was shown to be ATP dependent. Thus, birA from C. glutamicum codes for a functional biotin protein ligase (EC 6.3.4.15). The gene birA from C. glutamicum was overexpressed and the transcriptome was compared with the control strain revealing no significant gene expression changes of the bio-genes. However, biotin protein ligase overproduction increased the level of the biotin-containing protein pyruvate carboxylase and entailed a significant growth advantage in glucose minimal medium. Moreover, birA overexpression resulted in a twofold higher L-lysine yield on glucose as compared with the control strain. PMID:22159614

  20. Increased Long Chain acyl-Coa Synthetase Activity and Fatty Acid Import Is Linked to Membrane Synthesis for Development of Picornavirus Replication Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Alison J.; Ford, Lauren A.; Pei, Zhengtong; Watkins, Paul A.; Ernst, Robert K.; Belov, George A.

    2013-01-01

    All positive strand (+RNA) viruses of eukaryotes replicate their genomes in association with membranes. The mechanisms of membrane remodeling in infected cells represent attractive targets for designing future therapeutics, but our understanding of this process is very limited. Elements of autophagy and/or the secretory pathway were proposed to be hijacked for building of picornavirus replication organelles. However, even closely related viruses differ significantly in their requirements for components of these pathways. We demonstrate here that infection with diverse picornaviruses rapidly activates import of long chain fatty acids. While in non-infected cells the imported fatty acids are channeled to lipid droplets, in infected cells the synthesis of neutral lipids is shut down and the fatty acids are utilized in highly up-regulated phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Thus the replication organelles are likely built from de novo synthesized membrane material, rather than from the remodeled pre-existing membranes. We show that activation of fatty acid import is linked to the up-regulation of cellular long chain acyl-CoA synthetase activity and identify the long chain acyl-CoA syntheatse3 (Acsl3) as a novel host factor required for polio replication. Poliovirus protein 2A is required to trigger the activation of import of fatty acids independent of its protease activity. Shift in fatty acid import preferences by infected cells results in synthesis of phosphatidylcholines different from those in uninfected cells, arguing that the viral replication organelles possess unique properties compared to the pre-existing membranes. Our data show how poliovirus can change the overall cellular membrane homeostasis by targeting one critical process. They explain earlier observations of increased phospholipid synthesis in infected cells and suggest a simple model of the structural development of the membranous scaffold of replication complexes of picorna-like viruses, that may be

  1. DISTINCT TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE ISOFORMS AND CYTOSOLIC THIOESTERASE 1 IN THE RODENT HEART BY FATTY ACIDS AND INSULIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular mechanism(s) responsible for channeling long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) into oxidative versus nonoxidative pathways is (are) poorly understood in the heart. Intracellular LCFAs are converted to long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs (LCFA-CoAs) by a family of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs)...

  2. Arabidopsis C3HC4-RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase AtAIRP4 positively regulates stress-responsive abscisic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Qiaohong; Liu, Zhibin; Yang, Hao; Wang, Jianmei; Li, Xufeng; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Degradation of proteins via the ubiquitin system is an important step in many stress signaling pathways in plants. E3 ligases recognize ligand proteins and dictate the high specificity of protein degradation, and thus, play a pivotal role in ubiquitination. Here, we identified a gene, named Arabidopsis thaliana abscisic acid (ABA)-insensitive RING protein 4 (AtAIRP4), which is induced by ABA and other stress treatments. AtAIRP4 encodes a cellular protein with a C3HC4-RING finger domain in its C-terminal side, which has in vitro E3 ligase activity. Loss of AtAIRP4 leads to a decrease in sensitivity of root elongation and stomatal closure to ABA, whereas overexpression of this gene in the T-DNA insertion mutant atairp4 effectively recovered the ABA-associated phenotypes. AtAIRP4 overexpression plants were hypersensitive to salt and osmotic stresses during seed germination, and showed drought avoidance compared with the wild-type and atairp4 mutant plants. In addition, the expression levels of ABA- and drought-induced marker genes in AtAIRP4 overexpression plants were markedly higher than those in the wild-type and atairp4 mutant plants. Hence, these results indicate that AtAIRP4 may act as a positive regulator of ABA-mediated drought avoidance and a negative regulator of salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:25913143

  3. The Arabidopsis F-box E3 ligase RIFP1 plays a negative role in abscisic acid signalling by facilitating ABA receptor RCAR3 degradation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Liang; Li, Dekuan; Liu, Zhibin; Wang, Jianmei; Li, Xufeng; Yang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a vital role in plant growth and development. The function of ABA is mediated by a group of newly discovered ABA receptors, named PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE 1/PYR-LIKE/REGULATORY COMPONENTS OF ABA RECEPTORs (PYR1/PYLs/RCARs). Here, we report that an Arabidopsis thaliana F-box protein RCAR3 INTERACTING F-BOX PROTEIN 1 (RIFP1) interacts with ABA receptor (RCAR3) and SCF E3 ligase complex subunits Arabidopsis SKP1-LIKE PROTEINs (ASKs) in vitro and in vivo. The rifp1 mutant plants displayed increased ABA-mediated inhibition of seed germination and water loss of detached leaves, while the overexpression of RIFP1 in Arabidopsis led to plants being insensitive to ABA. Meanwhile, the rifp1 mutant plants showed greater tolerance to water deficit. In addition, the RCAR3 protein level was more stable in the rifp1 mutant plants than in the wild-type plants, indicating that RIFP1 facilitates the proteasome degradation of RCAR3. Accordingly, the loss of RIFP1 increased the transcript levels of several ABA-responsive genes. Taken together, these data indicate that RIFP1 plays a negative role in the RCAR3-mediated ABA signalling pathway and likely functions as an adaptor subunit of the SCF ubiquitin ligase complex to regulate ABA receptor RCAR3 stability. PMID:26386272

  4. Purification of Pseudomonas putida acyl coenzyme A ligase active with a range of aliphatic and aromatic substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Valverde, M; Reglero, A; Martinez-Blanco, H; Luengo, J M

    1993-01-01

    Acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) ligase (acyl-CoA synthetase [ACoAS]) from Pseudomonas putida U was purified to homogeneity (252-fold) after this bacterium was grown in a chemically defined medium containing octanoic acid as the sole carbon source. The enzyme, which has a mass of 67 kDa, showed maximal activity at 40 degrees C in 10 mM K2PO4H-NaPO4H2 buffer (pH 7.0) containing 20% (wt/vol) glycerol. Under these conditions, ACoAS showed hyperbolic behavior against acetate, CoA, and ATP; the Kms calculated for these substrates were 4.0, 0.7, and 5.2 mM, respectively. Acyl-CoA ligase recognizes several aliphatic molecules (acetic, propionic, butyric, valeric, hexanoic, heptanoic, and octanoic acids) as substrates, as well as some aromatic compounds (phenylacetic and phenoxyacetic acids). The broad substrate specificity of ACoAS from P. putida was confirmed by coupling it with acyl-CoA:6-aminopenicillanic acid acyltransferase from Penicillium chrysogenum to study the formation of several penicillins. Images PMID:8476289

  5. 3-Hydroxybenzoate:coenzyme A ligase from cell cultures of Centaurium erythraea: isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Barillas, W; Beerhues, L

    2000-02-01

    In xanthone biosynthesis, 3-hydroxybenzoate:coenzyme A ligase (3HBL) supplies the starter substrate for the formation of an intermediate benzophenone. 3HBL from cell cultures of the medicinal plant Centaurium erythraea was purified to apparent homogeneity using a seven-step-procedure. The enzyme was an AMP-forming CoA ligase with a Km = 14.7 microM for 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, 8.5 microM for coenzyme A and 229 microM for ATP. The pH and temperature optima were 7.5 and 35 degrees C, respectively. In SDS-PAGE, two polypeptides of Mr 41,500 and 40,500 were detected. Both proteins were structurally related to each other as shown by tryptic digestion. Their N-termini were blocked. The difference in their apparent molecular masses could not be attributed to glycosylation. 3HBL had a native Mr of approx. 50,000 and is thus active as a monomer. PMID:10746747

  6. Ectopic Expression of ABSCISIC ACID 2/GLUCOSE INSENSITIVE 1 in Arabidopsis Promotes Seed Dormancy and Stress Tolerance1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Chi; Hwang, San-Gwang; Endo, Akira; Okamoto, Masanori; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Cheng, Wan-Hsing

    2007-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that plays a critical role in seed development, dormancy, and stress tolerance. 9-cis-Epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase is the key enzyme controlling ABA biosynthesis and stress tolerance. In this study, we investigated the effect of ectopic expression of another ABA biosynthesis gene, ABA2 (or GLUCOSE INSENSITIVE 1 [GIN1]) encoding a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We show that ABA2-overexpressing transgenic plants with elevated ABA levels exhibited seed germination delay and more tolerance to salinity than wild type when grown on agar plates and/or in soil. However, the germination delay was abolished in transgenic plants showing ABA levels over 2-fold higher than that of wild type grown on 250 mm NaCl. The data suggest that there are distinct mechanisms underlying ABA-mediated inhibition of seed germination under diverse stress. The ABA-deficient mutant aba2, with a shorter primary root, can be restored to normal root growth by exogenous application of ABA, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing ABA2 showed normal root growth. The data reflect that the basal levels of ABA are essential for maintaining normal primary root elongation. Furthermore, analysis of ABA2 promoter activity with ABA2∷β-glucuronidase transgenic plants revealed that the promoter activity was enhanced by multiple prolonged stresses, such as drought, salinity, cold, and flooding, but not by short-term stress treatments. Coincidently, prolonged drought stress treatment led to the up-regulation of ABA biosynthetic and sugar-related genes. Thus, the data support ABA2 as a late expression gene that might have a fine-tuning function in mediating ABA biosynthesis through primary metabolic changes in response to stress. PMID:17189333

  7. The E3 ubiquitin ligase ZNRF2 is a substrate of mTORC1 and regulates its activation by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hoxhaj, Gerta; Caddye, Edward; Najafov, Ayaz; Houde, Vanessa P; Johnson, Catherine; Dissanayake, Kumara; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G; Prescott, Alan R; MacKintosh, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic Target of Rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) senses intracellular amino acid levels through an intricate machinery, which includes the Rag GTPases, Ragulator and vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase). The membrane-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase ZNRF2 is released into the cytosol upon its phosphorylation by Akt. In this study, we show that ZNRF2 interacts with mTOR on membranes, promoting the amino acid-stimulated translocation of mTORC1 to lysosomes and its activation in human cells. ZNRF2 also interacts with the V-ATPase and preserves lysosomal acidity. Moreover, knockdown of ZNRF2 decreases cell size and cell proliferation. Upon growth factor and amino acid stimulation, mTORC1 phosphorylates ZNRF2 on Ser145, and this phosphosite is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 6. Ser145 phosphorylation stimulates vesicle-to-cytosol translocation of ZNRF2 and forms a novel negative feedback on mTORC1. Our findings uncover ZNRF2 as a component of the amino acid sensing machinery that acts upstream of Rag-GTPases and the V-ATPase to activate mTORC1. PMID:27244671

  8. The E3 ubiquitin ligase ZNRF2 is a substrate of mTORC1 and regulates its activation by amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Hoxhaj, Gerta; Caddye, Edward; Najafov, Ayaz; Houde, Vanessa P; Johnson, Catherine; Dissanayake, Kumara; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G; Prescott, Alan R; MacKintosh, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic Target of Rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) senses intracellular amino acid levels through an intricate machinery, which includes the Rag GTPases, Ragulator and vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase). The membrane-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase ZNRF2 is released into the cytosol upon its phosphorylation by Akt. In this study, we show that ZNRF2 interacts with mTOR on membranes, promoting the amino acid-stimulated translocation of mTORC1 to lysosomes and its activation in human cells. ZNRF2 also interacts with the V-ATPase and preserves lysosomal acidity. Moreover, knockdown of ZNRF2 decreases cell size and cell proliferation. Upon growth factor and amino acid stimulation, mTORC1 phosphorylates ZNRF2 on Ser145, and this phosphosite is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 6. Ser145 phosphorylation stimulates vesicle-to-cytosol translocation of ZNRF2 and forms a novel negative feedback on mTORC1. Our findings uncover ZNRF2 as a component of the amino acid sensing machinery that acts upstream of Rag-GTPases and the V-ATPase to activate mTORC1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12278.001 PMID:27244671

  9. Regulation of amino acid transporter trafficking by mTORC1 in primary human trophoblast cells is mediated by the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Fredrick J; Dimasuay, Kris Genelyn; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Changes in placental amino acid transfer directly contribute to altered fetal growth, which increases the risk for perinatal complications and predisposes for the development of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life. Placental amino acid transfer is critically dependent on the expression of specific transporters in the plasma membrane of the trophoblast, the transporting epithelium of the human placenta. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating this process are largely unknown. Nedd4-2 is an ubiquitin ligase that catalyses the ubiquitination of proteins, resulting in proteasomal degradation. We hypothesized that inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) decreases amino acid uptake in primary human trophoblast (PHT) cells by activation of Nedd4-2, which increases transporter ubiquitination resulting in decreased transporter expression in the plasma membrane. mTORC 1 inhibition increased the expression of Nedd4-2, promoted ubiquitination and decreased the plasma membrane expression of SNAT2 (an isoform of the System A amino acid transporter) and LAT1 (a System L amino acid transporter isoform), resulting in decreased cellular amino acid uptake. Nedd4-2 silencing markedly increased the trafficking of SNAT2 and LAT1 to the plasma membrane, which stimulated cellular amino acid uptake. mTORC1 inhibition by silencing of raptor failed to decrease amino acid transport following Nedd4-2 silencing. In conclusion, we have identified a novel link between mTORC1 signalling and ubiquitination, a common posttranslational modification. Because placental mTORC1 is inhibited in fetal growth restriction and activated in fetal overgrowth, we propose that regulation of placental amino acid transporter ubiquitination by mTORC1 and Nedd4-2 constitutes a molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal fetal growth. PMID:26608079

  10. Mechanistic Insight with HBCH2CoA as a Probe to Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) Synthases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases catalyze the polymerization of 3-(R)-hydroxybutyrate coenzyme A (HBCoA) to produce polyoxoesters of 1–2 MDa. A substrate analogue HBCH2CoA, in which the S in HBCoA is replaced with a CH2 group, was synthesized in 13 steps using a chemoenzymatic approach in a 7.5% overall yield. Kinetic studies reveal it is a competitive inhibitor of a class I and a class III PHB synthases, with Kis of 40 and 14 μM, respectively. To probe the elongation steps of the polymerization, HBCH2CoA was incubated with a synthase acylated with a [3H]-saturated trimer-CoA ([3H]-sTCoA). The products of the reaction were shown to be the methylene analogue of [3H]-sTCoA ([3H]-sT-CH2-CoA), saturated dimer-([3H]-sD-CO2H), and trimer-acid ([3H]-sT-CO2H), distinct from the expected methylene analogue of [3H]-saturated tetramer-CoA ([3H]-sTet-CH2-CoA). Detection of [3H]-sT-CH2-CoA and its slow rate of formation suggest that HBCH2CoA may be reporting on the termination and repriming process of the synthases, rather than elongation. PMID:24896226

  11. Crystallographic trapping of the glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate of family I CoA transferases

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Li, Y.; Ajamian, E.; Iannuzzi, P.; Kernaghan, S.; Fraser, M.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.

    2005-01-01

    Coenzyme A transferases are involved in a broad range of biochemical processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and exhibit a diverse range of substrate specificities. The YdiF protein from Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an acyl-CoA transferase of unknown physiological function, and belongs to a large sequence family of CoA transferases, present in bacteria to humans, which utilize oxoacids as acceptors. In vitro measurements showed that YdiF displays enzymatic activity with short-chain acyl-CoAs. The crystal structures of YdiF and its complex with CoA, the first co-crystal structure for any Family I CoA transferase, have been determined and refined at 1.9 and 2.0 Angstrom resolution, respectively. YdiF is organized into tetramers, with each monomer having an open {alpha}/{beta} structure characteristic of Family I CoA transferases. Co-crystallization of YdiF with a variety of CoA thioesters in the absence of acceptor carboxylic acid resulted in trapping a covalent {gamma}-glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate. The CoA binds within a well defined pocket at the N- and C-terminal domain interface, but makes contact only with the C-terminal domain. The structure of the YdiF complex provides a basis for understanding the different catalytic steps in the reaction of Family I CoA transferases.

  12. Differences among Adult COAs and Adult Non-COAs on Levels of Self-Esteem, Depression, and Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, David T.; Roberts, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Examined self-esteem, depression, and anxiety among 60 adult children of alcoholics (COAs) and 143 adult non-COAs. Subjects completed Children of Alcoholics Screening Test, demographic questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. Found no significant differences between COAs and…

  13. EXPRESSION OF TURKEY TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS AND ACYL COA OXIDASE IN DIFFERENT TISSUES AND GENETIC POPULATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several transcription factors are involved in regulating lipid metabolism in various animal tissues. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma and PPAR alpha regulate both lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. Gene fragments for PPAR gamma, PPAR alpha, and acyl CoA oxidase (ACO) have b...

  14. The Antibiotic CJ-15,801 is an Antimetabolite which Hijacks and then Inhibits CoA Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    van der Westhuyzen, Renier; Hammons, Justin C.; Meier, Jordan L.; Dahesh, Samira; Moolman, Wessel J. A.; Pelly, Stephen C.; Nizet, Victor; Burkart, Michael D.; Strauss, Erick

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The natural product CJ-15,801 is an inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus, but not other bacteria. Its close structural resemblance to pantothenic acid, the vitamin precursor of coenzyme A (CoA), and its Michael acceptor moiety suggest that it irreversibly inhibits an enzyme involved in CoA biosynthesis or utilization. However, its mode of action and the basis for its specificity have not been elucidated to date. We demonstrate that CJ-15,801 is transformed by the uniquely selective S. aureus pantothenate kinase, the first CoA biosynthetic enzyme, into a substrate for the next enzyme, phosphopantothenoylcysteine synthetase, which is inhibited through formation of a tight-binding structural mimic of its native reaction intermediate. These findings reveal CJ-15,801 as a vitamin biosynthetic pathway antimetabolite with a mechanism similar to that of the sulfonamide antibiotics, and highlight CoA biosynthesis as a viable antimicrobial drug target. PMID:22633408

  15. Characterization and Functional Analysis of 4-Coumarate:CoA Ligase Genes in Mul-berry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan-Hong; Yu, Jian; Cai, Yu-Xiang; Zhu, Pan-Pan; Liu, Chang-Ying; Zhao, Ai-Chun; Lü, Rui-Hua; Li, Meng-Jiao; Xu, Feng-Xiang; Yu, Mao-De

    2016-01-01

    A small, multigene family encodes 4-coumarate:CoA ligases (4CLs) that catalyze the ligation of CoA to hydroxycinnamic acids, a branch point directing metabolites to flavonoid or monolignol pathways. In this study, we characterized four 4CL genes from M. notabilis Genome Database, and cloned four Ma4CL genes from M. atropurpurea cv. Jialing No.40. A tissue-specific expression analysis indicated that Ma4CL3 was expressed at higher levels than the other genes, and that Ma4CL3 was strongly expressed in root bark, stem bark, and old leaves. Additionally, the expression pattern of Ma4CL3 was similar to the trend of the total flavonoid content throughout fruit development. A phylogenetic analysis suggested that Mn4CL1, Mn4CL2, and Mn4CL4 belong to class I 4CLs, and Mn4CL3 belongs to class II 4CLs. Ma4CL genes responded differently to a series of stresses. Ma4CL3 expression was higher than that of the other Ma4CL genes following wounding, salicylic acid, and ultraviolet treatments. An in vitro enzyme assay indicated that 4-coumarate acid was the best substrate among cinnamic acid, 4-coumarate acid, and caffeate acid, but no catalytic activity to sinapate acid and ferulate acid. The results of subcellular localization experiments showed that Ma4CL3 localized to the cytomembrane, where it activated transcription. We used different vectors and strategies to fuse Ma4CL3 with stilbene synthase (STS) to construct four Ma4CL-MaSTS co-expression systems to generate resveratrol. The results indicated that only a transcriptional fusion vector, pET-Ma4CL3-T-MaSTS, which utilized a T7 promoter and lac operator for the expression of MaSTS, could synthesize resveratrol. PMID:27213624

  16. Characterization and Functional Analysis of 4-Coumarate:CoA Ligase Genes in Mulberry

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian; Cai, Yu-Xiang; Zhu, Pan-Pan; Liu, Chang-Ying; Zhao, Ai-Chun; Lü, Rui-Hua; Li, Meng-Jiao; Xu, Feng-Xiang; Yu, Mao-De

    2016-01-01

    A small, multigene family encodes 4-coumarate:CoA ligases (4CLs) that catalyze the ligation of CoA to hydroxycinnamic acids, a branch point directing metabolites to flavonoid or monolignol pathways. In this study, we characterized four 4CL genes from M. notabilis Genome Database, and cloned four Ma4CL genes from M. atropurpurea cv. Jialing No.40. A tissue-specific expression analysis indicated that Ma4CL3 was expressed at higher levels than the other genes, and that Ma4CL3 was strongly expressed in root bark, stem bark, and old leaves. Additionally, the expression pattern of Ma4CL3 was similar to the trend of the total flavonoid content throughout fruit development. A phylogenetic analysis suggested that Mn4CL1, Mn4CL2, and Mn4CL4 belong to class I 4CLs, and Mn4CL3 belongs to class II 4CLs. Ma4CL genes responded differently to a series of stresses. Ma4CL3 expression was higher than that of the other Ma4CL genes following wounding, salicylic acid, and ultraviolet treatments. An in vitro enzyme assay indicated that 4-coumarate acid was the best substrate among cinnamic acid, 4-coumarate acid, and caffeate acid, but no catalytic activity to sinapate acid and ferulate acid. The results of subcellular localization experiments showed that Ma4CL3 localized to the cytomembrane, where it activated transcription. We used different vectors and strategies to fuse Ma4CL3 with stilbene synthase (STS) to construct four Ma4CL-MaSTS co-expression systems to generate resveratrol. The results indicated that only a transcriptional fusion vector, pET-Ma4CL3-T-MaSTS, which utilized a T7 promoter and lac operator for the expression of MaSTS, could synthesize resveratrol. PMID:27213624

  17. SIZ1, a small ubiquitin-related modifier ligase, controls cold signaling through regulation of salicylic acid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Miura, Kenji; Ohta, Masaru

    2010-05-01

    Low temperature induces several genes to acquire plant cold tolerance. Here, we demonstrate that accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) is involved in the regulation of the DREB1A/CBF3 regulon and plant tolerance to cold stresses. The SA-accumulating mutant siz1 exhibits sensitivity to chilling and freezing conditions and decreased expression of DREB1A/CBF3 and its regulon genes. Reduction of SA levels in siz1 by nahG restored cold sensitivity and down-regulation of these genes. Database analyses and RT-PCR analysis revealed that the ice1 mutation also increased expression of SA-responsive genes. As well as siz1, another SA-accumulating mutant acd6 exhibited freezing sensitivity and the sensitivity was suppressed in acd6 nahG plants. Taken together, these data indicate that SA is involved in regulation of cold signaling. PMID:19959255

  18. Transcript profiling of jasmonate-elicited Taxus cells reveals a β-phenylalanine-CoA ligase.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Estrada, Karla; Altabella, Teresa; Onrubia, Miriam; Moyano, Elisabeth; Notredame, Cedric; Osuna, Lidia; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Goossens, Alain; Cusido, Rosa M; Palazon, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell cultures constitute eco-friendly biotechnological platforms for the production of plant secondary metabolites with pharmacological activities, as well as a suitable system for extending our knowledge of secondary metabolism. Despite the high added value of taxol and the importance of taxanes as anticancer compounds, several aspects of their biosynthesis remain unknown. In this work, a genomewide expression analysis of jasmonate-elicited Taxus baccata cell cultures by complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) indicated a correlation between an extensive elicitor-induced genetic reprogramming and increased taxane production in the targeted cultures. Subsequent in silico analysis allowed us to identify 15 genes with a jasmonate-induced differential expression as putative candidates for genes encoding enzymes involved in five unknown steps of taxane biosynthesis. Among them, the TB768 gene showed a strong homology, including a very similar predicted 3D structure, with other genes previously reported to encode acyl-CoA ligases, thus suggesting a role in the formation of the taxol lateral chain. Functional analysis confirmed that the TB768 gene encodes an acyl-CoA ligase that localizes to the cytoplasm and is able to convert β-phenylalanine, as well as coumaric acid, into their respective derivative CoA esters. β-phenylalanyl-CoA is attached to baccatin III in one of the last steps of the taxol biosynthetic pathway. The identification of this gene will contribute to the establishment of sustainable taxol production systems through metabolic engineering or synthetic biology approaches. PMID:25899320

  19. A Hybrid Non-Ribosomal Peptide/Polyketide Synthetase Containing Fatty-Acyl Ligase (FAAL) Synthesizes the β-Amino Fatty Acid Lipopeptides Puwainaphycins in the Cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum alatosporum

    PubMed Central

    Mareš, Jan; Hájek, Jan; Urajová, Petra; Kopecký, Jiří; Hrouzek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    A putative operon encoding the biosynthetic pathway for the cytotoxic cyanobacterial lipopeptides puwainphycins was identified in Cylindrospermum alatosporum. Bioinformatics analysis enabled sequential prediction of puwainaphycin biosynthesis; this process is initiated by the activation of a fatty acid residue via fatty acyl-AMP ligase and continued by a multidomain non-ribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthetase. High-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements proved the production of puwainaphycin F/G congeners differing in FA chain length formed by either 3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-methyl dodecanoic acid (4-methyl-Ahdoa) or 3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-methyl tetradecanoic acid (4-methyl-Ahtea). Because only one puwainaphycin operon was recovered in the genome, we suggest that the fatty acyl-AMP ligase and one of the amino acid adenylation domains (Asn/Gln) show extended substrate specificity. Our results provide the first insight into the biosynthesis of frequently occurring β-amino fatty acid lipopeptides in cyanobacteria, which may facilitate analytical assessment and development of monitoring tools for cytotoxic cyanobacterial lipopeptides. PMID:25369527

  20. Structural Characterization of a 140° Domain Movement in the Two-Step Reaction Catalyzed by 4-Chlorobenzoate:CoA Ligase#

    PubMed Central

    Reger, Albert S.; Wu, Rui; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the adenylate-forming family of enzymes play a role in the metabolism of halogenated aromatics and of short, medium, and long chain fatty acids, as well as in the biosynthesis of menaquinone, peptide antibiotics, and peptide siderophores. This family includes a subfamily of acyl- and aryl-CoA ligases that catalyze thioester synthesis through two half-reactions. A carboxylate substrate first reacts with ATP to form an acyl-adenylate. Subsequent to the release of the product PPi, the enzyme binds CoA, which attacks the activated acyl group to displace AMP. Structural and functional studies on different family members suggest that these enzymes alternate between two conformations during catalysis of the two half-reactions. Specifically, after the initial adenylation step, the C-terminal domain rotates by ~140° to adopt a second conformation for thioester formation. Previously, we determined the structure of 4-chlorobenzoate:CoA ligase (CBL) in the adenylate forming conformation bound to 4-chlorobenzoate. We have determined two new crystal structures. We have determined the structure of CBL in the original adenylate-forming conformation, bound to the adenylate intermediate. Additionally, we have used a novel product analog, 4-chlorophenacyl-CoA, to trap the enzyme in the thioester-forming conformation and determined this structure in a new crystal form. This work identifies a novel binding pocket for the CoA nucleotide. The structures presented herein provide the foundation for biochemical analyses presented in the accompanying manuscript (Wu et al.). The complete characterization of this enzyme allows us to provide an explanation for the use of the domain alternation strategy by these enzymes. PMID:18620418

  1. Molecular characterisation of a DNA ligase gene of the extremely thermophilic archaeon Desulfurolobus ambivalens shows close phylogenetic relationship to eukaryotic ligases.

    PubMed Central

    Kletzin, A

    1992-01-01

    A 3382 bp fragment containing a gene for a DNA ligase from the extremely thermophilic, acidophilic, and facultatively anaerobic archaeon (archaebacterium) Desulfurolobus ambivalens was cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence (600 amino acids, 67619 molecular weight) showed 30-34% sequence identity with the ATP-dependent eucaryal (eukaryotic) DNA ligases of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the human DNA ligase I, and with the Vaccinia DNA ligase. Distant similarity to the DNA ligases from the bacteriophages T3, T4, T6, T7 and the African swine fever virus was found, whereas no similarities were detectable to the NAD-dependent DNA ligases from the bacteria (eubacteria) Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus, to the ATP-dependent RNA-ligase of bacteriophage T4, and to the tRNA-Ligase from S.cerevisiae. A detailed comparison of the phylogenetic relationship of the amino acid sequences of all known DNA and RNA ligases is presented including a complete alignment of the ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The in vivo-transcription initiation and termination sites of the D.ambivalens gene were mapped. The calculated transcript length was 1904-1911 nt. Images PMID:1437556

  2. Disassociation between the effects of amino acids and insulin on signaling, ubiquitin ligases, and protein turnover in human muscle

    PubMed Central

    Greenhaff, P. L.; Karagounis, L. G.; Peirce, N.; Simpson, E. J.; Hazell, M.; Layfield, R.; Wackerhage, H.; Smith, K.; Atherton, P.; Selby, A.; Rennie, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    We determined the effects of intravenous infusion of amino acids (AA) at serum insulin of 5, 30, 72, and 167 mU/l on anabolic signaling, expression of ubiquitin-proteasome components, and protein turnover in muscles of healthy young men. Tripling AA availability at 5 mU/l insulin doubled incorporation of [1-13C]leucine [i.e., muscle protein synthesis (MPS), P < 0.01] without affecting the rate of leg protein breakdown (LPB; appearance of d5-phenylalanine). While keeping AA availability constant, increasing insulin to 30 mU/l halved LPB (P < 0.05) without further inhibition at higher doses, whereas rates of MPS were identical to that at 5 mU/l insulin. The phosphorylation of PKB Ser473 and p70S6k Thr389 increased concomitantly with insulin, but whereas raising insulin to 30 mU/l increased the phosphorylation of mTOR Ser2448, 4E-BP1 Thr37/46, or GSK3β Ser9 and decreased that of eEF2 Thr56, higher insulin doses to 72 and 167 mU/l did not augment these latter responses. MAFbx and proteasome C2 subunit proteins declined as insulin increased, with MuRF-1 expression largely unchanged. Thus increasing AA and insulin availability causes changes in anabolic signaling and amounts of enzymes of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, which cannot be easily reconciled with observed effects on MPS or LPB. PMID:18577697

  3. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Z Zhang; R Zhou; J Sauder; P Tonge; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  4. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhou, R.; Sauder, J. M.; Tonge, P. J.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-02-18

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  5. A single amino acid substitution in the DNA-binding domain of Aeropyrum pernix DNA ligase impairs its interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Kiyonari, Shinichi; Kamigochi, Toru; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2007-09-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is known as a DNA sliding clamp that acts as a platform for the assembly of enzymes involved in DNA replication and repair. Previously, it was reported that a crenarchaeal PCNA formed a heterotrimeric structure, and that each PCNA subunit has distinct binding specificity to PCNA-binding proteins. Here we describe the PCNA-binding properties of a DNA ligase from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1. Based on our findings on the Pyrococcus furiosus DNA ligase-PCNA interaction, we predicted that the aromatic residue, Phe132, in the DNA-binding domain of A. pernix DNA ligase (ApeLig) would play a critical role in binding to A. pernix PCNA (ApePCNA). Surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed that the ApeLig F132A mutant does not interact with an immobilized subunit of ApePCNA. Furthermore, we could not detect any stimulation of the ligation activity of the ApeLig F132A protein by ApePCNA in vitro. These results indicated that the phenylalanine, which is located in our predicted PCNA-binding region in ApeLig, has a critical role for the physical and functional interaction with ApePCNA. PMID:17487442

  6. Four Isoforms of Arabidopsis 4-Coumarate:CoA Ligase Have Overlapping yet Distinct Roles in Phenylpropanoid Metabolism1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Im

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of lignin, flavonoids, and hydroxycinnamoyl esters share the first three enzymatic steps of the phenylpropanoid pathway. The last shared step is catalyzed by 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), which generates p-coumaroyl CoA and caffeoyl CoA from their respective acids. Four isoforms of 4CL have been identified in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Phylogenetic analysis reveals that 4CL1, 4CL2, and 4CL4 are more closely related to each other than to 4CL3, suggesting that the two groups may serve different biological functions. Promoter-GUS analysis shows that 4CL1 and 4CL2 are expressed in lignifying cells. In contrast, 4CL3 is expressed in a broad range of cell types, and 4CL3 has acquired a distinct role in flavonoid metabolism. Sinapoylmalate, the major hydroxycinnamoyl ester found in Arabidopsis, is greatly reduced in the 4cl1 4cl3 mutant, showing that 4CL1 and 4CL3 function redundantly in its biosynthesis. 4CL1 accounts for the majority of the total 4CL activity, and loss of 4CL1 leads to reduction in lignin content but no growth defect. The 4cl1 4cl2 and 4cl1 4cl2 4cl3 mutants are both dwarf but do not have further reduced lignin than the 4cl1 mutant, indicating that either 4CL1 or 4CL2 is required for normal plant growth. Although 4CL4 has a limited expression profile, it does make a modest contribution to lignin biosynthesis. Together, these data show that the four isoforms of 4CL in Arabidopsis have overlapping yet distinct roles in phenylpropanoid metabolism. PMID:26491147

  7. ABD1 Is an Arabidopsis DCAF Substrate Receptor for CUL4-DDB1–Based E3 Ligases That Acts as a Negative Regulator of Abscisic Acid Signaling[W

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyoung-In; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Nezames, Cynthia D.; Zhong, Shangwei; Song, Eunyoung; Byun, Myung-Ok; Deng, Xing Wang

    2014-01-01

    Members of the DDB1-CUL4–associated factors (DCAFs) family directly bind to DAMAGED DNA BINDING PROTEIN1 (DDB1) and function as the substrate receptors in CULLIN4-based E3 (CUL4) ubiquitin ligases, which regulate the selective ubiquitination of proteins. Here, we describe a DCAF protein, ABD1 (for ABA-hypersensitive DCAF1), that negatively regulates abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. ABD1 interacts with DDB1 in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it likely functions as a CUL4 E3 ligase substrate receptor. ABD1 expression is induced by ABA, and mutations in ABD1 result in ABA- and NaCl-hypersensitive phenotypes. Loss of ABD1 leads to hyperinduction of ABA-responsive genes and higher accumulation of the ABA-responsive transcription factor ABA INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5), hypersensitivity to ABA during seed germination and seedling growth, enhanced stomatal closure, reduced water loss, and, ultimately, increased drought tolerance. ABD1 directly interacts with ABI5 in yeast two-hybrid assays and associates with ABI5 in vivo by coimmunoprecipitation, and the interaction was found in the nucleus by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Furthermore, loss of ABD1 results in a retardation of ABI5 degradation by the 26S proteasome. Taken together, these data suggest that the DCAF-CUL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase assembled with ABD1 is a negative regulator of ABA responses by directly binding to and affecting the stability of ABI5 in the nucleus. PMID:24563203

  8. Nucleotide sequence, heterologous expression and novel purification of DNA ligase from Bacillus stearothermophilus(1).

    PubMed

    Brannigan, J A; Ashford, S R; Doherty, A J; Timson, D J; Wigley, D B

    1999-07-13

    The gene for DNA ligase (EC 6.5.1.2) from thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus NCA1503 has been cloned and the complete nucleotide sequence determined. The ligase gene encodes a protein 670 amino acids in length. The gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the enzyme has been purified to homogeneity. Preliminary characterisation confirms that it is a thermostable, NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase. PMID:10407164

  9. Genetics Home Reference: succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase deficiency Enable Javascript to view ... PDF Open All Close All Description Succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase (SCOT) deficiency is an inherited ...

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF THE STRUCTURE AND ORIGIN OF A THIOACIDOLYSIS MARKER COMPOUND FOR FERULIC ACID INCORPORATION INTO ANGIOSPERM LIGNINS AND A PSEUDO-MARKER COMPOUND FOR CINNAMOYL-COA REDUCTASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A molecular marker compound, derived from lignin by the thioacidolysis degradative method, for structures produced during lignification when ferulic acid is incorporated into lignification in angiosperms (poplar, Arabidopsis, tobacco) has been structurally identified as 1,2,2-trithioethyl ethylguaia...

  11. Polynucleotide 3'-terminal phosphate modifications by RNA and DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; McReynolds, Larry A

    2014-11-28

    RNA and DNA ligases catalyze the formation of a phosphodiester bond between the 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl ends of nucleic acids. In this work, we describe the ability of the thermophilic RNA ligase MthRnl from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum to recognize and modify the 3'-terminal phosphate of RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). This ligase can use an RNA 3'p substrate to generate an RNA 2',3'-cyclic phosphate or convert DNA3'p to ssDNA(3')pp(5')A. An RNA ligase from the Thermus scotoductus bacteriophage TS2126 and a predicted T4 Rnl1-like protein from Thermovibrio ammonificans, TVa, were also able to adenylate ssDNA 3'p. These modifications of RNA and DNA 3'-phosphates are similar to the activities of RtcA, an RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase. The initial step involves adenylation of the enzyme by ATP, which is then transferred to either RNA 3'p or DNA 3'p to generate the adenylated intermediate. For RNA (3')pp(5')A, the third step involves attack of the adjacent 2' hydroxyl to generate the RNA 2',3'-cyclic phosphate. These steps are analogous to those in classical 5' phosphate ligation. MthRnl and TS2126 RNA ligases were not able to modify a 3'p in nicked double-stranded DNA. However, T4 DNA ligase and RtcA can use 3'-phosphorylated nicks in double-stranded DNA to produce a 3'-adenylated product. These 3'-terminal phosphate-adenylated intermediates are substrates for deadenylation by yeast 5'Deadenylase. Our findings that classic ligases can duplicate the adenylation and phosphate cyclization activity of RtcA suggests that they have an essential role in metabolism of nucleic acids with 3'-terminal phosphates. PMID:25324547

  12. Analysis of five rice 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activity and stress response for potential roles in lignin and flavonoid biosynthesis in rice

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Haiyan; Li, Ying; Feng, Shengqiu; Zou, Weihua; Guo, Kai; Fan, Chunfen; Si, Shengli; and others

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► 4CLs play important roles in both lignin and flavonoids biosynthesis. ► PA and FA are the two main substrates of 4CL (Os4CL1/3/4/5) for lignin biosynthesis. ► Os4CL2 is suggested for flavonoid formation in defense against UV radiation. -- Abstract: 4-Coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) catalyzes the conversion of hydroxycinnamates into corresponding CoA esters for biosynthesis of flavonoids and lignin. In this study, five members of the 4CL gene family from rice were cloned and analyzed. Recombinant 4CL data revealed that 4-coumaric acid and ferulic acid were the two main substrates of 4CL (Os4CL1/3/4/5) for monolignol biosynthesis in rice. Os4CL2 was specifically expressed in the anther and was strongly activated by UV irradiation, suggesting its potential involvement in flavonoid formation. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis showed that the existence of valine residue at the substrate-binding pocket may mainly affect rice 4CL activities toward sinapic acid.

  13. Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r-Induced Systemic Resistance in Rice against Magnaporthe oryzae Is Based on Pseudobactin-Mediated Priming for a Salicylic Acid-Repressible Multifaceted Defense Response1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    De Vleesschauwer, David; Djavaheri, Mohammad; Bakker, Peter A.H.M.; Höfte, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Selected strains of nonpathogenic rhizobacteria can reduce disease in foliar tissues through the induction of a defense state known as induced systemic resistance (ISR). Compared with the large body of information on ISR in dicotyledonous plants, little is known about the mechanisms underlying rhizobacteria-induced resistance in cereal crops. Here, we demonstrate the ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r to trigger ISR in rice (Oryza sativa) against the leaf blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Using salicylic acid (SA)-nonaccumulating NahG rice, an ethylene-insensitive OsEIN2 antisense line, and the jasmonate-deficient mutant hebiba, we show that this WCS374r-induced resistance is regulated by an SA-independent but jasmonic acid/ethylene-modulated signal transduction pathway. Bacterial mutant analysis uncovered a pseudobactin-type siderophore as the crucial determinant responsible for ISR elicitation. Root application of WCS374r-derived pseudobactin (Psb374) primed naive leaves for accelerated expression of a pronounced multifaceted defense response, consisting of rapid recruitment of phenolic compounds at sites of pathogen entry, concerted expression of a diverse set of structural defenses, and a timely hyperinduction of hydrogen peroxide formation putatively driving cell wall fortification. Exogenous SA application alleviated this Psb374-modulated defense priming, while Psb374 pretreatment antagonized infection-induced transcription of SA-responsive PR genes, suggesting that the Psb374- and SA-modulated signaling pathways are mutually antagonistic. Interestingly, in sharp contrast to WCS374r-mediated ISR, chemical induction of blast resistance by the SA analog benzothiadiazole was independent of jasmonic acid/ethylene signaling and involved the potentiation of SA-responsive gene expression. Together, these results offer novel insights into the signaling circuitry governing induced resistance against M. oryzae and suggest that rice is endowed with multiple

  14. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Schnable, Patrick S.; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2009-04-28

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.alpha. pPDH, E1.beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  15. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Behal, Robert; Schnable, Patrick S.; Ke, Jinshan; Johnson, Jerry L.; Allred, Carolyn C.; Fatland, Beth; Lutziger, Isabelle; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2004-07-20

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.sub..alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.sub..beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyurvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.sub..alpha. pPDH, E1.sub..beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  16. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Behal, Robert; Schnable, Patrick S.; Ke, Jinshan; Johnson, Jerry L.; Allred, Carolyn C.; Fatland, Beth; Lutziger, Isabelle; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2005-09-13

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.alpha. pPDH, E1.beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  17. A Chemo-Enzymatic Road Map to the Synthesis of CoA Esters.

    PubMed

    Peter, Dominik M; Vögeli, Bastian; Cortina, Niña Socorro; Erb, Tobias J

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA) is a ubiquitous cofactor present in every known organism. The thioesters of CoA are core intermediates in many metabolic processes, such as the citric acid cycle, fatty acid biosynthesis and secondary metabolism, including polyketide biosynthesis. Synthesis of CoA-thioesters is vital for the study of CoA-dependent enzymes and pathways, but also as standards for metabolomics studies. In this work we systematically tested five chemo-enzymatic methods for the synthesis of the three most abundant acyl-CoA thioester classes in biology; saturated acyl-CoAs, α,β-unsaturated acyl-CoAs (i.e., enoyl-CoA derivatives), and α-carboxylated acyl-CoAs (i.e., malonyl-CoA derivatives). Additionally we report on the substrate promiscuity of three newly described acyl-CoA dehydrogenases that allow the simple conversion of acyl-CoAs into enoyl-CoAs. With these five methods, we synthesized 26 different CoA-thioesters with a yield of 40% or higher. The CoA esters produced range from short- to long-chain, include branched and α,β-unsaturated representatives as well as other functional groups. Based on our results we provide a general guideline to the optimal synthesis method of a given CoA-thioester in respect to its functional group(s) and the commercial availability of the precursor molecule. The proposed synthetic routes can be performed in small scale and do not require special chemical equipment, making them convenient also for biological laboratories. PMID:27104508

  18. UDP-N-Acetylmuramic Acid l-Alanine Ligase (MurC) Inhibition in a tolC Mutant Escherichia coli Strain Leads to Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Humnabadkar, Vaishali; Prabhakar, K. R.; Narayan, Ashwini; Sharma, Sreevalli; Guptha, Supreeth; Manjrekar, Praveena; Chinnapattu, Murugan; Ramachandran, Vasanthi; Hameed, Shahul P.; Ravishankar, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    The Mur ligases play an essential role in the biosynthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan and hence are attractive antibacterial targets. A screen of the AstraZeneca compound library led to the identification of compound A, a pyrazolopyrimidine, as a potent inhibitor of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa MurC. However, cellular activity against E. coli or P. aeruginosa was not observed. Compound A was active against efflux pump mutants of both strains. Experiments using an E. coli tolC mutant revealed accumulation of the MurC substrate and a decrease in the level of product upon treatment with compound A, indicating inhibition of MurC enzyme in these cells. Such a modulation was not observed in the E. coli wild-type cells. Further, overexpression of MurC in the E. coli tolC mutant led to an increase in the compound A MIC by ≥16-fold, establishing a correlation between MurC inhibition and cellular activity. In addition, estimation of the intracellular compound A level showed an accumulation of the compound over time in the tolC mutant strain. A significant compound A level was not detected in the wild-type E. coli strain even upon treatment with high concentrations of the compound. Therefore, the lack of MIC and absence of MurC inhibition in wild-type E. coli were possibly due to suboptimal compound concentration as a consequence of a high efflux level and/or poor permeativity of compound A. PMID:25114134

  19. Global Hawk Pacific (GloPac) COA and Mission Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, Mark; Hall, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the science objectives of the Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in the Pacific region, shows examp le flight tracks, the satellite under-flight requirement, the flight planning, and the agencies coordination of the airspace required for the Certificate of Authorization (COA).

  20. SCF ubiquitin ligase targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Jeffrey R.; Pagan, Julia K.; Pagano, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Summary The recent clinical successes of inhibitors of the proteasome for the treatment of cancer have highlighted the therapeutic potential of this protein degradation system. Proteasome inhibitors prevent the degradation of numerous proteins, so increased specificity could be achieved by inhibiting the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system that target specific subsets of proteins for degradation. F-box proteins are the substrate-targeting subunits of SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complexes. Through the degradation of a plethora of diverse substrates, SCF ubiquitin ligases control a large number of processes at the cellular and organismal levels, and their misregulation is implicated in many pathologies. SCF ligases are characterized by a high specificity for their substrates, so they represent promising drug targets. However, the potential for therapeutic manipulation of SCF complexes remains an underdeveloped area. This review will explore and discuss potential strategies to target SCF-mediated biology to treat human diseases. PMID:25394868

  1. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Sriramachandran, Annie M; Dohmen, R Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Covalent posttranslational modification with SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) modulates functions of a wide range of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Sumoylation affects the activity, interaction properties, subcellular localization and the stability of its substrate proteins. The recent discovery of a novel class of ubiquitin ligases (E3), termed ULS (E3-S) or STUbL, that recognize sumoylated proteins, links SUMO modification to the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Here we review recent insights into the properties and function of these ligases and their roles in regulating sumoylated proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin-Proteasome System. Guest Editors: Thomas Sommer and Dieter H. Wolf. PMID:24018209

  2. Phosphorylation of a conserved Thr357 in yeast Nedd4-like ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 is involved in down-regulation of the general amino acid permease Gap1.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Toshiya; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    Rsp5, an essential HECT-type ubiquitin ligase, is the only yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae member of the Nedd4 family. Rsp5 triggers the ubiquitination-dependent endocytosis of the general amino acid permease Gap1 in response to a good nitrogen source. Previously, we showed that the Thr357Ala/Lys764Glu variant Rsp5 induces the constitutive inactivation of Gap1, which is mainly involved in uptake of the toxic proline analogue, l-azetidine-2-carboxylate (AZC). Here, our experimental results indicated that the Thr357Ala substitution in the substrate-recognizing WW2 domain of Rsp5 constitutively causes the down-regulation of four proline permeases (Gap1, Put4, Agp1 and Gnp1), leading to AZC tolerance to yeast cells. In RSP5(T357A) cells, Gap1 was highly ubiquitinated and constantly delivered to the vacuole from the Golgi without sorting to the plasma membrane. Analyses of RSP5 mutants using antiphosphopeptide antibody suggest that Thr phosphorylation occurred in all three WW domains and, interestingly, that Thr357 in the WW2 domain was phosphorylated, in agreement with the in vitro result for the mouse Rsp5 orthologue. Furthermore, the phosphorylation-mimic mutant (Thr357Asp) showed strong sensitivity to AZC. From these results, we propose a possible mechanism involved in the regulation of Rsp5 activity for Gap1 down-regulation via the phosphorylation of a conserved Thr357 in the Nedd4 family. PMID:23517290

  3. Metabolic biology of 3-methylglutaconic acid-uria: a new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Su, Betty; Ryan, Robert O.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Over the past twenty-five years a growing number of distinct syndromes / mutations associated with compromised mitochondrial function have been identified that share a common feature: urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3MGA). In the leucine degradation pathway, carboxylation of 3-methylcrotonyl CoA leads to formation of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA while 3-methylglutaconyl CoA hydratase converts this metabolite to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG CoA). In “primary” 3MGA-uria, mutations in the hydratase are directly responsible for the accumulation of 3MGA. On the other hand, in all “secondary” 3MGA-urias, no defect in leucine catabolism exists and the metabolic origin of 3MGA is unknown. Herein, a path to 3MGA from mitochondrial acetyl CoA is proposed. The pathway is initiated when syndrome-associated mutations / DNA deletions result in decreased Krebs cycle flux. When this occurs, acetoacetyl CoA thiolase condenses two acetyl CoA into acetoacetyl CoA plus CoASH. Subsequently, HMG CoA synthase 2 converts acetoacetyl CoA and acetyl CoA to HMG CoA. Under syndrome-specific metabolic conditions, 3-methylglutaconyl CoA hydratase converts HMG CoA into 3-methylglutaconyl CoA in a reverse reaction of the leucine degradation pathway. This metabolite fails to proceed further up the leucine degradation pathway owing to the kinetic properties of 3-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase. Instead, hydrolysis of the CoA moiety of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA generates 3MGA, which appears in urine. If experimentally confirmed, this pathway provides an explanation for the occurrence of 3MGA in multiple disorders associated with compromised mitochondrial function. PMID:24407466

  4. Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) ablation in mice increases energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and delays fat absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The family of acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes (ACSL) activates fatty acids within cells to generate long chain fatty acyl CoA (FACoA). The differing metabolic fates of FACoAs such as incorporation into neutral lipids, phospholipids, and oxidation pathways are differentially regulated by the ...

  5. Synthesis and magnetic properties of superparamagnetic CoAs nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, P.; Ashokaan, N.; Masud, J.; Pariti, A.; Nath, M.

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a comprehensive guide on the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic CoAs nanoparticles and elongated nanostructures with high blocking temperature, (TB), via hot-injection precipitation and solvothermal methods. Cobalt arsenides constitute an important family of magnetically active solids that find a variety of applications ranging from magnetic semiconductors to biomedical imaging. While the higher temperature hot-injection precipitation technique (300 °C) yields pure CoAs nanostructures, the lower temperature solvothermal method (200 °C) yields a mixture of CoAs nanoparticles along with other Co-based impurity phases. The synthesis in all these cases involved usage of triphenylarsine ((C6H5)3As) as the As precursor which reacts with solid Co2(CO)8 by ligand displacement to yield a single source precursor. The surfactant, hexadecylamine (HDA) further assists in controlling the morphology of the nanostructures. HDA also provides a basic medium and molten flux-like conditions for the redox chemistry to occur between Co and As at elevated temperatures. The influence of the length of reaction time was investigated by studying the evolution of product morphology over time. It was observed that while spontaneous nucleation at higher temperature followed by controlled growth led to the predominant formation of short nanorods, with longer reaction time, the nanorods were further converted to nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles obtained, was mostly in the range of 10-15 nm. The key finding of this work is exceptionally high coercivity in CoAs nanostructures for the first time. Coercivity observed was as high as 0.1 T (1000 Oe) at 2 K. These kinds of magnetic nanostructures find multiple applications in spintronics, whereas the superparamagnetic nanoparticles are viable for use in magnetic storage, ferrofluids and as contrast enhancing agents in MRI.

  6. Human DNA ligase I cDNA: Cloning and functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.E.; Kodama, Kenichi; Tomkinson, A.E.; Lindahl, T.; Lasko, D.D. ); Johnston, L.H. )

    1990-09-01

    Human cDNA clones encoding the major DNA ligase activity in proliferating cells, DNA ligase I, were isolated by two independent methods. In one approach, a human cDNA library was screened by hybridization with oligonucleotides deduced from partial amino acid sequence of purified bovine DNA ligase I. In an alternative approach, a human cDNA library was screened for functional expression of a polypeptide able to complement a cdc9 temperature-sensitive DNA ligase mutant of Saccharomuces cerevisiae. The sequence of an apparently full-length cDNA encodes a 102-kDa protein, indistinguishable in size from authentic human DNA ligase I. The deduced amino acid sequence of the human DNA ligase I cDNA is 40% homologous to the smaller DNA ligases of S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, homology being confined to the carboxyl-terminal regions of the respective proteins. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is transcribed from a single-copy gene on chromosome 19.

  7. Crystal structures of a Populus tomentosa 4-coumarate:CoA ligase shed light on its enzymatic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yonglin; Gai, Ying; Yin, Lei; Wang, Xiaoxue; Feng, Chunyan; Feng, Lei; Li, Defeng; Jiang, Xiang-Ning; Wang, Da-Cheng

    2010-09-01

    4-Coumaric acid:CoA ligase (4CL) is the central enzyme of the plant-specific phenylpropanoid pathway. It catalyzes the synthesis of hydroxycinnamate-CoA thioesters, the precursors of lignin and other important phenylpropanoids, in two-step reactions involving the formation of hydroxycinnamate-AMP anhydride and then the nucleophilic substitution of AMP by CoA. In this study, we determined the crystal structures of Populus tomentosa 4CL1 in the unmodified (apo) form and in forms complexed with AMP and adenosine 5'-(3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propyl)phosphate (APP), an intermediate analog, at 2.4, 2.5, and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively. 4CL1 consists of two globular domains connected by a flexible linker region. The larger N-domain contains a substrate binding pocket, while the C-domain contains catalytic residues. Upon binding of APP, the C-domain rotates 81° relative to the N-domain. The crystal structure of 4CL1-APP reveals its substrate binding pocket. We identified residues essential for catalytic activities (Lys-438, Gln-443, and Lys-523) and substrate binding (Tyr-236, Gly-306, Gly-331, Pro-337, and Val-338) based on their crystal structures and by means of mutagenesis and enzymatic activity studies. We also demonstrated that the size of the binding pocket is the most important factor in determining the substrate specificities of 4CL1. These findings shed light on the enzymatic mechanisms of 4CLs and provide a solid foundation for the bioengineering of these enzymes. PMID:20841425

  8. Doping Induced Itinerant Ferromagnetism in CoAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Morosan, Emilia

    2013-03-01

    The magnetism in α-CoAs is dominated by strong spin fluctuations. In this study, we explore the effects of Phosphorus doping in α-CoAs. Phosphorus is isovalent with Arsenic, and the resulting doping introduces disorder and chemical pressure. In CoAs1-xPx, a cross-over from the spin fluctuation-dominated regime to an itinerant ferromagnetic (IFM) state take places around x = 0.04. The IFM state persists up to x <= 0.27. For compositions between x = 0.28 and 0.40, the magnetization data suggests a possible Stoner enhanced state. We acknowledge the support from DOD PECASE.

  9. Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 2 Is Dispensable for CD8+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Eun; Walsh, Matthew C.; Hoehn, Kyle L.; James, David E.; Wherry, E. John; Choi, Yongwon

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of T cells is closely associated with dynamic changes in nutrient and energy metabolism. However, the extent to which specific metabolic pathways and molecular components are determinative of CD8+ T cell fate remains unclear. It has been previously established in various tissues that acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) regulates fatty acid oxidation (FAO) by inhibiting carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), a rate-limiting enzyme of FAO in mitochondria. Here, we explore the cell-intrinsic role of ACC2 in T cell immunity in response to infections. We report here that ACC2 deficiency results in a marginal increase of cellular FAO in CD8+ T cells, but does not appear to influence antigen-specific effector and memory CD8+ T cell responses during infection with listeria or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. These results suggest that ACC2 is dispensable for CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:26367121

  10. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivon, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; Goldman, Peter J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Richardson, Douglas; Phipps, William S.; Ye, Anne Z.; Ellisman, Mark H.; et al

    2014-10-13

    In this study, chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of themore » intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies.« less

  11. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivon, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; Goldman, Peter J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Richardson, Douglas; Phipps, William S.; Ye, Anne Z.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Baker, David; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-10-13

    In this study, chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of the intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies.

  12. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivón, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; Goldman, Peter J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Richardson, Douglas; Phipps, William S.; Ye, Anne Z.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Baker, David; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of the intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies. PMID:25313043

  13. Structural Basis for Specificity and Flexibility in a Plant 4-Coumarate:CoA Ligase.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Nair, Satish K

    2015-11-01

    Plant 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) serves as a central catalyst in the phenylpropanoid pathway that provides precursors for numerous metabolites and regulates carbon flow. Here, we present several high-resolution crystal structures of Nicotiana tabacum 4CL isoform 2 (Nt4CL2) in complex with Mg(2+) and ATP, with AMP and coenzyme A (CoA), and with three different hydroxycinnamate-AMP intermediates: 4-coumaroyl-AMP, caffeoyl-AMP, and feruloyl-AMP. The Nt4CL2-Mg(2+)-ATP structure is captured in the adenylate-forming conformation, whereas the other structures are in the thioester-forming conformation. These structures represent a rare example of an ANL enzyme visualized in both conformations, and also reveal the binding determinants for both CoA and the hydroxycinnamate substrate. Kinetic studies of structure-based variants were used to identify residues crucial to catalysis, ATP binding, and hydroxycinnamate specificity. Lastly, we characterize a deletion mutant of Nt4CL2 that possesses the unusual sinapinate-utilizing activity. These studies establish a molecular framework for the engineering of this versatile biocatalyst. PMID:26412334

  14. Identification of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is primarily expressed in Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Nemazanyy, Ivan . E-mail: nemazanyy@imbg.org.ua; Panasyuk, Ganna; Breus, Oksana; Zhyvoloup, Alexander; Filonenko, Valeriy; Gout, Ivan T. . E-mail: i.gout@ucl.ac.uk

    2006-03-24

    CoA and its derivatives Acetyl-CoA and Acyl-CoA are important players in cellular metabolism and signal transduction. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme which mediates the final stages of CoA biosynthesis. In previous studies, we have reported molecular cloning, biochemical characterization, and subcellular localization of CoA synthase (CoASy). Here, we describe the existence of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is the product of alternative splicing and possesses a 29aa extension at the N-terminus. We termed it CoASy {beta} and originally identified CoA synthase, CoASy {alpha}. The transcript specific for CoASy {beta} was identified by electronic screening and by RT-PCR analysis of various rat tissues. The existence of this novel isoform was further confirmed by immunoblot analysis with antibodies directed to the N-terminal peptide of CoASy {beta}. In contrast to CoASy {alpha}, which shows ubiquitous expression, CoASy {beta} is primarily expressed in Brain. Using confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that both isoforms are localized on mitochondria. The N-terminal extension does not affect the activity of CoA synthase, but possesses a proline-rich sequence which can bring the enzyme into complexes with signalling proteins containing SH3 or WW domains. The role of this novel isoform in CoA biosynthesis, especially in Brain, requires further elucidation.

  15. The Natural Mentors of Adolescent Children of Alcoholics (COAs): Implications for Preventive Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavell, Timothy A.; Meehan, Barbara T.; Heffer, Robert W.; Holladay, Janice J.

    2002-01-01

    Late adolescent children of alcoholics (COAs) were interviewed about their relationship with a natural mentor. Results showed that a typical mentor was a same-sex relative who had been responsible for initiating the mentor-like relationship. Differences in the reported adjustment of COAs with and without natural mentors are considered in light of…

  16. The poxvirus encoded ubiquitin ligase, p28, is regulated by proteasomal degradation and autoubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Mottet, Kelly; Bareiss, Bettina; Milne, Craig D; Barry, Michele

    2014-11-01

    Virus manipulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system has become increasingly apparent. Ubiquitin is a 76 amino acid protein that is post-translationally conjugated to target proteins, while poly-ubiquitination subsequently leads to degradation via the 26S proteasome. Target specificity is determined by a large family of ubiquitin ligases. Poxviruses encode p28, a highly conserved ubiquitin ligase expressed in a wide range of poxviruses (J. Virol. 79:597). Here we investigate the relationship between p28 and ubiquitination. Confocal microscopy indicated that orthologs of p28 co-localized with ubiquitin at the virus factory. Flow cytometry assays further demonstrated that p28 was regulated by proteasomal degradation. Moreover, when the ubiquitin ligase activity of p28 was disrupted by mutating the RING domain conjugated ubiquitin still localized to the viral factories, indicating that an unknown ubiquitin ligase(s) was responsible for regulating p28. Our observations indicate that p28 is a ubiquitin ligase that is regulated by ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. PMID:25240226

  17. Benzoate-coenzyme A ligase, encoded by badA, is one of three ligases able to catalyze benzoyl-coenzyme A formation during anaerobic growth of Rhodopseudomonas palustris on benzoate.

    PubMed Central

    Egland, P G; Gibson, J; Harwood, C S

    1995-01-01

    The first step of anaerobic benzoate degradation is the formation of benzoyl-coenzyme A by benzoate-coenzyme A ligase. This enzyme, purified from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, is maximally active with 5 microM benzoate. To study the molecular basis for this reaction, the benzoate-coenzyme A ligase gene (badA) was cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of badA showed substantial similarity to other coenzyme A ligases, with the highest degree of similarity being that to 4-hydroxybenzoate-coenzyme A ligase (50% amino acid identity) from R. palustris. A badA mutant that was constructed had barely detectable levels of ligase activity when cell extracts were assayed at 10 microM benzoate. Despite this, the mutant grew at wild-type rates on benzoate under laboratory culture conditions (3 mM benzoate), and mutant cell extracts had high levels of ligase activity when assayed at a high concentration of benzoate (1 mM). This suggested that R. palustris expresses, in addition to BadA, a benzoate-activating enzyme(s) with a relatively low affinity for benzoate. A possible role of 4-hydroxybenzoate-coenzyme A ligase (encoded by hbaA) in this capacity was investigated by constructing a badA hbaA double mutant. Although the double mutant grew more slowly on benzoate than badA cells, growth rates were still significant, suggesting the involvement of a third enzyme in benzoate activation. Competition experiments involving the addition of a small amount of cyclohexanecarboxylate to ligase assay mixtures implicated cyclohexanecarboxylate-coenzyme A ligase as being this third enzyme. These results show that wild-type R. palustris cells synthesize at least three enzymes that can catalyze the initial step in anaerobic benzoate degradation during growth on benzoate. This observation supports previous suggestions that benzoyl-coenzyme A formation plays a central role in anaerobic aromatic compound biodegradation. PMID:7592432

  18. 4-Hydroxybenzoate-coenzyme A ligase from Rhodopseudomonas palustris: purification, gene sequence, and role in anaerobic degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, J; Dispensa, M; Fogg, G C; Evans, D T; Harwood, C S

    1994-01-01

    Anaerobic metabolism of most aromatic acids is initiated by coenzyme A thioester formation. Rhodopseudomonas palustris grows well under anaerobic, phototrophic conditions with many aromatic acids, including benzoate and 4-hydroxybenzoate, as a carbon source. A coenzyme A ligase that reacts with 4-hydroxybenzoate was purified from 4-hydroxybenzoate-grown cells of R. palustris. This enzyme required MgATP, reduced coenzyme A, and 4-hydroxybenzoate, benzoate, or cyclohex-1,4-dienecarboxylate for optimal activity but also used phosphopantetheine, cyclohex-2,5-dienecarboxylate, and 4-fluorobenzoate at lower rates. The 4-hydroxybenzoate-coenzyme A ligase differed in molecular characteristics from a previously described benzoate-coenzyme A ligase from R. palustris, and the two ligases did not cross-react immunologically. The gene encoding the 4-hydroxybenzoate enzyme was cloned and sequenced. The deduced gene product showed about 20% amino acid identity with bacterial coenzyme A ligases involved in aerobic degradation of aromatic acids. An R. palustris mutant carrying a disrupted 4-hydroxybenzoate-coenzyme A ligase gene was unable to grow with 4-hydroxybenzoate under anaerobic conditions, indicating that the enzyme is essential for anaerobic degradation of this compound. Images PMID:8300518

  19. Lunapark Is a Component of a Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Localized to the Endoplasmic Reticulum Three-way Junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yupeng; Zhang, Ting; Huo, Huanhuan; Ye, Yihong; Liu, Yanfen

    2016-08-26

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network comprises sheets and tubules that are connected by dynamic three-way junctions. Lunapark (Lnp) localizes to and stabilizes ER three-way junctions by antagonizing the small GTPase Atlastin, but how Lnp shapes the ER network is unclear. Here, we used an affinity purification approach and mass spectrometry to identify Lnp as an interacting partner of the ER protein quality control ubiquitin ligase gp78. Accordingly, Lnp purified from mammalian cells has a ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro Intriguingly, biochemical analyses show that this activity can be attributed not only to associated ubiquitin ligase, but also to an intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity borne by Lnp itself. This activity is contained in the N-terminal 45 amino acids of Lnp although this segment does not share homology to any known ubiquitin ligase motifs. Despite its interaction with gp78, Lnp does not seem to have a broad function in degradation of misfolded ER proteins. On the other hand, the N-terminal ubiquitin ligase-bearing motif is required for the ER three-way junction localization of Lnp. Our study identifies a new type of ubiquitin ligase and reveals a potential link between ubiquitin and ER morphology regulation. PMID:27387505

  20. A Pathogen Type III Effector with a Novel E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Skarina, Tatiana; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Egler, Monique; Srikumar, Tharan; Raught, Brian; Lee, Justin; Scheel, Dierk; Savchenko, Alexei; Bonas, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    Type III effectors are virulence factors of Gram-negative bacterial pathogens delivered directly into host cells by the type III secretion nanomachine where they manipulate host cell processes such as the innate immunity and gene expression. Here, we show that the novel type III effector XopL from the model plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria exhibits E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro and in planta, induces plant cell death and subverts plant immunity. E3 ligase activity is associated with the C-terminal region of XopL, which specifically interacts with plant E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes and mediates formation of predominantly K11-linked polyubiquitin chains. The crystal structure of the XopL C-terminal domain revealed a single domain with a novel fold, termed XL-box, not present in any previously characterized E3 ligase. Mutation of amino acids in the central cavity of the XL-box disrupts E3 ligase activity and prevents XopL-induced plant cell death. The lack of cysteine residues in the XL-box suggests the absence of thioester-linked ubiquitin-E3 ligase intermediates and a non-catalytic mechanism for XopL-mediated ubiquitination. The crystal structure of the N-terminal region of XopL confirmed the presence of a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain, which may serve as a protein-protein interaction module for ubiquitination target recognition. While the E3 ligase activity is required to provoke plant cell death, suppression of PAMP responses solely depends on the N-terminal LRR domain. Taken together, the unique structural fold of the E3 ubiquitin ligase domain within the Xanthomonas XopL is unprecedented and highlights the variation in bacterial pathogen effectors mimicking this eukaryote-specific activity. PMID:23359647

  1. Isolation and characterization of temperature-sensitive pantothenate kinase (coaA) mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Vallari, D S; Rock, C O

    1987-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants conditionally defective in the conversion of pantothenate to coenzyme A were isolated and characterized. The gene was designated coaA and localized between argEH and rpoB near min 90 of the chromosome. The coaA15(Ts) mutation caused a temperature-sensitive growth phenotype and temperature-dependent inactivation of pantothenate kinase activity assayed both in vivo and in vitro. At 30 degrees C, coaA15(Ts) extracts contained less than 20% of the wild-type pantothenate kinase activity; the kinase had near normal kinetic constants for the substrates ATP and pantothenate and was inhibited by coenzyme A to the same degree as the wild-type enzyme. These data define the coaA gene as the structural gene for pantothenate kinase. PMID:2824448

  2. Characterization and Promoter Analysis of a Cotton Ring-Type Ubiquitin Ligase (E3) Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cotton fiber cDNA, GhRING1, and its corresponding gene have been cloned and characterized. The GhRING1 gene encodes a RING-type ubiquitin ligase (E3) containing 337 amino acids (aa). The GhRING1 protein contains a RING finger motif with conserved cysteine and histine residues at the C-terminus a...

  3. Exploring Peptide Ligase Orthologs in Actinobacteria-Discovery of Pseudopeptide Natural Products, Ketomemicins.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yasushi; Kawata, Junpei; Noike, Motoyoshi; Satoh, Yasuharu; Furihata, Kazuo; Dairi, Tohru

    2016-06-17

    We recently identified a novel peptide ligase (PGM1), an ATP-grasp-ligase, that catalyzes amide bond formation between (S)-2-(3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-2-guanidinoacetic acid and ribosomally supplied oligopeptides in pheganomycin biosynthesis. This was the first example of an ATP-grasp-ligase utilizing peptides as nucleophiles. To explore the potential of this type of enzyme, we performed a BLAST search and identified many orthologs. The orthologs of Streptomyces mobaraensis, Salinispora tropica, and Micromonospora sp. were found in similar gene clusters consisting of six genes. To probe the functions of these genes, we heterologously expressed each of the clusters in Streptomyces lividans and detected novel and structurally similar pseudotripeptides in the broth of all transformants. Moreover, a recombinant PGM1 ortholog of Micromonospora sp. was demonstrated to be a novel dipeptide ligase catalyzing amide bond formation between amidino-arginine and dipeptides to yield tripeptides; this is the first report of a peptide ligase utilizing dipeptides as nucleophiles. PMID:27023439

  4. Leucine: tRNA Ligase from Cultured Cells of Nicotiana tabacum var. Xanthi

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Nigel R.; Wray, John L.

