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Sample records for acid composition lipid

  1. A comparative study of the fatty acid composition of prochloron lipids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenrick, J. R.; Deane, E. M.; Bishop, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    The chemical analysis of lipids of Prochloron isolated from several hosts is discussed. The object was to determine whether differences in lipid composition could be used to characterize organisms from different sources. Major lipid components are given. An analysis of fatty acid composition of individual lipids slowed a distinctive disstribution of fatty acids. While present results do not justify the use of fatty acid content in the taxonomy of Prochlon, the variations found in the lipids of cells from the same host harvested from different areas, or at different times in the same area, suggest that a study of the effects of temperature and light intensity on lipid composition would be rewarding.

  2. Effect of brown seaweed lipids on fatty acid composition and lipid hydroperoxide levels of mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Airanthi, M K Widjaja-Adhi; Sasaki, Naoya; Iwasaki, Sayaka; Baba, Nobuko; Abe, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2011-04-27

    Brown seaweed lipids from Undaria pinnatifida (Wakame), Sargassum horneri (Akamoku), and Cystoseira hakodatensis (Uganomoku) contained several bioactive compounds, namely, fucoxanthin, polyphenols, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Fucoxanthin and polyphenol contents of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids were higher than those of Wakame lipids, while Wakame lipids showed higher total omega-3 PUFA content than Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) in liver lipids of KK-A(y) mouse significantly increased by Akamoku and Uganomoku lipid feeding as compared with the control, but not by Wakame lipid feeding. Fucoxanthin has been reported to accelerate the bioconversion of omega-3 PUFA and omega-6 PUFA to DHA and AA, respectively. The higher hepatic DHA and AA level of mice fed Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids would be attributed to the higher content of fucoxanthin of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The lipid hydroperoxide levels of the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids were significantly lower than those of control mice, even though total PUFA content was higher in the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids. This would be, at least in part, due to the antioxidant activity of fucoxanthin metabolites in the liver.

  3. Variation in amino acid and lipid composition of latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Croxton, Ruth S; Baron, Mark G; Butler, David; Kent, Terry; Sears, Vaughn G

    2010-06-15

    The enhancement of latent fingerprints, both at the crime scene and in the laboratory using an array of chemical, physical and optical techniques, permits their use for identification. Despite the plethora of techniques available, there are occasions when latent fingerprints are not successfully enhanced. An understanding of latent fingerprint chemistry and behaviour will aid the improvement of current techniques and the development of novel ones. In this study the amino acid and fatty acid content of 'real' latent fingerprints collected on a non-porous surface was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Squalene was also quantified in addition. Hexadecanoic acid, octadecanoic acid and cis-9-octadecenoic acid were the most abundant fatty acids in all samples. There was, however, wide variation in the relative amounts of each fatty acid in each sample. It was clearly demonstrated that touching sebum-rich areas of the face immediately prior to fingerprint deposition resulted in a significant increase in the amount of fatty acids and squalene deposited in the resulting 'groomed' fingerprints. Serine was the most abundant amino acid identified followed by glycine, alanine and aspartic acid. The significant quantitative differences between the 'natural' and 'groomed' fingerprint samples seen for fatty acids were not observed in the case of the amino acids. This study demonstrates the variation in latent fingerprint composition between individuals and the impact of the sampling protocol on the quantitative analysis of fingerprints.

  4. Effect of Growth on Fatty Acid Composition of Total Intramuscular Lipid and Phospholipids in Ira Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shan; He, Zhifei; Lu, Jingzhi; Tao, Xiaoqi; Zheng, Li; Xie, Yuejie; Xiao, Xia; Peng, Rong; Li, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    The changes in fatty acid composition of total intramuscular lipid and phospholipids were investigated in the longissimus dorsi, left-hind leg muscle, and abdominal muscle of male Ira rabbits. Changes were monitored at 35, 45, 60, 75, and 90 d. Analysis using gas chromatography identified 21 types of fatty acids. Results showed that the intramuscular lipid increased and the intramuscular phospholipids (total intramuscular lipid %) decreased in all muscles with increasing age (p<0.05). An abundant amount of unsaturated fatty acids, especially polyunsaturated fatty acids, was distributed in male Ira rabbits at different ages and muscles. Palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), and arachidonic acid (C20:4) were the major fatty acids, which account to the dynamic changes of the n-6/n-3 value in Ira rabbit meat.

  5. Lipid growth requirement and influence of lipid supplement on fatty acid and aldehyde composition of Syntrophococcus sucromutans.

    PubMed Central

    Doré, J; Bryant, M P

    1989-01-01

    Results concerning the ruminal fluid growth requirement of the ruminal acetogen, Syntrophococcus sucromutans, indicate that octadecenoic acid isomers satisfy this essential requirement. Complex lipids, such as triglycerides and phospholipids, can also support growth. The cellular fatty acid and aldehyde composition closely reflects that of the lipid supplement provided to the cells. Up to 98% of the fatty acids and 80% of the fatty aldehydes are identical in chain length and degree of unsaturation to the octadecenoic acid supplement provided in the medium. S. sucromutans shows a tendency to have a greater proportion of the aldehyde form among its 18 carbon chains than it does with the shorter-chain simple lipids, which may be interpreted as a strategy to maintain membrane fluidity. 14C labeling showed that most of the oleic acid taken up from the medium was incorporated into the membrane fraction of the cells. PMID:2729991

  6. Enhancement effect of ethanol on lipid and fatty acid accumulation and composition of Scenedesmus sp.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengchen; Wang, Wei; Yue, Long; Yang, Zhen; Fu, Qiuguo; Ye, Qingfu

    2013-07-01

    The effects of ethanol concentration gradients along with varied cultivation times on lipid and fatty acid accumulation and composition of Scenedesmus sp. were studied. The maximum increment of algal density, lipid productivity, lipid content and fatty acid content were 6.61, 11.75, 1.34 and 3.14 times higher than the control group under 12h photoperiod. Algal light deprivation inhibited ethanol positive effects on algal growth and lipid biomass. The cumulative quantity of C16:0 and C18:0 decreased correspondingly with the increase of ethanol concentrations and cultivation times. Besides, unsaturated fatty acids appeared early in algal cells and increased 57.02% in maximum. However, only 2.27% (14)C was transferred from ethanol to fatty acids. The results indicated that adding proper amount of ethanol in algal culture medium was beneficial to biodiesel feedstock production and biodiesel properties.

  7. Chronic administration of ursodeoxycholic and tauroursodeoxycholic acid changes microsomal membrane lipid content and fatty acid compositions in rats.

    PubMed

    Bellentani, S; Chao, Y C; Ferretti, I; Panini, R; Tiribelli, C

    1996-03-27

    We studied the effect of oral supplementation with ursodeoxycholate (UDCA) or tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDCA) on the lipid content and fatty acid composition of rat hepatic microsomes. UDCA and TUDCA significantly increased the total amount of lipids with the exception of cholesteryl-esters. UDCA significantly increased the triglycerides and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) microsomal content, and decreased the cholesterol/phospholipids and the phosphatidylcholine (PC)/PE ratio. Both treatments increased the percentage oleic acid and of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in each class of lipids. UDCA and TUDCA had a different action on PUFA microsomal molar percentage of phospholipids: UDCA increased the relative percentage of PUFA in the PE fraction, while TUDCA increased the relative percentage of PUFA in the PC fraction. These changes in the hepatic lipid content and composition might in part explain both cytoprotective action of these hydrophillic bile acids and their effect on membrane fluidity.

  8. Dietary lipids modify the fatty acid composition of cartilage, isolated chondrocytes and matrix vesicles.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Watkins, B A; Adkisson, H D

    1994-09-01

    The effects of dietary lipids on the fatty acid composition of hyaline cartilage, epiphyseal chondrocytes (EC) and matrix vesicles (MV) were evaluated in chicks. A basal semipurified diet was fed to chicks containing one of the following lipid sources at 70 g/kg: soybean oil, butter+corn oil, margarine+corn oil or menhaden oil+corn oil (MEC). Articular and epiphyseal growth cartilage were isolated from the proximal tibiotarsus; EC and MV were subsequently released by trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) and collagenase (EC 3.4.24.3) digestion followed by ultracentrifugation. The fatty acid composition of polar lipids in chick epiphyseal cartilage at three and six weeks, as well as articular cartilage, EC and MV at eight weeks of age revealed the presence of high levels of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (up to 85.5%) but low levels of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (2.6-10.2%). Mead acid (20:3n-9, > 3%) was also present in cartilage, EC and MV lipids, and was unaffected by the dietary lipid treatments. Total n-3 PUFA concentrations were the highest in cartilage, EC and MV of chicks consuming MEC. Feeding MEC lowered the levels of 20:4n-6 in cartilage, but increased 20:5n-3 levels. The data are consistent with those reported previously which showed that cartilage tissues are low in n-6 PUFA and that they contain 20:3n-9. We furthermore demonstrated that the PUFA composition of cartilage can be modified by dietary lipids.

  9. Lipid composition of cyanidium.

    PubMed

    Allen, C F; Good, P; Holton, R W

    1970-11-01

    The major lipids in Cyanidium caldarium Geitler are monogalactosyl diglyceride, digalactosyl diglyceride, plant sulfolipid, lecithin, phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl inositol, and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. Fatty acid composition varies appreciably among the lipids, but the major ones are palmitic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, and moderate amounts of stearic acid. Trace amounts of other acids in the C(14) to C(20) range were also present. Moderate amounts of linolenic acid were found in two strains, but not in a third. The proportion of saturated acid is relatively high in all lipids ranging from about a third in monogalactosyl diglyceride to three-fourths in sulfolipid. This may be a result of the high growth temperature. Lipases forming lysosulfolipid, and lysophosphatidyl glycerol are active in ruptured cells; galactolipid is degraded with loss of both acyl residues. Thus the lipid and fatty acid composition of Cyanidium more closely resembles that of green algae than that of the blue-green algae, although there are differences of possible phylogenetic interest.

  10. The Role of Tetraether Lipid Composition in the Adaptation of Thermophilic Archaea to Acidity

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Wang, Jinxiang; He, Liu; Zhang, Chuanlun L.

    2013-01-01

    Diether and tetraether lipids are fundamental components of the archaeal cell membrane. Archaea adjust the degree of tetraether lipid cyclization in order to maintain functional membranes and cellular homeostasis when confronted with pH and/or thermal stress. Thus, the ability to adjust tetraether lipid composition likely represents a critical phenotypic trait that enabled archaeal diversification into environments characterized by extremes in pH and/or temperature. Here we assess the relationship between geochemical variation, core- and polar-isoprenoid glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT, respectively) lipid composition, and archaeal 16S rRNA gene diversity and abundance in 27 geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The composition and abundance of C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal ecosystems were distinct from surrounding soils, indicating that they are synthesized endogenously. With the exception of GDGT-0 (no cyclopentyl rings), the abundances of individual C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids were significantly correlated. The abundance of a number of individual tetraether lipids varied positively with the relative abundance of individual 16S rRNA gene sequences, most notably crenarchaeol in both the core and polar GDGT fraction and sequences closely affiliated with Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. This finding supports the proposal that crenarchaeol is a biomarker for nitrifying archaea. Variation in the degree of cyclization of C- and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal mats and sediments could best be explained by variation in spring pH, with lipids from acidic environments tending to have, on average, more internal cyclic rings than those from higher pH ecosystems. Likewise, variation in the phylogenetic composition of archaeal 16S rRNA genes could best be explained by spring pH. In turn, the phylogenetic similarity of archaeal 16S rRNA genes was significantly correlated with the similarity

  11. The role of tetraether lipid composition in the adaptation of thermophilic archaea to acidity.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Hamilton, Trinity L; Wang, Jinxiang; He, Liu; Zhang, Chuanlun L

    2013-01-01

    Diether and tetraether lipids are fundamental components of the archaeal cell membrane. Archaea adjust the degree of tetraether lipid cyclization in order to maintain functional membranes and cellular homeostasis when confronted with pH and/or thermal stress. Thus, the ability to adjust tetraether lipid composition likely represents a critical phenotypic trait that enabled archaeal diversification into environments characterized by extremes in pH and/or temperature. Here we assess the relationship between geochemical variation, core- and polar-isoprenoid glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT, respectively) lipid composition, and archaeal 16S rRNA gene diversity and abundance in 27 geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The composition and abundance of C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal ecosystems were distinct from surrounding soils, indicating that they are synthesized endogenously. With the exception of GDGT-0 (no cyclopentyl rings), the abundances of individual C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids were significantly correlated. The abundance of a number of individual tetraether lipids varied positively with the relative abundance of individual 16S rRNA gene sequences, most notably crenarchaeol in both the core and polar GDGT fraction and sequences closely affiliated with Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. This finding supports the proposal that crenarchaeol is a biomarker for nitrifying archaea. Variation in the degree of cyclization of C- and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal mats and sediments could best be explained by variation in spring pH, with lipids from acidic environments tending to have, on average, more internal cyclic rings than those from higher pH ecosystems. Likewise, variation in the phylogenetic composition of archaeal 16S rRNA genes could best be explained by spring pH. In turn, the phylogenetic similarity of archaeal 16S rRNA genes was significantly correlated with the similarity

  12. Ontogenetic change in the lipid and fatty acid composition of scleractinian coral larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, J.; Baird, A. H.; Cohen, M. F.; Flot, J.-F.; Kamiki, T.; Meziane, T.; Tsuchiya, M.; Yamasaki, H.

    2012-06-01

    Some scleractinian coral larvae have an extraordinary capacity to delay metamorphosis, and this is reflected in the large geographic range of many species. Coral eggs typically contain a high proportion of wax esters, which have been hypothesized to provide a source of energy for long-distance dispersal. To better understand the role of lipids in the dispersal of broadcast spawning coral larvae, ontogenetic changes in the lipid and fatty acid composition of Goniastrea retiformis were measured from the eggs until larvae were 30 days old. Egg biomass was 78.8 ± 0.5% lipids, 86.3 ± 0.2% of which were wax esters, 9.3 ± 0.0% polar lipids, 4.1 ± 0.2% sterols, and 0.3 ± 0.1% triacylglycerols. The biomass of wax esters declined significantly through time, while polar lipids, sterols and triacylglycerols remained relatively constant, suggesting that wax esters are the prime source of energy for development. The most prevalent fatty acid in the eggs was palmitic acid, a marker of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium, highlighting the importance of symbiosis in coral reproductive ecology. The proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids declined through time, suggesting that they are essential for larval development. Interestingly, triacylglycerols are only abundant in the propagules that contain Symbiodinium, suggesting important differences in the energetic of dispersal among species with vertical and horizontal transmission of symbionts.

  13. Effects of sewage discharges on lipid and fatty acid composition of the Patagonian bivalve Diplodon chilensis.

    PubMed

    Rocchetta, Iara; Pasquevich, María Y; Heras, Horacio; Ríos de Molina, María del Carmen; Luquet, Carlos M

    2014-02-15

    Lipid and fatty acid (FA) composition and selected oxidative stress parameters of freshwater clams (Dipolodon chilensis), from a sewage-polluted (SMA) and a clean site, were compared. Trophic markers FA were analyzed in clams and sediment. Saturated FA (SAFA), and bacteria and sewage markers were abundant in SMA sediments, while diatom markers were 50% lower. Proportions of SAFA, branched FA, 20:5n-3 (EPA) and 22:6n-3 (DHA) were higher in SMA clams. Chronic exposure of D. chilensis to increasing eutrophication affected its lipid and FA composition. The increase in EPA and DHA proportions could be an adaptive response, which increases stress resistance but could also lead to higher susceptibility to lipid peroxidation TBARS, lipofuscins (20-fold) and GSH concentrations were higher in SMA clams. FA markers indicated terrestrial plant detritus and bacteria are important items in D. chilensis diet. Anthropogenic input in their food could be traced using specific FA as trophic markers.

  14. Fatty acid composition of plasma lipids and erythrocyte membranes during simulated extravehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skedina, M. A.; Katuntsev, V. P.; Buravkova, L. B.; Naidina, V. P.

    Ten subjects (from 27 to 41 years) have been participated in 32 experiments. They were decompressed from ground level to 40-35 kPa in altitude chamber when breathed 100% oxygen by mask and performed repeated cycles of exercises (3.0 Kcal/min). The intervals between decompressions were 3-5 days. Plasma lipid and erythrocyte membrane fatty acid composition was evaluated in the fasting venous blood before and immediately after hypobaric exposure. There were 7 cases decompression sickness (DCS). Venous gas bubbles (GB) were detected in 27 cases (84.4%). Any significant changes in the fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes and plasma didn't practically induce after the first decompression. However, by the beginning of the second decompression the total lipid level in erythrocyte membranes decreased from 54.6 mg% to 40.4 mg% in group with DCS symptoms and from 51.2 mg% to 35.2 mg% (p < 0.05) without DCS symptoms. In group with DCS symptoms a tendency to increased level of saturated fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes (16:0, 18:0), the level of the polyunsaturated linoleic fatty acid (18:2) and arachidonic acid (20:4) tended to be decreased by the beginning of the second decompression. Insignificant changes in blood plasma fatty acid composition was observed in both groups. The obtained biochemical data that indicated the simulated extravehicular activity (EVA) condition is accompanied by the certain changes in the blood lipid metabolism, structural and functional state of erythrocyte membranes, which are reversible. The most pronounced changes are found in subjects with DCS symptoms.

  15. Conjugated linoleic acid alters growth performance, tissue lipid deposition, and fatty acid composition of darkbarbel catfish (Pelteobagrus vachelli).

    PubMed

    Dong, Gui-Fang; Liu, Wen-Zuo; Wu, Lin-Zhou; Yu, Deng-Hang; Huang, Feng; Li, Peng-Cheng; Yang, Yan-Ou

    2015-02-01

    Fatty liver syndrome is a prevalent problem of farmed fish. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has received increased attention recently as a fat-reducing fatty acid to control fat deposition in mammals. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether dietary CLA can reduce tissue lipid content of darkbarbel catfish (Pelteobagrus vachelli) and whether decreased lipid content is partially due to alterations in lipid metabolism enzyme activities and fatty acid profiles. A 76-day feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary CLA on the growth, tissue lipid deposition, and fatty acid composition of darkbarbel catfish. Five diets containing 0 % (control), 0.5 % (CLA0.5), 1 % (CLA1), 2 % (CLA2), and 3 % (CLA3) CLA levels were evaluated. Results showed that fish fed with 2-3 % CLA diets showed a significantly lower specific growth rate and feed conversion efficiency than those fed with the control diet. Dietary CLA decreased the lipid contents in the liver and intraperitoneal fat with the CLA levels from 1 to 3 %. Fish fed with 2-3 % CLA diets showed significantly higher lipoprotein lipase and hepatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in liver than those of fish fed with the control, and fish fed with 1-3 % CLA diets had significantly higher pancreatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in liver than those of fish fed with the control. Dietary CLA was incorporated into liver, intraperitoneal fat, and muscle lipids, with higher percentages observed in liver compared with other tissues. Liver CLA deposition was at the expense of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). In contrast, CLA deposition appeared to be primarily at the expense of MUFA and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the intraperitoneal fat, whereas in muscle it was at the expense of n-3 PUFA. Our results suggested that CLA at a 1 % dose can reduce liver lipid content without eliciting any negative effect on growth rate in darkbarbel catfish. This lipid-lowering effect could

  16. A moderate change in temperature induces changes in fatty acid composition of storage and membrane lipids in a soil arthropod.

    PubMed

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Ellers, Jacintha

    2010-02-01

    A moderate change in ambient temperature can lead to vital physiological and biochemical adjustments in ectotherms, one of which is a change in fatty acid composition. When temperature decreases, the composition of membrane lipids (phospholipid fatty acids) is expected to become more unsaturated to be able to maintain homeoviscosity. Although different in function, storage lipids (triacylglycerol fatty acids) are expected to respond to temperature changes in a similar way. Age-specific differences, however, could influence this temperature response between different life stages. Here, we investigate if fatty acid composition of membrane and storage lipids responds similarly to temperature changes for two different life stages of Orchesella cincta. Juveniles and adults were cold acclimated (15 degrees C-->5 degrees C) for 28 days and then re-acclimated (5 degrees C-->15 degrees C) for another 28 days. We found adult membranes had a more unsaturated fatty acid composition than juveniles. Membrane lipids became more unsaturated during cold acclimation, and a reversed response occurred during warm acclimation. Membrane lipids, however, showed no warm acclimation, possibly due to the moderate temperature change. The ability to adjust storage lipid composition to moderate changes in ambient temperature may be an underestimated fitness component of temperature adaptation because fluidity of storage lipids permits accessibility of enzymes to energy reserves.

  17. Drosophila TRF2 and TAF9 regulate lipid droplet size and phospholipid fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Lam, Sin Man; Xin, Jingxue; Yang, Xiao; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Shui, Guanghou; Huang, Xun

    2017-03-01

    The general transcription factor TBP (TATA-box binding protein) and its associated factors (TAFs) together form the TFIID complex, which directs transcription initiation. Through RNAi and mutant analysis, we identified a specific TBP family protein, TRF2, and a set of TAFs that regulate lipid droplet (LD) size in the Drosophila larval fat body. Among the three Drosophila TBP genes, trf2, tbp and trf1, only loss of function of trf2 results in increased LD size. Moreover, TRF2 and TAF9 regulate fatty acid composition of several classes of phospholipids. Through RNA profiling, we found that TRF2 and TAF9 affects the transcription of a common set of genes, including peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes that affect phospholipid fatty acid composition. We also found that knockdown of several TRF2 and TAF9 target genes results in large LDs, a phenotype which is similar to that of trf2 mutants. Together, these findings provide new insights into the specific role of the general transcription machinery in lipid homeostasis.

  18. Drosophila TRF2 and TAF9 regulate lipid droplet size and phospholipid fatty acid composition

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wei; Lam, Sin Man; Xin, Jingxue; Yang, Xiao; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Shui, Guanghou

    2017-01-01

    The general transcription factor TBP (TATA-box binding protein) and its associated factors (TAFs) together form the TFIID complex, which directs transcription initiation. Through RNAi and mutant analysis, we identified a specific TBP family protein, TRF2, and a set of TAFs that regulate lipid droplet (LD) size in the Drosophila larval fat body. Among the three Drosophila TBP genes, trf2, tbp and trf1, only loss of function of trf2 results in increased LD size. Moreover, TRF2 and TAF9 regulate fatty acid composition of several classes of phospholipids. Through RNA profiling, we found that TRF2 and TAF9 affects the transcription of a common set of genes, including peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes that affect phospholipid fatty acid composition. We also found that knockdown of several TRF2 and TAF9 target genes results in large LDs, a phenotype which is similar to that of trf2 mutants. Together, these findings provide new insights into the specific role of the general transcription machinery in lipid homeostasis. PMID:28273089

  19. Parenteral lipid fatty acid composition directly determines the fatty acid composition of red blood cell and brain lipids in preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies in enterally-fed infants have shown a positive effect of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) supplementatin on neurodevelopment. The effect of n-3 LCPUFA in fish oil-based parenteral (PN) lipid emulsions on neuronal tissues of PN-fed preterm infants is unknown. The objective ...

  20. Changes in fatty acid composition and lipid profile during koji fermentation and their relationships with soy sauce flavour.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yunzi; Chen, Zhiyao; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Haifeng; Cui, Chun; Zhao, Mouming

    2014-09-01

    Evolution of lipids during koji fermentation and the effect of lipase supplementation on the sensory properties of soy sauce were investigated. Results showed that total lipids of the koji samples were in the range of 16-21%. The extracted lipid of initial koji consisted mainly of triacylglycerols (TAGs, >98%), followed by phospholipids (PLs), diglycerides (DAGs), monoacylglycerols (MAGs) and free fatty acids (FFAs). As the fermentation proceeded, peroxide value of the lipids decreased while carbonyl value increased (p<0.05). Linoleic acid was utilised fastest according to the fatty acid composition of total lipids, and preferential degradation of PLs to liberate FFAs was also observed. Moreover, phospholipase supplementation had significant influence on the sensory characteristics of soy sauce, especially enhanced (p<0.05) scores for the umami and kokumi taste attributes. All these results indicated that the control of PLs utilisation during fermentation was a potential method to improve soy sauce's characteristic taste.

  1. Lipid content and fatty acid composition of green algae Scenedesmus obliquus grown in a constant cell density apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, K. J.; Nakhost, Z.; Barzana, E.; Karel, M.

    1987-01-01

    The lipids of alga Scenedesmus obliquus grown under controlled conditions were separated and fractionated by column and thin-layer chromatography, and fatty acid composition of each lipid component was studied by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). Total lipids were 11.17%, and neutral lipid, glycolipid and phospholipid fractions were 7.24%, 2.45% and 1.48% on a dry weight basis, respectively. The major neutral lipids were diglycerides, triglycerides, free sterols, hydrocarbons and sterol esters. The glycolipids were: monogalactosyl diglyceride, digalactosyl diglyceride, esterified sterol glycoside, and sterol glycoside. The phospholipids included: phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl glycerol and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. Fourteen fatty acids were identified in the four lipid fractions by GLC. The main fatty acids were C18:2, C16:0, C18:3(alpha), C18:1, C16:3, C16:1, and C16:4. Total unsaturated fatty acid and essential fatty acid compositions of the total algal lipids were 80% and 38%, respectively.

  2. Responses in growth, lipid accumulation, and fatty acid composition of four oleaginous microalgae to different nitrogen sources and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Wan, Linglin; Li, Aifen; Zhang, Chengwu

    2013-11-01

    Nitrogen deficiency is an effective strategy for enhancing lipid production in microalgae. Close relationships exist among lipid production, microalgal species, and nitrogen sources. We report growth, lipid accumulation, and fatty acid composition in four microalgae ( Chlorococcum ellipsoideum UTEX972, Chlorococcum nivale LB2225, Chlorococcum tatrense UTEX2227, and Scenedesmus deserticola JNU19) under nitrate- and urea-nitrogen deficiencies. We found three patterns of response to nitrogen deficiency: Type-A (decrease in biomass and increase in lipid content), Type-B (reduction in both biomass and lipid content), and Type-C (enhancement of both biomass and lipid content). Type-C microalgae are potential candidates for large-scale oil production. Chlorococcum ellipsoideum, for example, exhibited a neutral lipid production of up to 239.6 mg/(L·d) under urea-nitrogen deficiency. In addition, nitrogen deficiency showed only a slight influence on lipid fractions and fatty acid composition. Our study provides useful information for further screening hyper-lipid microalgal strains for biofuel production.

  3. Distinctive lipid composition of the copepod Limnocalanus macrurus with a high abundance of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Hiltunen, Minna; Strandberg, Ursula; Keinänen, Markku; Taipale, Sami; Kankaala, Paula

    2014-09-01

    We studied the copepod Limnocalanus macrurus for seasonal variation in the composition of fatty acids, wax esters and sterols in large boreal lakes, where it occurs as a glacial-relict. Vast wax ester reserves of Limnocalanus were accumulated in a period of only two months, and comprised mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and saturated fatty alcohols. In winter, the mobilization of wax esters was selective, and the proportion of long-chain polyunsaturated wax esters declined first. PUFA accounted for >50% of all fatty acids throughout the year reaching up to ca. 65% during late summer and fall. Long-chain PUFA 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 together comprised 17-40% of all fatty acids. The rarely reported C24 and C26 very-long-chain PUFA (VLC-PUFA) comprised 6.2 ± 3.4 % of all fatty acids in August and 2.1 ± 1.7% in September. The VLC-PUFA are presumably synthesized by Limnocalanus from shorter chain-length precursors because they were not found in the potential food sources. We hypothesize that these VLC-PUFA help Limnocalanus to maximize lipid reserves when food is abundant. Sterol content of Limnocalanus, consisting ca. 90% of cholesterol, did not show great seasonal variation. As a lipid-rich copepod with high abundance of PUFA, Limnocalanus is excellent quality food for fish. The VLC-PUFA were also detected in planktivorous fish, suggesting that these compounds can be used as a trophic marker indicating feeding on Limnocalanus.

  4. Dynamics of lipid and fatty acid composition of shallow-water corals under thermal stress: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbs, A. B.; Yakovleva, I. M.

    2012-03-01

    Coral bleaching induces changes in lipid and fatty acid composition that result in low lipid content, reducing the likelihood of coral survival. Species-specific differences in the metabolism of lipid reserves may contribute to the differential resistance of corals under acute heat exposures. Here, we examined the dynamics of lipids and fatty acid abundance in corals subjected to short-term heat stress. The stony corals Acropora intermedia, Montipora digitata, and the soft coral Sinularia capitalis all showed a 60-75% decline in both storage and structural lipids. However, S. capitalis and M. digitata exhibited no significant change in the percentages of structural lipids (i.e., polar lipids and sterols) until they had lost 90-95% of their endosymbionts, whereas A. intermedia showed a rapid decline in structural lipids after a 50% loss of symbionts. After a 90-95% loss of symbionts under heat stress, all three corals showed a relative depletion of polyunsaturated fatty acids that had symbiont biomarkers, suggesting that polyunsaturated fatty acids were translocated from the symbiont to the coral host tissue.

  5. Changes in the Total Lipid, Neutral Lipid, Phospholipid and Fatty Acid Composition of Phospholipid Fractions during Pastırma Processing, a Dry-Cured Meat Product

    PubMed Central

    Aksu, Muhammet Irfan; Dogan, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Pastırma is a dry-cured meat product, produced from whole beef or water buffalo muscles. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of production stages (raw meat, after curing, after 2nd drying and pastırma) on the total lipid, neutral lipid, phospholipid and fatty acid composition of phospholipid fraction of pastırma produced from beef M. Longissimus dorsi muscles. The pH and colour (L*, a* and b*) analyses were also performed in raw meat and pastırma. It was found that pastırma production stages had significant effects (p<0.01) on the total amounts of lipid, neutral lipid and phospholipid, and the highest amounts of lipid, neutral lipid and phospholipid were detected in pastırma. In pastırma, neutral lipid ratio was determined as 79.33±2.06% and phospholipid ratio as 20.67±2.06%. Phospholipids was proportionately lower in pastırma than raw meat. Pastırma production stages affected pentadecanoic acid (15:1) (p<0.01), linoleic acid (18:2n-6) (p<0.05), γ-linoleic acid (18:3n-6) (p<0.05), erucic acid (22:1n-9) (p<0.05), docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-6) (p<0.05), total unsaturated fatty acid (ΣUSFA) (p<0.05) and total saturated fatty acid (ΣSFA) (p<0.05) ratios of phospholipid fraction and also the moisture content (p<0.01). Pastırma process also affected pH and colour (L*, a* and b*) values (p<0.01), and these values were higher in pastırma than raw meat. PMID:28316467

  6. Lipid and fatty acid composition of Gluconobacter oxydans before and after intracytoplasmic membrane formation.

    PubMed Central

    Heefner, D L; Claus, G W

    1978-01-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans differentiates by forming quantities of intracytoplasmic membranes at the end of exponential growth, and this formation occurs concurrently with a 60% increase in cellular lipid. The present study was initiated to determine whether this newly synthesized lipid differed from that extracted before intracytoplasmic membrane synthesis. Undifferentiated exponential-phase cells were found to contain 30% phosphatidylcholine, 27.1% caridolipin, 25% phosphatidylethanolamine, 12.5% phosphatidylglycerol, 0.4% phosphatidic acid, 0.2% phosphatidylserine, and four additional unidentified lipids totaling less than 5%. The only change detected after formation of intracytoplasmic membranes was a slight decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine and a corresponding increase in phosphatidylcholine. An examination of lipid hydrolysates revealed 11 different fatty acids in the lipids from each cell type. Hexadecanoic acid and monounsaturated octadecenoic accounted for more than 75% of the total fatty acids for both cell types. Proportional changes were noted in all fatty acids except octadecenoate. Anteiso-pentadecanoate comprised less than 1% of the fatty acids from undifferentiated cells but more than 13% of the total fatty acids from cells containing intracytoplasmic membranes. These results suggest that anteiso-pentadecanoate formation closely parallels the formation of intracytoplasmic membranes. Increased concentrations of this fatty acid may contribute to the fluidity necessary for plasma membrane convolution during intracytoplasmic membrane development. PMID:649571

  7. BIOCHEMISTRY OF DINOFLAGELLATE LIPIDS, WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO THE FATTY ACID AND STEROL COMPOSITION OF A KARENIA BREVIS BLOOM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leblond, Jeffrey D., Terence J. Evens and Peter J. Chapman. 2003. Biochemistry of Dinoflagellate Lipids, with Particular Reference to the Fatty Acid and Sterol Composition of a Karenia brevis Bloom. Phycologia. 42(4):324-331. (ERL,GB 1160).

    The harmful marine dinoflagella...

  8. Lipidomic Profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii Reveals Critical Changes in Lipid Composition in Response to Acetic Acid Stress

    PubMed Central

    Riezman, Howard; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555) cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L−1, while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L−1 acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS) showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP)2C 2.2×) and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP)2C 2.7×), when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to generate large

  9. Lipidomic profiling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii reveals critical changes in lipid composition in response to acetic acid stress.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Lina; Santos, Aline Xs; Riezman, Howard; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    When using microorganisms as cell factories in the production of bio-based fuels or chemicals from lignocellulosic hydrolysate, inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid, released from the biomass, reduce the production rate. The undissociated form of acetic acid enters the cell by passive diffusion across the lipid bilayer, mediating toxic effects inside the cell. In order to elucidate a possible link between lipid composition and acetic acid stress, the present study presents detailed lipidomic profiling of the major lipid species found in the plasma membrane, including glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CEN.PK 113_7D) and Zygosaccharomyces bailii (CBS7555) cultured with acetic acid. Detailed physiological characterization of the response of the two yeasts to acetic acid has also been performed in aerobic batch cultivations using bioreactors. Physiological characterization revealed, as expected, that Z. bailii is more tolerant to acetic acid than S. cerevisiae. Z. bailii grew at acetic acid concentrations above 24 g L(-1), while limited growth of S. cerevisiae was observed after 11 h when cultured with only 12 g L(-1) acetic acid. Detailed lipidomic profiling using electrospray ionization, multiple-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry (ESI-MRM-MS) showed remarkable changes in the glycerophospholipid composition of Z. bailii, including an increase in saturated glycerophospholipids and considerable increases in complex sphingolipids in both S. cerevisiae (IPC 6.2×, MIPC 9.1×, M(IP)2C 2.2×) and Z. bailii (IPC 4.9×, MIPC 2.7×, M(IP)2C 2.7×), when cultured with acetic acid. In addition, the basal level of complex sphingolipids was significantly higher in Z. bailii than in S. cerevisiae, further emphasizing the proposed link between lipid saturation, high sphingolipid levels and acetic acid tolerance. The results also suggest that acetic acid tolerance is associated with the ability of a given strain to generate large

  10. Comparative Analysis of Lipid Content and Fatty Acid Composition of Commercially Important Fish and Shellfish from Sri Lanka and Japan.

    PubMed

    Devadason, Chandravathany; Jayasinghe, Chamila; Sivakanesan, Ramiah; Senarath, Samanthika; Beppu, Fumiaki; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2016-01-01

    Sri Lanka is surrounded by the Indian Ocean, allowing plenty of fishes to be caught. Moreover, these fishes represent one of the undocumented fish resources in the world and their detailed lipid profiles have not been previously examined. In this study, the lipid content and fatty acid composition of 50 commercially important fishes from the Indian Ocean (Sri Lanka) and the Pacific Ocean (Japan) were compared. The total lipid content and fatty acid composition, including eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5n-3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6n-3, DHA), differed significantly among species. Fish from the Pacific Ocean had higher proportions of fatty acids, including EPA and DHA. Herrings and mackerels from both oceanic areas demonstrated high levels of EPA and DHA, and n-3/n-6 ratio. Brackish and freshwater fishes from both groups showed low levels of PUFAs. Fish from the Indian Ocean were high in n-6 fatty acids. Monounsaturated fatty acid levels were high in omnivorous fish from the Pacific Ocean, and saturated fatty acid levels were high in fish from the Indian Ocean. The results of this study will be of value in determining the dietary usefulness of fish caught in Sri Lanka.

  11. Lipid Classes, Fatty Acid Composition, and Glycerolipid Molecular Species of the Red Alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla, a Prostaglandin-Producing Seaweed.

    PubMed

    Honda, Masaki; Ishimaru, Takashi; Itabashi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla is a well-known producer of prostaglandins, such as PGE2 and PGF2α. In this study, the characteristics of glycerolipids as substrates of prostaglandin production were clarified, and the lipid classes, fatty acid composition, and glycerolipid molecular species were investigated in detail. The major lipid classes were monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), as well as phosphatidylcholine (PC), which accounted for 43.0% of the total lipid profile. Arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), a prostaglandin precursor, and palmitic acid (16:0) were the predominant fatty acids in the total lipid profile. The 20:4n-6 content was significantly high in MGDG and PC (more than 60%), and the 16:0 content was significantly high in DGDG and SQDG (more than 50%). Chiral-phase high-performance liquid chromatography determined that fatty acids were esterified at the sn-1 and sn-2 positions of those lipids. The main glycerolipid molecular species were 20:4n-6/20:4n-6 (sn-1/sn-2) for MGDG (56.5%) and PC (40.0%), and 20:4n-6/16:0 for DGDG (75.4%) and SQDG (58.4%). Thus, it was considered that the glycerolipid molecular species containing one or two 20:4n-6 were the major substrates for prostaglandin production in G. vermiculophylla.

  12. Lipid and fatty acid composition of muga silkworm, Antheraea assama, host plants in relation to silkworm growth.

    PubMed

    Unni, B G; Kakoty, A C; Khanikor, D; Bhattacharya, P R; Pathak, M G; Pillai, K; Pillai, R; Choudhury, A; Saikia, P C; Ghosh, A C

    1996-05-01

    The lipid and fatty acid composition of the leaves (tender, medium and mature) of muga host plants, Machilus bombycina, Litsaea monopetala (primary food plants) and L. cubeba and L. salicifolia (family: Lauraceae) (secondary food plants) was investigated by standard procedures, gas chromatography after saponification and esterification. The total lipid content of M. bombycina and L. monopetala leaves was recorded to be higher (16 and 18 g%), respectively, than that of L. cubeba (10 g%) and L. salicifolia (12 g%). GC analysis identified the presence of eight fatty acids (C14 to C22) and the concentration varied from 0.0297 to 8.1572 g% dry leaf powder. Among the fatty acids, (C14 to C22), polyunsaturated fatty acids were recorded to be highest in concentration in mature leaves of the primary host plants. The concentrations of saturated and polyunsatuated fatty acids were found to be at a minimum level in all the types of leaves of secondary muga host plants.

  13. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis.

  14. Chlorogenic acid from honeysuckle improves hepatic lipid dysregulation and modulates hepatic fatty acid composition in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Ruan, Zheng; Wen, Yanmei; Yang, Yuhui; Mi, Shumei; Zhou, Lili; Wu, Xin; Ding, Sheng; Deng, Zeyuan; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-03-01

    Chlorogenic acid as a natural hydroxycinnamic acid has protective effect for liver. Endotoxin induced metabolic disorder, such as lipid dysregulation and hyperlipidemia. In this study, we investigated the effect of chlorogenic acid in rats with chronic endotoxin infusion. The Sprague-Dawley rats with lipid metabolic disorder (LD group) were intraperitoneally injected endotoxin. And the rats of chlorogenic acid-LD group were daily received chlorogenic acid by intragastric administration. In chlorogenic acid-LD group, the area of visceral adipocyte was decreased and liver injury was ameliorated, as compared to LD group. In chlorogenic acid-LD group, serum triglycerides, free fatty acids, hepatic triglycerides and cholesterol were decreased, the proportion of C20:1, C24:1 and C18:3n-6, Δ9-18 and Δ6-desaturase activity index in the liver were decreased, and the proportion of C18:3n-3 acid was increased, compared to the LD group. Moreover, levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I, and fatty acid β-oxidation were increased in chlorogenic acid-LD group compared to LD rats, whereas levels of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase were decreased. These findings demonstrate that chlorogenic acid effectively improves hepatic lipid dysregulation in rats by regulating fatty acid metabolism enzymes, stimulating AMP-activated protein kinase activation, and modulating levels of hepatic fatty acids.

  15. Characteristic of lipids and fatty acid compositions of the neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    The lipids and fatty acids of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) were an-alyzed to clarify its lipid physiology and health benefit as marine food. Triacylglycerols were the only major component in the digestive gland (liver). In all other organs (mantle, arm, integument, and ovary), sterols and phospholipids were the major components with noticeable levels of ceramide aminoethyl phosphonate and sphingomyelin. The significant levels of sphingolipids suggest the O. bartramii lipids is a useful source for cosmetics. Although the lipid content between the liver and all other tissues markedly differed from each other, the same nine dominant fatty acids in the triacylglycerols were found in all organs; 14:0, 16:0, 18:0, 18:1n-9, 20:1n-9, 20:1n-11, 22:1n-11, 20:5n-3 (icosapentaenoic acid, EPA), and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA). Unusually high 20:1n-11 levels in the O. bartramii triacylglycerols were probably characteristic for western Pacific animal depot lipids, compared with non-detectable levels of 20:1n-11 reported in other marine animals. O. bartramii concurrently has high levels of DHA in their triacylglycerols. The major fatty acids in the phospholipids were 16:0, 18:0, 20:1n-9, EPA, and DHA without 20:1n-11. Markedly high levels of both EPA and DHA were observed in phosphatidylethanolamine, while only DHA was found as the major one in phosphatidylcholine. In particular, high levels of DHA were found both in its depot triacylglycerols and tissue phospholipids in all organs of O. bartramii, similar to that in highly migratory fishes. The high DHA levels in all its organs suggest that O. bartramii lipids is a healthy marine source for DHA supplements.

  16. Fatty Acid Composition and Lipid Profile of Diospyros mespiliformis, Albizia lebbeck, and Caesalpinia pulcherrima Seed Oils from Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oderinde, Rotimi Ayodele

    2014-01-01

    The screening of lesser-known underutilized seeds as source of food has been a way of finding solution to food insecurity in developing nations. In this regard, oil as a class of food was extracted from the seeds of Diospyros mespiliformis  (4.72 ± 0.2%), Albizia lebbeck  (6.40 ± 0.60%), and Caesalpinia pulcherrima  (7.2 ± 0.30%). The oils were finally analyzed for their fatty acid composition, lipid classes, fatty acid distribution in the lipid fractions, and molecular speciation of the triacylglycerols, glycolipids, and phospholipids. The fatty acid composition of the oils varied with C18:2 fatty acid being the most dominant in the oils. Neutral lipids were the most abundant lipid class found in the oils while molecular species of the triacylglycerol with equivalent carbon chain number C40 was majorly present in the oils of Diospyros mespiliformis and Caesalpinia pulcherrima. The present study presents lesser-known underutilized seeds as possible sources of food. PMID:26904625

  17. [Combined effect of environmental temperature and trematodes on fatty acids composition of lipids of Littorina saxatilis (Olivi 1792) (Gastropoda, Prosobranchia)].

    PubMed

    Arakelova, E S; Chebotareva, M A; Zabelinskiĭ, S A

    2004-01-01

    An effect of environmental temperatures and invasion by helminthes larvae on fatty acids composition of digestive gland lipids of marine littoral gastropod Littorina saxatilis from White Sea and Barents Sea was investigated. We have compared gastropods from boreal and subarctic populations. It was found that gastropods from waters of lower temperature have increased omega3/omega6 fatty acids ratio. However, saturation index of individual membrane phospholipids was not affected. Also, content of eicosenoic acid (20:1) in individual phospholipids was not affected by temperature. Invasion increases the omega3/omega6 ratio of common lipids but not the omega3/omega6 ratio of common and individual phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidilcholine of cold water mollusks from Barents Sea that had this ratio doubled. In contrast to temperature, invasion affects the content of eicosenoic acid that was increased in the investigated organs. Adaptability of these effects is discussed regarding parasite-host system.

  18. Effects of different dietary lipid sources on growth performance and tissue fatty acid composition of juvenile swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Wang, Jiteng; Hu, Shuixin; Li, Xinyu; Jiang, Yudong; Wang, Chunlin

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary lipid sources on the growth performance and fatty acid composition of the swimming crab, Portunus trituberculatus. Four isonitrogenous and isoenergetic experimental diets were formulated to contain four separate lipid sources, including fish, soybean, rapeseed, and linseed oils (FO, SO, RO, and LO, respectively). With three replicates of 18 crabs each for each diet, crabs (initial body weight, 17.00±0.09 g) were fed twice daily for 8 weeks. There were no significant differences among these groups in terms of weight gain, specific growth rate, and hepatosomatic index. However, the RO groups' survival rate was significantly lower than FO groups. The feed conversion and protein efficiency ratios of RO groups were poorer than other groups. The proximate compositions of whole body and hepatopancreas were significantly affected by these dietary treatments. Tissue fatty acid composition mainly reflected dietary fatty acid compositions. Crabs fed FO diets exhibited significantly higher arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic acid contents in muscle and hepatopancreas compared with VO crabs. Linoleic, oleic, and linolenic acids in muscle and hepatopancreas were the highest in the SO, RO, and LO groups, respectively. The present study suggested that SO and LO could substitute for FO in fishmeal-based diets for swimming crabs, without affecting growth performance and survival.

  19. [Effect of acetylsalicylic acid in complex with lipid nanostructures of various compositions on human platelet aggregation].

    PubMed

    Suslina, Z A; Prokhorov, D I; Shilova, A G; Kaplun, A P; Ionova, V G; Seĭfulla, R D

    2011-01-01

    The effect of lipid nanocomplexes loaded with acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) on platelet aggregation in vitro was investigated. The antithrombotic effect of aspirin in complex with liposomes prepared from pig brain glycosphingolipids is not only significantly higher compared to control, but also accompanied by leveling of the development of proaggregant effects. It was shown that ADP-induced platelet aggregation is reduced by the introduction of electrostatic charge in the structure of lipid bilayer of liposomes. The effect achieved for the liposomes possessing a negative charge was more pronounced in comparison to the effect of positively charged liposomes.

  20. A comparative analysis of fatty acid composition of root and shoot lipids in Zea mays under copper and cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Chaffai, R; Seybou, T N; Marzouk, B; El Ferjani, E

    2009-03-01

    A comparative analysis of fatty acid composition was conducted in maize (Zea mays L.) under copper and cadmium stress. The unsaturation level (double-bond index) of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) was increased in response to both metal treatments, whereas the phosphatidylinositol (PI), the phosphatidylcholine (PC) showed no significant changes. The Cu-treated roots showed a marked increase (about 2-fold) in the phospholipid (PL) content, while the Cd-treated roots showed a slight but insignificant increase. The steryl lipid SL/PL ratio was markedly decreased in response to Cu stress, and therefore, may indicate an activated phospholipid biosynthesis and turnover, in response to damage caused by Cu stress. The double bond indices of chloroplastic lipids: phosphatidylglycerol (PG), monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) revealed a similar but not identical pattern of change. The PG and MGDG contents in shoots were markedly decreased under Cu (by 53 and 48%) and Cd (by 78 and 65%) stress. The increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) content in roots induced by both metals indicates lipid peroxidation. Generally, in the presence of Cu fatty acid composition was markedly modulated but to lesser extent under Cd stress. These results suggest that changes in the fatty acid composition under Cu and Cd stress conditions are metal-specific and may therefore result in differential metal tolerance.

  1. The effects of season on fatty acid composition and ω3/ω6 ratios of northern pike ( Esox lucius L., 1758) muscle lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Ramazan; Bulut, Sait; Konuk, Muhsin

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of season on fatty acid composition, total lipids, and ω3/ω6 ratios of northern pike muscle lipids in Kizilirmak River (Kirikkale, Turkey) were investigated. A total of 35 different fatty acids were determined in gas chromatography. Among these, palmitic, oleic, and palmitoleic acids had the highest proportion. The main polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) were found to be docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and arachidonic acid. There were more PUFAs than monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in all seasons. Similarly, the percentages of ω3 fatty acids were higher than those of total ω6 fatty acids in the fatty acid composition. ω3/ω6 ratios were calculated as 1.53, 1.32, 1.97, and 1.71 in spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively. Overall, we found that the fatty acid composition and ω3/ω6 fatty acid ratio in the muscle of northern pike were significantly influenced by season.

  2. Lipids and Composition of Fatty Acids of Saccharina latissima Cultivated Year-Round in Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Gonçalo S; Holdt, Susan L; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-07-15

    This study is evaluating the seasonal lipid and fatty acid composition of the brown seaweed Saccharina latissima. Biomass was sampled throughout the year (bi-monthly) at the commercial cultivation site near a fish farm in an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) and at a reference site in Denmark (2013-2014). Generally, there was no difference in the biomass composition between sites; however, significant seasonal changes were found. The lipid concentration varied from 0.62%-0.88% dry weight (DW) in July to 3.33%-3.35% DW in November (p < 0.05) in both sites. The fatty acid composition in January was significantly different from all the other sampling months. The dissimilarities were mainly explained by changes in the relative abundance of 20:5n-3 (13.12%-33.35%), 14:0 (11.07%-29.37%) and 18:1n-9 (10.15%-16.94%). Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA's) made up more than half of the fatty acids with a maximum in July (52.3%-54.0% fatty acid methyl esters; FAME). This including the most appreciated health beneficial PUFA's, eicosapentaenoic (EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), but also arachidonic (ARA) and stearidonic acid (SDA), which are not found in land vegetables such as cabbage and lettuce. Compared to fat (salmon) and lean fish (cod) this seaweed species contains higher proportions of ARA and SDA, but lower EPA (only cod) and DHA. Conclusively, the season of harvest is important for the choice of lipid quantity and quality, but the marine vegetables provide better sources of EPA, DHA and long-chain (LC)-PUFA's in general compared to traditional vegetables.

  3. Lipids and Composition of Fatty Acids of Saccharina latissima Cultivated Year-Round in Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, Gonçalo S.; Holdt, Susan L.; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    This study is evaluating the seasonal lipid and fatty acid composition of the brown seaweed Saccharina latissima. Biomass was sampled throughout the year (bi-monthly) at the commercial cultivation site near a fish farm in an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) and at a reference site in Denmark (2013–2014). Generally, there was no difference in the biomass composition between sites; however, significant seasonal changes were found. The lipid concentration varied from 0.62%–0.88% dry weight (DW) in July to 3.33%–3.35% DW in November (p < 0.05) in both sites. The fatty acid composition in January was significantly different from all the other sampling months. The dissimilarities were mainly explained by changes in the relative abundance of 20:5n-3 (13.12%–33.35%), 14:0 (11.07%–29.37%) and 18:1n-9 (10.15%–16.94%). Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA’s) made up more than half of the fatty acids with a maximum in July (52.3%–54.0% fatty acid methyl esters; FAME). This including the most appreciated health beneficial PUFA’s, eicosapentaenoic (EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), but also arachidonic (ARA) and stearidonic acid (SDA), which are not found in land vegetables such as cabbage and lettuce. Compared to fat (salmon) and lean fish (cod) this seaweed species contains higher proportions of ARA and SDA, but lower EPA (only cod) and DHA. Conclusively, the season of harvest is important for the choice of lipid quantity and quality, but the marine vegetables provide better sources of EPA, DHA and long-chain (LC)-PUFA’s in general compared to traditional vegetables. PMID:26184241

  4. A Biochemical GC-MS Application for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory: Determination of Fatty Acid Composition of Arabidopsis thaliana Lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Jared D.; Catino, Arthur J., III.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Lassman, Michael E.; Leber, Phyllis A.; Reinard, Michael D.; Strotman, Neil A.; Pike, Carl S.

    2000-11-01

    A biochemical application of GC-MS in which students determine the qualitative and quantitative lipid composition of plant leaf samples is described. There are four facets of this project: (i) synthesis and characterization of individual fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) as standards for GC-MS analysis, (ii) isolation of the fatty acids of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, both wild type and mutants, as FAMEs, (iii) GC-MS analysis of the Arabidopsis leaf extracts for fatty acid composition, and (iv) comparison of the class results with the literature data for both wild type and the four mutants and with a biochemical model of two pathways for lipid synthesis in Arabidopsis leaves. Because this experimental paradigm links organic synthesis and spectral characterization by IR and NMR, both 1H and 13C, with separation and identification via GC-MS analysis, all of the key areas of laboratory procedure are encompassed in this single project. The experimental design permits a myriad of hypothesis-testing variations. Plants can be grown at different temperatures and for different lengths of time to determine if and how fatty acid composition varies. Different types of plant leaves can be examined to ascertain if each has a unique fatty acid fingerprint.

  5. [Application BAA "Glucorn" for the correction fatty-acid composition of pulmonary surfactant lipids in children-residents of radiation contaminated territories].

    PubMed

    Parkhomenko, V M; Kolpakov, I Ie; Briuzhina, T S; Artemchuk, H P

    2011-01-01

    During application of BAA "Glucorn" for the correction of fatty-acid composition of pulmonary surfactant lipids in children-residents of radiation contaminated territories detected changes, evidence about increasing adaptation-compensatory processes in lipid membrane structures of pulmonary surfactant and respiratory tracts epithelium, activation of enzymatic pathway conversion of polyunsaturated fatty acids in their derivations--eicosanoids in absence the changes lipid peroxydation.

  6. Influence of lipid profile and fatty acid composition on the oxidation behavior of rat and guinea pig low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M; Merlos, M; Adzet, T; Laguna, J C

    1998-02-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation is one of the first steps proposed for the development of atherosclerosis. Since lipid profile and fatty acid composition may affect this process, we studied the influence of these factors on the oxidation behavior of rat and guinea pig LDL. Marked compositional differences were observed. Thus, the main lipid carried by rat LDL was triglyceride (TG) (35.8 +/- 5.8%, w/w) whereas total cholesterol (TC) represented 23.8 +/- 3.0%. In contrast, guinea pig LDL contained 13.2 +/- 2% of TG and 44.8 +/- 4.5% of TC. Rat LDL contained higher 20:4(n-6) molar percentages than guinea pig LDL. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) production (255 +/- 26 and 137 +/- 13 nmol malondialdehyde/mg prot. for rat and guinea pig LDL, respectively) and the maximum rate of conjugated dienes (CD) formation (485 +/- 93 and 77 +/- 11 nmol CD/min/mg protein for rat and guinea pig LDL, respectively) showed that rat LDL are less resistant to oxidation in vitro than guinea pig LDL. The higher oxidation rate of rat LDL seems to be related to its lipid profile, mainly to the high proportion of TG, and to the high content of 20:4(n-6), which is one of the fatty acids most prone to oxidation.

  7. Effect of salinity stress on growth, lipid productivity, fatty acid composition, and biodiesel properties in Acutodesmus obliquus and Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Priti Raj; Fulekar, Madhusudan H; Karuna, Mallampalli Sri Lakshmi

    2017-04-07

    Two microalgae strains including Chlorella vulgaris and Acutodesmus obliquus were grown on BG11 medium with salinity stress ranging from 0.06 to 0.4 M NaCl. Highest lipid content in C. vulgaris and A. obliquus was 49 and 43% in BG11 amended with 0.4 M NaCl. The microalgal strains C. vulgaris and A. obliquus grow better at 0.06 M NaCl concentration than control condition. At 0.06 M NaCl, improved dry biomass content in C. vulgaris and A. obliquus was 0.92 and 0.68 gL(-1), respectively. Stress biomarkers like reactive oxygen species, antioxidant enzyme catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase were also lowest at 0.06 M NaCl concentration revealing that both the microalgal strains are well acclimatized at 0.06 M NaCl concentration. The fatty acid composition of the investigated microalgal strains was also improved by increased NaCl concentration. At 0.4 M NaCl, palmitic acid (37%), oleic acid (15.5%), and linoleic acid (20%) were the dominant fatty acids in C. vulgaris while palmitic acid (54%) and stearic acid (26.6%) were major fatty acids found in A. obliquus. Fatty acid profiling of C. vulgaris and A. obliquus significantly varied with salinity concentration. Therefore, the study showed that salt stress is an effective stress that could increase not only the lipid content but also improved the fatty acid composition which could make C. vulgaris and A. obliquus potential strains for biodiesel production.

  8. Relation of fatty acid composition in lead-exposed mallards to fat mobilization, lipid peroxidation and alkaline phosphatase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mateo, R.; Beyer, W.N.; Spann, J.W.; Hoffman, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    The increase of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in animal tissues has been proposed as a mechanism of Pb poisoning through lipid peroxidation or altered eicosanoids metabolism. We have studied fatty acid (FA) composition in liver and brain of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) feeding for three weeks on diets containing combinations of low or high levels of vitamin E (20 or 200 UI/kg) and Pb (0 or 2 g/kg). Saturated FA, n-6 PUFA and total concentrations of FA were higher in livers of Pb-exposed mallards, but not in their brains. The percentage of n-6 PUFA in liver and brain was slightly higher in Pb-exposed mallards. The increase of n-6 PUFA in liver was associated with increased triglycerides and cholesterol in plasma, thus could be in part attributed to feed refusal and fat mobilization. The hepatic ratios between adrenic acid (22:4 n-6) and arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) or between adrenic acid and linoleic acid (18:2 n-6) were higher in Pb exposed birds, supporting the existing hypothesis of increased fatty acid elongation by Pb. Among the possible consequences of increased n-6 PUFA concentration in tissues, we found increased lipid peroxidation in liver without important histopathological changes, and decreased plasma alkaline phosphatase activity that may reflect altered bone metabolism in birds.

  9. Effect of culture conditions on growth, lipid content, and fatty acid composition of Aurantiochytrium mangrovei strain BL10.

    PubMed

    Chaung, Kai-Chuang; Chu, Chun-Yao; Su, Yu-Ming; Chen, Yi-Min

    2012-08-10

    This study explored the influence of various culture conditions on the biomass, lipid content, production of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and fatty acid composition of Aurantiochytrium mangrovei strain BL10. The variables examined in this study include the species and concentration of salt, the concentrations of the two substrates glucose and yeast extract, the level of dissolved oxygen, the cerulenin treatment, and the stages of BL10 growth. Our results demonstrate that BL10 culture produces maximum biomass when salinity levels are between 0.2 and 3.0%. Decreasing salinity to 0.1% resulted in a considerable decrease in the biomass, lipid content, DHA production, and DHA to palmitic acid (PA) (DHA/PA) ratio, signifying deterioration in the quality of the oil produced. The addition of 0.9% sodium sulfate to replenish salinity from 0.1% to 1.0% successfully recovered biomass, lipid content and DHA production levels; however, this also led to a decrease in DHA/PA ratio. An increase in oxygen and cerulenin levels resulted in a concomitant decrease in the DHA to docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (DHA/DPA) ratio in BL10 oil. Furthermore, the DHA/DPA and DHA/PA ratios varied considerably before and after the termination of cell division, which occurred around the 24 hour mark. These results could serve as a foundation for elucidating the biochemistry underlying the accumulation of lipids, and a definition of the extrinsic (environmental or nutritional) and intrinsic (cell growth stage) factors that influence lipid quality and the production of DHA by BL10.

  10. Lipid content and fatty acid composition of the digital cushion of bulls offered different amounts of linseed.

    PubMed

    Baird, L G; Dawson, L E R; Young, I S; O'Connell, N E

    2010-07-01

    Previous research suggests that the digital cushion, a shock-absorbing structure in the claw, plays an important role in protecting cattle from lameness. This study aimed to assess the degree to which nutritional factors influence the composition of the digital cushion. This involved quantifying lipid content and fatty acid composition differences in digital cushion tissue from cattle offered diets with different amounts of linseed. Forty-six bulls were allocated to 1 of 4 treatments, which were applied for an average of 140 +/- 27 d during the finishing period. The treatments consisted of a linseed supplement offered once daily on top of the basal diet (grass silage:concentrate) at 0, 400, 800, or 1,200 g of supplement/animal per day. For each treatment, the concentrate offered was adjusted to ensure that total estimated ME intake was constant across treatments. Target BW at slaughter was 540 kg. Legs were collected in 3 batches after 120, 147 and 185 d on experiment. Six samples of the digital cushion were dissected from the right lateral hind claw of each animal. Lipids were extracted and expressed as a proportion of fresh tissue, and fatty acid composition of the digital cushion was determined by gas chromatography. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, with diet, location within the digital cushion, and their interactions as fixed effects and fat content (grams per 100 g of tissue) as a covariate. Linear or quadratic contrasts were examined. The lipid content of digital cushion tissue differed between sampling locations (P < 0.001) but did not vary by treatment. There were quadratic responses to increasing linseed supplementation for several fatty acids. Although the overall proportion of C18:3n-3 (the most abundant fatty acid in linseed) did not differ (P < 0.33) by treatment, there was a quadratic influence of diet on total PUFA concentration (P = 0.003) and a linear increase in C18:3n-3 as a proportion of total PUFA (P = 0.01) in the digital cushion. This work

  11. Influence of acetic, citric, and lactic acids on Escherichia coli O157:H7 membrane lipid composition, verotoxin secretion, and acid resistance in simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Hyun-Gyun; Marshall, Douglas L

    2005-04-01

    The effect of organic acid (acetic, citric, and lactic acids) adaptation at equivalent initial pH values (6.4 and 5.4) on changes in membrane lipid composition, verotoxin concentration, and acid resistance in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.5, 37 degrees C) was determined for Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43895 (HEC) and an rpoS mutant of E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43895 (RM, FRIK 816-3). For HEC, lactic acid-adapted (pH 5.4) cells had the greatest D-value (32.2 min) and acetic acid-adapted (pH 5.4) cells had the smallest D-value (16.6 min) in simulated gastric fluid. For RM, D-values of citric and acetic acid-adapted cells were similar to those for nonadapted cells grown at pH 7.3, but D-values increased from 13.1 to 27.9 min in lactic acid-adapted cells (from pH 7.3 to pH 5.4). For both strains, the ratio of cis-vaccenic to palmitic acids decreased for citric and lactic acid-adapted cells, but the ratio increased for acetic acid-adapted cells at pH 5.4. Organic acid-adapted cells produced less total verotoxin than did nonadapted cells at approximately 10(8) CFU/ml. Extracellular verotoxin concentration proportionally decreased with decreasing pH for both HEC and RM. Changes in membrane lipid composition, verotoxin concentration, and acid resistance in HEC and RM were dependent on both pH and organic acid. Deletion of the rpoS gene did not affect these changes but did decrease acid resistance in citric acid-adapted cells. Results indicate that decreased membrane fluidity may have caused increased acid resistance and decreased verotoxin secretion.

  12. Effect of Tween 80 on the growth, lipid accumulation and fatty acid composition of Thraustochytrium aureum ATCC 34304.

    PubMed

    Taoka, Yousuke; Nagano, Naoki; Okita, Yuji; Izumida, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Shinichi; Hayashi, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    Thraustochytrium aureum ATCC 34304 was grown in the presence and absence of polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80). The aim of this work was to obtain basic knowledge about the effect of Tween 80 on growth, lipid accumulation and fatty acid composition in T. aureum. The addition of Tween 80 to a culture medium significantly enhanced the growth of T. aureum, and the biomass increased with an increase of Tween 80 content. Total lipid content and total fatty acid content were significantly higher in 1.0% Tween 80 in comparison with the control (absence of Tween 80). The fatty acid profile showed that the content of C18:1n-9 (oleic acid) significantly increased as a result of the addition of Tween 80. These results indicated that part of the Tween 80 added to the medium was utilized as a carbon source or that the oleate included in Tween 80 was directly incorporated into T. aureum cells as a fatty acid. Neither the DHA content nor the percentage of DHA did not change in spite of the addition of Tween 80. However, the DHA yield significantly increased because the biomass increased due to the addition of Tween 80.

  13. Effects of UV radiation on hatching, lipid peroxidation, and fatty acid composition in the copepod Paracyclopina nana.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun-Ji; Lee, Yeonjung; Han, Jeonghoon; Hwang, Un-Ki; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Park, Heum Gi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of UV radiation on the reproductive physiology and macromolecules in marine zooplankton, several doses of UV radiation were used to treat the copepod Paracyclopina nana, and we analyzed in vivo endpoints of their life cycle such as mortality and reproductive parameters with in vitro biochemical biomarkers such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), the modulated enzyme activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and the production of a byproduct of peroxidation (e.g. malonedialdehyde, MDA). After UV radiation, the survival rate of P. nana was significantly reduced. Also, egg sac damage and a reduction in the hatching rate of offspring were observed in UV-irradiated ovigerous females. According to the assessed biochemical parameters, we found dose-dependent increases in ROS levels and high levels of the lipid peroxidation decomposition product by 2 kJ m(-2), implying that P. nana was under off-balanced status by oxidative stress-mediated cellular damage. Antioxidant enzyme activities of GST and SOD increased over different doses of UV radiation. To measure UV-induced lipid peroxidation, we found a slight reduction in the composition of essential fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). These findings indicate that UV radiation can induce oxidative stress-triggered lipid peroxidation with modulation of antioxidant enzyme activity, leading to a significant effect on mortality and reproductive physiology (e.g. fecundity). These results demonstrate the involvement of UV radiation on essential fatty acids and its susceptibility to UV radiation in the copepod P. nana compared to other species.

  14. Lipid nutritional value of legumes: Evaluation of different extraction methods and determination of fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Caprioli, Giovanni; Giusti, Federica; Ballini, Roberto; Sagratini, Gianni; Vila-Donat, Pilar; Vittori, Sauro; Fiorini, Dennis

    2016-02-01

    This study sought to contribute to the assessment of the nutritional properties of legumes by determining the fatty acid (FA) composition of 29 legume samples after the evaluation of nine extraction methods. The Folch method and liquid-solid extraction with hexane/isopropanol or with hexane/acetone were investigated, as was the effect of previous hydration of samples. Soxhlet extractions were also evaluated with different solvent mixtures. Results on FA composition using the hexane/isopropanol extraction method were the same in terms of FA composition of the Folch method, but the extraction yield was only around 20-40% of that of the Folch method preceded by hydration. Some types of legumes showed particularly interesting values for the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) n-6/n-3, such as lentils, with the value of 4.0, and Azuki beans, at 3.2. In lentils, the PUFAs% ranged from 42.0% to 57.4%, while in Azuki beans it was 57.5%.

  15. Biliary lipid, bile acid composition, and dietary correlations in Micmac Indian women. A population study.

    PubMed

    Williams, C N; Johnston, J L; McCarthy, S; Field, C A

    1981-01-01

    The precursor state for cholesterol gallstone formation is cholesterol-saturated bile. We studied a high-risk group for cholesterol gallstones to determine whether dietary variables affect bile cholesterol. Bile samples were analyzed from 46 Micmac Indian women without gallstones and 13 with gallstones for molar percentage cholesterol (MPC) and bile acid composition. The data were analyzed by multiple regression analysis with MPC as the dependent variable and the dietary variables, obtained from four consecutive-day food records, and biliary bile acid composition as the independent variables. In the 46 women without gallstones, obesity, calorie range/calorie intake, and iron and calcium intake were, in their order of importance, significant factors. In normal weight subjects (ponderal index > 12.5) relative obesity was still a significant correlate. Obesity and iron intake were positive correlates while calorie range/calorie intake and calcium intake varied inversely. When the effect of obesity was controlled, these factors were still significant in this group, as they were in the gallstone group. In addition, the duration of overnight fast obtained by history, together with the proportions of deoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in bile were correlates of the biliary molar percentage cholesterol.

  16. Effect of alpha-linolenic acid-rich Camelina sativa oil on serum fatty acid composition and serum lipids in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Karvonen, Henna M; Aro, Antti; Tapola, Niina S; Salminen, Irma; Uusitupa, Matti I j; Sarkkinen, Essi S

    2002-10-01

    Camelina sativa-derived oil (camelina oil) is a good source of alpha-linolenic acid. The proportion of alpha-linolenic acid in serum fatty acids is associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases. We studied the effects of camelina oil on serum lipids and on the fatty acid composition of total lipids in comparison to rapeseed and olive oils in a parallel, double-blind setting. Sixty-eight hypercholesterolemic subjects aged 28 to 65 years were randomly assigned after a 2-week pretrial period to 1 of 3 oil groups: camelina oil, olive oil, and rapeseed oil. Subjects consumed daily 30 g (actual intake, approximately 33 mL) of test oils for 6 weeks. In the camelina group, the proportion of alpha-linolenic acid in fatty acids of serum lipids was significantly higher (P <.001) compared to the 2 other oil groups at the end of the study: 2.5 times higher compared to the rapeseed oil group and 4 times higher compared to the olive oil group. Respectively the proportions of 2 metabolites of alpha-linolenic acid (eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic acids) increased and differed significantly in the camelina group from those in other groups. During the intervention, the serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentration decreased significantly by 12.2% in the camelina oil group, 5.4% in the rapeseed oil group, and 7.7% in the olive oil group. In conclusion, camelina oil significantly elevated the proportions of alpha-linolenic acid and its metabolites in serum of mildly or moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects. Camelina oil's serum cholesterol-lowering effect was comparable to that of rapeseed and olive oils.

  17. Lipid metabolism and tissue composition in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.)--effects of capelin oil, palm oil, and oleic acid-enriched sunflower oil as dietary lipid sources.

    PubMed

    Torstensen, B E; Lie, O; Frøyland, L

    2000-06-01

    Triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) were fed four diets containing different oils as the sole lipid source, i.e., capelin oil, oleic acid-enriched sunflower oil, a 1:1 (w/w) mixture of capelin oil and oleic acid-enriched sunflower oil, and palm oil (PO). The beta-oxidation capacity, protein utilization, digestibility of dietary fatty acids and fatty acid composition of lipoproteins, plasma, liver, belly flap, red and white muscle were measured. Further, the lipid class and protein levels in the lipoproteins were analyzed. The different dietary fatty acid compositions did not significantly affect protein utilization or beta-oxidation capacity in red muscle. The levels of total cholesterol, triacylglycerols, and protein in very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and plasma were not significantly affected by the dietary fatty acids. VLDL, LDL, and HDL fatty acid compositions were decreasingly affected by dietary fatty acid composition. Dietary fatty acid composition significantly affected both the relative fatty acid composition and the amount of fatty acids (mg fatty acid per g tissue, wet weight) in belly flap, liver, red and white muscle. Apparent digestibility of the fatty acids, measured by adding yttrium oxide as inert marker, was significantly lower in fish fed the PO diet compared to the other three diets.

  18. Effects of plant species, stage of maturity, and level of formic acid addition on lipolysis, lipid content, and fatty acid composition during ensiling.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, E; Jaakkola, S; Heikkilä, T; Lampi, A-M; Halmemies-Beauchet-Filleau, A; Lee, M R F; Winters, A L; Shingfield, K J; Vanhatalo, A

    2015-09-01

    Forage type and management influences the nutritional quality and fatty acid composition of ruminant milk. Replacing grass silage with red clover (RC; L.) silage increases milk fat 18:3-3 concentration. Red clover has a higher polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity compared with grasses, which has been suggested to decrease lipolysis and . The present study characterized the abundance and fatty acid composition of esterified lipid and NEFA before and after ensiling of grass and RC to investigate the influence of forage species, growth stage, and extent of fermentation on lipolysis. A randomized block design with a 2 × 3 × 4 factorial arrangement of treatments was used. Treatments comprised RC or a mixture of timothy ( L.) and meadow fescue ( Huds.) harvested at 3 growth stages and treated with 4 levels of formic acid (0, 2, 4, and 6 L/t). Lipid in silages treated with 0 or 6 L/t formic acid were extracted and separated into 4 fractions by TLC. Total PPO activity in fresh herbage and the content of soluble bound phenols in all silages were determined. Concentrations of 18:3-3 and total fatty acids (TFA) were higher ( < 0.001) for RC than for grass. For both forage species, 18:3-3 and TFA content decreased linearly ( < 0.001) with advancing growth stage, with the highest abundance at the vegetative stage. Most of lipid in fresh RC and grass herbage (97%) was esterified, whereas NEFA accounted for 71% of TFA in both silages. Ensiling resulted in marginal increases in TFA content and the amounts of individual fatty acids compared with fresh herbages. Herbage total PPO activity was higher ( < 0.001) for RC than grass (11 vs. 0.11 μkatal/g leaf fresh weight). Net lipolysis during ensiling was extensive for both forage species (660 to 759 g/kg fatty acid for grass and 563 to 737 g/kg fatty acid for RC). Formic acid application (0 vs. 6 L/t) resulted in a marked decrease ( = 0.026) in net lipolysis during the ensiling of RC, whereas the opposite was true ( = 0.026) for grass

  19. Fatty acid composition of muscle fat and enzymes of storage lipid synthesis in whole muscle from beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Kazala, E Chris; Lozeman, Fred J; Mir, Priya S; Aalhus, Jennifer L; Schmutz, Sheila M; Weselake, Randall J

    2006-11-01

    Enhanced intramuscular fat content (i.e., marbling) in beef is a desirable trait, which can result in increased product value. This study was undertaken with the aim of revealing biochemical factors associated with the marbling trait in beef cattle. Samples of longissimus lumborum (LL) and pars costalis diaphragmatis (PCD) were taken from a group of intact crossbred males and females at slaughter, lipids extracted, and the resulting FAME examined for relationships with marbling fat deposition. For LL, significant associations were found between degree of marbling and myristic (14:0, r = 0.55, P < 0.01), palmitic (16:0, r = 0.80, P < 0.001), stearic (18:0, r = -0.58, P < 0.01), and oleic (18:1c-9, r = 0.79, P < 0.001) acids. For PCD, significant relationships were found between marbling and palmitic (r = 0.71, P < 0.001) and oleic (r = 0.74, P < 0.001) acids. Microsomal fractions prepared from PCD muscle were assayed for diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT), and phosphatidic acid phosphatase-1 (PAP-1) activity, and the results examined for relationships with degree of intramuscular fat deposition. None of the enzyme activities from PCD displayed an association with marbling fat content, but DGAT specific activity showed significant positive associations with LPAAT (r = 0.54, P < 0.01), total PAP (r = 0.66, P < 0.001), and PAP-1 (r = 0.63, P < 0.01) specific activities. The results on FA compositions of whole muscle tissues provide insight into possible enzyme action associated with the production of specific FA. The increased proportion of oleic acid associated with enhanced lipid content of whole muscle is noteworthy given the known health benefits of this FA.

  20. Early changes in the fatty acid composition of photosynthetic membrane lipids from Populus nigra grown on a metallurgical landfill.

    PubMed

    Le Guédard, Marina; Faure, Olivier; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques

    2012-07-01

    We compared the fatty acid composition of leaves taken from poplars on a metal-contaminated landfill, and on the uncontaminated roadside bordering this site. For the first time, it is shown that the percentage of linolenic acid, which is mainly associated with thylakoid lipids, was significantly lower in tree species within the landfill than within the control area. A correlation study was carried out to investigate relationships between the C18:3/(C18:0 + C18:1 + C18:2) fatty acid ratios and the metal contents in soils and leaves. Lead and chromium leaf contents were significantly negatively correlated to this fatty acid ratio. The impact of each of these metals remains difficult to evaluate, but chromium in leaf likely plays a major role in toxicity. In addition, the decrease in the C18:3/(C18:0 + C18:1 + C18:2) fatty acid ratio occurred at low leaf metal content, and therefore it is shown that this ratio can be used as an early indicator of the effect of metals.

  1. Changes of biomass, lipid content and fatty acids composition under a light-dark cyclic culture of Chlorella pyrenoidosa in response to different temperature.

    PubMed

    Han, Feifei; Wang, Weiliang; Li, Yuanguang; Shen, Guomin; Wan, Minxi; Wang, Jun

    2013-03-01

    For outdoor culture with light-dark cycle, the biomass and lipid losing at night resulted in lowering the biomass and lipid productivity. Previous studies focused on the contents of carbohydrate and protein in response to temperature for production of animal feed and nutritional supplements. In this study, the effects of temperature on the variations of biomass concentration, lipid content and fatty acids composition for production of biofuels were investigated under a light-dark cyclic culture. The results showed that 30 °C was the optimal daytime temperature for achieving high biomass and lipid; raising daytime temperature can lessen night biomass loss and stimulate lipid accumulation. Subsequently, outdoor culture strategy has been improved: keeping culture broth no less than 30 °C during the daytime. Consequently, the net biomass and lipid productivity were increased by 37.8% and 44.9% when compared to the former culture process in the same outdoor climatic conditions.

  2. Lipid and fatty acid composition of cytoplasmic membranes from Streptomyces hygroscopicus and its stable protoplast-type L form.

    PubMed Central

    Hoischen, C; Gura, K; Luge, C; Gumpert, J

    1997-01-01

    The cells of an L-form strain of Streptomyces hygroscopicus have been grown for 20 years without a cell wall. Their cytoplasmic membranes have high stability and an unusual structural polymorphism. To clarify the importance of the lipid components for these membrane properties, a comparative analysis has been carried out with purified membranes of L-form cells, of parent vegetative hyphal cells (N-form cells), and of protoplasts derived from the latter. The phospholipid classes and fatty acids were determined by thin-layer chromatography (TLC), two-dimensional TLC, high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and mass spectrometry. The qualitative compositions of cardiolipin (CL), lyso-cardiolipin (LCL), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE1 and PE2), lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine (LPE), phosphatidylinositolmannoside (PIM), phosphatidic acid (PA), dilyso-cardiolipin-phosphatidylinositol (DLCL-PI), and the 13 main fatty acids were the same in the three membrane types. However, significant quantitative differences were observed in the L-form membrane. They consist of a three- to fourfold-higher content of total, extractable lipids, 20% more phospholipids, an increased content of CL and PIM, and a reduced amount of the component DLCL-PI. Furthermore, the L-form membrane is characterized by a higher content of branched anteiso 15:0 and anteiso 17:0 fatty acids compared to that of the membranes of the walled vegetative cells. These fatty acids have lower melting points than their straight and iso-branched counterparts and make the membrane more fluid. The phospholipid composition of the protoplast membrane differs quantitatively from that of the N form and the L form. Whereas the phospholipid classes are mostly similar to that of the N form, the fatty acid pattern tends to be closer to that of the L-form membrane. The membranes of both the L-form cells and the protoplasts need to be more fluid because of their spherical cell shape and higher degree of curvature

  3. Reproductive cycle and seasonal variations in lipid content and fatty acid composition in gonad of the cockle Fulvia mutica in relation to temperature and food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenguang; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng

    2013-09-01

    From March 2004 to February 2005, seasonal variations in lipid content and fatty acid composition of gonad of the cockle Fulvia mutica (Reeve) were studied on the eastern coast of China in relation to the reproductive cycle and environment conditions ( e.g., temperature and food availability). Histological analysis as well as lipid and fatty acid analyses were performed on neutral and polar lipids of the gonad. Results showed that gametogenesis occurred in winter and spring at the expense of lipids previously accumulated in summer and autumn, whereas spawning occurred in summer (20.4-24.6°C). The seasonal variation in lipid content was similar to that of the mean oocyte diameter. In both neutral and polar lipids, the 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 levels were relatively higher than saturated fatty acids, and polyunsaturated fatty acids were abundant, with series n-3 as the predominant component. Seasonal variations in the 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 levels and the principal n-3 fatty acids were clearly related to the reproductive cycle. The Σ(n-3) and Σ(n-6) values were relatively high during January-May, and the associated unsaturation index was significantly higher than that in other months. The results suggest that fatty acids play an important role in the gametogenesis of F. mutica.

  4. Conjugated linoleic acid versus high-oleic acid sunflower oil: effects on energy metabolism, glucose tolerance, blood lipids, appetite and body composition in regularly exercising individuals.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Estelle V; Goedecke, Julia H; Bluett, Kerry; Heggie, Kerry; Claassen, Amanda; Rae, Dale E; West, Sacha; Dugas, Jonathan; Dugas, Lara; Meltzeri, Shelly; Charlton, Karen; Mohede, Inge

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the effects of 12 weeks of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation on body composition, RER, RMR, blood lipid profiles, insulin sensitivity and appetite in exercising, normal-weight persons. In this double-blind, randomised, controlled trial, sixty-two non-obese subjects (twenty-five men, thirty-seven women) received either 3.9 g/d CLA or 3.9 g high-oleic acid sunflower oil for 12 weeks. Prior to and after 12 weeks of supplementation, oral glucose tolerance, blood lipid concentrations, body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and computerised tomography scans), RMR, resting and exercising RER and appetite were measured. There were no significant effects of CLA on body composition or distribution, RMR, RER or appetite. During the oral glucose tolerance tests, mean plasma insulin concentrations (0, 30, 120 min) were significantly lower (P= 0.04) in women who supplemented with CLA (24.3 (SD 9.7) to 20.4 (SD 8.5) microU/ml) compared to high-oleic acid sunflower oil control (23.7 (SD 9.8) to 26.0 (SD 8.8) microU/ml). Serum NEFA levels in response to oral glucose were attenuated in both men and women in the CLA (P=0.001) compared to control group. However, serum total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations decreased in both groups and HDL-cholesterol concentrations decreased in women over 12 weeks (P=0.001, P=0.02, P=0.02, respectively). In conclusion, mixed-isomer CLA supplementation had a favourable effect on serum insulin and NEFA response to oral glucose in non-obese, regularly exercising women, but there were no CLA-specific effects on body composition, energy expenditure or appetite.

  5. VARIATION IN GROWTH, LIPID CLASS AND FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF THE MUD CRAB, RHITHROPANOPEUS HARRISII (GOULD) DURING LARVAL DEVELOPMENT FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO AN INSECT JUVENILE HORMONE ANALOG (FENOXYCARB)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the effects of fenoxycarb?, an insect juvenile hormone analog, on larval growth, and lipid class and fatty acid composition in first crabs of the mud crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii reared through total larval development in nominal water concentrations from 1 ...

  6. Dietary Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Alter Fatty Acid Composition of Lipids and CYP2E1 Expression in Rat Liver Tissue.

    PubMed

    Maksymchuk, Oksana; Shysh, Angela; Chashchyn, Mykola; Moibenko, Olexyi

    2016-07-21

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are used for the treatment and prevention of numerous pathologies in humans. As recently found, PUFAs play significantly protective roles in liver, cardiovascular system and kidney. They also are widely used in total parenteral nutrition. We evaluated the effect of omega-3 PUFA consumption on liver fatty acid composition and the expression of CYP2E1, one of the key enzymes in detoxification and prooxidant systems of liver cells. To estimate the oxidative stress in liver tissue, the antioxidant status and the level of lipid peroxidation were determined in a rodent model. Animals were divided into two groups: control (n = 10) and experimental (n = 10). Epadol-containing omega-3 PUFA fish oil capsules were administered to Wistar rats within 4 weeks (0.1 mL/100 g b.w./day). The consumption of omega-3 PUFAs resulted in changes of fatty acid composition of liver tissue. A significant increase was detected in the α-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid content (5.1-, 16-, and 1.3-fold, respectively, p < 0.05), while the content of linoleic and arachidonic acid was reduced (1.7- and 3.2-fold, respectively, p < 0.05). This caused significant increases in the omega-3:omega-6 ratio. Consumption of omega-3 PUFAs led to a 3-fold (p < 0.05) increase in CYP2E1 content, which could entail enhanced Nrf2 expression levels and increases in the HO-1 content in rat liver. The alteration in CYP2E1 expression did not have an impact on the level of lipid peroxidation and on the prooxidant/antioxidant balance.

  7. Effect of acid whey and freeze-dried cranberries on lipid oxidation and fatty acid composition of nitrite-/nitrate-free fermented sausage made from deer meat

    PubMed Central

    Karwowska, Małgorzata; Dolatowski, Zbigniew J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the effect of acid whey and freeze-dried cranberries on the physicochemical characteristics, lipid oxidation and fatty acid composition of nitrite-free fermented sausage made from deer meat and pork fat. Antioxidant interactions between acid whey and cranberry compounds were also explored. Methods Four formulations of fermented venison sausage were prepared: F1 (control), F2 (with 5% liquid acid whey), F3 (with 0.06% of freeze-dried cranberries), and F4 (with 5% liquid acid whey and 0.06% of freeze-dried cranberries). Each sample was analyzed for pH, water activity (aw), heme iron content, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) value and conjugated dienes at the end of the manufacturing process and at 30 and 90 days of refrigerated storage. Fatty acid composition was measured once at the end of the manufacturing process. Results At the end of ripening, all samples presented statistically different values for a pH range of 4.47 to pH 4.59. The sum of the unsaturated fatty acids was higher, while the conjugated diene and the TBARS values were lower in sausages with freeze-dried cranberries as compared to the control sausage. The highest content of heme iron (21.52 mg/kg) at day 90 was found in the sausage formulation with the addition of freeze-dried cranberries, which suggests that the addition of cranberries stabilized the porphyrin ring of the heme molecule during storage and thereby reduced the release of iron. The use of liquid acid whey in combination with cranberries appears to not be justified in view of the oxidative stability of the obtained products. Conclusion The results suggest that the application of freeze-dried cranberries can lower the intensity of oxidative changes during the storage of nitrite-free fermented sausage made from deer meat. PMID:27165018

  8. [Oxidative stress in blood leukocytes, pro/antioxidant status and fatty acids composition of pancreas lipids at experimental acute pancreatitis in rats].

    PubMed

    Pryvrots'ka, I B; Kuchmerovs'ka, T M

    2013-01-01

    In an experimental model of acute pancreatitis (AP) in rats no alteration in leukocyte's viability was found by flow cytometry as compared to control. After 1 day of AP production of reactive oxygen forms in granulocytes was increased more than 5 times, but after 3 days their level was decreased. Alterations of pro/antioxidant status and specific changes in the fatty acid composition in the pancreas were established. With the development of AP, the processes of lipids peroxidation were intensified while antioxidant system was altered, that was evidenced by inflammation in the pancreas. In these conditions, the increase of phospholipase A2 activity was accompanied by significant changes of fatty acid composition of the total lipids in the pancreas. This increased relative total content of saturated fatty acids, in particular myristic, palmitic and stearic acid increased, while the total content of polyunsaturated essential fatty acids omega-3 (linolenic, eicosapentaenoic, dokozapentayenoic, docosahexaenoic) decreased. The preparation containing omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids partially normalized the lipid and fatty acids composition as well as prooxidant-antioxidant system.

  9. Lipid composition of lees from Sherry wine.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Maria Ester; Igartuburu, José M; Pando, Enrique; Luis, Francisco Rodríguez; Mourente, Gabriel

    2004-07-28

    In this paper, we describe the study and characterization of the lipids from lees of Sherry wine, one of the main byproducts from the wine-making industry in the Jerez/Xeres/Sherry denomination of the origin zone in Jerez de la Frontera, Spain. The lipid content, extractability, classification, fatty acid composition, and its main chemical characteristics have been determined in order to evaluate their potential use as a food or food additive.

  10. Role of plasma membrane lipid composition on cellular homeostasis: learning from cell line models expressing fatty acid desaturases

    PubMed Central

    Jaureguiberry, María S.; Tricerri, M. Alejandra; Sanchez, Susana A.; Finarelli, Gabriela S.; Montanaro, Mauro A.; Prieto, Eduardo D.; Rimoldi, Omar J.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evidence has suggested that plasma membrane (PM)-associated signaling and hence cell metabolism and viability depend on lipid composition and organization. The aim of the present work is to develop a cell model to study the endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) effect on PM properties and analyze its influence on cholesterol (Chol) homeostasis. We have previously shown that by using a cell line over-expressing stearoyl-CoA-desaturase, membrane composition and organization coordinate cellular pathways involved in Chol efflux and cell viability by different mechanisms. Now, we expanded our studies to a cell model over-expressing both Δ5 and Δ6 desaturases, which resulted in a permanently higher PUFA content in PM. Furthermore, this cell line showed increased PM fluidity, Chol storage, and mitochondrial activity. In addition, human apolipoprotein A-I-mediated Chol removal was less efficient in these cells than in the corresponding control. Taken together, our results suggested that the cell functionality is preserved by regulating PM organization and Chol exportation and homeostasis. PMID:24473084

  11. Role of plasma membrane lipid composition on cellular homeostasis: learning from cell line models expressing fatty acid desaturases.

    PubMed

    Jaureguiberry, María S; Tricerri, M Alejandra; Sanchez, Susana A; Finarelli, Gabriela S; Montanaro, Mauro A; Prieto, Eduardo D; Rimoldi, Omar J

    2014-04-01

    Experimental evidence has suggested that plasma membrane (PM)-associated signaling and hence cell metabolism and viability depend on lipid composition and organization. The aim of the present work is to develop a cell model to study the endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) effect on PM properties and analyze its influence on cholesterol (Chol) homeostasis. We have previously shown that by using a cell line over-expressing stearoyl-CoA-desaturase, membrane composition and organization coordinate cellular pathways involved in Chol efflux and cell viability by different mechanisms. Now, we expanded our studies to a cell model over-expressing both Δ5 and Δ6 desaturases, which resulted in a permanently higher PUFA content in PM. Furthermore, this cell line showed increased PM fluidity, Chol storage, and mitochondrial activity. In addition, human apolipoprotein A-I-mediated Chol removal was less efficient in these cells than in the corresponding control. Taken together, our results suggested that the cell functionality is preserved by regulating PM organization and Chol exportation and homeostasis.

  12. Dietary Lipid Sources Influence Fatty Acid Composition in Tissue of Large Yellow Croaker (Larmichthys crocea) by Regulating Triacylglycerol Synthesis and Catabolism at the Transcriptional Level

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hong; Jin, Min; Li, Yi; Lu, You; Hou, Yingmei; Zhou, Qicun

    2017-01-01

    An 8-week feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary lipid sources on growth performance, fatty acid composition, rate-limiting enzyme activities and gene expression related to lipid metabolism in large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea). Five iso-nitrogenous and iso-lipidic experimental diets were formulated to contain different lipid sources, such as fish oil (FO), soybean oil (SO), linseed oil (LO), rapeseed oil (RO) and peanut oil (PO), respectively. Triplicate groups of 50 fish (initial weight 13.77±0.07g) were stocked in 15 floating net cages (1.5m×1.5m×2.0m). Fish fed the diets containing RO and LO had lower weight gain and specific growth rates than those fed the FO, SO and PO diets. Survival, feed efficiency, protein efficiency ratio, hepatosomatic index, viscerasomatic index and condition factor were not significantly affected by different dietary lipid sources. Fish fed the diet containing FO had higher lipid content in whole body compared with the other groups, whereas fish fed the SO diet had the lowest muscle lipid content. Fatty acid profiles of muscle and liver reflected the fatty acid composition of the diets. Plasma glucose, triglyceride, and the enzymatic activity of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase were significantly influenced by different dietary lipid sources, while total protein, cholesterol, superoxide dismutase or malondialdehyde in plasma were not affected by the different dietary lipid sources. Fish fed the LO diet had lower adipose triglyceride lipase and fatty acid synthase activities in liver than those fed the diets containing FO and RO, while the LO diet resulted in the highest hepatic carnitine palmitoultransferase-1 activity. Hepatic gene relative expression of adipose triglyceride lipase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 in fish fed PO diet was significantly higher than all other groups, whereas fish fed the SO and LO diets had lower relative expression levels of lipoprotein

  13. Lipids of Sarcina lutea III. Composition of the Complex Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Charles K.; Albro, Phillip W.; Grindey, Gerald B.

    1965-01-01

    Huston, Charles K. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.), Phillip W. Albro, and Gerald B. Grindey. Lipids of Sarcina lutea. III. Composition of the complex lipids. J. Bacteriol. 89:768–775. 1965.—The complex lipids from a strain of Sarcina lutea were isolated and separated into fractions on diethylaminoethyl cellulose acetate and silicic acid columns. These fractions were monitored in several thin-layer chromatography systems. The various lipid types were characterized by their behavior in thin-layer systems and by an analysis of their hydrolysis products. The fatty acid composition of the column fractions was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. A number of components (13) were separated by thin-layer chromatography and characterized. The major components were polyglycerol phosphatide (17.0%), lipoamino acids (15.1%), phosphatidyl glycerol (13.8%), and an incompletely characterized substance (15.0%). Minor constituents included phosphatidyl inositol (5.5%), phosphatidic acid (4.2%), phosphatidyl serine (2.0%), and phosphatidyl choline (1.0%). No phosphatidyl ethanolamine was observed. PMID:14273659

  14. Comparison of lipid content and Fatty Acid composition in the edible meat of wild and cultured freshwater and marine fish and shrimps from china.

    PubMed

    Li, Guipu; Sinclair, Andrew J; Li, Duo

    2011-03-09

    The lipid content and fatty acid composition in the edible meat of twenty-nine species of wild and cultured freshwater and marine fish and shrimps were investigated. Both the lipid content and fatty acid composition of the species were specified due to their unique food habits and trophic levels. Most of the marine fish demonstrated higher lipid content than the freshwater fish, whereas shrimps had the lowest lipid content. All the marine fish and shrimps had much higher total n-3 PUFA than n-6 PUFA, while most of the freshwater fish and shrimps demonstrated much lower total n-3 PUFA than n-6 PUFA. This may be the biggest difference in fatty acid composition between marine and freshwater species. The cultured freshwater fish demonstrated higher percentages of total PUFA, total n-3 PUFA, and EPA + DHA than the wild freshwater fish. Two freshwater fish, including bighead carp and silver carp, are comparable to the marine fish as sources of n-3 PUFA.

  15. Fatty acid composition, sarcoplasmic reticular lipid oxidation, and immunity of hard clam (Meretrix lusoria) fed different dietary microalgae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Mei; Tseng, Kai-Yi; Huang, Chen-Huei

    2015-07-01

    Fatty acid profiles, activities of biomembrane lipid peroxidation, and immunity of a seawater clam (Meretrix lusoria) fed three species of dietary microalgae were investigated. Clams of a marketable size (25 g mean weight) were fed Tetraselmis chui, Chaetoceros muelleri, or Isochrysis galbana for 8 weeks. Fatty acids, particularly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in the polar lipid fractions of clams reflected those of the dietary algae species. Clams fed with T. chui and C. muelleri contained higher proportion of non-methylene interrupted (NMI) fatty acids than those fed I. galbana. Proportion of DHA in lipids of the clams fed with I. galbana was the highest among test groups. The NADH-dependent sarcoplasmic reticular lipid peroxidation activity of clams fed I. galbana was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than that of clams fed T. chui or C. muelleri. The hemocyte adhesion capacity of clams fed C. muelleri or I. galbana was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of clams fed T. chui. No significant differences (p ≥ 0.05) in total hemocyte count, phenoloxidase activity, clearance efficiency hemocyte and phagocytosis were detected among clams fed different microalgae.

  16. Lipid and fatty acid/alcohol compositions of the subarctic copepods Neocalanus cristatus and Eucalanus bungii from various depths in the Oyashio region, western North Pacific.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuichiro; Nishida, Shuhei; Graeve, Martin; Kattner, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Lipids of Neocalanus cristatus and Eucalanus bungii (C3 to adults), collected in March, May, and December from various depths (0-2000m) were studied in the Oyashio region, western North Pacific. Total lipid and wax ester contents of younger N. cristatus stages increased during the development, being higher in May than in March and December. Major fatty acids of younger N. cristatus were 16:0, 20:5(n-3), and 22:6(n-3) and the dominant alcohols were 16:0, 16:1(n-7), 20:1(n-9)/(n-11) and 22:1(n-11). The energy-rich 20:1 and 22:1 moieties increased from the younger to the adult stages showing the importance of lipid biosynthesis which may be advantageous for successful overwintering and reproduction at depth. The 16:4(n-1) fatty acid, characteristic of a diatom diet increased in May, particularly in the younger stages. Our results suggest that the diatom-dominated feeding mode of younger N. cristatus during the spring bloom is important for an effective accumulation of wax esters. In contrast to N. cristatus, E. bungii accumulated substantial amounts of triacylglycerols. The total lipid and triacylglycerol content increased slightly toward the older developmental stages. The major fatty acids were 16:0, 16:1(n-7), 18:1(n-9) and (n-7), and 20:5(n-3). There was no evidence of developmental or seasonal changes in the fatty acid composition. The differences in the lipid storage modes of both copepods via wax esters or triacylglycerols are species-specific but their fatty acid compositions varied according to diet and developmental stage, especially in N. cristatus. These lipid characteristics are discussed in relation to reproduction, feeding modes, diapause and overwintering strategies.

  17. Analysis of lipid and fatty acid composition of three species of scorpions with relation to different organs.

    PubMed

    Laino, Aldana; Mattoni, Camilo; Ojanguren-Affilastro, Andrés; Cunningham, Mónica; Fernando Garcia, C

    2015-12-01

    Within arthropods most of the information related to the type of mobilization and storage of lipids is found in insects and crustaceans. Literature is scarce with relation to scorpions. This order is a remarkably important model of the biochemistry, since it is characterized as an animal with very primitive traits which have varied minimally through time. In the present study we characterize and compare lipids and fatty acids present in three species of scorpion: Timogenes elegans, Timogenes dorbignyi, and Brachistosternus ferrugineus, focusing the study on the main organs/tissues involved in the dynamics of lipids. As found in the fat body of insects, hepatopancreas of crustaceans and midgut diverticula of spiders, the hepatopancreas of the three species studied here turned out to be the organ of lipid storage (great quantity of triacylglycerides). With relation to the hemolymph and muscles, a great quantity of phospholipids was observed, which is possibly involved in membrane formation. It is important to highlight that unlike what happens in insects, in scorpions the main circulating energetic lipid is the triacylglyceride. This lipid is found in greater proportion in the hepatopancreas of females, surely for reproduction. The fatty acid of the different organs/tissues analyzed remained constant in the three species studied with certain characteristic patterns, thus observing saturated and unsaturated most abundant fatty acids of C16 and C18. Finally, it could be observed that in T. elegans, T. dorbignyi and B. ferrugineus scorpions, there is a lack of 20:4 that generates a special condition within fatty acids of arthropods.

  18. New data on the total lipid, cholesterol and fatty acid composition of raw and grilled beef longissimus dorsi.

    PubMed

    Bragagnolo, Neura; Rodriguez-Amaya, Délia B

    2003-09-01

    Simultaneous analyses of total lipids, cholesterol and fatty acids were carried out on raw and grilled beef longissimus dorsi trimmed of external fat. Cholesterol was determined by high performance liquid chromatography and the fatty acids by gas chromatography. Mean total lipid (g/100 g) ranged from 2.1 to 2.6 for raw beef and 3.5 to 4.0 for grilled beef steaks. Cholesterol levels (mg/100 g) ranged from 40 to 43 for raw beef and 67 to 70 for grilled beef steaks. The main intramuscular fatty acids of the raw and grilled meat were 14:0, 16:0, 16:1n7, 18:0, 18:1n9, 18:1n7 and 18:2n6. Grilled lean beef steaks had significantly higher contents of the principal fatty acids and most of the minor fatty acids. The higher values for the three components in the grilled meat were due to loss of moisture during grilling. There was no significant difference between the apparent and true retentions values, both indicating no significant loss or degradation of total lipids, cholesterol and fatty acids during grilling.

  19. Lipid content and essential fatty acid (EFA) composition of mature Congolese breast milk are influenced by mothers' nutritional status: impact on infants' EFA supply.

    PubMed

    Rocquelin, G; Tapsoba, S; Dop, M C; Mbemba, F; Traissac, P; Martin-Prével, Y

    1998-03-01

    Optimum infant growth and development, especially neurodevelopment and visual acuity, require sufficient n-6 and n-3 essential fatty acid supplies from the placenta or breast milk. The lipid content and fatty acid composition of mature breast milk were measured in samples from 102 randomly selected Congolese mothers of 5-month-old infants, residing in a suburban district of Brazzaville. Mean body mass index (BMI) was 22.3; 14% of mothers were energy-deficient and 22% were overweight. Breast milk samples from these mothers were low in lipids (mean, 28.70 g/l), and 75% had a lipid content below reference values. Adequate lipid content was associated with a maternal diet high in carbohydrates and low in fats. Breast milk was rich in 8:0-14:0 fatty acids (25.97% of total fatty acids) and in polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially n-3. These findings appear related to Congolese mothers' frequent consumption of high-carbohydrate foods such as processed cassava roots, wheat bread, and doughnuts known to enhance 8:0-14:0 fatty acid biosynthesis, as well as locally produced foods such as fish, vegetable oil, leafy green vegetables, and high-fat fruit that provide n-6 and n-3 essential fatty acids. Milk lipid content was inversely associated with the maternal BMI, but was unrelated to maternal age or socioeconomic status. Since the essential fatty acid content of traditional complementary foods is lower than that present in breast milk, Congolese mothers should be encouraged to postpone the introduction of such foods until their infant is 4-6 months old.

  20. Quantitative analysis of aberrant fatty acid composition of zebrafish hepatic lipids induced by organochlorine pesticide using stable isotope-coded transmethylation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hongying; Dong, Linjie; Dong, Qingjian; Ke, Changshu; Fu, Jieying; Wang, Xiaoli; Liu, Cong; Dai, Ling

    2012-07-01

    Organochlorine pesticides have been extensively used worldwide for agricultural purposes. Due to their resistance to metabolism, a major public health concern has been raised. Aberrant hepatic lipid composition has been a hallmark of many liver diseases associated with exposure to various toxins and chemicals. And thus lots of efforts have been focused on the development of analytical techniques that can rapidly and quantitatively determine the changes in fatty acid composition of hepatic lipids. In this work, changes in fatty acid composition of hepatic lipids in response to DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) exposure were quantitatively analyzed by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometric approach based on stable isotope-coded transmethylation. It has been quantitatively demonstrated that polyunsaturated fatty acids including C20:3n3, C20:4n6, and C22:6n3 decrease in response to DDT exposure. However, saturated long chain fatty acids including C16:0, C18:0, as well as monounsaturated long chain fatty acid C18:1n9 consistently increase in a DDT-concentration-dependent manner. In particular, much higher changes in the level of hepatic C16:0 and C18:0 for male fish were observed than that for female fish. These experimental results are in accordance with qualitative histopathological analysis that revealed liver morphological alterations. The stable isotope-coded mass spectrometric approach provides a reliable means for investigating hepatotoxicity associated with fatty acid synthesis, desaturation, mitochondrial beta-oxidation, and lipid mobilization. It should be useful in elucidation of hepatotoxic mechanisms and safety assessment of environmental toxins.

  1. Alteration of the phospho- or neutral lipid content and fatty acid composition in Listeria monocytogenes due to acid adaptation mechanisms for hydrochloric, acetic and lactic acids at pH 5.5 or benzoic acid at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Mastronicolis, Sofia K; Berberi, Anita; Diakogiannis, Ioannis; Petrova, Evanthia; Kiaki, Irene; Baltzi, Triantafillia; Xenikakis, Polydoros

    2010-10-01

    This study provides a first approach to observe the effects on Listeria monocytogenes of cellular exposure to acid stress at low or neutral pH, notably how phospho- or neutral lipids are involved in this mechanism, besides the fatty acid profile alteration. A thorough investigation of the composition of polar and neutral lipids from L. monocytogenes grown at pH 5.5 in presence of hydrochloric, acetic and lactic acids, or at neutral pH 7.3 in presence of benzoic acid, is described relative to cells grown in acid-free medium. The results showed that only low pH values enhance the antimicrobial activity of an acid. We suggest that, irrespective of pH, the acid adaptation response will lead to a similar alteration in fatty acid composition [decreasing the ratio of branched chain/saturated straight fatty acids of total lipids], mainly originating from the neutral lipid class of adapted cultures. Acid adaptation in L. monocytogenes was correlated with a decrease in total lipid phosphorus and, with the exception of cells adapted to benzoic acid, this change in the amount of phosphorus reflected a higher content of the neutral lipid class. Upon acetic or benzoic acid stress the lipid phosphorus proportion was analysed in the main phospholipids present: cardiolipin, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphoaminolipid and phosphatidylinositol. Interestingly only benzoic acid had a dramatic effect on the relative quantities of these four phospholipids.

  2. Human milk in disease: lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Hamosh, M; Bitman, J

    1992-11-01

    Differences in the lipid composition of human milk have been described in maternal diseases known to affect fat metabolism. Diseases such as diabetes, cystic fibrosis, hypobetalipoproteinemia and Type I hyperlipoproteinemia affect the quantity and quality of human milk fat. Increased fatty acid chain elongation and changes in desaturation (especially delta 6 desaturase), as well as changes in lipid class composition, have been shown in diabetes and cystic fibrosis, whereas compensatory increases in medium-chain fatty acids have been described in hypobetalipoproteinemia and Type I hyperlipoproteinemia. It is important to realize that these observations were made either on single women or on very small groups of women. In infant diseases, such as breast milk jaundice and ectopic eczema, changes in polyunsaturated fatty acids in maternal milk have been described.

  3. Effects of different media and nitrogen sources and levels on growth and lipid of green microalga Botryococcus braunii KMITL and its biodiesel properties based on fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Ruangsomboon, Suneerat

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to find an optimum culture medium for green microalga Botryococcus braunii KMITL and investigate its biodiesel properties based on fatty acid composition. Four different media were tested. Chlorella medium was the best medium for lipid yield. Among four nitrogen sources tested, KNO3 produced the highest lipid yield. When varied the nitrogen concentrations, this strain gave the highest lipid yield at the highest nitrogen level. When cultivated in the best medium and nitrogen source and level for 30 days, and then cultivated further for 14 days in the medium with no nitrogen, the highest lipid content and yield were 49.94±0.82% and 2.71±0.02 g L(-1), respectively. C16:0 fatty acid was the major fatty acid found. Fatty acid profiles of B. braunii KMITL cultivated in Chlorella medium with 1.25 g L(-1) KNO3 gave the best biodiesel properties with the lowest iodine value, maximum cetane number, and lowest degree of unsaturation.

  4. Formation of lipid bodies and changes in fatty acid composition upon pre-akinete formation in Arctic and Antarctic Zygnema (Zygnematophyceae, Streptophyta) strains

    PubMed Central

    Pichrtová, Martina; Arc, Erwann; Stöggl, Wolfgang; Kranner, Ilse; Hájek, Tomáš; Hackl, Hubert; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous green algae of the genus Zygnema (Zygnematophyceae, Streptophyta) are key components of polar hydro-terrestrial mats where they face various stressors including UV irradiation, freezing, desiccation and osmotic stress. Their vegetative cells can develop into pre-akinetes, i.e. reserve-rich, mature cells. We investigated lipid accumulation and fatty acid (FA) composition upon pre-akinete formation in an Arctic and an Antarctic Zygnema strain using transmission electron microscopy and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Pre-akinetes formed after 9 weeks of cultivation in nitrogen-free medium, which was accompanied by massive accumulation of lipid bodies. The composition of FAs was similar in both strains, and α-linolenic acid (C18:3) dominated in young vegetative cells. Pre-akinete formation coincided with a significant change in FA composition. Oleic (C18:1) and linoleic (C18:2) acid increased the most (up to 17- and 8-fold, respectively). Small amounts of long-chain polyunsaturated FAs were also detected, e.g. arachidonic (C20:4) and eicosapentaenoic (C20:5) acid. Pre-akinetes exposed to desiccation at 86% relative humidity were able to recover maximum quantum yield of photosystem II, but desiccation had no major effect on FA composition. The results are discussed with regard to the capability of Zygnema spp. to thrive in extreme conditions. PMID:27170362

  5. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) and sardine (Sardina pilchardus) viscera using commercial proteases: effects on lipid distribution and amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Kechaou, Emna Soufi; Dumay, Justine; Donnay-Moreno, Claire; Jaouen, Pascal; Gouygou, Jean-Paul; Bergé, Jean-Pascal; Amar, Raja Ben

    2009-02-01

    Total lipid and phospholipid recovery as well as amino acid quality and composition from cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) and sardine (Sardina pilchardus) were compared. Enzymatic hydrolyses were performed using the three proteases Protamex, Alcalase, and Flavourzyme by the pH-stat method (24 h, pH 8, 50 degrees C). Three fractions were generated: an insoluble sludge, a soluble aqueous phase, and an oily phase. For each fraction, lipids, phospholipids, and proteins were quantified. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the raw material and hydrolysates were performed. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) for cuttlefish viscera was 3.2% using Protamex, 6.8% using Flavourzyme, and 7% using Alcalase. DH for sardine viscera was 1.9% (using Flavourzyme), 3.1% (using Protamex) and 3.3% (using Alcalase). Dry matter yields of all hydrolysis reactions increased in the aqueous phases. Protein recovery following hydrolysis ranged from 57.2% to 64.3% for cuttlefish and 57.4% to 61.2% for sardine. Tissue disruption following protease treatment increased lipid extractability, leading to higher total lipid content after hydrolysis. At least 80% of the lipids quantified in the raw material were distributed in the liquid phases for both substrates. The hydrolysed lipids were richer in phospholipids than in the lipids extracted by classical chemical extraction, especially after Flavourzyme hydrolysis for cuttlefish and Alcalase hydrolysis for sardine. The total amino acid content differed according to the substrate and the enzyme used. However, regardless of the raw material or the protease used, hydrolysis increased the level of essential amino acids in the hydrolysates, thereby increasing their potential nutritional value for feed products.

  6. Effect of vitamin E supplementation or alfalfa grazing on fatty acid composition and expression of genes related to lipid metabolism in lambs.

    PubMed

    González-Calvo, L; Joy, M; Blanco, M; Dervishi, E; Molino, F; Sarto, P; Ripoll, G; Serrano, M; Calvo, J H

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of vitamin E (VE) supplementation and alfalfa grazing during fattening on fatty acid composition and mRNA expression of genes related to lipid metabolism in the LM of Rasa Aragonesa light lambs. After weaning, 48 lambs were kept indoors and fed a commercial concentrate and a VE supplemented concentrate (480 mg DL-α-tocopheryl acetate/kg DM) for 0 (control [CON]), 10 (VE10d), 20 (VE20d), and 30 d (VE30d) before slaughtering at 22 to 24 kg. Simultaneously, 8 unweaned lambs grazed in alfalfa (154 mg α-tocopherol/kg DM) paddocks with their dams and supplemented with the commercial concentrate (ALF). Immediately after slaughter, LM was sampled to determine gene expression. After 24 h of cooling at 4°C, LM was extracted to determine intramuscular fat (IMF) content and fatty acid composition. The IMF content did not differ with the dietary treatment ( = 0.212). Unweaned grazing alfalfa lambs had greater concentration of rumenic acid (C18:2 c9,t11; P < 0.001) and lower oleic acid (C18:1 c9; = 0.001) content and PUFA n-6:n-3 ratio (P < 0.001) but similar expression of genes implicated in lipid metabolism compared to the concentrate-fed lambs. Vitamin E supplementation did not modify muscle fatty acid composition; however, it increased the expression of FADS2 and ELOVL6, which are involved in desaturation of long-chain fatty acid and the elongation of SFA and MUFA. The results showed that a short period of VE supplementation, especially 10 (VE10d) and 20 d (VE20d), modified gene expression. Overall, the results showed that VE may be acting as a regulatory factor for transcriptional control of genes related to lipid metabolism in the muscle of Rasa Aragonesa light lambs (22-24 kg live weight and younger than 90 d old).

  7. Fatty Acid composition of the muscle lipids of five fish species in işıklı and karacaören dam lake, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Citil, Ozcan Baris; Kalyoncu, Leyla; Kahraman, Oguzhan

    2014-01-01

    Total fatty acid composition of muscle lipids in some fish species (Cyprinus carpio (Işıklı Dam Lake), Tinca tinca (Işıklı Dam Lake), Scardinius erythrophthalmus (Işıklı Dam Lake), Cyprinus carpio (Karacaören Dam Lake), and Carassius carassius (Karacaören Dam Lake)) was determined by gas chromatography. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of Cyprinus carpio (Işıklı Dam Lake) were found higher than PUFA of other species. Palmitic acid was the highest saturated fatty acid (SFA) in Tinca tinca (24.64%). Oleic acid was the highest monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFAs) in Cyprinus carpio (Işıklı Dam Lake) (19.25%). The most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acid in Scardinius erythrophthalmus was docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (17.94%). Total ω3 fatty acid composition was higher than the total ω6 fatty acids of Cyprinus carpio in both dam lakes. ω3/ω6 rates in Cyprinus carpio (Işıklı Dam Lake), Tinca tinca, Scardinius erythrophthalmus, Cyprinus carpio (Karacaören), and Carassius carassius were 2.12, 1.19, 2.15, 2.87, and 2.82, respectively.

  8. The effects of nutrients and temperature on biomass, growth, lipid production, and fatty acid composition of Cyclotella cryptica Reimann, Lewin, and Guillard

    SciTech Connect

    Sriharan, S.; Bagga, D.; Nawaz, M.

    1991-12-31

    Batch cultures of Cyclotella cryptica Reimann, Lewin, and Guillard were grown at two different nutrient (nitrogen/silica) levels and at two different temperatures (20 and 30{degrees}C). Biomass and cell yields decreased with decreased levels of both the nutrients (nitrogen and silica) at 20 and 30{degrees}C; whereas lipids (total, neutral, and polar) increased with decreased levels of nutrients at these two temperatures. Changes in fatty acid composition were also noted; the diatoms produced increased amounts of fatty acids C14:0 and C16:0 when grown in nutrient-deficient medium. The influence of nutrient stress and temperature is discussed.

  9. Proper Fatty Acid Composition Rather than an Ionizable Lipid Amine Is Required for Full Transport Function of Lactose Permease from Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Vitrac, Heidi; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Dowhan, William

    2013-01-01

    Energy-dependent uphill transport but not energy-independent downhill transport by lactose permease (LacY) is impaired when expressed in Escherichia coli cells or reconstituted in liposomes lacking phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and containing only anionic phospholipids. The absence of PE results in inversion of the N-terminal half and misfolding of periplasmic domain P7, which are required for uphill transport of substrates. Replacement of PE in vitro by lipids with no net charge (phosphatidylcholine (PC), monoglucosyl diacylglycerol (GlcDAG), or diglucosyl diacylglycerol (GlcGlcDAG)) supported wild type transmembrane topology of the N-terminal half of LacY. The restoration of uphill transport in vitro was dependent on LacY native topology and proper folding of P7. Support of uphill transport by net neutral lipids in vitro (PE > PC ≫ GlcDAG ≠ GlcGlcDAG provided that PE or PC contained one saturated fatty acid) paralleled the results observed previously in vivo (PE = PC > GlcDAG ≠ GlcGlcDAG). Therefore, a free amino group is not required for uphill transport as previously concluded based on the lack of in vitro uphill transport when fully unsaturated PC replaced E. coli-derived PE. A close correlation was observed in vivo and in vitro between the ability of LacY to carry out uphill transport, the native conformation of P7, and the lipid headgroup and fatty acid composition. Therefore, the headgroup and the fatty acid composition of lipids are important for defining LacY topological organization and catalytically important structural features, further illustrating the direct role of lipids, independent of other cellular factors, in defining membrane protein structure/function. PMID:23322771

  10. Lactation Affects Isolated Mitochondria and Its Fatty Acid Composition but Has No Effect on Tissue Protein Oxidation, Lipid Peroxidation or DNA-Damage in Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Valencak, Teresa G.; Raith, Johannes; Staniek, Katrin; Gille, Lars; Strasser, Alois

    2016-01-01

    Linking peak energy metabolism to lifespan and aging remains a major question especially when focusing on lactation in females. We studied, if and how lactation affects in vitro mitochondrial oxygen consumption and mitochondrial fatty acid composition. In addition, we assessed DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls to extrapolate on oxidative stress in mothers. As model system we used C57BL/6NCrl mice and exposed lactating females to two ambient temperatures (15 °C and 22 °C) while they nursed their offspring until weaning. We found that state II and state IV respiration rates of liver mitochondria were significantly higher in the lactating animals than in non-lactating mice. Fatty acid composition of isolated liver and heart mitochondria differed between lactating and non-lactating mice with higher n-6, and lower n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the lactating females. Surprisingly, lactation did not affect protein carbonyls, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, nor did moderate cold exposure of 15 °C. We conclude that lactation increases rates of mitochondrial uncoupling and alters mitochondrial fatty acid composition thus supporting the “uncoupling to survive” hypothesis. Regarding oxidative stress, we found no impact of lactation and lower ambient temperature and contribute to growing evidence that there is no linear relationship between oxidative damage and lactation. PMID:26805895

  11. Effects of conjugated linoleic acid on the performance of laying hens, lipid composition of egg yolk, egg flavor, and serum components

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuelan; Zhang, Yan; Yan, Peipei; Shi, Tianhong; Wei, Xiangfa

    2017-01-01

    Objective This experiment investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on the serum components, laying hen productivity, lipid composition of egg yolk, egg flavor and egg quality. Methods Healthy 28-week-old Hy-Line white laying hens (n = 480) were divided randomly into 4 groups, 6 replicates/group, 20 birds/replicate. The 30-day experimental diets included 0% (control), 0.4%, 0.8%, and 1.6% CLA. Some serum indices of the birds, and egg production, quality, fatty acid composition, egg quality were measured. Results The dietary supplementation with 0.4%, 0.8%, and 1.6% CLA did not significantly affect the laying rate and feed intake, as well as calcium ion and phosphorus ion concentration in serum (p>0.05). However, the CLA had significantly increased the strength of eggshell, decreased the odor, flavor, and taste of egg yolk, deepened the color of egg yolk, increased saturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids, and reduced the monounsaturated fatty acids (p<0.05). On the other hand, the dietary supplementation with 1.6% CLA had significant effects on feed/gain, and improved serum hormones. Dietary supplementation with 0.4% and 0.8% CLA can significantly enhance the activity of alkaline phosphates. Conclusion CLA has no effect on production performance, but does enhance the lipid content of the egg yolk and the strength of the eggshell. PMID:27383812

  12. Diapause induces remodeling of the fatty acid composition of membrane and storage lipids in overwintering larvae of Ostrinia nubilalis, Hubn. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    PubMed

    Vukašinović, Elvira L; Pond, David W; Worland, M Roger; Kojić, Danijela; Purać, Jelena; Popović, Željko D; Grubor-Lajšić, Gordana

    2015-06-01

    Seasonal changes in the FA composition of triacylglycerols and phospholipids prepared from the whole bodies of non-diapausing and diapausing fifth instar larvae of Ostrinia nubilalis, Hubn. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) were determined to evaluate the role of these lipids in diapause. Substantial changes in the FA composition of triacylglycerols and phospholipids were triggered by diapause development. This led to a significant increase in the overall FA unsaturation (UFAs/SFAs ratio), attributable to an increase in the relative proportion of MUFAs and the concomitant decrease in PUFAs and SFAs. In triacylglycerols, the significant changes in the FAs composition are the result of an increase in the relative proportions of MUFAs, palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7) and oleic acid (18:1n-9), and a concomitant reduction in the composition of SFAs and PUFAs, mainly palmitic acid (16:0) and linoleic acid (18:2n-6), respectively. Changes in the composition of phospholipids were more subtle with FAs contributing to the overall increase of FA unsaturation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis revealed that the melt transition temperatures of total lipids prepared from whole larvae, primarily attributable to the triacylglycerol component, were significantly lower during the time course of diapause compared with non-diapause. These observations were correlated to the FA composition of triacylglycerols, most likely enabling them to remain functional during colder winter conditions. We conclude that O. nubilalis undergoes remodeling of FA profiles of both energy storage triacylglycerols and membrane phospholipids as an element of its overwintering physiology which may improve the ability to cold harden during diapause.

  13. Correlation of serum triglyceride and its reduction by omega-3 fatty acids with lipid transfer activity and the neutral lipid compositions of high-density and low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Pownall, H J; Brauchi, D; Kilinç, C; Osmundsen, K; Pao, Q; Payton-Ross, C; Gotto, A M; Ballantyne, C M

    1999-04-01

    Serum triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations are inversely correlated and mechanistically linked by means of lipid transfer activities. Phospholipid transfer activity (PLTA) moves phospholipids among serum lipoproteins; cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA), which exchanges cholesteryl esters (CE) and TG among lipoproteins, is stimulated by nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA). The aims of this study were (a) to develop a quantitative model that correlates the neutral lipid (NL = CE + TG) compositions of HDL and LDL with serum TG concentration; (b) identify the serum lipid determinants of CETA and PLTA, and; (c) identify the effects of serum TG reductions on the neutral lipid compositions of HDL and LDL, serum NEFA concentrations, and on PLTA and CETA. These aims were addressed in 40 hypertriglyceridemic subjects before and after treatment with an 85% concentrate of omega-3 fatty acids (Omacor) and in 16 untreated normolipidemic subjects. In vivo, the NL compositions of LDL and HDL were described by a mathematical model having the form of adsorption isotherms: HDL - (TG/NL) = (0.90 +/- 0.07) serum TG/(7.0 +/- 1.2 mmol/l + serum TG) and LDL - (TG/NL) = (0.65 +/- 0.08) serum TG/(4.9 +/- 1.5 mmol/l + serum TG). Reduction of serum TG was associated with reductions in HDL - (TG/NL), serum NEFA concentration, and serum CETA but not PLTA. These data suggest that both hypertriglyceridemia and the attendant elevated serum CETA but not PLTA are determinants of HDL and LDL composition and structure and that serum TG concentrations are good predictors of the NL compositions of HDL and LDL.

  14. Effect of dietary alfalfa on the fatty acid composition and indexes of lipid metabolism of rabbit meat.

    PubMed

    Dal Bosco, A; Mugnai, C; Roscini, V; Mattioli, S; Ruggeri, S; Castellini, C

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse and increase the quality of rabbit meat by increasing the levels of natural bioactive compounds through providing fresh alfalfa to rabbits as complementary feed. At 50 days of age, forty rabbits were divided into two homogeneous groups and fed pelleted feed (control group) or pelleted feed plus fresh alfalfa (alfalfa group). The lipid content of meat was significantly higher in the control group likely due to the higher feed consumption observed in this group. The same trend was observed in the contents of myristic, palmitoleic, oleic and linoleic acid. On the contrary, the supplementation of fresh alfalfa increased the stearic, linolenic, eicosatrienoic, eicosapentaenoic, docosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic and total polyunsaturated fatty acid contents; also the total monounsaturated fatty acids and the α- and γ-tocopherol content was significantly lower. Moreover, alfalfa ingestion decreased the n-6 content, n-6/n-3 ratio and thrombogenicity index.

  15. Effects of season and reproductive state on lipid intake and fatty acid composition of gastrointestinal tract contents in the European hare.

    PubMed

    Popescu, F D; Hackländer, K; Arnold, W; Ruf, T

    2011-07-01

    We investigated lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of gastrointestinal tract contents in free-living, herbivorous European hares (Lepus europaeus). Mean crude fat content in hare stomachs and total gastrointestinal (GI) tracts was higher than expected for typical herbivore forages and peaked in late fall when hares massively deposited body fat reserves. Changes of FA proportions in different parts of the GI-tract indicated a highly preferential absorption of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). A further reduction of PUFA content in the caecum, along with the appearance of odd-chained FAs in caecum, caecotrophes, and colon content, pointed to a biohydrogenation of PUFA in the hare's hindgut. GI-tract contents showed significant seasonal changes in their FA composition. Among PUFA, α-linolenic acid peaked in spring while linoleic acid was predominant in late summer and fall, which probably reflected changes in the plant composition of forage. However, independent of seasonal changes, GI-tracts of lactating females showed a significantly (+33%) higher content of linoleic acid, a FA that is known to increase reproductive performance in European hares. This finding suggests that lactating females actively selected dietary plants rich in linoleic acid, a PUFA that may represent a limited resource for European hares.

  16. Influence of the dietary protein:lipid ratio and fish oil substitution on fatty acid composition and metabolism of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) reared at high water temperatures.

    PubMed

    Karalazos, Vasileios; Bendiksen, Eldar Å; Dick, James R; Tocher, Douglas R; Bell, John Gordon

    2011-04-01

    A factorial, two-way, experimental design was used for this 10-week nutritional trial, aiming to elucidate the interactive effects of decreasing dietary protein:lipid level and substitution of fish oil (FO) with rapeseed oil (RO) on tissue fatty acid (FA) composition and metabolism of large Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) reared at high water temperatures (sub-optimal, summer temperatures: 11·6°C). The six experimental diets were isoenergetic and formulated to include either FO or RO (60 % of the added oil) at three dietary protein:lipid levels, specifically (1) 350 g/kg protein and 350 g/kg lipid, (2) 330 g/kg protein and 360 g/kg lipid, (3) 290 g/kg protein and 380 g/kg lipid. Final weight, specific growth rate and thermal growth coefficient were positively affected by the dietary RO inclusion at the expense of FO, while no significant effects were seen on growth due to the decreasing protein level. The oil source had a significant effect on muscle and liver FA composition. However, the changes in muscle and liver FA indicate selective utilisation or retention of individual FA and moderate reductions in tissue EPA and DHA. Pyloric caeca phospholipid FA composition was significantly affected by the two factors and, in some cases, significant interactions were also revealed. Liver and red muscle β-oxidation capacities were significantly increased due to RO inclusion, while an interactive effect of protein level and oil source was shown for white muscle β-oxidation capacity. The results could explain, at least partially, the better performance that was shown for the RO groups and the enhanced protein-sparing effect.

  17. Hypothyroidism modifies lipid composition of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Coria, Mariela J; Carmona Viglianco, Yamila V; Marra, Carlos A; Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E; Ramirez, Dario C; Anzulovich, Ana C; Gimenez, Maria S

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are important regulators of lipid metabolism. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are essential components of innate immune response. Our goal was to determine whether hypothyroidism affects lipid metabolism in PMN cells. Wistar rats were made hypothyroid by administrating 0.1 g/L 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) in drinking water during 30 days. Triacylglycerides (TG), cholesterol and phospholipids were determined in PMN and serum by conventional methods. The mRNA expression of LDL receptor (LDL-R), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCoAR), sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2), and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (DGAT-2) were quantified by Real-Time PCR. Cellular neutral lipids were identified by Nile red staining. We found hypothyroidism decreases serum TG whereas it increases them in PMN. This result agrees with those observed in Nile red preparations, however DAGT-2 expression was not modified. Cholesterol synthesizing enzyme HMGCoAR mRNA and protein was reduced in PMN of hypothyroid rats. As expected, cholesterol content decreased in the cells although it increased in serum. Hypothyroidism also reduced relative contents of palmitic, stearic, and arachidonic acids, whereas increased the myristic, linoleic acids, and the unsaturation index in PMN. Thus, hypothyroidism modifies PMN lipid composition. These findings would emphasize the importance of new research to elucidate lipid-induced alterations in specific function(s) of PMN.

  18. Serum fatty acid composition in normal Japanese and its relationship with dietary fish and vegetable oil contents and blood lipid levels.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Takebe, K; Tando, Y; Arai, Y; Yamada, N; Ishii, M; Kikuchi, H; Machida, K; Imamura, K; Terada, A

    1995-01-01

    A survey was conducted on 110 normal Japanese adults (55 men and 55 women) to determine their caloric intake, dietary fat content and its origin (animal, plant, or marine). In addition, their blood lipid levels and fatty acid compositions were examined. Men in their 30s-50s consumed 2,600-2,800 calories and 60 g of fats, while women in the same age range consumed 2,000-2,200 calories and 52-58 g of fats. In both sexes, caloric, fat, and cholesterol intakes were lower for those in their 60s but protein and crude fiber consumption remained generally unchanged. When the dietary fats were classified according to origin, men and women in their 30s were found to consume less oil of marine origin. This appeared to be the result of a western style diet for Japanese adults in their 30s. Compared with men, women exhibited lower blood lipid levels. As age increased, the total cholesterol level of the blood rose in women. Thus the blood lipid level was generally equal in the two groups in their 60s. There was a positive correlation between the blood eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels and dietary consumption of fish oil. The marine/plant lipid ratio was positively correlated with the blood EPA/arachidonic acid ratio. Therefore, it was believed that the origin of the dietary fats consumed is a factor in determining the blood fatty acid profile. The linoleic acid (18:2), arachidonic acid (20:4), and 18:2 + 20:4 contents were negatively correlated to the total cholesterol level in the blood but positively correlated to the HDL-cholesterol level. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (18:2 + 20:4 + 20:5 + 22:6) were negatively correlated with the blood triglyceride level. From the findings presented above, we concluded that dietary fats not derived from animal sources should be classified into fish and vegetable oils to evaluate their dietary significance. We also noted that Japanese in their 30s consume less fish oil, indicating the western trend in their

  19. Impact of lipid content and composition on lipid oxidation and protein carbonylation in experimental fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Verónica; Estévez, Mario; Ventanas, Jesús; Ventanas, Sonia

    2014-03-15

    This study aims to investigate the effect of lipid content (∼4%, ∼10% and ∼15%) and composition (different lipid sources; animal fat and sunflower oil) on the oxidative stability of proteins and lipids in experimental fermented sausages. Increasing the lipid content of sausages enhanced the susceptibility of lipids to oxidation whereas the effect on the formation of specific carbonyls from protein oxidation was not so evident. Sausages manufactured with different lipid sources affected the susceptibility of lipids and proteins to oxidation as a likely result of the modifications in the fatty acid profile, as well as to the presence of antioxidant compounds. While the fatty acid profile had a major effect on the occurrence and extent of lipid oxidation, the presence of compounds with potential antioxidant activity may be more influential on the extent of protein carbonylation.

  20. Effects of USDA beef quality grade and cooking on fatty acid composition of neutral and polar lipid fractions.

    PubMed

    Legako, J F; Dinh, T T N; Miller, M F; Brooks, J C

    2015-02-01

    The effects of USDA beef quality grade (QG; Prime, Low Choice, and Standard; n=8) and cooking (RC) on fatty acid (FA) concentrations (mg/g dry matter) and percentages of neutral and polar lipid fractions (NL and PL, respectively)from strip steaks were explored. An increase in QG led to an accumulation of most FA, especially in the NL fraction (P < 0.001). Common effects on FA percentages were two-way interactions of either QG or RC with LF (P ≤ 0.019). Fatty acids were affected differently by QG and RC depending on their originating LF. Monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) percentages of the PL were dependent on QG (P ≤ 0.014). Cooking and QG had minimal impact on FA percentages of the NL, however, greatly influenced PL MUFA and PUFA percentages (P b 0.001). There was evidence indicating that dry heat cookery affected not only PUFA, as generally thought, but also the MUFA of PL fraction.

  1. Changes in lipid and fatty acid composition of late larval and puerulus stages of the spiny lobster (Panulirus cygnus) across the continental shelf of Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bruce F; Jeffs, Andrew G; Melville-Smith, Roy; Chubb, Chris F; Nelson, Matthew M; Nichols, Peter D

    2006-02-01

    The feeding of the late larval stages of the spiny lobster, Panulirus cygnus, and the energy reserves used by the non-feeding post-larvae for crossing the continental shelf of Western Australia were examined through their lipid composition. Lipid was a significant component of the biomass of all larval and post-larval samples (range 63-213 mg g(-1) of dry biomass). The fatty acid profiles of late stage larvae (8-9) suggest that they were feeding on salps and small crustaceans, such as euphausids, from oligotrophic pelagic communities where herbivorous and microbial grazing is an important basis to the food web. There was a marked decrease in lipid content of post-larvae progressively across the continental shelf, and this corresponded closely with decreasing dry mass, suggesting that post-larvae were using lipid as an energy source during cross-shelf movement at a rate of 1.6 J km(-1). This is considerably lower than for other spiny lobster species, suggesting that the post-larvae of the western rock lobster may use physical processes as well as active swimming for onshore transport. This may help to explain the large inter-annual variability in the post-larval settlement of this species, which is closely related to differences in weather patterns capable of greatly varying onshore advection processes.

  2. Effects of dietary thia fatty acids on lipid composition, morphology and macrophage function of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) kidney.

    PubMed

    Gjøen, Tor; Kleveland, Ellen Johanne; Moya-Falcón, Corina; Frøystad, Marianne K; Vegusdal, Anne; Hvattum, Erlend; Berge, Rolf K; Ruyter, Bente

    2007-09-01

    High lipid levels are being used in modern salmonid diets to promote rapid growth; however there is a limiting supply of the traditional fish oils as the fish farming industry expands. One way to utilize the lipid sources better, could be to find ways to stimulate fatty acid (FA) oxidation so that Atlantic salmon use more energy for muscle growth and less for storage in perivisceral adipose tissue. We have previously shown that dietary inclusion of the thia FA tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) promoted hepatic beta-oxidation and reduced total body lipid levels. However, dietary TTA also had some negative effects, leading to accumulation of sulfone and sulfoxide metabolites of TTA in the kidney and increasing mortality rates, particularly at low water temperatures. Therefore we also wish to investigate the effects of TTA on kidney function at high and low temperatures, including some immune system parameters. The production of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) immunoreactive material from exogenously added arachidonic acid in isolated head kidney macrophages was affected by both diet and temperature. The phagocytic activity in these cells was reduced by DTA in the 12 degrees C group and there was significantly higher protein degradation in head kidney macrophages at 12 degrees C compared to 5 degrees C in all dietary groups. Interestingly, the incorporation of thia FAs in the kidney was higher at 5 degrees C (0.3% TTA and 0.6% DTA) than at 12 degrees C (0.1% TTA and 0.5% DTA). Additionally, there were lower levels of saturated FAs, while higher levels of polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) in the kidney of TTA fed fish at 5 degrees C. We also observed temperature-independent tubular dilatation and a reduction in the density of melanomacrophages of the kidney in salmon fed TTA. Nevertheless, the mRNA expression of some immune-relevant genes in head kidney tissue was not affected by TTA-inclusion in salmon diets. In conclusion, it is clear that 0.6% TTA

  3. Dietary linseed oil in the maternal diet affects immunoglobulins, tissue fatty acid composition and expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in piglets.

    PubMed

    Chen, X L; Wang, N; Tian, M L; Wang, L; Liu, T; Zhang, X W; Shi, B M; Shan, A S

    2016-11-21

    This experiment investigated the effects of supplementing the maternal diet with linseed oil (LSO) and soya bean oil (SBO) on immunoglobulins, the fatty acid composition and hepatic expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in piglets. Multiparous sows (twenty-four per diet) were fed on diets containing a supplement of either SBO or LSO during last week of gestation and lactation. The results indicated that supplementation of maternal diet with LSO could improve the weaning weight of piglets and average daily gain (ADG) (p < 0.05). The concentration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) was enhanced in sow plasma, colostrum and milk by the addition of LSO (p < 0.05). In addition, the concentration of 18: 3n-3 fatty acids was higher in the milk of LSO sows. Meanwhile, maternal supplementation with LSO increased the levels of plasma IgG, IgA and the tissues n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in piglets (p < 0.05). Correspondingly, the mRNA expression levels of hepatic ∆5-desaturase (D5D) and ∆6-desaturase (D6D) were higher, and fatty acid synthase (FAS) was lower in piglets from LSO-fed sows when compared with that in the SBO group. In conclusion, LSO supplementation of the maternal diet increases immunoglobulins, modifies the fatty acid composition and affects the gene of D5D and D6D expression of piglets.