    1978-01-01

    Leucine:tRNA ligase was assayed in extracts from cultured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) XD cells by measuring the initial rate of aminoacylation of transfer RNA with l-[4,5-3H]leucine. Transfer RNA was purified from tobacco XD cells after the method of Vanderhoef et al. (Phytochemistry 9: 2291-2304). The buoyant density of leucine:tRNA ligase from cells grown for 100 generations in 2.5 mm [15N]nitrate and 30% deuterium oxide was 1.3397. After transfer of cells into light medium (2.5 mm [14N]nitrate and 100% H2O) the ligase activity increased and the buoyant density decreased with time to 1.3174 at 72 hours after transfer. It was concluded that leucine:tRNA ligase molecules were synthesized de novo from light amino acids during the period of activity increase. The width at half-peak height of the enzyme distribution profiles following isopycnic equilibrium centrifugation in caesium chloride remained constant at all times after transfer into light medium providing evidence for the loss of preexisting functional ligase molecules. It was concluded that during the period of activity increase the cellular level of enzyme activity was determined by a balance between de novo synthesis and the loss of functional enzyme molecules due to either inactivation or degradation. PMID:16660229

  5. Assembly of the Elongin A Ubiquitin Ligase Is Regulated by Genotoxic and Other Stresses.

    PubMed

    Weems, Juston C; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Hall, Shawn M; McLaird, Merry B; Gilmore, Joshua M; Washburn, Michael P; Florens, Laurence; Yasukawa, Takashi; Aso, Teijiro; Conaway, Joan W; Conaway, Ronald C

    2015-06-12

    Elongin A performs dual functions in cells as a component of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription elongation factor Elongin and as the substrate recognition subunit of a Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been shown to target Pol II stalled at sites of DNA damage. Here we investigate the mechanism(s) governing conversion of the Elongin complex from its elongation factor to its ubiquitin ligase form. We report the discovery that assembly of the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase is a tightly regulated process. In unstressed cells, Elongin A is predominately present as part of Pol II elongation factor Elongin. Assembly of Elongin A into the ubiquitin ligase is strongly induced by genotoxic stress; by transcriptional stresses that lead to accumulation of stalled Pol II; and by other stimuli, including endoplasmic reticulum and nutrient stress and retinoic acid signaling, that activate Elongin A-dependent transcription. Taken together, our findings shed new light on mechanisms that control the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase and suggest that it may play a role in Elongin A-dependent transcription. PMID:25878247

  6. Assembly of the Elongin A Ubiquitin Ligase Is Regulated by Genotoxic and Other Stresses*

    PubMed Central

    Weems, Juston C.; Slaughter, Brian D.; Unruh, Jay R.; Hall, Shawn M.; McLaird, Merry B.; Gilmore, Joshua M.; Washburn, Michael P.; Florens, Laurence; Yasukawa, Takashi; Aso, Teijiro; Conaway, Joan W.; Conaway, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    Elongin A performs dual functions in cells as a component of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription elongation factor Elongin and as the substrate recognition subunit of a Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been shown to target Pol II stalled at sites of DNA damage. Here we investigate the mechanism(s) governing conversion of the Elongin complex from its elongation factor to its ubiquitin ligase form. We report the discovery that assembly of the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase is a tightly regulated process. In unstressed cells, Elongin A is predominately present as part of Pol II elongation factor Elongin. Assembly of Elongin A into the ubiquitin ligase is strongly induced by genotoxic stress; by transcriptional stresses that lead to accumulation of stalled Pol II; and by other stimuli, including endoplasmic reticulum and nutrient stress and retinoic acid signaling, that activate Elongin A-dependent transcription. Taken together, our findings shed new light on mechanisms that control the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase and suggest that it may play a role in Elongin A-dependent transcription. PMID:25878247

  7. Butelase 1 is an Asx-specific ligase enabling peptide macrocyclization and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Giang K T; Wang, Shujing; Qiu, Yibo; Hemu, Xinya; Lian, Yilong; Tam, James P

    2014-09-01

    Proteases are ubiquitous in nature, whereas naturally occurring peptide ligases, enzymes catalyzing the reverse reactions of proteases, are rare occurrences. Here we describe the discovery of butelase 1, to our knowledge the first asparagine/aspartate (Asx) peptide ligase to be reported. This highly efficient enzyme was isolated from Clitoria ternatea, a cyclic peptide-producing medicinal plant. Butelase 1 shares 71% sequence identity and the same catalytic triad with legumain proteases but does not hydrolyze the protease substrate of legumain. Instead, butelase 1 cyclizes various peptides of plant and animal origin with yields greater than 95%. With Kcat values of up to 17 s(-1) and catalytic efficiencies as high as 542,000 M(-1) s(-1), butelase 1 is the fastest peptide ligase known. Notably, butelase 1 also displays broad specificity for the N-terminal amino acids of the peptide substrate, thus providing a new tool for C terminus-specific intermolecular peptide ligations. PMID:25038786

  8. Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant D; Khan, Bashir M; Gaikwad, Sushama M

    2014-03-01

    Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase, a key regulatory enzyme in lignin biosynthesis, from Leucaena leucocephala (Ll-CCRH1) were studied using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The native protein possesses four trp residues exposed on the surface and 66% of helical structure, undergoes rapid structural transitions at and above 45 °C and starts forming aggregates at 55 °C. Ll-CCRH1 was transformed into acid induced (pH 2.0) molten globule like structure, exhibiting altered secondary structure, diminished tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic residues. The molten globule like structure was examined for the thermal and chemical stability. The altered secondary structure of L1-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 was stable up to 90 °C. Also, in presence of 0.25 M guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), it got transformed into different structure which was stable in the vicinity of 2M GdnHCl (as compared to drastic loss of native structure in 2M GdnHCl) as seen in far UV-CD spectra. The structural transition of Ll-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 followed another transition after readjusting the pH to 8.0, forming a structure with hardly any similarity to that of native protein. PMID:24309513

  9. Acyl CoA Binding Proteins are Required for Cuticle Formation and Plant Responses to Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ye; Yu, Keshun; Gao, Qing-ming; Wilson, Ella V.; Navarre, Duroy; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) and lipids are well known regulators of plant defense. Our previous studies have shown that components of prokaryotic (plastidal) FA biosynthesis pathway regulate various aspects of plant defense. Here, we investigated the defense related roles of the soluble acyl CoA binding proteins (ACBPs), which are thought to facilitate the intracellular transport of FA/lipids. We show that ACBP3 and 4 are required for maintaining normal lipid levels and that ACBP3 contributes to the lipid flux between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathways. We also show that loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 impair normal development of the cuticle and affect both basal and resistance protein-mediated defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 also inhibits the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) due to the plants inability to generate SAR inducing signal(s). Together, these data show that ACBP3, ACBP4, and ACBP6 are required for cuticle development as well as defense against microbial pathogens. PMID:23060893

  10. Identification of Candidate Substrates for the Golgi Tul1 E3 Ligase Using Quantitative diGly Proteomics in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zongtian; Kim, Min-Sik; Pandey, Akhilesh; Espenshade, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of protein homeostasis is essential for cellular survival. Central to this regulation are mechanisms of protein quality control in which misfolded proteins are recognized and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. One well-studied protein quality control pathway requires endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident, multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligases that function in ER-associated degradation. Using fission yeast, our lab identified the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase as required for proteolytic activation of fungal sterol regulatory element-binding protein transcription factors. The Dsc E3 ligase contains five integral membrane subunits and structurally resembles ER-associated degradation E3 ligases. Saccharomyces cerevisiae codes for homologs of Dsc E3 ligase subunits, including the Dsc1 E3 ligase homolog Tul1 that functions in Golgi protein quality control. Interestingly, S. cerevisiae lacks sterol regulatory element-binding protein homologs, indicating that novel Tul1 E3 ligase substrates exist. Here, we show that the S. cerevisiae Tul1 E3 ligase consists of Tul1, Dsc2, Dsc3, and Ubx3 and define Tul1 complex architecture. Tul1 E3 ligase function required each subunit as judged by vacuolar sorting of the artificial substrate Pep12D. Genetic studies demonstrated that Tul1 E3 ligase was required in cells lacking the multivesicular body pathway and under conditions of ubiquitin depletion. To identify candidate substrates, we performed quantitative diGly proteomics using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to survey ubiquitylation in wild-type and tul1Δ cells. We identified 3116 non-redundant ubiquitylation sites, including 10 sites in candidate substrates. Quantitative proteomics found 4.5% of quantified proteins (53/1172) to be differentially expressed in tul1Δ cells. Correcting the diGly dataset for these differences increased the number of Tul1-dependent ubiquitylation sites. Together, our data demonstrate that the Tul1 E3 ligase functions in

  11. Engineered DNA ligases with improved activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert H; Morton, Susan K; Deiderick, Heather; Gerth, Monica L; Paul, Hayden A; Gerber, Ilana; Patel, Ankita; Ellington, Andrew D; Hunicke-Smith, Scott P; Patrick, Wayne M

    2013-07-01

    The DNA ligase from bacteriophage T4 is one of the most widely used enzymes in molecular biology. It has evolved to seal single-stranded nicks in double-stranded DNA, but not to join double-stranded fragments with cohesive or blunt ends. Its poor activity in vitro, particularly with blunt-ended substrates, can lead to failed or sub-optimal experimental outcomes. We have fused T4 DNA ligase to seven different DNA-binding proteins, including eukaryotic transcription factors, bacterial DNA repair proteins and archaeal DNA-binding domains. Representatives from each of these classes improved the activity of T4 DNA ligase, by up to 7-fold, in agarose gel-based screens for cohesive- and blunt-ended fragment joining. Overall, the most active variants were p50-ligase (i.e. NF-κB p50 fused to T4 DNA ligase) and ligase-cTF (T4 DNA ligase fused to an artificial, chimeric transcription factor). Ligase-cTF out-performed T4 DNA ligase by ∼160% in blunt end 'vector + insert' cloning assays, and p50-ligase showed an improvement of a similar magnitude when it was used to construct a library for Illumina sequencing. The activity of the Escherichia coli DNA ligase was also enhanced by fusion to p50. Together, these results suggest that our protein design strategy is a generalizable one for engineering improved DNA ligases. PMID:23754529

  12. Cryogenic Optical Assembly (COA) cooldown analysis for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coladonato, Robert J.; Irish, Sandra M.; Mosier, Carol L.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft, developed by Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), was successfully launched on November 18, 1989 aboard a Delta expendable launch vehicle. Two of the three instruments for this mission were mounted inside a liquid helium (LHe) dewar which operates at a temperature of 2 K. These two instruments are the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) and the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS). They are mounted to a common Instrument Interface Structure (IIS) and the entire assembly is called the Cryogenic Optical Assembly (COA). As part of the structural verification requirement, it was necessary to show that the entire COA exhibited adequate strength and would be capable of withstanding the launch environment. This requirement presented an unique challenge for COBE because the COA is built and assembled at room temperature (300 K), cooled to 2 K, and then subjected to launch loads. However, strength testing of the entire COA at 2 K could not be done because of facility limitations. Therefore, it was decided to perform the strength verification of the COA by analysis.

  13. Cardiac-specific deletion of acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) prevents metabolic remodeling during pressure-overload hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Olson, David P.; Marney, Luke C.; Garcia-Menendez, Lorena; Synovec, Robert E.; Tian, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO) with increased reliance on glucose are hallmarks of metabolic remodeling that occurs in pathological cardiac hypertrophy and is associated with decreased myocardial energetics and impaired cardiac function. To date, it has not been tested whether prevention of the metabolic switch that occurs during the development of cardiac hypertrophy has unequivocal benefits on cardiac function and energetics. Objectives Since malonyl CoA production via acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) inhibits mitochondrial fatty acid transport, we hypothesized that mice with a cardiac-specific deletion of ACC2 (ACC2H−/−) would maintain cardiac fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and improve function and energetics during the development of pressure-overload hypertrophy. Methods and Results ACC2 deletion led to a significant reduction in cardiac malonyl CoA levels. In isolated perfused heart experiments, left ventricular (LV) function and oxygen consumption were similiar in ACC2H−/− mice despite an ~60% increase in FAO compared to controls (CON). After 8 weeks of pressure-overload via transverse aortic constriction (TAC), ACC2H−/− mice exhibited a substrate utilization profile similar to sham animals while CON-TAC hearts had decreased FAO with increased glycolysis and anaplerosis. Myocardial energetics, assessed by 31P NMR spectroscopy, and cardiac function were maintained in ACC2H−/− after 8 weeks of TAC. Furthermore, ACC2H−/−-TAC demonstrated an attenuation of cardiac hypertrophy with a significant reduction in fibrosis relative to CON-TAC. Conclusions These data suggest that reversion to the fetal metabolic profile in chronic pathological hypertrophy is associated with impaired myocardial function and energetics and maintenance of the inherent cardiac metabolic profile and mitochondrial oxidative capacity is a viable therapeutic strategy. PMID:22730442

  14. Protein neddylation: beyond cullin-RING ligases.

    PubMed

    Enchev, Radoslav I; Schulman, Brenda A; Peter, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    NEDD8 (neural precursor cell expressed developmentally downregulated protein 8) is a ubiquitin-like protein that activates the largest ubiquitin E3 ligase family, the cullin-RING ligases. Many non-cullin neddylation targets have been proposed in recent years. However, overexpression of exogenous NEDD8 can trigger NEDD8 conjugation through the ubiquitylation machinery, which makes validating potential NEDD8 targets challenging. Here, we re-evaluate studies of non-cullin targets of NEDD8 in light of the current understanding of the neddylation pathway, and suggest criteria for identifying genuine neddylation substrates under homeostatic conditions. We describe the biological processes that might be regulated by non-cullin neddylation, and the utility of neddylation inhibitors for research and as potential therapies. Understanding the biological significance of non-cullin neddylation is an exciting research prospect primed to reveal fundamental insights. PMID:25531226

  15. Abolition of mitochondrial substrate-level phosphorylation by itaconic acid produced by LPS-induced Irg1 expression in cells of murine macrophage lineage.

    PubMed

    Németh, Beáta; Doczi, Judit; Csete, Dániel; Kacso, Gergely; Ravasz, Dora; Adams, Daniel; Kiss, Gergely; Nagy, Adam M; Horvath, Gergo; Tretter, Laszlo; Mócsai, Attila; Csépányi-Kömi, Roland; Iordanov, Iordan; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Itaconate is a nonamino organic acid exhibiting antimicrobial effects. It has been recently identified in cells of macrophage lineage as a product of an enzyme encoded by immunoresponsive gene 1 (Irg1), acting on the citric acid cycle intermediate cis-aconitate. In mitochondria, itaconate can be converted by succinate-coenzyme A (CoA) ligase to itaconyl-CoA at the expense of ATP (or GTP), and is also a weak competitive inhibitor of complex II. Here, we investigated specific bioenergetic effects of increased itaconate production mediated by LPS-induced stimulation of Irg1 in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and RAW-264.7 cells. In rotenone-treated macrophage cells, stimulation by LPS led to impairment in substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP) of in situ mitochondria, deduced by a reversal in the directionality of the adenine nucleotide translocase operation. In RAW-264.7 cells, the LPS-induced impairment in SLP was reversed by short-interfering RNA(siRNA)-but not scrambled siRNA-treatment directed against Irg1. LPS dose-dependently inhibited oxygen consumption rates (61-91%) and elevated glycolysis rates (>21%) in BMDM but not RAW-264.7 cells, studied under various metabolic conditions. In isolated mouse liver mitochondria treated with rotenone, itaconate dose-dependently (0.5-2 mM) reversed the operation of adenine nucleotide translocase, implying impairment in SLP, an effect that was partially mimicked by malonate. However, malonate yielded greater ADP-induced depolarizations (3-19%) than itaconate. We postulate that itaconate abolishes SLP due to 1) a "CoA trap" in the form of itaconyl-CoA that negatively affects the upstream supply of succinyl-CoA from the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex; 2) depletion of ATP (or GTP), which are required for the thioesterification by succinate-CoA ligase; and 3) inhibition of complex II leading to a buildup of succinate which shifts succinate-CoA ligase equilibrium toward ATP (or GTP) utilization. Our results

  16. The COA360: a tool for assessing the cultural competency of healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    LaVeist, Thomas A; Relosa, Rachel; Sawaya, Nadia

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Census Bureau projects that by 2050, non-Hispanic whites will be in the numerical minority. This rapid diversification requires healthcare organizations to pay closer attention to cross-cultural issues if they are to meet the healthcare needs of the nation and continue to maintain a high standard of care. Although scorecards and benchmarking are widely used to gauge healthcare organizations' performance in various areas, these tools have been underused in relation to cultural preparedness or initiatives. The likely reason for this is the lack of a validated tool specifically designed to examine cultural competency. Existing validated cultural competency instruments evaluate individuals, not organizations. In this article, we discuss a study to validate the Cultural Competency Organizational Assessment--360 or the COA360, an instrument designed to appraise a healthcare organization's cultural competence. The Office of Minority Health and the Joint Commission have each developed standards for measuring the cultural competency of organizations. The COA360 is designed to assess adherence to both of these sets of standards. For this validation study, we enlisted a panel of national experts. The panel rated each dimension of the COA360, and the combination of items for each of the scale's 14 dimensions was rated above 4.13 (on 5-point scale). Our conclusion points to the validity of the COA360. As such, it is a valuable tool not only for assessing a healthcare organization's cultural readiness but also for benchmarking its progress in addressing cultural and diversity issues. PMID:18720687

  17. DNA Ligase IV regulates XRCC4 nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Dailia B.; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chavez, Jose; Chu, Jennifer; Malu, Shruti; Hanna, Mary; Cortes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    DNA Ligase IV, along with its interacting partner XRCC4, are essential for repairing DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Together, they complete the final ligation step resolving the DNA break. Ligase IV is regulated by XRCC4 and XLF. However, the mechanism(s) by which Ligase IV control the NHEJ reaction and other NHEJ factor(s) remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a C-terminal region of Ligase IV (aa 620 to 800), which encompasses a NLS, the BRCT I, and the XRCC4 interacting region (XIR), is essential for nuclear localization of its co-factor XRCC4. In Ligase IV deficient cells, XRCC4 showed deregulated localization remaining in the cytosol even after induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA Ligase IV was also required for efficient localization of XLF into the nucleus. Additionally, human fibroblasts that harbor hypomorphic mutations within the Ligase IV gene displayed decreased levels of XRCC4 protein, implicating that DNA Ligase IV is also regulating XRCC4 stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of DNA Ligase IV in controlling the cellular localization and protein levels of XRCC4. PMID:24984242

  18. Structural alterations of DNA ligase I in Bloom syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Willis, A E; Weksberg, R; Tomlinson, S; Lindahl, T

    1987-01-01

    Cell lines derived from seven patients with Bloom syndrome all contain a DNA ligase I with unusual properties. Six lines were shown to have a reduced level of this enzyme activity and the residual enzyme was anomalously heat-labile. The seventh line contained a dimeric rather than monomeric form of ligase I. Several cell lines representative of other inherited human syndromes have apparently normal DNA ligases. The data indicate that Bloom syndrome is due to a defect in the structure of DNA ligase I caused by a "leaky" point mutation occurring at one of at least two alternative sites. PMID:3479778

  19. DNA ligase I mediates essential functions in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, J H; Xiao, Y; Weaver, D T

    1995-01-01

    DNA replication, repair, and recombination are essential processes in mammalian cells. Hence, the application of gene targeting to the study of these DNA metabolic pathways requires the creation of nonnull mutations. We have developed a method for introducing partially defective mutants in murine embryonic stem cells that circumvents the problem of cellular lethality of targeted mutations at essential loci. Using this approach, we have determined that mammalian DNA ligase I is essential for cell viability. Thus, DNA ligases II and III are not redundant with DNA ligase I for the function(s) associated with cell proliferation. Partial complementation of the lethal DNA ligase I null mutation allowed the creation of deficient embryonic stem cell lines. We found that a wild-type DNA ligase I cDNA, as well as a variant DNA ligase I cDNA, was able to rescue the lethality of the homozygous null mutation, whereas an N-terminal deletion mutant consisting of the minimal DNA ligase I catalytic domain was not. This observation demonstrates that sequences outside the DNA ligase I catalytic domain are essential for DNA ligase I function in vivo. PMID:7623824

  20. Overexpression of a Soybean Ariadne-Like Ubiquitin Ligase Gene GmARI1 Enhances Aluminum Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolian; Wang, Ning; Chen, Pei; Gao, Mengmeng; Liu, Juge; Wang, Yufeng; Zhao, Tuanjie; Li, Yan; Gai, Junyi

    2014-01-01

    Ariadne (ARI) subfamily of RBR (Ring Between Ring fingers) proteins have been found as a group of putative E3 ubiquitin ligases containing RING (Really Interesting New Gene) finger domains in fruitfly, mouse, human and Arabidopsis. Recent studies showed several RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligases play important roles in plant response to abiotic stresses, but the function of ARI in plants is largely unknown. In this study, an ariadne-like E3 ubiquitin ligase gene was isolated from soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., and designated as GmARI1. It encodes a predicted protein of 586 amino acids with a RBR supra-domain. Subcellular localization studies using Arabidopsis protoplast cells indicated GmARI protein was located in nucleus. The expression of GmARI1 in soybean roots was induced as early as 2–4 h after simulated stress treatments such as aluminum, which coincided with the fact of aluminum toxicity firstly and mainly acting on plant roots. In vitro ubiquitination assay showed GmARI1 protein has E3 ligase activity. Overexpression of GmARI1 significantly enhanced the aluminum tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis. These findings suggest that GmARI1 encodes a RBR type E3 ligase, which may play important roles in plant tolerance to aluminum stress. PMID:25364908

  1. Chromium downregulates the expression of Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 1 gene in lipogenic tissues of domestic goats: a potential strategy for meat quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Najafpanah, Mohammad Javad; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Zali, Abolfazl; Moradi-Shahrebabak, Hossein; Mousapour, Hojatollah

    2014-06-15

    Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 1 (ACC1) is a biotin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carboxylation of Acetyl CoA to form Malonyl CoA, the key intermediate metabolite in fatty acid synthesis. In this study, the mRNA expression of the ACC1 gene was evaluated in four different tissues (liver, visceral fat, subcutaneous fat, and longissimus muscle) of the domestic goat (Capra hircus) kids feeding on four different levels of trivalent chromium (0, 0.5, 1, and 1.5mg/day) as food supplementation. RT-qPCR technique was used for expression analyses and heat shock protein 90 gene (HSP-90) was considered as reference gene for data normalization. Our results revealed that 1.5mg/day chromium significantly reduced the expression of the ACC1 gene in liver, visceral fat, and subcutaneous fat tissues, but not in longissimus muscles (P<0.05). We measured some phenotypic traits of kid's carcasses to detect their probable correlations with chromium-mediated downregulation of ACC1 expression. Interestingly, changes in ACC1 expression were accompanied with decreased accumulation of fats in adipose tissues such that the subcutaneous fat thickness and heart fat percentage decreased in kids feeding on chromium. By contrast, chromium supplemented kids showed higher percentage of muscles despite the fact that their total body weight did not differ from that of non-supplemented kids. Our study suggests that trivalent chromium alters the direction of energy accumulation towards muscles rather than fats and provides insights into application of chromium supplementation as a useful strategy for improvement of meat quality in domestic animals. PMID:24704275

  2. Intracellular signal transduction of PBAN action in the silkworm, Bombyx mori: involvement of acyl CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, R; Matsumoto, S

    1996-03-01

    In the silkworm, Bombyx mori, production of the sex pheromone bombykol is regulated by a neurohormone termed PBAN. We have detected the activity of acyl CoA reductase in the pheromone gland of B. mori by using palmitoyl CoA as a substrate. The acyl CoA reductase requires NADPH, but not NADH, as a proton dono. When the pheromone gland was incubated with the PBAN fragment peptide TKYFSPRLamide, palmitoyl CoA was incorporated and converted into the corresponding C16 alcohols. Radio HPLC analysis revealed that these C16 alcohols were hexadecan-1-ol (81.2%), (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol (12.3%), and (E, Z)-10, 12-hexadecadien-1-ol (= bombykol, 6.5%). The production of C16 alcohols in the pheromone gland was inhibited by the known bombykol biosynthesis inhibitors EDTA, LaCl3, W-7, trifluoperazine, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, NaF and compactin. By contrast, when the pheromone gland homogenate was incubated in the presence of palmitoyl CoA and NADPH, production of C16 alcohols was affected by compactin, W-7 and trifluoperazine, but not by EDTA, LaCl3, p-nitrophenyl phosphate and NaF. These results indicate that compactin, W-7 and trifluoperazine directly suppress the step catalyzed by acyl CoA reductase, whereas EDTA, LaCl3, pNPP, and NaF inhibit bombykol production by affecting other biochemical steps in the signal transduction of PBAN action. The present results also imply that PBAN regulates the step catalyzed by acyl CoA reductase and that palmitoyl CoA could be used as a substrate of the acyl CoA reductase that regulates bombykol biosynthesis. PMID:8900596

  3. Structure and function of Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase reveals aspects of RING and HECT ligases

    PubMed Central

    Riley, B.E.; Lougheed, J.C.; Callaway, K.; Velasquez, M.; Brecht, E.; Nguyen, L.; Shaler, T.; Walker, D.; Yang, Y.; Regnstrom, K.; Diep, L.; Zhang, Z.; Chiou, S.; Bova, M.; Artis, D.R.; Yao, N.; Baker, J.; Yednock, T.; Johnston, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Parkin is a RING-between-RING E3 ligase that functions in the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to specific substrates, and mutations in Parkin are linked to Parkinson’s disease, cancer and mycobacterial infection. The RING-between-RING family of E3 ligases are suggested to function with a canonical RING domain and a catalytic cysteine residue usually restricted to HECT E3 ligases, thus termed ‘RING/HECT hybrid’ enzymes. Here we present the 1.58 Å structure of Parkin-R0RBR, revealing the fold architecture for the four RING domains, and several unpredicted interfaces. Examination of the Parkin active site suggests a catalytic network consisting of C431 and H433. In cells, mutation of C431 eliminates Parkin-catalysed degradation of mitochondria, and capture of an ubiquitin oxyester confirms C431 as Parkin’s cellular active site. Our data confirm that Parkin is a RING/HECT hybrid, and provide the first crystal structure of an RING-between-RING E3 ligase at atomic resolution, providing insight into this disease-related protein. PMID:23770887

  4. Chromosome demise in the wake of ligase-deficient replication

    PubMed Central

    Kouzminova, Elena A.; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bacterial DNA ligases, NAD+-dependent enzymes, are distinct from eukaryotic ATP-dependent ligases, representing promising targets for broad-spectrum antimicrobials. Yet, the chromosomal consequences of ligase-deficient DNA replication, during which Okazaki fragments accumulate, are still unclear. Using ligA251(Ts), the strongest ligase mutant of Escherichia coli, we studied ligase-deficient DNA replication by genetic and physical approaches. Here we show that replication without ligase kills after a short resistance period. We found that double-strand break repair via RecA, RecBCD, RuvABC and RecG explains the transient resistance, whereas irreparable chromosomal fragmentation explains subsequent cell death. Remarkably, death is mostly prevented by elimination of linear DNA degradation activity of ExoV, suggesting that non-allelic double-strand breaks behind replication forks precipitate DNA degradation that enlarge them into allelic double-strand gaps. Marker frequency profiling of synchronized replication reveals stalling of ligase-deficient forks with subsequent degradation of the DNA synthesized without ligase. The mechanism that converts unsealed nicks behind replication forks first into repairable double-strand breaks and then into irreparable double-strand gaps may be behind lethality of any DNA damaging treatment. PMID:22582878

  5. KF-1 Ubiquitin Ligase: An Anxiety Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto-Gotoh, Tamotsu; Iwabe, Naoyuki; Tsujimura, Atsushi; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety is an instinct that may have developed to promote adaptive survival by evading unnecessary danger. However, excessive anxiety is disruptive and can be a basic disorder of other psychiatric diseases such as depression. The KF-1, a ubiquitin ligase located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), may prevent excessive anxiety; kf-1−/− mice exhibit selectively elevated anxiety-like behavior against light or heights. It is surmised that KF-1 degrades some target proteins, responsible for promoting anxiety, through the ER-associated degradation pathway, similar to Parkin in Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, another ER-ubiquitin ligase, prevents the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons by degrading the target proteins responsible for PD. Molecular phylogenetic studies have revealed that the prototype of kf-1 appeared in the very early phase of animal evolution but was lost, unlike parkin, in the lineage leading up to Drosophila. Therefore, kf-1−/− mice may be a powerful tool for elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in emotional regulation, and for screening novel anxiolytic/antidepressant compounds. PMID:19753093

  6. Evolution of Plant HECT Ubiquitin Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    HECT ubiquitin ligases are key components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, which is present in all eukaryotes. In this study, the patterns of emergence of HECT genes in plants are described. Phylogenetic and structural data indicate that viridiplantae have six main HECT subfamilies, which arose before the split that separated green algae from the rest of plants. It is estimated that the common ancestor of all plants contained seven HECT genes. Contrary to what happened in animals, the number of HECT genes has been kept quite constant in all lineages, both in chlorophyta and streptophyta, although evolutionary recent duplications are found in some species. Several of the genes found in plants may have originated very early in eukaryotic evolution, given that they have clear similarities, both in sequence and structure, to animal genes. Finally, in Arabidopsis thaliana, we found significant correlations in the expression patterns of HECT genes and some ancient, broadly expressed genes that belong to a different ubiquitin ligase family, called RBR. These results are discussed in the context of the evolution of the gene families required for ubiquitination in plants. PMID:23869223

  7. Inhibitory effect on in vitro LDL oxidation and HMG Co-A reductase activity of the liquid-liquid partitioned fractions of Hericium erinaceus (Bull.) Persoon (lion's mane mushroom).

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Aminudin, Norhaniza

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been strongly suggested as the key factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Mushrooms have been implicated in having preventive effects against chronic diseases due especially to their antioxidant properties. In this study, in vitro inhibitory effect of Hericium erinaceus on LDL oxidation and the activity of the cholesterol biosynthetic key enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG Co-A) reductase, was evaluated using five liquid-liquid solvent fractions consisting of methanol : dichloromethane (M : DCM), hexane (HEX), dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EA), and aqueous residue (AQ). The hexane fraction showed the highest inhibition of oxidation of human LDL as reflected by the increased lag time (100 mins) for the formation of conjugated diene (CD) at 1 µg/mL and decreased production (68.28%, IC50 0.73 mg/mL) of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) at 1 mg/mL. It also mostly inhibited (59.91%) the activity of the HMG Co-A reductase at 10 mg/mL. The GC-MS profiling of the hexane fraction identified the presence of myconutrients: inter alia, ergosterol and linoleic acid. Thus, hexane fraction of Hericium erinaceus was found to be the most potent in vitro inhibitor of both LDL oxidation and HMG Co-A reductase activity having therapeutic potential for the prevention of oxidative stress-mediated vascular diseases. PMID:24959591

  8. Inhibitory Effect on In Vitro LDL Oxidation and HMG Co-A Reductase Activity of the Liquid-Liquid Partitioned Fractions of Hericium erinaceus (Bull.) Persoon (Lion's Mane Mushroom)

    PubMed Central

    Aminudin, Norhaniza

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has been strongly suggested as the key factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Mushrooms have been implicated in having preventive effects against chronic diseases due especially to their antioxidant properties. In this study, in vitro inhibitory effect of Hericium erinaceus on LDL oxidation and the activity of the cholesterol biosynthetic key enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG Co-A) reductase, was evaluated using five liquid-liquid solvent fractions consisting of methanol : dichloromethane (M : DCM), hexane (HEX), dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EA), and aqueous residue (AQ). The hexane fraction showed the highest inhibition of oxidation of human LDL as reflected by the increased lag time (100 mins) for the formation of conjugated diene (CD) at 1 µg/mL and decreased production (68.28%, IC50 0.73 mg/mL) of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) at 1 mg/mL. It also mostly inhibited (59.91%) the activity of the HMG Co-A reductase at 10 mg/mL. The GC-MS profiling of the hexane fraction identified the presence of myconutrients: inter alia, ergosterol and linoleic acid. Thus, hexane fraction of Hericium erinaceus was found to be the most potent in vitro inhibitor of both LDL oxidation and HMG Co-A reductase activity having therapeutic potential for the prevention of oxidative stress-mediated vascular diseases. PMID:24959591

  9. Regulation of schistosome egg production by HMG CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    VandeWaa, E.A.; Bennett, J.L.

    1986-03-05

    Hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) catalyzes the conversion of HMG CoA to mevalonate in the synthesis of steroids, isoprenoids and terpenes. Mevinolin, an inhibitor of this enzyme, decreased egg production in Schistosoma mansoni during in vitro incubations. This was associated with a reduction in the incorporation of /sup 14/C-acetate into polyisoprenoids and a reduction in the formation of a lipid-linked oligosaccharide. In vivo, mevinolin in daily doses of 50 mg/kg (p.o., from days 30-48 post-infection) caused no change in gross liver pathology in S. mansoni infected mice. However, when parasites exposed to mevinolin or its vehicle in vivo were cultured in vitro, worms from mevinolin-treated mice produced six times more eggs than control parasites. When infected mice were dosed with 250 mg/kg mevinolin daily (p.o., from days 35-45 post-infection), liver pathology was reduced in comparison to control mice. Thus, during in vivo exposure to a high dose of the drug egg production is decreased, while at a lower dose it appears unaffected until the parasites are cultured in a drug-free in vitro system wherein egg production is stimulated to extraordinarily high levels. It may be that at low doses mevinolin, by inhibiting the enzyme, is blocking the formation of a product (such as an isoprenoid) which normally acts to down-regulate enzyme synthesis, resulting in enzyme induction. Induction of HMG CoA reductase is then expressed as increased egg production when the worms are removed from the drug. These data suggest that HMG CoA reductase plays a role in schistosome egg production.

  10. Fluorescently labelled bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein acting as an acyl-CoA sensor: interaction with CoA and acyl-CoA esters and its use in measuring free acyl-CoA esters and non-esterified fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Wadum, Majken C T; Villadsen, Jens K; Feddersen, Søren; Møller, Rikke S; Neergaard, Thomas B F; Kragelund, Birthe B; Højrup, Peter; Faergeman, Nils J; Knudsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA esters are key metabolites in lipid synthesis and beta-oxidation but, at the same time, are important regulators of intermediate metabolism, insulin secretion, vesicular trafficking and gene expression. Key tools in studying the regulatory functions of acyl-CoA esters are reliable methods for the determination of free acyl-CoA concentrations. No such method is presently available. In the present study, we describe the synthesis of two acyl-CoA sensors for measuring free acyl-CoA concentrations using acyl-CoA-binding protein as a scaffold. Met24 and Ala53 of bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein were replaced by cysteine residues, which were covalently modified with 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene to make the two fluorescent acyl-CoA indicators (FACIs) FACI-24 and FACI-53. FACI-24 and FACI-53 showed fluorescence emission maximum at 510 and 525 nm respectively, in the absence of ligand (excitation 387 nm). Titration of FACI-24 and FACI-53 with hexadecanoyl-CoA and dodecanoyl-CoA increased the fluorescence yield 5.5-and 4.7-fold at 460 and 495 nm respectively. FACI-24 exhibited a high, and similar increase in, fluorescence yield at 460 nm upon binding of C14-C20 saturated and unsaturated acyl-CoA esters. Both indicators bind long-chain (>C14) acyl-CoA esters with high specificity and affinity (K(d)=0.6-1.7 nM). FACI-53 showed a high fluorescence yield for C8-C12 acyl chains. It is shown that FACI-24 acts as a sensitive acyl-CoA sensor for measuring the concentration of free acyl-CoA, acyl-CoA synthetase activity and the concentrations of free fatty acids after conversion of the fatty acid into their respective acyl-CoA esters. PMID:12071849

  11. Isolation of ubiquitinated substrates by tandem affinity purification of E3 ligase-polyubiquitin-binding domain fusions (ligase traps).

    PubMed

    Mark, Kevin G; Loveless, Theresa B; Toczyski, David P

    2016-02-01

    Ubiquitination is an essential protein modification that influences eukaryotic processes ranging from substrate degradation to nonproteolytic pathway alterations, including DNA repair and endocytosis. Previous attempts to analyze substrates via physical association with their respective ubiquitin ligases have had some success. However, because of the transient nature of enzyme-substrate interactions and rapid protein degradation, detection of substrates remains a challenge. Ligase trapping is an affinity purification approach in which ubiquitin ligases are fused to a polyubiquitin-binding domain, which allows the isolation of ubiquitinated substrates. Immunoprecipitation is first used to enrich for proteins that are bound to the ligase trap. Subsequently, affinity purification is used under denaturing conditions to capture proteins conjugated with hexahistidine-tagged ubiquitin. By using this protocol, ubiquitinated substrates that are specific for a given ligase can be isolated for mass spectrometry or western blot analysis. After cells have been collected, the described protocol can be completed in 2-3 d. PMID:26766115

  12. Copper supplementation restores cytochrome c oxidase assembly defect in a mitochondrial disease model of COA6 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Alok; Trivedi, Prachi P.; Timbalia, Shrishiv A.; Griffin, Aaron T.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Chan, Sherine S. L.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain biogenesis is orchestrated by hundreds of assembly factors, many of which are yet to be discovered. Using an integrative approach based on clues from evolutionary history, protein localization and human genetics, we have identified a conserved mitochondrial protein, C1orf31/COA6, and shown its requirement for respiratory complex IV biogenesis in yeast, zebrafish and human cells. A recent next-generation sequencing study reported potential pathogenic mutations within the evolutionarily conserved Cx9CxnCx10C motif of COA6, implicating it in mitochondrial disease biology. Using yeast coa6Δ cells, we show that conserved residues in the motif, including the residue mutated in a patient with mitochondrial disease, are essential for COA6 function, thus confirming the pathogenicity of the patient mutation. Furthermore, we show that zebrafish embryos with zfcoa6 knockdown display reduced heart rate and cardiac developmental defects, recapitulating the observed pathology in the human mitochondrial disease patient who died of neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The specific requirement of Coa6 for respiratory complex IV biogenesis, its intramitochondrial localization and the presence of the Cx9CxnCx10C motif suggested a role in mitochondrial copper metabolism. In support of this, we show that exogenous copper supplementation completely rescues respiratory and complex IV assembly defects in yeast coa6Δ cells. Taken together, our results establish an evolutionarily conserved role of Coa6 in complex IV assembly and support a causal role of the COA6 mutation in the human mitochondrial disease patient. PMID:24549041

  13. Cooperation between COA6 and SCO2 in COX2 maturation during cytochrome c oxidase assembly links two mitochondrial cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Pacheu-Grau, David; Bareth, Bettina; Dudek, Jan; Juris, Lisa; Vögtle, F-Nora; Wissel, Mirjam; Leary, Scot C; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2015-06-01

    Three mitochondria-encoded subunits form the catalytic core of cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain. COX1 and COX2 contain heme and copper redox centers, which are integrated during assembly of the enzyme. Defects in this process lead to an enzyme deficiency and manifest as mitochondrial disorders in humans. Here we demonstrate that COA6 is specifically required for COX2 biogenesis. Absence of COA6 leads to fast turnover of newly synthesized COX2 and a concomitant reduction in cytochrome c oxidase levels. COA6 interacts transiently with the copper-containing catalytic domain of newly synthesized COX2. Interestingly, similar to the copper metallochaperone SCO2, loss of COA6 causes cardiomyopathy in humans. We show that COA6 and SCO2 interact and that corresponding pathogenic mutations in each protein affect complex formation. Our analyses define COA6 as a constituent of the mitochondrial copper relay system, linking defects in COX2 metallation to cardiac cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. PMID:25959673

  14. hCOA3 Stabilizes Cytochrome c Oxidase 1 (COX1) and Promotes Cytochrome c Oxidase Assembly in Human Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Paula; Peralta, Susana; Cruz-Bermudez, Alberto; Echevarría, Lucía; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni; Fernandez-Moreno, Miguel A.; Garesse, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) or complex IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain plays a fundamental role in energy production of aerobic cells. In humans, COX deficiency is the most frequent cause of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. Human COX is composed of 13 subunits of dual genetic origin, whose assembly requires an increasing number of nuclear-encoded accessory proteins known as assembly factors. Here, we have identified and characterized human CCDC56, an 11.7-kDa mitochondrial transmembrane protein, as a new factor essential for COX biogenesis. CCDC56 shares sequence similarity with the yeast COX assembly factor Coa3 and was termed hCOA3. hCOA3-silenced cells display a severe COX functional alteration owing to a decreased stability of newly synthesized COX1 and an impairment in the holoenzyme assembly process. We show that hCOA3 physically interacts with both the mitochondrial translation machinery and COX structural subunits. We conclude that hCOA3 stabilizes COX1 co-translationally and promotes its assembly with COX partner subunits. Finally, our results identify hCOA3 as a new candidate when screening for genes responsible for mitochondrial diseases associated with COX deficiency. PMID:23362268

  15. Long-Chain Acyl CoA Synthetase 4A regulates Smad activity and dorsoventral patterning in the zebrafish embryo

    PubMed Central

    Miyares, Rosa Linda; Stein, Cornelia; Renisch, Björn; Anderson, Jennifer Lynn; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Farber, Steven Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Summary Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) and their metabolites are critical players in cell biology and embryonic development. Here we show that long-chain acyl CoA synthetase 4a (Acsl4a), an LC-PUFA activating enzyme, is essential for proper patterning of the zebrafish dorsoventral axis. Loss of Acsl4a results in dorsalized embryos due to attenuated Bmp signaling. We demonstrate that Acsl4a modulates the activity of Smad transcription factors, the downstream mediators of Bmp signaling. Acsl4a promotes the inhibition of p38 MAPK and the Akt-mediated inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), critical inhibitors of Smad activity. Consequently, introduction of a constitutively active Akt can rescue the dorsalized phenotype of Acsl4a deficient embryos. Our results reveal a critical role for Acsl4a in modulating Bmp-Smad activity and provide a potential avenue for LC-PUFAs to influence a variety of developmental processes. PMID:24332754

  16. Functional identification of MdSIZ1 as a SUMO E3 ligase in apple.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui-Fen; Guo, Ying; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zhou, Li-Jie; Hao, Yu-Jin; You, Chun-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    SUMOylation, the conjugation of target proteins with SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier), is a type of post-translational modification in eukaryotes and involves the sequential action of activation (E1), conjugation (E2) and ligation (E3) enzymes. In Arabidopsis, the AtSIZ1 protein is a SUMO E3 ligase that promotes the conjugation of SUMO proteins to target substrates. Here, we isolated and identified a SUMO E3 ligase, MdSIZ1, in apple, which was similar to AtSIZ1. SUMOylation analysis showed that MdSIZ1 had SUMO E3 ligase activity in vitro and in vivo. SUMO conjugation was increased by high temperatures, low temperatures, and abscisic acid (ABA). The ectopic expression of MdSIZ1 in Arabidopsis siz1-2 mutant plants partially complemented the morphological mutant phenotype and enhanced the levels of SUMO conjugation. Taken together, these results suggest that MdSIZ1-mediated SUMO conjugation of target proteins is an important process that regulates the adaptation of apple plants to various environmental stresses. PMID:27152458

  17. Fluorogenic DNA ligase and base excision repair enzyme assays using substrates labeled with single fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Theo T; Roman, Steven

    2015-05-15

    Continuing our work on fluorogenic substrates labeled with single fluorophores for nucleic acid modifying enzymes, here we describe the development of such substrates for DNA ligases and some base excision repair enzymes. These substrates are hairpin-type synthetic DNA molecules with a single fluorophore located on a base close to the 3' ends, an arrangement that results in strong fluorescence quenching. When such substrates are subjected to an enzymatic reaction, the position of the dyes relative to that end of the molecules is altered, resulting in significant fluorescence intensity changes. The ligase substrates described here were 5' phosphorylated and either blunt-ended or carrying short, self-complementary single-stranded 5' extensions. The ligation reactions resulted in the covalent joining of the ends of the molecules, decreasing the quenching effect of the terminal bases on the dyes. To generate fluorogenic substrates for the base excision repair enzymes formamido-pyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG), human 8-oxo-G DNA glycosylase/AP lyase (hOGG1), endonuclease IV (EndoIV), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), we introduced abasic sites or a modified nucleotide, 8-oxo-dG, at such positions that their enzymatic excision would result in the release of a short fluorescent fragment. This was also accompanied by strong fluorescence increases. Overall fluorescence changes ranged from approximately 4-fold (ligase reactions) to more than 20-fold (base excision repair reactions). PMID:25728944

  18. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL): Mouse and human HL gene (HMGCL) cloning and detection of large gene deletions in two unrelated HL-deficient patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.P.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL, EC 4.1.3.4) catalyzes the cleavage of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA to acetoacetic acid and acetyl CoA, the final reaction of both ketogenesis and leucine catabolism. Autosomal-recessive HL deficiency in humans results in episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia and coma. Using a mouse HL cDNA as a probe, we isolated a clone containing the full-length mouse HL gene that spans about 15 kb of mouse chromosome 4 and contains nine exons. The promoter region of the mouse HL gene contains elements characteristic of a housekeeping gene: a CpG island containing multiple Sp1 binding sites surrounds exon 1, and neither a TATA nor a CAAT box are present. We identified multiple transcription start sites in the mouse HL gene, 35 to 9 bases upstream of the translation start codon. We also isolated two human HL genomic clones that include HL exons 2 to 9 within 18 kb. The mouse and human HL genes (HGMW-approved symbol HMGCL) are highly homologous, with identical locations of intron-exon junctions. By genomic Southern blot analysis and exonic PCR, was found 2 of 33 HL-deficient probands to be homozygous for large deletions in the HL gene. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Mutation analysis of methylmalonyl CoA mutase gene exon 2 in Egyptian families: Identification of 25 novel allelic variants

    PubMed Central

    Ghoraba, Dina A.; Mohammed, Magdy M.; Zaki, Osama K.

    2015-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of methylmalonate and cobalamin (cbl; vitamin B12) metabolism. It is an inborn error of organic acid metabolism which commonly results from a defect in the gene encoding the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) apoenzyme. Here we report the results of mutation study of exon 2 of the methylmalonyl CoA mutase (MUT) gene, coding MCM residues from 1 to 128, in ten unrelated Egyptian families affected with methylmalonic aciduria. Patients were presented with a wide-anion gap metabolic acidosis. The diagnosis has established by the measurement of C3 (propionylcarnitine) and C3:C2 (propionylcarnitine/acetylcarnitine) in blood by using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS–MS) and was confirmed by the detection of an abnormally elevated level of methylmalonic acid in urine by using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and isocratic cation exchange high-performance liquid-chromatography (HPLC). Direct sequencing of gDNA of the MUT gene exon 2 has revealed a total of 26 allelic variants: ten of which were intronic, eight were located upstream to the exon 2 coding region, four were novel modifications predicted to affect the splicing region, three were novel mutations within the coding region: c.15G > A (p.K5K), c.165C > A (p.N55K) and c.7del (p.R3EfsX14), as well as the previously reported mutation c.323G > A (p.R108H). PMID:25750861

  20. A route from darkness to light: emergence and evolution of luciferase activity in AMP-CoA-ligases inferred from a mealworm luciferase-like enzyme.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Prado, R A; Neves, D R; Kato, D; Barbosa, J A

    2013-06-11

    The origin of luciferases and of bioluminescence is enigmatic. In beetles, luciferases seem to have evolved from AMP-CoA-ligases. How the new oxygenase luminogenic function originated from AMP-ligases leading to luciferases is one of the most challenging mysteries of bioluminescence. Comparison of the cloned luciferase-like enzyme from the nonluminescent Zophobas morio mealworm and beetle luciferases showed that the oxygenase activity may have emerged as a stereoselective oxidative drift with d-luciferin, a substrate that cannot be easily thioesterified to CoA as in the case of the l-isomer. While the overall kcat displayed by beetle luciferases is orders of magnitude greater than that of the luciferase-like enzyme, the respective oxidation rates and quantum yields of bioluminescence are roughly similar, suggesting that the rate constant of the AMP-ligase activity exerted on the new d-luciferin substrate in beetle protoluciferases was the main enzymatic property that suffered optimization during the evolution of luciferases. The luciferase-like enzyme and luciferases boost the rate of luciferyl-adenylate chemiluminescent oxidation by factors of 10(6) and 10(7), respectively, as compared to the substrate spontaneous oxidation in buffer. A similar enhancement of luciferyl-adenylate chemiluminescence is provided by nucleophilic aprotic solvents, implying that the peptide bonds in the luciferin binding site of beetle luciferase could provide a similar catalytically favorable environment. These data suggest that the luciferase-like enzyme and other similar AMP-ligases are potential alternative oxygenases. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of the luciferase-like enzyme and the red light-producing luciferase of Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm confirm here a critical role for T/S345 in luciferase function. Mutations such as I327T/S in the luciferase-like enzyme, which simultaneously increases luciferase activity and promotes blue shifts in the emission spectrum, could have

  1. Physical and functional interaction of the HECT ubiquitin-protein ligases E6AP and HERC2.

    PubMed

    Kühnle, Simone; Kogel, Ulrike; Glockzin, Sandra; Marquardt, Andreas; Ciechanover, Aaron; Matentzoglu, Konstantin; Scheffner, Martin

    2011-06-01

    Deregulation of the ubiquitin-protein ligase E6AP contributes to the development of the Angelman syndrome and to cervical carcinogenesis suggesting that the activity of E6AP needs to be under tight control. However, how E6AP activity is regulated at the post-translational level under non-pathologic conditions is poorly understood. In this study, we report that the giant protein HERC2, which is like E6AP a member of the HECT family of ubiquitin-protein ligases, binds to E6AP. The interaction is mediated by the RCC1-like domain 2 of HERC2 and a region spanning amino acid residues 150-200 of E6AP. Furthermore, we provide evidence that HERC2 stimulates the ubiquitin-protein ligase activity of E6AP in vitro and within cells and that this stimulatory effect does not depend on the ubiquitin-protein ligase activity of HERC2. Thus, the data obtained indicate that HERC2 acts as a regulator of E6AP. PMID:21493713

  2. A Clinical Study to Validate the Pupil Rescaling Technique by using COAS Shack Hartmann Aberrometer.

    PubMed

    Kalikivayi, V; Kannan, K; Ganesan, A R

    2015-01-01

    In any optical system, optical aberrations of the imaging system affect the image quality. The human eye is also like an optical system which has optical aberrations influencing the quality of the retinal image. When pupil size exceeds 3 mm, ocular aberrations increase and play a major role on retinal image degradation. Pupil diameter is made constant in commercially available aberrometers by mathematically rescaling it. The aim of this study is to validate the pupil rescaling technique by using COAS (Complete Ophthalmic Analysis System)Shack Hartmann Aberrometer. Five subjects were recruited for this study. The measurements were taken over a moderately large pupil of 5mm in normal room illumination to allow for natural pupil dilation. The analyses diameter is fixed at 5 mm in COAS which means it rescales the aberration data to 5 mm if the pupil diameter recorded was more than 5 mm at the time of measurement. Ocular aberrations for natural and rescaled pupil sizes were analyzed. Estimation of ocular aberrations showed there was no statistical significance between natural pupil and rescaled pupil diameter. PMID:25996727

  3. Flexible DAQ card for detector systems utilizing the CoaXPress communication standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neue, G.; Hejtmánek, M.; Marčišovský, M.; Voleš, P.

    2015-04-01

    This work concerns the design and construction of a flexible FPGA based data acquisition system aimed for particle detectors. The interface card as presented was designed for large area detectors with millions of individual readout channels. Flexibility was achieved by partitioning the design into multiple PCBs, creating a set of modular blocks, allowing the creation of a wide variety of configurations by simply stacking functional PCBs together. This way the user can easily toggle the polarity of the high voltage bias supply or switch the downstream interface from CoaXPress to PCIe or stream directly HDMI. We addressed the issues of data throughput, data buffering, bias voltage generation, trigger timing and fine tuning of the whole readout chain enabling a smooth data transmission. On the current prototype, we have wire-bonded a MediPix2 MXR quad and connected it to a XILINX FPGA. For the downstream interface, we implemented the CoaXPress communication protocol, which enables us to stream data at 3.125 Gbps to a standard PC.

  4. Purification, gene cloning, and characterization of γ-butyrobetainyl CoA synthetase from Agrobacterium sp. 525a.

    PubMed

    Fujimitsu, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Akira; Takubo, Sayaka; Fukui, Akiko; Okada, Kazuma; Mohamed Ahmed, Isam A; Arima, Jiro; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2016-08-01

    The report is the first of purification, overproduction, and characterization of a unique γ-butyrobetainyl CoA synthetase from soil-isolated Agrobacterium sp. 525a. The primary structure of the enzyme shares 70-95% identity with those of ATP-dependent microbial acyl-CoA synthetases of the Rhizobiaceae family. As distinctive characteristics of the enzyme of this study, ADP was released in the catalytic reaction process, whereas many acyl CoA synthetases are annotated as an AMP-forming enzyme. The apparent Km values for γ-butyrobetaine, CoA, and ATP were, respectively, 0.69, 0.02, and 0.24 mM. PMID:27125317

  5. Association between the enterotoxin production and presence of Coa, Nuc genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from various sources, in Shiraz

    PubMed Central

    Moghassem Hamidi, R; Hosseinzadeh, S; Shekarforoush, S. S.; Poormontaseri, M; Derakhshandeh, A

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to identify the frequency of coagulase (Coa) and thermonuclease (Nuc) genes and Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (Sea) production among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from various sources in Shiraz. Moreover, the correlation between the Sea gene and coagulase and thermonuclease enzymes is also considered. A total of 100 S. aureus were isolated from various sources including 40 humans, 30 animals and 30 food samples by the routine biochemical tests. The frequency of Coa, Nuc and Sea genes was evaluated by PCR assay. Correlation among those genes was finally evaluated by statistical analysis. The PCR results showed that the prevalence of Coa, Nuc and Sea genes was 91%, 100% and 14%, respectively. The evaluation of the enterotoxin production indicated that 78.6% of the Sea gene was expressed. The presence of enterotoxin A was not necessarily correlated to the production of toxin. As a final conclusion to detect the enterotoxigenic strains, both genotypic and phenotypic methods are highly recommended. PMID:27175208

  6. Metabolic annotation of 2-ethylhydracrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-25

    Increased levels of the organic acid, 2-ethylhydracrylic acid (2-EHA) occur in urine of subjects with impaired L(+)-isoleucine metabolism. Chiral intermediates formed during isoleucine degradation are (S) enantiomers. Blockage of (S) pathway flux drives racemization of (2S, 3S) L(+)-isoleucine and its (2S, 3R) stereoisomer, L(+)-alloisoleucine. This non-protein amino acid is metabolized to (R)-2-methylbutyryl CoA via enzymes common to branched chain amino acid degradation. Subsequently, (R) intermediates serve as alternate substrates for three valine metabolic enzymes, generating 2-EHA. Once formed, 2-EHA accumulates because it is poorly recognized by distal valine pathway enzymes. Thus, urinary 2-EHA represents a biomarker of isoleucine pathway defects. 2-EHA levels are also increased in rats exposed to the industrial solvent, ethylene glycol monomethyl ether or the neurotoxin precursor, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. In these cases, a block in (S) pathway isoleucine catabolism occurs at the level of (S)-2-methylbutyryl CoA conversion to tiglyl CoA via inhibition of electron transferring flavoprotein/ubiquinone oxidoreductase dependent reactions. Elevated urinary 2-EHA in propionyl CoA carboxylase deficiency and methylmalonic aciduria results from a buildup of distal intermediates in the (S) pathway of isoleucine degradation. In Barth syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome, 2-EHA is a byproduct of impeded propionyl CoA entry into the Krebs cycle. PMID:26115894

  7. The Streptomyces coelicolor Lipoate-protein Ligase Is a Circularly Permuted Version of the Escherichia coli Enzyme Composed of Discrete Interacting Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xinyun; Cronan, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Lipoate-protein ligases are used to scavenge lipoic acid from the environment and attach the coenzyme to its cognate proteins, which are generally the E2 components of the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases. The enzymes use ATP to activate lipoate to its adenylate, lipoyl-AMP, which remains tightly bound in the active site. This mixed anhydride is attacked by the ϵ-amino group of a specific lysine present on a highly conserved acceptor protein domain, resulting in the amide-linked coenzyme. The Streptomyces coelicolor genome encodes only a single putative lipoate ligase. However, this protein had only low sequence identity (<25%) to the lipoate ligases of demonstrated activity and appears to be a circularly permuted version of the known lipoate ligase proteins in that the canonical C-terminal domain seems to have been transposed to the N terminus. We tested the activity of this protein both by in vivo complementation of an Escherichia coli ligase-deficient strain and by in vitro assays. Moreover, when the domains were rearranged into a protein that mimicked the arrangement found in the canonical lipoate ligases, the enzyme retained complementation activity. Finally, when the two domains were separated into two proteins, both domain-containing proteins were required for complementation and catalysis of the overall ligase reaction in vitro. However, only the large domain-containing protein was required for transfer of lipoate from the lipoyl-AMP intermediate to the acceptor proteins, whereas both domain-containing proteins were required to form lipoyl-AMP. PMID:25631049

  8. [Cloning and tissue expression of 4-coumarate coenzyme A ligase gene in Angelica sinensis].

    PubMed

    Wen, Sui-chao; Wang, Yin-quan; Luo, Jun; Xia, Qi; Fan, Qin; Li, Shu-nan; Wang, Zhen-heng

    2015-12-01

    4-coumarate coenzyme A ligase is a key enzyme of phenylpropanoid metabolic pathway in higher plant and may regulate the biosynthesis of ferulic acid in Angelica sinensis. In this study, the homology-based cloning and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique were used to clone a full length cDNA encoding 4-coumarate coenzyme A ligase gene (4CL), and then qRT-PCR was taken for analyzing 4CL gene expression levels in the root, stem and root tissue at different growth stages of seedlings of A. sinensis. The results showed that a full-length 4CL cDNA (1,815 bp) was obtained (GenBank accession number: KT880508) which shares an open reading frame (ORF) of 1 632 bp, encodes 544 amino acid polypeptides. We found 4CL gene was expressed in all tissues including leaf, stem and root of seedlings of A. sinensis. The expressions in the leave and stem were increased significantly with the growth of seedlings of A. sinensis (P < 0.05), while it in the root showed little change. It indicates a time-space pattern of 4CL gene expression in seedlings of A. sinensis. These findings will be useful for establishing an experiment basis for studying the structure and function of 4CL gene and elucidating mechanism of ferulic acid biosynthesis and space-time regulation in A. sinensis. PMID:27245029

  9. Mapping L1 Ligase ribozyme conformational switch

    PubMed Central

    Giambaşu, George M.; Lee, Tai-Sung; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2012-01-01

    L1 Ligase (L1L)molecular switch is an in vitro optimized synthetic allosteric ribozyme that catalyzes the regioselective formation of a 5’-to-3’ phosphodiester bond, a reaction for which there is no known naturally occurring RNA catalyst. L1L serves as a proof of principle that RNA can catalyze a critical reaction for prebiotic RNA self-replication according to the RNA World hypothesis. L1L crystal structure captures two distinct conformations that differ by a re-orientation of one of the stems by around 80 Å and are presumed to correspond to the active and inactive state, respectively. It is of great interest to understand the nature of these two states in solution, and the pathway for their interconversion. In this study, we use explicit solvent molecular simulation together with a novel enhanced sampling method that utilizes concepts from network theory to map out the conformational transition between active and inactive states of L1L. We find that the overall switching mechanism can be described as a 3-state/2-step process. The first step involves a large-amplitude swing that re-orients stem C. The second step involves the allosteric activation of the catalytic site through distant contacts with stem C. Using a conformational space network representation of the L1L switch transition, it is shown that the connection between the three states follows different topographical patterns: the stem C swing step passes through a narrow region of the conformational space network, whereas the allosteric activation step covers a much wider region and a more diverse set of pathways through the network. PMID:22771572

  10. Identification of candidate mitochondrial RNA editing ligases from Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed Central

    McManus, M T; Shimamura, M; Grams, J; Hajduk, S L

    2001-01-01

    Most mitochondrial genes of Trypanosoma brucei do not contain the necessary information to make translatable mRNAs. These transcripts must undergo RNA editing, a posttranscriptional process by which uridine residues are added and deleted from mitochondrial mRNAs. RNA editing is believed to be catalyzed by a ribonucleoprotein complex containing endonucleolytic, terminal uridylyl transferase (TUTase), 3' uridine-specific exonucleolytic (U-exo), and ligase activities. None of the catalytic enzymes for RNA editing have been identified. Here we describe the identification of two candidate RNA ligases (48 and 52 kDa) that are core catalytic components of the T. brucei ribonucleoprotein editing complex. Both enzymes share homology to the covalent nucleotidyl transferase superfamily and contain five key signature motifs, including the active site KXXG. In this report, we present data on the proposed 48 kDa RNA editing ligase. We have prepared polyclonal antibodies against recombinant 48 kDa ligase that specifically recognize the trypanosome enzyme. When expressed in trypanosomes as an epitope-tagged fusion protein, the recombinant ligase localizes to the mitochondrion, associates with RNA editing complexes, and adenylates with ATP. These findings provide strong support for the enzymatic cascade model for kinetoplastid RNA editing. PMID:11233974

  11. A Generic Platform for Cellular Screening Against Ubiquitin Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Maculins, Timurs; Carter, Nikki; Dorval, Thierry; Hudson, Kevin; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Hay, Ronald T.; Alwan, Husam

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin signalling regulates most aspects of cellular life, thus deregulation of ubiquitylation has been linked with a number of diseases. E3 ubiquitin ligases provide substrate selectivity in ubiquitylation cascades and are therefore considered to be attractive targets for developing therapeutic molecules. In contrast to established drug target classes, such as protein kinases, GPCRs, hormone receptors and ion channels, ubiquitin drug discovery is in its early stages. This is, in part, due to the complexity of the ubiquitylation pathways and the lack of robust quantitative technologies that allow high-throughput screening of inhibitors. Here we report the development of a Ubiquitin Ligase Profiling system, which is a novel and generic cellular technology designed to facilitate identification of selective inhibitors against RING type E3 ubiquitin ligases. Utilization of this system requires a single co-transfection of cells with assay vectors, thereby enabling readout of E3 ubiquitin ligase catalytic activity within the cellular environment. Therefore, our robust high-throughput screening platform offers novel opportunities for the development of inhibitors against this difficult-to-target E3 ligase enzyme class. PMID:26743172

  12. Generation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate from acetate in higher plants: Detection of acetoacetyl CoA reductase- and PHB synthase- activities in rice.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Hirohisa; Shiraki, Mari; Inoue, Eri; Saito, Terumi

    2016-08-20

    It has been reported that Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is generated from acetate in the rice root. However, no information is available about the biosynthetic pathway of PHB from acetate in plant cells. In the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 (R. eutropha), PHB is synthesized from acetyl CoA by the consecutive reaction of three enzymes: β-ketothiolase (EC: 2.3.1.9), acetoacetyl CoA reductase (EC: 1.1.1.36) and PHB synthase (EC: 2.3.1.-). Thus, in this study, we examined whether the above three enzymatic activities were also detected in rice seedlings. The results clearly showed that the activities of the above three enzymes were all detected in rice. In particular, the PHB synthase activity was detected specifically in the sonicated particulate fractions (2000g 10min precipitate (ppt) and the 8000g 30min ppt) of rice roots and leaves. In addition to these enzyme activities, several new experimental results were obtained on PHB synthesis in higher plants: (a) (14)C-PHB generated from 2-(14)C-acetate was mainly localized in the 2000g 10min ppt and the 8000g 30min ppt of rice root. (b) Addition of acetate (0.1-10mM) to culture medium of rice seedlings did not increase the content of PHB in the rice root or leaf. (c) In addition to C3 plants, PHB was generated from acetate in a C4 plant (corn) and in a CAM plant (Bryophyllum pinnatum). d) Washing with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) strongly suggested that the PHB synthesized from acetate was of plant origin and was not bacterial contamination. PMID:27372278

  13. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase in complex with the feedback inhibitor CoA reveals only one active-site conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wubben, T.; Mesecar, A.D.

    2014-10-02

    Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (PPAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, reversibly transferring an adenylyl group from ATP to 4'-phosphopantetheine to form dephosphocoenzyme A (dPCoA). To complement recent biochemical and structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPAT (MtPPAT) and to provide further insight into the feedback regulation of MtPPAT by CoA, the X-ray crystal structure of the MtPPAT enzyme in complex with CoA was determined to 2.11 {angstrom} resolution. Unlike previous X-ray crystal structures of PPAT-CoA complexes from other bacteria, which showed two distinct CoA conformations bound to the active site, only one conformation of CoA is observed in the MtPPAT-CoA complex.

  14. PEX2 is the E3 ubiquitin ligase required for pexophagy during starvation.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Graeme; van Zutphen, Tim; Shatseva, Tatiana; Zhang, Ling; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Bandsma, Robert; Kim, Peter Kijun

    2016-09-12

    Peroxisomes are metabolic organelles necessary for anabolic and catabolic lipid reactions whose numbers are highly dynamic based on the metabolic need of the cells. One mechanism to regulate peroxisome numbers is through an autophagic process called pexophagy. In mammalian cells, ubiquitination of peroxisomal membrane proteins signals pexophagy; however, the E3 ligase responsible for mediating ubiquitination is not known. Here, we report that the peroxisomal E3 ubiquitin ligase peroxin 2 (PEX2) is the causative agent for mammalian pexophagy. Expression of PEX2 leads to gross ubiquitination of peroxisomes and degradation of peroxisomes in an NBR1-dependent autophagic process. We identify PEX5 and PMP70 as substrates of PEX2 that are ubiquitinated during amino acid starvation. We also find that PEX2 expression is up-regulated during both amino acid starvation and rapamycin treatment, suggesting that the mTORC1 pathway regulates pexophagy by regulating PEX2 expression levels. Finally, we validate our findings in vivo using an animal model. PMID:27597759

  15. Bacteria-host relationship: ubiquitin ligases as weapons of invasion

    PubMed Central

    Maculins, Timurs; Fiskin, Evgenij; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Dikic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells utilize the ubiquitin (Ub) system for maintaining a balanced functioning of cellular pathways. Although the Ub system is exclusive to eukaryotes, prokaryotic bacteria have developed an armory of Ub ligase enzymes that are capable of employing the Ub systems of various hosts, ranging from plant to animal cells. These enzymes have been acquired through the evolution and can be classified into three main classes, RING (really interesting new gene), HECT (homologous to the E6-AP carboxyl terminus) and NEL (novel E3 ligases). In this review we describe the roles played by different classes of bacterial Ub ligases in infection and pathogenicity. We also provide an overview of the different mechanisms by which bacteria mimic specific components of the host Ub system and outline the gaps in our current understanding of their functions. Additionally, we discuss approaches and experimental tools for validating this class of enzymes as potential novel antibacterial therapy targets. PMID:26964724

  16. E3 ubiquitin ligases as novel targets for inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Goru, Santosh Kumar; Pandey, Anuradha; Gaikwad, Anil Bhanudas

    2016-04-01

    Ubiquitination is one of the post translational modifications which decide the fate of various proteins in the cells, by either directing them towards proteasomal degradation or participation in several cell signalling pathways. Recently, the role of ubiquitination has been unravelled in pathogenesis and progression of various diseases, where inflammation is critical, like obesity, insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, angiotensin-II induced cardiac inflammation and asthma. E3 ligases are known to be instrumental in regulation of the inflammatory cascade. This review focuses on the role of different E3 ligases in the development of inflammatory diseases and thus may help us to target these E3 ligases in future drug discovery to prevent inflammation. PMID:26875639

  17. Functional domains of an ATP-dependent DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Doherty, A J; Wigley, D B

    1999-01-01

    The crystal structure of an ATP-dependent DNA ligase from bacteriophage T7 revealed that the protein comprised two structural domains. In order to investigate the biochemical activities of these domains, we have overexpressed them separately and purified them to homogeneity. The larger N-terminal domain retains adenylation and ligase activities, though both at a reduced level. The adenylation activity of the large domain is stimulated by the presence of the smaller domain, suggesting that a conformational change is required for adenylation in the full length protein. The DNA binding properties of the two fragments have also been studied. The larger domain is able to band shift both single and double-stranded DNA, while the smaller fragment is only able to bind to double-stranded DNA. These data suggest that the specificity of DNA ligases for nick sites in DNA is produced by a combination of these different DNA binding activities in the intact enzyme. PMID:9878388

  18. Bacteria-host relationship: ubiquitin ligases as weapons of invasion.

    PubMed

    Maculins, Timurs; Fiskin, Evgenij; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Dikic, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Eukaryotic cells utilize the ubiquitin (Ub) system for maintaining a balanced functioning of cellular pathways. Although the Ub system is exclusive to eukaryotes, prokaryotic bacteria have developed an armory of Ub ligase enzymes that are capable of employing the Ub systems of various hosts, ranging from plant to animal cells. These enzymes have been acquired through the evolution and can be classified into three main classes, RING (really interesting new gene), HECT (homologous to the E6-AP carboxyl terminus) and NEL (novel E3 ligases). In this review we describe the roles played by different classes of bacterial Ub ligases in infection and pathogenicity. We also provide an overview of the different mechanisms by which bacteria mimic specific components of the host Ub system and outline the gaps in our current understanding of their functions. Additionally, we discuss approaches and experimental tools for validating this class of enzymes as potential novel antibacterial therapy targets. PMID:26964724

  19. Discovery of Tumor-Specific Irreversible Inhibitors of Stearoyl CoA Desaturase

    PubMed Central

    Theodoropoulos, Panayotis C.; Gonzales, Stephen S.; Winterton, Sarah E.; Rodriguez-Navas, Carlos; McKnight, John S.; Morlock, Lorraine K.; Hanson, Jordan M.; Cross, Bethany; Owen, Amy E.; Duan, Yingli; Moreno, Jose R.; Lemoff, Andrew; Mirzaei, Hamid; Posner, Bruce A.; Williams, Noelle S.

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of targeted cancer therapies is selective toxicity among cancer cell lines. We evaluated results from a viability screen of over 200,000 small molecules to identify two chemical series, oxalamides and benzothiazoles, that were selectively toxic to the same four of 12 human lung cancer cell lines at low nanomolar concentrations. Sensitive cell lines expressed cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4F11, which metabolized the compounds into irreversible stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) inhibitors. SCD is recognized as a promising biological target in cancer and metabolic disease. However, SCD is essential to sebocytes, and accordingly SCD inhibitors cause skin toxicity. Mouse sebocytes were unable to activate the benzothiazoles or oxalamides into SCD inhibitors, providing a therapeutic window for inhibiting SCD in vivo. We thus offer a strategy to target SCD in cancer by taking advantage of high CYP expression in a subset of tumors. PMID:26829472

  20. OUTCROP-BASED HIGH RESOLUTION GAMMA-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA). CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The COA supplies drinking water to a number of municipalities in central Oklahoma. Two major stratigraphic units in the COA, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, contain naturally occurring arsenic that exceeds government mandated drinking-water standards (EPA, 2001). ...

  1. On the origin of 3-methylglutaconic acid in disorders of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ikon, Nikita; Ryan, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    3-methylglutaconic acid (3MGA)-uria occurs in numerous inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) associated with compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism. This organic acid arises from thioester cleavage of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA (3MG CoA), an intermediate in leucine catabolism. In individuals harboring mutations in 3MG CoA hydratase (i.e., primary 3MGA-uria), dietary leucine is the source of 3MGA. In secondary 3MGA-uria, however, no leucine metabolism defects have been reported. While others have suggested 3MGA arises from aberrant isoprenoid shunting from cytosol to mitochondria, an alternative route posits that 3MG CoA arises in three steps from mitochondrial acetyl CoA. Support for this biosynthetic route in IEMs is seen by its regulated occurrence in microorganisms. The fungus, Ustilago maydis, the myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus and the marine cyanobacterium, Lyngbya majuscule, generate 3MG CoA (or acyl carrier protein derivative) in the biosynthesis of iron chelating siderophores, iso-odd chain fatty acids and polyketide/nonribosomal peptide products, respectively. The existence of this biosynthetic machinery in these organisms supports a model wherein, under conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of acetyl CoA in the inner mitochondrial space as a result of inefficient fuel utilization drives de novo synthesis of 3MG CoA. Since humans lack the downstream biosynthetic capability of the organisms mentioned above, as 3MG CoA levels rise, thioester hydrolysis yields 3MGA, which is excreted in urine as unspent fuel. Understanding the metabolic origins of 3MGA may increase its utility as a biomarker. PMID:27091556

  2. Spectroscopic Classification of ASASSN-16fn/AT2016coa and MASTER J202606.27-200732.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, E.; Calkins, M.; Challis, P.; Kirshner, R.; Prieto, J. L.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Optical spectra (range 350-760nm) of the supernova candidates ASASSN-16fn/AT2016coa (ATel #9081) and MASTER J202606.27-200732.6 (ATel #9056) were obtained on UT 2016 June 3 with the F. L. Whipple Observatory 1.5-m telescope (+ FAST).

  3. Mechanism of action and biological profile of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors. A new therapeutic alternative.

    PubMed

    Slater, E E; MacDonald, J S

    1988-01-01

    Lovastatin (MK-803, mevinolin) and simvastatin (MK-733, synvinolin), 2 highly potent 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been heralded as breakthrough therapy for the treatment of atherosclerotic disease. This paper discusses the biochemical attributes of these HMG CoA reductase inhibitors, their structures and inhibitory properties in a variety of biological systems and presents the rationale for their therapeutic use. Not only do lovastatin and simvastatin potently inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis; they also can result in the induction of hepatic low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, thus increasing the catabolism of LDL-cholesterol. Lovastatin and simvastatin are the first HMG CoA reductase inhibitors to receive regulatory agency approval for marketed use. Their safety profiles are reviewed and 2 aspects of this evaluation are stressed. First, the objective in the clinical use of these inhibitors is to normalise plasma cholesterol levels in hypercholesterolaemic individuals. This contrasts with the profound reductions in cholesterol obtained when normocholesterolaemic animals are treated by the high doses of these drugs required for toxicological assessment. Second, both lovastatin and simvastatin are administered as prodrugs in their lactone forms. As lactones, they readily undergo first-pass metabolism, hepatic sequestration and hydrolysis to the active form. Consequently, lovastatin and simvastatin achieve lower plasma drug levels than do other HMG CoA reductase inhibitors in clinical development. Low plasma levels have been established as an important determinant of safety in the use of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors in both animal and human studies. PMID:3076125

  4. Ancient origin of animal U-box ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The patterns of emergence and diversification of the families of ubiquitin ligases provide insights about the evolution of the eukaryotic ubiquitination system. U-box ubiquitin ligases (UULs) are proteins characterized by containing a peculiar protein domain known as U box. In this study, the origin of the animal UUL genes is described. Results Phylogenetic and structural data indicate that six of the seven main UUL-encoding genes found in humans (UBE4A, UBE4B, UIP5, PRP19, CHIP and CYC4) were already present in the ancestor of all current metazoans and the seventh (WDSUB1) is found in placozoans, cnidarians and bilaterians. The fact that only 4 - 5 genes orthologous to the human ones are present in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis suggests that several animal-specific cooptions of the U box to generate new genes occurred. Significantly, Monosiga contains five additional UUL genes that are not present in animals. One of them is also present in distantly-related protozoans. Along animal evolution, losses of UUL-encoding genes are rare, except in nematodes, which lack three of them. These general patterns are highly congruent with those found for other two families (RBR, HECT) of ubiquitin ligases. Conclusions Finding that the patterns of emergence, diversification and loss of three unrelated families of ubiquitin ligases (RBR, HECT and U-box) are parallel indicates that there are underlying, linage-specific evolutionary forces shaping the complexity of the animal ubiquitin system. PMID:20979629

  5. Structural and biochemical characterisation of Archaeoglobus fulgidus esterase reveals a bound CoA molecule in the vicinity of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, Christopher; Finnigan, William; Isupov, Michail N.; Levisson, Mark; Kengen, Servé W. M.; van der Oost, John; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    A new carboxyl esterase, AF-Est2, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus has been cloned, over-expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemically and structurally characterized. The enzyme has high activity towards short- to medium-chain p-nitrophenyl carboxylic esters with optimal activity towards the valerate ester. The AF-Est2 has good solvent and pH stability and is very thermostable, showing no loss of activity after incubation for 30 min at 80 °C. The 1.4 Å resolution crystal structure of AF-Est2 reveals Coenzyme A (CoA) bound in the vicinity of the active site. Despite the presence of CoA bound to the AF-Est2 this enzyme has no CoA thioesterase activity. The pantetheine group of CoA partially obstructs the active site alcohol pocket suggesting that this ligand has a role in regulation of the enzyme activity. A comparison with closely related α/β hydrolase fold enzyme structures shows that the AF-Est2 has unique structural features that allow CoA binding. A comparison of the structure of AF-Est2 with the human carboxyl esterase 1, which has CoA thioesterase activity, reveals that CoA is bound to different parts of the core domain in these two enzymes and approaches the active site from opposite directions. PMID:27160974

  6. Nedd8 targets ubiquitin ligase Smurf2 for neddylation and promote its degradation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jingyi; Liu, Chao; Wei, Rongfei; Xie, Ping; He, Shan; Zhang, Lingqiang

    2016-05-20

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are pivotal effectors of the ubiquitin-proteasome system as they determine the substrate specificity and transfer ubiquitin to the substrate. HECT-type ubiquitin ligase Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2) has been demonstrated functions as a tumor suppressor. However, the mechanisms underlying regulation of Smurf2 is still unclear. Here we show that ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 targets the HECT-type ubiquitin ligase Smurf2 for neddylation, and promotes Smurf2 degradation. Neddylation of Smurf1 activates its ubiquitin ligase activity and Smurf2 exerts Nedd8 ligase activity. This study provided new clues of Smurf2 activation regulation. PMID:27086113

  7. Investigation of the Roles of Allosteric Domain Arginine, Aspartate, and Glutamate Residues of Rhizobium etli Pyruvate Carboxylase in Relation to Its Activation by Acetyl CoA.

    PubMed

    Sirithanakorn, Chaiyos; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Attwood, Paul V

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of allosteric activation of pyruvate carboxylase by acetyl CoA is not fully understood. Here we have examined the roles of residues near the acetyl CoA binding site in the allosteric activation of Rhizobium etli pyruvate carboxylase using site-directed mutagenesis. Arg429 was found to be especially important for acetyl CoA binding as substitution with serine resulted in a 100-fold increase in the Ka of acetyl CoA activation and a large decrease in the cooperativity of this activation. Asp420 and Arg424, which do not make direct contact with bound acetyl CoA, were nonetheless found to affect acetyl CoA binding when mutated, probably through changed interactions with another acetyl CoA binding residue, Arg427. Thermodynamic activation parameters for the pyruvate carboxylation reaction were determined from modified Arrhenius plots and showed that acetyl CoA acts to decrease the activation free energy of the reaction by both increasing the activation entropy and decreasing the activation enthalpy. Most importantly, mutations of Asp420, Arg424, and Arg429 enhanced the activity of the enzyme in the absence of acetyl CoA. A main focus of this work was the detailed investigation of how this increase in activity occurred in the R424S mutant. This mutation decreased the activation enthalpy of the pyruvate carboxylation reaction by an amount consistent with removal of a single hydrogen bond. It is postulated that Arg424 forms a hydrogen bonding interaction with another residue that stabilizes the asymmetrical conformation of the R. etli pyruvate carboxylase tetramer, constraining its interconversion to the symmetrical conformer that is required for catalysis. PMID:27379711

  8. Reversible phosphorylation controls the activity of cyclosome-associated cyclin-ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Lahav-Baratz, S; Sudakin, V; Ruderman, J V; Hershko, A

    1995-01-01

    Cyclin B/cdc2 is responsible both for driving cells into mitosis and for activating the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of mitotic cyclins near the end of mitosis, an event required for the completion of mitosis and entry into interphase of the next cell cycle. Previous work with cell-free extracts of rapidly dividing clam embryos has identified two specific components required for the ubiquitination of mitotic cyclins: E2-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein that is constitutively active during the cell cycle, and E3-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase that purifies as part of a approximately 1500-kDa complex, termed the cyclosome, and which is active only near the end of mitosis. Here, we have separated the cyclosome from its ultimate upstream activator, cdc2. The mitotic, active form of the cyclosome can be inactivated by incubation with a partially purified, endogenous okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase; addition of cdc2 restores activity to the cyclosome after a lag that reproduces that seen previously in intact cells and in crude extracts. These results demonstrate that activity of cyclin-ubiquitin ligase is controlled by reversible phosphorylation of the cyclosome complex. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7568122

  9. Targeting quantum dots to surface proteins in living cells with biotin ligase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Mark; Takao, Keizo; Hayashi, Yasunori; Ting, Alice Y.

    2005-05-01

    Escherichia coli biotin ligase site-specifically biotinylates a lysine side chain within a 15-amino acid acceptor peptide (AP) sequence. We show that mammalian cell surface proteins tagged with AP can be biotinylated by biotin ligase added to the medium, while endogenous proteins remain unmodified. The biotin group then serves as a handle for targeting streptavidin-conjugated quantum dots (QDs). This labeling method helps to address the two major deficiencies of antibody-based labeling, which is currently the most common method for targeting QDs to cells: the size of the QD conjugate after antibody attachment and the instability of many antibody-antigen interactions. To demonstrate the versatility of our method, we targeted QDs to cell surface cyan fluorescent protein and epidermal growth factor receptor in HeLa cells and to -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptors in neurons. Labeling requires only 2 min, is extremely specific for the AP-tagged protein, and is highly sensitive. We performed time-lapse imaging of single QDs bound to AMPA receptors in neurons, and we compared the trafficking of different AMPA receptor subunits by using two-color pulse-chase labeling. BirA | labeling | streptavidin | glutamate receptor | single molecule

  10. A wild-type DNA ligase I gene is expressed in Bloom's syndrome cells

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, J.H.J.; Huwiler, K.G.; Weaver, D.T. )

    1991-09-01

    Alteration of DNA ligase I activity is a consistent biochemical feature of Bloom's syndrome (BS) cells. DNA ligase I activity in BS cells either is reduced and abnormally thermolabile or is present in an anomalously dimeric form. To assess the role of DNA ligase function in the etiology of BS, the authors have cloned the DNA ligase I cDNA from normal human cells by a PCR strategy using degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on conserved regions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA ligase genes. Human DNA ligase I cDNAs from normal and BS cells complemented a S. cerevisiae DNA ligase mutation, and protein extracts prepared from S. cerevisiae transformants expressing normal and BS cDNA contained comparable levels of DNA ligase I activity. DNA sequencing and Northern blot analysis of DNA ligase I expression in two BS human fibroblast lines representing each of the two aberrant DNA ligase I molecular phenotypes demonstrated that this gene was unchanged in BS cells. Thus, another factor may be responsible for the observed reduction in DNA ligase I activity associated with this chromosomal breakage syndrome.

  11. Ligase I and ligase III mediate the DNA double-strand break ligation in alternative end-joining.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guangqing; Duan, Jinzhi; Shu, Sheng; Wang, Xuxiang; Gao, Linlin; Guo, Jing; Zhang, Yu

    2016-02-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), one of the most harmful types of DNA damage, are repaired by homologous repair (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Surprisingly, in cells deficient for core classic NHEJ factors such as DNA ligase IV (Lig4), substantial end-joining activities have been observed in various situations, suggesting the existence of alternative end-joining (A-EJ) activities. Several putative A-EJ factors have been proposed, although results are mostly controversial. By using a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system, we generated mouse CH12F3 cell lines in which, in addition to Lig4, either Lig1 or nuclear Lig3, representing the cells containing a single DNA ligase (Lig3 or Lig1, respectively) in their nucleus, was completely ablated. Surprisingly, we found that both Lig1- and Lig3-containing complexes could efficiently catalyze A-EJ for class switching recombination (CSR) in the IgH locus and chromosomal deletions between DSBs generated by CRISPR/Cas9 in cis-chromosomes. However, only deletion of nuclear Lig3, but not Lig1, could significantly reduce the interchromosomal translocations in Lig4(-/-) cells, suggesting the unique role of Lig3 in catalyzing chromosome translocation. Additional sequence analysis of chromosome translocation junction microhomology revealed the specificity of different ligase-containing complexes. The data suggested the existence of multiple DNA ligase-containing complexes in A-EJ. PMID:26787905

  12. Molecular cloning and analysis of Ancylostoma ceylanicum glutamate-cysteine ligase.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Marcin; Lapiński, Maciej; Zdziarska, Anna; Długosz, Ewa; Bąska, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    Glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) is a heterodimer enzyme composed of a catalytic subunit (GCLC) and a modifier subunit (GCLM). This enzyme catalyses the synthesis of γ-glutamylcysteine, a precursor of glutathione. cDNAs of the putative glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic (Ace-GCLC) and modifier subunits (Ace-GCLM) of Ancylostoma ceylanicum were cloned using the RACE-PCR amplification method. The Ace-gclc and Ace-gclm cDNAs encode proteins with 655 and 254 amino acids and calculated molecular masses of 74.76 and 28.51kDa, respectively. The Ace-GCLC amino acid sequence shares about 70% identity and 80% sequence similarity with orthologs in Loa loa, Onchocerca volvulus, Brugia malayi, and Ascaris suum, whereas the Ace-GCLM amino acid sequence has only about 30% sequence identity and 50% similarity to homologous proteins in those species. Real-time PCR analysis of mRNA expression in L3, serum stimulated L3 and adult stages of A. ceylanicum showed the highest level of Ace-GCLC and Ace-GCLM expression occurred in adult worms. No differences were detected among adult hookworms harvested 21 and 35dpi indicating expression of Ace-gclc and Ace-gclm in adult worms is constant during the course of infection. Positive interaction between two subunits of glutamate-cysteine ligase was detected using the yeast two-hybrid system, and by specific enzymatic reaction. Ace-GCL is an intracellular enzyme and is not exposed to the host immune system. Thus, as expected, we did not detect IgG antibodies against Ace-GCLC or Ace-GCLM on days 21, 60 and 120 of A. ceylanicum infection in hamsters. Furthermore, vaccination with one or both antigens did not reduce worm burdens, and resulted in no improvement of clinical parameters (hematocrit and hemoglobin) of infected hamsters. Therefore, due to the significant role of the enzyme in parasite metabolism, our analyses raises hope for the development of a successful new drug against ancylostomiasis based on the specific GCL inhibitor. PMID

  13. Cloning, Expression and Purification of an Acetoacetyl CoA Thiolase from Sunflower Cotyledon

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, James H.; Maina, Anthony; Gomez, Iris D.; Cadet, Melissa; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schiedel, Anke C.

    2009-01-01

    Thiolase I and II coexist as part of the glyoxysomal β-oxidation system in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cotyledons, the only system shown to have both forms. The importance of thiolases can be underscored not only by their ubiquity, but also by their involvement in a wide variety of processes in plants, animals and bacteria. Here we describe the cloning, expression and purification of acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT) in enzymatically active form. Use of the extensive amount of sequence information from the databases facilitated the efficient generation of the gene-specific primers used in the RACE protocols. The recombinant AACT (1233 bp) shares 75% similarity with other plant AACTs. Comparison of specific activity of this recombinant AACT to a previously reported enzyme purified from primary sunflower cotyledon tissue was very similar (263 nkat/mg protein vs 220 nkat/mg protein, respectively). Combining the most pure fractions from the affinity column, the enzyme was purified 88-fold with a 55% yield of the enzymatically active, 47 kDa AACT. PMID:20011134

  14. Oligomerization of heme o synthase in cytochrome oxidase biogenesis is mediated by cytochrome oxidase assembly factor Coa2.

    PubMed

    Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Kim, Hyung; Watts, Talina; Perez-Martinez, Xochitl; Winge, Dennis R

    2012-08-01

    The synthesis of the heme a cofactor used in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is dependent on the sequential action of heme o synthase (Cox10) and heme a synthase (Cox15). The active state of Cox10 appears to be a homo-oligomeric complex, and formation of this complex is dependent on the newly synthesized CcO subunit Cox1 and the presence of an early Cox1 assembly intermediate. Cox10 multimerization is triggered by progression of Cox1 from the early assembly intermediate to downstream intermediates. The CcO assembly factor Coa2 appears important in coupling the presence of newly synthesized Cox1 to Cox10 oligomerization. Cells lacking Coa2 are impaired in Cox10 complex formation as well as the formation of a high mass Cox15 complex. Increasing Cox1 synthesis in coa2Δ cells restores respiratory function if Cox10 protein levels are elevated. The C-terminal segment of Cox1 is important in triggering Cox10 oligomerization. Expression of the C-terminal 54 residues of Cox1 appended to a heterologous matrix protein leads to efficient Cox10 complex formation in coa2Δ cells, but it fails to induce Cox15 complex formation. The state of Cox10 was evaluated in mutants, which predispose human patients to CcO deficiency and the neurological disorder Leigh syndrome. The presence of the D336V mutation in the yeast Cox10 backbone results in a catalytically inactive enzyme that is fully competent to oligomerize. Thus, Cox10 oligomerization and catalytic activation are separate processes and can be uncoupled. PMID:22669974

  15. Enhanced activity of acetyl CoA synthetase adsorbed on smart microgel: an implication for precursor biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Nidhi Chandrama; Tripathi, Bijay Prakash; Müller, Martin; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2015-01-28

    Acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl CoA) is an essential precursor molecule for synthesis of metabolites such as the polyketide-based drugs (tetracycline, mitharamycin, Zocor, etc.) fats, lipids, and cholesterol. Acetyl CoA synthetase (Acs) is one of the enzymes that catalyzes acetyl CoA synthesis, and this enzyme is essentially employed for continuous supply of the acetyl CoA for the production of these metabolites. To achieve reusable and a more robust entity of the enzyme, we carried out the immobilization of Acs on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-poly(ethylenimine) (PNIPAm-PEI) microgels via adsorption. Cationic PNIPAm-PEI microgel was synthesized by one-step graft copolymerization of NIPAm and N,N-methylene bis-acrylamide (MBA) from PEI. Adsorption studies of Acs on microgel indicated high binding of enzymes, with a maximum binding capacity of 286 μg/mg of microgel for Acs was achieved. The immobilized enzymes showed improved biocatalytic efficiency over free enzymes, beside this, the reaction parameters and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy studies indicated no significant changes in the enzyme structure after immobilization. This thoroughly characterized enzyme bioconjugate was further immobilized on an ultrathin membrane to assess the same reaction in flow through condition. Bioconjugate was covalently immobilized on a thin layer of preformed microgel support upon polyethylene terephthalate (PET) track etched membrane. The prepared membrane was used in a dead end filtration device to monitor the bioconversion efficiency and operational stability of cross-linked bioconjugate. The membrane reactor showed consistent operational stability and maintained >70% of initial activity after 7 consecutive operation cycles. PMID:25561344

  16. SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

  17. Correlation of ATP Citrate Lyase and Acetyl CoA Levels with Trichothecene Production in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Naoko; Tsuyuki, Rie; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Usuma, Jermnak; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2013-01-01

    Thecorrelation of ATP citrate lyase (ACL) and acetyl CoA levels with trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum was investigated using an inhibitor (precocene II) and an enhancer (cobalt chloride) of trichothecene production by changing carbon sources in liquid medium. When precocene II (30 µM) was added to inhibit trichothecene production in a trichothecene high-production medium containing sucrose, ACL expression was reduced and ACL mRNA level as well as acetyl CoA amount in the fungal cells were reduced to the levels observed in a trichothecene trace-production medium containing glucose or fructose. The ACL mRNA level was greatly increased by addition of cobalt chloride in the trichothecene high-production medium, but not in the trichothecene trace-production medium. Levels were reduced to those level in the trichothecene trace-production medium by addition of precocene II (300 µM) together with cobalt chloride. These results suggest that ACL expression is activated in the presence of sucrose and that acetyl CoA produced by the increased ALC level may be used for trichothecene production in the fungus. These findings also suggest that sucrose is important for the action of cobalt chloride in activating trichothecene production and that precocene II may affect a step down-stream of the target of cobalt chloride. PMID:24284828

  18. Failure of the normal ureagenic response to amino acids in organic acid-loaded rats. Proposed mechanism for the hyperammonemia of propionic and methylmalonic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P M; Walser, M

    1980-09-01

    Propionic and methylmalonic acidemia are both known to be associated with hyperammonemia. Rats injected with 10 or 20 mmol/kg of propionate or 20 mmol/kg of methylmalonate, along with 1.5 g/kg of a mixture of amino acids, developed severe hyperammonemia, whereas rats administered the same dosages of acetate did not. In vitro, neither propionyl nor methylmalonyl CoA affected the activity of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I, ornithine transcarbamylase, nor the activation constant (K(A)) of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I for N-acetyl glutamate. Furthermore, rats injected with propionate showed no alteration of liver amino acid concentrations, which could explain impaired ureagenesis. Animals injected with methylmalonate showed an increase in both citrulline and aspartate, suggesting that argininosuccinic acid synthetase may also have been inhibited. Liver ATP levels were unchanged. Citrullinogenesis, measured in intact mitochondria from livers of injected animals, was reduced 20-25% by 20 mmol/kg of propionate or methylmalonate (compared with acetate). This effect was attributable to an impairment in the normal rise of liver N-acetyl glutamate content after amino acid injection. Thus, carbamyl phosphate synthetase I activation was reduced. Liver levels of acetyl CoA and free CoA were reduced. Levels of unidentified acyl CoA derivatives rose, presumably reflecting the accumulation of propionyl and methylmalonyl CoA. Thus, the principal mechanism for hyperammonemia induced by these acids is depletion of liver N-acetyl glutamate, which is in turn attributable to depletion of acetyl CoA and/or competitive inhibition by propionyl and methylmalonyl CoA of N-acetyl glutamate synthetase. Injection of methylmalonate may also have an additional inhibitory effect on argininosuccinic acid synthetase. PMID:7400325

  19. Heterologous expression of the gourd E3 ubiquitin ligase gene LsRZF1 compromises the drought stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Min, Ji-Hee; Ju, Hyun-Woo; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Chung, Jung-Sung; Cho, Baik-Ho; Kim, Cheol Soo

    2014-04-01

    Protein ubiquitination is one of the major regulatory processes used by eukaryotic cells. The ubiquitin E3 ligase acts as a main determinant of substrate specificity. However, the precise roles of E3 ligase in plants to drought stress are poorly understood. In this study, a gourd family (Lagenaria siceraria) ortholog of Arabidopsis thaliana RING Zinc Finger 1 (AtRZF1) gene, designated LsRZF1, was identified and characterized. LsRZF1 was reduced by abscisic acid (ABA), osmotic stress, and drought conditions. Compared to wild type, transgenic Arabidopsis plants ectopic expressing LsRZF1 were hypersensitive to ABA and osmotic stress during early seedling development, indicating that LsRZF1 negatively regulates drought-mediated control of early seedling development. Moreover, the ectopic expression of the LsRZF1 gene was very influential in drought sensitive parameters including proline content, water loss, and the expression of dehydration stress-related genes. Furthermore, ubiquitin E3 ligase activity and genetic data indicate that AtRZF1 and LsRZF1 function in similar pathway to control proline metabolism in Arabidopsis under drought condition. Together, these results suggest that the E3 ligase LsRZF1 is an important regulator of water deficit stress during early seedling development. PMID:24525351

  20. Imaging proteins in live mammalian cells with biotin ligase and monovalent streptavidin

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, Mark; Ting, Alice Y

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes a simple and efficient way to label specific cell surface proteins with biophysical probes on mammalian cells. Cell surface proteins tagged with a 15-amino acid peptide are biotinylated by Escherichia coli biotin ligase (BirA), whereas endogenous proteins are not modified. The biotin group then allows sensitive and stable binding by streptavidin conjugates. This protocol describes the optimal use of BirA and streptavidin for site-specific labeling and also how to produce BirA and monovalent streptavidin. Streptavidin is tetravalent and the cross-linking of biotinylated targets disrupts many of streptavidin’s applications. Monovalent streptavidin has only a single functional biotin-binding site, but retains the femtomolar affinity, low off-rate and high thermostability of wild-type streptavidin. Site-specific biotinylation and streptavidin staining take only a few minutes, while expression of BirA takes 4 d and expression of monovalent streptavidin takes 8 d. PMID:18323822

  1. Antitumor/Antifungal Celecoxib Derivative AR-12 is a Non-Nucleoside Inhibitor of the ANL-Family Adenylating Enzyme Acetyl CoA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AR-12/OSU-03012 is an antitumor celecoxib-derivative that has progressed to Phase I clinical trial as an anticancer agent and has activity against a number of infectious agents including fungi, bacteria and viruses. However, the mechanism of these activities has remained unclear. Based on a chemical-genetic profiling approach in yeast, we have found that AR-12 is an ATP-competitive, time-dependent inhibitor of yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase. AR-12-treated fungal cells show phenotypes consistent with the genetic reduction of acetyl CoA synthetase activity, including induction of autophagy, decreased histone acetylation, and loss of cellular integrity. In addition, AR-12 is a weak inhibitor of human acetyl CoA synthetase ACCS2. Acetyl CoA synthetase activity is essential in many fungi and parasites. In contrast, acetyl CoA is primarily synthesized by an alternate enzyme, ATP-citrate lyase, in mammalian cells. Taken together, our results indicate that AR-12 is a non-nucleoside acetyl CoA synthetase inhibitor and that acetyl CoA synthetase may be a feasible antifungal drug target. PMID:27088128

  2. Kinetic framework for ligation by an efficient RNA ligase ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Bergman, N H; Johnston, W K; Bartel, D P

    2000-03-21

    The class I RNA ligase ribozyme, isolated previously from random sequences, performs an efficient RNA ligation reaction. It ligates two substrate RNAs, promoting the attack of the 3'-hydroxyl of one substrate upon the 5'-triphosphate of the other substrate with release of pyrophosphate. This ligation reaction has similarities to the reaction catalyzed by RNA polymerases. Using data from steady-state kinetic measurements and pulse-chase/pH-jump experiments, we have constructed minimal kinetic frameworks for two versions of the class I ligase, named 207t and 210t. For both ligases, as well as for the self-ligating parent ribozyme, the rate constant for the chemical step (k(c)) is log-linear with pH in the range 5.7-8.0. At physiological pH, the k(c) is 100 min(-1), a value similar to those reported for the fastest naturally occurring ribozymes. At higher pH, product release is limiting for both 207t and 210t. The 210t ribozyme, with its faster product release, attains multiple-turnover rates (k(cat) = 360 min(-1), pH 9.0) exceeding those of 207t and other reported ribozyme reactions. The kinetic framework for the 210t ribozyme describes the limits of this catalysis and suggests how key steps can be targeted for improvement using design or combinatorial approaches. PMID:10715133

  3. Cullin E3 Ligases and Their Rewiring by Viral Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Cathal; Krogan, Nevan J.; Craik, Charles S.; Pick, Elah

    2014-01-01

    The ability of viruses to subvert host pathways is central in disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, a critical role for the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) in counteracting host immune factors during viral infection has emerged. This counteraction is commonly achieved by the expression of viral proteins capable of sequestering host ubiquitin E3 ligases and their regulators. In particular, many viruses hijack members of the Cullin-RING E3 Ligase (CRL) family. Viruses interact in many ways with CRLs in order to impact their ligase activity; one key recurring interaction involves re-directing CRL complexes to degrade host targets that are otherwise not degraded within host cells. Removal of host immune factors by this mechanism creates a more amenable cellular environment for viral propagation. To date, a small number of target host factors have been identified, many of which are degraded via a CRL-proteasome pathway. Substantial effort within the field is ongoing to uncover the identities of further host proteins targeted in this fashion and the underlying mechanisms driving their turnover by the UPS. Elucidation of these targets and mechanisms will provide appealing anti-viral therapeutic opportunities. This review is focused on the many methods used by viruses to perturb host CRLs, focusing on substrate sequestration and viral regulation of E3 activity. PMID:25314029

  4. Interactions of methylamine and ammonia with atmospheric nucleation precursor H2SO4 and common organic acids: Thermodynamics and atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Nadykto, A. B.; Jiang, L.; Bai, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Interactions of the two common atmospheric bases, ammonia (NH3) and methylamine MA (CH3NH2), which are considered to be important stabilizers of binary clusters in the Earth's atmosphere, with H2SO4, the key atmospheric precursor, and 14 common atmospheric organic acids (COA) (formic (CH2O2), acetic (C2H4O2), oxalic (C2H2O4), malonic (C3H4O4), succinic (C4H6O4), glutaric acid (C5H8O4), adipic (C6H10O4), benzoic (C6H5COOH), phenylacetic (C6H5CH2COOH), pyruvic (C3H4O3), maleic acid (C4H4O4), malic (C4H6O5), tartaric (C4H6O6) and pinonic acid (C10H16O3)) have been studied using the composite high-accuracy G3MP2 method. The thermodynamic stability of mixed (COA) (H2SO4), (COA)(B1) and (COA)(B2) dimers and (COA) (H2SO4) (B1) and (COA) (H2SO4) (B1) trimers, where B1 and B2 represent methylamine (CH3NH2) and ammonia (NH3), respectively, have been investigated and their impacts on the thermodynamic stability of clusters containing H2SO4 have been analyzed. It has been shown that in many cases the interactions of H2SO4 with COA, ammonia and methylamine lead to the formation of heteromolecular dimers and trimers, which are certainly more stable than (H2SO4)2 and (H2SO4)3. It has also been found that free energies of (COA) (H2SO4)+ CH3NH2⇔(COA) (H2SO4)(CH3NH2) reactions exceed 10-15 kcal mol-1. This is a clear indication that mixed trimers composed of COA, H2SO4 and methylamine are very stable and can thus serve as possible nucleation sites. The present study leads us to conclude that the interactions of COA coexisting with H2SO4 and common atmospheric bases in the Earth's atmosphere may be an important factor affecting the stability of nucleating sulfuric acid clusters and that the impacts of COA on atmospheric nucleation should be studied in further details.

  5. Crystal structure of enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase at 2.5 angstroms resolution: a spiral fold defines the CoA-binding pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Engel, C K; Mathieu, M; Zeelen, J P; Hiltunen, J K; Wierenga, R K

    1996-01-01

    The crystal structure of rat liver mitochondrial enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase complexed with the potent inhibitor acetoacetyl-CoA has been refined at 2.5 angstroms resolution. This enzyme catalyses the reversible addition of water to alpha,beta-unsaturated enoyl-CoA thioesters, with nearly diffusion-controlled reaction rates for the best substrates. Enoyl-CoA hydratase is a hexamer of six identical subunits of 161 kDa molecular mass for the complex. The hexamer is a dimer of trimers. The monomer is folded into a right-handed spiral of four turns, followed by two small domains which are involved in trimerization. Each turn of the spiral consists of two beta-strands and an alpha-helix. The mechanism for the hydratase/dehydratase reaction follows a syn-stereochemistry, a preference that is opposite to the nonenzymatic reaction. The active-site architecture agrees with this stereochemistry. It confirms the importance of Glu164 as the catalytic acid for providing the alpha-proton during the hydratase reaction. It also shows the importance of Glu144 as the catalytic base for the activation of a water molecule in the hydratase reaction. The comparison of an unliganded and a liganded active site within the same crystal form shows a water molecule in the unliganded subunit. This water molecule is bound between the two catalytic glutamates and could serve as the activated water during catalysis. Images PMID:8895557

  6. Up-regulation of an N-terminal truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase enhances production of essential oils and sterols in transgenic Lavandula latifolia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Sales, Ester; Ros, Roc; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2007-11-01

    Spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) essential oil is widely used in the perfume, cosmetic, flavouring and pharmaceutical industries. Thus, modifications of yield and composition of this essential oil by genetic engineering should have important scientific and commercial applications. We generated transgenic spike lavender plants expressing the Arabidopsis thaliana HMG1 cDNA, encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR1S), a key enzyme of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway. Transgenic T0 plants accumulated significantly more essential oil constituents as compared to controls (up to 2.1- and 1.8-fold in leaves and flowers, respectively). Enhanced expression of HMGR1S also increased the amount of the end-product sterols, beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol (average differences of 1.8- and 1.9-fold, respectively), but did not affect the accumulation of carotenoids or chlorophylls. We also analysed T1 plants derived from self-pollinated seeds of T0 lines that flowered after growing for 2 years in the greenhouse. The increased levels of essential oil and sterols observed in the transgenic T0 plants were maintained in the progeny that inherited the HMG1 transgene. Our results demonstrate that genetic manipulation of the MVA pathway increases essential oil yield in spike lavender, suggesting a contribution for this cytosolic pathway to monoterpene and sesquiterpene biosynthesis in leaves and flowers of the species. PMID:17714440

  7. C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV drives XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Sicheng; Liu, Xunyue; Kamdar, Radhika Pankaj; Wanotayan, Rujira; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Adachi, Noritaka; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Chromatin binding of XRCC4 is dependent on the presence of DNA ligase IV. •C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV alone can recruit itself and XRCC4 to chromatin. •Two BRCT domains of DNA ligase IV are essential for the chromatin binding of XRCC4. -- Abstract: DNA ligase IV (LIG4) and XRCC4 form a complex to ligate two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). It is not fully understood how these proteins are recruited to DSBs. We recently demonstrated radiation-induced chromatin binding of XRCC4 by biochemical fractionation using detergent Nonidet P-40. In the present study, we examined the role of LIG4 in the recruitment of XRCC4/LIG4 complex to chromatin. The chromatin binding of XRCC4 was dependent on the presence of LIG4. The mutations in two BRCT domains (W725R and W893R, respectively) of LIG4 reduced the chromatin binding of LIG4 and XRCC4. The C-terminal fragment of LIG4 (LIG4-CT) without N-terminal catalytic domains could bind to chromatin with XRCC4. LIG4-CT with W725R or W893R mutation could bind to chromatin but could not support the chromatin binding of XRCC4. The ability of C-terminal region of LIG4 to interact with chromatin might provide us with an insight into the mechanisms of DSB repair through NHEJ.

  8. Antagonism of P2Y1-induced vasorelaxation by acyl CoA: a critical role for palmitate and 3′-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Alefishat, E; Alexander, SPH; Ralevic, V

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acyl derivatives of CoA have been shown to act as antagonists at human platelet and recombinant P2Y1 receptors, but little is known about their effects in the cardiovascular system. This study evaluated the effect of these endogenous nucleotide derivatives at P2Y1 receptors natively expressed in rat and porcine blood vessels. Experimental Approach Isometric tension recordings were used to evaluate the effects of CoA, acetyl CoA, palmitoyl CoA (PaCoA) and 3′-dephospho-palmitoyl-CoA on concentration relaxation–response curves to ADP and uridine triphosphate (UTP). A FlexStation monitored ADP- and UTP-evoked calcium responses in HEK293 cells. Key Results Acetyl CoA and PaCoA, but not CoA, inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxations to ADP with apparent selectivity for P2Y1 receptors (over P2Y2/4 receptors) in rat thoracic aorta; PaCoA was more potent than acetyl CoA (331-fold vs. fivefold shift of ADP response curve evoked by 10 μM PaCoA and acetyl CoA, respectively); the apparent pA2 value for PaCoA was 6.44. 3′-dephospho-palmitoyl-CoA (10 μM) was significantly less potent than PaCoA (20-fold shift). In porcine mesenteric arteries, PaCoA and the P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2500 blocked ADP-mediated endothelium-dependent relaxations; in contrast, they were ineffective against ADP-mediated endothelium-independent relaxation in porcine coronary arteries (which does not involve P2Y1 receptors). Calcium responses evoked by ADP activation of endogenous P2Y1 receptors in HEK293 cells were inhibited in the presence of PaCoA, which failed to alter responses to UTP (acting at endogenous P2Y2/4 receptors). Conclusions and Implications Acyl derivatives of CoA can act as endogenous selective antagonists of P2Y1 receptors in blood vessels, and this inhibitory effect critically depends on the palmitate and 3′-ribose phosphate substituents on CoA. PMID:23215951

  9. Defining interactions between DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Hsin-Ling; Yannone, Steven M.; Chen, David J.

    2001-04-10

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), ligase IV, and XRCC4 are all critical components of the NHEJ repair pathway. DNA-PK is composed of a heterodimeric DNA-binding component, Ku, and a large catalytic subunit, DNA-PKcs. Ligase IV and XRCC4 associate to form a multimeric complex that is also essential for NHEJ. DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4 interact at DNA termini which results in stimulated ligase activity. Here we define interactions between the components of these two essential complexes, DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4. We find that ligase IV/XRCC4 associates with DNA-PK in a DNA-independent manner. The specific protein-protein interactions that mediate the interaction between these two complexes are further identified. Direct physical interactions between ligase IV and Ku as well as between XRCC4 and DNA-PKcs are shown. No direct interactions are observed between ligase IV and DNA-PKcs or between XRCC4 and Ku. Our data defines the specific protein pairs involved in the association of DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4, and suggests a molecular mechanism for coordinating the assembly of the DNA repair complex at DNA breaks.

  10. Evidence that a single DNA ligase is involved in replication and recombination in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, F; Roman, H

    1979-01-01

    The possible existence in yeast of different nuclear DNA ligase enzymes led us to ask whether induced recombination (gene conversion) involves the same ligase as that involved in DNA replication. The conditional cdc9 mutant is known to be defective, under restrictive conditions, in the rejoining of Okazaki fragments. We show here that under the same conditions, x-ray-induced convertants within the cdc9 locus are produced with kinetics indicating that most, if not all, of the conversion events require the participation of the cdc9-controlled ligase. Thus, the same DNA ligase is involved in DNA replication and in induced gene conversion. PMID:388446

  11. Software interface for high-speed readout of particle detectors based on the CoaXPress communication standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejtmánek, M.; Neue, G.; Voleš, P.

    2015-06-01

    This article is devoted to the software design and development of a high-speed readout application used for interfacing particle detectors via the CoaXPress communication standard. The CoaXPress provides an asymmetric high-speed serial connection over a single coaxial cable. It uses a widely available 75 Ω BNC standard and can operate in various modes with a data throughput ranging from 1.25 Gbps up to 25 Gbps. Moreover, it supports a low speed uplink with a fixed bit rate of 20.833 Mbps, which can be used to control and upload configuration data to the particle detector. The CoaXPress interface is an upcoming standard in medical imaging, therefore its usage promises long-term compatibility and versatility. This work presents an example of how to develop DAQ system for a pixel detector. For this purpose, a flexible DAQ card was developed using the XILINX Spartan 6 FPGA. The DAQ card is connected to the framegrabber FireBird CXP6 Quad, which is plugged in the PCI Express bus of the standard PC. The data transmission was performed between the FPGA and framegrabber card via the standard coaxial cable in communication mode with a bit rate of 3.125 Gbps. Using the Medipix2 Quad pixel detector, the framerate of 100 fps was achieved. The front-end application makes use of the FireBird framegrabber software development kit and is suitable for data acquisition as well as control of the detector through the registers implemented in the FPGA.

  12. SCR7 is neither a selective nor a potent inhibitor of human DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Greco, George E; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Brooks, Rhys C; Lu, Zhengfei; Lieber, Michael R; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2016-07-01

    DNA ligases are attractive therapeutics because of their involvement in completing the repair of almost all types of DNA damage. A series of DNA ligase inhibitors with differing selectivity for the three human DNA ligases were identified using a structure-based approach with one of these inhibitors being used to inhibit abnormal DNA ligase IIIα-dependent repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB)s in breast cancer, neuroblastoma and leukemia cell lines. Raghavan and colleagues reported the characterization of a derivative of one of the previously identified DNA ligase inhibitors, which they called SCR7 (designated SCR7-R in our experiments using SCR7). SCR7 appeared to show increased selectivity for DNA ligase IV, inhibit the repair of DSBs by the DNA ligase IV-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway, reduce tumor growth, and increase the efficacy of DSB-inducing therapeutic modalities in mouse xenografts. In attempting to synthesize SCR7, we encountered problems with the synthesis procedures and discovered discrepancies in its reported structure. We determined the structure of a sample of SCR7 and a related compound, SCR7-G, that is the major product generated by the published synthesis procedure for SCR7. We also found that SCR7-G has the same structure as the compound (SCR7-X) available from a commercial vendor (XcessBio). The various SCR7 preparations had similar activity in DNA ligation assay assays, exhibiting greater activity against DNA ligases I and III than DNA ligase IV. Furthermore, SCR7-R failed to inhibit DNA ligase IV-dependent V(D)J recombination in a cell-based assay. Based on our results, we conclude that SCR7 and the SCR7 derivatives are neither selective nor potent inhibitors of DNA ligase IV. PMID:27235626

  13. Discovery of tumor-specific irreversible inhibitors of stearoyl CoA desaturase | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    A hallmark of targeted cancer therapies is selective toxicity among cancer cell lines. We evaluated results from a viability screen of over 200,000 small molecules to identify two chemical series, oxalamides and benzothiazoles, that were selectively toxic at low nanomolar concentrations to the same 4 of 12 human lung cancer cell lines. Sensitive cell lines expressed cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4F11, which metabolized the compounds into irreversible inhibitors of stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD). SCD is recognized as a promising biological target in cancer and metabolic disease.

  14. Overexpression of human fatty acid transport protein 2/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) reveals distinct patterns of trafficking of exogenous fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, Elaina M.; Cerny, Ronald L.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Black, Paul N.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Roles of FATP2 in fatty acid transport/activation contribute to lipid homeostasis. •Use of 13C- and D-labeled fatty acids provide novel insights into FATP2 function. •FATP2-dependent trafficking of FA into phospholipids results in distinctive profiles. •FATP2 functions in the transport and activation pathways for exogenous fatty acids. -- Abstract: In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4 h. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The

  15. A peptide ligase and the ribosome cooperate to synthesize the peptide pheganomycin.

    PubMed

    Noike, Motoyoshi; Matsui, Takashi; Ooya, Koichi; Sasaki, Ikuo; Ohtaki, Shouta; Hamano, Yoshimitsu; Maruyama, Chitose; Ishikawa, Jun; Satoh, Yasuharu; Ito, Hajime; Morita, Hiroyuki; Dairi, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibiotics are typically biosynthesized by one of two distinct machineries in a ribosome-dependent or ribosome-independent manner. Pheganomycin (PGM (1)) and related analogs consist of the nonproteinogenic amino acid (S)-2-(3,5-dihydroxy-4-hydroxymethyl)phenyl-2-guanidinoacetic acid (2) and a proteinogenic core peptide, making their origin uncertain. We report the identification of the biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces cirratus responsible for PGM production. Unexpectedly, the cluster contains a gene encoding multiple precursor peptides along with several genes plausibly encoding enzymes for the synthesis of amino acid 2. We identified PGM1, which has an ATP-grasp domain, as potentially capable of linking the precursor peptides with 2, and validate this hypothesis using deletion mutants and in vitro reconstitution. We document PGM1's substrate permissivity, which could be rationalized by a large binding pocket as confirmed via structural and mutagenesis experiments. This is to our knowledge the first example of cooperative peptide synthesis achieved by ribosomes and peptide ligases using a peptide nucleophile. PMID:25402768

  16. Biotin augments acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 gene expression in the hypothalamus, leading to the suppression of food intake in mice.

    PubMed

    Sone, Hideyuki; Kamiyama, Shin; Higuchi, Mutsumi; Fujino, Kaho; Kubo, Shizuka; Miyazawa, Masami; Shirato, Saya; Hiroi, Yuka; Shiozawa, Kota

    2016-07-29

    It is known that biotin prevents the development of diabetes by increasing the functions of pancreatic beta-cells and improving insulin sensitivity in the periphery. However, its anti-obesity effects such as anorectic effects remain to be clarified. Acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), a biotin-dependent enzyme, has two isoforms (ACC1 and ACC2) and serves to catalyze the reaction of acetyl CoA to malonyl CoA. In the hypothalamus, ACC2 increases the production of malonyl CoA, which acts as a satiety signal. In this study, we investigated whether biotin increases the gene expression of ACC2 in the hypothalamus and suppresses food intake in mice administered excessive biotin. Food intake was significantly decreased by biotin, but plasma regulators of appetite, including glucose, ghrelin, and leptin, were not affected. On the other hand, biotin notably accumulated in the hypothalamus and enhanced ACC2 gene expression there, but it did not change the gene expression of ACC1, malonyl CoA decarboxylase (a malonyl CoA-degrading enzyme), and AMP-activated protein kinase α-2 (an ACC-inhibitory enzyme). These findings strongly suggest that biotin potentiates the suppression of appetite by upregulating ACC2 gene expression in the hypothalamus. This effect of biotin may contribute to the prevention of diabetes by biotin treatment. PMID:27181349

  17. Microtubule-associated protein 1B interaction with tubulin tyrosine ligase contributes to the control of microtubule tyrosination.

    PubMed

    Utreras, Elías; Jiménez-Mateos, Eva Maria; Contreras-Vallejos, Erick; Tortosa, Elena; Pérez, Mar; Rojas, Sebastián; Saragoni, Lorena; Maccioni, Ricardo B; Avila, Jesús; González-Billault, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) is the first microtubule-associated protein to be expressed during nervous system development. MAP1B belongs to a large family of proteins that contribute to the stabilization and/or enhancement of microtubule polymerization. These functions are related to the control of the dynamic properties of microtubules. The C-terminal domain of the neuronal alpha-tubulin isotype is characterized by the presence of an acidic polypeptide, with the last amino acid being tyrosine. This tyrosine residue may be enzymatically removed from the protein by an unknown carboxypeptidase activity. Subsequently, the tyrosine residue is again incorporated into this tubulin by another enzyme, tubulin tyrosine ligase, to yield tyrosinated tubulin. Because neurons lacking MAP1B have a reduced proportion of tyrosinated microtubules, we analyzed the possible interaction between MAP1B and tubulin tyrosine ligase. Our results show that these proteins indeed interact and that the interaction is not affected by MAP1B phosphorylation. Additionally, neurons lacking MAP1B, when exposed to drugs that reversibly depolymerize microtubules, do not fully recover tyrosinated microtubules upon drug removal. These results suggest that MAP1B regulates tyrosination of alpha-tubulin in neuronal microtubules. This regulation may be important for general processes involved in nervous system development such as axonal guidance and neuronal migration. PMID:18075266

  18. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD[superscript +]-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S.; Griffor, Matt; Pfizer

    2010-09-17

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3''-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD{sup +}-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  19. Mammalian Fatty Acid Elongases

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Donald B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Very long chain fatty acids confer functional diversity on cells by variations in their chain length and degree of unsaturation. Microsomal fatty acid elongation represents the major pathway for determining the chain length of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids in cellular lipids. The overall reaction for fatty acid elongation involves four enzymes and utilizes malonyl CoA, NADPH, and fatty acyl CoA as substrates. While the fundamental pathway and its requirements have been known for many years, recent advances have revealed a family of enzymes involved in the first step of the reaction, i.e., the condensation reaction. Seven fatty acid elongase subtypes (Elovl #1–7) have been identified in the mouse, rat, and human genomes. These enzymes determine the rate of overall fatty acid elongation. Moreover, these enzymes also display differential substrate specificity, tissue distribution, and regulation, making them important regulators of cellular lipid composition as well as specific cellular functions. Herein, methods are described to measure elongase activity, analyze elongation products, and alter cellular elongase expression. PMID:19763486

  20. A design principle underlying the paradoxical roles of E3 ubiquitin ligases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daewon; Kim, Minjin; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2014-07-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are important cellular components that determine the specificity of proteolysis in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. However, an increasing number of studies have indicated that E3 ubiquitin ligases also participate in transcription. Intrigued by the apparently paradoxical functions of E3 ubiquitin ligases in both proteolysis and transcriptional activation, we investigated the underlying design principles using mathematical modeling. We found that the antagonistic functions integrated in E3 ubiquitin ligases can prevent any undesirable sustained activation of downstream genes when E3 ubiquitin ligases are destabilized by unexpected perturbations. Interestingly, this design principle of the system is similar to the operational principle of a safety interlock device in engineering systems, which prevents a system from abnormal operation unless stability is guaranteed.

  1. From Structure-Function Analyses to Protein Engineering for Practical Applications of DNA Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Maiko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Nishida, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    DNA ligases are indispensable in all living cells and ubiquitous in all organs. DNA ligases are broadly utilized in molecular biology research fields, such as genetic engineering and DNA sequencing technologies. Here we review the utilization of DNA ligases in a variety of in vitro gene manipulations, developed over the past several decades. During this period, fewer protein engineering attempts for DNA ligases have been made, as compared to those for DNA polymerases. We summarize the recent progress in the elucidation of the DNA ligation mechanisms obtained from the tertiary structures solved thus far, in each step of the ligation reaction scheme. We also present some examples of engineered DNA ligases, developed from the viewpoint of their three-dimensional structures. PMID:26508902

  2. An African swine fever virus gene with homology to DNA ligases.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, J M; Kerr, S M; Smith, G L; Dixon, L K

    1992-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the SalI g region of the genome of a virulent isolate of ASFV (Malawi Lil 20/1) has revealed an open reading frame with the potential to encode a 48 kilodalton (kD) polypeptide which has significant homology with eukaryotic and prokaryotic DNA ligases. This ASFV encoded gene also contains the putative active site region of DNA ligases including the lysine residue which is necessary for enzyme-adenylate adduct formation, but lacks the C-terminal basic region conserved in other eukaryotic DNA ligases. A novel [32P]-labelled potential DNA ligase-adenylate adduct of M(r) 45 kD was observed upon incubation of ASFV infected cell cytoplasmic extracts with alpha-[32P]-ATP and subsequent analysis of products by SDS/PAGE. These data together suggest that ASFV encodes its own DNA ligase. Images PMID:1614852

  3. TRIM32 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase for dysbindin.

    PubMed

    Locke, Matthew; Tinsley, Caroline L; Benson, Matthew A; Blake, Derek J

    2009-07-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding tripartite motif protein 32 (TRIM32) cause two seemingly diverse diseases: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H) or sarcotubular myopathy (STM) and Bardet-Biedl syndrome type 11(BBS11). Although TRIM32 is involved in protein ubiquitination, its substrates and the molecular consequences of disease-causing mutations are poorly understood. In this paper, we show that TRIM32 is a widely expressed ubiquitin ligase that is localized to the Z-line in skeletal muscle. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that TRIM32 binds and ubiquitinates dysbindin, a protein implicated in the genetic aetiology of schizophrenia, augmenting its degradation. Small-interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of TRIM32 in myoblasts resulted in elevated levels of dysbindin. Importantly, the LGMD2H/STM-associated TRIM32 mutations, D487N and R394H impair ubiquitin ligase activity towards dysbindin and were mislocalized in heterologous cells. These mutants were able to self-associate and also co-immunoprecipitated with wild-type TRIM32 in transfected cells. Furthermore, the D487N mutant could bind to both dysbindin and its E2 enzyme but was defective in monoubiquitination. In contrast, the BBS11 mutant P130S did not show any biochemical differences compared with the wild-type protein. Our data identify TRIM32 as a regulator of dysbindin and demonstrate that the LGMD2H/STM mutations may impair substrate ubiquitination. PMID:19349376

  4. Molecular insights into RBR E3 ligase ubiquitin transfer mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dove, Katja K; Stieglitz, Benjamin; Duncan, Emily D; Rittinger, Katrin; Klevit, Rachel E

    2016-08-01

    RING-in-between-RING (RBR) ubiquitin (Ub) ligases are a distinct class of E3s, defined by a RING1 domain that binds E2 Ub-conjugating enzyme and a RING2 domain that contains an active site cysteine similar to HECT-type E3s. Proposed to function as RING/HECT hybrids, details regarding the Ub transfer mechanism used by RBRs have yet to be defined. When paired with RING-type E3s, E2s perform the final step of Ub ligation to a substrate. In contrast, when paired with RBR E3s, E2s must transfer Ub onto the E3 to generate a E3~Ub intermediate. We show that RBRs utilize two strategies to ensure transfer of Ub from the E2 onto the E3 active site. First, RING1 domains of HHARI and RNF144 promote open E2~Ubs. Second, we identify a Ub-binding site on HHARI RING2 important for its recruitment to RING1-bound E2~Ub. Mutations that ablate Ub binding to HHARI RING2 also decrease RBR ligase activity, consistent with RING2 recruitment being a critical step for the RBR Ub transfer mechanism. Finally, we demonstrate that the mechanism defined here is utilized by a variety of RBRs. PMID:27312108

  5. Nucleostemin stabilizes ARF by inhibiting the ubiquitin ligase ULF.

    PubMed

    Lo, D; Zhang, Y; Dai, M-S; Sun, X-X; Zeng, S X; Lu, H

    2015-03-26

    Upregulated expression of nucleolar GTPase nucleostemin (NS) has been associated with increased cellular proliferation potential and tumor malignancy during cancer development. Recent reports attribute the growth regulatory effects of NS protein to its role in facilitating ribosome production. However, the oncogenic potential of NS remains unclear, as imbalanced levels of NS have been reported to exert growth inhibitory effect by modulating p53 tumor-suppressor activity. It also remains in questions if aberrant NS levels might have a p53-independent role in regulation of cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we performed affinity purification and mass spectrometry analysis to explore protein-protein interactions influencing NS growth regulatory properties independently of p53 tumor suppressor. We identified the alternative reading frame (ARF) protein as a key protein associating with NS and further verified the interaction through in vitro and in vivo assays. We demonstrated that NS is able to regulate cell cycle progression by regulating the stability of the ARF tumor suppressor. Furthermore, overexpression of NS suppressed ARF polyubiquitination by its E3 ligase Ubiquitin Ligase for ARF and elongated its half-life, whereas knockdown of NS led to the decrease of ARF levels. Also, we found that NS can enhance NPM stabilization of ARF. Thus, we propose that in the absence of p53, ARF can be stabilized by NS and nucleophosmin to serve as an alternative tumor-suppressor surveillance, preventing potential cellular transformation resulting from the growth-inducing effects of NS overexpression. PMID:24769896

  6. Mechanism of ubiquitylation by dimeric RING ligase RNF4.

    PubMed

    Plechanovová, Anna; Jaffray, Ellis G; McMahon, Stephen A; Johnson, Kenneth A; Navrátilová, Iva; Naismith, James H; Hay, Ronald T

    2011-09-01

    Mammalian RNF4 is a dimeric RING ubiquitin E3 ligase that ubiquitylates poly-SUMOylated proteins. We found that RNF4 bound ubiquitin-charged UbcH5a tightly but free UbcH5a weakly. To provide insight into the mechanism of RING-mediated ubiquitylation, we docked the UbcH5~ubiquitin thioester onto the RNF4 RING structure. This revealed that with E2 bound to one monomer of RNF4, the thioester-linked ubiquitin could reach across the dimer to engage the other monomer. In this model, the 'Ile44 hydrophobic patch' of ubiquitin is predicted to engage a conserved tyrosine located at the dimer interface of the RING, and mutation of these residues blocked ubiquitylation activity. Thus, dimeric RING ligases are not simply inert scaffolds that bring substrate and E2-loaded ubiquitin into close proximity. Instead, they facilitate ubiquitin transfer by preferentially binding the E2~ubiquitin thioester across the dimer and activating the thioester bond for catalysis. PMID:21857666

  7. Prokaryotic BirA ligase biotinylates K4, K9, K18 and K23 in eukaryotic histone H3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BirA ligase, a prokaryotic ortholog of human holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS), is known to biotinylate proteins. Here, we tested the hypothesis that BirA ligase may also catalyze biotinylation of eukaryotic histones. If so, this would render recombinant BirA ligase a useful surrogate for HCS in stud...

  8. Stearoyl CoA desaturase is required to produce active, lipid-modified Wnt proteins.

    PubMed

    Rios-Esteves, Jessica; Resh, Marilyn D

    2013-09-26

    Wnt proteins contain palmitoleic acid, an unusual lipid modification. Production of an active Wnt signal requires the acyltransferase Porcupine and depends on the attachment of palmitoleic acid to Wnt. The source of this monounsaturated fatty acid has not been identified, and it is not known how Porcupine recognizes its substrate and whether desaturation occurs before or after fatty acid transfer to Wnt. Here, we show that stearoyl desaturase (SCD) generates a monounsaturated fatty acid substrate that is then transferred by Porcupine to Wnt. Treatment of cells with SCD inhibitors blocked incorporation of palmitate analogs into Wnt3a and Wnt5a and reduced Wnt secretion as well as autocrine and paracrine Wnt signaling. The SCD inhibitor effects were rescued by exogenous addition of monounsaturated fatty acids. We propose that SCD is a key molecular player responsible for Wnt biogenesis and processing and that SCD inhibition provides an alternative mechanism for blocking Wnt pathway activation. PMID:24055053

  9. Stearoyl CoA desaturase is required to produce active, lipid-modified Wnt proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Esteves, Jessica; Resh, Marilyn D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Wnt proteins contain an unusual lipid modification, palmitoleic acid. Production of an active Wnt signal requires the acyltransferase Porcupine and depends on attachment of palmitoleic acid to Wnt. The source of this monounsaturated fatty acid has not been identified, and it is not known how Porcupine recognizes its substrate and whether desaturation occurs before or after fatty acid transfer to Wnt. Here we show that stearoyl desaturase (SCD) generates a monounsaturated fatty acid substrate which is then transferred by Porcupine to Wnt. Treatment of cells with SCD inhibitors blocked incorporation of palmitate analogs into Wnt3a and Wnt5a, and reduced Wnt secretion as well as autocrine and paracrine Wnt signaling. The SCD inhibitor effects were rescued by exogenous addition of monounsaturated fatty acids. We propose that SCD is a key molecular player responsible for Wnt biogenesis and processing and that SCD inhibition provides an alternative mechanism for blocking Wnt pathway activation. PMID:24055053

  10. CoaTx-II, a new dimeric Lys49 phospholipase A2 from Crotalus oreganus abyssus snake venom with bactericidal potential: Insights into its structure and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J R; Lancellotti, M; Soares, A M; Calderon, L A; Ramírez, D; González, W; Marangoni, S; Da Silva, S L

    2016-09-15

    Snake venoms are rich and intriguing sources of biologically-active molecules that act on target cells, modulating a diversity of physiological functions and presenting promising pharmacological applications. Lys49 phospholipase A2 is one of the multifunctional proteins present in these complex secretions and, although catalytically inactive, has a variety of biological activities, including cytotoxic, antibacterial, inflammatory, antifungal activities. Herein, a Lys49 phospholipase A2, denominated CoaTx-II from Crotalus oreganus abyssus, was purified and structurally and pharmacologically characterized. CoaTx-II was isolated with a high degree of purity by a combination of two chromatographic steps; molecular exclusion and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. This toxin is dimeric with a mass of 13868.2 Da (monomeric form), as determined by mass spectrometry. CoaTx-II is rich in Arg and Lys residues and displays high identity with other Lys49 PLA2 homologues, which have high isoelectric points. The structural model of dimeric CoaTx-II shows that the toxin is non-covalently stabilized. Despite its enzymatic inactivity, in vivo CoaTx-II caused local muscular damage, characterized by increased plasma creatine kinase and confirmed by histological alterations, in addition to an inflammatory activity, as demonstrated by mice paw edema induction and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 elevation. CoaTx-II also presents antibacterial activity against gram negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa 31NM, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922) and positive (Staphyloccocus aureus BEC9393 and Rib1) bacteria. Therefore, data show that this newly purified toxin plays a central role in mediating the degenerative events associated with envenomation, in addition to demonstrating antibacterial properties, with potential for use in the development of strategies for antivenom therapy and combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. PMID:27530662

  11. Unraveling Cholesterol Catabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: ChsE4-ChsE5 α2β2 Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Initiates β-Oxidation of 3-Oxo-cholest-4-en-26-oyl CoA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of host cholesterol by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is an important factor for both its virulence and pathogenesis, although how and why cholesterol metabolism is required is not fully understood. Mtb uses a unique set of catabolic enzymes that are homologous to those required for classical β-oxidation of fatty acids but are specific for steroid-derived substrates. Here, we identify and assign the substrate specificities of two of these enzymes, ChsE4-ChsE5 (Rv3504-Rv3505) and ChsE3 (Rv3573c), that carry out cholesterol side chain oxidation in Mtb. Steady-state assays demonstrate that ChsE4-ChsE5 preferentially catalyzes the oxidation of 3-oxo-cholest-4-en-26-oyl CoA in the first cycle of cholesterol side chain β-oxidation that ultimately yields propionyl-CoA, whereas ChsE3 specifically catalyzes the oxidation of 3-oxo-chol-4-en-24-oyl CoA in the second cycle of β-oxidation that generates acetyl-CoA. However, ChsE4-ChsE5 can catalyze the oxidation of 3-oxo-chol-4-en-24-oyl CoA as well as 3-oxo-4-pregnene-20-carboxyl-CoA. The functional redundancy of ChsE4-ChsE5 explains the in vivo phenotype of the igr knockout strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis; the loss of ChsE1-ChsE2 can be compensated for by ChsE4-ChsE5 during the chronic phase of infection. The X-ray crystallographic structure of ChsE4-ChsE5 was determined to a resolution of 2.0 Å and represents the first high-resolution structure of a heterotetrameric acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD). Unlike typical homotetrameric ACADs that bind four flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactors, ChsE4-ChsE5 binds one FAD at each dimer interface, resulting in only two substrate-binding sites rather than the classical four active sites. A comparison of the ChsE4-ChsE5 substrate-binding site to those of known mammalian ACADs reveals an enlarged binding cavity that accommodates steroid substrates and highlights novel prospects for designing inhibitors against the committed β-oxidation step in the first

  12. Different sites of inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase by malonyl-CoA, and by acetyl-CoA and CoA, in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Zierz, S; Engel, A G

    1987-01-01

    The inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT, EC 2.3.1.21) by malonyl-CoA, acetyl-CoA and free CoA was studied in sonicated skeletal-muscle homogenates from normal human subjects and from five patients with a mutant CPT [Zierz & Engel (1985) Eur. J. Biochem. 149, 207-214]. (1) Malonyl-CoA, acetyl-CoA and CoA were competitive inhibitors of CPT with palmitoyl-CoA. (2) Acetyl-CoA and CoA inhibited normal and mutant CPT to the same degree, whereas malonyl-CoA inhibited mutant CPT more than normal CPT. (3) Triton X-100 abolished the inhibition of normal CPT by malonyl-CoA, but not by acetyl-CoA or CoA. Triton X-100 by itself caused loss of activity of the mutant CPT. (4) In the concentration range 0.1-0.4 mM, the inhibitory effects of any two of the three inhibitors were synergistic. (5) The inhibitory constants (Ki) for acetyl-CoA and CoA were close to 45 microM. The Ki for malonyl-CoA was 200-fold lower, or 0.22 microM. Addition of 40 microM-acetyl-CoA or CoA resulted in a 3-fold increase in the Ki for acetyl-CoA. Addition of 20 microM-CoA resulted in a 3-fold increase in the Ki for acetyl-CoA. (6) The findings indicate that acetyl-CoA and CoA can inhibit CPT at the catalytic site or a nearby site which is different from that at which malonyl-CoA inhibits CPT. (7) The fact that small changes in the concentration of acetyl-CoA and CoA can antagonize the inhibitory effect of malonyl-CoA suggests that these compounds could modulate the inhibition of CPT by malonyl-CoA. PMID:3663146

  13. Cross sections for production of the CO(A 1 Pi)-(X 1 Sigma) fourth positive band system and O(3 S) by photodissociation of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentieu, E. P.; Mentall, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    The CO(A 1 Pi) cross sections reported here, along with previously determined electron impact results, establish the basis for calculating CO fourth positive system volume emission rates in the Martian dayglow. Calculated volume emission rates in turn determine relative distribution of photon vs. electron impact as mechanisms for producing CO(A 1 Pi) in the Mars atmosphere. The smallness of the O(1304) cross section confirms previous indirect evidence that photodissociative excitation of CO2 is not an important source of O(3 S) in the upper atmosphere of Mars.

  14. DNA ligase III and DNA ligase IV carry out genetically distinct forms of end joining in human somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sehyun; Harvey, Adam; Zimbric, Jacob; Wang, Yongbao; Nguyen, Thanh; Jackson, Pauline J.; Hendrickson, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Ku-dependent C-NHEJ (classic non-homologous end joining) is the primary DNA EJing (end joining) repair pathway in mammals. Recently, an additional EJing repair pathway (A-NHEJ; alternative-NHEJ) has been described. Currently, the mechanism of A-NHEJ is obscure although a dependency on LIGIII (DNA ligase III) is often implicated. To test the requirement for LIGIII in A-NHEJ we constructed a LIGIII conditionally-null human cell line using gene targeting. Nuclear EJing activity appeared unaffected by a deficiency in LIGIII as, surprisingly, so were random gene targeting integration events. In contrast, LIGIII was required for mitochondrial function and this defined the gene’s essential activity. Human Ku:LIGIII and Ku:LIGIV (DNA ligase IV) double knockout cell lines, however, demonstrated that LIGIII is required for the enhanced A-NHEJ activity that is observed in Ku-deficient cells. Most unexpectedly, however, the majority of EJing events remained LIGIV-dependent. In conclusion, although human LIGIII has an essential function in mitochondrial maintenance, it is dispensable for most types of nuclear DSB repair, except for the A-NHEJ events that are normally suppressed by Ku. Moreover, we describe that a robust Ku-independent, LIGIV-dependent repair pathway exists in human somatic cells. PMID:24837021

  15. Ubiquitin E3 ligase FIEL1 regulates fibrotic lung injury through SUMO-E3 ligase PIAS4.

    PubMed

    Lear, Travis; McKelvey, Alison C; Rajbhandari, Shristi; Dunn, Sarah R; Coon, Tiffany A; Connelly, William; Zhao, Joe Y; Kass, Daniel J; Zhang, Yingze; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Bill B

    2016-05-30

    The E3 small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT 4 (PIAS4) is a pivotal protein in regulating the TGFβ pathway. In this study, we discovered a new protein isoform encoded by KIAA0317, termed fibrosis-inducing E3 ligase 1 (FIEL1), which potently stimulates the TGFβ signaling pathway through the site-specific ubiquitination of PIAS4. FIEL1 targets PIAS4 using a double locking mechanism that is facilitated by the kinases PKCζ and GSK3β. Specifically, PKCζ phosphorylation of PIAS4 and GSK3β phosphorylation of FIEL1 are both essential for the degradation of PIAS4. FIEL1 protein is highly expressed in lung tissues from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), whereas PIAS4 protein levels are significantly reduced. FIEL1 overexpression significantly increases fibrosis in a bleomycin murine model, whereas FIEL1 knockdown attenuates fibrotic conditions. Further, we developed a first-in-class small molecule inhibitor toward FIEL1 that is highly effective in ameliorating fibrosis in mice. This study provides a basis for IPF therapeutic intervention by modulating PIAS4 protein abundance. PMID:27162139

  16. Human mitochondrial HMG CoA synthase: Liver cDNA and partial genomic cloning, chromosome mapping to 1p12-p13, and possible role in vertebrate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1994-10-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase (mHS) is the first enzyme of ketogenesis, whereas the cytoplasmic HS isozyme (cHS) mediates an early step in cholersterol synthesis. We here report the sequence of human and mouse liver mHS cDNAs, the sequence of an HS-like cDNA from Caenorhabditis elegans, the structure of a partial human mHS genomic clone, and the mapping of the human mHS gene to chromosome 1p12-p13. the nucleotide sequence of the human mHS cDNA encodes a mature mHS peptide of 471 residues, with a mean amino acid identity of 66.5% with cHS from mammals and chicken. Comparative analysis of all known mHS and cHS protein and DNA sequences shows a high degree of conservation near the N-terminus that decreases progressively toward the C-terminus and suggests that the two isozymes arose from a common ancestor gene 400-900 million years ago. Comparison of the gene structure of mHS and cHS is also consistant with a recent duplication event. We hypothesize that the physiologic result of the HS gene duplication was the appearance of HS within the mitochondria around the time of emergence of early vertebrates, which linked preexisting pathways of beta oxidation and leucine catabolism and created the HMG CoA pathway of ketogenesis, thus providing a lipid-derived energy source for the vertebrate brain. 56 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching between Two DNA-Bound States

    SciTech Connect

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-09-13

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a 'jackknife model' in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  18. Human DNA ligase III recognizes DNA ends by dynamic switching between two DNA-bound states.