  4. Dietary levels of chia: influence on yolk cholesterol, lipid content and fatty acid composition for two strains of hens.

    PubMed

    Ayerza, R; Coates, W

    2000-05-01

    Four hundred fifty H&N laying hens, half white and half brown, were fed for 90 d to compare a control diet to diets containing 7, 14, 21, and 28% chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seed. Cholesterol content, total fat content, and fatty acid composition of the yolks were determined 30, 43, 58, 72, and 90 d from the start of the trial. Significantly less cholesterol was found in the egg yolks produced by the hens fed the diets with 14, 21, and 28% chia compared with the control, except at Day 90. Palmitic fatty acid content and total saturated fatty acid content decreased as chia percentage increased and as the trial progressed. Total omega-3 fatty acid content was significantly greater (P < 0.05) for both strains for all chia diets compared with the control diet. Total polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content of the yolks from the chia diets was significantly greater (P < 0.05) than from the control diet. Generally, total PUFA content tended to be highest in the yolks of the white hens.

  5. Nutritional Evaluation and Optimisation in Neonates: a randomized, double-blind controlled trial of amino acid regimen and intravenous lipid composition in preterm parenteral nutrition12

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinxue; Babalis, Daphne; Doré, Caroline J; Warwick, Jane; Bell, Jimmy; Thomas, Louise; Ashby, Deborah; Durighel, Giuliana; Ederies, Ash; Yanez-Lopez, Monica; Modi, Neena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Parenteral nutrition is central to the care of very immature infants. Current international recommendations favor higher amino acid intakes and fish oil–containing lipid emulsions. Objective: The aim of this trial was to compare 1) the effects of high [immediate recommended daily intake (Imm-RDI)] and low [incremental introduction of amino acids (Inc-AAs)] parenteral amino acid delivery within 24 h of birth on body composition and 2) the effect of a multicomponent lipid emulsion containing 30% soybean oil, 30% medium-chain triglycerides, 25% olive oil, and 15% fish oil (SMOF) with that of soybean oil (SO)-based lipid emulsion on intrahepatocellular lipid (IHCL) content. Design: We conducted a 2-by-2 factorial, double-blind, multicenter randomized controlled trial. Results: We randomly assigned 168 infants born at <31 wk of gestation. We evaluated outcomes at term in 133 infants. There were no significant differences between Imm-RDI and Inc-AA groups for nonadipose mass [adjusted mean difference: 1.0 g (95% CI: −108, 111 g; P = 0.98)] or between SMOF and SO groups for IHCL [adjusted mean SMOF:SO ratio: 1.1 (95% CI: 0.8, 1.6; P = 0.58]. SMOF does not affect IHCL content. There was a significant interaction (P = 0.05) between the 2 interventions for nonadipose mass. There were no significant interactions between group differences for either primary outcome measure after adjusting for additional confounders. Imm-RDI infants were more likely than Inc-AA infants to have blood urea nitrogen concentrations >7 mmol/L or >10 mmol/L, respectively (75% compared with 49%, P < 0.01; 49% compared with 18%, P < 0.01). Head circumference at term was smaller in the Imm-RDI group [mean difference: −0.8 cm (95% CI: −1.5, −0.1 cm; P = 0.02)]. There were no significant differences in any prespecified secondary outcomes, including adiposity, liver function tests, incidence of conjugated hyperbilirubinemia, weight, length, mortality, and brain volumes. Conclusion

  6. Lipid and fatty acid analysis of the Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus (PiGV) envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri-Bhalla, K.; Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Virus envelope was isolated from Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus, produced in early fourth-instar larvae. Both polar and neutral lipids were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. Fatty acid composition of various individual neutral and polar lipids was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. The major components of envelope neutral lipid were diacylglycerols. Palmitic acid and stearic acid were the major saturated fatty acids in both polar and neutral lipids. Whereas palmitoleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acids in neutral lipids, oleic acid was the major unsaturated fatty acid in the polar lipids.

  7. Evaluation of food grade solvents for lipid extraction and impact of storage temperature on fatty acid composition of edible seaweeds Laminaria digitata (Phaeophyceae) and Palmaria palmata (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Schmid, Matthias; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the impact of different food- and non-food grade extraction solvents on yield and fatty acid composition of the lipid extracts of two seaweed species (Palmaria palmata and Laminaria digitata). The application of chloroform/methanol and three different food grade solvents (ethanol, hexane, ethanol/hexane) revealed significant differences in both, extraction yield and fatty acid composition. The extraction efficiency, in terms of yields of total fatty acids (TFA), was in the order: chloroform/methanol>ethanol>hexane>ethanol/hexane for both species. Highest levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were achieved by the extraction with ethanol. Additionally the effect of storage temperature on the stability of PUFA in ground and freeze-dried seaweed biomass was investigated. Seaweed samples were stored for a total duration of 22months at three different temperatures (-20°C, 4°C and 20°C). Levels of TFA and PUFA were only stable after storage at -20°C for the two seaweed species.

  8. Growth temperature alters Salmonella Enteritidis heat/acid resistance, membrane lipid composition and stress/virulence related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yishan; Khoo, Wei Jie; Zheng, Qianwang; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2014-02-17

    The influence of growth temperature (10, 25, 37, and 42 °C) on the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis in simulated gastric fluid (SGF; pH=2.0) and during heat treatment (54, 56, 58, and 60 °C), on the membrane fatty acid composition, as well as on stress-/virulence-related gene expression was studied. Cells incubated at temperatures lower or higher than 37 °C did not increase their acid resistance, with the maximum D-value of 3.07 min in cells grown at 37 °C; while those incubated at higher temperature increased their heat resistance, with the maximum D60 °C-values of 1.4 min in cells grown at 42 °C. A decrease in the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids was observed as the growth temperature increased. Compared to the control cells grown at 37 °C, the expression of rpoS was 16.5- and 14.4-fold higher in cells cultivated at 10 and 25 °C, respectively; while the expression of rpoH was 2.9-fold higher in those cultivated at 42 °C. The increased expression of stress response gene rpoH and the decreased ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids correlated with the greater heat resistance of bacteria grown at 42 °C; while the decreased expression of stress response gene rpoS at 42 °C might contribute to the decrease in acid resistance. Virulence related genes-spvR, hilA, avrA-were induced in cells cultivated at 42 °C, except sefA which was induced in the control cells. This study indicates that environmental temperature may affect the virulence potential of S. Enteritidis, thus temperature should be well controlled during food storage.

  9. Digital Cushion Fatty Acid Composition and Lipid Metabolism Gene Network Expression in Holstein Dairy Cows Fed a High-Energy Diet

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Zeeshan Muhammad; Akbar, Haji; Hosseini, Afshin; Bichi Ruspoli Forteguerri, Elena; Osorio, Johan S.

    2016-01-01

    The hoof digital cushion is a complex structure composed of adipose tissue beneath the distal phalanx, i.e. axial, middle and abaxial fat pad. The major role of these fat depots is dampening compression of the corium underneath the cushion. The study aimed to determine expression of target genes and fatty acid profiles in the hoof of non-pregnant dry Holstein cows fed low (CON) or high-energy (OVE) diets. The middle fat pad of the hoof digital cushion was collected soon after slaughter. Despite the lack of effect on expression of the transcription regulators SREBF1 and PPARG, the expression of the lipogenic enzymes ACACA, FASN, SCD, and DGAT2 was upregulated with OVE. Along with the upregulation of G6PD and IDH1, important for NADPH synthesis during lipogenesis, and the basal glucose transporter SLC2A1, these data indicated a pro-lipogenic response in the digital cushion with OVE. The expression of the lipid droplet-associated protein PLIN2 was upregulated while expression of lipolytic enzymes (ATGL, ABDH5, and LIPE) only tended to be upregulated with OVE. Therefore, OVE induced lipogenesis, lipid droplet formation, and lipolysis, albeit to different extents. Although concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) did not differ, among the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), the concentration of 20:5n3 was lower with OVE. Among the saturated fatty acids, 20:0 concentration was greater with OVE. Although data indicated that the hoof digital cushion metabolic transcriptome is responsive to higher-energy diets, this did not translate into marked differences in the fatty acid composition. The decrease in concentration of PUFA, which could contribute to synthesis of inflammatory molecules, in OVE-fed cows indicated that feeding higher-energy diets might be detrimental for the mediation of inflammation in digital cushion. This effect could be further exacerbated by physiologic and endocrine changes during the peripartal period that favor inflammation. PMID:27441691

  10. Lipid composition of human serum lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Skipski, V. P.; Barclay, Marion; Barclay, R. K.; Fetzer, Valentina A.; Good, J. J.; Archibald, F. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. The lipid compositions of the low-density lipoproteins, the high-density lipoproteins and the ultracentrifugal residue of human serum are presented, with emphasis on certain lipoprotein classes and lipid components not previously described. 2. Except for the lipoproteins with the lowest and highest densities, there is a trend for stepwise successive increase or, respectively, decrease in the relative amounts of the main constituents of lipoproteins. 3. High-density lipoprotein-2 and high-density lipoprotein-3 have different amounts of certain lipids; high-density lipoprotein-2 has relatively more free cholesterol and sphingomyelin; high-density lipoprotein-3 has more free fatty acids, diglycerides and ceramide monohexosides. 4. All the lipoproteins contain hydrocarbons of the alkane series. The greatest amount, which averages 4·4% of total lipid extracted, is in the ultracentrifugal residue; n-alkanes comprise 18–50% of the hydrocarbons. 5. All the lipoproteins contain ceramide monohexosides. The highest relative contents of these glycolipids are in high-density lipoprotein-3 and in the ultracentrifugal residue. 6. The ultracentrifugal residue contains 55% of the total quantity of free fatty acids present in serum. The remaining free fatty acids are distributed among the other lipoprotein classes. 7. The choline-containing phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin) comprise about 90% of the phospholipids in all the lipoprotein classes except the low-density lipoprotein-2, which contains about 80% of these phospholipids. 8. The presence of a large amount of lysophosphatidylcholine in the ultracentrifugal residue and the successive decrease of sphingomyelin from the low-density lipoprotein-1 to the ultracentrifugal residue was confirmed. 9. The low-density lipoprotein-2 and the ultracentrifugal residue are characterized by relatively high contents of the lower glycerides. PMID:6048776

  11. Effects of various dietary lipid additives on lamb performance, carcass characteristics, adipose tissue fatty acid composition, and wool characteristics.

    PubMed

    Meale, S J; Chaves, A V; He, M L; Guan, L L; McAllister, T A

    2015-06-01

    Tasco (Ascophyllum nodosum; TA) was compared to canola (CO), flax (FO), and safflower oils (SO) for effects on performance, carcass characteristics, and fatty acid profiles of adipose tissue in skirt muscle (SM), subcutaneous and perirenal adipose tissues, and wool production and quality characteristics of Canadian Arcott lambs. Fifty-six lambs were randomly assigned to dietary treatments (n = 14 per treatment). Diets consisted of a pelleted, barley-based finishing diet containing either TA, CO, FO, or SO (2% of dietary DM). Feed deliveries and orts were recorded daily. Lambs were weighed weekly and slaughtered once they reached ≥ 45 kg BW. Carcass characteristics, rumen pH, and liver weights were determined at slaughter. Wool yield was determined on mid-side patches of 100 cm2 shorn at d 0 and on the day before slaughter (d 105 or 140). Dye-bands were used to determine wool growth, micrometer and staple length. Adipose tissues and SM samples were taken at slaughter and analyzed for FA profiles. No effects were observed on intake, growth, or carcass characteristics. A greater (P = 0.02) staple strength of lambs fed CO was the only effect observed in wool. Flax oil increased total n-3 and decreased the n-6/n-3 ratio in tissue FA profiles (P < 0.001) in comparison to other diets. Tasco increased (P ≤ 0.001) SFA/PUFA in all tissues, whereas concentrations of CLA c-9, t-11 were greatest with SO in all tissues (P ≤ 0.02), compared to other diets. These results suggest Tasco supplementation did not improve the n-3/n-6 or SFA/PUFA ratios of lamb adipose tissues compared to other dietary lipid additives.

  12. Effect of ration size on fillet fatty acid composition, phospholipid allostasis and mRNA expression patterns of lipid regulatory genes in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Benedito-Palos, Laura; Calduch-Giner, Josep A; Ballester-Lozano, Gabriel F; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume

    2013-04-14

    The effect of ration size on muscle fatty acid (FA) composition and mRNA expression levels of key regulatory enzymes of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism have been addressed in juveniles of gilthead sea bream fed a practical diet over the course of an 11-week trial. The experimental setup included three feeding levels: (i) full ration until visual satiety, (ii) 70 % of satiation and (iii) 70 % of satiation with the last 2 weeks at the maintenance ration. Feed restriction reduced lipid content of whole body by 30 % and that of fillet by 50 %. In this scenario, the FA composition of fillet TAG was not altered by ration size, whereas that of phospholipids was largely modified with a higher retention of arachidonic acid and DHA. The mRNA transcript levels of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferases, phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase and FA desaturase 2 were not regulated by ration size in the present experimental model. In contrast, mRNA levels of stearoyl-CoA desaturases were markedly down-regulated by feed restriction. An opposite trend was found for a muscle-specific lipoprotein lipase, which is exclusive of fish lineage. Several upstream regulatory transcriptions were also assessed, although nutritionally mediated changes in mRNA transcripts were almost reduced to PPARα and β, which might act in a counter-regulatory way on lipolysis and lipogenic pathways. This gene expression pattern contributes to the construction of a panel of biomarkers to direct marine fish production towards muscle lean phenotypes with increased retentions of long-chain PUFA.

  13. Introduction to fatty acids and lipids.

    PubMed

    Burdge, Graham C; Calder, Philip C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the structure, function and metabolism of fatty acids and lipids that are of particular importance in the context of parenteral nutrition. Lipids are a heterogeneous group of molecules that share the common property of hydrophobicity. Lipids range in structure from simple short hydrocarbon chains to more complex molecules, including triacylglycerols, phospholipids and sterols and their esters. Lipids within each class may differ structurally. Fatty acids are common components of complex lipids, and these differ according to chain length and the presence, number and position of double bonds in the hydrocarbon chain. Structural variation among complex lipids and among fatty acids gives rise to functional differences that result in different impacts upon metabolism and upon cell and tissue responses. Fatty acids and complex lipids exhibit a variety of structural variations that influence their metabolism and their functional effects.

  14. Effect of Glucose on the Fatty Acid Composition of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 during 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Degradation: Implications for Lipid-Based Stable Isotope Probing Methods▿†

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Thomas Z.; Dignac, Marie-France; Barriuso, Enrique; Mariotti, André

    2011-01-01

    Combining lipid biomarker profiling with stable isotope probing (SIP) is a powerful technique for studying specific microbial populations responsible for the degradation of organic pollutants in various natural environments. However, the presence of other easily degradable substrates may induce significant physiological changes by altering both the rate of incorporation of the target compound into the biomass and the microbial lipid profiles. In order to test this hypothesis, Cupriavidus necator JMP134, a 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacterium, was incubated with [13C]2,4-D, [13C]glucose, or mixtures of both substrates alternatively labeled with 13C. C. necator JMP134 exhibited a preferential use of 2,4-D over glucose. The isotopic analysis showed that glucose had only a small effect on the incorporation of the acetic chain of 2,4-D into the biomass (at days 2 and 3) and no effect on that of the benzenic ring. The addition of glucose did change the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) composition. However, the overall FAME isotopic signature reflected that of the entire biomass. Compound-specific individual isotopic analyses of FAME composition showed that the 13C-enriched FAME profiles were slightly or not affected when tracing the 2,4-D acetic chain or 2,4-D benzenic ring, respectively. This batch study is a necessary step for validating the use of lipid-based SIP methods in complex environments. PMID:21856833

  15. VARIATION IN GROWTH, LIPID CLASS AND FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF THE MUD CRAB, RHITHROPANOPEUS HARRISII (GOULD) DURING LARVAL DEVELOPMENT FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO AN INSECT JUVENILE HORMONE ANALOG (FENOXYCARB(R))

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the effects of fenoxycarb?, an insect juvenile hormone (JH) analog, on larval growth, and lipid class and fatty acid composition in first crabs of the mud crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii reared through total larval development in nominal water concentrations fr...

  16. Polar lipid composition of a new halobacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tindall, B. J.; Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations of the polar lipid composition of a new aerobic, extremely halophilic aracheabacterium capable of nitrate reduction have shown that this organism contains two previously unknown phospholycolipids derived from diphytanyl glycerol diethers. Comparison of the lipid pattern from this new isolate with other known strains indicate that this organism is novel. On the basis of the unique polar lipid pattern it can be concluded that this organism represents a new taxon, at least at the species level.

  17. Effects of Dietary Coconut Oil as a Medium-chain Fatty Acid Source on Performance, Carcass Composition and Serum Lipids in Male Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianhong; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Juntao; Chen, Yiqiang; Yang, Wenjun; Zhang, Liying

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary coconut oil as a medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) source on performance, carcass composition and serum lipids in male broilers. A total of 540, one-day-old, male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly allotted to 1 of 5 treatments with each treatment being applied to 6 replicates of 18 chicks. The basal diet (i.e., R0) was based on corn and soybean meal and was supplemented with 1.5% soybean oil during the starter phase (d 0 to 21) and 3.0% soybean oil during the grower phase (d 22 to 42). Four experimental diets were formulated by replacing 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% of the soybean oil with coconut oil (i.e., R25, R50, R75, and R100). Soybean oil and coconut oil were used as sources of long-chain fatty acid and MCFA, respectively. The feeding trial showed that dietary coconut oil had no effect on weight gain, feed intake or feed conversion. On d 42, serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were linearly decreased as the coconut oil level increased (p<0.01). Lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and total lipase activities were linearly increased as the coconut oil level increased (p<0.01). Abdominal fat weight/eviscerated weight (p = 0.05), intermuscular fat width (p<0.01) and subcutaneous fat thickness (p<0.01) showed a significant quadratic relationship, with the lowest value at R75. These results indicated that replacement of 75% of the soybean oil in diets with coconut oil is the optimum level to reduce fat deposition and favorably affect lipid profiles without impairing performance in broilers. PMID:25557818

  18. Effects of Dietary Coconut Oil as a Medium-chain Fatty Acid Source on Performance, Carcass Composition and Serum Lipids in Male Broilers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhong; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Juntao; Chen, Yiqiang; Yang, Wenjun; Zhang, Liying

    2015-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary coconut oil as a medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) source on performance, carcass composition and serum lipids in male broilers. A total of 540, one-day-old, male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly allotted to 1 of 5 treatments with each treatment being applied to 6 replicates of 18 chicks. The basal diet (i.e., R0) was based on corn and soybean meal and was supplemented with 1.5% soybean oil during the starter phase (d 0 to 21) and 3.0% soybean oil during the grower phase (d 22 to 42). Four experimental diets were formulated by replacing 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% of the soybean oil with coconut oil (i.e., R25, R50, R75, and R100). Soybean oil and coconut oil were used as sources of long-chain fatty acid and MCFA, respectively. The feeding trial showed that dietary coconut oil had no effect on weight gain, feed intake or feed conversion. On d 42, serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were linearly decreased as the coconut oil level increased (p<0.01). Lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and total lipase activities were linearly increased as the coconut oil level increased (p<0.01). Abdominal fat weight/eviscerated weight (p = 0.05), intermuscular fat width (p<0.01) and subcutaneous fat thickness (p<0.01) showed a significant quadratic relationship, with the lowest value at R75. These results indicated that replacement of 75% of the soybean oil in diets with coconut oil is the optimum level to reduce fat deposition and favorably affect lipid profiles without impairing performance in broilers.

  19. Pasting characteristics of starch-lipid composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch-lipid composites (SLC) have been used as fat replacers and stabilizers in beef patties, dairy products, and baked goods. The SLC are produced by mixing aqueous starch slurry with a lipid source, and steam jet-cooking. The SLC may be dried using a drum drier and then milled in a Retch mill. ...

  20. Lipids, fatty acids, and more

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy is the most expensive component in livestock diets. Lipids are concentrated energy sources and are known to affect growth, feed efficiency, feed dust, and diet palatability. A large majority of research evaluating lipids in livestock has utilized lipids of high quality, dealt mainly with anim...

  1. Effect of feeding lambs with a tanniferous shrub (rockrose) and a vegetable oil blend on fatty acid composition of meat lipids.

    PubMed

    Francisco, A; Alves, S P; Portugal, P V; Pires, V M R; Dentinho, M T; Alfaia, C M; Jerónimo, E; Prates, J A M; Santos-Silva, J; Bessa, R J B

    2016-12-01

    The effects of feeding Cistus ladanifer (Cistus) and a blend of soybean and linseed oil (1 : 2 vol/vol) on fatty acid (FA) composition of lamb meat lipids and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of desaturase enzymes was assessed. In total, 54 male lambs were randomly assigned to 18 pens and to nine diets, resulting from the combination of three inclusion levels of Cistus (50 v. 100 v. 200 g/kg of dry matter (DM)) and three inclusion levels of oil (0 v. 40 v. 80 g/kg of DM). The forage-to-concentrate ratio of the diets was 1 : 1. Longissimus muscle lipids were extracted, fractionated into neutral (NL) and polar lipid (PL) and FA methyl esters obtained and analyzed by GLC. The expression of genes encoding Δ5, Δ6 and Δ9 desaturases (fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1), fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) and stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD)) was determined. Intramuscular fat, NL and PL contents were not affected by oil or Cistus. Oil supplementation reduced (P<0.05) 16:0, c9-16:1, 17:0, c9-17:1 and c9-18:1 FA and increased (P<0.05) 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3 and the majority of biohydrogenation intermediates in NL. Cistus alone had few effects on FA of NL but interacted with oil (P<0.05) by increasing t10-18:1,t10,t12-18:2,t10,c12-18:2 and t7,c9-18:2. The t10-/t11-18:1 ratio increased with both Cistus and oil levels. The c9, t11-18:2 did not increase (P<0.05) with both oil and Cistus dietary inclusion. Oil reduced c9-16:1, 17:0, c9-17:1,c9-18:1, 20:4n-6, 22:4n-6 and 20:3n-9 proportions in PL, and increased 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3, 20:3n-3 and of most of the biohydrogenation intermediates. The Cistus had only minor effects on FA composition of PL. Cistus resulted in a reduction (P<0.05) of 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 in the meat PL. The expression level of SCD mRNA increased (P=0.015) with Cistus level, although a linear relationship with condensed tannins intake (P=0.11) could not be established. FADS1 mRNA expressed levels increased linearly (P=0.019) with condensed tannins intake. In summary, the

  2. Effects of a medium chain triglyceride oil mixture and alpha-lipoic acid diet on body composition, antioxidant status, and plasma lipid levels in the Golden Syrian hamster.

    PubMed

    Wollin, Stephanie D; Wang, Yanwen; Kubow, Stan; Jones, Peter J H

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid (ALP) versus a medium chain triglyceride oil mixture (MCTo), which was designed to increase energy expenditure and to improve lipid profiles containing medium chain triglycerides, phytosterols, and omega-3 fatty acids in the form of flaxseed oil. A total of 48 hamsters were fed a) hypercholesterolemic (HC) control, b) HC MCTo, c) HC ALP, or d) HC MCTo/ALP diet for 4 weeks. No differences were observed on food intake, body weight, total body water, lean and fat mass, and tissue thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). ALP alone had no effect on total cholesterol (TC); however, MCTo feeding increased TC with (P < 0.03) and without (P < 0.003) ALP when compared with control. ALP increased HDL levels compared with control (P < 0.04) and MCTo/ALP (P < 0.007) groups. MCTo, with (P < 0.0001) or without (P < 0.006) ALP, increased non-HDL cholesterol levels versus control. The non-HDL:HDL cholesterol ratio was decreased by ALP compared with MCTo (45%) and MCTo/ALP (68%) (P < 0.0001), a similar trend was seen when compared with the HC control (22%) group (P < 0.14). Triglyceride levels were not altered by any dietary treatment. Liver and heart tissue reduced glutathione (GSH) was increased (P < 0.05) by all three treatments when compared with control. Both tissues showed an increase (P < 0.05) in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) when fed ALP as compared with other treatments. Hamsters fed ALP had a lower (P < 0.05) GSH/GSSG ratio compared with other treatment groups. In conclusion, MCTo feeding does not elicit beneficial effects on circulating plasma lipids and measures of body composition. In addition, our results do not clearly support an improvement in oxidative status through supplementation of ALP. However, our results do support the existence of beneficial effects of ALP on circulating lipoprotein content in the hamster.

  3. The effect of dietary alfalfa and flax sprouts on rabbit meat antioxidant content, lipid oxidation and fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Dal Bosco, A; Castellini, C; Martino, M; Mattioli, S; Marconi, O; Sileoni, V; Ruggeri, S; Tei, F; Benincasa, P

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of dietary supplementation with flax and alfalfa sprouts on fatty acid, tocopherol and phytochemical contents of rabbit meat. Ninety weaned New Zealand White rabbits were assigned to three dietary groups: standard diet (S); standard diet+20g/d of alfalfa sprouts (A); and standard diet+20g/d of flax sprouts (F). In the F rabbits the Longissimus dorsi muscle showed a higher thio-barbituric acid-reactive value and at the same time significantly higher values of alpha-linolenic acid, total polyunsaturated and n-3 fatty acids. Additionally n-3/n-6 ratio and thrombogenic indices were improved. The meat of A rabbits showed intermediate values of the previously reported examined parameters. Dietary supplementation with sprouts produced meat with a higher total phytoestrogen content. The addition of fresh alfalfa and flax sprouts to commercial feed modified the fat content, fatty acid and phytochemical profile of the meat, but the flax ones worsened the oxidative status of meat.

  4. Fatty acid composition of porcine cumulus oocyte complexes (COC) during maturation: effect of the lipid modulators trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (t10,c12 CLA) and forskolin.

    PubMed

    Prates, E G; Alves, S P; Marques, C C; Baptista, M C; Horta, A E M; Bessa, R J B; Pereira, R M

    2013-05-01

    The effect of maturation and of two lipid modulators supplementation along in vitro maturation (IVM) on fatty acid (FA) and dimethylacetal (DMA) composition of porcine cumulus oocyte complexes (COC) were studied. Abattoir-derived immature COC were analyzed for FA and DMA or submitted to IVM as follows: control group; t10,c12 CLA group, t10,c12 CLA supplementation for 44 h; Forskolin group, forskolin supplementation during the initial 2 h; t10,c12 CLA + forskolin group, t10,c12 CLA for 44 h and forskolin for just 2h. Each experimental group had five replicates. FA analysis of oocytes, cumulus cells (CC), follicular fluid, and culture media were performed by gas-liquid chromatography. Oocytes and their CC had different FA composition. Oocytes were richer in saturated FA (SFA) preferentially maintaining their FA profile during maturation. Mature CC had the highest polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) content. Five individual and total SFA, and monounsaturated FA (MUFA), notably oleic acid (c9-18:1), percentages were lower (P ≤ 0.023) in mature than in immature CC. t10,c12 CLA was accumulated by COC from t10,c12 CLA and t10,c12 CLA + forskolin groups, mostly in CC where MUFA and an eicosatrienoic isomer decreased (P ≤ 0.043). Nevertheless, PUFA or FA and DMA total content were not affected. Arachidonic acid was reduced in t10,c12 CLA + forskolin CC and hexadecanal-DMA-16:0 in t10,c12 CLA CC. Forskolin alone increased (P ≤ 0.043) c9-18:1 in oocytes. In conclusion, maturation process clearly changed porcine COC FA and DMA profiles, mostly of CC, also more susceptible to modifications induced by t10,c12 CLA. This possibility of manipulating COC lipid composition during IVM could be used to improve oocyte quality/cryopreservation efficiency.

  5. Effect of replacement of fish oil with camelina (Camelina sativa) oil on growth, lipid class and fatty acid composition of farmed juvenile Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Hixson, Stefanie M; Parrish, Christopher C; Anderson, Derek M

    2013-12-01

    Camelina (Camelina sativa) oil was tested as a replacement for fish oil in diets for farmed Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Camelina differs from other plant oilseeds previously used in aquaculture with high lipid (40 %), α-linolenic acid (40 %), antioxidants and low proportions of saturated fats. Dietary treatments were fed to cod (19 g fish⁻¹ initial weight) for 9 weeks and included a fish oil control (FO), 40 % (CO40) and 80 % (CO80) replacement of fish oil with camelina oil. There was no effect of replacing fish oil with camelina oil included at levels up to 80 % on the growth performance. Cod fed CO80 stored more lipid in the liver (p < 0.01), including more neutral lipid (p < 0.05) and triacylglycerol (p < 0.05). Cod fed CO80 decreased in total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in muscle compared to CO40 and FO (p < 0.05), increased in monounsaturated fatty acids (p < 0.01), decreased in total ω3 fatty acids (FO > CO40 > CO80; p < 0.01) and increased in total ω6 fatty acids (FO < CO40 < CO80; p < 0.01). In the liver, long-chain (LC) PUFA such as 20:4ω6, 20:5ω3, 22:5ω3 and 22:6ω3 decreased when fish oil was removed from the diet (p < 0.05), and increased in 18-carbon fatty acids (p < 0.01). Camelina oil can reduce the amount of fish oil needed to meet lipid requirements, although replacing 80 % of fish oil reduced LC PUFAs in both tissues. A comparison of BF₃ and H₂SO₄ as catalysts to transmethylate cod liver and muscle lipids revealed small but significant differences in some fatty acid proportions.

  6. Effect of dietary lipid on the growth, fatty acid composition and Δ5 Fads expression of abalone ( Haliotis discus hannai Ino) hepatopancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingzhu; Mai, Kangsen; Ai, Qinghui; He, Gen; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wenbing; Zhang, Yanjiao; Zhou, Huihui; Liufu, Zhiguo

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of dietary lipid on the growth, fatty acid composition and Δ5 fatty acyl desaturase genes ( Fads) expression of juvenile abalone ( Haliotis discus hannai Ino) hepatopancreas. Six purified diets were formulated to contain tripalmitin (TP), olive oil (OO, 72.87% 18:1n-9), grape seed oil (GO, 68.67% 18:2n-6), linseed oil (LO, 70.48% 18:3n-3), ARA oil (AO, 41.81% ARA) or EPA oil (EO, 44.09% EPA and 23.67% DAH). No significant difference in survival rate was observed among abalone fed with different diets. Weight gain rate ( WGR) and daily growth rate of shell length ( DGR SL) were significantly increased in abalone fed with diets containing OO, AO and EO, but decreased in abalone fed with LO diet ( P < 0.05) in comparison with those fed with TP. High level of dietary 18:2n-6 resulted in higher content of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in abalone fed with GO than those fed with TP, OO, LO and EO ( P < 0.05). n-3 PUFAs in abalone fed with LO was significantly higher than those in abalone fed with TP, OO, GO and AO ( P < 0.05). The highest contents of 20:1n-9 and 22:1n-9 were observed in abalone fed with OO. The expression of Δ5 Fads in hepatopancreas of abalone was enhanced by high concentration of 18:3n-3 and suppressed by dietary LC-PUFAs; however it was not affected by dietary high concentration of 18:1n-9 or 18:2n-6. These results provided valuable information for understanding the synthesis of LC-PUFAs and nutritional regulation of Δ5 Fads expression in abalone.

  7. Solubilization of lipids and lipid phases by the styrene-maleic acid copolymer.

    PubMed

    Dominguez Pardo, Juan J; Dörr, Jonas M; Iyer, Aditya; Cox, Ruud C; Scheidelaar, Stefan; Koorengevel, Martijn C; Subramaniam, Vinod; Killian, J Antoinette

    2017-01-01

    A promising tool in membrane research is the use of the styrene-maleic acid (SMA) copolymer to solubilize membranes in the form of nanodiscs. Since membranes are heterogeneous in composition, it is important to know whether SMA thereby has a preference for solubilization of either specific types of lipids or specific bilayer phases. Here, we investigated this by performing partial solubilization of model membranes and analyzing the lipid composition of the solubilized fraction. We found that SMA displays no significant lipid preference in homogeneous binary lipid mixtures in the fluid phase, even when using lipids that by themselves show very different solubilization kinetics. By contrast, in heterogeneous phase-separated bilayers, SMA was found to have a strong preference for solubilization of lipids in the fluid phase as compared to those in either a gel phase or a liquid-ordered phase. Together the results suggest that (1) SMA is a reliable tool to characterize native interactions between membrane constituents, (2) any solubilization preference of SMA is not due to properties of individual lipids but rather due to properties of the membrane or membrane domains in which these lipids reside and (3) exploiting SMA resistance rather than detergent resistance may be an attractive approach for the isolation of ordered domains from biological membranes.

  8. Effect of essential oil of Hyssopus officinalis on the lipid composition of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Ghfir, B; Fonvieille, J L; Koulali, Y; Ecalle, R; Dargent, R

    1994-06-01

    Addition of the essential oil of Hyssopus officinalis to the culture medium of Aspergillus fumigatus induced alterations in both growth and lipid composition of this mould. Total lipids and sterols were reduced, whereas total phospholipids were increased. There were alterations in the proportions of fatty acids, neutral lipid and phospholipid fractions.

  9. Total lipids and fatty acids composition of the coastal and the deep-sea common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) populations: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ben-Youssef, Saoussen; Selmi, Salah; Ezzeddine-Najai, Sofia; Sadok, Saloua

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate biochemical differences between Octopus vulgaris caught off costal zone and from the deep-sea of the Golf of Gabès (South coast of Tunisia). In both fishing grounds, octopus total lipids constituted almost 1.5% of wet tissue showing no significant difference (p < 0.05). The percentage distribution of fatty acids was not significantly different, neither between males and females, nor between both areas. Polyunsaturated fatty acids constituted about 50 % of the total fatty acids. Docosahexaenoic (DHA; C22:6 omega 3), eicosapentaenoic (EPA; C20:5 omega 3) and the arachidonic acids (C20:4) were the most important of this group with percentages of 25, 14 and 10% respectively. The saturated fraction constituted almost 30% of the total fatty acids. The most dominant saturated fatty acids were palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0), with 18% and 7% respectively. The monounsaturated content was found to contribute only 10% of the total fatty acids. Most of the monounsaturated fat was present as oleic acid (C18:1) and palmitoleic acid (C16:1) with 2.5% and 1.5% respectively. The presence of arachidonic acid in substantial proportions with an omega 3 to omega 6 ratios of 3.9 to 1 is of special interest because of the role of cephalopods in the traditional Mediterranean diet.

  10. Severe alterations in lipid composition of frontal cortex lipid rafts from Parkinson's disease and incidental Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Santpere, Gabriel; Marín, Raquel; Torrent, Laia; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains that provide a highly saturated and viscous physicochemical microenvironment to promote protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. We purified lipid rafts from human frontal cortex from normal, early motor stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) and incidental Parkinson's disease (iPD) subjects and analyzed their lipid composition. We observed that lipid rafts from PD and iPD cortices exhibit dramatic reductions in their contents of n-3 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (22:6-n3) and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). Also, saturated fatty acids (16:0 and 18:0) were significantly higher than in control brains. Paralleling these findings, unsaturation and peroxidability indices were considerably reduced in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Lipid classes were also affected in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Thus, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were increased in PD and iPD, whereas cerebrosides and sulfatides and plasmalogen levels were considerably diminished. Our data pinpoint a dramatic increase in lipid raft order due to the aberrant biochemical structure in PD and iPD and indicate that these abnormalities of lipid rafts in the frontal cortex occur at early stages of PD pathology. The findings correlate with abnormal lipid raft signaling and cognitive decline observed during the development of these neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. [Linoleic acid and the immune system. Controversies about lipid emulsions].

    PubMed

    García de Lorenzo, A; Culebras, J M

    1992-01-01

    The selection of a given lipidic function for nutritional backup requires not only knowledge of the metabolism of the different existing lipidic emulsions and of their specific therapeutic indications, but also of their contraindications and controversies because, apart from their calorific value, the contribution of liposoluble vitamins and their function in preventing essential fatty acid deficiencies, we know that they are powerful metabolic modulators. This in associated with the fact that manipulation of dietary lipids (enteral or parenteral) can affect and modulate the response to the disease, attack or infection by improving or impairing the different immune functions. This review is focused on the scientific publications which have examined the varying effects of lipidic emulsions, in quantity and in quality (particularly linoleic acid) on the immune system, on the fatty acid composition of the cellular membranes and on the production of and prostaglandins and leukotrienes. An update is given of the known interrelation between lipids and immunity, with appraisal of triglycerides and long-medium -- and short-chain fatty acids, mixtures of medium -- and long-chain triglycerides, the proportions between infinity-3/infinity-6, and structured lipids.

  12. Composite S-layer lipid structures

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2010-01-01

    Designing and utilization of biomimetic membrane systems generated by bottom-up processes is a rapidly growing scientific and engineering field. Elucidation of the supramolecular construction principle of archaeal cell envelopes composed of S-layer stabilized lipid membranes led to new strategies for generating highly stable functional lipid membranes at meso- and macroscopic scale. In this review, we provide a state of the art survey how S-layer proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides may be used as basic building blocks for the assembly of S-layer supported lipid membranes. These biomimetic membrane systems are distinguished by a nanopatterned fluidity, enhanced stability and longevity and thus, provide a dedicated reconstitution matrix for membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins. Exciting areas for application of composite S-layer membrane systems concern sensor systems involving specific membrane functions. PMID:19303933

  13. Starch-lipid composites containing cimmamaldehyde

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The formulation of a starch-lipid composite containing cinnamaldehyde as antimicrobial agent has been studied. Cinnamaldehyde was incorporated as an emulsion using Acetem 90-50K as a carrier and Tween 60 as the emulsifier. Oil in water emulsions were prepared by direct emulsification using a high sh...

  14. Fatty acid composition of California grown almonds.

    PubMed

    Sathe, S K; Seeram, N P; Kshirsagar, H H; Heber, D; Lapsley, K A

    2008-11-01

    Eight almond (Prunus dulcis L.) cultivars from 12 different California counties, collected during crop years 2004 to 2005 and 2005 to 2006, were extracted with petroleum ether. The extracts were subjected to GC-MS analyses to determine fatty acid composition of soluble lipids. Results indicated palmitic (C16:0), oleic (C18:1), linoleic (C18:2), and alpha-linolenic (C18:3) acid, respectively, accounted for 5.07% to 6.78%, 57.54% to 73.94%, 19.32% to 35.18%, and 0.04% to 0.10%; of the total lipids. Oleic and linoleic acid were inversely correlated (r=-0.99, P= 0.05) and together accounted for 91.16% to 94.29% of the total soluble lipids. Statistically, fatty acid composition was significantly affected by cultivar and county.

  15. Fatty Acids and Bioactive Lipids of Potato Cultivars: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy; Oraby, Hesahm Farouk

    2016-01-01

    Potato tuber is a highly nutritious, wherein genotype and environmental differences are known to exist in the shape, size and nutritional value of potatoes. Owing to its high consumption, potato could be an ideal carrier of health-promoting phytochemicals. Potato cultivars contain many bioactive lipidic compounds such as fatty acids, glycolipids, phospholipids, sterols, tocols and carotenoids, which are highly desirable in diet because of their health-promoting effects. In the scientific literature, information on the content and profile of bioactive lipidic compounds in potato cultivars are few. The concentration and stability of bioactive lipids are affected by many factors such as genotype, agronomic factors, postharvest storage, cooking and processing conditions. In this review levels and composition of bioactive lipids in terms of lipid classes, fatty acids, phytosterols, tocopherols, and caroteinoids distribution in different potato cultivars including genetically modified potato (GMP) were highlighted and discussed. In addition, factors affecting bioactive lipids levels, stability and health benefits are reviewed. In consideration of potential nutritional value, detailed knowledge on lipids of potato cultivars is of major importance.

  16. Lipid Composition, Fatty Acids and Sterols in the Seaweeds Ulva armoricana, and Solieria chordalis from Brittany (France): An Analysis from Nutritional, Chemotaxonomic, and Antiproliferative Activity Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kendel, Melha; Wielgosz-Collin, Gaëtane; Bertrand, Samuel; Roussakis, Christos; Bourgougnon, Nathalie; Bedoux, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Lipids from the proliferative macroalgae Ulva armoricana (Chlorophyta) and Solieria chordalis (Rhodophyta) from Brittany, France, were investigated. The total content of lipids was 2.6% and 3.0% dry weight for U. armoricana and S. chordalis, respectively. The main fractions of S. chordalis were neutral lipids (37%) and glycolipids (38%), whereas U. armoricana contained mostly neutral lipids (55%). Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) represented 29% and 15% of the total lipids in U. armoricana and S. chordalis, respectively. In both studied algae, the phospholipids were composed of PUFA for 18%. In addition, PUFA were shown to represent 9% and 4.5% of glycolipids in U. armoricana and S. chordalis, respectively. The essential PUFA were 16:4n-3, 18:4n-3, 18:2n-3, 18:2n-6, and 22:6n-3 in U. armoricana, and 20:4n-6 and 20:5n-3 in S. chordalis. It is important to notice that six 2-hydroxy-, three 3-hydroxy-, and two monounsaturated hydroxy fatty acids were also identified and may provide a chemotaxonomic basis for algae. These seaweeds contained interesting compounds such as squalene, α-tocopherol, cholest-4-en-3-one and phytosterols. The antiproliferative effect was evaluated in vitro on human non-small-cell bronchopulmonary carcinoma line (NSCLC-N6) with an IC50 of 23 μg/mL for monogalactosyldiacylglycerols isolated from S. chordalis and 24 μg/mL for digalactosyldiacylglycerols from U. armoricana. These results confirm the potentialities of valorization of these two species in the fields of health, nutrition and chemotaxonomy. PMID:26404323

  17. Feeding long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids to obese leptin receptor-deficient JCR:LA- cp rats modifies immune function and lipid-raft fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Ruth, Megan R; Proctor, Spencer D; Field, Catherine J

    2009-05-01

    Dietary EPA and DHA modulate immunity and thereby may improve the aberrant immune function in obese states. To determine the effects of feeding fish oil (FO) containing EPA and DHA on splenocyte phospholipid (PL) and lipid-raft fatty acid composition, phenotypes and cytokine production, 14-week-old obese, leptin receptor-deficient JCR:LA-cp rats (cp/cp; n 10) were randomised to one of three nutritionally adequate diets for 3 weeks: control (Ctl, 0 % EPA+DHA); low FO (LFO, 0.8 % (w/w) EPA+DHA); high FO (HFO, 1.4 % (w/w) EPA+DHA). Lean JCR:LA-cp (+/ - or +/+) rats (n 5) were fed the Ctl diet. Obese Ctl rats had a higher proportion of n-3 PUFA in splenocyte PL than lean rats fed the same diet (P < 0.05). The lower n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio of splenocyte PL was consistent with the lower mitogen-stimulated interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-1beta production by cells from obese rats (P < 0.05). Obese rats fed the FO diet had lower mitogen-stimulated Th1 (IFN-gamma) and Th2 (IL-4) cytokine responses, but IL-2 production (concanavalin A; ConA) did not differ (P < 0.05). The HFO diet was more effective in lowering IL-1beta and increasing IL-10 production (ConA, P < 0.05). This lower IL-1beta production was accompanied by a lower proportion of major histocompatability complex class II-positive cells and a higher incorporation of DHA into lipid rafts. This is the first study to demonstrate impaired responses to mitogen stimulation and altered fatty acid incorporation into the membrane PL of JCR:LA-cp rats. Feeding FO lowered the ex vivo inflammatory response, without altering IL-2 production from ConA-stimulated splenocytes which may occur independent of leptin signalling.

  18. Nonadditive Compositional Curvature Energetics of Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodt, A. J.; Venable, R. M.; Lyman, E.; Pastor, R. W.

    2016-09-01

    The unique properties of the individual lipids that compose biological membranes together determine the energetics of the surface. The energetics of the surface, in turn, govern the formation of membrane structures and membrane reshaping processes, and thus they will underlie cellular-scale models of viral fusion, vesicle-dependent transport, and lateral organization relevant to signaling. The spontaneous curvature, to the best of our knowledge, is always assumed to be additive. We describe observations from simulations of unexpected nonadditive compositional curvature energetics of two lipids essential to the plasma membrane: sphingomyelin and cholesterol. A model is developed that connects molecular interactions to curvature stress, and which explains the role of local composition. Cholesterol is shown to lower the number of effective Kuhn segments of saturated acyl chains, reducing lateral pressure below the neutral surface of bending and favoring positive curvature. The effect is not observed for unsaturated (flexible) acyl chains. Likewise, hydrogen bonding between sphingomyelin lipids leads to positive curvature, but only at sufficient concentration, below which the lipid prefers negative curvature.

  19. Stability of lipid encapsulated ferulic acid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Encapsulation of bioactive compounds by a solid lipid matrix provides stability and a mechanism for controlled release in formulated products. Phenolic compounds exhibit antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and have applications as functional food and feed additives. Ferulic acid, a common pheno...

  20. Phytic acid inhibits lipid peroxidation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Alicja; Wilczok, Adam; Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10-20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products.

  1. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10–20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products. PMID:24260736

  2. Lipid interaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A. Acid-triggered permeabilization and aggregation of lipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Menestrina, G; Pederzolli, C; Forti, S; Gambale, F

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of Pseudomonas exotoxin A with small unilamellar vesicles comprised of different phospholipids as a function of pH, toxin, and lipid concentration. We have found that this toxin induces vesicle permeabilization, as measured by the release of a fluorescent dye. Permeabilization is due to the formation of ion-conductive channels which we have directly observed in planar lipid bilayers. The toxin also produces vesicle aggregation, as indicated by an increase of the turbidity. Aggregation and permeabilization have completely different time course and extent upon toxin dose and lipid composition, thus suggesting that they are two independent events. Both time constants decrease by lowering the pH of the bulk phase or by introducing a negative lipid into the vesicles. Our results indicate that at least three steps are involved in the interaction of Pseudomonas exotoxin A with lipid vesicles. After protonation of one charged group the toxin becomes competent to bind to the surface of the vesicles. Binding is probably initiated by an electrostatic interaction because it is absolutely dependent on the presence of acidic phospholipids. Binding is a prerequisite for the subsequent insertion of the toxin into the lipid bilayer, with a special preference for phosphatidylglycerol-containing membranes, to form ionic channels. At high toxin and vesicle concentrations, bound toxin may also induce aggregation of the vesicles, particularly when phosphatidic acid is present in the lipid mixture. A quenching of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the protein, which is induced by lowering the pH of the solution, becomes more drastic in the presence of lipid vesicles. However, this further quenching takes so long that it cannot be a prerequisite to either vesicle permeabilization or aggregation. Pseudomonas exotoxin A shares many of these properties with other bacterial toxins like diphtheria and tetanus toxin. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 12

  3. Membrane lipid composition and stress/virulence related gene expression of Salmonella Enteritidis cells adapted to lactic acid and trisodium phosphate and their resistance to lethal heat and acid stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yishan; Kadim, Mellissa Irlianti; Khoo, Wei Jie; Zheng, Qianwang; Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Shin, Yu-Jin; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2014-11-17

    This study evaluated the acid and heat resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis in simulated gastric fluid (pH 2.0) and during thermal treatment (54-60 °C), respectively, after adaptation to lactic acid (LA) or trisodium phosphate (TSP) at various pHs (pH 5.3-9.0). The changes in membrane lipid composition and expression levels of RpoS and RpoH were examined to elucidate their roles in bacterial stress resistance. Transcriptional profile of several virulence-related genes was also analyzed. Results showed that LA-adapted cells at pH 5.3 and 6.3 had higher acid and heat resistance than control cells and cells adapted to TSP at pH 8.3 and 9.0. LA-adapted cells had the lowest ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids, indicating that they might possess a less fluid membrane. It was observed that the expression levels of RpoH and RpoS were upregulated in TSP-adapted cells but not in LA-adapted cells. Thus, these results indicate that the increased acid and heat resistance of LA-adapted S. Enteritidis was possibly due to the decreased membrane fluidity instead of the upregulation of RpoS and RpoH. About 6.0, 2.1, and 2.46-fold upregulation of spvR, avrA, and hilA were observed in cells adapted to TSP at pH 9.0, except sefA that had its highest expression level in the control cells, indicating that the expression of these virulence genes highly depends on environmental conditions. This is the first study to show that the alteration in the cytoplasmic membrane rather than RpoS and RpoH plays a more crucial role in conferring greater acid and heat resistance on LA-adapted S. Enteritidis, thus providing a better understanding on the bacterial stress response to acidic conditions.

  4. The fatty acid compositions of erythrocyte and plasma polar lipids in children with autism, developmental delay or typically developing controls and the effect of fish oil intake.

    PubMed

    Bell, John Gordon; Miller, Deborah; MacDonald, Donald J; MacKinlay, Elizabeth E; Dick, James R; Cheseldine, Sally; Boyle, Rose M; Graham, Catriona; O'Hare, Anne E

    2010-04-01

    The erythrocyte and plasma fatty acid compositions of children with autism were compared in a case-control study with typically developing (TD) children and with children showing developmental delay (DD). Forty-five autism subjects were age-matched with TD controls and thirty-eight with DD controls. Fatty acid data were compared using paired t tests. In addition, blood fatty acids from treatment-naive autism subjects were compared with autism subjects who had consumed fish oil supplements by two-sample t tests. Relatively few differences were seen between erythrocyte fatty acids in autism and TD subjects although the former had an increased arachidonic acid (ARA):EPA ratio. This ratio was also increased in plasma samples from the same children. No changes in n-3 fatty acids or ARA:EPA ratio were seen when comparing autism with DD subjects but some SFA and MUFA were decreased in the DD subjects, most notably 24 : 0 and 24 : 1, which are essential components of axonal myelin sheaths. However, if multiple comparisons are taken into account, and a stricter level of significance applied, most of these values would not be significant. Autism subjects consuming fish oil showed reduced erythrocyte ARA, 22 : 4n-6, 22 : 5n-6 and total n-6 fatty acids and increased EPA, 22 : 5n-3, 22 : 6n-3 and total n-3 fatty acids along with reduced n-6:n-3 and ARA:EPA ratios. Collectively, the autism subjects did not have an underlying phospholipid disorder, based on erythrocyte fatty acid compositions, although the increased ARA:EPA ratio observed suggested that an imbalance of essential highly unsaturated fatty acids may be present in a cohort of autism subjects.

  5. Changes in tissue lipid and fatty acid composition of farmed rainbow trout in response to dietary camelina oil as a replacement of fish oil.

    PubMed

    Hixson, Stefanie M; Parrish, Christopher C; Anderson, Derek M

    2014-01-01

    Camelina oil (CO) replaced 50 and 100 % of fish oil (FO) in diets for farmed rainbow trout (initial weight 44 ± 3 g fish(-1)). The oilseed is particularly unique due to its high lipid content (40 %) and high amount of 18:3n-3 (α-linolenic acid, ALA) (30 %). Replacing 100 % of fish oil with camelina oil did not negatively affect growth of rainbow trout after a 12-week feeding trial (FO = 168 ± 32 g fish(-1); CO = 184 ± 35 g fish(-1)). Lipid and fatty acid profiles of muscle, viscera and skin were significantly affected by the addition of CO after 12 weeks of feeding. However, final 22:6n-3 [docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] and 20:5n-3 [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)] amounts (563 mg) in a 75 g fillet (1 serving) were enough to satisfy daily DHA and EPA requirements (250 mg) set by the World Health Organization. Other health benefits include lower SFA and higher MUFA in filets fed CO versus FO. Compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) confirmed that the δ(13)C isotopic signature of DHA in CO fed trout shifted significantly compared to DHA in FO fed trout. The shift in DHA δ(13)C indicates mixing of a terrestrial isotopic signature compared to the isotopic signature of DHA in fish oil-fed tissue. These results suggest that ~27 % of DHA was synthesized from the terrestrial and isotopically lighter ALA in the CO diet rather than incorporation of DHA from fish meal in the CO diet. This was the first study to use CSIA in a feeding experiment to demonstrate synthesis of DHA in fish.

  6. In vitro performance of lipid-PLGA hybrid nanoparticles as an antigen delivery system: lipid composition matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yun; Ehrich, Marion; Fuhrman, Kristel; Zhang, Chenming

    2014-08-01

    Due to the many beneficial properties combined from both poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) and liposomes, lipid-PLGA hybrid NPs have been intensively studied as cancer drug delivery systems, bio-imaging agent carriers, as well as antigen delivery vehicles. However, the impact of lipid composition on the performance of lipid-PLGA hybrid NPs as a delivery system has not been well investigated. In this study, the influence of lipid composition on the stability of the hybrid NPs and in vitro antigen release from NPs under different conditions was examined. The uptake of hybrid NPs with various surface charges by dendritic cells (DCs) was carefully studied. The results showed that PLGA NPs enveloped by a lipid shell with more positive surface charges could improve the stability of the hybrid NPs, enable better controlled release of antigens encapsulated in PLGA NPs, as well as enhance uptake of NPs by DC.

  7. Tissue lipid composition in fatty liver and kidney syndrome in chicks.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, C C

    1975-01-01

    The lipid composition of the liver, kidneys, heart and adipose tissue of chicks affected by the fatty liver and kidney syndrome were analysed. Livers and kidneys showed 400 to 500 per cent increases in heart lipid levels. Liver and kidney triglycerides contained increased proportions of mono-unsaturated fatty acids, mainly palmitoleic acid, at the expense of the saturated fatty acids, mainly stearic acid. Phospholipid and adipose tissue fatty acid composition were not markedly altered. The abnormalities were regressing in birds recovering from the syndrome.

  8. Modification of fillet composition and evidence of differential fatty acid turnover in sunshine bass Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis following change in dietary lipid source.

    PubMed

    Lane, Ryan L; Trushenski, Jesse T; Kohler, Christopher C

    2006-11-01

    Marine oil-based finishing diets have been used to restore fillet FA profile in several "medium-fat" fleshed aquaculture species, and a simple dilution model describing FA turnover has been established to predict and tailor final fillet composition. We evaluated finishing diet efficacy and suitability of the dilution model to describe patterns of FA change in a lean-fleshed model, sunshine bass. Two practical diets (45% crude protein, 15% crude lipid) were formulated, respectively containing corn oil (CO) or menhaden oil (MO) as the primary lipid sources. Sunshine bass (age 1 [approximately 14 mo], 347 +/- 8.6 g, mean individual weight +/- SEM) were stocked in a recirculating system and fed the diets according to different feeding regimens during the final 28 wk of the production cycle. Control groups were fed the CO or the MO feeds exclusively; whereas, the remaining treatment groups were transitioned from the CO diet to the MO diet at 4-, 8-, or 12-wk intervals. Upon completion of the feeding trial, fish were harvested, and production performance and fillet composition were assessed. Replacing MO with CO as the primary lipid source in sunshine bass diets yielded fillets with distinctly different FA profiles; however, finishing with a MO-based diet offered significant compensation for CO-associated reductions in fillet long-chain highly unsaturated FA (LC-HUFA). Although complete restoration was not observed, we achieved significant augmentation of endogenous n-3 FA within 4 wk of feeding the MO diet, and observed a significant increase in LC-HUFA and a beneficial shift in n-3:n-6 FA ratio after 8 weeks. Simple dilution accurately predicted tissue composition for most FA; however, deviations from the model were noted, suggesting selective retention of n-3, PUFA, and LC-HUFA and preferential catabolism of saturates. We conclude marine oil-based finishing diets can rapidly augment beneficial FA levels in sunshine bass fillets; however, simple dilution models do not

  9. Intake of a Western diet containing cod instead of pork alters fatty acid composition in tissue phospholipids and attenuates obesity and hepatic lipid accumulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Liisberg, Ulrike; Fauske, Kristin Røen; Kuda, Ondrej; Fjære, Even; Myrmel, Lene Secher; Norberg, Nina; Frøyland, Livar; Graff, Ingvild Eide; Liaset, Bjørn; Kristiansen, Karsten; Kopecky, Jan; Madsen, Lise

    2016-07-01

    The content of the marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is far lower in lean than in fatty seafood. Cod filets contain less than 2g fat per kg, whereof approximately 50% is EPA and DHA. However, a large fraction of these n-3 PUFAs is present in the phospholipid (PL) fraction and may have high bioavailability and capacity to change the endocannabinoid profile. Here we investigated whether exchanging meat from a lean terrestrial animal with cod in a background Western diet would alter the endocannabinoid tone in mice and thereby attenuate obesity development and hepatic lipid accumulation. Accordingly, we prepared iso-caloric diets with 15.1 energy (e) % protein, 39.1 e% fat and 45.8 e% carbohydrates using freeze-dried meat from cod filets or pork sirloins, and using a combination of soybean oil, corn oil, margarine, milk fat, and lard as the fat source. Compared with mice receiving diets containing pork, mice fed cod gained less adipose tissue mass and had a lower content of hepatic lipids. This was accompanied by a lower n-6 to n-3 ratio in liver PLs and in red blood cells (RBCs) in the mice. Furthermore, mice receiving the cod-containing diet had lower circulating levels of the two major endocannabinoids, N-arachidonoylethanolamine and 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Together, our data demonstrate that despite the relatively low content of n-3 PUFAs in cod fillets, the cod-containing diet could exert beneficial metabolic effects.

  10. Effects of boiling and roasting on proximate composition, lipid oxidation, fatty acid profile and mineral content of two sesame varieties commercialized and consumed in Far-North Region of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Tenyang, Noël; Ponka, Roger; Tiencheu, Bernard; Djikeng, Fabrice T; Azmeera, Thirupathi; Karuna, Mallampalli S L; Prasad, Rachapudi B N; Womeni, Hilaire M

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of boiling and roasting on the proximate, lipid oxidation, fatty acid profile and mineral content of two sesame seeds varieties. The proximate composition was significantly affected (P<0.05) during treatments. The minerals of seeds roasting at 120°C for 10min were significantly decreased. The free fatty acids content of sesame oil after processing was significantly increased (P<0.05). Iodine and peroxide value were also affected by processing. Totox and p-Anisidine values were significantly increased during processing. The fatty acids composition a little modified during processing, and roasting at 180°C for 10min mostly affected the polyunsaturated fatty acids for all sesame varieties. C16:0, C18:0, C18:1 and C18:2 were quantitatively the most important fatty acids in sesame oil. Boiling appeared to be the best processing method for cooking the two sesame varieties concerning oxidative stability and fatty acid profile.

  11. Intercellular skin barrier lipid composition and organization in Netherton syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Janssens, Michelle; Boiten, Walter A; van Drongelen, Vincent; Furio, Laetitia; Vreeken, Rob J; Hovnanian, Alain; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2014-05-01

    Netherton syndrome (NTS) is a rare genetic skin disease caused by mutations in the serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5 gene, which encodes the lympho-epithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor. NTS patients have profoundly impaired skin barrier function. As stratum corneum (SC) lipids have a crucial role in the skin barrier function, we investigated the SC lipid composition and organization in NTS patients. We studied the SC lipid composition by means of mass spectrometry, and the lipid organization was examined by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Decreased free fatty acid (FFA) chain length and increased levels of monounsaturated FFAs were observed in the SC of NTS patients compared with controls. Furthermore, the level of short-chain ceramides (CERs) was enhanced in NTS patients and a strong reduction in long-chain CER levels was seen in several patients. The changes in lipid composition modified the lipid organization leading to an increased disordering of the lipids compared with the controls. In addition, in a subgroup of patients the organization of the lipid layers changed dramatically. The altered FFA and CER profiles in NTS patients corresponded to changes in the expression of enzymes involved in SC lipid processing. The observed changes in lipid composition, lipid organization, and enzyme expression are likely to contribute to the barrier dysfunction in NTS.

  12. Isolation and Compositional Analysis of Plant Cuticle Lipid Polyester Monomers

    PubMed Central

    Jenkin, Seamus; Molina, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial plants produce extracellular aliphatic biopolyesters that modify cell walls of specific tissues. Epidermal cells synthesize cutin, a polyester of glycerol and modified fatty acids that constitutes the framework of the cuticle that covers aerial plant surfaces. Suberin is a related lipid polyester that is deposited on the cell walls of certain tissues, including the root endodermis and the periderm of tubers, tree bark and roots. These lipid polymers are highly variable in composition among plant species, and often differ among tissues within a single species. Here, we describe a detailed protocol to study the monomer composition of cutin in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves by sodium methoxide (NaOMe)-catalyzed depolymerisation, derivatization, and subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. This method can be used to investigate the monomers of insoluble polyesters isolated from whole delipidated plant tissues bearing either cutin or suberin. The method can by applied not only to characterize the composition of lipid polymers in species not previously analyzed, but also as an analytical tool in forward and reverse genetic approaches to assess candidate gene function. PMID:26650846

  13. Isolation and Compositional Analysis of Plant Cuticle Lipid Polyester Monomers.

    PubMed

    Jenkin, Seamus; Molina, Isabel

    2015-11-22

    Terrestrial plants produce extracellular aliphatic biopolyesters that modify cell walls of specific tissues. Epidermal cells synthesize cutin, a polyester of glycerol and modified fatty acids that constitutes the framework of the cuticle that covers aerial plant surfaces. Suberin is a related lipid polyester that is deposited on the cell walls of certain tissues, including the root endodermis and the periderm of tubers, tree bark and roots. These lipid polymers are highly variable in composition among plant species, and often differ among tissues within a single species. Here, we describe a detailed protocol to study the monomer composition of cutin in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves by sodium methoxide (NaOMe)-catalyzed depolymerisation, derivatization, and subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. This method can be used to investigate the monomers of insoluble polyesters isolated from whole delipidated plant tissues bearing either cutin or suberin. The method can by applied not only to characterize the composition of lipid polymers in species not previously analyzed, but also as an analytical tool in forward and reverse genetic approaches to assess candidate gene function.

  14. Comparative lipid composition of heterotrophically and autotrophically grown Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Langworthy, T A

    1977-06-01

    Complex lipids from the thermoacidophilic facultative autotroph Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, as well as a strictly autotrophic isolate, were compared between cells grown on yeast extract and elemental sulfur. Lipids from both organisms grown autotrophically were nearly identical. Each contained about 15% neutral lipids, 35% glycolipids, and 50% acidic lipids. Glycolipids and acidic lipids contained C40H82-76-derived glycerol ether residues. Major glycolipids included the glycerol ether analogues of glucosyl galactosyl diglyceride (5%) and glucosyl polyol diglyceride (75%). Acidic lipids were comprised mainly of the glycerol ether analogues of phosphatidyl inositol (7%), inositolphosphoryl glucosyl polyol diglyceride (72%), and a partially characterized sulfate- and phosphate-containing derivative of glucosyl polyol diglyceride (13%). The lipids from cells grown heterotrophically were similar to those from autotrophically grown cells, except that the partially characterized acidic lipid was absent. In addition, the two glycolipids as well as the respective inositolphosphoryl derivatives were each present in nearly equal proportions.

  15. Comparative lipid composition of heterotrophically and autotrophically grown Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed Central

    Langworthy, T A

    1977-01-01

    Complex lipids from the thermoacidophilic facultative autotroph Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, as well as a strictly autotrophic isolate, were compared between cells grown on yeast extract and elemental sulfur. Lipids from both organisms grown autotrophically were nearly identical. Each contained about 15% neutral lipids, 35% glycolipids, and 50% acidic lipids. Glycolipids and acidic lipids contained C40H82-76-derived glycerol ether residues. Major glycolipids included the glycerol ether analogues of glucosyl galactosyl diglyceride (5%) and glucosyl polyol diglyceride (75%). Acidic lipids were comprised mainly of the glycerol ether analogues of phosphatidyl inositol (7%), inositolphosphoryl glucosyl polyol diglyceride (72%), and a partially characterized sulfate- and phosphate-containing derivative of glucosyl polyol diglyceride (13%). The lipids from cells grown heterotrophically were similar to those from autotrophically grown cells, except that the partially characterized acidic lipid was absent. In addition, the two glycolipids as well as the respective inositolphosphoryl derivatives were each present in nearly equal proportions. Images PMID:863856

  16. Investigating the barrier function of skin lipid models with varying compositions.

    PubMed

    Groen, Daniël; Poole, Dana S; Gooris, Gert S; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2011-10-01

    The lipids in the uppermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), play an important role in the barrier function. The main lipid classes in stratum corneum are ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. In previous publications, a lipid model was presented, referred to as the stratum corneum substitute (SCS), that closely mimics the SC lipid organization and SC barrier function. In the present study, we use the SCS to study the effect of changes in lipid organization on the lipid barrier function using benzoic acid as permeation compound. First, in the SCS, we increased the level of one of the three major lipid classes keeping the ratio between the other lipid classes constant. An increased cholesterol level resulted in an increase in phase-separated cholesterol and a reduction in the permeability. An increase in ceramide or free fatty acid level resulted in the formation of additional phases, but had no significant influence on the permeability. We also examined models that mimic selected changes in lipid composition reported for dry or diseased skin. The SCS that mimics the composition in recessive X-linked ichthyosis skin displayed a twofold increase in permeability. This increase is possibly related to the formation of an additional, less ordered phase in this model.

  17. Altered composition of epidermal lipids correlates with Staphylococcus aureus colonization status in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Villarreal, M; Stewart, S; Choi, J; Indra, G; Babineau, D C; Philpot, C; David, G; Yoshida, T; Boguniewicz, M; Hanifin, J; Beck, L A; Leung, D; Simpson, E; Indra, A K

    2017-02-28

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by disrupted epidermal barrier functions.(1) Stratum corneum (SC) consists of corneocytes and a lipid-rich extracellular matrix, which plays a key role in epidermal permeability barrier (EPB) functions.(2,3) Major lipid constituents of the SC are ceramides (CERs), free fatty acids (FFAs), cholesterol and triglycerides (TGs).(2,3) Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) colonization is an important trigger of AD.(4) Comprehensive profiling of SC lipids using S.aureus colonization status, and association between S.aureus colonization and skin lipid composition, has never been documented. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Season-induced variation in lipid composition is associated with semen quality in Holstein bulls.

    PubMed

    Argov-Argaman, N; Mahgrefthe, K; Zeron, Y; Roth, Z

    2013-05-01

    Season-induced variation in fatty acid and cholesterol composition in bovine semen has been associated with semen quality. Given the specific roles of the various semen compartments (seminal fluids, sperm head, and sperm tail) in fertilization, we hypothesized that environmental-stress-induced alterations in the lipid composition of a specific compartment might impair semen quality and sperm function. Semen samples were collected from five mature Holstein-Friesian bulls during the summer (August to September) and winter (December to January). Semen was evaluated by computerized sperm-quality analyzer, calibrated for bulls' semen, and centrifuged to separate the spermatozoa from the seminal fluids. The spermatozoal fraction was sonicated to separate the sperm head and tail compartments. Cold lipid extraction was performed with chloroform:methanol (2:1, vol/vol). Lipids were identified and quantified by gas chromatography. Seasonal variation was found in both physiological and structural parameters. The proportion of spermatozoa defined as morphologically normal was higher in the winter, with higher motility, progressive motility, and velocity relative to summer samples. Lipid composition within fractions varied between seasons with prominent impairment in the tail compartment, characterized by high saturated fatty acid, low polyunsaturated fatty acid, and low cholesterol concentrations during the summer. Given the association between alterations in lipid composition and reduced sperm motility and velocity during the summer, it is suggested that lipid composition might serve to predict sperm quality.

  19. Abiotic factors influence plant storage lipid accumulation and composition.

    PubMed

    Singer, Stacy D; Zou, Jitao; Weselake, Randall J

    2016-02-01

    The demand for plant-derived oils has increased substantially over the last decade, and is sure to keep growing. While there has been a surge in research efforts to produce plants with improved oil content and quality, in most cases the enhancements have been small. To add further complexity to this situation, substantial differences in seed oil traits among years and field locations have indicated that plant lipid biosynthesis is also influenced to a large extent by multiple environmental factors such as temperature, drought, light availability and soil nutrients. On the molecular and biochemical levels, the expression and/or activities of fatty acid desaturases, as well as diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1, have been found to be affected by abiotic factors, suggesting that they play a role in the lipid content and compositional changes seen under abiotic stress conditions. Unfortunately, while only a very small number of strategies have been developed as of yet to minimize these environmental effects on the production of storage lipids, it is clear that this feat will be of the utmost importance for developing superior oil crops with the capability to perform in a consistent manner in field conditions in the future.

  20. Severe Alterations in Lipid Composition of Frontal Cortex Lipid Rafts from Parkinson’s Disease and Incidental Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Santpere, Gabriel; Marín, Raquel; Torrent, Laia; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains that provide a highly saturated and viscous physicochemical microenvironment to promote protein–lipid and protein–protein interactions. We purified lipid rafts from human frontal cortex from normal, early motor stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and incidental Parkinson’s disease (iPD) subjects and analyzed their lipid composition. We observed that lipid rafts from PD and iPD cortices exhibit dramatic reductions in their contents of n-3 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (22:6-n3) and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). Also, saturated fatty acids (16:0 and 18:0) were significantly higher than in control brains. Paralleling these findings, unsaturation and peroxidability indices were considerably reduced in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Lipid classes were also affected in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Thus, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were increased in PD and iPD, whereas cerebrosides and sulfatides and plasmalogen levels were considerably diminished. Our data pinpoint a dramatic increase in lipid raft order due to the aberrant biochemical structure in PD and iPD and indicate that these abnormalities of lipid rafts in the frontal cortex occur at early stages of PD pathology. The findings correlate with abnormal lipid raft signaling and cognitive decline observed during the development of these neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:21717034

  1. Lipid Classes and Fatty Acids in Ophryotrocha cyclops, a Dorvilleid from Newfoundland Aquaculture Sites.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Flora; Dufour, Suzanne C; Hamoutene, Dounia; Parrish, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    A new opportunistic annelid (Ophryotrocha cyclops) discovered on benthic substrates underneath finfish aquaculture sites in Newfoundland (NL) may be involved in the remediation of organic wastes. At those aquaculture sites, bacterial mats and O. cyclops often coexist and are used as indicators of organic enrichment. Little is known on the trophic strategies used by these annelids, including whether they might consume bacteria or other aquaculture-derived wastes. We studied the lipid and fatty acid composition of the annelids and their potential food sources (degraded flocculent organic matter, fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats) to investigate feeding relationships in these habitats and compared the lipid and fatty acid composition of annelids before and after starvation. Fish pellets were rich in lipids, mainly terrestrially derived C18 fatty acids (18:1ω9, 18:2ω6, 18:3ω3), while bacterial samples were mainly composed of ω7 fatty acids, and flocculent matter appeared to be a mixture of fresh and degrading fish pellets, feces and bacteria. Ophryotrocha cyclops did not appear to store excessive amounts of lipids (13%) but showed a high concentration of ω3 and ω6 fatty acids, as well as a high proportion of the main fatty acids contained in fresh fish pellets and bacterial mats. The dorvilleids and all potential food sources differed significantly in their lipid and fatty acid composition. Interestingly, while all food sources contained low proportions of 20:5ω3 and 20:2ω6, the annelids showed high concentrations of these two fatty acids, along with 20:4ω6. A starvation period of 13 days did not result in a major decrease in total lipid content; however, microscopic observations revealed that very few visible lipid droplets remained in the gut epithelium after three months of starvation. Ophryotrocha cyclops appears well adapted to extreme environments and may rely on lipid-rich organic matter for survival and dispersal in cold environments.

  2. Direct comparison of fatty acid ratios in single cellular lipid droplets as determined by comparative Raman spectroscopy and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schie, Iwan W; Nolte, Lena; Pedersen, Theresa L; Smith, Zach; Wu, Jian; Yahiatène, Idir; Newman, John W; Huser, Thomas

    2013-11-07

    Cellular lipid droplets are the least studied and least understood cellular organelles in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Despite a significant body of research studying the physiology of lipid droplets it has not yet been possible to fully determine the composition of individual cellular lipid droplets. In this paper we use Raman spectroscopy on single cellular lipid droplets and least-squares fitting of pure fatty acid spectra to determine the composition of individual lipid droplets in cells after treatment with different ratios of oleic and palmitic acid. We validate the results of the Raman spectroscopy-based single lipid droplet analysis with results obtained by gas chromatography analysis of millions of cells, and find that our approach can accurately predict the relative amount of a specific fatty acid in the lipid droplet. Based on these results we show that the fatty acid composition in individual lipid droplets is on average similar to that of all lipid droplets found in the sample. Furthermore, we expand this approach to the investigation of the lipid composition in single cellular peroxisomes. We determine the location of cellular peroxisomes based on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of peroxisomes labeled with the green fluorescent protein, and successive Raman spectroscopy of peroxisomes. We find that in some cases peroxisomes can produce a detectable CARS signal, and that the peroxisomal Raman spectra exhibit an oleic acid-like signature.

  3. Manipulation of Galactolipid Fatty Acid Composition with Substituted Pyridazinones

    PubMed Central

    John, Judith B. St.

    1976-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of the major lipids of the chloroplast membranes, the mono- and digalactosyl diglycerides, can be definably altered with various substituted pyridazinones. Galactolipid fatty acid composition of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) can be altered so that there is a decrease in linolenic acid accompanied by an increase in linoleic acid without a shift in the relative proportion of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids; the fatty acid composition can be shifted toward a higher proportion of saturated fatty acids; or the fatty acid composition of the monogalactosyl diglycerides can be altered in preference to the digalactosyl diglycerides. Also, the light-mediated parallel accumulation of chlorophyll and linolenic acid can be separated with a substituted pyridazinone. The substituted pyridazinones may be useful tools in clarifying the role the galactolipids and their component fatty acids play in the structure and function of chloroplast membranes in higher plants. PMID:16659420

  4. Effects of a high n-3 fatty acid diet on membrane lipid composition of heart and skeletal muscle in normal swine and in swine with the genetic mutation for malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Otten, W; Iaizzo, P A; Eichinger, H M

    1997-10-01

    Knowledge concerning the genetic defects underlying malignant hyperthermia (MH) has expanded rapidly in recent years. In contrast, our understanding of the accompanying physiological changes is less clear. In this regard, the aim of this study was to determine whether normal swine and swine susceptible to MH (both heterozygous and homozygous animals) differ in their abilities to incorporate n-3 (omega 3) fatty acids into their skeletal and heart muscles. Swine of each genotype were fed either a diet rich in n-3 fatty acids (i.e., 5% fish oil) or an equal caloric diet low in n-3 fatty acids (i.e., 5% coconut oil). All dietary supplementations were given over a 13-week period. Subsequently, for each muscle type the following was determined: 1) the relative fatty acid profiles of eight different phospholipid classes and of neutral lipids, and 2) the total phospholipid and the total lipid content. The incorporation of n-3 fatty acids (i.e., eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) occurred within the various phospholipids and neutral lipids without influencing their total lipid content. The increased content of n-3 fatty acids in neutral lipids of skeletal muscle was related to a decreased content of medium-chain saturated fatty acids, whereas an increased incorporation of n-3 fatty acids into the membrane phospholipids was often related to a decreased content of linoleic acid and/or arachidonic acid. In general, the pattern of n-3 fatty acid incorporation was considerably different between the normal animals and the MH homozygous and heterozygous animals. The significant interaction between diet-induced n-3 fatty acid profiles and the stress-susceptible MH genotype may indicate an altered mechanism for fatty acid turnover and a repair mechanism to maintain cellular functions and structure.

  5. Fatty acid profile of 25 alternative lipid feedstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the fatty acid profiles of 25 alternative lipid feedstocks for the production of bio-based fuels and chemicals. Lipids were extracted using hexane from oil-bearing seeds using a standard Soxhlet apparatus. Fatty acid profiles were measured using gas chromatography-flame ionization...

  6. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Lipid Bilayers and Tubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Linda S.; Yuan, Jing; Pramudya, Yohannes; Nguyen, Lam T.

    2007-03-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are found in a variety of biological membranes and have been implicated with lipid raft formation and possible function, typical molecules include DHA (Docosahexanoic Acid) and AA (Alphalinoleic Acid) which have been the focus of considerable attention in recent years. We are interested in the phase behavior of these molecules in the lipid bilayer. The addition of lipid molecules with polyunsaturated chains has a clear effect on the fluidity and curvature of the membrane and we investigate the effects the addition of polyunsaturated lipids on bilayer structure and tubule formation. Self-assembled cylindrical lipid tubules have attracted considerable attention because of their interesting structures and potential technological applications. Using x-ray diffraction techniques, Atomic Force Microscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging, both symmetric and mixed chain lipids were incorporated into model membranes and the effects on bilayer structure and tubule formation investigated.

  7. Lipid Composition of Multilamellar Bodies Secreted by Dictyostelium discoideum Reveals Their Amoebal Origin

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Valérie E.; Lessire, René; Domergue, Frédéric; Fouillen, Laetitia; Filion, Geneviève; Sedighi, Ahmadreza

    2013-01-01

    When they are fed with bacteria, Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae produce and secrete multilamellar bodies (MLBs), which are composed of membranous material. It has been proposed that MLBs are a waste disposal system that allows D. discoideum to eliminate undigested bacterial remains. However, the real function of MLBs remains unknown. Determination of the biochemical composition of MLBs, especially lipids, represents a way to gain information about the role of these structures. To allow these analyses, a protocol involving various centrifugation procedures has been developed to purify secreted MLBs from amoeba-bacterium cocultures. The purity of the MLB preparation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and by immunofluorescence using H36, an antibody that binds to MLBs. The lipid and fatty acid compositions of pure MLBs were then analyzed by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and gas chromatography (GC), respectively, and compared to those of amoebae as well as bacteria used as a food source. While the bacteria were devoid of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol (PI), these two polar lipid species were major classes of lipids in MLBs and amoebae. Similarly, the fatty acid composition of MLBs and amoebae was characterized by the presence of polyunsaturated fatty acids, while cyclic fatty acids were found only in bacteria. These results strongly suggest that the lipids constituting the MLBs originate from the amoebal metabolism rather than from undigested bacterial membranes. This opens the possibility that MLBs, instead of being a waste disposal system, have unsuspected roles in D. discoideum physiology. PMID:23748431

  8. Altered lipid composition in cortical lipid rafts occurs at early stages of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and facilitates APP/BACE1 interactions.

    PubMed

    Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Marín, Raquel; Moreno, Dolores; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2014-08-01

    The presence of lipid alterations in lipid rafts from the frontal cortex in late stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been recently demonstrated. Here, we have isolated and analyzed the lipid composition of lipid rafts from different brain areas from control and AD subjects at initial neuropathologic stages. We have observed that frontal cortex lipid rafts are profoundly altered in AD brains from the earliest stages of AD, namely AD I/II. These changes in the lipid matrix of lipid rafts affected both lipid classes and fatty acids and were also detected in the entorhinal cortex, but not in the cerebellum from the same subjects. Paralleling these changes, lipid rafts from AD frontal and entorhinal cortices displayed higher anisotropy for environment-sensitive probes, indicating that lipid changes in AD lipid rafts increased membrane order and viscosity in these domains. The pathophysiological consequences of these alterations in the development and progression of AD were strengthened by the significant, and specific, accumulation of β-secretase within the lipid rafts of AD subjects even at the earliest stages. Our results provide a mechanistic connection between lipid alterations in these microdomains and amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein.

  9. Effects of solvents and alcohols on the polar lipid composition of Clostridium butyricum under conditions of controlled lipid chain composition

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, D.L.; Goldfine, H. )

    1991-12-01

    Clostridium butyricum has been grown in media devoid of biotin, to which long-chain fatty acids have been added to promote growth. The authors have shown previously that, under these conditions, exogenous fatty acids are extensively incorporated into the cellular phospholipids. Cells grown with elaidic acid, trans-9-18:1, have normal ratios of the glycerol acetal of plasmenylethanolamine (GaPlaE) to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) plus plasmenylethanolamine (PlaE) compared with cells grown with biotin. When ethanol, cyclohexane, or n-octanol was added to elaidate-containing media, the ratio of GAPlaE to Pe plus PlaE was significantly increased. Addition of dodecane and n-butanol did not affect this ratio. When cells were grown with oleic acid in the absence of biotin, the GAPlaE to PE plus PlaE ratio was increased 5.4-fold compared with elaidate-grown cells. In oleate-supplemented media, the addition of solvents or n-alcohols produced no further increase in this ratio. They conclude that these changes in lipid composition represent cellular responses to perturbation of the equilibria between the lamellar and nonlamellar liquid crystalline phases in the cell membrane.

  10. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium.

    PubMed

    Vasavada, A R; Thampi, P; Yadav, S; Rawal, U M

    1993-12-01

    The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium) and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium). From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  11. Australian Acid Brine Lake as a Mars Analog: An Analysis of Preserved Lipids in Shore and Lake Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, H. V.; Stern, J. C.; Baldridge, A. M.; Thomsen, B. J.

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates organic molecules preserved in sediment cores from an acid brine lake. We explore the distribution and stable isotopic composition of lipids in order to understand preservation potential in similar martian environments.

  12. Fatty Acids from Membrane Lipids Become Incorporated into Lipid Bodies during Myxococcus xanthus Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Swapna; Boynton, Tye O.; Pham, Dan; Shimkets, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus responds to amino acid limitation by producing fruiting bodies containing dormant spores. During development, cells produce triacylglycerides in lipid bodies that become consumed during spore maturation. As the cells are starved to induce development, the production of triglycerides represents a counterintuitive metabolic switch. In this paper, lipid bodies were quantified in wild-type strain DK1622 and 33 developmental mutants at the cellular level by measuring the cross sectional area of the cell stained with the lipophilic dye Nile red. We provide five lines of evidence that triacylglycerides are derived from membrane phospholipids as cells shorten in length and then differentiate into myxospores. First, in wild type cells, lipid bodies appear early in development and their size increases concurrent with an 87% decline in membrane surface area. Second, developmental mutants blocked at different stages of shortening and differentiation accumulated lipid bodies proportionate with their cell length with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.76. Third, peripheral rods, developing cells that do not produce lipid bodies, fail to shorten. Fourth, genes for fatty acid synthesis are down-regulated while genes for fatty acid degradation are up regulated. Finally, direct movement of fatty acids from membrane lipids in growing cells to lipid bodies in developing cells was observed by pulse labeling cells with palmitate. Recycling of lipids released by Programmed Cell Death appears not to be necessary for lipid body production as a fadL mutant was defective in fatty acid uptake but proficient in lipid body production. The lipid body regulon involves many developmental genes that are not specifically involved in fatty acid synthesis or degradation. MazF RNA interferase and its target, enhancer-binding protein Nla6, appear to negatively regulate cell shortening and TAG accumulation whereas most cell-cell signals activate these processes. PMID:24906161

  13. Lipid and fatty acid analysis of uninfected and granulosis virus-infected Plodia interpunctella larvae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri-Bhalla, K.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A comparative study on the lipid and fatty acid composition of the uninfected and GV-infected Plodia interpunctella larvae was performed. Higher levels of free fatty acids were found in GV-infected larvae compared to those of the uninfected larvae, while the latter had more triacylglycerol compared to the former. The known identified phospholipids were fewer in the GV-infected larvae compared to those in the uninfected larvae. However, an unidentified phospholipid was found to be approximately two times higher in GV-infected larvae. The total lipid of both larvae had palmitic, oleic, and linoleic as the major fatty acids. The fatty acid composition of the GV-infected larval phospholipid differed considerably compared to that of the uninfected larvae, in that the ratio of unsaturated fatty acid to saturated fatty acid was 3.5 times less in the GV-infected larvae.

  14. Changes in fatty acid composition of Chlorella vulgaris by hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Choi, Sun-A; Jeong, Min-Ji; Nam, Bora; Oh, You-Kwan; Lee, Jin-Suk

    2014-06-01

    Hypochlorous acid treatment of a microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, was investigated to improve the quality of microalgal lipid and to obtain high biodiesel-conversion yield. Because chlorophyll deactivates the catalyst for biodiesel conversion, its removal in the lipid-extraction step enhances biodiesel productivity. When microalgae contacted the hypochlorous acid, chlorophyll was removed, and resultant changes in fatty acid composition of microalgal lipid were observed. The lipid-extraction yield after activated clay treatment was 32.7 mg lipid/g cell; after NaClO treatment at 0.8% available chlorine concentration, it was 95.2 mg lipid/g cell; and after NaCl electrolysis treatment at the 1 g/L cell concentration, it was 102.4 mg lipid/g cell. While the contents of all of the unsaturated fatty acids except oleic acid, in the microalgal lipid, decreased as the result of NaClO treatment, the contents of all of the unsaturated fatty acids including oleic acid decreased as the result of NaCl electrolysis treatment.

  15. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  16. Nitrogen-Deprivation Elevates Lipid Levels in Symbiodinium spp. by Lipid Droplet Accumulation: Morphological and Compositional Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Pei-Luen; Pasaribu, Buntora; Chen, Chii-Shiarng

    2014-01-01

    Stable cnidarian-dinoflagellate (genus Symbiodinium) endosymbioses depend on the regulation of nutrient transport between Symbiodinium populations and their hosts. It has been previously shown that the host cytosol is a nitrogen-deficient environment for the intracellular Symbiodinium and may act to limit growth rates of symbionts during the symbiotic association. This study aimed to investigate the cell proliferation, as well as ultrastructural and lipid compositional changes, in free-living Symbiodinium spp. (clade B) upon nitrogen (N)-deprivation. The cell proliferation of the N-deprived cells decreased significantly. Furthermore, staining with a fluorescent probe, boron dipyrromethane 493/503 (BODIPY 493/503), indicated that lipid contents progressively accumulated in the N-deprived cells. Lipid analyses further showed that both triacylglycerol (TAG) and cholesterol ester (CE) were drastically enriched, with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA; i.e., docosahexaenoic acid, heneicosapentaenoic acid, and oleic acid) became more abundant. Ultrastructural examinations showed that the increase in concentration of these lipid species was due to the accumulation of lipid droplets (LDs), a cellular feature that have previously shown to be pivotal in the maintenance of intact endosymbioses. Integrity of these stable LDs was maintained via electronegative repulsion and steric hindrance possibly provided by their surface proteins. Proteomic analyses of these LDs identified proteins putatively involved in lipid metabolism, signaling, stress response and energy metabolism. These results suggest that LDs production may be an adaptive response that enables Symbiodinium to maintain sufficient cellular energy stores for survival under the N-deprived conditions in the host cytoplasm. PMID:24475285

  17. The effect of copper ions on the lipid composition of subcellular membranes in Hydrilla verticillata.

    PubMed

    Rozentsvet, Olga A; Nesterov, Viktor N; Sinyutina, Natalia F

    2012-09-01

    The paper studies changes in the content and composition of lipids in the membranes of chloroplasts, mitochondria and microsomes of the aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata exposed to copper ions (100 μM; 1, 3, 6 and 24 h). The rate of copper accumulation and the coefficient of its extraction by the plant were also determined. The presence of copper in the incubation medium and its accumulation in the plant tissues decreased the content of photosynthetic pigments, stimulated lipid peroxidation and enhanced membrane permeability. The gradual accumulation of copper in the plant tissues was accompanied by specific changes in the composition of lipids: the content of sulfolipids (SQDG) in chloroplasts declined; the content of monogalactosyl diacylglycerols (MGDG), digalactosyl diacylglycerols (DGDG) and phosphatidyl glycerols (PG) in chloroplasts and mitochondria grew after an hour of copper exposure; and the content of all the lipids except phosphatidic acids (PA) decreased after 3 h of exposure. The decline in the content of phosphatidyl cholines (PC) was first observed in the membranes of microsomes (after an hour of exposure) and later in the membranes of chloroplasts and mitochondria (after 3-6 h of exposure). The experiments with incorporation of [2-(14)C]sodium acetate into fatty acids of polar lipids showed that in parallel with lipid destruction, there took place an intensive and specific renewal of the lipid pool of subcellular membrane fractions.

  18. Milk fat content and DGAT1 genotype determine lipid composition of the milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Argov-Argaman, Nurit; Mida, Kfir; Cohen, Bat-Chen; Visker, Marleen; Hettinga, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    During secretion of milk fat globules, triacylglycerol (TAG) droplets are enveloped by a phospholipid (PL) trilayer. Globule size has been found to be related to polar lipid composition and fat content, and milk fat content and fatty acid composition have been associated with the diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) K232A polymorphism; however, the association between the DGAT1 polymorphism and fat globule size and polar lipid composition has not been studied. The ratio between polar and neutral lipids as well as the composition of the polar lipids in milk has industrial as well as nutritional and health implications. Understanding phenotypic and genotypic factors influencing these parameters could contribute to improving milk lipid composition for dairy products. The focus of the present study was to determine the effect of both fat content and DGAT1 polymorphism on PL/TAG ratio, as a marker for milk fat globule size, and detailed PL composition. Milk samples were selected from 200 cows such that there were equal numbers of samples for the different fat contents as well as per DGAT1 genotype. Samples were analyzed for neutral and polar lipid concentration and composition. PL/TAG ratio was significantly associated with both fat content and DGAT1 genotype. Phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine concentrations were associated with fat content*DGAT1 genotype with a stronger association for the AA than the KK genotype. Sphingomyelin concentration tended to interact with fat content*DGAT1 genotype. Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) concentration showed a biphasic response to fat content, suggesting that multiple biological processes influence its concentration. These results provide a new direction for controlling polar lipid concentration and composition in milk through selective breeding of cows.

  19. Alterations of the lipid content and fatty acid profile of Chlorella protothecoides under different light intensities.

    PubMed

    Krzemińska, Izabela; Piasecka, Agata; Nosalewicz, Artur; Simionato, Diana; Wawrzykowski, Jacek

    2015-11-01

    Chlorella protothecoides is a valuable source of lipids that may be used for biodiesel production. The present work shows analysis of the potential of photoheterotrophic cultivation of C. protothecoides under various light intensities aiming to identify the conditions with maximal biomass and lipid content. An increase in light intensity was associated with an increased specific growth rate and a shortened doubling time. Also, the relative total lipid content increased from 24.8% to 37.5% with increase of light intensity. The composition of fatty acid methyl esters was affected by light intensity with the C16-18 fatty acids increased from 76.97% to 90.24% of total fatty acids. However, the content of linolenic acids decreased with the increase of the culture irradiance. These studies indicate that cultures irradiated with high light intensities achieve the minimal specifications for biodiesel quality on linolenic acids and thus are suitable for biodiesel production.

  20. Lipid composition of metacestodes of Taenia taeniaeformis and lipid changes during growth.

    PubMed

    Mills, G L; Taylor, D C; Williams, J F

    1981-09-01

    A lipid analysis was performed on developing metacestodes of Taenia taeniaeformis removed from the livers of rats at times varying from 3 to 35 weeks post infection. Lipid accounted for 7-21% of the dry weight of the parasites. The highest proportions were found at the earlier stages. The distribution was as follows; neutral lipid 27-45%; glycolipid 5-11%; and phospholipid 50-61%. The major neutral lipid was cholesterol, and minor neutral lipids were sterol esters, triglycerides, diglycerides and monoglycerides. Hydrocarbons were present throughout development, but in the highest amounts at the earlier stages. Five different glycolipids were found, all of which were identified as glycosphingolipids. An increase in the proportion of more complex glycolipids was noted as parasites grew older. Ten different phospholipids were identified, with the major components being phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine. Other phospholipids were: lysophosphatides, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidic acid, diphosphatidylglycerol, sphingomyelin, and an unknown phospholipid component. Changes in the relative amounts of the two major phospholipids were found when the early and late stages were compared. Two lipids found throughout development were identified as glycosylated dolichol phosphates, and they comprised between 1 and 3% of the total phospholipid fraction. Nineteen fatty acids were detected, and the fatty acid distribution for each lipid class at each stage was determined. Seven major fatty acids were common to each. These were: hexadecanoic, octadecanoic, oleic, linoleic, arachidonic, docosanoic, and docosahexaenoic.

  1. Effect of dietary alpha-linolenic fatty acid derived from chia when fed as ground seed, whole seed and oil on lipid content and fatty acid composition of rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Ayerza, Ricardo; Coates, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of death in the Western world. In both the USA and the EU it accounts for over 600,000 deaths yearly. Early data showing the benefits n-3 fatty acids provide in preventing CHD disease were obtained using 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 fatty acids derived from fish. Recently, however, it has been shown that reduced risks of CHD and other cardiovascular diseases are found with 18:3n-3 fatty acid as well. To determine if 18:3n-3 fatty acids positively influence plasma composition, 32 male Wistar rats were fed ad libitum four isocaloric diets with the energy derived from corn oil (T(1)), whole chia seed (T(2)), ground chia seed (T(3)), or chia oil (T(4)) for 30 days. At the end of the feeding period the rats were sacrificed, and blood samples were analyzed to determine serum CHOL, HDL, LDL, TG content, hemogram, and fatty acid composition. Chia decreased serum TG content and increased HDL content. Only with the T(2) diet was TG significantly (p < 0.05) lower, and only with the T(3) diet was HDL significantly (p < 0.05) higher, than the control diet. Chia significantly (p < 0.05) increased the 18:3n-3, 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 plasma contents compared to the control diet, with no significant (p < 0.05) difference among chia diets detected. Significant (p < 0.05) improvement in n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio was observed for all chia diets when compared to the control.

  2. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid isomers change the unsaturation degree of hepatic fatty acids in neutral lipids but not in polar lipids.

    PubMed

    Martins, Susana V; Lopes, Paula A; Alves, Susana P; Alfaia, Cristina M; Nascimento, Mafalda; Castro, Matilde F; Bessa, Rui J B; Prates, José António Mestre

    2011-03-01

    The fatty acid composition of phospholipids plays a key role in the structural and functional properties of cellular membrane. In this study, it was hypothesized that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomer supplementation changes the unsaturation degree of the fatty acids of neutral lipids (NLs) but not those of polar lipids (PLs). Thus, the main goal was to determine the pattern of fatty acid incorporation into hepatic PL and NL fractions. Wistar male rats were fed cis(c)9,trans(t)11 and t10,c12 CLA isomers, separately or as a mixture. Whereas the t10,c12 isomer incorporation in the PL fraction was similar when supplemented either individually or as a mixture, the c9,t11 isomer reached the highest values of incorporation when combined with t10,c12. In the PL fraction, the linoleic acid did not change; but the arachidonic acid decreased, especially in the rats given the mixture. Also in this fraction, the t10,c12 isomer, either separately or as a mixture, decreased the amounts of n-6 long-chain (LC) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and increased those of the n-3 LC PUFA relative to the control. In the NL fraction, linoleic acid incorporation followed the diet composition, whereas the arachidonic acid was similar among treatments. Facing CLA isomer supplementation, the present study suggests that fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids, through the balance between n-6 and n-3 LC PUFA, is dependent upon maintaining the unsaturation degree of cellular membrane.

  3. Identification of furan fatty acids in the lipids of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Chvalová, Daniela; Špička, Jiří

    2016-06-01

    Fatty acid (FA) composition was analyzed in muscle and gonad tissues of marketed common carp (Cyprinus carpio). The extracted lipids were separated into four fractions: polar lipids (PL), diacylglycerols, free fatty acids and triacylglycerols (TAG) using thin layer chromatography. FA content within the lipid fractions was determined by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC/FID). The muscle lipids consisted primarily of TAG (96.9% of total FA), while PL were the major component of both male (67.6%) and female gonad (58.6%) lipids. Polyunsaturated fatty acids predominated in PL of all tissues (52.2-55.8% of total FA); monounsaturated fatty acids were the most abundant FA group in TAG of muscle (51.8%) and female gonads (47.8%) whereas high proportion of furan fatty acids (F-acids) (38.2%) was detected in TAG of male gonads. Eight F-acids were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in male gonad samples, including less common 12,15-epoxy-13,14-dimethylnonadeca-12,14-dienoic acid with even-numbered alkyl moiety.

  4. Performance of structured lipids incorporating selected phenolic and ascorbic acids.

    PubMed

    Gruczynska, Eliza; Przybylski, Roman; Aladedunye, Felix

    2015-04-15

    Conditions applied during frying require antioxidant which is stable at these conditions and provides protection for frying oil and fried food. Novel structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants were formed by enzymatic transesterification, exploring canola oil and naturally occurring antioxidants such as ascorbic and selected phenolic acids as substrates. Lipozyme RM IM lipase from Rhizomucor miehei was used as biocatalyst. Frying performance and oxidative stability of the final transesterification products were evaluated. The novel lipids showed significantly improved frying performance compared to canola oil. Oxidative stability assessment of the structured lipids showed significant improvement in resistance to oxidative deterioration compared to original canola oil. Interestingly, the presence of ascorbic acid in an acylglycerol structure protected α-tocopherol against thermal degradation, which was not observed for the phenolic acids. Developed structured lipids containing nutraceuticals and antioxidants may directly affect nutritional properties of lipids also offering nutraceutical ingredients for food formulation.

  5. Adhesion and hemifusion of cytoplasmic myelin lipid membranes are highly dependent on the lipid composition

    PubMed Central

    Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Lee, Dong Woog; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2012-01-01

    We report the effects of calcium ions on the adhesion and hemifusion mechanisms of model supported myelin lipid bilayer membranes of differing lipid composition. As in our previous studies [1, 2], the lipid compositions used mimic “healthy” and “diseased-like” (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, EAE) membranes. Our results show that the interaction forces as a function of membrane separation distance are well described by a generic model that also (and in particular) includes the hydrophobic interaction arising from the hydrophobically exposed (interior) parts of the bilayers. The model is able to capture the mechanical instability that triggers the onset of the hemifusion event, and highlights the primary role of the hydrophobic interaction in membrane fusion. The effects of lipid composition on the fusion mechanism, and the adhesion forces between myelin lipid bilayers, can be summarized as follow: in calcium-free buffer, healthy membranes do not present any signs of adhesion or hemifusion, while diseased membranes hemifuse easily. Addition of 2 mM calcium favors adhesion and hemifusion of the membranes independently of their composition, but the mechanisms involved in the two processes were different: healthy bilayers systematically presented stronger adhesion forces and lower energy barriers to fusion compared to diseased bilayers. These results are of particular relevance for understanding lesion development (demyelination, swelling, vacuolization and/or vesiculation) in myelin associated diseases such as multiple sclerosis and its relationship to lipid domain formation in myelin membranes. PMID:22047743

  6. GROWTH AND VARIATIONS IN LIPID CLASS AND FATTY ACID COMPOSITION DURING LARVAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE STONE CRAB, MENIPPE ADINA WILLIAMS AND FELDER, 1986

    EPA Science Inventory

    Larval development in decapod crustaceans is marked by variable growth patterns and changes in weight and biochemical composition. Larvae of the stone crab, Menippe adina, were mass-reared under laboratory conditions (28|C; 20o/ooS) from hatching to the megalopal stage. Growth in...

  7. GROWTH AND VARIATIONS IN LIPID CLASS AND FATTY ACID COMPOSITION DURING LARVAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE STONE CRAB, MENIPPE ADINA WILLIAMS AND FELDER, 1986.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Larval development in decapod crustaceans is marked by variable growth patterns and changes in weight and biochemical composition. Larvae of the stone crab, Menippe adina, were mass-reared under laboratory conditions (28?C; 20o/ooS) from hatching to the megalopa stage. Growth in...

  8. Effect of exposure to chlorpyrifos on the cuticular and internal lipid composition of Blattella germanica males.

    PubMed

    Paszkiewicz, Monika; Sikora, Agata; Boguś, Mieczysława I; Włóka, Emilia; Stepnowski, Piotr; Gołębiowski, Marek

    2016-02-01

    The results of our research on the cuticular and internal lipids of Blattella germanica males provide new information on variation in the composition of the cuticular and internal lipids of B. germanica males after exposure to the presence of the insecticide. gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses were used to identify and quantify the cuticular and internal lipid composition in males and males exposed to insecticide. There were significantly more acids having an even number of carbon atoms in the molecule, and these were also generally in higher concentrations. The following acids were in a higher concentration: C16:0 and C18:1, C18:2, C18:0. In both males and males exposed to insecticide, 24 fatty acids ranging from C6 to C22 were determined. However, there was a significantly higher content of fatty acids in the surface lipids of B. germanica males after exposure to insecticide. Our results indicate a higher content of n-alkanes, sterols, particularly cholesterol, fatty acids, and fatty acid methyl esters in the B. germanica surface after exposure to chlorpyrifos than in males that were not exposed.

  9. Effects of γ-irradiation on the lipid composition of inner sprout of garlic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, M. B.; Curzio, O. A.; Aveldaño, M. I.; Croci, C. A.

    1998-06-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of a dose of 60.0 Gy of 60Co γ-rays on the concentration and composition of lipids from the inner sprout of garlic cloves. 210 days after treatment, the levels of phospholipids, triacylglycerols and glycolipids were significantly reduced as a result of radiation. Levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids from these lipid fractions such as linoleic acids showed a similar trend of decrease. Irradiation also brought about an increase in diacylglycerols. Results are correlated with sprouting inhibition induced by γ-irradiation in garlic.

  10. Acid test: lipid antigens get into the groove.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Mitchell; Sullivan, Barbara A

    2008-06-01

    How do CD1 molecules load lipid antigens? In this issue of Immunity, Relloso et al. (2008) uncover how lysosomal pH targets amino acids in CD1b, causing it to open and attain a conformation more receptive to lipid antigens.

  11. Evening primrose oil in rheumatoid arthritis: changes in serum lipids and fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Jäntti, J; Nikkari, T; Solakivi, T; Vapaatalo, H; Isomäki, H

    1989-01-01

    The serum concentration of lipids and composition of fatty acids after overnight fasting were studied in 18 patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated for 12 weeks with either 20 ml of evening primrose oil containing 9% of gamma-linolenic acid or olive oil. The serum concentrations of oleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and apolipoprotein B decreased and those of linoleic acid, gamma-linolenic acid, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid increased during treatment with evening primrose oil. During olive oil treatment the serum concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid decreased and those of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I increased slightly. The decrease in serum eicosapentaenoic acid and the increase in arachidonic acid concentrations induced by evening primrose oil may not be favourable effects in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in the light of the roles of these fatty acids as precursors of eicosanoids. PMID:2649022

  12. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids enhance neonatal insulin-regulated protein metabolism in piglets by differentially altering muscle lipid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the role of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFAs) of muscle phospholipids in the regulation of neonatal metabolism. Twenty-eight piglets were weaned at 2 days of age and raised on one of two milk formulas that consisted of either a control formula supplying ...

  13. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids enhance neonatal insulin-regulated protein metabolism in piglets by differentially altering muscle lipid composition

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Karen; Julien, Pierre; Davis, Teresa A.; Myre, Alexandre; Thivierge, M. Carole

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the role of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFAs) of muscle phospholipids in the regulation of neonatal metabolism. Twenty-eight piglets were weaned at 2 days of age and raised on one of two milk formulas that consisted of either a control formula supplying 0% or a formula containing 3.5% LCn-3PUFAs until 10 or 28 days of age. There was a developmental decline in the insulin sensitivity of amino acid disposal in control pigs during the first month of life, with a slope of −2.24 μmol·kg−1·h−1 (P = 0.01) per unit of insulin increment, as assessed using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic clamps. LCn-3PUFA feeding blunted this developmental decline, resulting in differing insulin sensitivities (P < 0.001). When protein metabolism was assessed under parenteral feeding-induced hyperinsulinemia, LCn-3PUFAs reduced by 16% whole body oxidative losses of amino acids (from 238 to 231 μmol·kg−1·h−1; P = 0.06), allowing 41% more amino acids to accrete into body proteins (from 90 to 127 μmol·kg−1·h−1; P = 0.06). The fractional synthetic rate of muscle mixed proteins remained unaltered by the LCn-3PUFA feeding. However, LCn-3PUFAs retarded a developmental increase in the essential-to-nonessential amino acid ratio of the muscle intracellular free pool (P = 0.05). Overall, alterations in metabolism were concomitant with a preferential incorporation of LCn-3PUFAs into muscle total membrane phospholipids (P < 0.001), in contrast to intramuscular triglycerides. These results underscore the potential role of LCn-3PUFAs as regulators of different aspects of protein metabolism in the neonate. PMID:17673528

  14. Visualization of lipid droplet composition by direct organelle mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick J; Ledbetter, Nicole R; James, Christopher N; Hoffman, William D; Case, Charlene R; Verbeck, Guido F; Chapman, Kent D

    2011-02-04

    An expanding appreciation for the varied functions of neutral lipids in cellular organisms relies on a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms of lipid production and packaging into cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs). Conventional lipid profiling procedures involve the analysis of tissue extracts and consequently lack cellular or subcellular resolution. Here, we report an approach that combines the visualization of individual LDs, microphase extraction of lipid components from droplets, and the direct identification of lipid composition by nanospray mass spectrometry, even to the level of a single LD. The triacylglycerol (TAG) composition of LDs from several plant sources (mature cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) embryos, roots of cotton seedlings, and Arabidopsis thaliana seeds and leaves) were examined by direct organelle mass spectrometry and revealed the heterogeneity of LDs derived from different plant tissue sources. The analysis of individual LDs makes possible organellar resolution of molecular compositions and will facilitate new studies of LD biogenesis and functions, especially in combination with analysis of morphological and metabolic mutants. Furthermore, direct organelle mass spectrometry could be applied to the molecular analysis of other subcellular compartments and macromolecules.

  15. Fatty acid methyl ester profiles of bat wing surface lipids.

    PubMed

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Fuller, Nathan W; Moore, Patrick R; Gilmore, David F; Savary, Brett J; Risch, Thomas S

    2014-11-01

    Sebocytes are specialized epithelial cells that rupture to secrete sebaceous lipids (sebum) across the mammalian integument. Sebum protects the integument from UV radiation, and maintains host microbial communities among other functions. Native glandular sebum is composed primarily of triacylglycerides (TAG) and wax esters (WE). Upon secretion (mature sebum), these lipids combine with minor cellular membrane components comprising total surface lipids. TAG and WE are further cleaved to smaller molecules through oxidation or host enzymatic digestion, resulting in a complex mixture of glycerolipids (e.g., TAG), sterols, unesterified fatty acids (FFA), WE, cholesteryl esters, and squalene comprising surface lipid. We are interested if fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling of bat surface lipid could predict species specificity to the cutaneous fungal disease, white nose syndrome (WNS). We collected sebaceous secretions from 13 bat spp. using Sebutape(®) and converted them to FAME with an acid catalyzed transesterification. We found that Sebutape(®) adhesive patches removed ~6× more total lipid than Sebutape(®) indicator strips. Juvenile eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis) had significantly higher 18:1 than adults, but 14:0, 16:1, and 20:0 were higher in adults. FAME profiles among several bat species were similar. We concluded that bat surface lipid FAME profiling does not provide a robust model predicting species susceptibility to WNS. However, these results provide baseline data that can be used for lipid roles in future ecological studies, such as life history, diet, or migration.

  16. Nucleic acid-lipid membrane interactions studied by DSC.

    PubMed

    Giatrellis, Sarantis; Nounesis, George

    2011-01-01

    The interactions of nucleic acids with lipid membranes are of great importance for biological mechanisms as well as for biotechnological applications in gene delivery and drug carriers. The optimization of liposomal vectors for clinical use is absolutely dependent upon the formation mechanisms, the morphology, and the molecular organization of the lipoplexes, that is, the complexes of lipid membranes with DNA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has emerged as an efficient and relatively easy-to-operate experimental technique that can straightforwardly provide data related to the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the DNA-lipid complexation and especially to the lipid organization and phase transitions within the membrane. In this review, we summarize DSC studies considering nucleic acid-membrane systems, accentuating DSC capabilities, and data analysis. Published work involving cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic lipids as well as lipid mixtures interacting with RNA and DNA of different sizes and conformations are included. It is shown that despite limitations, issues such as DNA- or RNA-induced phase separation and microdomain lipid segregation, liposomal aggregation and fusion, alterations of the lipid long-range molecular order, as well as membrane-induced structural changes of the nucleic acids can be efficiently treated by systematic high-sensitivity DSC studies.

  17. Enhanced lipid extraction from algae using free nitrous acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Naghdi, Forough Ghasemi; Ye, Liu; Lant, Paul; Pratt, Steven

    2014-05-01

    Lipid extraction has been identified as a major bottleneck for large-scale algal biodiesel production. In this work free nitrous acid (FNA) is presented as an effective and low cost pretreatment to enhance lipid recovery from algae. Two batch tests, with a range of FNA additions, were conducted to disrupt algal cells prior to lipid extraction by organic solvents. Total accessible lipid content was quantified by the Bligh and Dyer method, and was found to increase with pretreatment time (up to 48 h) and FNA concentration (up to 2.19 mg HNO2-N/L). Hexane extraction was used to study industrially accessible lipids. The mass transfer coefficient (k) for lipid extraction using hexane from algae treated with 2.19 mg HNO2-N/L FNA was found to be dramatically higher than for extraction from untreated algae. Consistent with extraction results, cell disruption analysis indicated the disruption of the cell membrane barrier.

  18. Polar and neutral lipid composition in the pelagic tunicate Pyrosoma atlanticum.

    PubMed

    Mayzaud, Patrick; Boutoute, Marc; Perissinotto, Renzo; Nichols, Peter

    2007-07-01

    Structure and functioning of colonial pyrosomes are largely undescribed and their lipid characteristics have received limited attention. The aim of this paper is to fill this gap on one of the dominant species Pyrosoma atlanticum. Lipid content is tightly coupled to size and weight. Lipid composition shows a large dominance of structural polar lipids. Neutral lipids were dominated by sterols with low levels of acylglycerols and free fatty acids. Phospholipids show a dominance of PC with intermediate percentages of PE and DPG. Other constituents (PS, PI, LPC, sphingolipids) were present at lower levels. Fatty acid composition of DAG and TAG showed a dominance of saturated acids (16:0, 14:0), DHA and intermediate levels of MUFA. Phospholipids were dominated by DHA with values exceeding 30% of total FA in all categories except for PI, where lower percentages occurred. Saturated acids were second in abundance with MUFA showing intermediate concentrations. Sterols were dominated by 24-methylcholesta-5,22E-dien-3beta-ol with more than 22% of the total sterol. Cholesterol (cholest-5-en-3beta-ol) represented only 12 % of the total while 24-methylcholesta-5,24(28)E-dien-3beta-ol accounted for 11% of the total sterols. The low levels of triacylglycerols and free fatty acids, coupled with high concentrations of glycolipids and phytoplankton-derived degraded chloropigments, is evidence of a direct link with the digestive activity and substantiate the idea of a high physiological turnover as an alternative to large lipid accumulation. The fatty acid and sterol profiles are consistent with a diverse phytoplankton diet, and a strong contribution of phospholipid classes to energy needs, including locomotion.

  19. Changes in membrane lipid composition during saline growth of the fresh water cyanobacterium Synechococcus 6311

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huflejt, M. E.; Tremolieres, A.; Pineau, B.; Lang, J. K.; Hatheway, J.; Packer, L.

    1990-01-01

    Growth of Synechococcus 6311 in the presence of 0.5 molar NaCl is accompanied by significant changes in membrane lipid composition. Upon transfer of the cells from a low salt' (0.015 molar NaCl) to high salt' (0.5 molar NaCl) growth medium at different stages of growth, a rapid decrease in palmitoleic acid (C16:1 delta 9) content was accompanied by a concomitant increase in the amount of the two C18:1 acids (C18:1 delta 9, C18:1 delta 11), with the higher increase in oleic acid C18:1 delta 9 content. These changes began to occur within the first hour after the sudden elevation of NaCl and progressed for about 72 hours. The percentage of palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0) remained almost unchanged in the same conditions. High salt-dependent changes within ratios of polar lipid classes also occurred within the first 72 hours of growth. The amount of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol (bilayer-destabilizing lipid) decreased and that of the digalactosyl diacylglycerol (bilayer-stabilizing lipid) increased. Consequently, in the three day old cells, the ratio of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol to digalactosyl diacylglycerol in the membranes of high salt-grown cells was about half of that in the membranes of low salt-grown cells. The total content of anionic lipids (phosphatidylglycerol and sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol) was always higher in the isolated membranes and the whole cells from high salt-grown cultures compared to that in the cells and membranes from low salt-grown cultures. All the observed rearrangements in the lipid environment occurred in both thylakoid and cytoplasmic membranes. Similar lipid composition changes, however, to a much lesser extent, were also observed in the aging, low salt-grown cultures. The observed changes in membrane fatty acids and lipids composition correlate with the alterations in electron and ion transport activities, and it is concluded that the rearrangement of the membrane lipid environment is an essential part of the

  20. Changes in Membrane Lipid Composition during Saline Growth of the Fresh Water Cyanobacterium Synechococcus 6311 1

    PubMed Central

    Huflejt, Margaret E.; Tremolieres, Antoine; Pineau, Bernard; Lang, Johanna K.; Hatheway, John; Packer, Lester

    1990-01-01

    Growth of Synechococcus 6311 in the presence of 0.5 molar NaCl is accompanied by significant changes in membrane lipid composition. Upon transfer of the cells from a `low salt' (0.015 molar NaCl) to `high salt' (0.5 molar NaCl) growth medium at different stages of growth, a rapid decrease in palmitoleic acid (C16:1Δ9) content was accompanied by a concomitant increase in the amount of the two C18:1 acids (C18:1Δ9, C18:1Δ11), with the higher increase in oleic acid C18:1Δ9 content. These changes began to occur within the first hour after the sudden elevation of NaCl and progressed for about 72 hours. The percentage of palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0) remained almost unchanged in the same conditions. High salt-dependent changes within ratios of polar lipid classes also occurred within the first 72 hours of growth. The amount of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol (bilayer-destabilizing lipid) decreased and that of the digalactosyl diacylglycerol (bilayer-stabilizing lipid) increased. Consequently, in the three day old cells, the ratio of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol to digalactosyl diacylglycerol in the membranes of high salt-grown cells was about half of that in the membranes of low salt-grown cells. The total content of anionic lipids (phosphatidylglycerol and sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol) was always higher in the isolated membranes and the whole cells from high salt-grown cultures compared to that in the cells and membranes from low salt-grown cultures. All the observed rearrangements in the lipid environment occurred in both thylakoid and cytoplasmic membranes. Similar lipid composition changes, however, to a much lesser extent, were also observed in the aging, low salt-grown cultures. The observed changes in membrane fatty acids and lipids composition correlate with the alterations in electron and ion transport activities, and it is concluded that the rearrangement of the membrane lipid environment is an essential part of the process by which cells

  1. Molecular and isotopic composition of lipids in modern and fossil bivalve shells: Records of paleoenvironmental change?

    SciTech Connect

    CoBabe, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    Suites of lipids residing in situ in modern and fossil bivalve shells offer new possibilities for the study of paleoecology and paleoclimatology. Distributions of carbon isotopic compositions of modem shell lipids suggests that many of these compounds, including alkanes, sterols, fatty acids, ketones and phytadienes, are derived from the bivalves and not directly from the surrounding environment. The occurrence of fatty acids in modem and fossil shell material opens up the possibility that saturation levels of these compounds may be used as paleothermometers. To date, the utility of fatty acids in paleoclimate studies has been limited because of the swift breakdown of these compounds in sediment. However, initial results indicate that fatty acids in bivalve shells retain their original structure for at least several million years. Comparison of modem bivalve shell fatty acids from tropical, temperate and polar nearshore marine systems will be presented, along with analogous fossil data.

  2. Lipid composition of the Antarctic fish Pleuragramma antarcticum. Influence of age class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayzaud, P.; Chevallier, J.; Tavernier, E.; Moteki, M.; Koubbi, P.

    2011-08-01

    Larvae and juvenile stages of Pleuragramma antarcticum have been collected in the Dumont D’Urville Sea (East Antarctica) during summer 2008 on board the TRV Umitaka Maru during the CEAMARC survey. Detailed analyses of their lipid class and fatty acid compositions were carried out. P. antarcticum showed a pronounced ontogenic lipid accumulation with increasing size. Larvae displayed a dominance of polar lipids (83% of total lipids) and low percentage of triglycerides (7%). Conversely juveniles showed an increasing accumulation of triglycerides (up to 72.4%). The fatty acid composition of polar lipids remained rather stable between stages with 22:6n-3 and 20:5n-3 as dominant contributors. The relatively minor ontogenic changes, e.g. increase of monounsaturated and decrease of C18 polyunsaturated fatty acids, may reflect the influence of differences in diet. Triglycerides showed that all three age classes are well segregated in term of fatty acid composition. Larvae triglycerides are characterized by significant percentages of 16:0, 20:5n-3, 20:6n-3 and to a minor extent 18:4n-3, which suggest a prymnesiophyte based diet. Juveniles are characterized by larger percentages of C20:1 and C22:1 acids, considered as markers of Calanus type copepods. The increasing contribution of 18:1n-9 in the triglycerides of the older juveniles suggests a gradual and increasing shift from a copepod dominant diet to an euphausiid dominant diet. Fatty acid trophic markers pattern suggests a shift from a phytophagous and omnivorous diet for larvae to a carnivorous diet for juveniles.

  3. Protein restriction during pregnancy affects maternal liver lipid metabolism and fetal brain lipid composition in the rat.

    PubMed

    Torres, Nimbe; Bautista, Claudia J; Tovar, Armando R; Ordáz, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Ortiz, Victor; Granados, Omar; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Larrea, Fernando; Zambrano, Elena

    2010-02-01

    Suboptimal developmental environments program offspring to lifelong metabolic problems. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of protein restriction in pregnancy on maternal liver lipid metabolism at 19 days of gestation (dG) and its effect on fetal brain development. Control (C) and restricted (R) mothers were fed with isocaloric diets containing 20 and 10% of casein. At 19 dG, maternal blood and livers and fetal livers and brains were collected. Serum insulin and leptin levels were determinate in mothers. Maternal and fetal liver lipid and fetal brain lipid quantification were performed. Maternal liver and fetal brain fatty acids were quantified by gas chromatography. In mothers, liver desaturase and elongase mRNAs were measured by RT-PCR. Maternal body and liver weights were similar in both groups. However, fat body composition, including liver lipids, was lower in R mothers. A higher fasting insulin at 19 dG in the R group was observed (C = 0.2 +/- 0.04 vs. R = 0.9 +/- 0.16 ng/ml, P < 0.01) and was inversely related to early growth retardation. Serum leptin in R mothers was significantly higher than that observed in C rats (C = 5 +/- 0.1 vs. R = 7 +/- 0.7 ng/ml, P < 0.05). In addition, protein restriction significantly reduced gene expression in maternal liver of desaturases and elongases and the concentration of arachidonic (AA) and docosahexanoic (DHA) acids. In fetus from R mothers, a low body weight (C = 3 +/- 0.3 vs. R = 2 +/- 0.1 g, P < 0.05), as well as liver and brain lipids, including the content of DHA in the brain, was reduced. This study showed that protein restriction during pregnancy may negatively impact normal fetal brain development by changes in maternal lipid metabolism.

  4. Effects of silicon deficiency on lipid composition and metabolism in the diatom Cyclotella cryptica

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, P.G. )

    1988-09-01

    The effects of silicon deficiency on the metabolism and composition of lipids in Cyclotella cryptica T13L Reimann, Lewin, and Guillard were examined Silicon-deficient cells had higher levels of neutral lipids (primarily triacylglycerols) and higher proportions of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids than silicon-replete cells. After 4 h of silicon deficiency, the percentage of newly assimilated NaH{sup 14}CO{sub 3} partitioned into lipids increased from 27.6% to 54.1%, whereas the percentage partitioned into chrysolaminarin decreased from 21.6% to 54.1%, whereas the percentage partitioned into chrysolaminarin decreased from 21.6% to 10.6%. In addition, pulse-chase experiments with NaH{sup 14}CO{sub 3} indicated that the amount of {sup 14}C in the total cellular lipid fraction increased by 32% after 12 h of silicon deficiency despite the absence of additional photoassimilable {sup 14}C. Therefore, the accumulation of lipids in response to silicon deficiency appears to be due to two distinct processes: (1) an increase in the proportion of newly assimilated carbon partitioned into lipids, and (2) a slow conversion of previously assimilated carbon from non-lipid compounds into lipids.

  5. Lipid Composition of Organelles from Germinating Castor Bean Endosperm 1

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Robert P.; Beevers, Harry

    1977-01-01

    Glyoxysome, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and proplastid fractions were isolated from endosperm of castor beans (Ricinus communis) germinated for 5 days at 30 C. Samples from sucrose density gradients were diluted with 0.15 m KCI and the membranes pelleted. Lipid extracts of these membranes were analyzed for phosphoglyceride, acyl lipid, and sterol content. The endoplasmic reticulum contains 1.24 μmol of phosphoglyceride per mg of protein; the mitochondria, 0.65 μmol/mg; and the glyoxysome membranes, 0.55 μmol/mg. Phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine are the most abundant lipids in all membranes studied, accounting for 70% or more of the lipid phosphorus and 50% or more of the fatty acid. Glyoxysome membranes and endoplasmic reticulum also contain phosphatidyl inositol (respectively, 9 and 17% of the lipid phosphorus) and free fatty acids (13% of the total fatty acid in each). Compared with other organelles, mitochondrial membranes have more phosphatidyl ethanolamine relative to phosphatidyl choline and are characterized by the presence of cardiolipin, in which 80% of the fatty acid is linoleate. The relative amounts of linoleate, palmitate, oleate, stearate, and linolenate in each of the phosphotoglycerides are constant regardless of the membrane source. Stimasgasterol and β-sitosterol are present in the membranes (1-9 nmol each/mg protein). The data provide further evidence that glyoxysome membranes are derived from the endoplasmic reticulum but at the same time indicate some differentiation. PMID:16659829

  6. Modulation of lipid rafts by Omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and cancer: implications for use of lipids during nutrition support.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Rafat A; Harvey, Kevin A; Zaloga, Gary P; Stillwell, William

    2007-02-01

    Current understanding of biologic membrane structure and function is largely based on the concept of lipid rafts. Lipid rafts are composed primarily of tightly packed, liquid-ordered sphingolipids/cholesterol/saturated phospholipids that float in a sea of more unsaturated and loosely packed, liquid-disordered lipids. Lipid rafts have important clinical implications because many important membrane-signaling proteins are located within the raft regions of the membrane, and alterations in raft structure can alter activity of these signaling proteins. Because rafts are lipid-based, their composition, structure, and function are susceptible to manipulation by dietary components such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and by cholesterol depletion. We review how alteration of raft lipids affects the raft/nonraft localization and hence the function of several proteins involved in cell signaling. We focus our discussion of raft-signaling proteins on inflammation and cancer.

  7. Stabilization of composition fluctuations in mixed membranes by hybrid lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, Samuel; Palmieri, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    A ternary mixture model is proposed to describe composition fluctuations in mixed membranes composed of saturated, unsaturated and hybrid lipids. The asymmetric hybrid lipid has one saturated and one unsaturated hydrocarbon chain and it can reduce the packing incompatibility between saturated and unsaturated lipids. A methodology to recast the free-energy of the lattice in terms of a continuous isotropic field theory is proposed and used to analyze composition fluctuations above the critical temperature. The effect of hybrid lipids on fluctuations domains rich in saturated/unsaturated lipids is predicted. The correlation length of such fluctuations decreases significantly with increasing amounts of hybrids even if the temperature is maintained close to the critical temperature. This provides an upper bound for the domain sizes expected in rafts stabilized by hybrids, above the critical temperature. When the hybrid composition of the membrane is increased further, a crossover value is found above which ``stripe-like'' fluctuations are observed. The wavelength of these fluctuations decreases with increasing hybrid fraction and tends toward a molecular size in a membrane that contains only hybrids.

  8. Acid Base Equilibrium in a Lipid/Water Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streb, Kristina K.; Ilich, Predrag-Peter

    2003-12-01

    A new and original experiment in which partition of bromophenol blue dye between water and lipid/water gel causes a shift in the acid base equilibrium of the dye is described. The dye-absorbing material is a monoglyceride food additive of plant origin that mixes freely with water to form a stable cubic phase gel; the nascent gel absorbs the dye from aqueous solution and converts it to the acidic form. There are three concurrent processes taking place in the experiment: (a) formation of the lipid/water gel, (b) absorption of the dye by the gel, and (c) protonation of the dye in the lipid/water gel environment. As the aqueous solution of the dye is a deep purple-blue color at neutral pH and yellow at acidic pH the result of these processes is visually striking: the strongly green-yellow particles of lipid/water gel are suspended in purple-blue aqueous solution. The local acidity of the lipid/water gel is estimated by UV vis spectrophotometry. This experiment is an example of host-guest (lipid/water gel dye) interaction and is suitable for project-type biophysics, physical chemistry, or biochemistry labs. The experiment requires three, 3-hour lab sessions, two of which must not be separated by more than two days.

  9. Novel interference in thiobarbituric acid assay for lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, W A; Baker, N; Hill, V A; Wright, E T

    1975-05-01

    The thiobarbituric acid test for lipid peroxidation, when applied to a mixture of acetaldehyde and sucrose, produces a 532 nm aborbing chromogen which is indistinguishable from that formed by malonaldehyde and thiobarbituric acid. Unless special procedures are adopted to correct for this effect, the combined action of acetaldehyde and sucrose interferes seriously with the assay of lipid peroxidation reactions, notably those implicated in alcohol-induced liver injuries. However, this unusual thiobarbituric acid effect also can be used as a sensitive method for the detection of acetaldehyde.

  10. Effects of crude rapeseed oil on lipid composition in Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, A; Pickova, J; Brännäs, E

    2009-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of crude rapeseed oil (RO) on lipid content and composition in muscle and liver of Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus. Triplicate groups were fed diets containing fish oil (FO):RO ratio of 100:0, 75:25, 50:50 and 25:75 until two-fold mass increase. Total lipid content increased significantly in the liver with higher proportion of RO in the diet. Profound effects were seen in the fatty acid composition in the analysed tissues with a reduction in 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 and an increase in 18:2n-6 with higher RO content in the diets. A drop in cholesterol content was seen at 25% inclusion of RO in both tissues. Wild-caught fish contained a considerably higher amount of 20:4n-6 in both storage and membrane lipids of white muscle compared with the experimental fish.

  11. Lipid Class Specific Quantitative Analysis of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Food Supplements.

    PubMed

    Kutzner, Laura; Ostermann, Annika I; Konrad, Thade; Riegel, Dieter; Hellhake, Stefan; Schuchardt, Jan Philipp; Schebb, Nils Helge

    2017-01-11

    Supplementation products containing n-3 PUFA from marine sources serve a large market. Although the amount of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in the products is provided by the manufacturer, no or little information is available on their lipid pattern. Therefore, we quantitatively analyzed the fatty acid pattern in the lipid fractions triglycerides, phospholipids, ethyl esters, and free fatty acids in supplementation products by means of solid phase extraction and gas chromatography. Twelve products from the European and U.S. markets containing fish, krill, algal, or plant oil were analyzed. Total n-3 PUFA content ranged from 68 g/100 g fat (fish oil) to 42 g/100 g fat (algal oil) to 17 g/100 g fat (krill oil). On the basis of the n-3 PUFA containing lipid class, the supplements can be separated dominantly in ethyl ester, re-esterified triglyceride, triglyceride, and phospholipid containing products. Algae-based products contained natural triglycerides, krill oils a complex mixture of phospholipids, triglycerides, and free fatty acids, and fish oil products either ethyl esters, re-esterified triglycerides, or triglycerides. Even products of the same class and source showed distinct differences in their lipid pattern. A specification of the lipid composition of n-3 PUFA products would allow distinguishing the different (qualities of) supplements.

  12. Yogurt Fermentation in the Presence of Starch-Lipid Composite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effect of Starch-lipid composites (SLC) on the fermentation of set-style yogurt was investigated by incorporating 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5% of SLC into the yogurt mix. The fermentation was performed at 40 deg C and its process was monitored with an optical microscope. It was found that SLC acce...

  13. Effect of salinity on moisture content, pigment system, and lipid composition in Ephedra alata Decne.

    PubMed

    Alqarawi, A A; Hashem, Abeer; Abd Allah, E F; Alshahrani, T S; Huqail, Asma A

    2014-03-01

    The present work was carried out to uncover the effect of salinity stress on shoot moisture percentage, pigment content and lipid composition of Ephedra alata Decne. The results suggested that salinity caused significant decrease in plant moisture content. The chl. a, b and carotenoids showed significant decrease with increasing concentration of salt. Total pigment content also showed decline at all salt stress levels. Salt stress caused significant decrease in total lipids (TL), triacylglycerol (TG) and sterol (S) accompanied with an increase in diacylglycerol (DG), sterol ester (SE), and non-esterified fatty acids (FAA) of E. alata. Moreover, saline stress caused significant decrease in all phospholipid fractions except phosphatidic acid which increases during salt stress. Salinity stress resulted in increase of saturated fatty acids and decreases the percentage of un-saturated fatty acids in E. alalta.

  14. Salivary composition in obese vs normal-weight subjects: towards a role in postprandial lipid metabolism?

    PubMed

    Vors, C; Drai, J; Gabert, L; Pineau, G; Laville, M; Vidal, H; Guichard, E; Michalski, M-C; Feron, G

    2015-09-01

    In the pathophysiological context of obesity, oral exposure to dietary fat can modulate lipid digestion and absorption, but underlying in-mouth mechanisms have not been clearly identified. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that salivary components related to dietary fat sensitivity would differ according to body mass index (BMI) and postprandial lipid metabolism in young men. Saliva was collected from nine normal-weight (BMI=22.3±0.5 kg m(-2)) and nine non-morbid obese (BMI=31.7±0.3 kg m(-2)) men before an 8-h postprandial metabolic exploration test involving the consumption of a 40-g fat meal, in which obese subjects revealed a delayed postprandial lipid metabolism. Nine salivary characteristics (flow, protein content, lipolysis, amylase, proteolysis, total antioxidant status, lysozyme, lipocalin 1 and carbonic anhydrase-VI) were investigated. We show that, under fasting conditions, salivary lipolysis was lower in obese vs normal-weight subjects, whereas proteolysis and carbonic anhydrase VI were higher. We reveal through multivariate and Mann-Whitney analysis that differences in fasting salivary lipolysis and proteolysis between both groups are related to differences in postprandial lipid metabolism including exogenous fatty-acid absorption and β-oxidation. These results suggest a potential role of salivary composition on postprandial lipid metabolism and bring novel causal hypotheses on the links between salivary composition, sensitivity to dietary fat oral income and postprandial lipid metabolism according to BMI.

  15. Changes in lipid composition of hepatocyte plasma membrane induced by overfeeding in duck.

    PubMed

    Molee, W; Bouillier-Oudot, M; Auvergne, A; Babilé, R

    2005-08-01

    This experiment was carried out to examine the influence of overfeeding ducks with corn on the lipid composition of hepatocyte plasma membrane. Seventy-day-old male Mule ducks (Cairina moschata x Anas platyrhynchos) were overfed with corn for 12.5 days in order to induce fatty livers. The cholesterol and phospholipid contents were approximately 50% higher in hepatocyte plasma membranes from fatty livers compared to those of lean livers obtained from non-overfed ducks. However, the cholesterol/phospholipids molar ratio did not differ between both groups. Overfeeding induced a significant change in phospholipid composition of hepatocyte plasma membrane with a decrease in phosphatidylcholine proportion and conversely an increase in phosphatidylethanolamine. The fatty acid profile of phospholipids was also altered. In fatty hepatocyte plasma membrane, the overall proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was decreased and this was due to the decrease of some of, but not all, the PUFA. In addition, the proportions of oleic acid and n-9 series unsaturated fatty acids were higher in fatty than in lean liver membranes. This study provides evidence that overfeeding with a carbohydrate-rich corn-based diet induces a de novo hepatic lipogenesis in Mule duck which predominates over dietary lipid intake to change the lipid composition of the hepatocyte plasma membrane.

  16. Simultaneous hydrolysis-esterification of wet microalgal lipid using acid.

    PubMed

    Takisawa, Kenji; Kanemoto, Kazuyo; Kartikawati, Muliasari; Kitamura, Yutaka

    2013-12-01

    This research demonstrated hydrolysis of wet microalgal lipid and esterification of free fatty acid (FFA) using acid in one-step process. The investigation of simultaneous hydrolysis-esterification (SHE) of wet microalgal lipid was conducted by using L27 orthogonal design and the effects of water content, volume of sulphuric acid, volume of methanol, temperature and time on SHE were examined. As a result, water content was found to be the most effective factor. The effects of various parameters on fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) content and equilibrium relation between FAME and FFA were also examined under water content 80%. Equimolar amounts of sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid showed similar results. This method has great potential in terms of biodiesel production from microalgae since no organic solvents are used.

  17. Lipid and polymeric carrier-mediated nucleic acid delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Mahato, Ram I

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Nucleic acids such as plasmid DNA, antisense oligonucleotide, and RNA interference (RNAi) molecules, have a great potential to be used as therapeutics for the treatment of various genetic and acquired diseases. To design a successful nucleic acid delivery system, the pharmacological effect of nucleic acids, the physiological condition of the subjects or sites, and the physicochemical properties of nucleic acid and carriers have to be thoroughly examined. Areas covered in this review The commonly used lipids, polymers and corresponding delivery systems are reviewed in terms of their characteristics, applications, advantages and limitations. What the reader will gain This article aims to provide an overview of biological barriers and strategies to overcome these barriers by properly designing effective synthetic carriers for nucleic acid delivery. Take home message A thorough understanding of biological barriers and the structure–activity relationship of lipid and polymeric carriers is the key for effective nucleic acid therapy. PMID:20836625

  18. [The composition of lipids and lipid peroxidation in the pancreas of quails exposed to nitrates and correction by the amaranth's seeds].

    PubMed

    Tsekhmistrenko, S I; Ponomarenko, N V

    2013-01-01

    Researches of features of lipid composition, functioning of the system of antioxidant defense, maintenance of lipid peroxidation products in the quail's pancreas on the early postnatal ontogenesis stages are conducted for actions of nitrates and feeding with amaranth's seeds in mixed fodder. The arrival of nitrates in the organism of quails results in the decline of general lipids maintenance and nonetherified fat acids in the pancreas. Using of amaranth's seeds in mixed fodder on the background of the nitrate loading results in the increase of activity of the enzimes system of antioxidant defence, the growth of general lipid level in the quail's pancreas. Thus in correlation with separate classes of lipid maintenance of cholesterol goes down for certain, whereas the maintenance of triacylglycerols and ethers of cholesterol rises. The results obtained in the researches show the ability of amaranth's seeds to avert oxidative stress in quail's pancreas under nitrates influence.