    PubMed

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A; Tomkinson, Alan E; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-07-27

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a "jackknife model" in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers. PMID:20518483

  19. The Arabidopsis MIEL1 E3 ligase negatively regulates ABA signalling by promoting protein turnover of MYB96.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Gil; Seo, Pil Joon

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates plant responses to various environmental challenges. Controlled protein turnover is an important component of ABA signalling. Here we show that the RING-type E3 ligase MYB30-INTERACTING E3 LIGASE 1 (MIEL1) regulates ABA sensitivity by promoting MYB96 turnover in Arabidopsis. Germination of MIEL1-deficient mutant seeds is hypersensitive to ABA, whereas MIEL1-overexpressing transgenic seeds are less sensitive. MIEL1 can interact with MYB96, a regulator of ABA signalling, and stimulate its ubiquitination and degradation. Genetic analysis shows that MYB96 is epistatic to MIEL1 in the control of ABA sensitivity in seeds. While MIEL1 acts primarily via MYB96 in seed germination, MIEL1 regulates protein turnover of both MYB96 and MYB30 in vegetative tissues. We find that ABA regulates the expression of MYB30-responsive genes during pathogen infection and this regulation is partly dependent on MIEL1. These results suggest that MIEL1 may facilitate crosstalk between ABA and biotic stress signalling. PMID:27615387

  20. Neuropsychological Outcomes in Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders: 85 Cases Detected by Newborn Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waisbren, Susan E.; Landau, Yuval; Wilson, Jenna; Vockley, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders include conditions in which the transport of activated acyl-Coenzyme A (CoA) into the mitochondria or utilization of these substrates is disrupted or blocked. This results in a deficit in the conversion of fat into energy. Most patients with fatty acid oxidation defects are now identified through…

  1. The Ubiquitin Ligase Hul5 Promotes Proteasomal Processivity▿

    PubMed Central

    Aviram, Sharon; Kornitzer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large cytoplasmic protease that degrades polyubiquitinated proteins to short peptides in a processive manner. The proteasome 19S regulatory subcomplex tethers the target protein via its polyubiquitin adduct and unfolds the target polypeptide, which is then threaded into the proteolytic site-containing 20S subcomplex. Hul5 is a 19S subcomplex-associated ubiquitin ligase that elongates ubiquitin chains on proteasome-bound substrates. We isolated hul5Δ as a mutation with which fusions of an unstable cyclin to stable reporter proteins accumulate as partially processed products. These products appear transiently in the wild type but are strongly stabilized in 19S ATPase mutants and in the hul5Δ mutant, supporting a role for the ATPase subunits in the unfolding of proteasome substrates before insertion into the catalytic cavity and suggesting a role for Hul5 in the processive degradation of proteins that are stalled on the proteasome. PMID:20008553

  2. The Gp78 ubiquitin ligase: probing endoplasmic reticulum complexity.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, Pascal; Nabi, Ivan R

    2012-02-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been classically divided, based on electron microscopy analysis, into parallel ribosome-studded rough ER sheets and a tubular smooth ER network. Recent studies have identified molecular constituents of the ER, the reticulons and DP1, that drive ER tubule formation and whose expression determines expression of ER sheets and tubules and thereby rough and smooth ER. However, segregation of the ER into only two domains remains simplistic and multiple functionally distinct ER domains necessarily exist. In this review, we will discuss the sub-organization of the ER in different domains focusing on the localization and role of the gp78 ubiquitin ligase in the mitochondria-associated smooth ER and on the evidence for a quality control ERAD domain. PMID:22045301

  3. Regulation of cancer stem cells by RING finger ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Like normal stem cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs) are capable of self-renewal, either by symmetric or asymmetric cell division. They have the exclusive ability to reproduce malignant tumors indefinitely, and to confer resistance in response to radiation or chemotherapy. The ubiquitin modification system plays various roles in physiology and pathology. The key component for the specificity of this system is ubiquitin ligases (E3s). Of these E3s, the majority are RING finger proteins. Many RING finger E3s, such as the Cullin1-Skp1-F-box protein (SCF) E3s, CBL, BRCA1, MDM2 and von Hippel-Lindau tumour suppressor (VHL), are crucial in the regulation of cell-cycle progression and cell differentiation. As a result, many RING finger E3s are implicated in the positive and negative regulation of CSC maintenance. This review summarizes current knowledge in this research field. PMID:27358852

  4. Fbxo45, a Novel Ubiquitin Ligase, Regulates Synaptic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Hirobumi; Okano, Hirotaka James; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shibata, Shinsuke; Yao, Ikuko; Matsumoto, Masaki; Saiga, Toru; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Kashima, Haruo; Takahashi, Takuya; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Okano, Hideyuki

    2010-01-01

    Neurons communicate with each other through synapses. To establish the precise yet flexible connections that make up neural networks in the brain, continuous synaptic modulation is required. The ubiquitin-proteasome system of protein degradation is one of the critical mechanisms that underlie this process, playing crucial roles in the regulation of synaptic structure and function. We identified a novel ubiquitin ligase, Fbxo45, that functions at synapses. Fbxo45 is evolutionarily conserved and selectively expressed in the nervous system. We demonstrated that the knockdown of Fbxo45 in primary cultured hippocampal neurons resulted in a greater frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. We also found that Fbxo45 induces the degradation of a synaptic vesicle-priming factor, Munc13-1. We propose that Fbxo45 plays an important role in the regulation of neurotransmission by modulating Munc13-1 at the synapse. PMID:19996097

  5. RBR ubiquitin ligases: Diversification and streamlining in animal lineages.

    PubMed

    Marín, Ignacio

    2009-07-01

    The patterns of emergence and disappearance in animal species of genes encoding RBR ubiquitin ligases are described. RBR genes can be classified into subfamilies (Parkin, Ariadne, Dorfin, ARA54, etc.) according to sequence and structural data. Here, I show that most animal-specific RBR subfamilies emerged early in animal evolution, and that ancient animals, before the cnidarian/bilaterian split, had a set of RBR genes, which was as complex as the one currently found in mammals. However, some lineages (nematodes, dipteran insects) have recently suffered multiple losses, leading to a highly simplified set of RBR genes. Genes of a particular RBR subfamily, characterized by containing a helicase domain and so far found only in plants, are present also in some animal species. The meaning of these patterns of diversification and streamlining are discussed at the light of functional data. Extreme evolutionary conservation may be related to gene products having housekeeping functions. PMID:19526189

  6. PARC and CUL7 form atypical cullin RING ligase complexes.

    PubMed

    Skaar, Jeffrey R; Florens, Laurence; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Arai, Takehiro; Tron, Adriana; Swanson, Selene K; Washburn, Michael P; DeCaprio, James A

    2007-03-01

    CUL7 and the p53-associated, PARkin-like cytoplasmic protein (PARC) were previously reported to form homodimers and heterodimers, the first demonstration of cullin dimerization. Although a CUL7-based SKP1/CUL1/F-box (SCF)-like complex has been observed, little is known about the existence of a PARC-based SCF-like complex and how PARC interacts with CUL7-based complexes. To further characterize PARC-containing complexes, we examined the ability of PARC to form an SCF-like complex. PARC binds RBX1 and is covalently modified by NEDD8, defining PARC as a true cullin. However, PARC fails to bind SKP1 or F-box proteins, including the CUL7-associated FBXW8. To examine the assembly of PARC- and CUL7-containing complexes, tandem affinity purification followed by multidimensional protein identification technology were used. Multidimensional protein identification technology analysis revealed that the CUL7 interaction with FBXW8 was mutually exclusive of CUL7 binding to PARC or p53. Notably, although heterodimers of CUL7 and PARC bind p53, p53 is not required for the dimerization of CUL7 and PARC. The observed physical separation of FBXW8 and PARC is supported functionally by the generation of Parc-/-, Fbxw8-/- mice, which do not show exacerbation of the Fbxw8-/- phenotype. Finally, all of the PARC and CUL7 subcomplexes examined exhibit E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro. Together, these findings indicate that the intricate assembly of PARC- and CUL7-containing complexes is highly regulated, and multiple subcomplexes may exhibit ubiquitin ligase activity. PMID:17332328

  7. Human ITCH E3 ubiquitin ligase deficiency causes syndromic multisystem autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Naomi J; Molleston, Jean P; Strauss, Kevin A; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo; Sherman, Eric A; Squires, Robert H; Rider, Nicholas L; Chikwava, Kudakwashe R; Cummings, Oscar W; Morton, D Holmes; Puffenberger, Erik G

    2010-03-12

    Ubiquitin ligases play an important role in the regulation of the immune system. Absence of Itch E3 ubiquitin ligase in mice has been shown to cause severe autoimmune disease. Using autozygosity mapping in a large Amish kindred, we identified a linkage region on chromosome 20 and selected candidate genes for screening. We describe, in ten patients, identification of a mutation resulting in truncation of ITCH. These patients represent the first reported human phenotype associated with ITCH deficiency. These patients not only have multisystem autoimmune disease but also display morphologic and developmental abnormalities. This disorder underscores the importance of ITCH ubiquitin ligase in many cellular processes. PMID:20170897

  8. Human ITCH E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Deficiency Causes Syndromic Multisystem Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Naomi J.; Molleston, Jean P.; Strauss, Kevin A.; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo; Sherman, Eric A.; Squires, Robert H.; Rider, Nicholas L.; Chikwava, Kudakwashe R.; Cummings, Oscar W.; Morton, D. Holmes; Puffenberger, Erik G.

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitin ligases play an important role in the regulation of the immune system. Absence of Itch E3 ubiquitin ligase in mice has been shown to cause severe autoimmune disease. Using autozygosity mapping in a large Amish kindred, we identified a linkage region on chromosome 20 and selected candidate genes for screening. We describe, in ten patients, identification of a mutation resulting in truncation of ITCH. These patients represent the first reported human phenotype associated with ITCH deficiency. These patients not only have multisystem autoimmune disease but also display morphologic and developmental abnormalities. This disorder underscores the importance of ITCH ubiquitin ligase in many cellular processes. PMID:20170897

  9. Protein Interaction Screening for the Ankyrin Repeats and Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) Box (ASB) Family Identify Asb11 as a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Resident Ubiquitin Ligase*

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Christina Aaen; Smedegaard, Stine; Sylvestersen, Kathrine Beck; Svensson, Charlotte; Iglesias-Gato, Diego; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Nielsen, Tine Kragh; Nielsen, Michael Lund; Flores-Morales, Amilcar

    2014-01-01

    The ankyrin and SOCS (suppressor of cytokine signaling) box (ASB) family of proteins function as the substrate recognition subunit in a subset of Elongin-Cullin-SOCS (ECS) E3 ubiquitin ligases. Despite counting 18 members in humans, the identity of the physiological targets of the Asb proteins remains largely unexplored. To increase our understanding of the function of ASB proteins, we conducted a family-wide SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture)-based protein/protein interaction analysis. This investigation led to the identification of novel as well as known ASB-associated proteins like Cullin 5 and Elongins B/C. We observed that several proteins can be bound by more than one Asb protein. The additional exploration of this phenomenon demonstrated that ASB-Cullin 5 complexes can oligomerize and provides evidence that Cullin 5 forms heterodimeric complexes with the Cullin 4a-DDB1 complex. We also demonstrated that ASB11 is a novel endoplasmic reticulum-associated ubiquitin ligase with the ability to interact and promote the ubiquitination of Ribophorin 1, an integral protein of the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) glycosylation complex. Moreover, expression of ASB11 can increase Ribophorin 1 protein turnover in vivo. In summary, we provide a comprehensive protein/protein interaction data resource that can aid the biological and functional characterization of ASB ubiquitin ligases. PMID:24337577

  10. Arabidopsis RZFP34/CHYR1, a Ubiquitin E3 Ligase, Regulates Stomatal Movement and Drought Tolerance via SnRK2.6-Mediated Phosphorylation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone that plays a fundamental role in plant development and stress response, especially in the regulation of stomatal closure in response to water deficit stress. The signal transduction that occurs in response to ABA and drought stress is mediated by protein phosphorylation and ubiquitination. This research identified Arabidopsis thaliana RING ZINC-FINGER PROTEIN34 (RZP34; renamed here as CHY ZINC-FINGER AND RING PROTEIN1 [CHYR1]) as an ubiquitin E3 ligase. CHYR1 expression was significantly induced by ABA and drought, and along with its corresponding protein, was expressed mainly in vascular tissues and stomata. Analysis of CHYR1 gain-of-function and loss-of-function plants revealed that CHYR1 promotes ABA-induced stomatal closure, reactive oxygen species production, and plant drought tolerance. Furthermore, CHYR1 interacted with SNF1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE2 (SnRK2) kinases and could be phosphorylated by SnRK2.6 on the Thr-178 residue. Overexpression of CHYR1T178A, a phosphorylation-deficient mutant, interfered with the proper function of CHYR1, whereas CHYR1T178D phenocopied the gain of function of CHYR1. Thus, this study identified a RING-type ubiquitin E3 ligase that functions positively in ABA and drought responses and detailed how its ubiquitin E3 ligase activity is regulated by SnRK2.6-mediated protein phosphorylation. PMID:26508764

  11. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder Mirror Dynamics Using the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, C.; Hadaway, J.; Olczak, G.; Cosentino, J.; Johnston, J.; Whitman, T.; Connolly, M.; Chaney, D.; Knight, J.; Telfer, R.

    2016-01-01

    The JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 meter clear aperture, 18-segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  12. Structural Characterization of Modified Lignin in Transgenic Tobacco Plants in Which the Activity of 4-Coumarate:Coenzyme A Ligase Is Depressed.

    PubMed

    Kajita, S.; Hishiyama, S.; Tomimura, Y.; Katayama, Y.; Omori, S.

    1997-07-01

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants in which the activity of 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase is very low contain a novel lignin in their xylem. Details of changes in hydroxycinnamic acids bound to cell walls and in the structure of the novel lignin were identified by base hydrolysis, alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation, pyrolysis-gas chromatography, and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. In the brownish tissue of the transgenic plants, the levels of three hydroxycinnamic acids, p-coumaric, ferulic, and sinapic, which were bound to cell walls, were apparently increased as a result of down-regulation of the expression of the gene for 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase. Some of these hydroxycinnamic acids were linked to cell walls via ester and ether linkages. The accumulation of hydroxycinnamic acids also induced an increase in the level of condensed units in the novel lignin of the brownish tissue. Our data indicate that the behavior of some of the incorporated hydroxycinnamic acids resembles lignin monomers in the brownish tissue, and their accumulation results in dramatic changes in the biosynthesis of lignin in transgenic plants. PMID:12223748

  13. The RING E3 Ligase KEEP ON GOING Modulates JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN12 Stability1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, Laurens; Ritter, Andrés; Goossens, Jonas; Durand, Astrid Nagels; Liu, Hongxia; Gu, Yangnan; Geerinck, Jan; Boter, Marta; Vanden Bossche, Robin; De Clercq, Rebecca; Van Leene, Jelle; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Solano, Roberto; Stone, Sophia; Innes, Roger W.; Callis, Judy; Goossens, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA) signaling in plants is mediated by the JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins that repress the activity of several transcription factors regulating JA-inducible gene expression. The hormone JA-isoleucine triggers the interaction of JAZ repressor proteins with the F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1), part of an S-phase kinase-associated protein1/Cullin1/F-box protein COI1 (SCFCOI1) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, and their degradation by the 26S proteasome. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the JAZ family consists of 13 members. The level of redundancy or specificity among these members is currently not well understood. Here, we characterized JAZ12, encoded by a highly expressed JAZ gene. JAZ12 interacted with the transcription factors MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4 in vivo and repressed MYC2 activity. Using tandem affinity purification, we found JAZ12 to interact with SCFCOI1 components, matching with observed in vivo ubiquitination and with rapid degradation after treatment with JA. In contrast to the other JAZ proteins, JAZ12 also interacted directly with the E3 RING ligase KEEP ON GOING (KEG), a known repressor of the ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5 transcription factor in abscisic acid signaling. To study the functional role of this interaction, we circumvented the lethality of keg loss-of-function mutants by silencing KEG using an artificial microRNA approach. Abscisic acid treatment promoted JAZ12 degradation, and KEG knockdown led to a decrease in JAZ12 protein levels. Correspondingly, KEG overexpression was capable of partially inhibiting COI1-mediated JAZ12 degradation. Our results provide additional evidence for KEG as an important factor in plant hormone signaling and a positive regulator of JAZ12 stability. PMID:26320228

  14. Synthesis of bisphosphonate derivatives of ATP by T4 DNA ligase, ubiquitin activating enzyme (E1) and other ligases.

    PubMed

    Günther Sillero, María A; de Diego, Anabel; Pérez-Zúñiga, Francisco J; Sillero, Antonio

    2008-05-15

    T4 DNA ligase and the ubiquitin activating enzyme (E1), catalyze the synthesis of ATP beta,gamma-bisphosphonate derivatives. Concerning T4 DNA ligase: (i) etidronate (pC(OH)(CH(3))p) displaced the AMP moiety of the complex E-AMP in a concentration dependent manner; (ii) the K(m) values and the rate of synthesis k(cat) (s(-1)), determined for the following compounds were, respectively: etidronate, 0.73+/-0.09 mM and (70+/-10)x10(-3) s(-1); clodronate (pCCl(2)p), 0.08+/-0.01 mM and (4.1+/-0.3)x10(-3) s(-1); methylenebisphosphonate (pCH(2)p), 0.024+/-0.001 mM and (0.6+/-0.1)x10(-3) s(-1); tripolyphosphate (P(3)) (in the synthesis of adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate, p(4)A), 1.30+/-0.30 mM and (6.2+/-1.1)x10(-3) s(-1); (iii) in the presence of GTP and ATP, inhibition of the synthesis of Ap(4)G was observed with clodronate but not with pamidronate (pC(OH)(CH(2)-CH(2)-NH(3))p). Concerning the ubiquitin activating enzyme (E1): methylenebisphosphonate was the only bisphosphonate, out of the ones tested, that served as substrate for the synthesis of an ATP derivative (K(m)=0.36+/-0.09 mM and k(cat)=0.15+/-0.02 s(-1)). None of the above bisphosphonates were substrates of the reaction catalyzed by luciferase or by acyl-CoA synthetase. The ability of acetyl-CoA synthetase to use methylenebisphosphonate as substrate depended on the commercial source of the enzyme. In our view this report widens our knowledge of the enzymes able to metabolize bisphosphonates, a therapeutic tool widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:18378215

  15. Regulatory and functional diversity of methylmercaptopropionate coenzyme A ligases from the dimethylsulfoniopropionate demethylation pathway in Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3 and other proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Hannah A; Reisch, Chris R; Burns, Andrew S; Moran, Mary Ann; Whitman, William B

    2014-03-01

    The organosulfur compound dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is produced by phytoplankton and is ubiquitous in the surface ocean. Once released from phytoplankton, marine bacteria degrade DMSP by either the cleavage pathway to form the volatile gas dimethylsulfide (DMS) or the demethylation pathway, yielding methanethiol (MeSH), which is readily assimilated or oxidized. The enzyme DmdB, a methylmercaptopropionate (MMPA)-coenzyme A (CoA) ligase, catalyzes the second step in the demethylation pathway and is a major regulatory point. The two forms of DmdB present in the marine roseobacter Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, RPO_DmdB1 and RPO_DmdB2, and the single form in the SAR11 clade bacterium "Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique" HTCC1062, PU_DmdB1, were characterized in detail. DmdB enzymes were also examined from Ruegeria lacuscaerulensis ITI-1157, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, and Burkholderia thailandensis E264. The DmdB enzymes separated into two phylogenetic clades. All enzymes had activity with MMPA and were sensitive to inhibition by salts, but there was no correlation between the clades and substrate specificity or salt sensitivity. All Ruegeria species enzymes were inhibited by physiological concentrations (70 mM) of DMSP. However, ADP reversed the inhibition of RPO_DmdB1, suggesting that this enzyme was responsive to cellular energy charge. MMPA reversed the inhibition of RPO_DmdB2 as well as both R. lacuscaerulensis ITI-1157 DmdB enzymes, suggesting that a complex regulatory system exists in marine bacteria. In contrast, the DmdBs of the non-DMSP-metabolizing P. aeruginosa PAO1 and B. thailandensis E264 were not inhibited by DMSP, suggesting that DMSP inhibition is a specific adaptation of DmdBs from marine bacteria. PMID:24443527

  16. Gln40 deamidation blocks structural reconfiguration and activation of SCF ubiquitin ligase complex by Nedd8

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Clinton; Mao, Haibin; Novitsky, Eric J.; Tang, Xiaobo; Rychnovsky, Scott D.; Zheng, Ning; Huang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    The full enzymatic activity of the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) requires a ubiquitin-like protein (that is, Nedd8) modification. By deamidating Gln40 of Nedd8 to glutamate (Q40E), the bacterial cycle-inhibiting factor (Cif) family is able to inhibit CRL E3 activities, thereby interfering with cellular functions. Despite extensive structural studies on CRLs, the molecular mechanism by which Nedd8 Gln40 deamidation affects CRL functions remains unclear. We apply a new quantitative cross-linking mass spectrometry approach to characterize three different types of full-length human Cul1–Rbx1 complexes and uncover major Nedd8-induced structural rearrangements of the CRL1 catalytic core. More importantly, we find that those changes are not induced by Nedd8(Q40E) conjugation, indicating that the subtle change of a single Nedd8 amino acid is sufficient to revert the structure of the CRL catalytic core back to its unmodified form. Our results provide new insights into how neddylation regulates the conformation and activity of CRLs. PMID:26632597

  17. Membrane-Associated Ubiquitin Ligase SAUL1 Suppresses Temperature- and Humidity-Dependent Autoimmunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Disch, Eva-Maria; Tong, Meixuezi; Kotur, Tanja; Koch, Gerald; Wolf, Carl-Asmus; Li, Xin; Hoth, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved elaborate mechanisms to regulate pathogen defense. Imbalances in this regulation may result in autoimmune responses that are affecting plant growth and development. In Arabidopsis, SAUL1 encodes a plant U-box ubiquitin ligase and regulates senescence and cell death. Here, we show that saul1-1 plants exhibit characteristics of an autoimmune mutant. A decrease in relative humidity or temperature resulted in reduced growth and systemic lesioning of saul1-1 rosettes. These physiological changes are associated with increased expression of salicylic acid-dependent and pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Consistently, resistance of saul1-1 plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326, P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, or Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis Noco2 was enhanced. Transmission electron microscopy revealed alterations in saul1-1 chloroplast ultrastructure and cell-wall depositions. Confocal analysis on aniline blue-stained leaf sections and cellular universal micro spectrophotometry further showed that these cell-wall depositions contain callose and lignin. To analyze signaling downstream of SAUL1, we performed epistasis analyses between saul1-1 and mutants in the EDS1/PAD4/SAG101 hub. All phenotypes observed in saul1-1 plants at low temperature were dependent on EDS1 and PAD4 but not SAG101. Taken together, SAUL1 negatively regulates immunity upstream of EDS1/PAD4, likely through the degradation of an unknown activator of the pathway. PMID:26505534

  18. Arabidopsis nitrate reductase activity is stimulated by the E3 SUMO ligase AtSIZ1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bong Soo; Song, Jong Tae; Seo, Hak Soo

    2011-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is a small polypeptide that modulates protein activity and regulates hormone signalling, abiotic and biotic responses in plants. Here we show that AtSIZ regulates nitrogen assimilation in Arabidopsis through its E3 SUMO ligase function. Dwarf plants of siz1-2 flower early, show abnormal seed development and have high salicylic acid content and enhanced resistance to bacterial pathogens. These mutant phenotypes are reverted to wild-type phenotypes by exogenous ammonium but not by nitrate, phosphate or potassium. Decreased nitrate reductase activity in siz1-2 plants resulted in low nitrogen concentrations, low nitric oxide production and high nitrate content in comparison with wild-type plants. The nitrate reductases, NIA1 and NIA2, are sumoylated by AtSIZ1, which dramatically increases their activity. Both sumoylated and non-sumoylated NIA1 and NIA2 can form dimers. Our results indicate that AtSIZ1 positively controls nitrogen assimilation by promoting sumoylation of NRs in Arabidopsis. PMID:21772271

  19. Proteomic analysis and identification of cellular interactors of the giant ubiquitin ligase HERC2.

    PubMed

    Galligan, Jeffrey T; Martinez-Noël, Gustavo; Arndt, Verena; Hayes, Sebastian; Chittenden, Thomas W; Harper, J Wade; Howley, Peter M

    2015-02-01

    HERC2 is a large E3 ubiquitin ligase with multiple structural domains that has been implicated in an array of cellular processes. Mutations in HERC2 are linked to developmental delays and impairment caused by nervous system dysfunction, such as Angelman Syndrome and autism-spectrum disorders. However, HERC2 cellular activity and regulation remain poorly understood. We used a broad proteomic approach to survey the landscape of cellular proteins that interact with HERC2. We identified nearly 300 potential interactors, a subset of which we validated binding to HERC2. The potential HERC2 interactors included the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 complex, the intracellular transport COPI coatomer complex, the glycogen regulator phosphorylase kinase, beta-catenin, PI3 kinase, and proteins involved in fatty acid transport and iron homeostasis. Through a complex bioinformatic analysis of potential interactors, we linked HERC2 to cellular processes including intracellular protein trafficking and transport, metabolism of cellular energy, and protein translation. Given its size, multidomain structure, and association with various cellular activities, HERC2 may function as a scaffold to integrate protein complexes and bridge critical cellular pathways. This work provides a significant resource with which to interrogate HERC2 function more deeply and evaluate its contributions to mechanisms governing cellular homeostasis and disease. PMID:25476789

  20. An allosteric inhibitor of substrate recognition by the SCF[superscript Cdc4] ubiquitin ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Orlicky, Stephen; Tang, Xiaojing; Neduva, Victor; Elowe, Nadine; Brown, Eric D.; Sicheri, Frank; Tyers, Mike

    2010-09-17

    The specificity of SCF ubiquitin ligase-mediated protein degradation is determined by F-box proteins. We identified a biplanar dicarboxylic acid compound, called SCF-I2, as an inhibitor of substrate recognition by the yeast F-box protein Cdc4 using a fluorescence polarization screen to monitor the displacement of a fluorescein-labeled phosphodegron peptide. SCF-I2 inhibits the binding and ubiquitination of full-length phosphorylated substrates by SCF{sup Cdc4}. A co-crystal structure reveals that SCF-I2 inserts itself between the {beta}-strands of blades 5 and 6 of the WD40 propeller domain of Cdc4 at a site that is 25 {angstrom} away from the substrate binding site. Long-range transmission of SCF-I2 interactions distorts the substrate binding pocket and impedes recognition of key determinants in the Cdc4 phosphodegron. Mutation of the SCF-I2 binding site abrogates its inhibitory effect and explains specificity in the allosteric inhibition mechanism. Mammalian WD40 domain proteins may exhibit similar allosteric responsiveness and hence represent an extensive class of druggable target.

  1. Transcriptional repressor NIR interacts with the p53-inhibiting ubiquitin ligase MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Kristina; Förster, Juliane; Schüle, Roland; Roemer, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    NIR (novel INHAT repressor) can bind to p53 at promoters and inhibit p53-mediated gene transactivation by blocking histone acetylation carried out by p300/CBP. Like NIR, the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 can also bind and inhibit p53 at promoters. Here, we present data indicating that NIR, which shuttles between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, not only binds to p53 but also directly to MDM2, in part via the central acidic and zinc finger domain of MDM2 that is also contacted by several other nucleolus-based MDM2/p53-regulating proteins. Like some of these, NIR was able to inhibit the ubiquitination of MDM2 and stabilize MDM2; however, unlike these nucleolus-based MDM2 regulators, NIR did not inhibit MDM2 to activate p53. Rather, NIR cooperated with MDM2 to repress p53-induced transactivation. This cooperative repression may at least in part involve p300/CBP. We show that NIR can block the acetylation of p53 and MDM2. Non-acetylated p53 has been documented previously to more readily associate with inhibitory MDM2. NIR may thus help to sustain the inhibitory p53:MDM2 complex, and we present evidence suggesting that all three proteins can indeed form a ternary complex. In sum, our findings suggest that NIR can support MDM2 to suppress p53 as a transcriptional activator. PMID:24413661

  2. Ligase chain reaction for detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in urogenital swabs.

    PubMed Central

    Ching, S; Lee, H; Hook, E W; Jacobs, M R; Zenilman, J

    1995-01-01

    The ligase chain reaction (LCR) is an in vitro nucleic acid amplification technique that exponentially amplifies targeted DNA sequences. In a multicenter study, we evaluated the use of a 4-h LCR-based assay for the diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection of the cervix and male urethra. The LCR results were compared with those of culture for N. gonorrhoeae by using selective media. This assay amplifies target sequences within the N. gonorrhoeae opacity gene. Discordant LCR-positive and culture-negative specimens were further evaluated by testing by another LCR assay which used N. gonorrhoeae-specific pilin probe sets. A total of 1,539 female endocervical specimens and 808 male urethral swab specimens were evaluated in the study. An expanded "gold standard" was defined to include all culture-positive as well as culture-negative, confirmed LCR-positive specimens. After resolution of discrepant samples, the sensitivities of the N. gonorrhoeae LCR assays for the female and male specimens were 97.3 and 98.5%, respectively, with specificities of 99.6 and 99.8%, respectively. Resolved culture sensitivities were 83.9 and 96.5% for the female and male specimens, respectively. The LCR assay for gonorrhea is a rapid, highly sensitive nonculture method for detecting gonococcal infection of the cervix and male urethra. PMID:8586683

  3. Arabidopsis nitrate reductase activity is stimulated by the E3 SUMO ligase AtSIZ1.

    PubMed

    Park, Bong Soo; Song, Jong Tae; Seo, Hak Soo

    2011-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is a small polypeptide that modulates protein activity and regulates hormone signalling, abiotic and biotic responses in plants. Here we show that AtSIZ regulates nitrogen assimilation in Arabidopsis through its E3 SUMO ligase function. Dwarf plants of siz1-2 flower early, show abnormal seed development and have high salicylic acid content and enhanced resistance to bacterial pathogens. These mutant phenotypes are reverted to wild-type phenotypes by exogenous ammonium but not by nitrate, phosphate or potassium. Decreased nitrate reductase activity in siz1-2 plants resulted in low nitrogen concentrations, low nitric oxide production and high nitrate content in comparison with wild-type plants. The nitrate reductases, NIA1 and NIA2, are sumoylated by AtSIZ1, which dramatically increases their activity. Both sumoylated and non-sumoylated NIA1 and NIA2 can form dimers. Our results indicate that AtSIZ1 positively controls nitrogen assimilation by promoting sumoylation of NRs in Arabidopsis. PMID:21772271

  4. Proteomic Analysis and Identification of Cellular Interactors of the Giant Ubiquitin Ligase HERC2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    HERC2 is a large E3 ubiquitin ligase with multiple structural domains that has been implicated in an array of cellular processes. Mutations in HERC2 are linked to developmental delays and impairment caused by nervous system dysfunction, such as Angelman Syndrome and autism-spectrum disorders. However, HERC2 cellular activity and regulation remain poorly understood. We used a broad proteomic approach to survey the landscape of cellular proteins that interact with HERC2. We identified nearly 300 potential interactors, a subset of which we validated binding to HERC2. The potential HERC2 interactors included the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 complex, the intracellular transport COPI coatomer complex, the glycogen regulator phosphorylase kinase, beta-catenin, PI3 kinase, and proteins involved in fatty acid transport and iron homeostasis. Through a complex bioinformatic analysis of potential interactors, we linked HERC2 to cellular processes including intracellular protein trafficking and transport, metabolism of cellular energy, and protein translation. Given its size, multidomain structure, and association with various cellular activities, HERC2 may function as a scaffold to integrate protein complexes and bridge critical cellular pathways. This work provides a significant resource with which to interrogate HERC2 function more deeply and evaluate its contributions to mechanisms governing cellular homeostasis and disease. PMID:25476789

  5. The ubiquitin ligase HACE1 regulates Golgi membrane dynamics during the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Danming; Xiang, Yi; De Renzis, Stefano; Rink, Jochen; Zheng, Gen; Zerial, Marino; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2012-01-01

    Partitioning of the Golgi membrane into daughter cells during mammalian cell division occurs through a unique disassembly and reassembly process that is regulated by ubiquitination. However, the identity of the ubiquitin ligase is unknown. Here we show that the Homologous to the E6-AP Carboxyl Terminus (HECT) domain containing ubiquitin ligase HACE1 is targeted to the Golgi membrane through interactions with Rab proteins. The ubiquitin ligase activity of HACE1 in mitotic Golgi disassembly is required for subsequent postmitotic Golgi membrane fusion. Depletion of HACE1 using small interfering RNAs or expression of an inactive HACE1 mutant protein in cells impaired postmitotic Golgi membrane fusion. The identification of HACE1 as a Golgi-localized ubiquitin ligase provides evidence that ubiquitin has a critical role in Golgi biogenesis during the cell cycle. PMID:21988917

  6. Functional redundancy between DNA ligases I and III in DNA replication in vertebrate cells

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Bednar, Theresa; Wang, Minli; Paul, Katja; Mladenov, Emil; Bencsik-Theilen, Alena A.; Iliakis, George

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the three families of ATP-dependent DNA ligases are associated with specific functions in DNA metabolism. DNA ligase I (LigI) catalyzes Okazaki-fragment ligation at the replication fork and nucleotide excision repair (NER). DNA ligase IV (LigIV) mediates repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) via the canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. The evolutionary younger DNA ligase III (LigIII) is restricted to higher eukaryotes and has been associated with base excision (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR). Here, using conditional knockout strategies for LIG3 and concomitant inactivation of the LIG1 and LIG4 genes, we show that in DT40 cells LigIII efficiently supports semi-conservative DNA replication. Our observations demonstrate a high functional versatility for the evolutionary new LigIII in DNA replication and mitochondrial metabolism, and suggest the presence of an alternative pathway for Okazaki fragment ligation. PMID:22127868

  7. Structure of the DNA Ligase-Adenylate Intermediate: Lysine (ε-amino)-Linked Adenosine Monophosphoramidate*

    PubMed Central

    Gumport, Richard I.; Lehman, I. R.

    1971-01-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the Escherichia coli DNA ligase-adenylate intermediate releases adenosine 5′-monophosphate linked to the ε-amino group of lysine by a phosphoamide bond. Measurements of the rate of hydroxylaminolysis of the ligase-adenylate provide further support for a phosphoamide linkage in the native enzyme. Lysine (ε-amino)-linked adenosine monophosphoramidate has also been isolated from the T4 phage-induced ligase-adenylate intermediate. These results indicate that an initial step of the DNA ligase reaction consists of the nucleophilic attack of the ε-amino group of a lysine residue of the enzyme on the adenylyl phosphorus of DPN or ATP that leads to the formation of enzyme-bound lysine (εamino)-linked adenosine monophosphoramidate. PMID:4944632

  8. Structural Basis for Nick Recognition by a Minimal Pluripotent DNA Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Nair,P.; Nandakumar, J.; Smith, P.; Odell, M.; Lima, C.; Shuman, S.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella virus DNA ligase, the smallest eukaryotic ligase known, has pluripotent biological activity and an intrinsic nick-sensing function, despite having none of the accessory domains found in cellular ligases. A 2.3-{angstrom} crystal structure of the Chlorella virus ligase-AMP intermediate bound to duplex DNA containing a 3'-OH-5'-PO{sub 4} nick reveals a new mode of DNA envelopment, in which a short surface loop emanating from the OB domain forms a {beta}-hairpin 'latch' that inserts into the DNA major groove flanking the nick. A network of interactions with the 3'-OH and 5'-PO{sub 4} termini in the active site illuminates the DNA adenylylation mechanism and the crucial roles of AMP in nick sensing and catalysis. Addition of a divalent cation triggered nick sealing in crystallo, establishing that the nick complex is a bona fide intermediate in the DNA repair pathway.

  9. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  10. Genetic effects of XRCC4 and ligase IV genes on human glioma.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Keping; Qin, Juan; Zhao, Yumei; Zhang, Honglian

    2016-09-28

    Ligase IV and XRCC4 genes, important molecules in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks, may play crucial roles in carcinogenesis. To detect their effects on the risk of human glioma, their gene expression differences between 110 human glioma tissues and 50 healthy brain tissues were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, two tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ligase IV and four SNPs in XRCC4 genes were genotyped in 317 glioma patients and 352 healthy controls. The association of glioma and ligase IV/XRCC4 was evaluated using methods for SNP, haplotype, and gene-gene interaction analysis. Compared with those in normal brain tissues, the relative gene expression levels of ligase IV and XRCC4 were significantly downregulated in glioma tissue (P=0.0017 and 0.0006, respectively). Single SNP analysis indicated that only rs10131 in ligase IV remained significantly associated with glioma (P=0.0036) after 10 000 permutation tests. Haplotype analysis showed that the haplotype profiles of ligase IV and XRCC4 were significantly different between glioma patients and healthy controls (P=0.004 and 3.13E-6, respectively). Finally, the gene-gene interaction analysis suggested that the three-locus model (rs1805388, rs10131, and rs2075685) was the best model for ligase IV and XRCC4 to have interaction effects on the risk of glioma. In conclusion, both ligase IV and XRCC4 may act in concert to modulate the development of glioma. PMID:27508978

  11. Comprehensive database of human E3 ubiquitin ligases: application to aquaporin-2 regulation.

    PubMed

    Medvar, Barbara; Raghuram, Viswanathan; Pisitkun, Trairak; Sarkar, Abhijit; Knepper, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is regulated in part via vasopressin-mediated changes in protein half-life that are in turn dependent on AQP2 ubiquitination. Here we addressed the question, "What E3 ubiquitin ligase is most likely to be responsible for AQP2 ubiquitination?" using large-scale data integration based on Bayes' rule. The first step was to bioinformatically identify all E3 ligase genes coded by the human genome. The 377 E3 ubiquitin ligases identified in the human genome, consisting predominant of HECT, RING, and U-box proteins, have been used to create a publically accessible and downloadable online database (https://hpcwebapps.cit.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/E3-ligases/). We also curated a second database of E3 ligase accessory proteins that included BTB domain proteins, cullins, SOCS-box proteins, and F-box proteins. Using Bayes' theorem to integrate information from multiple large-scale proteomic and transcriptomic datasets, we ranked these 377 E3 ligases with respect to their probability of interaction with AQP2. Application of Bayes' rule identified the E3 ligases most likely to interact with AQP2 as (in order of probability): NEDD4 and NEDD4L (tied for first), AMFR, STUB1, ITCH, ZFPL1. Significantly, the two E3 ligases tied for top rank have also been studied extensively in the reductionist literature as regulatory proteins in renal tubule epithelia. The concordance of conclusions from reductionist and systems-level data provides strong motivation for further studies of the roles of NEDD4 and NEDD4L in the regulation of AQP2 protein turnover. PMID:27199454

  12. Fragment-based discovery of 6-azaindazoles as inhibitors of bacterial DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Howard, Steven; Amin, Nader; Benowitz, Andrew B; Chiarparin, Elisabetta; Cui, Haifeng; Deng, Xiaodong; Heightman, Tom D; Holmes, David J; Hopkins, Anna; Huang, Jianzhong; Jin, Qi; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Martin, Agnes C L; Massey, Frances; McCloskey, Lynn; Mortenson, Paul N; Pathuri, Puja; Tisi, Dominic; Williams, Pamela A

    2013-12-12

    Herein we describe the application of fragment-based drug design to bacterial DNA ligase. X-ray crystallography was used to guide structure-based optimization of a fragment-screening hit to give novel, nanomolar, AMP-competitive inhibitors. The lead compound 13 showed antibacterial activity across a range of pathogens. Data to demonstrate mode of action was provided using a strain of S. aureus, engineered to overexpress DNA ligase. PMID:24900632

  13. Fragment-Based Discovery of 6-Azaindazoles As Inhibitors of Bacterial DNA Ligase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Herein we describe the application of fragment-based drug design to bacterial DNA ligase. X-ray crystallography was used to guide structure-based optimization of a fragment-screening hit to give novel, nanomolar, AMP-competitive inhibitors. The lead compound 13 showed antibacterial activity across a range of pathogens. Data to demonstrate mode of action was provided using a strain of S. aureus, engineered to overexpress DNA ligase. PMID:24900632

  14. Structure of the HHARI Catalytic Domain Shows Glimpses of a HECT E3 Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Donald E.; Mercier, Pascal; Shaw, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin-signaling pathway utilizes E1 activating, E2 conjugating, and E3 ligase enzymes to sequentially transfer the small modifier protein ubiquitin to a substrate protein. During the last step of this cascade different types of E3 ligases either act as scaffolds to recruit an E2 enzyme and substrate (RING), or form an ubiquitin-thioester intermediate prior to transferring ubiquitin to a substrate (HECT). The RING-inBetweenRING-RING (RBR) proteins constitute a unique group of E3 ubiquitin ligases that includes the Human Homologue of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI). These E3 ligases are proposed to use a hybrid RING/HECT mechanism whereby the enzyme uses facets of both the RING and HECT enzymes to transfer ubiquitin to a substrate. We now present the solution structure of the HHARI RING2 domain, the key portion of this E3 ligase required for the RING/HECT hybrid mechanism. The structure shows the domain possesses two Zn2+-binding sites and a single exposed cysteine used for ubiquitin catalysis. A structural comparison of the RING2 domain with the HECT E3 ligase NEDD4 reveals a near mirror image of the cysteine and histidine residues in the catalytic site. Further, a tandem pair of aromatic residues exists near the C-terminus of the HHARI RING2 domain that is conserved in other RBR E3 ligases. One of these aromatic residues is remotely located from the catalytic site that is reminiscent of the location found in HECT E3 enzymes where it is used for ubiquitin catalysis. These observations provide an initial structural rationale for the RING/HECT hybrid mechanism for ubiquitination used by the RBR E3 ligases. PMID:24058416

  15. Characterization of a novel eukaryal nick-sealing RNA ligase from Naegleria gruberi

    PubMed Central

    Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    The proteome of the amoebo-flagellate protozoan Naegleria gruberi is rich in candidate RNA repair enzymes, including 15 putative RNA ligases, one of which, NgrRnl, is a eukaryal homolog of Deinococcus radiodurans RNA ligase, DraRnl. Here we report that purified recombinant NgrRnl seals nicked 3′-OH/5′-PO4 duplexes in which the 3′-OH strand is RNA. It does so via the “classic” ligase pathway, entailing reaction with ATP to form a covalent NgrRnl–AMP intermediate, transfer of AMP to the nick 5′-PO4, and attack of the RNA 3′-OH on the adenylylated nick to form a 3′–5′ phosphodiester. Unlike members of the four known families of ATP-dependent RNA ligases, NgrRnl lacks a carboxy-terminal appendage to its nucleotidyltransferase domain. Instead, it contains a defining amino-terminal domain that we show is important for 3′-OH/5′-PO4 nick-sealing and ligase adenylylation, but dispensable for phosphodiester synthesis at a preadenylylated nick. We propose that NgrRnl, DraRnl, and their homologs from diverse bacteria, viruses, and unicellular eukarya comprise a new “Rnl5 family” of nick-sealing ligases with a signature domain organization. PMID:25740837

  16. Structure and two-metal mechanism of a eukaryal nick-sealing RNA ligase

    PubMed Central

    Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Goldgur, Yehuda; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    ATP-dependent RNA ligases are agents of RNA repair that join 3′-OH and 5′-PO4 RNA ends. Naegleria gruberi RNA ligase (NgrRnl) exemplifies a family of RNA nick-sealing enzymes found in bacteria, viruses, and eukarya. Crystal structures of NgrRnl at three discrete steps along the reaction pathway—covalent ligase-(lysyl-Nζ)–AMP•Mn2+ intermediate; ligase•ATP•(Mn2+)2 Michaelis complex; and ligase•Mn2+ complex—highlight a two-metal mechanism of nucleotidyl transfer, whereby (i) an enzyme-bound “catalytic” metal coordination complex lowers the pKa of the lysine nucleophile and stabilizes the transition state of the ATP α phosphate; and (ii) a second metal coordination complex bridges the β- and γ-phosphates. The NgrRnl N domain is a distinctively embellished oligonucleotide-binding (OB) fold that engages the γ-phosphate and associated metal complex and orients the pyrophosphate leaving group for in-line catalysis with stereochemical inversion at the AMP phosphate. The unique domain architecture of NgrRnl fortifies the theme that RNA ligases have evolved many times, and independently, by fusions of a shared nucleotidyltransferase domain to structurally diverse flanking modules. The mechanistic insights to lysine adenylylation gained from the NgrRnl structures are likely to apply broadly to the covalent nucleotidyltransferase superfamily of RNA ligases, DNA ligases, and RNA capping enzymes. PMID:26512110

  17. Cullin 3 Ubiquitin Ligases in Cancer Biology: Functions and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Ruey-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases are the largest E3 ligase family in eukaryotes and are multiprotein complexes. In these complexes, the Cullin protein serves as a scaffold to connect two functional modules of the ligases, the catalytic subunit and substrate-binding subunit. To date, eight members of the Cullin family proteins have been identified. In the Cul3 ubiquitin ligases, Bric-a-brac/Tramtrack/Broad complex (BTB) domain-containing proteins function as a bridge to connect Cul3 and substrates. While the BTB domain is responsible for Cul3 binding, these proteins usually contain an additional domain for substrate interaction, such as MATH, kelch, Zn finger, and PAM, Highwire, and RPM-1 (PHR domain). With the existence of a large number of BTB proteins in human, the Cul3 ubiquitin ligases ubiquitinate a wide range of substrates involving in diverse cellular functions. In this review, we will discuss recent advances on the functions of Cul3 ubiquitin ligases in cancer development, progression, and therapeutic response and the dysregulation of Cul3-mediated ubiquitination events in human malignancies. In particular, we will focus on three Cul3 substrate adaptors, kelch-like ECH-associated protein (Keap1), kelch-like family member 20 (KLHL20), and speckle type BTB/POZ protein (SPOP), with the intent to highlight novel targets in cancer therapy. PMID:27200299

  18. Discovery and design of DNA and RNA ligase inhibitors in infectious microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Robert V.; Amaro, Rommie E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Members of the nucleotidyltransferase superfamily known as DNA and RNA ligases carry out the enzymatic process of polynucleotide ligation. These guardians of genomic integrity share a three-step ligation mechanism, as well as common core structural elements. Both DNA and RNA ligases have experienced a surge of recent interest as chemotherapeutic targets for the treatment of a range of diseases, including bacterial infection, cancer, and the diseases caused by the protozoan parasites known as trypanosomes. Objective In this review, we will focus on efforts targeting pathogenic microorganisms; specifically, bacterial NAD+-dependent DNA ligases, which are promising broad-spectrum antibiotic targets, and ATP-dependent RNA editing ligases from Trypanosoma brucei, the species responsible for the devastating neurodegenerative disease, African sleeping sickness. Conclusion High quality crystal structures of both NAD+-dependent DNA ligase and the Trypanosoma brucei RNA editing ligase have facilitated the development of a number of promising leads. For both targets, further progress will require surmounting permeability issues and improving selectivity and affinity. PMID:20354588

  19. A diverse superfamily of enzymes with ATP-dependent carboxylate-amine/thiol ligase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, M. Y.; Koonin, E. V.

    1997-01-01

    The recently developed PSI-BLAST method for sequence database search and methods for motif analysis were used to define and expand a superfamily of enzymes with an unusual nucleotide-binding fold, referred to as palmate, or ATP-grasp fold. In addition to D-alanine-D-alanine ligase, glutathione synthetase, biotin carboxylase, and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, enzymes with known three-dimensional structures, the ATP-grasp domain is predicted in the ribosomal protein S6 modification enzyme (RimK), urea amidolyase, tubulin-tyrosine ligase, and three enzymes of purine biosynthesis. All these enzymes possess ATP-dependent carboxylate-amine ligase activity, and their catalytic mechanisms are likely to include acylphosphate intermediates. The ATP-grasp superfamily also includes succinate-CoA ligase (both ADP-forming and GDP-forming variants), malate-CoA ligase, and ATP-citrate lyase, enzymes with a carboxylate-thiol ligase activity, and several uncharacterized proteins. These findings significantly extend the variety of the substrates of ATP-grasp enzymes and the range of biochemical pathways in which they are involved, and demonstrate the complementarity between structural comparison and powerful methods for sequence analysis. PMID:9416615

  20. Recent progress in the discovery and development of stearoyl CoA desaturase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yoshikazu

    2016-05-01

    Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids from their saturated fatty acid precursors. SCD1 introduces a cis-double bond at the Δ9 position (between carbons 9 and 10) of stearoyl (C18:0) and palmitoyl-CoA (C16:0). SCD1 has been shown to be a crucial factor in lipid metabolism and body weight control. In addition, SCD1 inhibitors are claimed to be new treatments for various diseases, such as skin disorders, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), hepatitis C virus (HCV), Alzheimer's disease, or cancer. This review aims to summarize the examples of the recently reported novel SCD1 inhibitors and to highlight the emerging areas of target indications that may hold promise for the development of SCD1 inhibitors. PMID:26344107

  1. DNA ligase III is the major high molecular weight DNA joining activity in SV40-transformed human fibroblasts: normal levels of DNA ligase III activity in Bloom syndrome cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tomkinson, A E; Starr, R; Schultz, R A

    1993-01-01

    The phenotypes of cultured cell lines established from individuals with Bloom syndrome (BLM), including an elevated spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), are consistent with a defect in DNA joining. We have investigated the levels of DNA ligase I and DNA ligase III in an SV40-transformed control and BLM fibroblast cell line, as well as clonal derivatives of the BLM cell line complemented or not for the elevated SCE phenotype. No differences in either DNA ligase I or DNA ligase III were detected in extracts from these cell lines. Furthermore, the data indicate that in dividing cultures of SV40-transformed fibroblasts, DNA ligase III contributes > 85% of high molecular weight DNA joining activity. This observation contrasts with previous studies in which DNA ligase I was reported to be the major DNA joining activity in extracts from proliferating mammalian cells. Images PMID:8265359

  2. Predicting the Function of 4-Coumarate:CoA Ligase (LJ4CL1) in Lonicera japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yuan; Yu, Shulin; Yu, Jun; Zhan, Zhilai; Li, Minhui; Liu, Guiming; Wang, Xumin; Huang, Luqi

    2014-01-01

    4-Coumarate:CoA ligases (4CLs) are a group of essential enzymes involved in the pathway of phenylpropanoid-derived compound metabolisms; however it is still difficult to identify orthologs and paralogs of these important enzymes just based on sequence similarity of the conserved domains. Using sequence data of 20 plant species from the public databases and sequences from Lonicera japonica, we define 1252 adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-dependent synthetase/ligase sequences and classify them into three phylogenetic clades. 4CLs are in one of the four subgroups, according to their partitioning, with known proteins characterized in A. thaliana and Oryza sativa. We also defined 184 non-redundant sequences that encode proteins containing the GEICIRG motif and the taxonomic distribution of these GEICIRG-containing proteins suggests unique catalytic activities in plants. We further analyzed their transcription levels in L. japonica and L. japonica. var. chinensis flowers and chose the highest expressed genes representing the subgroups for structure and binding site predictions. Coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of the L. japonica flowers, the structural study on putative substrate binding amino acid residues, ferulate, and 4-coumaric acid of the conserved binding-site of LJ4CL1 leads to a conclusion that this highly expressed protein group in the flowers may process 4-coumarate that represents 90% of the known phenylpropanoid-derived compounds. The activity of purified crude LJ4CL1 protein was analyzed using 4-coumarate as template and high activity indicating that 4-coumarate is one of the substrates of LJ4CL1. PMID:24518682

  3. Structural basis of tubulin tyrosination by tubulin tyrosine ligase.

    PubMed

    Prota, Andrea E; Magiera, Maria M; Kuijpers, Marijn; Bargsten, Katja; Frey, Daniel; Wieser, Mara; Jaussi, Rolf; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Kammerer, Richard A; Janke, Carsten; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2013-02-01

    Tubulin tyrosine ligase (TTL) catalyzes the post-translational retyrosination of detyrosinated α-tubulin. Despite the indispensable role of TTL in cell and organism development, its molecular mechanism of action is poorly understood. By solving crystal structures of TTL in complex with tubulin, we here demonstrate that TTL binds to the α and β subunits of tubulin and recognizes the curved conformation of the dimer. Biochemical and cellular assays revealed that specific tubulin dimer recognition controls the activity of the enzyme, and as a consequence, neuronal development. The TTL-tubulin structure further illustrates how the enzyme binds the functionally crucial C-terminal tail sequence of α-tubulin and how this interaction catalyzes the tyrosination reaction. It also reveals how TTL discriminates between α- and β-tubulin, and between different post-translationally modified forms of α-tubulin. Together, our data suggest that TTL has specifically evolved to recognize and modify tubulin, thus highlighting a fundamental role of the evolutionary conserved tubulin tyrosination cycle in regulating the microtubule cytoskeleton. PMID:23358242

  4. Biotin Protein Ligase Is a Target for New Antibacterials.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiage; Paparella, Ashleigh S; Booker, Grant W; Polyak, Steven W; Abell, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    There is a desperate need for novel antibiotic classes to combat the rise of drug resistant pathogenic bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Inhibitors of the essential metabolic enzyme biotin protein ligase (BPL) represent a promising drug target for new antibacterials. Structural and biochemical studies on the BPL from S. aureus have paved the way for the design and development of new antibacterial chemotherapeutics. BPL employs an ordered ligand binding mechanism for the synthesis of the reaction intermediate biotinyl-5'-AMP from substrates biotin and ATP. Here we review the structure and catalytic mechanism of the target enzyme, along with an overview of chemical analogues of biotin and biotinyl-5'-AMP as BPL inhibitors reported to date. Of particular promise are studies to replace the labile phosphoroanhydride linker present in biotinyl-5'-AMP with alternative bioisosteres. A novel in situ click approach using a mutant of S. aureus BPL as a template for the synthesis of triazole-based inhibitors is also presented. These approaches can be widely applied to BPLs from other bacteria, as well as other closely related metabolic enzymes and antibacterial drug targets. PMID:27463729

  5. Structural basis of tubulin tyrosination by tubulin tyrosine ligase

    PubMed Central

    Prota, Andrea E.; Magiera, Maria M.; Kuijpers, Marijn; Bargsten, Katja; Frey, Daniel; Wieser, Mara; Jaussi, Rolf; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; Kammerer, Richard A.; Janke, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin tyrosine ligase (TTL) catalyzes the post-translational retyrosination of detyrosinated α-tubulin. Despite the indispensable role of TTL in cell and organism development, its molecular mechanism of action is poorly understood. By solving crystal structures of TTL in complex with tubulin, we here demonstrate that TTL binds to the α and β subunits of tubulin and recognizes the curved conformation of the dimer. Biochemical and cellular assays revealed that specific tubulin dimer recognition controls the activity of the enzyme, and as a consequence, neuronal development. The TTL–tubulin structure further illustrates how the enzyme binds the functionally crucial C-terminal tail sequence of α-tubulin and how this interaction catalyzes the tyrosination reaction. It also reveals how TTL discriminates between α- and β-tubulin, and between different post-translationally modified forms of α-tubulin. Together, our data suggest that TTL has specifically evolved to recognize and modify tubulin, thus highlighting a fundamental role of the evolutionary conserved tubulin tyrosination cycle in regulating the microtubule cytoskeleton. PMID:23358242

  6. Molecular and immunological characterization of DNA ligase IV deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinqiu; Tang, Wenjing; An, Yunfei; Tang, Maozhi; Wu, Junfeng; Qin, Tao; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    DNA ligase IV (LIG4) deficiency is an extremely rare autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disease caused by the LIG4 mutation. To date, fewer than 30 cases of patients have been reported worldwide. No reversion mutations have been previously identified in LIG4. This study enrolled seven Chinese patients with LIG4 deficiency who presented with combined immunodeficiency, microcephaly, and growth retardation. One patient (P1) acquired non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Four patients had impaired T cell proliferation function and skewed T cell receptor diversity. Five novel mutations in LIG4 and a potential hotspot mutation (c.833G>T; p.R278L) in the Chinese population were identified. TA cloning analysis of T cells, NK cells, granulocytes, and oral mucosa cells in P6 revealed wild-type clones and clones that contained both maternally and paternally inherited mutations, indicating possible somatic reversion which need further investigation since no functional or protein assays were possible for all the patients died and no cell lines were available. PMID:26762768

  7. Identification of Erwinia stewartii by a ligase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W J; Wiedmann, M; Dillard, H R; Batt, C A

    1994-01-01

    A PCR-coupled ligase chain reaction (LCR) assay was developed to distinguish the plant pathogenic bacterium Erwinia stewartii from other erwiniae. This new technique allows discrimination to the species level on the basis of a single-base-pair difference in the 16S rRNA gene which is unique to E. stewartii. Portions of the 16S rRNA genes of E. stewartii and the closely related Erwinia herbicola were sequenced. From comparison of the two 16S rRNA gene regions, two primer pairs were constructed such that only E. stewartii DNA gave a product in the LCR assay. The ligated product was separated from the radioactively labelled primers by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualized by autoradiography. Twenty-four different Erwinia species and strains were tested by PCR-coupled LCR to verify the specificity of the assay, and only E. stewartii strains gave a positive reaction. In addition, infected and healthy plant material was also assayed. E. stewartii was detected in infected plant material, even when large populations of epiphytic bacteria were present. No enrichment was necessary for detection of the pathogen in corn leaves. This assay has potential as a diagnostic technique for the detection of E. stewartii in infected plant and vector material. Images PMID:7509585

  8. Ubiquitin-protein ligases in muscle wasting: multiple parallel pathways?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecker, Stewart H.; Goldberg, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Studies in a wide variety of animal models of muscle wasting have led to the concept that increased protein breakdown via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is responsible for the loss of muscle mass seen as muscle atrophy. The complexity of the ubiquitination apparatus has hampered our understanding of how this pathway is activated in atrophying muscles and which ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes in muscle are responsible. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent experiments have shown that two newly identified ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s), atrogin-1/MAFbx and MURF-1, are critical in the development of muscle atrophy. Other in-vitro studies also implicated E2(14k) and E3alpha, of the N-end rule pathway, as playing an important role in the process. SUMMARY: It seems likely that multiple pathways of ubiquitin conjugation are activated in parallel in atrophying muscle, perhaps to target for degradation specific classes of muscle proteins. The emerging challenge will be to define the protein targets for, as well as inhibitors of, these E3s.

  9. Screening for E3-Ubiquitin ligase inhibitors: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Landré, Vivien; Rotblat, Barak; Melino, Sonia; Bernassola, Francesca; Melino, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays a role in the regulation of most cellular pathways, and its deregulation has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies that include cancer, neurodegenerative and immunological disorders and viral infections. Targeting the UPS by small molecular regulators thus provides an opportunity for the development of therapeutics for the treatment of several diseases. The proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib was approved for treatment of hematologic malignancies by the FDA in 2003, becoming the first drug targeting the ubiquitin proteasome system in the clinic. Development of drugs targeting specific components of the ubiquitin proteasome system, however, has lagged behind, mainly due to the complexity of the ubiquitination reaction and its outcomes. However, significant advances have been made in recent years in understanding the molecular nature of the ubiquitination system and the vast variety of cellular signals that it produces. Additionally, improvement of screening methods, both in vitro and in silico, have led to the discovery of a number of compounds targeting components of the ubiquitin proteasome system, and some of these have now entered clinical trials. Here, we discuss the current state of drug discovery targeting E3 ligases and the opportunities and challenges that it provides. PMID:25237759

  10. UHRF2, another E3 ubiquitin ligase for p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Fangmin; Yang, Yan; Qian, Guanhua; Duan, Changzhu

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 associates with p53 in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 interacts with p53 through its SRA/YDG domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 ubiquitinates p53 in vivo and in vitro. -- Abstract: UHRF2, ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 2, is a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is involved in cell cycle and epigenetic regulation. UHRF2 interacts with multiple cell cycle proteins, including cyclins (A2, B1, D1, and E1), CDK2, and pRb; moreover, UHRF2 could ubiquitinate cyclin D1 and cyclin E1. Also, UHRF2 has been shown to be implicated in epigenetic regulation by associating with DNMTs, G9a, HDAC1, H3K9me2/3 and hemi-methylated DNA. We found that UHRF2 associates with tumor suppressor protein p53, and p53 is ubiquitinated by UHRF2 in vivo and in vitro. Given that both UHRF2 and p53 are involved in cell cycle regulation, this study may suggest a novel signaling pathway on cell proliferation.

  11. Selective inhibition of Biotin Protein Ligase from Staphylococcus aureus*

    PubMed Central

    Soares da Costa, Tatiana P.; Tieu, William; Yap, Min Y.; Pendini, Nicole R.; Polyak, Steven W.; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel; Morona, Renato; Turnidge, John D.; Wallace, John C.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Booker, Grant W.; Abell, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    There is a well documented need to replenish the antibiotic pipeline with new agents to combat the rise of drug resistant bacteria. One strategy to combat resistance is to discover new chemical classes immune to current resistance mechanisms that inhibit essential metabolic enzymes. Many of the obvious drug targets that have no homologous isozyme in the human host have now been investigated. Bacterial drug targets that have a closely related human homologue represent a new frontier in antibiotic discovery. However, to avoid potential toxicity to the host, these inhibitors must have very high selectivity for the bacterial enzyme over the human homolog. We have demonstrated that the essential enzyme biotin protein ligase (BPL) from the clinically important pathogen Staphylococcus aureus could be selectively inhibited. Linking biotin to adenosine via a 1,2,3 triazole yielded the first BPL inhibitor selective for S. aureus BPL over the human equivalent. The synthesis of new biotin 1,2,3-triazole analogues using click chemistry yielded our most potent structure (Ki 90 nm) with a >1100-fold selectivity for the S. aureus BPL over the human homologue. X-ray crystallography confirmed the mechanism of inhibitor binding. Importantly, the inhibitor showed cytotoxicity against S. aureus but not cultured mammalian cells. The biotin 1,2,3-triazole provides a novel pharmacophore for future medicinal chemistry programs to develop this new antibiotic class. PMID:22437830

  12. The ubiquitin–protein ligase Itch regulates p73 stability

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Mario; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo; Munarriz, Eliana; Green, Douglas R; Liu, Yun-Cai; Vousden, Karen H; Cesareni, Gianni; Melino, Gerry

    2005-01-01

    p73, a member of the p53 family of transcription factors, is upregulated in response to DNA damage, inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Besides indications that this p73 response is post-transcriptional, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms of p73 protein degradation. Ubiquitination and proteasomal-dependent degradation of p53 are regulated by its transcriptional target MDM2. However, unlike p53, p73 binds to, but is not degraded by, MDM2. Here we describe the binding of p73 to Itch, a Hect ubiquitin–protein ligase. Itch selectively binds and ubiquitinates p73 but not p53; this results in the rapid proteasome-dependent degradation of p73. Upon DNA damage Itch itself is downregulated, allowing p73 protein levels to rise and thus interfere with p73 function. In conclusion, we have identified a key mechanism in the control of p73 protein levels both in normal as well as in stress conditions. PMID:15678106

  13. Brain microsomal fatty acid elongation is increased in abcd1-deficient mouse during active myelination phase.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masashi; Kawamichi, Misato; Shimura, Yusuke; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Watanabe, Shiro; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2015-12-01

    The dysfunction of ABCD1, a peroxisomal ABC protein, leads to the perturbation of very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) metabolism and is the cause of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Abcd1-deficient mice exhibit an accumulation of saturated VLCFAs, such as C26:0, in all tissues, especially the brain. The present study sought to measure microsomal fatty acid elongation activity in the brain of wild-type (WT) and abcd1-deficient mice during the course of development. The fatty acid elongation activity in the microsomal fraction was measured by the incorporation of [2-(14)C]malonyl-CoA into fatty acids in the presence of C16:0-CoA or C20:0-CoA. Cytosolic fatty acid synthesis activity was completely inhibited by the addition of N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). The microsomal fatty acid elongation activity in the brain was significantly high at 3 weeks after birth and decreased substantially at 3 months after birth. Furthermore, we detected two different types of microsomal fatty acid elongation activity by using C16:0-CoA or C20:0-CoA as the substrate and found the activity toward C20:0-CoA in abcd1-deficient mice was higher than the WT 3-week-old animals. These results suggest that during the active myelination phase the microsomal fatty acid elongation activity is stimulated in abcd1-deficient mice, which in turn perturbs the lipid composition in myelin. PMID:26108493

  14. BROWN ADIPOSE TISSUE FUNCTION IN SHORT-CHAIN ACYL-COA DEHYDROGENASE DEFICIENT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Skilling, Helen; Coen, Paul M.; Fairfull, Liane; Ferrell, Robert E.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Vockley, Jerry; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue is a highly specialized organ that uses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation to fuel nonshivering thermogenesis. In mice, mutations in the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family of fatty acid oxidation genes are associated with sensitivity to cold. Brown adipose tissue function has not previously been characterized in these knockout strains. Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficient mice were found to have increased brown adipose tissue mass as well as modest cardiac hypertrophy. Uncoupling protein-1 was reduced by 70% in brown adipose tissue and this was not due to a change in mitochondrial number, nor was it due to decreased signal transduction through protein kinase A which is known to be a major regulator of uncoupling protein-1 expression. PKA activity and in vitro lipolysis were normal in brown adipose tissue, although in white adipose tissue a modest increase in basal lipolysis was seen in SCAD−/ − mice. Finally, an in vivo norepinephrine challenge of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis revealed normal heat production in SCAD−/− mice. These results suggest that reduced brown adipose tissue function is not the major factor causing cold sensitivity in acyl-CoA dehydrogenase knockout strains. We speculate that other mechanisms such as shivering capacity, cardiac function, and reduced hepatic glycogen stores are involved. PMID:20727852

  15. Fat Metabolism in Higher Plants XXXVI: Long Chain Fatty Acid Synthesis in Germinating Peas 1

    PubMed Central

    Macey, Michael J. K.; Stumpf, P. K.