  19. New fluorescent octadecapentaenoic acids as probes of lipid membranes and protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, C R; Souto, A A; Amat-Guerri, F; Acuña, A U

    1996-01-01

    The chemical and spectroscopic properties of the new fluorescent acids all(E)-8, 10, 12, 14, 16-octadecapentaenoic acid (t-COPA) and its (8Z)-isomer (c-COPA) have been characterized in solvents of different polarity, synthetic lipid bilayers, and lipid/protein systems. These compounds are reasonably photostable in solution, present an intense UV absorption band (epsilon(350 nm) approximately 10(5) M(-1) cm(-1)) strongly overlapped by tryptophan fluorescence and their emission, centered at 470 nm, is strongly polarized (r(O) = 0.385 +/- 0.005) and decays with a major component (85%) of lifetime 23 ns and a faster minor one of lifetime 2 ns (D,L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), 15 degrees C). Both COPA isomers incorporate readily into vesicles and membranes (K(p) approximately 10(6)) and align parallel to the lipids. t-COPA distributes homogeneously between gel and fluid lipid domains and the changes in polarization accurately reflect the lipid T(m) values. From the decay of the fluorescence anisotropy in spherical bilayers of DMPC and POPC it is shown that t-COPA also correctly reflects the lipid order parameters, determined by 2H NMR techniques. Resonance energy transfer from tryptophan to the bound pentaenoic acid in serum albumin in solution, and from the tryptophan residues of gramicidin in lipid bilayers also containing the pentaenoic acid, show that this probe is a useful acceptor of protein tryptophan excitation, with R(O) values of 30-34 A. Images FIGURE 10 PMID:8889194

  20. Long-term melatonin administration increases polyunsaturated fatty acid percentage in plasma lipids of hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Pita, Maria L; Hoyos, Marta; Martin-Lacave, Inés; Osuna, Carmen; Fernández-Santos, Jose M; Guerrero, Juan M

    2002-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of melatonin on the fatty acid composition of plasma and tissue lipids. Melatonin administration to rats fed with a standard diet only increased long-chain n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in total plasma lipids and liver phospholipids but induced significant changes in hypercholesterolemic rats. In plasma, palmitoleic and oleic acids increased and n-6 and n-3 PUFA decreased in hypercholesterolemic rats; theses changes were reversed by melatonin administration. The analysis of lipid fractions revealed that only the cholesteryl ester fraction was affected by melatonin. Histological studies of the carotid artery intima revealed the appearance, in hypercholesterolemic rats, of fatty streaks produced by a mass of foam cells covered by the endothelium and by a thin layer of mononucleated cells. These changes were prevented by melatonin. We conclude that long-term melatonin administration modifies the fatty acid composition of rat plasma and liver lipids and ameliorates the arterial fatty infiltration induced by cholesterol.

  1. Effects of cultivation conditions and media composition on cell growth and lipid productivity of indigenous microalga Chlorella vulgaris ESP-31.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Kuei-Ling; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2012-02-01

    The growth and lipid productivity of an isolated microalga Chlorella vulgaris ESP-31 were investigated under different media and cultivation conditions, including phototrophic growth (NaHCO(3) or CO(2), with light), heterotrophic growth (glucose, without light), photoheterotrophic growth (glucose, with light) and mixotrophic growth (glucose and CO(2), with light). C. vulgaris ESP-31 preferred to grow under phototrophic (CO(2)), photoheterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions on nitrogen-rich medium (i.e., Basal medium and Modified Bristol's medium), reaching a biomass concentration of 2-5 g/l. The growth on nitrogen-limiting MBL medium resulted in higher lipid accumulation (20-53%) but slower growth rate. Higher lipid content (40-53%) and higher lipid productivity (67-144 mg/l/d) were obtained under mixotrophic cultivation with all the culture media used. The fatty acid composition of the microalgal lipid comprises over 60-68% of saturated fatty acids (i.e., palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0)) and monounsaturated acids (i.e., oleic acid (C18:1)). This lipid composition is suitable for biodiesel production.

  2. Fatty acids in berry lipids of six sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L., subspecies carpatica) cultivars grown in Romania

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A systematic mapping of the phytochemical composition of different sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) fruit subspecies is still lacking. No data relating to the fatty acid composition of main lipid fractions from the berries of ssp. carpatica (Romania) have been previously reported. Results The fatty acid composition of the total lipids (oils) and the major lipid fractions (PL, polar lipids; FFA, free fatty acids; TAG, triacylglycerols and SE, sterol esters) of the oils extracted from different parts of six sea buckthorn berry subspecies (ssp. carpatica) cultivated in Romania were investigated using the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The dominating fatty acids in pulp/peel and whole berry oils were palmitic (23-40%), oleic (20-53%) and palmitoleic (11-27%). In contrast to the pulp oils, seed oils had higher amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) (65-72%). The fatty acid compositions of TAGs were very close to the compositions of corresponding seed and pulp oils. The major fatty acids in PLs of berry pulp/peel oils were oleic (20-40%), palmitic (17-27%), palmitoleic (10-22%) and linoleic (10%-20%) acids, whereas in seeds PLs, PUFAs prevailed. Comparing with the other lipid fractions the SEs had the highest contents of saturated fatty acids (SFAs). The fatty acid profiles of the FFA fractions were relatively similar to those of TAGs. Conclusions All parts of the analyzed sea buckthorn berry cultivars (ssp. carpatica) exhibited higher oil content then the other European or Asiatic sea buckthorn subspecies. Moreover, the pulp/peel oils of ssp. carpatica were found to contain high levels of oleic acid and slightly lower amounts of linoleic and α-linolenic acids. The studied cultivars of sea buckthorn from Romania have proven to be potential sources of valuable oils. PMID:22995716

  3. Light-Induced Changes in Fatty Acid Profiles of Specific Lipid Classes in Several Freshwater Phytoplankton Species

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Alexander; Piepho, Maike; Harwood, John L.; Guschina, Irina A.; Arts, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    We tested the influence of two light intensities [40 and 300 μmol PAR / (m2s)] on the fatty acid composition of three distinct lipid classes in four freshwater phytoplankton species. We chose species of different taxonomic classes in order to detect potentially similar reaction characteristics that might also be present in natural phytoplankton communities. From samples of the bacillariophyte Asterionella formosa, the chrysophyte Chromulina sp., the cryptophyte Cryptomonas ovata and the zygnematophyte Cosmarium botrytis we first separated glycolipids (monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, digalactosyldiacylglycerol, and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol), phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylserine) as well as non-polar lipids (triacylglycerols), before analyzing the fatty acid composition of each lipid class. High variation in the fatty acid composition existed among different species. Individual fatty acid compositions differed in their reaction to changing light intensities in the four species. Although no generalizations could be made for species across taxonomic classes, individual species showed clear but small responses in their ecologically-relevant omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in terms of proportions and of per tissue carbon quotas. Knowledge on how lipids like fatty acids change with environmental or culture conditions is of great interest in ecological food web studies, aquaculture, and biotechnology, since algal lipids are the most important sources of omega-3 long-chain PUFA for aquatic and terrestrial consumers, including humans. PMID:27014290

  4. Lipid composition analysis of milk fats from different mammalian species: potential for use as human milk fat substitutes.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Jianhua; Jin, Qingzhe; Guo, Zheng; Liu, Yuanfa; Cheong, Lingzhi; Xu, Xuebing; Wang, Xingguo

    2013-07-24

    The lipid compositions of commercial milks from cow, buffalo, donkey, sheep, and camel were compared with that of human milk fat (HMF) based on total and sn-2 fatty acid, triacylglycerol (TAG), phospholipid, and phospholipid fatty acid compositions and melting and crystallization profiles, and their degrees of similarity were digitized and differentiated by an evaluation model. The results showed that these milk fats had high degrees of similarity to HMF in total fatty acid composition. However, the degrees of similarity in other chemical aspects were low, indicating that these milk fats did not meet the requirements of human milk fat substitutes (HMFSs). However, an economically feasible solution to make these milks useful as raw materials for infant formula production could be to modify these fats, and a possible method is blending of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and 1,3-dioleoyl-2-palmitoylglycerol (OPO) enriched fats and minor lipids based on the corresponding chemical compositions of HMF.

  5. Effect of forage conservation method on plasma lipids, mammary lipogenesis, and milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows fed diets containing a 60:40 forage-to-concentrate ratio.

    PubMed

    Halmemies-Beauchet-Filleau, A; Kairenius, P; Ahvenjärvi, S; Toivonen, V; Huhtanen, P; Vanhatalo, A; Givens, D I; Shingfield, K J

    2013-08-01

    The effects of forage conservation method on plasma lipids, mammary lipogenesis, and milk fat were examined in 2 complementary experiments. Treatments comprised fresh grass, hay, or untreated (UTS) or formic acid treated silage (FAS) prepared from the same grass sward. Preparation of conserved forages coincided with the collection of samples from cows fed fresh grass. In the first experiment, 5 multiparous Finnish Ayrshire cows (229 d in milk) were used to compare a diet based on fresh grass followed by hay during 2 consecutive 14-d periods, separated by a 5-d transition during which extensively wilted grass was fed. In the second experiment, 5 multiparous Finnish Ayrshire cows (53 d in milk) were assigned to 1 of 2 blocks and allocated treatments according to a replicated 3×3 Latin square design, with 14-d periods to compare hay, UTS, and FAS. Cows received 7 or 9 kg/d of the same concentrate in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Arterial concentrations of triacylglycerol (TAG) and phospholipid were higher in cows fed fresh grass, UTS, and FAS compared with hay. Nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations and the relative abundance of 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-3 in TAG of arterial blood were also higher in cows fed fresh grass than conserved forages. On all diets, TAG was the principle source of fatty acids (FA) for milk fat synthesis, whereas mammary extraction of NEFA was negligible, except during zero-grazing, which was associated with a lower, albeit positive calculated energy balance. Mammary FA uptake was higher and the synthesis of 16:0 lower in cows fed fresh grass than hay. Conservation of grass by drying or ensiling had no influence on mammary extraction of TAG and NEFA, despite an increase in milk fat secretion for silages compared with hay and for FAS than UTS. Relative to hay, milk fat from fresh grass contained lower 12:0, 14:0, and 16:0 and higher S3,R7,R11,15-tetramethyl-16:0, cis-9 18:1, trans-11 18:1, cis-9,trans-11 18:2, 18:2n-6, and 18:3n-3

  6. Creation and Relaxation of Phospholipid Compositional Asymmetry in Lipid Bilayers Examined by Sum-Frequency Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglin, Timothy C.; Brown, Krystal; Conboy, John C.

    2010-08-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain an asymmetric distribution of phospholipids in the two leaflets of the lipid bilayer which is known to contribute to cellular function. In the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, the aminophospholipids with phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) headgroups are predominately located on the cytosolic leaflet while sphingolipids with phosphatidylcholine (PC) headgroups and sphingomeylin are on the extra-cellular leaflet. There have been a number of theories about the mechanism of transbilayer movement of lipids in cellular systems and the physical process by which lipid compositional asymmetry in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is maintained. It is generally accepted that a significant barrier to native lipid translocation (movement between leaflets of the bilayer) exists which is related to the energetic penalty of moving the hydrophilic headgroup of a phospholipid through the hydrophobic core of the membrane. Overcoming this energetic barrier represents the rate limiting step in the spontaneous flip-flop of phospholipids in biological membranes, yet, while numerous kinetic studies of phospholipid flip-flop have been conducted, few researchers have reported thermodynamic parameters for the process. Using methods of classical surface chemistry coupled with nonlinear optical methods, we have developed a novel analytical approach, using sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS), to selectively probe lipid compositional asymmetry in a planar supported lipid bilayer. This new method allows for the detection of lipid flip-flop kinetics and compositional asymmetry without the need for a fluorescent or spin-labeled lipid species by exploiting the coherent nature of SFVS. The SFVS intensity arising from the terminal methyl groups of the lipid fatty acid chains is used as an internal probe to directly monitor the compositional asymmetry in planar supported lipid bilayers (PSLBs(. By selectively deuterating a sub

  7. Influence of abscisic acid on growth, biomass and lipid yield of Scenedesmus quadricauda under nitrogen starved condition.

    PubMed

    Sulochana, Sujitha Balakrishnan; Arumugam, Muthu

    2016-08-01

    Scenedesmus quadricauda, accumulated more lipid but with a drastic reduction in biomass yield during nitrogen starvation. Abscisic acid (ABA) being a stress responsible hormone, its effect on growth and biomass with sustainable lipid yield during nitrogen depletion was studied. The result revealed that the ABA level shoots up at 24h (27.21pmol/L) during the onset of nitrogen starvation followed by a sharp decline. The external supplemented ABA showed a positive effect on growth pattern (38×10(6)cells/ml) at a lower concentration. The dry biomass yield is also increasing up to 2.1 fold compared to nitrogen deficient S. quadricauda. The lipid content sustains in 1 and 2μM concentration of ABA under nitrogen-deficient condition. The fatty acid composition of ABA treated S. quadricauda cultures with respect to nitrogen-starved cells showed 11.17% increment in saturated fatty acid content, the desired lipid composition for biofuel application.

  8. Differential lipid and fatty acid profiles of photoautotrophic and heterotrophic Chlorella zofingiensis: assessment of algal oils for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Huang, Junchao; Sun, Zheng; Zhong, Yujuan; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to document and compare the lipid class and fatty acid composition of the green microalga Chlorella zofingiensis cultivated under photoautotrophic and heterotrophic conditions. Compared with photoautotrophic cells, a 900% increase in lipid yield was achieved in heterotrophic cells fed with 30 g L(-1) of glucose. Furthermore heterotrophic cells accumulated predominantly neutral lipids (NL) that accounted for 79.5% of total lipids with 88.7% being triacylglycerol (TAG); whereas photoautotrophic cells contained mainly the membrane lipids glycolipids (GL) and phospholipids (PL). Together with the much higher content of oleic acid (C18:1) (35.2% of total fatty acids), oils from heterotrophic C. zofingiensis appear to be more feasible for biodiesel production. Our study highlights the possibility of using heterotrophic algae for producing high quality biodiesel.

  9. Abscisic acid-lipid interactions: a phospholipid monolayer study.

    PubMed

    Bürner, H; Benz, R; Gimmler, H; Hartung, W; Stillwell, W

    1993-08-15

    Lipid monolayer studies were performed on a Langmuir trough in the absence and in the presence of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA). The ABA-induced effects on the lipid monolayers can be summarized as follows: (i) ABA as the free acid (pH below 5.3) increased the molecular area and slightly decreased the surface pressure in the collapse points of monolayers made of saturated, unsaturated and of mixed lipids; ABA as the anion showed only minor effects. (ii) The ABA-induced area increase of the lipid monolayers decreased when the surface pressure increased, but some ABA remained in the monolayers made of unsaturated phospholipids even at collapse pressure. (iii) The incorporation of ABA into the monolayers could be inhibited by adding the plant sterol beta-sitosterol to the monolayer forming phospholipids. (iv) There was no substantial difference of ABA action on plant phospholipids as compared with other phospholipids. (v) ABA had a much stronger influence on unsaturated phospholipids than on saturated ones. (vi) ABA decreased the phase-transition temperature of saturated phospholipids. These results, which agree with those obtained from phospholipid vesicle studies, indicate that the physical state of the lipid is important for the ability of ABA penetrating into the lipid monolayer. Finally, a possible relevance of these results is discussed in terms of the action of ABA on guard cell membranes of plants.

  10. The fusogenic lipid phosphatidic acid promotes the biogenesis of mitochondrial outer membrane protein Ugo1

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael; Taskin, Asli A.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Guan, Xue Li; Prinz, Claudia; Opalińska, Magdalena; Zorzin, Carina; van der Laan, Martin; Wenk, Markus R.; Schubert, Rolf; Wiedemann, Nils; Holzer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Import and assembly of mitochondrial proteins depend on a complex interplay of proteinaceous translocation machineries. The role of lipids in this process has been studied only marginally and so far no direct role for a specific lipid in mitochondrial protein biogenesis has been shown. Here we analyzed a potential role of phosphatidic acid (PA) in biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vivo remodeling of the mitochondrial lipid composition by lithocholic acid treatment or by ablation of the lipid transport protein Ups1, both leading to an increase of mitochondrial PA levels, specifically stimulated the biogenesis of the outer membrane protein Ugo1, a component of the mitochondrial fusion machinery. We reconstituted the import and assembly pathway of Ugo1 in protein-free liposomes, mimicking the outer membrane phospholipid composition, and found a direct dependency of Ugo1 biogenesis on PA. Thus, PA represents the first lipid that is directly involved in the biogenesis pathway of a mitochondrial membrane protein. PMID:26347140

  11. The effects of temperature and growth rate on the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids in bacterial lipids.

    PubMed

    Gill, C O; Suisted, J R

    1978-01-01

    The effects of temperature and growth rate on the fatty acid composition of the extractable lipids of four mesophilic and three psychotrophic bacteria were examined. Two of the mesophiles (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) increased the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids in their lipids with decreasing temperature over their whole growth temperature range. The other mesophiles (Enterobacter aerogenes and Lactobacillus casei) increased the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids with decreasing temperature only over the lower half of their growth temperature ranges. The psychrotrophs Pseudomonas fluorescens and Enterobacter sp. had a constant proportion of unsaturated acids over the lower half of their growth temperature range, while the psychotrophic Lactobacillus sp. showed no consistent change in its unsaturated fatty acid composition with temperature. All species showed some variation of unsaturated fatty acid composition with growth rate at the highest and lowest growth temperatures, although such variations were small in some species (Ent. aerogenes and Lactobacillus sp.).

  12. Lipid oxidation stability of omega-3- and conjugated linoleic acid-enriched sous vide chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Narciso-Gaytán, C; Shin, D; Sams, A R; Keeton, J T; Miller, R K; Smith, S B; Sánchez-Plata, M X

    2011-02-01

    Lipid oxidation is known to occur rather rapidly in cooked chicken meat containing relatively high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids. To assess the lipid oxidation stability of sous vide chicken meat enriched with n-3 and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fatty acids, 624 Cobb × Ross broilers were raised during a 6-wk feeding period. The birds were fed diets containing CLA (50% cis-9, trans-11 and 50% trans-10, cis-12 isomers), flaxseed oil (FSO), or menhaden fish oil (MFO), each supplemented with 42 or 200 mg/kg of vitamin E (dl-α-tocopheryl acetate). Breast or thigh meat was vacuum-packed, cooked (74°C), cooled in ice water, and stored at 4.4°C for 0, 5, 10, 15, and 30 d. The lipid oxidation development of the meat was estimated by quantification of malonaldehyde (MDA) values, using the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances analysis. Fatty acid, nonheme iron, moisture, and fat analyses were performed as well. Results showed that dietary CLA induced deposition of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA isomers, increased the proportion of saturated fatty acids, and decreased the proportions of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Flaxseed oil induced higher deposition of C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, and C20:4 fatty acids, whereas MFO induced higher deposition of n-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5), and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6; P < 0.05). Meat lipid oxidation stability was affected by the interaction of either dietary oil or vitamin E with storage day. Lower (P < 0.05) MDA values were found in the CLA treatment than in the MFO and FSO treatments. Lower (P < 0.05) MDA values were detected in meat samples from the 200 mg/kg of vitamin E than in meat samples from the 42 mg/kg of vitamin E. Nonheme iron values did not affect (P > 0.05) lipid oxidation development. In conclusion, dietary CLA, FSO, and MFO influenced the fatty acid composition of chicken muscle and the lipid oxidation stability of meat over the storage time. Supranutritional

  13. Effects of dietary fats on plasma lipids and lipoproteins: an hypothesis for the lipid-lowering effect of unsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Spritz, Norton; Mishkel, Maurice A.

    1969-01-01

    Several aspects of the effects of dietary fat on plasma lipids and lipoproteins were investigated in 12 subjects during the long-term feeding of formulas containing 40% of their calories as either saturated or unsaturated fats. The changes in fatty acid composition of plasma lipids, shown previously to occur after prolonged feedings of a dietary fat, required 10-14 days to be complete and were synchronous with the effect of the fat on plasma lipid concentrations. The change in lipid concentration occurred in low but not in high density lipoproteins. The effects on lipid levels of the low density lipoproteins were found to occur with little or no effect on the concentration of the protein moiety of these lipoproteins; as a result, cholesterol- and phospholipid to protein ratios in low density lipoproteins fell during unsaturated fat feeding. The effects of dietary fat on plasma phospholipids were studied in detail: the relative amounts of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, and lysophosphatidylcholine were unaffected by the type of dietary fat. However, the molecular species of phosphatidylcholine were markedly affected. More than 90% of the fatty acids at the α-position were saturated during both saturated and unsaturated feedings. In contrast, during unsaturated feedings, linoleate at the β-position outnumbered oleate by approximately 4:1, whereas during saturated feedings these two types of fatty acids were present in nearly equal amounts. This paper also presents the following hypothesis for the lipid-lowering effect of unsaturated dietary fat: since unsaturated fatty acids occupy a greater area than saturated acids, they alter the spatial configuration of the lipids into which they are incorporated; as a result, fewer lipid molecules can be accommodated by the apoprotein of the low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and thus the lipid content of the lipoprotein is lowered. The experimental findings of this study, while not proving this

  14. Lipid dynamics in yeast under haem-induced unsaturated fatty acid and/or sterol depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Thierry; Régnacq, Matthieu; Alimardani, Parissa; Moreau-Vauzelle, Carole; Bergès, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, UFA (unsaturated fatty acids) and ergosterol syntheses are aerobic processes that require haem. We took advantage of a strain affected in haem synthesis ( hem1 Delta) to starve specifically for one or the other of these essential lipids in order to examine the consequences on the overall lipid composition. Our results demonstrate that reserve lipids (i.e. triacylglycerols and steryl esters) are depleted independently of haem availability and that their UFA and sterol content is not crucial to sustain residual growth under lipid depletion. In parallel to UFA starvation, a net accumulation of SFA (saturated fatty acids) is observed as a consequence of haem biosynthesis preclusion. Interestingly, the excess SFA are not mainly stored within triacylglycerols and steryl esters but rather within specific phospholipid species, with a marked preference for PtdIns. This results in an increase in the cellular PtdIns content. However, neutral lipid homoeostasis is perturbed under haem starvation. The contribution of two lipid particle-associated proteins (namely Tgl1p and Dga1p) to this process is described. PMID:14640980

  15. Effect of fermentation temperature and culture media on the yeast lipid composition and wine volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Gemma; Novo, Maite; Guillamón, José M; Mas, Albert; Rozès, Nicolas

    2008-01-31

    The temperature of a wine fermentation strongly affects lipid metabolism and thus, aromatic profiles. Most of the metabolic studies are done in well-controlled laboratory conditions, yet wine is produced in less-reproducible industrial conditions. The aim of this study is to analyse the effect of fermentation temperature (13 degrees C and 25 degrees C) and culture media (synthetic media and grape must) on yeast lipid composition and volatile compounds in wine. Our results show that yeast viability was better at 13 degrees C than at 25 degrees C whichever growth medium is used, but that the complexity of the grape must enabled cells to reach higher viable population size. Viability was also related to the incorporation of linoleic acid and beta-sitosterol, which were present in the grape must. A lower temperature modified the cellular lipid composition of yeast, increasing the degree of unsaturation at the beginning of fermentation and decreasing the chain length as fermentation progressed. We also found that medium-chain fatty acids, mainly dodecanoic acid, were present in the cell phospholipids. Wines produced from grape must were more aromatic and had a lower volatile acidity content than those derived from a synthetic medium. Fermentations that were performed at the lower temperature also emphasized this feature.

  16. Non-additive compositional curvature energetics of lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Sodt, A.J.; Venable, R.M.; Lyman, E.; Pastor, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    The unique properties of the individual lipids that compose biological membranes together determine the energetics of the surface. The energetics of the surface in turn govern the formation of membrane structures and membrane reshaping processes, and will thus underlie cellular-scale models of viral fusion, vesicle-dependent transport, and lateral organization relevant to signaling. The spontaneous curvature, to the best of our knowledge, is always assumed to be additive. The letter describes observations from simulations of unexpected non-additive compositional curvature energetics of two lipids essential to the plasma membrane: sphingomyelin and cholesterol. A model is developed that connects molecular interactions to curvature stress, and which explains the role of local composition. Cholesterol is shown to lower the number of effective Kuhn segments of saturated acyl chains, reducing lateral pressure below the neutral surface of bending and favoring positive curvature. The effect is not observed for unsaturated (flexible) acyl chains. Likewise, hydrogen bonding between sphingomyelin lipids leads to positive curvature, but only at sufficient concentration, below which the lipid prefers negative curvature. PMID:27715135

  17. Lipids and fatty acids in Calanus sinicus during over-summering in the southern Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanqing; Li, Chaolun; Liu, Mengtan; Jin, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Over-summering is a crucial period for Calanus sinicus in the southern Yellow Sea, where it is a key member of the zooplankton community. Lipids play an important role in copepod diapause, which is part of their over-summering strategy. We investigated how different fatty acids and lipid classes, including wax esters, changed during over-summering of C. sinicus during three cruises in June and August 2011 and November 2010, corresponding to the pre-, during and post- diapause periods, respectively. Large amounts of lipids were accumulated, mainly wax esters as previously found in C. finmarchicus during its diapause, and most of the storage lipids were used during over-summering. Wax ester polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) showed the most variation of the fatty acids (FAs), while the percentage composition of FAs in polar lipids was relatively stable. Selective use of wax ester PUFAs has already been shown to play important roles in the winter diapause of Calanus species in other regions, and our FA results show that this is the case for the YSCBW population that diapauses in summer.

  18. Multiscale structures of lipids in foods as parameters affecting fatty acid bioavailability and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Michalski, M C; Genot, C; Gayet, C; Lopez, C; Fine, F; Joffre, F; Vendeuvre, J L; Bouvier, J; Chardigny, J M; Raynal-Ljutovac, K

    2013-10-01

    On a nutritional standpoint, lipids are now being studied beyond their energy content and fatty acid (FA) profiles. Dietary FA are building blocks of a huge diversity of more complex molecules such as triacylglycerols (TAG) and phospholipids (PL), themselves organised in supramolecular structures presenting different thermal behaviours. They are generally embedded in complex food matrixes. Recent reports have revealed that molecular and supramolecular structures of lipids and their liquid or solid state at the body temperature influence both the digestibility and metabolism of dietary FA. The aim of the present review is to highlight recent knowledge on the impact on FA digestion, absorption and metabolism of: (i) the intramolecular structure of TAG; (ii) the nature of the lipid molecules carrying FA; (iii) the supramolecular organization and physical state of lipids in native and formulated food products and (iv) the food matrix. Further work should be accomplished now to obtain a more reliable body of evidence and integrate these data in future dietary recommendations. Additionally, innovative lipid formulations in which the health beneficial effects of either native or recomposed structures of lipids will be taken into account can be foreseen.

  19. Fatty acid metabolism in L1210 murine leukemia cells: differences in modification of fatty acids incorporated into various lipids.

    PubMed

    Burns, C P; Wei, S P; Spector, A A

    1978-10-01

    L1210 leukemia cells can utilize all of the main fatty acids that normally are present in the ascites fluid in which they grow. This finding is consistent with the view that L1210 cells derive most of their fatty acids from the ascites fluid. From 80--90% of each fatty acid was incorporated into cell lipids without structural modification, suggesting that the lipid composition of these cells can be altered by changing the type of fatty acids to which they are exposed. Most importantly, the palmitate that was subsequently incorporated into total cell phospholipids was elongated and desaturated somewhat more than that incorporated into triglycerides. This difference was due primarily to more extensive modification of the palmitate incorporated into the ethanolamine phosphoglycerides fraction. Although there was no difference between total phospholipids and triglycerides with linoleate, more of the linoleate incorporated into ethanolamine phosphoglycerides was elongated and further desaturated than that incorporated into choline phosphoglycerides and triglycerides. These findings indicate fatty acids incorporated into various cell lipid fractions are not structurally modified to the same extent. There appears to be greater modification of fatty acid used for ethanolamine phosphoglyceride synthesis as compared with triglyceride and choline phosphoglyceride synthesis.

  20. [Change in the lipid composition of the inner mitochondrial membranes in rat organs during adaptation to heat].

    PubMed

    Zubareva, E V; Seferova, R I; Denisova, N A

    1991-01-01

    Under conditions of adaptation to heating lipid composition in mitochondrial membranes of rat inner tissues was altered as follows: an increase in relative concentration of plasmalogenous forms of phospholipids (kidney, heart) and in content of saturated fatty acids (liver tissue), a decrease in the index of fatty acids unsaturation and in the ratio of fatty acids omega-3/omega-6. The alterations observed enabled the membranes to keep sufficient amount of liquidity essential for functional activity of mitochondria in heating.

  1. Lipid content and fatty acid distribution in tissues from Portuguese dogfish, leafscale gulper shark and black dogfish.

    PubMed

    Remme, Jannicke Fugledal; Larssen, Wenche Emblem; Bruheim, Inge; Saebø, Per Christian; Saebø, Asgeir; Stoknes, Iren S

    2006-04-01

    The lipid characterization in tissues from the three deep-sea sharks leafscale gulper shark (Centrophorus squamosus), Portuguese dogfish (Centroscymnus coelolepis) and black dogfish (Centrocyllium fabricii) captured at Hatton Bank in the North Atlantic were examined. The objective was to determine the lipid content and the fatty acid composition in different tissues. In addition, the fatty acid composition in tissues and species was compared. The tissues examined were pancreas, heart, kidney, stomach, spleen and liver. The lipid content was high in liver (40-50%) and ranged from 1% to 5% in the other tissues. The dominant fatty acids were C16:0, C18:1 (n-9), C18:1 (n-7) and C22:6 (n-3) in all tissues. All tissues had a high content of unsaturated fatty acids.

  2. Chemical composition and effect on intestinal Caco-2 cell viability and lipid profile of fixed oil from Cynomorium coccineum L.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Antonella; Rescigno, Antonio; Piras, Alessandra; Atzeri, Angela; Scano, Paola; Porcedda, Silvia; Zucca, Paolo; Assunta Dessì, M

    2012-10-01

    Cynomorium coccineum L. is a non-photosynthetic plant, spread over Mediterranean countries, amply used in traditional medicine. We investigated the composition and effect on intestinal Caco-2 cell viability and lipid profile of fixed oil obtained from dried stems of the plant. Oil isolation has been performed by supercritical fractioned extraction with CO2. 13C NMR spectroscopy has been used to study the molecular composition of oil lipids; fatty acid composition was identified using GC and HPLC techniques. The fixed oil was composed mainly by triacylglycerols and derivates. The main fatty acids were 18:1 n-9 (38%), 18:2 n-6 (20%), 16:0 (15%), and 18:3 n-3 (10.8%). The oil showed a significant in vitro inhibitory effect on the growth of colon cancer undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Moreover, cell viability, lipid composition, and lipid peroxidation were measured in intestinal epithelial cells (differentiated Caco-2 cells) after 24 h incubation with fixed oil. The oil did not show a toxic effect on colon epithelial cell viability but induced a significant change in fatty acid composition, with a significant accumulation of the essential fatty acids 18:3 n-3 and 18:2 n-6. The results showed remarkable biological activity of Maltese mushroom oil, and qualify it as a potential resource for food/pharmaceutical applications.

  3. Influence of chemical reactivities of lipids bound in different pools on their isotopic compositions during degradation in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, M.; Pan, H.; Culp, R.

    2013-05-01

    Lipid biomarkers and associated compound specific stable carbon isotope compositions have been widely applied to study biogeochemical cycling of organic matter in natural environments. This experimental study was specifically designed to examine the influence of chemical reactivities of lipid compounds bound in different pools on their isotopic composition during microbial degradation in marine sediments. 13C-labeled (labeling at different carbon positions of fatty acid chains) and unlabeled tripalmitins were spiked and incubated in natural oxic (top 1 cm) and anoxic (> 10 cm) marine sediments. In anoxic sediments, neither naturally-occurred fatty acids nor tripalmitin-derived 16:0 fatty acid were apparently degraded within two months and hence no significant variation in stable carbon isotopic composition of 16:0 fatty acid was observed. However, in oxic sediments, both naturally-occurred fatty acids and spiked tripalmitin-derived 16:0 fatty acid were degraded by 26% - 95% during incubation. For natural fatty acids such as 14:0, 16:1, 18:1, 20:5/20:4, and >C20:0, degradation rates varied according to the following order: polyunsaturated > monounsaturated > short chain saturated > long chain saturated fatty acids, which reflects variable reactivities of natural lipid compounds from different sources. Tripalmitin-derived 16:0 fatty acid degraded at an at least 2-3× faster rate compared to naturally-occurred 16:0 in sediments. Meanwhile, isotopic compositions of 16:0 fatty acid in the oxic sediments shifted negatively during incubation. It appears that the isotopic shifts are dependent on the amount of 13C-labeled compound spiked into the sediments but not related to the labeling position of 13C in the molecular structure. The results from this study provide direct evidence that the relative reactivities of lipid compounds from different sources (or different pools) can cause alterations in molecular isotopic composition during microbial degradation in natural

  4. Mitochondrial modulators improve lipid composition and attenuate memory deficits in experimental model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Arpit; Sood, Abhilasha; Sandhir, Rajat

    2015-12-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) is an irreversible inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase and induces neuropathological changes similar to those observed in Huntington's disease (HD). The objective of the present study was to investigate neuroprotective effect of mitochondrial modulators; alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) and acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) on 3-NP-induced alterations in mitochondrial lipid composition, mitochondrial structure and memory functions. Experimental model of HD was developed by administering 3-NP at sub-chronic doses, twice daily for 17 days. The levels of conjugated dienes, cholesterol and glycolipids were significantly increased, whereas the levels of phospholipids (phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine) including cardiolipin were significantly decreased in the mitochondria isolated from the striatum of 3-NP-treated animals. In addition, the difference in molecular composition of each phospholipid class was also evaluated using mass spectrometry. Mitochondria lipid from 3-NP-treated animals showed increased cholesterol to phospholipid ratio, suggesting decreased mitochondrial membrane fluidity. 3-NP administration also resulted in ultra-structural changes in mitochondria, accompanied by swelling as assessed by transmission electron microscopy. The 3-NP administered animals had impaired spatial memory evaluated using elevated plus maze test. However, combined supplementation with ALA + ALCAR for 21 days normalized mitochondrial lipid composition, improved mitochondrial structure and ameliorated memory impairments in 3-NP-treated animals, suggesting an imperative role of these two modulators in combination in the management of HD.

  5. Well acidizing compositions and method

    SciTech Connect

    Gardener, T.R.; Dill, W.R.; Ford, W.G.F.; King, K.L.

    1991-07-23

    This patent describes a concentrate which forms an acid internal microemulsion well treatment composition when added to an acid treatment fluid. It comprises in the range of from about 20% to about 98% by weight of a hydrocarbon carrier fluid; in the range of from about 1% to about 50% by weight of an alkyl alcohol having in the range of from about 4 to 18 carbon atoms; and in the range of from about 1% to about 50% by weight of an emulsifying agent comprising at least one compound selected from the group consisting of amine salts having ester or amide linkages and propoxylated alcohols, each of the components being different compounds or different mixtures of compounds.

  6. Composition and occurrence of lipid droplets in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme

    PubMed Central

    Peramuna, Anantha; Summers, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Inclusions of neutral lipids termed lipid droplets (LDs) located throughout the cell were identified in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme by staining with lipophyllic fluorescent dyes. LDs increased in number upon entry into stationary phase and addition of exogenous fructose indicating a role for carbon storage, whereas high-light stress did not increase LD numbers. LD accumulation increased when nitrate was used as the nitrogen source during exponential growth as compared to added ammonia or nitrogen–fixing conditions. Analysis of isolated LDs revealed enrichment of triacylglycerol (TAG), - tochopherol, and C17 alkanes. LD TAG from exponential phase growth contained mainly saturated C16 and C18 fatty acids whereas stationary phase LD TAG had additional unsaturated fatty acids characteristic of whole cells. This is the first characterization of cyanobacterial LD composition and conditions leading to their production. Based upon their abnormally large size and atypical location these structures represent a novel sub-organelle in cyanobacteria. PMID:25135835

  7. High saturated fat diet alters the lipid composition of triacylglycerol and polar lipids in the femur of dam and offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Paula M; Castelli, Laura M; Amoye, Foyinsola; Ward, Wendy E; LeBlanc, Paul J

    2015-06-01

    Previous work has shown that dietary lipids alter femur lipid composition. Specifically, we have shown that exposure to high saturated fatty acid (SFA) diets in utero, during suckling, or post-weaning alters femur total lipid composition, resulting in higher percent bone mass in males and females and bone mineral density (BMD) in female offspring with no effect on bone mineral outcomes in dams. Comparatively, high n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) diets increase femur polar (PL) lipid n-3 content, which has been associated with increased bone mineral content and strength. However, the extent that PL or triacylglycerol (TAG) lipids change with high SFA diets is unknown. The current investigation examined the influence of a high SFA diet (20 % lard by weight) on femur PL and TAG lipid composition in 5-month old female Wistar rats (fed high SFA diet from age 28 days onwards; dams) and their 19-day old offspring (exposed to high SFA in utero and during suckling; pups). High SFA exposure resulted in increased monounsaturates and decreased n-3 and n-6 PUFA in the TAG fraction in both dams and pups, and higher SFA and n-6:n-3 ratio in dams only. The PL fraction showed decreased n-6 PUFA in both dams and pups. The magnitude of the diet-mediated responses, specifically TAG 18:1 and PL n-6 PUFA, may have contributed to the previously reported altered BMD, which was supported with correlation analysis. Future research should investigate the relationship of diet-induced changes in bone lipids on bone structure, as quantified through micro-computed tomography.

  8. Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert and mesic nestling house sparrows

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Williams, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    Intercellular lipids of the stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis, form a barrier to water vapor diffusion through the skin. Previously, we measured cutaneous water loss (CWL) and lipid composition of the SC of adult house sparrows from two populations, one living in the deserts of Saudi Arabia and another living in mesic Ohio. Adult desert house sparrows had a lower CWL, a lower proportion of free fatty acids, and a higher proportion of ceramides and cerebrosides in the SC compared with mesic sparrows. In this study, we investigated developmental plasticity of CWL and lipid composition of the SC in desert and mesic nestling house sparrows reared in low and high humidity and compared our results with previous work on adults. We measured CWL of nestlings and analyzed the lipid composition of the SC using thin-layer chromatography. We showed that nestling house sparrows from both localities had higher CWL than adults in their natural environment, a result of major modifications of the lipid composition of the SC. The expression of plasticity in CWL seems to be a response to opposed selection pressures, thermoregulation and water conservation, at different life stages, on which regulation of CWL plays a crucial role. Desert nestlings showed a greater degree of plasticity in CWL and lipid composition of the SC than did mesic nestlings, a finding consistent with the idea that organisms exposed to more environmental stress ought to be more plastic than individuals living in more benign environments. PMID:18838693

  9. The Lipid domain Phase diagram in a Dipalmitoyl-PC/Docosahaexnoic Acid-PE/Cholesterol System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lor, Chai; Hirst, Linda

    2011-03-01

    Lipid domains in bilayer membrane and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are thought to play an important role in cellular activities. In particular, lipids containing docosahaexnoic acid are an interesting class of PUFAs due to their health benefits. In this project, we perform oxidation measurements of DHA-PE to determine the rate of oxidation in combination with antioxidants. A ternary diagram of DPPC/DHA-PE/cholesterol is mapped out to identify phase separation phenomena using atomic force microscope (AFM). Fluorescence microscopy is also used to image lipid domains in a flat bilayer with fluorescent labels. As expected, we observe the phase, shape, and size of lipid domains changes with varying composition. Moreover, we find that the roughness of the domains changes possibly due to overpacking of cholesterol in domains. This model study provides further understanding of the role of cholesterol in the bilayer membrane leading towards a better understanding of cell membranes. NSF award # DMR 0852791, ``CAREER: Self-Assembly of Polyunsaturated Lipids and Cholesterol In The Cell Membrane.''

  10. Fruit cuticle lipid composition during development in tomato ripening mutants.

    PubMed

    Kosma, Dylan K; Parsons, Eugene P; Isaacson, Tal; Lü, Shiyou; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Jenks, Matthew A

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that fruit cuticle is an important contributing factor to tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit shelf life and storability. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that variation in fruit cuticle composition may underlie differences in traits such as fruit resistance to desiccation and microbial infection. To gain a better understanding of cuticle lipid composition diversity during fruit ontogeny and to assess if there are common features that correlate with ripening, we examined developmental changes in fruit cuticle wax and cutin monomer composition of delayed-ripening tomato fruit mutants, ripening inhibitor (rin) and non-ripening (nor) and delayed-ripening landrace Alcobaça. Previous reports show that fruit ripening processes such as climacteric ethylene production, cell wall degradation and color change are significantly delayed, or do not occur, in these lines. In the study presented here, however, we show that fruits from rin, nor and Alcobaça have cuticle lipid compositions that differ significantly from normal fruits of Ailsa Craig (AC) even at very early stages in fruit development, with continuing impacts throughout ripening. Moreover, rin, nor and the Alcobaça lines show quite different wax profiles from AC and each other throughout fruit development. Although cutin monomer composition differed much less than wax composition among the genotypes, all delayed-ripening lines possessed higher relative amounts of C(18) monomers than AC. Together, these results reveal new genetic associations between cuticle and fruit development processes and define valuable genetic resources to further explore the importance of cuticle in fruit shelf life.

  11. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-09-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces.

  12. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces. PMID:23867843

  13. Omega-3 fatty acids, lipid rafts, and T cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tim Y; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-08-15

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been shown in many clinical studies to attenuate inflammatory responses. Although inflammatory responses are orchestrated by a wide spectrum of cells, CD4(+) T cells play an important role in the etiology of many chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. In light of recent concerns over the safety profiles of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), alternatives such as bioactive nutraceuticals are becoming more attractive. In order for these agents to be accepted into mainstream medicine, however, the mechanisms by which nutraceuticals such as n-3 PUFA exert their anti-inflammatory effects must be fully elucidated. Lipid rafts are nanoscale, dynamic domains in the plasma membrane that are formed through favorable lipid-lipid (cholesterol, sphingolipids, and saturated fatty acids) and lipid-protein (membrane-actin cytoskeleton) interactions. These domains optimize the clustering of signaling proteins at the membrane to facilitate efficient cell signaling which is required for CD4(+) T cell activation and differentiation. This review summarizes novel emerging data documenting the ability of n-3 PUFA to perturb membrane-cytoskeletal structure and function in CD4(+) T cells. An understanding of these underlying mechanisms will provide a rationale for the use of n-3 PUFA in the treatment of chronic inflammation.

  14. Composition of the silk lipids of the spider Nephila clavipes.

    PubMed

    Schulz, S

    2001-06-01

    A detailed analysis of the lipids of spider silk is given for the first time. Extracts of the silk from the golden orb weaver, Nephila clavipes, were studied by gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and chemical derivatizations. The major group of the lipids consisted of methyl-branched 1-methoxyalkanes (methyl ethers) with up to four methyl groups in the chain (chain length between C28 and C34), which are unique to spiders. The position of the methyl branches was determined by conversion into cyanides, which allowed easy location of methyl branches. The second-largest group included alkanes with a wide structural variety; 2-methyl-branched, even-numbered hydrocarbons predominated. A general numerical method for the estimation of retention indices of alkanes and their derivatives is presented. Further components of the web included alkanols and alkanediols, fatty acids, and glyceryl ethers. Some comments on the biosynthesis of these compounds are also given.

  15. Specific Membrane Lipid Composition Is Important for Plasmodesmata Function in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Grison, Magali S.; Brocard, Lysiane; Fouillen, Laetitia; Nicolas, William; Wewer, Vera; Dörmann, Peter; Nacir, Houda; Benitez-Alfonso, Yoselin; Claverol, Stéphane; Germain, Véronique; Boutté, Yohann; Mongrand, Sébastien; Bayer, Emmanuelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are nano-sized membrane-lined channels controlling intercellular communication in plants. Although progress has been made in identifying PD proteins, the role played by major membrane constituents, such as the lipids, in defining specialized membrane domains in PD remains unknown. Through a rigorous isolation of “native” PD membrane fractions and comparative mass spectrometry-based analysis, we demonstrate that lipids are laterally segregated along the plasma membrane (PM) at the PD cell-to-cell junction in Arabidopsis thaliana. Remarkably, our results show that PD membranes display enrichment in sterols and sphingolipids with very long chain saturated fatty acids when compared with the bulk of the PM. Intriguingly, this lipid profile is reminiscent of detergent-insoluble membrane microdomains, although our approach is valuably detergent-free. Modulation of the overall sterol composition of young dividing cells reversibly impaired the PD localization of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins Plasmodesmata Callose Binding 1 and the β-1,3-glucanase PdBG2 and altered callose-mediated PD permeability. Altogether, this study not only provides a comprehensive analysis of the lipid constituents of PD but also identifies a role for sterols in modulating cell-to-cell connectivity, possibly by establishing and maintaining the positional specificity of callose-modifying glycosylphosphatidylinositol proteins at PD. Our work emphasizes the importance of lipids in defining PD membranes. PMID:25818623

  16. Specific membrane lipid composition is important for plasmodesmata function in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Grison, Magali S; Brocard, Lysiane; Fouillen, Laetitia; Nicolas, William; Wewer, Vera; Dörmann, Peter; Nacir, Houda; Benitez-Alfonso, Yoselin; Claverol, Stéphane; Germain, Véronique; Boutté, Yohann; Mongrand, Sébastien; Bayer, Emmanuelle M

    2015-04-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are nano-sized membrane-lined channels controlling intercellular communication in plants. Although progress has been made in identifying PD proteins, the role played by major membrane constituents, such as the lipids, in defining specialized membrane domains in PD remains unknown. Through a rigorous isolation of "native" PD membrane fractions and comparative mass spectrometry-based analysis, we demonstrate that lipids are laterally segregated along the plasma membrane (PM) at the PD cell-to-cell junction in Arabidopsis thaliana. Remarkably, our results show that PD membranes display enrichment in sterols and sphingolipids with very long chain saturated fatty acids when compared with the bulk of the PM. Intriguingly, this lipid profile is reminiscent of detergent-insoluble membrane microdomains, although our approach is valuably detergent-free. Modulation of the overall sterol composition of young dividing cells reversibly impaired the PD localization of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins Plasmodesmata Callose Binding 1 and the β-1,3-glucanase PdBG2 and altered callose-mediated PD permeability. Altogether, this study not only provides a comprehensive analysis of the lipid constituents of PD but also identifies a role for sterols in modulating cell-to-cell connectivity, possibly by establishing and maintaining the positional specificity of callose-modifying glycosylphosphatidylinositol proteins at PD. Our work emphasizes the importance of lipids in defining PD membranes.

  17. The effect of lipid composition on the permeability of fluorescent markers from photosensitized membranes.

    PubMed

    Ytzhak, Shany; Weitman, Hana; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence indicating that the cellular locus of PDT action by amphiphilic sensitizers are the cellular membranes. The photosensitization process causes oxidative damage to membrane components that can result in the cell's death. However, it was not yet established whether lipid oxidation can cause free passage of molecules through the membrane and, as a result, be the primary cause of the cell's death. In this work, we studied the effect of liposomes' lipid composition on the kinetics of the leakage of three fluorescent dyes, calcein, carboxyfluorescein and DTAF, which were trapped in the intraliposomal aqueous phase, after photosensitization with the photosensitizer deuteroporphyrin. We found that as the degree of fatty acid unsaturation increased, the photosensitized passage of these molecules through the lipid bilayer increased. We also found that the rate of leakage of these molecules was affected by their size and bulkiness as well as by their net electric charge. In liposomes that are composed of a lipid mixture similar to that of natural membranes, the observed passage of molecules through the membrane is slow. Thus, the photodynamic damage to lipids does not appear to be severe enough to be an immediate, primary cause of cell death in biological photosensitization.

  18. Clinorotation Effect on Coupling Level and Lipid Composition of Barley Thylakoid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhaylenko, N.; Podorvano, V.; Zolotareva, O.

    Microgravity can induce structural perturbation of plant photosynthetic apparatus. It was shown that space flight conditions caused both pigment content and chloroplast ultrastructure changes in a number of various plant species. The transformations of photosynthetic membrane lipid composition were observed in wheat plants under microgravity as well as in chloroplasts of pea under clinorotation. The photosynthetic apparatus is located in thylakoid membranes of chloroplast and provides plant cell by macroerg compounds (ATP and NADPH) necessary for inorganic carbon fixation and metabolism. ATP is formed in the process of photophosphorylation, the rate of which is determined by a coupling level of thylakoid membranes. The aim of the work was to study the coupling level and lipid composition of thylakoid membranes isolated from barley plants grown under clinorotation. Plants of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) were grown for 7 days at 22-24°C, at low illumination (143 μ mol m-2 s-1) with a light period of 16 h, on a horizontal clinostat (2 rpm) and in vertical control. Photochemical activity of isolated chloroplasts (class II) was estimated by the following reactions: cyclic and non-cyclic photophosphorylation, coupled and uncoupled electron transfer from water to K3Fe(CN)6. Total lipids were extracted from isolated chloroplasts and individual lipid classes were separated by thin-layer chromatography. Phospholipids were determined in the form of inorganic phosphate after mineralization with perchloric acid. Glycolipids were assayed by monosaccharide content after acidic hydrolysis. Gas chromatography was applied to analyse the fatty acid composition of membrane glycerolipids. The rates of both cyclic and non-cyclic photophosphorylation in chloroplasts isolated from clinorotated plants were lower than those in control samples. At the same time the rate of electron transfer in thylakoid membranes from clinorotated plants was higher. In the presence of protonophoric channel

  19. Effects of different biomass drying and lipid extraction methods on algal lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and biodiesel quality.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Javid; Liu, Yan; Lopes, Wilson A; Druzian, Janice I; Souza, Carolina O; Carvalho, Gilson C; Nascimento, Iracema A; Liao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Three lipid extraction methods of hexane Soxhlet (Sox-Hex), Halim (HIP), and Bligh and Dyer (BD) were applied on freeze-dried (FD) and oven-dried (OD) Chlorella vulgaris biomass to evaluate their effects on lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and algal biodiesel quality. Among these three methods, HIP was the preferred one for C. vulgaris lipid recovery considering both extraction efficiency and solvent toxicity. It had the highest lipid yields of 20.0 and 22.0% on FD and OD biomass, respectively, with corresponding neutral lipid yields of 14.8 and 12.7%. The lipid profiling analysis showed that palmitic, oleic, linoleic, and α-linolenic acids were the major fatty acids in the algal lipids, and there were no significant differences on the amount of these acids between different drying and extraction methods. Correlative models applied to the fatty acid profiles concluded that high contents of palmitic and oleic acids in algal lipids contributed to balancing the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and led to a high-quality algal biodiesel.

  20. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms. PMID:26731720

  1. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N) of Lipids in Marine Animals.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; Middelburg, Jack J; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2016-01-01

    Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete), as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰). Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE) was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰). The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰) than the TLE (-7 ‰), possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms.

  2. Variable recoveries of fatty acids following the separation of lipids on commercial silica gel TLC plates Selective loss of unsaturated fatty acids on certain brands of plates.

    PubMed

    Sowa, Jennifer M; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2004-12-25

    Since we recently noticed poor recoveries of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) when the parent lipids were first separated on TLC plates, we investigated the source of this error by examining several variables, including the brand of TLC plate, nature of the lipid, and conditions of methylation. Of the five commercial brands of plates used, two (Baker and Whatman) showed loss of UFA, and three (Alltech Hardlayer, Alltech Softlayer, and Merck) did not. This loss occurred in both neutral and phospholipids, did not affect saturated acids, and was independent of the methylation reagent used. No loss occurred, however, if the lipids were eluted from the silica gel before methylation, indicating that the loss is due to oxidation of UFA in presence of certain brands of silica gel. These results show that some brands of TLC plates may be unsuitable for lipid analysis, if the aim is to determine the fatty acid composition by GC using direct methylation.

  3. The relationship between size and lipid composition of the bovine milk fat globule is modulated by lactation stage.

    PubMed

    Mesilati-Stahy, Ronit; Argov-Argaman, Nurit

    2014-02-15

    The effect of lactation stage and size on the lipid composition of bovine milk fat globules (MFG) and their membranes (MFGM) was investigated. MFG were separated into six size groups (1-3 μm) from samples collected in early, mid and late lactation stages (10-250 days postpartum). Fatty acid and polar lipid composition was determined in each size group, at each lactation stage. PUFA concentration was affected by lactation stage but not MFG size. Saturated fatty acid concentration at 60 days postpartum was 10% higher in small vs. large globules. Phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol followed the same concentration pattern throughout lactation in all MFG size groups. From day 100 postpartum on, phosphatidylethanolamine concentration was constant in the large MFG, but dropped twofold in the small MFG. Results suggest distinct compositional regulation for large and small MFG at different lactation stages. Such interactions between structure, composition and lactation stage may be exploited for human milk and dairy product consumption.

  4. [Lipid composition of marine shellfish berbigão Anomalocardia brasiliana (Gmelin, 1791) raw and cooked].

    PubMed

    Aveiro, Mariana Vincenzi; Barrera-Arellano, Daniel; Tramonte, Vera Lúcia Cardoso Garcia

    2009-09-01

    The berbigão Anomalocardia brasiliana is a marine shellfish which is commoning consumed in the coastal region of Santa Catarina. However, there are limited available data on the composition of their fatty acids and sterols. The objetive of this study was to determine the lipid composition of the berbigão from Reserva Extrativista Marinha de Pirajubaé (REMAPI), Florianópolis/SC, Brasil, during the autumn and spring. The total lipid content was 1.21g% and 0.72g% in the autumn and spring, respectively. Several fatty acids were identified and quantified, including 20 fatty acids, 6 saturated (14:0, 15:0, 16:0, 17:0, 18:0, 20:0), 4 monounsaturated (16:1, 17:1, 18:1, 20:1) and 10 polyunsaturated (18:2, 18:3, 18:4, 20:2, 20:3, 20:4, 20:5, 22:4, 22:5, 22:6). There was a higher proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids in total than saturated and monounsaturated, regardless of season: 40.7% of polyunsaturated, 30.8% of saturated, 17.2% of monounsaturated in the autumn and 39.7% of polyunsaturated, 27.7% of saturated, 13.7% of monounsaturated in the spring. The cholesterol corresponded to a value of 94.38 mg% in the autumn and 76.75 mg% in the spring. Among the sterols were found campesterol, estigmasterol and beta-sitosterol, but in lower quantities than cholesterol. These results showed that the berbigão was not a significant source of lipids, revealing low levels of saturated fatty acids and cholesterol. Berbigão is recommended for daily consumption as part of a healthy diet due to it is safe levels of fats and cholesterol.

  5. Fatty acid composition of two Tunisian pine seed oils.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Nizar; Khaldi, Abdelhamid; Hammami, Mohamed; Triki, Saida

    2005-01-01

    Oils were extracted from fully ripen Pinus pinea L. and Pinus halepensis Mill seeds and fatty acid composition has been established by capillary gas chromatography. Seeds are rich in lipids, 34.63-48.12% on a dry weight basis. Qualitatively, fatty acid composition of both species is identical. For P. halepensis linoleic acid is the major fatty acid (56.06% of total fatty acids) followed by oleic (24.03%) and palmitic (5.23%) acids. For P. pinea, the same fatty acids are found with the proportions 47.28%, 36.56%, and 6.67%, respectively. Extracted fatty acids from both species are mainly unsaturated, respectively, 89.87% and 88.01%. Pinus halepensis cis-5 olefinic acids are more abundant (7.84% compared to 2.24%). Results will be important as a good indication of the potential nutraceutical value of Pinus seeds as new sources of fruit oils rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and cis-5 olefinic acids.

  6. Changes in fatty acid composition in sardines (Sardinops melanosticta) with cooking and refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Imose, K

    1989-02-01

    The influence of cooking and later storage in a refrigerator for 7 days on the fatty acid composition of lipids in sardines (Sardinops melanosticta) was studied. The total lipid and triacylglycerol (TG) levels did not change and the phospholipid (PL) level decreased somewhat with cooking or during storage. The fatty acid composition of the total lipids and TG fractions was little changed and that in the PL fractions was somewhat changed by the cooking. The composition of the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in lipids of sardine precooked at 100 or 170 degrees C for 30 min changed from 42.7 to 38.3 or 33.5%, respectively, for total lipids and from 51.5 to 38.4 or 37.6%, respectively, for PL fractions during storage. The fatty acids in lipids from the ordinary meat of sardine was stable and those in the dark meat were extremely unstable during storage after cooking. We concluded that the PUFA in the lipids of sardines were stable to cooking, but unstable to oxidation during storage in a refrigerator. The PUFA of lipids in the dark meat of sardine were extremely unstable to oxidation.

  7. Ellagic acid improves hepatic steatosis and serum lipid composition through reduction of serum resistin levels and transcriptional activation of hepatic ppara in obese, diabetic KK-A(y) mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Nishii, Saori; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Kawamura, Yukio

    2013-05-10

    Ellagic acid (EA) is a polyphenol found in a wide variety of plant foods that not only exhibits free radical-scavenging activity, but also confers protective effects against liver injury. Previously, we reported that pomegranate fruit extract (PFE) had an inhibitory effect on resistin secretion from differentiated murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes and identified EA contained in PFE as a potent suppressor of resistin secretion. Resistin, an adipocytokine, is considered the link between obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this study, we explored whether EA supplementation reduces serum resistin and improves hepatic steatosis and serum lipid profile by using KK-A(y) mice fed high-fat diet as a model for obese type 2 diabetes. We found that EA supplementation improved serum lipid profile and hepatic steatosis, and reduced serum resistin levels without altering mRNA expression levels in adipose tissue. Moreover, EA supplementation upregulated mRNA expression of apoa1, ldlr, cpt1a, and ppara genes in the liver. In conclusion, our findings indicate that EA is a potent suppressor of resistin secretion in vivo and a transcriptional activator of ppara in the liver, suggesting a possibility for improving obesity-induced dyslipidemia and hepatic steatosis in KK-A(y) mice.

  8. Manipulation of culture conditions alters lipid content and fatty acid profiles of a wide variety of known and new oleaginous yeast species.

    PubMed

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Sestric, Ryan; Ignatia, Laura; Levin, David; German, J Bruce; Gillies, Laura A; Almada, Luis A G; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2013-09-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been studied for oleochemical production for over 80 years. Only a few species have been studied intensely. To expand the diversity of oleaginous yeasts available for lipid research, we surveyed a broad diversity of yeasts with indicators of oleaginicity including known oleaginous clades, and buoyancy. Sixty-nine strains representing 17 genera and 50 species were screened for lipid production. Yeasts belonged to Ascomycota families, Basidiomycota orders, and the yeast-like algal genus Prototheca. Total intracellular lipids and fatty acid composition were determined under different incubation times and nitrogen availability. Thirteen new oleaginous yeast species were discovered, representing multiple ascomycete and basidiomycete clades. Nitrogen starvation generally increased intracellular lipid content. The fatty acid profiles varied with the growth conditions regardless of taxonomic affiliation. The dominant fatty acids were oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid. Yeasts and culture conditions that produced fatty acids appropriate for biodiesel were identified.

  9. Manipulation of culture conditions alters lipid content and fatty acid profiles of a wide variety of known and new oleaginous yeasts species

    PubMed Central

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Sestric, Ryan; Ignatia, Laura; Levin, David; German, J. Bruce; Gillies, Laura A.; Almada, Luis A.G.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2013-01-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been studied for oleochemical production for over 80 years. Only a few species have been studied intensely. To expand the diversity of oleaginous yeasts available for lipid research, we surveyed a broad diversity of yeasts with indicators of oleaginicity including known oleaginous clades, and buoyancy. Sixty-nine strains representing 17 genera and 50 species were screened for lipid production. Yeasts belonged to Ascomycota families, Basidiomycota orders, and the yeast-like algal genus Prototheca. Total intracellular lipids and fatty acid composition were determined under different incubation times and nitrogen availability. Thirteen new oleaginous yeast species were discovered, representing multiple ascomycete and basidiomycete clades. Nitrogen starvation generally increased intracellular lipid content. The fatty acid profiles varied with the growth conditions regardless of taxonomic affiliation. The dominant fatty acids were oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid. Yeasts and culture conditions that produced fatty acids appropriate for biodiesel were identified. PMID:23891835

  10. Altered lipid composition and enhanced lipid production in green microalga by introduction of brassica diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Irshad; Sharma, Anil K.; Daniell, Henry; Kumar, Shashi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Higher lipid biosynthesis and accumulation are important to achieve economic viability of biofuel production via microalgae. To enhance lipid content, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was genetically engineered with a key enzyme diacylglycerol acyltransferase (BnDGAT2) from Brassica napus, responsible for neutral lipid biosynthesis. The transformed colonies harbouring aph7 gene, screened on hygromycin-supplemented medium, achieved transformation frequency of ~120 ± 10 colonies/1 × 106 cells. Transgene integration and expression were confirmed by PCR, Southern blots, staining lipid droplets, proteins and spectro-fluorometric analysis of Nile red-stained cells. The neutral lipid is a major class (over 80% of total lipids) and most significant requirement for biodiesel production; this was remarkably higher in the transformed alga than the untransformed control. The levels of saturated fatty acids in the transformed alga decreased to about 7% while unsaturated fatty acids increased proportionately when compared to wild type cells. Polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially α-linolenic acid, an essential omega-3 fatty acid, were enhanced up to 12% in the transformed line. Nile red staining confirmed formation of a large number of lipid globules in the transformed alga. Evaluation of long-term stability and vitality of the transgenic alga revealed that cryopreservation produced significantly higher quantity of lipid than those maintained continuously over 128 generations on solid medium. The overexpression of BnDGAT2 significantly altered the fatty acids profile in the transformed alga. Results of this study offer a valuable strategy of genetic manipulation for enhancing polyunsaturated fatty acids and neutral lipids for biofuel production in algae. PMID:25403771

  11. Altered lipid composition and enhanced lipid production in green microalga by introduction of brassica diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Irshad; Sharma, Anil K; Daniell, Henry; Kumar, Shashi

    2015-05-01

    Higher lipid biosynthesis and accumulation are important to achieve economic viability of biofuel production via microalgae. To enhance lipid content, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was genetically engineered with a key enzyme diacylglycerol acyltransferase (BnDGAT2) from Brassica napus, responsible for neutral lipid biosynthesis. The transformed colonies harbouring aph7 gene, screened on hygromycin-supplemented medium, achieved transformation frequency of ~120 ± 10 colonies/1 × 10(6) cells. Transgene integration and expression were confirmed by PCR, Southern blots, staining lipid droplets, proteins and spectro-fluorometric analysis of Nile red-stained cells. The neutral lipid is a major class (over 80% of total lipids) and most significant requirement for biodiesel production; this was remarkably higher in the transformed alga than the untransformed control. The levels of saturated fatty acids in the transformed alga decreased to about 7% while unsaturated fatty acids increased proportionately when compared to wild type cells. Polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially α-linolenic acid, an essential omega-3 fatty acid, were enhanced up to 12% in the transformed line. Nile red staining confirmed formation of a large number of lipid globules in the transformed alga. Evaluation of long-term stability and vitality of the transgenic alga revealed that cryopreservation produced significantly higher quantity of lipid than those maintained continuously over 128 generations on solid medium. The overexpression of BnDGAT2 significantly altered the fatty acids profile in the transformed alga. Results of this study offer a valuable strategy of genetic manipulation for enhancing polyunsaturated fatty acids and neutral lipids for biofuel production in algae.

  12. Evidence that oleic acid exists in a separate phase within stratum corneum lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Ongpipattanakul, B.; Burnette, R.R.; Potts, R.O.; Francoeur, M.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Oleic acid is known to be a penetration enhancer for polar to moderately polar molecules. A mechanism related to lipid phase separation has been previously proposed by this laboratory to explain the increases in skin transport. In the studies presented here, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was utilized to investigate whether or not oleic acid exists in a separate phase within stratum corneum (SC) lipids. Per-deuterated oleic acid was employed allowing the conformational phase behavior of the exogenously added fatty acid and the endogenous SC lipids to be monitored independently of each other. The results indicated that oleic acid exerts a significant effect on the SC lipids, lowering the lipid transition temperature (Tm) in addition to increasing the conformational freedom or flexibility of the endogenous lipid alkyl chains above their Tm. At temperatures lower than Tm, however, oleic acid did not significantly change the chain disorder of the SC lipids. Similar results were obtained with lipids isolated from the SC by chloroform:methanol extraction. Oleic acid, itself, was almost fully disordered at temperatures both above and below the endogenous lipid Tm in the intact SC and extracted lipid samples. This finding suggested that oleic acid does exist as a liquid within the SC lipids. The coexistence of fluid oleic acid and ordered SC lipids, at physiological temperatures, is consistent with the previously proposed phase-separation transport mechanism for enhanced diffusion.

  13. Hyperbaric nitrogen and pentobarbital on synaptosomal membrane lipids and free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kostopanagiotou, G; Hamamoto, I; Hartwell, V; Nemoto, E M

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen at high pressures and anesthetics increase lipid monolayer surface pressure and in turn modulates monolayer associated lipolytic enzyme activity that could alter membrane lipids. We tested the hypothesis that nitrogen at pressures of 5 and 10 megapascals (MPa) and pentobarbital induce alterations in synaptosomal membrane phospholipid and free fatty acid (FFA). Rat cortical synaptosomes in Krebs-Henseleit buffer were placed in steel chambers and incubated for four hours at 37 degrees C: at 5 or 10 MPa of O2/balance N2; at one 0.1 MPa on room air, and with 10 mg pentobarbital. Free fatty acids (FFA) were quantified by thin-layer and gas chromatography, and neutral and acidic lipids by high-pressure thin layer chromatography and protein by Biorad colorimetric assay. Statistical analyses were by ANOVA and posthoc analysis by Neuman-Keuls and Kruskal-Wallis tests at p < 0.05. Sphyngomyelin, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, cerebroside and cholesterol were unchanged by 5 and 10 MPa nitrogen and pentobarbital. Free fatty acids (16:00, 18:00, 18:01, 20:00, 22:0, 22:01 and 24:01) at 10 MPa were reduced compared to 5 MPa (p < 0.05) but unaffected by pentobarbital. The decrease in synaptosomal membrane FFA at 10 MPa suggests attenuated hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids without detectable alterations in membrane phospholipid composition.

  14. β2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibril-Induced Membrane Disruption Is Enhanced by Endosomal Lipids and Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Sophia C.; Sheynis, Tania; Thompson, Rebecca; Tipping, Kevin W.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Ranson, Neil A.; Beales, Paul A.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of amyloidoses are not well understood, the interaction between amyloid proteins and cell membranes is thought to play a role in several amyloid diseases. Amyloid fibrils of β2-microglobulin (β2m), associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), have been shown to cause disruption of anionic lipid bilayers in vitro. However, the effect of lipid composition and the chemical environment in which β2m-lipid interactions occur have not been investigated previously. Here we examine membrane damage resulting from the interaction of β2m monomers and fibrils with lipid bilayers. Using dye release, tryptophan fluorescence quenching and fluorescence confocal microscopy assays we investigate the effect of anionic lipid composition and pH on the susceptibility of liposomes to fibril-induced membrane damage. We show that β2m fibril-induced membrane disruption is modulated by anionic lipid composition and is enhanced by acidic pH. Most strikingly, the greatest degree of membrane disruption is observed for liposomes containing bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) at acidic pH, conditions likely to reflect those encountered in the endocytic pathway. The results suggest that the interaction between β2m fibrils and membranes of endosomal origin may play a role in the molecular mechanism of β2m amyloid-associated osteoarticular tissue destruction in DRA. PMID:25100247

  15. Influence of glucogenic dietary supplementation and reproductive state of dairy cows on the composition of lipids in milk.