    1968-01-01

    A low lipid, high starch containing tissue, namely cotyledons of germinating pea seedlings was examined for its capacity to synthesize fatty acid. Intact tissue slices readily incorporate acetate-14C into fatty acids from C16 to C24. Although crude homogenates synthesize primarily 16:0 and 18:0 from malonyl CoA, subsequent fractionation into a 10,000g pellet, a 105g pellet and supernatant (soluble synthetase) revealed that the 105g pellet readily synthesizes C16 to C28 fatty acids whereas the 10,000g and the supernatant synthesize primarily C16 and C18. All systems require acyl carrier protein (ACP), TPNH, DPNH if malonyl CoA is the substrate and ACP, Mg2+, CO2, ATP, TPNH, and DPNH if acetyl CoA is the substrate. The cotyledons of germinating pea seedlings appear to have a soluble synthetase and 10,000g particles for the synthesis of C16 and C18 fatty acid, and 105g particles which specifically synthesize the very long chain fatty acid from malonyl CoA, presumably via malonyl ACP. PMID:16656949

  16. Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) ablation in mice increases energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and delays fat absorption

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Thomas A.; O'Keeffe, Kayleigh R.; D'Aquila, Theresa; Yan, Qing Wu; Griffin, John D.; Killion, Elizabeth A.; Salter, Deanna M.; Mashek, Douglas G.; Buhman, Kimberly K.; Greenberg, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The family of acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes (ACSL) activates fatty acids within cells to generate long chain fatty acyl CoA (FACoA). The differing metabolic fates of FACoAs such as incorporation into neutral lipids, phospholipids, and oxidation pathways are differentially regulated by the ACSL isoforms. In vitro studies have suggested a role for ACSL5 in triglyceride synthesis; however, we have limited understanding of the in vivo actions of this ACSL isoform. Methods To elucidate the in vivo actions of ACSL5 we generated a line of mice in which ACSL5 expression was ablated in all tissues (ACSL5−/−). Results Ablation of ACSL5 reduced ACSL activity by ∼80% in jejunal mucosa, ∼50% in liver, and ∼37% in brown adipose tissue lysates. Body composition studies revealed that ACSL5−/−, as compared to control ACSL5loxP/loxP, mice had significantly reduced fat mass and adipose fat pad weights. Indirect calorimetry studies demonstrated that ACSL5−/− had increased metabolic rates, and in the dark phase, increased respiratory quotient. In ACSL5−/− mice, fasting glucose and serum triglyceride were reduced; and insulin sensitivity was improved during an insulin tolerance test. Both hepatic mRNA (∼16-fold) and serum levels of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) (∼13-fold) were increased in ACSL5−/− as compared to ACSL5loxP/loxP. Consistent with increased FGF21 serum levels, uncoupling protein-1 gene (Ucp1) and PPAR-gamma coactivator 1-alpha gene (Pgc1α) transcript levels were increased in gonadal adipose tissue. To further evaluate ACSL5 function in intestine, mice were gavaged with an olive oil bolus; and the rate of triglyceride appearance in serum was found to be delayed in ACSL5−/− mice as compared to control mice. Conclusions In summary, ACSL5−/− mice have increased hepatic and serum FGF21 levels, reduced adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity, increased energy expenditure and delayed triglyceride absorption. These studies

  17. Circulating E3 ligases are novel and sensitive biomarkers for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qiu-Yue; Wang, Hong-Xia; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Guo, Cai-Xia; Hua, Qi; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Li, Nan; Yang, Yan-Zong; Du, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin ligase (E3) is a decisive element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), which is the main pathway for intracellular protein turnover. Recently, circulating E3 ligases have been increasingly considered as cancer biomarkers. In the present study, we aimed to determine if cardiac-specific E3 ligases in circulation can serve as novel predictors for early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). By screening and verifying their tissue expression patterns with microarray and real-time PCR analysis, six of 261 E3 ligases, including cardiac-specific Rnf207 and cardiac- and muscle-enriched Fbxo32/atrogin-1, Trim54/MuRF3, Trim63/MuRF1, Kbtbd10/KLHL41, Asb11 and Asb2 in mouse heart, were selected for the present study. In the AMI rats, the levels of five E3 ligases including Rnf207, Fbxo32, Trim54, Trim63 and Kbtbd10 in the plasma were significantly increased compared with control animals. Especially, the plasma levels of Rnf207 was markedly increased at 1 h, peaked at 3 h and decreased at 6–24 h after ligation. Further evaluation of E3 ligases in AMI patients confirmed that plasma Rnf207 level increased significantly compared with that in healthy people and patients without AMI, and showed a similar time course to that in AMI rats. Simultaneously, plasma level of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) was measured by ELISA assays. Finally, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that Rnf207 showed a similar sensitivity and specificity to the classic biomarker troponin I for diagnosis of AMI. Increased cardiac-specific E3 ligase Rnf207 in plasma may be a novel and sensitive biomarkers for AMI in humans. PMID:25599194

  18. Sensitive and specific miRNA detection method using SplintR Ligase.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jingmin; Vaud, Sophie; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; Posfai, Janos; McReynolds, Larry A

    2016-07-27

    We describe a simple, specific and sensitive microRNA (miRNA) detection method that utilizes Chlorella virus DNA ligase (SplintR(®) Ligase). This two-step method involves ligation of adjacent DNA oligonucleotides hybridized to a miRNA followed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). SplintR Ligase is 100X faster than either T4 DNA Ligase or T4 RNA Ligase 2 for RNA splinted DNA ligation. Only a 4-6 bp overlap between a DNA probe and miRNA was required for efficient ligation by SplintR Ligase. This property allows more flexibility in designing miRNA-specific ligation probes than methods that use reverse transcriptase for cDNA synthesis of miRNA. The qPCR SplintR ligation assay is sensitive; it can detect a few thousand molecules of miR-122. For miR-122 detection the SplintR qPCR assay, using a FAM labeled double quenched DNA probe, was at least 40× more sensitive than the TaqMan assay. The SplintR method, when coupled with NextGen sequencing, allowed multiplex detection of miRNAs from brain, kidney, testis and liver. The SplintR qPCR assay is specific; individual let-7 miRNAs that differ by one nucleotide are detected. The rapid kinetics and ability to ligate DNA probes hybridized to RNA with short complementary sequences makes SplintR Ligase a useful enzyme for miRNA detection. PMID:27154271

  19. RBR E3 ubiquitin ligases: new structures, new insights, new questions

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Donald E.; Walden, Helen; Shaw, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    The RBR (RING-BetweenRING-RING) or TRIAD [two RING fingers and a DRIL (double RING finger linked)] E3 ubiquitin ligases comprise a group of 12 complex multidomain enzymes. This unique family of E3 ligases includes parkin, whose dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis of early-onset Parkinson's disease, and HOIP (HOIL-1-interacting protein) and HOIL-1 (haem-oxidized IRP2 ubiquitin ligase 1), members of the LUBAC (linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex). The RBR E3 ligases share common features with both the larger RING and HECT (homologous with E6-associated protein C-terminus) E3 ligase families, directly catalysing ubiquitin transfer from an intrinsic catalytic cysteine housed in the C-terminal domain, as well as recruiting thioester-bound E2 enzymes via a RING domain. Recent three-dimensional structures and biochemical findings of the RBRs have revealed novel protein domain folds not previously envisioned and some surprising modes of regulation that have raised many questions. This has required renaming two of the domains in the RBR E3 ligases to more accurately reflect their structures and functions: the C-terminal Rcat (required-for-catalysis) domain, essential for catalytic activity, and a central BRcat (benign-catalytic) domain that adopts the same fold as the Rcat, but lacks a catalytic cysteine residue and ubiquitination activity. The present review discusses how three-dimensional structures of RBR (RING1-BRcat-Rcat) E3 ligases have provided new insights into our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of these important enzymes in ubiquitin biology. PMID:24576094

  20. Intracellular signal transduction of PBAN action in lepidopteran insects: inhibition of sex pheromone production by compactin, an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, R; Matsumoto, S; Kim, G H; Uchiumi, K; Kurihara, M; Shono, T; Mitsui, T

    1995-06-27

    Pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) regulates sex pheromone production in the pheromone glands of many species of female moths. In order to probe the biochemical steps as well as underlying mechanisms regulated by PBAN, we have tested the effect of chemicals on sex pheromone production by using an in vitro assay. Among the chemicals we tested here, compactin, a specific 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitor, clearly inhibited the pheromone biosynthesis in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and the common cutworm, Spodoptera litura. Since the activation of HMG CoA reductase occurs by dephosphorylation mediated by a specific phosphatase and the biochemical step regulated by PBAN in bombykol biosynthesis is similar to the one catalyzed by HMG-CoA reductase in cholesterol biosynthesis, the present results support the idea that phosphoprotein phosphatase has a significant role to regulate bombykol production in the intracellular transduction of PBAN action in B. mori. PMID:7480881

  1. Nonthermal rotational distribution of CO/A 1Pi/ fragments produced by dissociative excitation of CO2 by electron impact. [in Mars atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.; Stone, E. J.; Zipf, E. C.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made of the rotational profiles of specific bands of the CO fourth-positive group (4PG). The CO 4PG bands were excited by electron impact dissociative excitation of CO2. The results are applicable to analysis of the Mariner observations of the CO 4PG in the dayglow of Mars. The results indicate that dissociative excitation of CO2 by electron impact leads to CO(A 1Pi) fragments with a rotational distribution that is highly nonthermal. The parent CO2 temperature was about 300 K in the experiment, while the fragment CO(A 1Pi) showed emission band profiles consistent with a rotational temperature greater than about 1500 K. Laboratory measurement of the reduced transmission of the hot bands by thermal CO appears to be the most direct way of determining the column density responsible for the CO(v',0) absorption of Mars.

  2. Inhibition of HMG CoA reductase reveals an unexpected role for cholesterol during PGC migration in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jiaxi; Jiang, DeChen; Kurczy, Michael; Nalepka, Jennifer; Dudley, Brian; Merkel, Erin I; Porter, Forbes D; Ewing, Andrew G; Winograd, Nicholas; Burgess, James; Molyneaux, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Background Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the embryonic precursors of the sperm and eggs. Environmental or genetic defects that alter PGC development can impair fertility or cause formation of germ cell tumors. Results We demonstrate a novel role for cholesterol during germ cell migration in mice. Cholesterol was measured in living tissue dissected from mouse embryos and was found to accumulate within the developing gonads as germ cells migrate to colonize these structures. Cholesterol synthesis was blocked in culture by inhibiting the activity of HMG CoA reductase (HMGCR) resulting in germ cell survival and migration defects. These defects were rescued by co-addition of isoprenoids and cholesterol, but neither compound alone was sufficient. In contrast, loss of the last or penultimate enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis did not alter PGC numbers or position in vivo. However embryos that lack these enzymes do not exhibit cholesterol defects at the stage at which PGCs are migrating. This demonstrates that during gestation, the cholesterol required for PGC migration can be supplied maternally. Conclusion In the mouse, cholesterol is required for PGC survival and motility. It may act cell-autonomously by regulating clustering of growth factor receptors within PGCs or non cell-autonomously by controlling release of growth factors required for PGC guidance and survival. PMID:19117526

  3. Impact of single-dose nandrolone decanoate on gonadotropins, blood lipids and HMG CoA reductase in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Gårevik, N; Börjesson, A; Choong, E; Ekström, L; Lehtihet, M

    2016-06-01

    The aim was to study the effect and time profile of a single dose of nandrolone decanoate (ND) on gonadotropins, blood lipids and HMG CoA reductase [3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR)] in healthy men. Eleven healthy male participants aged 29-46 years were given a single dose of 150 mg ND as an intramuscular dose of Deca Durabol®, Organon. Blood samples for sex hormones, lipids and HMGCR mRNA analysis were collected prior to ND administration day 0, 4 and 14. A significant suppression of luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was seen after 4 days. Total testosterone and bioavailable testosterone level decreased significantly throughout the observed study period. A small but significant decrease in sexual hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was seen after 4 days but not after 14 days. Total serum (S)-cholesterol and plasma (P)-apolipoprotein B (ApoB) increased significantly after 14 days. In 80% of the individuals, the HMGCR mRNA level was increased 4 days after the ND administration. Our results show that a single dose of 150 mg ND increases (1) HMGCR mRNA expression, (2) total S-cholesterol and (3) P-ApoB level. The long-term consequences on cardiovascular risk that may appear in users remain to be elucidated. PMID:26370185

  4. The prenyltransferase UBIAD1 is the target of geranylgeraniol in degradation of HMG CoA reductase

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Marc M; Elsabrouty, Rania; Seemann, Joachim; Jo, Youngah; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2015-01-01

    Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD) is an autosomal dominant disorder in humans characterized by abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in the cornea. SCD-associated mutations have been identified in the gene encoding UBIAD1, a prenyltransferase that synthesizes vitamin K2. Here, we show that sterols stimulate binding of UBIAD1 to the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme HMG CoA reductase, which is subject to sterol-accelerated, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation augmented by the nonsterol isoprenoid geranylgeraniol through an unknown mechanism. Geranylgeraniol inhibits binding of UBIAD1 to reductase, allowing its degradation and promoting transport of UBIAD1 from the ER to the Golgi. CRISPR-CAS9-mediated knockout of UBIAD1 relieves the geranylgeraniol requirement for reductase degradation. SCD-associated mutations in UBIAD1 block its displacement from reductase in the presence of geranylgeraniol, thereby preventing degradation of reductase. The current results identify UBIAD1 as the elusive target of geranylgeraniol in reductase degradation, the inhibition of which may contribute to accumulation of cholesterol in SCD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05560.001 PMID:25742604

  5. Application of reverse-phase HPLC to quantify oligopeptide acetylation eliminates interference from unspecific acetyl CoA hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Evjenth, Rune; Hole, Kristine; Ziegler, Mathias; Lillehaug, Johan R

    2009-01-01

    Protein acetylation is a common modification that plays a central role in several cellular processes. The most widely used methods to study these modifications are either based on the detection of radioactively acetylated oligopetide products or an enzyme-coupled reaction measuring conversion of the acetyl donor acetyl CoA to the product CoASH. Due to several disadvantages of these methods, we designed a new method to study oligopeptide acetylation. Based on reverse phase HPLC we detect both reaction products in a highly robust and reproducible way. The method reported here is also fully compatible with subsequent product analysis, e.g. by mass spectroscopy. The catalytic subunit, hNaa30p, of the human NatC protein N-acetyltransferase complex was used for N-terminal oligopeptide acetylation. We show that unacetylated and acetylated oligopeptides can be efficiently separated and quantified by the HPLC-based analysis. The method is highly reproducible and enables reliable quantification of both substrates and products. It is therefore well-suited to determine kinetic parameters of acetyltransferases. PMID:19660098

  6. Genetic and Pharmacological Inhibition of Malonyl CoA Decarboxylase Does Not Exacerbate Age-Related Insulin Resistance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ussher, John R; Fillmore, Natasha; Keung, Wendy; Zhang, Liyan; Mori, Jun; Sidhu, Vaninder K; Fukushima, Arata; Gopal, Keshav; Lopaschuk, David G; Wagg, Cory S; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Dyck, Jason R B; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2016-07-01

    Aging is associated with the development of chronic diseases such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. A reduction in mitochondrial fat oxidation is postulated to be a key factor contributing to the progression of these diseases. Our aim was to investigate the contribution of impaired mitochondrial fat oxidation toward age-related disease. Mice deficient for malonyl CoA decarboxylase (MCD(-/-)), a mouse model of reduced fat oxidation, were allowed to age while life span and a number of physiological parameters (glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance, indirect calorimetry) were assessed. Decreased fat oxidation in MCD(-/-) mice resulted in the accumulation of lipid intermediates in peripheral tissues, but this was not associated with a worsening of age-associated insulin resistance and, conversely, improved longevity. This improvement was associated with reduced oxidative stress and reduced acetylation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2 in muscle but not the liver of MCD(-/-) mice. These findings were recapitulated in aged mice treated with an MCD inhibitor (CBM-3001106), and these mice also demonstrated improvements in glucose and insulin tolerance. Therefore, our results demonstrate that in addition to decreasing fat oxidation, MCD inhibition also has novel effects on protein acetylation. These combined effects protect against age-related metabolic dysfunction, demonstrating that MCD inhibitors may have utility in the battle against chronic disease in the elderly. PMID:27207536

  7. Enzymatic synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) with CoA recycling using polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase and acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yasuharu; Murakami, Fumikazu; Tajima, Kenji; Munekata, Masanobu

    2005-05-01

    We succeeded in developing a novel method for in vitro poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3 HB-co-4 HB)] synthesis with CoA recycling using polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase and an acyl-CoA synthetase. Using this method, the monomer compositions in P(3 HB-co-4 HB)s could be controlled strictly by the ratios of the monomers in the reaction mixtures. PMID:16233824

  8. Entropy-driven mechanism of an E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Truong, Khue; Su, Yang; Song, Jing; Chen, Yuan

    2011-06-28

    Ubiquitin-like modifications are macromolecular chemistry for which our understanding of the enzymatic mechanisms is lacking. Most E3 ligases in ubiquitin-like modifications do not directly participate in chemistry but are thought to confer allosteric effects; however, the nature of the allosteric effects has been elusive. Recent molecular dynamics simulations suggested that an E3 binding enhances the population of the conformational states of the E2·SUMO thioester that favor reactions. In this study, we conducted the first temperature-dependent enzyme kinetic analysis to investigate the role of an E3 on activation entropy and enthalpy. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3, RanBP2, confers unusually large, favorable activation entropy to lower the activation energy of the reaction. Mutants of RanBP2, designed to alter the flexibilities of the E2·SUMO thioester, showed a direct correlation of their favorable entropic effects with their ability to restrict the conformational flexibility of the E2·SUMO thioester. While the more favorable activation entropy is consistent with the previously suggested role of E3 in conformational selection, the large positive entropy suggests a significant role of solvent in catalysis. Indeed, molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water revealed that the more stable E2·SUMO thioester upon E3 binding results in stabilization of a large number of bound water molecules. Liberating such structured water at the transition state can result in large favorable activation entropy but unfavorable activation enthalpy. The entropy-driven mechanism of the E3 is consistent with the lack of structural conservation among E3s despite their similar functions. This study also illustrates how proteins that bind both SUMO and E2 can function as E3s and how intrinsically unstructured proteins can enhance macromolecular chemistry in addition to their known advantages in protein--protein interactions. PMID:21568279

  9. Leucine-684: A conserved residue of an AMP-acetyl CoA synthetase (AceCS) from Leishmania donovani is involved in substrate recognition, catalysis and acetylation.

    PubMed

    Soumya, Neelagiri; Tandan, Hitendra; Damre, Mangesh V; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Singh, Sushma

    2016-04-15

    AMP-acetyl CoA synthetase (AMP-AceCS) is a key enzyme which catalyzes the activation of acetate to acetyl CoA, an important intermediate at the cross roads of various anabolic and catabolic pathways. Multiple sequence alignment of Leishmania donovani AceCS with other organisms revealed the presence of a highly conserved leucine residue at 684 position which is known to be crucial for acetylation by protein acetyl transferases in other organisms. In an attempt to understand the role of leucine residue at 684 position in L. donovani acetyl CoA synthetase (LdAceCS), it was mutated to proline (P) by site directed mutagenesis. Kinetic analysis of the L684P-LdAceCS mutant revealed approximately two fold increased binding affinity with acetate, whereas fivefold decreased affinity was observed with ATP. There was insignificant change in secondary structure as revealed by CD however, two fold decreased fluorescence intensity was observed at an emission maxima of 340nm. Interestingly, L684P mutation abolished the acetylation of the mutant enzyme indicating the importance of L684 in acetylation of the enzyme. Changes in biochemical parameters of the mutant protein were validated by homology modeling of the wild type and mutant LdAceCS enzyme using Salmonella enterica AceCS crystal structure as template. Our data provides evidence for the role of leucine 684 residue in substrate recognition, catalysis and acetylation of the AceCS enzyme. PMID:26794803

  10. CRP Is an Activator of Yersinia pestis Biofilm Formation that Operates via a Mechanism Involving gmhA and waaAE-coaD.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Fang, Haihong; Yang, Huiying; Zhang, Yiquan; Han, Yanping; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Ruifu

    2016-01-01

    gmhA encodes a phosphoheptose isomerase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of heptose, a conserved component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). GmhA plays an important role in Yersinia pestis biofilm blockage in the flea gut. waaA, waaE, and coaD constitute a three-gene operon waaAE-coaD in Y. pestis. waaA encodes a transferase that is responsible for binding lipid-A to the core oligosaccharide of LPS. WaaA is a key determinant in Y. pestis biofilm formation, and the waaA expression is positively regulated by the two-component regulatory system PhoP/PhoQ. WaaE is involved in LPS modification and is necessary for Y. pestis biofilm production. In this study, the biofilm-related phenotypic assays indicate that the global regulator CRP stimulates Y. pestis biofilm formation in vitro and on nematodes, while it has no regulatory effect on the biosynthesis of the biofilm-signaling molecular 3',5'-cyclic diguanosine monophosphate. Further gene regulation experiments disclose that CRP does not regulate the hms genes at the transcriptional level but directly promotes the gmhA transcription and indirectly activates the waaAE-coaD transcription through directly acting on phoPQ-YPO1632. Thus, it is speculated that CRP-mediated carbon catabolite regulation of Y. pestis biofilm formation depends on the CRP-dependent carbon source metabolic pathways of the biosynthesis, modification, and transportation of biofilm exopolysaccharide. PMID:27014218

  11. Structural and Functional Interaction Between the Human DNA Repair Proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, P.; Meesala, S; Dauvillier, S; Modesti, M; Andres, S; Huang, Y; Sekiguchi, J; Calsou, P; Salles, B; Junop, M

    2009-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  12. Low levels of DNA ligases III and IV sufficient for effective NHEJ.

    PubMed

    Windhofer, Frank; Wu, Wenqi; Iliakis, George

    2007-11-01

    Cells of higher eukaryotes rejoin double strand breaks (DSBs) in their DNA predominantly by a non-homologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) pathway that utilizes the products of DNA-PKcs, Ku, LIG4, XRCC4, XLF/Cernunnos, Artemis as well as DNA polymerase lambda (termed D-NHEJ). Mutants with defects in these proteins remove a large proportion of DSBs from their genome utilizing an alternative pathway of NHEJ that operates as a backup (B-NHEJ). While D-NHEJ relies exclusively on DNA ligase IV, recent work points to DNA ligase III as a component of B-NHEJ. Here, we use RNA interference (RNAi) to further investigate the activity requirements for DNA ligase III and IV in the pathways of NHEJ. We report that 70-80% knock down of LIG3 expression has no detectable effect on DSB rejoining, either in D-NHEJ proficient cells, or in cells where D-NHEJ has been chemically or genetically compromised. Surprisingly, also LIG4 knock down has no effect on repair proficient cells, but inhibits DSB rejoining in a radiosensitive cell line with a hypomorphic LIG4 mutation that severely compromises its activity. The results suggest that complete coverage for D-NHEJ or B-NHEJ is afforded by very low ligase levels and demonstrate residual end joining by DNA ligase IV in cells of patients with mutations in LIG4. PMID:17492771

  13. ATLs and BTLs, plant-specific and general eukaryotic structurally-related E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2014-02-01

    Major components of the ubiquitin proteasome system are the enzymes that operate on the transfer of ubiquitin to selected target substrate, known as ubiquitin ligases. The RING finger is a domain that is present in key classes of ubiquitin ligases. This domain coordinates the interaction with a suitable E2 conjugase and the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 to protein targets. Additional domains coupled to the same polypeptide are important for modulating the function of these ubiquitin ligases. Plants contain several types of E3 ubiquitin ligases that in many cases have expanded as multigene families. Some families are specific to the plant lineage, whereas others may have a common ancestor among plants and other eukaryotic lineages. Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATLs) and BCA2 zinc finger ATLs (BTLs) are two families of ubiquitin ligases that share some common structural features. These are intronless genes that encode a highly related RING finger domain, and yet during evolutionary history, their mode of gene expansion and function is rather different. In each of these two families, the co-occurrence of transmembrane helices or C2/C2 (BZF finger) domains with a selected variation on the RING finger has been subjected to strong selection pressure in order to preserve their unique domain architectures during evolution. PMID:24388516

  14. A high-throughput assay for the comprehensive profiling of DNA ligase fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Bauer, Robert J; Nichols, Nicole M; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Evans, Thomas C

    2016-01-29

    DNA ligases have broad application in molecular biology, from traditional cloning methods to modern synthetic biology and molecular diagnostics protocols. Ligation-based detection of polynucleotide sequences can be achieved by the ligation of probe oligonucleotides when annealed to a complementary target sequence. In order to achieve a high sensitivity and low background, the ligase must efficiently join correctly base-paired substrates, while discriminating against the ligation of substrates containing even one mismatched base pair. In the current study, we report the use of capillary electrophoresis to rapidly generate mismatch fidelity profiles that interrogate all 256 possible base-pair combinations at a ligation junction in a single experiment. Rapid screening of ligase fidelity in a 96-well plate format has allowed the study of ligase fidelity in unprecedented depth. As an example of this new method, herein we report the ligation fidelity of Thermus thermophilus DNA ligase at a range of temperatures, buffer pH and monovalent cation strength. This screen allows the selection of reaction conditions that maximize fidelity without sacrificing activity, while generating a profile of specific mismatches that ligate detectably under each set of conditions. PMID:26365241

  15. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of an archaeal DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Hirokazu; Tsuchiya, Daisuke; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2005-12-01

    Crystals of the archaeal DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus were obtained using 6.6%(v/v) ethanol as a precipitant and diffracted X-rays to 1.7 Å resolution. DNA ligases seal single-strand breaks in double-stranded DNA and their function is essential to maintain the integrity of the genome during various aspects of DNA metabolism, such as replication, excision repair and recombination. DNA-strand breaks are frequently generated as reaction intermediates in these events and the sealing of these breaks depends solely on the proper function of DNA ligase. Crystals of the archaeal DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus were obtained using 6.6%(v/v) ethanol as a precipitant and diffracted X-rays to 1.7 Å resolution. They belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.1, b = 88.3, c = 63.4 Å, β = 108.9°. The asymmetric unit contains one ligase molecule.

  16. A high-throughput assay for the comprehensive profiling of DNA ligase fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Gregory J. S.; Bauer, Robert J.; Nichols, Nicole M.; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Evans, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    DNA ligases have broad application in molecular biology, from traditional cloning methods to modern synthetic biology and molecular diagnostics protocols. Ligation-based detection of polynucleotide sequences can be achieved by the ligation of probe oligonucleotides when annealed to a complementary target sequence. In order to achieve a high sensitivity and low background, the ligase must efficiently join correctly base-paired substrates, while discriminating against the ligation of substrates containing even one mismatched base pair. In the current study, we report the use of capillary electrophoresis to rapidly generate mismatch fidelity profiles that interrogate all 256 possible base-pair combinations at a ligation junction in a single experiment. Rapid screening of ligase fidelity in a 96-well plate format has allowed the study of ligase fidelity in unprecedented depth. As an example of this new method, herein we report the ligation fidelity of Thermus thermophilus DNA ligase at a range of temperatures, buffer pH and monovalent cation strength. This screen allows the selection of reaction conditions that maximize fidelity without sacrificing activity, while generating a profile of specific mismatches that ligate detectably under each set of conditions. PMID:26365241

  17. Distinct and overlapping functions of the cullin E3 ligase scaffolding proteins CUL4A and CUL4B.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Jeffrey; Zhou, Pengbo

    2015-11-15

    The cullin 4 subfamily of genes includes CUL4A and CUL4B, which share a mostly identical amino acid sequence aside from the elongated N-terminal region in CUL4B. Both act as scaffolding proteins for modular cullin RING ligase 4 (CRL4) complexes which promote the ubiquitination of a variety of substrates. CRL4 function is vital to cells as loss of both genes or their shared substrate adaptor protein DDB1 halts proliferation and eventually leads to cell death. Due to their high structural similarity, CUL4A and CUL4B share a substantial overlap in function. However, in some cases, differences in subcellular localization, spatiotemporal expression patterns and stress-inducibility preclude functional compensation. In this review, we highlight the most essential functions of the CUL4 genes in: DNA repair and replication, chromatin-remodeling, cell cycle regulation, embryogenesis, hematopoiesis and spermatogenesis. CUL4 genes are also clinically relevant as dysregulation can contribute to the onset of cancer and CRL4 complexes are often hijacked by certain viruses to promote viral replication and survival. Also, mutations in CUL4B have been implicated in a subset of patients suffering from syndromic X-linked intellectual disability (AKA mental retardation). Interestingly, the antitumor effects of immunomodulatory drugs are caused by their binding to the CRL4CRBN complex and re-directing the E3 ligase towards the Ikaros transcription factors IKZF1 and IKZF3. Because of their influence over key cellular functions and relevance to human disease, CRL4s are considered promising targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26344709

  18. Multiple Src Homology 3 Binding to the Ubiquitin Ligase Itch Conserved Proline-Rich Region.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Guillaume; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G; Angers, Annie

    2015-12-22

    Itch is a member of the C2-WW-HECT (CWH) family of ubiquitin ligases involved in the control of inflammatory signaling pathways, several transcription factors, and sorting of surface receptors to the degradative pathway. In addition to these common domains, Itch also contains a conserved proline-rich region (PRR) allowing its interaction with Src homology 3 (SH3) domain-containing proteins. This region is composed of 20 amino acids and contains one consensus class I and three class II SH3-binding motifs. Several SH3 domain-containing partners have been shown to recognize the Itch PRR, but their binding properties have been poorly defined. Here we compare a subset of endocytic SH3 domain-containing proteins using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, isothermal titration calorimetry, and pull-down assays. Results indicate that Endophilin is a high-affinity binding partner of Itch both in vivo and in vitro, with a calculated KD placing this complex among the highest-affinity SH3 domain-mediated interactions reported to date. All of the SH3 domains tested here bind to Itch with a 1:1 stoichiometry, except for β-PIX that binds with a 2:1 stoichiometry. Together, these results indicate that Itch PRR is a versatile binding module that can accommodate several different SH3 domain-containing proteins but has a preference for Endophilin. Interestingly, the catalytic activity of Itch toward different SH3 domain-containing proteins was similar, except for β-PIX that was not readily ubiquitylated even though it could interact with an affinity comparable to those of other substrates tested. PMID:26613292

  19. Composition, Roles, and Regulation of Cullin-Based Ubiquitin E3 Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Christina M.; Gray, William M.; Mooney, Sutton; Hellmann, Hanjo

    2014-01-01

    Due to their sessile nature, plants depend on flexible regulatory systems that allow them to adequately regulate developmental and physiological processes in context with environmental cues. The ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which targets a great number of proteins for degradation, is cellular tool that provides the necessary flexibility to accomplish this task. Ubiquitin E3 ligases provide the needed specificity to the pathway by selectively binding to particular substrates and facilitating their ubiquitylation. The largest group of E3 ligases known in plants is represented by CULLIN-REALLY INTERESTING NEW GENE (RING) E3 ligases (CRLs). In recent years, a great amount of knowledge has been generated to reveal the critical roles of these enzymes across all aspects of plant life. This review provides an overview of the different classes of CRLs in plants, their specific complex compositions, the variety of biological processes they control, and the regulatory steps that can affect their activities. PMID:25505853

  20. GIDE is a mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase that induces apoptosis and slows growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bicheng; Huang, Jun; Li, Hong-Liang; Liu, Ting; Wang, Yan-Yi; Waterman, Paul; Mao, Ai-Ping; Xu, Liang-Guo; Zhai, Zhonghe; Liu, Depei; Marrack, Philippa; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2011-01-01

    We report here the identification of GIDE, a mitochondrially located E3 ubiquitin ligase. GIDE contains a C-terminal Ring finger domain, which is mostly conserved with those of the IAP family members, and which is required for its E3 ligase activity. Overexpression of GIDE induces apoptosis via a pathway involving activation of caspases since the caspase inhibitors, XIAP and an inactive mutant of caspase-9 block GIDE-induced apoptosis. GIDE also activates JNK, and blockade of JNK activation inhibits GIDE-induced release of cytochrome c and Smac and apoptosis, suggesting that JNK activation precedes release of cytochrome c and Smac and is required for GIDE-induced apoptosis. These proapoptotic properties of GIDE require its E3 ligase activity. When somewhat over or underexpressed, GIDE slows or hastens cell growth respectively. These pro-apoptotic or growth rate effects of GIDE may account for its absence from tumor cells. PMID:18591963

  1. Discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species by ligase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmann, M; Czajka, J; Barany, F; Batt, C A

    1992-01-01

    A ligase chain reaction assay based on a single-base-pair difference in the V9 region of the 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) was developed to distinguish between Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species. For this purpose, two pairs of primers were designed, with one primer of each pair being radioactively labeled. The ligated product was separated from the primers by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then detected by autoradiography. To achieve a higher sensitivity, the 16S rDNA was initially amplified by polymerase chain reaction prior to the ligase chain reaction. The ligase chain reaction was tested on 19 different Listeria species and strains and proved to be a highly specific diagnostic method for the detection of L. monocytogenes. Images PMID:1482171

  2. Structure of 5-formyltetrahydrofolate cyclo-ligase from Bacillus anthracis (BA4489)

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Christoph; Carter, Lester G.; Winter, Graeme; Owens, Ray J.; Stuart, David I.; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2007-03-01

    The structure of 5-formyltetrahydrofolate cyclo-ligase from B. anthracis determined by X-ray crystallography at a resolution of 1.6 Å is described. Bacillus anthracis is a spore-forming bacterium and the causative agent of the disease anthrax. The Oxford Protein Production Facility has been targeting proteins from B. anthracis in order to develop high-throughput technologies within the Structural Proteomics in Europe project. As part of this work, the structure of 5-formyltetrahydrofolate cyclo-ligase (BA4489) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure, solved in complex with magnesium-ion-bound ADP and phosphate, gives a detailed picture of the proposed catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. Chemical differences from other cyclo-ligase structures close to the active site that could be exploited to design specific inhibitors are also highlighted.

  3. A synthetic biology approach identifies the mammalian UPR RNA ligase RtcB

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yanyan; Liang, Feng-Xia; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Signaling in the ancestral branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR) is initiated by unconventional splicing of HAC1/XBP1 mRNA during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In mammals, IRE1α has been known to cleave the XBP1 intron. However, the enzyme responsible for ligation of two XBP1 exons remains unknown. Using an XBP1 splicing-based synthetic circuit, we identify RtcB as the primary UPR RNA ligase. In RtcB knockout cells, XBP1 mRNA splicing is defective during ER stress. Genetic rescue and in vitro splicing show that the RNA ligase activity of RtcB is directly required for the splicing of XBP1 mRNA. Taken together, these data demonstrate that RtcB is the long sought RNA ligase that catalyzes unconventional RNA splicing during the mammalian UPR. PMID:25087875

  4. The E3 ubiquitin ligase WVIP2 highlights the versatility of protein ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Davide; Cattivelli, Luigi; Mazzucotelli, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Plant cells regulate many cellular processes controlling the half-life of critical proteins through ubiquitination. Previously, we characterized two interacting RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligases of Triticum durum, TdRF1 and WVIP2. We revealed their role in tolerance to dehydration, and existing knowledge about their partners also indicated their involvement in the regulation of some aspects of plant development. Here we located WVIP2 in the regulation of the ABA signaling, based on sequence similarities. Further we acquired general evidence about the versatility of ubiquitination in plant cells. A protein can be target of different E3 ligases for a perfect tuning of its abundance as well as the same E3 ligase can ubiquitinate different and unrelated proteins, thus representing a cross-connections between different signaling pathways for a global coordination of cellular processes. PMID:22899050

  5. Immunoprecipitation of Cullin-RING Ligases (CRLs) in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Franciosini, Anna; Serino, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    CRL (Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase) is the major class of plant E3 ubiquitin ligases. Immunoprecipitation-based methods are useful techniques for revealing interactions among Cullin-RING Ligase (CRL) subunits or between CRLs and other proteins, as well as for detecting poly-ubiquitin modifications of the CRLs themselves. Here, we describe two immunoprecipitation (IP) procedures suitable for CRLs in Arabidopsis: a procedure for IP analysis of CRL subunits and their interactors and a second procedure for in vivo ubiquitination analysis of the CRLs. Both protocols can be divided into two major steps: (1) preparation of cell extracts without disruption of protein interactions and (2) affinity purification of the protein complexes and subsequent detection. We provide a thorough description of all the steps, as well as advice on how to choose proper buffers for these analyses. We also suggest a series of negative controls that can be used to verify the specificity of the procedure. PMID:27424742

  6. Ligand Specificity of Group I Biotin Protein Ligase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Sudha; Gupta, Garima; Srivastava, Richa; Ramu, Vasanthakumar Ganga; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2008-01-01

    Background Fatty acids are indispensable constituents of mycolic acids that impart toughness & permeability barrier to the cell envelope of M. tuberculosis. Biotin is an essential co-factor for acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) the enzyme involved in the synthesis of malonyl-CoA, a committed precursor, needed for fatty acid synthesis. Biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) provides the co-factor for catalytic activity of ACC. Methodology/Principal Findings BPL/BirA (Biotin Protein Ligase), and its substrate, biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mt) were cloned and expressed in E. coli BL21. In contrast to EcBirA and PhBPL, the ∼29.5 kDa MtBPL exists as a monomer in native, biotin and bio-5′AMP liganded forms. This was confirmed by molecular weight profiling by gel filtration on Superdex S-200 and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). Computational docking of biotin and bio-5′AMP to MtBPL show that adenylation alters the contact residues for biotin. MtBPL forms 11 H-bonds with biotin, relative to 35 with bio-5′AMP. Docking simulations also suggest that bio-5′AMP hydrogen bonds to the conserved ‘GRGRRG’ sequence but not biotin. The enzyme catalyzed transfer of biotin to BCCP was confirmed by incorporation of radioactive biotin and by Avidin blot. The Km for BCCP was ∼5.2 µM and ∼420 nM for biotin. MtBPL has low affinity (Kb = 1.06×10−6 M) for biotin relative to EcBirA but their Km are almost comparable suggesting that while the major function of MtBPL is biotinylation of BCCP, tight binding of biotin/bio-5′AMP by EcBirA is channeled for its repressor activity. Conclusions/Significance These studies thus open up avenues for understanding the unique features of MtBPL and the role it plays in biotin utilization in M. tuberculosis. PMID:18509457

  7. Defects in DNA ligase I trigger PCNA ubiquitylation at Lys 107.

    PubMed

    Das-Bradoo, Sapna; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Wood, Jamie L; Ricke, Robin M; Haworth, Justin C; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2010-01-01

    In all eukaryotes, the ligation of newly synthesized DNA, also known as Okazaki fragments, is catalysed by DNA ligase I (ref. 1). An individual with a DNA ligase I deficiency exhibits growth retardation, sunlight sensitivity and severe immunosuppression, probably due to accumulation of DNA damage. Surprisingly, not much is known about the DNA damage response (DDR) in DNA ligase I-deficient cells. As DNA replication and DDR pathways are highly conserved in eukaryotes, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to address this issue. We uncovered a new pathway, which facilitates ubiquitylation at Lys 107 of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Unlike ubiquitylation at Lys 164 of PCNA in response to UV irradiation, which triggers translesion synthesis, modification of Lys 107 is not dependent on the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (E2) Rad6 (ref. 4) nor the ubiquitin ligase (E3) Rad18 (ref. 5), but requires the E2 variant Mms2 (ref. 6) in conjunction with Ubc4 (ref. 7) and the E3 Rad5 (Refs 8, 9). Surprisingly, DNA ligase I-deficient S. cerevisiae cdc9-1 cells that carry a PCNAK107R mutation are inviable, because they cannot activate a robust DDR. Furthermore, we show that ubiquitylation of PCNA in response to DNA ligase I deficiency is conserved in humans, yet the lysine residue that is modified remains to be determined. We propose that PCNA ubiquitylation provides a 'DNA damage code' that allows cells to categorize different types of defects that arise during DNA replication. PMID:20010813

  8. Ubiquitin ligase activity of TFIIH and the transcriptional response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yuichiro; Masuda, Claudio A; Chang, Wei-Hau; Komori, Hirofumi; Wang, Dong; Hunter, Tony; Joazeiro, Claudio A P; Kornberg, Roger D

    2005-04-15

    Core transcription factor (TF) IIH purified from yeast possesses an E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase activity, which resides, at least in part, in a RING finger (RNF) domain of the Ssl1 subunit. Yeast strains mutated in the Ssl1 RNF domain are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). This increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents does not reflect a deficiency in nucleotide excision repair. Rather, it correlates with reduced transcriptional induction of genes involved in DNA repair, suggesting that the E3 Ub ligase activity of TFIIH mediates the transcriptional response to DNA damage. PMID:15837426

  9. Biochemical Properties and Biological Function of a Monofunctional Microbial Biotin Protein Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Beckett, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Biotin protein ligases constitute a family of enzymes that catalyze biotin linkage to biotin-dependent carboxylases. In bacteria these enzymes are functionally divided into two classes; the monofunctional enzymes that only catalyze biotin addition and the bifunctional enzymes that also bind to DNA to regulate transcription initiation. Biochemical and biophysical studies of the bifunctional Escherichia coli ligase suggest that several properties of the enzyme have evolved to support its additional regulatory role. Included among these properties are the order of substrate binding and linkage between oligomeric state and ligand binding. PMID:20499837

  10. Bioinformatics analysis identifies several intrinsically disordered human E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Sofie V.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system targets misfolded proteins for degradation. Since the accumulation of such proteins is potentially harmful for the cell, their prompt removal is important. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases mediate substrate ubiquitination by bringing together the substrate with an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which transfers ubiquitin to the substrate. For misfolded proteins, substrate recognition is generally delegated to molecular chaperones that subsequently interact with specific E3 ligases. An important exception is San1, a yeast E3 ligase. San1 harbors extensive regions of intrinsic disorder, which provide both conformational flexibility and sites for direct recognition of misfolded targets of vastly different conformations. So far, no mammalian ortholog of San1 is known, nor is it clear whether other E3 ligases utilize disordered regions for substrate recognition. Here, we conduct a bioinformatics analysis to examine >600 human and S. cerevisiae E3 ligases to identify enzymes that are similar to San1 in terms of function and/or mechanism of substrate recognition. An initial sequence-based database search was found to detect candidates primarily based on the homology of their ordered regions, and did not capture the unique disorder patterns that encode the functional mechanism of San1. However, by searching specifically for key features of the San1 sequence, such as long regions of intrinsic disorder embedded with short stretches predicted to be suitable for substrate interaction, we identified several E3 ligases with these characteristics. Our initial analysis revealed that another remarkable trait of San1 is shared with several candidate E3 ligases: long stretches of complete lysine suppression, which in San1 limits auto-ubiquitination. We encode these characteristic features into a San1 similarity-score, and present a set of proteins that are plausible candidates as San1 counterparts in humans. In conclusion, our work indicates that San1 is

  11. Identification and functional expression of the pepper RING type E3 ligase, CaDTR1, involved in drought stress tolerance via ABA-mediated signalling

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hyunhee; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Drought negatively affects plant growth and development, thereby leading to loss of crop productivity. Several plant E3 ubiquitin ligases act as positive or negative regulators of abscisic acid (ABA) and thus play important roles in the drought stress response. Here, we show that the C3HC4-type RING finger E3 ligase, CaDTR1, regulates the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. CaDTR1 contains an amino-terminal RING finger motif and two carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic regions; the RING finger motif functions during attachment of ubiquitins to the target proteins, and the carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic regions function during subcellular localisation. The expression of CaDTR1 was induced by ABA, drought, and NaCl treatments. CaDTR1 localised in the nucleus and displayed in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. CaDTR1-silenced pepper plants exhibited a drought-sensitive phenotype characterised by high levels of transpirational water loss. On the other hand, CaDTR1-overexpressing (OX) Arabidopsis plants exhibited an ABA-hypersensitive phenotype during the germinative and post-germinative growth stages. Moreover, in contrast to CaDTR1-silenced pepper plants, CaDTR1-OX plants exhibited a drought-tolerant phenotype characterised by low levels of transpirational water loss via increased stomatal closure and high leaf temperatures. Our data indicate that CaDTR1 functions as a positive regulator of the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. PMID:27439598

  12. Identification and functional expression of the pepper RING type E3 ligase, CaDTR1, involved in drought stress tolerance via ABA-mediated signalling.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyunhee; Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Drought negatively affects plant growth and development, thereby leading to loss of crop productivity. Several plant E3 ubiquitin ligases act as positive or negative regulators of abscisic acid (ABA) and thus play important roles in the drought stress response. Here, we show that the C3HC4-type RING finger E3 ligase, CaDTR1, regulates the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. CaDTR1 contains an amino-terminal RING finger motif and two carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic regions; the RING finger motif functions during attachment of ubiquitins to the target proteins, and the carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic regions function during subcellular localisation. The expression of CaDTR1 was induced by ABA, drought, and NaCl treatments. CaDTR1 localised in the nucleus and displayed in vitro E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. CaDTR1-silenced pepper plants exhibited a drought-sensitive phenotype characterised by high levels of transpirational water loss. On the other hand, CaDTR1-overexpressing (OX) Arabidopsis plants exhibited an ABA-hypersensitive phenotype during the germinative and post-germinative growth stages. Moreover, in contrast to CaDTR1-silenced pepper plants, CaDTR1-OX plants exhibited a drought-tolerant phenotype characterised by low levels of transpirational water loss via increased stomatal closure and high leaf temperatures. Our data indicate that CaDTR1 functions as a positive regulator of the drought stress response via ABA-mediated signalling. PMID:27439598

  13. Methylmalonic acid and coenzyme A concentrations in the livers of pair-fed vitamin B12-deficient and vitamin B12-treated sheep

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R. M.; Osborne-White, W. S.; Russell, G. R.

    1969-01-01

    The concentrations of CoA in the livers of severely vitamin B12-deficient ewes were about 2·6 times those in pair-fed animals treated with vitamin B12. When the feeding rates of the pair-fed animals were closely similar, the concentrations of methylmalonic acid in deficient livers were about twice those in vitamin B12-sufficient livers. The molar concentrations of CoA present were more than three times those of methylmalonic acid in both deficient and treated animals, and it is concluded that the elevated concentrations of CoA in the deficient livers were not primarily due to accumulation of methylmalonyl-CoA. PMID:4898195

  14. Fatty Acid Elongation Is Independent of Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase Activities in Leek and Brassica napus1

    PubMed Central

    Hlousek-Radojcic, Alenka; Evenson, Kimberly J.; Jaworski, Jan G.; Post-Beittenmiller, Dusty

    1998-01-01

    In both animal and plant acyl elongation systems, it has been proposed that fatty acids are first activated to acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) before their elongation, and that the ATP dependence of fatty acid elongation is evidence of acyl-CoA synthetase involvement. However, because CoA is not supplied in standard fatty acid elongation assays, it is not clear if CoA-dependent acyl-CoA synthetase activity can provide levels of acyl-CoAs necessary to support typical rates of fatty acid elongation. Therefore, we examined the role of acyl-CoA synthetase in providing the primer for acyl elongation in leek (Allium porrum L.) epidermal microsomes and Brassica napus L. cv Reston oil bodies. As presented here, fatty acid elongation was independent of CoA and proceeded at maximum rates with CoA-free preparations of malonyl-CoA. We also showed that stearic acid ([1-14C]18:0)-CoA was synthesized from [1-14C]18:0 in the presence of CoA-free malonyl-CoA or acetyl-CoA, and that [1-14C]18:0-CoA synthesis under these conditions was ATP dependent. Furthermore, the appearance of [1-14C]18:0 in the acyl-CoA fraction was simultaneous with its appearance in phosphatidylcholine. These data, together with the s of a previous study (A. Hlousek-Radojcic, H. Imai, J.G. Jaworski [1995] Plant J 8: 803–809) showing that exogenous [14C]acyl-CoAs are diluted by a relatively large endogenous pool before they are elongated, strongly indicated that acyl-CoA synthetase did not play a direct role in fatty acid elongation, and that phosphatidylcholine or another glycerolipid was a more likely source of elongation primers than acyl-CoAs.

  15. Sequential Poly-ubiquitylation by Specialized Conjugating Enzymes Expands the Versatility of a Quality Control Ubiquitin Ligase.

    PubMed

    Weber, Annika; Cohen, Itamar; Popp, Oliver; Dittmar, Gunnar; Reiss, Yuval; Sommer, Thomas; Ravid, Tommer; Jarosch, Ernst

    2016-09-01

    The Doa10 quality control ubiquitin (Ub) ligase labels proteins with uniform lysine 48-linked poly-Ub (K48-pUB) chains for proteasomal degradation. Processing of Doa10 substrates requires the activity of two Ub conjugating enzymes. Here we show that the non-canonical conjugating enzyme Ubc6 attaches single Ub molecules not only to lysines but also to hydroxylated amino acids. These Ub moieties serve as primers for subsequent poly-ubiquitylation by Ubc7. We propose that the evolutionary conserved propensity of Ubc6 to mount Ub on diverse amino acids augments the number of ubiquitylation sites within a substrate and thereby increases the target range of Doa10. Our work provides new insights on how the consecutive activity of two specialized conjugating enzymes facilitates the attachment of poly-Ub to very heterogeneous client molecules. Such stepwise ubiquitylation reactions most likely represent a more general cellular phenomenon that extends the versatility yet sustains the specificity of the Ub conjugation system. PMID:27570077

  16. A novel ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 functions as a modulator of immune response against lipopolysaccharide in Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qi; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Shuai; Wang, Lingling; Xin, Lusheng; Liu, Conghui; Jia, Zhihao; Song, Linsheng; Zhu, Beiwei

    2016-07-01

    Ubiquitination is an important post-translational protein modification and plays a crucial role in various processes such as cell cycle, signal transduction, and transcriptional regulation. In the present study, a novel ubiquitin (Ub)-protein ligase E3 (designed as CgE3Rv1) was identified from Crassostrea gigas, and its ubiquitination regulation in the immune response against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation was investigated. The open reading frame of CgE3Rv1 gene was of 1455 bp encoding a polypeptide of 484 amino acids with the predicted molecular mass of 54.89 kDa. There were two transmembrane regions and a RING-variant (RINGv) domain identified in CgE3Rv1. CgE3Rv1 shared similar C4HC3 zinc-finger-like motif with those RINGv domain Ub-protein ligases E3s identified from vertebrates and invertebrates, and it was closely clustered with the membrane-associated RING-CH2 (MARCH2) Ub-protein ligases E3s in the phylogenetic tree. The mRNA transcript of CgE3Rv1 was highest expressed in gonads and hemolymph (p < 0.05), and its mRNA expression level in hemocytes was significantly increased at 6 h (p < 0.01) after the stimulation of LPS, while the up-regulated mRNA expression was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) after acetylcholine stimulation. No significant changes of CgE3Rv1 expression were observed after peptidoglycan or mannan stimulation. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization assays revealed that CgE3Rv1 protein and mRNA were dominantly distributed in the gonad. In the hemocytes, CgE3Rv1 was mainly located around the nucleus, and slightly distributed in the cytoplasm and on the cell membrane. Recombinant CgE3Rv1 RINGv domain protein (rCgE3Rv1-RINGv) was confirmed to activate the Ub reaction system in vitro with the aid of Ub-activating enzyme E1 and Ub-conjugating enzyme E2. These results demonstrated that CgE3Rv1 was an Ub-protein ligase E3, which was involved in the immune response against LPS and the interaction with cell surface signal

  17. SILENCING OF 4-COUMARATE-CoA LIGASE IN PINUS RADIATA, A CONIFEROUS GYMNOSPERM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzyme 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL) is involved in the general phenylpropanoid pathway and provides monolignol precursors such as p-coumaroyl-CoA, ultimately for the biosynthesis of lignin. Recombinant studies designed to assess the role of 4CL in the lignification process have focused on angios...

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu; Li, Lan-Fen; Tang, De-Wei; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  19. THE ROLE OF E3 LIGASES IN THE UBIQUITIN-DEPENDENT REGULATION OF SPERMATOGENESIS*

    PubMed Central

    Richburg, John H.; Myers, Jessica L.; Bratton, Shawn B.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitination of proteins is a post-translational modification that was first described as a means to target misfolded or unwanted proteins for degradation by the proteasome. It is now appreciated that the ubiquitination of proteins also serves as a mechanism to modify protein function and cellular functions such as protein trafficking, cell signaling, DNA repair, chromatin modifications, cell-cycle progression and cell death. The ubiquitination of proteins occurs through the hierarchal transfer of ubiquitin from an E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme to an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and finally to an E3 ubiquitin ligase that transfers the ubiquitin to its target protein. It is the final E3 ubiquitin ligase that confers the substrate specificity for ubiquitination and is the focus of this review. Spermatogenesis is a complex and highly regulated process by which spermatogonial stem cells undergo mitotic proliferation and expansion of the diploid spermatogonial population, differentiate into spermatocytes and progress through two meiotic divisions to produce haploid spermatids that proceed through a final morphogenesis to generate mature spermatozoa. The ubiquitination of proteins in the cells of the testis occurs in many of the processes required for the progression of mature spermatozoa. Since it is the E3 ubiquitin ligase that recognizes the target protein and provides the specificity and selectivity for ubiquitination, this review highlights known examples of E3 ligases in the testis and the differing roles that they play in maintaining functional spermatogenesis. PMID:24632385

  20. The prolific ATL family of RING-H2 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2012-01-01

    An abundant class of E3 ubiquitin ligases encodes the RING-finger domain. The RING finger binds to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and brings together both the E2 and substrate. It is predicted that 477 RING finger E3 ligases exist in Arabidopsis thaliana. A particular family among them, named Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL), consists of 91 members that contain the RING-H2 variation and a hydrophobic domain located at the N-terminal end. Transmembrane E3 ligases are important in several biological processes. For instance, some transmembrane RING finger E3 ligases are main participants in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway that targets misfolded proteins. Functional analysis of a number of ATLs has shown that some of them regulate distinct pathways in plants. Several ATLs have been shown to participate in defense responses, while others play a role in the regulation of the carbon/nitrogen response during post-germinative seedling growth transition, in the regulation of cell death during root development, in endosperm development, or in the transition to flowering under short day conditions. The ATL family has also been instrumental in evolution studies for showing how gene families are expanded in plant genomes. PMID:22827943

  1. Structural insight into β-Clamp and its interaction with DNA Ligase in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preeti; Tarique, Khaja Faisal; Mazumder, Mohit; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; Kumari, Nilima; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative and microaerophilic bacterium, is the major cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Owing to its central role, DNA replication machinery has emerged as a prime target for the development of antimicrobial drugs. Here, we report 2Å structure of β-clamp from H. pylori (Hpβ-clamp), which is one of the critical components of DNA polymerase III. Despite of similarity in the overall fold of eubacterial β-clamp structures, some distinct features in DNA interacting loops exists that have not been reported previously. The in silico prediction identified the potential binders of β-clamp such as alpha subunit of DNA pol III and DNA ligase with identification of β-clamp binding regions in them and validated by SPR studies. Hpβ-clamp interacts with DNA ligase in micromolar binding affinity. Moreover, we have successfully determined the co-crystal structure of β-clamp with peptide from DNA ligase (not reported earlier in prokaryotes) revealing the region from ligase that interacts with β-clamp. PMID:27499105

  2. Effective interaction studies for inhibition of DNA ligase protein from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Vijayalakshmi, Periyasamy; Daisy, Pitchai

    2015-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has been recognized as an important human pathogen for more than 100 years. It is among the most important causative agent of human infections in the twenty-first century. DNA ligase is the main protein responsible for the replication of S. aureus. In order to control the replication mechanism, DNA ligase is a successive drug target, hence we have chosen this protein for this study. We performed virtual screening using ZINC database for identification of potent inhibitor against DNA ligase. Based on the scoring methods, we have selected best five compounds from the ZINC database. In order to improve the accuracy, selected compounds were subjected into Quantum Polarized Ligand Docking (QPLD) docking, for which the results showed high docking score, compared to glide docking score. QPLD is more accurate as it includes charges in the scoring function, which was not available in the glide docking. Binding energy calculation results also indicated that selected compounds have good binding capacity with the target protein. In addition, these compounds on screening have good absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity property. In this study, we identified few compounds that particularly work against DNA ligase protein, having better interaction phenomenon and it would help further the experimental analysis. PMID:25055026

  3. Chimeric ubiquitin ligases inhibit non-small cell lung cancer via negative modulation of EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Daixing; Ru, Yi; Wang, Qinhao; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Junxia; Wu, Jin; Yao, Libo; Li, Xiaofei; Li, Xia

    2015-04-01

    Targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) represents a promising therapeutic strategy for non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a major pathway that mediates protein degradation. To target the degradation of EGFR, we generated two artificial ubiquitin ligases, which are composed of an EGFR-binding domain, i.e., the SH2 domain from growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2), and an ubiquitin ligase catalytic domain, i.e., the RING domain from Cbl or the U-box domain from CHIP. When the chimeric ubiquitin ligases were introduced into lung cancer SPC-A1 cells, they effectively associated with EGFR, promoted its ubiquitination and degradation, and as a result, blocked the downstream PI3K-Akt signal pathway. Moreover, cell proliferation and invasion were inhibited, the sensitivity to docetaxel-induced apoptosis was enhanced and the tumorigenicity was suppressed. In conclusion, negative modulation of EGFR signaling by the chimeric ubiquitin ligases can inhibit malignancy of SPC-A1 cells and sensitize these cells to chemotherapy, thus it may be applied to targeted therapy for NSCLC. PMID:25573345

  4. The Not4 RING E3 Ligase: A Relevant Player in Cotranslational Quality Control

    PubMed Central

    Collart, Martine A.

    2013-01-01

    The Not4 RING E3 ligase is a subunit of the evolutionarily conserved Ccr4-Not complex. Originally identified in yeast by mutations that increase transcription, it was subsequently defined as an ubiquitin ligase. Substrates for this ligase were characterized in yeast and in metazoans. Interestingly, some substrates for this ligase are targeted for polyubiquitination and degradation, while others instead are stable monoubiquitinated proteins. The former are mostly involved in transcription, while the latter are a ribosomal protein and a ribosome-associated chaperone. Consistently, Not4 and all other subunits of the Ccr4-Not complex are present in translating ribosomes. An important function for Not4 in cotranslational quality control has emerged. In the absence of Not4, the total level of polysomes is reduced. In addition, translationally arrested polypeptides, aggregated proteins, and polyubiquitinated proteins accumulate. Its role in quality control is likely to be related on one hand to its importance for the functional assembly of the proteasome and on the other hand to its association with the RNA degradation machines. Not4 is in an ideal position to signal to degradation mRNAs whose translation has been aborted, and this defines Not4 as a key player in the quality control of newly synthesized proteins. PMID:27335678

  5. Structural insight into β-Clamp and its interaction with DNA Ligase in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Preeti; Tarique, Khaja Faisal; Mazumder, Mohit; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; kumari, Nilima; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative and microaerophilic bacterium, is the major cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Owing to its central role, DNA replication machinery has emerged as a prime target for the development of antimicrobial drugs. Here, we report 2Å structure of β-clamp from H. pylori (Hpβ-clamp), which is one of the critical components of DNA polymerase III. Despite of similarity in the overall fold of eubacterial β-clamp structures, some distinct features in DNA interacting loops exists that have not been reported previously. The in silico prediction identified the potential binders of β-clamp such as alpha subunit of DNA pol III and DNA ligase with identification of β-clamp binding regions in them and validated by SPR studies. Hpβ-clamp interacts with DNA ligase in micromolar binding affinity. Moreover, we have successfully determined the co-crystal structure of β-clamp with peptide from DNA ligase (not reported earlier in prokaryotes) revealing the region from ligase that interacts with β-clamp. PMID:27499105

  6. Competing E3 ubiquitin ligases govern circadian periodicity by degradation of CRY in nucleus and cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung-Hee; Mohawk, Jennifer A; Siepka, Sandra M; Shan, Yongli; Huh, Seong Kwon; Hong, Hee-Kyung; Kornblum, Izabela; Kumar, Vivek; Koike, Nobuya; Xu, Ming; Nussbaum, Justin; Liu, Xinran; Chen, Zheng; Chen, Zhijian J; Green, Carla B; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2013-02-28

    Period determination in the mammalian circadian clock involves the turnover rate of the repressors CRY and PER. We show that CRY ubiquitination engages two competing E3 ligase complexes that either lengthen or shorten circadian period in mice. Cloning of a short-period circadian mutant, Past-time, revealed a glycine to glutamate missense mutation in Fbxl21, an F-box protein gene that is a paralog of Fbxl3 that targets the CRY proteins for degradation. While loss of function of FBXL3 leads to period lengthening, mutation of Fbxl21 causes period shortening. FBXL21 forms an SCF E3 ligase complex that slowly degrades CRY in the cytoplasm but antagonizes the stronger E3 ligase activity of FBXL3 in the nucleus. FBXL21 plays a dual role: protecting CRY from FBXL3 degradation in the nucleus and promoting CRY degradation within the cytoplasm. Thus, the balance and cellular compartmentalization of competing E3 ligases for CRY determine circadian period of the clock in mammals. PMID:23452855

  7. Yeast SREBP cleavage activation requires the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase complex

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Emerson V.; Nwosu, Christine C.; Tong, Zongtian; Roguev, Assen; Cummins, Timothy D.; Kim, Dong-Uk; Hayles, Jacqueline; Park, Han-Oh; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Powell, David W.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Espenshade, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Mammalian lipid homeostasis requires proteolytic activation of membrane-bound sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors through sequential action of the Golgi Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. Here, we report that while SREBP function is conserved in fungi, fission yeast employs a different mechanism for SREBP cleavage. Using genetics and biochemistry, we identified four genes defective for SREBP cleavage, dsc1–4, encoding components of a transmembrane Golgi E3 ligase complex with structural homology to the Hrd1 E3 ligase complex involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. The Dsc complex binds SREBP and cleavage requires components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway: the E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc4, the Dsc1 RING E3 ligase and the proteasome. dsc mutants display conserved aggravating genetic interactions with components of the multivesicular body pathway in fission yeast and budding yeast, which lacks SREBP. Together, these data suggest that the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase complex functions in a post-ER pathway for protein degradation. PMID:21504829

  8. In vitro selection of optimal DNA substrates for T4 RNA ligase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Kazuo; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1993-01-01

    We have used in vitro selection techniques to characterize DNA sequences that are ligated efficiently by T4 RNA ligase. We find that the ensemble of selected sequences ligated about 10 times as efficiently as the random mixture of sequences used as the input for selection. Surprisingly, the majority of the selected sequences approximated a well-defined consensus sequence.

  9. COA User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, B.; Pautz, J.; Sellers, C.

    1999-01-28

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has one of the largest and most complete collections of information on crude oil composition that is available to the public. The computer program that manages this database of crude oil analyses has recently been rewritten to allow easier access to this information. This report describes how the new system can be accessed and how the information contained in the Crude Oil Analysis Data Bank can be obtained.

  10. Pantothenic acid and its derivatives protect Ehrlich ascites tumor cells against lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Slyshenkov, V S; Rakowska, M; Moiseenok, A G; Wojtczak, L

    1995-12-01

    Preincubation of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells at 22 or 32 degrees C, but not at 0 degree C, with pantothenic acid, 4'-phosphopantothenic acid, pantothenol, or pantethine reduced lipid peroxidation (measured by production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive compounds) induced by the Fenton reaction (Fe2+ + H2O2) and partly protected the plasma membrane against the leakiness to cytoplasmic proteins produced by the same reagent. Pantothenic acid and its derivatives did not inhibit (Fe2+ + H2O2)-induced peroxidation of phospholipid multilamellar vesicles, thus indicating that their effect on the cells was not due to the scavenging mechanism. Homopantothenic acid and its 4'-phosphate ester (which are not precursors of CoA) neither protected Ehrlich ascites tumor cells against lipid peroxidation nor prevented plasma membrane leakiness under the same conditions. Incubation of the cells with pantothenic acid, 4'-phosphopantothenic acid, pantothenol, or pantethine significantly increased the amount of cellular CoA and potentiated incorporation of added palmitate into phospholipids and cholesterol esters. It is concluded that pantothenic acid and its related compounds protect the plasma membrane of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells against the damage by oxygen free radicals due to increasing cellular level of CoA. The latter compound may act by diminishing propagation of lipid peroxidation and promoting repair mechanisms, mainly the synthesis of phospholipids. PMID:8582649

  11. Effect of Genistein and L-Carnitine and Their Combination on Gene Expression of Hepatocyte HMG-COA Reductase and LDL Receptor in Experimental Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    YOUSEFINEJAD, Abbas; SIASSI, Fereydoon; MIRSHAFIEY, Abbas; ESHRAGHIAN, Mohammad-Reza; KOOHDANI, Fariba; JAVANBAKHT, Mohammad Hassan; SEDAGHAT, Reza; RAMEZANI, Atena; ZAREI, Mahnaz; DJALALI, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nephrotic syndrome is a disorder that leads to hyperlipidemia. L-carnitine and genistein can effect on lipid metabolism and the syndrome. In the present study, we have delved into the separate and the twin-effects of L-carnitine and genistein on the gene expressions of HMG-COA reductase and LDL receptor in experimental nephrotic syndrome. Methods: In this controlled experimental study, 50 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: NC (normal-control), PC (patient-control), LC (L-carnitine), G (genistein), LCG (L-carnitine-genistein). Adriamycin was used for inducing nephrotic syndrome and the spot urine samples and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio were measured. Hepatocytic RNA was extracted and real-time PCR was used for HMG-COA Reductase and LDL receptor gene Expression measurement. Results: The final weight of the patients groups were lower than the NC group (P=0.001), and weight gain of the NC group was higher than the other groups (P<0.001). The proteinuria and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio showed significant differences between PC group and LC, G and LCG groups at week 7 (P<0.001). The expression of HMGCOA Reductase mRNA down regulated in LC, G and LCG groups in comparison with PC group (P<0.001). ΔCT of LDLr mRNA showed significant differences between the PC group and the other patient groups (P<0.001). Conclusion: This study shows a significant decreasing (P<0.001) and non-significant increasing trend in HMG-COA Reductase and LDLr gene expression, respectively, and synergistic effect of L-carnitine and genistein on these genes in experimental nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26576346

  12. CRP Is an Activator of Yersinia pestis Biofilm Formation that Operates via a Mechanism Involving gmhA and waaAE-coaD

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Fang, Haihong; Yang, Huiying; Zhang, Yiquan; Han, Yanping; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Ruifu

    2016-01-01

    gmhA encodes a phosphoheptose isomerase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of heptose, a conserved component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). GmhA plays an important role in Yersinia pestis biofilm blockage in the flea gut. waaA, waaE, and coaD constitute a three-gene operon waaAE-coaD in Y. pestis. waaA encodes a transferase that is responsible for binding lipid-A to the core oligosaccharide of LPS. WaaA is a key determinant in Y. pestis biofilm formation, and the waaA expression is positively regulated by the two-component regulatory system PhoP/PhoQ. WaaE is involved in LPS modification and is necessary for Y. pestis biofilm production. In this study, the biofilm-related phenotypic assays indicate that the global regulator CRP stimulates Y. pestis biofilm formation in vitro and on nematodes, while it has no regulatory effect on the biosynthesis of the biofilm-signaling molecular 3′,5′-cyclic diguanosine monophosphate. Further gene regulation experiments disclose that CRP does not regulate the hms genes at the transcriptional level but directly promotes the gmhA transcription and indirectly activates the waaAE-coaD transcription through directly acting on phoPQ-YPO1632. Thus, it is speculated that CRP-mediated carbon catabolite regulation of Y. pestis biofilm formation depends on the CRP-dependent carbon source metabolic pathways of the biosynthesis, modification, and transportation of biofilm exopolysaccharide. PMID:27014218

  13. 248-nm laser photolysis of CHBr3/O-atom mixtures: kinetic evidence for UV CO(A) chemiluminescence in the reaction of methylidyne radicals with atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L

    2005-03-17

    The 4th positive and Cameron band emissions from electronically excited CO have been observed for the first time in 248-nm pulsed laser photolysis of a trace amount of CHBr(3) vapor in an excess of O atoms. O atoms were produced by dissociation of N(2)O (or O(2)) in a cw-microwave discharge cavity in 2.0 Torr of He at 298 K. The CO emission intensity in these bands showed a quadratic dependence on the laser fluence employed. Temporal profiles of the CO(A) and other excited-state products that formed in the photoproduced precursor + O-atom reactions were measured by recording their time-resolved chemiluminescence in discrete vibronic bands. The CO 4th positive transition (A(1)Pi, v' = 0 --> X(1)Sigma(+), v' ' = 2) near 165.7 nm was monitored in this work to deduce the pseudo-first-order decay kinetics of the CO(A) chemiluminescence in the presence of various added substrates (CH(4), NO, N(2)O, H(2), and O(2)). From this, the second-order rate coefficient values were determined for reactions of these substrates with the photoproduced precursors. The measured reactivity trends suggest that the prominent precursors responsible for the CO(A) chemiluminescence are the methylidyne radicals, CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)), whose production requires the absorption of at least 2 laser photons by the photolysis mixture. The O-atom reactions with brominated precursors (CBr, CHBr, and CBr(2)), which also form in the photolysis, are shown to play a minor role in the production of the CO(A or a) chemiluminescence. However, the CBr(2) + O-atom reaction was identified as a significant source for the 289.9-nm Br(2) chemiluminescence that was also observed in this work. The 282.2-nm OH and the 336.2-nm NH chemiluminescences were also monitored to deduce the kinetics of CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)) reactions when excess O(2) and NO were present. PMID:16838991

  14. Effects of RING-SH2Grb², a chimeric protein containing the E3 ligase domain of Cbl, on the EGFR pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Hao; Wang, Pei-Yu; Lin, Yu-Hung; Chou, He-Yen; Lee, Yen-Hsien; Lee, Chien-Kuo; Pai, Li-Mei

    2014-12-31

    The E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Casitas B-lineage lymphoma protein (Cbl) negatively regulates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway in many organisms, and has crucial roles in cell growth, development and human pathologies, including lung cancers. RING-SH2Grb² a chimeric protein of 215 amino acids containing the RING domain of Cbl that provides E3 ligase activity, and the SH2 domain of Grb2 that serves as an adaptor for EGFR. In this study, we demonstrated that RING-SH2Grb² could promote the ubiquitinylation and degradation of EGFR in a human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line H1299. Moreover, we discovered that the RING-SH2Grb² chimera promoted the internalization of ligand-bound EGFR, inhibited the growth of H1299 cells, and significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model. In summary, our results revealed a potential new cancer therapeutic approach for non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:25575524

  15. The RING Finger Ubiquitin E3 Ligase OsHTAS Enhances Heat Tolerance by Promoting H2O2-Induced Stomatal Closure in Rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Cuicui; Wei, Chuchu; Liu, Xin; Wang, Mugui; Yu, Feifei; Xie, Qi; Tu, Jumin

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress often results in the generation of reactive oxygen species, such as hydrogen peroxide, which plays a vital role as a secondary messenger in the process of abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated stomatal closure. Here, we characterized the rice (Oryza sativa) HEAT TOLERANCE AT SEEDLING STAGE (OsHTAS) gene, which plays a positive role in heat tolerance at the seedling stage. OsHTAS encodes a ubiquitin ligase localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm. OsHTAS expression was detected in all tissues surveyed and peaked in leaf blade, in which the expression was concentrated in mesophyll cells. OsHTAS was responsive to multiple stresses and was strongly induced by exogenous ABA. In yeast two-hybrid assays, OsHTAS interacted with components of the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system and an isoform of rice ascorbate peroxidase. OsHTAS modulated hydrogen peroxide accumulation in shoots, altered the stomatal aperture status of rice leaves, and promoted ABA biosynthesis. The results suggested that the RING finger ubiquitin E3 ligase OsHTAS functions in leaf blade to enhance heat tolerance through modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced stomatal closure and is involved in both ABA-dependent and DROUGHT AND SALT TOLERANCE-mediated pathways. PMID:26564152

  16. Structural evolution of luciferase activity in Zophobas mealworm AMP/CoA-ligase (protoluciferase) through site-directed mutagenesis of the luciferin binding site.