    PubMed

    Mesilati-Stahy, R; Malka, H; Argov-Argaman, N

    2015-06-01

    We studied the effects of the frequently used glucogenic dietary supplementation in dairy herds and the hormonal changes occurring during the normal estrous cycle on the composition and concentration of milk lipid components. Holstein dairy cows were synchronized with two injections of prostaglandin F2α (estrus=day 0). Animals were held as controls or drenched for 11 days (day -3 to day 8 of the cycle) with 850 ml/day liquid propylene glycol (treatment, n=13 per group). Blood and milk samples were collected on day 1 and 8 of the cycle. In both groups, plasma progesterone concentration increased ∼10-fold between 1 and 8 days post-estrus. Milk fatty acid composition was associated primarily with estrous-cycle day: polyunsaturated fatty acids increased by 16%, n-6 by 15% and n-3 by 1% from day 1 to 8 post-estrus. Polar lipid composition was also altered by cycle day: phosphatidylethanolamine concentration was 2-fold and 1.5-fold higher on day 1 v. day 8 post-estrus in the control and treatment groups, respectively. Phosphatidylserine concentration in milk was also affected by cycle day by treatment interaction (P=0.04). A progesterone level by treatment interaction influenced the triglyceride-to-phospholipid ratio in the milk (P=0.02). The results suggest that progesterone plays a role in modulating milk lipid composition and structure. Therefore, strategies designed to alter milk lipid composition should consider the cow's reproductive status.

  16. The influence of dietary lipid composition on skeletal muscle mitochondria from mice following eight months of calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Hagopian, K; Bibus, D; Villalba, J M; López-Lluch, G; Navas, P; Kim, K; Ramsey, J J

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) has been shown to decrease reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and retard aging in a variety of species. It has been proposed that alterations in membrane saturation are central to these actions of CR. As a step towards testing this theory, mice were assigned to 4 dietary groups (control and 3 CR groups) and fed AIN-93G diets at 95 % (control) or 60 % (CR) of ad libitum for 8 months. To manipulate membrane composition, the primary dietary fats for the CR groups were soybean oil (also used in the control diet), fish oil or lard. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial lipid composition, proton leak, and H(2)O(2) production were measured. Phospholipid fatty acid composition in CR mice was altered in a manner that reflected the n-3 and n-6 fatty acid profiles of their respective dietary lipid sources. Dietary lipid composition did not alter proton leak kinetics between the CR groups. However, the capacity of mitochondrial complex III to produce ROS was decreased in the CR lard compared to the other CR groups. The results of this study indicate that dietary lipid composition can influence ROS production in muscle mitochondria of CR mice. It remains to be determined if lard or other dietary oils can maximize the CR-induced decreases in ROS production.

  17. Fatty acid composition of selected prosthecate bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carter, R N; Schmidt, J M

    1976-10-11

    The cellular fatty acid composition of 14 strains of Caulobacter speices and types, two species of Prosthecomicrobium, and two species of Asticcacaulis was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. In most of these bacteria, the major fatty acids were octadecenoic acid (C18:1), hexadecenoic acid (C16:1) and hexadecanoic acid (C16:0). Some cyclopropane and branched chain fatty acids were detected in addition to the straight chained acids. Hydroxytetradecanoic acid was an important component of P.enhydrum but significant amounts of hydroxy acids were not detected in other prosthecate bacteria examined.

  18. Ether- and Ester-Bound iso-Diabolic Acid and Other Lipids in Members of Acidobacteria Subdivision 4

    PubMed Central

    Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Foesel, Bärbel U.; Wüst, Pia K.; Overmann, Jörg; Tank, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A.; Dunfield, Peter F.; Houghton, Karen; Stott, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, iso-diabolic acid (13,16-dimethyl octacosanedioic acid) has been identified as a major membrane-spanning lipid of subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria, a highly diverse phylum within the Bacteria. This finding pointed to the Acidobacteria as a potential source for the bacterial glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers that occur ubiquitously in peat, soil, lakes, and hot springs. Here, we examined the lipid composition of seven phylogenetically divergent strains of subdivision 4 of the Acidobacteria, a bacterial group that is commonly encountered in soil. Acid hydrolysis of total cell material released iso-diabolic acid derivatives in substantial quantities (11 to 48% of all fatty acids). In contrast to subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria, 6 out of the 7 species of subdivision 4 (excepting “Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum”) contained iso-diabolic acid ether bound to a glycerol in larger fractional abundance than iso-diabolic acid itself. This is in agreement with the analysis of intact polar lipids (IPLs) by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), which showed the dominance of mixed ether-ester glycerides. iso-Diabolic acid-containing IPLs were not identified, because these IPLs are not released with a Bligh-Dyer extraction, as observed before when studying lipid compositions of subdivisions 1 and 3 of the Acidobacteria. The presence of ether bonds in the membrane lipids does not seem to be an adaptation to temperature, because the five mesophilic isolates contained a larger amount of ether lipids than the thermophile “Ca. Chloracidobacterium thermophilum.” Furthermore, experiments with Pyrinomonas methylaliphatogenes did not reveal a major influence of growth temperature over the 50 to 69°C range. PMID:24928878

  19. Permeability of lipid bilayers to amino acids and phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Permeability coefficients for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, were measured and compared with values for other ionic solutes such as phosphate. The rates of efflux of glycine, lysine, phenylalanine, serine and tryptophan were determined after they were passively entrapped in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) composed of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). The following permeability coefficients were obtained for: glycine, 5.7 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 2.0 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); serine, 5.5 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 1.6 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); lysine, 5.1 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 1.9 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); tryptophan, 4.1 x 10(-10) cm s-1 (EPC); and phenylalanine, 2.5 x 10(-10) cm s-1 (EPC). Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly, while variations in pH had only minor effects on the permeability coefficients of the amino acids tested. Phosphate permeability was in the range of 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1 depending on the pH of the medium. The values for the polar and charged amino acids were surprisingly similar to those previously measured for monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium, which are in the range of 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1, depending on conditions and the lipid species used. This observation suggests that the permeation rates for the neutral, polar and charged amino acids are controlled by bilayer fluctuations and transient defects, rather than partition coefficients and Born energy barriers. The results are relevant to the permeation of certain peptides into lipid bilayers during protein translocation and membrane biogenesis.

  20. Lipogenesis and lipid peroxidation in rat testes after long-term treatment with sucrose and tannic acid in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Mašek, T; Starčević, K

    2016-06-30

    We studied the influence of long-term treatment with sucrose and tannic acid in drinking water on the fatty acid profile and lipid peroxidation in rat testes. Male Wistar rats were supplemented with sucrose (30% w/v) or with sucrose and tannic acid (sucrose 30% w/v, tannic acid 0.1% w/v) in drinking water. The treatment with sucrose elevated blood glucose levels in the plasma (p < .05) and decreased the testis weight (p < .05) and testis index (p < .05) of the rats. Sucrose treatment increased monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and C22:6n3, and decreased n6 fatty acids in testis tissue. Lipid peroxidation was significantly increased after sucrose administration in plasma (p < .05) and testis tissue (p < .01). The addition of tannic acid led to the decrease in lipid peroxidation in the plasma (p < .05) and testis (p < .05), a further increase in MUFA and decrease in n6 fatty acids. In conclusion, sucrose significantly altered the testis fatty acid profile with an increase in MUFA and C22:6n3, and a decrease in n6 fatty acids. Tannic acid attenuated oxidative stress and hyperglycaemia, but it did not improve pathological changes in the fatty acid composition of the testis.

  1. Compositions for acid treating subterranean formations

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E. Jr.; Swanson, B.L.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes a high viscosity acid composition. It comprises: an aqueous acid solution; one or more acrylamide polymers dissolved in the acid solution in an amount sufficient to increase the viscosity of the acid solution; a liquid hydrocarbon dispersed in the acid solution; and one or more nonionic surface active agents having at least one reactive hydroxyl group per molecule present in the composition in an amount sufficient to interact with the acrylamide polymer or polymers in the presence of the liquid hydrocarbon whereby the viscosity of the acid solution is further increased and stabilized.

  2. Fish Lipids as a Valuable Source of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merdzhanova, Albena; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Dobreva, Diana A.; Makedonski, Lyubomir

    2017-03-01

    This article presents information about omega-3 (h-3) and omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) contents in a broad range of commercially important fish species available on Bulgarian fish markets. The aim is to raise consumers' awareness and encourage them to eat fish. Fish species from the Black Sea coast have relatively high proportion of n-3 PUFAs, of which more than 80% is by EPf (eicosapentaenoic acid, C 20:5 n-3) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, C 22:6 n-3). Extensive epidemiological studies show that fish consumption is inversely associated with the incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), stroke and the functioning of the brain. About 0.5 g of omega-3 (EPA+DHA) a day or two savings of oily fish a week are required to reduce the risk of death from CVD. PUFAs needs should be satisfied not only with food additives but with fish lipids containing food.

  3. [Lipid composition of novel Shewanella species isolated from far Eastern seas].

    PubMed

    Frolova, G M; Pavel', K G; Shparteeva, A A; Nedashkovskaia, O I; Gorshkova, N M; Ivanova, E P; Mikhaĭlov, V V

    2005-01-01

    A comparative study of the lipid composition of 26 strains (including type strains) of marine Gammaproteobacteria belonging to the genera Shewanella, Alteromonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Marinobacterium, Microbulbifer, and Marinobacter was carried out. The bacteria exhibited genus-specific profiles of ubiquinones, phospholipids, and fatty acids, which can serve as reliable chemotaxonomic markers for tentative identification of new isolates. The studied species of the genus Shewanella were distinguished by the presence of two types of isoprenoid quinones, namely, ubiquinones Q-7 and Q-8 and menaquinones MK-7 and MMK-7; five phospholipids typical of this genus, namely, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), lyso-PE, and acyl-PG; and the fatty acids 15:0, 16:0, 16:1 (n-7), 17:1 (n-8), i-13:0, and i-15:0. The high level of branched fatty acids (38-45%) and the presence of eicosapentaenoic acid (4%) may serve as criteria for the identification of this genus. Unlike Shewanella spp., bacteria of the other genera contained a single type of isoprenoid quinone: Q-8 (Alteromonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Marinobacterium, and Microbulbifer) or Q-9 (Marinobacter). The phospholipid compositions of these bacteria were restricted to three components: two major phospholipids (PE and PG) and a minor phospholipid, bisphosphatidic acid (Alteromonas and Pseudoalteromonas) or DPG (Marinobacterium, Microbulbifer, and Marinobacter). The bacteria exhibited genus-specific profiles of fatty acids.

  4. N-stearoylethanolamine restores pancreas lipid composition in obesity-induced insulin resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Onopchenko, Oleksandra V; Kosiakova, Galina V; Oz, Murat; Klimashevsky, Vitaliy M; Gula, Nadiya M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the protective effect of N-stearoylethanolamine (NSE), a bioactive N-acylethanolamine , on the lipid profile distribution in the pancreas of obesity-induced insulin resistant (IR) rats fed with prolonged high fat diet (58% of fat for 6 months). The phospholipid composition was determined using 2D thin-layer chromatography. The level of individual phospholipids was estimated by measuring inorganic phosphorus content. The fatty acid (FA) composition and cholesterol level were investigated by gas-liquid chromatography. Compared to controls, plasma levels of triglycerides and insulin were significantly increased in IR rats. The pancreas lipid composition indicated a significant reduction of the free cholesterol level and some phospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho), phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn), phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) compared to controls. Moreover, the FA composition of pancreas showed a significant redistribution of the main FA (18:1n-9, 18:2n-6, 18:3n-6 and 20:4n-6) levels between phospholipid, free FA, triglyceride fractions under IR conditions that was accompanied by a change in the estimated activities of Δ9-, Δ6-, Δ5-desaturase. Administration of N-stearoylethanolamine (NSE, 50 mg/kg daily per os for 2 weeks) IR rats triggered an increase in the content of free cholesterol, PtdCho and normalization of PtdEtn, PtdSer level. Furthermore, the NSE modulated the activity of desaturases, thus influenced FA composition and restored the FA ratios in the lipid fractions. These NSE-induced changes were associated with a normalization of plasma triglyceride content, considerable decrease of insulin and index HOMA-IR level in rats under IR conditions.

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands regulate lipid content, metabolism, and composition in fetal lungs of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, M; Capobianco, E; Careaga, V; Martinez, N; Mazzucco, M B; Maier, M; Jawerbaum, A

    2014-03-01

    Maternal diabetes impairs fetal lung development. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors relevant in lipid homeostasis and lung development. This study aims to evaluate the effect of in vivo activation of PPARs on lipid homeostasis in fetal lungs of diabetic rats. To this end, we studied lipid concentrations, expression of lipid metabolizing enzymes and fatty acid composition in fetal lungs of control and diabetic rats i) after injections of the fetuses with Leukotriene B4 (LTB4, PPARα ligand) or 15deoxyΔ(12,14)prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2, PPARγ ligand) and ii) fed during pregnancy with 6% olive oil- or 6% safflower oil-supplemented diets, enriched with PPAR ligands were studied. Maternal diabetes increased triglyceride concentrations and decreased expression of lipid-oxidizing enzymes in fetal lungs of diabetic rats, an expression further decreased by LTB4 and partially restored by 15dPGJ2 in lungs of male fetuses in the diabetic group. In lungs of female fetuses in the diabetic group, maternal diets enriched with olive oil increased triglyceride concentrations and fatty acid synthase expression, while those enriched with safflower oil increased triglyceride concentrations and fatty acid transporter expression. Both olive oil- and safflower oil-supplemented diets decreased cholesterol and cholesteryl ester concentrations and increased the expression of the reverse cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 in fetal lungs of female fetuses of diabetic rats. In fetal lungs of control and diabetic rats, the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids increased with the maternal diets enriched with olive and safflower oils. Our results revealed important changes in lipid metabolism in fetal lungs of diabetic rats, and in the ability of PPAR ligands to modulate the composition of lipid species relevant in the lung during the perinatal period.

  6. Lipid, fatty acid and protein content of late larval to early juvenile stages of the western rock lobster, Panulirus cygnus.

    PubMed

    Limbourn, Andrew J; Nichols, Peter D

    2009-03-01

    Lipid, fatty acid and protein content were determined individually on 7 phyllosomata, 69 clear pueruli, 286 pre-moult pueruli, and 86 juvenile western rock lobster (WRL) collected from four locations between the settlement seasons 2000 to 2006 to evaluate compositional changes during the non-feeding puerulus stage. Only the lipid content, particularly the phospholipids, decreased significantly with development. Protein declined sharply following moult to the juvenile. PL comprised between 86-94% of total lipid in all animals, and declined most between phyllosomata and clear pueruli (238.5 to 121.4 mg g(-1) DW) (p<0.001). Triacylglycerols were the only lipid to increase in absolute amounts with development, but declined 53% on average following moult to juvenile. This increase in TAG is likely due to the conversion of phospholipids to triacylglycerols. Monounsaturated fatty acids were the main energy form utilised during benthic development while polyunsaturated fatty acids showed a high degree of sparing. The n-3:n-6 fatty acid ratio of juveniles indicates that they may be approaching critically low levels of stored lipid energy reserves. Both protein, and lipid, declined sharply from the final puerulus phase to the juvenile confirming that a high energetic demand is required to fuel the moulting process.

  7. Influences of intraperitoneally and dietary administered vitamin E and selenium on the lipid composition in reproductive organs of male animals.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, O; Celik, S; Dilsiz, N

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the protective effect of intraperitoneally and dietary administered vitamin E and selenium (Se) on the total lipid, cholesterol, and fatty acid composition in rat and lamb testes. The level of total lipid in rat testes was significantly decreased (p < 0.001) in the combination group as compared to the control group but slightly decreased in lamb testes (p < 0.05). In addition, the level of total lipid in lamb testes was significantly decreased (p < 0.001) by the Se alone. The content of total cholesterol in rats was higher in the Se group and its level in lamb testes was higher in the vitamin E groups than in the control group (p < 0.001). In rats testes, the amounts of palmitic, oleic, arachidonic acids, the total fatty acid, total unsaturated and total omega 6 acids were higher (p < 0.001) in the Se group. The proportions of palmitic and arachidonic acids were reduced in the vitamin E group and linoleic acid, total unsaturated, and total omega 6 fatty acids were high (p < 0.05) in the vitamin E and combination groups. In lamb testis tissues, the amounts of palmitic, arachidonic, total unsaturated and total omega 6 fatty acids were decreased in the vitamin E group in comparison to the control (p < 0.05). However, the amounts of arachidonic and total omega 6 fatty acids increased (p < 0.05) in the Se group. The proportions of arachidonic acid, total unsaturated fatty acid and total omega 6 fatty acids were high (p < 0.05) in the Se and combination groups. We concluded that the level of total lipid in testis tissues was reduced by dietary and intraperitoneally administered vitamin E and Se together. In contrast, it seems that the proportions of unsaturated and essential fatty acids in examined tissues are increased by vitamin E and Se.

  8. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chromatographic methods identify altered lipid composition in human renal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tosi, M R; Rodriguez-Estrada, M T; Lercker, G; Poerio, A; Trinchero, A; Reggiani, A; Tugnoli, V

    2004-07-01

    We report on the characterization of the lipid obtained from cortical and medullary normal human kidney tissue, benign renal neoplasms (oncocytoma) and 2 different types of malignant renal neoplasms (chromophobic cell carcinoma and clear cell carcinoma). The total lipid fractions were analyzed by 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography, whereas the composition of the total fatty acids and the content of total cholesterol were determined by gas chromatography. alpha-Tocopherol was detected and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. The spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis revealed significant differences in the renal tissues examined. It was confirmed that cholesteryl esters (mainly oleate) are typical of clear cell renal carcinomas. Their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic factors is discussed, with particular emphasis on its capability to indicate the tumor diffusion in healthy renal parenchyma. alpha-Tocopherol is prevalent in clear cell carcinoma and it is present in nearly the same low amounts in cortex, medulla and chromophobic cell renal carcinoma. Q10 coenzyme and dolichols were detected by thin-layer chromatography and they are present in significant amounts in the cortex and the benign oncocytoma. Great variations were found in the distribution of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, especially in the docosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids and the corresponding omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids ratio.

  9. Octopus lipid and vitamin E composition: interspecies, interorigin, and nutritional variability.

    PubMed

    Torrinha, Alvaro; Cruz, Rebeca; Gomes, Filipa; Mendes, Eulália; Casal, Susana; Morais, Simone

    2014-08-20

    Octopus vulgaris, Octopus maya, and Eledone cirrhosa from distinct marine environments [Northeast Atlantic (NEA), Northwest Atlantic (NWA), Eastern Central Atlantic, Western Central Atlantic (WCA), Pacific Ocean, and Mediterranean Sea] were characterized regarding their lipid and vitamin E composition. These species are those commercially more relevant worldwide. Significant interspecies and interorigin differences were observed. Unsaturated fatty acids account for more than 65% of total fatty acids, mostly ω-3 PUFA due to docosahexaenoic (18.4-29.3%) and eicosapentanoic acid (11.4-23.9%) contributions. The highest ω-3 PUFA amounts and ω-3/ω-6 ratios were quantified in the heaviest specimens, O. vulgaris from NWA, with high market price, and simultaneously in the lowest graded samples, E. cirrhosa from NEA, of reduced dimensions. Although having the highest cholesterol contents, E. cirrhosa from NEA and O. maya from WCA have also higher protective fatty acid indexes. Chemometric discrimination allowed clustering the selected species and several origins based on lipid and vitamin E profiles.

  10. Alterations of erythrocyte morphology and lipid composition by hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Brito, M A; Silva, R M; Matos, D C; da Silva, A T; Brites, D T

    1996-05-30

    Morphology and membrane lipid composition of erythrocytes from neonates (jaundiced and healthy) and adults (before and after incubation with bilirubin) were studied. The morphological index, expressing the relative proportions of the different stages of cell distortion, and the membrane cholesterol, phospholipids and cholesterol/phospholipids molar ratio, were determined. In jaundiced neonates a significant increase in the morphological index (P < 0.01) was found. After incubation with bilirubin, adult erythrocytes also showed an increase in the morphological index (P < 0.01). Hemolysis occurred under these conditions, and the red cell ghosts obtained (vesicles) showed a rounded morphology. Higher cholesterol/phospholipid ratio and lower phospholipid content were found in jaundiced neonates compared with healthy babies (P < 0.05) and adults (P < 0.01), as well as in the cells (P < 0.05) and vesicles (P < 0.01) obtained after bilirubin incubation. Bilirubin cytotoxicity may occur in a stepwise manner: deposition of bilirubin in membrane produces echinocytosis, which is followed by disintegration of the lipid bilayer with loss of phospholipids from the membrane.

  11. Yogurt fermentation in the presence of starch-lipid composite.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Kim, S

    2009-03-01

    The fermentation of yogurt in the presence of 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0% starch-lipid composite (SLC) was investigated. The pH, viscosity, and morphology of the mix were monitored during the fermentation process. The rate of drop in pH with time during incubation was not affected by the addition of SLC. However, it was found that the presence of SLC caused faster aggregation, which was clearly evidenced by the viscosity variation during the process of fermentation. An examination of the morphologies confirmed that aggregation occurred earlier in the presence of SLC and SLC did not form phase-separated domains. This study concludes that SLC would serve as a good additive (fat replacer and stabilizer) for the production of yogurt.

  12. Crz1p regulates pH homeostasis in Candida glabrata by altering membrane lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dongni; Lin, Xiaobao; Qi, Yanli; Liu, Hui; Chen, Xiulai; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2016-09-23

    The asexual facultative aerobic haploid yeast Candida glabrata is widely used in the industrial production of various organic acids. To elucidate the physiological function of the transcription factor CgCrz1p and its role in tolerance to acid stress we deleted or overexpressed the corresponding gene CgCRZ1 Deletion of CgCRZ1 resulted in a 60% decrease in dry cell weight (DCW) and a 50% drop in cell viability compared to the wild type at pH 2.0. Expression of lipid metabolism-associated genes was also significantly down-regulated. Consequently, the proportion of C18:1 fatty acids, ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids, and ergosterol content decreased by 30%, 46%, and 30%, respectively. Additionally, membrane integrity, fluidity, and H(+)-ATPase activity were reduced by 45%, 9%, and 50%, respectively. In contrast, overexpression of CgCrz1p increased C18:1 and ergosterol content by 16% and 40%, respectively. Overexpression also enhanced membrane integrity, fluidity, and H(+)-ATPase activity by 31%, 6%, and 20%, respectively. Moreover, in the absence of pH buffering, DCW and pyruvate titer increased by 48% and 60%, respectively, compared to the wild type. Together, these results suggest that CgCrz1p regulates tolerance to acidic conditions by altering membrane lipid composition in C. glabrata IMPORTANCE: The present study provides an insight into the metabolism of Candida glabrata under acidic conditions, such as those encountered during industrial production of organic acids. We found that overexpression of the transcription factor CgCrz1p improved viability, biomass, and pyruvate yields at low pH. Analysis of plasma membrane lipid composition indicated that CgCrz1p might play an important role in its integrity and fluidity, and enhanced the pumping of protons in acidic environments. We propose that altering the structure of the cell membrane may provide a successful strategy for increasing C glabrata productivity at low pH.

  13. Relationships between dairy powder surface composition and wetting properties during storage: importance of residual lipids.

    PubMed

    Gaiani, Claire; Scher, Joel; Ehrhardt, Jean Jacques; Linder, Michel; Schuck, Pierre; Desobry, Stephane; Banon, Sylvie

    2007-08-08

    The relationships between powder surface composition and powder rehydration properties under variable conditions of storage are investigated in this paper. A rheological approach was used to evaluate the modifications induced by storage on the rehydration properties of native phosphocaseinate powder. Concurrently, the powder surface composition (i.e., lactose, proteins, and lipids) was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A strong correlation was found between the powder wetting time lengthening and the migration of lipids on the powder surface during storage. XPS studies indicated also an over-representation of lipids on the powder surface (6%) in comparison with total lipids (0.4%) even on fresh powder before storage. Detailed investigation of powder lipids revealed the presence of high levels of polar lipids (66% compared with <1% in milk lipids). Their amphiphilic nature and their melting points could explain the extensive enrichment of lipids observed at the powder surface during processing and storage.

  14. Lipid exchange between membranes: effects of membrane surface charge, composition, and curvature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Jiang, Zhongying; Ma, Yuqiang

    2012-09-01

    Intermembrane lipid exchange is critical to membrane functions and pharmaceutical applications. The exchange process is not fully understood and it is explored by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitor method in this research. It is found that intermembrane lipid exchange is accelerated with the decrease of vesicle size and the increase of charge and liquid crystalline lipid composition ratio. Vesicle adsorption rate, membrane lateral pressure gradient, and lipid lateral diffusion coefficient are inferred to be critical in deciding the lipid exchange kinetics between membranes. Besides that, the membrane contact situation during lipid exchange is also studied. The maximum total membrane contact area is found to increase with the decrease of vesicle size, charged and liquid crystalline lipid composition ratio. A competition mechanism between the vesicle adsorption rate and the intermembrane lipid exchange rate was proposed to control the maximum total membrane contact area.

  15. Composition, structure and absorption of milk lipids: a source of energy, fat-soluble nutrients and bioactive molecules.

    PubMed

    German, J Bruce; Dillard, Cora J

    2006-01-01

    Milkfat is a remarkable source of energy, fat-soluble nutrients and bioactive lipids for mammals. The composition and content of lipids in milkfat vary widely among mammalian species. Milkfat is not only a source of bioactive lipid components, it also serves as an important delivery medium for nutrients, including the fat-soluble vitamins. Bioactive lipids in milk include triacylglycerides, diacylglycerides, saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, and phospholipids. Beneficial activities of milk lipids include anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and immunosuppression properties. The major mammalian milk that is consumed by humans as a food commodity is that from bovine whose milkfat composition is distinct due to their diet and the presence of a rumen. As a result of these factors bovine milkfat is lower in polyunsaturated fatty acids and higher in saturated fatty acids than human milk, and the consequences of these differences are still being researched. The physical properties of bovine milkfat that result from its composition including its plasticity, make it a highly desirable commodity (butter) and food ingredient. Among the 12 major milk fatty acids, only three (lauric, myristic, and palmitic) have been associated with raising total cholesterol levels in plasma, but their individual effects are variable-both towards raising low-density lipoproteins and raising the level of beneficial high-density lipoproteins. The cholesterol-modifying response of individuals to consuming saturated fats is also variable, and therefore the composition, functions and biological properties of milkfat will need to be re-evaluated as the food marketplace moves increasingly towards more personalized diets.

  16. Effects of Fatty Acids on the Interfacial and Solution Behavior of Mixed Lipidic Aggregates Called Solid Lipid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Gourab; Nahak, Prasant; Guha, Pritam; Roy, Biplab; Chettri, Priyam; Sapkota, Manish; Koirala, Suraj; Misono, Takeshi; Torigoe, Kanjiro; Ghosh, Shilpi; Panda, Amiya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Mutual miscibility of soylecithin, tristearin, fatty acids (FAs), and curcumin was assessed by means of surface pressure-area isotherms at the air-solution interface in order to formulate modified solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). Appearance of minima in the excess area (Aex) and changes in free energy of mixing (∆G(0)ex) were recorded for systems with 20 mole% FAs. Modified SLNs, promising as topical drug delivery systems, were formulated using the lipids in combination with curcumin, stabilized by an aqueous Tween 60 solution. Optimal formulations were assessed by judiciously varying the FA chain length and composition. Physicochemical properties of SLNs were studied such as the size, zeta potential (by dynamic light scattering), morphology (by freeze fracture transmission electron microscopy), and thermal behavior (by differential scanning calorimetry). The size and zeta potential of the formulations were in the range 300-500 nm and -10 to -20 mV, respectively. Absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses supported the dynamic light scattering and differential scanning calorimetry data and confirmed localization of curcumin to the palisade layer of SLNs. These nanoparticles showed a sustained release of incorporated curcumin. Curcumin-loaded SLNs were effective against a gram-positive bacterial species, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Our results on the physicochemical properties of curcumin-loaded SLNs, the sustained release, and on antibacterial activity suggest that SLNs are promising delivery agents for topical drugs.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Cyanobacterium sp. Strain IPPAS B-1200 with a Unique Fatty Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Starikov, Alexander Y.; Usserbaeva, Aizhan A.; Sinetova, Maria A.; Sarsekeyeva, Fariza K.; Zayadan, Bolatkhan K.; Ustinova, Vera V.; Kupriyanova, Elena V.; Los, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome of Cyanobacterium sp. IPPAS strain B-1200, isolated from Lake Balkhash, Kazakhstan, and characterized by the unique fatty acid composition of its membrane lipids, which are enriched with myristic and myristoleic acids. The approximate genome size is 3.4 Mb, and the predicted number of coding sequences is 3,119. PMID:27856596

  18. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Loaded with Retinoic Acid and Lauric Acid as an Alternative for Topical Treatment of Acne Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elton Luiz; Carneiro, Guilherme; De Araújo, Lidiane Advíncula; Trindade, Mariana de Jesus Vaz; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Oréfice, Rodrigo Lambert; Farias, Luis de Macêdo; De Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Dos Santos, Simone Gonçalves; Goulart, Gisele Assis Castro; Alves, Ricardo José; Ferreira, Lucas Antônio Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Topical therapy is the first choice for the treatment of mild to moderate acne and all-trans retinoic acid is one of the most used drugs. The combination of retinoids and antimicrobials is an innovative approach for acne therapy. Recently, lauric acid, a saturated fatty acid, has shown strong antimicrobial activity against Propionibacterium acnes. However, topical application of retinoic acid is followed by high incidence of side-effects, including erythema and irritation. Solid lipid nanoparticles represent an alternative to overcome these side-effects. This work aims to develop solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with retinoic acid and lauric acid and evaluate their antibacterial activity. The influence of lipophilic stearylamine on the characteristics of solid lipid nanoparticles was investigated. Solid lipid nanoparticles were characterized for size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The in vitro inhibitory activity of retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles was evaluated against Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. High encapsulation efficiency was obtained at initial time (94 ± 7% and 100 ± 4% for retinoic acid and lauric acid, respectively) and it was demonstrated that lauric acid-loaded-solid lipid nanoparticles provided the incorporation of retinoic acid. However, the presence of stearylamine is necessary to ensure stability of encapsulation. Moreover, retinoic acid-lauric acid-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles showed growth inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus, representing an interesting alternative for the topical therapy of acne vulgaris.

  19. [Assessment of an association between fatty acid structure of lipids in pulmonary surfactant and 137Cs content in the body of children, residents of radiation-contaminated areas].

    PubMed

    Parkhomenko, V M; Kolpakov, I Ie; Studenykina, O M; Briuzhina, T S; Artemchuk, H P

    2012-01-01

    An evaluation of correlation between fatty acid composition in pulmonary surfactant lipids and 137Cs content in the body of children, residents of radiation-contaminated areas revealed that a increased incorporation of 137Cs promotes a disruption of fatty acid balance towards an increase in the saturation of the surfactant lipid complex, a destruction of lecithin fraction of surfactant, a decrease in antioxidant properties of surfactant system, an activation of lipid peroxidation processes in the respiratory area of lung by lipoxygenase type, a disturbance of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism on the stage of bioregulators-eicosanoid formation.

  20. The content and composition of lipids in the digital cushion of the bovine claw with respect to age and location--a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Räber, M; Scheeder, M R L; Ossent, P; Lischer, Ch J; Geyer, H

    2006-07-01

    The pads of the bovine digital cushion, which serves as a shock absorber, have specific anatomical structures to cope with the substantial forces acting within the claw. To gain more information on the lipid composition and content of the pads, horn shoes from 12 slaughtered heifers and cows were removed and different samples of the pads excised with a scalpel. Pad lipids were extracted and the fatty acid composition determined by gas chromatography. Fat from perirenal and subcutaneous adipose tissues served as a comparison. Overall, this fat contained a higher quantity of extracted lipids than that of the claw pads and did not differ between heifers and cows. In contrast, lipid content in the pads was significantly higher in the cows than in the heifers. In both groups, the lipid content of the middle and abaxial pads, which are situated directly under the distal phalanx, was lower than in the pads of the other locations. The lipids in all pads contained >77% monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), differing sharply from the adipose tissue with values <51%. Among the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) a significantly higher proportion of arachidonic acid (AA) was found in the heifer pads than in those of the cows, whereas the proportion of AA was similar in the adipose tissue of all animals. The proportion of AA in the pad lipids also varied between the defined locations with the highest proportion found in locations that showed the lowest lipid content and was related to the age of the animal.

  1. Postnatal changes in fatty acids composition of brown adipose tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, T.; Ogawa, K.; Kuroshima, A.

    1992-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that thermogenic activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is higher during the early postnatal period, decreasing towards a low adult level. The present study examined postnatal changes in the lipid composition of BAT. BAT from pre-weaning rats at 4 and 14 days old showed the following differences in lipid composition compared to that from adults of 12 weeks old. (i) Relative weight of interscapular BAT to body weight was markedly greater. (ii) BAT-triglyceride (TG) level was lower, while BAT-phospholipid (PL)level was higher. (iii) In TG fatty acids (FA) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PU; mol %), arachidonate index (AI), unsaturation index (UI) and PU/saturated FA (SA) were higher; rare FA such as eicosadienoate, bishomo- γ-linolenic acid and lignoceric acid in mol % were also higher. (iv) In PL-FA monounsaturated FA (MU) in mol % was lower; PU mol %, AI and UI were higher. These features in BAT of pre-weaning rats resembled those in the cold-acclimated adults, suggesting a close relationship of the PL-FA profile to high activity of BAT.

  2. Plasma zinc status and membrane lipid composition in genetically diabetic mice (db/db)

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J.P.; Fenton, M.R.

    1986-03-05

    Sex and age matched diabetic C57BL/Ks-db+/db+ mice (db/db) were sacrificed at eight weeks of age. Plasma samples were collected and zinc levels determined. Livers were excised and mitochondrial and microsomal membranes prepared. Aliquots of membrane fractions were subjected to lipid extraction and cholesterol (Cl), phospholipid (PL) and fatty acid analysis (FA) performed. Plasma zinc levels in db/db mice were elevated 25% compared to m/m controls (148.8+/-8.1 ..mu..g/dl vs. 118.9+/-14.9 ..mu..g/dl). Cholesterol and PL levels remained unchanged in both mitochondrial and microsomal membranes. Analysis of PL composition from db/db mitochondria by two dimensional thin layer chromatography revealed no change in the percentage of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) but a 40% decrease in cardiolipin. Slight increases were observed in the percentage of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol (PS+PI) in microsomes isolated from db/db mice. Fatty acid analysis of microsomal PC and PE showed a decrease of 28% in the 18:1/18:0 ratio as well as a 21% decrease in the ratio of 20:4/18:2 in db/db animals. Analysis of succinate dehydrogenase (mitochondrial) and glucose-6-phosphatase (microsomal) revealed significant decreases in activity in livers of db/db mice. The altered zinc metabolism as well as the changes in membrane lipid composition suggest that this may be a model to study the role of zinc in membrane structure.

  3. The lipid composition and its alteration during the growth stage in pathogenic fungus, epidermophyton floccosum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, T.; Watanabe, R.; Nozawa, Y.; Ito, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative changes of lipid components during the growth stages were studied in E. floccosum. The acyl group components of total lipids of Trichophyton rubrum and Microsporum cookei were also examined. The lipids of E. floccosum amounted to approximately 4% of the dry cell weight. Neutral lipids mainly consisted of triglycerides and sterols, and major polar lipids were phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and an unknown lipid X. The fatty acids in tryglycerides and phospholipids were palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids. The unknown polar lipid X which appeared between phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin on thin layer chromatography plates contained no phosphorus. There was no significant change in the fatty acid components of E. floccosum and T. rubrum during the cell growth, whereas profound changes occurred in M. cookei. The sterol components of E. floccosum showed striking changes depending on the growth stage.

  4. Micellar lipid composition affects micelle interaction with class B scavenger receptor extracellular loops.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Gontero, Brigitte; Nowicki, Marion; Margier, Marielle; Masset, Gabriel; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2015-06-01

    Scavenger receptors (SRs) like cluster determinant 36 (CD36) and SR class B type I (SR-BI) play a debated role in lipid transport across the intestinal brush border membrane. We used surface plasmon resonance to analyze real-time interactions between the extracellular protein loops and various ligands ranging from single lipid molecules to mixed micelles. Micelles mimicking physiological structures were necessary for optimal binding to both the extracellular loop of CD36 (lCD36) and the extracellular loop of SR-BI (lSR-BI). Cholesterol, phospholipid, and fatty acid micellar content significantly modulated micelle binding to and dissociation from the transporters. In particular, high phospholipid micellar concentrations inhibited micelle binding to both receptors (-53.8 and -74.4% binding at 0.32 mM compared with 0.04 mM for lCD36 and lSR-BI, respectively, P < 0.05). The presence of fatty acids was crucial for micelle interactions with both proteins (94.4 and 81.3% binding with oleic acid for lCD36 and lSR-BI, respectively, P < 0.05) and fatty acid type substitution within the micelles was the component that most impacted micelle binding to the transporters. These effects were partly due to subsequent modifications in micellar size and surface electric charge, and could be correlated to micellar vitamin D uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our findings show for the first time that micellar lipid composition and micellar properties are key factors governing micelle interactions with SRs.

  5. Micellar lipid composition affects micelle interaction with class B scavenger receptor extracellular loops

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Gontero, Brigitte; Nowicki, Marion; Margier, Marielle; Masset, Gabriel; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    Scavenger receptors (SRs) like cluster determinant 36 (CD36) and SR class B type I (SR-BI) play a debated role in lipid transport across the intestinal brush border membrane. We used surface plasmon resonance to analyze real-time interactions between the extracellular protein loops and various ligands ranging from single lipid molecules to mixed micelles. Micelles mimicking physiological structures were necessary for optimal binding to both the extracellular loop of CD36 (lCD36) and the extracellular loop of SR-BI (lSR-BI). Cholesterol, phospholipid, and fatty acid micellar content significantly modulated micelle binding to and dissociation from the transporters. In particular, high phospholipid micellar concentrations inhibited micelle binding to both receptors (−53.8 and −74.4% binding at 0.32 mM compared with 0.04 mM for lCD36 and lSR-BI, respectively, P < 0.05). The presence of fatty acids was crucial for micelle interactions with both proteins (94.4 and 81.3% binding with oleic acid for lCD36 and lSR-BI, respectively, P < 0.05) and fatty acid type substitution within the micelles was the component that most impacted micelle binding to the transporters. These effects were partly due to subsequent modifications in micellar size and surface electric charge, and could be correlated to micellar vitamin D uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our findings show for the first time that micellar lipid composition and micellar properties are key factors governing micelle interactions with SRs. PMID:25833688

  6. Optimization of bicelle lipid composition and temperature for EPR spectroscopy of aligned membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Jesse E.; James, Zachary M.; Thomas, David D.

    2015-01-01

    We have optimized the magnetic alignment of phospholipid bilayered micelles (bicelles) for EPR spectroscopy, by varying lipid composition and temperature. Bicelles have been extensively used in NMR spectroscopy for several decades, in order to obtain aligned samples in a near-native membrane environment and take advantage of the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance to molecular orientation. Recently, bicelles have also seen increasing use in EPR, which offers superior sensitivity and orientational resolution. However, the low magnetic field strength (less than 1 T) of most conventional EPR spectrometers results in homogeneously oriented bicelles only at a temperature well above physiological. To optimize bicelle composition for magnetic alignment at reduced temperature, we prepared bicelles containing varying ratios of saturated (DMPC) and unsaturated (POPC) phospholipids, using EPR spectra of a spin-labeled fatty acid to assess alignment as a function of lipid composition and temperature. Spectral analysis showed that bicelles containing an equimolar mixture of DMPC and POPC homogeneously align at 298 K, 20 K lower than conventional DMPC-only bicelles. It is now possible to perform EPR studies of membrane protein structure and dynamics in well-aligned bicelles at physiological temperatures and below.

  7. Nutrients and neurodevelopment: lipids.

    PubMed

    González, Horacio F; Visentin, Silvana

    2016-10-01

    Nutrients, lipids in particular, make up the central nervous system structure and play major functional roles: they stimulate development, migration, and nerve cell differentiation. They are part of gray matter, white matter, nerve nuclei, and synaptogenesis. Breast milk contains lipids which are crucial for infant brain development. The lipid profile of breast milk was used as a guideline for the development of breast milk substitutes. However, to date, no substitute has matched it. Complementary feeding should include docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, other polyunsaturated fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, and complex lipids found in milk fat. The lipid composition of breast milk depends on maternal intake and nutritional status during pregnancy and breast-feeding. It has a great impact on development. Our goal is to review scientific literature regarding the role of lipids on infant brain development and the importance of breast milk lipid composition, maternal diet, and complementary feeding.

  8. Temperature-induced plasticity in membrane and storage lipid composition: thermal reaction norms across five different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Van Dooremalen, Coby; Koekkoek, Jacco; Ellers, Jacintha

    2011-02-01

    Temperature is a key environmental factor inducing phenotypic plasticity in a wide range of behavioral, morphological, and life history traits in ectotherms. The strength of temperature-induced responses in fitness-related traits may be determined by plasticity of the underlying physiological or biochemical traits. Lipid composition may be an important trait underlying fitness response to temperature, because it affects membrane fluidity as well as availability of stored energy reserves. Here, we investigate the effect of temperature on lipid composition of the springtail Orchesella cincta by measuring thermal reaction norms across five different temperatures after four weeks of cold or warm acclimation. Fatty acid composition in storage and membrane lipids showed a highly plastic response to temperature, but the responses of single fatty acids revealed deviations from the expectations based on HVA theory. We found an accumulation of C(18:2n6) and C(18:3n3) at higher temperatures and the preservation of C(20:4n6) across temperatures, which is contrary to the expectation of decreased unsaturation at higher temperatures. The thermal response of these fatty acids in O. cincta differed from the findings in other species, and therefore shows there is interspecific variation in how single fatty acids contribute to HVA. Future research should determine the consequences of such variation in terms of costs and benefits for the thermal performance of species.

  9. The influence of bacteria-dominated diets on Daphnia magna somatic growth, reproduction, and lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Taipale, Sami J; Brett, Michael T; Pulkkinen, Katja; Kainz, Martin J

    2012-10-01

    We explored how dietary bacteria affect the life history traits and biochemical composition of Daphnia magna, using three bacteria taxa with very different lipid composition. Our objectives were to (1) examine whether and how bacteria-dominated diets affect Daphnia survival, growth, and fecundity, (2) see whether bacteria-specific fatty acid (FA) biomarkers accrued in Daphnia lipids, and (3) explore the quantitative relationship between bacteria availability in Daphnia diets and the amounts of bacterial FA in their lipids. Daphnia were fed monospecific and mixed diets of heterotrophic (Micrococcus luteus) or methanotrophic bacteria (Methylomonas methanica and Methylosinus trichosporium) and two phytoplankton species (Cryptomonas ozolinii and Scenedesmus obliquus). Daphnia neonates fed pure bacteria diets died after 6-12 days and produced no viable offspring, whereas those fed pure phytoplankton diets had high survival, growth, and reproduction success. Daphnia fed a mixed diet with 80% M. luteus and 20% of either phytoplankton had high somatic growth, but low reproduction. Conversely, Daphnia fed mixed diets including 80% of either methane-oxidizing bacteria and 20% Cryptomonas had high reproduction rates, but low somatic growth. All Daphnia fed mixed bacteria and phytoplankton diets had strong evidence of both bacteria- and phytoplankton-specific FA biomarkers in their lipids. FA mixing model calculations indicated that Daphnia that received 80% of their carbon from bacteria assimilated 46 ± 25% of their FA from this source. A bacteria-phytoplankton gradient experiment showed a strong positive correlation between the proportions of the bacterial FA in the Daphnia and their diet, indicating that bacterial utilization can be traced in this keystone consumer using FA biomarkers.

  10. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  11. Low temperature alters plasma membrane lipid composition and ATPase activity of pineapple fruit during blackheart development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuchan; Pan, Xiaoping; Qu, Hongxia; Underhill, Steven J R

    2014-02-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) plays central role in triggering primary responses to chilling injury and sustaining cellular homeostasis. Characterising response of membrane lipids to low temperature can provide important information for identifying early causal factors contributing to chilling injury. To this end, PM lipid composition and ATPase activity were assessed in pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus) in relation to the effect of low temperature on the development of blackheart, a form of chilling injury. Chilling temperature at 10 °C induced blackheart development in concurrence with increase in electrolyte leakage. PM ATPase activity was decreased after 1 week at low temperature, followed by a further decrease after 2 weeks. The enzyme activity was not changed during 25 °C storage. Loss of total PM phospholipids was found during postharvest senescence, but more reduction was shown from storage at 10 °C. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were the predominant PM phospholipid species. Low temperature increased the level of phosphatidic acid but decreased the level of phosphatidylinositol. Both phospholipid species were not changed during storage at 25 °C. Postharvest storage at both temperatures decreased the levels of C18:3 and C16:1, and increased level of C18:1. Low temperature decreased the level of C18:2 and increased the level of C14:0. Exogenous application of phosphatidic acid was found to inhibit the PM ATPase activity of pineapple fruit in vitro. Modification of membrane lipid composition and its effect on the functional property of plasma membrane at low temperature were discussed in correlation with their roles in blackheart development of pineapple fruit.

  12. The stereoisomeric composition of phytanyl chains in lipids of Dead Sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R.; Kates, M.; Baedecker, M. J.; Kaplan, I. R.; Ackman, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Lipid extracts from five recent Dead Sea sediments were analyzed for isoprenoid compounds and the following were isolated: free and phospholipid-bound di-O-phytanylglycerol, free phytanol and free and esterified phytanic acid. The phytanyl groups of the diether and the free phytanol were oxidized to the corresponding phytanic acid; the stereoisomeric composition of the derived phytanic acids as well as of the ester-bound phytanic acid was determined by open-tubular gas-liquid chromatography of the corresponding methyl esters on butanediolsuccinate polyester. Only the 3R, 7R, 11R-isomer of phytanic acid was detected in each of the phytanate samples, indicating that these phytanyl chains in the Dead Sea sediments are most likely derived from extremely halophilic bacteria rather than from phytol of chlorophyll origin. These findings also provide further evidence that the mixtures of RRR and SRR-phytanic acids previously isolated from organic-rich shales were most likely derived from the phytyl chain in chlorophyll.

  13. The stereoisomeric composition of phytanyl chains in lipids of Dead Sea sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.; Kates, M.; Baedecker, M.J.; Kaplan, I.R.; Ackman, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    Lipid extracts from five recent Dead Sea sediments were analyzed for isoprenoid compounds and the following were isolated: free and phospholipid-bound di-O-phytanylglycerol, free phytanol and free and esterifled phytanic acid. The phytanyl groups of the diether and the free phytanol were oxidized to the corresponding phytanic acid; the stereoisomeric composition of the derived phytanic acids as well as of the ester-bound phytanic acid was determined by open-tubular gas-liquid chromatography of the corresponding methyl esters on butanediolsuccinate polyester. Only the 3R,7R,11R-isomer of phytanic acid was detected in each of the phytanate samples, indicating that these phytanyl chains in the Dead Sea sediments are most likely derived from extremely halophilic bacteria rather than from phytol of chlorophyll origin. These findings also provide further evidence that the mixtures of RRR and SRR-phytanic acids previously isolated from organic-rich shales were most likely derived from the phytyl chain in chlorophyll. ?? 1977.

  14. Comparison of the lipid composition of oat root and coleoptile plasma membranes. [Avena sativa L

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstrom, R.P. ); Cleland, R.E. )

    1989-07-01

    The total lipid composition of plasma membranes (PM), isolated by the phase partitioning method from two different oat (Avena sativa L.) tissues, the root and coleoptile, was compared. In general, the PM lipid composition was not conserved between these two organs of the oat seedling. Oat roots contained 50 mole % phospholipid, 25 mole % glycolipid, and 25 mole % free sterol, whereas comparable amounts in the coleoptile were 42, 39, and 19 mole %, respectively. Individual lipid components within each lipid class also showed large variations between the two tissues. Maximum specific ATPase activity in the root PM was more than double the activity in the coleoptile. Treatment of coleoptile with auxin for 1 hour resulted in no detectable changes in PM lipids or extractable ATPase activity. Differences in the PM lipid composition between the two tissues that may define the limits of ATPase activity are discussed.

  15. Improved Experimental Techniques for Analyzing Nucleic Acid Transport Through Protein Nanopores in Planar Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Justin A.

    The translocation of nucleic acid polymers across cell membranes is a fundamental requirement for complex life and has greatly contributed to genomic molecular evolution. The diversity of pathways that have evolved to transport DNA and RNA across membranes include protein receptors, active and passive transporters, endocytic and pinocytic processes, and various types of nucleic acid conducting channels known as nanopores. We have developed a series of experimental techniques, collectively known as "Wicking", that greatly improves the biophysical analysis of nucleic acid transport through protein nanopores in planar lipid bilayers. We have verified the Wicking method using numerous types of classical ion channels including the well-studied chloride selective channel, CLIC1. We used the Wicking technique to reconstitute α-hemolysin and found that DNA translocation events of types A and B could be routinely observed using this method. Furthermore, measurable differences were observed in the duration of blockade events as DNA length and composition was varied, consistent with previous reports. Finally, we tested the ability of the Wicking technology to reconstitute the dsRNA transporter Sid-1. Exposure to dsRNAs of increasing length and complexity showed measurable differences in the current transitions suggesting that the charge carrier was dsRNA. However, the translocation events occurred so infrequently that a meaningful electrophysiological analysis was not possible. Alterations in the lipid composition of the bilayer had a minor effect on the frequency of translocation events but not to such a degree as to permit rigorous statistical analysis. We conclude that in many instances the Wicking method is a significant improvement to the lipid bilayer technique, but is not an optimal method for analyzing transport through Sid-1. Further refinements to the Wicking method might have future applications in high throughput DNA sequencing, DNA computation, and

  16. Physical activity-induced alterations on tissue lipid composition and lipid metabolism in fattening pigs.

    PubMed

    Daza, A; Rey, A I; Olivares, A; Cordero, G; Toldrá, F; López-Bote, C J

    2009-04-01

    In a first experiment one group of pigs was maintained in free-range conditions according to the traditional way in a Mediterranean forest (exercised-1) and another group was housed individually and received acorns (sedentary-1). In a second experiment two groups of pigs were fed a mixed diet for the whole experimental period. One of these groups was housed individually in 8m(2) pens (sedentary-2). The other group was housed in a corridor and forced to walk daily (exercised-2). The subcutaneous fat and neutral lipids of muscle from the exercised pigs fed acorns had higher C18:1n-9, MUFA, C18:1/C18:0, MUFA/SAT and lower C16:0 and SAT when compared with the fat from the pigs fed acorns in confinement. Those exercised animals fed the mixed diet had also lower C16:0 and SAT in subcutaneous fat and lower SAT and higher C18:2, C18:3, PUFA and MUFA/SAT in neutral lipids when compared with the sedentary pigs, which may indicate that delta-9-desaturase activity was higher in exercised than in sedentary pigs. Exercised pigs had higher acid and neutral esterases and lower neutral lipase activity than sedentary pigs. No differences in the α-tocopherol concentration and TBARS values of meat samples among the pigs that received a mixed diet either exercised or sedentary were observed. The moderate exercise reduced the postprandrial concentrations of triglycerides in plasma, but did not reduce other plasma levels.

  17. Trans isomeric octadecenoic acids are related inversely to arachidonic acid and DHA and positively related to mead acid in umbilical vessel wall lipids.

    PubMed

    Decsi, Tamás; Boehm, Günther; Tjoonk, H M Ria; Molnár, Szilárd; Dijck-Brouwer, D A Janneke; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Martini, Ingrid A; Muskiet, Frits A J; Boersma, E Rudy

    2002-10-01

    Long-chain PUFA play an important role in early human neurodevelopment. Significant inverse correlations were reported between values of trans isomeric and long-chain PUFA in plasma lipids of preterm infants and children aged 1-15 yr as well as in venous cord blood lipids of full-term infants. Here we report FA compositional data of cord blood vessel wall lipids in 308 healthy, full-term infants (gestational age: 39.7 +/- 1.2 wk, birth weight: 3528 +/- 429 g, mean +/- SD). The median (interquartile range) of the sum of 18-carbon trans FA was 0.22 (0.13) % w/w in umbilical artery and 0.16 (0.10) % w/w in umbilical vein lipids. Nonparametric correlation analysis showed significant inverse correlations between the sum of 18-carbon trans FA and both arachidonic acid and DHA in artery (r = -0.38, P < 0.01, and r = -0.20, P < 0.01) and vein (r = -0.36, P < 0.01, and -0.17, P < 0.01) wall lipids. In addition, the sum of 18-carbon trans FA was significantly positively correlated to Mead acid, a general indicator of EFA deficiency, in both artery (r = +0.35, P < 0.01) and vein (r = +0.31, P< 0.01) wall lipids. The present results obtained in a large group of full-term infants suggest that maternal trans FA intake is inversely associated with long-chain PUFA status of the infant at birth.

  18. Lipid Composition and Protein Dynamics in Thylakoids of Two Wheat Cultivars Differently Sensitive to Drought.

    PubMed Central

    Quartacci, M. F.; Pinzino, C.; Sgherri, CLM.; Navari-Izzo, F.

    1995-01-01

    Two wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) cultivars with different sensitivities to drought were either grown under regular irrigation or subjected to water deficit by withholding water for 14 d. Water-stressed plants of both cultivars underwent similar decreases in leaf water potential, but the drought-tolerant cultivar showed higher relative water content and turgor. Neither osmotic nor elastic adjustment mechanisms appeared to be active under the conditions described here. Thylakoids isolated from the stressed, drought-tolerant wheat showed an increase in lipid-to-protein ratio, in comparison with the control, whereas this ratio remained unchanged in the sensitive wheat. In both cultivars, water deficit determined different rearrangements in the composition of the thylakoid individual polar lipids, but their unsaturation level remained unaffected with the exception of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. In the drought-sensitive cultivar, an accumulation of free fatty acids together with a reduction in polar lipid amount was observed. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of spin-labeled proteins of stressed plants from the sensitive cv Adamello showed a higher spin label rotational correlation time together with lower sulphydryl group and mobile proteic portion levels, in comparison with the control. In the tolerant cv Ofanto, the first two parameters changed to a lesser extent following water depletion, and the mobile proteic portion was not altered. PMID:12228463

  19. The influence of dietary palm olein, fish oil and lard on the egg yolk and plasma lipid composition, and performances of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Hodzic, A; Hamamdzic, M; Gagic, A; Mihaljevic, M; Vegara, M; Krnic, J; Pasic Juhas, E

    2008-01-01

    The influence of dietary palm olein, in comparison to fish oil and lard, on lipid levels in egg yolk and blood plasma, the fatty acid composition of egg yolk, and various production parameters were studied. Brown Lohman laying hens (n=45) were randomly assigned into three groups of 15 birds, and treated with experimental diets with either 3% palm olein (PO), fish oil (FO) or lard (L) for 6 weeks. At the end of the experiment, feed consumption was significantly lower for hens fed the PO diet, except week 6 of the experiment. The concentration of plasma triglycerides was increased by all experimental diets, whereas there were no significant increases of plasma total lipid and total cholesterol concentrations only in the PO group. For yolk lipids a decrease in triglycerides in the FO and L groups was observed, while total cholesterol and total lipid were significantly decreased in the PO group. Feeding with the PO diet resulted in the lowest concentrations of palmitic, stearic and linoleic acid, as well as in the highest concentration of monounsaturated oleic acid in the yolk total lipid. It was concluded that the composition of yolk lipids did not closely match the concentrations of lipids observed in experimental diets or plasma. Based on the current work it seems that the PO diet modulates egg yolk lipid content best.

  20. Amino acid composition of some Mexican foods.

    PubMed

    Morales de León, Josefina; Camacho, M Elena; Bourges, Héctor

    2005-06-01

    Knowledge of the amino acid composition of foods is essential to calculate their chemical score, which is used to predict protein quality of foods and diets. Though amino acid composition of many foods is reasonably well established, better knowledge is needed on native foods consumed in different regions and countries. This paper presents the amino acid composition of different presentations of raw and processed foods produced and consumed in Mexico. The amino acid composition was determined using Beckman amino acid analyzers (models 116 and 6300). Tryptophan was determined using the Spies and Chambers method. Of the different foods analyzed, some comments are made on native or basic foods in Mexico: Spirulin, where lysine is the limiting amino acid, with a chemical score of 67%, is a good source of tryptophan (1.16g/16 gN); amaranth contains high levels of sulphur amino acids (4.09 to 5.34 g/16gN), with a protein content of 15 g/100g; and pulque, a Pre-Hispanic beverage that contains high levels of tryptophan (2.58 g/16 gN) and sulphur amino acids (2.72 g/16 gN). Finally, insects are good sources of sulphur amino acids and lysine.

  1. Evaluation of fatty acid and amino acid compositions in okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) grown in different geographical locations.

    PubMed

    Sami, Rokayya; Lianzhou, Jiang; Yang, Li; Ma, Ying; Jing, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Okra has different uses as a food and a remedy in traditional medicine. Since it produces many seeds, distribution of the plant is also quite easy. Although seed oil yield is low (4.7%), since the linoleic acid composition of the seed oil is quiet high (67.5%), it can still be used as a source of (UNSAT) unsaturated fatty acids. In this study, samples of okra grown in four different locations were analyzed to measure fatty acid and amino acid compositions. The content of the lipid extraction ranged from 4.34% to 4.52% on a dry weight basis. Quantitatively, the main okra fatty acids were palmitic acid (29.18-43.26%), linoleic acid (32.22-43.07%), linolenic acid (6.79-12.34%), stearic acid (6.36-7.73%), oleic acid (4.31-6.98%), arachidic acid (ND-3.48%), margaric acid (1.44-2.16%), pentadecylic acid (0.63-0.92%), and myristic acid (0.21-0.49%). Aspartic acid, proline, and glutamic acids were the main amino acids in okra pods, while cysteine and tyrosine were the minor amino acids. Statistical methods revealed how the fatty acid and amino acid contents in okra may be affected by the sampling location.

  2. Membrane Binding of HIV-1 Matrix Protein: Dependence on Bilayer Composition and Protein Lipidation

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Nanda, Hirsh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT By assembling in a protein lattice on the host's plasma membrane, the retroviral Gag polyprotein triggers formation of the viral protein/membrane shell. The MA domain of Gag employs multiple signals—electrostatic, hydrophobic, and lipid-specific—to bring the protein to the plasma membrane, thereby complementing protein-protein interactions, located in full-length Gag, in lattice formation. We report the interaction of myristoylated and unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag MA domains with bilayers composed of purified lipid components to dissect these complex membrane signals and quantify their contributions to the overall interaction. Surface plasmon resonance on well-defined planar membrane models is used to quantify binding affinities and amounts of protein and yields free binding energy contributions, ΔG, of the various signals. Charge-charge interactions in the absence of the phosphatidylinositide PI(4,5)P2 attract the protein to acidic membrane surfaces, and myristoylation increases the affinity by a factor of 10; thus, our data do not provide evidence for a PI(4,5)P2 trigger of myristate exposure. Lipid-specific interactions with PI(4,5)P2, the major signal lipid in the inner plasma membrane, increase membrane attraction at a level similar to that of protein lipidation. While cholesterol does not directly engage in interactions, it augments protein affinity strongly by facilitating efficient myristate insertion and PI(4,5)P2 binding. We thus observe that the isolated MA protein, in the absence of protein-protein interaction conferred by the full-length Gag, binds the membrane with submicromolar affinities. IMPORTANCE Like other retroviral species, the Gag polyprotein of HIV-1 contains three major domains: the N-terminal, myristoylated MA domain that targets the protein to the plasma membrane of the host; a central capsid-forming domain; and the C-terminal, genome-binding nucleocapsid domain. These domains act in concert to condense Gag into a membrane

  3. [The action of week inorganic acids and lower carboxylic acids on the conductivity of bilayer lipid membranes].

    PubMed

    Kilivnik, K E; Khmarskaia, L A; Ksenzhek, O S

    2009-01-01

    The ability of weak inorganic acids (H2S, HCN) and lower carboxylic acids to interact with bilayer lipid membranes, change their conductivity, and act as protonophores has been investigated. The mechanism of changes in BLM conductivity was studied. Factors influencing the interaction of acids with model lipid membranes were determined. Maximum changes in conductivity were observed at pH values equal to the dissociation constants of weak acids and depend on the coefficients of distribution "octanol-water".

  4. Fat deposition, fatty acid composition and meat quality: A review.

    PubMed

    Wood, J D; Enser, M; Fisher, A V; Nute, G R; Sheard, P R; Richardson, R I; Hughes, S I; Whittington, F M

    2008-04-01

    This paper reviews the factors affecting the fatty acid composition of adipose tissue and muscle in pigs, sheep and cattle and shows that a major factor is the total amount of fat. The effects of fatty acid composition on meat quality are also reviewed. Pigs have high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), including the long chain (C20-22) PUFA in adipose tissue and muscle. The full range of PUFA are also found in sheep adipose tissue and muscle whereas cattle 'conserve' long chain PUFA in muscle phospholipid. Linoleic acid (18:2n-6) is a major ingredient of feeds for all species. Its incorporation into adipose tissue and muscle in relation to the amount in the diet is greater than for other fatty acids. It is deposited in muscle phospholipid at a high level where it and its long chain products eg aracidonic acid (20:4n-6) compete well for insertion into phospholipid molecules. Its proportion in pig adipose tissue declines as fat deposition proceeds and is an index of fatness. The same inverse relationships are not seen in ruminant adipose tissue but in all species the proportion of 18:2n-6 declines in muscle as fat deposition increases. The main reason is that phospholipid, where 18:2n-6 is located, declines as a proportion of muscle lipid and the proportion of neutral lipid, with its higher content of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, increases. Oleic acid (18:1cis-9), formed from stearic acid (18:0) by the enzyme stearoyl Co-A desaturase, is a major component of neutral lipid and in ruminants the same enzyme forms conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), an important nutrient in human nutrition. Like 18:2n-6, α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) is an essential fatty acid and is important to ruminants since it is the major fatty acid in grass. However it does not compete well for insertion into phospholipid compared with 18:2n-6 and its incorporation into adipose tissue and muscle is less efficient. Greater biohydrogenation of 18:3n-3 and a long rumen transit time

  5. Fatty acid composition of selected macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Patarra, R F; Leite, J; Pereira, R; Baptista, J; Neto, A I

    2013-04-01

    The content of total lipids and the fatty acid (FA) profile were determined for eight macroalgae (Cystoseira abies-marina, Fucus spiralis, Chaetomorpha pachynema, Codium elisabethae, Porphyra sp., Osmundea pinnatifida, Pterocladiella capillacea and Sphaeroccoccus coronopifolius). Total lipids were extracted using a solvent mixture of methanol/chloroform (2/1, v/v) and further derivatised to FA methyl esters (FAME). The analyses of FAME samples were performed by gas chromatography coupled to a flame ionisation detector. The total lipid content ranged from 0.06 to 3.54 g (per 100 g). The most abundant saturated FA were palmitic (C16:0) and myristic (C14:0), while oleic (C18:1 n-9) was the dominant monounsaturated acid. All seaweeds contained linoleic FA (C18:2 n-6). The α-linolenic (C18:3 n-3) and eicosapentaenoic (20:5 n-3) acids were present only in Porphyra sp. (3.34% ± 0.13) and C. pachynema (0.47% ± 0.12), respectively. The n-6/n-3 and h/H ratios were low, suggesting a high nutritional value of the algae studied.

  6. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modify fatty acid composition in hepatic and abdominal adipose tissue of sucrose-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Aguilera, Alfonso; Berruezo, Silvia; Hernández-Diaz, Guillermo; Angulo, Ofelia; Oliart-Ros, Rosamaria

    2011-12-01

    The fatty acid profile of hepatocytes and adipocytes is determined by the composition of the dietary lipids. It remains unclear which fatty acid components contribute to the development or reduction of insulin resistance. The present work examined the fatty acid composition of both tissues in sucrose-induced obese rats receiving fish oil to determine whether the effect of dietary (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on the reversion of metabolic syndrome in these rats is associated to changes in the fatty acid composition of hepatocyte and adipocyte membrane lipids. Animals with metabolic syndrome were divided into a corn-canola oil diet group and a fish oil diet group, and tissues fatty acids composition were analyzed after 6 weeks of dietary treatment. Fatty acid profiles of the total membrane lipids were modified by the fatty acid composition of the diets fed to rats. N-3 PUFAs levels in animals receiving the fish oil diet plus sucrose in drinking water were significantly higher than in animals under corn-canola oil diets. It is concluded that in sucrose-induced obese rats, consumption of dietary fish oil had beneficial effects on the metabolic syndrome and that such effects would be conditioned by the changes in the n-3 PUFAs composition in hepatic and adipose tissues because they alter membrane properties and modify the type of substrates available for the production of active lipid metabolites acting on insulin resistance and obesity.

  7. Lipid Oxidation Inhibitory Effects and Phenolic Composition of Aqueous Extracts from Medicinal Plants of Colombian Amazonia

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Leandro J.; Viloria-Bernal, María; Vicente, Francisca; Berrueta, Luis Angel; Gallo, Blanca; Martínez-Cañamero, Magdalena; Ruiz-Larrea, Maria Begoña; Ruiz-Sanz, José Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Diverse plants of ethnobotanic interest in Amazonia are commonly used in traditional medicine. We determined the antioxidant potential against lipid peroxidation, the antimicrobial activity, and the polyphenol composition of several Amazonian plants (Brownea rosademonte, Piper glandulosissimum, Piper krukoffii, Piper putumayoense, Solanum grandiflorum, and Vismia baccifera). Extracts from the plant leaf, bark, and stem were prepared as aqueous infusions, as used in folk medicine, and added to rat liver microsomes exposed to iron. The polyphenolic composition was detected by reverse-phase HPLC coupled to diode-array detector and MS/MS analysis. The antimicrobial activity was tested by the spot-on-a-lawn method against several indicator microorganisms. All the extracts inhibited lipid oxidation, except the P. glandulosissimum stem. The plant extracts exhibiting high antioxidant potential (V. baccifera and B. rosademonte) contained high levels of flavanols (particularly, catechin and epicatechin). By contrast, S. grandiflorum leaf, which exhibited very low antioxidant activity, was rich in hydroxycinnamic acids. None of the extracts showed antimicrobial activity. This study demonstrates for the first time the presence of bioactive polyphenolic compounds in several Amazonian plants, and highlights the importance of flavanols as major phenolic contributors to antioxidant activity. PMID:22754307

  8. Influence of a hyperlipidic diet on the composition of the non-membrane lipid pool of red blood cells of male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Remesar, Xavier; Antelo, Arantxa; Llivina, Clàudia; Albà, Emma; Berdié, Lourdes; Agnelli, Silvia; Arriarán, Sofía; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives. Red blood cells (RBC) are continuously exposed to oxidative agents, affecting their membrane lipid function. However, the amount of lipid in RBCs is higher than the lipids of the cell membrane, and includes triacylglycerols, which are no membrane components. We assumed that the extra lipids originated from lipoproteins attached to the cell surface, and we intended to analyse whether the size and composition of this lipid pool were affected by sex or diet. Experimental design. Adult male and female Wistar rats were fed control or cafeteria diets. Packed blood cells and plasma lipids were extracted and analysed for fatty acids by methylation and GC-MS, taking care of not extracting membrane lipids. Results. The absence of ω3-PUFA in RBC extracts (but not in plasma) suggest that the lipids extracted were essentially those in the postulated lipid surface pool and not those in cell membrane. In cells’ extracts, there was a marked depletion of PUFA (and, in general, of insaturation). Fatty acid patterns were similar for all groups studied, with limited effects of sex and no effects of diet in RBC (but not in plasma) fatty acids. Presence of trans fatty acids was small but higher in RBC lipids, and could not be justified by dietary sources. Conclusions. The presence of a small layer of lipid on the RBC surface may limit oxidative damage to the cell outer structures, and help explain its role in the transport of lipophilic compounds. However, there may be other, so far uncovered, additional functions for this lipid pool. PMID:26213652

  9. Effect of dietary fat source on lipoprotein composition and plasma lipid concentrations in pigs.

    PubMed

    Faidley, T D; Luhman, C M; Galloway, S T; Foley, M K; Beitz, D C

    1990-10-01

    Most studies of the effects of dietary fat sources on plasma lipid components have used diets with extreme fat compositions; the current study was designed to more nearly mimic human dietary fat intake. Young growing pigs were fed diets containing either 20 or 40% of energy as soy oil, beef tallow or a 50/50 blend of soy oil and tallow. Different dietary fats did not affect concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerol or protein in plasma or major lipoprotein fractions. The concentration of phospholipid was less in plasma and in very low density lipoproteins with soy oil feeding than with tallow feeding. The weight percentage of cholesteryl ester in the low density lipoprotein fraction tended to be greater with 40% than with 20% tallow and tended to be less with 40% than with 20% soy oil. Phospholipid as a weight percentage of low density lipoprotein was least in pigs fed soy oil. Tallow feeding increased the percentage of myristic, palmitic, palmitoleic and oleic acids in plasma, relative to both other groups. Soy oil feeding increased the percentage of linoleic and linolenic acids. These moderate diets were not hypercholesterolemic, but they did alter plasma fatty acid composition and phospholipid concentrations in plasma and very low density lipoprotein.