    PubMed

    Prado, R A; Barbosa, J A; Ohmiya, Y; Viviani, V R

    2011-07-01

    The structural origin and evolution of bioluminescent activity of beetle luciferases from AMP/CoA ligases remains a mystery. Previously we cloned the luciferase-like enzyme from Zophobas morio mealworm, a reasonable protoluciferase model that could shine light on this mystery. Kinetic characterization and studies with D- and L-luciferin and their adenylates showed that stereoselectivity constitutes a critical feature for the origin of luciferase activity in AMP/CoA ligases. Comparison of the primary structures and modeling studies of this protoluciferase and the three main families of beetle luciferases showed that the carboxylic acid substrate binding site of this enzyme is smaller and more hydrophobic than the luciferin binding site of beetle luciferases, showing several substitutions of otherwise conserved residues. Thus, here we performed a site-directed mutagenesis survey of the carboxylic binding site motifs of the protoluciferase by replacing their residues by the respective conserved ones found in beetle luciferases in order to identify the structural determinants of luciferase/oxygenase activity. Although most of the substitutions had negative impact on the luminescence activity of the protoluciferase, only the substitution I327T improved the luminescence activity, resulting in a broad and 15 nm blue-shifted luminescence spectrum. Such substitution indicates the importance of the loop motif 322YGMSEI327 (341YGLTETT347 in Photinus pyralis luciferase) for luciferase activity, and indicates a possible route for the evolution of bioluminescence function of beetle luciferases. PMID:21505686

  17. The cowpea RING ubiquitin ligase VuDRIP interacts with transcription factor VuDREB2A for regulating abiotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Sadhukhan, Ayan; Panda, Sanjib Kumar; Sahoo, Lingaraj

    2014-10-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) is an important grain legume cultivated in drought-prone parts of the world, having higher tolerance to heat and drought than many other crops. The transcription factor, Dehydration-Responsive Element-Binding protein 2A (DREB2A), controls expression of many genes involved in osmotic and heat stress responses of plants. In Arabidopsis, DREB2A-interacting proteins (DRIPs), which function as E3 ubiquitin ligases (EC 6.3.2.19), regulate the stability of DREB2A by targeting it for proteasome-mediated degradation. In this study, we cloned the cowpea ortholog of DRIP (VuDRIP) using PCR based methods. The 1614 bp long VuDRIP mRNA encoded a protein of 433 amino acids having a C3HC4-type Really Interesting New Gene (RING) domain in the N-terminus and a C-terminal conserved region, similar to Arabidopsis DRIP1 and DRIP2. We found VuDRIP up-regulation in response to various abiotic stresses and phytohormones. Using yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisae) two-hybrid analysis, VuDRIP was identified as a VuDREB2A-interacting protein. The results indicate negative regulation of VuDREB2A by ubiquitin ligases in cowpea similar to Arabidopsis along with their other unknown roles in stress and hormone signaling pathways. PMID:25090086

  18. Tripartite motif ligases catalyze polyubiquitin chain formation through a cooperative allosteric mechanism.

    PubMed

    Streich, Frederick C; Ronchi, Virginia P; Connick, J Patrick; Haas, Arthur L

    2013-03-22

    Ligation of polyubiquitin chains to proteins is a fundamental post-translational modification, often resulting in targeted degradation of conjugated proteins. Attachment of polyubiquitin chains requires the activities of an E1 activating enzyme, an E2 carrier protein, and an E3 ligase. The mechanism by which polyubiquitin chains are formed remains largely speculative, especially for RING-based ligases. The tripartite motif (TRIM) superfamily of ligases functions in many cellular processes including innate immunity, cellular localization, development and differentiation, signaling, and cancer progression. The present results show that TRIM ligases catalyze polyubiquitin chain formation in the absence of substrate, the rates of which can be used as a functional readout of enzyme function. Initial rate studies under biochemically defined conditions show that TRIM32 and TRIM25 are specific for the Ubc5 family of E2-conjugating proteins and, along with TRIM5α, exhibit cooperative kinetics with respect to Ubc5 concentration, with submicromolar [S]0.5 and Hill coefficients of 3-5, suggesting they possess multiple binding sites for their cognate E2-ubiquitin thioester. Mutation studies reveal a second, non-canonical binding site encompassing the C-terminal Ubc5α-helix. Polyubiquitin chain formation requires TRIM subunit oligomerization through the conserved coiled-coil domain, but can be partially replaced by fusing the catalytic domain to GST to promote dimerization. Other results suggest that TRIM32 assembles polyubiquitin chains as a Ubc5-linked thioester intermediate. These results represent the first detailed mechanistic study of TRIM ligase activity and provide a functional context for oligomerization observed in the superfamily. PMID:23408431

  19. Identifying the ERAD ubiquitin E3 ligases for viral and cellular targeting of MHC class I.

    PubMed

    van den Boomen, D J H; Lehner, P J

    2015-12-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US2 and US11 gene products hijack mammalian ER-associated degradation (ERAD) to induce rapid degradation of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) molecules. The rate-limiting step in this pathway is thought to be the polyubiquitination of MHC-I by distinct host ERAD E3 ubiquitin ligases. TRC8 was identified as the ligase responsible for US2-mediated MHC-I degradation and shown to be required for the cleavage-dependent degradation of some tail-anchored proteins. In addition to MHC-I, plasma membrane profiling identified further immune receptors, which are also substrates for the US2/TRC8 complex. These include at least six α integrins, the coagulation factor thrombomodulin and the NK cell ligand CD112. US2's use of specific HCMV-encoded adaptors makes it an adaptable viral degradation hub. US11-mediated degradation is MHC-I-specific and genetic screens have identified TMEM129, an uncharacterised RING-C2 E3 ligase, as responsible for US11-mediated degradation. In a unique auto-regulatory loop, US11 readily responds to changes in cellular expression of MHC-I. Free US11 either rebinds more MHC-I or is itself degraded by the HRD1/SEL1L E3 ligase complex. While virally encoded US2 and US11 appropriate mammalian ERAD, the MHC-I complex also undergoes stringent cellular quality control and misfolded MHC-I is degraded by the HRD1/SEL1L complex. We discuss the identification and central role of E3 ubiquitin ligases in ER quality control and viral degradation of the MHC-I chain. PMID:26210183

  20. Identifying the ERAD ubiquitin E3 ligases for viral and cellular targeting of MHC class I

    PubMed Central

    van den Boomen, D.J.H.; Lehner, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US2 and US11 gene products hijack mammalian ER-associated degradation (ERAD) to induce rapid degradation of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) molecules. The rate-limiting step in this pathway is thought to be the polyubiquitination of MHC-I by distinct host ERAD E3 ubiquitin ligases. TRC8 was identified as the ligase responsible for US2-mediated MHC-I degradation and shown to be required for the cleavage-dependent degradation of some tail-anchored proteins. In addition to MHC-I, plasma membrane profiling identified further immune receptors, which are also substrates for the US2/TRC8 complex. These include at least six α integrins, the coagulation factor thrombomodulin and the NK cell ligand CD112. US2’s use of specific HCMV-encoded adaptors makes it an adaptable viral degradation hub. US11-mediated degradation is MHC-I-specific and genetic screens have identified TMEM129, an uncharacterised RING-C2 E3 ligase, as responsible for US11-mediated degradation. In a unique auto-regulatory loop, US11 readily responds to changes in cellular expression of MHC-I. Free US11 either rebinds more MHC-I or is itself degraded by the HRD1/SEL1L E3 ligase complex. While virally encoded US2 and US11 appropriate mammalian ERAD, the MHC-I complex also undergoes stringent cellular quality control and misfolded MHC-I is degraded by the HRD1/SEL1L complex. We discuss the identification and central role of E3 ubiquitin ligases in ER quality control and viral degradation of the MHC-I chain. PMID:26210183

  1. Modulation of myocardin function by the ubiquitin E3 ligase UBR5.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guoqing; Wang, Xiaobo; Saunders, Darren N; Henderson, Michelle; Russell, Amanda J; Herring, B Paul; Zhou, Jiliang

    2010-04-16

    Fully differentiated mature smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are characterized by the presence of a unique repertoire of smooth muscle-specific proteins. Although previous studies have shown myocardin to be a critical transcription factor for stimulating expression of smooth muscle-specific genes, the mechanisms regulating myocardin activity are still poorly understood. We used a yeast two-hybrid screen with myocardin as bait to search for factors that may regulate the transcriptional activity of the myocardin. From this screen we identified a HECT domain-containing protein UBR5 (ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 5) as a myocardin-binding protein. Previous studies have shown that HECT domain-containing proteins are ubiquitin E3 ligases that play an important role in protein degradation. UBR5 has, however, also been shown to regulate transcription independent of its E3 ligase activity. In the current study we demonstrated that UBR5 localized in the nuclei of SMCs and forms a complex with myocardin in vivo and in vitro. We also show that UBR5 specifically enhanced trans-activation of smooth muscle-specific promoters by the myocardin family of proteins. In addition, UBR5 significantly augmented the ability of myocardin to induce expression of endogenous SMC marker genes independent on its E3 ligase function. Conversely, depletion of endogenous UBR5 by small interfering RNA in fibroblast cells attenuated myocardin-induced smooth muscle-specific gene expression, and UBR5 knockdown in SMCs resulted in down-regulation of smooth muscle-specific genes. Furthermore, we found that UBR5 can attenuate myocardin protein degradation resulting in increased myocardin protein expression without affecting myocardin mRNA expression. The effects of UBR5 on myocardin requires only the HECT and UBR1 domains of UBR5. This study reveals an unexpected role for the ubiquitin E3 ligase UBR5 as an activator of smooth muscle differentiation through its ability to stabilize myocardin

  2. Structure of a HOIP/E2~ubiquitin complex reveals RBR E3 ligase mechanism and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lechtenberg, Bernhard C.; Rajput, Akhil; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Dobaczewska, Małgorzata K.; Ware, Carl F.; Mace, Peter D.; Riedl, Stefan J.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a central process affecting all facets of cellular signaling and function1. A critical step in ubiquitination is the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to a substrate or a growing ubiquitin chain, which is mediated by E3 ubiquitin ligases. RING-type E3 ligases typically facilitate the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 directly to the substrate2,3. The RBR family of RING-type E3 ligases, however, breaks this paradigm by forming a covalent intermediate with ubiquitin similarly to HECT-type E3 ligases4–6. The RBR family includes Parkin4 and HOIP, the central catalytic factor of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC)7. While structural insights into the RBR E3 ligases Parkin and HHARI in their overall autoinhibited forms are available8–13, no structures exist of intact fully active RBR E3 ligases or any of their complexes. Thus, the RBR mechanism of action has remained largely enigmatic. Here we present the first structure of the fully active HOIP-RBR in its transfer complex with an E2~ubiquitin conjugate, which elucidates the intricate nature of RBR E3 ligases. The active HOIP-RBR adopts a conformation markedly different from that of autoinhibited RBRs. HOIP-RBR binds the E2~ubiquitin conjugate in an elongated fashion, with the E2 and E3 catalytic centers ideally aligned for ubiquitin transfer, which structurally both requires and enables a HECT-like mechanism. In addition, surprisingly, three distinct helix–IBR-fold motifs inherent to RBRs form ubiquitin-binding regions that engage the activated ubiquitin of the E2~Ub conjugate as well as an additional regulatory ubiquitin molecule. The features uncovered reveal critical states of the HOIP-RBR E3 ligase cycle, and comparison with Parkin and HHARI suggests a general mechanism for RBR E3 ligases. PMID:26789245

  3. Structure of a HOIP/E2~ubiquitin complex reveals RBR E3 ligase mechanism and regulation.

    PubMed

    Lechtenberg, Bernhard C; Rajput, Akhil; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Dobaczewska, Małgorzata K; Ware, Carl F; Mace, Peter D; Riedl, Stefan J

    2016-01-28

    Ubiquitination is a central process affecting all facets of cellular signalling and function. A critical step in ubiquitination is the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to a substrate or a growing ubiquitin chain, which is mediated by E3 ubiquitin ligases. RING-type E3 ligases typically facilitate the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 directly to the substrate. The RING-between-RING (RBR) family of RING-type E3 ligases, however, breaks this paradigm by forming a covalent intermediate with ubiquitin similarly to HECT-type E3 ligases. The RBR family includes Parkin and HOIP, the central catalytic factor of the LUBAC (linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex). While structural insights into the RBR E3 ligases Parkin and HHARI in their overall auto-inhibited forms are available, no structures exist of intact fully active RBR E3 ligases or any of their complexes. Thus, the RBR mechanism of action has remained largely unknown. Here we present the first structure, to our knowledge, of the fully active human HOIP RBR in its transfer complex with an E2~ubiquitin conjugate, which elucidates the intricate nature of RBR E3 ligases. The active HOIP RBR adopts a conformation markedly different from that of auto-inhibited RBRs. HOIP RBR binds the E2~ubiquitin conjugate in an elongated fashion, with the E2 and E3 catalytic centres ideally aligned for ubiquitin transfer, which structurally both requires and enables a HECT-like mechanism. In addition, three distinct helix-IBR-fold motifs inherent to RBRs form ubiquitin-binding regions that engage the activated ubiquitin of the E2~ubiquitin conjugate and, surprisingly, an additional regulatory ubiquitin molecule. The features uncovered reveal critical states of the HOIP RBR E3 ligase cycle, and comparison with Parkin and HHARI suggests a general mechanism for RBR E3 ligases. PMID:26789245

  4. Biochemical Competition Makes Fatty-Acid β-Oxidation Vulnerable to Substrate Overload

    PubMed Central

    van Eunen, Karen; Simons, Sereh M. J.; Gerding, Albert; Bleeker, Aycha; den Besten, Gijs; Touw, Catharina M. L.; Houten, Sander M.; Groen, Bert K.; Krab, Klaas; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Bakker, Barbara M.

    2013-01-01

    Fatty-acid metabolism plays a key role in acquired and inborn metabolic diseases. To obtain insight into the network dynamics of fatty-acid β-oxidation, we constructed a detailed computational model of the pathway and subjected it to a fat overload condition. The model contains reversible and saturable enzyme-kinetic equations and experimentally determined parameters for rat-liver enzymes. It was validated by adding palmitoyl CoA or palmitoyl carnitine to isolated rat-liver mitochondria: without refitting of measured parameters, the model correctly predicted the β-oxidation flux as well as the time profiles of most acyl-carnitine concentrations. Subsequently, we simulated the condition of obesity by increasing the palmitoyl-CoA concentration. At a high concentration of palmitoyl CoA the β-oxidation became overloaded: the flux dropped and metabolites accumulated. This behavior originated from the competition between acyl CoAs of different chain lengths for a set of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases with overlapping substrate specificity. This effectively induced competitive feedforward inhibition and thereby led to accumulation of CoA-ester intermediates and depletion of free CoA (CoASH). The mitochondrial [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio modulated the sensitivity to substrate overload, revealing a tight interplay between regulation of β-oxidation and mitochondrial respiration. PMID:23966849

  5. Chlorsulfuron modifies biosynthesis of acyl Acid substituents of sucrose esters secreted by tobacco trichomes.

    PubMed

    Kandra, L; Wagner, G J

    1990-11-01

    Sucrose esters and duvatrienediol diterpenes are principal constituents formed in and secreted outside head cells of trichomes occurring on surfaces of Nicotiana tabacum. Using trichome-bearing epidermal peels prepared from midveins of N. tabacum cv T.I. 1068 leaves, we found that chlorsulfuron reduced and modified radiolabeling of sucrose ester acyl acids derived from branched-chain amino acid metabolism. The herbicide did not effect formation and exudation of diterpenes which are products of isoprenoid metabolism. Treatment with 1.0 micromolar chlorsulfuron affected 8.5- and 6.3-fold reductions in radiolabeling of methylvaleryl and methylbutyryl groups of sucrose esters, respectively, and concomitant increases of 9- and 9.8-fold in radiolabeling of straight chain valeryl and butyryl groups, respectively. These results and others indicate that inhibition of acetolactate synthase causes an accumulation of 2-oxo-butyric acid that is utilized by enzymes common to Leu biosynthesis to form 2-oxo-valeric acid. Coenzyme A (CoA) activation of this keto acid gives rise to butyryl CoA, which is utilized to form butyryl containing sucrose esters. Alternatively, reutilization of 2-oxo-valeric acid by the same enzymes followed by CoA activation leads to valeryl containing sucrose esters. We propose that in trichome secretory cells synthase, isomerase and dehydrogenase enzymes which catalyze Leu synthesis/degredation in most tissues, convert iso-branched, anteiso-branched and straight-chain keto acids in the formation of sucrose ester acyl groups. PMID:16667871

  6. Chlorsulfuron Modifies Biosynthesis of Acyl Acid Substituents of Sucrose Esters Secreted by Tobacco Trichomes

    PubMed Central

    Kandra, Lili; Wagner, George J.

    1990-01-01

    Sucrose esters and duvatrienediol diterpenes are principal constituents formed in and secreted outside head cells of trichomes occurring on surfaces of Nicotiana tabacum. Using trichome-bearing epidermal peels prepared from midveins of N. tabacum cv T.I. 1068 leaves, we found that chlorsulfuron reduced and modified radiolabeling of sucrose ester acyl acids derived from branched-chain amino acid metabolism. The herbicide did not effect formation and exudation of diterpenes which are products of isoprenoid metabolism. Treatment with 1.0 micromolar chlorsulfuron affected 8.5- and 6.3-fold reductions in radiolabeling of methylvaleryl and methylbutyryl groups of sucrose esters, respectively, and concomitant increases of 9- and 9.8-fold in radiolabeling of straight chain valeryl and butyryl groups, respectively. These results and others indicate that inhibition of acetolactate synthase causes an accumulation of 2-oxo-butyric acid that is utilized by enzymes common to Leu biosynthesis to form 2-oxo-valeric acid. Coenzyme A (CoA) activation of this keto acid gives rise to butyryl CoA, which is utilized to form butyryl containing sucrose esters. Alternatively, reutilization of 2-oxo-valeric acid by the same enzymes followed by CoA activation leads to valeryl containing sucrose esters. We propose that in trichome secretory cells synthase, isomerase and dehydrogenase enzymes which catalyze Leu synthesis/degredation in most tissues, convert iso-branched, anteiso-branched and straight-chain keto acids in the formation of sucrose ester acyl groups. PMID:16667871

  7. Functional conservation between mammalian MGRN1 and plant LOG2 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Damian D.; Pratelli, Réjane; Kraft, Edward; Callis, Judy; Pilot, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Plant LOSS OF GDU 2 (LOG2) and mammalian MAHOGUNIN RING FINGER 1 (MGRN1) proteins are RING-type E3 ligases sharing similarity N-terminal to the RING domain. Deletion of this region disrupts the interaction of LOG2 with the plant membrane protein GLUTAMINE DUMPER 1 (GDU1). Phylogenetic analysis identified two clades of LOG2/MGRN1-like proteins in vertebrates and plants. The ability of MGRN1 to functionally replace LOG2 was tested. MGRN1 ubiquitylates GDU1 in vitro and can partially substitute for LOG2 in the plant, partially restoring amino acid resistance to a GDU1-myc over-expression, log2-1 background. Altogether, these results suggest a conserved function for the N-terminal domain in evolution. Structured summary of protein interactionsGDU1 physically interactswith rnMGRN1by two hybrid (1, 2)rnMGRN1 binds to GDU1by pull down(View interaction)GDU6 physically interactswith rnMGRN1by two hybrid (1, 2)GDU3 physically interactswith hsMGRN1by two hybrid (1, 2)rnMGRN1 physically interactswith GDU7by two hybrid (1, 2)GDU5 physically interactswith hsMGRN1by two hybrid (1, 2)hsMGRN1 physically interactswith GDU1by two hybrid (1, 2)rnMGRN1 physically interactswith GDU3by two hybrid (1, 2)rnMGRN1 physically interactswith GDU5by two hybrid (1, 2)hsMGRN1 physically interactswith GDU7by two hybrid (1, 2)GDU6 physically interactswith hsMGRN1by two hybrid (1, 2)LOG2 binds to GDU1by pull down (1, 2)hsMGRN1 physically interactswith GDU4by two hybrid (1, 2)rnMGRN1 physically interactswith GDU2by two hybrid (1, 2)GDU4 physically interactswith rnMGRN1by two hybrid (1, 2)LOG2 physically interactswith GDU1by two hybrid (1, 2, 3, 4)GDU2 physically interactswith hsMGRN1by two hybrid (1, 2) PMID:24036454

  8. A SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase is involved in the degradation of the nuclear pool of the SUMO E3 ligase Siz1

    PubMed Central

    Westerbeck, Jason W.; Pasupala, Nagesh; Guillotte, Mark; Szymanski, Eva; Matson, Brooke C.; Esteban, Cecilia; Kerscher, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The Slx5/Slx8 heterodimer constitutes a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) with an important role in SUMO-targeted degradation and SUMO-dependent signaling. This STUbL relies on SUMO-interacting motifs in Slx5 to aid in substrate targeting and carboxy-terminal RING domains in both Slx5 and Slx8 for substrate ubiquitylation. In budding yeast cells, Slx5 resides in the nucleus, forms distinct foci, and can associate with double-stranded DNA breaks. However, it remains unclear how STUbLs interact with other proteins and their substrates. To examine the targeting and functions of the Slx5/Slx8 STUbL, we constructed and analyzed truncations of the Slx5 protein. Our structure–function analysis reveals a domain of Slx5 involved in nuclear localization and in the interaction with Slx5, SUMO, Slx8, and a novel interactor, the SUMO E3 ligase Siz1. We further analyzed the functional interaction of Slx5 and Siz1 in vitro and in vivo. We found that a recombinant Siz1 fragment is an in vitro ubiquitylation target of the Slx5/Slx8 STUbL. Furthermore, slx5∆ cells accumulate phosphorylated and sumoylated adducts of Siz1 in vivo. Specifically, we show that Siz1 can be ubiquitylated in vivo and is degraded in an Slx5-dependent manner when its nuclear egress is prevented in mitosis. In conclusion, our data provide a first look into the STUbL-mediated regulation of a SUMO E3 ligase. PMID:24196836

  9. Effect of carbon chain length in acyl coenzyme A on the efficiency of enzymatic transformation of okadaic acid to 7-O-acyl okadaic acid.

    PubMed

    Furumochi, Sachie; Onoda, Tatsuya; Cho, Yuko; Fuwa, Haruhiko; Sasaki, Makoto; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Konoki, Keiichi

    2016-07-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), a product of dinoflagellate Prorocentrum spp., is transformed into 7-O-acyl OA in various bivalve species. The structural transformation proceeds enzymatically in vitro in the presence of the microsomal fraction from the digestive gland of bivalves. We have been using LC-MS/MS to identify OA-transforming enzymes by detecting 7-O-acyl OA, also known as dinophysistoxin 3 (DTX3). However, an alternative assay for DTX3 is required because the OA-transforming enzyme is a membrane protein, and surfactants for solubilizing membrane proteins decrease the sensitivity of LC-MS/MS. The present study examined saturated fatty acyl CoAs with a carbon chain length of 10 (decanoyl), 12 (dodecanoyl), 14 (tetradecanoyl), 16 (hexadecanoyl) and 18 (octadecanoyl) as the substrate for the in vitro acylation reaction. Saturated fatty acyl CoAs with a carbon chain length of 14, 16 and 18 exhibited higher yields than those with a carbon chain length of 10 or 12. Acyl CoAs with carbon chain lengths from 14 to 18 and containing either a diene unit, an alkyne unit, or an azide unit in the carbon chain were synthesized and shown to provide the corresponding DTX3 with a yield comparable to that of hexadecanoyl CoA. The three functional units can be conjugated with fluorescent reagents and are applicable to the development of a novel assay for DTX3. PMID:27231127

  10. Degradation of the ABA co-receptor ABI1 by PUB12/13 U-box E3 ligases

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingyao; Cheng, Jinkui; Zhu, Yujuan; Ding, Yanglin; Meng, Jingjing; Chen, Zhizhong; Xie, Qi; Guo, Yan; Li, Jigang; Yang, Shuhua; Gong, Zhizhong

    2015-01-01

    Clade A protein phosphatase 2Cs (PP2Cs) are abscisic acid (ABA) co-receptors that block ABA signalling by inhibiting the downstream protein kinases. ABA signalling is activated after PP2Cs are inhibited by ABA-bound PYR/PYL/RCAR ABA receptors (PYLs) in Arabidopsis. However, whether these PP2Cs are regulated by other factors remains unknown. Here, we report that ABI1 (ABA-INSENSITIVE 1) can interact with the U-box E3 ligases PUB12 and PUB13, but is ubiquitinated only when it interacts with ABA receptors in an in vitro assay. A mutant form of ABI1-1 that is unable to interact with PYLs is more stable than the wild-type protein. Both ABI1 degradation and all tested ABA responses are reduced in pub12 pub13 mutants compared with the wild type. Introducing the abi1-3 loss-of-function mutation into pub12 pub13 mutant recovers the ABA-insensitive phenotypes of the pub12 pub13 mutant. We thus uncover an important regulatory mechanism for regulating ABI1 levels by PUB12 and PUB13. PMID:26482222

  11. Structural and Functional Impact of Parkinson Disease-Associated Mutations in the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Fiesel, Fabienne C.; Caulfield, Thomas R.; Moussaud-Lamodière, Elisabeth L.; Ogaki, Kotaro; Dourado, Daniel F.A.R.; Flores, Samuel C.; Ross, Owen A.; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the PARKIN/PARK2 gene that result in loss-of-function of the encoded, neuroprotective E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin cause recessive, familial early-onset Parkinson disease. As an increasing number of rare Parkin sequence variants with unclear pathogenicity are identified, structure-function analyses will be critical to determine their disease relevance. Depending on the specific amino acids affected, several distinct pathomechanisms can result in loss of Parkin function. These include disruption of overall Parkin folding, decreased solubility and protein aggregation. However pathogenic effects can also result from misregulation of Parkin auto-inhibition and of its enzymatic functions. In addition, interference of binding to co-enzymes, substrates and adaptor proteins can affect its catalytic activity too. Herein, we have performed a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of 21 PARK2 missense mutations distributed across the individual protein domains. Using this combined approach we were able to pinpoint some of the pathogenic mechanisms of individual sequence variants. Similar analyses will be critical in gaining a complete understanding of the complex regulations and enzymatic functions of Parkin. These studies will not only highlight the important residues, but will also help to develop novel therapeutics aimed at activating and preserving an active, neuroprotective form of Parkin. PMID:25939424

  12. RNF123 has an E3 ligase-independent function in RIG-I-like receptor-mediated antiviral signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Yang, Yong-Kang; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Heng; Yang, Wei-Wei; Song, Sheng-Sheng; Zhai, Zhong-He; Chen, Dan-Ying

    2016-08-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) are cytoplasmic sensors crucial for recognizing different species of viral RNAs, which triggers the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and inflammatory cytokines. Here, we identify RING finger protein 123 (RNF123) as a negative regulator of RIG-I and MDA5. Overexpression of RNF123 inhibits IFN-β production triggered by Sendai virus (SeV) and encephalomyocarditis picornavirus (EMCV). Knockdown or knockout of endogenous RNF123 potentiates IFN-β production triggered by SeV and EMCV, but not by the sensor of DNA viruses cGAS RNF123 associates with RIG-I and MDA5 in both endogenous and exogenous cases in a viral infection-inducible manner. The SPRY and coiled-coil, but not the RING, domains of RNF123 are required for the inhibitory function. RNF123 interacts with the N-terminal CARD domains of RIG-I/MDA5 and competes with the downstream adaptor VISA/MAVS/IPS-1/Cardif for RIG-I/MDA5 CARD binding. These findings suggest that RNF123 functions as a novel inhibitor of innate antiviral signaling mediated by RIG-I and MDA5, a function that does not depend on its E3 ligase activity. PMID:27312109

  13. Regulating ehrlich and demethiolation pathways for alcohols production by the expression of ubiquitin-protein ligase gene HUWE1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Jia, Kai-Zhi; Xia, Shi-Tao; Xu, Yang-Hua; Liu, Rui-Sang; Li, Hong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlich and demethiolation pathways as two competing branches converted amino acid into alcohols. Controlling both pathways offers considerable potential for industrial applications including alcohols overproduction, flavor-quality control and developing new flavors. While how to regulate ehrlich and demethiolation pathways is still not applicable. Taking the conversion of methionine into methionol and methanethiol for example, we constructed two suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of Clonostachys rosea by using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technology for screening regulators controlling the conversion. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase gene HUWE1 screened from forward SSH library was validated to be related with the biosynthesis of end products. Overexpressing HUWE1 in C. rosea and S. cerevisiae significantly increased the biosynthesis of methanethiol and its derivatives in demethiolation pathway, while suppressed the biosynthesis of methional and methionol in ehrlich pathway. These results attained the directional regulation of both pathways by overexpressing HUWE1. Thus, HUWE1 has potential to be a key target for controlling and enhancing alcohols production by metabolic engineering. PMID:26860895

  14. Regulating ehrlich and demethiolation pathways for alcohols production by the expression of ubiquitin-protein ligase gene HUWE1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan; Jia, Kai-Zhi; Xia, Shi-Tao; Xu, Yang-Hua; Liu, Rui-Sang; Li, Hong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlich and demethiolation pathways as two competing branches converted amino acid into alcohols. Controlling both pathways offers considerable potential for industrial applications including alcohols overproduction, flavor-quality control and developing new flavors. While how to regulate ehrlich and demethiolation pathways is still not applicable. Taking the conversion of methionine into methionol and methanethiol for example, we constructed two suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of Clonostachys rosea by using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technology for screening regulators controlling the conversion. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase gene HUWE1 screened from forward SSH library was validated to be related with the biosynthesis of end products. Overexpressing HUWE1 in C. rosea and S. cerevisiae significantly increased the biosynthesis of methanethiol and its derivatives in demethiolation pathway, while suppressed the biosynthesis of methional and methionol in ehrlich pathway. These results attained the directional regulation of both pathways by overexpressing HUWE1. Thus, HUWE1 has potential to be a key target for controlling and enhancing alcohols production by metabolic engineering. PMID:26860895

  15. Identification of TRIM22 as a RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Zhijian; Gao Bo; Xu Wei; Xiong Sidong

    2008-09-26

    TRIM22, a member of the TRIM family proteins which contain RING finger, B-box, and coiled-coil domains, has been reported as a transcriptional regulator and involved in various cellular processes. In this study, the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, a novel property of TRIM22, was demonstrated. It was found that TRIM22 underwent self-ubiquitylation in vitro in combination with the E2 enzyme UbcH5B and the ubiquitylation was dependent on its RING finger domain. Further evidences showed that TRIM22 could also be self-ubiquitylated in vivo. Importantly, TRIM22 was conjugated with poly-ubiquitin chains and stabilized by the proteasome inhibitor in 293T cells, suggesting that TRIM22 targeted itself for proteasomal degradation through the poly-ubiquitylation. We also found that TRIM22 was located in the nucleus, indicating that TRIM22 might function as a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase.

  16. Control of iron homeostasis by an iron-regulated ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Vashisht, Ajay A; Zumbrennen, Kimberly B; Huang, Xinhua; Powers, David N; Durazo, Armando; Sun, Dahui; Bhaskaran, Nimesh; Persson, Anja; Uhlen, Mathias; Sangfelt, Olle; Spruck, Charles; Leibold, Elizabeth A; Wohlschlegel, James A

    2009-10-30

    Eukaryotic cells require iron for survival and have developed regulatory mechanisms for maintaining appropriate intracellular iron concentrations. The degradation of iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) in iron-replete cells is a key event in this pathway, but the E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for its proteolysis has remained elusive. We found that a SKP1-CUL1-FBXL5 ubiquitin ligase protein complex associates with and promotes the iron-dependent ubiquitination and degradation of IRP2. The F-box substrate adaptor protein FBXL5 was degraded upon iron and oxygen depletion in a process that required an iron-binding hemerythrin-like domain in its N terminus. Thus, iron homeostasis is regulated by a proteolytic pathway that couples IRP2 degradation to intracellular iron levels through the stability and activity of FBXL5. PMID:19762596

  17. Ozz-E3 ubiquitin ligase targets sarcomeric embryonic myosin heavy chain during muscle development.

    PubMed

    Campos, Yvan; Qiu, Xiaohui; Zanoteli, Edmar; Moshiach, Simon; Vergani, Naja; Bongiovanni, Antonella; Harris, A John; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Muscle contractile proteins are expressed as a series of developmental isoforms that are in constant dynamic remodeling during embryogenesis, but how obsolete molecules are recognized and removed is not known. Ozz is a developmentally regulated protein that functions as the adaptor component of a RING-type ubiquitin ligase complex specific to striated muscle. Ozz(-/-) mutants exhibit defects in myofibrillogenesis and myofiber differentiation. Here we show that Ozz targets the rod portion of embryonic myosin heavy chain and preferentially recognizes the sarcomeric rather than the soluble pool of myosin. We present evidence that Ozz binding to the embryonic myosin isoform within sarcomeric thick filaments marks it for ubiquitination and proteolytic degradation, allowing its replacement with neonatal or adult isoforms. This unique function positions Ozz within a system that facilitates sarcomeric myosin remodeling during muscle maturation and regeneration. Our findings identify Ozz-E3 as the ubiquitin ligase complex that interacts with and regulates myosin within its fully assembled cytoskeletal structure. PMID:20352047

  18. An improved smaller biotin ligase for BioID proximity labeling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae In; Jensen, Samuel C.; Noble, Kyle A.; KC, Birendra; Roux, Kenneth H.; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Roux, Kyle J.

    2016-01-01

    The BioID method uses a promiscuous biotin ligase to detect protein–protein associations as well as proximate proteins in living cells. Here we report improvements to the BioID method centered on BioID2, a substantially smaller promiscuous biotin ligase. BioID2 enables more-selective targeting of fusion proteins, requires less biotin supplementation, and exhibits enhanced labeling of proximate proteins. Thus BioID2 improves the efficiency of screening for protein–protein associations. We also demonstrate that the biotinylation range of BioID2 can be considerably modulated using flexible linkers, thus enabling application-specific adjustment of the biotin-labeling radius. PMID:26912792

  19. Structurally complex and highly active RNA ligases derived from random RNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekland, E. H.; Szostak, J. W.; Bartel, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    Seven families of RNA ligases, previously isolated from random RNA sequences, fall into three classes on the basis of secondary structure and regiospecificity of ligation. Two of the three classes of ribozymes have been engineered to act as true enzymes, catalyzing the multiple-turnover transformation of substrates into products. The most complex of these ribozymes has a minimal catalytic domain of 93 nucleotides. An optimized version of this ribozyme has a kcat exceeding one per second, a value far greater than that of most natural RNA catalysts and approaching that of comparable protein enzymes. The fact that such a large and complex ligase emerged from a very limited sampling of sequence space implies the existence of a large number of distinct RNA structures of equivalent complexity and activity.

  20. IAPs as E3 ligases of Rac1: shaping the move.

    PubMed

    Oberoi-Khanuja, Tripat Kaur; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitors of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) are well-studied E3 ubiquitin ligases predominantly known for regulation of apoptosis. We uncovered that IAPs can function as a direct E3 ubiquitin ligase of RhoGTPase Rac1. cIAP1 and XIAP directly conjugate polyubiquitin chains to Lysine 147 of activated Rac1 and target it for proteasomal degradation. Consistently, loss of these IAPs by various strategies led to stabilization of Rac1 and mesenchymal mode of migration in tumor cells. IAPs also regulate Rac1 degradation upon RhoGDI1 depletion and CNF1 toxin treatment. Our observations revealed an evolutionarily conserved role of IAPs in regulating Rac1 stability shedding light on to the mechanisms behind ubiquitination-dependent inactivation of Rac1 signaling. PMID:22790203

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Pendini, Nicole R.; Polyak, Steve W.; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.

    2008-01-01

    Biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus catalyses the biotinylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase. Recombinant biotin protein ligase from S. aureus has been cloned, expressed and purified. Crystals were grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as the precipitant at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution from crystals using synchrotron X-ray radiation at 100 K. The diffraction was consistent with the tetragonal space group P42212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 93.665, c = 131.95. PMID:18540065

  2. Neuromuscular regulation in zebrafish by a large AAA+ ATPase/ubiquitin ligase, mysterin/RNF213

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Yuri; Morito, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Satoru; Ogino, Kazutoyo; Kawakami, Koichi; Takashima, Seiji; Hirata, Hiromi; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Mysterin (also known as RNF213) is a huge intracellular protein with two AAA+ ATPase modules and a RING finger ubiquitin ligase domain. Mysterin was originally isolated as a significant risk factor for the cryptogenic cerebrovascular disorder moyamoya disease, and was found to be involved in physiological angiogenesis in zebrafish. However, the function and the physiological significance of mysterin in other than blood vessels remain largely unknown, although mysterin is ubiquitously expressed in animal tissues. In this study, we performed antisense-mediated suppression of a mysterin orthologue in zebrafish larvae and revealed that mysterin-deficient larvae showed significant reduction in fast myofibrils and immature projection of primary motoneurons, leading to severe motor deficits. Fast muscle-specific restoration of mysterin expression cancelled these phenotypes, and interestingly both AAA+ ATPase and ubiquitin ligase activities of mysterin were indispensable for proper fast muscle formation, demonstrating an essential role of mysterin and its enzymatic activities in the neuromuscular regulation in zebrafish. PMID:26530008

  3. CHIP: a quality-control E3 ligase collaborating with molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Murata, Shigeo; Chiba, Tomoki; Tanaka, Keiji

    2003-05-01

    It is notable that both the chaperone and ubiquitin-proteasome systems are required for removal of aberrant cellular proteins to ensure protein homeostasis in cells. However, the entity that links the two systems had remained elusive. Carboxyl-terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein (CHIP), originally identified as a co-chaperone of Hsc70, has both a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motif and a U-box domain. The TPR motif associates with Hsc70 and Hsp90, while the U-box domain executes a ubiquitin ligase activity. Thus, CHIP is an ideal molecule acting as a protein quality-control ubiquitin ligase that selectively leads abnormal proteins recognized by molecular chaperones to degradation by the proteasome. Accumulating evidence from in vitro studies indicates that this is apparently the case. Here, we present and discuss several unresolved but critical issues related to the molecular mechanism and in vivo roles of CHIP. PMID:12672450

  4. “Ubiquitylation: mechanism and functions“ Review series: RBR E3-ligases at work

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Judith J; Sixma, Titia K

    2014-01-01

    The RING-in-between-RING (RBR) E3s are a curious family of ubiquitin E3-ligases, whose mechanism of action is unusual in several ways. Their activities are auto-inhibited, causing a requirement for activation by protein-protein interactions or posttranslational modifications. They catalyse ubiquitin conjugation by a concerted RING/HECT-like mechanism in which the RING1 domain facilitates E2-discharge to directly form a thioester intermediate with a cysteine in RING2. This short-lived, HECT-like intermediate then modifies the target. Uniquely, the RBR ligase HOIP makes use of this mechanism to target the ubiquitin amino-terminus, by presenting the target ubiquitin for modification using its distinctive LDD region. PMID:24469331

  5. Identification of HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase family genes involved in stem cell regulation and regeneration in planarians.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Jordana M; Nisperos, Sean V; Weeks, Joi; Ghulam, Mahjoobah; Marín, Ignacio; Zayas, Ricardo M

    2015-08-15

    E3 ubiquitin ligases constitute a large family of enzymes that modify specific proteins by covalently attaching ubiquitin polypeptides. This post-translational modification can serve to regulate protein function or longevity. In spite of their importance in cell physiology, the biological roles of most ubiquitin ligases remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the function of the HECT domain family of E3 ubiquitin ligases in stem cell biology and tissue regeneration in planarians. Using bioinformatic searches, we identified 17 HECT E3 genes that are expressed in the Schmidtea mediterranea genome. Whole-mount in situ hybridization experiments showed that HECT genes were expressed in diverse tissues and most were expressed in the stem cell population (neoblasts) or in their progeny. To investigate the function of all HECT E3 ligases, we inhibited their expression using RNA interference (RNAi) and determined that orthologs of huwe1, wwp1, and trip12 had roles in tissue regeneration. We show that huwe1 RNAi knockdown led to a significant expansion of the neoblast population and death by lysis. Further, our experiments showed that wwp1 was necessary for both neoblast and intestinal tissue homeostasis as well as uncovered an unexpected role of trip12 in posterior tissue specification. Taken together, our data provide insights into the roles of HECT E3 ligases in tissue regeneration and demonstrate that planarians will be a useful model to evaluate the functions of E3 ubiquitin ligases in stem cell regulation. PMID:25956527

  6. Structure And Function of the Yeast U-Box-Containing Ubiquitin Ligase Ufd2p

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, D.; Li, W.; Ye, Y.; Brunger, A.T.

    2009-06-04

    Proteins conjugated by Lys-48-linked polyubiquitin chains are preferred substrates of the eukaryotic proteasome. Polyubiquitination requires an activating enzyme (E1), a conjugating enzyme (E2), and a ligase (E3). Occasionally, these enzymes only assemble short ubiquitin oligomers, and their extension to full length involves a ubiquitin elongating factor termed E4. Ufd2p, as the first E4 identified to date, is involved in the degradation of misfolded proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and of a ubiquitin-{beta}-GAL fusion substrate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mechanism of action of Ufd2p is unknown. Here we describe the crystal structure of the full-length yeast Ufd2p protein. Ufd2p has an elongated shape consisting of several irregular Armadillo-like repeats with two helical hairpins protruding from it and a U-box domain flexibly attached to its C terminus. The U-box of Ufd2p has a fold similar to that of the RING (Really Interesting New Gene) domain that is present in certain ubiquitin ligases. Accordingly, Ufd2p has all of the hallmarks of a RING finger-containing ubiquitin ligase: it associates with its cognate E2 Ubc4p via its U-box domain and catalyzes the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 active site to Ufd2p itself or to an acceptor ubiquitin molecule to form unanchored diubiquitin oligomers. Thus, Ufd2p can function as a bona fide E3 ubiquitin ligase to promote ubiquitin chain elongation on a substrate.

  7. Cell cycle-dependent localization and properties of a second mitochondrial DNA ligase in Crithidia fasciculata.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Krishna Murari; Hines, Jane C; Ray, Dan S

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA in kinetoplastid protozoa is contained in a single highly condensed structure consisting of thousands of minicircles and approximately 25 maxicircles. The disk-shaped structure is termed kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) and is located in the mitochondrial matrix near the basal body. We have previously identified a mitochondrial DNA ligase (LIG kbeta) in the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata that localizes to antipodal sites flanking the kDNA disk where several other replication proteins are localized. We describe here a second mitochondrial DNA ligase (LIG kalpha). LIG kalpha localizes to the kinetoplast primarily in cells that have completed mitosis and contain either a dividing kinetoplast or two newly divided kinetoplasts. Essentially all dividing or newly divided kinetoplasts show localization of LIG kalpha. The ligase is present on both faces of the kDNA disk and at a high level in the kinetoflagellar zone of the mitochondrial matrix. Cells containing a single nucleus show localization of the LIG kalpha to the kDNA but at a much lower frequency. The mRNA level of LIG kalpha varies during the cell cycle out of phase with that of LIG kbeta. LIG kalpha transcript levels are maximal during the phase when cells contain two nuclei, whereas LIG kbeta transcript levels are maximal during S phase. The LIG kalpha protein decays with a half-life of 100 min in the absence of protein synthesis. The periodic expression of the LIG kalpha transcript and the instability of the LIG kalpha protein suggest a possible role of the ligase in regulating minicircle replication. PMID:16400168

  8. Nanobody-targeted E3-ubiquitin ligase complex degrades nuclear proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ju Shin, Yeong; Kyun Park, Seung; Jung Jung, Yoo; Na Kim, Ye; Sung Kim, Ki; Kyu Park, Ok; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Ho Jeon, Sung; Trinh, Le A.; Fraser, Scott E.; Kee, Yun; Joon Hwang, Byung

    2015-01-01

    Targeted protein degradation is a powerful tool in determining the function of specific proteins or protein complexes. We fused nanobodies to SPOP, an adaptor protein of the Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, resulting in rapid ubiquitination and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of specific nuclear proteins in mammalian cells and zebrafish embryos. This approach is easily modifiable, as substrate specificity is conferred by an antibody domain that can be adapted to target virtually any protein. PMID:26373678

  9. Homology modeling, molecular docking and electrostatic potential analysis of MurF ligase from Klebsiella pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Venkatabalasubramanian; Thiyagarajan, Chinnaiyan; Kalaivanan, Sivakumaran; Selvakumar, Raj; Anusuyadevi, Muthuswamy; Jayachandran, Kesavan Swaminathan

    2012-01-01

    In spite of availability of moderately protective vaccine and antibiotics, new antibacterial agents are urgently needed to decrease the global incidence of Klebsiella pneumonia infections. MurF ligase, a key enzyme, which participates in the bacterial cell wall assembly, is indispensable to existence of K. pneumonia. MurF ligase lack mammalian vis-à-vis and have high specificity, uniqueness, and occurrence only in eubacteria, epitomizing them as promising therapeutic targets for intervention. In this study, we present a unified approach involving homology modeling and molecular docking studies on MurF ligase enzyme. As part of this study, a homology model of K. pneumonia (MurF ligase) enzyme was predicted for the first time in order to carry out structurebased drug design. The accuracy of the model was further validated using different computational approaches. The comparative molecular docking study on this enzyme was undertaken using different phyto-ligands from Desmodium sp. and a known antibiotic Ciprofloxacin. The docking analysis indicated the importance of hotspots (HIS 281 and ASN 282) within the MurF binding pocket. The Lipinski's rule of five was analyzed for all ligands considered for this study by calculating the ADME/Tox, drug likeliness using Qikprop simulation. Only ten ligands were found to comply with the Lipinski rule of five. Based on the molecular docking results and Lipinki values 6-Methyltetrapterol A was confirmed as a promising lead compound. The present study should therefore play a guiding role in the experimental design and development of 6-Methyltetrapterol A as a bactericidal agent. PMID:22715301

  10. Discovery of bacterial NAD⁺-dependent DNA ligase inhibitors: improvements in clearance of adenosine series.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Suzanne S; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Huynh, Hoan; Lu, Min; Mullen, George B; Chen, Brendan; Albert, Robert; O'Shea, Thomas J; Rooney, Michael T; Hu, Haiqing; Newman, Joseph V; Mills, Scott D

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of clearance of adenosine inhibitors of bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase is discussed. To reduce Cytochrome P-450-mediated metabolic clearance, many strategies were explored; however, most modifications resulted in compounds with reduced antibacterial activity and/or unchanged total clearance. The alkyl side chains of the 2-cycloalkoxyadenosines were fluorinated, and compounds with moderate antibacterial activity and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in rat and dog were identified. PMID:22154350

  11. Unexpected substrate specificity of T4 DNA ligase revealed by in vitro selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Kazuo; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1993-01-01

    We have used in vitro selection techniques to characterize DNA sequences that are ligated efficiently by T4 DNA ligase. We find that the ensemble of selected sequences ligates about 50 times as efficiently as the random mixture of sequences used as the input for selection. Surprisingly many of the selected sequences failed to produce a match at or close to the ligation junction. None of the 20 selected oligomers that we sequenced produced a match two bases upstream from the ligation junction.

  12. Homology modeling, molecular docking and electrostatic potential analysis of MurF ligase from Klebsiella pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Sivaramakrishnan, Venkatabalasubramanian; Thiyagarajan, Chinnaiyan; Kalaivanan, Sivakumaran; Selvakumar, Raj; Anusuyadevi, Muthuswamy; Jayachandran, Kesavan Swaminathan

    2012-01-01

    In spite of availability of moderately protective vaccine and antibiotics, new antibacterial agents are urgently needed to decrease the global incidence of Klebsiella pneumonia infections. MurF ligase, a key enzyme, which participates in the bacterial cell wall assembly, is indispensable to existence of K. pneumonia. MurF ligase lack mammalian vis-à-vis and have high specificity, uniqueness, and occurrence only in eubacteria, epitomizing them as promising therapeutic targets for intervention. In this study, we present a unified approach involving homology modeling and molecular docking studies on MurF ligase enzyme. As part of this study, a homology model of K. pneumonia (MurF ligase) enzyme was predicted for the first time in order to carry out structurebased drug design. The accuracy of the model was further validated using different computational approaches. The comparative molecular docking study on this enzyme was undertaken using different phyto-ligands from Desmodium sp. and a known antibiotic Ciprofloxacin. The docking analysis indicated the importance of hotspots (HIS 281 and ASN 282) within the MurF binding pocket. The Lipinski's rule of five was analyzed for all ligands considered for this study by calculating the ADME/Tox, drug likeliness using Qikprop simulation. Only ten ligands were found to comply with the Lipinski rule of five. Based on the molecular docking results and Lipinki values 6-Methyltetrapterol A was confirmed as a promising lead compound. The present study should therefore play a guiding role in the experimental design and development of 6-Methyltetrapterol A as a bactericidal agent. PMID:22715301

  13. Synthesis and reactivity of intermediates formed in the T4 RNA ligase reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, P U; McLaughlin, L W

    1987-01-01

    The intermediate adenylated donor derivatives A(5')pp(5')dTp and A(5')pp(5')GpGpGp have been prepared from suitable phosphorylating reagents activated by 1-hydroxybenzotriazole. Phosphodiester bond formation between donor and acceptor oligonucleotides as catalyzed by T4 RNA ligase is shown to be more efficient when the adenylated form of the donor molecule is used. PMID:3299268

  14. Impaired rate of microsomal fatty acid elongation in undernourished neonatal rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y.Y.

    1986-05-01

    Hypomyelination caused by undernourishment in characterized by low concentrations of myelin lipids and marked reduction in lignocerate (C/sub 24:0/) and nervonate (C/sub 24:1/) moiety of cerebroside and sulfatide. Since microsomal elongation is the major source of long chain (22 to 24 carbons) fatty acids in the brain, the effect of neonatal undernourishment on acyl elongation was investigated. Undernourishment of suckling rats were induced after birth by restricting maternal dietary intake to 40% of that consumed by dams fed ad libitum. Neonates suckled by the normally fed dams served as controls. Microsomal elongation was measured as nmol from (2-/sup 14/C) malonyl CoA incorporated/h per mg of protein. At 19 days of age, rates of behenoyl CoA (C/sub 22:0/) and erucoyl CoA (C/sub 22:1/) elongation in whole brain of undernourished neonates were 30-40% lower than that of the control, whereas the elongation rates of acyl CoA 16, 18 and 20 carbons in length either saturated or monounsaturated were similar in both groups. Undernourishment had no effect on cytoplasmic de novo fatty acid synthesis from acetyl CoA. If there are multiple elongation factors, the results indicate that the depressed activity of elongating enzyme(s) for C/sub 22:0/ and C/sub 22:1/ is an important contributing factor in lowering S/sub 24:0/ and C/sub 24:1/ content in cerebroside and sulfatide. This impairment may be a specific lesion leading to hypomyelination in undernourished rats.

  15. Functional role of TRIM E3 ligase oligomerization and regulation of catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Koliopoulos, Marios G; Esposito, Diego; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Taylor, Ian A; Rittinger, Katrin

    2016-06-01

    TRIM E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate a wide variety of cellular processes and are particularly important during innate immune signalling events. They are characterized by a conserved tripartite motif in their N-terminal portion which comprises a canonical RING domain, one or two B-box domains and a coiled-coil region that mediates ligase dimerization. Self-association via the coiled-coil has been suggested to be crucial for catalytic activity of TRIMs; however, the precise molecular mechanism underlying this observation remains elusive. Here, we provide a detailed characterization of the TRIM ligases TRIM25 and TRIM32 and show how their oligomeric state is linked to catalytic activity. The crystal structure of a complex between the TRIM25 RING domain and an ubiquitin-loaded E2 identifies the structural and mechanistic features that promote a closed E2~Ub conformation to activate the thioester for ubiquitin transfer allowing us to propose a model for the regulation of activity in the full-length protein. Our data reveal an unexpected diversity in the self-association mechanism of TRIMs that might be crucial for their biological function. PMID:27154206

  16. The E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 regulates myoblast proliferation by controlling turnover of NDRG2.

    PubMed

    Mokhonova, Ekaterina I; Avliyakulov, Nuraly K; Kramerova, Irina; Kudryashova, Elena; Haykinson, Michael J; Spencer, Melissa J

    2015-05-15

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2H is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM32. Previously, we generated and characterized a Trim32 knockout mouse (T32KO) that displays both neurogenic and myopathic features. The myopathy in these mice is attributable to impaired muscle growth, associated with satellite cell senescence and premature sarcopenia. This satellite cell senescence is due to accumulation of the SUMO ligase PIASy, a substrate of TRIM32. The goal of this investigation was to identify additional substrates of TRIM32 using 2D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) in order to further explore its role in skeletal muscle. Because TRIM32 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, we reasoned that TRIM32's substrates would accumulate in its absence. 2D-DIGE identified 19 proteins that accumulate in muscles from the T32KO mouse. We focused on two of these proteins, NDRG2 and TRIM72, due to their putative roles in myoblast proliferation and myogenesis. Follow-up analysis confirmed that both proteins were ubiquitinated by TRIM32 in vitro; however, only NDRG2 accumulated in skeletal muscle and myoblasts in the absence of TRIM32. NDRG2 overexpression in myoblasts led to reduced cell proliferation and delayed cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. Thus, we identified NDRG2 as a novel target for TRIM32; these findings further corroborate the hypothesis that TRIM32 is involved in control of myogenic cells proliferation and differentiation. PMID:25701873

  17. Auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 Enhances Its Substrate Ubiquitin Ligase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Ranaweera, Ruchira S.; Yang, Xiaolu

    2013-01-01

    The RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2 is the master regulator of the tumor suppressor p53. It targets p53 for proteasomal degradation, restraining the potent activity of p53 and enabling cell survival and proliferation. Like most E3 ligases, Mdm2 can also ubiquitinate itself. How Mdm2 auto-ubiquitination may influence its substrate ubiquitin ligase activity is undefined. Here we show that auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 is an activating event. Mdm2 that has been conjugated to polyubiquitin chains, but not to single ubiquitins, exhibits substantially enhanced activity to polyubiquitinate p53. Mechanistically, auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 facilitates the recruitment of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. This occurs through noncovalent interactions between the ubiquitin chains on Mdm2 and the ubiquitin binding domain on E2s. Mutations that diminish the noncovalent interactions render auto-ubiquitination unable to stimulate Mdm2 substrate E3 activity. These results suggest a model in which polyubiquitin chains on an E3 increase the local concentration of E2 enzymes and permit the processivity of substrate ubiquitination. They also support the notion that autocatalysis may be a prevalent mode for turning on the activity of latent enzymes. PMID:23671280

  18. Arabidopsis HIGH PLOIDY2 Sumoylates and Stabilizes Flowering Locus C through Its E3 Ligase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jun S.; Son, Ga H.; Kim, Sung-Il; Song, Jong T.; Seo, Hak S.

    2016-01-01

    Flowering Locus C (FLC), a floral repressor, plays an important role in flowering. The mechanisms regulating FLC gene expression and protein function have been studied extensively; however, post-translational regulation of FLC remains unclear. Here, we identified Arabidopsis HIGH PLOIDY2 (HPY2) as an E3 SUMO ligase for FLC. In vitro and vivo pull-down assays showed that FLC physically interacts with HPY2. In vitro assays showed that the stimulation of FLC sumoylation by HPY2 was dependent on SUMO-activating enzyme E1 and -conjugating enzyme E2, indicating that HPY2 was an E3 SUMO ligase for FLC. In transgenic plants, inducible HPY2 overexpression increased the concentration of FLC, indicating that HPY2 stabilized FLC through direct sumoylation. Flowering time in hpy2-2 mutants was shorter than in wild-type plants under long- and short-day conditions, with a greater effect under short-day conditions, and FLC was downregulated in hpy2-2 mutants. These data indicate that HPY2 regulates FLC function and stability at both the transcriptional and post-translational levels through its E3 SUMO ligase activity. PMID:27148346

  19. Structural basis for catalytic activation by the human ZNF451 SUMO E3 ligase

    PubMed Central

    Cappadocia, Laurent; Pichler, Andrea; Lima, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    E3 protein ligases enhance transfer of ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins from E2 conjugating enzymes to substrates by stabilizing the thioester-charged E2~Ubl in a closed configuration optimally aligned for nucleophilic attack. Here, we report biochemical and structural data that define the N-terminal domain of the Homo sapiens ZNF451 as the catalytic module for SUMO E3 ligase activity. ZNF451 catalytic module contains tandem SUMO interaction motifs (SIMs) bridged by a Proline-Leucine-Arginine-Proline (PLRP) motif. The first SIM and PLRP motif engage thioester charged E2~SUMO while the next SIM binds a second molecule of SUMO bound to the backside of E2. We show that ZNF451 is SUMO2 specific and that SUMO-modification of ZNF451 may contribute to activity by providing a second molecule of SUMO that interacts with E2. Our results are consistent with ZNF451 functioning as a bona fide SUMO E3 ligase. PMID:26524494

  20. TRAIP is a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase that protects genome stability after replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Saskia; Smedegaard, Stine; Nakamura, Kyosuke; Mortuza, Gulnahar B.; Räschle, Markus; Ibañez de Opakua, Alain; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Feng, Yunpeng; Blanco, Francisco J.; Mann, Matthias; Montoya, Guillermo; Groth, Anja; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cellular genomes are highly vulnerable to perturbations to chromosomal DNA replication. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the processivity factor for DNA replication, plays a central role as a platform for recruitment of genome surveillance and DNA repair factors to replication forks, allowing cells to mitigate the threats to genome stability posed by replication stress. We identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAIP as a new factor at active and stressed replication forks that directly interacts with PCNA via a conserved PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) box motif. We show that TRAIP promotes ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling in human cells by facilitating the generation of RPA-bound single-stranded DNA regions upon replication stress in a manner that critically requires its E3 ligase activity and is potentiated by the PIP box. Consequently, loss of TRAIP function leads to enhanced chromosomal instability and decreased cell survival after replication stress. These findings establish TRAIP as a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase with an important role in protecting genome integrity after obstacles to DNA replication. PMID:26711499

  1. UBXN2A regulates nicotinic receptor degradation by modulating the E3 ligase activity of CHIP.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yanfen; Rezvani, Khosrow; De Biasi, Mariella

    2015-10-15

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) containing the α3 subunit are known for their prominent role in normal ganglionic transmission while their involvement in the mechanisms underlying nicotine addiction and smoking-related disease has been emerging only in recent years. The amount of information available on the maturation and trafficking of α3-containing nAChRs is limited. We previously showed that UBXN2A is a p97 adaptor protein that facilitates the maturation and trafficking of α3-containing nAChRs. Further investigation of the mechanisms of UBXN2A actions revealed that the protein interacts with CHIP (carboxyl terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein), whose ubiquitin E3 ligase activity regulates the degradation of several disease-related proteins. We show that CHIP displays E3 ligase activity toward the α3 nAChR subunit and contributes to its ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. UBXN2A interferes with CHIP-mediated ubiquitination of α3 and protects the nicotinic receptor subunit from endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD). UBXN2A also cross-talks with VCP/p97 and HSC70/HSP70 proteins in a complex where α3 is likely to be targeted by CHIP. Overall,we identify CHIP as an E3 ligase for α3 and UBXN2A as a protein that may efficiently regulate the stability of CHIP's client substrates. PMID:26265139

  2. The E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF8 stabilizes TPP1 to promote telomere end protection

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rekha; Li, Ju-Mei; Zheng, Hong; Lok, Gabriel Tsz-Mei; Deng, Yu; Huen, Michael; Chen, Junjie; Jin, Jianping; Chang, Sandy

    2013-01-01

    TPP1, a component of the mammalian shelterin complex, plays essential roles in telomere maintenance. It forms a heterodimer with POT1 to repress ATR-dependent DNA damage signaling at telomeres, and recruits telomerase to chromosome ends. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF8 localizes to and promotes the accumulation of DNA damage proteins 53BP1 and γ-H2AX to uncapped telomeres. TPP1 is unstable in the absence of RNF8, resulting in telomere shortening and chromosome fusions via the alternative non-homologous end joining (A-NHEJ)-mediated DNA repair pathway. The RNF8 ubiquitin ligase RING domain is essential for TPP1 stability and retention at telomeres. RNF8 physically interacts with TPP1 to generate Ubc13-dependent K63 polyubiquitin chains that stabilizes TPP1 at telomeres. The conserved TPP1 lysine residue 233 is essential for RNF8-mediated TPP1 ubiquitylation and localization to telomeres. Our results demonstrate that TPP1 is a novel substrate for RNF8, and suggest a previously unrecognized role for RNF8 in telomere end protection. We propose a model in which engagement of classical vs. A-NHEJ repair pathways at dysfunctional telomeres is controlled by the ubiquitin ligase functions of RNF8. PMID:22101936

  3. The E3 ubiquitin ligase GREUL1 anteriorizes ectoderm during Xenopus development.

    PubMed

    Borchers, Annette G M; Hufton, Andrew L; Eldridge, Adam G; Jackson, Peter K; Harland, Richard M; Baker, Julie C

    2002-11-15

    We have identified a family of RING finger proteins that are orthologous to Drosophila Goliath (G1, Gol). One of the members, GREUL1 (Goliath Related E3 Ubiquitin Ligase 1), can convert Xenopus ectoderm into XAG-1- and Otx2-expressing cells in the absence of both neural tissue and muscle. This activity, combined with the finding that XGREUL1 is expressed within the cement gland, suggests a role for GREUL1 in the generation of anterior ectoderm. Although GREUL1 is not a direct inducer of neural tissue, it can activate the formation of ectopic neural cells within the epidermis of intact embryos. This suggests that GREUL1 can sensitize ectoderm to neuralizing signals. In this paper, we provide evidence that GREUL1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Using a biochemical assay, we show that GREUL1 catalyzes the addition of polyubiquitin chains. These events are mediated by the RING domain since a mutation in two of the cysteines abolishes ligase activity. Mutation of these cysteines also compromises GREUL1's ability to induce cement gland. Thus, GREUL1's RING domain is necessary for both the ubiquitination of substrates and for the conversion of ectoderm to an anterior fate. PMID:12435366

  4. RNF38 encodes a nuclear ubiquitin protein ligase that modifies p53

    SciTech Connect

    Sheren, Jamie E.; Kassenbrock, C. Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •RNF38 is shown to be a nuclear protein with a bipartite nuclear localization signal. •RNF38 protein is purified and shown to have ubiquitin protein ligase (E3) activity. •We show that RNF38 binds p53 and can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro. •Overexpression of RNF38 increases p53 ubiquitination in HEK293T cells. •Overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells alters p53 localization. -- Abstract: The RNF38 gene encodes a RING finger protein of unknown function. Here we demonstrate that RNF38 is a functional ubiquitin protein ligase (E3). We show that RNF38 isoform 1 is localized to the nucleus by a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS). We confirm that RNF38 is a binding partner of p53 and demonstrate that RNF38 can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells results in relocalization of p53 to discrete foci associated with PML nuclear bodies. These results suggest RNF38 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that may play a role in regulating p53.

  5. Solving the SAT problem using a DNA computing algorithm based on ligase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Bao, Zhenmin; Hu, Jingjie; Wang, Shi; Zhan, Aibin

    2008-01-01

    A new DNA computing algorithm based on a ligase chain reaction is demonstrated to solve an SAT problem. The proposed DNA algorithm can solve an n-variable m-clause SAT problem in m steps and the computation time required is O (3m+n). Instead of generating the full-solution DNA library, we start with an empty test tube and then generate solutions that partially satisfy the SAT formula. These partial solutions are then extended step by step by the ligation of new variables using Taq DNA ligase. Correct strands are amplified and false strands are pruned by a ligase chain reaction (LCR) as soon as they fail to satisfy the conditions. If we score and sort the clauses, we can use this algorithm to markedly reduce the number of DNA strands required throughout the computing process. In a computer simulation, the maximum number of DNA strands required was 2(0.48n) when n=50, and the exponent ratio varied inversely with the number of variables n and the clause/variable ratio m/n. This algorithm is highly space-efficient and error-tolerant compared to conventional brute-force searching, and thus can be scaled-up to solve large and hard SAT problems. PMID:17904730

  6. Mechanistic Details of Glutathione Biosynthesis Revealed by Crystal Structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glutamate Cysteine Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-12-01

    Glutathione is a thiol-disulfide exchange peptide critical for buffering oxidative or chemical stress, and an essential cofactor in several biosynthesis and detoxification pathways. The rate-limiting step in its de novo biosynthesis is catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase, a broadly expressed enzyme for which limited structural information is available in higher eukaryotic species. Structural data are critical to the understanding of clinical glutathione deficiency, as well as rational design of enzyme modulators that could impact human disease progression. Here, we have determined the structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate cysteine ligase (ScGCL) in the presence of glutamate and MgCl{sub 2} (2.1 {angstrom}; R = 18.2%, R{sub free} = 21.9%), and in complex with glutamate, MgCl{sub 2}, and ADP (2.7 {angstrom}; R = 19.0%, R{sub free} = 24.2%). Inspection of these structures reveals an unusual binding pocket for the {alpha}-carboxylate of the glutamate substrate and an ATP-independent Mg{sup 2+} coordination site, clarifying the Mg{sup 2+} dependence of the enzymatic reaction. The ScGCL structures were further used to generate a credible homology model of the catalytic subunit of human glutamate cysteine ligase (hGCLC). Examination of the hGCLC model suggests that post-translational modifications of cysteine residues may be involved in the regulation of enzymatic activity, and elucidates the molecular basis of glutathione deficiency associated with patient hGCLC mutations.

  7. The E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 regulates myoblast proliferation by controlling turnover of NDRG2

    PubMed Central

    Mokhonova, Ekaterina I.; Avliyakulov, Nuraly K.; Kramerova, Irina; Kudryashova, Elena; Haykinson, Michael J.; Spencer, Melissa J.

    2015-01-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2H is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM32. Previously, we generated and characterized a Trim32 knockout mouse (T32KO) that displays both neurogenic and myopathic features. The myopathy in these mice is attributable to impaired muscle growth, associated with satellite cell senescence and premature sarcopenia. This satellite cell senescence is due to accumulation of the SUMO ligase PIASy, a substrate of TRIM32. The goal of this investigation was to identify additional substrates of TRIM32 using 2D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) in order to further explore its role in skeletal muscle. Because TRIM32 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, we reasoned that TRIM32's substrates would accumulate in its absence. 2D-DIGE identified 19 proteins that accumulate in muscles from the T32KO mouse. We focused on two of these proteins, NDRG2 and TRIM72, due to their putative roles in myoblast proliferation and myogenesis. Follow-up analysis confirmed that both proteins were ubiquitinated by TRIM32 in vitro; however, only NDRG2 accumulated in skeletal muscle and myoblasts in the absence of TRIM32. NDRG2 overexpression in myoblasts led to reduced cell proliferation and delayed cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. Thus, we identified NDRG2 as a novel target for TRIM32; these findings further corroborate the hypothesis that TRIM32 is involved in control of myogenic cells proliferation and differentiation. PMID:25701873

  8. PINK1 phosphorylates ubiquitin to activate Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Lesley A.; Lazarou, Michael; Fogel, Adam I.; Li, Yan; Yamano, Koji; Sarraf, Shireen A.; Banerjee, Soojay

    2014-01-01

    PINK1 kinase activates the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin to induce selective autophagy of damaged mitochondria. However, it has been unclear how PINK1 activates and recruits Parkin to mitochondria. Although PINK1 phosphorylates Parkin, other PINK1 substrates appear to activate Parkin, as the mutation of all serine and threonine residues conserved between Drosophila and human, including Parkin S65, did not wholly impair Parkin translocation to mitochondria. Using mass spectrometry, we discovered that endogenous PINK1 phosphorylated ubiquitin at serine 65, homologous to the site phosphorylated by PINK1 in Parkin’s ubiquitin-like domain. Recombinant TcPINK1 directly phosphorylated ubiquitin and phospho-ubiquitin activated Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in cell-free assays. In cells, the phosphomimetic ubiquitin mutant S65D bound and activated Parkin. Furthermore, expression of ubiquitin S65A, a mutant that cannot be phosphorylated by PINK1, inhibited Parkin translocation to damaged mitochondria. These results explain a feed-forward mechanism of PINK1-mediated initiation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. PMID:24751536

  9. PINK1 phosphorylates ubiquitin to activate Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Kane, Lesley A; Lazarou, Michael; Fogel, Adam I; Li, Yan; Yamano, Koji; Sarraf, Shireen A; Banerjee, Soojay; Youle, Richard J

    2014-04-28

    PINK1 kinase activates the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin to induce selective autophagy of damaged mitochondria. However, it has been unclear how PINK1 activates and recruits Parkin to mitochondria. Although PINK1 phosphorylates Parkin, other PINK1 substrates appear to activate Parkin, as the mutation of all serine and threonine residues conserved between Drosophila and human, including Parkin S65, did not wholly impair Parkin translocation to mitochondria. Using mass spectrometry, we discovered that endogenous PINK1 phosphorylated ubiquitin at serine 65, homologous to the site phosphorylated by PINK1 in Parkin's ubiquitin-like domain. Recombinant TcPINK1 directly phosphorylated ubiquitin and phospho-ubiquitin activated Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in cell-free assays. In cells, the phosphomimetic ubiquitin mutant S65D bound and activated Parkin. Furthermore, expression of ubiquitin S65A, a mutant that cannot be phosphorylated by PINK1, inhibited Parkin translocation to damaged mitochondria. These results explain a feed-forward mechanism of PINK1-mediated initiation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. PMID:24751536

  10. Ubiquitin protein ligase Nedd4 binds to connexin43 by a phosphorylation-modulated process.

    PubMed

    Leykauf, Kerstin; Salek, Mojibrahman; Bomke, Jörg; Frech, Matthias; Lehmann, Wolf-Dieter; Dürst, Matthias; Alonso, Angel

    2006-09-01

    Connexin43 is degraded by the proteasomal as well as the lysosomal pathway with ubiquitin playing a role in both degradation pathways. So far, no ubiquitin protein ligase has been identified for any of the connexins. By using pull-down assays, here we show binding of a ubiquitin protein ligase, Nedd4, to the C-terminus of connexin43. This observation was confirmed in vivo by coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence, showing colocalization of Nedd4 and connexin43. Binding of Nedd4 to its interaction partners is generally carried out by its WW domains. Our results indicate that the interaction with connexin43 occurs through all three WW domains of Nedd4. Furthermore, whereas WW1 and WW2 domains mainly interact with the unphosphorylated form of connexin43, WW3 binds phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms equally. In addition, using the surface plasmon resonance approach we show that only the WW2 domain binds to the PY motif located at the C-terminus of connexin43. Suppression of Nedd4 expression with siRNA resulted in an accumulation of gap junction plaques at the plasma membrane, suggesting an involvement of the ubiquitin protein ligase Nedd4 in gap junction internalization. PMID:16931598

  11. Disinhibition of the HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP2 by polymerized Dishevelled

    PubMed Central

    Mund, Thomas; Graeb, Michael; Mieszczanek, Juliusz; Gammons, Melissa; Pelham, Hugh R. B.; Bienz, Mariann

    2015-01-01

    Dishevelled is a pivot in Wnt signal transduction, controlling both β-catenin-dependent transcription to specify proliferative cell fates, and cell polarity and other non-nuclear events in post-mitotic cells. In response to Wnt signals, or when present at high levels, Dishevelled forms signalosomes by dynamic polymerization. Its levels are controlled by ubiquitylation, mediated by various ubiquitin ligases, including NEDD4 family members that bind to a conserved PPxY motif in Dishevelled (mammalian Dvl1–3). Here, we show that Dvl2 binds to the ubiquitin ligase WWP2 and unlocks its ligase activity from autoinhibition. This disinhibition of WWP2 depends on several features of Dvl2 including its PPxY motif and to a lesser extent its DEP domain, but crucially on the ability of Dvl2 to polymerize, indicating that WWP2 is activated in Wnt signalosomes. We show that Notch intracellular domains are substrates for Dvl-activated WWP2 and their transcriptional activity is consequently reduced, providing a molecular mechanism for cross-talk between Wnt and Notch signalling. These regulatory interactions are conserved in Drosophila whose WWP2 orthologue, Suppressor-of-deltex, downregulates Notch signalling upon activation by Dishevelled in developing wing tissue. Attentuation of Notch signalling by Dishevelled signalosomes could be important during the transition of cells from the proliferative to the post-mitotic state. PMID:26701932

  12. Crystal growth in LiGaSe2 for semiconductor radiation detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowe, A. C.; Woodward, J.; Tupitsyn, E.; Rowe, E.; Wiggins, B.; Matei, L.; Bhattacharya, P.; Burger, A.