  10. The effect of dietary fat and omega-3 fatty acids on whole body lipid oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids yields several electrophilic, reactive carbonyl metabolites. We hypothesized that an increased intake of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3) would lead to increased lipid peroxidation metabolites compared to a diet low in n-3. As part of a randomized crossov...

  11. LIPID CLASS DISTRIBUTION OF HIGHLY UNSATURATED LONG CHAIN FATTY ACIDS IN MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The very long chain highly unsaturated C28 fatty acids, octacosaheptaenoic [28:7(n-6)] and octacosaoctaenoic acid [28:8(n-3)], were found to be associated with phospholipids, obtained by fractionation of total lipid extracts into distinct lipid classes, in 4 and 6, respectively, ...

  12. Process strategies to maximize lipid accumulations of novel yeast in acid and base treated hydrolyzates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleaginous yeasts can accumulate up to 70% of cell biomass as lipids, predominantly as triacylglycerols. Yeast lipid fatty acid profiles have been reported to be similar to that of vegetable oils and consist primarily of oleic, palmitic, stearic, and linoleic acids. This capability provides the oppo...

  13. Factors affecting Archaeal Lipid Compositions of the Sulfolobus Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, L.; Han, J.; Wei, Y.; Lin, L.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, C.

    2010-12-01

    Temperature is the best known variable affecting the distribution of the archaeal glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) in marine and freshwater systems. Other variables such as pH, ionic strength, or bicarbonate concentration may also affect archaeal GDGTs in terrestrial systems. Studies of pure cultures can help us pinpoint the specific effects these variables may have on archaeal lipid distribution in natural environments. In this study, three Sulfolobus species (HG4, HB5-2, HB9-6) isolated from Tengchong hot springs (pH 2-3, temperature 73-90°C) in China were used to investigate the effects of temperature, pH, substrate, and type of strain on the composition of GDGTs. Results showed that increase in temperature had negative effects on the relative contents of GDGT-0 (no cyclopentyl rings), GDGT-1 (one cyclopentyl ring), GDGT-2 and GDGT-3 but positive effects on GDGT-4, GDGT-4', GDGT-5 and GDGT-5'. Increase in pH, on the other hand, had negative effects on GDGT-0, GDGT-1, GDGT-4', GDGT-5 and GDGT-5', and positive effects on GDGT-3 and GDGT-4. GDGT-2 remained relatively constant with changing pH. When the HG4 was grown on different substrates, GDGT-5 was five time more abundant in sucrose-grown cultures than in yeast extract- or sulfur- grown cultures, suggesting that carbohydrates may stimulate the production of GDGT-5. For all three species, the ring index (average number of rings) of GDGTs correlated positively with incubation temperature. In HG4, ring index was much lower at optimal pH (3.5) than at other pH values. Ring index of HB5-2 or HB9-6 is higher than that of HG4, suggesting that speciation may affect the degree of cyclization of GDGT of the Sulfolobus. These results indicate that individual archaeal lipids respond differently to changes in environmental variables, which may be also species specific.

  14. New and Uncommon Fatty Acids in Lipids of Deep-Sea Foraminifera.

    PubMed

    Kharlamenko, Vladimir I; Svetashev, Vasily I; Tarasova, Tatyana S

    2017-04-01

    Fatty acids (FA) of agglutinating foraminifera of two genera, Bathysiphon and Rhabdammina, collected from a depth of 3307-3377 m in the Kuril Basin, Sea of Okhotsk, and adjacent deep-sea waters of the Pacific Ocean, were analyzed. In lipids of two Bathysiphon species, in addition to common FA typical for marine organisms, the uncommon ∆4 and ∆7 monoenoic acids and ∆4,7-dienoic acid were found in noticeable amounts. FA of two Rhabdammina species included also such uncommon acids as ∆5,8,11,14-21:4, ∆5,8,11,14-22:4, and ∆5,8,11,14-23:4, which are homologues to arachidonic acid. High levels of cis-vaccenic and arachidonic acids were typical for lipids of all the studied species. At the same time, we observed a substantial difference in FA composition between members of these two genera. Using GC and GC-MS of FAME, pyrrolidide and DMOX derivatives, the structures of 10 new FA were confirmed: ∆4-i-16:1 (1.1-0.6%), ∆7-i-21:1 (0.4%), ∆7-ai-21:1 (0.3-0.8%), ∆4,11-18:2 (0.3-0.9%), ∆4,7-20:2 (8.8%), ∆7,12-20:2 (0.4-0.6%), ∆4,7-21:2 (0.6%), ∆7,12-22:2 (6.4-2.1%); ∆5,8,11,14-22:4 (1.2-2.0%), and ∆5,8,11,14-23:4 (1.7-2.3%). The origin of the new FA and the role of foraminifera FA in deep-sea communities are discussed.

  15. Investigation of heat induced reactions between lipid oxidation products and amino acids in lipid rich model systems and hazelnuts.

    PubMed

    Karademir, Yeşim; Göncüoğlu, Neslihan; Gökmen, Vural

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the contribution of lipid oxidation to non-enzymatic browning reactions in lipid rich model and actual food systems. Hazelnut oil and model reaction mixtures consisting of different amino acids were heated under certain conditions to determine possible lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reaction products. In model systems, the Schiff base of 2,4-decadienal, its decarboxylated form, and reaction products formed after hydrolytic cleavage of the Schiff base or decarboxylated form were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. No furosine was detected in hazelnuts after roasting at 160 °C while the concentration of free amino acids significantly decreased. 2,4-Decadienal reacted effectively with all amino acids studied through a Maillard type carbonyl-amine condensation pathway. (2E,4E)-Deca-2,4-dien-1-amine was identified as a typical reaction product in model systems and roasted hazelnuts. In lipid-rich foods like hazelnuts, lipid-derived carbonyls might be responsible for potential modifications of free and protein bound amino acids during heating.

  16. Fatty acid composition and extreme temperature tolerance following exposure to fluctuating temperatures in a soil arthropod.

    PubMed

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Suring, Wouter; Ellers, Jacintha

    2011-09-01

    Ectotherms commonly adjust their lipid composition to ambient temperature to counteract detrimental thermal effects on lipid fluidity. However, the extent of lipid remodeling and the associated fitness consequences under continuous temperature fluctuations are not well-described. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of repeated temperature fluctuations on fatty acid composition and thermal tolerance. We exposed the springtail Orchesella cincta to two constant temperatures of 5 and 20°C, and a continuously fluctuating treatment between 5 and 20°C every 2 days. Fatty acid composition differed significantly between constant low and high temperatures. As expected, animals were most cold tolerant in the low temperature treatment, while heat tolerance was highest under high temperature. Under fluctuating temperatures, fatty acid composition changed with temperature initially, but later in the experiment fatty acid composition stabilized and closely resembled that found under constant warm temperatures. Consistent with this, heat tolerance in the fluctuating temperature treatment was comparable to the constant warm treatment. Cold tolerance in the fluctuating temperature treatment was intermediate compared to animals acclimated to constant cold or warmth, despite the fact that fatty acid composition was adjusted to warm conditions. This unexpected finding suggests that in animals acclimated to fluctuating temperatures an additional underlying mechanism is involved in the cold shock response. Other aspects of homeoviscous adaptation may protect animals during extreme cold. This paper forms a next step to fully understand the functioning of ectotherms in more thermally variable environments.

  17. Insulin Receptor Processing and Lipid Composition of Erythrocyte Membrane in Patients with Hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Masella, R.; Cantafora, A.; Maffì, D.; Volpe, R.; Ginnetti, M.G.; Ricci, G.; Mace, N.L.; Buxton, G.M.; Peterson, S.W.

    1995-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the common forms of dyslipidemia could affect either the lipid composition or insulin receptor processing (down-regulation) of erythrocytes. The study included 22 patients with type IIa hypercholesterolemia, 15 patients with type IV hypertriglyceridemia and 12 patients with type IIb hyperlipidemia. Ten normolipidemic subjects were used as controls. Their erythrocyte membranes were analyzed for lipid composition and insulin receptor down-regulation. The results show that all the hyperlipidemias investigated were characterized by significant increases in the cholesterol to phospholipid molar ratio (0.56 +/- 0.08 in controls and 1.11 +/- 0.13, 1.09 +/- 0.14, 1.04 +/- 0.15, p < 0.001, in types IIa, IIb and IV, respectively). Surface insulin receptors of type IIa and IIb patients did not appear to down-regulate when compared to normal subjects, but rather up-regulated (+65.2% in controls, -1.0% and -8.7%, p < 0.001, in type IIa and IIb patients, respectively). Patients with type IV hypertriglyceridemia showed a residual capacity for insulin receptor internalization (10.7% down-regulation). Membranes of all the patients contained a higher proportion of phosphatidylethanolamine; the molar ratio of sphingomyelin to phosphatidylcholine was significantly higher in types IIb than in controls (1.22 +/- 0.11 and 1.12 +/- 0.10, p < 0.05, respectively); all the patients showed a lower content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the major glycerophospholipid classes. However, type IV hypertriglyceridemics showed less variations, especially in the phosphatidylserine fraction. These results indicate that the alterations in lipoprotein pattern may affect both the lipid membrane equilibria and the processing ability of surface insulin receptors. Copyright 1995 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Fruit cuticle lipid composition and water loss in a diverse collection of pepper (Capsicum).

    PubMed

    Parsons, Eugene P; Popopvsky, Sigal; Lohrey, Gregory T; Alkalai-Tuvia, Sharon; Perzelan, Yaacov; Bosland, Paul; Bebeli, Penelope J; Paran, Ilan; Fallik, Elazar; Jenks, Matthew A

    2013-10-01

    Pepper (Capsicum spp.) fruits are covered by a relatively thick coating of cuticle that limits fruit water loss, a trait previously associated with maintenance of postharvest fruit quality during commercial marketing. To shed light on the chemical-compositional diversity of cuticles in pepper, the fruit cuticles from 50 diverse pepper genotypes from a world collection were screened for both wax and cutin monomer amount and composition. These same genotypes were also screened for fruit water loss rate and this was tested for associations with cuticle composition. Our results revealed an unexpectedly large amount of variation for the fruit cuticle lipids, with a more than 14-fold range for total wax amounts and a more than 16-fold range for cutin monomer amounts between the most extreme accessions. Within the major wax constituents fatty acids varied from 1 to 46%, primary alcohols from 2 to 19%, n-alkanes from 13 to 74% and triterpenoids and sterols from 10 to 77%. Within the cutin monomers, total hexadecanoic acids ranged from 54 to 87%, total octadecanoic acids ranged from 10 to 38% and coumaric acids ranged from 0.2 to 8% of the total. We also observed considerable differences in water loss among the accessions, and unique correlations between water loss and cuticle constituents. The resources described here will be valuable for future studies of the physiological function of fruit cuticle, for the identification of genes and QTLs associated with fruit cuticle synthesis in pepper fruit, and as a starting point for breeding improved fruit quality in pepper.

  19. Acid-Catalyzed Algal Biomass Pretreatment for Integrated Lipid and Carbohydrate-Based Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect

    Laurens, L. M. L.; Nagle, N.; Davis, R.; Sweeney, N.; Van Wychen, S.; Lowell, A.; Pienkos, P. T.

    2014-11-12

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. We studied the effect of harvest timing on the conversion yields, using two algal strains; Chlorella and Scenedesmus, generating biomass with distinctive compositional ratios of protein, carbohydrate, and lipids. We found that the late harvest Scenedesmus biomass had the maximum theoretical biofuel potential at 143 gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) combined fuel yield per dry ton biomass, followed by late harvest Chlorella at 128 GGE per ton. Our experimental data show a clear difference between the two strains, as Scenedesmus was more successfully converted in this process with a demonstrated 97 GGE per ton. Our measurements indicated a release of >90% of the available glucose in the hydrolysate liquors and an extraction and recovery of up to 97% of the fatty acids from wet biomass. Techno-economic analysis for the combined product yields indicates that this process exhibits the potential to improve per-gallon fuel costs by up to 33% compared to a lipids-only process for one strain, Scenedesmus, grown to the mid-point harvest condition.

  20. Non-acidic activation of pain-related Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 3 by lipids.

    PubMed

    Marra, Sébastien; Ferru-Clément, Romain; Breuil, Véronique; Delaunay, Anne; Christin, Marine; Friend, Valérie; Sebille, Stéphane; Cognard, Christian; Ferreira, Thierry; Roux, Christian; Euller-Ziegler, Liana; Noel, Jacques; Lingueglia, Eric; Deval, Emmanuel

    2016-02-15

    Extracellular pH variations are seen as the principal endogenous signal that triggers activation of Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs), which are basically considered as proton sensors, and are involved in various processes associated with tissue acidification. Here, we show that human painful inflammatory exudates, displaying non-acidic pH, induce a slow constitutive activation of human ASIC3 channels. This effect is largely driven by lipids, and we identify lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and arachidonic acid (AA) as endogenous activators of ASIC3 in the absence of any extracellular acidification. The combination of LPC and AA evokes robust depolarizing current in DRG neurons at physiological pH 7.4, increases nociceptive C-fiber firing, and induces pain behavior in rats, effects that are all prevented by ASIC3 blockers. Lipid-induced pain is also significantly reduced in ASIC3 knockout mice. These findings open new perspectives on the roles of ASIC3 in the absence of tissue pH variation, as well as on the contribution of those channels to lipid-mediated signaling.

  1. Fatty acid concentration, proximate composition, and mineral composition in fishbone flour of Nile Tilapia.

    PubMed

    Petenuci, Maria Eugênia; Stevanato, Flávia Braidoti; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Matsushita, Makoto; Garcia, Edivaldo Egea; de Souza, Nilson Evelázio; Visentainer, Jesui Vergilio

    2008-03-01

    Nile tilapia (Oreochormis niloticus) fishbone is a fish part with unknown composition. After elaboration of flour fishbone of tilapia it was analysede. The results in 100 g of flour were: moisture (14.2%), protein (40.8%), total lipids (25.3%), and ash (18.3%), and mineral (in 100 g) was 2715.9 mg (calcium), 1.3 mg (iron), and 1132.7 mg (phosphorus). A total of 22 fatty acids were detected in fishbone flour total lipids (TL), being the major ones in (g) of total lipids: 16:0 (208.5 mg); 18:1n-9 (344.3 mg); and 18:2n-6 (109.6 mg). The concentration of linolenic acid--LNA (18:3n-3); eicopentaenoic acid--EPA (20:5n-3), and docosahexaenoic acid--DHA (22:6n-3) were (29.9 mg), (3.3 mg), and (12.9 mg), respectively. The content to saturated (SFA) were (296.2 mg), monounsaturated (MUFA) 415.0 mg, and polyunsaturated (PUFA) 175.6 mg. The ratio PUFA:MUFA:SFA was 1:2.4:1.7, and the ratio omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids were 2.8. The last is within the recommended values. The results show low concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids in flour. The value caloric and calcium, iron, phosphorus, and protein content the fishbone flour of tilapia may results a valuable alternative food in the human diet.

  2. Lipid composition of slash pine tissue cultures grown with lunar and earth soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.; Weete, J. D.; Baur, P. S.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    Lipid analyses were conducted on slash pine tissues grown in culture in the presence of lunar (Apollo 15) and earth soils. Significant reductions in the total lipids, fatty acids, and sterol components were found in the tissues grown in contact with each of the soils employed when compared to the control. Tissues grown with lunar soil showed the greatest reductions. These results are discussed with respect to previous ultrastructural studies on similarly treated slash pine tissues and lipid analyses on tobacco tissue cultures.

  3. Australian Acid Playa Lake as a Mars Analog: Results from Sediment Lipid Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, H.; Baldridge, A. M.; Stern, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The ephemeral saline acidic lakes on the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia have been suggested as geochemical analogues to martian terrains. Both are characterized by interbedded phyllosilicates and hydrated sulfates. On Mars, these areas indicate shifting environmental conditions, from the neutral/alkaline and wet conditions that dominated during the Noachian era to the more familiar dry, acidic conditions that began in the Hesperian. The habitability of such a dynamic environment can be informed by investigation of the Yilgarn Lake system. Previous work has found phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) evidence of microbial communities in sections of sediment cores taken from Lake Gilmore. These communities include both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, Actinomycetes, and even methanotrophs. Given recurring detection of methane on the martian surface, evidence of a methane cycling community in an analogous environment is of particular interest. In this study we analyze the carbon isotope composition of bulk organic material as well as extracted lipids from the Lake Gilmore sediment cores at both a near-shore and mid-lake location. These analyses reveal very low accumulations of organic carbon, concentrated primarily in the gypsum-rich near-shore core. The near-shore sediments show a down-core decrease in abundance of organic carbon as well as depletion in the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) with depth. Bulk carbon did not exhibit the unique, highly depleted, diagnostic signature associated with methanotrophic biomass. Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of carbon in extracted methanotroph PFLAs can confirm the presence of a methane cycling metabolism at depth. Also, additional extractions have isolated lipids associated with lake-edge grasses. These analyses consider both the chain-length distribution and carbon CSIA of these lipids in order to understand the effect of terrestrial detritus on any preserved methanotroph carbon signal, given the very low

  4. Rearing system and oleic acid supplementation effect on carcass and lipid characteristics of two muscles from an obese pig breed.

    PubMed

    Martins, J M; Neves, J A; Freitas, A; Tirapicos, J L

    2015-10-01

    Quality of pork depends on genotype, rearing and pre- and post-slaughter conditions. However, no information is available on rearing system changes and oleic acid supplementation on carcass characteristics and fatty acid (FA) profile of pork from the Alentejano (AL) pig, an obese breed. This study evaluates the effects of feeding low (LO) or high oleic acid diets (HO) to AL pigs reared in individual pens (IND) or outdoor (OUT) with access to pasture. Carcass composition was obtained and longissimus dorsi and semimembranosus samples were collected to analyse chemical composition and neutral and polar intramuscular lipids FA profile by gas chromatography. Statistical analysis was performed by a two-way ANOVA for rearing system and diet effects. OUT-reared pigs presented leaner carcasses than IND-reared ones. Both muscles presented lower intramuscular lipid content in OUT-reared pigs. Treatments affected the FA profile of muscles. Overall, OUT-reared pigs presented lower n-6/n-3 FA ratios, whereas pigs fed the HO diet exhibited lower saturated fatty acids (SFA), higher monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) levels and lower thrombogenic indexes on neutral intramuscular lipids than LO-fed pigs. On the polar fraction, OUT-reared pigs presented lower SAT and n-6/n-3 FA ratio, and higher polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) levels on both muscles. Pigs fed the HO diet exhibited higher MUFA and lower PUFA levels on both muscles, and lower SAT levels on semimembranosus. This study shows rearing system and oleic acid supplementation have complementary effects and influence carcass composition and the nutritional quality of meat.

  5. Radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in whole grain of rye, wheat and rice: Effects on linoleic and linolenic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaca, C. E.; Harms-Ringdahl, M.

    Changes in the fatty acid composition in lipids after γ-irradation of whole grain of wheat, rye and rice were examined. The radiosensitivity of linoleic acid (18:2) and linolenic acid (18:3) was studied up to a dose of 63 kGy in seeds with different water content and after a post-irradiation storage time of 2 months. At doses in the range recommended for grain desinfestation, i.e. 0.1-1.0 kGy, no detectable degradation of 18:2 and 18:3 was found, but at the highest dose applied, 63 kGy, a degradation in the range from a few percent up to 40% was observed. Under extreme conditions, i.e. pre- and post-irradation treatment with oxygen, or when the flour prepared from the seeds was mixed with water and heated before the extraction of the lipids, a more pronounced degradation of the unsaturated fatty acids was noticed. Lipid peroxidation induced by γ-irradation was estimated using the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) method. High yields of the TBA-reactive material were formed in the three types of grain investigated corresponding to G-values in the range of 12-18. The influence on peroxidation yields of the water content of the seeds was studied in wheat. The origin of the TBA-reactive material formed in the seeds is not yet known, but could only to a minor extent be due to fatty acid peroxidation.

  6. Amino acid- and lipid-induced insulin resistance in rat heart: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Terruzzi, Ileana; Allibardi, Sonia; Bendinelli, Paola; Maroni, Paola; Piccoletti, Roberta; Vesco, Flavio; Samaja, Michele; Luzi, Livio

    2002-04-25

    Lipids compete with glucose for utilization by the myocardium. Amino acids are an important energetic substrate in the heart but it is unknown whether they reduce glucose disposal. The molecular mechanisms by which lipids and amino acids impair insulin-mediated glucose disposal in the myocardium are unknown. We evaluated the effect of lipids and amino acids on the insulin stimulated glucose uptake in the isolated rat heart and explored the involved target proteins. The hearts were perfused with 16 mM glucose alone or with 6% lipid or 10% amino acid solutions at the rate of 15 ml/min. After 1 h of perfusion (basal period), insulin (240 nmol/l) was added and maintained for an additional hour. Both lipids and amino acids blocked the insulin effect on glucose uptake (P<0.01) and reduced the activity of the IRSs/PI 3-kinase/Akt/GSK3 axis leading to the activation of glucose transport and glycogen synthesis. Amino acids, but not lipids, increased the activity of the p70 S6 kinase leading to the stimulation of protein synthesis. Amino acids induce myocardial insulin resistance recruiting the same molecular mechanisms as lipids. Amino acids retain an insulin-like stimulatory effect on p70 S6 kinase, which is independent from the PI 3-Kinase downstream effectors.

  7. Normal lipid composition of fibroblasts from a case of type II achondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Le Lous, M; Hors-Cayla, M C; Hendrickx, G F; Maroteaux, P

    1980-08-01

    Fibroblasts from a case of achondrogenesis type II and fibroblasts from a normal control donor were subcultivated in vitro in parallel. The lipid study on these cells showed similar total lipid content, free cholesterol level, phospholipid distribution and fatty acid patterns, while neutral glycerides were slightly more elevated in the control fibroblasts. The histological finding of Laxova et al. (1973) could not be confirmed.

  8. Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid and carcinoembryonic antigen in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dnistrian, A M; Schwartz, M K

    1981-10-01

    We evaluated lipid-bound sialic acid as a "marker" in cancer patients and assessed the individual and combined value of lipid-bound sialic acid and carcinoembryonic antigen determinations in these patients. Plasma was sampled from 62 normal subjects and 125 cancer patients. Lipid-bound sialic acid was determined by the resorcinol method after total lipid extraction and isolation of the sialolipid fraction from plasma. Neither marker was increased in many breast cancer patients. Carcinoembryonic antigen was increased more commonly and to a greater degree in colon cancer patients and seems to be the preferred marker. Both markers were increased in lung cancer patients and their combined evaluation improved the rate of detection. Lipid-bound sialic acid was increased in more patients with leukemias, lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and melanomas, suggesting that it may be a useful biochemical marker in these types of cancer.

  9. Starch composites with aconitic acid.

    PubMed

    Gilfillan, William Neil; Doherty, William O S

    2016-05-05

    The aim of this project is to examine the effectiveness of using aconitic acid (AcA), a tricarboxylic acid which contains a carbon/carbon double bond (CC), to enhance the properties of starch-based films. Starch/glycerol cast films were prepared with 0, 2, 5, 10 and 15wt% AcA (starch wt% basis) and the properties analysed. It was shown that AcA acted as both a cross-linking agent and also a strong plasticising agent. The 5wt% AcA derived starch films were the most effectively cross-linked having the lowest solubility (28wt%) and decreased swelling coefficient (35vol.%) by approximately 3 times and 2.4 times respectively compared to the control film submerged in water (23°C). There was also a significant increase in the film elongation at break by approximately 35 times (compared to the control) with the addition of 15wt% AcA, emphasising the plasticising effect of AcA. However, generally there was a reduced tensile strength, softening of the film, and reduced thermal stability with increased amounts of AcA.

  10. Characterization of Fatty Acid Composition in Bone Marrow Fluid From Postmenopausal Women: Modification After Hip Fracture.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Melissa; Pino, Ana María; Fuenzalida, Karen; Rosen, Clifford J; Seitz, Germán; Rodríguez, J Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is associated with low bone mass, although the functional consequences for skeletal maintenance of increased BMAT are currently unclear. BMAT might have a role in systemic energy metabolism, and could be an energy source as well as an endocrine organ for neighboring bone cells, releasing cytokines, adipokines and free fatty acids into the bone marrow microenvironment. The aim of the present report was to compare the fatty acid composition in the bone marrow supernatant fluid (BMSF) and blood plasma of postmenopausal women women (65-80 years old). BMSF was obtained after spinning the aspirated bone marrow samples; donors were classified as control, osteopenic or osteoporotic after dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Total lipids from human bone marrow fluid and plasma were extracted, converted to the corresponding methyl esters, and finally analyzed by a gas chromatographer coupled with a mass spectrometer. Results showed that fatty acid composition in BMSF was dynamic and distinct from blood plasma, implying significance in the locally produced lipids. The fatty acid composition in the BMSF was enriched in saturated fatty acid and decreased in unsaturated fatty acids as compared to blood plasma, but this relationship switched in women who suffered a hip fracture. On the other hand, there was no relationship between BMSF and bone mineral density. In conclusion, lipid composition of BMSF is distinct from the circulatory compartment, most likely reflecting the energy needs of the marrow compartment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2370-2376, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. FadD Is Required for Utilization of Endogenous Fatty Acids Released from Membrane Lipids ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pech-Canul, Ángel; Nogales, Joaquina; Miranda-Molina, Alfonso; Álvarez, Laura; Geiger, Otto; Soto, María José; López-Lara, Isabel M.

    2011-01-01

    FadD is an acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase responsible for the activation of exogenous long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) into acyl-CoAs. Mutation of fadD in the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti promotes swarming motility and leads to defects in nodulation of alfalfa plants. In this study, we found that S. meliloti fadD mutants accumulated a mixture of free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. The composition of the free fatty acid pool and the results obtained after specific labeling of esterified fatty acids with a Δ5-desaturase (Δ5-Des) were in agreement with membrane phospholipids being the origin of the released fatty acids. Escherichia coli fadD mutants also accumulated free fatty acids released from membrane lipids in the stationary phase. This phenomenon did not occur in a mutant of E. coli with a deficient FadL fatty acid transporter, suggesting that the accumulation of fatty acids in fadD mutants occurs inside the cell. Our results indicate that, besides the activation of exogenous LCFA, in bacteria FadD plays a major role in the activation of endogenous fatty acids released from membrane lipids. Furthermore, expression analysis performed with S. meliloti revealed that a functional FadD is required for the upregulation of genes involved in fatty acid degradation and suggested that in the wild-type strain, the fatty acids released from membrane lipids are degraded by β-oxidation in the stationary phase of growth. PMID:21926226

  12. Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid alterations in neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, C; Dixit, M; Hardy, R E

    1990-01-15

    Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid (LSA) was assayed in normal volunteers, patients with non-malignant diseases, and a variety of cancer patients. Mean plasma LSA in 50 normal volunteers, 16 patients with non-malignant diseases, 54 breast cancer, 17 lung cancer, 15 colon cancer, 7 ovarian cancer, 5 prostate cancer, 4 leukemia, 4 gastrointestinal, 3 thyroid cancer, 3 pancreas cancer and 2 adrenal cancer patients were 17.7, 23.2, 58, 85, 56.7, 46.2, 56.7, 53.3, 31.1, 33.2 and 119.5 mg/dl, respectively. None of the normal volunteers had elevated plasma LSA values. Plasma LSA level was not significantly different in male and female volunteers. Two out of 114 different cancer patients had plasma LSA levels within normal range exhibiting 98.2% sensitivity of the assay. Plasma LSA, which is relatively simple to assay, may be used as a tumor marker in wide variety of neoplastic diseases.

  13. Changes in membrane fatty acid composition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in response to UV-C radiations.

    PubMed

    Ghorbal, Salma Kloula Ben; Chatti, Abdelwaheb; Sethom, Mohamed Marwan; Maalej, Lobna; Mihoub, Mouadh; Kefacha, Sana; Feki, Moncef; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Hassen, Abdennaceur

    2013-07-01

    The changes in lipid composition enable the micro-organisms to maintain membrane functions in the face of environmental fluctuations. The relationship between membrane fatty acid composition and UV-C stress was determined for mid-exponential phase and stationary phase Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The total lipids were obtained by dichloromethane/methanol (3:1) and were quantified by GC. The TLC analysis of phospholipids showed the presence of three major fractions phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cardiolipin. Significant modifications, as manifested by an increase of UFA, were obtained. Interestingly, this microorganism showed a remarkable capacity for recovery from the stressful effects of UV-C.

  14. Relationship of fatty acid composition to intramuscular fat content in beef from crossbred Wagyu cattle.

    PubMed

    Kazala, E C; Lozeman, F J; Mir, P S; Laroche, A; Bailey, D R; Weselake, R J

    1999-07-01

    The deposition of i.m. fat, or marbling, in cattle is recognized as a desirable carcass trait in North American beef grading schemes. In order to investigate the relationship between degree of marbling and fatty acid composition of whole bovine muscle, we extracted the total lipid from pars costalis diaphragmatis (PCD) (n = 23) and longissimus (n = 36) muscles from Wagyu crossbred cattle that were assigned Canadian Grading Agency marbling scores ranging from 1 to 8 on an inverse 10-point scale (i.e., a score of 1 indicated "very abundant" marbling and a score of 10 would be assigned to a carcass "devoid" of marbling). Fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) of the total lipid and triacylglycerol fractions were resolved and quantified through GLC. Marbling scores were negatively associated with total lipid from both PCD (r = -.57, P < .01) and longissimus (r = -.80, P < .001). Differences between PCD and longissimus were found for almost all FAME studied from both lipid fractions, but no differences (P > .05) were seen when the monounsaturated:saturated fatty acid (MUFA/SFA) ratios were compared. Heifers had higher (P < .05) oleic acid content and lower (P < .05) palmitic acid content in lipid extracted from both muscles, resulting in higher (P < .05) MUFA/SFA ratios than those for steers. The relative amount of myristic acid increased as the lipid content (total lipid and triacylglycerol) increased in either longissimus (r values from .48 to .55; n = 36; P < .01) or PCD muscles (r from .67 to .76; n = 23; P < .001). The relative amount of linoleic acid (cis-9, cis-12 isomer) from total lipid was negatively associated with all chemical measurements of lipid from the longissimus (r from -.52 to -.64; n = 36; P < .001) and PCD muscles (r from -.75 to -.85; n = 23; P < .001). This association was not significant (P > .1) for either muscle when linoleic acid from the triacylglycerol fraction was examined, suggesting the negative association between this fatty acid and lipid

  15. The adrenal specific toxicant mitotane directly interacts with lipid membranes and alters membrane properties depending on lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, Holger A; Haralampiev, Ivan; Theisgen, Stephan; Schirbel, Andreas; Sbiera, Silviu; Huster, Daniel; Kroiss, Matthias; Müller, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Mitotane (o,p'.-DDD) is an orphan drug approved for the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma. The mechanisms, which are responsible for this activity of the drug, are not completely understood. It can be hypothesized that an impact of mitotane is mediated by the interaction with cellular membranes. However, an interaction of mitotane with (lipid) membranes has not yet been investigated in detail. Here, we characterized the interaction of mitotane and its main metabolite o,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroacetic acid (o,p'-DDA) with lipid membranes by applying a variety of biophysical approaches of nuclear magnetic resonance, electron spin resonance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that mitotane and o,p'-DDA bind to lipid membranes by inserting into the lipid-water interface of the bilayer. Mitotane but not o,p'-DDA directly causes a disturbance of bilayer structure leading to an increased permeability of the membrane for polar molecules. Mitotane induced alterations of the membrane integrity required the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine and/or cholesterol. Collectively, our data for the first time characterize the impact of mitotane on the lipid membrane structure and dynamics, which may contribute to a better understanding of specific mitotane effects and side effects.

  16. Wildfire effects on soil lipid composition in burnt eucalypt stands, in north-central Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, Sílvia; De la Rosa, José Maria; Knicker, Heike; González-Pérez, José A.; González-Vila, Francisco J.; Keizer, Jan Jacob

    2013-04-01

    long chain molecules. All, burnt and unburnt samples contained a homologous series of C18 - C35 n-alkanes, with maximum at C27 and C29. The results further suggested an enrichment in the burnt samples of homologues of low molecular weight (as evidenced by a decrease in average chain length) and of even-numbered homologues (as evidenced by a decrease in the Carbon Preference Index-CPI). Apparently, the wildfire also reduced the natural odd-to-even CPI of the n-alkane series. Saturated n-fatty acid bimodal series were detected in the range C14-C3, with a sharp first maximum at C16 and a second maximum at C24, indicating a strong contribution by epicuticular waxes from vascular plants. The n-fatty acid series distribution seemed a particularly good indicator of soil quality status and post-fire recovery, discerning significant seasonal variations in the lipid composition as well as a partial recovery of after 24 months after the wildfire.

  17. Maximized PUFA measurements improve insight in changes in fatty acid composition in response to temperature.

    PubMed

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Pel, Roel; Ellers, Jacintha

    2009-10-01

    A general mechanism underlying the response of ectotherms to environmental changes often involves changes in fatty acid composition. Theory predicts that a decrease in temperature causes an increase in unsaturation of fatty acids, with an important role for long-chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). However, PUFAs are particularly unstable and susceptible to peroxidation, hence subtle differences in fatty acid composition can be challenging to detect. We determined the fatty acid composition in springtail (Collembola) in response to two temperatures (5 degrees C and 25 degrees C). First, we tested different sample preparation methods to maximize PUFAs. Treatments consisted of different solvents for primary lipid extraction, mixing with antioxidant, flushing with inert gas, and using different temperature exposures during saponification. Especially slow saponification at low temperature (90 min at 70 degrees C) in combination with replacement of headspace air with nitrogen during saponification and methylation maximized PUFAs for GC analysis. Applying these methods to measure thermal responses in fatty acid composition, the data showed that the (maximized) proportion of C(20) PUFAs increased at low acclimation temperature. However, C(18) PUFAs increased at high acclimation temperature, which is contrary to expectations. Our study illustrates that PUFA levels in lipids may often be underestimated and this may hamper a correct interpretation of differential responses of fatty acid composition.

  18. Effect of γ irradiation on the fatty acid composition of soybean and soybean oil.

    PubMed

    Minami, Ikuko; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Todoriki, Setsuko; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Food irradiation is a form of food processing to extend the shelf life and reduce spoilage of food. We examined the effects of γ radiation on the fatty acid composition, lipid peroxidation level, and antioxidative activity of soybean and soybean oil which both contain a large amount of unsaturated fatty acids. Irradiation at 10 to 80 kGy under aerobic conditions did not markedly change the fatty acid composition of soybean. While 10-kGy irradiation did not markedly affect the fatty acid composition of soybean oil under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, 40-kGy irradiation considerably altered the fatty acid composition of soybean oil under aerobic conditions, but not under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, 40-kGy irradiation produced a significant amount of trans fatty acids under aerobic conditions, but not under anaerobic conditions. Irradiating soybean oil induced lipid peroxidation and reduced the radical scavenging activity under aerobic conditions, but had no effect under anaerobic conditions. These results indicate that the fatty acid composition of soybean was not markedly affected by radiation at 10 kGy, and that anaerobic conditions reduced the degradation of soybean oil that occurred with high doses of γ radiation.

  19. Lipid classes and fatty acid regiodistribution in triacylglycerols of seed oils of two Sambucus species (S. nigra L. and S. ebulus L.).

    PubMed

    Dulf, Francisc Vasile; Oroian, Ioan; Vodnar, Dan Cristian; Socaciu, Carmen; Pintea, Adela

    2013-09-25

    The oil content and fatty acid composition of total lipids (TLs) and main lipid classes (NLs- neutral and PLs- polar lipids) in seeds of two wild Sambucus species (S. nigra and S. ebulus) from Transylvania (Romania) were determined by capillary gas chromatography (GC-MS). In addition, the positional distribution of fatty acids in seed triacylglycerols (TAGs) was determined by hydrolysis with pancreatic lipase. The seeds were found to be rich in fat (22.40-24.90 g/100g) with high amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) ranging from 68.96% (S. ebulus) to 75.15% (S. nigra). High ratios of PUFAs/SFAs (saturated fatty acids), ranging from 7.06 (S. nigra) to 7.64 (S. ebulus), and low ratios of n-6/n-3, ranging from 0.84 (S. nigra) to 1.51 (S. ebulus), were determined in both oils. The lipid classes/subclasses analyzed (PLs, MAGs--monoacylglycerols, DAGs--diacylglycerols, FFAs--free fatty acids, TAGs and SEs--sterol esters) were separated and identified using thin-layer chromatography. The fatty acid compositions of the TAG fractions were practically identical to the profiles of TLs, with the same dominating fatty acids in both analyzed species. SEs and FFAs, were characterized by high proportions of SFAs. The sn-2 position of TAGs was esterified predominantly with linoleic acid (43.56% for S. nigra and 50.41% for S. ebulus).

  20. Milk fat globules: fatty acid composition, size and in vivo regulation of fat liquidity.

    PubMed

    Timmen, H; Patton, S

    1988-07-01

    Populations of large and small milk fat globules were isolated and analyzed to determine differences in fatty acid composition. Globule samples were obtained by centrifugation from milks of a herd and of individual animals produced under both pasture and barn feeding. Triacylglycerols of total globule lipids were prepared by thin layer chromatography and analyzed for fatty acid composition by gas chromatography. Using content of the acids in large globules as 100%, small globules contained fewer short-chain acids, -5.9%, less stearic acid, -22.7%, and more oleic acids, +4.6%, mean values for five trials. These differences are consistent with alternative use of short-chain acids or oleic acid converted from stearic acid to maintain liquidity at body temperature of milk fat globules and their precursors, intracellular lipid droplets. Stearyl-CoA desaturase (EC 1.14.99.5), which maintains fluidity of cellular endoplasmic reticulum membrane, is suggested to play a key role in regulating globule fat liquidity. Possible origins of differences between individual globules in fatty acid composition of their triacylglycerols are discussed.

  1. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopic studies of hexane-extractable lipids from soils under shelterbelts of different age and composition of plants.

    PubMed

    Szajdak, Lech Wojciech; Maryganova, Victoria; Skakovskii, Eugene; Tychinskaya, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    Comparative study of the composition of lipids extracted with n-hexane from soils under shelterbelts of different age and composition of plants and adjoining cultivated fields in agrolandscape has been carried out with the application of (1)Н and (13)С NMR spectroscopy. The lipid content correlates with the organic carbon content in soils and is the highest in the soil under the 200-years old shelterbelt. The data received indicate that hexane-extractable lipids from the soil under the 200-years old shelterbelt have undergone the most significant biochemical and chemical transformations (oxidation, hydrolysis, polymerization) with the accumulation of resistant compounds and destruction of esters of o-phthalic acid as anthropogenic contaminants compared to the lipids from the soil under the 14-years old shelterbelt and soils of adjoining arable fields.

  2. Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 + 0.7% and 8.8 + 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 + 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 + 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 + 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

  3. Dietary linoleic acid-induced alterations in pro- and anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Amit; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon F; Yang, Jun; Blanchard, Helene; Zamora, Daisy; Loewke, James D; Rapoport, Stanley I; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Davis, John M; Hammock, Bruce D; Taha, Ameer Y

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic idiopathic pain syndromes are major causes of personal suffering, disability, and societal expense. Dietary n-6 linoleic acid has increased markedly in modern industrialized populations over the past century. These high amounts of linoleic acid could hypothetically predispose to physical pain by increasing the production of pro-nociceptive linoleic acid-derived lipid autacoids and by interfering with the production of anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids derived from n-3 fatty acids. Here, we used a rat model to determine the effect of increasing dietary linoleic acid as a controlled variable for 15 weeks on nociceptive lipid autacoids and their precursor n-6 and n-3 fatty acids in tissues associated with idiopathic pain syndromes. Results Increasing dietary linoleic acid markedly increased the abundance of linoleic acid and its pro-nociceptive derivatives and reduced the abundance of n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and their anti-nociceptive monoepoxide derivatives. Diet-induced changes occurred in a tissue-specific manner, with marked alterations of nociceptive lipid autacoids in both peripheral and central tissues, and the most pronounced changes in their fatty acid precursors in peripheral tissues. Conclusions The present findings provide biochemical support for the hypothesis that the high linoleic acid content of modern industrialized diets may create a biochemical susceptibility to develop chronic pain. Dietary linoleic acid lowering should be further investigated as part of an integrative strategy for the prevention and management of idiopathic pain syndromes. PMID:27030719

  4. Trans fatty acids and fatty acid composition of mature breast milk in turkish women and their association with maternal diet's.

    PubMed

    Samur, Gülhan; Topcu, Ali; Turan, Semra

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the fatty acid composition and trans fatty acid and fatty acid contents of breast milk in Turkish women and to find the effect of breastfeeding mothers' diet on trans fatty acid and fatty acid composition. Mature milk samples obtained from 50 Turkish nursing women were analyzed. Total milk lipids extracts were transmethylated and analyzed by using gas liquid chromatography to determine fatty acids contents. A questionnaire was applied to observe eating habits and 3 days dietary records from mothers were obtained. Daily dietary intake of total energy and nutrients were estimated by using nutrient database. The mean total trans fatty acids contents was 2.13 +/- 1.03%. The major sources of trans fatty acids in mothers' diets were margarines-butter (37.0%), bakery products and confectionery (29.6%). Mothers who had high level of trans isomers in their milk consumed significantly higher amounts of these products. Saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fatty acids of human milk constituted 40.7 +/- 4.7%, 26.9 +/- 4.2% and 30.8 +/- 0.6% of the total fatty acids, respectively. The levels of fatty acids in human milk may reflect the current diet of the mother as well as the diet consumed early in pregnancy. Margarines, bakery products and confectionery are a major source of trans fatty acids in maternal diet in Turkey.

  5. Dual Role for Phospholipid:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase: Enhancing Fatty Acid Synthesis and Diverting Fatty Acids from Membrane Lipids to Triacylglycerol in Arabidopsis Leaves[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jilian; Yan, Chengshi; Zhang, Xuebin; Xu, Changcheng

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in engineering green biomass to expand the production of plant oils as feed and biofuels. Here, we show that PHOSPHOLIPID:DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE1 (PDAT1) is a critical enzyme involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis in leaves. Overexpression of PDAT1 increases leaf TAG accumulation, leading to oil droplet overexpansion through fusion. Ectopic expression of oleosin promotes the clustering of small oil droplets. Coexpression of PDAT1 with oleosin boosts leaf TAG content by up to 6.4% of the dry weight without affecting membrane lipid composition and plant growth. PDAT1 overexpression stimulates fatty acid synthesis (FAS) and increases fatty acid flux toward the prokaryotic glycerolipid pathway. In the trigalactosyldiacylglycerol1-1 mutant, which is defective in eukaryotic thylakoid lipid synthesis, the combined overexpression of PDAT1 with oleosin increases leaf TAG content to 8.6% of the dry weight and total leaf lipid by fourfold. In the plastidic glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase1 mutant, which is defective in the prokaryotic glycerolipid pathway, PDAT1 overexpression enhances TAG content at the expense of thylakoid membrane lipids, leading to defects in chloroplast division and thylakoid biogenesis. Collectively, these results reveal a dual role for PDAT1 in enhancing fatty acid and TAG synthesis in leaves and suggest that increasing FAS is the key to engineering high levels of TAG accumulation in green biomass. PMID:24076979

  6. Lipid metabolism and body composition in Gclm(-/-) mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kendig, Eric L.; Chen, Ying; Krishan, Mansi; Johansson, Elisabet; Schneider, Scott N.; Genter, Mary Beth; Nebert, Daniel W.; Shertzer, Howard G.

    2011-12-15

    In humans and experimental animals, high fat diets (HFD) are associated with risk factors for metabolic diseases, such as excessive weight gain and adiposity, insulin resistance and fatty liver. Mice lacking the glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit gene (Gclm(-/-)) and deficient in glutathione (GSH), are resistant to HFD-mediated weight gain. Herein, we evaluated Gclm-associated regulation of energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and glucose and lipid homeostasis. C57BL/6J Gclm(-/-) mice and littermate wild-type (WT) controls received a normal diet or an HFD for 11 weeks. HFD-fed Gclm(-/-) mice did not display a decreased respiratory quotient, suggesting that they are unable to process lipid for metabolism. Although dietary energy consumption and intestinal lipid absorption were unchanged in Gclm(-/-) mice, feeding these mice an HFD did not produce excess body weight nor fat storage. Gclm(-/-) mice displayed higher basal metabolic rates resulting from higher activities of liver mitochondrial NADH-CoQ oxidoreductase, thus elevating respiration. Although Gclm(-/-) mice exhibited strong systemic and hepatic oxidative stress responses, HFD did not promote glucose intolerance or insulin resistance. Furthermore, HFD-fed Gclm(-/-) mice did not develop fatty liver, likely resulting from very low expression levels of genes encoding lipid metabolizing enzymes. We conclude that Gclm is involved in the regulation of basal metabolic rate and the metabolism of dietary lipid. Although Gclm(-/-) mice display a strong oxidative stress response, they are protected from HFD-induced excessive weight gain and adipose deposition, insulin resistance and steatosis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high fat diet does not produce body weight and fat gain in Gclm(-/-) mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high fat diet does not induce steatosis or insulin resistance in Gclm(-/-) mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gclm(-/-) mice have high basal metabolism and mitochondrial

  7. Altered membrane lipid composition and functional parameters of circulating cells in cockles (Cerastoderma edule) affected by disseminated neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Le Grand, Fabienne; Soudant, Philippe; Marty, Yanic; Le Goïc, Nelly; Kraffe, Edouard

    2013-01-01

    Membrane lipid composition and morpho-functional parameters were investigated in circulating cells of the edible cockle (Cerastoderma edule) affected by disseminated neoplasia (neoplastic cells) and compared to those from healthy cockles (hemocytes). Membrane sterol levels, phospholipid (PL) class and subclass proportions and their respective fatty acid (FA) compositions were determined. Morpho-functional parameters were evaluated through total hemocyte count (THC), mortality rate, phagocytosis ability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Both morpho-functional parameters and lipid composition were profoundly affected in neoplastic cells. These dedifferentiated cells displayed higher THC (5×), mortality rate (3×) and ROS production with addition of carbonyl cyanide m-chloro phenylhydrazone (1.7×) but lower phagocytosis ability (½×), than unaffected hemocytes. Total PL amounts were higher in neoplastic cells than in hemocytes (12.3 and 5.1 nmol×10(-6) cells, respectively). However, sterols and a particular subclass of PL (plasmalogens; 1-alkenyl-2-acyl PL) were present in similar amounts in both cell type membranes. This led to a two times lower proportion of these membrane lipid constituents in neoplastic cells when compared to hemocytes (20.5% vs. 42.1% of sterols in total membrane lipids and 21.7% vs. 44.2% of plasmalogens among total PL, respectively). Proportions of non-methylene interrupted FA- and 20:1n-11-plasmalogen molecular species were the most impacted in neoplastic cells when compared to hemocytes (⅓× and ¼×, respectively). These changes in response to this leukemia-like disease in bivalves highlight the specific imbalance of plasmalogens and sterols in neoplastic cells, in comparison to the greater stability of other membrane lipid components.

  8. The impact of membrane lipid composition on macrophage activation in the immune defense against Rhodococcus equi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Schoeniger, Axel; Adolph, Stephanie; Fuhrmann, Herbert; Schumann, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Nutritional fatty acids are known to have an impact on membrane lipid composition of body cells, including cells of the immune system, thus providing a link between dietary fatty acid uptake, inflammation and immunity. In this study we reveal the significance of macrophage membrane lipid composition on gene expression and cytokine synthesis thereby highlighting signal transduction processes, macrophage activation as well as macrophage defense mechanisms. Using RAW264.7 macrophages as a model system, we identified polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of both the n-3 and the n-6 family to down-regulate the synthesis of: (i) the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α; (ii) the co-stimulatory molecule CD86; as well as (iii) the antimicrobial polypeptide lysozyme. The action of the fatty acids partially depended on the activation status of the macrophages. It is particularly important to note that the anti-inflammatory action of the PUFA could also be seen in case of infection of RAW264.7 with viable microorganisms of the genera R. equi and P. aeruginosa. In summary, our data provide strong evidence that PUFA from both the n-3 and the n-6 family down-regulate inflammation processes in context of chronic infections caused by persistent pathogens.

  9. Fatty acids for controlled release applications: A comparison between prilling and solid lipid extrusion as manufacturing techniques.

    PubMed

    Vervaeck, A; Monteyne, T; Siepmann, F; Boone, M N; Van Hoorebeke, L; De Beer, T; Siepmann, J; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the solid state characteristics, drug release and stability of fatty acid-based formulations after processing via prilling and solid lipid extrusion. Myristic acid (MA), stearic acid (SA) and behenic acid (BA) were used as matrix formers combined with metoprolol tartrate (MPT) as model drug. The prilling process allowed complete dissolution of MPT in the molten fatty acid phase, generating semi-crystalline MPT and the formation of hydrogen bonds between drug and fatty acids in the solid prills. In contrast, as solid lipid extrusion (SLE) induced only limited melting of the fatty acids, molecular interaction with the drug was inhibited, yielding crystalline MPT. Although the addition of a low melting fatty acid allowed more MPT/fatty acid interaction during extrusion, crystalline MPT was detected after processing. Mathematical modeling revealed that the extrudates exhibited a higher apparent drug/water mobility than prills of the same composition, probably due to differences in the inner systems' structure. Irrespective of the processing method, mixed fatty acid systems (e.g. MA/BA) exhibited a lower matrix porosity, resulting in a slower drug release rate. Solid state analysis of these systems indicated that the crystalline structure of the fatty acids was maintained after SLE, while prilling generated a reduced MA crystallinity. Binary MPT/fatty acid systems processed via extrusion showed better stability during storage at 40 °C than the corresponding prills. Although mixed fatty acid systems were stable at 25 °C, stability problems were encountered during storage at 40 °C: a faster release was obtained from the prills, whereas drug release from the extrudates was slower.

  10. Reduced expression of CDP-DAG synthase changes lipid composition and leads to male sterility in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Laurinyecz, Barbara; Péter, Mária; Vedelek, Viktor; Kovács, Attila L.; Juhász, Gábor; Maróy, Péter; Vígh, László; Balogh, Gábor; Sinka, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila spermatogenesis is an ideal system to study the effects of changes in lipid composition, because spermatid elongation and individualization requires extensive membrane biosynthesis and remodelling. The bulk of transcriptional activity is completed with the entry of cysts into meiotic division, which makes post-meiotic stages of spermatogenesis very sensitive to even a small reduction in gene products. In this study, we describe the effect of changes in lipid composition during spermatogenesis using a hypomorphic male sterile allele of the Drosophila CDP-DAG synthase (CdsA) gene. We find that the CdsA mutant shows defects in spermatid individualization and enlargement of mitochondria and the axonemal sheath of the spermatids. Furthermore, we could genetically rescue the male sterile phenotype by overexpressing Phosphatidylinositol synthase (dPIS) in a CdsA mutant background. The results of lipidomic and genetic analyses of the CdsA mutant highlight the importance of correct lipid composition during sperm development and show that phosphatidic acid levels are crucial in late stages of spermatogenesis. PMID:26791243

  11. LIPID CLASS DISTRIBUTION OF HIGHLY UNSATURATED LONG-CHAIN FATTY ACIDS IN MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Very-long-chain highly unsaturated C28 fatty acids (HUFAs), found in a number of dinoflagellates, are released as methyl esters from phospholipids obtained by fractionation of lipid extracts. By contrast, the highly unsaturated C18 fatty acid octadecapentaenoic acid (18:5n-3), co...

  12. Determination of fatty acid composition and quality characteristics of oils from palm fruits using solvent extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasmin, Hasimah; Lazim, Azwan Mat; Awang, Roila

    2015-09-01

    Palm oil contains about 45% of saturated palmitic acid and 39% of mono-unsaturated oleic acid. Investigations made in the past to trace the fatty acid composition in palm revealed that ripeness of fresh fruit bunch (FFB) affect oil composition. However, there is no evidence that processing operations affect oil composition, although different stage of processing does affect the quality of oil extracted. An improved method for sterilizing the oil palm fruits by dry heating, followed by oil extraction has been studied. This method eliminates the use of water, thus, increasing the extraction of lipid soluble. The objective of this study is to determine the possibility production of palm oil with different fatty acid composition (FAC) as well as the changes in quality from conventional milling. The unripe and ripe FFB were collected, sterilized and extracted using different method of solvent extraction. Preliminary data have shown that variation in FAC will also alter the physical and chemical properties of the oil extracted.

  13. Altering the Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Synthesis (mtFASII) Pathway Modulates Cellular Metabolic States and Bioactive Lipid Profiles as Revealed by Metabolomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Hayley B.; Parl, Angelika K.; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Singh, Larry; Bell, Lauren N.; Murdock, Deborah G.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presence of a cytosolic fatty acid synthesis pathway, mitochondria have retained their own means of creating fatty acids via the mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (mtFASII) pathway. The reason for its conservation has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, to better understand the role of mtFASII in the cell, we used thin layer chromatography to characterize the contribution of the mtFASII pathway to the fatty acid composition of selected mitochondrial lipids. Next, we performed metabolomic analysis on HeLa cells in which the mtFASII pathway was either hypofunctional (through knockdown of mitochondrial acyl carrier protein, ACP) or hyperfunctional (through overexpression of mitochondrial enoyl-CoA reductase, MECR). Our results indicate that the mtFASII pathway contributes little to the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial lipid species examined. Additionally, loss of mtFASII function results in changes in biochemical pathways suggesting alterations in glucose utilization and redox state. Interestingly, levels of bioactive lipids, including lysophospholipids and sphingolipids, directly correlate with mtFASII function, indicating that mtFASII may be involved in the regulation of bioactive lipid levels. Regulation of bioactive lipid levels by mtFASII implicates the pathway as a mediator of intracellular signaling. PMID:26963735

  14. Palmitic acid, verified by lipid profiling using secondary ion mass spectrometry, demonstrates anti-multiple myeloma activity.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yasuyuki; Ishizaki, Itsuko; Waki, Michihiko; Ide, Yoshimi; Hossen, Md Amir; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Miyayama, Takuya; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies indicate that lipid metabolic changes affect the survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), an imaging mass spectrometry technique, is used to visualize the subcellular distribution of biomolecules including lipids. We therefore applied this method to human clinical specimens to analyze the membrane fatty acid composition and determine candidate molecules for MM therapies. We isolated MM cells and normal plasma cells (PCs) from bone marrow aspirates of MM patients and healthy volunteers, respectively, and these separated cells were analyzed by TOF-SIMS. Multiple ions including fatty acids were detected and their ion counts were estimated. In MM cells, the mean intensity of palmitic acid was significantly lower than the mean intensity in PCs. In a cell death assay, palmitic acid reduced U266 cell viability dose-dependently at doses between 50 and 1000 μM. The percentage of apoptotic cells increased from 24h after palmitic acid administration. In contrast, palmitic acid had no effect on the viability of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The results of this study indicated that palmitic acid is a potential candidate for novel therapeutic agents that specifically attack MM cells.

  15. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, B. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  16. Identification of marine-derived lipids in juvenile coho salmon and aquatic insects through fatty acid analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heintz, Ron A.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Hudson, John P.

    2010-01-01

    The energetic benefits enjoyed by consumers in streams with salmon runs depend on how those benefits are accrued. Adult Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. deliver significant amounts of nutrients (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus) and carbon to streams when they spawn and die; these nutrient additions can have demonstrable effects on primary production in streams. Consumption of carcass tissues or eggs provides for direct energy subsidies to consumers and may have significant effects on their condition. In this study, comparisons of juvenile coho salmon O. kisutch and aquatic insects exposed to terrestrial and marine energy sources demonstrated that direct consumption of marine-derived lipids had a significant effect on the lipid reserves of consumers. Direct consumption of marine-derived tissues was verified through fatty acid analysis. Selected aquatic insects and juvenile coho salmon were reared for 6 weeks in experimental streams supplied with terrestrial or marine energy sources. Chironomid midges, nemourid stoneflies, and juvenile coho salmon exposed to the marine energy source altered their fatty acid compositions by incorporating the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids that are characteristic of marine fish. The fatty acid composition of baetid mayflies was unaffected. The direct movement of specific fatty markers indicated that direct consumption of marine-derived tissues led to increased energy reserves (triacylglycerols) in consumers. Similar results were obtained for juvenile coho salmon sampled from natural streams before and after the arrival of adult salmon runs. These data indicate that marine-derived lipids from anadromous fish runs are an important source of reserve lipids for consumers that overwinter in streams.

  17. Pinolenic Acid Downregulates Lipid Anabolic Pathway in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ah Ron; Han, Sung Nim

    2016-07-01

    Pine nut oil (PNO) was reported to reduce lipid accumulation in the liver. However, the specific effect of pinolenic acid (18:3, all-cis-Δ5,9,12), a unique component of PNO, on lipid metabolism has not been studied. We hypothesized that pinolenic acid downregulates the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells. HepG2 cells were incubated in serum-free medium supplemented with 50 μM bovine serum albumin (BSA), palmitic acid, oleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, pinolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or α-linolenic acid for 24 h. Lipid accumulation was determined by Oil Red O (ORO) staining. The mRNA levels of genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis (SREBP1c, FAS, SCD1, and ACC1), fatty acid oxidation (ACC2, PPARα, CPT1A, and ACADL), cholesterol synthesis (SREBP2 and HMGCR), and lipoprotein uptake (LDLr) and of genes that may be involved in the downregulation of the lipogenic pathway (ACSL3, ACSL4, and ACSL5) were determined by qPCR. LDLR protein levels were measured by Western blot analysis. The mRNA levels of SREBP1c, FAS, and SCD1 were significantly downregulated by pinolenic acid treatment compared to BSA control (53, 54, and 38 % lower, respectively). In addition, the mRNA levels of HMGCR, ACSL3, and LDLr were significantly lower (30, 30, and 43 % lower, respectively), and ACSL4 tended to be lower in the pinolenic acid group (20 % lower, P = 0.082) relative to the control group. In conclusion, pinolenic acid downregulated the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells by reducing expression of genes related to lipid synthesis, lipoprotein uptake, and the regulation of the lipogenic pathway.

  18. Fatty Acid and Lipid Profiles with Emphasis on n-3 Fatty Acids and Phospholipids from Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yadong; Wang, Miao; Lindström, Mikael E; Li, Jiebing

    2015-10-01

    In order to establish Ciona intestinalis as a new bioresource for n-3 fatty acids-rich marine lipids, the animal was fractionated into tunic and inner body tissues prior to lipid extraction. The lipids obtained were further classified into neutral lipids (NL), glycolipids (GL) and phospholipids (PL) followed by qualitative and quantitative analysis using GC-FID, GC-MS, (1)H NMR, 2D NMR, MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-ESI-MS methods. It was found that the tunic and inner body tissues contained 3.42-4.08% and 15.9-23.4% of lipids respectively. PL was the dominant lipid class (42-60%) irrespective of the anatomic fractions. From all lipid fractions and classes, the major fatty acids were 16:0, 18:1n-9, C20:1n-9, C20:5n-3 (EPA) and C22:6n-3 (DHA). The highest amounts of long chain n-3 fatty acids, mainly EPA and DHA, were located in PL from both body fractions. Cholestanol and cholesterol were the dominant sterols together with noticeable amounts of stellasterol, 22 (Z)-dehydrocholesterol and lathosterol. Several other identified and two yet unidentified sterols were observed for the first time from C. intestinalis. Different molecular species of phosphatidylcholine (34 species), sphingomyelin (2 species), phosphatidylethanolamine (2 species), phosphatidylserine (10 species), phosphatidylglycerol (9 species), ceramide (38 species) and lysophospholipid (5 species) were identified, representing the most systematic PL profiling knowledge so far for the animal. It could be concluded that C. intestinalis lipids should be a good alternative for fish oil with high contents of n-3 fatty acids. The lipids would be more bioavailable due to the presence of the fatty acids being mainly in the form of PL.

  19. Coping with sub-optimal water temperature: modifications in fatty acid profile of barramundi as influenced by dietary lipid.

    PubMed

    Alhazzaa, Ramez; Bridle, Andrew R; Nichols, Peter D; Carter, Chris G

    2013-06-01

    Metabolic responses to sub-optimal temperature deplete lipid depots, remodel membrane lipid and alter the fatty acid profile in the whole body and tissues of ectothermic vertebrates including fish. The magnitude of these changes may depend on dietary history including oil sources with different fatty acid compositions. Barramundi, Lates calcarifer (Perciformes, Latidae), a tropical ectothermic fish, was fed on diets either rich in dietary long-chain (≥C(20)) polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) from fish oil, rich in stearidonic and γ-linolenic acid (SDA and GLA, respectively) from Echium plantagineum, or rapeseed oil deficient in LC-PUFA. Following 5 weeks at the optimum temperature of 30 °C when growth rates were comparable amongst dietary treatments, water temperature was dropped to 20 °C for 1 week for half of the animals and maintained at 30 °C for the other half. Decreased temperature increased the liver and skeletal muscle content of LC-PUFA in fish fed on echium oil compared with rapeseed oil, while dietary LC-PUFA depots in fish oil fed-fish depleted rapidly in the week of sub-optimal temperature. The lipid unsaturation index of cellular membrane in the liver and muscle increased under low temperature at the same rate regardless of dietary oil. Therefore, rapid exposure of an ectothermic vertebrate to a lower and sub-optimal temperature caused significant modulation in fatty acid composition. We propose that the tolerance of barramundi, a representative of tropical farmed fish, to sub-optimal temperature will be enhanced when fatty acid substrates closer to the LC-PUFA are available in their diet.

  20. Relationship between abnormal sperm morphology induced by dietary zinc deficiency and lipid composition in testes of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Merrells, Krystal J; Blewett, Heather; Jamieson, Jennifer A; Taylor, Carla G; Suh, Miyoung

    2009-07-01

    The present study investigated the effect of dietary Zn deficiency during sexual maturation on sperm integrity and testis phospholipid fatty acid composition. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were randomised into four dietary groups for 3 weeks: Zn control (ZC; 30 mg Zn/kg); Zn marginally deficient (ZMD; 9 mg Zn/kg); Zn deficient (ZD; < 1 mg Zn/kg); pair fed (PF; 30 mg Zn/kg) to the ZD group. Morphology of cauda epididymal sperm and lipid profiles of testis phospholipids were analysed. The rats fed the ZD diet had a lower testis weight (P < 0.02). Seminal vesicles and prostate weight were also lower in the ZD and PF groups. Rats fed the ZD diet, but not the ZMD diet, had 34-35 % more abnormal spermatozoa and 24 % shorter sperm tail length than the ZC and PF rats (P < 0.001). Testis cholesterol concentration was higher in the ZD rats compared with the ZC and PF rats (P < 0.04). Testes were highly enriched with n-6 fatty acids by showing n-6 : n-3 fatty acid ratios of 27:1 in phosphatidylcholine (PC) and 23:1 in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The dominant fatty acid in testes was docosapentaenoic acid (22 : 5n-6), comprising 15 and 24 % of PC and PE, respectively. This fatty acid was significantly lower in the ZD rats, whereas 18 : 2n-6 was higher compared with the rats in the other diet groups. These results demonstrate that severe Zn deficiency adversely affects sperm integrity and modulates testis fatty acid composition by interrupting essential fatty acid metabolism. This suggests that Zn deficiency-associated abnormal testicular function is perhaps preceded by altered membrane fatty acid composition, especially of a major fatty acid, 22 : 5n-6.

  1. [FATTY ACID COMPOSITION ALTEROMONAS-LIKE BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM THE BLACK SEA WATER].

    PubMed

    Klochko, V V; Avdeeva, L V

    2015-01-01

    Alteromonas macleodii strains isolated from the Black sea water were similar in their fatty acids composition with the type strain of this species. Analysis of lipid composition of 10 A. macleodii strains isolated from the deep and surface water layers in different World ocean regions including the Black sea water has shown that the deep and surface isolates of this species formed two groups different in their fatty acids profiles. The Black sea isolates of Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis, P. citrea, P. flavipulchra conformed to these species type strains in their fatty acids composition. On the basis of the fatty acids spectra similarity of three Pseudoalteromonas species strains with Plipolytica described in 2010 has been established. Presence of three isomers C16:1ψ7, C 16:1ψ9 and C16:1ψ6--components of hexadecenic acid in the Black sea isolates of Shewanella baltica has been shown.

  2. The effect of lipid content on the elemental composition and energy capacity of yeast biomass.

    PubMed

    Minkevich, Igor G; Dedyukhina, Emiliya G; Chistyakova, Tat'yana I

    2010-10-01

    Oleaginous yeasts (18 strains) were grown in ethanol media under various cultivation conditions (33 biomass samples). It was found that lipid and lipid-free fractions of dry biomass have elemental composition and biomass reductivity very close to values which can be considered as biological constants. The energy content of dry biomass strongly depended on the total lipid content. When the lipid content was 64%, the energy value of dry biomass reached 73% of diesel oil; therefore, oleaginous microorganisms can be a promising source of biodiesel fuel. The approach used in this work makes it possible to determine the energy value of biomass by its elemental composition without application of laborious and expensive calorimetric measurements of combustion heats.

  3. Serum Paraoxonase 1 Activity Is Associated with Fatty Acid Composition of High Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Boshtam, Maryam; Pourfarzam, Morteza; Ani, Mohsen; Naderi, Gholam Ali; Basati, Gholam; Mansourian, Marjan; Dinani, Narges Jafari; Asgary, Seddigheh; Abdi, Soheila

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Cardioprotective effect of high density lipoprotein (HDL) is, in part, dependent on its related enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (PON1). Fatty acid composition of HDL could affect its size and structure. On the other hand, PON1 activity is directly related to the structure of HDL. This study was designed to investigate the association between serum PON1 activity and fatty acid composition of HDL in healthy men. Methods. One hundred and forty healthy men participated in this research. HDL was separated by sequential ultracentrifugation, and its fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography. PON1 activity was measured spectrophotometrically using paraxon as substrate. Results. Serum PON1 activity was directly correlated with the amount of stearic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA). PON1/HDL-C was directly correlated with the amount of miristic acid, stearic acid, and DGLA and was inversely correlated with total amount of ω6 fatty acids of HDL. Conclusion. The fatty acid composition of HDL could affect the activity of its associated enzyme, PON1. As dietary fats are the major determinants of serum lipids and lipoprotein composition, consuming some special dietary fatty acids may improve the activity of PON1 and thereby have beneficial effects on health. PMID:24167374

  4. Maternal omega-3 fatty acids and micronutrients modulate fetal lipid metabolism: A review.

    PubMed

    Khaire, Amrita A; Kale, Anvita A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2015-07-01

    It is well established that alterations in the mother's diet or metabolism during pregnancy has long-term adverse effects on the lipid metabolism in the offspring. There is growing interest in the role of specific nutrients especially omega-3 fatty acids in the pathophysiology of lipid disorders. A series of studies carried out in humans and rodents in our department have consistently suggested a link between omega-3 fatty acids especially docosahexaenoic acid and micronutrients (vitamin B12 and folic acid) in the one carbon metabolic cycle and its effect on the fatty acid metabolism, hepatic transcription factors and DNA methylation patterns. However the association of maternal intake or metabolism of these nutrients with fetal lipid metabolism is relatively less explored. In this review, we provide insights into the role of maternal omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12 and their influence on fetal lipid metabolism through various mechanisms which influence phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase activity, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor, adiponectin signaling pathway and epigenetic process like chromatin methylation. This will help understand the possible mechanisms involved in fetal lipid metabolism and may provide important clues for the prevention of lipid disorders in the offspring.

  5. Bioconversion of volatile fatty acids derived from waste activated sludge into lipids by Cryptococcus curvatus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Jia-Nan; Yuan, Ming; Shen, Zi-Heng; Peng, Kai-Ming; Lu, Li-Jun; Huang, Xiang-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Pure volatile fatty acid (VFA) solution derived from waste activated sludge (WAS) was used to produce microbial lipids as culture medium in this study, which aimed to realize the resource recovery of WAS and provide low-cost feedstock for biodiesel production simultaneously. Cryptococcus curvatus was selected among three oleaginous yeast to produce lipids with VFAs derived from WAS. In batch cultivation, lipid contents increased from 10.2% to 16.8% when carbon to nitrogen ratio increased from about 3.5 to 165 after removal of ammonia nitrogen by struvite precipitation. The lipid content further increased to 39.6% and the biomass increased from 1.56g/L to 4.53g/L after cultivation for five cycles using sequencing batch culture (SBC) strategy. The lipids produced from WAS-derived VFA solution contained nearly 50% of monounsaturated fatty acids, including palmitic acid, heptadecanoic acid, ginkgolic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid, which showed the adequacy of biodiesel production.

  6. Expression of lipases and lipid receptors in sperm storage tubules and possible role of fatty acids in sperm survival in the hen oviduct.

    PubMed

    Huang, A; Isobe, N; Obitsu, T; Yoshimura, Y

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of fatty acids for sperm survival in the sperm storage tubules (SSTs) of the hen oviduct. The mucosa tissues of uterovaginal junction (UVJ) of White Leghorn laying hens with or without artificial insemination using semen from Barred Plymouth Rock roosters were collected. The lipid density in the epithelium of UVJ and SST was analyzed by Sudan black B staining. The expressions of genes encoding lipid receptors and lipases were assayed by polymerase chain reaction in UVJ mucosa and SST cells isolated by laser microdissection. Fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and sperm were cultured with or without the identified predominant fatty acids for 24 hours to examine their effect on sperm viability. The lipid droplets were localized in the epithelium of UVJ mucosa and SSTs. The expression of genes encoding very low-density lipoprotein receptor(VLDLR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) were found in SST cells. Expression of genes encoding endothelial lipase (EL), lipase H (LIPH), adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) were found in UVJ. In contrast, only ATGL was found in SST cells, and its expression was significantly upregulated after artificial insemination. In UVJ mucosal tissues, five fatty acids, namely myristic acid (C14), palmitic acid (C16), stearic acid (C18), oleic acid (C18:1n9), and linoleic acid (C18:2n6), were identified as predominant fatty acids. The viability of sperm cultured with 1 mM oleic acid or linoleic acid was significantly higher than the sperm in the control culture without fatty acids. These results suggest that lipids in the SST cells may be degraded by ATGL, and fatty acids including oleic acid and linoleic acid may be released into the SST lumen to support sperm survival.

  7. Yeast fermentation of carboxylic acids obtained from pyrolytic aqueous phases for lipid production.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jieni; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Coates, Ralph; Wu, Hongwei; Chen, Shulin

    2012-08-01

    The presence of very reactive C1-C4 molecules adversely affects the quality bio-oils produced from the pyrolysis of lignocellulosic materials. In this paper a scheme to produce lipids with Cryptococcus curvatus from the carboxylic acids in the pyrolytic aqueous phase collected in fractional condensers is proposed. The capacities of three oleaginous yeasts C. curvatus, Rhodotorula glutinis, Lipomyces starkeyi to ferment acetate, formate, hydroxylacat-aldehyde, phenol and acetol were investigated. While acetate could be a good carbon source for lipid production, formate provides additional energy and contributes to yeast growth and lipid production as auxiliary energy resource. Acetol could slightly support yeast growth, but it inhibits lipid accumulation. Hydroxyacetaldehyde and phenols showed high yeast growth and lipid accumulation inhibition. A pyrolytic aqueous phase with 20 g/L acetate was fermented with C. curvatus, after neutralization and detoxification to produce 6.9 g/L dry biomass and 2.2 g/L lipid.

  8. Role of maternal tissue in the synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids in response to a lipid-deficient diet during pregnancy and lactation in rats.

    PubMed

    González, Raúl Sánchez; Rodriguez-Cruz, Maricela; Maldonado, Jorge; Saavedra, Filiberto Jasso

    2014-10-01

    During pregnancy and lactation, metabolic adaptations involve changes in expression of desaturases and elongases (Elovl2 and Elovl5) in the mammary gland and liver for the synthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) such as arachidonic acid (AA) required for fetal and postnatal growth. Adipose tissue is a pool of LC-PUFAs. The response of adipose tissue for the synthesis of these fatty acids in a lipid-deficient diet of dams is unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the role of maternal tissue in the synthesis of LC-PUFAs in rats fed a low-lipid diet during pregnancy and lactation. Fatty acid composition (indicative of enzymatic activity) and gene expression of encoding enzymes for fatty acid synthesis were measured in liver, mammary gland and adipose tissue in rats fed a low-lipid diet. Gene expression of desaturases, elongases, fatty acid synthase (Fasn) and their regulator Srebf-1c was increased in the mammary gland, liver and adipose tissue of rats fed a low-lipid diet compared with rats from the adequate-lipid diet group throughout pregnancy and lactation. Genes with the highest (P<0.05) expression in the mammary gland, liver and adipose tissue were Elovl5 (1333%), Fads2 (490%) and Fasn (6608%), respectively, in a low-lipid diet than in adequate-lipid diet. The percentage of AA in the mammary gland was similar between the low-lipid diet and adequate-lipid diet groups during the second stage of pregnancy and during lactation. The percentage of monounsaturated and saturated fatty acids was significantly (P<0.05) increased throughout pregnancy and lactation in all tissues in rats fed a low-lipid diet than in rats fed an adequate-lipid diet. Results suggest that maternal metabolic adaptations used to compensate for lipid-deficient diet during pregnancy and lactation include increased expression of genes involved in LC-PUFAs synthesis in a stage- and tissue-specific manner and elevated lipogenic activity (saturated and monounsaturated

  9. Lateral diffusion of membrane proteins: consequences of hydrophobic mismatch and lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Ramadurai, Sivaramakrishnan; Duurkens, Ria; Krasnikov, Victor V; Poolman, Bert

    2010-09-08

    Biological membranes are composed of a large number lipid species differing in hydrophobic length, degree of saturation, and charge and size of the headgroup. We now present data on the effect of hydrocarbon chain length of the lipids and headgroup composition on the lateral mobility of the proteins in model membranes. The trimeric glutamate transporter (GltT) and the monomeric lactose transporter (LacY) were reconstituted in giant unilamellar vesicles composed of unsaturated phosphocholine lipids of varying acyl chain length (14-22 carbon atoms) and various ratios of DOPE/DOPG/DOPC lipids. The lateral mobility of the proteins and of a fluorescent lipid analog was determined as a function of the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer (h) and lipid composition, using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The diffusion coefficient of LacY decreased with increasing thickness of the bilayer, in accordance with the continuum hydrodynamic model of Saffman-Delbrück. For GltT, the mobility had its maximum at diC18:1 PC, which is close to the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer in vivo. The lateral mobility decreased linearly with the concentration of DOPE but was not affected by the fraction of anionic lipids from DOPG. The addition of DOPG and DOPE did not affect the activity of GltT. We conclude that the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer is a major determinant of molecule diffusion in membranes, but protein-specific properties may lead to deviations from the Saffman-Delbrück model.

  10. [FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF PHOSPHOLIPIDS AND ESTERIFIED CHOLESTEROL OF THE BLOOD PLASMA OF RABBIT UNDER ARGININE ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Hopanenko, O O; Rivis, J F

    2015-01-01

    The content and fatty acid composition of phospholipids and esterified cholesterol were studied in the blood plasma of rabbits under acute arginine pancreatitis and its correction using linseed oil. It is established that the transport and anti-inflammatory functions of blood plasma deteriorates under acute arginine pancreatitis due to a decrease of the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids. The amount of cholesterol esterified with saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids increases in the blood plasma of rabbits. The concentration of phospholipids and esterified cholesterol is normalized and their fatty acid composition is improved in the lipid composition of the blood plasma of rabbits with acute arginine pancreatitis fed with linseed oil.

  11. Modulation of lipid metabolism by n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in gestational diabetic rats and their macrosomic offspring.

    PubMed

    Soulimane-Mokhtari, Nassima A; Guermouche, Baya; Yessoufou, Akadiri; Saker, Myrieum; Moutairou, Kebirou; Hichami, Aziz; Merzouk, Hafida; Khan, Naim A

    2005-09-01

    The time course of changes in lipid metabolism by dietary n-3 PUFAs (polyunsaturated fatty acids) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats during pregnancy (days 12 and 21) and their macrosomic offspring at birth (day 0) and through adulthood (days 60 and 90) was studied with respect to adipose tissue, liver and serum lipid concentrations, and fatty acid composition. Glucose and insulin levels were also assessed in order to characterize the diabetic state of macrosomic offspring. Pregnant diabetic and control rats were fed either an Isio-4 or EPAX diet (enriched with n-3 PUFA). The same diets were also consumed by pups at weaning. Compared with control rats, during pregnancy diabetic rats had a significant elevation in liver and serum triacylglycerol (triglyceride) and cholesterol concentrations. At birth, macrosomic pups had higher serum insulin and glucose levels than control pups. The macrosomic rats maintained accelerated postnatal growth combined with high adipose tissue weight and lipid content through the first 12 weeks of age. The macrosomic pups from diabetic rats fed the Isio-4 diet also showed a significant enhancement in liver and serum triacylglycerol and cholesterol levels at birth and during adulthood. Feeding the EPAX diet to diabetic mothers as well as their macrosomic pups increased serum and liver levels of EPA (eicospentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) with a reduction in arachidonic acid. The EPAX diet induced a significant decrease in liver and serum triacylglycerol and cholesterol concentrations in mothers during pregnancy and in their macrosomic pups during adulthood. Since the EPAX diet improves lipid anomalies considerably in diabetic mothers and their macrosomic offspring, it may prevent long-term metabolic abnormalities associated with macrosomia.

  12. Detailed Dimethylacetal and Fatty Acid Composition of Rumen Content from Lambs Fed Lucerne or Concentrate Supplemented with Soybean Oil

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Susana P.; Santos-Silva, José; Cabrita, Ana R. J.; Fonseca, António J. M.; Bessa, Rui J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid metabolism in the rumen is responsible for the complex fatty acid profile of rumen outflow compared with the dietary fatty acid composition, contributing to the lipid profile of ruminant products. A method for the detailed dimethylacetal and fatty acid analysis of rumen contents was developed and applied to rumen content collected from lambs fed lucerne or concentrate based diets supplemented with soybean oil. The methodological approach developed consisted on a basic/acid direct transesterification followed by thin-layer chromatography to isolate fatty acid methyl esters from dimethylacetal, oxo- fatty acid and fatty acid dimethylesters. The dimethylacetal composition was quite similar to the fatty acid composition, presenting even-, odd- and branched-chain structures. Total and individual odd- and branched-chain dimethylacetals were mostly affected by basal diet. The presence of 18∶1 dimethylacetals indicates that biohydrogenation intermediates might be incorporated in structural microbial lipids. Moreover, medium-chain fatty acid dimethylesters were identified for the first time in the rumen content despite their concentration being relatively low. The fatty acids containing 18 carbon-chain lengths comprise the majority of the fatty acids present in the rumen content, most of them being biohydrogenation intermediates of 18∶2n−6 and 18∶3n−3. Additionally, three oxo- fatty acids were identified in rumen samples, and 16-O-18∶0 might be produced during biohydrogenation of the 18∶3n−3. PMID:23484024

  13. Combined nitrogen limitation and cadmium stress stimulate total carbohydrates, lipids, protein and amino acid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae).

    PubMed

    Chia, Mathias Ahii; Lombardi, Ana Teresa; da Graça Gama Melão, Maria; Parrish, Christopher C

    2015-03-01

    Metals have interactive effects on the uptake and metabolism of nutrients in microalgae. However, the effect of trace metal toxicity on amino acid composition of Chlorella vulgaris as a function of varying nitrogen concentrations is not known. In this research, C. vulgaris was used to investigate the influence of cadmium (10(-7) and 2.0×10(-8)molL(-1) Cd) under varying nitrogen (2.9×10(-6), 1.1×10(-5) and 1.1×10(-3)molL(-1)N) concentrations on its growth rate, biomass and biochemical composition. Total carbohydrates, total proteins, total lipids, as well as individual amino acid proportions were determined. The combination of Cd stress and N limitation significantly inhibited growth rate and cell density of C. vulgaris. However, increasing N limitation and Cd stress stimulated higher dry weight and chlorophyll a production per cell. Furthermore, biomolecules like total proteins, carbohydrates and lipids increased with increasing N limitation and Cd stress. Ketogenic and glucogenic amino acids were accumulated under the stress conditions investigated in the present study. Amino acids involved in metal chelation like proline, histidine and glutamine were significantly increased after exposure to combined Cd stress and N limitation. We conclude that N limitation and Cd stress affects the physiology of C. vulgaris by not only decreasing its growth but also stimulating biomolecule production.

  14. ω-Alkynyl lipid surrogates for polyunsaturated fatty acids: free radical and enzymatic oxidations.

    PubMed

    Beavers, William N; Serwa, Remigiusz; Shimozu, Yuki; Tallman, Keri A; Vaught, Melissa; Dalvie, Esha D; Marnett, Lawrence J; Porter, Ned A

    2014-08-13

    Lipid and lipid metabolite profiling are important parameters in understanding the pathogenesis of many diseases. Alkynylated polyunsaturated fatty acids are potentially useful probes for tracking the fate of fatty acid metabolites. The nonenzymatic and enzymatic oxidations of ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid were compared to that of linoleic and arachidonic acid. There was no detectable difference in the primary products of nonenzymatic oxidation, which comprised cis,trans-hydroxy fatty acids. Similar hydroxy fatty acid products were formed when ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid were reacted with lipoxygenase enzymes that introduce oxygen at different positions in the carbon chains. The rates of oxidation of ω-alkynylated fatty acids were reduced compared to those of the natural fatty acids. Cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 did not oxidize alkynyl linoleic but efficiently oxidized alkynyl arachidonic acid. The products were identified as alkynyl 11-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid, alkynyl 11-hydroxy-8,9-epoxy-eicosatrienoic acid, and alkynyl prostaglandins. This deviation from the metabolic profile of arachidonic acid may limit the utility of alkynyl arachidonic acid in the tracking of cyclooxygenase-based lipid oxidation. The formation of alkynyl 11-hydroxy-8,9-epoxy-eicosatrienoic acid compared to alkynyl prostaglandins suggests that the ω-alkyne group causes a conformational change in the fatty acid bound to the enzyme, which reduces the efficiency of cyclization of dioxalanyl intermediates to endoperoxide intermediates. Overall, ω-alkynyl linoleic acid and ω-alkynyl arachidonic acid appear to be metabolically competent surrogates for tracking the fate of polyunsaturated fatty acids when looking at models involving autoxidation and oxidation by lipoxygenases.

  15. Membrane synthesis, specific lipid requirements, and localized lipid composition changes associated with a positive-strand RNA virus RNA replication protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wai-Ming; Ahlquist, Paul

    2003-12-01

    Multifunctional RNA replication protein 1a of brome mosaic virus (BMV), a positive-strand RNA virus, localizes to the cytoplasmic face of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes and induces ER lumenal spherules in which viral RNA synthesis occurs. We previously showed that BMV RNA replication in yeast is severely inhibited prior to negative-strand RNA synthesis by a single-amino-acid substitution in the ole1w allele of yeast Delta9 fatty acid (FA) desaturase, which converts saturated FAs (SFAs) to unsaturated FAs (UFAs). Here we further define the relationships between 1a, membrane lipid composition, and RNA synthesis. We show that 1a expression increases total membrane lipids in wild-type (wt) yeast by 25 to 33%, consistent with recent results indicating that the numerous 1a-induced spherules are enveloped by invaginations of the outer ER membrane. 1a did not alter total membrane lipid composition in wt or ole1w yeast, but the ole1w mutation selectively depleted 18-carbon, monounsaturated (18:1) FA chains and increased 16:0 SFA chains, reducing the UFA-to-SFA ratio from approximately 2.5 to approximately 1.5. Thus, ole1w inhibition of RNA replication was correlated with decreased levels of UFA, membrane fluidity, and plasticity. The ole1w mutation did not alter 1a-induced membrane synthesis, 1a localization to the perinuclear ER, or colocalization of BMV 2a polymerase, nor did it block spherule formation. Moreover, BMV RNA replication templates were still recovered from cell lysates in a 1a-induced, 1a- and membrane-associated, and nuclease-resistant but detergent-susceptible state consistent with spherules. However, unlike nearby ER membranes, the membranes surrounding spherules in ole1w cells were not distinctively stained with osmium tetroxide, which interacts specifically with UFA double bonds. Thus, in ole1w cells, spherule-associated membranes were locally depleted in UFAs. This localized UFA depletion helps to explain why BMV RNA replication is more sensitive

  16. Temperature and pH control on lipid composition of silica sinters from diverse hot springs in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Mountain, Bruce W; Stott, Matthew B; Hopmans, Ellen C; Pancost, Richard D

    2015-03-01

    Microbial adaptations to environmental extremes, including high temperature and low pH conditions typical of geothermal settings, are of interest in astrobiology and origin of life investigations. The lipid biomarkers preserved in silica deposits associated with six geothermal areas in the Taupo Volcanic Zone were investigated and variations in lipid composition as a function of temperature and pH were assessed. Lipid analyses reveal highly variable abundances and distributions, reflecting community composition as well as adaptations to extremes of pH and temperature. Biomarker profiles reveal three distinct microbial assemblages across the sites: the first in Champagne Pool and Loop Road, the second in Orakei Korako, Opaheke and Ngatamariki, and the third in Rotokawa. Similar lipid distributions are observed in sinters from physicochemically similar springs. Furthermore, correlation between lipid distributions and geothermal conditions is observed. The ratio of archaeol to bacterial diether abundance, bacterial diether average chain length, degree of GDGT cyclisation and C31 and C32 hopanoic acid indices typically increase with temperature. At lower pH, the ratio of archaeol to bacterial diethers, degree of GDGT cyclisation and C31 and C32 hopanoic acid indices are typically higher. No trends in fatty acid distributions with temperature or pH are evident, likely reflecting overprinting due to population influences.

  17. Reversible Nuclear-Lipid-Droplet Morphology Induced by Oleic Acid: A Link to Cellular-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lagrutta, Lucía C.; Montero-Villegas, Sandra; Layerenza, Juan P.; Sisti, Martín S.; García de Bravo, Margarita M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutral lipids—involved in many cellular processes—are stored as lipid droplets (LD), those mainly cytosolic (cLD) along with a small nuclear population (nLD). nLD could be involved in nuclear-lipid homeostasis serving as an endonuclear buffering system that would provide or incorporate lipids and proteins involved in signalling pathways as transcription factors and as enzymes of lipid metabolism and nuclear processes. Our aim was to determine if nLD constituted a dynamic domain. Oleic-acid (OA) added to rat hepatocytes or HepG2 cells in culture produced cellular-phenotypic LD modifications: increases in TAG, CE, C, and PL content and in cLD and nLD numbers and sizes. LD increments were reversed on exclusion of OA and were prevented by inhibition of acyl-CoA synthetase (with Triacsin C) and thus lipid biosynthesis. Under all conditions, nLD corresponded to a small population (2–10%) of total cellular LD. The anabolism triggered by OA, involving morphologic and size changes within the cLD and nLD populations, was reversed by a net balance of catabolism, upon eliminating OA. These catabolic processes included lipolysis and the mobilization of hydrolyzed FA from the LD to cytosolic-oxidation sites. These results would imply that nLD are actively involved in nuclear processes that include lipids. In conclusion, nLD are a dynamic nuclear domain since they are modified by OA through a reversible mechanism in combination with cLD; this process involves acyl-CoA-synthetase activity; ongoing TAG, CE, and PL biosynthesis. Thus, liver nLD and cLD are both dynamic cellular organelles. PMID:28125673

  18. Composition of Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Communities as Revealed by Analyses of Signature Lipids, Stable Carbon Isotopes and Aquificales Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Edger, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Hayes, John M.; DesMarais, David J.; Cady, Sherry; Hope, Janet M.; Summons, Roger E.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extremely thermophilic microbial communities associated with the siliceous vent walls and outflow channel of Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, have been examined for lipid biomarkers and carbon isotopic signatures. These data were compared with that obtained from representatives of three Aquificales genera. Thermocrinis ruber. "Thermocrinis sp. HI", Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, Aquifex pyrophilus and Aquifex aeolicus all contained phospholipids composed not only of the usual ester-linked fatty acids, but also ether-linked alkyls. The fatty acids of all cultured organisms were dominated by a very distinct pattern of n-C-20:1 and cy-C-21 compounds. The alkyl glycerol ethers were present primarily as CIS() monoethers with the expection of the Aquifex spp. in which dialkyl glycerol ethers with a boarder carbon-number distribution were also present. These Aquificales biomarker lipids were the major constituents in the lipid extracts of the Octopus Spring microbial samples. Two natural samples, a microbial biofilm growing in association with deposition of amorphous silica on the vent walls at 92 C, and the well-known 'pink-streamers community' (PSC), siliceous filaments of a microbial consortia growing in the upper outflow channel at 87 C were analyzed. Both the biofilm and PSC samples contained mono and dialkyl glycerol ethers with a prevalence of C-18 and C-20 alkyls. Phospholipid fatty acids were comprised of both the characteristic Aquificales n-C-20:1 and cy-C-21, and in addition, a series of iso-branched fatty acids from i-C-15:0 to i-C-21:0, With i-C-17:0 dominant in the PSC and i-C-19:0 in the biofilm, suggesting the presence of two major bacterial groups. Bacteriohopanepolyols were absent and the minute quantities of archaeol detected showed that Archaea were only minor constituents. Carbon isotopic compositions of the PSC yielded information about community structure and likely physiology. Biomass was C-13-depleted (10.9%) relative to available

  19. Lipid composition and structure of commercial parenteral emulsions.

    PubMed

    Férézou, J; Nguyen, T L; Leray, C; Hajri, T; Frey, A; Cabaret, Y; Courtieu, J; Lutton, C; Bach, A C

    1994-07-14

    In order to study the influence of the phospholipid/triacylglycerol (PL/TG) ratio of parenteral emulsions on the distribution and the physico-chemical properties of their fat particles, commercial 10, 20 or 30% fat formulas were fractionated by centrifugation into an upper lipid cake (resuspended in aqueous glycerol) and a subnatant or mesophase, from which a PL-rich subfraction (d = 1.010-1.030 g/l) was purified by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Chemical and 31P-NMR analyses of these fractions indicated that at least two types of fat particles coexist in parenteral emulsions: (i) TG-rich particles (mean diameter: 330, 400, 470 nm in the 10, 20, 30% emulsion) which contain practically all the TG and esterified phytosterols of native emulsions, but only a fraction of their PL, unesterified cholesterol and phytosterols, and other minor lipids; (ii) PL-bilayer particles or liposomes (mean diameter: 80-100 nm) which are constituted with the remaining PL and relatively very small amounts of TG and other lipids. The higher the oil content of the emulsion, the lower the amount of these PL-rich particles, which represent the major particle population of the mesophase. Indeed, minute amounts of TG-rich particles (probably the smallest ones) are also present in the mesophase, even in the PL-rich subfraction which contains the bulk of liposomal PL. Since the PL-rich particles of the infused emulsion generate lipoprotein X-like particles, only the large TG-rich particles can be considered as true chylomicron counterparts.

  20. Fatty acid composition of symbiotic zooxanthellae in relation to their hosts.

    PubMed

    Bishop, D G; Kenrick, J R

    1980-10-01

    Gymnodinoid dinoflagellate symbionts, commonly referred to as zooxanthellae, are widely distributed among marine invertebrates. It has been assumed that they represent only one species,Gymnodinium microadriaticum. The fatty acid composition of total lipids and galactolipids of zooxanthellae isolated from 8 species of corals, 3 species of clams and a foraminiferan have been analyzed and found to vary according to the host. For example, the content of eicosapentaenoic acid in clam zooxanthellae monogalactosyldiacylglycerol was less than 2%, whereas in the same lipid from coral zooxanthellae, the content ranged from 9 to 22%. Corresponding values for the acid in digalactosyl-diacylglycerol were 1-8% from clam zooxanthellae and 23-40% from coral zooxanthellae. Coral zooxanthellae monogalactosyldiacylglycerol contain higher levels of octadecatetraenoic acid than are found in digalactosyldiacylglycerol, whereas the reverse is true in clam zooxanthellae. The fatty acid composition of the lipids of an axenic culture of zooxanthellae isolated from the clamTridacna maxima are similar to those of cells freshly isolated from the host. The results suggest either that the host is capable of affecting the fatty acid metabolism of the symbiont or that different strains of zooxanthellae occur in corals and clams.

  1. Facile distinction of neutral and acidic tetraether lipids in archaea membrane by halogen atom adduct ions in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Murae, Tatsushi; Takamatsu, Yuichiro; Muraoka, Ryohei; Endoh, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Noriaki

    2002-02-01

    Calditocaldarchaeol (neutral tetraether lipid) from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius (acidothermophilic archaea) and intact total lipid from the thermoacidophilic archaea Sulfolobus sp. was examined by electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in the negative-ion mode using high resolution. When the sample was injected as a solution in a 3:1 mixture of methanol (MeOH) and chloroform (CHCl(3)) using an infusion system, the total ether lipid afforded molecular-related ions as [M - H](-) for acidic polar lipids containing a phosphoric or sulfuric group, and as [M + Cl](-) ion for neutral glycolipids. The attachment of chloride was confirmed by the observation of [M + Br](-) ion, instead of [M + Cl](-) ion, when a 3:1 mixture of MeOH and CHBr(3) was used in place of MeOH-CHCl(3) as the solvent. The composition of tetraether neutral glycolipids that are different from each other only in the number of five-membered rings in the isoprenoid chain was determined on the basis of the isotope-resolved mass spectrum of [M + Cl](-) ions. As for acidic tetraether lipids, molecular-related ions [M - H](-)) were not observed when the 3:1 MeOH-CHBr(3) mixture was used as the solvent. These results together afforded a facile method of distinguishing neutral from acidic tetraether lipids in intact total lipids of acidothermophilic archaea. This method was applied to determine the difference of the number of five-membered rings in isoprenyl chains of neutral tetraether glycolipids yielded by the Sulfolobus sp. grown at different temperatures. Discrimination of neutral tetraether glycolipids from acidic tetraether lipids in the total lipids obtained from Thermoplasma sp. was also achieved by this method.

  2. Nitrogen solubility in odontocete blubber and mandibular fats in relation to lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Lonati, Gina L; Westgate, Andrew J; Pabst, D Ann; Koopman, Heather N

    2015-08-01

    Understanding toothed whale (odontocete) diving gas dynamics is important given the recent atypical mass strandings of odontocetes (particularly beaked whales) associated with mid-frequency naval sonar. Some stranded whales have exhibited gas emboli (pathologies resembling decompression sickness) in their specialized intramandibular and extramandibular fat bodies used for echolocation and hearing. These tissues have phylogenetically unique, endogenous lipid profiles with poorly understood biochemical properties. Current diving gas dynamics models assume an Ostwald nitrogen (N2) solubility of 0.07 ml N2 ml(-1) oil in odontocete fats, although solubility in blubber from many odontocetes exceeds this value. The present study examined N2 solubility in the blubber and mandibular fats of seven species across five families, relating it to lipid composition. Across all species, N2 solubility increased with wax ester content and was generally higher in mandibular fats (0.083 ± 0.002 ml N2 ml(-1) oil) than in blubber (0.069 ± 0.007 ml N2 ml(-1) oil). This effect was more pronounced in mandibular fats with higher concentrations of shorter, branched fatty acids/alcohols. Mandibular fats of short-finned pilot whales, Atlantic spotted dolphins and Mesoplodon beaked whales had the highest N2 solubility values (0.097 ± 0.005, 0.081 ± 0.007 and 0.080 ± 0.003 ml N2 ml(-1) oil, respectively). Pilot and beaked whales may experience high N2 loads during their relatively deeper dives, although more information is needed about in vivo blood circulation to mandibular fats. Future diving models should incorporate empirically measured N2 solubility of odontocete mandibular fats to better understand N2 dynamics and potential pathologies from gas/fat embolism.

  3. Marked depletion of polar lipid and non-essential fatty acids following settlement by post-larvae of the spiny lobster Jasus verreauxi.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Andrew G; Phleger, Charles F; Nelson, Matthew M; Mooney, Ben D; Nichols, Peter D

    2002-02-01

    The development from the non-feeding post-larva (puerulus) to the first instar juvenile of spiny lobsters is highly energetically demanding. These demands may greatly compromise the energy reserves of the lobsters following settlement, leading to reduced growth and survival in the wild, and also in aquaculture. Therefore, the lipid class and fatty acid composition of wild caught pueruli and first instar juveniles of the spiny lobster Jasus verreauxi (H. Milne Edwards, 1851) were analysed by thin layer chromatography-flame ionisation detection and capillary gas chromatography. Pueruli contained substantially more lipid than first instar juveniles (mean difference =3.5 mg, or 41.9%) and most of this difference was due to the presence of greater amounts of polar lipid (mean difference =3.9 mg or 49.2%) in pueruli. First instar juveniles contained significantly more triacylglycerol (mean =0.2 mg), consistent with the polar lipid being converted to a more readily metabolised lipid class in the hepatopancreas. These results indicate that polar lipid is the major energy store during the non-feeding puerulus stage of spiny lobsters from the genus Jasus. Overall, the essential, polyunsaturated linoleic, docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids did not show a significant decrease between the two developmental stages, despite the absence of feeding. However, significant reductions in the abundance of both saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids between the two stages were identified (decrease of 811 and 783 microg per individual, respectively). This suggested that selective depletion of non-essential fatty acids may be occurring, with resultant sparing of the essential fatty acids. Supplying diets rich in these depleted fatty acids, and in particular the essential fatty acids, preferably in polar lipid, is likely to result in increased survival and growth of J. verreauxi and other spiny lobsters from first instar juveniles in aquaculture.

  4. Distribution and Carbon-Isotope Composition of Lipid Biomarkers in Lake Sediments on the Tibetan Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuo, J.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Jiang, H.; Dong, H.; Zhang, C. L.

    2005-12-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the carbon source and microbial community structure in different lake environments on the Tibetan Plateau using carbon isotopes and lipid biomarkers. Microbial mats and sediments were collected from Erhai-, Qinghai-, Gahai-, and Chaka-lakes, which have different pHs (7.4-9.5) and salinities (0.1-21%). Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) have different distribution patterns in algal mats, sandy mud, and salt deposits, which may reflect changes in microbial community structure in different environments. For example, terminally branched fatty acids reflect heterotrophic bacteria and varied from less than 1% in a brown algal mat in Lake Gahai to 23% in a salt deposit in Lake Chaka. The cyclopropyl fatty acids may reflect stress conditions under different salinities. These compounds varied from 0% in algal mats living on the bank of the lake, which received freshwater run off, to 12% in grey mud in the saline lake water. On the other hand, long-chain n-alkanes in these samples reflect contributions of a mixture of epicuticular waxes of higher plants and submerged or floating aquatic macrophytes. Carbon isotopes of lipid biomarkers indicate different sources of organic carbon in different lake sediments. For example, carbon isotopes of total organic carbon and lipid biomarkers averaged -23.9 ± 1.5‰ (n = 2) and -26.0 ± 3.1‰ (n = 18), respectively, in Lake Erhai, and averaged -30.0 ± 1.5‰ (n = 4) and -33.5 ± 3.3‰ (n = 92), respectively, in Lake Gahai. These results suggest that a relatively heavy carbon source is going into Lake Erhai compared to carbon sources going into Lake Gahai. This study indicates that the distribution patterns of the lipid biomarkers and theirs carbon-isotope compositions can be used to evaluate the community structure and the source of carbon that supports microbial growth in lake sediments on the Tibetan Plateau.

  5. Chemical characteristics, fatty acid composition and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) content of traditional Greek yogurts.

    PubMed

    Serafeimidou, Amalia; Zlatanos, Spiros; Laskaridis, Kostas; Sagredos, Angelos

    2012-10-15

    Many studies with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) indicate that it has a protective effect against mammary cancer. Because dairy products are the most important dietary sources of CLA, we have investigated the CLA concentrations and additionally the fatty acid profiles and chemical composition of several commercial, traditional, Greek yogurts from different geographical origin. The fat content of yogurts was in the order of goatlipid basis compared to full-fat yogurts. Samples from mountain areas showed average c-9, t-11 CLA content higher than those from prairie districts. The highest amounts of saturated fatty acids (SFA) were found in low-fat yogurts, of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in sheep milk yogurts and of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in low-fat cow milk yogurts.

  6. A conditional mutant of the fatty acid synthase unveils unexpected cross talks in mycobacterial lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cabruja, Matías; Mondino, Sonia; Tsai, Yi Ting; Lara, Julia; Gramajo, Hugo; Gago, Gabriela

    2017-02-01

    Unlike most bacteria, mycobacteria rely on the multi-domain enzyme eukaryote-like fatty acid synthase I (FAS I) to make fatty acids de novo. These metabolites are precursors of the biosynthesis of most of the lipids present both in the complex mycobacteria cell wall and in the storage lipids inside the cell. In order to study the role of the type I FAS system in Mycobacterium lipid metabolism in vivo, we constructed a conditional mutant in the fas-acpS operon of Mycobacterium smegmatis and analysed in detail the impact of reduced de novo fatty acid biosynthesis on the global architecture of the cell envelope. As expected, the mutant exhibited growth defect in the non-permissive condition that correlated well with the lower expression of fas-acpS and the concomitant reduction of FAS I, confirming that FAS I is essential for survival. The reduction observed in FAS I provoked an accumulation of its substrates, acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA, and a strong reduction of C12 to C18 acyl-CoAs, but not of long-chain acyl-CoAs (C19 to C24). The most intriguing result was the ability of the mutant to keep synthesizing mycolic acids when fatty acid biosynthesis was impaired. A detailed comparative lipidomic analysis showed that although reduced FAS I levels had a strong impact on fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis, mycolic acids were still being synthesized in the mutant, although with a different relative species distribution. However, when triacylglycerol degradation was inhibited, mycolic acid biosynthesis was significantly reduced, suggesting that storage lipids could be an intracellular reservoir of fatty acids for the biosynthesis of complex lipids in mycobacteria. Understanding the interaction between FAS I and the metabolic pathways that rely on FAS I products is a key step to better understand how lipid homeostasis is regulated in this microorganism and how this regulation could play a role during infection in pathogenic mycobacteria.

  7. Characterization of five typical agave plants used to produce mezcal through their simple lipid composition analysis by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Aguilar, Juan Fco; Peña-Alvarez, Araceli

    2009-03-11

    Five agave plants typically used in Mexico for making mezcal in places included in the Denomination of Origin (Mexican federal law that establishes the territory within which mezcal can be produced) of this spirit were analyzed: Agave salmiana ssp. crassispina, A. salmiana var. salmiana, Agave angustifolia, Agave cupreata, and Agave karwinskii. Fatty acid and total simple lipid profiles of the mature heads of each plant were determined by means of a modified Bligh-Dyer extraction and gas chromatography. Sixteen fatty acids were identified, from capric to lignoceric, ranging from 0.40 to 459 microg/g of agave. Identified lipids include free fatty acids, beta-sitosterol, and groups of mono-, di-, and triacylglycerols, their total concentration ranging from 459 to 992 microg/g of agave. Multivariate analyses performed on the fatty acid profiles showed a close similarity between A. cupreata and A. angustifolia. This fact can be ascribed to the taxa themselves or differences in growing conditions, an issue that is still to be explored. These results help to characterize the agaves chemically and can serve to relate the composition of mezcals from various states of Mexico with the corresponding raw material.

  8. [Effect of phenolic ketones on ethanol fermentation and cellular lipid composition of Pichia stipitis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinlong; Cheng, Yichao; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Junjun; Chen, Tingting; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Yu, Shiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Lignin degradation products are toxic to microorganisms, which is one of the bottlenecks for fuel ethanol production. We studied the effects of phenolic ketones (4-hydroxyacetophenone, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone and 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy-acetophenone) derived from lignin degradation on ethanol fermentation of xylose and cellular lipid composition of Pichia stipitis NLP31. Ethanol and the cellular fatty acid of yeast were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Results indicate that phenolic ketones negatively affected ethanol fermentation of yeast and the lower molecular weight phenolic ketone compound was more toxic. When the concentration of 4-hydroxyacetophenone was 1.5 g/L, at fermentation of 24 h, the xylose utilization ratio, ethanol yield and ethanol concentration decreased by 42.47%, 5.30% and 9.76 g/L, respectively, compared to the control. When phenolic ketones were in the medium, the ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids (UFA/SFA) of yeast cells was improved. When 1.5 g/L of three aforementioned phenolic ketones was added to the fermentation medium, the UFA/SFA ratio of yeast cells increased to 3.03, 3.06 and 3.61, respectively, compared to 2.58 of the control, which increased cell membrane fluidity and instability. Therefore, phenolic ketones can reduce the yeast growth, increase the UFA/SFA ratio of yeast and lower ethanol productivity. Effectively reduce or remove the content of lignin degradation products is the key to improve lignocellulose biorefinery.

  9. Fatty acids composition of Caenorhabditis elegans using accurate mass GCMS-QTOF.

    PubMed

    Henry, Parise; Owopetu, Olufunmilayo; Adisa, Demilade; Nguyen, Thao; Anthony, Kevin; Ijoni-Animadu, David; Jamadar, Sakha; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2016-08-02

    The free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a proven model organism for lipid metabolism research. Total lipids of C. elegans were extracted using chloroform and methanol in 2:1 ratio (v/v). Fatty acids composition of the extracted total lipids was converted to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMEs) and analyzed by gas chromatography/accurate mass quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry using both electron ionization and chemical ionization techniques. Twenty-eight fatty acids consisting of 12 to 22 carbon atoms were identified, 65% of them were unsaturated. Fatty acids containing 12 to17 carbons were mostly saturated with stearic acid (18:0) as the major constituent. Several branched-chain fatty acids were identified. Methyl-14-methylhexadecanoate (iso- 17:0) was the major identified branched fatty acid. This is the first report to detect the intact molecular parent ions of the identified fatty acids in C. elegans using chemical ionization compared to electron ionization which produced fragmentations of the FAMEs.

  10. Lipid composition affects the rate of photosensitized dissipation of cross-membrane diffusion potential on liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Ytzhak, Shany; Wuskell, Joseph P.; Loew, Leslie M.; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Hydrophobic or amphiphilic tetrapyrrole sensitizers are taken up by cells and are usually located in cellular lipid membranes. Singlet oxygen is photogenerated by the sensitizer and it diffuses in the membrane and causes oxidative damage to membrane components. This damage can occur to membrane lipids and to membrane-localized proteins. Depolarization of the Nernst electric potential on cells’ membranes has been observed in cellular photosensitization, but it was not established whether lipid oxidation is a relevant factor leading to abolishing the resting potential of cells’ membranes and to their death. In this work we studied the effect of liposomes’ lipid composition on the kinetics of hematoporphyrin-photosensitized dissipation of K+-diffusion electric potential that was generated across the membranes. We employed an electrochromic voltage-sensitive spectroscopic probe that possesses a high fluorescence signal response to the potential. We found a correlation between the structure and unsaturation of lipids and the leakage of the membrane, following photosensitization. As the extent of non-conjugated unsaturation of the lipids is increased from 1 to 6 double bonds, the kinetics of depolarization become faster. We also found that the kinetics of depolarization is affected by the percentage of the unsaturated lipids in the liposome: as the fraction of the unsaturated lipids increases the leakage trough the membrane is enhanced. When liposomes are composed of a lipid mixture similar to that of natural membranes and photosensitization is being carried out under usual photodynamic therapy (PDT) conditions, photodamage to the lipids is not likely to cause enhanced permeability of ions through the membrane, which would have been a mechanism that leads to cell death. PMID:20536150

  11. Lipid, fatty acid and energy density profiles of white sharks: insights into the feeding ecology and ecophysiology of a complex top predator.

    PubMed

    Pethybridge, Heidi R; Parrish, Christopher C; Bruce, Barry D; Young, Jock W; Nichols, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are major sources of metabolic energy in sharks and are closely linked to environmental conditions and biological cycles, such as those related to diet, reproduction and migration. In this study, we report for the first time, the total lipid content, lipid class composition and fatty acid profiles of muscle and liver tissue of white sharks, Carcharodon carcharias, of various lengths (1.5-3.9 m), sampled at two geographically separate areas off southern and eastern Australia. Muscle tissue was low in total lipid content (<0.9% wet mass, wm) and was dominated by phospholipids (>90% of total lipid) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (34±12% of total fatty acids). In contrast, liver was high in total lipid which varied between 51-81% wm and was dominated by triacylglycerols (>93%) and monounsaturated fatty acids (36±12%). With knowledge of total lipid and dry tissue mass, we estimated the energy density of muscle (18.4±0.1 kJ g-1 dm) and liver (34.1±3.2 kJ g-1 dm), demonstrating that white sharks have very high energetic requirements. High among-individual variation in these biochemical parameters and related trophic markers were observed, but were not related to any one biological or environmental factor. Signature fatty acid profiles suggest that white sharks over the size range examined are generalist predators with fish, elasmobranchs and mammalian blubber all contributing to the diet. The ecological applications and physiological influences of lipids in white sharks are discussed along with recommendations for future research, including the use of non-lethal sampling to examine the nutritional condition, energetics and dietary relationships among and between individuals. Such knowledge is fundamental to better understand the implications of environmental perturbations on this iconic and threatened species.

  12. Lipid, Fatty Acid and Energy Density Profiles of White Sharks: Insights into the Feeding Ecology and Ecophysiology of a Complex Top Predator

    PubMed Central

    Pethybridge, Heidi R.; Parrish, Christopher C.; Bruce, Barry D.; Young, Jock W.; Nichols, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are major sources of metabolic energy in sharks and are closely linked to environmental conditions and biological cycles, such as those related to diet, reproduction and migration. In this study, we report for the first time, the total lipid content, lipid class composition and fatty acid profiles of muscle and liver tissue of white sharks, Carcharodon carcharias, of various lengths (1.5–3.9 m), sampled at two geographically separate areas off southern and eastern Australia. Muscle tissue was low in total lipid content (<0.9% wet mass, wm) and was dominated by phospholipids (>90% of total lipid) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (34±12% of total fatty acids). In contrast, liver was high in total lipid which varied between 51–81% wm and was dominated by triacylglycerols (>93%) and monounsaturated fatty acids (36±12%). With knowledge of total lipid and dry tissue mass, we estimated the energy density of muscle (18.4±0.1 kJ g−1 dm) and liver (34.1±3.2 kJ g−1 dm), demonstrating that white sharks have very high energetic requirements. High among-individual variation in these biochemical parameters and related trophic markers were observed, but were not related to any one biological or environmental factor. Signature fatty acid profiles suggest that white sharks over the size range examined are generalist predators with fish, elasmobranchs and mammalian blubber all contributing to the diet. The ecological applications and physiological influences of lipids in white sharks are discussed along with recommendations for future research, including the use of non-lethal sampling to examine the nutritional condition, energetics and dietary relationships among and between individuals. Such knowledge is fundamental to better understand the implications of environmental perturbations on this iconic and threatened species. PMID:24871223

  13. Changes in amino acids and lipids during embryogenesis of European lobster, Homarus gammarus (Crustacea: Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Rosa, R; Calado, R; Andrade, A M; Narciso, L; Nunes, M L

    2005-02-01

    We studied the amino acid and lipid dynamics during embryogenesis of Homarus gammarus. Major essential amino acids (EAA) in the last stage of embryonic development were arginine, lysine and leucine; major nonessential amino acids (NEAA) were glutamic acid, aspartic acid, valine and glycine. The highest percent of utilization occurred in respect to EAA (27.8%), mainly due to a significant decrease (p<0.05) of methionine (38.3%) and threonine (36.0%). NEAA also decreased significantly (p<0.05, 11.4%), namely serine (38.1%), tyrosine (26.4%) and glutamic acid (25.7%). In contrast, the free amino acid content increased significantly (p<0.05) during embryonic development, especially the free nonessential amino acids (FNEAA). In the last stage, the most abundant FNEAA were glycine, proline, alanine and taurine, and the major free essential amino acids (FEAA) were arginine, lysine and leucine. Lipid content decreased significantly (p<0.05) during embryonic development. A substantial decrease in all neutral lipid classes was observed (>80% of utilization). Major fatty acids were 16:0, 18:0, 18:1n-9, 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3, 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3. Unsaturated (UFA) and saturated fatty acids (SFA) were used up at similar rates (76.5% and 76.3%, respectively). Within UFA, monounsaturates (MUFA) were consumed more than polyunsaturates (PUFA) (82.9% and 67.5%, respectively).

  14. Changes in Human Meibum Lipid Composition with Age Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Foulks, Gary N.; Yappert, Marta C.; Milliner, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Human tear film stability decreases with increasing age. In this study, the changes in meibum composition were measured in search of markers of tear film instability. Methods. 1H NMR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 43 normal donors aged 1 to 88 years were acquired. Results. Compared with meibum from adolescents and adults, meibum from infants and children contains less CH3 and C═C groups and an increased aldehyde-to-lipid hydroperoxide ratio. Conclusions. It is reasonable that tear film stability is higher in infants than in adults. Their meibum contains less CH3 and C═C groups and higher levels of protein, and as a result, the lipid is more ordered because of the tighter and stronger lipid–lipid interactions. For water to evaporate, it must first pass through the tight lipid–lipid barrier. For tears to break up, lipid–lipid interactions must be broken. It is reasonable that because the lipid–lipid interactions are stronger in infants' and children's tears compared with those of adolescents and adults, the tear film in the younger groups is more stable and provides a better barrier to evaporation than does the tear film of adults. Lipid saturation could be the critical feature in meibum that stabilizes tears in infants. PMID:22169100

  15. Ca(2+) adsorption to lipid membranes and the effect of cholesterol in their composition.

    PubMed

    Iraolagoitia, Ximena L Raffo; Martini, M Florencia

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the binding of ionic calcium (Ca(2+)) to lipid membranes in which the availability of the phosphate groups to the aqueous phase is modified by the degree of saturation of the lipids and the inclusion of cholesterol. The shifts in the phosphate bands observed in the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra are direct evidence of the interaction of Ca(2+) with phosphate groups. The binding analysis was done by determining the changes in the zeta potential of liposomes suspended in buffer at controlled temperature. The changes produced by the ion on the zeta potential of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC); dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC); distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC); dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) and their mixers with cholesterol were measured, showing a Langmuir isotherm behavior in all the lipid composition assayed. The results show that the interaction of Ca(2+) to lipid membranes depends on the exposure and the density of phosphate groups at the membrane interphase.

  16. Gut microbiota affects lens and retinal lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Oresic, Matej; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Yetukuri, Laxman; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Hänninen, Virve

    2009-11-01

    The gut microbiota affects host lipid metabolism and is considered an environmental factor that contributes to development of obesity. To investigate whether the gut microbiota affects the eye lipidome, we performed comprehensive lipidomic profiling of lens and retina from conventionally raised and germ-free mice. Conventionally raised mice had diminished phosphatidylcholines in the lens and elevated ethanolamine plasmalogens in the retina. Diminishment of lens phosphatidylcholines in the presence of gut microbiota suggests that the conventionally raised mice are exposed over time to more oxidative stress than germ-free mice. Consistent with this, their lifespan is also shorter. Our findings may open a new area of investigation how modulation of gut microbiota affects the eye health.

  17. Rat liver microsomal lipid peroxidation produced during the oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Masubuchi, Y; Narimatsu, S; Kobayashi, S; Horie, T

    2001-04-01

    Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were produced in rat liver microsomal suspension incubated with ethacrynic acid (loop diuretic drug) and NADPH. Two oxidative metabolites of ethacrynic acid with dicarboxylic acid and hydroxylated ethyl group, respectively, were formed in the reaction mixture. The oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid was inhibited by cytochrome P450 inhibitors. The formation of TBARS was remarkably depressed by inhibitors like diethyldithiocarbamate and disulfiram. These results indicate that lipid peroxidation occurred in rat liver microsomes through the oxidative metabolism of ethacrynic acid.

  18. A special acyl carrier protein for transferring long hydroxylated fatty acids to lipid A in Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Brozek, K A; Carlson, R W; Raetz, C R

    1996-12-13

    Lipid A, the hydrophobic anchor of lipopolysaccharides in the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, varies in structure among different Rhizobiaceae. The Rhizobium meliloti lipid A backbone, like that of Escherichia coli, is a beta1'-6-linked glucosamine disaccharide that is phosphorylated at positions 1 and 4'. Rhizobium leguminosarum lipid A lacks both phosphates, but contains aminogluconate in place of the proximal glucosamine 1-phosphate, and galacturonic acid instead of the 4'-phosphate. A peculiar feature of the lipid As of all Rhizobiaceae is acylation with 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid, a long hydroxylated fatty acid not found in E. coli. We now describe an in vitro system, consisting of a membrane enzyme and a cytosolic acyl donor from R. leguminosarum, that transfers 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid to (Kdo)2-lipid IVA, a key lipid A precursor common to both E. coli and R. leguminosarum. The 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid moiety was detected in the lipid product by mass spectrometry. The membrane enzyme required the presence of Kdo residues in the acceptor substrate for activity. The cytosolic acyl donor was purified from wild-type R. leguminosarum using the acylation of (Kdo)2-[4'-32P]-lipid IVA as the assay. Amino-terminal sequencing of the purified acyl donor revealed an exact 19-amino acid match with a partially sequenced gene (orf*) of R. leguminosarum. Orf* contains the consensus sequence, DSLD, for attachment of 4'-phosphopantetheine. When the entire orf* gene was sequenced, it was found to encode a protein of 92 amino acids. Orf* is a new kind of acyl carrier protein because it is only approximately 25% identical both to the constitutive acyl carrier protein (AcpP) and to the inducible acyl carrier protein (NodF) of R. leguminosarum. Mass spectrometry of purified active Orf* confirmed the presence of 4'-phosphopantetheine and 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid in the major species. Smaller mass peaks indicative of Orf* acylation with hydroxylated 20, 22, 24

  19. Prebiotic oligomerization of amino acids inside lipid vesicles of unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, E.; Furuuchi, R.; Nemoto, A.; Hatori, K.; Honda, H.; Matsuno, K.

    We have already attempted an experimental model simulating seawater circulation in the vicinity of hydrothermal vents in the primitive ocean. We used a flow reactor that was constructed for simulating the pressure and temperature conditions of the hydrothermal vents. In the flow reactor, a high-temperature high-pressure fluid at 125˜ 250°C and at 20MPa was injected into a low temperature (0˜ 40°C ) chamber that was maintained at about the same high pressure as the fluid. We then experimentally examined a possibility of oligomerizing amino acids on or inside lipid vesicles. We compared three different kinds of lipid vesicles made of unsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid), saturated fatty acids (decanoic acid) and phospholipids (DPPC). Identification of the oligomeric products was made with the aid of an HPLC analysis. The oligomeric yields from glycine increased significantly in the presence of lipid vesicles compared to the case of their absence. On the other hand, there was found no significant difference in the yields of oligomers between in the presence of lipid vesicles dissolved by surfactant and in their absence. The possibility of lipid molecules serving as catalysts for oligomerization may be dismissed. The diameters of those lipid vesicles observed under a phase contrast microscope were about 10 micrometer or less. The total volume shared by oleic acid vesicles was about 5 % of the total volume of the suspension. Oligomerization of glycine inside oleic acid vesicles was enhanced more than 15 times compared to that proceeding in their outside. Enhancement of oligomerization of glycine in the presence of lipid vesicles was repeated as the reactants revisited the interface zone between the hot and cold regions. Even those lipid vesicles made of saturated fatty acid such as decanoic acid could have been functional in enhancing the oligomerization of monomers in their inside in the primitive ocean. References E. Imai, et al. (1999) Science 283, 831-833. H

  20. Sasa quelpaertensis and p-coumaric acid attenuate oleic acid-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kang, Seong-Il; Shin, Hye-Sun; Yoon, Seon-A; Kang, Seung-Woo; Ko, Hee-Chul; Kim, Se-Jae

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of Jeju dwarf bamboo (Sasa quelpaertensis Nakai) extract (JBE) and p-coumaric acid (CA) on oleic acid (OA)-induced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells. JBE and CA increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1a (CPT1a) in OA-treated HepG2 cells. Additionally, these compounds decreased sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and OA-induced lipid accumulation, suggesting that JBE and CA modulate lipid metabolism in HepG2 cells via the AMPK activation pathway.

  1. Longitudinal evaluation of hepatic lipid deposition and composition in ob/ob and ob/+ control mice.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qiong; Danzer, Carsten Friedrich; Fuchs, Alexander; Vats, Divya; Wolfrum, Christian; Rudin, Markus

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance (IR) and hepatosteatosis. Understanding the link between IR and hepatosteatosis could be relevant to chronic clinical outcomes. The objective of this study was to quantitatively assess lipid deposition (fractional lipid mass, fLM) and composition (fraction of polyunsaturated lipids, fPUL and mean chain length, MCL) in livers of ob/ob mice, a genetic model of obesity and mild diabetes, and ob/+ heterozygous control animals in a noninvasive manner using (1) H-MRS at 9.4T. For accurate quantification, intensity values were corrected for differences in T2 values while T1 effects were considered minimal due to the long TR values used. Values of fLM, fPUL and MCL were derived from T2 -corrected signal intensities of lipids and water resonance. Hepatic lipid signals were compared with fasted plasma insulin, glucose and lipid levels. Statistically significant correlations between fPUL and fasting plasma insulin/glucose levels were found in adolescent ob/ob mice. A similar correlation was found between fLM and fasting plasma insulin levels; however, the correlation between fLM and fasting plasma glucose levels was less obvious in adolescent ob/ob mice. These correlations were lost in adult ob/ob mice. The study showed that in adolescent ob/ob mice, there was an obvious link between lipid deposition/composition in the liver and plasma insulin/glucose levels. This correlation was lost in adult animals, probably due to the limited lipid storage capacity of the liver.

  2. Effect of cell rupturing methods on the drying characteristics and lipid compositions of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, T; Mani, S; Das, K C; Chinnasamy, S; Bhatnagar, A; Singh, R K; Singh, M

    2012-12-01

    This paper investigated the effect of cell rupturing methods on the drying characteristics and the lipid compositions of a green algae consortium grown in an open raceway pond. The ruptured microalgae samples obtained from French press, autoclave and sonication methods were used for conducting thin layer drying experiment at four drying temperatures (30, 50, 70 and 90 °C). The rate of moisture removal at each drying condition was recorded until no change in moisture loss. A typical drying curve for a microalgae consortium indicated that the rate of drying was limited by diffusion. Among three drying models (Newton, Page and Henderson-Pabis) used to fit the drying data, Page model fitted well on the experimental drying data with a coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.99. Solvent extraction of French press ruptured cells produced the highest total lipid yield with no significant change in lipid compositions.

  3. Cellular fatty acid composition of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Braunthal, S D; Holt, S C; Tanner, A C; Socransky, S S

    1980-01-01

    Strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from deep pockets of patients with juvenile periodontitis were analyzed for their content of cellular fatty acids. Oral Haemophilus strains, morphologically and biochemically similar to Haemophilus aphrophilus, were also examined for their content of cellular fatty acids. The extractable lipids of the actinobacilli represented approximately 10% of the cell dry weight, with the bound lipids representing 2 to 5%. The major fatty acids consisted of myristic (C14:0) and palmitic (C16:0) acids and a C16:1 acid, possibly palmitoleic acid, accounting for 21, 35, and 31% of the total extractable fatty acids, respectively. Haemophilus strains had a similar cellular fatty acid content. PMID:7430333

  4. Culture strategies for lipid production using acetic acid as sole carbon source by Rhodosporidium toruloides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Jia-Nan; Lu, Li-Jun; Peng, Kai-Ming; Yang, Gao-Xiang; Liu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Rhodosporidium toruloides AS 2.1389 was tested using different concentrations of acetic acid as a low-cost carbon source for the production of microbial lipids, which are good raw materials for biodiesel production. It grew and had higher lipid contents in media containing 4-20 g/L acetic acid as the sole carbon source, compared with that in glucose-containing media under the same culture conditions. At acetic acid concentrations as high as 20 g/L and the optimal carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (C/N) of 200 in a batch culture, the highest biomass production was 4.35 g/L, with a lipid content of 48.2%. At acetic acid concentrations as low as 4 g/L, a sequencing batch culture (SBC) with a C/N of 100 increased biomass production to 4.21 g/L, with a lipid content of 38.6%. These results provide usable culture strategies for lipid production by R. toruloides AS 2.1389 when using diverse waste-derived volatile fatty acids.

  5. Sodium pump molecular activity and membrane lipid composition in two disparate ectotherms, and comparison with endotherms.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nigel; Hulbert, A J; Else, Paul L

    2005-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the lower sodium pump molecular activity observed in tissues of ectotherms compared to endotherms, is largely related to the lower levels of polyunsaturates and higher levels of monounsaturates found in the cell membranes of ectotherms. Marine-based ectotherms, however, have very polyunsaturated membranes, and in the current study, we measured molecular activity and membrane lipid composition in tissues of two disparate ectothermic species, the octopus (Octopus vulgaris) and the bearded dragon lizard (Pogona vitticeps), to determine whether the high level of membrane polyunsaturation generally observed in marine-based ectotherms is associated with an increased sodium pump molecular activity relative to other ectotherms. Phospholipids from all tissues of the octopus were highly polyunsaturated and contained high concentrations of the omega-3 polyunsaturate, docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 (n-3)). In contrast, phospholipids from bearded dragon tissues contained higher proportions of monounsaturates and lower proportions of polyunsaturates. Sodium pump molecular activity was only moderately elevated in tissues of the octopus compared to the bearded dragon, despite the much greater level of polyunsaturation in octopus membranes. When the current data were combined with data for the ectothermic cane toad, a significant (P = 0.003) correlation was observed between sodium pump molecular activity and the content of 22:6 (n-3) in the surrounding membrane. These results are discussed in relation to recent work which shows a similar relationship in endotherms.

  6. Zinc deficiency in the rat alters the lipid composition of the erythrocyte membrane Triton shell.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, E R; Bettger, W J

    1992-12-01

    The effect of dietary zinc deficiency on the lipid composition of the erythrocyte membrane Triton shell was determined. Weanling male Wistar rats were fed an egg white-based diet containing < 1.0 mg Zn/kg diet ad libitum. Control rats were either pair-fed or ad libitum-fed the basal diet supplemented with 100 mg Zn/kg diet. A Zn refed group was fed the -Zn diet until day 18 and then pair-fed the +Zn diet until day 21. Dietary Zn deficiency caused an increased cholesterol/phospholipid ratio in Triton shells compared to those from pair-fed controls. Zn deficiency caused a decreased double bond index of fatty acids in phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylcholine (PC); there was a decreased proportion of 18:2n-6 and 22:4n-6 in PC and 20:4n-6 in PI as compared to that found in pair-fed controls. All glycerophospholipids that were retained in the shell had a lower double bond index and increased content of 16:0 and/or 18:0 relative to the phospholipid in the intact membrane.

  7. Caenorhabditis elegans PAQR-2 and IGLR-2 Protect against Glucose Toxicity by Modulating Membrane Lipid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Svensk, Emma; Devkota, Ranjan; Ståhlman, Marcus; Ranji, Parmida; Rauthan, Manish; Magnusson, Fredrik; Hammarsten, Sofia; Johansson, Maja; Borén, Jan; Pilon, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the worldwide impact of diabetes on human health, the mechanisms behind glucose toxicity remain elusive. Here we show that C. elegans mutants lacking paqr-2, the worm homolog of the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1/2, or its newly identified functional partner iglr-2, are glucose intolerant and die in the presence of as little as 20 mM glucose. Using FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching) on living worms, we found that cultivation in the presence of glucose causes a decrease in membrane fluidity in paqr-2 and iglr-2 mutants and that genetic suppressors of this sensitivity act to restore membrane fluidity by promoting fatty acid desaturation. The essential roles of paqr-2 and iglr-2 in the presence of glucose are completely independent from daf-2 and daf-16, the C. elegans homologs of the insulin receptor and its downstream target FoxO, respectively. Using bimolecular fluorescence complementation, we also show that PAQR-2 and IGLR-2 interact on plasma membranes and thus may act together as a fluidity sensor that controls membrane lipid composition. PMID:27082444

  8. Differences in the fatty-acid composition of rodent spermatozoa are associated to levels of sperm competition.

    PubMed

    delBarco-Trillo, Javier; Mateo, Rafael; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2015-03-20

    Sperm competition is a prevalent phenomenon that drives the evolution of sperm function. High levels of sperm competition lead to increased metabolism to fuel higher sperm velocities. This enhanced metabolism can result in oxidative damage (including lipid peroxidation) and damage to the membrane. We hypothesized that in those species experiencing high levels of sperm competition there are changes in the fatty-acid composition of the sperm membrane that makes the membrane more resistant to oxidative damage. Given that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are the most prone to lipid peroxidation, we predicted that higher sperm competition leads to a reduction in the proportion of sperm PUFAs. In contrast, we predicted that levels of sperm competition should not affect the proportion of PUFAs in somatic cells. To test these predictions, we quantified the fatty-acid composition of sperm, testis and liver cells in four mouse species (genus Mus) that differ in their levels of sperm competition. Fatty-acid composition in testis and liver cells was not associated to sperm competition levels. However, in sperm cells, as predicted, an increase in sperm competition levels was associated with an increase in the proportion of saturated fatty-acids (the most resistant to lipid peroxidation) and by a concomitant decrease in the proportion of PUFAs. Two particular fatty acids were most responsible for this pattern (arachidonic acid and palmitic acid). Our findings thus indicate that sperm competition has a pervasive influence in the composition of sperm cells that ultimately may have important effects in sperm function.

  9. Alkali-aided protein extraction of chicken dark meat: composition and stability to lipid oxidation of the recovered proteins.

    PubMed

    Moayedi, V; Omana, D A; Chan, J; Xu, Y; Betti, M

    2010-04-01

    Chicken dark meat has been considered as a major underused commodity due to the increasing demand for further-processed breast meat products. One option to increase the utilization of chicken dark meat is to extract myofibrillar proteins and separate them from fat and pigments to enhance their application for the preparation of further-processed meat products. The objective of the current study was to determine the effect of pH, in the range of 10.5 to 12.0, on the alkaline solubilization process of chicken dark meat. Aspects studied were the effect of the alkali-aided process on protein content, lipid composition, lipid oxidation, and color characteristics of the extracted meat. Each experiment and each assay were done at least in triplicate. Lipid content of the extracted meat showed a 50% reduction compared with the chicken dark meat. Neutral lipids were reduced by 61.51%, whereas polar lipids were not affected by the alkali treatments. There was a higher amount of TBA reactive substances observed in the extracted meat compared with chicken dark meat, indicating that extracted meat was more susceptible to oxidation. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (22:4n-6, 20:3n-3, 20:5n-3, 22:5n-3, and 22:6n-3), which were detected only in the polar lipids, were responsible for increasing lipid oxidation susceptibility of extracted meat compared with chicken dark meat. Alkali-aided extraction of chicken dark meat lightened the color of the meat. The redness, yellowness, and total heme pigments in extracted meat significantly decreased by 83, 11, and 53%, respectively, compared with chicken dark meat. Even though this process did not remove polar lipids, based on our early findings, the extracted meat had considerable physicochemical and textural properties for product preparation compared with those of raw dark meat. Hence, alkali recovery of protein can be considered a potentially useful method to increase the utilization of dark chicken meat.

  10. Coexisting role of fasting or feeding and dietary lipids in the control of gene expression of enzymes involved in the synthesis of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Sánchez González, Raúl; Sánchez García, Apolos M; Lòpez-Alarcòn, Mardia

    2012-03-15

    In the liver, maintaining lipid homeostasis is regulated by physiological and exogenous factors. These lipids are synthesized by Fasn, elongases and desaturases. Interactions in an organism among these factors are quite complex and, to date, relatively little is known about them. The aim of this study was to evaluate the coexisting role of physiological (insulin, fasting and feeding) and exogenous (dietary lipids) factors in the control of gene expression of Fasn, elongases and desaturases via Srebf-1c in liver from rats. Gene expression of encoding enzymes for fatty acid synthesis and fatty acid composition was evaluated in liver from rats in fasting and feeding (at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after feeding) when food intake (adequate or high-lipid diet) was synchronized to a restricted period of 7h. Fasn, Scd and Fads2 were induced during 120 min after initial feeding in both dietary groups. This induction may be activated in part by insulin via Srebf-1c. Also, we showed for the first time that Elovl7 may be regulated by insulin and dietary lipids. The failure to synthesize saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids is consistent with a downregulation of Fasn and Scd, respectively, by dietary lipids. A higher content of LC-PUFAs was observed due to a high expression of Elovl2 and Elovl5, although Fads2 was suppressed by dietary lipids. Therefore, elongases may have a mechanism that is Srebf-1c-independent. This study suggests that a high-lipid diet triggers, during 120 min after initial feeding, a tight coordination among de novo lipogenesis, elongation, and desaturation and may not always be regulated by Srebf-1c. Finally, upregulation by feeding (insulin) of Fasn, Scd, Fads2 and Srebf-1c is insufficient to compensate for the inhibitory effect of dietary lipids.