    2013-09-01

    Lithium containing AIBIIICVI semiconductors are being considered as alternative materials for room temperature neutron detection. Materials such as LiGaSe2 have been synthesized for non-linear optical applications; however, when the crystal is grown enriched in the 6Li isotope, it is possible to imagine a radiation detector. A nuclear reaction occurs with 6Li, which can be detected within the semiconductor crystal. As such, high quality crystals are required, which have few defects which prohibit charge collection. One of the primary challenges in growing a high quality crystal is the reactivity of lithium metal. Vacuum purified lithium metal was therefore reacted with gallium to form LiGa as an intermediate to LiGaSe2 synthesis. Vertical and horizontal Bridgman growth was then conducted to determine the optimal growth conditions. Vertical Bridgman growth resulted in more pure crystals. Annealing in lithium metal vapor reduced crystal defects and improved optical and electrical properties of the subsequent LiGaSe2 crystal.

  13. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    PubMed Central

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  14. Arkadia, a novel SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase involved in PML degradation.

    PubMed

    Erker, Yigit; Neyret-Kahn, Helene; Seeler, Jacob S; Dejean, Anne; Atfi, Azeddine; Levy, Laurence

    2013-06-01

    Arkadia is a RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligase that activates the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) pathway by inducing degradation of the inhibitor SnoN/Ski. Here we show that Arkadia contains three successive SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs) that mediate noncovalent interaction with poly-SUMO2. We identify the third SIM (VVDL) of Arkadia to be the most relevant one in this interaction. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Arkadia can function as a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUBL) by ubiquitinating SUMO chains. While the SIMs of Arkadia are not essential for SnoN/Ski degradation in response to TGF-β, we show that they are necessary for the interaction of Arkadia with polysumoylated PML in response to arsenic and its concomitant accumulation into PML nuclear bodies. Moreover, Arkadia depletion leads to accumulation of polysumoylated PML in response to arsenic, highlighting a requirement of Arkadia for arsenic-induced degradation of polysumoylated PML. Interestingly, Arkadia homodimerizes but does not heterodimerize with RNF4, the other STUBL involved in PML degradation, suggesting that these two E3 ligases do not act synergistically but most probably act independently during this process. Altogether, these results identify Arkadia to be a novel STUBL that can trigger degradation of signal-induced polysumoylated proteins. PMID:23530056

  15. Cyclic AMP-dependent Protein Lysine Acylation in Mycobacteria Regulates Fatty Acid and Propionate Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Nambi, Subhalaxmi; Gupta, Kallol; Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Ramakrishnan, Parvathy; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Siddiqui, Nida; Thomas, Ann Terene; Visweswariah, Sandhya S.

    2013-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine residues is a posttranslational modification that is used by both eukaryotes and prokaryotes to regulate a variety of biological processes. Here we identify multiple substrates for the cAMP-dependent protein lysine acetyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (KATmt). We demonstrate that a catalytically important lysine residue in a number of FadD (fatty acyl CoA synthetase) enzymes is acetylated by KATmt in a cAMP-dependent manner and that acetylation inhibits the activity of FadD enzymes. A sirtuin-like enzyme can deacetylate multiple FadDs, thus completing the regulatory cycle. Using a strain deleted for the KATmt ortholog in Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), we show for the first time that acetylation is dependent on intracellular cAMP levels. KATmt can utilize propionyl CoA as a substrate and, therefore, plays a critical role in alleviating propionyl CoA toxicity in mycobacteria by inactivating acyl CoA synthetase (ACS). The precision by which mycobacteria can regulate the metabolism of fatty acids in a cAMP-dependent manner appears to be unparalleled in other biological organisms and is ideally suited to adapt to the complex environment that pathogenic mycobacteria experience in the host. PMID:23553634

  16. Fatty acid biosynthesis in pea root plastids

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, R.J.; Sparace, S.A. )

    1989-04-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis from (1-{sup 14}C)acetate was optimized in plastids isolated from primary root tips of 7-day-old germinating pea seeds. Fatty acid synthesis was maximum at approximately 80 nmoles/hr/mg protein in the presence of 200 {mu}M acetate, 0.5 mM each of NADH, NADPH and CoA, 6 mM each of ATP and MgCl{sub 2}, 1 mM each of the MnCl{sub 2} and glycerol-3-phosphate, 15 mM KHCO{sub 3}, and 0.1M Bis-tris-propane, pH 8.0 incubated at 35C. At the standard incubation temperature of 25C, fatty acid synthesis was linear from up to 6 hours with 80 to 100 {mu}g/mL plastid protein. ATP and CoA were absolute requirements, whereas KHCO{sub 3}, divalent cations and reduced nucleotides all improved activity by 80 to 85%. Mg{sup 2+} and NADH were the preferred cation and nucleotide, respectively. Dithiothreitol and detergents were generally inhibitory. The radioactive products of fatty acid biosynthesis were approximately 33% 16:0, 10% 18:0 and 56% 18:1 and generally did not vary with increasing concentrations of each cofactor.

  17. In vitro mutagenesis and functional expression in Escherichia coli of a cDNA encoding the catalytic domain of human DNA ligase I.

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, K; Barnes, D E; Lindahl, T

    1991-01-01

    Human cDNAs encoding fragments of DNA ligase I, the major replicative DNA ligase in mammalian cells, have been expressed as lacZ fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. A cDNA encoding the carboxyl-terminal catalytic domain of human DNA ligase I was able to complement a conditional-lethal DNA ligase mutation in E. coli as measured by growth of the mutant strain at the non-permissive temperature. Targeted deletions of the amino and carboxyl termini of the catalytic domain identified a minimum size necessary for catalytic function and a maximum size for optimal complementing activity in E. coli. The human cDNA was subjected to systematic site-directed mutagenesis in vitro and mutant polypeptides assayed for functional expression in the E. coli DNA ligase mutant. Such functional analysis of the active site of DNA ligase I identified specific residues required for the formation of an enzyme-adenylate reaction intermediate. Images PMID:1956768

  18. Post-Transcriptional Coordination of the Arabidopsis Iron Deficiency Response is Partially Dependent on the E3 Ligases RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1) and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2).

    PubMed

    Pan, I-Chun; Tsai, Huei-Hsuan; Cheng, Ya-Tan; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Buckhout, Thomas J; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Acclimation to changing environmental conditions is mediated by proteins, the abundance of which is carefully tuned by an elaborate interplay of DNA-templated and post-transcriptional processes. To dissect the mechanisms that control and mediate cellular iron homeostasis, we conducted quantitative high-resolution iTRAQ proteomics and microarray-based transcriptomic profiling of iron-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana plants. A total of 13,706 and 12,124 proteins was identified with a quadrupole-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in roots and leaves, respectively. This deep proteomic coverage allowed accurate estimates of post-transcriptional regulation in response to iron deficiency. Similarly regulated transcripts were detected in only 13% (roots) and 11% (leaves) of the 886 proteins that differentially accumulated between iron-sufficient and iron-deficient plants, indicating that the majority of the iron-responsive proteins was post-transcriptionally regulated. Mutants harboring defects in the RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1)(1) and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2) showed a pleiotropic phenotype that resembled iron-deficient plants with reduced trichome density and the formation of branched root hairs. Proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of rglg1 rglg2 double mutants revealed that the functional RGLG protein is required for the regulation of a large set of iron-responsive proteins including the coordinated expression of ribosomal proteins. This integrative analysis provides a detailed catalog of post-transcriptionally regulated proteins and allows the concept of a chiefly transcriptionally regulated iron deficiency response to be revisited. Protein data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002126. PMID:26253232

  19. Novel Cul3 binding proteins function to remodel E3 ligase complexes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cullins belong to a family of scaffold proteins that assemble multi-subunit ubiquitin ligase complexes to recruit protein substrates for ubiquitination via unique sets of substrate adaptor, such as Skp1 or Elongin B, and a substrate-binding protein with a conserved protein-protein interacting domain, such as leucine-rich repeats (LRR), a WD40 domain, or a zinc-finger domain. In the case of the Cullin3 (Cul3), it forms a BTB-Cul3-Rbx1 (BCR) ubiquitin ligase complex where it is believed that a BTB domain-containing protein performs dual functions where it serves as both the substrate adaptor and the substrate recognition protein. Results Tandem affinity purification and LC/MS-MS analysis of the BCR complex led to the identification of 10,225 peptides. After the SEQUEST algorithm and CDART program were used for protein identification and domain prediction, we discovered a group of Cul3-bound proteins that contain either the LRR or WD40 domain (CLWs). Further biochemical analysis revealed that the LRR domain-containing CLWs could bind both Cul3 and BTB domain-containing proteins. The dual binding role for the LRR domain-containing CLWs results in causing the BTB-domain protein to become a substrate instead of an adaptor. To further distinguish potential substrates from other components that are part of the BCR ubiquitin ligase complex, we altered the parameters in the SEQUEST algorithm to select for peptide fragments with a modified lysine residue. This method not only identifies the potential substrates of the BCR ubiquitin ligase complex, but it also pinpoints the lysine residue in which the post-translational modification occurs. Interestingly, none of the CLWs were identified by this method, supporting our hypothesis that CLWs were not potential substrates but rather additional components of the BCR ubiquitin ligase complex. Conclusion Our study identified a new set of Cul3-binding proteins known as CLWs via tandem affinity purification and LC

  20. Protein Kinase R Degradation Is Essential for Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection and Is Regulated by SKP1-CUL1-F-box (SCF)FBXW11-NSs E3 Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Mudhasani, Rajini; Tran, Julie P.; Retterer, Cary; Kota, Krishna P.; Whitehouse, Chris A.; Bavari, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Activated protein kinase R (PKR) plays a vital role in antiviral defense primarily by inhibiting protein synthesis and augmenting interferon responses. Many viral proteins have adopted unique strategies to counteract the deleterious effects of PKR. The NSs (Non-structural s) protein which is encoded by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) promotes early PKR proteasomal degradation through a previously undefined mechanism. In this study, we demonstrate that NSs carries out this activity by assembling the SCF (SKP1-CUL1-F-box)FBXW11 E3 ligase. NSs binds to the F-box protein, FBXW11, via the six amino acid sequence DDGFVE called the degron sequence and recruits PKR through an alternate binding site to the SCFFBXW11 E3 ligase. We further show that disrupting the assembly of the SCFFBXW11-NSs E3 ligase with MLN4924 (a small molecule inhibitor of SCF E3 ligase activity) or NSs degron viral mutants or siRNA knockdown of FBXW11 can block PKR degradation. Surprisingly, under these conditions when PKR degradation was blocked, NSs was essential and sufficient to activate PKR causing potent inhibition of RVFV infection by suppressing viral protein synthesis. These antiviral effects were antagonized by the loss of PKR expression or with a NSs deleted mutant virus. Therefore, early PKR activation by disassembly of SCFFBXW11-NSs E3 ligase is sufficient to inhibit RVFV infection. Furthermore, FBXW11 and BTRC are the two homologues of the βTrCP (Beta-transducin repeat containing protein) gene that were previously described to be functionally redundant. However, in RVFV infection, among the two homologues of βTrCP, FBXW11 plays a dominant role in PKR degradation and is the limiting factor in the assembly of the SCFFBXW11 complex. Thus, FBXW11 serves as a master regulator of RVFV infection by promoting PKR degradation. Overall these findings provide new insights into NSs regulation of PKR activity and offer potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention of RVFV infection. PMID

  1. Peptide Arrays for Binding Studies of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases.

    PubMed

    Klecker, Maria; Dissmeyer, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The automated SPOT (synthetic peptide arrays on membrane support technique) synthesis technology has entrenched as a rapid and robust method to generate peptide libraries on cellulose membrane supports. The synthesis method is based on conventional Fmoc chemistry building up peptides with free N-terminal amino acids starting at their cellulose-coupled C-termini. Several hundreds of peptide sequences can be assembled with this technique on one membrane comprising a strong binding potential due to high local peptide concentrations. Peptide orientation on SPOT membranes qualifies this array type for assaying substrate specificities of N-recognins, the recognition elements of the N-end rule pathway of targeted protein degradation (NERD). Pioneer studies described binding capability of mammalian and yeast enzymes depending on a peptide's N-terminus. SPOT arrays have been successfully used to describe substrate specificity of N-recognins which are the recognition elements of the N-end rule pathway of targeted protein degradation (NERD). Here, we describe the implementation of SPOT binding assays with focus on the identification of N-recognin substrates, applicable also for plant NERD enzymes. PMID:27424747

  2. Rhamnolipid and poly (hydrozyalkanoate) biosynthesis in 3-hydrozyacyl-ACP:COA transacylase (phaG) - knockouts of pseudomonas chloroaphis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 3-hydroxyacyl-ACP:CoA transacylase gene (phaG(Pc30761)) of P. chlororaphis NRRL B-30761 was cloned and analyzed. The nucleotide and translated amino-acid sequences of phaG(Pc30761) had 99% identities (at 100% query coverage) with the phaG gene of P. fluorescens O6. Two phaG-knockout strains of...

  3. Possible mechanism for species difference on the toxicity of pivalic acid between dogs and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Toshiro . E-mail: toshiro.yamaguchi@shionogi.co.jp; Nakajima, Yoshitsugu; Nakamura, Yutaka

    2006-07-01

    In a high dose toxicity study of pivalic acid (PA), PA caused skeletal muscle disorder in dog, and a significant increase of pivaloyl carnitine (PC) was observed in canine muscle, but not in rat muscle. In order to understand species difference of the toxicity of PA, we compared the in vitro metabolism of PA among dog, rat and rabbit, especially focussing on the carnitine conjugate. Canine muscle showed low, but significant carnitine conjugating activity, while that of rat was negligible. Canine kidney mitochondria had significant activity in the pivaloyl CoA synthesis (7 nmol/mg protein/h), but muscle mitochondria showed only trace activity. Both kidney and muscle mitochondria displayed similar carnitine acyltransferase activity (2-3 nmol/mg protein/h) towards pivaloyl CoA. On the other hand, with respect to the activity of carnitine acyltransferase in the reverse direction using PC as substrate, canine muscle mitochondria showed higher activity than that of kidney mitochondria. This means that PC is not the final stable metabolite, but is converted easily to pivaloyl CoA in canine muscle. These results suggest one of the possible mechanisms for canine selective muscle disorder to be as follows. Only canine muscle can metabolize PA to its carnitine conjugate slowly, but significantly. In canine muscle, PC is not the final stable metabolite; it is easily converted to pivaloyl CoA. As carnitine conjugation is thought to be the only detoxification metabolic route in canine muscle, under certain circumstances such as carnitine deficiency, the risk of exposure with toxic pivaloyl CoA might increase and the CoASH pool in canine muscle might be exhausted, resulting in toxicity in canine muscle.

  4. A Family of Salmonella Virulence Factors Functions as a Distinct Class of Autoregulated E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    SciTech Connect

    Quezada, C.; Hicks, S; Galan, J; Stebbins, C

    2009-01-01

    Processes as diverse as receptor binding and signaling, cytoskeletal dynamics, and programmed cell death are manipulated by mimics of host proteins encoded by pathogenic bacteria. We show here that the Salmonella virulence factor SspH2 belongs to a growing class of bacterial effector proteins that harness and subvert the eukaryotic ubiquitination pathway. This virulence protein possesses ubiquitination activity that depends on a conserved cysteine residue. A crystal structure of SspH2 reveals a canonical leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain that interacts with a unique E{sub 3} ligase [which we have termed NEL for Novel E{sub 3} Ligase] C-terminal fold unrelated to previously observed HECT or RING-finger E{sub 3} ligases. Moreover, the LRR domain sequesters the catalytic cysteine residue contained in the NEL domain, and we suggest a mechanism for activation of the ligase requiring a substantial conformational change to release the catalytic domain for function. We also show that the N-terminal domain targets SspH2 to the apical plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells and propose a model whereby binding of the LRR to proteins at the target site releases the ligase domain for site-specific function.

  5. Structural Insight into the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Vif SOCS Box and Its Role in Human E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley,B.; Ehrlich, E.; Short, L.; Yu, Y.; Xiao, Z.; Yu, X.; Xiong, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virion infectivity factor (Vif) causes the proteasome-mediated destruction of human antiviral protein APOBEC3G by tethering it to a cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase composed of ElonginB, ElonginC, Cullin5, and Rbx2. It has been proposed that HIV Vif hijacks the E3 ligase through two regions within its C-terminal domain: a BC box region that interacts with ElonginC and a novel zinc finger motif that interacts with Cullin5. We have determined the crystal structure of the HIV Vif BC box in complex with human ElonginB and ElonginC. This complex presents direct structural evidence of the recruitment of a human ubiquitin ligase by a viral BC box protein that mimics the conserved interactions of cellular ubiquitin ligases. We further mutated conserved hydrophobic residues in a region downstream of the Vif BC box. These mutations demonstrate that this region, the Vif Cullin box, composes a third E3-ligase recruiting site critical for interaction between Vif and Cullin5. Furthermore, our homology modeling reveals that the Vif Cullin box and zinc finger motif may be positioned adjacent to the N terminus of Cullin5 for interaction with loop regions in the first cullin repeat of Cullin5.

  6. Kinetic mechanism of nick sealing by T4 RNA ligase 2 and effects of 3′-OH base mispairs and damaged base lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chauleau, Mathieu; Shuman, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    T4 RNA ligase 2 (Rnl2) repairs 3′-OH/5′-PO4 nicks in duplex nucleic acids in which the broken 3′-OH strand is RNA. Ligation entails three chemical steps: reaction of Rnl2 with ATP to form a covalent Rnl2–(lysyl-Nζ)–AMP intermediate (step 1); transfer of AMP to the 5′-PO4 of the nick to form an activated AppN– intermediate (step 2); and attack by the nick 3′-OH on the AppN– strand to form a 3′–5′ phosphodiester (step 3). Here we used rapid mix-quench methods to analyze the kinetic mechanism and fidelity of single-turnover nick sealing by Rnl2–AMP. For substrates with correctly base-paired 3′-OH nick termini, kstep2 was fast (9.5 to 17.9 sec−1) and similar in magnitude to kstep3 (7.9 to 32 sec−1). Rnl2 fidelity was enforced mainly at the level of step 2 catalysis, whereby 3′-OH base mispairs and oxoguanine, oxoadenine, or abasic lesions opposite the nick 3′-OH elicited severe decrements in the rate of 5′-adenylylation and relatively modest slowing of the rate of phosphodiester synthesis. The exception was the noncanonical A:oxoG base pair, which Rnl2 accepted as a correctly paired end for rapid sealing. These results underscore (1) how Rnl2 requires proper positioning of the 3′-terminal ribonucleoside at the nick for optimal 5′-adenylylation and (2) the potential for nick-sealing ligases to embed mutations during the repair of oxidative damage. PMID:24158792

  7. Genome-wide identification and characterization of the apple (Malus domestica) HECT ubiquitin-protein ligase family and expression analysis of their responsiveness to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianing; Xing, Shanshan; Cui, Haoran; Chen, Xuesen; Wang, Xiaoyun

    2016-04-01

    The ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s) directly participate in ubiquitin (Ub) transferring to the target proteins in the ubiquitination pathway. The HECT ubiquitin-protein ligase (UPL), one type of E3s, is characterized as containing a conserved HECT domain of approximately 350 amino acids in the C terminus. Some UPLs were found to be involved in trichome development and leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. However, studies on plant UPLs, such as characteristics of the protein structure, predicted functional motifs of the HECT domain, and the regulatory expression of UPLs have all been limited. Here, we present genome-wide identification of the genes encoding UPLs (HECT gene) in apple. The 13 genes (named as MdUPL1-MdUPL13) from ten different chromosomes were divided into four groups by phylogenetic analysis. Among these groups, the encoding genes in the intron-exon structure and the included additional functional domains were quite different. Notably, the F-box domain was first found in MdUPL7 in plant UPLs. The HECT domain in different MdUPL groups also presented different spatial features and three types of conservative motifs were identified. The promoters of each MdUPL member carried multiple stress-response related elements by cis-acting element analysis. Experimental results demonstrated that the expressions of several MdUPLs were quite sensitive to cold-, drought-, and salt-stresses by qRT-PCR assay. The results of this study helped to elucidate the functions of HECT proteins, especially in Rosaceae plants. PMID:26510744

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the WW4 domain of the Nedd4-2 ubiquitin–protein ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Umadevi, N.; Kumar, S.; Narayana, N.

    2005-12-01

    The first crystallographic study of an isolated WW domain is reported. Single crystals of the WW4 domain of the Nedd4-2 ubiquitin–protein ligase contain a high solvent content of 74% and diffract X-rays to 2.5 Å resolution. Ubiquitin-mediated protein modification via covalent attachment of ubiquitin has emerged as one of the most common regulatory processes in all eukaryotes. Nedd4-2, closely related to neuronal precursor cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 4 (Nedd4), is a multimodular ubiquitin–protein ligase comprised of four WW domains and a Hect domain. The WW domains recognize the proline-rich motifs on the multi-subunit amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). To gain insights into the binding of the WW domain to proline-rich peptides, a protein fragment (78 amino acids) containing the fourth WW domain (WW4) of the Nedd4-2 protein was purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected. A data set was obtained to 2.5 Å resolution from a cryocooled single crystal at a synchrotron source. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 (or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 113.43, c = 103.21 Å. Analysis of the self-rotation function suggests the presence of four WW4 molecules in the asymmetric unit, with a high unit-cell solvent content of 74%.

  9. SIAH ubiquitin ligases regulate breast cancer cell migration and invasion independent of the oxygen status

    PubMed Central

    Adam, M Gordian; Matt, Sonja; Christian, Sven; Hess-Stumpp, Holger; Haegebarth, Andrea; Hofmann, Thomas G; Algire, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Seven-in-absentia homolog (SIAH) proteins are evolutionary conserved RING type E3 ubiquitin ligases responsible for the degradation of key molecules regulating DNA damage response, hypoxic adaptation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation. Many studies suggest a tumorigenic role for SIAH2. In breast cancer patients SIAH2 expression levels correlate with cancer aggressiveness and overall patient survival. In addition, SIAH inhibition reduced metastasis in melanoma. The role of SIAH1 in breast cancer is still ambiguous; both tumorigenic and tumor suppressive functions have been reported. Other studies categorized SIAH ligases as either pro- or antimigratory, while the significance for metastasis is largely unknown. Here, we re-evaluated the effects of SIAH1 and SIAH2 depletion in breast cancer cell lines, focusing on migration and invasion. We successfully knocked down SIAH1 and SIAH2 in several breast cancer cell lines. In luminal type MCF7 cells, this led to stabilization of the SIAH substrate Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain protein 3 (PHD3) and reduced Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α (HIF1α) protein levels. Both the knockdown of SIAH1 or SIAH2 led to increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation, with comparable effects. These results point to a tumor promoting role for SIAH1 in breast cancer similar to SIAH2. In addition, depletion of SIAH1 or SIAH2 also led to decreased cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. SIAH knockdown also controlled microtubule dynamics by markedly decreasing the protein levels of stathmin, most likely via p27Kip1. Collectively, these results suggest that both SIAH ligases promote a migratory cancer cell phenotype and could contribute to metastasis in breast cancer. PMID:26654769

  10. Aβ-Induced Synaptic Alterations Require the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Nedd4-1

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Elizabeth M.; Scudder, Samantha L.; Goo, Marisa S.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease in which patients experience progressive cognitive decline. A wealth of evidence suggests that this cognitive impairment results from synaptic dysfunction in affected brain regions caused by cleavage of amyloid precursor protein into the pathogenic peptide amyloid-β (Aβ). Specifically, it has been shown that Aβ decreases surface AMPARs, dendritic spine density, and synaptic strength, and also alters synaptic plasticity. The precise molecular mechanisms by which this occurs remain unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for ubiquitination in Aβ-induced synaptic dysfunction in cultured rat neurons. We find that Aβ promotes the ubiquitination of AMPARs, as well as the redistribution and recruitment of Nedd4-1, a HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase we previously demonstrated to target AMPARs for ubiquitination and degradation. Strikingly, we show that Nedd4-1 is required for Aβ-induced reductions in surface AMPARs, synaptic strength, and dendritic spine density. Our findings, therefore, indicate an important role for Nedd4-1 and ubiquitin in the synaptic alterations induced by Aβ. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Synaptic changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) include surface AMPAR loss, which can weaken synapses. In a cell culture model of AD, we found that AMPAR loss correlates with increased AMPAR ubiquitination. In addition, the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-1, known to ubiquitinate AMPARs, is recruited to synapses in response to Aβ. Strikingly, reducing Nedd4-1 levels in this model prevented surface AMPAR loss and synaptic weakening. These findings suggest that, in AD, Nedd4-1 may ubiquitinate AMPARs to promote their internalization and weaken synaptic strength, similar to what occurs in Nedd4-1's established role in homeostatic synaptic scaling. This is the first demonstration of Aβ-mediated control of a ubiquitin ligase to regulate surface AMPAR expression. PMID:26843640

  11. TRIM37 is a new histone H2A ubiquitin ligase and breast cancer oncoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Sanchita; Gazin, Claude; Chamberlain, Lynn; Ou, Jianhong; Zhu, Xiaochun; Tushir, Jogender S; Virbasius, Ching-Man; Lin, Ling; Zhu, Lihua J; Wajapeyee, Narendra; Green, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    The TRIM37 (also known as MUL) gene is located in the 17q23 chromosomal region, which is amplified in up to ∼ 40% of breast cancers. TRIM37 contains a RING finger domain, a hallmark of E3 ubiquitin ligases, but its protein substrate(s) is unknown. Here we report that TRIM37 mono-ubiquitinates histone H2A, a chromatin modification associated with transcriptional repression. We find that in human breast cancer cell lines containing amplified 17q23, TRIM37 is upregulated and, reciprocally, the major H2A ubiquitin ligase RNF2 (also known as RING1B) is downregulated. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip experiments in 17q23-amplified breast cancer cells identified many genes, including multiple tumour suppressors, whose promoters were bound by TRIM37 and enriched for ubiquitinated H2A. However, unlike RNF2, which is a subunit of polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), we find that TRIM37 associates with polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). TRIM37, PRC2 and PRC1 are co-bound to specific target genes, resulting in their transcriptional silencing. RNA-interference-mediated knockdown of TRIM37 results in loss of ubiquitinated H2A, dissociation of PRC1 and PRC2 from target promoters, and transcriptional reactivation of silenced genes. Knockdown of TRIM37 in human breast cancer cells containing amplified 17q23 substantially decreases tumour growth in mouse xenografts. Conversely, ectopic expression of TRIM37 renders non-transformed cells tumorigenic. Collectively, our results reveal TRIM37 as an oncogenic H2A ubiquitin ligase that is overexpressed in a subset of breast cancers and promotes transformation by facilitating silencing of tumour suppressors and other genes. PMID:25470042

  12. UV-B induction of the E3 ligase ARIADNE12 depends on CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lisi; Lang-Mladek, Christina; Richter, Julia; Nigam, Neha; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2015-08-01

    The UV-B inducible ARIADNE12 (ARI12) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana is a member of the RING-between-RING (RBR) family of E3 ubiquitin ligases for which a novel ubiquitination mechanism was identified in mammalian homologs. This RING-HECT hybrid mechanism needs a conserved cysteine which is replaced by serine in ARI12 and might affect the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. We have shown that under photomorphogenic UV-B, ARI12 is a downstream target of the classical ultraviolet B (UV-B) UV Resistance Locus 8 (UVR8) pathway. However, under high fluence rate of UV-B ARI12 was induced independently of UVR8 and the UV-A/blue light and red/far-red photoreceptors. A key component of several light signaling pathways is Constitutively Photomorphogenic 1 (COP1). Upon UV-B COP1 is trapped in the nucleus through interaction with UVR8 permitting the activation of genes that regulate the biosynthesis of UV-B protective metabolites and growth adaptations. To clarify the role of COP1 in the regulation of ARI12 mRNA expression and ARI12 protein stability, localization and interaction with COP1 was assessed with and without UV-B. We found that COP1 controls ARI12 in white light, low and high fluence rate of UV-B. Furthermore we show that ARI12 is indeed an E3 ubiquitin ligase which is mono-ubiquitinated, a prerequisite for the RING-HECT hybrid mechanism. Finally, genetic analyses with transgenes expressing a genomic pmARI12:ARI12-GFP construct confirm the epistatic interaction between COP1 and ARI12 in growth responses to high fluence rate UV-B. PMID:25817546

  13. The Ubiquitin Ligase Ubr11 Is Essential for Oligopeptide Utilization in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Nakase, Mai; Tohda, Hideki; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2012-01-01

    Uptake of extracellular oligopeptides in yeast is mediated mainly by specific transporters of the peptide transporter (PTR) and oligopeptide transporter (OPT) families. Here, we investigated the role of potential peptide transporters in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Utilization of naturally occurring dipeptides required only Ptr2/SPBC13A2.04c and none of the other 3 OPT proteins (Isp4, Pgt1, and Opt3), whereas only Isp4 was indispensable for tetrapeptide utilization. Both Ptr2 and Isp4 localized to the cell surface, but under rich nutrient conditions Isp4 localized in the Golgi apparatus through the function of the ubiquitin ligase Pub1. Furthermore, the ubiquitin ligase Ubr11 played a significant role in oligopeptide utilization. The mRNA levels of both the ptr2 and isp4 genes were significantly reduced in ubr11Δ cells, and the dipeptide utilization defect in the ubr11Δ mutant was rescued by the forced expression of Ptr2. Consistent with its role in transcriptional regulation of peptide transporter genes, the Ubr11 protein was accumulated in the nucleus. Unlike the situation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the oligopeptide utilization defect in the S. pombe ubr11Δ mutant was not rescued by inactivation of the Tup11/12 transcriptional corepressors, suggesting that the requirement for the Ubr ubiquitin ligase in the upregulation of peptide transporter mRNA levels is conserved in both yeasts; however, the actual mechanism underlying the control appears to be different. We also found that the peptidomimetic proteasome inhibitor MG132 was still operative in a strain lacking all known PTR and OPT peptide transporters. Therefore, irrespective of its peptide-like structure, MG132 is carried into cells independently of the representative peptide transporters. PMID:22226946

  14. UV-B induction of the E3 ligase ARIADNE12 depends on CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lisi; Lang-Mladek, Christina; Richter, Julia; Nigam, Neha; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2015-01-01

    The UV-B inducible ARIADNE12 (ARI12) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana is a member of the RING-between-RING (RBR) family of E3 ubiquitin ligases for which a novel ubiquitination mechanism was identified in mammalian homologs. This RING-HECT hybrid mechanism needs a conserved cysteine which is replaced by serine in ARI12 and might affect the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. We have shown that under photomorphogenic UV-B, ARI12 is a downstream target of the classical ultraviolet B (UV-B) UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) pathway. However, under high fluence rate of UV-B ARI12 was induced independently of UVR8 and the UV-A/blue light and red/far-red photoreceptors. A key component of several light signaling pathways is CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1). Upon UV-B COP1 is trapped in the nucleus through interaction with UVR8 permitting the activation of genes that regulate the biosynthesis of UV-B protective metabolites and growth adaptations. To clarify the role of COP1 in the regulation of ARI12 mRNA expression and ARI12 protein stability, localization and interaction with COP1 was assessed with and without UV-B. We found that COP1 controls ARI12 in white light, low and high fluence rate of UV-B. Furthermore we show that ARI12 is indeed an E3 ubiquitin ligase which is mono-ubiquitinated, a prerequisite for the RING-HECT hybrid mechanism. Finally, genetic analyses with transgenes expressing a genomic pmARI12:ARI12-GFP construct confirm the epistatic interaction between COP1 and ARI12 in growth responses to high fluence rate UV-B. PMID:25817546

  15. Cancer related mutations in NRF2 impair its recognition by Keap1-Cul3 E3 ligase and promote malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Ohta, Tsutomu; Tong, Kit I.; Kokubu, Akiko; Odogawa, Reiko; Tsuta, Koji; Asamura, Hisao; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hirohashi, Setsuo

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a master transcriptional activator of genes encoding numerous cytoprotective enzymes that are induced in response to environmental and endogenously derived oxidative/electrophilic agents. Under normal, nonstressed circumstances, low cellular concentrations of Nrf2 are maintained by proteasomal degradation through a Keap1-Cul3-Roc1-dependent mechanism. A model for Nrf2 activation has been proposed in which two amino-terminal motifs, DLG and ETGE, promote efficient ubiquitination and rapid turnover; known as the two-site substrate recognition/hinge and latch model. Here, we show that in human cancer, somatic mutations occur in the coding region of NRF2, especially among patients with a history of smoking or suffering from squamous cell carcinoma; in the latter case, this leads to poor prognosis. These mutations specifically alter amino acids in the DLG or ETGE motifs, resulting in aberrant cellular accumulation of Nrf2. Mutant Nrf2 cells display constitutive induction of cytoprotective enzymes and drug efflux pumps, which are insensitive to Keap1-mediated regulation. Suppression of Nrf2 protein levels by siRNA knockdown sensitized cancer cells to oxidative stress and chemotherapeutic reagents. Our results strongly support the contention that constitutive Nrf2 activation affords cancer cells with undue protection from their inherently stressed microenvironment and anti-cancer treatments. Hence, inactivation of the Nrf2 pathway may represent a therapeutic strategy to reinforce current treatments for malignancy. Congruously, the present study also provides in vivo validation of the two-site substrate recognition model for Nrf2 activation by the Keap1-Cul3-based E3 ligase. PMID:18757741

  16. Lipoate-Protein Ligase and Octanoyltransferase Are Essential for Protein Lipoylation in Mitochondria of Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Ralph; Hoffmann, Christiane; Florian, Alexandra; Neuhaus, Ekkehard; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Bauwe, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic lipoyl groups are required for the function of several essential multienzyme complexes, such as pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDH), and the glycine cleavage system (glycine decarboxylase [GDC]). How these proteins are lipoylated has been extensively studied in prokaryotes and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), but little is known for plants. We earlier reported that mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis by ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase is not vital for protein lipoylation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and does not play a significant role in roots. Here, we identify Arabidopsis lipoate-protein ligase (AtLPLA) as an essential mitochondrial enzyme that uses octanoyl-nucleoside monophosphate and possibly other donor substrates for the octanoylation of mitochondrial PDH-E2 and GDC H-protein; it shows no reactivity with bacterial and possibly plant KGDH-E2. The octanoate-activating enzyme is unknown, but we assume that it uses octanoyl moieties provided by mitochondrial β-oxidation. AtLPLA is essential for the octanoylation of PDH-E2, whereas GDC H-protein can optionally also be octanoylated by octanoyltransferase (LIP2) using octanoyl chains provided by mitochondrial ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase to meet the high lipoate requirement of leaf mesophyll mitochondria. Similar to protein lipoylation in yeast, LIP2 likely also transfers octanoyl groups attached to the H-protein to KGDH-E2 but not to PDH-E2, which is exclusively octanoylated by LPLA. We suggest that LPLA and LIP2 together provide a basal protein lipoylation network to plants that is similar to that in other eukaryotes. PMID:24872381

  17. The E3 ubiquitin protein ligase HERC2 modulates the activity of tumor protein p53 by regulating its oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Cubillos-Rojas, Monica; Amair-Pinedo, Fabiola; Peiró-Jordán, Roser; Bartrons, Ramon; Ventura, Francesc; Rosa, Jose Luis

    2014-05-23

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that coordinates the cellular response to several kinds of stress. p53 inactivation is an important step in tumor progression. Oligomerization of p53 is critical for its posttranslational modification and its ability to regulate the transcription of target genes necessary to inhibit tumor growth. Here we report that the HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase HERC2 interacts with p53. This interaction involves the CPH domain of HERC2 (a conserved domain within Cul7, PARC, and HERC2 proteins) and the last 43 amino acid residues of p53. Through this interaction, HERC2 regulates p53 activity. RNA interference experiments showed how HERC2 depletion reduces the transcriptional activity of p53 without affecting its stability. This regulation of p53 activity by HERC2 is independent of proteasome or MDM2 activity. Under these conditions, up-regulation of cell growth and increased focus formation were observed, showing the functional relevance of the HERC2-p53 interaction. This interaction was maintained after DNA damage caused by the chemotherapeutic drug bleomycin. In these stressed cells, p53 phosphorylation was not impaired by HERC2 knockdown. Interestingly, p53 mutations that affect its tetramerization domain disrupted the HERC2-p53 interaction, suggesting a role for HERC2 in p53 oligomerization. This regulatory role was shown using cross-linking assays. Thus, the inhibition of p53 activity after HERC2 depletion can be attributed to a reduction in p53 oligomerization. Ectopic expression of HERC2 (residues 2292-2923) confirmed these observations. Together, these results identify HERC2 as a novel regulator of p53 signaling. PMID:24722987

  18. Characterisation of ATP-Dependent Mur Ligases Involved in the Biogenesis of Cell Wall Peptidoglycan in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Munshi, Tulika; Gupta, Antima; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; Guzman, Juan David; Gibbons, Simon; Keep, Nicholas H.; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2013-01-01

    ATP-dependent Mur ligases (Mur synthetases) play essential roles in the biosynthesis of cell wall peptidoglycan (PG) as they catalyze the ligation of key amino acid residues to the stem peptide at the expense of ATP hydrolysis, thus representing potential targets for antibacterial drug discovery. In this study we characterized the division/cell wall (dcw) operon and identified a promoter driving the co-transcription of mur synthetases along with key cell division genes such as ftsQ and ftsW. Furthermore, we have extended our previous investigations of MurE to MurC, MurD and MurF synthetases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Functional analyses of the pure recombinant enzymes revealed that the presence of divalent cations is an absolute requirement for their activities. We also observed that higher concentrations of ATP and UDP-sugar substrates were inhibitory for the activities of all Mur synthetases suggesting stringent control of the cytoplasmic steps of the peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway. In line with the previous findings on the regulation of mycobacterial MurD and corynebacterial MurC synthetases via phosphorylation, we found that all of the Mur synthetases interacted with the Ser/Thr protein kinases, PknA and PknB. In addition, we critically analyzed the interaction network of all of the Mur synthetases with proteins involved in cell division and cell wall PG biosynthesis to re-evaluate the importance of these key enzymes as novel therapeutic targets in anti-tubercular drug discovery. PMID:23555903

  19. Structure of a Putative Lipoate Protein Ligase from Thermoplasma acidophilum and the Mechanism of Target Selection for Post-Translational Modification

    SciTech Connect

    McManus,E.; Luisi, B.; Perham, R.

    2006-01-01

    Lipoyl-lysine swinging arms are crucial to the reactions catalysed by the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes. A gene encoding a putative lipoate protein ligase (LplA) of Thermoplasma acidophilum was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein, a monomer of molecular mass 29 kDa, was catalytically inactive. Crystal structures in the absence and presence of bound lipoic acid were solved at 2.1 Angstroms resolution. The protein was found to fall into the a/{beta} class and to be structurally homologous to the catalytic domains of class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthases and biotin protein ligase, BirA. Lipoic acid in LplA was bound in the same position as biotin in BirA. The structure of the T. acidophilum LplA and limited proteolysis of E. coli LplA together highlighted some key features of the post-translational modification. A loop comprising residues 71-79 in the T. acidophilumligase is proposed as interacting with the dithiolane ring of lipoic acid and discriminating against the entry of biotin. A second loop comprising residues 179-193 was disordered in the T. acidophilum structure; tryptic cleavage of the corresponding loop in the E. coli LplA under non-denaturing conditions rendered the enzyme catalytically inactive, emphasizing its importance. The putative LplA of T. acidophilum lacks a C-terminal domain found in its counterparts in E. coli (Gram-negative) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (Gram-positive). A gene encoding a protein that appears to have structural homology to the additional domain in the E. coli and S. pneumoniae enzymes was detected alongside the structural gene encoding the putative LplA in the T. acidophilum genome. It is likely that this protein is required to confer activity on the LplA as currently purified, one protein perhaps catalysing the formation of the obligatory lipoyl-AMP intermediate, and the other transferring the lipoyl group from it to the specific lysine residue in the target protein.

  20. The ubiquitin ligase APC/CCdh1 puts the brakes on DNA-end resection

    PubMed Central

    Lafranchi, Lorenzo; Sartori, Alessandro A

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly deleterious lesions and their misrepair can promote genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer. DNA-end resection is a cell cycle-regulated mechanism that is required for the faithful repair of DSBs. We recently discovered that the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome-Cdh1 (APC/CCdh1) ubiquitin ligase is responsible for the timely degradation of CtBP-interacting protein (CtIP), a key DNA-end resection factor, providing a new layer of regulation of DSB repair in human cells. PMID:27308488

  1. Versatile and Efficient Site-Specific Protein Functionalization by Tubulin Tyrosine Ligase.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Dominik; Helma, Jonas; Mann, Florian A; Pichler, Garwin; Natale, Francesco; Krause, Eberhard; Cardoso, M Cristina; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2015-11-01

    A novel chemoenzymatic approach for simple and fast site-specific protein labeling is reported. Recombinant tubulin tyrosine ligase (TTL) was repurposed to attach various unnatural tyrosine derivatives as small bioorthogonal handles to proteins containing a short tubulin-derived recognition sequence (Tub-tag). This novel strategy enables a broad range of high-yielding and fast chemoselective C-terminal protein modifications on isolated proteins or in cell lysates for applications in biochemistry, cell biology, and beyond, as demonstrated by the site-specific labeling of nanobodies, GFP, and ubiquitin. PMID:26404067

  2. Structural insight into SUMO chain recognition and manipulation by the ubiquitin ligase RNF4.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingqi; Plechanovová, Anna; Simpson, Peter; Marchant, Jan; Leidecker, Orsolya; Kraatz, Sebastian; Hay, Ronald T; Matthews, Steve J

    2014-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) can form polymeric chains that are important signals in cellular processes such as meiosis, genome maintenance and stress response. The SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 engages with SUMO chains on linked substrates and catalyses their ubiquitination, which targets substrates for proteasomal degradation. Here we use a segmental labelling approach combined with solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and biochemical characterization to reveal how RNF4 manipulates the conformation of the SUMO chain, thereby facilitating optimal delivery of the distal SUMO domain for ubiquitin transfer. PMID:24969970

  3. Structural insight into SUMO chain recognition and manipulation by the ubiquitin ligase RNF4

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yingqi; Plechanovová, Anna; Simpson, Peter; Marchant, Jan; Leidecker, Orsolya; Kraatz, Sebastian; Hay, Ronald T.; Matthews, Steve J.

    2014-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) can form polymeric chains that are important signals in cellular processes such as meiosis, genome maintenance and stress response. The SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 engages with SUMO chains on linked substrates and catalyses their ubiquitination, which targets substrates for proteasomal degradation. Here we use a segmental labelling approach combined with solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and biochemical characterization to reveal how RNF4 manipulates the conformation of the SUMO chain, thereby facilitating optimal delivery of the distal SUMO domain for ubiquitin transfer. PMID:24969970

  4. Ectopic expression of a loblolly pine class II 4-coumarate:CoA ligase alters soluble phenylpropanoid metabolism but not lignin biosynthesis in Populus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-Yi; Babst, Benjamin A; Nyamdari, Batbayar; Hu, Hao; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Mark F; Harding, Scott A; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2014-09-01

    4-Coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) catalyzes the formation of hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA esters for phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Phylogenetically distinct Class I and Class II 4CL isoforms occur in angiosperms, and support lignin and non-lignin phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, respectively. In contrast, the few experimentally characterized gymnosperm 4CLs are associated with lignin biosynthesis and belong to the conifer-specific Class III. Here we report a new Pinus taeda isoform Pinta4CL3 that is phylogenetically more closely related to Class II angiosperm 4CLs than to Class III Pinta4CL1. Like angiosperm Class II 4CLs, Pinta4CL3 transcript levels were detected in foliar and root tissues but were absent in xylem, and recombinant Pinta4CL3 exhibited a substrate preference for 4-coumaric acid. Constitutive expression of Pinta4CL3 in transgenic Populus led to significant increases of hydroxycinnamoyl-quinate esters at the expense of hydroxycinnamoyl-glucose esters in green tissues. In particular, large increases of cinnamoyl-quinate in transgenic leaves suggested in vivo utilization of cinnamic acid by Pinta4CL3. Lignin was unaffected in transgenic Populus, consistent with Pinta4CL3 involvement in biosynthesis of non-structural phenylpropanoids. We discuss the in vivo cinnamic acid utilization activity of Pinta4CL3 and its adaptive significance in conifer defense. Together with phylogenetic inference, our data support an ancient origin of Class II 4CLs that pre-dates the angiosperm-gymnosperm split. PMID:25016610

  5. Phosphorylation-dependent control of Pc2 SUMO E3 ligase activity by its substrate protein HIPK2.

    PubMed

    Roscic, Ana; Möller, Andreas; Calzado, Marco A; Renner, Florian; Wimmer, Verena C; Gresko, Ekaterina; Lüdi, Katharina Schmid; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2006-10-01

    Sumoylation serves to control key cellular functions, but the regulation of SUMO E3 ligase activity is largely unknown. Here we show that the polycomb group protein Pc2 binds to and colocalizes with homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) and serves as a SUMO E3 ligase for this kinase. DNA damage-induced HIPK2 directly phosphorylates Pc2 at multiple sites, which in turn controls Pc2 sumoylation and intranuclear localization. Inducible phosphorylation of Pc2 at threonine 495 is required for its ability to increase HIPK2 sumoylation in response to DNA damage, thereby establishing an autoregulatory feedback loop between a SUMO substrate and its cognate E3 ligase. Sumoylation enhances the ability of HIPK2 to mediate transcriptional repression, thus providing a mechanistic link for DNA damage-induced transcriptional silencing. PMID:17018294

  6. RMND5 from Xenopus laevis Is an E3 Ubiquitin-Ligase and Functions in Early Embryonic Forebrain Development

    PubMed Central

    Pfirrmann, Thorsten; Villavicencio-Lorini, Pablo; Subudhi, Abinash K.; Menssen, Ruth; Wolf, Dieter H.; Hollemann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the Gid-complex functions as an ubiquitin-ligase complex that regulates the metabolic switch between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. In higher organisms six conserved Gid proteins form the CTLH protein-complex with unknown function. Here we show that Rmnd5, the Gid2 orthologue from Xenopus laevis, is an ubiquitin-ligase embedded in a high molecular weight complex. Expression of rmnd5 is strongest in neuronal ectoderm, prospective brain, eyes and ciliated cells of the skin and its suppression results in malformations of the fore- and midbrain. We therefore suggest that Xenopus laevis Rmnd5, as a subunit of the CTLH complex, is a ubiquitin-ligase targeting an unknown factor for polyubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation for proper fore- and midbrain development. PMID:25793641

  7. Development of a novel immunochromatographic assay for rapid detection of VanA ligase-producing vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed

    Ji, Gil Yong; Song, Hyung Geun; Son, Bo Ra; Hong, Seung Bok; Kim, Jong Wan; Shin, Kyeong Seob

    2014-03-28

    We developed a novel immunochromatographic assay (ICA) (EZ-Step VanA rapid kit; Dinona, Korea) for the detection of VanA ligase from vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Of eight monoclonal antibodies screened by ELISAs, the VanA ligase ICA constructed with 1H9 plus 3G11 showed the greatest reactivity. The detection limit of the kit was 6.3 × 10(6) CFU per test. Of 127 vancomycin-resistant microorganisms, 100 vanA VRE were positive in the VanA ligase ICA, and 27 non-vanA vancomycin-resistant isolates were negative. These results were consistent with those of the PCR analyses. Thus, our ICA is a reliable and easy-to-use immunological assay for detecting VanA-producing VRE in clinical laboratories. PMID:24346470

  8. Lignin and Fiber digestibility in Caffeic Acid 3-O-Methyltransferase and Caffeoyl CoA 3-O-Methyltransferase Downregulated Alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the most important forages in the United States. Increasing alfalfa fiber digestibility would improve forage management and ration formulation flexibility. Currently, growers and breeders rely on near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to predict forage quality tra...

  9. Agronomic field evaluation of caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase and caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase downregulated alfalfas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is a widely used forage legume. Increasing alfalfa digestibility would increase forage value. One digestibility limitation in alfalfa is stem lignification, which presents an attractive target for genetic manipulation and selection. Lignin biosynthesis is controlled by the...

  10. Ubiquitin ligase ITCH recruitment suppresses the aggregation and cellular toxicity of cytoplasmic misfolded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chhangani, Deepak; Upadhyay, Arun; Amanullah, Ayeman; Joshi, Vibhuti; Mishra, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The protein quality control (QC) system protects cells against cellular toxicity induced by misfolded proteins and maintains overall cellular fitness. Inefficient clearance of or failure to degrade damaged proteins causes several diseases, especially age-linked neurodegenerative disorders. Attenuation of misfolded protein degradation under severe stress conditions leads to the rapid over-accumulation of toxic proteinaceous aggregates in the cytoplasmic compartment. However, the precise cytoplasmic quality control degradation mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that the Nedd4-like E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH specifically interacts with mutant bona fide misfolded proteins and colocalizes with their perinuclear aggregates. In a cell culture model, we demonstrate ITCH recruitment by cytoplasmic inclusions containing polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin or ataxin-3 proteins. Transient overexpression of ITCH dramatically induced the degradation of thermally denatured misfolded luciferase protein. Partial depletion of ITCH increased the rate of aggregate formation and cell death generated by expanded polyglutamine proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of ITCH alleviates the cytotoxic potential of expanded polyglutamine proteins and reduces aggregation. These observations indicate that ITCH is involved in the cytosolic quality control pathway and may help to explain how abnormal proteins are targeted by QC ubiquitin-protein ligases. PMID:24865853

  11. F-box only protein 9 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase of PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeong Won; Kwak, Soo Heon; Koo, Young Do; Cho, Yun-Kyung; Lee, Hak Mo; Jung, Hye Seung; Cho, Young Min; Park, Young Joo; Chung, Sung Soo; Park, Kyong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a critical regulator of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, adipocyte differentiation and inflammatory response. Post-translational modification of PPARγ and its degradation involve several pathways, including the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Here, we identified F-box only protein 9 (FBXO9) as an E3 ubiquitin ligase of PPARγ. We screened interacting partners of PPARγ using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric analysis and identified FBXO9 as an E3 ubiquitin ligase of PPARγ. FBXO9 directly interacted with PPARγ through the activation function-1 domain and ligand-binding domain. FBXO9 decreased the protein stability of PPARγ through induction of ubiquitination. We found that the F-box motif of FBXO9 was required for its ubiquitination function. The activity of PPARγ was significantly decreased by FBXO9 overexpression. Furthermore, FBXO9 overexpression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in decreased levels of endogenous PPARγ and suppression of adipogenesis. These results suggest that FBXO9 is an important enzyme that regulates the stability and activity of PPARγ through ubiquitination. PMID:27197753

  12. [The applications of thermostable ligase chain reaction in facilitating DNA recombination].

    PubMed

    Xiangda, Zhou; Xiao, Song; Cong, Huai; Haiyan, Sun; Hongyan, Chen; Daru, Lu

    2016-02-01

    The traditional Type Ⅱ restriction enzyme-based method is restricted by the purification steps, and therefore, cannot be applied to specific DNA assembly in chaotic system. To solve this problem, Thermostable Ligase Chain Reaction (TLCR) was introduced in the process of DNA assembly and capture. This technique combines the feature of thermostable DNA ligase and sequence specific oligo ligation template, "Helper", to achieve specific assembly of target fragments and exponential increase of products in multiple thermocyclings. Two plasmid construction experiments were carried out in order to test the feasibility and practical performance of TLCR. One was that, TLCR was used to specifically capture a 1.5 kb fragment into vector from an unpurified chaotic system which contained 7 different sizes of fragments. The results showed that the capturing accuracy was around 80%, which proved the feasibility and accuracy of using TLCR to specific assembly of DNA fragments in a complicated mixed system. In the other experiment, TLCR was used to capture two fragments (total length was 27 kb) from Hind Ⅲ digestion of Lambda genome into vector by order. The results also showed an accuracy of around 80%. As demonstrated in the results, TLCR can simplify the process of DNA recombination experiments and is suitable for the assembly of multiple and large DNA fragments. This technique can provide convenience to biological experiments. PMID:26907780

  13. Roles of E3 ubiquitin ligases in cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cai

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that a number of E3 ubiquitin ligases, including Cbl, Smurf1, Smurf2, HDM2, BCA2, SCF(beta-TRCP) and XRNF185, play important roles in cell adhesion and migration. Cbl negatively regulates cell adhesion via alpha integrin and Rap1 and inhibits actin polymerization by ubiquitinating mDab1 and WAVE2. Smurf1 regulates cell migration through ubiquitination of RhoA, talin head domain and hPEM2, while Smurf2 ubiquitinates Smurf1, TGFbeta type I receptor and RaplB to modulate cell migration and adhesion. HDM2 negatively regulates cell migration by targeting NFAT (a transcription factor) for ubiquitination and degradation, while SCF(beta-TRCP) ubiquitinates Snail (a transcriptional repressor of E-cadherin) to inhibit cell migration. TRIM32 promotes cell migration through ubiquitination of Abl interactor 2 (Abi2), a tumor suppressor. RNF5 and XRNF185 modulate cell migration by ubiquitinating paxillin. Thus, these E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate cell adhesion and (or) migration through ubiquitination of their specific substrates. PMID:20009572

  14. RAD5a ubiquitin ligase is involved in ubiquitination of Arabidopsis thaliana proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, Wojciech; Bartnicki, Filip; Pels, Katarzyna; Jakubowska, Agata; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2013-02-01

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is post-translationally modified by ubiquitin in yeast and mammalian cells. It is widely accepted that in yeast mono- and polyubiquitinated PCNA is involved in distinct pathways of DNA postreplication repair. This study showed an interaction between plant ubiquitin and PCNA in the plant cell. Using different approaches, it was demonstrated that Arabidopsis RAD5a ubiquitin ligase is involved in the post-translational modification of plant PCNA. A detailed analysis of the properties of selected Arabidopsis ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (AtUBC) has shown that a plant homologue of yeast RAD6 (AtUBC2) is sufficient to monoubiquitinate AtPCNA in the absence of ubiquitin ligase. Using different combinations of selected AtUBC proteins together with AtRAD5a, it was demonstrated that plants have potential to use different pathways to ubiquitinate PCNA. The analysis of Arabidopsis PCNA1 and PCNA2 did not demonstrate substantial differences in the ubiquitination pattern between these two proteins. The major ubiquitination target of Arabidopsis PCNA, conserved in eukaryotes, is lysine 164. Taken together, the presented results clearly demonstrate the involvement of Arabidopsis UBC and RAD5a proteins in the ubiquitination of plant PCNA at lysine 164. The data show the complexity of the plant ubiquitination system and open new questions about its regulation in the plant cell. PMID:23314815

  15. The APC/C Ubiquitin Ligase: From Cell Biology to Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Penas, Clara; Ramachandran, Vimal; Ayad, Nagi George

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is required for normal cell proliferation, vertebrate development, and cancer cell transformation. The UPS consists of multiple proteins that work in concert to target a protein for degradation via the 26S proteasome. Chains of an 8.5-kDa protein called ubiquitin are attached to substrates, thus allowing recognition by the 26S proteasome. Enzymes called ubiquitin ligases or E3s mediate specific attachment to substrates. Although there are over 600 different ubiquitin ligases, the Skp1–Cullin–F-box (SCF) complexes and the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) are the most studied. SCF involvement in cancer has been known for some time while APC/C’s cancer role has recently emerged. In this review we will discuss the importance of APC/C to normal cell proliferation and development, underscoring its possible contribution to transformation. We will also examine the hypothesis that modulating a specific interaction of the APC/C may be therapeutically attractive in specific cancer subtypes. Finally, given that the APC/C pathway is relatively new as a cancer target, therapeutic interventions affecting APC/C activity may be beneficial in cancers that are resistant to classical chemotherapy. PMID:22655255

  16. The Ubiquitin Ligase Siah2 Regulates Obesity-induced Adipose Tissue Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kilroy, Gail; Carter, Lauren E.; Newman, Susan; Burk, David H.; Manuel, Justin; Möller, Andreas; Bowtell, David D.; Mynatt, Randall L.; Ghosh, Sujoy; Floyd, Z. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic, low-grade adipose tissue inflammation associated with adipocyte hypertrophy is an important link in the relationship between obesity and insulin resistance. Although ubiquitin ligases regulate inflammatory processes, the role of these enzymes in metabolically driven adipose tissue inflammation is relatively unexplored. Herein, we examined the effect of the ubiquitin ligase Siah2 on obesity-related adipose tissue inflammation. Methods Wild-type and Siah2KO mice were fed a low or high fat diet for 16 weeks. Indirect calorimetry, body composition, glucose and insulin tolerance were assayed along with glucose and insulin levels. Gene and protein expression, immunohistochemistry, adipocyte size distribution and lipolysis were also analyzed. Results Enlarged adipocytes in obese Siah2KO mice are not associated with obesity-induced insulin resistance. Proinflammatory gene expression, stress kinase signaling, fibrosis and crown-like structures are reduced in the Siah2KO adipose tissue and Siah2KO adipocytes are more responsive to insulin-dependent inhibition of lipolysis. Loss of Siah2 increases expression of PPARγ target genes involved in lipid metabolism and decreases expression of proinflammatory adipokines regulated by PPARγ. Conclusions Siah2 links adipocyte hypertrophy with adipocyte dysfunction and recruitment of proinflammatory immune cells to adipose tissue. Selective regulation of PPARγ activity is a Siah2-mediated mechanism contributing to obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation. PMID:26380945

  17. Structure of the DDB1-CRBN E3 ubiquitin ligase in complex with thalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Eric S.; Böhm, Kerstin; Lydeard, John R.; Yang, Haidi; Stadler, Michael B.; Cavadini, Simone; Nagel, Jane; Serluca, Fabrizio; Acker, Vincent; Lingaraju, Gondichatnahalli M.; Tichkule, Ritesh B.; Schebesta, Michael; Forrester, William C.; Schirle, Markus; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Ottl, Johannes; Hild, Marc; Beckwith, Rohan E. J.; Harper, J. Wade; Jenkins, Jeremy L.; Thomä, Nicolas H.

    2015-01-01

    In the 1950s the drug thalidomide administered as a sedative to pregnant women led to the birth of thousands of children with multiple defects. Despite its teratogenicity, thalidomide and its derivatives lenalidomide and pomalidomide (together known as Immunomodulatory Drugs: IMiDs) recently emerged as effective treatments for multiple myeloma and 5q-dysplasia. IMiDs target the CUL4-RBX1-DDB1-CRBN (CRL4CRBN) E3 ubiquitin ligase and promote the ubiquitination of Ikaros/Aiolos transcription factors by CRL4CRBN. Here we present the crystal structure of the DDB1-CRBN complex bound to thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide. The structure establishes CRBN as a CRL4CRBN substrate receptor, which enantioselectively binds IMiDs. Through an unbiased screen we identify the homeobox transcription factor MEIS2 as an endogenous substrate of CRL4CRBN. Our studies suggest that IMiDs block endogenous substrates (MEIS2) from binding to CRL4CRBN when recruiting Ikaros/Aiolos for degradation. This dual activity implies that small molecules can principally modulate a ligase to up- or down-regulate the ubiquitination of proteins. PMID:25043012

  18. Ubiquitin ligase parkin promotes Mdm2-arrestin interaction but inhibits arrestin ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, M. Rafiuddin; Zhan, Xuanzhi; Song, Xiufeng; Kook, Seunghyi; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous mutations in E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin were shown to associate with familial Parkinson's disease. Here we show that parkin binds arrestins, versatile regulators of cell signaling. Arrestin-parkin interaction was demonstrated by coimmuno-precipitation of endogenous proteins from brain tissue, and shown to be direct using purified proteins. Parkin binding enhances arrestin interactions with another E3 ubiquitin ligase, Mdm2, apparently by shifting arrestin conformational equilibrium to the basal state preferred by Mdm2. Although Mdm2 was reported to ubiquitinate arrestins, parkin-dependent increase in Mdm2 binding dramatically reduces the ubiquitination of both non-visual arrestins, basal and stimulated by receptor activation, without affecting receptor internalization. Several disease-associated parkin mutations differentially affect the stimulation of Mdm2 binding. All parkin mutants tested effectively suppress arrestin ubiquitination, suggesting that bound parkin shields arrestin lysines targeted by Mdm2. Parkin binding to arrestins along with its effects on arrestin interaction with Mdm2 and ubiquitination is a novel function of this protein with implications for Parkinson's disease pathology. PMID:21466165

  19. MDM2 Inhibits Axin-Induced p53 Activation Independently of its E3 Ligase Activity.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Lian, Guili; Lin, Shuyong; Ye, Zhiyun; Li, Qinxi

    2013-01-01

    MDM2 plays a crucial role in negatively regulating the functions of tumor suppressor p53. Here we show that MDM2 can inhibit Axin-stimulated p53-dependent apoptosis by suppressing p53 phosphorylation at Ser 46 and apoptosis-related p53 transactivational activity. Interestingly, the ubiquitin E3 ligase activity of MDM2 is not required for this inhibitory effect. Mechanically, either wildtype MDM2 or its E3-dead mutant, disrupts the Axin-based HIPK2/p53 complex formation by blocking the binding of p53 and HIPK2 to Axin. MDM2Δp53, a deletion mutant that lacks p53 binding domain fails to exert the inhibitory effect, demonstrating that the interaction of MDM2 and p53, but not its E3 ligase activity toward p53 plays key role in suppressing Axin-stimulated p53 activation. Our results thus have revealed a novel aspect of the mechanism by which MDM2 regulates p53 activities. PMID:23826318

  20. Ubiquitin ligase gp78 targets unglycosylated prion protein PrP for ubiquitylation and degradation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jia; Choe, Vitnary; Cheng, Haili; Tsai, Yien Che; Weissman, Allan M; Luo, Shiwen; Rao, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Prion protein PrP is a central player in several devastating neurodegenerative disorders, including mad cow disease and Creutzfeltd-Jacob disease. Conformational alteration of PrP into an aggregation-prone infectious form PrPSc can trigger pathogenic events. How levels of PrP are regulated is poorly understood. Human PrP is known to be degraded by the proteasome, but the specific proteolytic pathway responsible for PrP destruction remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the ubiquitin ligase gp78, known for its role in protein quality control, is critical for unglycosylated PrP ubiquitylation and degradation. Furthermore, C-terminal sequences of PrP protein are crucial for its ubiquitylation and degradation. Our study reveals the first ubiquitin ligase specifically involved in prion protein PrP degradation and PrP sequences crucial for its turnover. Our data may lead to a new avenue to control PrP level and pathogenesis. PMID:24714645

  1. The relationship between polymorphisms in the glutamate cysteine ligase gene and asthma susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Polonikov, A V; Ivanov, V P; Solodilova, M A; Khoroshaya, I V; Kozhuhov, M A; Panfilov, V I

    2007-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate an association of common -588C/T and -23G/T polymorphisms within glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit gene with susceptibility to bronchial asthma. A total of 435 ethnically Russian subjects were recruited in this study, including 221 patients with asthma and 214 sex and age matched healthy subjects. As previously reported, the -588C/T and -23G/T polymorphisms were completely linked. The -588TT/-23TT genotype was found to be associated with decreased risk of allergic asthma after adjustment for age, gender and smoking status using multivariate logistic regression analysis (OR=0.33 95% CI 0.15-0.70, p=0.036). However, the -588CT/-23GT genotype was associated with increased risk of non-allergic asthma (OR=2.03 95% CI 1.05-3.90, p=0.06). This is a first study reporting the association between genetic variations in the glutamate cysteine ligase gene and susceptibility to bronchial asthma. PMID:17643973

  2. SpyLigase peptide–peptide ligation polymerizes affibodies to enhance magnetic cancer cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Jacob O.; Veggiani, Gianluca; Howarth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Individual proteins can now often be modified with atomic precision, but there are still major obstacles to connecting proteins into larger assemblies. To direct protein assembly, ideally, peptide tags would be used, providing the minimal perturbation to protein function. However, binding to peptides is generally weak, so assemblies are unstable over time and disassemble with force or harsh conditions. We have recently developed an irreversible protein–peptide interaction (SpyTag/SpyCatcher), based on a protein domain from Streptococcus pyogenes, that locks itself together via spontaneous isopeptide bond formation. Here we develop irreversible peptide–peptide interaction, through redesign of this domain and genetic dissection into three parts: a protein domain termed SpyLigase, which now ligates two peptide tags to each other. All components expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli and peptide tags were reactive at the N terminus, at the C terminus, or at internal sites. Peptide–peptide ligation enabled covalent and site-specific polymerization of affibodies or antibodies against the tumor markers epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2. Magnetic capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one of the most promising approaches to improve cancer prognosis and management, but CTC capture is limited by inefficient recovery of cells expressing low levels of tumor antigen. SpyLigase-assembled protein polymers made possible the isolation of cancerous cells expressing lower levels of tumor antigen and should have general application in enhancing molecular capture. PMID:24639550

  3. XLF-Cernunnos promotes DNA ligase IV-XRCC4 re-adenylation following ligation.

    PubMed

    Riballo, Enriqueta; Woodbine, Lisa; Stiff, Thomas; Walker, Sarah A; Goodarzi, Aaron A; Jeggo, Penny A

    2009-02-01

    XLF-Cernunnos (XLF) is a component of the DNA ligase IV-XRCC4 (LX) complex, which functions during DNA non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Here, we use biochemical and cellular approaches to probe the impact of XLF on LX activities. We show that XLF stimulates adenylation of LX complexes de-adenylated by pyrophosphate or following LX decharging during ligation. XLF enhances LX ligation activity in an ATP-independent and dependent manner. ATP-independent stimulation can be attributed to enhanced end-bridging. Whilst ATP alone fails to stimulate LX ligation activity, addition of XLF and ATP promotes ligation in a manner consistent with XLF-stimulated readenylation linked to ligation. We show that XLF is a weakly bound partner of the tightly associated LX complex and, unlike XRCC4, is dispensable for LX stability. 2BN cells, which have little, if any, residual XLF activity, show a 3-fold decreased ability to repair DNA double strand breaks covering a range of complexity. These findings strongly suggest that XLF is not essential for NHEJ but promotes LX adenylation and hence ligation. We propose a model in which XLF, by in situ recharging DNA ligase IV after the first ligation event, promotes double stranded ligation by a single LX complex. PMID:19056826

  4. The Ubiquitin Ligase CBLC Maintains the Network Organization of the Golgi Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Joanne; Boey, Adrian; Gunko, Natalia V.; Bard, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus plays a pivotal role in the sorting and post-translational modifications of secreted and membrane proteins. In mammalian cells, the Golgi is organized in stacks of cisternae linked together to form a network with a ribbon shape. Regulation of Golgi ribbon formation is poorly understood. Here we find in an image-based RNAi screen that depletion of the ubiquitin-ligase CBLC induces Golgi fragmentation. Depletions of the close homologues CBL and CBLB do not induce any visible defects. In CBLC-depleted cells, Golgi stacks appear relatively unperturbed at both the light and electron microscopy levels, suggesting that CBLC controls mostly network organization. CBLC partially localizes on Golgi membranes and this localization is enhanced after activation of the SRC kinase. Inhibition of SRC reverts CBLC depletion effects, suggesting interplay between the two. CBLC’s regulation of Golgi network requires its ubiquitin ligase activity. However, SRC levels are not significantly affected by CBLC, and CBLC knockdown does not phenocopy SRC activation, suggesting that CBLC’s action at the Golgi is not direct downregulation of SRC. Altogether, our results demonstrate a role of CBLC in regulating Golgi ribbon by antagonizing the SRC tyrosine kinase. PMID:26393512

  5. Cytoplasmic CUL9/PARC ubiquitin ligase is a tumor suppressor and promotes p53-dependent apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Xin-Hai; Bai, Feng; Li, Zhijun; Smith, Matthew D.; Whitewolf, Gabrielle; Jin, Ran; Xiong, Yue

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of cell stresses, including DNA damage, signal to p53 through post-translational modification of p53. The cytoplasmic functions of p53 are emerging as an important constituent of p53’s role in tumor suppression. Here we report that deletion of the Cul9 (formerly Parc) gene, which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase that binds to p53 and localizes in the cytoplasm, resulted in spontaneous tumor development, accelerated Eμ-Myc-induced lymphomagenesis and rendered mice susceptible to carcinogenesis. Cul9-p53 double mutant mice exhibited indistinguishable tumor phenotypes as p53 single mutant mice, indicating that the function of Cul9 in tumor suppression is largely mediated by p53. Deletion of Cul9 had no significant effect on cell cycle progression, but attenuated DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Ectopic expression of wild-type CUL9, but not a point mutant CUL9 deficient in p53 binding, promotes apoptosis. These results demonstrate CUL9 as a potential p53 activating E3 ligase in the cytoplasm. PMID:21487039

  6. Detection of low abundant mutations in DNA using single-molecule FRET and ligase detection reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wabuyele, Musundi B.; Farquar, Hannah; Stryjewski, Wieslaw J.; Hammer, Robert P.; Soper, Steven A.; Cheng, Yu-Wei; Barany, Francis

    2003-06-01

    New strategies for analyzing molecular signatures of disease states in real time using single pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) were developed to rapidly detect point mutations in unamplified genomic DNA (DNA diagnostics). The assay was carried out using allele-specific primers, which flanked the point mutation in the target gene fragment and were ligated using a thremostable ligase enzyme only when the genomic DNA carried this mutation (ligase detection reaction, LDR). We coupled LDR with spFRET to identify a single base mutation in codon 12 of a K-ras oncogene that has high diagnostic value for colorectal cancers. A simple diode laser-based fluorescence system capable of interrogating single fluorescent molecules undergoing FRET was used to detect photon bursts generated from the MB probes formed upon ligation. We demonstrated the ability to rapidly discriminate single base differences in heterogeneous populations having as little as 600 copies of human genomic DNA without PCR amplification. Single base difference in the K-ras gene was discriminated in less than 5 min at a frequency of 1 mutant DNA per 10 normals using only a single LDR thermal cycle of genomic DNA. Real time analyses of point mutations were also performed in PMMA microfluidic device.

  7. An E3 ubiquitin ligase, ERECT LEAF1, functions in brassinosteroid signaling of rice

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Kitano, Hidemi; Fujioka, Shozo

    2013-01-01

    A spontaneous rice mutant, erect leaf1 (elf1–1), produced a dwarf phenotype with erect leaves and short grains. Physiological analyses suggested that elf1–1 is brassinosteroid-insensitive, so we hypothesized that ELF1 encodes a positive regulator of brassinosteroid signaling. ELF1, identified by means of positional cloning, encodes a protein with both a U-box domain and ARMADILLO (ARM) repeats. U-box proteins have been shown to function as E3 ubiquitin ligases; in fact, ELF1 possessed E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro. However, ELF1 itself does not appear to be polyubiquitinated. Mutant phenotypes of 2 more elf1 alleles indicate that the entire ARM repeats is indispensable for ELF1 activity. These results suggest that ELF1 ubiquitinates target proteins through an interaction mediated by ARM repeats. Similarities in the phenotypes of elf1 and d61 mutants (mutants of brassinosteroid receptor gene OsBRI1), and in the regulation of ELF1 and OsBRI1 expression, imply that ELF1 functions as a positive regulator of brassinosteroid signaling in rice. PMID:24299927

  8. Characterization of the mammalian family of DCN-type NEDD8 E3 ligases

    PubMed Central

    Keuss, Matthew J.; Thomas, Yann; Mcarthur, Robin; Wood, Nicola T.; Knebel, Axel; Kurz, Thimo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cullin-RING ligases (CRL) are ubiquitin E3 enzymes that bind substrates through variable substrate receptor proteins and are activated by attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 to the cullin subunit. DCNs are NEDD8 E3 ligases that promote neddylation. Mammalian cells express five DCN-like (DCNL) proteins but little is known about their specific functions or interaction partners. We found that DCNLs form stable stoichiometric complexes with CAND1 and cullins that can only be neddylated in the presence of a substrate adaptor. These CAND–cullin–DCNL complexes might represent ‘reserve’ CRLs that can be rapidly activated when needed. We further found that all DCNLs interact with most cullin subtypes, but that they are probably responsible for the neddylation of different subpopulations of any given cullin. This is consistent with the fact that the subcellular localization of DCNLs in tissue culture cells differs and that they show unique tissue-specific expression patterns in mice. Thus, the specificity between DCNL-type NEDD8 E3 enzymes and their cullin substrates is only apparent in well-defined physiological contexts and related to their subcellular distribution and restricted expression. PMID:26906416

  9. An Arabidopsis SUMO E3 Ligase, SIZ1, Negatively Regulates Photomorphogenesis by Promoting COP1 Activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao-Li; Niu, De; Hu, Zi-Liang; Kim, Dae Heon; Jin, Yin Hua; Cai, Bin; Liu, Peng; Miura, Kenji; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Lin, Rongcheng; Jin, Jing Bo

    2016-04-01

    COP1 (CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1), a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is a central negative regulator of photomorphogenesis. However, how COP1 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications remains largely unknown. Here we show that SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification enhances COP1 activity. Loss-of-function siz1 mutant seedlings exhibit a weak constitutive photomorphogenic phenotype. SIZ1 physically interacts with COP1 and mediates the sumoylation of COP1. A K193R substitution in COP1 blocks its SUMO modification and reduces COP1 activity in vitro and in planta. Consistently, COP1 activity is reduced in siz1 and the level of HY5, a COP1 target protein, is increased in siz1. Sumoylated COP1 may exhibits higher transubiquitination activity than does non-sumoylated COP1, but SIZ1-mediated SUMO modification does not affect COP1 dimerization, COP1-HY5 interaction, and nuclear accumulation of COP1. Interestingly, prolonged light exposure reduces the sumoylation level of COP1, and COP1 mediates the ubiquitination and degradation of SIZ1. These regulatory mechanisms may maintain the homeostasis of COP1 activity, ensuing proper photomorphogenic development in changing light environment. Our genetic and biochemical studies identify a function for SIZ1 in photomorphogenesis and reveal a novel SUMO-regulated ubiquitin ligase, COP1, in plants. PMID:27128446

  10. An Arabidopsis SUMO E3 Ligase, SIZ1, Negatively Regulates Photomorphogenesis by Promoting COP1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiao-Li; Niu, De; Hu, Zi-Liang; Kim, Dae Heon; Jin, Yin Hua; Cai, Bin; Liu, Peng; Miura, Kenji; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Lin, Rongcheng

    2016-01-01

    COP1 (CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1), a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is a central negative regulator of photomorphogenesis. However, how COP1 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications remains largely unknown. Here we show that SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification enhances COP1 activity. Loss-of-function siz1 mutant seedlings exhibit a weak constitutive photomorphogenic phenotype. SIZ1 physically interacts with COP1 and mediates the sumoylation of COP1. A K193R substitution in COP1 blocks its SUMO modification and reduces COP1 activity in vitro and in planta. Consistently, COP1 activity is reduced in siz1 and the level of HY5, a COP1 target protein, is increased in siz1. Sumoylated COP1 may exhibits higher transubiquitination activity than does non-sumoylated COP1, but SIZ1-mediated SUMO modification does not affect COP1 dimerization, COP1-HY5 interaction, and nuclear accumulation of COP1. Interestingly, prolonged light exposure reduces the sumoylation level of COP1, and COP1 mediates the ubiquitination and degradation of SIZ1. These regulatory mechanisms may maintain the homeostasis of COP1 activity, ensuing proper photomorphogenic development in changing light environment. Our genetic and biochemical studies identify a function for SIZ1 in photomorphogenesis and reveal a novel SUMO-regulated ubiquitin ligase, COP1, in plants. PMID:27128446

  11. The SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) Ligase PIAS3 Primes ATR for Checkpoint Activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Shyi; Zou, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of genomic stability relies on the concerted action of DNA repair and DNA damage signaling pathways. The PIAS (protein inhibitor of activated STAT) family of SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) ligases has been implicated in DNA repair, but whether it plays a role in DNA damage signaling is still unclear. Here, we show that the PIAS3 SUMO ligase is important for activation of the ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related)-regulated DNA damage signaling pathway. PIAS3 is the only member of the PIAS family that is indispensable for ATR activation. In response to different types of DNA damage and replication stress, PIAS3 plays multiple roles in ATR activation. In cells treated with camptothecin (CPT), PIAS3 contributes to formation of DNA double-stranded breaks. In UV (ultraviolet light)- or HU (hydroxyurea)-treated cells, PIAS3 is required for efficient ATR autophosphorylation, one of the earliest events during ATR activation. Although PIAS3 is dispensable for ATRIP (ATR-interacting protein) SUMOylation and the ATR-ATRIP interaction, it is required for maintaining the basal kinase activity of ATR prior to DNA damage. In the absence of PIAS3, ATR fails to display normal kinase activity after DNA damage, which accompanies with reduced phosphorylation of ATR substrates. Together, these results suggest that PIAS3 primes ATR for checkpoint activation by sustaining its basal kinase activity, revealing a new function of the PIAS family in DNA damage signaling. PMID:26565033

  12. CUL4A ubiquitin ligase: a promising drug target for cancer and other human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Puneet; Nag, Alo

    2014-01-01

    The ability of cullin 4A (CUL4A), a scaffold protein, to recruit a repertoire of substrate adaptors allows it to assemble into distinct E3 ligase complexes to mediate turnover of key regulatory proteins. In the past decade, a considerable wealth of information has been generated regarding its biology, regulation, assembly, molecular architecture and novel functions. Importantly, unravelling of its association with multiple tumours and modulation by viral proteins establishes it as one of the key proteins that may play an important role in cellular transformation. Considering the role of its substrate in regulating the cell cycle and maintenance of genomic stability, understanding the detailed aspects of these processes will have significant consequences for the treatment of cancer and related diseases. This review is an effort to provide a broad overview of this multifaceted ubiquitin ligase and addresses its critical role in regulation of important biological processes. More importantly, its tremendous potential to be exploited for therapeutic purposes has been discussed. PMID:24522884

  13. Ubiquitin ligase Siah2 regulates RevErbα degradation and the mammalian circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    DeBruyne, Jason P.; Baggs, Julie E.; Sato, Trey K.; Hogenesch, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated degradation of proteins by the proteasome is often critical to their function in dynamic cellular pathways. The molecular clock underlying mammalian circadian rhythms relies on the rhythmic expression and degradation of its core components. However, because the tools available for identifying the mechanisms underlying the degradation of a specific protein are limited, the mechanisms regulating clock protein degradation are only beginning to be elucidated. Here we describe a cell-based functional screening approach designed to quickly identify the ubiquitin E3 ligases that induce the degradation of potentially any protein of interest. We screened the nuclear hormone receptor RevErbα (Nr1d1), a key constituent of the mammalian circadian clock, for E3 ligases that regulate its stability and found Seven in absentia2 (Siah2) to be a key regulator of RevErbα stability. Previously implicated in hypoxia signaling, Siah2 overexpression destabilizes RevErbα/β, and siRNA depletion of Siah2 stabilizes endogenous RevErbα. Moreover, Siah2 depletion delays circadian degradation of RevErbα and lengthens period length. These results demonstrate the utility of functional screening approaches for identifying regulators of protein stability and reveal Siah2 as a previously unidentified circadian clockwork regulator that mediates circadian RevErbα turnover. PMID:26392558

  14. Hippo Stabilises Its Adaptor Salvador by Antagonising the HECT Ubiquitin Ligase Herc4

    PubMed Central

    Aerne, Birgit L.; Gailite, Ieva; Sims, David; Tapon, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Signalling through the Hippo (Hpo) pathway involves a kinase cascade, which leads to the phosphorylation and inactivation of the pro-growth transcriptional co-activator Yorkie (Yki). Despite the identification of a large number of pathway members and modulators, our understanding of the molecular events that lead to activation of Hpo and the downstream kinase Warts (Wts) remain incomplete. Recently, targeted degradation of several Hpo pathway components has been demonstrated as a means of regulating pathway activity. In particular, the stability of scaffold protein Salvador (Sav), which is believed to promote Hpo/Wts association, is crucially dependent on its binding partner Hpo. In a cell-based RNAi screen for ubiquitin regulators involved in Sav stability, we identify the HECT domain protein Herc4 (HECT and RLD domain containing E3 ligase) as a Sav E3 ligase. Herc4 expression promotes Sav ubiquitylation and degradation, while Herc4 depletion stabilises Sav. Interestingly, Hpo reduces Sav/Herc4 interaction in a kinase-dependent manner. This suggests the existence of a positive feedback loop, where Hpo stabilises its own positive regulator by antagonising Herc4-mediated degradation of Sav. PMID:26125558

  15. A complex ligase ribozyme evolved in vitro from a group I ribozyme domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeger, L.; Wright, M. C.; Joyce, G. F.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Like most proteins, complex RNA molecules often are modular objects made up of distinct structural and functional domains. The component domains of a protein can associate in alternative combinations to form molecules with different functions. These observations raise the possibility that complex RNAs also can be assembled from preexisting structural and functional domains. To test this hypothesis, an in vitro evolution procedure was used to isolate a previously undescribed class of complex ligase ribozymes, starting from a pool of 10(16) different RNA molecules that contained a constant region derived from a large structural domain that occurs within self-splicing group I ribozymes. Attached to this constant region were three hypervariable regions, totaling 85 nucleotides, that gave rise to the catalytic motif within the evolved catalysts. The ligase ribozymes catalyze formation of a 3',5'-phosphodiester linkage between adjacent template-bound oligonucleotides, one bearing a 3' hydroxyl and the other a 5' triphosphate. Ligation occurs in the context of a Watson-Crick duplex, with a catalytic rate of 0.26 min(-1) under optimal conditions. The constant region is essential for catalytic activity and appears to retain the tertiary structure of the group I ribozyme. This work demonstrates that complex RNA molecules, like their protein counterparts, can share common structural domains while exhibiting distinct catalytic functions.

  16. Human BRCA1-BARD1 ubiquitin ligase activity counteracts chromatin barriers to DNA resection.

    PubMed

    Densham, Ruth M; Garvin, Alexander J; Stone, Helen R; Strachan, Joanna; Baldock, Robert A; Daza-Martin, Manuel; Fletcher, Alice; Blair-Reid, Sarah; Beesley, James; Johal, Balraj; Pearl, Laurence H; Neely, Robert; Keep, Nicholas H; Watts, Felicity Z; Morris, Joanna R

    2016-07-01

    The opposing activities of 53BP1 and BRCA1 influence pathway choice in DNA double-strand-break repair. How BRCA1 counteracts the inhibitory effect of 53BP1 on DNA resection and homologous recombination is unknown. Here we identify the site of BRCA1-BARD1 required for priming ubiquitin transfer from E2∼ubiquitin and demonstrate that BRCA1-BARD1's ubiquitin ligase activity is required for repositioning 53BP1 on damaged chromatin. We confirm H2A ubiquitination by BRCA1-BARD1 and show that an H2A-ubiquitin fusion protein promotes DNA resection and repair in BARD1-deficient cells. BRCA1-BARD1's function in homologous recombination requires the chromatin remodeler SMARCAD1. SMARCAD1 binding to H2A-ubiquitin and optimal localization to sites of damage and activity in DNA repair requires its ubiquitin-binding CUE domains. SMARCAD1 is required for 53BP1 repositioning, and the need for SMARCAD1 in olaparib or camptothecin resistance is alleviated by 53BP1 loss. Thus, BRCA1-BARD1 ligase activity and subsequent SMARCAD1-dependent chromatin remodeling are critical regulators of DNA repair. PMID:27239795

  17. Pharmacological inactivation of Skp2 SCF ubiquitin ligase restricts cancer stem cell traits and cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chia-Hsin; Morrow, John Kenneth; Li, Chien-Feng; Gao, Yuan; Jin, Guoxiang; Moten, Asad; Stagg, Loren J.; Ladbury, John E.; Cai, Zhen; Xu, Dazhi; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Zhang, Shuxing; Lin, Hui-Kuan

    2013-01-01

    Skp2 E3 ligase is overexpressed in numerous human cancers and plays a critical role in cell cycle progression, senescence, metabolism, cancer progression and metastasis. In the present study, we identified a specific Skp2 inhibitor using high-throughput in silico screening of large and diverse chemical libraries. This Skp2 inhibitor selectively suppresses Skp2 E3 ligase activity, but not activity of other SCF complexes. It also phenocopies the effects observed upon genetic Skp2 deficiency, such as suppressing survival, Akt-mediated glycolysis as well as triggering p53-independent cellular senescence. Strikingly, we discovered a critical function of Skp2 in positively regulating cancer stem cell populations and self-renewal ability through genetic and pharmacological approaches. Notably, Skp2 inhibitor exhibits potent anti-tumor activities in multiple animal models and cooperates with chemotherapeutic agents to reduce cancer cell survival. Our study thus provides pharmacological evidence that Skp2 is a promising target for restricting cancer stem cell and cancer progression. PMID:23911321

  18. A novel effect of thalidomide and its analogs: suppression of cereblon ubiquitination enhances ubiquitin ligase function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaobin; Huang, Xiangao; He, Xian; Zhou, Yanqing; Jiang, Xiaogang; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Jaffrey, Samie R; Xu, Guoqiang

    2015-12-01

    The immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) thalidomide and its structural analogs lenalidomide and pomalidomide are highly effective in treating clinical indications. Thalidomide binds to cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor of the cullin-4 really interesting new gene (RING) E3 ligase complex. Here, we examine the effect of thalidomide and its analogs on CRBN ubiquitination and its functions in human cell lines. We find that the ubiquitin modification of CRBN includes K48-linked polyubiquitin chains and that thalidomide blocks the formation of CRBN-ubiquitin conjugates. Furthermore, we show that ubiquitinated CRBN is targeted for proteasomal degradation. Treatment of human myeloma cell lines such as MM1.S, OPM2, and U266 with thalidomide (100 μM) and its structural analog lenalidomide (10 μM) results in stabilization of CRBN and elevation of CRBN protein levels. This in turn leads to the reduced level of CRBN target proteins and enhances the sensitivity of human multiple myeloma cells to IMiDs. Our results reveal a novel mechanism by which thalidomide and its analogs modulate the CRBN function in cells. Through inhibition of CRBN ubiquitination, thalidomide and its analogs allow CRBN to accumulate, leading to the increased cullin-4 RING E3 ligase-mediated degradation of target proteins. PMID:26231201

  19. A conserved role for the ARC1 E3 ligase in Brassicaceae self-incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Indriolo, Emily; Goring, Daphne R

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitination plays essential roles in the regulation of many processes in plants including pollen rejection in self-incompatible species. In the Brassicaceae (mustard family), self-incompatibility drives the rejection of self-pollen by preventing pollen hydration following pollen contact with the stigmatic surface. Self-pollen is recognized by a ligand-receptor pair: the pollen S-locus cysteine rich/S-locus protein 11 (SCR/SP11) ligand and the pistil S receptor kinase (SRK). Following self-pollen contact, the SCR/SP11 ligand on the pollen surface binds to SRK on the pistil surface, and the SRK-activated signaling pathway is initiated. This pathway includes the armadillo repeat containing 1 (ARC1) protein, a member of the plant U-box (PUB) family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. ARC1 is a functional E3 ligase and is required downstream of SRK for the self-incompatibility response. This mini review highlights our recent progress in establishing ARC1's conserved role in self-pollen rejection in Brassica and Arabidopsis species and discusses future research directions in this field. PMID:24847339

  20. Degringolade, a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase, inhibits Hairy/Groucho-mediated repression.

    PubMed

    Abed, Mona; Barry, Kevin C; Kenyagin, Dorit; Koltun, Bella; Phippen, Taryn M; Delrow, Jeffrey J; Parkhurst, Susan M; Orian, Amir

    2011-04-01

    Transcriptional cofactors are essential for proper embryonic development. One such cofactor in Drosophila, Degringolade (Dgrn), encodes a RING finger/E3 ubiquitin ligase. Dgrn and its mammalian ortholog RNF4 are SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs). STUbLs bind to SUMOylated proteins via their SUMO interaction motif (SIM) domains and facilitate substrate ubiquitylation. In this study, we show that Dgrn is a negative regulator of the repressor Hairy and its corepressor Groucho (Gro/transducin-like enhancer (TLE)) during embryonic segmentation and neurogenesis, as dgrn heterozygosity suppresses Hairy mutant phenotypes and embryonic lethality. Mechanistically Dgrn functions as a molecular selector: it targets Hairy for SUMO-independent ubiquitylation that inhibits the recruitment of its corepressor Gro, without affecting the recruitment of its other cofactors or the stability of Hairy. Concomitantly, Dgrn specifically targets SUMOylated Gro for sequestration and antagonizes Gro functions in vivo. Our findings suggest that by targeting SUMOylated Gro, Dgrn serves as a molecular switch that regulates cofactor recruitment and function during development. As Gro/TLE proteins are conserved universal corepressors, this may be a general paradigm used to regulate the Gro/TLE corepressors in other developmental processes. PMID:21343912

  1. Structure of a RING E3 ligase and ubiquitin-loaded E2 primed for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Plechanovová, Anna; Jaffray, Ellis G; Tatham, Michael H; Naismith, James H; Hay, Ronald T

    2012-09-01

    Ubiquitin modification is mediated by a large family of specificity determining ubiquitin E3 ligases. To facilitate ubiquitin transfer, RING E3 ligases bind both substrate and a ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme linked to ubiquitin via a thioester bond, but the mechanism of transfer has remained elusive. Here we report the crystal structure of the dimeric RING domain of rat RNF4 in complex with E2 (UbcH5A) linked by an isopeptide bond to ubiquitin. While the E2 contacts a single protomer of the RING, ubiquitin is folded back onto the E2 by contacts from both RING protomers. The carboxy-terminal tail of ubiquitin is locked into an active site groove on the E2 by an intricate network of interactions, resulting in changes at the E2 active site. This arrangement is primed for catalysis as it can deprotonate the incoming substrate lysine residue and stabilize the consequent tetrahedral transition-state intermediate. PMID:22842904

  2. The SUMO E3 ligase activity of Pc2 is coordinated through a SUMO interaction motif.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shen-hsi; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2010-05-01

    Protein modification by SUMO conjugation has emerged to be an important regulatory event. Recently, the mechanisms through which SUMO elicits its effects on target proteins have been elucidated. One of these is the noncovalent association between SUMO and coregulatory proteins via SUMO interaction motifs (SIMs). We therefore searched for additional binding proteins to elucidate how SUMO acts as a signal to potentiate novel noncovalent interactions with SUMO-binding proteins. We identified an E3 ligase, Pc2, as a SUMO-binding protein with two functionally distinct SIMs. Here, we focus on the role of SIM2 and demonstrate that it is crucial for many of the documented Pc2 functions, which converge on determining its E3 ligase activity. One role of SUMO binding in this context is the subnuclear partitioning of the active form of Ubc9 (SUMO approximately Ubc9) by Pc2. The significance of the SIM2-dependent functions of Pc2 is demonstrated in the control of the precise expression of lineage-specific genes during embryonic stem cell differentiation. PMID:20176810

  3. Delineation of myotoxicity induced by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors in human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sacher, Julia; Weigl, Lukas; Werner, Martin; Szegedi, Csaba; Hohenegger, Martin

    2005-09-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used and well tolerated cholesterol-lowering drugs. In rare cases, side effects occur in skeletal muscle, including myositis or even rhabdomyolysis. However, the molecular mechanisms are not well understood that lead to these muscle-specific side effects. Here, we show that statins cause apoptosis in differentiated human skeletal muscle cells. The prototypical representative of statins, simvastatin, triggered sustained intracellular Ca(2+) transients, leading to calpain activation. Intracellular chelation of Ca(2+) completely abrogated cell death. Moreover, ryanodine also completely prevented the simvastatin-induced calpain activation. Nevertheless, an activation of the ryanodine receptor by simvastatin could not be observed. Downstream of the calpain activation simvastatin led to a translocation of Bax to mitochondria in a caspase 8-independent manner. Consecutive activation of caspase 9 and 3 execute apoptotic cell death that was in part reversed by the coadministration of mevalonic acid. Conversely, the simvastatin-induced activation of calpain was not prevented by mevalonic acid. These data delineate the signaling cascade that leads to muscle injury caused by statins. Our observations also have implications for improving the safety of this important medication and explain to some extent why physical exercise aggravates skeletal muscle side effects. PMID:15914674

  4. Synthesis of ATP derivatives of compounds of the mevalonate pathway (isopentenyl di- and triphosphate; geranyl di- and triphosphate, farnesyl di- and triphosphate, and dimethylallyl diphosphate) catalyzed by T4 RNA ligase, T4 DNA ligase and other ligases Potential relationship with the effect of bisphosphonates on osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Sillero, Maria A Günther; de Diego, Anabel; Tavares, Janeth E F; Silva, Joana A D Catanho da; Pérez-Zúñiga, Francisco J; Sillero, Antonio

    2009-08-15

    Compounds of the mevalonate pathway containing a terminal di- or triphosphate (mev-PP or mev-PPP) were tested as substrates of several enzyme ligases (T4 RNA ligase, T4 DNA ligase, firefly luciferase and other ligases) for the synthesis of ATP derivatives of the mev-pppA or mev-ppppA type. T4 RNA ligase, in the presence of ATP and the substrates: geranyl, farnesyl or isopentenyl triphosphates, and geranyl, farnesyl, dimethylallyl or isopentenyl diphosphates, all at 0.3 mM concentration, catalyzed the synthesis of the corresponding ATP derivatives at a relative rate of activity of: 7.6+/-1.4 mU/mg or 100%; 39%; 42%; 24%; 18%; 12% and 6%, respectively. Inhibition (%) of the synthesis by excess of substrate (0.8 mM vs. 0.3 mM) was observed with farnesyl diphosphate (99%); farnesyl triphosphate (96%) and geranyl triphosphate (32%). V(max), K(m), K(cat) and K(cat)/K(m) values were also determined. The K(cat)/K(m) values calculated were for: farnesyl triphosphate, 166; geranyl triphosphate, 52.2; farnesyl diphosphate, 12.1; geranyl diphosphate, 8.6; isopentenyl triphosphate, 6.7; dimethylallyl diphosphate, 3.1 and isopentenyl diphosphate, 0.9. Similar results were obtained with T4 DNA ligase. The above-mentioned compounds were also substrates of firefly luciferase synthesizing the mev-pppA or mev-ppppA derivatives. In our hands, neither the acyl- or acetyl-CoA synthetases nor the ubiquiting activating enzyme (E1) catalyzed the synthesis of ATP derivatives of these compounds. The results here presented could be related with the mechanism of action of bisphosphonates on osteoclasts or tumor cells. PMID:19414000

  5. Involvement of the Pepper Antimicrobial Protein CaAMP1 Gene in Broad Spectrum Disease Resistance1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Chul; Hwang, In Sun; Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2008-01-01

    Pathogen-inducible antimicrobial defense-related proteins have emerged as key antibiotic peptides and enzymes involved in disease resistance in plants. A novel antimicrobial protein gene, CaAMP1 (for Capsicum annuum ANTIMICROBIAL PROTEIN1), was isolated from pepper (C. annuum) leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria. Expression of the CaAMP1 gene was strongly induced in pepper leaves not only during pathogen infection but also after exposure to abiotic elicitors. The purified recombinant CaAMP1 protein possessed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi. CaAMP1:smGFP fusion protein was localized mainly in the external and intercellular regions of onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells. The virus-induced gene silencing technique and gain-of-function transgenic plants were used to determine the CaAMP1 gene function in plant defense. Silencing of CaAMP1 led to enhanced susceptibility to X. campestris pv vesicatoria and Colletotrichum coccodes infection, accompanied by reduced PATHOGENESIS-RELATED (PR) gene expression. In contrast, overexpression of CaAMP1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) conferred broad-spectrum resistance to the hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato, the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora parasitica, and the fungal necrotrophic pathogens Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. matthiolae and Alternaria brassicicola. CaAMP1 overexpression induced the salicylic acid pathway-dependent genes PR1 and PR5 but not the jasmonic acid-dependent defense gene PDF1.2 during P. syringae pv tomato infection. Together, these results suggest that the antimicrobial CaAMP1 protein is involved in broad-spectrum resistance to bacterial and fungal pathogen infection. PMID:18676663

  6. Type 1 diacylglycerol acyltransferases of Brassica napus preferentially incorporate oleic acid into triacylglycerol

    PubMed Central

    Aznar-Moreno, Jose; Denolf, Peter; Van Audenhove, Katrien; De Bodt, Stefanie; Engelen, Steven; Fahy, Deirdre; Wallis, James G.; Browse, John

    2015-01-01

    DGAT1 enzymes (acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1, EC 2.3.1.20) catalyse the formation of triacylglycerols (TAGs), the most abundant lipids in vegetable oils. Thorough understanding of the enzymology of oil accumulation is critical to the goal of modifying oilseeds for improved vegetable oil production. Four isoforms of BnDGAT1, the final and rate-limiting step in triacylglycerol synthesis, were characterized from Brassica napus, one of the world’s most important oilseed crops. Transcriptional profiling of developing B. napus seeds indicated two genes, BnDGAT1-1 and BnDGAT1-2, with high expression and two, BnDGAT1-3 and BnDGAT1-4, with low expression. The activities of each BnDGAT1 isozyme were characterized following expression in a strain of yeast deficient in TAG synthesis. TAG from B. napus seeds contain only 10% palmitic acid (16:0) at the sn-3 position, so it was surprising that all four BnDGAT1 isozymes exhibited strong (4- to 7-fold) specificity for 16:0 over oleic acid (18:1) as the acyl-CoA substrate. However, the ratio of 18:1-CoA to 16:0-CoA in B. napus seeds during the peak period of TAG synthesis is 3:1. When substrate selectivity assays were conducted with 18:1-CoA and 16:0-CoA in a 3:1 ratio, the four isozymes incorporated 18:1 in amounts 2- to 5-fold higher than 16:0. This strong sensitivity of the BnDGAT1 isozymes to the relative concentrations of acyl-CoA substrates substantially explains the observed fatty acid composition of B. napus seed oil. Understanding these enzymes that are critical for triacylglycerol synthesis will facilitate genetic and biotechnological manipulations to improve this oilseed crop. PMID:26195728

  7. Type 1 diacylglycerol acyltransferases of Brassica napus preferentially incorporate oleic acid into triacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Moreno, Jose; Denolf, Peter; Van Audenhove, Katrien; De Bodt, Stefanie; Engelen, Steven; Fahy, Deirdre; Wallis, James G; Browse, John

    2015-10-01

    DGAT1 enzymes (acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1, EC 2.3.1.20) catalyse the formation of triacylglycerols (TAGs), the most abundant lipids in vegetable oils. Thorough understanding of the enzymology of oil accumulation is critical to the goal of modifying oilseeds for improved vegetable oil production. Four isoforms of BnDGAT1, the final and rate-limiting step in triacylglycerol synthesis, were characterized from Brassica napus, one of the world's most important oilseed crops. Transcriptional profiling of developing B. napus seeds indicated two genes, BnDGAT1-1 and BnDGAT1-2, with high expression and two, BnDGAT1-3 and BnDGAT1-4, with low expression. The activities of each BnDGAT1 isozyme were characterized following expression in a strain of yeast deficient in TAG synthesis. TAG from B. napus seeds contain only 10% palmitic acid (16:0) at the sn-3 position, so it was surprising that all four BnDGAT1 isozymes exhibited strong (4- to 7-fold) specificity for 16:0 over oleic acid (18:1) as the acyl-CoA substrate. However, the ratio of 18:1-CoA to 16:0-CoA in B. napus seeds during the peak period of TAG synthesis is 3:1. When substrate selectivity assays were conducted with 18:1-CoA and 16:0-CoA in a 3:1 ratio, the four isozymes incorporated 18:1 in amounts 2- to 5-fold higher than 16:0. This strong sensitivity of the BnDGAT1 isozymes to the relative concentrations of acyl-CoA substrates substantially explains the observed fatty acid composition of B. napus seed oil. Understanding these enzymes that are critical for triacylglycerol synthesis will facilitate genetic and biotechnological manipulations to improve this oilseed crop. PMID:26195728

  8. Age-related macular degeneration and protective effect of HMG Co-A reductase inhibitors (statins): results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2008

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, D T Q; Mendes, T S; Cíntron-Colon, H R; Wang, S Y; Bhisitkul, R B; Singh, K; Lin, S C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the association of hydroxymethylglutarylcoenzyme A (HMG Co-A) reductase inhibitor (statin) use with the prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods This cross-sectional study included 5604 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2005 to 2008, ≥40 years of age, who were ascertained with regard to the diagnosis of AMD, the use of statins, and comorbidities and health-related behaviors such as smoking. Results The mean age of participants denying or confirming a history of AMD was 68 (SEM 0.90) and 55 (SEM 0.36) years, respectively. Individuals 68 years of age or older who were classified as long-term users of statins had statistically significant less self-reported AMD (odds ratio (OR) 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49–0.84; P=0.002), after adjusting for potential confounding variables. No significant association was found between the prevalence of AMD and statin consumption among subjects between 40 and 67 years of age (OR 1.61, 95% CI 0.85–3.03; P=0.137). Conclusions Our results suggest a possible beneficial effect of statin intake for the prevention of AMD in individuals 68 years of age or older. PMID:24503725

  9. 4-Coumarate:Coenzyme A Ligase Has the Catalytic Capacity to Synthesize and Reuse Various (Di)Adenosine Polyphosphates1

    PubMed Central

    Pietrowska-Borek, Małgorzata; Stuible, Hans-Peter; Kombrink, Erich; Guranowski, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    4-Coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) is known to activate cinnamic acid derivatives to their corresponding coenzyme A esters. As a new type of 4CL-catalyzed reaction, we observed the synthesis of various mono- and diadenosine polyphosphates. Both the native 4CL2 isoform from Arabidopsis (At4CL2 wild type) and the At4CL2 gain of function mutant M293P/K320L, which exhibits the capacity to use a broader range of phenolic substrates, catalyzed the synthesis of adenosine 5′-tetraphosphate (p4A) and adenosine 5′-pentaphosphate when incubated with MgATP−2 and tripolyphosphate or tetrapolyphosphate (P4), respectively. Diadenosine 5′,5‴,-P1,P4-tetraphosphate represented the main product when the enzymes were supplied with only MgATP2−. The At4CL2 mutant M293P/K320L was studied in more detail and was also found to catalyze the synthesis of additional dinucleoside polyphosphates such as diadenosine 5′,5‴-P1,P5-pentaphosphate and dAp4dA from the appropriate substrates, p4A and dATP, respectively. Formation of Ap3A from ATP and ADP was not observed with either At4CL2 variant. In all cases analyzed, (di)adenosine polyphosphate synthesis was either strictly dependent on or strongly stimulated by the presence of a cognate cinnamic acid derivative. The At4CL2 mutant enzyme K540L carrying a point mutation in the catalytic center that is critical for adenylate intermediate formation was inactive in both p4A and diadenosine 5′,5‴,-P1,P4-tetraphosphate synthesis. These results indicate that the cinnamoyl-adenylate intermediate synthesized by At4CL2 not only functions as an intermediate in coenzyme A ester formation but can also act as a cocatalytic AMP-donor in (di)adenosine polyphosphate synthesis. PMID:12644689

  10. Identification of 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (CoA) desulfinases within the Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Marc; Demming, Rebecca Michaela; Krewing, Marco; Rose, Judith; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    In a previous study, the essential role of 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acd) in Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7(T) (AcdDPN7) during degradation of 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) was elucidated. DTDP is a sulfur-containing precursor substrate for biosynthesis of polythioesters (PTEs). AcdDPN7 showed high amino acid sequence similarity to acyl-CoA dehydrogenases but was unable to catalyze a dehydrogenation reaction. Hence, it was investigated in the present study whether 3SP-CoA desulfinase activity is an uncommon or a widespread property within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Therefore, proteins of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily from Advenella kashmirensis WT001, Bacillus cereus DSM31, Cupriavidus necator N-1, Escherichia coli BL21, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, Ralstonia eutropha H16, Variovorax paradoxus B4, Variovorax paradoxus S110, and Variovorax paradoxus TBEA6 were expressed in E. coli strains. All purified acyl-CoA dehydrogenases appeared as homotetramers, as revealed by size exclusion chromatography. AcdS110, AcdB4, AcdH16, and AcdKT2440 were able to dehydrogenate isobutyryl-CoA. AcdKT2440 additionally dehydrogenated butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA, whereas AcdDSM31 dehydrogenated only butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA. No dehydrogenation reactions were observed with propionyl-CoA, isovaleryl-CoA, succinyl-CoA, and glutaryl-CoA for any of the investigated acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. Only AcdTBEA6, AcdN-1, and AcdLB400 desulfinated 3SP-CoA and were thus identified as 3SP-CoA desulfinases within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, although none of these three Acds dehydrogenated any of the tested acyl-CoA thioesters. No appropriate substrates were identified for AcdBL21 and AcdWT001. Spectrophotometric assays provided apparent Km and Vmax values for active substrates and indicated the applicability of phylogenetic analyses to predict the substrate range of

  11. Comparison of a Ligase Chain Reaction-Based Assay and Cell Culture for Detection of Pharyngeal Carriage of Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Andrew J.; Gilleran, Gerry; Eastick, Kirstine; Ross, Jonathan D. C.

    2000-01-01

    In 264 genitourinary medicine clinic attenders reporting recent fellatio, the prevalence of pharyngeal Chlamydia trachomatis determined by an expanded standard including cell culture and two in-house PCR tests was 1.5% in 194 women and zero in 70 men. The ligase chain reaction (Abbott LCx) had a specificity of 99.2% and a positive predictive value of 60%. PMID:10970416

  12. Discovery of Mdm2-MdmX E3 Ligase Inhibitors Using a Cell-Based Ubiquitination Assay

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Ariel G.; Hayano, Miki; Poyurovsky, Masha V.; Shimada, Kenichi; Skouta, Rachid; Prives, Carol; Stockwell, Brent R.

    2011-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are of interest as drug targets for their ability to regulate protein stability and function. The oncogene Mdm2 is an attractive E3 ligase to target, as it is the key negative regulator of the tumor suppressor p53, which controls the transcription of genes involved in cell fate. Overexpression of Mdm2 facilitates tumorigenesis by inactivating p53, and through p53-independent oncogenic effects. We developed a high-throughput cellular Mdm2 auto-ubiquitination assay, which we used to discover a class of small molecule Mdm2 ligase activity inhibitors. These compounds inhibit Mdm2 and p53 ubiquitination in cells, reduce viability of cells with wild-type p53, and synergize with DNA-damaging agents to cause cell death. We determined that these compounds effectively inhibit the E3 ligase activity of the Mdm2-MdmX hetero-complex. This mechanism may be exploitable to create a new class of anti-tumor agents. PMID:22586610

  13. Characterization of a novel RING-type ubiquitin E3 ligase GhRING2 differentially expressed in cotton fiber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ubiquitin-proteasome proteolysis pathway is responsible for the degradation of abnormal and short-lived proteins to regulate many important biochemical activities in eukaryotes. By employing affymetrix microarray analysis, we have identified a novel ubiquitin ligase E3 gene GhRING2 that is diffe...

  14. Length-dependent binding of human XLF to DNA and stimulation of XRCC4.DNA ligase IV activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haihui; Pannicke, Ulrich; Schwarz, Klaus; Lieber, Michael R

    2007-04-13

    An XRCC4-like factor, called XLF or Cernunnos, was recently identified as another important factor in the non-homologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) process. NHEJ is the major pathway for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. The similarity in the putative secondary structures of XLF and XRCC4 as well as the association of XLF with XRCC4.DNA ligase IV in vivo suggested a role in the final ligation step of NHEJ. Here, we find that purified XLF directly interacts with purified XRCC4.DNA ligase IV complex and stimulates the ligase complex in a direct assay for ligation activity. Purified XLF has DNA binding activity, but this binding is dependent on DNA length in a manner most consistent with orientation of the C-terminal alpha helices parallel to the DNA helix. To better understand the function of XLF, we purified an XLF mutant (R57G), which was identified in patients with NHEJ deficiency and severe combined immunodeficiency. Surprisingly, the mutant protein retained its ability to stimulate XRCC4.DNA ligase IV but failed to translocate to the nucleus, and this appears to be the basis for the NHEJ defect in this patient. PMID:17317666

  15. Regulation of 4CL, encoding 4-coumarate: coenzyme A ligase, expression in kenaf under diverse stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We cloned the full length 4CL ortholog encoding 4-coumarate: coenzymeA ligase from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabiuns) using degenerate primers and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) systems. The 4CL is a key regulatory enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway that regulates the activation of cinnamic ac...

  16. Sorghum Brown midrib 2 (Bmr2) gene encodes the major 4-coumarate Coenzyme A ligase involved in lignin synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful modification of plant cell wall composition without compromising plant integrity is dependent on being able to modify the expression of specific genes, but can be very challenging when the target genes are members of multigene families. 4-Coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) catalyzes the formatio...

  17. Heterologous expression of rice SUMO E3 ligase (OsSIZ1) enhances drought and heat tolerance in transgenic cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Arabidopsis gene AtSIZ1 encodes a SUMO E3 ligase that plays important roles in plant response to abiotic stresses such as drought, heat, cold, salt, and nutrient starvation. Loss of function in AtSIZ1 leads to increased sensitivity to drought, heat, and salt stresses, whereas overexpression of t...

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the biotin–protein ligase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kuroishi, Chizu; Sugahara, Mitsuaki; Kunishima, Naoki

    2005-02-01

    The biotin–protein ligase from P. horikoshii OT3 was overexpressed, purified, crystallized and cocrystallized with biotin, ADP and biotinyl-5′-AMP. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1} and diffract to beyond 1.6 Å resolution.

  19. Atypical ubiquitination by E3 ligase WWP1 inhibits the proteasome-mediated degradation of mutant huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Jin, Zhenzhen; Tan, Huiping; Xu, Qiaoqiao; Peng, Ting; Li, He

    2016-07-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by the expansion of CAG trinucleotide repeats in exon 1 of HD gene encoding huntingtin (Htt), which is characterized by aggregation and formation of mutant Htt containing expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeats. Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of HD. As the linkage mediator between ubiquitin and specific target proteins, E3 ubiquitin ligases have been suggested to be involved in mHtt degradation and HD pathology. However, the potential involvement of the E3 ligase WWP1 in HD has not been explored. The present study determined whether WWP1 is involved in the development of HD in both in vivo and in vitro models. The results showed that in contrast to several other E3 ligases, expression of WWP1 is enhanced in mice and N2a cells expressing mutant Htt (160Q) and co-localized with mHtt protein aggregates. In addition, expression of WWP1 positively regulates mutan Htt levels, aggregate formation, and cell toxicity. Further analysis revealed that WWP1 ubiquitinated mHtt at an atypical position of Lys-63, which may have inhibited degradation of mutant Htt through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In conclusion, these results suggested that the E3 ligase WWP1 is involved in the pathogenesis of HD; therefore, it may be a novel target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27107943

  20. Arabidopsis ETHE1 Encodes a Sulfur Dioxygenase That Is Essential for Embryo and Endosperm Development1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Holdorf, Meghan M.; Owen, Heather A.; Lieber, Sarah Rhee; Yuan, Li; Adams, Nicole; Dabney-Smith, Carole; Makaroff, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in human (Homo sapiens) ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) result in the complex metabolic disease ethylmalonic encephalopathy, which is characterized in part by brain lesions, lactic acidemia, excretion of ethylmalonic acid, and ultimately death. ETHE1-like genes are found in a wide range of organisms; however, the biochemical and physiological role(s) of ETHE1 have not been examined outside the context of ethylmalonic encephalopathy. In this study we characterized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ETHE1 and determined the effect of an ETHE1 loss-of-function mutation to investigate the role(s) of ETHE1 in plants. Arabidopsis ETHE1 is localized in the mitochondrion and exhibits sulfur dioxygenase activity. Seeds homozygous for a DNA insertion in ETHE1 exhibit alterations in endosperm development that are accompanied by a delay in embryo development followed by embryo arrest by early heart stage. Strong ETHE1 labeling was observed in the peripheral and chalazal endosperm of wild-type seeds prior to cellularization. Therefore, ETHE1 appears to play an essential role in regulating sulfide levels in seeds. PMID:22786886

  1. E3 ubiquitin ligases promote progression of differentiation during C. elegans embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhuo; He, Fei; Yu, Zidong; Bowerman, Bruce; Bao, Zhirong

    2015-02-15

    Regulated choice between cell fate maintenance and differentiation provides decision points in development to progress toward more restricted cell fates or to maintain the current one. Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis follows an invariant cell lineage where cell fate is generally more restricted upon each cell division. EMS is a progenitor cell in the four-cell embryo that gives rise to the endomesoderm. We recently found that when ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is compromised, the anterior daughter of EMS, namely MS, reiterates the EMS fate. This observation demonstrates an essential function of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation in driving the progression of EMS-to-MS differentiation. Here we report a genome-wide screen of the ubiquitin pathway and extensive lineage analyses. The results suggest a broad role of E3 ligases in driving differentiation progression. First, we identified three substrate-binding proteins for two Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL) E3 complexes that promote the progression from the EMS fate to MS, namely LIN-23/β-TrCP and FBXB-3 for the CRL1/SCF complex and ZYG-11/ZYG-11B for the CRL2 complex. Genetic analyses suggest these E3 ligases function through a multifunctional protein OMA-1 and the endomesoderm lineage specifier SKN-1 to drive differentiation. Second, we found that depletion of components of the CRL1/SCF complex induces fate reiteration in all major founder cell lineages. These data suggest that regulated choice between self-renewal and differentiation is widespread during C. elegans embryogenesis as in organisms with regulative development, and ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation drives the choice towards differentiation. Finally, bioinformatic analysis of time series gene expression data showed that expression of E3 genes is transiently enriched during time windows of developmental stage transitions. Transcription factors show similar enrichment, but not other classes of regulatory genes. Based on these

  2. E3 ubiquitin ligases promote progression of differentiation during C. elegans embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhuo; He, Fei; Yu, Zidong; Bowerman, Bruce; Bao, Zhirong

    2014-01-01

    Regulated choice between cell fate maintenance and differentiation provides decision points in development to progress toward more restricted cell fates or to maintain the current one. C. elegans embryogenesis follows an invariant cell lineage where cell fate is generally more restricted upon each cell division. EMS is a progenitor cell in the four-cell embryo that gives rise to the endomesoderm. We recently found that when ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is compromised, the anterior daughter of EMS, namely MS, reiterates the EMS fate. This observation demonstrates an essential function of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation in driving the progression of EMS-to-MS differentiation. Here we report a genome-wide screen of the ubiquitin pathway and extensive lineage analyses. The results suggest a broad role of E3 ligases in driving differentiation progression. First, we identified three substrate-binding proteins for two CRL (Cullin-RING ubiquitin Ligase) E3 complexes that promote the progression from the EMS fate to MS, namely LIN-23/β-TrCP and FBXB-3 for the CRL1/SCF complex and ZYG-11/ZYG-11B for the CRL2 complex. Genetic analyses suggest these E3 ligases function through a multifunctional protein OMA-1 and the endomesoderm lineage specifier SKN-1 to drive differentiation. Second, we found that depletion of components of the CRL1/SCF complex induces fate reiteration in all major founder cell lineages. These data suggest that regulated choice between self-renewal and differentiation is widespread during C. elegans embryogenesis as in organisms with regulative development, and ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation drives the choice towards differentiation. Finally, bioinformatic analysis of time series gene expression data showed that expression of E3 genes is transiently enriched during time windows of developmental stage transitions. Transcription factors show similar enrichment, but not other classes of regulatory genes. Based on these findings we

  3. Cullin 3 mediates SRC-3 ubiquitination and degradation to control the retinoic acid response

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, Christine; Gaouar, Samia; Fischer, Benoit; Boeglin, Marcel; Paul, Nicodeme; Samarut, Eric; Piskunov, Aleksandr; Pankotai-Bodo, Gabriella; Brino, Laurent; Rochette-Egly, Cecile

    2011-01-01

    SRC-3 is an important coactivator of nuclear receptors including the retinoic acid (RA) receptor α. Most of SRC-3 functions are facilitated by changes in the posttranslational code of the protein that involves mainly phosphorylation and ubiquitination. We recently reported that SRC-3 is degraded by the proteasome in response to RA. Here, by using an RNAi E3-ubiquitin ligase entry screen, we identified CUL-3 and RBX1 as components of the E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in the RA-induced ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of SRC-3. We also show that the RA-induced ubiquitination of SRC-3 depends on its prior phosphorylation at serine 860 that promotes binding of the CUL-3–based E3 ligase in the nucleus. Finally, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation of SRC-3 cooperate to control the dynamics of transcription. In all, this process participates to the antiproliferative effect of RA. PMID:22147914

  4. Underlying Resistance Mechanisms in the Cynosurus echinatus Biotype to Acetyl CoA Carboxylase-Inhibiting Herbicides.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pablo; Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Cruz-Hipólito, Hugo; Osuna, María D; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog dogtail (Cynosurus echinatus) is an annual grass, native to Europe, but also widely distributed in North and South America, South Africa, and Australia. Two hedgehog dogtail biotypes, one diclofop-methyl (DM)-resistant and one DM-susceptible were studied in detail for experimental dose-response resistance mechanisms. Herbicide rates that inhibited shoot growth by 50% (GR50) were determined for DM, being the resistance factor (GR50R/GR50S) of 43.81. When amitrole (Cyt. P450 inhibitor) was applied before treatment with DM, the R biotype growth was significantly inhibited (GR50 of 1019.9 g ai ha(-1)) compared with the GR50 (1484.6 g ai ha(-1)) found for the R biotype without pretreatment with amitrole. However, GR50 values for S biotype do not vary with or without amitrole pretreatment. Dose-response experiments carried out to evaluate cross-resistance, showed resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate (APP), cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylpyrazoline (PPZ) inhibiting herbicides. Both R and S biotypes had a similar (14)C-DM uptake and translocation. The herbicide was poorly distributed among leaves, the rest of the shoot and roots with unappreciable acropetal and/or basipetal DM translocation at 96 h after treatment (HAT). The metabolism of (14)C-DM, D-acid and D-conjugate metabolites were identified by thin-layer chromatography. The results showed that DM resistance in C. echinatus is likely due to enhanced herbicide metabolism, involving Cyt. P450 as was demonstrated by indirect assays (amitrole pretreatment). The ACCase in vitro assays showed that the target site was very sensitive to APP, CHD and PPZ herbicides in the C. echinatus S biotype, while the R biotype was insensitive to the previously mentioned herbicides. DNA sequencing studies confirmed that C. echinatus cross-resistance to ACCase inhibitors has been conferred by specific ACCase double point mutations Ile-2041-Asn and Cys-2088-Arg. PMID:27148285

  5. Underlying Resistance Mechanisms in the Cynosurus echinatus Biotype to Acetyl CoA Carboxylase-Inhibiting Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Pablo; Alcántara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Cruz-Hipólito, Hugo; Osuna, María D.; De Prado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog dogtail (Cynosurus echinatus) is an annual grass, native to Europe, but also widely distributed in North and South America, South Africa, and Australia. Two hedgehog dogtail biotypes, one diclofop-methyl (DM)-resistant and one DM-susceptible were studied in detail for experimental dose-response resistance mechanisms. Herbicide rates that inhibited shoot growth by 50% (GR50) were determined for DM, being the resistance factor (GR50R/GR50S) of 43.81. When amitrole (Cyt. P450 inhibitor) was applied before treatment with DM, the R biotype growth was significantly inhibited (GR50 of 1019.9 g ai ha-1) compared with the GR50 (1484.6 g ai ha-1) found for the R biotype without pretreatment with amitrole. However, GR50 values for S biotype do not vary with or without amitrole pretreatment. Dose-response experiments carried out to evaluate cross-resistance, showed resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate (APP), cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylpyrazoline (PPZ) inhibiting herbicides. Both R and S biotypes had a similar 14C-DM uptake and translocation. The herbicide was poorly distributed among leaves, the rest of the shoot and roots with unappreciable acropetal and/or basipetal DM translocation at 96 h after treatment (HAT). The metabolism of 14C-DM, D-acid and D-conjugate metabolites were identified by thin-layer chromatography. The results showed that DM resistance in C. echinatus is likely due to enhanced herbicide metabolism, involving Cyt. P450 as was demonstrated by indirect assays (amitrole pretreatment). The ACCase in vitro assays showed that the target site was very sensitive to APP, CHD and PPZ herbicides in the C. echinatus S biotype, while the R biotype was insensitive to the previously mentioned herbicides. DNA sequencing studies confirmed that C. echinatus cross-resistance to ACCase inhibitors has been conferred by specific ACCase double point mutations Ile-2041-Asn and Cys-2088-Arg. PMID:27148285

  6. Mutations in CUL4B, Which Encodes a Ubiquitin E3 Ligase Subunit, Cause an X-linked Mental Retardation Syndrome Associated with Aggressive Outbursts, Seizures, Relative Macrocephaly, Central Obesity, Hypogonadism, Pes Cavus, and Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Tarpey, Patrick S. ; Raymond, F. Lucy ; O’Meara, Sarah ; Edkins, Sarah ; Teague, Jon ; Butler, Adam ; Dicks, Ed ; Stevens, Claire ; Tofts, Calli ; Avis, Tim ; Barthorpe, Syd ; Buck, Gemma ; Cole, Jennifer ; Gray, Kristian ; Halliday, Kelly ; Harrison, Rachel ; Hills, Katy ; Jenkinson, Andrew ; Jones, David ; Menzies, Andrew ; Mironenko, Tatiana ; Perry, Janet ; Raine, Keiran ; Richardson, David ; Shepherd, Rebecca ; Small, Alexandra ; Varian, Jennifer ; West, Sofie ; Widaa, Sara ; Mallya, Uma ; Moon, Jenny ; Luo, Ying ; Holder, Susan ; Smithson, Sarah F. ; Hurst, Jane A. ; Clayton-Smith, Jill ; Kerr, Bronwyn ; Boyle, Jackie ; Shaw, Marie ; Vandeleur, Lucianne ; Rodriguez, Jayson ; Slaugh, Rachel ; Easton, Douglas F. ; Wooster, Richard ; Bobrow, Martin ; Srivastava, Anand K. ; Stevenson, Roger E. ; Schwartz, Charles E. ; Turner, Gillian ; Gecz, Jozef ; Futreal, P. Andrew ; Stratton, Michael R. ; Partington, Michael 

    2007-01-01

    We have identified three truncating, two splice-site, and three missense variants at conserved amino acids in the CUL4B gene on Xq24 in 8 of 250 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). During affected subjects' adolescence, a syndrome emerged with delayed puberty, hypogonadism, relative macrocephaly, moderate short stature, central obesity, unprovoked aggressive outbursts, fine intention tremor, pes cavus, and abnormalities of the toes. This syndrome was first described by Cazebas et al., in a family that was included in our study and that carried a CUL4B missense variant. CUL4B is a ubiquitin E3 ligase subunit implicated in the regulation of several biological processes, and CUL4B is the first XLMR gene that encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase. The relatively high frequency of CUL4B mutations in this series indicates that it is one of the most commonly mutated genes underlying XLMR and suggests that its introduction into clinical diagnostics should be a high priority. PMID:17236139

  7. Shigella IpaH7.8 E3 ubiquitin ligase targets glomulin and activates inflammasomes to demolish macrophages.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shiho; Mimuro, Hitomi; Kim, Minsoo; Ogawa, Michinaga; Ashida, Hiroshi; Toyotome, Takahito; Franchi, Luigi; Suzuki, Masato; Sanada, Takahito; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Tsutsui, Hiroko; Núñez, Gabriel; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2014-10-01

    When nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) sense cytosolic-invading bacteria, they induce the formation of inflammasomes and initiate an innate immune response. In quiescent cells, inflammasome activity is tightly regulated to prevent excess inflammation and cell death. Many bacterial pathogens provoke inflammasome activity and induce inflammatory responses, including cell death, by delivering type III secreted effectors, the rod component flagellin, and toxins. Recent studies indicated that Shigella deploy multiple mechanisms to stimulate NLR inflammasomes through type III secretion during infection. Here, we show that Shigella induces rapid macrophage cell death by delivering the invasion plasmid antigen H7.8 (IpaH7.8) enzyme 3 (E3) ubiquitin ligase effector via the type III secretion system, thereby activating the NLR family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) and NLR family CARD domain-containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasomes and caspase-1 and leading to macrophage cell death in an IpaH7.8 E3 ligase-dependent manner. Mice infected with Shigella possessing IpaH7.8, but not with Shigella possessing an IpaH7.8 E3 ligase-null mutant, exhibited enhanced bacterial multiplication. We defined glomulin/flagellar-associated protein 68 (GLMN) as an IpaH7.8 target involved in IpaH7.8 E3 ligase-dependent inflammasome activation. This protein originally was identified through its association with glomuvenous malformations and more recently was described as a member of a Cullin ring ligase inhibitor. Modifying GLMN levels through overexpression or knockdown led to reduced or augmented inflammasome activation, respectively. Macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide/ATP induced GLMN puncta that localized with the active form of caspase-1. Macrophages from GLMN(+/-) mice were more responsive to inflammasome activation than those from GLMN(+/+) mice. Together, these results highlight a unique bacterial adaptation that hijacks inflammasome activation via

  8. Covalent modifier NEDD8 is essential for SCF ubiquitin-ligase in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Osaka, F; Saeki, M; Katayama, S; Aida, N; Toh-E, A; Kominami, K; Toda, T; Suzuki, T; Chiba, T; Tanaka, K; Kato, S

    2000-07-01

    A ubiquitin-like modifier, NEDD8, is covalently attached to cullin-family proteins, but its physiological role is poorly understood. Here we report that the NEDD8-modifying pathway is essential for cell viability and function of Pcu1 (cullin-1 orthologue) in fission yeast. Pcu1 assembled on SCF ubiquitin-ligase was completely modified by NEDD8. Pcu1(K713R) defective for NEDD8 conjugation lost the ability to complement lethality due to pcu1 deletion. Forced expression of Pcu1(K713R) or depletion of NEDD8 in cells resulted in impaired cell proliferation and marked stabilization of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Rum1, which is a substrate of the SCF complex. Based on these findings, we propose that covalent modification of cullin-1 by the NEDD8 system plays an essential role in the function of SCF in fission yeast. PMID:10880460

  9. Single Quantum Dot Analysis Enables Multiplexed Point Mutation Detection by Gap Ligase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yunke; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Gene point mutations present important biomarkers for genetic diseases. However, existing point mutation detection methods suffer from low sensitivity, specificity, and tedious assay processes. In this report, we propose an assay technology which combines the outstanding specificity of gap ligase chain reaction (Gap-LCR), the high sensitivity of single molecule coincidence detection and superior optical properties of quantum dots (QDs) for multiplexed detection of point mutations in genomic DNA. Mutant-specific ligation products are generated by Gap-LCR and subsequently captured by QDs to form DNA-QD nanocomplexes that are detected by single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) through multi-color fluorescence burst coincidence analysis, allowing for multiplexed mutation detection in a separation-free format. The proposed assay is capable of detecting zeptomoles of KRAS codon 12 mutation variants with near 100% specificity. Its high sensitivity allows direct detection of KRAS mutation in crude genomic DNA without PCR pre-amplification. PMID:23239594

  10. Ube2w and ataxin-3 coordinately regulate the ubiquitin ligase CHIP.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, K Matthew; Zavodszky, Eszter; Todi, Sokol V; Patury, Srikanth; Xu, Ping; Rodríguez-Lebrón, Edgardo; Fischer, Svetlana; Konen, John; Djarmati, Ana; Peng, Junmin; Gestwicki, Jason E; Paulson, Henry L

    2011-08-19

    The mechanisms by which ubiquitin ligases are regulated remain poorly understood. Here we describe a series of molecular events that coordinately regulate CHIP, a neuroprotective E3 implicated in protein quality control. Through their opposing activities, the initiator E2, Ube2w, and the specialized deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), ataxin-3, participate in initiating, regulating, and terminating the CHIP ubiquitination cycle. Monoubiquitination of CHIP by Ube2w stabilizes the interaction between CHIP and ataxin-3, which through its DUB activity limits the length of chains attached to CHIP substrates. Upon completion of substrate ubiquitination, ataxin-3 deubiquitinates CHIP, effectively terminating the reaction. Our results suggest that functional pairing of E3s with ataxin-3 or similar DUBs represents an important point of regulation in ubiquitin-dependent protein quality control. In addition, the results shed light on disease pathogenesis in SCA3, a neurodegenerative disorder caused by polyglutamine expansion in ataxin-3. PMID:21855799

  11. Structural insights into the role of domain flexibility in human DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Takashi; Wu, Qian; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Grossmann, J Günter; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M; Blundell, Tom L

    2012-07-01

    Knowledge of the architecture of DNA ligase IV (LigIV) and interactions with XRCC4 and XLF-Cernunnos is necessary for understanding its role in the ligation of double-strand breaks during nonhomologous end joining. Here we report the structure of a subdomain of the nucleotidyltrasferase domain of human LigIV and provide insights into the residues associated with LIG4 syndrome. We use this structural information together with the known structures of the BRCT/XRCC4 complex and those of LigIV orthologs to interpret small-angle X-ray scattering of LigIV in complex with XRCC4 and size exclusion chromatography of LigIV, XRCC4, and XLF-Cernunnos. Our results suggest that the flexibility of the catalytic region is limited in a manner that affects the formation of the LigIV/XRCC4/XLF-Cernunnos complex. PMID:22658747

  12. Merlin's tumor suppression linked to inhibition of the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4DCAF1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism by which the FERM domain protein Merlin, encoded by the tumor suppressor NF2, restrains cell proliferation is poorly understood. Prior studies have suggested that Merlin exerts its antimitogenic effect by interacting with multiple signaling proteins located at or near the plasma membrane. We have recently observed that Merlin translocates into the nucleus and binds to and inhibits the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4DCAF1. Genetic evidence indicates that inactivation of Merlin induces oncogenic gene expression, hyperproliferation, and tumorigenicity by unleashing the activity of CRL4DCAF1. In addition to providing a potential explanation for the diverse effects that loss of Merlin exerts in multiple cell types, these findings suggest that compounds inhibiting CRL4DCAF1 may display therapeutic efficacy in Neurofibromatosis type 2 and other cancers driven by Merlin inactivation. PMID:21084862

  13. The Ubiquitin E3 Ligase NOSIP Modulates Protein Phosphatase 2A Activity in Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmeister, Meike; Prelle, Carola; Küchler, Philipp; Kovacevic, Igor; Moser, Markus; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Oess, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly is a common developmental disorder in humans characterised by incomplete brain hemisphere separation and midface anomalies. The etiology of holoprosencephaly is heterogeneous with environmental and genetic causes, but for a majority of holoprosencephaly cases the genes associated with the pathogenesis could not be identified so far. Here we report the generation of knockout mice for the ubiquitin E3 ligase NOSIP. The loss of NOSIP in mice causes holoprosencephaly and facial anomalies including cleft lip/palate, cyclopia and facial midline clefting. By a mass spectrometry based protein interaction screen we identified NOSIP as a novel interaction partner of protein phosphatase PP2A. NOSIP mediates the monoubiquitination of the PP2A catalytic subunit and the loss of NOSIP results in an increase in PP2A activity in craniofacial tissue in NOSIP knockout mice. We conclude, that NOSIP is a critical modulator of brain and craniofacial development in mice and a candidate gene for holoprosencephaly in humans. PMID:25546391

  14. Ubiquitin ligase CHIP suppresses cancer stem cell properties in a population of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Mai; Nakajima, Yuka; Hirata, Naoya; Morishita, Tamaki; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Kanda, Yasunari; Kimura, Keiji

    2014-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have several distinctive characteristics, including high metastatic potential, tumor-initiating potential, and properties that resemble normal stem cells such as self-renewal, differentiation, and drug efflux. Because of these characteristics, CSC is regarded to be responsible for cancer progression and patient prognosis. In our previous study, we showed that a ubiquitin E3 ligase carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) suppressed breast cancer malignancy. Moreover, a recent clinical study reported that CHIP expression levels were associated with favorable prognostic parameters of patients with breast cancer. Here we show that CHIP suppresses CSC properties in a population of breast cancer cells. CHIP depletion resulted in an increased proportion of CSCs among breast cancers when using several assays to assess CSC properties. From our results, we propose that inhibition of CSC properties may be one of the functions of CHIP as a suppressor of cancer progression. PMID:25234599

  15. The antiobesity factor WDTC1 suppresses adipogenesis via the CRL4WDTC1 E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Groh, Beezly S; Yan, Feng; Smith, Matthew D; Yu, Yanbao; Chen, Xian; Xiong, Yue

    2016-05-01

    WDTC1/Adp encodes an evolutionarily conserved suppressor of lipid accumulation. While reduced WDTC1 expression is associated with obesity in mice and humans, its cellular function is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that WDTC1 is a component of a DDB1-CUL4-ROC1 (CRL4) E3 ligase. Using 3T3-L1 cell culture model of adipogenesis, we show that disrupting the interaction between WDTC1 and DDB1 leads to a loss of adipogenic suppression by WDTC1, increased triglyceride accumulation and adipogenic gene expression. We show that the CRL4(WDTC) (1) complex promotes histone H2AK119 monoubiquitylation, thus suggesting a role for this complex in transcriptional repression during adipogenesis. Our results identify a biochemical role for WDTC1 and extend the functional range of the CRL4 complex to the suppression of fat accumulation. PMID:27113764

  16. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes with a nonisotopic polymerase chain reaction-coupled ligase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmann, M; Barany, F; Batt, C A

    1993-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-coupled ligase chain reaction (LCR) assay for the specific detection of Listeria monocytogenes (M. Wiedmann, J. Czajka, F. Barany, and C. A. Batt, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:3443-3447, 1992) has been modified for detection of the LCR products with a nonisotopic readout. When a chemiluminescent or a colorimetric substrate for the nonisotopic detection of the LCR products was used, the PCR-coupled LCR gave a sensitivity of 10 CFU of L. monocytogenes. The detection method with the chemiluminescent substrate Lumi-Phos 530 permitted detection of the LCR products in less than 3 h, so that the whole assay can be completed within 10 h. Images PMID:8368859

  17. Structural Insights into the Role of Domain Flexibility in Human DNA Ligase IV

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, Takashi; Wu, Qian; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y.; Grossmann, J. Günter; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Knowledge of the architecture of DNA ligase IV (LigIV) and interactions with XRCC4 and XLF-Cernunnos is necessary for understanding its role in the ligation of double-strand breaks during nonhomologous end joining. Here we report the structure of a subdomain of the nucleotidyltrasferase domain of human LigIV and provide insights into the residues associated with LIG4 syndrome. We use this structural information together with the known structures of the BRCT/XRCC4 complex and those of LigIV orthologs to interpret small-angle X-ray scattering of LigIV in complex with XRCC4 and size exclusion chromatography of LigIV, XRCC4, and XLF-Cernunnos. Our results suggest that the flexibility of the catalytic region is limited in a manner that affects the formation of the LigIV/XRCC4/XLF-Cernunnos complex. PMID:22658747

  18. Structural and functional insights into the E3 ligase, RNF126.

    PubMed

    Krysztofinska, Ewelina M; Martínez-Lumbreras, Santiago; Thapaliya, Arjun; Evans, Nicola J; High, Stephen; Isaacson, Rivka L

    2016-01-01

    RNF126 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that collaborates with the BAG6 sortase complex to ubiquitinate hydrophobic substrates in the cytoplasm that are destined for proteasomal recycling. Composed of a trimeric complex of BAG6, TRC35 and UBL4A the BAG6 sortase is also associated with SGTA, a co-chaperone from which it can obtain hydrophobic substrates. Here we solve the solution structure of the RNF126 zinc finger domain in complex with the BAG6 UBL domain. We also characterise an interaction between RNF126 and UBL4A and analyse the competition between SGTA and RNF126 for the N-terminal BAG6 binding site. This work sheds light on the sorting mechanism of the BAG6 complex and its accessory proteins which, together, decide the fate of stray hydrophobic proteins in the aqueous cytoplasm. PMID:27193484

  19. Oncogenesis driven by the Ras/Raf pathway requires the SUMO E2 ligase Ubc9

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Swatkoski, Stephen; Holly, Alesia; Lee, Liam C.; Giroux, Valentin; Lee, Chih-Shia; Hsu, Dennis; Smith, Jordan L.; Yuen, Garmen; Yue, Junqiu; Ann, David K.; Simpson, R. Mark; Creighton, Chad J.; Figg, William D.; Gucek, Marjan; Luo, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase KRAS is frequently mutated in human cancer and currently there are no targeted therapies for KRAS mutant tumors. Here, we show that the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) pathway is required for KRAS-driven transformation. RNAi depletion of the SUMO E2 ligase Ubc9 suppresses 3D growth of KRAS mutant colorectal cancer cells in vitro and attenuates tumor growth in vivo. In KRAS mutant cells, a subset of proteins exhibit elevated levels of SUMOylation. Among these proteins, KAP1, CHD1, and EIF3L collectively support anchorage-independent growth, and the SUMOylation of KAP1 is necessary for its activity in this context. Thus, the SUMO pathway critically contributes to the transformed phenotype of KRAS mutant cells and Ubc9 presents a potential target for the treatment of KRAS mutant colorectal cancer. PMID:25805818

  20. Adenovirus-mediated downregulation of the ubiquitin ligase RNF8 sensitizes bladder cancer to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xu-Guang; Xie, Kun; Jing, Yu-Hong; Wang, De-Gui

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase RNF8 promotes the DNA damage response (DDR). We observed that the expression of RNF8 was increased in bladder cancer cells and that this change in RNF8 expression could be reversed by adenovirus-mediated shRNA treatment. Moreover, we found that RNF8 knockdown sensitized bladder cancer cells to radiotherapy, as demonstrated by reduced cell survival. Additionally, the absence of RNF8 induced a high rate of apoptosis and impaired double-strand break repair signaling after radiotherapy. Furthermore, experiments on nude mice showed that combining shRNF8 treatment with radiotherapy suppressed implanted bladder tumor growth and enhanced apoptotic cell death in vivo. Altogether, our results indicated that RNF8 might be a novel target for bladder cancer treatment. PMID:26788910